WorldWideScience

Sample records for birthweight infant mortality

  1. Low birthweight and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakketeig, Leiv S.; Jacobsen, Geir; Skjærven, Rolv

    2006-01-01

    , the infant mortality was significantly higher among non-repeat LBW births (78.4 vs 60.8 per 1000, RR 1.30, CI 1.06, 1.56). Both after 1 and 5 minutes a significantly greater proportion of LBW repeat births had Apgar scores of 7 or above. Repeat second order LBW births weighed on average 68 grams more than...... and non-repeat LBW births. The study showed that the tendency to repeat LBW was associated with a reduced early neonatal and infant mortality compared to non-repeat LBW births. This was particularly the case for repeat LBW births born at term and Apgar scores were higher for the repeats. Repeat LBW births...... weighed significantly more. Apart from this difference in weight we have not been able to explain the improved survival for these repeat compared to the non-repeat births. And apart from differences in Apgar scores there were no differences in morbidity based on recorded hospitalizations in infancy....

  2. Radiological rickets in extremely low birthweight infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, A.J.; McIntosh, N.; Wheeler, K.; Williams, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-eight infants of birthweight less than 1000 grams who survived for more than 28 days, had wrist X-rays to prospectively determine the incidence of radiological rickets. Twelve infants (25%) had normal X-rays throughout, 10 infants (21%) showed osteopoenia and 26 infants (54%) had classical changes or rickets of which 8 (17% of the total) had spontaneous fractures. There was poor correlation between peak values of serum alkaline phosphatase and the radiological changes.

  3. Infant Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Midwest. Top of Page Infant Mortality Rates by Race and Ethnicity, 2015 *Source: Table 1 (p. 79) ... 1.27MB] . In 2015, infant mortality rates by race and ethnicity were as follows: Non-Hispanic black ...

  4. Recent Declines in Infant Mortality in the United States, 2005-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading cause of infant death in 2011 was congenital malformations, followed by short gestation/low birthweight, Sudden infant ... 2011, the infant mortality rate declined 6% for congenital malformations. The infant mortality rate declined 9% for short ...

  5. INTERGROWTH-21st vs customized birthweight standards for identification of perinatal mortality and morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ngaire H; Sadler, Lynn C; McKinlay, Christopher J D; McCowan, Lesley M E

    2016-04-01

    The recently published INTERGROWTH-21st Project international population standard for newborn size is intended for global use, but its ability to identify small infants at risk of adverse outcomes in a general obstetric population has not been reported. The objective of the study was to compare adverse neonatal outcomes among small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants between the INTERGROWTH-21st standard and a customized birthweight standard (accounting for maternal characteristics of height, weight, parity, and ethnicity). We hypothesized that in a multiethnic general obstetric population in Auckland, New Zealand, a customized birthweight standard would better identify SGA infants at-risk of neonatal morbidity/mortality and stillbirth than the INTERGROWTH-21st standard. Using prospectively gathered maternity data from a general obstetric population in Auckland, New Zealand, from 2006 to 2013 (n = 53,484 births at ≥ 33 weeks), infants were classified as SGA (birthweight 48 hours, or ventilation > 4 hours or 5-minute Apgar score population, birthweight customization identified more SGA infants at risk of perinatal mortality and morbidity compared with the INTERGROWTH-21st standard. The INTERGROWTH-21st standard failed to detect many at-risk SGA infants, particularly among ethnic groups with larger maternal size while disproportionately identifying higher rates of SGA among those with smaller maternal size. Local validation is needed prior to implementation of the INTERGROWTH-21st standard to avoid misclassification of infant birth size. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Improving the quality of survival for infants of birthweight Victorian Infant Collaborative Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-04

    To compare between eras the early care of extremely low birthweight (birthweight eras, 1979-1980 and 1985-1987. PATIENTS AND OUTCOMES: Mortality data to two years of age were available for all infants liveborn in non-level-III centres in the two eras (1979-1980, n = 106; 1985-1987, n = 129). In 1979-1980, 47 of 52 infants transferred to a level-III centre were transported by the Newborn Emergency Transport Service (NETS); in 1985-1987, all 49 infants transferred were transported by NETS. Data concerning the immediate care after birth and during transport to a level-III centre were available for all infants transferred by NETS. All survivors were assessed for sensorineural impairments and disabilities at two years of age, corrected for prematurity. In both eras, 18 children born outside and transferred to a level-III centre survived to two years of age. Survivors in both eras had almost identical mean birthweights and gestational ages. There were trends for more survivors to be referred by paediatricians--1979-1980, 61%; 1985-1987, 83%; odds ratio (OR), 2.94; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.7-12.4--and for quicker referral times to NETS in 1985-1987 (1979-1980, median 34.5 minutes after birth; 1985-1987, median 21.5 minutes after birth; z = 1.91, P = 0.056). It was possible only during 1985-1987 to monitor transcutaneous PO2 during transport. Durations of transport were similar in both eras. However, only in 1985-1987 was it possible in survivors to reduce significantly the inspired oxygen concentration during transport (median reductions in inspired oxygen, 1979-1980 3.5%; 1985-1987 20%; P = 0.028). Neurological impairment rates were substantially lower in survivors transported in the latter era (1979-1980 72% impaired; 1985-1987 22% impaired; OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.04-0.52). Of the neurological impairments, fewer had severe developmental delay alone (1979-1980 22%; 1985-1987 0%; OR 0.09, 95% CI 0.018-0.46), and the rate of blindness was lower, but the latter difference

  7. Dietary exposure to persistent organochlorine compounds and health effects in women and their infants. Epidemiological studies on birth-weight, cancer incidence, and mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rylander, L.

    1997-05-01

    In Sweden the main exposure route for both polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and other persistent organochlorine compounds is through consumption of fatty fish species from the Baltic Sea (the eastern coast of Sweden). Cohorts of fishermen`s wives from the Swedish east and west coasts were established. Interviewed east and west coast cohort women ate locally caught fish at least twice as often as women from the general population. The east coast cohort women displayed during the period 1968-1989 an increased breast cancer incidence and mortality in ischemic heart disease as compared with the west coast cohort. Due to lack of individual data on exposure and confounding factors, it is not possible to conclude that the differences were caused by fish intake. Infants from the east coast cohort had during the period 1973-1991 an increased risk for low birth weight, as compared with infants from the west coast cohort. A nested case-referent study within the east coast cohort indicated an increased risk of low birth weight among infants born to mothers who reported a relatively high current intake of fish from the Baltic Sea, as well as among mothers who had grown up in a fishing village. Moreover, maternal 2,2`,4,4`,5,5`-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153, which was showed to be a feasible biomarker for exposure to PCB) concentrations in plasma drawn in 1995 and the estimated concentrations during the year of childbirth showed effects on the risk for having an infant with low birth weight. Employing alternative plausible kinetic models, an increased risk for low birth weight was observed at a CB-153 concentration in plasma during year of childbirth around 300-400 ng/g lipid. 117 refs, 5 figs, 4 tabs

  8. Effect of frozen/thawed embryo transfer on birthweight, macrosomia, and low birthweight rates in US singleton infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzky, Julia F; Boulet, Sheree L; Esfandiari, Navid; Zhang, Yujia; Kissin, Dmitry M; Theiler, Regan N; Marsit, Carmen J

    2017-12-29

    Singleton infants conceived using assisted reproductive technology have lower average birthweights than naturally conceived infants and are more likely to be born low birthweight (macrosomia (>4000 g) and low birthweight (macrosomia and low birthweight were evaluated using multivariable predicted marginal proportions from logistic regression models. In total, 180,184 singleton, term infants were included, with 55,898 (31.02%) having been conceived from frozen/thawed embryos. Frozen/thawed embryo transfer was associated with, on average, a 142 g increase in birthweight compared with infants born after fresh embryo transfer (P macrosomia following frozen/thawed embryo transfer was greater than that following fresh embryo transfer, but the risk of low birthweight among frozen/thawed embryo transfer infants was significantly decreased in comparison with fresh embryo transfer infants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Infant Mortality and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Profiles > Black/African American > Infant Health & Mortality Infant Mortality and African Americans African Americans have 2.2 ... to receive late or no prenatal care. Infant Mortality Rate Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live ...

  10. Mortality risk in preterm and small-for-gestational-age infants in low-income and middle-income countries: a pooled country analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katz, Joanne; Lee, Anne C. C.; Kozuki, Naoko; Lawn, Joy E.; Cousens, Simon; Blencowe, Hannah; Ezzati, Majid; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Marchant, Tanya; Willey, Barbara A.; Adair, Linda; Barros, Fernando; Baqui, Abdullah H.; Christian, Parul; Fawzi, Wafaie; Gonzalez, Rogelio; Humphrey, Jean; Huybregts, Lieven; Kolsteren, Patrick; Mongkolchati, Aroonsri; Mullany, Luke C.; Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Nien, Jyh Kae; Osrin, David; Roberfroid, Dominique; Sania, Ayesha; Schmiegelow, Christentze; Silveira, Mariangela F.; Tielsch, James; Vaidya, Anjana; Velaphi, Sithembiso C.; Victora, Cesar G.; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Black, Robert E.; Clarke, Siân; Kariuki, Simon; Lusingu, John; Ndirangu, James; Newell, Marie-Louise; Ntozini, Robert; Rosen, Heather; ter Kuile, Feiko O.

    2013-01-01

    Babies with low birthweight ( <2500 g) are at increased risk of early mortality. However, low birthweight includes babies born preterm and with fetal growth restriction, and not all these infants have a birthweight less than 2500 g. We estimated the neonatal and infant mortality associated with

  11. Enemas, suppositories and rectal stimulation are not effective in accelerating enteral feeding or meconium evacuation in low-birthweight infants : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphorst, Kim; Sietsma, Ydelette; Brouwer, Annemieke J; Rood, Paul J T; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    2016-01-01

    Early full enteral feeding in preterm infants decreases morbidity and mortality. Our systematic review covered the effectiveness of rectal stimulation, suppositories and enemas on stooling patterns and feeding tolerance in low-birthweight infants born at up to 32 weeks. It comprised seven studies

  12. Birthweight, HIV exposure and infant feeding as predictors of malnutrition in Botswanan infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalashika, P; Essex, C; Mellor, D; Swift, J A; Langley-Evans, S

    2017-12-01

    A better understanding of the nutritional status of infants who are HIV-Exposed-Uninfected (HEU) and HIV-Unexposed-Uninfected (HUU) during their first 1000 days is key to improving population health, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. A cross-sectional study compared the nutritional status, feeding practices and determinants of nutritional status of HEU and HUU infants residing in representative selected districts in Botswana during their first 1000 days of life. Four hundred and thirteen infants (37.3% HIV-exposed), aged 6-24 months, attending routine child health clinics, were recruited. Anthropometric, 24-h dietary intake and socio-demographic data was collected. Anthropometric Z-scores were calculated using 2006 World Health Organization growth standards. Modelling of the determinants of malnutrition was undertaken using logistic regression. Overall, the prevalences of stunting, wasting and being underweight were 10.4%, 11.9% and 10.2%, respectively. HEU infants were more likely to be underweight (15.6% versus 6.9%), (P economic status. HEU infants aged 6-24 months had worse nutritional status compared to HUU infants. Low birthweight was the main predictor of undernutrition in this population. Optimisation of infant nutritional status should focus on improving birthweight. In addition, specific interventions should target HEU infants aiming to eliminate growth disparity between HEU and HUU infants. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  13. Coffin-Siris syndrome: a case of an extremely low birthweight infant with severe kyphoscoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzumura, H; Sakurai, K; Kano, K; Ichimura, T

    1996-10-01

    A case of Coffin-Siris syndrome in a male of extremely low birthweight with severe kyphoscoliosis is reported. His birthweight was 965 g, the lowest reported in the world for an infant with this syndrome. Coffin-Siris syndrome is characterized by nail hypoplasia of the fingers and toes, eyebrow hypertrichosis, prominent lips and prenatal or postnatal growth retardation. He was the only case who was mechanically ventilated from birth because of birth asphyxia. He died at 12 days of age because of sepsis, a poor immune system as in other extremely low birthweight infants, and because he easily suffered from upper respiratory infection as a result of Coffin-Siris syndrome. Kyphoscoliosis is suggested as one of the important features in low birthweight cases of Coffin-Siris syndrome in previous reports and in the present case.

  14. Stillbirth and Infant Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Ellen Aagaard

    2012-01-01

    mechanisms behind these associations remain largely unknown. Although maternal obesity is associated with a wide range of complications in the mother and neonate that may impair fetal and infant survival, the increased risk of stillbirth and infant mortality is virtually unchanged when accounting...

  15. Palatal development of preterm and low birthweight infants compared to term infants – What do we know? Part 2: The palate of the preterm/low birthweight infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehmer Ulrike

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Well-designed clinical studies on the palatal development in preterm and low birthweight infants are desirable because the literature is characterized by contradictory results. It could be shown that knowledge about 'normal' palatal development is still weak as well (Part 1. The objective of this review is therefore to contribute a fundamental analysis of methodologies, confounding factors, and outcomes of studies on palatal development in preterm and low birthweight infants. Methods An electronic literature search as well as hand searches were performed based on Cochrane search strategies including sources of more than a century in English, German, and French. Original data were recalculated from studies which primarily dealt with both preterm and term infants. The extracted data, especially those from non-English paper sources, were provided unfiltered for comparison. Results Seventy-eight out of 155 included articles were analyzed for palatal morphology of preterm infants. Intubation, feeding tubes, feeding mode, tube characteristics, restriction of oral functions, kind of diet, cranial form and birthweight were seen as causes contributing to altered palatal morphology. Changes associated with intubation concern length, depth, width, asymmetry, crossbite, and contour of the palate. The phenomenon 'grooving' has also been described as a complication associated with oral intubation. However, this phenomenon suffers from lack of a clear-cut definition. Head flattening, pressure from the oral tube, pathologic or impaired tongue function, and broadening of the alveolar ridges adjacent to the tube have been raised as causes of 'grooving'. Metrically, the palates of intubated preterm infants remain narrower, which has been examined up to the age of the late mixed dentition. Conclusion There is no evidence that would justify the exclusion of any of the raised causes contributing to palatal alteration. Thus, early orthodontic and

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes predicts infant birthweight ratio and neonatal morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic-Peterson, L; Crues, J; Durak, E; Peterson, C M

    1993-11-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be safe during pregnancy and can accurately assess fetal fat and rate of growth. The purpose of this study was to investigate with MRI the relationship between maternal weight, fat distribution, and glucose levels and neonatal birthweight ratio, percent fat, and infant outcome in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes. Twenty gestational diabetic women were studied at 36 to 38 weeks' gestation with hemoglobin A1c, a glucose tolerance test and maternal body fat by electrical impedance. MRI scans of the maternal upper arm and from her zyphoid process to her pubic symphysis, including all fetal components, were analyzed for percent fat of the mother's arm and trunk and her fetus' trunk. All variables were then related to infant outcome (birthweight, birthweight ratio, and neonatal morbidity). Maternal body composition was related to maternal weight (p = 0.012, r = 0.54), as was maternal arm fat (p weight (p = NS). Although maternal Hb A1c correlated with maternal weight (p = 0.05, r = 0.43), it did not correlate with infant birthweight. In contrast, maternal mean glucose levels correlated with both maternal and infant weight and infant birthweight ratio (p = 0.05, r = 0.60; p = 0.05, r = 0.42; and p = 0.01, r = 0.64, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Permissive hypotension in the extremely low birthweight infant with signs of good perfusion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dempsey, E M

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Many practitioners routinely treat infants whose mean arterial blood pressure in mm Hg is less than their gestational age in weeks (GA). OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of utilising a combined approach of clinical signs, metabolic acidosis and absolute blood pressure (BP) values when deciding to treat hypotension in the extremely low birthweight (ELBW) infant. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of all live born ELBW infants admitted to our neonatal intensive care unit over a 4-year period. Patients were grouped as either normotensive (BP never less than GA), hypotensive and not treated (BPmortality, odds ratio 8.0 (95% CI 2.3 to 28, p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Blood pressure spontaneously improves in ELBW infants during the first 24 h. Infants hypotensive on GA criteria but with clinical evidence of good perfusion had as good an outcome as normotensive patients. Treated low blood pressure was associated with adverse outcome.

  18. Urine gonadotropin and testosterone levels in male very-low-birthweight infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, M.; Rotteveel, J.; Heijboer, A. C.; Cranendonk, A.; Twisk, J. W. R.; van Weissenbruch, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    The postnatal activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is more exaggerated in preterm than in full-term-born infants, and may be important for reproductive function. Our objective was to investigate this activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male very-low-birthweight

  19. A Review of the Impact of Dietary Intakes in Human Pregnancy on Infant Birthweight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Grieger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies assessing maternal dietary intakes and the relationship with birthweight are inconsistent, thus attempting to draw inferences on the role of maternal nutrition in determining the fetal growth trajectory is difficult. The aim of this review is to provide updated evidence from epidemiological and randomized controlled trials on the impact of dietary and supplemental intakes of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, zinc, folate, iron, calcium, and vitamin D, as well as dietary patterns, on infant birthweight. A comprehensive review of the literature was undertaken via the electronic databases Pubmed, Cochrane Library, and Medline. Included articles were those published in English, in scholarly journals, and which provided information about diet and nutrition during pregnancy and infant birthweight. There is insufficient evidence for omega-3 fatty acid supplements’ ability to reduce risk of low birthweight (LBW, and more robust evidence from studies supplementing with zinc, calcium, and/or vitamin D needs to be established. Iron supplementation appears to increase birthweight, particularly when there are increases in maternal hemoglobin concentrations in the third trimester. There is limited evidence supporting the use of folic acid supplements to reduce the risk for LBW; however, supplementation may increase birthweight by ~130 g. Consumption of whole foods such as fruit, vegetables, low-fat dairy, and lean meats throughout pregnancy appears beneficial for appropriate birthweight. Intervention studies with an understanding of optimal dietary patterns may provide promising results for both maternal and perinatal health. Outcomes from these studies will help determine what sort of dietary advice could be promoted to women during pregnancy in order to promote the best health for themselves and their baby.

  20. Infant Mortality and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Asian American > Infant Health & Mortality Infant Mortality and Asians and Pacific Islanders Among Asian/Pacific ... as compared to non-Hispanic white mothers. Infant Mortality Rate Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live ...

  1. Growth and survival of low birthweight infants from 0 to 9 years in a rural area of Ghana. Comparison of moderately low (1501-2000 g) and very low birthweight(1000-1500 g) infants and a local reference population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volmer, M; Boersma, ER

    This prospective and descriptive study was conducted to evaluate the growth and survival of 105 low birthweight (LBW, 1000-2000 g) infants discharged during a 4-year period from Agogo Hospital, Ghana, and followed from birth until the age of 4-9 years. Thirty-two babies were very low birthweight

  2. Thinking outside the curve, part II: modeling fetal-infant mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charnigo Richard

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Greater epidemiologic understanding of the relationships among fetal-infant mortality and its prognostic factors, including birthweight, could have vast public health implications. A key step toward that understanding is a realistic and tractable framework for analyzing birthweight distributions and fetal-infant mortality. The present paper is the second of a two-part series that introduces such a framework. Methods We propose estimating birthweight-specific mortality within each component of a normal mixture model representing a birthweight distribution, the number of components having been determined from the data rather than fixed a priori. Results We address a number of methodological issues related to our proposal, including the construction of confidence intervals for mortality risk at any given birthweight within a component, for odds ratios comparing mortality within two different components from the same population, and for odds ratios comparing mortality within analogous components from two different populations. As an illustration we find that, for a population of white singleton infants, the odds of mortality at 3000 g are an estimated 4.15 times as large in component 2 of a 4-component normal mixture model as in component 4 (95% confidence interval, 2.04 to 8.43. We also outline an extension of our framework through which covariates could be probabilistically related to mixture components. This extension might allow the assertion of approximate correspondences between mixture components and identifiable subpopulations. Conclusions The framework developed in this paper does not require infants from compromised pregnancies to share a common birthweight-specific mortality curve, much less assume the existence of an interval of birthweights over which all infants have the same curve. Hence, the present framework can reveal heterogeneity in mortality that is undetectable via a contaminated normal model or a 2

  3. Enemas, suppositories and rectal stimulation are not effective in accelerating enteral feeding or meconium evacuation in low-birthweight infants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphorst, Kim; Sietsma, Ydelette; Brouwer, Annemieke J; Rood, Paul J T; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    2016-11-01

    Early full enteral feeding in preterm infants decreases morbidity and mortality. Our systematic review covered the effectiveness of rectal stimulation, suppositories and enemas on stooling patterns and feeding tolerance in low-birthweight infants born at up to 32 weeks. It comprised seven studies published between 2007 and 2014 and covered 495 infants. Suppositories were ineffective in shortening the time to reach full enteral feeding, and the evidence on enemas was contradictory. Enemas and rectal stimulation did not shorten the time until complete meconium evacuation was reached. Further research into safe, effective interventions to accelerate meconium excretion is needed. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Deciphering infant mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrut, Sylvie; Pouillard, Violette; Richmond, Peter; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2016-12-01

    This paper is about infant mortality. In line with reliability theory, "infant" refers to the time interval following birth during which the mortality (or failure) rate decreases. This definition provides a systems science perspective in which birth constitutes a sudden transition falling within the field of application of the Transient Shock (TS) conjecture put forward in Richmond and Roehner (2016c). This conjecture provides predictions about the timing and shape of the death rate peak. It says that there will be a death rate spike whenever external conditions change abruptly and drastically and also predicts that after a steep rise there will be a much longer hyperbolic relaxation process. These predictions can be tested by considering living organisms for which the transient shock occurs several days after birth. Thus, for fish there are three stages: egg, yolk-sac and young adult phases. The TS conjecture predicts a mortality spike at the end of the yolk-sac phase and this timing is indeed confirmed by observation. Secondly, the hyperbolic nature of the relaxation process can be tested using very accurate Swiss statistics for postnatal death rates spanning the period from one hour immediately after birth through to age 10 years. It turns out that since the 19th century despite a significant and large reduction in infant mortality, the shape of the age-specific death rate has remained basically unchanged. Moreover the hyperbolic pattern observed for humans is also found for small primates as recorded in the archives of zoological gardens. Our overall objective is to identify a series of cases which start from simple systems and move step by step to more complex organisms. The cases discussed here we believe represent initial landmarks in this quest.

  5. Birthweight and mortality in adulthood: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, Kari R; Vatten, Lars J; Baker, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    results. METHODS: The Meta-analyses of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines for conducting and reporting meta-analysis of observational studies were followed. We retrieved 22 studies that assessed the association between birthweight and adult mortality from all causes, CVD or cancer...

  6. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Infant Deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Infant Deaths (from Linked Birth / Infant Death Records) online databases on CDC WONDER provide counts and rates for deaths of children under 1 year...

  7. Antenatal steroids and fluid balance in very low birthweight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriou, G; Kavvadia, V; Marcou, M; Greenough, A

    2005-11-01

    To determine if insensible water loss (IWL) differed between infants exposed or not exposed antenatally to corticosteroids and to explore possible mechanisms for the early postnatal diuresis associated with antenatal steroid exposure. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. Level three neonatal intensive care unit. Ninety six infants, median gestational age 27.5 weeks (range 23-33). Comparison of the IWL, urine output and osmolality, fluid input, electrolyte imbalance, respiratory illness severity (as assessed by surfactant requirement, maximum peak inspiratory pressure, and inspired oxygen concentration), and cardiovascular status (as assessed by inotrope requirement) between infants with antenatal corticosteroid exposure and gestational age matched controls. The infants exposed to antenatal steroids differed significantly from the controls in having both a lower IWL (p = 0.0135) and a higher urine output (p = 0.0036) on day 1, and fewer developed hyponatraemia (p = 0.027) on day 2. Fewer of those exposed to antenatal steroids required inotropes (p = 0.06), but their respiratory status was similar to that of the controls. Infants exposed to antenatal corticosteroids have a lower IWL. The results suggest that greater skin maturation, but also better perfusion rather than less severe respiratory status, explains the early diuresis in infants exposed to antenatal steroids.

  8. Trends in Infant mortality rate and mortality for neonates born at less than 32 weeks and with very low birth weight

    OpenAIRE

    Barría-Pailaquilén, René Mauricio; Mendoza-Maldonado, Yessy; Urrutia-Toro, Yohana; Castro-Mora, Cristian; Santander-Manríquez, Gema

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the trend of the infant mortality rate between 1990-2004 and the neonatal mortality between 2000-2005 in infants born at less than 32 weeks of gestational age or with very low birth-weight. Based on secondary data, infant mortality rate and by its component for Valdivia city were compared with national indicators. Mortality at

  9. Cognitive outcome of very-low-birthweight infants at 6 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Toshimitsu; Egashira, Masanori; Yamaguchi, Tomona; Murata, Noriko; Yokota, Goro; Matsuo, Koji; Ogata, Tsutomu; Egashira, Tomoko; Iwanaga, Manabu; Mizukami, Tomoko

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of the cognitive function in very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWI) at 6 years of age and investigate significant factors during neonatal intensive care unit admission that affect cognitive outcomes. One hundred and eighty-nine VLBWI (28.4 weeks, 1024 g), including 93 extremely low-birthweight (EL) infants whose birthweight was IQ tests, four factor indices and 13 subtest scores. Regression analyses were performed to analyze the cognitive indices and clinical variables during neonatal intensive care unit admission. The full-scale IQ (FIQ) in the EL infants was 85.3 ± 13.4, which was significantly lower than the 91.8 ± 9.7 observed in the VL infants. The verbal IQ and performance IQ in the EL infants were also lower than those observed in the VL infants. The rate of difference between verbal IQ and performance IQ >14 was 20% in the EL infants and 22% in the VL infants. A multiple linear regression analysis revealed a significant relation between FIQ and HC (P = 0.002) and FIQ and dexamethasone (P = 0.012). In comparison with that observed in the VL infants, the intelligence quotient of the EL infants was inferior and exhibited more inter-individual variation. Intra-individual imbalances of the cognitive function were highly observed irrespective of the EL or VL status. Restriction of intrauterine brain growth and greater doses of dexamethasone may be harmful for subsequent cognitive outcomes. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. Neonatal vaccination of low birthweight infants in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Maureen; Edmond, Karen; Floyd, Sian; Hurt, Lisa; Shannon, Caitlin; Thomas, Gyan; Newton, Sam; Kirkwood, Betty; Thomas, Sara

    2017-02-01

    Global vaccination policy advocates for identifying and targeting groups who are underserved by vaccination to increase equity and uptake. We investigated whether birth weight and other factors are determinants of neonatal BCG vaccination in order to identify infants underserved by vaccination. We used logistic regression to calculate adjusted ORs (AORs) for the association between birth weight (categorised as non-low birth weight (NLBW) (≥2.50 kg) and low birth weight (LBW) (2-2.49 kg, 1.50-1.99 kg and vaccination with BCG at the end of the neonatal period (0-27 days). We assessed whether this association varied by place of delivery and infant illness. We calculated how BCG timing and uptake would improve by ensuring the vaccination of all facility-born infants prior to discharge. There was a strong dose-response relationship between LBW and not receiving BCG in the neonatal period (p-trendvaccination 1.6 times (AOR 1.64; 95% CI 1.30 to 2.08), and those weighing vaccination (p-interaction all >0.19). Facility-born infants were vaccinated at a mean of 6 days, suggesting that they were not vaccinated in the facility at birth but were referred for vaccination. LBW is a risk factor for neonatal under-vaccination, even for facility-born infants. Ensuring vaccination at facility births would substantively improve timing and equitable BCG vaccination. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Endothelial progenitor cells in mothers of low-birthweight infants: a link between defective placental vascularization and increased cardiovascular risk?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    King, Thomas F J

    2013-01-01

    Offspring birthweight is inversely associated with future maternal cardiovascular mortality, a relationship that has yet to be fully elucidated. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are thought to play a key role in vasculogenesis, and EPC numbers reflect cardiovascular risk.

  12. Intervention strategies for reduction of infant mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V; Datta, N

    1985-01-01

    The Government of India has established the goal of a 50% reduction in the infant mortality rate by the year 2000 for the country as a whole as well as for each state and union territory. Experience has indicated that this is an achievable goal provided that the appropriate, cost-effective interventions are introduced. Choice of intervention strategies requires consideration of the contribution of various problems to overall infant mortality, the technical feasibility of various interventions within the context of primary health care, economic feasibility, and cultural acceptability. About 50% of deaths occur in the neonatal period, and the determinants of mortality in this stage differ from those in the postneonatal period. Pilot experiments have indicated that acute diarrheal disease can be reduced substantially by the use of oral rehydration solution. Neonatal tetanus is a completely preventable disease. Preventive interventions have a more limited role in the case of acute lower respiratory infections, although their diagnosis and treatment may be possible at the primary health care level. The problems of protein-energy malnutrition and low birthweight require improvements in maternal health and prenatal care, promotion of breastfeeding and child spacing, and growth monitoring. Longterm gains in this area require attention to behavioral and community development issues, including reduction of the sex and parity related differentials in mortality, enhancement of the status of women, improved female literacy and employment opportunities, improved intrafamilial food distribution patterns, maternity benefits, provision of potable water, intersectoral development to strengthen health care delivery, increased community participation, expanded health services, and enhancement of the pace of development. Pilot experiments and population-based studies carried out in 2 community development blocks in Haryana confirm the effectiveness of well thought-out interventions in

  13. Development and behaviour of low-birthweight term infants at 8 years in northeast Brazil: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emond, Alan M; Lira, Pedro I C; Lima, Marilia C; Grantham-McGregor, Sally M; Ashworth, Ann

    2006-10-01

    To investigate the development and behaviour of low-birthweight (LBW) term infants compared with matched term infants of appropriate birthweight (ABW). Two parallel cohorts of LBW infants (1500-2499 g) and ABW controls (3000-3499 g) were enrolled at birth in northeast Brazil. At 8 y, 164 children were assessed using clinical and psychological tests. The LBW group had lower IQ scores than ABW children on the Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children; differences were larger on the performance (5 points, p = 0.04) than the verbal scale (3 points, p = 0.11). LBW children had poorer dynamic balance (p = 0.03) and eye-hand coordination (p = 0.02), but better selective attention (p = 0.02). Hyperactivity and conduct problems were common in both groups, but fewer LBW children had peer problems (p = 0.04). After controlling for social background, IQ was not significantly associated with birthweight (p = 0.10). Significant determinants were maternal education, home stimulation and type of school attended. The effect of birthweight on coordination and selective attention remained significant. Birth head circumference and growth in head size in the first 6 mo had independent effects on IQ. After controlling for social background, LBW term infants did not differ from ABW infants in cognition at school age. Head circumference at birth and 6 mo was a better predictor than birthweight of IQ.

  14. Predictive macrosomia birthweight thresholds for adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Zhu, Li; Zhang, Shulian; Wu, Xueqin; Wang, Xiaoli; Lv, Qin; Gan, Dongmei; Liu, Ling; Li, Wen; Zhou, Qin; Lu, Jiarong; He, Haiying; Wang, Jimei; Xin, Hua; Li, Zhankui; Chen, Chao

    2016-12-01

    We examined the predictive macrosomia birthweight thresholds for adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. This was a multicenter, retrospective cohort study conducted in China. We selected 178 709 singletons weighing ≥2500 g with gestational age 37-44 weeks. We categorized macrosomia with two gradations (4000-4499 g and ≥4500 g) and compared them with a normosomic reference group of infants with birthweight 2500-3999 g. The risks of obstetric and neonatal complications increased when infants had a birthweight of ≥4000 g. The rates of infant mortality, Apgar score ≤3 at 5 min, respiratory and neurological disorders rose significantly among neonates weighing ≥4500 g. A definition of macrosomia as birthweight ≥4000 g could be beneficial as an indicator of obstetric and newborn complications, and birthweight ≥4500 g might be predictive of severe infant morbidity and mortality risk.

  15. Infant Mortality: An American Tragedy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Christiane B.

    1990-01-01

    Assesses the complex problem of infant deaths in America and reviews the policy options before the nation. High infant mortality rates have been attributed to population heterogeneity, poverty, or differences in the way health services are organized. Links health policy issues to the larger issue of social and economic equity. (AF)

  16. Should We Promote Catch-Up Growth or Growth Acceleration in Low-Birthweight Infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Atul

    2015-01-01

    The idea that catch-up growth or growth acceleration has adverse effects on long-term health has generated much debate. This pattern of growth is most commonly seen after birth in infants of low birthweight; a global problem affecting over 20 million newborns a year. Faster postnatal growth may have short-term benefits but increases the long-term risk of aging, obesity and metabolic disease. Consequently, the optimal pattern of postnatal growth is unclear and is likely to differ in different populations. In infants born prematurely, faster postnatal growth improves long-term cognitive function but is associated with later risk factors for cardiovascular disease. So, on balance, the current policy is to promote faster growth by increasing nutrient intake (e.g. using higher-nutrient preterm formulas). Whether the same policy should apply to larger preterm infants is not known. Similarly, in infants from impoverished environments, the short-term benefits of faster postnatal growth may outweigh long-term disadvantages. However, whether similar considerations apply to infants from countries in transition is uncertain. For term infants from developed countries, promoting catch-up growth by nutritional supplementation has few advantages for short- or long-term health. Overall therefore, a 'one size fits all' solution for the optimal pattern of postnatal growth is unlikely. © 2015 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Umbilical Cord Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations and Relation to Birthweight, Head Circumference and Infant Length at Age 14 Days

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgård, Christine; Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Steuerwald, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insufficient supply of vitamin D during early development may negatively affect offspring growth. METHODS: We examined the association between umbilical cord (UC) serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations and infant size in a study of two Faroese birth cohorts of 1038 singleton...... with vitamin D status 50 nmol/L in models further adjusted for birthweight. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that umbilical cord serum 25(OH)D concentrations are positively associated with infant length...

  18. Early diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccination associated with higher female mortality and no difference in male mortality in a cohort of low birthweight children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Ravn, Henrik; Roth, Adam Anders Edvin

    2012-01-01

    Studies from low-income countries have suggested that diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine provided after Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination may have a negative effect on female survival. The authors examined the effect of DTP in a cohort of low birthweight (LBW) infants.......Studies from low-income countries have suggested that diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine provided after Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination may have a negative effect on female survival. The authors examined the effect of DTP in a cohort of low birthweight (LBW) infants....

  19. Kangaroo mother care for low birthweight infants: a randomized controlled trial in different settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, A; Davanzo, R; Worku, B; Surjono, A; Echeverria, M; Bedri, A; Haksari, E; Osorno, L; Gudetta, B; Setyowireni, D; Quintero, S; Tamburlini, G

    1998-09-01

    A randomized controlled trial was carried out for 1 y in three tertiary and teaching hospitals, in Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), Yogyakarta (Indonesia) and Merida (Mexico), to study the effectiveness, feasibility, acceptability and cost of kangaroo mother care (KMC) when compared to conventional methods of care (CMC). About 29% of 649 low birthweight infants (LBWI; 1000-1999 g) died before eligibility. Of the survivors, 38% were excluded for various reasons, 149 were randomly assigned to KMC (almost exclusive skin-to-skin care after stabilization), and 136 to CMC (warm room or incubator care). There were three deaths in each group and no difference in the incidence of severe disease. Hypothermia was significantly less common in KMC infants in Merida (13.5 vs 31.5 episodes/100 infants/d) and overall (10.8 vs 14.6). Exclusive breastfeeding at discharge was more common in KMC infants in Merida (80% vs 16%) and overall (88% vs 70%). KMC infants had a higher mean daily weight gain (21.3 g vs 17.7 g) and were discharged earlier (13.4 vs 16.3 d after enrolment). KMC was considered feasible and presented advantages over CMC in terms of maintenance of equipment. Mothers expressed a clear preference for KMC and health workers found it safe and convenient. KMC was cheaper than CMC in terms of salaries (US$ 11,788 vs US$ 29,888) and other running costs (US$ 7501 vs US$ 9876). This study confirms that hospital KMC for stabilized LBWI 1000-1999 g is at least as effective and safe as CMC, and shows that it is feasible in different settings, acceptable to mothers of different cultures, and less expensive. Where exclusive breastfeeding is uncommon among LBWI, KMC may bring about an increase in its prevalence and duration, with consequent benefits for health and growth. For hospitals in low-income countries KMC may represent an appropriate use of scarce resources.

  20. Use of multiple linear regression and logistic regression models to investigate changes in birthweight for term singleton infants in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonellie, Sandra R

    2012-10-01

    To illustrate the use of regression and logistic regression models to investigate changes over time in size of babies particularly in relation to social deprivation, age of the mother and smoking. Mean birthweight has been found to be increasing in many countries in recent years, but there are still a group of babies who are born with low birthweights. Population-based retrospective cohort study. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression models are used to analyse data on term 'singleton births' from Scottish hospitals between 1994-2003. Mothers who smoke are shown to give birth to lighter babies on average, a difference of approximately 0.57 Standard deviations lower (95% confidence interval. 0.55-0.58) when adjusted for sex and parity. These mothers are also more likely to have babies that are low birthweight (odds ratio 3.46, 95% confidence interval 3.30-3.63) compared with non-smokers. Low birthweight is 30% more likely where the mother lives in the most deprived areas compared with the least deprived, (odds ratio 1.30, 95% confidence interval 1.21-1.40). Smoking during pregnancy is shown to have a detrimental effect on the size of infants at birth. This effect explains some, though not all, of the observed socioeconomic birthweight. It also explains much of the observed birthweight differences by the age of the mother.   Identifying mothers at greater risk of having a low birthweight baby as important implications for the care and advice this group receives. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Infant Mortality and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Indian/Alaska Native > Infant Health & Mortality Infant Mortality and American Indians/Alaska Natives American Indian/Alaska ... as compared to non-Hispanic white mothers. Infant Mortality Rate: Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live ...

  2. Infant Mortality and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Infant Health & Mortality Infant Mortality and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders While the overall ... data for this ethnic group is limited. Infant Mortality Rate Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live ...

  3. Population growth and infant mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Fabella, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between population growth and economic outcomes is an issue of great policy significance. In the era of the Millennium Development Goals, poverty and its correlates have become the compelling issues. Economic growth may not automatically translate into reductions in poverty and its correlates (may not trickle down) if income distribution is at the same time worsening. We therefore investigate the direct effect of population growth on infant mortality for various income catego...

  4. Impact of maternal diabetes mellitus on mortality and morbidity of preterm infants (24-33 weeks' gestation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bental, Yoram; Reichman, Brian; Shiff, Yakov; Weisbrod, Meir; Boyko, Valentina; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Mimouni, Francis B

    2011-10-01

    We hypothesized that maternal diabetes mellitus (DM) increases the risk for mortality, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and major complications of prematurity. Analysis of prospectively collected (1995-2007) Israel National Very Low Birth Weight Infant Database. Maternal DM was recorded as pregestational or gestational. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to assess the independent effect of maternal DM status on infant mortality, RDS, and other complications of prematurity. Infants of mothers with pregestational (n = 120) and gestational (n = 825) DM were similar, and their data were pooled for analyses. Mothers with DM were more likely to have received a complete course of prenatal steroids than control mothers. Infants of diabetic mothers (IDM) had a slightly higher gestational age and birthweight than non-IDM's. Distribution of birthweight percentiles and the mean birthweight z scores were similar. Apgar scores were statistically higher in the IDM group. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of delivery room mortality, RDS, and other major complications of prematurity. Total mortality and bronchopulmonary dysplasia rates were significantly higher in the nondiabetic group. The adjusted odds ratios for mortality, RDS, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, retinopathy of prematurity, necrotizing enterocolitis, and patent ductus arteriosus were not significantly increased in the IDM group. With modern management and adequate prenatal care, IDM born very low birthweight do not seem to be at an excess risk of developing RDS or other major complications of prematurity compared with non-IDM.

  5. VSRR - Quarterly provisional estimates for infant mortality

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provisional estimates of infant mortality (deaths of infants under 1 year per 1,000 live births), neonatal mortality (deaths of infants aged 0-27 days per 1,000 live...

  6. Selection and Adaptation Components of Infant Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöley, Jonas; Oeppen, James; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune

    We test the selection hypothesis of infant mortality against the adaptation hypothesis by decomposing the mortality age pattern over the first year of life into an adaptation- and a selection component. We show that the population level decline in mortality over the first hour of life...... is significantly influenced by mortality selection, i.e.~the frailest infants leaving the population shortly after birth. The subsequent mortality decline predominantly results from mortality changes observed in homogeneous sub-populations. This confirms the common view of the infant mortality age pattern being...

  7. The 'Effects of Transfusion Thresholds on Neurocognitive Outcome of Extremely Low Birth-Weight Infants (ETTNO)' Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinholdt, Jes; Veiergang, Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Background: Infants with extremely low birth weight uniformly develop anemia of prematurity and frequently require red blood cell transfusions (RBCTs). Although RBCT is widely practiced, the indications remain controversial in the absence of conclusive data on the long-term effects of RBCT....... Objectives: To summarize the current equipoise and to outline the study protocol of the 'Effects of Transfusion Thresholds on Neurocognitive Outcome of extremely low birth-weight infants (ETTNO)' study. Methods: Review of the literature and design of a large pragmatic randomized controlled trial...

  8. Reduced infant birthweight consequent upon maternal exposure to severe life events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khashan, Ali; McNamee, R.; Pedersen, Marianne Giørtz

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between maternal exposure to severe life events and fetal growth (birthweight and small for gestational age). Stress has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. METHODS: Mothers of 1.38 million singleton live births in Denmark between January 1...... conception or during pregnancy have babies with significantly lower birthweight. If this association is causal, the potential mechanisms of stress-related effects on birthweight include changes in lifestyle due to the exposure and stress-related dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during...

  9. Does supplementation of formula with evening primrose and fish oils augment long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status of low birthweight infants to that of breast-fed counterparts?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltil, HA; van Beusekom, CM; Schaafsma, A; Okken, A; Muskiet, FAJ

    We investigated whether formulae with evening primrose and fish oils raise long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) in plasma cholesterol esters (CE), erythrocytes (RSC) and platelets (PLT) to levels encountered in breast-fed infants. Low birthweight infants (less than or equal to 2500 g)

  10. Benchmarking care for very low birthweight infants in Ireland and Northern Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, B P

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Benchmarking is that process through which best practice is identified and continuous quality improvement pursued through comparison and sharing. The Vermont Oxford Neonatal Network (VON) is the largest international external reference centre for very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. This report from 2004-7 compares survival and morbidity throughout Ireland and benchmarks these results against VON. METHODS: A standardised VON database for VLBW infants was created in 14 participating centres across Ireland and Northern Ireland. RESULTS: Data on 716 babies were submitted in 2004, increasing to 796 babies in 2007, with centres caring for from 10 to 120 VLBW infants per year. In 2007, mortality rates in VLBW infants varied from 4% to 19%. Standardised mortality ratios indicate that the number of deaths observed was not significantly different from the number expected, based on the characteristics of infants treated. There was no difference in the incidence of severe intraventricular haemorrhage between all-Ireland and VON groups (5% vs 6%, respectively). All-Ireland rates for chronic lung disease (CLD; 15-21%) remained lower than rates seen in the VON group (24-28%). The rates of late onset nosocomial infection in the all-Ireland group (25-26%) remained double those in the VON group (12-13%). DISCUSSION: This is the first all-Ireland international benchmarking report in any medical specialty. Survival, severe intraventricular haemorrhage and CLD compare favourably with international standards, but rates of nosocomial infection in neonatal units are concerning. Benchmarking clinical outcomes is critical for quality improvement and informing decisions concerning neonatal intensive care service provision.

  11. ["Medical Texts and Jorunals," and Resources on "Prenatal Risk,""Premature and Low Birthweight Infants,""Infant Nutrition and Breastfeeding"; "Effectiveness of Early Intervention." IPHA Birth-to-Three Clearinghouse Bibliographies 5, 6, 7, 8, and 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Public Health Association, Springfield.

    Five separate bibliographies present citations of resources regarding prenatal risk, premature and low birthweight infants, infant nutrition and breastfeeding, and early intervention for infants with disabilities. The first bibliography lists 133 references from medical texts and journals regarding child development, disabilities, diagnosis, and…

  12. Kangaroo mother method: randomised controlled trial of an alternative method of care for stabilised low-birthweight infants. Maternidad Isidro Ayora Study Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, N L; Camacho, L W; Rojas, E P; Stern, C

    1994-09-17

    Because resources for care of low-birthweight (LBW) infants in developing countries are scarce, the Kangaroo mother method (KMM) was developed. The infant is kept upright in skin-to-skin contact with the mother's breast. Previous studies reported several benefits with the KMM but interpretation of their findings is limited by small size and design weaknesses. We have done a longitudinal, randomised, controlled trial at the Isidro Ayora Maternity Hospital in Quito, Ecuador. Infants with LBW (< 2000 g) who satisfied out-of-risk criteria of tolerance of food and weight stabilisation were randomly assigned to KMM and control (standard incubator care) groups (n = 128 and 147, respectively). During 6 months of follow-up the KMM group had a significantly lower rate than the control group of serious illness (lower-respiratory-tract disorders, apnoea, aspiration, pneumonia, septicaemia, general infections; 7 [5%] vs 27 [18%], p < 0.002), although differences between the groups in less severe morbidity were not significant. There was no significant difference in growth or in the proportion of women breastfeeding, perhaps because the proportion breastfeeding was high in both groups owing to strong promotion. Mortality was the same in both groups; most deaths occurred during the stabilisation period before randomisation. KMM mothers made more unscheduled clinic visits than control mothers but their infants had fewer re-admissions and so the cost of care was lower with the KMM. Since the eligibility criteria excluded nearly 50% of LBW infants from the study, the KMM is not universally applicable to these infants. The benefits might be greater in populations where breastfeeding is not so common.

  13. Neighborhood Disadvantage, Preconception Health Behaviors and Infant Birthweight: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flagg, Lee A; Needham, Belinda L; Locher, Julie L

    2014-04-01

    Prior studies have shown that neighborhood disadvantage and disorder are associated with birth outcomes. This study examined preconception diet and physical activity level, as well as body mass index, as mediators of the association between neighborhood conditions and birthweight. Secondary data analyses were conducted using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). The final analytic sample consisted of 523 adolescent and young adult mothers giving singleton live births between 1997 and 1998. In contrast to previous research, we found that neighborhood characteristics were unrelated to birthweight. Consistent with prior studies, compared to those who were White, on average, Blacks had birthweights that were 163.25 grams lighter. In addition, compared to mothers who were married or living with a partner, mothers who did not have a partner at the time of birth, on average, had offspring that were 127.20 grams lighter. No evidence was found for the mediation hypotheses as there were no associations between neighborhood characteristics and preconception diet or physical activity or between these behavioral variables and birthweight. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study examining diet and physical activity as possible behavioral pathways between the neighborhood context and birthweight.

  14. Poverty Mapping Project: Global Subnational Infant Mortality Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Subnational Infant Mortality Rates consists of estimates of infant mortality rates for the year 2000. The infant mortality rate for a region or country is...

  15. Prospective evaluation of a multi-factorial prevention strategy on the impact of nosocomial infection in very-low-birthweight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, C; Hart, J; Vemgal, P; Harrison, C

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of a multi-factorial intervention on nosocomial infection in very-low-birthweight infants. Consecutive infants with a birth weight less than 1500 g, born between February 2002 and February 2003, were included in this prospective study. The first six-month period (control) included surveillance of current practice. The intervention began in the seventh month and included: (i) changes to handwashing solutions with hand hygiene education; (ii) standardization of intravascular device (IV) insertion with specialized packs; (iii) changes to skin antiseptic solutions (2% aqueous chlorhexidine and 1% chlorhexidine in ethanol); and (iv) mandatory removal or replacement of peripheral IV after 48 hours and removal once enteral intake was > 120 mL/kg/day. Demographic data and details of every device were collected prospectively. Bloodstream infections (BSIs), length of stay (LOS), length of ventilation (LOV) and death were recorded and the rate of nosocomial BSI was calculated. Overall, 174 newborns required 1359 devices. The two cohorts were similar for birth weight and gestation. There was a reduction in nosocomial BSIs from 21% to 9% (control vs. intervention) (P = 0.05, confidence intervals 0.19-1.0). There was no significant difference in LOS, LOV, or mortality. Four infants had complications from 2% chlorhexidine. In conclusion, implementation of the multi-factorial prevention strategy reduced nosocomial BSIs. Alternative antiseptic solutions are needed to reduce the complications caused by 2% aqueous chlorhexidine.

  16. Cigarette Tax Increase and Infant Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Stephen W; Warner, Kenneth E; Pordes, Elisabeth; Davis, Matthew M

    2016-01-01

    Maternal smoking increases the risk for preterm birth, low birth weight, and sudden infant death syndrome, which are all causes of infant mortality. Our objective was to evaluate if changes in cigarette taxes and prices over time in the United States were associated with a decrease in infant mortality. We compiled data for all states from 1999 to 2010. Time-series models were constructed by infant race for cigarette tax and price with infant mortality as the outcome, controlling for state per-capita income, educational attainment, time trend, and state random effects. From 1999 through 2010, the mean overall state infant mortality rate in the United States decreased from 7.3 to 6.2 per 1000 live births, with decreases of 6.0 to 5.3 for non-Hispanic white and 14.3 to 11.3 for non-Hispanic African American infants (P increased from $0.84 to $2.37 per pack (P increase per pack in cigarette tax was associated with a change in infant deaths of -0.19 (95% confidence interval -0.33 to -0.05) per 1000 live births overall, including changes of -0.21 (-0.33 to -0.08) for non-Hispanic white infants and -0.46 (-0.90 to -0.01) for non-Hispanic African American infants. Models for cigarette price yielded similar findings. Increases in cigarette taxes and prices are associated with decreases in infant mortality rates, with stronger impact for African American infants. Federal and state policymakers may consider increases in cigarette taxes as a primary prevention strategy for infant mortality. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Trends in Infant mortality rate and mortality for neonates born at less than 32 weeks and with very low birth weight Tendencia de la mortalidad infantil y de neonatos menores de 32 semanas y de muy bajo peso Tendência da mortalidade infantil e dos neonatos menores de 32 semanas e de muito baixo peso

    OpenAIRE

    René Mauricio Barría-Pailaquilén; Yessy Mendoza-Maldonado; Yohana Urrutia-Toro; Cristian Castro-Mora; Gema Santander-Manríquez

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the trend of the infant mortality rate between 1990-2004 and the neonatal mortality between 2000-2005 in infants born at less than 32 weeks of gestational age or with very low birth-weight. Based on secondary data, infant mortality rate and by its component for Valdivia city were compared with national indicators. Mortality at

  18. Factors affecting infant and child mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlakha, A L; Suchindran, C M

    1985-10-01

    This paper examines the determinants of infant and child mortality variations in Jordan, Yemen, Egypt, and Tunisia using data from WFS surveys. The analysis considers biological correlates of mortality--mother's age, birth order, birth interval, and previous infant loss--and several social factors--mother's and father's education, mother's residence, father's occupation, and mother's work experience since marriage. The estimates for the 4 countries show large variations in the mortality rates and an expected pattern of declining infant and child mortality during the period of 20 years prior to the survey. Further, the proportionate decline in child mortality in each country was generally greater than the proportionate decline in infant mortality. A persistent pattern of higher child mortality for females than for males is found, suggesting preferential care and treatment of male offspring. The higher mortality risk is found for infants born to very young and very old mothers, with short previous birth intervals, of higher birth orders, and where the previous infant had died. Among the socioeconomic characteristics, the education of the mother and rural-urban residence are found to affect infant survival. In childhood, among the demographic factors, only birth interval shows a significant effect on mortality. The risk of child mortality decreases considerably with the increase in the birth interval. The analysis of the effect of breastfeeding on mortality, although based on limited information, clearly shows the beneficial effect of breastfeeding on the infant's survival, especially during the early months of life. For all countries, the mortality rate for the non-breastfeeders is substantially higher than for the breastfeeders even when the effect of the other covariates is controlled.

  19. The Cues and Care Trial: A randomized controlled trial of an intervention to reduce maternal anxiety and improve developmental outcomes in very low birthweight infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunkley David

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very low birthweight infants are at risk for deficits in cognitive and language development, as well as attention and behaviour problems. Maternal sensitive behaviour (i.e. awareness of infant cues and appropriate responsiveness to those cues in interaction with her very low birthweight infant is associated with better outcomes in these domains; however, maternal anxiety interferes with the mother's ability to interact sensitively with her very low birthweight infant. There is a need for brief, cost-effective and timely interventions that address both maternal psychological distress and interactive behaviour. The Cues and Care trial is a randomized controlled trial of an intervention designed to reduce maternal anxiety and promote sensitive interaction in mothers of very low birthweight infants. Methods and design Mothers of singleton infants born at weights below 1500 g are recruited in the neonatal intensive care units of 2 tertiary care hospitals, and are randomly assigned to the experimental (Cues intervention or to an attention control (Care condition. The Cues intervention teaches mothers to attend to their own physiological, cognitive, and emotional cues that signal anxiety and worry, and to use cognitive-behavioural strategies to reduce distress. Mothers are also taught to understand infant cues and to respond sensitively to those cues. Mothers in the Care group receive general information about infant care. Both groups have 6 contacts with a trained intervener; 5 of the 6 sessions take place during the infant's hospitalization, and the sixth contact occurs after discharge, in the participant mother's home. The primary outcome is maternal symptoms of anxiety, assessed via self-report questionnaire immediately post-intervention. Secondary outcomes include maternal sensitive behaviour, maternal symptoms of posttraumatic stress, and infant development at 6 months corrected age. Discussion The Cues and Care trial will

  20. Influence of birth weight on differences in infant mortality by social class and legitimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, D A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the influence of birth weight on the pronounced social class differences in infant mortality in Britain. DESIGN--Analysis of routine data on births and infant deaths. SETTING--England and Wales. SUBJECTS--All live births and infant deaths, 1983-5. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Mortality in infants by social class, birth weight, and legitimacy according to birth and death certificates. RESULTS--Neonatal and postneonatal mortality (deaths/1000 births) increased with social class. Neonatal and postneonatal mortality was 4.2/1000 and 2.3/1000 respectively for social class I and 6.8/1000 and 5.6/1000 respectively for social class V. Mortality was lower among births registered within marriage (postneonatal 3.5/1000; neonatal 5.2/1000) than among those jointly registered outside marriage (5.1/1000; 6.4/1000); mortality was highest in those solely registered outside marriage (7.2/1000; 7.0/1000). For neonatal mortality the effect of social class varied with birth weight. Social class had little effect on neonatal mortality in low birthweight babies and increasing effect in heavier babies. For postneonatal mortality the effect of social class was similar for all birth weights and was almost as steep as for all birth weights combined. CONCLUSION--Birth weight mediates little of the effect of social class on postneonatal mortality. PMID:1954421

  1. Social Welfare Expenditures and Infant Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of social welfare expenditures on infant mortality (deaths younger than age 1 per 1,000 live births) across 19 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries from 1980 to 2010. Data are obtained from various sources including the OECD, World Health Organization, and World Bank. The findings indicate that among three social welfare expenditure measures for families, the expenditures on family cash allowances are predicted to reduce infant mortality. However, the other two measures-the expenditures on parental and maternity leave and expenditures on family services-have no significant effects on infant mortality.

  2. US infant mortality and the President's party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Javier M; Bound, John; Geronimus, Arline T

    2014-06-01

    Infant mortality rates in the US exceed those in all other developed countries and in many less developed countries, suggesting political factors may contribute. Annual time series on overall, White and Black infant mortality rates in the US were analysed over the 1965-2010 time period to ascertain whether infant mortality rates varied across presidential administrations. Data were de-trended using cubic splines and analysed using both graphical and time series regression methods. Across all nine presidential administrations, infant mortality rates were below trend when the President was a Democrat and above trend when the President was a Republican. This was true for overall, neonatal and postneonatal mortality. Regression estimates show that, relative to trend, Republican administrations were characterized by infant mortality rates that were, on average, 3% higher than Democratic administrations. In proportional terms, effect size is similar for US Whites and Blacks. US Black rates are more than twice as high as White, implying substantially larger absolute effects for Blacks. We found a robust, quantitatively important association between net of trend US infant mortality rates and the party affiliation of the president. There may be overlooked ways by which macro-dynamics of policy impact microdynamics of physiology, suggesting the political system is a component of the underlying mechanism generating health inequality in the USA. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association © The Author 2013; all rights reserved.

  3. Infant mortality rates declining, but still high.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, M

    1992-10-01

    Family planning can improve infant survival. Specifically, use of family planning methods can minimize family size, increase birth spacing, and reduce the likelihood of pregnancy for teenagers and women aged 40 or older. Immunizations and oral rehydration are responsible for the falling infant mortality rats since 1977 in developing countries, especially among 1-12 month old infants. Yet, neonatal mortality in developing countries had not changed. WHO intends to step up efforts to improve newborn survival. Accurate data are needed, however. Even in developed countries which keep good statistics, infant mortality bias exists. For example, in Japan, some infant deaths are called fetal deaths. In developing countries, much of the data come from hospitals, yet most birth do not occur in hospitals. Even in surveys, bias exists, such as problems with recall. Many researchers use traditional birth attendants (TBAs) to follow up on all births in an area which may eliminate some biases. Such a prospective and longitudinal study in Trairi county in northeastern Brazil shows the infant mortality rate to be less than half of the official rate (65 vs. 142). The major causes of infant death in developed countries, which tends to occur in the neonatal period, are low birth weight, prematurity, birth complications, and congenital defects; developing countries; they are vaccine preventable infectious diseases, diarrhea and dehydration, and respiratory illnesses, all complicated by malnutrition. To make further strides in reducing infant mortality, public health workers must concentrate on the neonatal period. Training TBAs in sterile techniques, appropriate technology, resuscitation of infants, and identification of potential problems is a positive step. Yet, unpredictable conditions (e.g., AIDS) exist and/or will arise which erode improvements. For example, in Nicaragua, within 1 year after the new government introduced health budget cuts which resulted in the poor paying for

  4. Selection and Adaptation Components of Infant Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöley, Jonas; Oeppen, James; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune

    We test the selection hypothesis of infant mortality against the adaptation hypothesis by decomposing the mortality age pattern over the first year of life into an adaptation- and a selection component. We show that the population level decline in mortality over the first hour of life...... caused by adaptation on an individual level. The analysis is informed by detailed micro-data on births and infant deaths in the United States including more than 25 million births and 162,546 deaths. No parametric assumptions were necessary....

  5. Low-level radiation and infant mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, V.R.

    1981-01-01

    Annual data for 1960-70 for each of the 48 contiguous states are analyzed in a variety of ways to determine whether interstate or intertemporal differences in infant mortality were associated with differences in radioactive fallout as measured by 90 Sr or 137 Cs in pasteurized milk. Typically, the null hypothesis of no effect of fallout on infant mortality cannot be rejected. This conclusion is relatively robust under alternative specifications of time trends, the period of study, the timing of the relation between radioactivity and mortality, and the inclusion or exclusion of other variables. Changes in radiation levels do not explain the slow improvement in infant mortality in the early 1960s or the rapid improvement after 1965. (author)

  6. Changing outcome for infants of birth-weight 500-999 g born outside level 3 centres in Victoria. The Victorian Infant Collaborative Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The aim of this study of extremely low birth-weight (ELBW, birth weight 500-999 g) infants born in Victoria was to determine the changes between 3 distinct eras; 1979-80, 1985-87, and 1991-2, in the proportions who were born outside level 3 perinatal centres (outborn), the proportions of outborn infants who were transferred after birth to a level 3 neonatal unit, the survival rate for outborn infants, and sensorineural impairment and disability rates in outborn survivors. The proportion of ELBW livebirths who were outborn fell significantly over successive eras, from 30.2% (106 of 351) in 1979-80, to 23.0% (129 of 560) in 1985-87, and to 15.6% (67 of 429) in 1991-92. Between 1979-80 and 1985-87, the proportions who were outborn fell predominantly in those of birth-weight from 800-999 g, whereas between 1985-87 and 1991-92 the proportions who were outborn fell predominantly in those of birth weight 500-799 g. The proportions of outborn infants who were transferred after birth to a level 3 neonatal unit were similar in the 3 eras, at 49.1%, 38.0% and 41.2%, respectively. The survival rates for outborn infants were lower in each era than for infants born in a level 3 perinatal centre. Only 1 outborn infant not transferred after birth to a level-3 unit survived in any era. The survival rates for infants transferred after birth were similar in the first 2 eras, but rose significantly in 1991-92 (34.6%, 36.7% and 60.7%, respectively). The rates of sensorineural impairments and disabilities in survivors fell significantly between the first 2 eras, and remained low in the last era. It is pleasing that the proportion of tiny babies who were outborn fell significantly over time, reflecting increased referral of high-risk mothers to level 3 perinatal centres before birth. For ELBW outborn infants, survival prospects free of substantial disability are reasonable, but not as good as for those born in level 3 perinatal centres.

  7. Trends in cerebral palsy among infants of very low birthweight (<1500 g) or born prematurely (<32 weeks) in 16 European centres: a database study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platt, Mary Jane; Cans, Christine; Johnson, Ann

    2007-01-01

    of infants from both of these groups survive into childhood. This paper describes changes in the frequency and distribution of cerebral palsy by sex and neurological subtype in infants with a birthweight below 1000 g and 1000-1499 g in the period 1980-96. METHODS: A group of 16 European centres, Surveillance...... of Cerebral Palsy in Europe, agreed a standard definition of cerebral palsy and inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data for children with cerebral palsy born in the years 1980-96 were pooled. The data were analysed to describe the distribution and prevalence of cerebral palsy in VLBW infants. Prevalence trends...

  8. Ethnicity and infant mortality in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, G

    1993-06-01

    Malaysian infant mortality differentials are a worthwhile subject for study, because socioeconomic development has very clearly had a differential impact by ethnic group. The Chinese rates of infant mortality are significantly lower than the Malay or Indian rates. Instead of examining the obvious access to care issues, this study considered factors related to the culture of infant care. Practices include the Chinese confinement of the mother in the first month after childbirth ("pe'i yue") and Pillsbury's 12 normative rules for Malaysian Chinese care. Malay practices vary widely by region and history. Indian mothers are restricted by diet. Data-recording flaws do not permit analysis of Sarawak or Sabah. The general assumption that Western medicine favors better health for mothers and infants is substantiated among peninsular communities, however, there are also negative impacts which affect infant mortality. The complex interaction of factors impacting on infant mortality reported in seven previous studies is discussed. A review of these studies reveals that immediate causes are infections, injuries, and dehydration. Indirect causes are birth weight or social and behavioral factors such as household income or maternal education. Indirect factors, which are amenable to planned change and influence the biological proximate determinants of infant mortality, are identified as birth weight, maternal age at birth, short pregnancy intervals or prior reproductive loss, sex of the child, birth order, duration of breast feeding and conditions of supplementation, types of household water and sanitation, year of child's birth, maternal education, household income and composition, institution of birth, ethnicity, and rural residence. Nine factors are identified empirically as not significant: maternal hours of work in the child's first year, maternal occupation, distance from home to workplace, presence of other children or servants, incidence of epidemics in the child's first

  9. Thinking outside the curve, part I: modeling birthweight distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charnigo Richard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Greater epidemiologic understanding of the relationships among fetal-infant mortality and its prognostic factors, including birthweight, could have vast public health implications. A key step toward that understanding is a realistic and tractable framework for analyzing birthweight distributions and fetal-infant mortality. The present paper is the first of a two-part series that introduces such a framework. Methods We propose describing a birthweight distribution via a normal mixture model in which the number of components is determined from the data using a model selection criterion rather than fixed a priori. Results We address a number of methodological issues, including how the number of components selected depends on the sample size, how the choice of model selection criterion influences the results, and how estimates of mixture model parameters based on multiple samples from the same population can be combined to produce confidence intervals. As an illustration, we find that a 4-component normal mixture model reasonably describes the birthweight distribution for a population of white singleton infants born to heavily smoking mothers. We also compare this 4-component normal mixture model to two competitors from the existing literature: a contaminated normal model and a 2-component normal mixture model. In a second illustration, we discover that a 6-component normal mixture model may be more appropriate than a 4-component normal mixture model for a general population of black singletons. Conclusions The framework developed in this paper avoids assuming the existence of an interval of birthweights over which there are no compromised pregnancies and does not constrain birthweights within compromised pregnancies to be normally distributed. Thus, the present framework can reveal heterogeneity in birthweight that is undetectable via a contaminated normal model or a 2-component normal mixture model.

  10. Physical outcome and school performance of very-low-birthweight infants treated with minimal handling and early nasal CPAP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Marianne; Kamper, Jens

    2006-01-01

    . Eighty-seven per cent of VLBW children and 95% of their siblings attended regular school. Average or above-average achievement was accomplished by 33 (65%) of the VLBW children and 34 (74%) of the siblings in mathematics, and 35 (69%) and 32 (68%), respectively, in reading/spelling. None......% attended ordinary schools, with near-average performances in mathematics and reading/spelling, which were not statistically different to their siblings. The overall results indicate that these infants fare at least as well as survivors after conventional treatment.......AIM: To describe physical outcome and school performance in a cohort of very-low-birthweight infants treated with early nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP)/minimal handling regimen with permissive hypercapnia, in comparison to siblings of normal birthweight. MATERIAL AND METHODS...

  11. Economic outcome for intensive care of infants of birthweight 500-999 g born in Victoria in the post surfactant era. The Victorian Infant Collaborative Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    To determine the incremental cost of improving the outcome for extremely low birthweight (ELBW, birthweight 500-999 g) infants born in Victoria after the introduction of exogenous surfactant (the post surfactant era). This was a geographically determined cohort study of ELBW children in Victoria, Australia of consecutive livebirths born in three distinct eras: (i) 1979-80 (n = 351); (ii) 1985-87 (n = 560); and (iii) 1991-92 (n = 429). Exogenous surfactant was first used in Victoria in March, 1991. The consumption of nursery resources per livebirth, and the survival and sensorineural disability rates at 2 years of age for each era were investigated. Utilities were assigned as follows: 0 for dead, 0.4 for severe disability, 0.6 for moderate disability, 0.8 for mild disability, and 1 for no disability. Utilities were multiplied for more than one disability. Dollar costs were assumed to be $1470 ($A 1992) per day of assisted ventilation, and one dose of exogenous surfactant was assumed to be equivalent to one third of a day of assisted ventilation. Cost-effectiveness (additional costs per additional survivor or life-year gained) and cost-utility (additional costs per additional quality-adjusted survivor or life-year gained) ratios were calculated for the pre-surfactant era (1985-87 vs 1979-80), and for the post surfactant era (1991-92 vs 1985-87). Considering only the costs incurred during the primary hospitalization, cost-effectiveness and cost-utility ratios were lower (i.e. economically better) in the post surfactant era than in the pre-surfactant era (pre-surfactant vs post surfactant; $7040 vs $4040 per life year gained; $6700 vs $5360 per quality-adjusted life year gained). Both ratios fell with increasing birthweight. In contrast with the pre-surfactant era, cost-utility ratios were less favourable than cost-effectiveness ratios in the post surfactant era. With costs for long-term care of severely disabled children added, both cost ratios were higher in the post

  12. Live music reduces stress levels in very low-birthweight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwilling, Diana; Vogeser, Michael; Kirchhoff, Fabian; Schwaiblmair, Frauke; Boulesteix, Anne-Laure; Schulze, Andreas; Flemmer, Andreas W

    2015-04-01

    Music might benefit preterm infants in stressful, intensive care environments. However, data on stress level indicators, determined by salivary cortisol levels, are scarce. We evaluated the effect of live harp music on the stress level indicators of preterm infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We exposed 20 stable preterm infants to music for 15 min on three consecutive days. Saliva was collected before the music was played and 25 min and 4 h after it ended. Salivary cortisol levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and vital signs, oxygen saturation, bradycardia, apnoeas and oxygen desaturations were recorded. Pain levels were assessed by the Bernese Pain Scale for Neonates. Salivary cortisol was significantly lower 25 min (18.9 nmol/L [3.9-35.6] p = 0.001) and 4 h after music (17.4 nmol/L [3.9-35.3] p = 0.003) than at baseline 4 h before exposure (19.5 nmol/L [7.2-51.1]). After music, the number of apnoeas and oxygen desaturations was significantly reduced on all three, days and the number of bradycardia episodes on day one. Pain scores significantly improved after music on all 3 days. Exposure to live music reduced salivary cortisol and had beneficial effects on the physiologic parameters of stable preterm infants in a NICU. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Factors associated with thymic size at birth among low and normal birth-weight infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Helle Brander; Biering-Sørensen, Sofie; Lund, Najaaraq

    2014-01-01

    treatment at the time of labor (0.84 [0.70-1.00]), number of pregnancy consultations (1.03 [1.00-1.05]), maternal age (0.91 [0.84-0.98]), Apgar score (1.06 [1.03-1.10]), and infant convulsions (0.44 [0.29-0.65]) were all independent determinants of thymic index but not all were determinants of thymus...

  14. [Factors influencing infant mortality. Havana Province, 1983].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castell-florit Serrate, P; Portuondo Dustet, N; Suarez Rosas, L; Ovies Garcia, A; Alvarez Fernandez, R; Lima Perez, M T

    1986-01-01

    Questionnaires intended to determine the factors involved in deaths in infants under 1 year have been completed in the province of Havana, Cuba, since 1980. The questionnaires are completed by obstetricians and pediatricians of the municipal health areas and analyzed at the secondary care level. This work examines the factors present in the 133 infant deaths occurring in Havana Province in 1983. The infant mortality rate in the province in 1983 was 14.1/1000 live births, the lowest ever recorded in the province. 74 of the deaths occurred in the early neonatal period, 13 in the late neonatal, and 46 in the postneonatal period. 22 of the early neonatal deaths were due to intrapartum anoxia, 15 to hyaline membrane disease, 10 to prematurity, 7 to bronchoaspiration, 3 to sepsis, 1 to bronchial pneumonia, and 13 to malformations. In the late neonatal and postneonatal periods, 11 deaths were attributed to acute diarrheal disease, 6 to meningitis, and 5 to accidents. 8 of the mothers were under 17 years old, 30 were 18-20, 57 were 21-30, and 16 were 31 or over. Maternal age was unknown for 22. 22 of the mothers were overweight, 29 were malnourished, 55 were of normal nutritional status, and the status of 27 was unknown. 67.7% of the early neonatal deaths were in low birth weight babies. Low educational level and rural residence were social factors in infant mortality.

  15. Infant mortality and life expectancy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanhua; Zhang, Weifang; Yang, Rulai; Zou, Chaochun; Zhao, Zhengyan

    2014-03-07

    It is reported that the infant mortality (IM) rate decreased rapidly in China and the life expectancy (LE) also had a high increase. Our objective was to determine the health status of the Chinese population by investigating IM and LE and their inter-relationship. Based on a literature review on the history and current status of IM and LE in China and other major countries, the relationship between IM, LE, and per capita gross national income (GNI) was investigated in 2013. The decline in IM from 30% to 15% took China only 7 years, which was faster than in developed countries. The leading causes of infant death in China were perinatal diseases, infectious and parasitic diseases, congenital anomalies, accidents, and signs, symptoms, and ill-defined conditions. Most under-5 mortality occurred during infancy (80%), particularly during the neonatal period (55%). LE was negatively correlated with IM (r=-0.921, PChina are still below the level of developing countries. Some countries have a comparable IM and healthcare capabilities, but they have a much higher per capita GNI than China. In China, IM has decreased and IE increased rapidly. However, they were not in parallel with the current economic development. Deviation of these data might be attributed to many factors. In-house surveys and hospital-based follow-ups should be carried out to better understand infant death.

  16. Infant mortality and life expectancy in China

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yanhua; Zhang, Weifang; Yang, Rulai; Zou, Chaochun; Zhao, Zhengyan

    2014-01-01

    Background It is reported that the infant mortality (IM) rate decreased rapidly in China and the life expectancy (LE) also had a high increase. Our objective was to determine the health status of the Chinese population by investigating IM and LE and their inter-relationship. Material/Methods Based on a literature review on the history and current status of IM and LE in China and other major countries, the relationship between IM, LE, and per capita gross national income (GNI) was investigated...

  17. Early diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccination associated with higher female mortality and no difference in male mortality in a cohort of low birthweight children: an observational study within a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaby, Peter; Ravn, Henrik; Roth, Adam; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Lisse, Ida Maria; Diness, Birgitte Rode; Lausch, Karen Rokkedal; Lund, Najaaraq; Rasmussen, Julie; Biering-Sørensen, Sofie; Whittle, Hilton; Benn, Christine Stabell

    2012-08-01

    Studies from low-income countries have suggested that diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine provided after Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination may have a negative effect on female survival. The authors examined the effect of DTP in a cohort of low birthweight (LBW) infants. 2320 LBW newborns were visited at 2, 6 and 12 months of age to assess nutritional and vaccination status. The authors examined survival until the 6-month visit for children who were DTP vaccinated and DTP unvaccinated at the 2-month visit. Two-thirds of the children had received DTP at 2 months and 50 deaths occurred between the 2-month and 6-month visits. DTP vaccinated children had a better anthropometric status for all indices than DTP unvaccinated children. Small mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) was the strongest predictor of mortality. The death rate ratio (DRR) for DTP vaccinated versus DTP unvaccinated children differed significantly for girls (DRR 2.45; 95% CI 0.93 to 6.45) and boys (DRR 0.53; 95% CI 0.23 to 1.20) (p=0.018, homogeneity test). Adjusting for MUAC, the overall effect for DTP vaccinated children was 2.62 (95% CI 1.34 to 5.09); DRR was 5.68 (95% CI 1.83 to 17.7) for girls and 1.29 (95% CI 0.56 to 2.97) for boys (p=0.023, homogeneity test). While anthropometric indices were a strong predictor of mortality among boys, there was little or no association for girls. Surprisingly, even though the children with the best nutritional status were vaccinated early, early DTP vaccination was associated with increased mortality for girls.

  18. Review of interventional procedures in the very low birth-weight infant (<1.5 kg): complications, lessons learned and current practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laffan, Eoghan E. [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada); McNamara, Patrick J.; Whyte, Hilary; L' Herault, Johanne [The Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Neonatology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; John, Philip; Connolly, Bairbre L. [The Hospital for Sick Children, The Image-Guided Therapy Unit, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    Interventional radiology (IR) procedures in very low birth-weight (VLBW) infants (<1.5 kg) are challenging due to size, immaturity, comorbidities and lack of devices of suitable size. Infants are moved from the neonatal intensive care unit to the IR suite, further exposing them to risk. Our purpose was to review our experience of interventional procedures in VLBW infants, specifically complications and potential risks. VLBW infants referred for image-guided therapy between 1998 and 2005 were identified and medical records reviewed. ''Complications'' were divided into: major or minor, periprocedural or postprocedural, and intervention-/device-related, patient-related or equipment-related. Transport risk index of physiological stability (TRIPS) scores were calculated. A total of 116 infants (68 male, 48 female) underwent 176 procedures (159 vascular access-related and 17 nonvascular). Of 158 complications identified, 116 were major and 42 were minor. Major complications included hypothermia (n=33), line manipulations/removals (n=25), bleeding (n=12), thrombosis (n=4), cardiac arrest (n=3), tamponade (n=2), and multiorgan failure (n=1). Of the complications, 119 were categorized as intervention-/device-related, 32 patient-related and 7 equipment-related. There were no significant differences between pre- and postprocedural TRIPS scores. Successful completion of IR procedures in the VLBW infant is possible, but complications still occur in these fragile infants. (orig.)

  19. Perinatal mortality in relation to birthweight and gestational age: a registry-based comparison of Northern Norway and Murmansk County, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, Erik Eik; Nieboer, Evert; Wilsgaard, Tom; Kovalenko, Anton Alexandrovich; Odland, Jon Øyvind

    2011-05-01

    The objective was to explore how perinatal mortality relates to birthweight, gestational age and optimal perinatal survival weight for two Arctic populations employing an existing and a newly established birth registry. A medical birth registry for all births in Murmansk County of North-West Russia became operational on 1st January 2006. Its primary function is to provide useful information for health care officials pertinent to improving perinatal care. The cohort studied consisted of 17,302 births in 2006-07 (Murmansk County) and 16,006 in 2004-06 (Northern Norway). Birthweight probability density functions were analysed, and logistic regression models were employed to calculate gestational-age-specific mortality ratios. The perinatal mortality rate was 10.7/1000 in Murmansk County and 5.7/1000 in Northern Norway. Murmansk County had a higher proportion of preterm deliveries (8.7%) compared to Northern Norway (6.6%). The odds ratio (OR) of risk of mortality (Northern Norway as the reference group) was higher for all gestational ages in Murmansk County, but the largest risk difference occurred among term deliveries (OR 2.45, 95% confidence interval 1.45, 4.14) which hardly changed on adjustment for maternal age, parity and gestation. Proportionately, more babies were born near (± 500 g) the optimal perinatal survival weight in Murmansk County (67.2%) than in Northern Norway (47.6%). The observed perinatal mortality was higher in Murmansk County at all birthweight strata and at gestational ages between weeks 25 and 42, but the adjusted risk difference was most significant for term deliveries. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. i-gel: a new supraglottic device for effective resuscitation of a very low birthweight infant with Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galderisi, Alfonso; De Bernardo, Giuseppe; Lorenzon, Eleonora; Trevisanuto, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) has been indicated as an effective device for airway management when face-mask ventilation and intubation have both failed in infants weighing >2000 g or delivered ≥34 weeks of gestation. All previous studies used a classic LMA. The current report describes the first case of a very low birthweight infant (1470 g, <3rd centile; 36+3gestational weeks) with micrognathia and palate cleft with Cornelia De Lange syndrome, resuscitated at birth with a new supraglottic airway device, i-gel size-1, positioned by a trainee paediatrician at first attempt. The procedure allowed reaching prompt effective ventilation and oxygenation of the patient, who was stabilised and intubated through i-gel. PMID:25809435

  1. Variation in term birthweight across European countries affects the prevalence of small for gestational age among very preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeitlin, Jennifer; Bonamy, Anna-Karin Edstedt; Piedvache, Aurelie

    2017-01-01

    's approach and Hadlock's foetal growth model, using national data on birthweights by sex. These references were applied to the Effective Perinatal Intensive Care in Europe (EPICE) cohort, which comprised 7766 live VPT births without severe congenital anomalies under 32 weeks of gestation in 2011...

  2. Quality indicators for human milk use in very low-birthweight infants: are we measuring what we should be measuring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, H R; Fogg, L J; Patel, A; Johnson, T; Engstrom, J L; Meier, P P

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the currently used human milk (HM) quality indicators that measure whether very low-birthweight (VLBW; Quality indicators that focus on the amount and timing of HM feedings in the NICU should be added to the HM-Ever and HM-DC measures.

  3. Childhood diarrhoea in Danish day care centres could be associated with infant colic, low birthweight and antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebbelstrup Jensen, B.; Röser, D.; Utoft Andreassen, Bente

    2016-01-01

    and low birthweight. Methods A dynamic one-year follow-up cohort study comprising 179 children from 36 day care centres was conducted from September 2009 to July 2013 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Questionnaires were sent to the children's parents or legal guardians every two months for a year, requesting...

  4. Gender Differentials and Disease-Specific Cause of Infant Mortality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    instance, in the CIA rankings, the national infant mortality rate in 2007 was 53.56 deaths per 1000 live births for Ghana with different rates for males. (56.64/1000) and females (47.85/1000)6. In. Ghana, there are also variations in infant mortality rates based on socio-economic factors especially rural-urban and regional ...

  5. Adolescent Pregnancy and Infant Mortality: Isolating the Effects of Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Examined data from state of North Carolina to test assumption that inordinately high Black teenage pregnancy rate accounts for difference between Black and White infant mortality rates. Results suggest that poverty, not race, plays crucial role in infant mortality. (Author/NB)

  6. birth-weight infants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hours of life was more strongly associated with death than four traditional risk factors (birth weight, short gestation, male sex and the diagnosis of respiratory distress syndrome). Furthermore, mean pH in the first 12 hours was as strongly associated with death as was birth weight. Previous research in our neonatal population ...

  7. Short-term outcome of very-low-birthweight infants with arterial hypotension in the first 24 h of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Kirstin; Härtel, Christoph; Preuß, Michael; Rabe, Heike; Roll, Claudia; Emeis, Michael; Wieg, Christian; Szabo, Miklos; Herting, Egbert; Göpel, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate lowest mean arterial blood pressure during the first 24 h of life (minMAP(24)) in very-low-birthweight (VLBW) infants and to identify associations between hypotension and short-term outcome. Retrospective cohort analysis of the minMAP(24) of 4907 VLBW infants with a gestational age Hypotension was defined as minMAP(24) being lower than the median value of all patients of the same gestational age. MinMAP(24) values correlated with gestational age. Median minMAP(24) values of VLBW infants ≤29 weeks' gestation were 1-2 mm Hg lower than gestational age in completed weeks. Hypotensive infants had a higher rate of intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH, 20.3% vs 15.9%, pHypotension during the first 24 h of life is associated with adverse outcomes in VLBW infants. This underlines the need for randomised controlled trials on the use of vasoactive drugs in this vulnerable patient cohort. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Reduction of infant mortality in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V; Datta, N

    1982-01-01

    In India the infant mortality rate (IMR) registered an impressive decline during the first 5-6 decades of the 20th century, but in the last 30 years a significant decline has not been documented. The IMR continues to be in the range of 120-130/1000. In many developed countries it is reported as less than 20/1000. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended that by the year 2000 the IMR should be reduced to below 50/1000. India's government has set a target of 60/1000 to be reached by 2000. In Kerala this target has already been achieved. Several projects throughout India have indicated that this task can be accomplished. Many lessons can be learned from Kerala and the successful projects. 1 major constraint in information on IMR in India is the lack of uniformity and reliability in the system of recording vital events. Mere knowledge of IMR is insufficient for planning and execution of an appropriate intervention strategy. It is also important to understand the various causes of death. Based on the available information and a review of the literature, it is clear that 50% of the deaths in infancy occurred during the neonatal period. The common preventable causes of death in infancy identified are acute respiratory infections, acute diarrheal disease, low birth weight, protein energy malnutrition, tetanus neonatorum, and communicable diseases like measles, whooping cough, and typhoid. The high IMR can be reduced by general measures which can only be recommended as medium-term and longterm plans. These include an increase in the gross national product and female literacy, a decreasing birthrate, and an increasing capita food intake. At this time India is not experiencing rapid gains in any of these areas. Many of the strategies to reduce IMR have been reviewed objectively by Bhargava et al. Each strategy has merit, but, due to limited resources, it is essential to set priorities. The selection of priorities should be based on 4 basic questions: how common is

  9. Low infant mortality among Palestine refugees despite the odds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, Ali; Sabatinelli, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present data from a 2008 infant mortality survey conducted in Jordan, Lebanon, the Syrian Arab Republic, the Gaza Strip and the West Bank and analyse infant mortality trends among Palestine refugees in 1995–2005. Methods Following the preceding birth technique, mothers who were registering a new birth were asked if the preceding child was alive or dead, the day the child was born and the date of birth of the neonate whose birth was being registered. From this information, neonatal, infant and early child mortality rates were estimated. The age at death for early child mortality was determined by the mean interval between successive births and the mean age of neonates at registration. Findings In 2005–2006, infant mortality among Palestine refugees ranged from 28 deaths per 100 000 live births in the Syrian Arab Republic to 19 in Lebanon. Thus, infant mortality in Palestine refugees is among the lowest in the Near East. However, infant mortality has stopped decreasing in recent years, although it remains at a level compatible with the attainment of Millennium Development Goal 4. Conclusion Largely owing to the primary health care provided by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) for Palestine Refugees in the Near East and other entities, infant mortality among Palestine refugees had consistently decreased. However, it is no longer dropping. Measures to address the most likely reasons – early marriage and childbearing, poor socioeconomic conditions and limited access to good perinatal care – are needed. PMID:21479095

  10. Effect of Determinants of Infant and Child Mortality In Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Osuagwwu

    Infant and child mortality is a major public health problem; however, quantifying its burden in a population is a challenge. Routine data collected provided a proxy for measuring the incidence of mortality among children under five years of age and for crudely estimating mortality rate. The data collected from National ...

  11. Socio-demographic correlates of infant and childhood mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, K; Murthy, M S; Reddy, P R; Reddy, P J; Gowri, V; Sivaraju, S

    1985-01-01

    The influence of selected demographic and socioeconomic variables on infant and child mortality (1979 data) among 3 cultural groups -- Muslims, Harijans, and Caste Hindus -- in the rural Chittoor District of Andhra Pradesh state in the South Central Region of India are analysed. Infant mortality was high throughout Andhra Pradesh, but it was higher among Muslims and Harijans (82.6/1000 and 82/8/1000 live births) than among Caste Hindus (63.25). The demographic variables examined were: age at marriage, age, number of conceptions, number of living children, and birth intervals. All except age at marriage and number of living children affected the 3 groups uniformly. Child mortality among the Harijans reflected the adverse effect of early marriage, and the large number of living children had and adverse effect on both infant and child mortality among the Muslims. Regression analysis also showed the high correlation of birth order to both infant and child mortality and of number of living children to childhood mortality. The socioeconomic values considered were economic status, education, occupation, family structure, type of marriage, and type of residence (in terms of ventilation). Economically, Caste Hindus were best off; educational status was lowest among the Harijans. Occupationally, most Caste Hindus were farmers; Muslims were businessmen; and Harijans were laborers. More Harijan women and children under 14 worked for wages as agricultural laborers. From the point of view of infant mortality, family income correlated negatively among the Harijans but positively among Muslims and Caste Hindus; occupation of husband correlated very negatively for Harijans and Muslims. Type of house and household size were negatively correlated for the Harijans but were not significant for the others. Correlations for childhood mortality were similar to those for infant mortality for most variables, but among Muslims education of husband and type of family correlated negatively and

  12. Infant Mortality in Novo Hamburgo: Associated Factors and Cardiovascular Causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brum, Camila de Andrade [Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia (IC/FUC), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Stein, Airton Tetelbom [Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Grupo Hospitalar Conceição (GHC), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Universidade Luterana do Brasil (ULBRA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pellanda, Lucia Campos, E-mail: luciapell.pesquisa@cardiologia.org.br [Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia (IC/FUC), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    Infant mortality has decreased in Brazil, but remains high as compared to that of other developing countries. In 2010, the Rio Grande do Sul state had the lowest infant mortality rate in Brazil. However, the municipality of Novo Hamburgo had the highest infant mortality rate in the Porto Alegre metropolitan region. To describe the causes of infant mortality in the municipality of Novo Hamburgo from 2007 to 2010, identifying which causes were related to heart diseases and if they were diagnosed in the prenatal period, and to assess the access to healthcare services. This study assessed infants of the municipality of Novo Hamburgo, who died, and whose data were collected from the infant death investigation records. Of the 157 deaths in that period, 35.3% were reducible through diagnosis and early treatment, 25% were reducible through partnership with other sectors, 19.2% were non-preventable, 11.5% were reducible by means of appropriate pregnancy monitoring, 5.1% were reducible through appropriate delivery care, and 3.8% were ill defined. The major cause of death related to heart disease (13.4%), which was significantly associated with the variables ‘age at death’, ‘gestational age’ and ‘birth weight’. Regarding access to healthcare services, 60.9% of the pregnant women had a maximum of six prenatal visits. It is mandatory to enhance prenatal care and newborn care at hospitals and basic healthcare units to prevent infant mortality.

  13. Infant Mortality in Novo Hamburgo: Associated Factors and Cardiovascular Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Andrade Brum

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infant mortality has decreased in Brazil, but remains high as compared to that of other developing countries. In 2010, the Rio Grande do Sul state had the lowest infant mortality rate in Brazil. However, the municipality of Novo Hamburgo had the highest infant mortality rate in the Porto Alegre metropolitan region. Objective: To describe the causes of infant mortality in the municipality of Novo Hamburgo from 2007 to 2010, identifying which causes were related to heart diseases and if they were diagnosed in the prenatal period, and to assess the access to healthcare services. Methods: This study assessed infants of the municipality of Novo Hamburgo, who died, and whose data were collected from the infant death investigation records. Results: Of the 157 deaths in that period, 35.3% were reducible through diagnosis and early treatment, 25% were reducible through partnership with other sectors, 19.2% were non-preventable, 11.5% were reducible by means of appropriate pregnancy monitoring, 5.1% were reducible through appropriate delivery care, and 3.8% were ill defined. The major cause of death related to heart disease (13.4%, which was significantly associated with the variables ‘age at death’, ‘gestational age’ and ‘birth weight’. Regarding access to healthcare services, 60.9% of the pregnant women had a maximum of six prenatal visits. Conclusion: It is mandatory to enhance prenatal care and newborn care at hospitals and basic healthcare units to prevent infant mortality.

  14. Infant Mortality in Novo Hamburgo: Associated Factors and Cardiovascular Causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brum, Camila de Andrade; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-01-01

    Infant mortality has decreased in Brazil, but remains high as compared to that of other developing countries. In 2010, the Rio Grande do Sul state had the lowest infant mortality rate in Brazil. However, the municipality of Novo Hamburgo had the highest infant mortality rate in the Porto Alegre metropolitan region. To describe the causes of infant mortality in the municipality of Novo Hamburgo from 2007 to 2010, identifying which causes were related to heart diseases and if they were diagnosed in the prenatal period, and to assess the access to healthcare services. This study assessed infants of the municipality of Novo Hamburgo, who died, and whose data were collected from the infant death investigation records. Of the 157 deaths in that period, 35.3% were reducible through diagnosis and early treatment, 25% were reducible through partnership with other sectors, 19.2% were non-preventable, 11.5% were reducible by means of appropriate pregnancy monitoring, 5.1% were reducible through appropriate delivery care, and 3.8% were ill defined. The major cause of death related to heart disease (13.4%), which was significantly associated with the variables ‘age at death’, ‘gestational age’ and ‘birth weight’. Regarding access to healthcare services, 60.9% of the pregnant women had a maximum of six prenatal visits. It is mandatory to enhance prenatal care and newborn care at hospitals and basic healthcare units to prevent infant mortality

  15. Different extent in decline of infant mortality by region and cause in Shenyang, China

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yan-Hong; Wu, Qi-Jun; Li, Li-Li; Li, Da; Li, Jing; Zhou, Chen; Wu, Lang; Zhu, Jingjing; Gong, Ting-Ting

    2016-01-01

    To compare the pattern of cause of death of infant mortality rates by urban/rural areas as well as to generate knowledge for potential strategies to decrease this mortality, we carried out a study by analyzing the infant mortality data from the Shenyang Women and Children Health Care Centre. From 1997 to 2014, 970,583 live births and 6510 infant deaths were registered. Infant mortality rates, percent change, and annual percent change (APC) were calculated. The infant mortality significantly d...

  16. Economic Development, Infant Mortality, and Their Dynamics in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Tadashi Yamada

    1983-01-01

    The main issue of this paper is to study infant mortality in Latin America in recent decades. In so doing, two questions must be answered: First, how large is the economic loss in terms of net national product due to child mortality under the age of 15 and what are the major causes of death? Second, has the decline of infant mortality been principally a product of economic development in Latin American countries?Surprisingly enough, there is significant variation of economic losses across Lat...

  17. Beriberi (thiamine deficiency) and high infant mortality in northern Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barennes, Hubert; Sengkhamyong, Khouanheuan; René, Jean Pascal; Phimmasane, Maniphet

    2015-03-01

    Infantile beriberi (thiamine deficiency) occurs mainly in infants breastfed by mothers with inadequate intake of thiamine, typically among vulnerable populations. We describe possible and probable cases of infantile thiamine deficiency in northern Laos. Three surveys were conducted in Luang Namtha Province. First, we performed a retrospective survey of all infants with a diagnosis of thiamine deficiency admitted to the 5 hospitals in the province (2007-2009). Second, we prospectively recorded all infants with cardiac failure at Luang Namtha Hospital. Third, we further investigated all mothers with infants (1-6 months) living in 22 villages of the thiamine deficiency patients' origin. We performed a cross-sectional survey of all mothers and infants using a pre-tested questionnaire, physical examination and squat test. Infant mortality was estimated by verbal autopsy. From March to June 2010, four suspected infants with thiamine deficiency were admitted to Luang Namtha Provincial hospital. All recovered after parenteral thiamine injection. Between 2007 and 2009, 54 infants with possible/probable thiamine deficiency were diagnosed with acute severe cardiac failure, 49 (90.2%) were cured after parenteral thiamine; three died (5.6%). In the 22 villages, of 468 live born infants, 50 (10.6%, 95% CI: 8.0-13.8) died during the first year. A peak of mortality (36 deaths) was reported between 1 and 3 months. Verbal autopsy suggested that 17 deaths (3.6%) were due to suspected infantile thiamine deficiency. Of 127 mothers, 60 (47.2%) reported edema and paresthesia as well as a positive squat test during pregnancy; 125 (98.4%) respected post-partum food avoidance and all ate polished rice. Of 127 infants, 2 (1.6%) had probable thiamine deficiency, and 8 (6.8%) possible thiamine deficiency. Thiamine deficiency may be a major cause of infant mortality among ethnic groups in northern Laos. Mothers' and children's symptoms are compatible with thiamine deficiency. The severity of

  18. Infant and fetal mortality among a high fertility and mortality population in the Bolivian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurven, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Indigenous populations experience higher rates of poverty, disease and mortality than non-indigenous populations. To gauge current and future risks among Tsimane Amerindians of Bolivia, I assess mortality rates and growth early in life, and changes in risks due to modernization, based on demographic interviews conducted Sept. 2002-July 2005. Tsimane have high fertility (total fertility rate = 9) and infant mortality (13%). Infections are the leading cause of infant death (55%). Infant mortality is greatest among women who are young, monolingual, space births close together, and live far from town. Infant mortality declined during the period 1990-2002, and a higher rate of reported miscarriages occurred during the 1950-1989 period. Infant deaths are more frequent among those born in the wet season. Infant stunting, underweight and wasting are common (34%, 15% and 12%, respectively) and greatest for low-weight mothers and high parity infants. Regression analysis of infant growth shows minimal regional differences in anthropometrics but greater stunting and underweight during the first two years of life. Males are more likely to be underweight, wasted, and spontaneously aborted. Whereas morbidity and stunting are prevalent in infancy, greater food availability later in life has not yet resulted in chronic diseases (e.g. hypertension, atherosclerosis and diabetes) in adulthood due to the relatively traditional Tsimane lifestyle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Community variations in infant and child mortality in Peru.

    OpenAIRE

    Edmonston, B; Andes, N

    1983-01-01

    Data from the national Peru Fertility Survey are used to estimate infant and childhood mortality ratios, 1968--77, for 124 Peruvian communities, ranging from small Indian hamlets in the Andes to larger cities on the Pacific coast. Significant mortality variations are found: mortality is inversely related to community population size and is higher in the mountains than in the jungle or coast. Multivariate analysis is then used to assess the influence of community population size, average femal...

  20. Community variations in infant and child mortality in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonston, B; Andes, N

    1983-06-01

    Data from the national Peru Fertility Survey are used to estimate infant and childhood mortality ratios, 1968--77, for 124 Peruvian communities, ranging from small Indian hamlets in the Andes to larger cities on the Pacific coast. Significant mortality variations are found: mortality is inversely related to community population size and is higher in the mountains than in the jungle or coast. Multivariate analysis is then used to assess the influence of community population size, average female education, medical facilities, and altitude on community mortality. Finally, this study concludes that large-scale sample surveys, which include maternal birth history, add useful data for epidemiological studies of childhood mortality.

  1. Modifiers of the effect of maternal multiple micronutrient supplementation on stillbirth, birth outcomes, and infant mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Emily R; Shankar, Anuraj H; Wu, Lee S-F

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Micronutrient deficiencies are common among women in low-income and middle-income countries. Data from randomised trials suggest that maternal multiple micronutrient supplementation decreases the risk of low birthweight and potentially improves other infant health outcomes. However, h...

  2. Socioeconomic inequality and its determinants regarding infant mortality in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damghanian, Maryam; Shariati, Mohammad; Mirzaiinajmabadi, Khadigeh; Yunesian, Masud; Emamian, Mohammad Hassan

    2014-06-01

    Infant mortality rate is a useful indicator of health conditions in the society, the racial and socioeconomic inequality of which is from the most important measures of social inequality. The aim of this study was to determine the socioeconomic inequality and its determinants regarding infant mortality in an Iranian population. This cross-sectional study was performed on 3794 children born during 2010-2011 in Shahroud, Iran. Based on children's addresses and phone numbers, 3412 were available and finally 3297 participated in the study. A data collection form was filled out through interviewing the mothers as well as using health records. Using principal component analysis, the study population was divided to high and low socioeconomic groups based on the case's home asset, education and job of the household's head, marital status, and composition of the household members. Inequality between the groups with regard to infant mortality was investigated by Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition method. The mortality rate was 15.1 per 1000 live births in the high socioeconomic group and 42.3 per 1000 in the low socioeconomic group. Mother's education, consanguinity of parents, and infant's nutrition type and birth weight constituted 44% of the gap contributing factors. Child's gender, high-risk pregnancy, and living area had no impact on the gap. There was considerable socioeconomic inequality regarding infant mortality in Shahroud. Mother's education was the most contributing factor in this inequality.

  3. Narrowing inequalities in infant mortality in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldani Marcelo Zubaran

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the trends of infant mortality from 1995 to 1999 according to a geographic area-based measure of maternal education in Porto Alegre, Brazil. METHODS: A registry-based study was carried out and a municipal database created in 1994 was used. All live births (n=119,170 and infant deaths (n=1,934 were considered. Five different geographic areas were defined according to quintiles of the percentage of low maternal educational level (<6 years of schooling: high, medium high, medium, medium low, and low. The chi-square test for trend was used to compare rates between years. Incidence rate ratio was calculated using Poisson regression to identify excess infant mortality in poorer areas compared to higher schooling areas. RESULTS: The infant mortality rate (IMR decreased steadily from 18.38 deaths per 1,000 live births in 1995 to 12.21 in 1999 (chi-square for trend p<0.001. Both neonatal and post-neonatal mortality rates decreased although the drop seemed to be steeper for the post-neonatal component. The higher decline was seen in poorer areas. CONCLUSION: Inequalities in IMR seem to have decreased due to a steeper reduction in both neonatal and post-neonatal components of infant mortality in lower maternal schooling area.

  4. HIV, malaria, and infant anemia as risk factors for postneonatal infant mortality among HIV-seropositive women in Kisumu, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, Anna M.; Ayisi, John G.; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Slutsker, Laurence; Shi, Ya Ping; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Otieno, Juliana A.; Kager, Piet A.; Lal, Renu B.; Steketee, Richard W.; Nahlen, Bernard L.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HIV and malaria in sub-Saharan Africa are associated with poor pregnancy outcome and infant survival. We studied the association of placental malaria, infant malaria and anemia, and infant HIV status with postneonatal infant mortality (PNIM) among infants of HIV-seropositive women.

  5. Severe events in the first 6 months of life in a cohort of HIV-unexposed infants from South Africa: effects of low birthweight and breastfeeding status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Tanya; Jackson, Debra; Swanevelder, Sonja; Lombard, Carl; Engebretsen, Ingunn M S; Tylleskär, Thorkild; Goga, Ameena; Ekström, Eva-Charlotte; Sanders, David

    2014-10-01

    To report on risk factors for severe events (hospitalisation or infant death) within the first half of infancy amongst HIV-unexposed infants in South Africa. South African data from the multisite community-based cluster-randomised trial PROMISE EBF promoting exclusive breastfeeding in three sub-Saharan countries from 2006 to 2008 were used. The South African sites were Paarl in the Western Cape Province, and Umlazi and Rietvlei in KwaZulu-Natal. This analysis included 964 HIV-negative mother-infant pairs. Data on severe events and infant feeding practices were collected at 3, 6, 12 and 24 weeks post-partum. We used a stratified extended Cox model to examine the association between the time to the severe event and covariates including birthweight, with breastfeeding status as a time-dependent covariate. Seventy infants (7%) experienced a severe event. The median age at first hospitalisation was 8 weeks, and the two main reasons for hospitalisation were cough and difficult breathing followed by diarrhoea. Stopping breastfeeding before 6 months (HR 2.4; 95% CI 1.2-5.1) and low birthweight (HR 2.4; 95% CI 1.3-4.3) were found to increase the risk of a severe event, whilst maternal completion of high school education was protective (HR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-0.7). A strengthened primary healthcare system incorporating promotion of breastfeeding and appropriate caring practices for low birthweight infants (such as kangaroo mother care) are critical. Given the leading reasons for hospitalisation, early administration of oral rehydration therapy and treatment of suspected pneumonia are key interventions needed to prevent hospitalisation in young infants. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Variation in term birthweight across European countries affects the prevalence of small for gestational age among very preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeitlin, Jennifer; Bonamy, Anna Karin Edstedt; Piedvache, Aurelie; Cuttini, Marina; Barros, Henrique; Van Reempts, Patrick; Mazela, Jan; Jarreau, Pierre Henri; Gortner, Ludwig; Draper, Elizabeth S.; Maier, Rolf F.; Martens, E.; Martens, Guy; Boerch, Klaus; Hasselager, Asbjoern; Huusom, Lene; Pryds, Ole; Weber, Tom; Toome, Liis; Varendi, Heili; Ancel, Pierre Yves; Blondel, Beatrice; Burguet, Antoine; Truffert, P.; Misselwitz, Bjoern; Schmidt, S.; Baronciani, Dante; Gargano, G.; Agostino, Rocco; DiLallo, D.; Franco, Francesco; Carnielli, Virgilio; Koopman-Esseboom, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/14117739X; van Heijst, A.; Nijman, J.; Gadzinowski, Janusz; Graça, Luis M.; Ceu Machado, Maria; Carrapato, M. R.G.; Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Teresa; Norman, Mikael; Wilson, E.; Boyle, Elaine M.; Manktelow, B. N.; Fenton, A. C.; Milligan, David W A; Marques-Bonet, T.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study assessed the prevalence of small for gestational age (SGA) among very preterm (VPT) infants using national and European intrauterine references. Methods: We generated country-specific and common European intrauterine growth references for 11 European countries, according to Gardosi's

  7. Plasma total homocysteine increases from day 20 to 40 in breastfed but not formula-fed low-birthweight infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, M R; Woltil, H A; van Beusekom, C M; Schaafsma, A; Dijck-Brouwer, D A J; Muskiet, F A J

    2002-01-01

    Homocysteine is an intermediate in the folate cycle and methionine metabolism. This study investigated whether formula-fed infants have different plasma total homocysteine to their breastfed counterparts, and during what period any difference developed. Plasma total homocysteine was determined in 53

  8. Temperature extremes and infant mortality in Bangladesh: Hotter months, lower mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babalola, Olufemi; Razzaque, Abdur; Bishai, David

    2018-01-01

    Our study aims to obtain estimates of the size effects of temperature extremes on infant mortality in Bangladesh using monthly time series data. Data on temperature, child and infant mortality were obtained for Matlab district of rural Bangladesh for January 1982 to December 2008 encompassing 49,426 infant deaths. To investigate the relationship between mortality and temperature, we adopted a regression with Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) errors model of seasonally adjusted temperature and mortality data. The relationship between monthly mean and maximum temperature on infant mortality was tested at 0 and 1 month lags respectively. Furthermore, our analysis was stratified to determine if the results differed by gender (boys versus girls) and by age (neonates (≤ 30 days) versus post neonates (>30days and Bangladesh. Each degree Celsius increase in mean monthly temperature reduced monthly mortality by 3.672 (SE 1.544, pBangladesh. This may reflect a more heightened sensitivity of infants to hypothermia than hyperthermia in this environment.

  9. Case-control study on infant mortality in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendes Karina Giane

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors associated with infant mortality and, more specifically, with neonatal mortality. METHODS: A case-control study was carried out in the municipality of Caxias do Sul, Southern Brazil. Characteristics of prenatal care and causes of mortality were assessed for all live births in the 2001-2002 period with a completed live-birth certificate and whose mothers lived in the municipality. Cases were defined as all deaths within the first year of life. As controls, there were selected the two children born immediately after each case in the same hospital, who were of the same sex, and did not die within their first year of life. Multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: There was a reduction in infant mortality, the greatest reduction was observed in the post-neonatal period. The variables gestational age (<36 weeks, birth weight (<2,500 g, and 5-minute Apgar (<6 remained in the final model of the multivariate analysis, after adjustment. CONCLUSIONS: Perinatal conditions comprise almost the totality of neonatal deaths, and the majority of deaths occur at delivery. The challenge for reducing infant mortality rate in the city is to reduce the mortality by perinatal conditions in the neonatal period.

  10. INFANT MORTALITY IN THE SOUTHERN URALS IN THE 1930 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravilya Rakhimyanovna Khisamutdinova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this paper is to study infant mortality in the southern Urals in the 1930 years and the establishment of its causes. The relevance of the researched problem is connected with difficulties of solving demographic problems in the country and the policy of the state to protect motherhood and childhood. Methodology. Basis of research is historical and comparative and historical and systematic methods and critical analysis. Results. Infant mortality is the most significant symptom of demographic decline among the population. This period has been one of the most difficult in the history of our nation, as it was accompanied by major economic, social and political processes that influenced the decline of natural increase among the population. Based on the analysis of Central and local archives, statistical information of mortality of the 1930 years in the region, the authors made the weather dynamics of the number of deaths among children under 1 year and came to the conclusion that the causes of high mortality in the early 1930 years were not only the political processes in society, and especially the famine of 1932–1933 years. The authors have proved that the population of the southern Urals in the 1930 years the mortality rate of children under 1 year was high, not only in relation to the population of the region but for the country as a whole. The number of child deaths in the region was the leader Chelyabinsk region, especially among the urban population. This was due to the high level of population, the predominance of urban population over the rural, the needs of industrialization, that is heavy physical labour of women, weak health care system. By the middle of the period under review, despite the measures taken by the state for the support of motherhood and childhood, the infant mortality rate in the southern Urals remains at a high level, increasing the number of illegal abortions, infectious diseases in the summer

  11. Effect Of Determinants Of Infant And Child Mortality In Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    regression and reported that father's education and occupation of father, mother standard of living index, breastfeeding status, birth order have impact on child mortality. Zerai [10] examined socio-economic and demographic variables in a multi-level framework to determine conditions influencing infant survival in Zimbabwe.

  12. Alcohol drinking pattern during pregnancy and risk of infant mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Grønboek, Morten; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2009-01-01

    The safety of small amounts of alcohol drinking and occasional binge-level drinking during pregnancy remains unsettled. We examined the association of maternal average alcohol intake and binge drinking (>or=5 drinks per sitting) with infant mortality, both in the neonatal and postneonatal period....

  13. Health status of hostel dwellers: Part II. Infant mortality and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here a high infant mortality rate is examined against a low prevalence of diabetes, hypertension and syphilis and some of the effects of migrant labour on the health status of migrant hostel dwellers are identified. The low prevalence of disease among the Cape Town hostel residents suggests that migrant labour, by sifting ...

  14. Cautionary tales from the neonatal intensive care unit: diapers may mislead urinary output estimation in extremely low birthweight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amey, Mark; Butchard, Natalie; Hanson, Lynne; Kinross, Denise; Mannion, Marie; Parsons, Justine; Wright, Ian M R

    2008-01-01

    To examine the validity of the weighing of modern polyacrylate diapers to determine urine output in the extremely low birth weight infant nursed in a humidified incubator. Observational study with repeated measures using high-absorbency cellulose/polyacrylate diapers and a humidified incubator in a modeled clinical scenario. A tertiary referral neonatal intensive care unit. Six dry diapers were placed into eight levels of humidity, between 55% and 90% inclusive, in an incubator set at 37 degrees C. Hourly weight increments were recorded. The study was repeated with 5 mL of normal saline added to the diaper to mimic prior urine output. Results were compared by Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric analysis of variance. Dry diapers increased in weight for each humidity level after 1 hr (p diaper weight changes depended on environmental relative humidity. At > or = 80% humidity, the diapers continued to gain weight; at 70% or 75% humidity, they did not change weight; and at diapers lost weight. Maximal evaporative loss was median 1.11 g (range, 0.8-1.24 g) at 6 hrs in 55% relative humidity. The use of diaper weighing in high-humidity infant environments may not be an accurate measure of actual urine output in the extremely low birth weight infant. This study demonstrates the need for caution when interpreting this measure, and we discuss some possible clinical approaches to ameliorate this difficulty.

  15. Beriberi (thiamine deficiency and high infant mortality in northern Laos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Barennes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Infantile beriberi (thiamine deficiency occurs mainly in infants breastfed by mothers with inadequate intake of thiamine, typically among vulnerable populations. We describe possible and probable cases of infantile thiamine deficiency in northern Laos.Three surveys were conducted in Luang Namtha Province. First, we performed a retrospective survey of all infants with a diagnosis of thiamine deficiency admitted to the 5 hospitals in the province (2007-2009. Second, we prospectively recorded all infants with cardiac failure at Luang Namtha Hospital. Third, we further investigated all mothers with infants (1-6 months living in 22 villages of the thiamine deficiency patients' origin. We performed a cross-sectional survey of all mothers and infants using a pre-tested questionnaire, physical examination and squat test. Infant mortality was estimated by verbal autopsy. From March to June 2010, four suspected infants with thiamine deficiency were admitted to Luang Namtha Provincial hospital. All recovered after parenteral thiamine injection. Between 2007 and 2009, 54 infants with possible/probable thiamine deficiency were diagnosed with acute severe cardiac failure, 49 (90.2% were cured after parenteral thiamine; three died (5.6%. In the 22 villages, of 468 live born infants, 50 (10.6%, 95% CI: 8.0-13.8 died during the first year. A peak of mortality (36 deaths was reported between 1 and 3 months. Verbal autopsy suggested that 17 deaths (3.6% were due to suspected infantile thiamine deficiency. Of 127 mothers, 60 (47.2% reported edema and paresthesia as well as a positive squat test during pregnancy; 125 (98.4% respected post-partum food avoidance and all ate polished rice. Of 127 infants, 2 (1.6% had probable thiamine deficiency, and 8 (6.8% possible thiamine deficiency.Thiamine deficiency may be a major cause of infant mortality among ethnic groups in northern Laos. Mothers' and children's symptoms are compatible with thiamine deficiency. The severity

  16. Understanding Racial and Ethnic Disparities in U.S. Infant Mortality Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mortality rates for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), congenital malformations, and unintentional injuries were also substantially higher for ... infant mortality rate. SIDS accounted for 6 percent, congenital malformations 5 percent, and unintentional injuries 4 percent of ...

  17. Socioeconomic inequalities and infant mortality of 46,470 preterm infants born in Sweden between 1992 and 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calling, Susanna; Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2011-07-01

    Studies on possible sociodemographic inequities in the survival of preterm infants are scarce. Individual and neighbourhood sociodemographic factors are related to preterm birth and to infant mortality in full-term infants. The aim here was to examine whether infant mortality in Swedish preterm infants is related to individual and neighbourhood sociodemographic factors, and to study whether the hypothesised association between neighbourhood deprivation and infant mortality persists after accounting for individual sociodemographic factors. The study included 46,470 infants with a gestational length of Sweden between 1992 and 2006. Neighbourhood deprivation was assessed by an index (education, income, unemployment, welfare assistance) in small geographical units, and categorised into low, moderate and high deprivation. Adjusted odds ratios for infant mortality were examined in relation to individual and neighbourhood sociodemographic factors. After adjusting for maternal age, infant mortality was associated with the following sociodemographic variables: maternal non-married/non-cohabiting status, low family income, low maternal education and rural status. After full adjustment, the odds ratio [95% confidence interval] was 2.98 [2.42, 3.67] for low family income compared with high family income. An increase in infant mortality was also associated with high neighbourhood deprivation; however, this increased risk no longer remained statistically significant after adjusting for individual sociodemographic factors. In conclusion, this study showed an increased infant mortality in preterm infants born to women with a less favourable sociodemographic profile. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Assessment of infant mortality surveillance: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conceição Maria de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: assess the implementation of child mortality surveillance in Recife/PE. Methods: an analytical evaluative study was conducted on its implementation. It was a single-case study that correlated degree of implementation with the of the result indicators surveillance. A logic model on this strategy and a matrix of indicators and judgments according to model components were drawn up. The degree of implementation was obtained from structure and process indicators and this was then correlated with result indicators, in a deductive approach based on intervention theory. Results: the structure approach presented superior results to the process in all evaluated components. This strategy was considered to have been partially implemented (75. 7%, however, the components of 'identification of deaths' (85.7%, 'epidemiological research' (88.1% and 'referral of proposals for promotion and health care and correction of official statistics' (95.8% were classified implemented. Regarding the relation of the degree of implantation of the surveillance and its results with the logical model, only one of the 17 indicators was considered inconsistent. Conclusions: this strategy was considered to have been partially implemented. The model of child mortality surveillance and its assessment were shown to be adequate for signaling the consistency of the interrelations between the activities proposed and the effects expected, and would be reproducible within other scenarios.

  19. Infant mortality and mothers' religious involvement in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula de Andrade Verona

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The growth of Protestantism in Brazil has been associated with changes in mortality and health-related outcomes. Recent research has suggested that affiliation with Protestant churches may positively influence their members' well being by: 1 providing moral directives, 2 creating formal or informal sanctions, and 3 promoting social networks and support. This article uses data from the 1996 and 2006 Brazilian Demographic Health Surveys (DHS and Cox's proportional hazard models to examine the relationship between infant mortality and mothers' religious involvement. Unadjusted results show that differences in the hazard ratios of infant mortality by mothers' religious involvement are considerable and statistically significant. When one controls demographic and socioeconomic variables in the 1996 DHS, the baseline relationship disappears, supporting the hypothesis of selectivity. Results using the 2006 DHS are somewhat different and suggest that the association between religious involvement and infant mortality was stronger in Brazil in 2006 than in 1996. This research should encourage future studies on religious involvement and health-related outcomes in Brazil. This topic deserves further consideration from Brazilian demographers not simply because this country has undergone enormous changes in its religious landscape over recent decades, but also because religion can affect believers' lifestyles and behaviors, and this can indirectly influence their health and well-being.

  20. Thymus development and infant and child mortality in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sophie E; Fulford, Anthony J C; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Persson, Lars Å; Arifeen, Shams E; Prentice, Andrew M

    2014-02-01

    Data from West Africa indicate that a small thymus at birth and at 6 months of age is a strong and independent risk factor for infection-related mortality up to 24 and 36 months of age, respectively. We investigated the association between thymus size (thymic index, TI) in infancy and subsequent infant and child survival in a contemporary South Asian population. The study focused on the follow-up of a randomized trial of prenatal nutritional interventions in rural Bangladesh (ISRCTN16581394), with TI measured longitudinally in infancy (at birth and weeks 8, 24 and 52 of age) and accurate recording of mortality up to 5 years of age. A total of 3267 infants were born into the Maternal and Infant Nutrition Interventions, Matlab study; data on TI were available for 1168 infants at birth, increasing to 2094 infants by 52 weeks of age. TI in relation to body size was largest at birth, decreasing through infancy. For infants with at least one measure of TI available, there were a total of 99 deaths up to the age of 5 years. No association was observed between TI and subsequent mortality when TI was measured at birth. However, an association with mortality was observed with TI at 8 weeks of age [odds ratio (OR) for change in mortality risk associated with 1 standard deviation change in TI: all deaths: OR = 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41, 0.98; P = 0.038; and infection-related deaths only: OR = 0.32, 95% CI 0.14, 0.74; P = 0.008]. For TI when measured at 24 and 52 weeks of age, the numbers of infection-related deaths were too few (3 and 1, respectively) for any meaningful association to be observed. These results confirm that thymus size in early infancy predicts subsequent survival in a lower mortality setting than West Africa. The absence of an effect at birth and its appearance at 8 weeks of age suggests early postnatal influences such as breast milk trophic factors.

  1. Undoing Racism Through Genesee County's REACH Infant Mortality Reduction Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Daniel J; Carty, Denise C; Turbeville, Ashley R; French-Turner, Tonya M; Brownlee, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Genesee County Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health Program (REACH) is a Community-Based Public Health partnership for reducing African American infant mortality rates that hosts the Undoing Racism Workshop (URW). Assess the URW's effectiveness in promoting an understanding of racism, institutional racism, and how issues related to race/ethnicity can affect maternal and infant health. Recent URW participants (n=84) completed brief preassessment and postassessment forms; participants (n=101) also completed an on-line, long-term assessment (LTA). URWs promoted understanding of racism and institutional racism, although they were less effective in addressing racism as related to maternal and infant health. The URWs were most effective in the domains related to their standard content. Additional effort is necessary to customize URWs when utilized for activities beyond their original purpose of community mobilization.

  2. Preterm low birthweight and the role of oral bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Shira Davenport

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Preterm and low birthweight (PTLBW continues to be a major cause of mortality and morbidity across the world. In recent years, maternal periodontal disease has been implicated as a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes. There is conflicting evidence to support such an outcome as illustrated by descriptive, case control and randomised controlled trials involving pregnant women from across the world, using different measurement tools to determine the level of periodontal disease. Whilst considering the literature, there is evidence for both arguments, based on the effect of periodontal inflammatory by products. Bacteria associated with periodontal disease are not dissimilar to those known to be associated with genito-urinary bacterial infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Several groups have demonstrated the apparent translocation of Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonus gingivalis, Treponema denticola to the foetal placental unit whereby a maternal or foetal response has been detected resulting in premature birth or low birthweight. The normal process of parturition involves a cascade of events including a build-up of inflammatory mediators as linked to inflammation, whereby the maternal environment becomes hostile and threatens the well-being of the infant, and the foetus expelled. The question remains therefore, is there a greater risk of delivering a PTLBW infant when the mother has detectable periodontal disease, or is the release of inflammatory mediators and their translocation via the haematogenous route sufficient to induce a poor pregnancy outcome? The data investigated would suggest that there is a positive outcome when certain oral gram-negative bacteria create a cumulative effect sufficient to trigger early delivery, which represents the final straw to result in preterm or low birthweight delivery. There is equally sufficient epidemiological evidence that does not support this

  3. Infant Mortality in Germany in the 19th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Gehrmann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Developments in infant mortality in Germany have previously only been documented in a fragmentary fashion for the 19th century as a whole, and only on a small scale for the period prior to 1871. For the first time, this paper lays a solid statistical foundation by reprocessing the figures assembled by the German states of that time. The reconstructed national statistical series (from 1826 onwards reveals a comparatively high infant mortality, with minor deviations until the turn of the 20th century. The impact of urbanisation and industrialisation is not denied, but an evaluation of the different regional patterns and trends leads to a new weighting. The living and working conditions in the countryside were thus highly determining. The relationship between fertility and infant mortality is assessed differently for the era of the sustained reduction in fertility than for the preceding period. All in all, the prevalent customs and attitudes are regarded as being vital to infants’ survival chances. We therefore need to look at attitudes among the educated public and the authorities. Efforts on the part of these groups to bring about change were particularly observed in the South West, where an awareness of the dramatic problem arose comparatively early. Further historic research at the regional level will be needed in order to achieve a final evaluation of these processes.

  4. The Differential Mortality of Undesired Infants in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatø, Martin

    2018-02-01

    With high rates of infant mortality in sub-Saharan Africa, investments in infant health are subject to tough prioritizations within the household, in which maternal preferences may play a part. How these preferences will affect infant mortality as African women have ever-lower fertility is still uncertain, as increased female empowerment and increased difficulty in achieving a desired gender composition within a smaller family pull in potentially different directions. I study how being born at a parity or of a gender undesired by the mother relates to infant mortality in sub-Saharan Africa and how such differential mortality varies between women at different stages of the demographic transition. Using data from 79 Demographic and Health Surveys, I find that a child being undesired according to the mother is associated with a differential mortality that is not due to constant maternal factors, family composition, or factors that are correlated with maternal preferences and vary continuously across siblings. As a share of overall infant mortality, the excess mortality of undesired children amounts to 3.3 % of male and 4 % of female infant mortality. Undesiredness can explain a larger share of infant mortality among mothers with lower fertility desires and a larger share of female than male infant mortality for children of women who desire 1-3 children. Undesired gender composition is more important for infant mortality than undesired childbearing and may also lead couples to increase family size beyond the maternal desire, in which case infants of the surplus gender are particularly vulnerable.

  5. Prevalência do aleitamento materno em recém-nascidos de baixo peso Prevalence of breast feeding of low birthweight infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César C. Xavier

    1991-10-01

    had started it was of 4 months. An association was found between the level of literacy of the mothers and the duration of breast feeding. Birthweight was found to be associated with the incidence and duration of breast feeding in general, as well as with the incidence of exclusive breast feeding. These data are considerably lower than recent figures obtained from the populations of well-developed countries, especially than those of Finnish infants born with a weight of less than 1.500 g. Action programmes involving the community and/or the Institution must be implemented in order to improve these figures.

  6. Geographical disparities of infant mortality in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanping; Zhu, Jun; He, Chunhua; Li, Xiaohong; Miao, Lei; Liang, Juan

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the trends and causes of regional disparities of infant mortality rate (IMR) in rural China from 1996 to 2008. A population-based, longitudinal study. The national child mortality surveillance network. Population of the 79 surveillance counties. IMR, leading causes of infant death and the RR of IMR. The IMR in coastal, inland and remote regions declined by 72.4%, 62.9% and 58.2%, respectively, from 1996 to 2008. Compared with the coastal region, the RR of IMR were 1.7 (95% CI 1.6 to 1.9), 1.9 (95% CI 1.7 to 2.0) and 1.8 (95% CI 1.6 to 2.0) for inland region and 2.6 (95% CI 2.4 to 2.7), 3.2 (95% CI 3.0 to 3.5) and 3.1 (95% CI 2.7 to 3.4) for the remote region during 1996-2000, 2001-2005 and 2006-2008, respectively. The regional disparities existed for both male and female IMRs. The postneonatal mortality showed the highest regional disparities. Pneumonia, birth asphyxia, prematurity/low birth weight, injuries and diarrhoea were the main contributors to the regional disparities. There were significantly more infants who did not seek healthcare services before death in the remote region relative to the inland and coastal regions. The results indicated persistent existence of regional disparities in IMR in rural China. It is worth noting that regional disparities in IMR increased in the remote and coastal regions during 2001-2005 in rural China. These disparities remained unchanged during 2006-2008. The results indicate that strategies to reduce mortality caused by pneumonia, birth asphyxia and diarrhoea are keys to reducing IMR.

  7. Determinants of infant and child mortality in Zimbabwe: Results of multivariate hazard analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Kembo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses important issues in infant and child mortality in Zimbabwe. The objective of the paper is to determine the impact of maternal, socioeconomic and sanitation variables on infant and child mortality. Results show that births of order 6+ with a short preceding interval had the highest risk of infant mortality. The infant mortality risk associated with multiple births was 2.08 times higher relative to singleton births (p<0.001. Socioeconomic variables did not have a distinct impact on infant mortality. Determinants of child mortality were different in relative importance from those of infant mortality. This study supports health policy initiatives to stimulate use of family planning methods to increase birth spacing. These and other results are expected to assist policy makers and programme managers in the child health sector to formulate appropriate strategies to improve the situation of children under 5 in Zimbabwe.

  8. [Association between types of need, human development index, and infant mortality in Mexico, 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Gómez, Oswaldo Sinoe; López-Arellano, Oliva

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between different types of economic and social deprivation and infant mortality rates reported in 2008 in Mexico. We conducted an ecological study analyzing the correlation and relative risk between the human development index and levels of social and economic differences in State and national infant mortality rates. There was a strong correlation between higher human development and lower infant mortality. Low schooling and poor housing and crowding were associated with higher infant mortality. Although infant mortality has declined dramatically in Mexico over the last 28 years, the decrease has not been homogeneous, and there are persistent inequalities that determine mortality rates in relation to different poverty levels. Programs with a multidisciplinary approach are needed to decrease infant mortality rates through comprehensive individual and family development.

  9. Low birthweight and prematurity in relation to paternal factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basso, Olga; Olsen, Jørn; Christensen, Kaare

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The importance of paternal determinants in the occurrence of low birthweight and prematurity is not well known. We investigated these outcomes in siblings and paternal half siblings as a function of changes in putative external determinants between two births in fathers who had...... experienced the birth of a premature and/or low birthweight (PTB/LBW) infant. METHODS: All fathers who, between 1980 and 1992, had an infant born before 37 completed weeks' gestation or weighing

  10. Birthweight percentiles by gestational age for births following assisted reproductive technology in Australia and New Zealand, 2002-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuoyang; Wang, Yueping A; Ledger, William; Sullivan, Elizabeth A

    2014-08-01

    What is the standard of birthweight for gestational age for babies following assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment? Birthweight for gestational age percentile charts were developed for singleton births following ART treatment using population-based data. Small for gestational age (SGA) and large for gestational age (LGA) births are at increased risks of perinatal morbidity and mortality. A birthweight percentile chart allows the detection of neonates at high risk, and can help inform the need for special care if required. This population study used data from the Australian and New Zealand Assisted Reproduction Database (ANZARD) for 72 694 live born singletons following ART treatment between January 2002 and December 2010 in Australia and New Zealand. A total of 69 315 births (35 580 males and 33 735 females) following ART treatment were analysed for the birthweight percentile. Exact percentiles of birthweight in grams were calculated for each gestational week between Week 25 and 42 for fresh and thaw cycles by infant sex. Univariate analysis was used to determine the exact birthweight percentile values. Student t-test was used to examine the mean birthweight difference between male and female infants, between single embryo transfer (SET) and double embryo transfer (DET) and between fresh and thaw cycles. Preterm births (birth before 37 completed weeks of gestation) and low birthweight (fetal growth standards but only the weight of live born infants at birth. The comparison of birthweight percentile charts for ART births and general population births provide evidence that the proportion of SGA births following ART treatment was comparable to the general population for SET fresh cycles and significantly lower for thaw cycles. Both fresh and thaw cycles showed better outcomes for singleton births following SET compared with DET. Policies to promote single embryo transfer should be considered in order to minimize the adverse perinatal outcomes associated

  11. Effects of employment and education on preterm and full-term infant mortality in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Y-J; Shin, S-H; Park, S M; Kim, H-S; Lee, J-Y; Kim, K H; Cho, B

    2014-03-01

    The infant mortality rate is a sensitive and commonly used indicator of the socio-economic status of a population. Generally, studies investigating the relationship between infant mortality and socio-economic status have focused on full-term infants in Western populations. This study examined the effects of education level and employment status on full-term and preterm infant mortality in Korea. Data were collected from the National Birth Registration Database and merged with data from the National Death Certification Database. Prospective cohort study. In total, 1,316,184 singleton births registered in Korea's National Birth Registration Database between January 2004 and December 2006 were included in the study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Paternal and maternal education levels were inversely related to infant mortality in preterm and full-term infants following multivariate adjusted logistic models. Parental employment status was not associated with infant mortality in full-term infants, but was associated with infant mortality in preterm infants, after adjusting for place of birth, gender, marital status, paternal age, maternal age and parity. Low paternal and maternal education levels were found to be associated with infant mortality in both full-term and preterm infants. Low parental employment status was found to be associated with infant mortality in preterm infants but not in full-term infants. In order to reduce inequalities in infant mortality, public health interventions should focus on providing equal access to education. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Changes in infant mortality among extremely preterm infants: US vital statistics data 1990 vs 2000 vs 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, M H

    2015-10-01

    Infant mortality among extremely preterm infants (22 to 28 weeks gestation) varies considerably by gestational age. The reduction in mortality over a 20-year period, when examined in gestational age week increments, may give a more precise estimate of progress or lack thereof in caring for these infants and provide information to better inform practitioners and parents of the risk of mortality among these small infants. The objective of this analysis is to examine infant mortality (birth to 365 days) by week of gestation for infants 22 to 28 weeks gestation comparing mortality rates, adjusting for maternal and infant birth characteristics, among US births for the years 1990, 2000 and 2010. US vital statistics period-linked birth and infant death certificate files for the years 1990, 2000 and 2010 were used. Maternal and infant characteristics for births at 22 to 28 weeks were abstracted from the files. A trimming procedure was used to remove records that had birth weights that exceeded the interquartile range of birth weights for a given week of gestational age. Infant mortality rates were calculated, and adjusted odds ratios for mortality were generated using logistic regression models. A total of 15,593 live births, 22 to 28 weeks gestation were available for the year 1990; 17,095 for the year 2000; and 14,721 for the year 2010. Infant mortality rates ranged from 904 per 1000 live births at 22 weeks gestation in 1990, to 835 in 2000, to 866 in 2010. Across all gestational age groups there was an adjusted reduction in the odds ratio for mortality of ~50% from 1990 to the year 2000. However, between 2000 and 2010 there was no significant reduction in infant mortality except at 25 weeks gestation (adjusted odds ratio=0.81, 95% confidence interval=0.70, 0.93). Despite a significant reduction in infant mortality among extremely preterm infants between the years 1990 and 2000, there has been little progress in reducing mortality between the years 2000 and 2010.

  13. The effect of birthweight on childhood cognitive development in a middle-income country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torche, Florencia; Echevarría, Ghislaine

    2011-08-01

    Intra-uterine growth is a powerful predictor of infant mortality and of health, developmental and socioeconomic outcomes in adulthood. The question about whether this relationship is causal rather than driven by unobserved characteristics of low-weight infants is, however, still open. We use twin models to examine the hypothesis that in utero growth has a detrimental impact on cognitive development in childhood. We merge birth registry information on birthweight with standardized Math and Spanish test scores for all fourth graders in Chile to create a prospective data set. Twin fixed-effects models are used to estimate the causal effect of intra-uterine growth on test scores. Fixed-effect estimates are compared with traditional regression results in a cross-section of births to gauge the omitted variable bias emerging from unobserved genetic, maternal and pregnancy-related factors in cross-sectional models. Birthweight differences within twin pairs have a substantial effect on test scores. A 400-g increase in birthweight results in a 15% standard deviation increase in Math scores. The effect is larger among (estimated) monozygotic than dizygotic pairs, reaching >20% standard deviation. The effect varies across family socioeconomic status. It is strong among disadvantaged families but it nearly disappears among advantaged ones. Scarcity of uterine resources resulting in intra-uterine growth restriction has a detrimental effect on cognitive development in childhood. This effect interacts with family socioeconomic status (SES), so that low-SES families reinforce the effect of low birthweight and high-SES families fully compensate for it. Findings are particularly relevant in the developing world, where intra-uterine growth restriction is the main determinant of low birthweight.

  14. Infant mortality: a call to action overcoming health disparities in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison A. Vanderbilt

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Among all of the industrialized countries, the United States has the highest infant mortality rate. Racial and ethnic disparities continue to plague the United States with a disproportionally high rate of infant death. Furthermore, racial disparities among infant and neonatal mortality rates remain a chronic health problem in the United States. These risks are based on the geographical variations in mortality and disparities among differences in maternal risk characteristics, low birth weights, and lack of access to health care.

  15. [Eugenic abortion could explain the lower infant mortality in Cuba compared to that in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso S, Enrique; Carvajal C, Jorge A

    2012-08-01

    Cuba and Chile have the lower infant mortality rates of Latin America. Infant mortality rate in Cuba is similar to that of developed countries. Chilean infant mortality rate is slightly higher than that of Cuba. To investigate if the lower infant mortality rate in Cuba, compared to Chile, could be explained by eugenic abortion, considering that abortion is legal in Cuba but not in Chile. We compared total and congenital abnormalities related infant mortality in Cuba and Chile during 2008, based on vital statistics of both countries. In 2008, infant mortality rates in Chile were significantly higher than those of Cuba (7.8 vs. 4.7 per 1,000 live born respectively, odds ratio (OR) 1.67; 95% confidence intervals (Cl) 1.52-1.83). Congenital abnormalities accounted for 33.8 and 19.2% of infant deaths in Chile and Cuba, respectively. Discarding infant deaths related to congenital abnormalities, infant mortality rate continued to be higher in Chile than in Cuba (5.19 vs. 3.82 per 1000 live born respectively, OR 1.36; 95%CI 1.221.52). Considering that antenatal diagnosis is widely available in both countries, but abortion is legal in Cuba but not in Chile, we conclude that eugenic abortion may partially explain the lower infant mortality rate observed in Cuba compared to that observed in Chile.

  16. Gender imbalance in infant mortality: a cross-national study of social structure and female infanticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Kana; Crenshaw, Edward M

    2006-01-01

    Sex differentials in infant mortality vary widely across nations. Because newborn girls are biologically advantaged in surviving to their first birthday, sex differentials in infant mortality typically arise from genetic factors that result in higher male infant mortality rates. Nonetheless, there are cases where mortality differentials arise from social or behavioral factors reflecting deliberate discrimination by adults in favor of boys over girls, resulting in atypical male to female infant mortality ratios. This cross-national study of 93 developed and developing countries uses such macro-social theories as modernization theory, gender perspectives, human ecology, and sociobiology/evolutionary psychology to predict gender differentials in infant mortality. We find strong evidence for modernization theory, human ecology, and the evolutionary psychology of group process, but mixed evidence for gender perspectives.

  17. Rate and Time Trend of Perinatal, Infant, Maternal Mortality, Natality and Natural Population Growth in Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Gashi, Sanije; Berisha, Majlinda; Kolgeci, Selim; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work has been the presentation of the rate and time trends of some indicators of the heath condition of mothers and children in Kosovo: fetal mortality, early neonatal mortality, perinatal mortality, infant mortality, natality, natural growth of population etc. The treated patients were the newborn and infants in the post neonatal period, women during their pregnancy and those 42 days before and after the delivery. Methods: The data were taken from: register of the patients tr...

  18. Vitamin A supplementation and BCG vaccination at birth in low birthweight neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Fisker, Ane Baerent; Napirna, Bitiguida Mutna

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of vitamin A supplementation and BCG vaccination at birth in low birthweight neonates. DESIGN: Randomised, placebo controlled, two by two factorial trial. SETTING: Bissau, Guinea-Bissau. PARTICIPANTS: 1717 low birthweight neonates born at the national hospital...... months of age for infants who received vitamin A supplementation compared with those who received placebo. RESULTS: No interaction was observed between vitamin A supplementation and BCG vaccine allocation (P=0.73). Vitamin A supplementation at birth was not significantly associated with mortality......: the MRR of vitamin A supplementation compared with placebo, controlled for randomisation to "early BCG" versus "no early BCG" was 1.08 (95% CI 0.79 to 1.47). Stratification by sex revealed a significant interaction between vitamin A supplementation and sex (P=0.046), the MRR of vitamin A supplementation...

  19. Different extent in decline of infant mortality by region and cause in Shenyang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Hong; Wu, Qi-Jun; Li, Li-Li; Li, Da; Li, Jing; Zhou, Chen; Wu, Lang; Zhu, Jingjing; Gong, Ting-Ting

    2016-04-14

    To compare the pattern of cause of death of infant mortality rates by urban/rural areas as well as to generate knowledge for potential strategies to decrease this mortality, we carried out a study by analyzing the infant mortality data from the Shenyang Women and Children Health Care Centre. From 1997 to 2014, 970,583 live births and 6510 infant deaths were registered. Infant mortality rates, percent change, and annual percent change (APC) were calculated. The infant mortality significantly decreased by 5.92%, 7.41%, and 3.92% per year in overall, urban, and rural areas, respectively. Among the categories of causes of infant death, congenital anomalies (APC = -7.87%), asphyxia-related conditions (APC = -9.43), immaturity-related conditions (APC = -3.44%), diseases of the nervous system and sense organs (APC = -6.01%), and diseases of the respiratory system (APC = -6.29%) decreased significantly in the observational periods. Additionally, among selective causes of infant death, pneumonia, congenital heart disease, neural tube defects, preterm birth and low birth weight, birth asphyxia, and intracranial hemorrhage of the newborn significantly decreased by 5.45%, 5.45%, 16.47%, 2.18%, 10.95%, and 10.33% per year, respectively. In conclusion, infant mortality has been continuously decreased in Shenyang from 1997 to 2014, although further efforts are still needed to decrease the infant mortality in rural areas.

  20. Social inequality in infant mortality: what explains variation across low and middle income countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh, Mohammad; Nandi, Arijit; Heymann, Jody

    2014-01-01

    Growing work demonstrates social gradients in infant mortality within countries. However, few studies have compared the magnitude of these inequalities cross-nationally. Even fewer have assessed the determinants of social inequalities in infant mortality across countries. This study provides a comprehensive and comparative analysis of social inequalities in infant mortality in 53 low-and-middle-income countries (LMICs). We used the most recent nationally representative household samples (n = 874,207) collected through the Demographic Health Surveys (DHS) to calculate rates of infant mortality. The relative and absolute concentration indices were used to quantify social inequalities in infant mortality. Additionally, we used meta-regression analyses to examine whether levels of inequality in proximate determinants of infant mortality were associated with social inequalities in infant mortality across countries. Estimates of both the relative and the absolute concentration indices showed a substantial variation in social inequalities in infant mortality among LMICs. Meta-regression analyses showed that, across countries, the relative concentration of teenage pregnancy among poorer households was positively associated with the relative concentration of infant mortality among these groups (beta = 0.333, 95% CI = 0.115 0.551). Our results demonstrate that the concentration of infant deaths among socioeconomically disadvantaged households in the majority of LMICs remains an important health and social policy concern. The findings suggest that policies designed to reduce the concentration of teenage pregnancy among mothers in lower socioeconomic groups may mitigate social inequalities in infant mortality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Peso ao nascer de recém-nascidos de mães adolescentes comparados com o de puérperas adultas jovens Infants' birthweight born from adolescents as compared to those of young adult women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir B. Kassar

    2005-09-01

    significant (p=0.14. Multiple linear regression did not determine significant variation of mother's age in birthweight, nevertheless, variables with significant impact were: maternal nutritional status, prenatal care and infant's gender. CONCLUSIONS: although adolescent mothers have more unfavorable social and economic conditions as compared to young adult mothers, maternal age did not significantly influence birthweight.

  2. The Prevention of Prematurity: A Strategy to Reduce Infant Mortality in the District of Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Joan

    The infant mortality rate in the District of Columbia is higher than that for any other state. This high rate stems from the great number of infants born seriously underweight and reflects the area's high percentage of births to impoverished black women. Efforts to reduce the mortality rate have centered around the medical treatment approach,…

  3. Determinants of infant mortality in Ethiopia: A study based on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2mikitser

    Cox proportional hazards analysis identified “breast feeding status”, “mother's age”, “mother's level of education”,. “child birth order”, “source of drinking water” and “sex of infant” as significant predictors of infant mortality. Conclusion: In order to reduce infant mortality, awareness creation efforts have to increase birth spacing, ...

  4. Fatores associados à morte neonatal em recém-nascidos de muito baixo peso em quatro maternidades no Município do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Factors associated with neonatal mortality among very low birthweight newborns in four maternity hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Muniz Bandeira Duarte

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Os recém-nascidos de muito baixo peso representam a grande maioria das mortes no período neonatal, constituindo o maior percentual da mortalidade infantil no Brasil. Este estudo, do tipo longitudinal, incluiu um total de 487 recém-nascidos e propôs uma análise dos fatores associados à mortalidade em recém-nascidos de muito baixo peso até completarem 27 dias de vida. Foram calculados os riscos relativos de óbito para cada uma das variáveis estudada, e as que se mostraram estatisticamente significativas foram selecionadas para o modelo multivariado, no qual se calcularam as razões de chances (OR com a regressão logística. Os fatores associados à diminuição do risco de morte foram: uso de corticosteróide antenatal (OR = 0,40; IC90%: 0,23-0,74 e uso de nutrição parenteral total (OR = 0,06; IC90%: 0,02-0,15. Os fatores associados ao risco de morte foram: recém-nascido do sexo masculino (OR = 2,19; IC90%: 1,27-4,00; hemorragia materna (OR = 4,28; IC90%: 1,27-14,46 e uso de ventilação mecânica (OR = 18,83; IC90%: 5,15-68,87; escore de CRIB (OR = 4,48; IC90%: 2,43-8,27 e peso ao nascimento. O uso de corticosteróide antenatal deve ser mais difundido, visando à diminuição da morbi-mortalidade neonatal.In Brazil, neonatal mortality is the most common cause of infant mortality. The majority of deaths occur in very low birthweight newborns. This longitudinal study assesses factors associated with mortality risk in very low birthweight newborns during the first 27 days of life. Relative risk of mortality was assessed for each variable, and the most statistically significant variables were selected for the multivariate model, in which odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression. Factors associated with decreased mortality risk were: prenatal corticosteroid (OR = 0.40; 90%CI: 0.23-0.74 and total parenteral nutrition (OR = 0.06; 90%CI: 0.02-0.15. Factors associated with increased mortality risk were: male gender (OR = 2

  5. Separate and unequal: Structural racism and infant mortality in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Maeve; Crear-Perry, Joia; Richardson, Lisa; Tarver, Meshawn; Theall, Katherine

    2017-05-01

    We examined associations between state-level measures of structural racism and infant mortality among black and white populations across the US. Overall and race-specific infant mortality rates in each state were calculated from national linked birth and infant death records from 2010 to 2013. Structural racism in each state was characterized by racial inequity (ratio of black to white population estimates) in educational attainment, median household income, employment, imprisonment, and juvenile custody. Poisson regression with robust standard errors estimated infant mortality rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) associated with an IQR increase in indicators of structural racism overall and separately within black and white populations. Across all states, increasing racial inequity in unemployment was associated with a 5% increase in black infant mortality (RR=1.05, 95% CI=1.01, 1.10). Decreasing racial inequity in education was associated with an almost 10% reduction in the black infant mortality rate (RR=0.92, 95% CI=0.85, 0.99). None of the structural racism measures were significantly associated with infant mortality among whites. Structural racism may contribute to the persisting racial inequity in infant mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Transient cultural influences on infant mortality: Fire-Horse daughters in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Tim A; Subbaraman, Meenakshi; Catalano, Ralph A

    2011-01-01

    Parental investment theory suggests that the quality and quantity of parental care depends, in part, on assessments of whether offspring will survive and yield grandchildren. Consistent with this theory, we hypothesize that parental perception that a birth cohort will have low reproductive success coincides with higher than expected infant mortality in the cohort. We test this hypothesis in industrialized Japan in 1966 when cultural aversion to females born in the astrological year of the Fire-Horse may have jeopardized the life of female infants. We applied time-series methods to cohort infant mortality data for Japan, from 1947 to 1976, to test whether female infant mortality in 1966 rose above levels expected from history, male infant mortality, and fertility. Methods control for the secular decline in infant mortality as well as other temporal patterns that could induce spurious associations. Findings support the hypothesis in that female infant mortality rises by 1.1 deaths per 1,000 live births above expected levels (coefficient = 0.0011; standard error = 0.0005; P = 0.03). The result indicates an excess of 721 female infant deaths statistically attributable to the Fire-Horse year. Findings remain robust to control for male infant mortality and the secular decline in mortality over the test period. The discovery of a predictable, acute increase in female infant mortality during the Fire-Horse year supports the relevance of parental investment theory to developed countries. Results should encourage further research on the health sequelae of abrupt, population-level shifts in culture. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Optimal breastfeeding durations for HIV-exposed infants: the impact of maternal ART use, infant mortality and replacement feeding risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallampati, Divya; MacLean, Rachel L; Shapiro, Roger; Dabis, Francois; Engelsmann, Barbara; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Leroy, Valeriane; Lockman, Shahin; Walensky, Rochelle; Rollins, Nigel; Ciaranello, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    In 2010, the WHO recommended women living with HIV breastfeed for 12 months while taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) to balance breastfeeding benefits against HIV transmission risks. To inform the 2016 WHO guidelines, we updated prior research on the impact of breastfeeding duration on HIV-free infant survival (HFS) by incorporating maternal ART duration, infant/child mortality and mother-to-child transmission data. Using the Cost-Effectiveness of Preventing AIDS Complications (CEPAC)-Infant model, we simulated the impact of breastfeeding duration on 24-month HFS among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. We defined "optimal" breastfeeding durations as those maximizing 24-month HFS. We varied maternal ART duration, mortality rates among breastfed infants/children, and relative risk of mortality associated with replacement feeding ("RRRF"), modelled as a multiplier on all-cause mortality for replacement-fed infants/children (range: 1 [no additional risk] to 6). The base-case simulated RRRF = 3, median infant mortality, and 24-month maternal ART duration. In the base-case, HFS ranged from 83.1% (no breastfeeding) to 90.2% (12-months breastfeeding). Optimal breastfeeding durations increased with higher RRRF values and longer maternal ART durations, but did not change substantially with variation in infant mortality rates. Optimal breastfeeding durations often exceeded the previous WHO recommendation of 12 months. In settings with high RRRF and long maternal ART durations, HFS is maximized when mothers breastfeed longer than the previously-recommended 12 months. In settings with low RRRF or short maternal ART durations, shorter breastfeeding durations optimize HFS. If mothers are supported to use ART for longer periods of time, it is possible to reduce transmission risks and gain the benefits of longer breastfeeding durations. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of the International AIDS Society published by John Wiley & sons Ltd on behalf of the International AIDS Society.

  8. Cohort-specific trends in stroke mortality in seven European countries were related to infant mortality rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amiri, M.; Kunst, A. E.; Janssen, F.; Mackenbach, J. P.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To assess, in a population-based study, whether secular trends in cardiovascular disease mortality in seven European countries were correlated with past trends in infant mortality rate (IMR) in these countries. Study Design and Setting: Data on ischemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke

  9. Perinatal mortality in the Cape Province, 1989 - 1991

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1995-05-05

    May 5, 1995 ... birth-weight infants, stillbirths and early neonatal deaths in each planning region of the Cape Province ... low-birth-weight, stillbirth and early neonatal mortality rates are in greatest need of improved ... Subdirectorate: Nursing, Hospital and Health Service Branch, Cape. Provincial Administration. H. H. Louw.

  10. White Infant Mortality in Appalachian States, 1976-1980 and 1996-2000: Changing Patterns and Persistent Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Nengliang; Matthews, Stephen A.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Appalachian counties have historically had elevated infant mortality rates. Changes in infant mortality disparities over time in Appalachia are not well-understood. This study explores spatial inequalities in white infant mortality rates over time in the 13 Appalachian states, comparing counties in Appalachia with non-Appalachian…

  11. Differences in perinatal and infant mortality in high-income countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deb-Rinker, Paromita; León, Juan Andrés; Gilbert, Nicolas L.

    2015-01-01

    of viability are likely due to differences in birth registration practices, although true differences in maternal, fetal and infant health cannot be ruled out. This study emphasises the need for further standardisations, in order to enhance the relevance of international comparisons of infant mortality.......BACKGROUND: Variation in birth registration criteria may compromise international comparisons of fetal and infant mortality. We examined the effect of birth registration practices on fetal and infant mortality rates to determine whether observed differences in perinatal and infant mortality rates...... were artifacts of birth registration or reflected true differences in health status. METHODS: A retrospective population-based cohort study was done using data from Canada, United States, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden from 1995-2005. Main outcome measures included live births...

  12. Effect of determinants of infant and child mortality in Nigeria: Hazard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infant and child mortality is a major public health problem; however, quantifying its burden in a population is a challenge. Routine data collected provided a proxy for measuring the incidence of mortality among children under five years of age and for crudely estimating mortality rate. The data collected from National ...

  13. BIRTH ORDER, STAGE OF INFANCY AND INFANT MORTALITY IN INDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S K; Ram, Bali; Singh, Abhishek; Yadav, Awdhesh

    2017-10-02

    Using data from India's National Family Health Survey, 2005-06 (NFHS-3), this article examines the patterns of relationship between birth order and infant mortality. The analysis controls for a number of variables, including mother's characteristics such as age at the time of survey, current place of residence (urban/rural), years of schooling, religion, caste, and child's sex and birth weight. A modest J-shaped relationship between birth order of children and their risk of dying in the neonatal period is found, suggesting that although both first- and last-born children are at a significantly greater risk of dying compared with those in the middle, last-borns (i.e. fourth and higher order births) are at the worst risk. However, in the post-neonatal period first-borns are not as vulnerable, but the risk increases steadily with the addition of successive births and last-borns are at much greater risk, even worse than those in the neonatal period. Although the strength of relationship between birth order and mortality is attenuated after the potential confounders are taken into account, the relationship between the two variables remains curvilinear in the neonatal period and direct in the post-neonatal period. There are marked differences in these patterns by the child's sex. While female children are less prone to the risk of dying in the neonatal period in comparison with male children, the converse is true in the post-neonatal period. Female children not only run higher risks of dying in the post-neonatal period, but also become progressively more vulnerable with an increase in birth order.

  14. Factors associated to infant mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Viguera Ester

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Half of the 10 million children who die annually in the world are from Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. The reasons are known, but lack of will and resources avoid the development of sustainable policies. Associated factors to the high infant mortality rate (IMR in SSA have been investigated in this research. An ecological multi-group study was designed comparing rates within SSA. The dependent variable is the IMR and health services, economic and development indicators are the independent variables. Information and data sources were WHO, World Bank, UNICEF and UNDP (1997-2007. IMR mean value is 92.2 (per 1000 live births and a relationship with several of the factors could be observed. In the bi-variate analysis direct relationship was observed with maternal mortality rate and an inverse relationship was observed with prenatal care coverage, births assisted by skilled health personnel, gross national income per capita, per capita government expenditure on health, social security expenditure, adult literacy rate, net primary school enrolment rate, population with access to safe drinking water (in urban and rural areas and with population with access to basic sanitation in rural areas. In the multi-variate analysis IMR had an inverse relationship with children under 5 years with diarrhoea who receive oral re-hydration, with social security expenditure as percentage of general government expenditure on health and with per capita government expenditure on health. The situation in SSA would change if their inhabitants received education and information to demand more equitable polices and better investments from their governments.

  15. Factors associated to infant mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ester, Pablo Viguera; Torres, Alberto; Freire, José M; Hernández, Valentín; Gil, Ángel

    2011-09-05

    Half of the 10 million children who die annually in the world are from Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The reasons are known, but lack of will and resources avoid the development of sustainable policies. Associated factors to the high infant mortality rate (IMR) in SSA have been investigated in this research. An ecological multi-group study was designed comparing rates within SSA. The dependent variable is the IMR and health services, economic and development indicators are the independent variables. Information and data sources were WHO, World Bank, UNICEF and UNDP (1997-2007). IMR mean value is 92.2 (per 1000 live births) and a relationship with several of the factors could be observed. In the bi-variate analysis direct relationship was observed with maternal mortality rate and an inverse relationship was observed with prenatal care coverage, births assisted by skilled health personnel, gross national income per capita, per capita government expenditure on health, social security expenditure, adult literacy rate, net primary school enrolment rate, population with access to safe drinking water (in urban and rural areas) and with population with access to basic sanitation in rural areas. In the multi-variate analysis IMR had an inverse relationship with children under 5 years with diarrhoea who receive oral re-hydration, with social security expenditure as percentage of general government expenditure on health and with per capita government expenditure on health. The situation in SSA would change if their inhabitants received education and information to demand more equitable polices and better investments from their governments.

  16. Infant mortality among Arab-Americans: findings from the Arab-American birth outcomes study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkton, Darryl W; El-Sayed, Abdulrahman M; Galea, Sandro

    2013-05-01

    Arab-Americans (AAs) have lower risk of preterm birth relative to Non-Arab Whites. This has been attributed to lower likelihood of birth out of wedlock, maternal tobacco use during pregnancy, and foreign maternal birthplace among AAs. We were interested in understanding the roles of these and other demographic factors in the etiology of infant mortality among this group. Using data about all live, singleton births between 1989 and 2005 in the state with the highest proportion of AAs in the US, we calculated infant mortality (death prior to 1 year of life) for AAs and Non-Arab Whites. To clarify the etiology of potential differences in infant mortality, we also assessed infant mortality sub-categories, including neonatal mortality (death prior to 28 days of life) and post-neonatal mortality (death between 28 and 365 days of life). We fit trivariable and multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for explanatory covariates to assess each covariate's contributions to the relation between ethnicity and infant mortality. AAs had a lower infant mortality rate (4.7 per 1,000 live births) than non-Arab Whites (5.6 per 1,000 live births), overall (odds ratio = 0.84, 95% confidence interval: 0.74-0.96). In trivariable models, adjusting for marital status, maternal tobacco consumption during pregnancy, and maternal birthplace each separately attenuated the bivariate ethnicity-mortality relation to non-significance. Our findings suggest that lower risk of infant mortality among AAs relative to non-Arab Whites may be explained by differences in demographic characteristics and parental behavioral practices between them.

  17. Patterns of Infant Mortality in Texas' Triethnic Population During 1993 Through 1995

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guerra, Horacio

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated the patterns of infant mortality in relation to birth weight, gestational and maternal age, parity, and prenatal care in Texas' triethnic population from 1993 through 1995 using...

  18. NCHS - Infant and neonatal mortality rates: United States, 1915-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Rates are infants (under 1 year) and neonatal (under 28 days) deaths per 1,000 live births. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data-visualization/mortality-trends/

  19. Euphemisms for hunger: know doctor, infant mortality and malnutrition in Colombia, 1888-1940

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Humberto Márquez Valderrama,

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the medical discourses during the period 1888-1940 on infant mortality in Colombia. Relations between malnutrition, morbidity and mortality are one of the most important problems of Colombian medical-hygienist field. Medical objectification of these relationships involved hygiene, germ theory, childcare, eugenics and modern pediatrics. This knowledge produced nuances in the etiology of infant mortality and in medical explanations of epidemiological profiles of the first four decades of the twentieth century. Here, a contribution to the history of the relationship between malnutrition, morbidity and mortality in Colombia is presented.

  20. Infant mortality due to perinatal causes in Brazil: trends, regional patterns and possible interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Gomes Victora

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Brazilian infant and child mortality levels are not compatible with the country's economic potential. In this paper, we provide a description of levels and trends in infant mortality due to perinatal causes and malformations and assess the likely impact of changing intermediate-level determinants, many of which are amenable to direct interventions through the health or related sectors. TYPE OF STUDY: Review paper. METHODS: Two main sources of mortality data were used: indirect mortality estimates based on censuses and surveys, and rates based on registered deaths. The latter were corrected for under-registration. Combination of the two sources of data allowed the estimation of cause-specific mortality rates. Data on current coverage of preventive and curative interventions were mostly obtained from the 1996 Demographic and Health Survey. Other national household surveys and Ministry of Health Statistics were also used. A thorough review of the Brazilian literature on levels, trends and determinants of infant mortality led to the identification of a large number of papers and books. These provided the background for the analyses of risk factors and potential interventions. RESULTS: The indirect infant mortality rate estimate for 1995-97 is of 37.5 deaths per thousand live births, about six times higher than in the lowest mortality countries in the world. Perinatal causes account for 57% of all infant deaths, and congenital malformations are responsible for 11.2% of these deaths. Mortality levels are highest in the Northeast and North, and lowest in the South and Southeast; the Center-West falls in between. Since surveys of the North region do not cover rural areas, mortality for this region may be underestimated. CONCLUSIONS: A first priority for the further reduction in infant mortality in Brazil is to improve equality among regions, since the North and Northeast, and particularly rural areas, still show very high death rates. Further

  1. The contribution of very low birth weight death to infant mortality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Infant mortality remains high in many developing countries in which the contribution of deaths among infants born very low birth weight (VLBW) may be considerable. This contribution has however not been quantified in most such countries. This paper explores a model that can be used in this respect.

  2. Analyzing Infant and Child (Under-five) Mortality in Zaria: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    info

    that there are marginal deviations in the levels of infant and child mortality, comparing the child's age, gender, the mothers' educational attainment, age at birth, nature and duration of marriage, financial status. It has been discovered that a mother's education is one of the single most significant determinant of infant and child ...

  3. Determining the Amount, Timing and Causes of Mortality among Infants with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S. E.; Urbano, R. C.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the amount, timing and causes/correlates of infant mortality among newborns with Down syndrome. Methods: Using the Tennessee Department of Health Birth, Hospital Discharge and Death records, infants were identified who were born with Down syndrome from 1990 to 2006. Those who died during the first year were separated into…

  4. Trends in mortality and morbidity for very low birth weight infants, 1991-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbar, Jeffrey D; Badger, Gary J; Carpenter, Joseph H; Fanaroff, Avroy A; Kilpatrick, Sarah; LaCorte, Meena; Phibbs, Roderic; Soll, Roger F

    2002-07-01

    Medical care for very low birth weight (VLBW) infants and their mothers has changed dramatically during the 1990s, yet it is unclear how these changes have affected mortality and morbidity. We used the Vermont Oxford Network Database to identify trends in clinical practice and patient outcomes for VLBW infants born from 1991 to 1999. Logistic regression was used to evaluate temporal trends in practices and outcomes while adjusting for patient characteristics and accounting for clustering of cases within hospitals. There were 118 448 infants 501 to 1500 g from 362 neonatal intensive care units enrolled in the Network Database from 1991 to 1999. Prenatal care, cesarean section, multiple births, antenatal steroids, and 1-minute Apgar scores increased during this period, as did the use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, high-frequency ventilation, surfactant, and postnatal steroids. The proportion of white infants decreased; the proportions of Hispanic infants and those of other races increased. The crude and adjusted rates of mortality, pneumothorax, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and severe IVH declined from 1991 to 1995, whereas from 1995 to 1999, the rates of mortality, IVH, and severe IVH did not change significantly, and pneumothorax increased. There have been major changes in both obstetric and neonatal care during the 1990s. These changes were associated with decreases in mortality and morbidity for VLBW infants during the first half of the decade. However, since 1995, no additional improvements in mortality or morbidity have been seen, ending a decades-long trend of improving outcomes for these infants.

  5. Ecological context of infant mortality in high-focus states of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laishram Ladusingh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This goal of this study was to shed light on the ecological context as a potential determinant of the infant mortality rate in nine high-focus states in India. METHODS: Data from the Annual Health Survey (2010-2011, the Census of India (2011, and the District Level Household and Facility Survey 3 (2007-08 were used in this study. In multiple regression analysis explanatory variable such as underdevelopment is measured by the non-working population, and income inequality, quantified as the proportion of households in the bottom wealth quintile. While, the trickle-down effect of education is measured by female literacy, and investment in health, as reflected by neonatal care facilities in primary health centres. RESULTS: A high spatial autocorrelation of district infant mortality rates was observed, and ecological factors were found to have a significant impact on district infant mortality rates. The result also revealed that non-working population and income inequality were found to have a negative effect on the district infant mortality rate. Additionally, female literacy and new-born care facilities were found to have an inverse association with the infant mortality rate. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions at the community level can reduce district infant mortality rates.

  6. Ecological context of infant mortality in high-focus states of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladusingh, Laishram; Gupta, Ashish Kumar; Yadav, Awdhesh

    2016-01-01

    This goal of this study was to shed light on the ecological context as a potential determinant of the infant mortality rate in nine high-focus states in India. Data from the Annual Health Survey (2010-2011), the Census of India (2011), and the District Level Household and Facility Survey 3 (2007-08) were used in this study. In multiple regression analysis explanatory variable such as underdevelopment is measured by the non-working population, and income inequality, quantified as the proportion of households in the bottom wealth quintile. While, the trickle-down effect of education is measured by female literacy, and investment in health, as reflected by neonatal care facilities in primary health centres. A high spatial autocorrelation of district infant mortality rates was observed, and ecological factors were found to have a significant impact on district infant mortality rates. The result also revealed that non-working population and income inequality were found to have a negative effect on the district infant mortality rate. Additionally, female literacy and new-born care facilities were found to have an inverse association with the infant mortality rate. Interventions at the community level can reduce district infant mortality rates.

  7. Developing a statewide public health initiative to reduce infant mortality in Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Suzanna; Patrick, Paul; Lincoln, Alicia; Cline, Janette

    2014-01-01

    The Preparing for a Lifetime, It's Everyone's Responsibility initiative was developed to improve the health and well- being of Oklahoma's mothers and infants. The development phase included systematic data collection, extensive data analysis, and multi-disciplinary partnership development. In total, seven issues (preconception/interconception health, tobacco use, postpartum depression, breastfeeding, infant safe sleep, preterm birth, and infant injury prevention) were identified as crucial to addressing infant mortality in Oklahoma. Workgroups were created to focus on each issue. Data and media communications workgroups were added to further partner commitment and support for policy and programmatic changes across multiple agencies and programs. Leadership support, partnership, evaluation, and celebrating small successes were important factors that lead to large scale adoption and support for the state-wide initiative to reduce infant mortality.

  8. Polygynous contexts, family structure, and infant mortality in sub-saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Greenaway, Emily; Trinitapoli, Jenny

    2014-04-01

    Contextual characteristics influence infant mortality above and beyond family-level factors. The widespread practice of polygyny is one feature of many sub-Saharan African contexts that may be relevant to understanding patterns of infant mortality. Building on evidence that the prevalence of polygyny reflects broader economic, social, and cultural features and that it has implications for how families engage in the practice, we investigate whether and how the prevalence of polygyny (1) spills over to elevate infant mortality for all families, and (2) conditions the survival disadvantage for children living in polygynous families (i.e., compared with monogamous families). We use data from Demographic and Health Surveys to estimate multilevel hazard models that identify associations between infant mortality and region-level prevalence of polygyny for 236,336 children in 260 subnational regions across 29 sub-Saharan African countries. We find little evidence that the prevalence of polygyny influences mortality for infants in nonpolygynous households net of region-level socioeconomic factors and gender inequality. However, the prevalence of polygyny significantly amplifies the survival disadvantage for infants in polygynous families. Our findings demonstrate that considering the broader marital context reveals important insights into the relationship between family structure and child well-being.

  9. Effect of Concomitant Birth Defects and Genetic Anomalies on Infant Mortality in Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Eric G; Strassle, Paula D; Stebbins, Rebecca C; Meyer, Robert E; Nelson, Jennifer S

    2017-08-15

    A substantial proportion of infants born with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) die in infancy. A better understanding of the heterogeneity associated with TOF, including extracardiac malformations and chromosomal anomalies is vital to stratifying risk and optimizing outcomes during infancy. Using the North Carolina Birth Defects Monitoring Program, infants diagnosed with TOF and born between 2003 and 2012 were included. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to estimate cumulative 1-year mortality, stratified by the presence of concomitant birth defects (BDs) and chromosomal anomalies. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the direct effect of each concomitant BD, after adjusting for all others. A total of 496 infants with TOF were included, and 15% (n = 76) died. The number of concomitant BD systems was significantly associated with the risk of death at 1-year, p < 0.0001. Specifically, the risk of mortality was 8% among infants with TOF with or without additional cardiac defects, 16% among infants with TOF and 1 extracardiac BD system, 19% among infants with 2 extracardiac BD systems, and 39% among infants with ≥ 3 extracardiac BD systems. After adjustment, concomitant eye and gastrointestinal defects were significantly associated increased with 1-year mortality, odds ratio 2.83 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-7.32) and odds ratio 4.43 (95% confidence interval, 1.57, 12.45), respectively. Infants with trisomy 13 or trisomy 18 were also significantly more likely to die, p < 0.0001. Both concomitant BDs and genetic anomalies increase the risk of mortality among infants with TOF. Future studies are needed to identify the underlying genetic and socioeconomic risk factors for high-risk TOF infants. Birth Defects Research 109:1154-1165, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Infant mortality in Kyrgyzstan before and after the break-up of the Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Michel; Lim, So-Jung; Torgasheva, Liudmila; Denisenko, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    There is a great deal of uncertainty over the levels of, and trends in, infant mortality in the former Soviet republics of Central Asia. As a result, the impact of the break-up of the Soviet Union on infant mortality in the region is not known, and proper monitoring of mortality levels is impaired. In this paper, a variety of data sources and methods are used to assess levels of infant mortality and their trend over time in one Central Asian republic, Kyrgyzstan, between 1980 and 2010. An abrupt halt to an already established decline in infant mortality was observed to occur during the decade following the break-up of the Soviet Union, contradicting the official statistics based on vital registration. Infants of Central Asian ethnicity and those born in rural areas were also considerably more at risk of mortality than suggested by the official sources. We discuss the implications of these findings, both for health policy in this seldom studied part of the former Soviet Union and for our understanding of the health crisis which it currently faces.

  11. Working toward decreasing infant mortality in developing countries through change in the medical curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaman Iffat F

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High infant and maternal mortality rates are one of the biggest health issues in Pakistan. Although these rates are given high priority at the national level (Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5, respectively, there has been no significant decrease in them so far. We hypothesize that this lack of success is because the undergraduate curriculum in Pakistan does not match local needs. Currently, the Pakistani medical curriculum deals with issues in maternal and child morbidity and mortality according to Western textbooks. Moreover, these are taught disjointedly through various departments. We undertook curriculum revision to sensitize medical students to maternal and infant mortality issues important in the Pakistani context and educate them about ways to reduce the same through an integrated teaching approach. Methods The major determinants of infant mortality in underdeveloped countries were identified through a literature review covering international research produced over the last 10 years and the Pakistan Demographic Health Survey 2006-07. An interdisciplinary maternal and child health module team was created by the Medical Education Department at Shifa College of Medicine. The curriculum was developed based on the role of identified determinants in infant and maternal mortality. It was delivered by an integrated team without any subject boundaries. Students' knowledge, skills, and attitudes were assessed by multiple modalities and the module itself by student feedback using questionnaires and focus group discussions. Results Assessment and feedback demonstrated that the students had developed a thorough understanding of the complexity of factors that contribute to infant mortality. Students also demonstrated knowledge and skill in counseling, antenatal care, and care of newborns and infants. Conclusions A carefully designed integrated curriculum can help sensitize undergraduate medical students and equip them to

  12. FACTORS INFLUENCING MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY IN INFANTS WITH SEVERE RESPIRATORY-DISTRESS SYNDROME TREATED WITH SINGLE OR MULTIPLE DOSES OF A NATURAL PORCINE SURFACTANT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HERTING, E; HARMS, K; CURSTEDT, T; COMPAGNONE, D; MCCLURE, G; TUBMAN, R; NOACK, G; KOPPE, J; LAUFKOTTER, E; BOENISCH, H; ROLL, C; HAIM, M; Okken, Albert; GRONECK, P; RELIER, JP; SPEER, CP; ROBERTSON, B; HALLIDAY, HL; GEFELLER, O; REID, M; HERIN, P; KOK, J; VANSONDEREN, L; KOHLER, W; ALBRECHT, K; HANSSLER, L; OETOMO, SB; ALTFELD, PC; KACHEL, W; WALTI, H

    1992-01-01

    In an international multicenter trial infants with clinical and radiological signs of severe RDS (age 2-15 h, birthweight 700-2,000 g, mechanical ventilation, FiO2 greater-than-or-equal-to 0.6, no complicating disease) were randomized to receive either a single dose (n = 176) or up to three

  13. A population-based study of effect of multiple birth on infant mortality in Nigeria

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    Uthman Mubashir B

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-foetal pregnancies and multiple births including twins and higher order multiples births such as triplets and quadruplets are high-risk pregnancy and birth. These high-risk groups contribute to the higher rate of childhood mortality especially during early period of life. Methods We examined the relationship between multiple births and infant mortality using univariable and multivariable survival regression procedure with Weibull hazard function, controlling for child's sex, birth order, prenatal care, delivery assistance; mother's age at child birth, nutritional status, education level; household living conditions and several other risk factors. Results Children born multiple births were more than twice as likely to die during infancy as infants born singleton (hazard ratio = 2.19; 95% confidence interval: 1.50, 3.19 holding other factors constant. Maternal education and household asset index were associated with lower risk of infant mortality. Conclusion Multiple births are strongly negatively associated with infant survival in Nigeria independent of other risk factors. Mother's education played a protective role against infant death. This evidence suggests that improving maternal education may be key to improving child survival in Nigeria. A well-educated mother has a better chance of satisfying important factors that can improve infant survival: the quality of infant feeding, general care, household sanitation, and adequate use of preventive and curative health services.

  14. Mortality among infants with congenital malformations, New York State, 1983 to 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druschel, C; Hughes, J P; Olsen, C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The authors examined first-year mortality and risk factors for mortality among infants with major congenital malformations. METHODS. Infants with major congenital malformations born from 1983 to 1988 were identified from a statewide population-based congenital malformations registry. Variables analyzed included year of birth, birth weight, gestational age, infant sex, number of malformations, number of organ systems involved, level of care of the birth hospital, maternal age, maternal education, and maternal ethnicity. RESULTS. Infants with major malformations had a risk of death 6.3 times higher than the general population of live births. The risk declined from 6.5 in 1983 to 5.9 in 1988. Birth weight and number of malformations were the strongest risk factors. The likelihood of survival was similar for white and black infants. CONCLUSIONS. Being born with a malformation outweighs most of the other risks for infant mortality. Children with congenital malformations had higher cause-specific mortality for all causes except injury. PMID:8711105

  15. The effect of war on infant mortality in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindskog, Elina Elveborg

    2016-10-06

    The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has suffered from war and lingering conflicts in East DRC and has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the world. Prior research has documented increases in infant and child mortality associated with war, but the empirical evidence is limited in several respects. Measures of conflict are quite crude or conflict is not tightly linked to periods of exposure to infant death. Few studies have distinguished between the effects of war on neonatal versus post-neonatal infants. No study has considered possible differences between women who give birth during wartime and those who do not that may be related to greater infant mortality. The analysis used the nationally representative sample of 15,103 mothers and 53,768 children from the 2007 and 2013/2014 Demographic Health Survey in the DRC and indicators of conflict events and conflict deaths from the 2013 Uppsala Conflict Data. To account for unobserved heterogeneity across women, a multi-level modeling approach was followed by grouping all births for each woman and estimating random intercepts in discrete time event history models. Post-neonatal mortality increased during the Congolese wars, and was highest where conflict events and deaths were extreme. Neonatal mortality was not associated with conflict levels. Infant mortality was not higher in East DRC, where conflicts continued during the post Congolese war period. Models specifying unobserved differences between mothers who give birth during war and those who have children in peacetime did not reduce the estimated effect of war, i.e., no support was found for selectivity in the sample of births during war. Differences in effects of the Congolese war on neonatal versus post-neonatal mortality suggest that conflict influences the conditions of infants' lives more than the aspects of mothers' pregnancy conditions and delivery that are relevant for infant mortality. These differences may, however, be specific to the nature

  16. Macrosomia, Perinatal and Infant Mortality in Cree Communities in Quebec, 1996-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lin; Zhang, Dan-Li; Torrie, Jill; Auger, Nathalie; McHugh, Nancy Gros-Louis; Luo, Zhong-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Cree births in Quebec are characterized by the highest reported prevalence of macrosomia (~35%) in the world. It is unclear whether Cree births are at greater elevated risk of perinatal and infant mortality than other First Nations relative to non-Aboriginal births in Quebec, and if macrosomia may be related. This was a population-based retrospective birth cohort study using the linked birth-infant death database for singleton births to mothers from Cree (n = 5,340), other First Nations (n = 10,810) and non-Aboriginal (n = 229,960) communities in Quebec, 1996-2010. Community type was ascertained by residential postal code and municipality name. The primary outcomes were perinatal and infant mortality. Macrosomia (birth weight for gestational age >90th percentile) was substantially more frequent in Cree (38.0%) and other First Nations (21.9%) vs non-Aboriginal (9.4%) communities. Comparing Cree and other First Nations vs non-Aboriginal communities, perinatal mortality rates were 1.52 (95% confidence intervals 1.17, 1.98) and 1.34 (1.10, 1.64) times higher, and infant mortality rates 2.27 (1.71, 3.02) and 1.49 (1.16, 1.91) times higher, respectively. The risk elevations in perinatal and infant death in Cree communities attenuated after adjusting for maternal characteristics (age, education, marital status, parity), but became greater after further adjustment for birth weight (small, appropriate, or large for gestational age). Cree communities had greater risk elevations in perinatal and infant mortality than other First Nations relative to non-Aboriginal communities in Quebec. High prevalence of macrosomia did not explain the elevated risk of perinatal and infant mortality in Cree communities.

  17. Infant mortality trends in a region of Belarus, 1980–2000

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    Lawvere Silvana

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Chernobyl disaster in 1986 and the breakup of the former Soviet Union (FSU in 1991 challenged the public health infrastructure in the former Soviet republic of Belarus. Because infant mortality is regarded as a sensitive measure of the overall health of a population, patterns of neonatal and postneonatal deaths were examined within the Mogilev region of Belarus between 1980 and 2000. Methods Employing administrative death files, this study utilized a regional cohort design that included all infant deaths occurring among persons residing within the Mogilev oblast of Belarus between 1980 and 2000. Patterns of death and death rates were examined across 3 intervals: 1980–1985 (pre-Chernobyl, 1986–1991 (post-Chernobyl & pre-FSU breakup, and 1992–2000 (post-Chernobyl & post-FSU breakup. Results Annual infant mortality rates declined during the 1980s, increased during the early 1990s, and have remained stable thereafter. While infant mortality rates in Mogilev have decreased since the period 1980–1985 among both males and females, this decrement appears due to decreases in postneonatal mortality. Rates of postneonatal mortality in Mogilev have decreased since the period 1980–1985 among both males and females. Analyses of trends for infant mortality and neonatal mortality demonstrated continuous decreases between 1990, followed by a bell-shaped excess in the 1990's. Compared to rates of infant mortality for other countries, rates in the Mogilev region are generally higher than rates for the United States, but lower than rates in Russia. During the 1990s, rates for both neonatal and postneonatal mortality in Mogilev were two times the comparable rates for East and West Germany. Conclusions While neonatal mortality rates in Mogilev have remained stable, rates for postneonatal mortality have decreased among both males and females during the period examined. Infant mortality rates in the Mogilev region of Belarus remain

  18. Residential segregation and infant mortality: a multilevel study using Iranian census data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Ss Hashemi; Mahmoodi, M; Mansournia, Ma; Naieni, K Holakouie

    2012-01-01

    There is a great amount of literature concerning the effect of racial segregation on health outcomes but few papers have discussed the effect of segregation on the basis of social, demographic and economic characteristics on health. We estimated the independent effect of segregation of determinants of socioeconomic status on infant mortality in Iranian population. For measuring segregation, we used generalized dissimilarity index for two group and multi group nominal variables and ordinal information theory index for ordinal variables. Sample data was obtained from Iranian latest national census and multilevel modeling with individual variables at level one and segregation indices measured at province level for socioeconomic status variables at level two were used to assess the effect of segregation on infant mortality. Among individual factors, mother activity was a risk factor for infant mortality. Segregated provinces in regard to size of the house, ownership of a house and motorcycle, number of literate individual in the family and use of natural gas for cooking and heating had higher infant mortality. Segregation indices measured for education level, migration history, activity, marital status and existence of bathroom were negatively associated with infant mortality. Segregation of different contextual characteristics of neighborhood had different effects on health outcomes. Studying segregation of social, economic, and demographic factors, especially in communities, which are racially homogenous, might reveal new insights into dissimilarities in health.

  19. The evolution of fetal and infant mortality review as a public health strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Ann M; Buckley, Kathleen A; Ruderman, Marjory

    2004-12-01

    Infant mortality review (IMR), the forerunner of fetal and infant mortality review (FIMR), emerged at the national level in the mid-1980s as a promising method to improve understanding of local factors contributing to infant mortality and to motivate community response. Building on federal efforts to enhance data capacity and early state and local infant mortality case review studies, the federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) initiated its IMR Program in 1988. Key actions taken to refine and diffuse the IMR/FIMR method include forging a public-private partnership between MCHB and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in 1990 to develop the National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Program, recruiting prominent leaders to advocate for FIMR, seeding community projects in geographically dispersed states and localities, and routinely reporting best practices information to the field. In concert with the articulation of core public health functions and a growing emphasis on accountability, attention at the national level has turned to promoting and institutionalizing FIMR in state systems. Efforts are underway in states to build on the FIMR model and coordinate multiple maternal and child health-related review programs. Increasingly, FIMR is recognized as a strategy for contributing to implementation of the core public health functions of assessment, policy development, and quality assurance. The recent national evaluation of FIMR sheds new light on the role of FIMR in community and state maternal and child health systems and marks a new phase in the evolution of FIMR.

  20. Residential Segregation and Infant Mortality: A Multilevel Study Using Iranian Census Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, SS Hashemi; Mahmoodi, M; Mansournia, MA; Naieni, K Holakouie

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a great amount of literature concerning the effect of racial segregation on health outcomes but few papers have discussed the effect of segregation on the basis of social, demographic and economic characteristics on health. We estimated the independent effect of segregation of determinants of socioeconomic status on infant mortality in Iranian population. Methods: For measuring segregation, we used generalized dissimilarity index for two group and multi group nominal variables and ordinal information theory index for ordinal variables. Sample data was obtained from Iranian latest national census and multilevel modeling with individual variables at level one and segregation indices measured at province level for socioeconomic status variables at level two were used to assess the effect of segregation on infant mortality. Results: Among individual factors, mother activity was a risk factor for infant mortality. Segregated provinces in regard to size of the house, ownership of a house and motorcycle, number of literate individual in the family and use of natural gas for cooking and heating had higher infant mortality. Segregation indices measured for education level, migration history, activity, marital status and existence of bathroom were negatively associated with infant mortality. Conclusion: Segregation of different contextual characteristics of neighborhood had different effects on health outcomes. Studying segregation of social, economic, and demographic factors, especially in communities, which are racially homogenous, might reveal new insights into dissimilarities in health. PMID:23113167

  1. Pregnancy and Lifetime Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Infant Mortality in Massachusetts, 2001-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ji-Young; Lee, Hyung Joo; Koutrakis, Petros; Bell, Michelle L

    2017-12-01

    Many studies have found associations between particulate matter having an aerodynamic diameter of ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5) and adult mortality. Comparatively few studies evaluated particles and infant mortality, although infants and children are particularly vulnerable to pollution. Moreover, existing studies mostly focused on short-term exposure to larger particles. We investigated PM2.5 exposure during pregnancy and lifetime and postneonatal infant mortality. The study included 465,682 births with 385 deaths in Massachusetts (2001-2007). Exposures were estimated from PM2.5-prediction models based on satellite imagery. We applied extended Cox proportional hazards modeling with time-dependent covariates to total, respiratory, and sudden infant death syndrome mortality. Exposure was calculated from birth to death (or end of eligibility for outcome, at age 1 year) and pregnancy (gestation and each trimester). Models adjusted for sex, birth weight, gestational length, season of birth, temperature, relative humidity, and maternal characteristics. Hazard ratios for total, respiratory, and sudden infant death syndrome mortality per-interquartile-range increase (1.3 μg/m3) in lifetime PM2.5 exposure were 2.66 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.11, 3.36), 3.14 (95% CI: 2.39, 4.13), and 2.50 (95% CI: 1.56, 4.00), respectively. We did not observe a statistically significant relationship between gestational exposure and mortality. Our findings provide supportive evidence that lifetime exposure to PM2.5 increases risk of infant mortality. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. An assessment of infant and child mortality by social group and place of residence in districts of Orissa

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    Jyotishikha Nanda

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To provide an approximation of infant and child mortality rate for all the districts of Orissa using CEB (Children Ever Born and CS (Children Survival data of Census of India, 2001. And to find out the correlations of IMR and CMR with selected monitoring indicators. Methods: Trussell method has been used in estimating infant and child mortality rate. For a better understanding, the districts were classified into three groups on the basis of estimated infant mortality rate viz. i infant mortality rate lower than national average, ii infant mortality rate between state and national average and iii infant mortality rate more than state average. Results: Study reveals that most of the districts of Orissa are experiencing higher IMR and CMR as compared to estimated IMR and CMR of state average. Only one district of Orissa (Mayurbhanj has IMR and CMR lower than national average in comparison with other districts of Orissa. On the other hand, 17 districts have an infant mortality between the state and national average, 12 districts have an infant mortality higher than the state average. Conclusion: The ranking of districts helps to identify the backward and most backward districts in reproductive and child health programmes and to intensify the intervention strategies to reduce the infant and child mortality in the state of Orissa.

  3. Rate and time trend of perinatal, infant, maternal mortality, natality and natural population growth in kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Gashi, Sanije; Berisha, Majlinda; Kolgeci, Selim; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora

    2012-01-01

    THE AIM OF WORK HAS BEEN THE PRESENTATION OF THE RATE AND TIME TRENDS OF SOME INDICATORS OF THE HEATH CONDITION OF MOTHERS AND CHILDREN IN KOSOVO: fetal mortality, early neonatal mortality, perinatal mortality, infant mortality, natality, natural growth of population etc. The treated patients were the newborn and infants in the post neonatal period, women during their pregnancy and those 42 days before and after the delivery. THE DATA WERE TAKEN FROM: register of the patients treated in the Pediatric Clinic of Prishtina, World Health Organization, Mother and Child Health Care, Reproductive Health Care, Ministry of Health of the Republic of Kosovo, Statistical Department of Kosovo, the National Institute of Public Health and several academic texts in the field of pediatrics. Some indicators were analyzed in a period between year 1945-2010 and 1950-2010, whereas some others were analyzed in a time period between year 2000 and 2011. The perinatal mortality rate in 2000 was 29.1‰, whereas in 2011 it was 18.7‰. The fetal mortality rate was 14.5‰ during the year 2000, whereas in 2011 it was 11.0‰, in 2000 the early neonatal mortality was 14.8‰, in 2011 it was 7.5‰. The infant mortality in Kosovo was 164‰ in 1950, whereas in 2010 it was 20.5‰. The most frequent causes of infant mortality have been: lower respiratory tract infections, acute infective diarrhea, perinatal causes, congenital malformations and unclassified conditions. Maternal death rate varied during this time period. Maternal death in 2000 was 23 whereas in 2010 only two cases were reported. Regarding the natality, in 1950 it reached 46.1 ‰, whereas in 2010 it reached 14‰, natural growth of population rate in Kosovo was 29.1‰ in 1950, whereas in 2011 it was 11.0‰. Perinatal mortality rate in Kosovo is still high in comparison with other European countries (Turkey and Kyrgyzstan have the highest perinatal mortality rate), even though it is in a continuous decrease. Infant mortality

  4. Rate and Time Trend of Perinatal, Infant, Maternal Mortality, Natality and Natural Population Growth in Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Gashi, Sanije; Berisha, Majlinda; Kolgeci, Selim; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work has been the presentation of the rate and time trends of some indicators of the heath condition of mothers and children in Kosovo: fetal mortality, early neonatal mortality, perinatal mortality, infant mortality, natality, natural growth of population etc. The treated patients were the newborn and infants in the post neonatal period, women during their pregnancy and those 42 days before and after the delivery. Methods: The data were taken from: register of the patients treated in the Pediatric Clinic of Prishtina, World Health Organization, Mother and Child Health Care, Reproductive Health Care, Ministry of Health of the Republic of Kosovo, Statistical Department of Kosovo, the National Institute of Public Health and several academic texts in the field of pediatrics. Some indicators were analyzed in a period between year 1945-2010 and 1950-2010, whereas some others were analyzed in a time period between year 2000 and 2011. Results: The perinatal mortality rate in 2000 was 29.1‰, whereas in 2011 it was 18.7‰. The fetal mortality rate was 14.5‰ during the year 2000, whereas in 2011 it was 11.0‰, in 2000 the early neonatal mortality was 14.8‰, in 2011 it was 7.5‰. The infant mortality in Kosovo was 164‰ in 1950, whereas in 2010 it was 20.5‰. The most frequent causes of infant mortality have been: lower respiratory tract infections, acute infective diarrhea, perinatal causes, congenital malformations and unclassified conditions. Maternal death rate varied during this time period. Maternal death in 2000 was 23 whereas in 2010 only two cases were reported. Regarding the natality, in 1950 it reached 46.1 ‰, whereas in 2010 it reached 14‰, natural growth of population rate in Kosovo was 29.1‰ in 1950, whereas in 2011 it was 11.0‰. Conclusion: Perinatal mortality rate in Kosovo is still high in comparison with other European countries (Turkey and Kyrgyzstan have the highest perinatal mortality rate), even though it is in a

  5. Maternal Age and Infant Mortality for White, Black, and Mexican Mothers in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip N. Cohen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the pattern of infant mortality by maternal age for white, black, and Mexican mothers using the 2013 Period Linked Birth/Infant Death Public Use File from the Centers for Disease Control. The results are consistent with the “weathering” hypothesis, which suggests that white women benefit from delayed childbearing while for black women early childbearing is adaptive because of deteriorating health status through the childbearing years. For white women, the risk (adjusted for covariates of infant death is U-shaped—lowest in the early thirties—while for black women the risk increases linearly with age. Mexican-origin women show a J-shape, with highest risk at the oldest ages. The results underscore the need for understanding the relationship between maternal age and infant mortality in the context of unequal health experiences across race/ethnic groups in the US.

  6. The effect of war on infant mortality in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Elveborg Lindskog

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC has suffered from war and lingering conflicts in East DRC and has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the world. Prior research has documented increases in infant and child mortality associated with war, but the empirical evidence is limited in several respects. Measures of conflict are quite crude or conflict is not tightly linked to periods of exposure to infant death. Few studies have distinguished between the effects of war on neonatal versus post-neonatal infants. No study has considered possible differences between women who give birth during wartime and those who do not that may be related to greater infant mortality. Methods The analysis used the nationally representative sample of 15,103 mothers and 53,768 children from the 2007 and 2013/2014 Demographic Health Survey in the DRC and indicators of conflict events and conflict deaths from the 2013 Uppsala Conflict Data. To account for unobserved heterogeneity across women, a multi-level modeling approach was followed by grouping all births for each woman and estimating random intercepts in discrete time event history models. Results Post-neonatal mortality increased during the Congolese wars, and was highest where conflict events and deaths were extreme. Neonatal mortality was not associated with conflict levels. Infant mortality was not higher in East DRC, where conflicts continued during the post Congolese war period. Models specifying unobserved differences between mothers who give birth during war and those who have children in peacetime did not reduce the estimated effect of war, i.e., no support was found for selectivity in the sample of births during war. Conclusion Differences in effects of the Congolese war on neonatal versus post-neonatal mortality suggest that conflict influences the conditions of infants’ lives more than the aspects of mothers’ pregnancy conditions and delivery that are relevant for infant

  7. Reproductive justice & preventable deaths: State funding, family planning, abortion, and infant mortality, US 1980–2010

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    Nancy Krieger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little current research examines associations between infant mortality and US states’ funding for family planning services and for abortion, despite growing efforts to restrict reproductive rights and services and documented associations between unintended pregnancy and infant mortality. Material and methods: We obtained publicly available data on state-only public funding for family planning and abortion services (years available: 1980, 1987, 1994, 2001, 2006, and 2010 and corresponding annual data on US county infant death rates. We modeled the funding as both fraction of state expenditures and per capita spending (per woman, age 15–44. State-level covariates comprised: Title X and Medicaid per capita funding, fertility rate, and percent of counties with no abortion services; county-level covariates were: median family income, and percent: black infants, adults without a high school education, urban, and female labor force participation. We used Possion log-linear models for: (1 repeat cross-sectional analyses, with random state and county effects; and (2 panel analysis, with fixed state effects. Results: Four findings were robust to analytic approach. First, since 2000, the rate ratio for infant death comparing states in the top funding quartile vs. no funding for abortion services ranged (in models including all covariates between 0.94 and 0.98 (95% confidence intervals excluding 1, except for the 2001 cross-sectional analysis, whose upper bound equaled 1, yielding an average 15% reduction in risk (range: 8–22%. Second, a similar risk reduction for state per capita funding for family planning services occurred in 1994. Third, the excess risk associated with lower county income increased over time, and fourth, remained persistently high for counties with a high percent of black infants. Conclusions: Insofar as reducing infant mortality is a government priority, our data underscore the need, despite heightened contention

  8. Infant mortality and prenatal care: contributions of the clinic in the light of Canguilhem and Foucault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Paula Pereira de; Lunardi Filho, Wilson Danilo; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Pimpão, Fernanda Demutti

    2012-01-01

    This review study aimed to verify how studies conducted in Brazil have related infant mortality to prenatal care and to present contributions of the clinic in the light of Canguilhem and Foucault for qualification of the care. An integrative literature review was conducted from searches in the databases SciELO, LILACS, MEDLINE and BDENF for the period 2000 to 2009. The relationship between infant mortality and prenatal care is related to the insufficient number of consultations or to the quality of the care provided. Even when the number of and routine consultations in the prenatal care were adequate, avoidable deaths were present. For the qualification of prenatal care, it is suggested that the clinical knowledge and other elements that comprise the process of human living are considered, in order that the clinical view is enlarged and articulated to the technologies available in the health system and, together, they are able to contribute to the reduction of infant mortality in Brazil.

  9. Environmental regulations on air pollution in China and their impact on infant mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shinsuke

    2015-07-01

    This study explores the impact of environmental regulations in China on infant mortality. In 1998, the Chinese government imposed stringent air pollution regulations, in one of the first large-scale regulatory attempts in a developing country. We find that the infant mortality rate fell by 20 percent in the treatment cities designated as "Two Control Zones." The greatest reduction in mortality occurred during the neonatal period, highlighting an important pathophysiologic mechanism, and was largest among infants born to mothers with low levels of education. The finding is robust to various alternative hypotheses and specifications. Further, a falsification test using deaths from causes unrelated to air pollution supports these findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Infant, maternal, and geographic factors influencing gastroschisis related mortality in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfeld, Jordan C; Wren, Sherry M; Macheka, Nyasha; Mbuwayesango, Bothwell A; Bruzoni, Matias; Sylvester, Karl G; Kastenberg, Zachary J

    2015-12-01

    Survival for infants with gastroschisis in developed countries has improved dramatically in recent decades with reported mortality rates of 4-7%. Conversely, mortality rates for gastroschisis in sub-Saharan Africa remain as great as 60% in contemporary series. This study describes the burden of gastroschisis at the major pediatric hospital in Zimbabwe with the goal of identifying modifiable factors influencing gastroschisis-related infant mortality. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all cases of gastroschisis admitted to Harare Children's Hospital in 2013. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to describe infant, maternal, and geographic factors influencing survival. A total of 5,585 neonatal unit admissions were identified including 95 (1.7%) infants born with gastroschisis. Gastroschisis-related mortality was 84% (n = 80). Of infants with gastroschisis, 96% (n = 91) were born outside Harare Hospital, 82% (n = 78) were born outside Harare Province, and 23% (n = 25) were home births. The unadjusted odds of survival for these neonates with gastroschisis were decreased for low birth weight infants (age; OR, 0.06; 95% CI, 0.01-0.50), and for those born to teenage mothers (age; OR, 0.05; 95% CI, 0.01-0.46). There was also a trend toward decreased odds of survival for home births (OR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.02-1.34) and for those born outside Harare Province (OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.10-1.22). Gastroschisis-related infant mortality in Zimbabwe is associated with well-known risk factors, including low birth weight, prematurity, and teenage mothers. However, modifiable factors identified in this study signify potential opportunities for developing innovative approaches to perinatal care in such a resource-constrained environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Birth Order and Injury-Related Infant Mortality in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Katherine A; Rossen, Lauren M; Thoma, Marie E; Warner, Margaret; Simon, Alan E

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk of death during the first year of life due to injury, such as unintentional injury and homicide, by birth order in the U.S. Using national birth cohort-linked birth-infant death data (births, 2000-2010; deaths, 2000-2011), risks of infant mortality due to injury in second-, third-, fourth-, and fifth or later-born singleton infants were compared with first-born singleton infants. Risk ratios were estimated using log-binomial models adjusted for maternal age, marital status, race/ethnicity, and education. The statistical analyses were conducted in 2016. Approximately 40%, 32%, 16%, 7%, and 4% of singleton live births were first, second, third, fourth, and fifth or later born, respectively. From 2000 to 2011, a total of 15,866 infants died as a result of injury (approximately 1,442 deaths per year). Compared with first-born infants (2.9 deaths per 10,000 live births), second or later-born infants were at increased risk of infant mortality due to injury (second, 3.6 deaths; third, 4.2 deaths; fourth, 4.8 deaths; fifth or later, 6.4 deaths). The corresponding adjusted risk ratios were as follows: second, 1.84 (95% CI=1.76, 1.91); third, 2.42 (95% CI=2.30, 2.54); fourth, 2.96 (95% CI=2.77, 3.16); and fifth or later, 4.26 (95% CI=3.96, 4.57). Singleton infants born second or later were at increased risk of mortality due to injury during their first year of life in the U.S. This study's findings highlight the importance of investigating underlying mechanisms behind this increased risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Average age at death in infancy and infant mortality level: Reconsidering the Coale-Demeny formulas at current levels of low mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny M. Andreev

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The long-term historical decline in infant mortality has been accompanied by increasing concentration of infant deaths at the earliest stages of infancy. In the mid-1960s Coale and Demeny developed formulas describing the dependency of the average age of death in infancy on the level of infant mortality, based on data obtained up to that time. Objective: In the more developed countries a steady rise in average age of infant death began in the mid-1960s. This paper documents this phenomenon and offers alternative formulas for calculation of the average age of death, taking into account the new mortality trends. Methods: Standard statistical methodologies and a specially developed method are applied to the linked individual birth and infant death datasets available from the US National Center for Health Statistics and the initial (raw numbers of deaths from the Human Mortality Database. Results: It is demonstrated that the trend of decline in the average age of infant death becomes interrupted when the infant mortality rate attains a level around 10 per 1000, and modifications of the Coale-Demeny formulas for practical application to contemporary low levels of mortality are offered. Conclusions: The average age of death in infancy is an important characteristic of infant mortality, although it does not influence the magnitude of life expectancy. That the increase in average age of death in infancy is connected with medical advances is proposed as a possible explanation.

  13. Natality and infant mortality in Roma children in the Prešov region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Koval

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the lack of exact data on natality and infant mortality rates of the Roma living in Slovakia we aim to look closer into these parameters, analyze them and in this respect compare two ethnic groups: Roma and non-Roma Slovak children. Material and methods: In the time period from 1997 to 2011, we collected data in selected parameters (birth rate, infant mortality rate, the number of newborns with low birth weight, the number of children abandoned by their mothers after birth in the Prešov region, and we evaluated them. Findings: A declining natality rate was observed in non-Roma children, as opposed to an upward trend in Roma children. In 1997, every fourth child was born to a Roma woman; in 2011, it was every third child. A declining infant mortality rate was observed in all groups studied. In the Roma children, the decline in the infant mortality rate was the biggest, yet the mere infant mortality rate, in this group of children, was the highest – in 1997 and in 2011 approximately 3-times higher than in the children born to non-Roma mothers. Conclusion: In our study, the infant mortality rate of Roma children is on decline, yet still it is high when compared to the non-Roma population. This may be caused by low interest of the Roma in providing health care to their children and their low responsibility or their inability to take responsibility for health and health care education of their children.

  14. Seasonal Variation in Solar Ultra Violet Radiation and Early Mortality in Extremely Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Ariel A; Smith, Kelly A; Rodgers, Mackenzie D; Phillips, Vivien; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin D production during pregnancy promotes fetal lung development, a major determinant of infant survival after preterm birth. Because vitamin D synthesis in humans is regulated by solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, we hypothesized that seasonal variation in solar UVB doses during fetal development would be associated with variation in neonatal mortality rates. This cohort study included infants born alive with gestational age (GA) between 23 and 28 weeks gestation admitted to a neonatal unit between 1996 and 2010. Three infant cohort groups were defined according to increasing intensities of solar UVB doses at 17 and 22 weeks gestation. The primary outcome was death during the first 28 days after birth. Outcome data of 2,319 infants were analyzed. Mean birth weight was 830 ± 230 g and median gestational age was 26 weeks. Mortality rates were significantly different across groups (p = 0.04). High-intensity solar UVB doses were associated with lower mortality when compared with normal intensity solar UVB doses (hazard ratio: 0.70; 95% confidence interval: 0.54-0.91; p = 0.01). High-intensity solar UVB doses during fetal development seem to be associated with risk reduction of early mortality in preterm infants. Prospective studies are needed to validate these preliminary findings. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Infant mortality rates and structure in a town near a nuclear power enterprise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tret'yakov, F.D.; Voronina, Z.I.; Voronin, P.F.; Demin, S.N.

    1991-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of the rates and structure of mortality of infants aged under 1 in a town, situated near a nuclear power enterprise (NPE). Altogether 38124 infants born in 1950-1978, were investigated. The dead infants (1160) were divided into 3 groups with relation to their parents' place of work: 1 - infants whose parents worked in the NPE; 2 - infants whose parents worked in town factories and offices; 3 - all infants in the town. The total doses of γ-irradiation for mothers were 10-400 cSv, those for fathers - 30-520 cSv, intrauterine irradiation of a fetus was 0.5-0.55 cSv. The individual effective equivalent dose of irradiation of the residents of the town was 17.3 cSv over 40 years. Occupational γ-irradiation of the parents at doses exceeding the maximum permissible ones in the first 10 years of work at the NPE made no effect on the mortality rates in infants of the first generation

  16. Perinatal and infant mortality and low birth weight among residents near cokeworks in Great Britain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolk, H.; Pattenden, S.; Vrijheid, M.; Thakrar, B.; Armstrong, B.

    2000-02-01

    With growing evidence of the adverse health effects of air pollution--especially fine particulates--investigators must concentrate on the fetus, neonate, and infant as potentially vulnerable groups. Cokeworks are a major source of smoke and sulfur dioxide. In the current study, the authors investigated whether populations residing near cokeworks had a higher risk of adverse perinatal and infant outcomes. Zones of 7.5-km radius around 22 cokeworks in Great Britain were studied, within which the authors assumed that exposure declined from highest levels within 2 km to background levels. Routinely recorded birth and death data for Great Britain during the period 1981--1992 were analyzed. Each individual record had a postcode that referred to a small geographical area of typically 15--17 addresses. The authors calculated expected numbers on the basis of regional rates, stratified by year, sex, and a small-area socio-economic deprivation score. For all cokeworks combined, the observed/expected ratio within 2 km of cokeworks was 1.00 for low-birth-weight infants; 0.94 for still births; 0.95 for infant mortality; 0.86 for neonatal mortality; 1.10 for postneonatal mortality; 0.79 for respiratory postneonatal mortality; and 1.07 for postneonatal Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Respiratory postneonatal mortality was low throughout the entire 0--7.5-km study area. There was no statistically significant decline in risk with distance from cokeworks for any of the outcomes studied. The authors concluded that there was no evidence of an increased risk of low birth weight, stillbirths, and/or neonatal mortality near cokeworks, and there was no strong evidence for any association between residence near cokeworks and postneonatal mortality. One must remember, however, the limited statistical power of the study to detect small risks.

  17. [Trends in avoidable causes of infant mortality in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, 1984 to 1998].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Antônio Prates; França, Elisabeth; Perpétuo, Ignez Helena Oliva; Goulart, Eugênio Marcos Andrade

    2005-02-01

    To analyze the infant mortality trend in a metropolitan area, from 1984 to 1998. The main focus was on avoidable causes of neonatal and post-neonatal mortality. Sources of data were the Sistema de Informacoes em Mortalidade do Ministerio da Saude (SIM-MS) [Mortality Information System of the Ministry of Health] and Fundacao Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica (IBGE) [Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics Foundation] (official live birth and death records) for the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte, in the State of Minas Gerais. A simple linear regression model was used to evaluate time-trends of mortality rates. Statistical significance of the inclination of the regression curves was considered for the p<0.05 level. During the 15 year period in question, the infant mortality rate declined from 48.5 to 22.1/1,000 live births. However, the most accentuated decrease was observed during the last four years of the study period. The post-neonatal group was greatly responsible for this decline both in the capital and in the other districts within the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte. Although a significant decrease in the infant mortality rate has been observed, particularly in the post-neonatal mortality, it is still larger than the rates found in developed countries. Deaths due to perinatal morbidities as well as the group of causes represented by diarrhea-pneumonia-malnutrition still present an important potential for reduction. The authors discuss the role of the health services in improving the rates of these avoidable causes of infant mortality.

  18. Elevated infant mortality rate among Dutch oral cleft cases: a retrospective analysis from 1997 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daan Pieter Frederik Van Nunen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: First, to determine the infant mortality rate for Dutch patients with isolated oral clefts as well as for patients with clefts seen in association with other malformations. Second, to conduct a similar analysis per cleft type: cleft lip with or without cleft palate, cleft palate (including Robin sequence. Third, to examine the underlying causes of death. Material and methods: A retrospective review of the charts of patients with oral clefts born in the period 1997-2011 and treated in three regional cleft centers in the Netherlands. Results: 1530 patients with oral clefts were born during the study period and treated in the cleft centers. The overall infant mortality rate for all clefts was 2.09%, significantly higher than the general Dutch infant mortality rate of 0.45%. In a subanalysis per cleft type the infant mortality rates were 1.22%, 1.38%, 2.45% and 3.62% for cleft lip, cleft lip with cleft palate, cleft palate and Robin sequence. The mortality rates for isolated oral clefts did not differ significantly from the general Dutch rate. Causes of death were congenital malformations of the heart in 40.6%, airway / lungs in 15.6%, nervous system in 15.6%, infectious disease in 12.5% and other or unknown in 15.6%. Conclusion: The elevated infant mortality rate observed in Dutch patients with oral clefts is almost exclusively caused by associated congenital malformations. After diagnosis of an oral cleft an in-depth medical examination and a consult by the pediatrician and clinical geneticist is imperative to instigate the appropriate medical management.

  19. Is ambient temperature associated with risk of infant mortality? A multi-city study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ji-Young; Lee, Jong-Tae; Bell, Michelle L

    2017-10-01

    Although numerous studies have shown increased risk of mortality from elevated temperatures for adults, limited studies have examined temperature's effect on mortality for infants. Our study investigated the city-specific and overall effects of ambient temperature on infant mortality in seven major cities in Korea, 2004-2007. Birth cohort using a linked birth and death records included 777,570 births with 557 all-cause deaths. We estimated city-specific hazard ratios for each city using an extended Cox proportional hazards model with time-dependent covariates. Then we combined city-specific hazard ratios to generate overall hazard ratio across the seven cities using a Bayesian hierarchical model. Stratified analyses were conducted by cause of death (total and SIDS), exposure period (whole gestation, each trimester, lifetime, 1 month before death, and 2 weeks before death), sex, and maternal characteristics. Overall across the cities, we found significantly positive associations between ambient temperature during 1 month before death or 2 weeks before death and infant mortality from total or SIDS. The overall hazard ratio of infant mortality from total deaths and SIDS for a 1°C increase during 1 month before death was 1.52 (95% CI, 1.46-1.57) and 1.50 (95% CI, 1.35-1.66), respectively. We also found suggestive evidence that some factors such as mother's age may modify the association. Our findings have implications for establishment of policy to reduce the risk of infant mortality from high ambient temperature under climate change. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Modifying effect of maternal nutritional status on the impact of maternal multiple micronutrient supplementation on birthweight in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebayang, S K; Dibley, M J; Kelly, P; Shankar, A V; Shankar, A H

    2011-10-01

    Low birthweight (LBW) and intrauterine growth restriction are linked with maternal nutritional status during pregnancy, and maternal supplementation with multiple micronutrients (MMNs) is reported to increase birthweight. Responses to MMN, however, might be modified by maternal nutrition. To examine the differential effects of maternal nutritional status on birthweight responses to prenatal MMN supplementation, data from the Supplementation with Multiple Micronutrient Intervention Trial, a cluster-randomized trial in Indonesia was analyzed. Birthweight outcomes of 7001 infants whose mothers received iron/folic acid were compared with 7292 infants whose mothers received MMN. The modifying effects of maternal short-term nutritional status (mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) and long-term nutritional status (height) on the birthweight response to MMN supplementation were assessed. For women with higher MUAC (≥23.5 cm), MMN increased mean birthweight by 33 g (95% confidence interval (CI): -1 to 66, P=0.06) and significantly reduced LBW by 21% (relative risk: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.64-0.99, P=0.04). The modifying effect of MUAC on mean birthweight, LBW and small for gestational age was significant. There was no evidence of a modifying effect of maternal height on the response to MMN. Supplementation with MMN in pregnancy increased birthweight, but maternal nutritional status modified this response, with infants born to women with better short-term nutrition having greater birthweight response.

  1. Influence of a combination of probiotics on bacterial infections in very low birthweight newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanic, Zlatka; Micetic Turk, Dusanka; Burja, Silva; Kanic, Vojko; Dinevski, Dejan

    2015-12-01

    Late-onset infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. The purpose of our prospective randomised study was to establish whether a combination of probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Enterococcus faecium and Bifidobacterium infantum) affects the incidence of late-onset sepsis and other infections in very low birthweight infants (birthweight under 1500 g, gestational age under 33 weeks). From 80 included infants, one half received probiotics (L. acidophilus, E. faecium and B. infantum) in the ratio 1.5:1:1.5, at a dose of 0.6 × 107 colony-forming units twice daily, given with the first portions of milk until discharge, whereas the other half did not. In the group receiving probiotics, 16 children had late-onset sepsis compared with 29 in the group without probiotics; p = 0.006. The number of late-onset septic events was lower (30) in the group receiving probiotics than in the group that did not receive probiotics (69); p = 0.003. Furthermore, fewer children had at least one late-onset infection (20 infants in the group receiving probiotics compared with 32 in the group without them; p = 0.009). There were less episodes of late-onset infections in the group receiving probiotics (35) than in the group without probiotics (79); p = 0.002. A combination of probiotics at a low dose (1.2 × 107 colony-forming units) decreased the frequency of late-onset sepsis and other infections, as described in previous studies. In addition, children were discharged at a lower postmenstrual age. There were no side effects of probiotics reported.

  2. Greater mortality and morbidity in extremely preterm infants fed a diet containing cow milk protein products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Steven A; Schanler, Richard J; Lee, Martin L; Rechtman, David J

    2014-01-01

    Provision of human milk has important implications for the health and outcomes of extremely preterm (EP) infants. This study evaluated the effects of an exclusive human milk diet on the health of EP infants during their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit. EP infants milk fortified with a human milk protein-based fortifier (HM) (n=167) or a diet containing variable amounts of milk containing cow milk-based protein (CM) (n=93). Principal outcomes were mortality, necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), growth, and duration of parenteral nutrition (PN). Mortality (2% versus 8%, p=0.004) and NEC (5% versus 17%, p=0.002) differed significantly between the HM and CM groups, respectively. For every 10% increase in the volume of milk containing CM, the risk of sepsis increased by 17.9% (pmilk diet, devoid of CM-containing products, was associated with lower mortality and morbidity in EP infants without compromising growth and should be considered as an approach to nutritional care of these infants.

  3. Single motherhood and neonatal and infant mortality in Sierra Leone, Burkina Faso and Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izugbara, C

    2016-06-01

    Childhood mortality is a stubborn problem and remains highest in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Existing research on childhood mortality in SSA indicate that most of the childhood deaths are from preventable causes such as diarrhoea, pneumonia, measles, malaria, HIV and underlying malnutrition, acute respiratory infections, whooping cough, tuberculosis, bronchopneumonia, dirty feeding bottles and utensils, inadequate disposal of household refuse and poor storage of drinking water. However, insufficient attention has been given to maternal marital status and childhood mortality relationships. Understanding the implications of maternal marital status for childhood mortality can add to our knowledge of the correlates of neonatal and infant mortality and furnish insights to support the design and delivery of interventions to address the problem. To document and examine the extent to which the association between neonatal and infant mortality varies between single and ever-married mothers in Sierra Leone, Burkina Faso, and Burundi. A single mother is defined in this study as a woman who has either lived with a partner, married before, widowed, separated during the survey periods and has given at least one life birth. Ever-married woman is woman who has been married at least once in their lives although their current marital status may not be married. Data for this study were drawn from the latest Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) in Burkina Faso, Sierra Leone and Burundi. The selected datasets came from 2010 Burkina Faso DHS (BFDHS), 2008 Sierra Leone DHS (SLDHS) and 2010 Burundi DHS (EDSB II). The relevant data for this study (women age 15-49 years who had at least one live birth within the five years preceding the survey) were extracted from the whole dataset of each country (Burkinabe (n = 17,087), Sierra Leonean (n = 7374) and Burundian (n = 9389). Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were used to assess the association between neonatal and infant

  4. Identifying the intergenerational effects of the 1959-1961 Chinese Great Leap Forward Famine on infant mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shige

    2013-12-01

    Using the 1959-1961 Chinese Great Leap Forward Famine as a natural experiment, this study examines the relationship between mothers' prenatal exposure to acute malnutrition and their children's infant mortality risk. According to the results, the effect of mothers' prenatal famine exposure status on children's infant mortality risk depends on the level of famine severity. In regions of low famine severity, mothers' prenatal famine exposure significantly reduces children's infant mortality, whereas in regions of high famine severity, such prenatal exposure increases children's infant mortality although the effect is not statistically significant. Such a curvilinear relationship between mothers' prenatal malnutrition status and their children's infant mortality risk is more complicated than the linear relationship predicted by the original fetal origins hypothesis but is consistent with the more recent developmental origins of health and disease theory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Does Family Planning Reduce Infant Mortality? Evidence from Surveillance Data in Matlab, Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Soest, A.H.O.; Saha, U.R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Analyzing the effect of family planning on child survival remains an important issue but is not straightforward because of several mechanisms linking family planning, birth intervals, total fertility, and child survival. This study uses a dynamic model jointly explaining infant mortality,

  6. Admission Hypothermia in Very Preterm Infants and Neonatal Mortality and Morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Emilija; Maier, Rolf F; Norman, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    and in-hospital mortality and neonatal morbidity were analyzed by the use of mixed effects generalized linear models. The final model adjusted for pregnancy complications, singleton or multiple pregnancy, antenatal corticosteroids, mode of delivery, gestational age, infant size and sex, and Apgar score...

  7. Admission Hypothermia in Very Preterm Infants and Neonatal Mortality and Morbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, Emilija; Norman, Mikael; Wilson, Emilija; Norman, Mikael; Wilson, Emilija; Maier, Rolf F.; Misselwitz, Bjoern; Howell, Elizabeth A.; Howell, Elizabeth A.; Howell, Elizabeth A.; Zeitlin, Jennifer; Zeitlin, Jennifer; Bonamy, Anna Karin; Bonamy, Anna Karin; Van Reempts, Patrick; Martens, Evelyne; Martens, Guy; Pryds, Ole; Boerch, Klaus; Hasselager, Asbjoern; Huusom, Lene; Weber, Tom; Toome, Liis; Varendi, Heili; Truffert, Patrick; Jarreau, Pierre Henri; Ancel, Pierre Yves; Blondel, Beatrice; Burguet, Antoine; Schmidt, Stephan; Gortner, Ludwig; Cuttini, Marina; Croci, Ileana; Baronciani, Dante; Gargano, Giancarlo; Carnielli, Virgilio; Di Lallo, Domenico; Agostino, Rocco; Franco, Francesco; Koopman-Esseboom, Corine|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/14117739X; Nijman, Joppe; van Heijst, Arno; Gadzinowski, Janusz; Mazela, Jan; Graça, Luis M.; Ceu Machado, Maria; Carapato, Rui; Barros, Henrique; Rodrigues, Carina; Rodrigues, Teresa; Draper, Elizabeth; Boyle, Elaine M.; Manktelow, Brad; Milligan, David W A; Fenton, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between body temperature at admission to neonatal intensive care and in-hospital mortality in very preterm infants, stratified by postnatal age of death. Moreover, we assessed the association between admission temperature and neonatal morbidity. Study design

  8. Morbidity and mortality of low birth weight infants in the New Born ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Compared to previous studies, mortality of LBW infants in KNH- NBU has increased over the years. Improvement in supportive care as regards nutrition, temperature regulation, laboratory back up and respiratory support is recommended. There is a place for trial of kangaroo mother care and simple continuous ...

  9. Wage inequality, the health system, and infant mortality in wealthy industrialized countries, 1970-1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macinko, James A; Shi, Leiyu; Starfield, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    This pooled, cross-sectional, time-series study assesses the impact of health system variables on the relationship between wage inequality and infant mortality in 19 OECD countries over the period 1970-1996. Data are derived from the OECD, World Value Surveys, Luxembourg Income Study, and political economy databases. Analyses include Pearson correlation and fixed-effects multivariate regression. In year-specific and time-series analyses, the Theil measure of wage inequality (based on industrial sector wages) is positively and statistically significantly associated with infant mortality rates--even while controlling for GDP per capita. Health system variables--in particular the method of healthcare financing and the supply of physicians--significantly attenuated the effect of wage inequality on infant mortality. In fixed effects multivariate regression models controlling for GDP per capita and wage inequality, variables generally associated with better health include income per capita, the method of healthcare financing, and physicians per 1000 population. Alcohol consumption, the proportion of the population in unions, and government expenditures on health were associated with poorer health outcomes. Ambiguous effects were seen for the consumer price index, unemployment rates, the openness of the economy, and voting rates. This study provides international evidence for the impact of wage inequalities on infant mortality. Results suggest that improving aspects of the healthcare system may be one way to partially compensate for the negative effects of social inequalities on population health.

  10. Morbidity and mortality of low birth weight infants in the New Born ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Morbidity and mortality of low birth weight (LBW) infants at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) has previously been found to be high. Other centres have shown that even with lack of neonatal intensive care facilities, selective interventions can be implemented that improve neonatal survival rates. It is important to ...

  11. What is the infant mortality rate in South Africa? The need for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The number of births recorded in the health services was analysed by province in order to assess and explore alternatives within health authorities that could complement the existing system. Results. 1. Published estimates of infant mortality for the period from 1990 range from 40 to 71 / 1 000 births and estimates based on ...

  12. International Ranking of Infant Mortality Rates: Taiwan Compared with European Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Wen Liang

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: The ranking of Taiwan was similar (11th vs. 12th according the two definitions. However, after consideration of the confidence interval, only six countries (Sweden, Finland, Czech Republic, Belgium, Austria, and Germany had infant mortality rates statistically significantly lower than those of Taiwan in 2004.

  13. What explains the Rural-Urban Gap in Infant Mortality — Household or Community Characteristics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Van de Poel (Ellen); O.A. O'Donnell (Owen); E.K.A. van Doorslaer (Eddy)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe rural-urban gap in infant mortality rates is explained using a new decomposition method that permits identification of the ontribution of unobserved heterogeneity at the household and the community level. Using Demographic and Health Survey data for six Francophone countries in

  14. Dynamics of Inequality: Mother's Education and Infant Mortality in China, 1970-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shige; Burgard, Sarah A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors analyze the dynamic relationship between Chinese women's education, their utilization of newly available medical pregnancy care, and their infants' mortality risk. China has undergone enormous social, economic, and political changes over recent decades and is a novel context in which to examine the potential influence of…

  15. Sex Ratio at Birth and Infant Mortality Rate in China: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Denjian

    2005-01-01

    In this article, we used the data from the last three population censuses of China in 1982, 1990 and 2000, to study the dynamics of the sex ratio at birth and the infant mortality rate in China. In the late 1970s, China started its economic reform and implemented many family planning programs. Since then there has been great economic development…

  16. 77 FR 7594 - Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... myriad of Federal, State, local and private programs and efforts that are designed to deal with the... and Territorial Health Officials; a State-level presentation on activities related to reducing infant mortality; and, Improvement Science. Proposed agenda items are subject to change as priorities dictate. Time...

  17. infant mortality and the Kimberley Board of Health, 1898-1977

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    recently, Yach analysed local authority data to provide estimates of national infant mortality rates.sThe review of innovative source material may provide important insights into heatth determinants as shown by a study of historical demographic data from Moravian Church records in Mamre.' This paper examines almost a ...

  18. [Social determinants of infant mortality in socioeconomic deprived rural areas in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Gómez, María Beatriz; Núñez-Urquiza, Rosa María; Restrepo-Restrepo, José Alonso; Richardson-López-Collada, Vesta Louise

    The aim of this study was to identify determinants of infant mortality in rural areas in Mexico and recommend strategies for its decrease. A study was conducted in a sample of 16 municipalities among those with the lowest index of human development. Infant deaths were identified through official data, records and through interviews with civil authorities, health workers and community leaders. Mothers of children who died were also interviewed. In most cases, deaths were related with intermediate social determinants (living conditions and health services converged). The most important critical factors were the prevention programs and delays in receiving healthcare. Deficiencies in intersectorial policies to guarantee effective access to health services were found. To decrease infant mortality in rural areas of Mexico, geographic access has to be improved as well as investment in resources and training health personnel in intercultural competence and primary health care skills. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  19. Morbidity and mortality in infant mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei): A 46-year retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassell, James M; Zimmerman, Dawn; Cranfield, Michael R; Gilardi, Kirsten; Mudakikwa, Antoine; Ramer, Jan; Nyirakaragire, Elisabeth; Lowenstine, Linda J

    2017-10-01

    Long-term studies of morbidity and mortality in free-ranging primates are scarce, but may have important implications for the conservation of extant populations. Infants comprise a particularly important age group, as variation in survival rates may have a strong influence on population dynamics. Since 1968, the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project (MGVP, Inc.) and government partners have conducted a comprehensive health monitoring and disease investigation program on mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) in Rwanda, Uganda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In an effort to better understand diseases in this species, we reviewed reliable field reports (n = 37), gross post-mortem (n = 66), and histopathology (n = 53) reports for 103 infants (less than 3.5 years) mountain gorillas in the Virunga Massif. Our aim was to conduct the first comprehensive analysis of causes of infant mortality and to correlate histological evidence with antemortem morbidity in infant mountain gorillas. Causes of morbidity and mortality were described, and compared by age, sex, and over time. Trauma was the most common cause of death in infants (56%), followed by respiratory infections and aspiration (13%). Gastrointestinal parasitism (33%), atypical lymphoid hyperplasia (suggestive of infectious disease) (31%), and hepatic capillariasis (25%) were the most significant causes of antemortem morbidity identified post-mortem. Identifying the causes of mortality and morbidity in infants of this critically endangered species will help to inform policy aimed at their protection and guide ante- and post-mortem health monitoring and clinical decision-making in the future. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Spatial modeling of geographic inequalities in infant and child mortality across Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Brian; Montana, Livia; Basagaña, Xavier

    2011-07-01

    A survival regression model that allows for spatially correlated random effects is used to predict the hazard of dying among 12,714 children born between 1996 and 2006 in Nepal. The maps of fitted hazard rates show that even after accounting for individual and community-level covariates, a residual spatial pattern in infant mortality remains, with higher mortality concentrated in parts of Nepal's Far-Western and Mid-Western development regions. Results suggest a need to consider health policies and programs that reach children in spatially concentrated high-mortality areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. THE ROLE OF SOCIO-ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF WOMEN ON INFANT MORTALITY: A PANEL DATA ANALYSES FOR OECD COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat KÜRKCÜ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Social and economic development of a nation is often reflected by the existing infant and child mortality rates. In this context, one of the millennium development goals is to reduce infant and child mortalities globally. In particular, women’s socio-economic positions are important variables in explaining infant/child mortality. The correlation between infant/child mortalities and socio-economic positions of women is very strong. This study uses a panel data analysis to measure the effect of labour force participation rate of women on infant/child mortalities. The present article analyzes how women’s socio-economic situations affect infant/child mortality in OECD countries for the era 2000-2014. Our results are statistically significant and also suitable for theoretical expectations. According to our conclusions mortality rates may decline as a result of the increase in labour force participation rates of women. In this context, there is a negative relationship between the labor force participation rate of women and gender inequality. So, as gender inequality decreases, infant/child mortality rates also decrease.

  2. Twin birth order, birthweight and birthweight discordance: any relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyiriuka A.N.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is widely believed that in twin pairs, at birth, the first-born weigh more than the second-born but this concept has been challenged. Objective: To assess the truthfulness of this common concept that first-born twins are usually heavier than their second-born siblings at birth. Methods: In a series of 104 sets of live-born twins, the birth weights of first-born twins were compared with those of their second-born siblings, after controlling for gender. Their intra-pair birthweight differences were determined and twin pairs whose birthweight difference was 15% or more were designated as discordant. Results: Twin I was heavier than Twin II in 61.5% of cases while Twin II was heavier than Twin I in 28.9% of cases. Twins I and II had equal birthweights in 9.6% of cases. Comparing the mean birthweight of the first-born-male twin with that of second-born- male twin, it was 2515+427g (95% Confidence Interval, CI=2402-2628 versus 2432 +435g (95% CI=2321-2543 p>0.05. The mean birthweight of first-born-female twin was 2326+445g (95% CI=2214-2439 while that of the second-born-female twin was 2325+501g (95% CI=2197-2453 p>0.05. When the birthweight difference exceeded 750g, the probability that Twin I will be heavier than Twin II was 83.3% (5 of 6. Conclusion: Although the first-born twin was more often heavier than their second-born siblings, either could weigh more or less at birth. The larger the birthweight difference between growth-discordant twin pair, the greater the probability that the heavier twin would be delivered first

  3. [Risks factors associated with intra-partum foetal mortality in pre-term infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeballos Sarrato, Susana; Villar Castro, Sonia; Ramos Navarro, Cristina; Zeballos Sarrato, Gonzalo; Sánchez Luna, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Pre-term delivery is one of the leading causes of foetal and perinatal mortality. However, perinatal risk factors associated with intra-partum foetal death in preterm deliveries have not been well studied. To analyse foetal mortality and perinatal risk factors associated with intra-partum foetal mortality in pregnancies of less than 32 weeks gestational age. The study included all preterm deliveries between 22 and 31 +1 weeks gestational age (WGA), born in a tertiary-referral hospital, over a period of 7 years (2008-2014). A logistic regression model was used to identify perinatal risk factors associated with intra-partum foetal mortality (foetal malformations and chromosomal abnormalities were excluded). During the study period, the overall foetal mortality was 63.1% (106/168) (≥22 weeks of gestation) occurred in pregnancies of less than 32 WGA. A total of 882 deliveries between 22 and 31+6 weeks of gestation were included for analysis. The rate of foetal mortality was 11.3% (100/882). The rate of intra-partum foetal death was 2.6% (23/882), with 78.2% (18/23) of these cases occurring in hospitalised pregnancies. It was found that Assisted Reproductive Techniques, abnormal foetal ultrasound, no administration of antenatal steroids, lower gestational age, and small for gestational age, were independent risk factors associated with intra-partum foetal mortality. This study showed that there is a significant percentage intra-partum foetal mortality in infants between 22 and 31+6 WGA. The analysis of intrapartum mortality and risk factors associated with this mortality is of clinical and epidemiological interest to optimise perinatal care and improve survival of preterm infants. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. The price of play: self-organized infant mortality cycles in chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjalmar S Kuehl

    Full Text Available Chimpanzees have been used extensively as a model system for laboratory research on infectious diseases. Ironically, we know next to nothing about disease dynamics in wild chimpanzee populations. Here, we analyze long-term demographic and behavioral data from two habituated chimpanzee communities in Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire, where previous work has shown respiratory pathogens to be an important source of infant mortality. In this paper we trace the effect of social connectivity on infant mortality dynamics. We focus on social play which, as the primary context of contact between young chimpanzees, may serve as a key venue for pathogen transmission. Infant abundance and mortality rates at Taï cycled regularly and in a way that was not well explained in terms of environmental forcing. Rather, infant mortality cycles appeared to self-organize in response to the ontogeny of social play. Each cycle started when the death of multiple infants in an outbreak synchronized the reproductive cycles of their mothers. A pulse of births predictably arrived about twelve months later, with social connectivity increasing over the following two years as the large birth cohort approached the peak of social play. The high social connectivity at this play peak then appeared to facilitate further outbreaks. Our results provide the first evidence that social play has a strong role in determining chimpanzee disease transmission risk and the first record of chimpanzee disease cycles similar to those seen in human children. They also lend more support to the view that infectious diseases are a major threat to the survival of remaining chimpanzee populations.

  5. Vietnamese infant and childhood mortality in relation to the Vietnam War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, D A; Thang, N M; Swenson, I E; Stone, E M

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. There is obvious potential for war to adversely affect infant and childhood mortality through direct trauma and disruption of the societal infrastructure. This study examined trends in Vietnam through the period of the war. METHODS. The 1988 Vietnam Demographic and Health Survey collected data on reproductive history and family planning from 4172 women aged 15 through 49 years in 12 selected provinces of Vietnam. The 13,137 births and 737 deaths to children younger than age 6 reported by the respondents were analyzed. RESULTS. For the country as a whole, infant and childhood mortality dropped by 30% to 80% from the prewar period to the wartime period and was stable thereafter. In provinces in which the war was most intense, mortality did not decline from the prewar period to the wartime period but declined after the war, consistent with an adverse effect during the wartime period. CONCLUSIONS. The data are limited by assignment of birth location on the basis of mother's current residence and by inadequate information on areas of war activity. Nonetheless, the data do not indicate a widespread, sizable adverse effect of the war on national infant and childhood mortality in Vietnam but suggest detrimental effects in selected provinces. PMID:8342722

  6. Vietnamese infant and childhood mortality in relation to the Vietnam War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, D A; Thang, N M; Swenson, I E; Stone, E M

    1993-08-01

    There is obvious potential for war to adversely affect infant and childhood mortality through direct trauma and disruption of the societal infrastructure. This study examined trends in Vietnam through the period of the war. The 1988 Vietnam Demographic and Health Survey collected data on reproductive history and family planning from 4172 women aged 15 through 49 years in 12 selected provinces of Vietnam. The 13,137 births and 737 deaths to children younger than age 6 reported by the respondents were analyzed. For the country as a whole, infant and childhood mortality dropped by 30% to 80% from the prewar period to the wartime period and was stable thereafter. In provinces in which the war was most intense, mortality did not decline from the prewar period to the wartime period but declined after the war, consistent with an adverse effect during the wartime period. The data are limited by assignment of birth location on the basis of mother's current residence and by inadequate information on areas of war activity. Nonetheless, the data do not indicate a widespread, sizable adverse effect of the war on national infant and childhood mortality in Vietnam but suggest detrimental effects in selected provinces.

  7. Pregnancy loss and role of infant HIV status on perinatal mortality among HIV-infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae-Young; Kasonde, Prisca; Mwiya, Mwiya; Thea, Donald M; Kankasa, Chipepo; Sinkala, Moses; Aldrovandi, Grace; Kuhn, Louise

    2012-08-31

    HIV-infected women, particularly those with advanced disease, may have higher rates of pregnancy loss (miscarriage and stillbirth) and neonatal mortality than uninfected women. Here we examine risk factors for these adverse pregnancy outcomes in a cohort of HIV-infected women in Zambia considering the impact of infant HIV status. A total of 1229 HIV-infected pregnant women were enrolled (2001-2004) in Lusaka, Zambia and followed to pregnancy outcome. Live-born infants were tested for HIV by PCR at birth, 1 week and 5 weeks. Obstetric and neonatal data were collected after delivery and the rates of neonatal (<28 days) and early mortality (<70 days) were described using Kaplan-Meier methods. The ratio of miscarriage and stillbirth per 100 live-births were 3.1 and 2.6, respectively. Higher maternal plasma viral load (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] for each log10 increase in HIV RNA copies/ml = 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-3.27) and being symptomatic were associated with an increased risk of stillbirth (AOR = 3.19; 95% CI 1.46-6.97), and decreasing maternal CD4 count by 100 cells/mm3 with an increased risk of miscarriage (OR = 1.25; 95% CI 1.02-1.54). The neonatal mortality rate was 4.3 per 100 increasing to 6.3 by 70 days. Intrauterine HIV infection was not associated with neonatal morality but became associated with mortality through 70 days (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.76; 95% CI 1.25-6.08). Low birth weight and cessation of breastfeeding were significant risk factors for both neonatal and early mortality independent of infant HIV infection. More advanced maternal HIV disease was associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Excess neonatal mortality in HIV-infected women was not primarily explained by infant HIV infection but was strongly associated with low birth weight and prematurity. Intrauterine HIV infection contributed to mortality as early as 70 days of infant age. Interventions to improve pregnancy outcomes for HIV-infected women are

  8. Reactor accident and infant mortality?; Reaktorkatastrophe und Saeuglingssterblichkeit?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellerer, A.M. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenbiologie]|[Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Strahlenbiologisches Inst.

    1998-12-31

    The publication discusses a hypothesis that for some years now has been an item of debate in the public media and by political groups. Having a closer look at the statements of the hypothesis, they actually do not convince an expert and do not really justify scientific debate. However, in view of the many publications issued by the time, of which most rather obscured an unbiased view of the problems involved by presenting mathematical formalism, it seems appropriate to make an attempt for clarification. In addition, it is hoped that a discussion of facts and figures beyond the problem of perinatal mortality in this context will help facilitate an understanding of the risks of low-dose exposure to ionizing radiation. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Es geht um eine Hypothese, die bereits seit mehreren Jahren die Medien und selbst politische Gremien beschaeftigt. Ihre Ueberzeugungskraft koennte bei genauerer Inspektion der Daten als zu gering erscheinen, um ausfuehrliche Eroerterungen wirklich zu rechtfertigen. Andererseits ist nach einer Vielzahl von Veroeffentlichungen und Schriftsaetzen, in denen Annahmen und Ueberlegungen meist hinter mathematischem Formalismus verborgen blieben, eine Klaerung angebracht. Zudem kann die Diskussion, ueber das Beispiel der perinatalen Sterblichkeit hinaus, generell das Verstaendnis der Risiken kleiner Strahlendosen erleichtern. (orig.)

  9. Association of Cigarette Price Differentials With Infant Mortality in 23 European Union Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippidis, Filippos T; Laverty, Anthony A; Hone, Thomas; Been, Jasper V; Millett, Christopher

    2017-11-01

    Raising the price of cigarettes by increasing taxation has been associated with improved perinatal and child health outcomes. Transnational tobacco companies have sought to undermine tobacco tax policy by adopting pricing strategies that maintain the availability of budget cigarettes. To assess associations between median cigarette prices, cigarette price differentials, and infant mortality across the European Union. A longitudinal, ecological study was conducted from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2014, of infant populations in 23 countries (comprising 276 subnational regions) within the European Union. Median cigarette prices and the differential between these and minimum cigarette prices were obtained from Euromonitor International. Pricing differentials were calculated as the proportions (%) obtained by dividing the difference between median and minimum cigarette price by median price. Prices were adjusted for inflation. Annual infant mortality rates. Associations were assessed using linear fixed-effect panel regression models adjusted for smoke-free policies, gross domestic product, unemployment rate, education, maternal age, and underlining temporal trends. Among the 53 704 641 live births during the study period, an increase of €1 (US $1.18) per pack in the median cigarette price was associated with a decline of 0.23 deaths per 1000 live births in the same year (95% CI, -0.37 to -0.09) and a decline of 0.16 deaths per 1000 live births the following year (95% CI, -0.30 to -0.03). An increase of 10% in the price differential between median-priced and minimum-priced cigarettes was associated with an increase of 0.07 deaths per 1000 live births (95% CI, 0.01-0.13) the following year. Cigarette price increases across 23 European countries between 2004 and 2014 were associated with 9208 (95% CI, 8601-9814) fewer infant deaths; 3195 (95% CI, 3017-3372) infant deaths could have been avoided had there been no cost differential between the median-priced and

  10. Son preference, use of maternal health care, and infant mortality in rural China, 1989-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajian; Xie, Zhenming; Liu, Hongyan

    2007-07-01

    This study assesses the effects of socio-economic conditions and the interaction between son preference and China's one-child family planning policy on the use of maternal health care services and their effects on infant mortality in rural China, using nationally representative data from the 2001 National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Survey. The results show that while the use of maternal health care services has continued to increase over time, large gaps still exist in the use of these services and in infant survival by mother's education, community income, and parity. Further improvements in the reproductive health of all women and in infant survival will require effective reduction of the obstacles to the use of maternal health care among those women in rural China who are less educated, poor, and of higher parity.

  11. The Effect of an Increased Minimum Wage on Infant Mortality and Birth Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komro, Kelli A; Livingston, Melvin D; Markowitz, Sara; Wagenaar, Alexander C

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of state minimum wage laws on low birth weight and infant mortality in the United States. We estimated the effects of state-level minimum wage laws using a difference-in-differences approach on rates of low birth weight (minimum wage above the federal level was associated with a 1% to 2% decrease in low birth weight births and a 4% decrease in postneonatal mortality. If all states in 2014 had increased their minimum wages by 1 dollar, there would likely have been 2790 fewer low birth weight births and 518 fewer postneonatal deaths for the year.

  12. Political gender inequality and infant mortality in the United States, 1990-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Patricia

    2017-06-01

    Although gender inequality has been recognized as a crucial factor influencing population health in the developing world, research has not yet thoroughly documented the role it may play in shaping U.S. infant mortality rates (IMRs). This study uses administrative data with fixed-effects and random-effects models to (1) investigate the relationship between political gender inequality in state legislatures and state infant mortality rates in the United States from 1990 to 2012, and (2) project the population level costs associated with women's underrepresentation in 2012. Results indicate that higher percentages of women in state legislatures are associated with reduced IMRs, both between states and within-states over time. According to model predictions, if women were at parity with men in state legislatures, the expected number of infant deaths in the U.S. in 2012 would have been lower by approximately 14.6% (3,478 infant deaths). These findings underscore the importance of women's political representation for population health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Laryngotracheobronchial anomalies in infants and the related risk factors of in-hospital mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Lung Lee

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Most infants with LTBAs were initially diagnosed and hospitalized when they were aged 3 months or younger. The risk factors for in-hospital mortality of the children with LTBAs included being diagnosed and treated at an age of 4 months and older, and the presence of perinatal disease, cardiovascular anomalies, other congenital anomalies, neurological diseases, and an age of 4 months and older.

  14. Social Conditions and Infant Mortality in China: A Test of the Fundamental Cause

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Shige; Burgard, Sarah A

    2008-01-01

    The fundamental cause argument represents a distinctively sociological approach to explaining persistent social disparities in health across a range of sociohistorical contexts. We elaborate and test this U.S.-based argument using nationally representative survey data from China covering births from 1970 to 2001, and focusing on social disparities in infant mortality over a period of dramatic social, political, and macroeconomic change. Our results show that despite the massive changes during...

  15. Infant mortality in Brazil, 1980-2000: A spatial panel data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barufi Ana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infant mortality is an important measure of human development, related to the level of welfare of a society. In order to inform public policy, various studies have tried to identify the factors that influence, at an aggregated level, infant mortality. The objective of this paper is to analyze the regional pattern of infant mortality in Brazil, evaluating the effect of infrastructure, socio-economic, and demographic variables to understand its distribution across the country. Methods Regressions including socio-economic and living conditions variables are conducted in a structure of panel data. More specifically, a spatial panel data model with fixed effects and a spatial error autocorrelation structure is used to help to solve spatial dependence problems. The use of a spatial modeling approach takes into account the potential presence of spillovers between neighboring spatial units. The spatial units considered are Minimum Comparable Areas, defined to provide a consistent definition across Census years. Data are drawn from the 1980, 1991 and 2000 Census of Brazil, and from data collected by the Ministry of Health (DATASUS. In order to identify the influence of health care infrastructure, variables related to the number of public and private hospitals are included. Results The results indicate that the panel model with spatial effects provides the best fit to the data. The analysis confirms that the provision of health care infrastructure and social policy measures (e.g. improving education attainment are linked to reduced rates of infant mortality. An original finding concerns the role of spatial effects in the analysis of IMR. Spillover effects associated with health infrastructure and water and sanitation facilities imply that there are regional benefits beyond the unit of analysis. Conclusions A spatial modeling approach is important to produce reliable estimates in the analysis of panel IMR data. Substantively, this paper

  16. Pregnancy loss and role of infant HIV status on perinatal mortality among HIV-infected women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hae-Young

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-infected women, particularly those with advanced disease, may have higher rates of pregnancy loss (miscarriage and stillbirth and neonatal mortality than uninfected women. Here we examine risk factors for these adverse pregnancy outcomes in a cohort of HIV-infected women in Zambia considering the impact of infant HIV status. Methods A total of 1229 HIV-infected pregnant women were enrolled (2001–2004 in Lusaka, Zambia and followed to pregnancy outcome. Live-born infants were tested for HIV by PCR at birth, 1 week and 5 weeks. Obstetric and neonatal data were collected after delivery and the rates of neonatal ( Results The ratio of miscarriage and stillbirth per 100 live-births were 3.1 and 2.6, respectively. Higher maternal plasma viral load (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] for each log10 increase in HIV RNA copies/ml = 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10–3.27 and being symptomatic were associated with an increased risk of stillbirth (AOR = 3.19; 95% CI 1.46–6.97, and decreasing maternal CD4 count by 100 cells/mm3 with an increased risk of miscarriage (OR = 1.25; 95% CI 1.02–1.54. The neonatal mortality rate was 4.3 per 100 increasing to 6.3 by 70 days. Intrauterine HIV infection was not associated with neonatal morality but became associated with mortality through 70 days (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.76; 95% CI 1.25–6.08. Low birth weight and cessation of breastfeeding were significant risk factors for both neonatal and early mortality independent of infant HIV infection. Conclusions More advanced maternal HIV disease was associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Excess neonatal mortality in HIV-infected women was not primarily explained by infant HIV infection but was strongly associated with low birth weight and prematurity. Intrauterine HIV infection contributed to mortality as early as 70 days of infant age. Interventions to improve pregnancy outcomes for HIV-infected women are needed to

  17. Early BCG-Denmark and Neonatal Mortality Among Infants Weighing <2500 g: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Sofie; Aaby, Peter; Lund, Najaaraq

    2017-01-01

    -Denmark” (intervention group; n = 2083) or “control” (local policy for LW and no BCG-Denmark; n = 2089) at discharge from the maternity ward or at first contact with the health center. The infants were randomized (1:1) without blinding in blocks of 24. Data was analyzed in Cox hazards models providing mortality rate...... ratios (MRRs). We had prespecified an analysis censoring follow-up at oral poliovirus vaccine campaigns. Results. Early administration of BCG-Denmark was associated with a nonsignificant reduction in neonatal mortality rate (MRR, 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], .47–1.04) and a 34% reduction (0...... by 38% (MRR, 0.62; 95% CI, .46–.83) within the neonatal period and 16% (0.84; .71–1.00) by age 12 months.ConclusionEarly administration of BCG-Denmark in LW infants is associated with major reductions in mortality rate. It is important that all LW infants receive early BCG in areas with high neonatal...

  18. WAYS TO DECREASE INFANT MORTALITY IN A LARGE AGRO INDUSTRIAL REGION IN RUSSIAN NORTH WEST BASED ON A PROGRAMMED GOAL ORIENTED APPROACH (MATERIALS FROM VOLOGDA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Orel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors analyze infant mortality situation in a large agroindustrial region to the north west of Russia. Basing on a programmed goal oriented approach and the example of Vologda region, the authors suggest ways to reduce the sickness rate, perinatal, early neonatal and infant mortality, as well as the methods to improve medical aid to early children.Key words: infant mortality, maternity and infant health protection, sickness rate, organization of health services.

  19. Morbidity and mortality of very low birth weight infants in Taiwan—Changes in 15 years: A population based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Yu Su

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Although the mortality and most of the morbidity of VLBW infants improved over time, the incidence of ROP remained constant. This requires us to further evaluate our strategy for preventing ROP in the future.

  20. An Investigation of the Mortality Rate and Risk Factors in Newborn Infants With Meconium Aspiration Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabzehei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background One of the serious challenges facing neonatal medicine is meconium aspiration syndrome, delays in the treatment of which can lead to high mortality. Objectives This study was designed and conducted with the aim of determining the mortality rate and risk factors affecting this rate in newborn infants with meconium aspiration syndrome. Methods This study was conducted as a retrospective descriptive research on newborn infants with meconium aspiration syndrome hospitalized at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of Fatemieh and Be’sat hospitals in Hamadan city during a 10-year period from 2004 to 2014. Demographic information of the mother and the newborn, hospitalization course, the need for mechanical ventilation, and complications and outcomes of disease were extracted and were analyzed using the SPSS software version 22. Results Sixty-three newborn infants, diagnosed with meconium aspiration syndrome, were entered in this study, 40% of them were male, 85.7% wighed more than 2500 g, and 17.5% were post term, 25.3% had a five-minute Apgar Score (AS5min of less than seven, 39.6% were nonvigorous at birth, 31.8% needed to be placed on mechanical ventilation, and 14.3% died during the hospitalization course. There was a significant relationship between the need for mechanical ventilation, nonvigorous state at the birth, complications of disease and mortality rate. Conclusions Despite the progress made in medicine, meconium aspiration syndrome is still one of the causes of newborn infants’ mortality. The mortality and morbidity rates can be reduced by improvement in perinatal care, prevention of post term delivery, timely caesarean and effective neonatal resuscitation at birth.

  1. Territorial differences in infant mortality in Latvia in the first decade of the third millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebela, Inguna; Zile, Irisa; Muciņa, Nadīne; Ražuka-Ebelal, Danute; Rumba-Rozenfelde, Ingrīda

    2015-03-01

    Infant and child mortality are some of the most substantial indicators of country welfare. Infant mortality (IM) in Latvia is constantly the highest among 25 Member States of the European Union. Since the regaining of independence in 1991, IM has decreased by almost 50%, however, it is still high enough to cause concern that the country will not be able to meet the UN Millennium Development Goals to decrease IM in Latvia by 2015. The Medical Faculty at the University of Latvia has conducted several studies identifying correlations between IM and GDP, total expenditure on health, unemployment and GINI coefficient. It is necessary to identify all IM causes and relationships which have not been studied, including the effect of social factors causing inequality between inhabitants of urban and rural areas: - The aim of the study was to determine the IM rate and the main death causes and their differences between rural and urban areas in Latvia (2000-2010). This is a register-based study. The data of 1994 deceased infants was analyzed over the time period from 2000-2010. The studied population was divided into two groups - urban and rural areas by mothers' area of residence. Descriptive and analytical methods were used for analysis - frequency distribution, correlation and regression analysis. IM by maternal residence as well as IM indicators in the most common diagnostic subgroups have been higher in rural areas in the entire studied period (2000-2010). The decrease proportion of IM was more rapid in rural regions with a period average of 6.2% in comparison to urban regions - 2.6%. Annual decrease of IM from perinatal period conditions was 50% lower in rural than urban areas; annual decrease of IM from congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities was 20% lower in urban than rural areas; annual decrease in other diagnostic groups was 40% lower in urban than rural areas. During the study period, differences in infant mortality based on maternal

  2. Infant mortality by color or race from Rondônia, Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gava, Caroline; Cardoso, Andrey Moreira; Basta, Paulo Cesar

    2017-04-10

    To analyze the quality of records for live births and infant deaths and to estimate the infant mortality rate for skin color or race, in order to explore possible racial inequalities in health. Descriptive study that analyzed the quality of records of the Live Births Information System and Mortality Information System in Rondônia, Brazilian Amazonian, between 2006-2009. The infant mortality rates were estimated for skin color or race with the direct method and corrected by: (1) proportional distribution of deaths with missing data related to skin color or race; and (2) application of correction factors. We also calculated proportional mortality by causes and age groups. The capture of live births and deaths improved in relation to 2006-2007, which required lower correction factors to estimate infant mortality rate. The risk of death of indigenous infant (31.3/1,000 live births) was higher than that noted for the other skin color or race groups, exceeding by 60% the infant mortality rate in Rondônia (19.9/1,000 live births). Black children had the highest neonatal infant mortality rate, while the indigenous had the highest post-neonatal infant mortality rate. Among the indigenous deaths, 15.2% were due to ill-defined causes, while the other groups did not exceed 5.4%. The proportional infant mortality due to infectious and parasitic diseases was higher among indigenous children (12.1%), while among black children it occurred due to external causes (8.7%). Expressive inequalities in infant mortality were noted between skin color or race categories, more unfavorable for indigenous infants. Correction factors proposed in the literature lack to consider differences in underreporting of deaths for skin color or race. The specific correction among the color or race categories would likely result in exacerbation of the observed inequalities. Analisar a qualidade dos registros de nascidos vivos e de óbitos infantis e estimar a taxa de mortalidade infantil segundo cor ou

  3. Infant mortality in a very low birth weight cohort from a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Coeli Azeredo Cardoso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to evaluate infant mortality in very low birth weight newborns from a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (2002-2006. METHODS: a retrospective cohort study was performed using the probabilistic linkage method to identify infant mortality. Mortality proportions were calculated according to birth weight intervals and period of death. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate overall cumulative survival probability. The association between maternal schooling and survival of very low birth weight infants was evaluated by means of Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for: prenatal care, birth weight, and gestational age. RESULTS: the study included 782 very low birth weight newborns. Of these, (28.6% died before one year of age. Neonatal mortality was 19.5%, and earlyneonatal mortality was 14.9%. Mortality was highest in the lowest weight group (71.6%. Newborns whose mothers had less than four years of schooling had 2.5 times higher risk of death than those whose mothers had eight years of schooling or more, even after adjusting for intermediate factors. CONCLUSIONS: the results showed higher mortality among very low birth weight infants. Low schooling was an independent predictor of infant death in this low-income population sample.

  4. Intrapair birthweight discordance in twins

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-10-05

    The prevalence of birthweight discordance was 28.8% when a 15% cut-off point was used but dropped to. 9.6% when a 25% cut-off point was applied. Grand multiparity was associated with a significantly increased risk.

  5. Trends in infant/child mortality and life expectancy in Indigenous populations in Yunnan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianghong; Luo, Chun; de Klerk, Nicholas

    2008-06-01

    The 2000 Census in China registered 55 groups of Indigenous population, including 104.49 million people, making up 8.1% of China's total population. Yunnan Province, located in Southwest China, is the only province where all 55 Indigenous nationalities are represented (14.15 million), making up 33.4% of Yunnan's total population. This study aimed to examine trends in infant and child mortality and life expectancy at birth of the 22 largest Indigenous nationalities and compared these trends with those of the majority Han Chinese in Yunnan and China as a whole. Data sources of mortality and socioeconomic status came from the population censuses of China (1953, 1964, 1982, 1990, and 2000) and Yunnan (1990-2000) and from the Provincial Health Department (1990, 1995, 1996 and 2000). Weighted linear regression analysis was used to examine the associations between infant/child mortality and life expectancy at birth, socioeconomic indicators and the use of preventive health services. In 2000, the infant mortality rate was 26.90 for China and 53.64 for Han Chinese in Yunnan per 1,000 live birth versus 77.75 for the 22 largest minority nationalities in Yunnan, despite improvements in health status indicators since 1990. The inequalities in life expectancy at birth between China as a whole and some minority nationalities remained striking in 2000 (57.18 versus 71.40). Literacy, prenatal examination, hospital deliveries, economic development were important predictors of these health indicators. Efforts to continue to improve these intermediate proximate determinants and to target the most disadvantaged Indigenous groups are likely to further reduce health disparities between the Chinese and Indigenous populations.

  6. Association between exposure to secondhand smoke during pregnancy and low birthweight: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawsawi, Abdulrhman M; Bryant, Lawrence O; Goodfellow, Lynda T

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) during pregnancy may have adverse effects on the mother and infant. This study investigates the association of maternal exposure to SHS with low birthweight (LBW) in infants. Smoking during pregnancy has been linked to multiple complications for both mother and infant. To examine association of LBW and environmental tobacco smoke exposure during pregnancy, we reviewed 20 articles. Articles were accessed using the following electronic databases: CINAHL Plus with full text (EBSCO), PubMed, Embase, and MEDLINE. The findings of this review revealed that maternal exposure to environmental smoke is correlated with LBW in infants as well as numerous other adverse effects. The majority of the studies found negative consequences of SHS on the birthweight of infants born to nonsmoking women. Thus, this review helps to confirm the association between maternal exposure to SHS and LBW in infants. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  7. Time-trends and causes of infant, neonatal and postneonatal mortality in Mexico, 1980-1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUSAN VANDALE

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This article analyzes the time-trends and causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality in Mexico during the 1980’s. Material and methods. Data on infant deaths came from yearly tabulations (1980 to 1990 published by the Mexican government. Time-trends of mortality rates were determined by simple linear regression models. The parallelism test was performed for evaluating similarities in trends in neonatal and postneonatal mortality rates by causes. Results. During the 1980’s, infant mortality rates in Mexico declined from 40.4 to 31.1/1 000 (ß= -0.791. Postneonatal mortality rates showed a strong decrease (ß= -0.892, while neonatal mortality rates were almost stationary (ß= 0.089. Significant rate decreases were observed for Intestinal infections, Pneumonia and influenza and all other causes while Certain perinatal problems, Congenital defects and Nutritional deficiencies increased. No changes were observed in Acute respiratory infections. The neonatal proportional mortality showed an incremental trend accounting for 37.6% in 1980 and ascending to 48.8% in 1990 of the mortality in the first year of life. Conclusions.This analysis indicates that the reduction in infant mortality in Mexico during the 1980’s was due to declining postneonatal mortality while neonatal mortality rates remain almost unchanged.Objetivo. Analizar las tendencias seculares de las tasas de mortalidad infantil (TMI neonatal (TMN y posneonatal (TMP en México de 1980-1990. Material y métodos. La información estudiada fue proporcionada por el Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Geografía e Informática. Las tendencias de los indicadores fueron determinadas mediante modelos de regresión lineal y se efectuaron pruebas de paralelismo para evaluar la semejanza en pendientes de TMN y TMP por causas. Resultados. Las TMI se redujeron de 40.4 a 31.1/1 000, (ß= -0.791. Las TMP mostraron un decremento significativo (ß= -0.892, mientras que las TMN

  8. Infant Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Limitation Diet Quality Obesity Asthma Special Feature: Peer Victimization in the 3rd Grade Data Topics List of ... Among racial and ethnic groups, Black, non-Hispanic women were the most likely to have a low ...

  9. Determinants of infant and early childhood mortality levels and their decline in the Netherlands in the late nineteenth century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Wolleswinkel-van den Bosch (Judith); F.W.A. van Poppel (Frans); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To study the relative importance of various determinants of total and cause-specific infant and early childhood mortality rates and their decline in The Netherlands in the period 1875-1879 to 1895-1899. DATA AND METHODS: Mortality and population

  10. What has driven the decline of infant mortality in Kenya in the 2000s?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demombynes, Gabriel; Trommlerová, Sofia Karina

    2016-05-01

    Substantial declines in early childhood mortality have taken place in many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Kenya's infant mortality rate fell by 7.6 percent per year between 2003 and 2008, the fastest rate of decline among the 20 countries in the region for which recent Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data are available. The average rate of decline across all 20 countries was 3.6 percent per year. Among the possible causes of the observed decline in Kenya is a large-scale campaign to distribute insecticide-treated bednets (ITN) which started in 2004. A Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition using DHS data shows that the increased ownership of bednets in endemic malaria zones explains 79 percent of the decline in infant mortality. Although the Oaxaca-Blinder method cannot identify causal effects, given the wide evidence basis showing that ITN usage can reduce malaria prevalence and the huge surge in ITN ownership in Kenya, it is likely that the decomposition results reflect at least in part a causal effect. The widespread ownership of ITNs in areas of Kenya where malaria is rare suggests that better targeting of ITN provision could improve the cost-effectiveness of such programs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Data linkage to explore the risk of low birthweight associated with maternal proximity to hazardous waste sites from the National Priorities List

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosniak, W.A.; Kaye, W.E. (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, GA (United States)); Gomez, T.M. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States))

    Data from the 1988 National Maternal and Infant Health Survey files were linked with data from the 1990 Environmental Protection Agency National Priorities List of hazardous waste sites to determine whether any relationship existed between living in proximity to hazardous waste sites and low birthweight. The odds ratio for low birthweight versus normal birthweight was 1.03 (95% confidence internal [95% Cl] = 0.98-1.16), and remained at 0.99 (95% Cl = 0.86-1.16) when adjusted for maternal age, parity, infant sex, prenatal care, and behavioral and socioeconomic factors. Very low birthweight, infant and fetal death, prematurity, and congenital malformation were not found to be associated with living in the vicinity of a hazardous waste site during pregnancy. Merging a large population database with environmental data proved to be an innovative but not very efficient method of assessing the risks of low birthweight related to the environment. 20 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Prenatal sex selection and female infant mortality are more common in India after firstborn and second-born daughters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellatly, Corry; Petrie, Marion

    2017-03-01

    The Indian sex ratio has become highly male-biased in recent decades. This may be attributed to prenatal sex selection (PSS) and excess female infant mortality. However, the question of whether these factors are related has not been adequately studied. Here we examine whether increased use of PSS may offset excess female infant mortality, by reducing the number of 'unwanted' daughters being born. We analyse the National Family Health Survey (NHFS) data sets for India, which contain nationally representative samples of birth histories for women aged 15-49, interviewed in 1992-1993, 1998-1999 and 2005-2006. We test for missing female births at the second and third birth order, by analysis of the frequencies of sibling sex combinations, and examine the mortality differential between male and female infants, controlling for household wealth and sex(es) of older siblings. PSS was used most in wealthier households at the second and third birth order, when the firstborn, or firstborn and second-born, siblings were female. Having preceding female siblings was a significant risk factor for female infant mortality, but was not correlated with household wealth. PSS and female infant mortality increase with the presence of older female siblings, yet we find no evidence that increasing use of PSS prevents female infant mortality, because PSS and the proportion of female infant mortality attributable to having older sisters increased over the study period. Increased pressure on higher birth order females caused by the trend towards smaller family sizes may explain this. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. An ecological quantification of the relationships between water, sanitation and infant, child, and maternal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, June J; Schuster-Wallace, Corinne J; Watt, Susan; Newbold, Bruce K; Mente, Andrew

    2012-01-27

    Water and sanitation access are known to be related to newborn, child, and maternal health. Our study attempts to quantify these relationships globally using country-level data: How much does improving access to water and sanitation influence infant, child, and maternal mortality? Data for 193 countries were abstracted from global databases (World Bank, WHO, and UNICEF). Linear regression was used for the outcomes of under-five mortality rate and infant mortality rate (IMR). These results are presented as events per 1000 live births. Ordinal logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios for the outcome of maternal mortality ratio (MMR). Under-five mortality rate decreased by 1.17 (95%CI 1.08-1.26) deaths per 1000, p < 0.001, for every quartile increase in population water access after adjustments for confounders. There was a similar relationship between quartile increase of sanitation access and under-five mortality rate, with a decrease of 1.66 (95%CI 1.11-1.32) deaths per 1000, p < 0.001. Improved water access was also related to IMR, with the IMR decreasing by 1.14 (95%CI 1.05-1.23) deaths per 1000, p < 0.001, with increasing quartile of access to improved water source. The significance of this relationship was retained with quartile improvement in sanitation access, where the decrease in IMR was 1.66 (95%CI 1.11-1.32) deaths per 1000, p < 0.001. The estimated odds ratio that increased quartile of water access was significantly associated with increased quartile of MMR was 0.58 (95%CI 0.39-0.86), p = 0.008. The corresponding odds ratio for sanitation was 0.52 (95%CI 0.32-0.85), p = 0.009, both suggesting that better water and sanitation were associated with decreased MMR. Our analyses suggest that access to water and sanitation independently contribute to child and maternal mortality outcomes. If the world is to seriously address the Millennium Development Goals of reducing child and maternal mortality, then improved water and sanitation accesses are key

  14. No effect of embryo culture media on birthweight and length of newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shengli; Li, Ming; Lian, Ying; Chen, Lixue; Liu, Ping

    2013-07-01

    Does the type of media used to culture embryos for IVF influence the birthweight and length of neonates? No significant differences were observed in birthweight and length among the three embryo culture media used for in vitro embryo culture. Since the establishment of IVF as an assisted reproductive technology (ART), many different culture systems have been used for the development of human embryos. Some studies have shown that the types of culture media influence the newborn birthweight; however, other studies have shown no effect. To further explore this contradictory issue, we compared the birthweight and length of neonates born after the transfer of embryos cultured in one of three commercially available media. This retrospective analysis of birthweight and length of newborns included 1201 women who delivered singletons and 445 women who delivered twins. The following three commercially available culture media were used: G5™, Global and Quinn's advantage media. Women who underwent IVF-ET cycles between 2008 and 2010 were analyzed. Patients younger than 40 years of age with a body mass index (BMI) culture medium. Inter-twin mean birthweight and length disparities were analyzed, but were not shown to be significantly different. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that maternal weight, maternal height, gestational age and infant gender were significantly related to birthweight, and paternal height, gestational age and newborn complications were significantly associated with birth length. The current study showed that birthweight and length of newborns were not associated with the embryo culture medium. More research needs to be performed to analyze the effects of other culture medium formulations and to evaluate the long-term effects of embryo culture medium on the health of children conceived through ART. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THESE FINDINGS: Our retrospective study suggests that embryo culture medium does not influence neonatal birthweight and length

  15. Ecological context of infant mortality in high-focus states of India

    OpenAIRE

    Laishram Ladusingh; Ashish Kumar Gupta; Awdhesh Yadav

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This goal of this study was to shed light on the ecological context as a potential determinant of the infant mortality rate in nine high-focus states in India. METHODS: Data from the Annual Health Survey (2010-2011), the Census of India (2011), and the District Level Household and Facility Survey 3 (2007-08) were used in this study. In multiple regression analysis explanatory variable such as underdevelopment is measured by the non-working population, and income inequality, quanti...

  16. Acute exposure to fine and coarse particulate matter and infant mortality in Tokyo, Japan (2002-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kashima, Saori; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have evaluated the effect of short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) less than 2.5μm in diameter (PM2.5) or to coarse particles on infant mortality. We evaluated the association between short-term exposure to PM and infant mortality in Japan and assessed whether adverse health effects were observable at PM concentrations below Japanese air quality guidelines. We used a time-stratified, case-crossover design. The participants included 2086 infants who died in the 23 urbanized wards of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government between January 2002 and December 2013. We obtained measures of PM2.5 and suspended particulate matter (SPM; PM<7μm in diameter) from one general monitoring station. As a measure of coarse particles, we calculated PM7-2.5 by subtracting PM2.5 from SPM. We then used conditional logistic regression to analyze the data. Same-day PM2.5 was associated with increased risks of infant and postneonatal mortality, especially for mortality related to respiratory causes. For a 10μg/m(3) increase in PM2.5, the odds ratios were 1.06 (95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.12) for infant mortality and 1.10 (1.02-1.19) for postneonatal mortality. PM7-2.5 was also associated with an increased risk of postneonatal mortality, independent of PM2.5. Even when PM2.5 and SPM concentrations were below Japanese air quality guidelines, we observed adverse health effects. This study provides further evidence that acute exposure to PM2.5 and coarse particles (PM7-2.5) is associated with an increased risk of infant mortality. Further, rigorous evaluation of air quality guidelines for daily average PM2.5 and larger particles is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of systematic pediatric care on neonatal mortality and hospitalizations of infants born with oral clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wehby George L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P increase mortality and morbidity risks for affected infants especially in less developed countries. This study aimed at assessing the effects of systematic pediatric care on neonatal mortality and hospitalizations of infants with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P in South America. Methods The intervention group included live-born infants with isolated or associated CL/P in 47 hospitals between 2003 and 2005. The control group included live-born infants with CL/P between 2001 and 2002 in the same hospitals. The intervention group received systematic pediatric care between the 7th and 28th day of life. The primary outcomes were mortality between the 7th and 28th day of life and hospitalization days in this period among survivors adjusted for relevant baseline covariates. Results There were no significant mortality differences between the intervention and control groups. However, surviving infants with associated CL/P in the intervention group had fewer hospitalization days by about six days compared to the associated control group. Conclusions Early systematic pediatric care may significantly reduce neonatal hospitalizations of infants with CL/P and additional birth defects in South America. Given the large healthcare and financial burden of CL/P on affected families and the relatively low cost of systematic pediatric care, improving access to such care may be a cost-effective public policy intervention. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00097149

  18. The Role of Empowerment in the Association between a Woman's Educational Status and Infant Mortality in Ethiopia: Secondary Analysis of Demographic and Health Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Alemayehu, Yibeltal Kiflie; Theall, Katherine; Lemma, Wuleta; Hajito, Kifle Woldemichael; Tushune, Kora

    2015-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic status at national, sub-national, household, and individual levels explains a significant portion of variation in infant mortality. Women's education is among the major determinants of infant mortality. The mechanism through which a woman's own educational status, over her husband's as well as household characteristics, influences infant mortality has not been well studied in developing countries. The objective of this study was to explore the role of woman's empowerm...

  19. Modifiers of the effect of maternal multiple micronutrient supplementation on stillbirth, birth outcomes, and infant mortality: a meta-analysis of individual patient data from 17 randomised trials in low-income and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emily R; Shankar, Anuraj H; Wu, Lee S-F; Aboud, Said; Adu-Afarwuah, Seth; Ali, Hasmot; Agustina, Rina; Arifeen, Shams; Ashorn, Per; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Christian, Parul; Devakumar, Delanjathan; Dewey, Kathryn G; Friis, Henrik; Gomo, Exnevia; Gupta, Piyush; Kæstel, Pernille; Kolsteren, Patrick; Lanou, Hermann; Maleta, Kenneth; Mamadoultaibou, Aissa; Msamanga, Gernard; Osrin, David; Persson, Lars-Åke; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Rivera, Juan A; Rizvi, Arjumand; Sachdev, H P S; Urassa, Willy; West, Keith P; Zagre, Noel; Zeng, Lingxia; Zhu, Zhonghai; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Sudfeld, Christopher R

    2017-11-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies are common among women in low-income and middle-income countries. Data from randomised trials suggest that maternal multiple micronutrient supplementation decreases the risk of low birthweight and potentially improves other infant health outcomes. However, heterogeneity across studies suggests influence from effect modifiers. We aimed to identify individual-level modifiers of the effect of multiple micronutrient supplements on stillbirth, birth outcomes, and infant mortality in low-income and middle-income countries. This two-stage meta-analysis of individual patient included data from 17 randomised controlled trials done in 14 low-income and middle-income countries, which compared multiple micronutrient supplements containing iron-folic acid versus iron-folic acid alone in 112 953 pregnant women. We generated study-specific estimates and pooled subgroup estimates using fixed-effects models and assessed heterogeneity between subgroups with the χ 2 test for heterogeneity. We did sensitivity analyses using random-effects models, stratifying by iron-folic acid dose, and exploring individual study effect. Multiple micronutrient supplements containing iron-folic acid provided significantly greater reductions in neonatal mortality for female neonates compared with male neonates than did iron-folic acid supplementation alone (RR 0·85, 95% CI 0·75-0·96 vs 1·06, 0·95-1·17; p value for interaction 0·007). Multiple micronutrient supplements resulted in greater reductions in low birthweight (RR 0·81, 95% CI 0·74-0·89; p value for interaction 0·049), small-for-gestational-age births (0·92, 0·87-0·97; p=0·03), and 6-month mortality (0·71, 0·60-0·86; p=0·04) in anaemic pregnant women (haemoglobin supplements also had a greater effect on preterm births among underweight pregnant women (BMI supplements before 20 weeks gestation provided greater reductions in preterm birth (RR 0·89, 95% CI 0·85-0·93; p=0·03). Generally, the

  20. Impact of Socioeconomic and Health System Factors on Infant Mortality Rate in Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC: Evidence from 2004 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satar Rezaei

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: infant mortality rate is one of the main health indicators for assessing the health system’s performance over the world. We aim to examine the socioeconomic and health system factors affect infant mortality in OPEC from 2004 to 2013. Methods: was used to examine the effects of some of the key explanatory factors (total fertility rate per women, GDP per capita (current US$, public health expenditure as % of total health expenditure and female labor force participation rate on infant mortality in OPEC from 2004 to 2013.  These data were obtained from World Bank and World Health Organization data bank. Results: our results showed the total fertility rate had a positive and significant impact on infant mortality in the studied period. Also, there are negative significant associations between GDP per capita and public health expenditure with infant mortality. We did not observe any relationship between infant mortality and female labour force participation rate in the studied countries from 2004 to 2013. Conclusion: total fertility rate per women, GDP per capita (current US$, public health expenditure as % of total health expenditure were identified as the main factors affecting on infant mortality in OPEC over the ten years (2004-2013. This study enables health policy-makers to better understand the factors affecting on infant mortality and thereby take necessary steps in managing and decreasing the infant mortality rate in the studied countries.

  1. High Rates of All-cause and Gastroenteritis-related Hospitalization Morbidity and Mortality among HIV-exposed Indian Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathy Srikanth

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-infected and HIV-exposed, uninfected infants experience a high burden of infectious morbidity and mortality. Hospitalization is an important metric for morbidity and is associated with high mortality, yet, little is known about rates and causes of hospitalization among these infants in the first 12 months of life. Methods Using data from a prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT trial (India SWEN, where HIV-exposed breastfed infants were given extended nevirapine, we measured 12-month infant all-cause and cause-specific hospitalization rates and hospitalization risk factors. Results Among 737 HIV-exposed Indian infants, 93 (13% were HIV-infected, 15 (16% were on HAART, and 260 (35% were hospitalized 381 times by 12 months of life. Fifty-six percent of the hospitalizations were attributed to infections; gastroenteritis was most common accounting for 31% of infectious hospitalizations. Gastrointestinal-related hospitalizations steadily increased over time, peaking around 9 months. The 12-month all-cause hospitalization, gastroenteritis-related hospitalization, and in-hospital mortality rates were 906/1000 PY, 229/1000 PY, and 35/1000 PY respectively among HIV-infected infants and 497/1000 PY, 107/1000 PY, and 3/1000 PY respectively among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. Advanced maternal age, infant HIV infection, gestational age, and male sex were associated with higher all-cause hospitalization risk while shorter duration of breastfeeding and abrupt weaning were associated with gastroenteritis-related hospitalization. Conclusions HIV-exposed Indian infants experience high rates of all-cause and infectious hospitalization (particularly gastroenteritis and in-hospital mortality. HIV-infected infants are nearly 2-fold more likely to experience hospitalization and 10-fold more likely to die compared to HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. The combination of scaling up HIV PMTCT programs and implementing proven health

  2. Welfare state regimes, infant mortality and life expectancy: integrating evidence from East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ying-Chih; Chuang, Kun-Yang; Chen, You-Rong; Shi, Bo-Wen; Yang, Tzu-Hsuan

    2012-07-01

    This longitudinal study builds on the cross-sectional work of Karim et al and examines the influence of welfare state regime on population health with a particular focus on East Asian welfare states (eg, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Singapore and Taiwan). Data were extracted from the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development Data Set, World Development Indicators and Asian Development Bank's key indicators from 1980 to 2006. Infant mortalities and life expectancy were used as health-outcome varables. Thirty-one countries were categorised into six types of welfare regimes: Scandinavian, Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian, Southern, Eastern European and East Asian. Mixed models were applied to analyse the data with repeated measurements. In keeping with Karim et al, Scandinavian and Eastern European welfare states have lower and higher infant mortalities respectively compared with East Asian welfare states. Eastern European welfare states had a lower life expectancy than East Asian welfare states. Most welfare states had a higher social, health and education expenditure, and higher densities of physicians than East Asian welfare states. East Asian welfare states did not have worse health than most welfare states. Future studies should continue to incorporate East Asian countries in the typology of welfare regimes that include more social, economic, political and healthcare system characteristic variables to provide insight on the mechanism by which welfare-state regimes influence population health.

  3. The impact of economic recession on maternal and infant mortality: lessons from history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitzmaurice Ann

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of the recent world recession on population health has featured heavily in recent international meetings. Maternal health is a particular concern given that many countries were already falling short of their MDG targets for 2015. Methods We utilise 20th century time series data from 14 high and middle income countries to investigate associations between previous economic recession and boom periods on maternal and infant outcomes (1936 to 2005. A first difference logarithmic model is used to investigate the association between short run fluctuations in GDP per capita (individual incomes and changes in health outcomes. Separate models are estimated for four separate time periods. Results The results suggest a modest but significant association between maternal and infant mortality and economic growth for early periods (1936 to 1965 but not more recent periods. Individual country data display markedly different patterns of response to economic changes. Japan and Canada were vulnerable to economic shocks in the post war period. In contrast, mortality rates in countries such as the UK and Italy and particularly the US appear little affected by economic fluctuations. Conclusions The data presented suggest that recessions do have a negative association with maternal and infant outcomes particularly in earlier stages of a country's development although the effects vary widely across different systems. Almost all of the 20 least wealthy countries have suffered a reduction of 10% or more in GDP per capita in at least one of the last five decades. The challenge for today's policy makers is the design and implementation of mechanisms that protect vulnerable populations from the effects of fluctuating national income.

  4. Infant mortality gap in the Baltic region - Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania - in relation to macroeconomic factors in 1996-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebela, Inguna; Zile, Irisa; Ebela, Danute Razuka; Rozenfelde, Ingrida Rumba

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE. A constant gap has appeared in infant mortality among the 3 Baltic States - Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania - since the restoration of independence in 1991. The aim of the study was to compare infant mortality rates in all the 3 Baltic countries and examine some of the macro- and socioeconomic factors associated with infant mortality. MATERIAL AND METHODS. The data were obtained from international databases, such as World Health Organization and EUROSTAT, and the national statistical databases of the Baltic States. The time series data sets (1996-2010) were used in the regression and correlation analysis. RESULTS. In all the 3 Baltic States, a strong and significant correlation was found: Latvia (r=-0.81, PLatvia (r=-0.81, PLatvia (r=0.87, PLatvia are apparently explained by less successful adaptation to a new political and economic situation and limited skills in adjusting the healthcare system to the reality of life.

  5. High infant mortality rate, high total fertility rate and very low female literacy in selected African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susuman, A Sathiya; Chialepeh, Wilson N; Bado, Aristide; Lailulo, Yishak

    2016-02-01

    This study focused on the top 10 selected African countries with key interventions such as high infant mortality rate, high total fertility rate and female literacy rate. The World Bank's 2013 data were used. Descriptive analyses were performed. Findings show that Sierra Leone (107.2), Angola (102) and Central Africa Republic (96.1) reported the highest infant mortality rate per 1000 live births. The total fertility rates in Niger (7.6), Mali (6.8) and Somalia (6.6) were higher than other comparable countries. Health care service providers need to pay more attention during pregnancy periods, improve number of field visits, identify pregnant women and promote 100% antenatal care if this is done practically, these countries will reduce and ultimately eliminate infant mortality. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  6. Infant and Child Mortality in India in the Last Two Decades: A Geospatial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek; Pathak, Praveen Kumar; Chauhan, Rajesh Kumar; Pan, William

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies examining the intricate interplay between poverty, female literacy, child malnutrition, and child mortality are rare in demographic literature. Given the recent focus on Millennium Development Goals 4 (child survival) and 5 (maternal health), we explored whether the geographic regions that were underprivileged in terms of wealth, female literacy, child nutrition, or safe delivery were also grappling with the elevated risk of child mortality; whether there were any spatial outliers; whether these relationships have undergone any significant change over historical time periods. Methodology The present paper attempted to investigate these critical questions using data from household surveys like NFHS 1992–1993, NFHS 1998–1999 and DLHS 2002–2004. For the first time, we employed geo-spatial techniques like Moran's-I, univariate LISA, bivariate LISA, spatial error regression, and spatiotemporal regression to address the research problem. For carrying out the geospatial analysis, we classified India into 76 natural regions based on the agro-climatic scheme proposed by Bhat and Zavier (1999) following the Census of India Study and all estimates were generated for each of the geographic regions. Result/Conclusions This study brings out the stark intra-state and inter-regional disparities in infant and under-five mortality in India over the past two decades. It further reveals, for the first time, that geographic regions that were underprivileged in child nutrition or wealth or female literacy were also likely to be disadvantaged in terms of infant and child survival irrespective of the state to which they belong. While the role of economic status in explaining child malnutrition and child survival has weakened, the effect of mother's education has actually become stronger over time. PMID:22073208

  7. Infant and child mortality in India in the last two decades: a geospatial analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh

    Full Text Available Studies examining the intricate interplay between poverty, female literacy, child malnutrition, and child mortality are rare in demographic literature. Given the recent focus on Millennium Development Goals 4 (child survival and 5 (maternal health, we explored whether the geographic regions that were underprivileged in terms of wealth, female literacy, child nutrition, or safe delivery were also grappling with the elevated risk of child mortality; whether there were any spatial outliers; whether these relationships have undergone any significant change over historical time periods.The present paper attempted to investigate these critical questions using data from household surveys like NFHS 1992-1993, NFHS 1998-1999 and DLHS 2002-2004. For the first time, we employed geo-spatial techniques like Moran's-I, univariate LISA, bivariate LISA, spatial error regression, and spatiotemporal regression to address the research problem. For carrying out the geospatial analysis, we classified India into 76 natural regions based on the agro-climatic scheme proposed by Bhat and Zavier (1999 following the Census of India Study and all estimates were generated for each of the geographic regions.This study brings out the stark intra-state and inter-regional disparities in infant and under-five mortality in India over the past two decades. It further reveals, for the first time, that geographic regions that were underprivileged in child nutrition or wealth or female literacy were also likely to be disadvantaged in terms of infant and child survival irrespective of the state to which they belong. While the role of economic status in explaining child malnutrition and child survival has weakened, the effect of mother's education has actually become stronger over time.

  8. Juvenile marriages, child-brides and infant mortality among Serbian gypsies

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    Čvorović Jelena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gypsies/Roma make up the largest minority in Europe. Roma communities tend to be segregated and characterized by poverty, unemployment, poor education, and poor quality housing. So far, the European strategy for Gypsy/Roma integration proved insufficient because it fails to account to the normative nature of the isolationist and ethnocentric nature of certain elements of Gypsy culture, as well as the deep and mutual distrust between Gypsies and non-Gypsies within European countries. In Serbia, the Gypsy population tends to suffer disproportionately from higher rates of poverty, unemployment, illiteracy, and disease. At the same time, the Serbian Gypsy women average an infant mortality rate between 10-20%. For most of these girls/women, endogamous, arranged marriages are negotiated at an early age, usually without their consent. Among these women, a certain level of infant mortality is “expected”, following an underinvestment in some children manifested in their care, feeding, and the response to their illnesses. These juvenile arranged marriages, subsequent reproduction and child mortality are culturally self-sufficient and hence pose a challenge for international human rights: while many Gypsy girls/women are being denied the right to choose whom and when to marry, the Gypsy community itself openly accepts juvenile arranged marriage as a preservation strategy and means of cultural, economic, and societal maintenance and independence. Although efforts to improve education, health, living conditions, encourage employment and development opportunities for Gypsies/Roma are essential, these objectives cannot be attained without directing the changes needed within Gypsy/Roma culture itself. The initial point for change must come from an increased sense of responsibility among the Gypsies themselves.

  9. Micronutrient Deficiencies among Breastfeeding Infants in Tanzania

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    Alexandra L. Bellows

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Infant mortality accounts for the majority of child deaths in Tanzania, and malnutrition is an important underlying cause. The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to describe the micronutrient status of infants in Tanzania and assess predictors of infant micronutrient deficiency. We analyzed serum vitamin D, vitamin B12, folate, and ferritin levels from 446 infants at two weeks of age, 408 infants at three months of age, and 427 mothers three months post-partum. We used log-Poisson regression to estimate relative risk of being deficient in vitamin D and vitamin B12 for infants in each age group. The prevalence of vitamin D and vitamin B12 deficiency decreased from 60% and 30% at two weeks to 9% and 13% at three months respectively. Yet, the prevalence of insufficiency at three months was 49% for vitamin D and 17% for vitamin B12. Predictors of infant vitamin D deficiency were low birthweight, urban residence, maternal education, and maternal vitamin D status. Maternal vitamin B12 status was the main predictor for infant vitamin B12 deficiency. The majority of infants had sufficient levels of folate or ferritin. Further research is necessary to examine the potential benefits of improving infants’ nutritional status through vitamin D and B12 supplements.

  10. Mortality and Morbidity of Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants in the Mainland of China: A Multi-center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Jia; Du, Li-Zhong; Ma, Xiao-Lu; Shi, Li-Ping; Pan, Jia-Hua; Tong, Xiao-Mei; Li, Qiu-Ping; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Yi, Bing; Liu, Ling; Chen, Yun-Bing; Wei, Qiu-Fen; Wu, Hui-Qing; Li, Mei; Liu, Cui-Qing; Gao, Xi-Rong; Xia, Shi-Wen; Li, Wen-Bin; Yan, Chao-Ying; He, Ling; Liang, Kun; Zhou, Xiao-Yu; Han, Shu-Ping; Lyu, Qin; Qiu, Yin-Ping; Li, Wen; Chen, Dong-Mei; Lu, Hong-Ru; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Hong; Lin, Zhen-Lang; Liu, Li; Zhu, Jia-Jun; Xiong, Hong; Yue, Shao-Jie; Zhuang, Si-Qi

    2015-10-20

    With the progress of perinatal medicine and neonatal technology, more and more extremely low birth weight (ELBW) survived all over the world. This study was designed to investigate the short-term outcomes of ELBW infants during their Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) stay in the mainland of China. All infants admitted to 26 NICUs with a birth weight (BW) infants were admitted to 26 NICUs, of whom the mean gestational age (GA) was 28.1 ± 2.2 weeks, and the mean BW was 868 ± 97 g. The overall survival rate at discharge was 50.0%. Despite aggressive treatment 60 infants (23.3%) died and another 69 infants (26.7%) died after medical care withdrawal. Furthermore, the survival rate was significantly higher in coastal areas than inland areas (53.6% vs. 35.3%, P = 0.019). BW mortality. Respiratory distress syndrome was the most common complication. The incidence of patent ductus arteriosus, intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity was 26.2%, 33.7%, 6.7%, 48.1%, and 41.4%, respectively. Ventilator associated pneumonia was the most common hospital acquired infection during hospitalization. Our study was the first survey that revealed the present status of ELBW infants in the mainland of China. The mortality and morbidity of ELBW infants remained high as compared to other developed countries.

  11. Association between Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy and Low Birthweight: Effects by Maternal Age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zheng

    Full Text Available Maternal smoking during pregnancy has been consistently related to low birthweight. However, older mothers, who are already at risk of giving birth to low birthweight infants, might be even more susceptible to the effects of maternal smoking. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the modified association between maternal smoking and low birthweight by maternal age.Data were obtained from a questionnaire survey of all mothers of children born between 2004 and 2010 in Okinawa, Japan who underwent medical check-ups at age 3 months. Variables assessed were maternal smoking during pregnancy, maternal age, gestational age, parity, birth year, and complications during pregnancy. Stratified analyses were performed using a logistic regression model.In total, 92641 participants provided complete information on all variables. Over the 7 years studied, the proportion of mothers smoking during pregnancy decreased from 10.6% to 5.0%, while the prevalence of low birthweight did not change remarkably (around 10%. Maternal smoking was significantly associated with low birthweight in all age groups. The strength of the association increased with maternal age, both in crude and adjusted models.Consistent with previous studies conducted in Western countries, this study demonstrates that maternal age has a modifying effect on the association between maternal smoking and birthweight. This finding suggests that specific education and health care programs for older smoking mothers are important to improve their foetal growth.

  12. The Aristotle score predicts mortality after surgery of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yun Hee; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Ji-yong; Youn, YoungAh; Lee, Eun-Jung; Moon, Sena; Lee, Ju Young; Sung, In Kyung

    2013-09-01

    Outcomes after surgical ligation of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in preterm infants are often complicated by prematurity associated comorbidities. The Aristotle comprehensive complexity score (ACCS) has been proposed as a useful tool for complexity adjustment in the analysis of outcome after congenital heart surgery. The aims of this study were to define preoperative risk factors for mortality and to demonstrate the usefulness of ACCS to predict mortality after surgical ligation of PDA in the preterm. Included were 49 preterm babies (≤35 weeks of gestation) who had surgical ligation of PDA between May 2009 and July 2012. Median gestational age was 27.6 weeks (range, 23 to 35 weeks) and median birth weight was 1,040 g (range, 520 to 2,280 g). Median age at operation was 15 days (range, 4 to 44 days) and median weight was 1,120 g (range, 400 to 2,880 g). Initial oral ibuprofen was ineffective in 24 patients and contraindicated in 25. All surgical ligations were done at bedside in the neonatal intensive care unit. Preoperative clinical and laboratory profiles were reviewed and ACCS was derived. Eight of 49 patients (16.3%) died at a median of 14 days (range, 2 to 73 days) after PDA ligation. Patients who had contraindications for oral ibuprofen (odds ratio [OR] 8.94; p=0.049), coagulopathy (OR 12.13; p=0.025), renal dysfunction (OR 28.88; p=0.003), intraventricular hemorrhage greater than grade II or seizure (OR 34.00; p=0.002), and ACCS points (OR 29.594; p<0.05) were significantly associated with an increased risk for mortality. Among the risk factors, ACCS showed the largest area under curve (0.991) by receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis. Optimal cutoff value of ACCS for mortality were 15 or greater, with sensitivity of 87.5%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100%, and negative predictive value of 97.6%. The ACCS, especially for procedure-independent complexity factors, is a useful tool to predict mortality after ligation of PDA in

  13. Computer-generated versus nurse-determined strategy for incubator humidity and time to regain birthweight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, Onno K.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2008-01-01

    To compare effects on premature infants' weight gain of a computer-generated and a nurse-determined incubator humidity strategy. An optimal humidity protocol is thought to reduce time to regain birthweight. Prospective randomized controlled design. Level IIIC neonatal intensive care unit in the

  14. A birthweight nomogram for Africa, as a malaria-control indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brabin, B. J.; Agbaje, S. O.; Ahmed, Y.; Briggs, N. D.

    1999-01-01

    Low birthweight (LBW) attributable to malaria in pregnancy is a significant risk for millions in Africa. Infants born to primigravidae are at greatest risk and it is proposed that this excess risk can be used as a simple indicator of malaria transmission and exposure in pregnant women in Africa.

  15. The effect of divorce on infant mortality in a remote area of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, N; Saha, S K; Razzaque, A; van Ginneken, J K

    2001-04-01

    The process of divorce is usually lengthy and hazardous, and can start quarrels that can lead to the abuse of women and their children. This study examines the effects of divorce on neonatal and postneonatal mortality of babies born before and after divorce in Teknaf, a remote area of Bangladesh. The longitudinal demographic surveillance system (DSS) followed 1,762 Muslim marriages in 1982-83 for 5 years to record divorce, deaths of spouse, emigration and births. It recorded 2,696 live births during the follow-up period, and their survival status during infancy. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the effect of divorce on neonatal and postneonatal mortality, controlling for maternal age at birth, parity, sex of the child and household economic status. The odds of neonatal and postneonatal deaths among babies born after divorce or less than 12 months before mothers were divorced were more than double the odds of those born to mothers of intact marriages. The odds of postneonatal deaths were two times higher among babies born more than 12 months before divorce happens than their peers. The high mortality of infants born before and after mothers were divorced may reflect how abusive marriage and divorce increase the vulnerability of women and children in rural Bangladesh. Divorce and abuse of women are difficult and intractable social and health problems that must be addressed.

  16. La mortalidad infantil, indicador de excelencia Infant mortality, an indicator of excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurima Díaz Elejalde

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available La mortalidad infantil es un indicador de gran importancia para el Sistema Nacional de Salud cubano y a nivel mundial. Es utilizado para evaluar el estado de salud de la población, por lo que se realizó un estudio descriptivo, retrospectivo y longitudinal con el objetivo de caracterizar el comportamiento de la mortalidad infantil en el municipio de Guanabacoa, desde el 1º de enero de 2000 al 30 de junio de 2005. Se estudió una muestra de 48 defunciones a través de variables maternas y del recién nacido, con la información obtenida de los registros médicos e historias clínicas. Se encontró que la tasa de mortalidad infantil de nuestro municipio, fundamentalmente en los 4 años iniciales, es irregular con tendencia decreciente, siendo las principales causas de muerte las infecciones (37,5 %, la sepsis (14,5 %, la asfixia (10,4 % y las malformaciones congénitas (10,4 %. Las variables maternas afectadas fueron los factores de riesgo en el embarazo: bajo peso materno, la moniliasis vaginal y la anemia ferropénica ; y en el recién nacido, el componente neonatal precoz y el sexo masculino.Infant mortality is an indicator of great importance for the Cuban National Health System and for the world. It is used to evaluate the health status of the population. A descriptive, retrospective and longitudinal study was conducted aimed at characterizing the behavior of infant mortality in the municipality of Guanabacoa from January 1st, 2000 to June 30th, 2005. A sample of 48 deaths was studied through variables of the mother and the newborn obtained from the medical registries and histories. It was found that infant mortality rate in our municipality, mainly in the 4 initial years is irregular with a decreasing trend. The main causes of death are infections (37.5 %, sepsis (14.5 %, asphyxia (10.4 % and congenital malformations (10.4 %. The affected maternal variables were the risk factors during pregnancy: maternal low weight, vaginal moniliasis

  17. Morbidity and mortality among a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected and uninfected pregnant women and their infants from Malawi, Zambia, and Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilongozi, David; Wang, Lei; Brown, Lillian; Taha, Taha; Valentine, Megan; Emel, Lynda; Sinkala, Moses; Kafulafula, George; Noor, Ramadhani A; Read, Jennifer S; Brown, Elizabeth R; Goldenberg, Robert L; Hoffman, Irving

    2008-09-01

    Morbidity and mortality patterns among pregnant women and their infants (before antiretroviral therapy was widely available) determines HIV-1 diagnostic, monitoring, and care interventions. Data from mothers and their infants enrolled in a trial of antibiotics to reduce mother-to-child-transmission of HIV-1 at 4 sub-Saharan African sites were analyzed. Women were enrolled during pregnancy and follow-up continued until the infants reached 12 months of age. We describe maternal and infant morbidity and mortality in a cohort of HIV-1-infected and HIV-1-uninfected mothers. Maternal and infant factors associated with mortality risk in the infants were assessed using Cox proportional hazard modeling. Among 2292 HIV-1-infected mothers, 166 (7.2%) had a serious adverse event (SAE) and 42 (1.8%) died, whereas no deaths occurred among the 331 HIV-1 uninfected mothers. Four hundred twenty-four (17.8%) of 2383 infants had an SAE and 349 (16.4%) died before the end of follow-up. Infants with early HIV-1 infection (birth to 4-6 weeks) had the highest mortality. Among infants born to HIV-1-infected women, maternal morbidity and mortality (P = 0.0001), baseline CD4 count (P = 0.0002), and baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA concentration (P < 0.0001) were significant predictors of infant mortality in multivariate analyses. The high mortality among infants with early HIV-1 infection supports access to HIV-1 diagnostics and appropriate early treatment for all infants of HIV-1-infected mothers. The significant association between stage of maternal HIV-1 infection and infant mortality supports routine CD4 counts at the time of prenatal HIV-1 testing.

  18. Factors associated with infant mortality in Nepal: a comparative analysis of Nepal demographic and health surveys (NDHS 2006 and 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeta Lamichhane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infant mortality is one of the priority public health issues in developing countries like Nepal. The infant mortality rate (IMR was 48 and 46 per 1000 live births for the year 2006 and 2011, respectively, a slight reduction during the 5 years’ period. A comprehensive analysis that has identified and compared key factors associated with infant mortality is limited in Nepal, and, therefore, this study aims to fill the gap. Methods Datasets from Nepal Demographic and Health Surveys (NDHS 2006 and 2011 were used to identify and compare the major factors associated with infant mortality. Both surveys used multistage stratified cluster sampling techniques. A total of 8707 and 10,826 households were interviewed in 2006 and 2011, with more than 99% response rate in both studies. The survival information of singleton live-born infants born 5 years preceding the two surveys were extracted from the ‘childbirth’ dataset. Multiple logistic regression analysis using a hierarchical modelling approach with the backward elimination method was conducted. Complex Samples Analysis was used to adjust for unequal selection probability due to the multistage stratified cluster-sampling procedure used in both NDHS. Results Based on NDHS 2006, ecological region, succeeding birth interval, breastfeeding status and type of delivery assistance were found to be significant predictors of infant mortality. Infants born in hilly region (AOR = 0.43, p = 0.013 and with professional assistance (AOR = 0.27, p = 0.039 had a lower risk of mortality. On the other hand, infants with succeeding birth interval less than 24 months (AOR = 6.66, p = 0.001 and those who were never breastfed (AOR = 1.62, p = 0.044 had a higher risk of mortality. Based on NDHS 2011, birth interval (preceding and succeeding and baby’s size at birth were identified to be significantly associated with infant mortality. Infants born with preceding

  19. "Look at the Whole Me": A Mixed-Methods Examination of Black Infant Mortality in the US through Women's Lived Experiences and Community Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Maeve E; Green, Carmen; Richardson, Lisa; Theall, Katherine; Crear-Perry, Joia

    2017-07-05

    In the US, the non-Hispanic Black infant mortality rate exceeds the rate among non-Hispanic Whites by more than two-fold. To explore factors underlying this persistent disparity, we employed a mixed methods approach with concurrent quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis. Eighteen women participated in interviews about their experience of infant loss. Several common themes emerged across interviews, grouped by domain: individual experiences (trauma, grieving and counseling; criminalization); negative interactions with healthcare providers and the healthcare system; and broader contextual factors. Concurrently, we estimated the Black infant mortality rate (deaths per 1000 live births) using linked live birth-infant death records from 2010 to 2013 in every metropolitan statistical area in the US. Poisson regression examined how contextual indicators of population health, socioeconomic conditions of the Black population, and features of the communities in which they live were associated with Black infant mortality and inequity in Black-White infant mortality rates across 100 metropolitan statistical areas with the highest Black infant mortality rates. We used principal components analysis to create a Birth Equity Index in order to examine the collective impact of contextual indicators on Black infant mortality and racial inequity in mortality rates. The association between the Index and Black infant mortality was stronger than any single indicator alone: in metropolitan areas with the worst social, economic, and environmental conditions, Black infant mortality rates were on average 1.24 times higher than rates in areas where conditions were better (95% CI = 1.16, 1.32). The experiences of Black women in their homes, neighborhoods, and health care centers and the contexts in which they live may individually and collectively contribute to persistent racial inequity in infant mortality.

  20. Pentaglobin as an adjunct therapy in very low birthweight neonates with nosocomial sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salihoglu, O.; Can, E.; Koc, M.O.; Durmus, E.; Hatipoglu, S.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of pentaglobin treatment on clinical and laboratory parametres and the major morbidities in very low birthweight neonates with nosocomial sepsis before and after pentaglobin treatment. Methods: The prospective interventional study was conducted from January 1 to December 31, 2010, at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. Pentaglobin was initiated on the day of diagnosis of nosocomial sepsis to 13 pre-term neonates as a support therapy in addition to antibiotics; 5 ml/kg per day of pentaglobin was infused over a 4-hour period on 3 consecutive days. Clinical and laboratory parametres and major morbidities were recorded before and after pentaglobin treatment and compared using NCSS software. Results: Of the total, 8(66%) were females and 5 (40%) males. Following pentaglobin therapy, the immature-to-total neutrophil ratio and C-reactive protein levels were significantly decreased, and the capillary pH and base excess were significantly increased (p 0.05). Coagulase-negative staphylococci (n=3; 23%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=2; 15.3%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=1; 7.7%) were identified in blood cultures. The presence of intraventricular haemorrhages, necrotising enterocolitis, periventricular leukomalacia, and patent ductus arteriosus was not changed following the treatment. Adverse effects and mortality were not observed during or after the therapy. Conclusion: Pentaglobin treatment of nosocomial sepsis could be used as an adjunct therapy without any adverse short-term reactions, even in very low birthweight pre-term infants. (author)

  1. Evaluation and Estimation of the Provincial Infant Mortality Rate in China's Sixth Census.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Song Bo; Wang, Fang; Yu, Chuan Hua

    2015-06-01

    To assess the data quality and estimate the provincial infant mortality rate (1q0) from China's sixth census. A log-quadratic model is applied to under-fifteen data. We analyze and compare the average relative errors (AREs) for 1q0 between the estimated and reported values using the leave-one-out cross-validation method. For the sixth census, the AREs are more than 100% for almost all provinces. The estimated average 1q0 level for 31 provinces is 12.3‰ for males and 10.7‰ for females. The data for the provincial 1q0 from China's sixth census have a serious data quality problem. The actual levels of 1q0 for each province are significantly higher than the reported values. Copyright © 2015 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  2. Independent and combined effects of maternal smoking and solid fuel on infant and child mortality in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, Joshua O; Adedini, Sunday A; Wandera, Stephen O; Odimegwu, Clifford O

    2016-12-01

    To estimate the independent and combined risks of infant and child mortality associated with maternal smoking and use of solid fuel in sub-Saharan Africa. Pooled weighted data on 143 602 under-five children in the most recent demographic and health surveys for 15 sub-Saharan African countries were analysed. The synthetic cohort life table technique and Cox proportional hazard models were employed to investigate the effect of maternal smoking and solid cooking fuel on infant (age 0-11 months) and child (age 12-59 months) mortality. Socio-economic and other confounding variables were included as controls. The distribution of the main explanatory variable in households was as follows: smoking + solid fuel - 4.6%; smoking + non-solid fuel - 0.22%; no smoking + solid fuel - 86.9%; and no smoking + non-solid fuel - 8.2%. The highest infant mortality rate was recorded among children exposed to maternal smoking + solid fuel (72 per 1000 live births); the child mortality rate was estimated to be 54 per 1000 for this group. In full multivariate models, the risk of infant death was 71% higher among those exposed to maternal smoking + solid fuel (HR = 1.71, CI: 1.29-2.28). For ages 12 to 59 months, the risk of death was 99% higher (HR = 1.99, CI: 1.28-3.08). Combined exposures to cigarette smoke and solid fuel increase the risks of infant and child mortality. Mothers of under-five children need to be educated about the danger of smoking while innovative approaches are needed to reduce the mortality risks associated with solid cooking fuel. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The impact of maternal celiac disease on birthweight and preterm birth: a Danish population-based cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khashan, A S

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Adverse pregnancy outcomes have been associated with maternal celiac disease (CD). In this study, we investigate the effect of treated and untreated maternal CD on infant birthweight and preterm birth. METHODS: A population-based cohort study consisted of all singleton live births in Denmark between 1 January 1979 and 31 December 2004 was used. A total of 1,504,342 babies were born to 836,241 mothers during the study period. Of those, 1105 babies were born to women with diagnosed CD and 346 were born to women with undiagnosed CD. Women with diagnosed CD were considered as treated with a gluten free diet while women with undiagnosed CD were considered as untreated. The outcome measures were: birthweight, small for gestational age (SGA: birthweight <10th centile), very small for gestational age (VSGA: birthweight <5th centile) and preterm birth. We compared these measures in treated and untreated women with those of a reference group (no history of CD). RESULTS: Women with untreated CD delivered smaller babies [difference = -98 g (95% CI: -130, -67)], with a higher risk of SGA infants [OR = 1.31 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.63)], VSGA infants [OR = 1.54 (95% CI: 1.17, 2.03)] and preterm birth [OR = 1.33 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.72)] compared with women without CD. Women with treated CD had no increased risk of reduced mean birthweight, risk of delivering SGA and VSGA infants or preterm birth compared with women without CD. CONCLUSION: Untreated maternal CD increases the risk of reduced birthweight, the risk of delivering SGA and VSGA infants and preterm birth. Diagnosis and presumed treatment of maternal CD with a gluten-free diet appeared to result in a birthweight and preterm birth rate similar to those in women without CD.

  4. Use of new World Health Organization child growth standards to assess how infant malnutrition relates to breastfeeding and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesel, Linda; Bahl, Rajiv; Martines, Jose; Penny, Mary; Bhandari, Nita; Kirkwood, Betty R

    2010-01-01

    To compare the estimated prevalence of malnutrition using the World Health Organization's (WHO) child growth standards versus the National Center for Health Statistics' (NCHS) growth reference, to examine the relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and malnutrition, and to determine the sensitivity and specificity of nutritional status indicators for predicting death during infancy. A secondary analysis of data on 9424 mother-infant pairs in Ghana, India and Peru was conducted. Mothers and infants were enrolled in a trial of vitamin A supplementation during which the infants' weight, length and feeding practices were assessed regularly. Malnutrition indicators were determined using WHO and NCHS growth standards. The prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight in infants aged mortality in India. No indicator was a good predictor in Ghana or Peru. In infants aged 6-12 months, underweight at 6 months had the highest sensitivity and specificity for predicting mortality in Ghana (37.0% and 82.2%, respectively) and Peru (33.3% and 97.9% respectively), while wasting was the best predictor in India (sensitivity: 54.6%; specificity: 85.5%). Malnutrition indicators determined using WHO standards were better predictors of mortality than those determined using NCHS standards. No association was found between breastfeeding duration and malnutrition at 6 months. Use of WHO child growth standards highlighted the importance of malnutrition in the first 6 months of life.

  5. Black-White Differences in Maternal Age, Maternal Birth Cohort, and Period Effects on Infant Mortality in the U.S. (1983-2002)1

    OpenAIRE

    Powers, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate three interrelated sources of change in infant mortality rates over a 20 year period using the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) linked birth and infant death cohort files. The effects of maternal age, maternal birth cohort, and time period of childbirth on infant mortality are estimated using a modified age/period/cohort (APC) model that identifies age, period, cohort effects. We document black-white differences in the patterning of these effects and find that mater...

  6. Catch-up growth in Malawian babies, a longitudinal study of normal and low birthweight babies born in a malarious endemic area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalanda, B.F.; Buuren, S. van; Verhoeff, F.H.; Brabin, B.J.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Infant growth has not been studied in developing countries in relation to maternal factors related to malaria in pregnancy and maternal illiteracy. Objective: To describe growth patterns in infants with low and normal birthweight and determine maternal risk factors for infant

  7. [Infant mortality according to color or race based on the 2010 Population Census and national health information systems in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Aline Diniz Rodrigues; Santos, Ricardo Ventura; Borges, Gabriel Mendes; Valente, Joaquim Gonçalves; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo; Marinho, Gerson Luiz

    2017-08-07

    The aim of this study was to investigate infant mortality data according to color or race in Brazil with a focus on indigenous individuals, based on data from the 2010 Population Census and the Brazilian Mortality Information System (SIM) and Brazilian Information System on Live Births (SINASC). In both sources, the infant mortality rate (IMR) for indigenous individuals was the highest of all the various population segments. Although the census data indicate inequalities by color or race, the infant mortality rates for indigenous and black individuals were lower than those based on data from SIM/SINASC. Methodological specificities in the data collection in the two sources should be considered. The reduction in IMR in Brazil in recent decades is largely attributed to the priority of infant health on the policy agenda. The study's findings indicate that the impact of public policies failed to reach indigenous peoples on the same scale as in the rest of the population. New sources of nationwide data on deaths in households, as in the case of the 2010 Census, can contribute to a better understanding of inequalities by color or race in Brazil.

  8. Effect of 50,000 IU vitamin A given with BCG vaccine on mortality in infants in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Diness, Birgitte Rode; Roth, Adam

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of high dose vitamin A supplementation given with BCG vaccine at birth in an African setting with high infant mortality. DESIGN: Randomised placebo controlled trial. Setting Bandim Health Project's demographic surveillance system in Guinea-Bissau, covering app...

  9. In Italy, North-South Differences in IQ Predict Differences in Income, Education, Infant Mortality, Stature, and Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Regional differences in IQ are presented for 12 regions of Italy showing that IQs are highest in the north and lowest in the south. Regional IQs obtained in 2006 are highly correlated with average incomes at r = 0.937, and with stature, infant mortality, literacy and education. The lower IQ in southern Italy may be attributable to genetic…

  10. Permissive hypercapnia for the prevention of morbidity and mortality in mechanically ventilated newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, P G; Davies, M W

    2001-01-01

    Experimental animal data and uncontrolled, observational studies in human infants have suggested that hyperventilation and hypocapnia may be associated with increased pulmonary and neurodevelopmental morbidity. Protective ventilatory strategies allowing higher levels of arterial CO2 (permissive hypercapnia) are now widely used in adult critical care. The aggressive pursuit of normocapnia in ventilated newborn infants may contribute to the already present burden of lung disease. However, the safe or ideal range for PCO2 in this vulnerable population has not been established. To assess whether, in mechanically ventilated neonates, a strategy of permissive hypercapnia improves short and long term outcomes (esp. mortality, duration of respiratory support, incidence of chronic lung disease and neurodevelopmental outcome). Standard strategies of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group were used. Searches were made of the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Current Contents. Searches were also made of previous reviews including cross-referencing, abstracts, and conference and symposia proceedings published in Pediatric Research. All randomised controlled trials in which a strategy of permissive hypercapnia was compared with conventional strategies aimed at achieving normocapnia (or lower levels of hypercapnia) in newborn infants who are mechanically ventilated were eligible. Standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group were used. Trials identified by the search strategy were independently reviewed by each author and assessed for eligibility and trial quality. Data were extracted separately. Differences were compared and resolved. Additional information was requested from trial authors. Only published data were available for review. Results are expressed as relative risk and risk difference for dichotomous outcomes, and weighted mean difference for continuous variables. Two trials involving 269 newborn infants were included. Meta-analysis of

  11. Infant mortality surveillance in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil: operationalization, strengths and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Conceição Maria de; Bonfim, Cristine Vieira do; Guimarães, Maria José Bezerra; Frias, Paulo Germano; Antonino, Verônica Cristina Sposito; Medeiros, Zulma Maria

    2017-01-01

    to report the experience on infant mortality surveillance (IMS) in the municipality of Recife-PE, Brazil. a documentary research and a query with key-informants who participated in the implementation and consolidation of the IMS were conducted; data of the Mortality Information System (SIM) and of the surveillance worksheets were used to measure the coverage of the investigated deaths. the implementation of the IMS has occurred gradually since 2003; the strategy is composed by (i) identification of deaths, (ii) investigation, (iii) discussion, (iv) recommendations and correction of vital statistics; upon completion of implementation (2006), 98.5% (256) of the deaths had been investigated and discussed, with the participation of those involved in the cases; in 2015, this coverage corresponded to 97.7%. the main recommendations consisted of expanding the access, coverage and improvement of primary, secondary and tertiary care quality; IMS is able to support changes in health care practices, as well as planning and organization of maternal and child care.

  12. Hyperglycaemia Among Nigerian Infants Weighing Less Than 1,500 Grammes at Birth: A Retrospective Assessment of the Clinical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyiriuka Alphonsus N.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: In very low birthweight (VLBW infants, birthweight < 1,500g, hyperglycaemia is associated with increased rates of mortality and morbidity. Our study aimed at determining the prevalence of hyperglycaemia among VLBW infants and describing their clinical characteristics. Methods: A retrospective chart review of all inborn VLBW infants was performed. Information obtained included birthweight, gestational age (best obstetric record, gender, and history of chorioamnionitis/maternal medical disorders, type and rates of intravenous fluid administration. Blood glucose level ≥ 7 mmol/L on at least two occasions defined hyperglycaemia. Results: Of the 279 blood glucose values, obtained from 93 infants, 91 (32.6%; 95% CI = 27.1% -38.1% were in the hyperglycaemic range, with the majority (61.5% occurring in the first 48 hours of life. The frequency of hyperglycaemia was significantly associated with a rate of infusion greater than 0.4g/kg/hour (Odds Ratio, OR = 3.76; 95% CI=1.58-8.94 and a positive history of maternal chorioamnionitis (OR = 3.04; 95%CI= 1.15-8.01. Conclusion: In the first 48 hours of life, hyperglycaemia co-existing with or complicating primary illnesses was common in VLBW infants who had dextrose infusion and a positive history of maternal chorioamnionitis

  13. Risk factors for perinatal mortality in an urban area of Southern Brazil, 1993

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    Ana M. B. Menezes

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Although there was a considerable reduction in infant mortality in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul in the last decade, its perinatal causes were reduced only by 28%. The associated factors of these causes were analised. MATERIAL AND METHOD: All hospital births and perinatal deaths were assessed by daily visits to all the maternity hospitals in the city, throughout 1993 and including the first week of 1994. RESULTS: The perinatal mortality rate was 22.1 per thousand births. The multivariate analysis showed the following risk factors: low socioeconomic level, male sex and maternal age above 35 years . Among multigravidae women, the fetal mortality rate was significantly increased for mothers with a previously low birthweight and a previous stillbirth. For early neonatal mortality the risk was significantly increased by a smaller number of antenatal visits than 5 and low birthweight. CONCLUSIONS: Main risk factors for perinatal mortality: low socioeconomic level, maternal age above 35 years and male sex. For early neonatal mortality the risk was significantly increased by a smaller number of antenatal visits than 5 and low birthweight.

  14. Infant mortality in Pelotas, Brazil: a comparison of risk factors in two birth cohorts La mortalidad de menores de un año en Pelotas, Brasil: comparación de factores de riesgo en dos cohortes de nacimiento

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    Ana Maria Baptista Menezes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare two population-based birth cohorts to assess trends in infant mortality rates and the distribution of relevant risk factors, and how these changed after an 11-year period. METHODS: Data from two population-based prospective birth cohorts (1982 and 1993 were analyzed. Both studies included all children born in a hospital (> 99% of all births in the city of Pelotas, Southern Brazil. Infant mortality was monitored through surveillance of all maternity hospitals, mortality registries and cemeteries. RESULTS: There were 5 914 live-born children in 1982 and 5 249 in 1993. The infant mortality rate decreased by 41%, from 36.0 per 1 000 live births in 1982 to 21.1 per 1 000 in 1993. Socioeconomic and maternal factors tended to become more favorable during the study period, but there were unfavorable changes in birthweight and gestational age. Poverty, high parity, low birthweight, preterm delivery, and intrauterine growth restriction were the main risk factors for infant mortality in both cohorts. The 41% reduction in infant mortality between 1982 and 1993 would have been even greater had the prevalence of risk factors remained constant during the period studied here. CONCLUSIONS: There were impressive declines in infant mortality which were not due to changes in the risk factors we studied. Because no reduction was seen in the large social inequalities documented in the 1982 cohort, it is likely that the reduction in infant mortality resulted largely from improvements in health care.OBJETIVOS: Comparar dos cohortes de nacimiento tomadas de la población en general a fin de evaluar las tendencias observadas en las tasas de mortalidad de menores de un año y la distribución de los factores de riesgo asociados con ella, así como los cambios sufridos por ambas cosas al cabo de un período de 11 años. MÉTODOS: Se analizaron los datos procedentes de dos cohortes de nacimiento prospectivas (1982 y 1993 tomadas de la población en

  15. Body composition and newborn birthweight in pregnancies of adolescent and mature women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Campos, María Elena; Rodríguez-Cervantes, Nora; Reza-López, Sandra; Ávila-Esparza, Marina; Chávez-Corral, Dora Virginia; Levario-Carrillo, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Teenage pregnancy has been associated with adverse effects for the mother and the newborn (NB). In order to compare body composition (BC) between adolescents (Ad) and mature women (MW) during pregnancy and to determine the difference in birthweight and perinatal morbidity, pregnant Ad (n=40) and MW (n=227) were studied. BC changes between the second and third trimesters were determined by multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis, and birthweight and NB morbidity were evaluated. During the second and third trimesters of the pregnancy, fat mass was lower in the Ad group [16 kg (13-19)] than in the MW group [22 kg (17-27)] (Ppregnancy. In addition, the NB infants of Ad mothers tended to have a lower birthweight than those from MW, a result that suggests that the Ad should be in strict prenatal control. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Analysis of risk factors for infant mortality in the 1992-3 and 2002-3 birth cohorts in rural Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Stine; Østergaard, Marie Louise Drivsholm; Rodrigues, Amabelia

    2017-01-01

    : The Bandim Health Project (BHP) continuously surveys children in rural Guinea-Bissau. We investigated the association between maternal and infant factors (especially DTP and measles coverage) and infant mortality. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using Cox regression. We tested for interactions with sex......INTRODUCTION: Though still high, the infant mortality rate in Guinea-Bissau has declined. We aimed to identify risk factors including vaccination coverage, for infant mortality in the rural population of Guinea-Bissau and assess whether these risk factors changed from 1992-3 to 2002-3. METHODS......, age groups (defined by current vaccination schedule) and cohort to assess whether the risk factors were the same for boys and girls, in different age groups in 1992-3 and in 2002-3. RESULTS: The infant mortality rate declined from 148/1000 person years (PYRS) in 1992-3 to 124/1000 PYRS in 2002-3 (HR...

  17. Plurality of Birth and Infant Mortality Due to External Causes in the United States, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Katherine A; Thoma, Marie E; Rossen, Lauren M; Warner, Margaret; Simon, Alan E

    2017-03-01

    Risk of death during the first year of life due to external causes, such as unintentional injury and homicide, may be higher among twins and higher-order multiples than among singletons in the United States. We used national birth cohort linked birth-infant death data (2000-2010) to evaluate the risk of infant mortality due to external causes in multiples versus singletons in the United States. Risk of death from external causes during the study period was 3.6 per 10,000 live births in singletons and 5.1 per 10,000 live births in multiples. Using log-binomial regression, the corresponding unadjusted risk ratio was 1.40 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.30, 1.50). After adjustment for maternal age, marital status, race/ethnicity, and education, the risk ratio was 1.68 (95% CI: 1.56, 1.81). Infant deaths due to external causes were most likely to occur between 2 and 7 months of age. Applying inverse probability weighting and assuming a hypothetical intervention where no infants were low birth weight, the adjusted controlled direct effect of plurality on infant mortality due to external causes was 1.64 (95% CI: 1.39, 1.97). Twins and higher-order multiples were at greater risk of infant mortality due to external causes, particularly between 2 and 7 months of age, and this risk appeared to be mediated largely by factors other than low-birth-weight status. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  18. Mortalidade infantil em duas coortes de base populacional no Sul do Brasil: tendências e diferenciais Infant mortality in two population-based cohorts in southern Brazil: trends and differentials

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    Ana M. B. Menezes

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se a tendência temporal da mortalidade infantil através de dois estudos de coorte realizados em Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, em 1982 e 1993. Ambas coortes incluíram todos os nascimentos hospitalares e óbitos verificados através de visitas regulares aos hospitais, cartórios e cemitérios. As informações sobre a causa de morte foram obtidas através de entrevistas com pediatras, revisão do prontuário, necrópsias e entrevista com os pais das crianças. O coeficiente de mortalidade infantil caiu de 36,4 por mil nascidos vivos para 21,1 na década. As principais causas de mortalidade infantil em 1993 foram as perinatais, malformações congênitas, diarréia e infecções respiratórias. Crianças com baixo peso ao nascer apresentaram mortalidade 12 vezes maior do que crianças com peso adequado, e crianças pré-termo, duas vezes mais do que crianças com retardo de crescimento intra-uterino. Crianças de famílias com renda baixa (um salário mínimo apresentaram mortalidade sete vezes superior àquelas com renda alta (10 salários mínimos. A mortalidade de crianças de baixo peso ao nascer e alta renda familiar decresceu em 67%, contra apenas 36% para as de baixa renda. Conclui-se que, mesmo com uma queda expressiva da mortalidade infantil na década, persistem importantes desigualdades sociais.Time trends in infant mortality were assessed through two cohort studies carried out in Pelotas, Southern Brazil, in 1982 and 1993. Both cohorts included all hospital deliveries, and deaths were monitored through regular visits to hospitals, cemeteries, and notary publics. Information on cause of death was obtained from pediatricians, case notes, autopsies, and home visits to parents. The infant mortality rate fell from 36.4 in 1982 to 21.1 per thousand live births in 1993. The main causes of death in 1993 were perinatal, congenital malformations, diarrhea, and respiratory infections. Low birthweight babies were twelve times more likely

  19. Impact of maternal diabetes mellitus on mortality and morbidity of very low birth weight infants: a multicenter Latin America study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, Carlos; Tapia, Jose L; Cardoso, Viviane C

    2015-01-01

    To compare mortality and morbidity in very low birth weight infants (VLBWI) born to women with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). This was a cohort study with retrospective data collection (2001-2010, n=11.991) from the NEOCOSUR network. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for the outcome of neonatal mortality and morbidity as a function of maternal DM. Women with no DM served as the reference group. The rate of maternal DM was 2.8% (95% CI: 2.5-3.1), but a significant (p=0.019) increase was observed between 2001-2005 (2.4%, 2.1-2.8) and 2006-2010 (3.2%, 2.8-3.6). Mothers with DM were more likely to have received a complete course of prenatal steroids than those without DM. Infants of diabetic mothers had a slightly higher gestational age and birth weight than infants of born to non-DM mothers. Distribution of mean birth weight Z-scores, small for gestational age status, and Apgar scores were similar. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, and patent ductus arteriosus. Delivery room mortality, total mortality, need for mechanical ventilation, and early-onset sepsis rates were significantly lower in the diabetic group, whereas necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) was significantly higher in infants born to DM mothers. In the logistic regression analysis, NEC grades 2-3 was the only condition independently associated with DM (adjusted OR: 1.65 [95% CI: 1.2 -2.27]). VLBWI born to DM mothers do not appear to be at an excess risk of mortality or early morbidity, except for NEC. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of sociodemographic factors on infant mortality according to cause of death: a birth cohort in Seoul, Korea, 1999-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ji-Young; Lee, Jong-Tae

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of socioeconomic status and demographic factors on infant mortality, classified by cause of death, in a group of children born in Seoul, Korea during 1999-2003. Linked infant birth and death data were collected from the Korea National Statistical Office. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the effect of socioeconomic and demographic factors on infant mortality. The results were adjusted to take into account the infants' length of gestation and birth weight. Infant death rates from all causes tended to decrease as the parents' educational level increased. We observed a similar pattern for deaths from other specific causes. We also found higher mortality rates for mothers less than 20 years of age and over 35. Our analysis shows that socioeconomic and demographic factors affect infant mortality. In the case of postneonatal infant death, we confirmed that adequate follow-up care can reduce the risks of death from these acquired factors. This suggests that these are important factors to consider in reducing infant mortality.

  1. Greater mortality and mordidity in extremely preterm infants fed a diet containing cow milk protein products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provision of human milk has important implications for the health and outcomes of extremely preterm (EP) infants. This study evaluated the effects of an exclusive human milk diet on the health of EP infants during their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit. EP infants <1,250 g birth weight recei...

  2. Causes of and contributors to infant mortality in a rural community of North India: evidence from verbal and social autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Sanjay Kumar; Kant, Shashi; Srivastava, Rahul; Gupta, Priti; Misra, Puneet; Pandav, Chandrakant Sambhaji; Singh, Arvind Kumar

    2017-08-11

    To identify the medical causes of death and contribution of non-biological factors towards infant mortality by a retrospective analysis of routinely collected data using verbal and social autopsy tools. The study site was Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS), Ballabgarh, North India PARTICIPANTS: All infant deaths during the years 2008-2012 were included for verbal autopsy and infant deaths from July 2012 to December 2012 were included for social autopsy. Cause of death ascertained by a validated verbal autopsy tool and level of delay based on a three-delay model using the INDEPTH social autopsy tool were the main outcome measures. The level of delay was defined as follows: level 1, delay in identification of danger signs and decision making to seek care; level 2, delay in reaching a health facility from home; level 3, delay in getting healthcare at the health facility. The infant mortality rate during the study period was 46.5/1000 live births. Neonatal deaths contributed to 54.3% of infant deaths and 39% occurred on the first day of life. Birth asphyxia (31.5%) followed by low birth weight (LBW)/prematurity (26.5%) were the most common causes of neonatal death, while infection (57.8%) was the most common cause of post-neonatal death. Care-seeking was delayed among 50% of neonatal deaths and 41.2% of post-neonatal deaths. Delay at level 1 was most common and occurred in 32.4% of neonatal deaths and 29.4% of post-neonatal deaths. Deaths due to LBW/prematurity were mostly followed by delay at level 1. A high proportion of preventable infant mortality still exists in an area which is under continuous health and demographic surveillance. There is a need to enhance home-based preventive care to enable the mother to identify and respond to danger signs. Verbal autopsy and social autopsy could be routinely done to guide policy interventions aimed at reduction of infant mortality. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text

  3. [Trendency analysis of infant mortality rate due to premature birth or low birth weight in China from 1996 to 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hao; He, Chunhua; Miao, Lei; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Yanping; Li, Qi; Li, Xiaohong; Shen, Liqin

    2015-02-01

    To study the secular trend and characteristics of infant mortality rate due to premature birth or low birth weight (IMRPL) in China from 1996 to 2013. Data used in this study was collected from the population-based Child's Health Surveillance Network of China. The Cochran-Armitage Trend test and Poisson regression were used to test the trend of IMRPL and explore the differences of the trend among different regions or areas. The nationwide IMRPL was 629.9 per 100 000 live births in 1996 and it decreased to 214.6 per 100 000 live births in 2013. The average annual decline rate was 6.14%, while the proportion of infant mortality due to premature birth or low birth weight in all infant deaths was on the rise with the average annual growth rate of 1.52%. And the proportion increased to 22.6% in 2013. IMRPLin rural and urban areas fell 28.1% and 66.6% respectively during 1996 and 2013. But the differences between urban and rural areas was obvious. During the same period, the average IMRPLin the central region was 1.40 times (95%CI:1.31-1.49) of that in the eastern region. And the average IMRPL in the western region was 2.25 times (95%CI:2.12-2.40) of that in the eastern region. The differences among different regions was obvious. Male infant mortality rate due to premature birth or low birth weight was 1.09 times (95%CI:1.05-1.14) of that in female infant from 1996 to 2013. The risk of IMRPL decreased substantially in China from 1996 to 2013. And the risk of IMRPL decreased more in rural areas than that in urban areas. The differences among different regions and areas were obvious. Premature birth or low birth weight as one of main factors has become a serious threat for health of Chinese children.

  4. Effect of 50 000 IU vitamin A given with BCG vaccine on mortality in infants in Guinea-Bissau: randomised placebo controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diness, B.R.; Roth, A.; Nante, E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of high dose vitamin A supplementation given with BCG vaccine at birth in an African setting with high infant mortality. Design Randomised placebo controlled trial. Setting Bandim Health Project's demographic surveillance system in Guinea-Bissau, covering...... approximately 90 000 inhabitants. Participants 4345 infants due to receive BCG. Intervention Infants were randomised to 50 000 IU vitamin A or placebo and followed until age 12 months. Main outcome measure Mortality rate ratios. Results 174 children died during follow-up (mortality=47/ 1000 person......-years). Vitamin A supplementation was not significantly associated with mortality; the mortality rate ratio was 1.07 (95% confidence interval 0.79 to 1.44). The effect was 1.00 (0.65 to 1.56) during the first four months and 1.13 (0.75 to 1.68) from 4 to 12 months of age. The mortality rate ratio in boys was 0...

  5. Reduced mortality and increased BPD with histological chorioamnionitis and leukocytosis in very-low-birth-weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, D A; Zook, K; Mackley, A; Locke, R G

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the association between leukocytosis, mortality and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBW) born to mothers with histological chorioamnionitis. A retrospective cohort study from a single level 3 neonatal intensive care unit. The study sample included infants born to mothers with histological chorioamnionitis (n=252). Total white blood cells (WBCs) after birth were measured. Leukocytosis was defined as a total WBC count >30 000 per mm(3) in the first 2 days of life. Outcomes investigated included BPD and death. Both unadjusted and multivariable analyses were carried out. After controlling for potential confounding variables, infants who developed a leukocytosis after birth had increased odds of BPD (4.6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 2.0 to 10.3), but decreased odds of death (0.3, 95% CI: 0.1 to 0.90). In our population of VLBW infants born to mothers with histological chorioamnionitis, leukocytosis after birth is associated with a decrease in mortality but an increase in BPD.

  6. Determinants of infant mortality in the Jequitinhonha Valley and in the North and Northeast regions of Brazil

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    Maria do Carmo Leal

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE This study aims to identify the social and demographic determinants, in addition to the determinants of reproductive health and use of health services, associated with infant mortality in small and medium-sized cities of the North, Northeast and Southeast regions of Brazil. METHODS This is a case-control study with 803 cases of death of children under one year and 1,969 live births (controls, whose mothers lived in the selected cities in 2008. The lists of the names of cases and controls were extracted from the Sistema de Informação sobre Mortalidade (SIM – Mortality Information System and the Sistema de Informação sobre Nascidos Vivos (SINASC – Live Birth Information System and supplemented by data obtained by the research of “active search of death and birth”. Data was collected in the household using a semi-structured questionnaire, and the analysis was carried out using multiple logistic regression. RESULTS The final model indicates that the following items are positively and significantly associated with infant mortality: family working in agriculture, mother having a history of fetal and infant losses, no prenatal or inadequate prenatal, and not being associated to the maternity hospital during the prenatal period. We have observed significant interactions to explain the occurrence of infant mortality between race and socioeconomic score and between high-risk pregnancy and pilgrimage for childbirth. CONCLUSIONS The excessive number of home deliveries and pilgrimage for childbirth indicates flaws in the line of maternity care and a lack of collaboration between the levels of outpatient and hospital care. The study reinforces the need for an integrated management of the health care networks, leveraging the capabilities of cities in meeting the needs of pregnancy, delivery and birth with quality.

  7. [A possible objective from now to the year 2000: reducing infant mortality by one half in Third World countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthet, E

    1984-06-01

    Every day 40.000 children die throughout the world. Most of them in developing countries. There is a close relationship between infant mortality, life expectancy at birth, the adult illiteracy rate and national income per capita. Why such huge differences between the infant mortality rate of 7 per 1.000 (live births) in Sweden and 208 in Upper Volta? The four scourges which afflict developing countries: hunger (malnutrition), disease, ignorance and poverty are responsible for this state of affairs. The author suggests that coordinated action by governments and International Agencies should be taken to halve the infant mortality rate by the year 2.000. He notes that in the past three mistakes were made which should not be repeated. The first was to improve the living conditions of the population. The green Revolution in India provides a striking example of an important progress which benefited only the wealthier farmers. A second mistake was to believe that only a medical approach reduce the infant mortality rate. A third error was to overlook the importance of health education and not to seek the active participation of the people concerned. The author recalls that the International Union for Health Education carried out a sanitary and social programme from 1975 to 1978 in Africa, south of the Sahara. To this effect, the IUHE had to find out what the people really wanted, could be motivated, to increase the welfare of the villagers by measures adapted to existing possibilities, to study how the people could recruit among the villagers health workers and train them, to create village health committees.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Risk factors for diarrhea-associated infant mortality in the United States, 2005-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehal, Jason M; Esposito, Douglas H; Holman, Robert C; Tate, Jacqueline E; Callinan, Laura S; Parashar, Umesh D

    2012-07-01

    Diarrhea-associated deaths among US children increased from the mid-1980s through 2006, particularly among infants. Understanding risk factors for diarrhea-associated death could improve prevention strategies. Records of singleton infants with diarrhea listed anywhere on the death certificate were selected from the US Linked Birth/Infant Death data for the period, 2005 to 2007; characteristics of these infants were compared with those of infants who survived their first year. During 2005 to 2007, 1087 diarrhea-associated infant deaths were reported; 86% occurred among low birth weight (LBW, risk ratio: 91.9, 95% confidence interval: 77.4-109.0) and younger median age at death (7 versus 15 weeks, Pdiarrhea-associated death among LBW and NBW infants were sepsis (26%) and volume depletion (20%), respectively. Among LBW infants, 97% of diarrhea-associated deaths occurred in inpatient settings, whereas 27% of NBW infant deaths occurred in outpatient settings and 5.3% in the decedent's home. Male sex, black race, unmarried status and low 5-minute Apgar score (diarrhea-associated morality should focus on understanding and improving management of diarrhea in vulnerable LBW infants. For prevention of diarrhea-associated deaths in NBW infants, educating mothers who fit the high-risk profile regarding home hydration therapy and timely access to medical treatment is important.

  9. Mortality and Length of Stay of Very Low Birth Weight and Very Preterm Infants: A EuroHOPE Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino Numerato

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to compare health outcomes and hospital care use of very low birth weight (VLBW, and very preterm (VLGA infants in seven European countries. Analysis was performed on linkable patient-level registry data from seven European countries between 2006 and 2008 (Finland, Hungary, Italy (the Province of Rome, the Netherlands, Norway, Scotland, and Sweden. Mortality and length of stay (LoS were adjusted for differences in gestational age (GA, sex, intrauterine growth, Apgar score at five minutes, parity and multiple births. The analysis included 16,087 infants. Both the 30-day and one-year adjusted mortality rates were lowest in the Nordic countries (Finland, Sweden and Norway and Scotland and highest in Hungary and the Netherlands. For survivors, the adjusted average LoS during the first year of life ranged from 56 days in the Netherlands and Scotland to 81 days in Hungary. There were large differences between European countries in mortality rates and LoS in VLBW and VLGA infants. Substantial data linkage problems were observed in most countries due to inadequate identification procedures at birth, which limit data validity and should be addressed by policy makers across Europe.

  10. The Role of Empowerment in the Association between a Woman's Educational Status and Infant Mortality in Ethiopia: Secondary Analysis of Demographic and Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemayehu, Yibeltal Kiflie; Theall, Katherine; Lemma, Wuleta; Hajito, Kifle Woldemichael; Tushune, Kora

    2015-10-01

    Socioeconomic status at national, sub-national, household, and individual levels explains a significant portion of variation in infant mortality. Women's education is among the major determinants of infant mortality. The mechanism through which a woman's own educational status, over her husband's as well as household characteristics, influences infant mortality has not been well studied in developing countries. The objective of this study was to explore the role of woman's empowerment and household wealth in the association between a woman's educational status and infant mortality. The association between a woman's educational status and infant death, and the role of woman's empowerment and household wealth in this relationship, were examined among married women in Ethiopia through a secondary, serial cross-sectional analysis utilizing data on birth history of married women from three rounds of the Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey. Univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses were conducted to examine the association between woman's education and infant death, and the possible mediation or moderation roles of woman empowerment and household wealth. Female education and empowerment were inversely associated with infant death. The results indicated mediation by empowerment in the education-infant death association, and effect modification by household wealth. Both empowerment and education had strongest inverse association with infant death among women from the richest households. The findings suggest an important role of female empowerment in the education-infant death relation, and the complexity of these factors according to household wealth. Woman empowerment programs may prove effective as a shorter term intervention in reducing infant mortality.

  11. Oral immunoglobulin for the prevention of rotavirus infection in low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pammi, Mohan; Haque, Khalid N

    2011-11-09

    Rotavirus is a common neonatal nosocomial viral infection and epidemics with the newer P(6)G9 strains have been reported. Local mucosal immunity in the intestine to rotavirus is important in the resolution of infection and protection against subsequent infections. Oral administration of anti-rotaviral immunoglobulin preparations might be a useful strategy in preventing rotaviral infections, especially in low birth weight babies. To determine the effectiveness and safety of oral immunoglobulin preparations for the prevention of rotavirus infection in hospitalized low birthweight infants (birthweight rotavirus infection compared to placebo OR no intervention; 4) at least one of the following outcomes were reported: all cause mortality during hospital stay, mortality due to rotavirus infection during hospital stay, rotavirus infection , duration of diarrhea, need for rehydration, duration of viral excretion, duration of infection control measures, length of hospital stay in days, recurrent diarrhea or chronic diarrhea. The two review authors independently abstracted data from the included trials. One published study (Barnes 1982) was eligible for inclusion in this review. Barnes 1982 found no significant difference in the rates of rotavirus infection after oral gammaglobulin versus placebo in hospitalized low birthweight babies [RR 1.27 (95% CI 0.65 to 2.37)]. In the subset of infants who became infected with rotavirus after receiving gammaglobulin or placebo for prevention of rotavirus infection, there was no significant difference in the duration of rotavirus excretion between the group who had gammaglobulin (mean 2 days, range 1 to 4 days) and the group who had placebo (mean 3 days, range 1 to 6 days). Barnes 1982 reported no adverse effects after administration of oral immunoglobulin preparations. Current evidence does not support the use of oral immunoglobulin preparations to prevent rotavirus infection in low birthweight infants. Researchers are encouraged to

  12. Infant Mortality Risk and Paternity Certainty Are Associated with Postnatal Maternal Behavior toward Adult Male Mountain Gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Stacy; Hirwa, Jean Paul; Silk, Joan B.; Vigilant, Linda; Stoinski, Tara S.

    2016-01-01

    Sexually selected infanticide is an important source of infant mortality in many mammalian species. In species with long-term male-female associations, females may benefit from male protection against infanticidal outsiders. We tested whether mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei) mothers in single and multi-male groups monitored by the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund’s Karisoke Research Center actively facilitated interactions between their infants and a potentially protective male. We also evaluated the criteria mothers in multi-male groups used to choose a preferred male social partner. In single male groups, where infanticide risk and paternity certainty are high, females with infants <1 year old spent more time near and affiliated more with males than females without young infants. In multi-male groups, where infanticide rates and paternity certainty are lower, mothers with new infants exhibited few behavioral changes toward males. The sole notable change was that females with young infants proportionally increased their time near males they previously spent little time near when compared to males they had previously preferred, perhaps to encourage paternity uncertainty and deter aggression. Rank was a much better predictor of females’ social partner choice than paternity. Older infants (2–3 years) in multi-male groups mirrored their mothers’ preferences for individual male social partners; 89% spent the most time in close proximity to the male their mother had spent the most time near when they were <1 year old. Observed discrepancies between female behavior in single and multi-male groups likely reflect different levels of postpartum intersexual conflict; in groups where paternity certainty and infanticide risk are both high, male-female interests align and females behave accordingly. This highlights the importance of considering individual and group-level variation when evaluating intersexual conflict across the reproductive cycle. PMID:26863300

  13. Trends of Social Inequalities in the Specific Causes of Infant Mortality in a Nationwide Birth Cohort in Korea, 1995-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Mia; An, Soo Jeong; Kim, Young Ju

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between social disparity and specific causes of infant mortality has rarely been studied. The present study analyzed infant mortality trends according to the causes of death and the inequalities in specific causes of infant mortality between different parental social classes. We analyzed 8,209,836 births from the Statistics Korea between 1995 and 2009. The trends of disparity for cause-specific infant mortality according to parental education and employment were examined using the Cox proportional hazard model for the birth-year intervals of 1995-1999, 2000-2004, and 2005-2009. Adjusted hazard ratios were calculated after adjusting for infants' gender, parents' age, maternal obstetrical history, gestational age, and birth weight. An increasing trend in social inequalities in all-cause infant mortality according to paternal education was evident. Social inequalities in infant mortality were greater for "Not classified symptoms, signs and findings" (International Classification of Diseases 10th revision [ICD-10]: R00-R99) and "Injury, poisoning and of external causes" (S00-T98), particularly for "Ill-defined and unspecified causes" (R990) and "Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)" (R950); and increased overtime for "Not classified symptoms, signs and findings" (R00-R99), "Injury, poisoning and of external causes" (S00-T98) and "Conditions in perinatal period" (P00-P96), particularly for "SIDS" (R950) and "Respiratory distress syndrome of newborns (RDS)" (P220). The specific causes of infant mortality, in particular the "Not classified causes" (R00-R99 coded deaths) should be investigated more thoroughly to reduce inequality in health. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  14. Optimality of the birth population reduces learning and behaviour disorders and sudden infant death after the first month.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugstad, L F

    1999-05-01

    The weight distribution pattern of all births can be divided into a "skewing to the left" to lower weights and high neonatal mortality, a "skewing to the right" to higher weights (>3500g) and minimum neonatal and postneonatal mortality, and a "symmetrical distribution" with mortality in between. This study was initiated with the hypothesis that a deficit in newborns of more than 3500 g would adversely affect postneonatal death. Higher and rising postneonatal mortality solely attributable to sudden infant death of unknown cause (sudden infant death syndrome; SIDS) was observed in the Nordic countries with a lower proportion of heavy newborns. Minor environmental intervention almost eliminated excess mortality from this cause, supporting raised susceptibility with a depressed birthweight in postneonatal SIDS. This contrasts with classical neonatal low birthweight SIDS, which is stable despite numerous attempts at reduction, supporting a multi-factorial aetiology: low maternal age, low education, low socioeconomic status, maternal smoking, infection, etc. The postneonatal SIDS epidemic associated with a deficit in heavy newborns is thought to be a result of changing behaviour in pregnancy: moderate iatrogenic dietary restriction and young women favouring a low-calorie, low-fat diet, especially in the third trimester when the foetus is most vulnerable, which delays myelination and somatic growth and renders the infant susceptible to minor morbidity and irregularity. The timing of death and neuropathological findings suggestive of repeated hypoxic episodes in more than 80% of cases of SIDS prior to death support this theory. The similar weight distribution patterns in SIDS and all births in Denmark, the UK and the USA suggest a substantial proportion of the neonates in these countries could be growth-retarded and at risk of hypoxic episodes in infancy. A few cases, particularly males (sex-ratio = 1.7), suffer SIDS, the majority survive. Many, mostly males, present minor

  15. Health system determinants of infant, child and maternal mortality: A cross-sectional study of UN member countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muldoon Katherine A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Few studies have examined the link between health system strength and important public health outcomes across nations. We examined the association between health system indicators and mortality rates. Methods We used mixed effects linear regression models to investigate the strength of association between outcome and explanatory variables, while accounting for geographic clustering of countries. We modelled infant mortality rate (IMR, child mortality rate (CMR, and maternal mortality rate (MMR using 13 explanatory variables as outlined by the World Health Organization. Results Significant protective health system determinants related to IMR included higher physician density (adjusted rate ratio [aRR] 0.81; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.71-0.91, higher sustainable access to water and sanitation (aRR 0.85; 95% CI 0.78-0.93, and having a less corrupt government (aRR 0.57; 95% CI 0.40-0.80. Out-of-pocket expenditures on health (aRR 1.29; 95% CI 1.03-1.62 were a risk factor. The same four variables were significantly related to CMR after controlling for other variables. Protective determinants of MMR included access to water and sanitation (aRR 0.88; 95% CI 0.82-0.94, having a less corrupt government (aRR 0.49; 95%; CI 0.36-0.66, and higher total expenditures on health per capita (aRR 0.84; 95% CI 0.77-0.92. Higher fertility rates (aRR 2.85; 95% CI: 2.02-4.00 were found to be a significant risk factor for MMR. Conclusion Several key measures of a health system predict mortality in infants, children, and maternal mortality rates at the national level. Improving access to water and sanitation and reducing corruption within the health sector should become priorities.

  16. Health system determinants of infant, child and maternal mortality: A cross-sectional study of UN member countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Katherine A; Galway, Lindsay P; Nakajima, Maya; Kanters, Steve; Hogg, Robert S; Bendavid, Eran; Mills, Edward J

    2011-10-24

    Few studies have examined the link between health system strength and important public health outcomes across nations. We examined the association between health system indicators and mortality rates. We used mixed effects linear regression models to investigate the strength of association between outcome and explanatory variables, while accounting for geographic clustering of countries. We modelled infant mortality rate (IMR), child mortality rate (CMR), and maternal mortality rate (MMR) using 13 explanatory variables as outlined by the World Health Organization. Significant protective health system determinants related to IMR included higher physician density (adjusted rate ratio [aRR] 0.81; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.71-0.91), higher sustainable access to water and sanitation (aRR 0.85; 95% CI 0.78-0.93), and having a less corrupt government (aRR 0.57; 95% CI 0.40-0.80). Out-of-pocket expenditures on health (aRR 1.29; 95% CI 1.03-1.62) were a risk factor. The same four variables were significantly related to CMR after controlling for other variables. Protective determinants of MMR included access to water and sanitation (aRR 0.88; 95% CI 0.82-0.94), having a less corrupt government (aRR 0.49; 95%; CI 0.36-0.66), and higher total expenditures on health per capita (aRR 0.84; 95% CI 0.77-0.92). Higher fertility rates (aRR 2.85; 95% CI: 2.02-4.00) were found to be a significant risk factor for MMR. Several key measures of a health system predict mortality in infants, children, and maternal mortality rates at the national level. Improving access to water and sanitation and reducing corruption within the health sector should become priorities.

  17. Mortality and Morbidity of Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants in the Mainland of China: A Multi-center Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jia Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the progress of perinatal medicine and neonatal technology, more and more extremely low birth weight (ELBW survived all over the world. This study was designed to investigate the short-term outcomes of ELBW infants during their Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU stay in the mainland of China. Methods: All infants admitted to 26 NICUs with a birth weight (BW < l000 g were included between January l, 2011 and December 31, 2011. All the data were collected retrospectively from clinical records by a prospectively designed questionnaire. The data collected from each NICU transmitted to the main institution where the results were aggregated and analyzed. Categorical variables were performed with Pearson Chi-square test. Binary Logistic regression analysis was used to detect risk factors. Results: A total of 258 ELBW infants were admitted to 26 NICUs, of whom the mean gestational age (GA was 28.1 ± 2.2 weeks, and the mean BW was 868 ± 97 g. The overall survival rate at discharge was 50.0%. Despite aggressive treatment 60 infants (23.3% died and another 69 infants (26.7% died after medical care withdrawal. Furthermore, the survival rate was significantly higher in coastal areas than inland areas (53.6% vs. 35.3%, P = 0.019. BW < 750 g and GA < 28 weeks were the largest risk factors, and being small for gestational age was a protective factor related to mortality. Respiratory distress syndrome was the most common complication. The incidence of patent ductus arteriosus, intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity was 26.2%, 33.7%, 6.7%, 48.1%, and 41.4%, respectively. Ventilator associated pneumonia was the most common hospital acquired infection during hospitalization. Conclusions: Our study was the first survey that revealed the present status of ELBW infants in the mainland of China. The mortality and morbidity of ELBW infants remained high as compared to other

  18. Comparison of liveborn and stillborn low birthweight babies and analysis of aetiological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, M; Rafferty, G; Murphy, J F

    1997-11-01

    A retrospective study was performed at a tertiary maternity hospital, to define the incidence of low birthweight (LBW) and its associated risk factors in term liveborn infants and in term stillbirths, to ascertain the antenatal detection rate in each and to assess the role of ultrasound in antenatal detection. One hundred and ninety-four term liveborn LBW infants and twenty stillborn LBW infants were studied. Fifty-six percent of the liveborn infants were detected antenatally compared to 5% of the stillborn LBW infants. Previous LBW, the extremes of maternal age, cigarette smoking and pre-eclampsia were the main risk factors for the development of LBW, not all of which were present to the same extent in each group. Ultrasound scanning antenatally increases the detection rate. Knowledge of abnormal growth antenatally significantly increases obstetric intervention. Detection of LBW antenatally remains difficult. The main risk factors for LBW were similar in both groups.

  19. An increasing proportion of infants weight more than 4000 grams at birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørskou, J.; Kesmodel, Ulrik; Henriksen, Tine Brink

    2001-01-01

    Background. To investigate how mean birthweight has changed in the past decade, and to describe changes in the proportion of infants with a birthweight above 4000 grams (g). Methods. We analyzed data on 43,561 singleton infants born between 1990 and 1999 at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark...

  20. Infant mortality in twin pregnancies following in-utero demise of the co-twin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boubakari Ibrahimou

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Risks for all mortality types were lower among converted co-twins than their unconverted or same-quantile counterparts. The lower neonatal and higher post-neonatal mortality among black require future research.

  1. Global, regional, and national levels of neonatal, infant, and under-5 mortality during 1990-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Haidong; Liddell, Chelsea A; Coates, Matthew M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Remarkable financial and political efforts have been focused on the reduction of child mortality during the past few decades. Timely measurements of levels and trends in under-5 mortality are important to assess progress towards the Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG 4) target of redu...... levels of under-5 mortality in 2030. FUNDING: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, US Agency for International Development....

  2. Maternal Obesity and Risk of Preterm Birth and Low Birthweight in Hawaii PRAMS, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Alana C; Heyman, Melvin B; Garber, Andrea K; Wojcicki, Janet M

    2018-03-01

    Objective Maternal obesity is a risk factor for preterm birth, a leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islanders (NHOPI) have high rates of poor birth outcomes. Despite the high rates of obesity in NHOPI in Hawaii, the association with preterm birth has not been examined in this population. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of 20,061 women using data collected by Hawaii's Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) from 2000 to 2011. We investigated the contribution of maternal age, pre-pregnancy BMI, gestational diabetes, hypertension, race, socioeconomic status, and smoking to our primary outcomes of preterm birth and low birthweight using multivariable logistic regression, stratified by NHOPI versus non-NHOPI race. Results Pre-pregnancy obesity was more common in NHOPI than non-NHOPI women (23.9 and 10.5%, respectively; p < 0.01). Overall, the risk for preterm birth increased with maternal obesity (BMI ≥ 30.0; aOR = 1.24, 95% CI 1.06-1.45, p < 0.01), compared with normal weight women. Among NHOPI women, the prevalence of preterm birth was elevated compared with non-NHOPI women although the prevalence of low birth weight was lower. After adjusting for confounders, risk for preterm birth and low birth weight were elevated in NHOPI women compared with White women. Maternal obesity did not significantly affect the risk of prematurity within the NHOPI group. Conclusions for Practice Our study demonstrates an association between maternal pre-pregnancy obesity and preterm deliveries in Hawaii. NHOPI have high rates of pre-pregnancy obesity as well as increased risk of both preterm delivery and low birthweight when compared to White women. Further data are needed to assess interactions between race, maternal health, and neonatal morbidity, and to identify ways to improve birth outcomes for minority populations in the state of Hawaii.

  3. Girl child marriage and its association with national rates of HIV, maternal health, and infant mortality across 97 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Anita; Boehmer, Ulrike

    2013-04-01

    This study was designed to assess associations between national rates of girl child marriage and national rates of HIV and maternal and child health (MCH) concerns, using national indicator data from 2009 United Nations reports. Current analyses were limited to the N = 97 nations (of 188 nations) for which girl child marriage data were available. Regression analyses adjusted for development and world region demonstrate that nations with higher rates of girl child marriage are significantly more likely to contend with higher rates of maternal and infant mortality and nonutilization of maternal health services, but not HIV.

  4. Effect of 50,000 IU vitamin A given with BCG vaccine on mortality in infants in Guinea-Bissau: randomised placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Diness, Birgitte Rode; Roth, Adam; Nante, Ernesto; Fisker, Ane Baerent; Lisse, Ida Maria; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Whittle, Hilton; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Aaby, Peter

    2008-06-21

    To investigate the effect of high dose vitamin A supplementation given with BCG vaccine at birth in an African setting with high infant mortality. Randomised placebo controlled trial. Setting Bandim Health Project's demographic surveillance system in Guinea-Bissau, covering approximately 90,000 inhabitants. Participants 4345 infants due to receive BCG. Infants were randomised to 50,000 IU vitamin A or placebo and followed until age 12 months. Mortality rate ratios. 174 children died during follow-up (mortality=47/1000 person-years). Vitamin A supplementation was not significantly associated with mortality; the mortality rate ratio was 1.07 (95% confidence interval 0.79 to 1.44). The effect was 1.00 (0.65 to 1.56) during the first four months and 1.13 (0.75 to 1.68) from 4 to 12 months of age. The mortality rate ratio in boys was 0.84 (0.55 to 1.27) compared with 1.39 (0.90 to 2.14) in girls (P for interaction=0.10). An explorative analysis revealed a strong interaction between vitamin A and season of administration. Vitamin A supplementation given with BCG vaccine at birth had no significant benefit in this African setting. Although little doubt exists that vitamin A supplementation reduces mortality in older children, a global recommendation of supplementation for all newborn infants may not contribute to better survival. Clinical trials NCT00168597.

  5. Neonatal Mortality and Long-Term Outcome of Infants Born between 27 and 32 Weeks of Gestational Age in Breech Presentation: The EPIPAGE Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azria, Elie; Kayem, Gilles; Langer, Bruno; Marchand-Martin, Laetitia; Marret, Stephane; Fresson, Jeanne; Pierrat, Véronique; Arnaud, Catherine; Goffinet, François; Kaminski, Monique; Ancel, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether breech presentation is an independent risk factor for neonatal morbidity, mortality, or long-term neurologic morbidity in very preterm infants. Prospective population-based cohort. Singletons infants without congenital malformations born from 27 to 32 completed weeks of gestation enrolled in France in 1997 in the EPIPAGE cohort. The neonatal and long-term follow-up outcomes of preterm infants were compared between those in breech presentation and those in vertex presentation. The relation of fetal presentation with neonatal mortality and neurodevelopmental outcomes was assessed using multiple logistic regression models. Among the 1518 infants alive at onset of labor included in this analysis (351 in breech presentation), 1392 were alive at discharge. Among those eligible to follow up and alive at 8 years, follow-up data were available for 1188 children. Neonatal mortality was significantly higher among breech than vertex infants (10.8% vs. 7.5%, P = 0.05). However the differences were not significant after controlling for potential confounders. Neonatal morbidity did not differ significantly according to fetal presentation. Severe cerebral palsy was less frequent in the group born in breech compared to vertex presentation but there was no difference after adjustment. There was no difference according to fetal presentation in cognitive deficiencies/learning disabilities or overall deficiencies. Our data suggest that breech presentation is not an independent risk factor for neonatal mortality or long-term neurologic deficiencies among very preterm infants.

  6. Increased Duration of Paid Maternity Leave Lowers Infant Mortality in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Arijit; Hajizadeh, Mohammad; Harper, Sam; Koski, Alissa; Strumpf, Erin C; Heymann, Jody

    2016-03-01

    Maternity leave reduces neonatal and infant mortality rates in high-income countries. However, the impact of maternity leave on infant health has not been rigorously evaluated in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In this study, we utilized a difference-in-differences approach to evaluate whether paid maternity leave policies affect infant mortality in LMICs. We used birth history data collected via the Demographic and Health Surveys to assemble a panel of approximately 300,000 live births in 20 countries from 2000 to 2008; these observational data were merged with longitudinal information on the duration of paid maternity leave provided by each country. We estimated the effect of an increase in maternity leave in the prior year on the probability of infant (maternity was associated with 7.9 fewer infant deaths per 1,000 live births (95% CI 3.7, 12.0), reflecting a 13% relative reduction. Reductions in infant mortality associated with increases in the duration of paid maternity leave were concentrated in the post-neonatal period. Estimates were robust to adjustment for individual, household, and country-level characteristics, although there may be residual confounding by unmeasured time-varying confounders, such as coincident policy changes. More generous paid maternity leave policies represent a potential instrument for facilitating early-life interventions and reducing infant mortality in LMICs and warrant further discussion in the post-2015 sustainable development agenda. From a policy planning perspective, further work is needed to elucidate the mechanisms that explain the benefits of paid maternity leave for infant mortality.

  7. Correlation or causation? Income inequality and infant mortality in fixed effects models in the period 1960-2008 in 34 OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendano, Mauricio

    2012-08-01

    Income inequality is strongly associated with infant mortality across countries, but whether this association is causal has not been established. In their commentary in this issue of Social Science & Medicine, Regidor et al. (2012) argue that this association has disappeared in recent years, and question the premise of a causal link. This paper empirically tests the impact of income inequality on infant mortality in a fixed effects model that exploits the evolution of income inequality over a 38-year period, controlling for all time-invariant differences across countries. Data came from the Standardized World Income Inequality Database, containing yearly estimates for the period 1960-2008 in 34 countries member of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), linked to infant mortality data from the OECD Health database. Infant mortality was modelled as a function of income inequality in a country and year fixed effects model, incorporating controls for changing economic and labour conditions. In a model without country fixed effects, a one-point increase in the Gini coefficient was associated with a 7% increase in the infant mortality rate (Rate ratio[RR] = 1.07, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.04, 1.09). Controlling for differences across countries in a country fixed effects model, however, income inequality was no longer associated with infant mortality (RR = 1.00, 0.98, 1.01). Similar results were obtained when using lagged values of income inequality for up to 15 years, and in models that controlled for changing labour and economic conditions. Findings suggest that in the short-run, changes in income inequality are not associated with changes in infant mortality. A possible interpretation of the discrepancy between cross-country correlations and fixed effects models is that social policies that reduce infant mortality cluster in countries with low income inequality, but their effects do not operate via income. Findings highlight the

  8. Predictors of Haitian-American Infant Development at Twelve Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmayer, Susan M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Families in urban and rural settings were studied in an investigation of environmental influences on the development of Haitian-American infants. Birthweight and scores on the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment predicted mental development. Psychomotor development was related to birthweight and household crowding. (PCB)

  9. Unfinished lives: the effect of domestic violence on neonatal & infant mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Menon, Seetha

    2014-01-01

    India accounts for 1.7 million child deaths, a quarter of global child mortality. The current literature has succeeded in establishing an association between domestic violence and child mortality, but has yet to present evidence of a causal relationship. In this paper we use an instrumental variable approach to analyse the causal impact of domestic violence against the mother on child mortality in the Indian context. Domestic violence is instrumented with the real price of gold at the time of...

  10. Effects of air pollution on infant and children respiratory mortality in four large Latin-American cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Nelson; Junger, Washington Leite

    2018-01-01

    Air pollution is an important public health concern especially for children who are particularly susceptible. Latin America has a large children population, is highly urbanized and levels of pollution are substantially high, making the potential health impact of air pollution quite large. We evaluated the effect of air pollution on children respiratory mortality in four large urban centers: Mexico City, Santiago, Chile, and Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. Generalized Additive Models in Poisson regression was used to fit daily time-series of mortality due to respiratory diseases in infants and children, and levels of PM 10 and O 3 . Single lag and constrained polynomial distributed lag models were explored. Analyses were carried out per cause for each age group and each city. Fixed- and random-effects meta-analysis was conducted in order to combine the city-specific results in a single summary estimate. These cities host nearly 43 million people and pollution levels were above the WHO guidelines. For PM 10 the percentage increase in risk of death due to respiratory diseases in infants in a fixed effect model was 0.47% (0.09-0.85). For respiratory deaths in children 1-5 years old, the increase in risk was 0.58% (0.08-1.08) while a higher effect was observed for lower respiratory infections (LRI) in children 1-14 years old [1.38% (0.91-1.85)]. For O 3 , the only summarized estimate statistically significant was for LRI in infants. Analysis by season showed effects of O 3 in the warm season for respiratory diseases in infants, while negative effects were observed for respiratory and LRI deaths in children. We provided comparable mortality impact estimates of air pollutants across these cities and age groups. This information is important because many public policies aimed at preventing the adverse effects of pollution on health consider children as the population group that deserves the highest protection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Improvement of outcome for infants of birth weight under 1000 g. The Victorian Infant Collaborative Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    The two year outcome of extremely low birth-weight (ELBW) infants (birth weight 500 to 999 g), born in the state of Victoria over two distinct eras, 1979-80 and 1985-7, were compared. In the 1979-80 era, 25.4% of the ELBW infants survived to 2 years of age; only 12.5% of liveborn ELBW infants survived to 2 years with no neurological disabilities. In the 1979-80 era, ELBW infants born outside the level III centres in the state were significantly disadvantaged in both mortality and neurological morbidity. By 1985-7, the two year survival rate of ELBW infants rose significantly from 25.4% to 37.9%. By 1985-7, the proportion of ELBW infants who survived to 2 years free of neurological disabilities increased from 12.5% to 26.2%. Despite the improved survival, the absolute number of 2 year old children survivors with severe neurological disabilities remained constant at 8/year in both eras. By 1985-7, fewer ELBW infants were born outside the level III centres, their survival rate remained lower, but the severe neurological disability rate in survivors was no longer significantly higher. There has been a concomitant improvement in both survival and reduction in neurological morbidity.

  12. Newborn regional body composition is influenced by maternal obesity, gestational weight gain and the birthweight standard score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, E M; Renault, Kristina Martha; Nørgaard, K

    2014-01-01

    AIM: This study investigated whether newborn body composition is influenced by prepregnancy obesity and gestational weight gain (GWG) and explored any associations between body composition and birthweight standard score (z-score), categorised by size for gestational age. METHODS: We recruited 231...... the offspring of normal weight mothers. The infants' fat mass increased by 11 g (p associations between prepregnancy obesity and fat-free mass. The fat percentage was significantly higher in infants who were large for gestational age (15.3%) than small...... for gestational age (5.2%) and appropriate for gestational age (9.8%) (p associated with a higher proportion of abdominal fat mass (p = 0.009). CONCLUSION: Infants born to obese mothers had higher fat mass at birth, with abdominal fat accumulation. Low birthweight...

  13. Young and vulnerable: Spatial-temporal trends and risk factors for infant mortality in rural South Africa (Agincourt, 1992-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vounatsou Penelope

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infant mortality is an important indicator of population health in a country. It is associated with several health determinants, such as maternal health, access to high-quality health care, socioeconomic conditions, and public health policy and practices. Methods A spatial-temporal analysis was performed to assess changes in infant mortality patterns between 1992-2007 and to identify factors associated with infant mortality risk in the Agincourt sub-district, rural northeast South Africa. Period, sex, refugee status, maternal and fertility-related factors, household mortality experience, distance to nearest primary health care facility, and socio-economic status were examined as possible risk factors. All-cause and cause-specific mortality maps were developed to identify high risk areas within the study site. The analysis was carried out by fitting Bayesian hierarchical geostatistical negative binomial autoregressive models using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation. Simulation-based Bayesian kriging was used to produce maps of all-cause and cause-specific mortality risk. Results Infant mortality increased significantly over the study period, largely due to the impact of the HIV epidemic. There was a high burden of neonatal mortality (especially perinatal with several hot spots observed in close proximity to health facilities. Significant risk factors for all-cause infant mortality were mother's death in first year (most commonly due to HIV, death of previous sibling and increasing number of household deaths. Being born to a Mozambican mother posed a significant risk for infectious and parasitic deaths, particularly acute diarrhoea and malnutrition. Conclusions This study demonstrates the use of Bayesian geostatistical models in assessing risk factors and producing smooth maps of infant mortality risk in a health and socio-demographic surveillance system. Results showed marked geographical differences in mortality risk across

  14. Gravidez na adolescência e baixo peso ao nascer: existe associação? Embarazo en la adolescencia y bajo peso al nacer: ¿existe asociación? Pregnancy in teenagers and low birthweight infant: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almir de Castro Neves Filho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a associação entre gravidez na adolescência (dez a 19 anos e baixo peso ao nascer. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal realizado em maternidade terciária entre junho de 2000 a junho de 2001. Por sorteio aleatório simples, foram selecionadas mães adolescentes e não adolescentes entrevistadas no primeiro dia após o parto. Aplicou-se a análise multivariada por meio de regressão logística das variáveis implicadas com o baixo peso ao nascer. RESULTADOS: Foram selecionadas 539 duplas (mães e seus respectivos recém-nascidos, sendo 331 (61,4% mulheres com 20 anos ou mais e 208 (38,5% abaixo de 20 anos. Entre as adolescentes, 50 bebês (24% tiveram idade gestacional OBJETIVO: Verificar la asociación entre embarazo en la adolescencia (10 a 19 años y bajo peso al nacer. MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal realizado en maternidad terciaria entre junio de 2000 a junio de 2001. Por sorteo aleatorio simple, se seleccionaron madres adolescentes y no adolescentes entrevistadas en el primer día después del parto. Se aplicó el análisis multivariado mediante regresión logística de las variables implicadas con el bajo peso al nacer. RESULTADOS: Se seleccionaron 539 parejas (madres y sus respectivos recién-nacidos, siendo 331 (61,4% mujeres con 20 años o más y 208 (38,5% abajo de los 20 años. Entre las adolescentes, 50 bebés (24% tuvieron edad gestacional OBJECTIVE: To study the association between teenage pregnancy (ten to 19 years old and low birthweight. METHODS: Cross-sectional study carried out at a tertiary center from June 2000 to June 2001. A simple random drawing selected teenagers and adult mothers who were interviewed during the first day after birth. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression of variables related to low birthweight was applied. RESULTS: 539 pairs (mothers and their newborns were studied - 331 (61.4% women with 20 years old or more and 208 (38.5% <20 years old. Among the adolescents, 50 (24% infants

  15. The persistent caste divide in India’s infant mortality: A study of Dalits (ex-untouchables), Adivasis (indigenous peoples), Other Backward Classes, and forward castes

    OpenAIRE

    Bali Ram; Abhishek Singh; Awdhesh Yadav

    2017-01-01

    Using data from two national surveys, this paper examines caste differences in infant mortality in India. We find that children from the three lower caste groups—Dalits (ex-untouchables), Adivasis (indigenous peoples), and Other Backward Classes—are significantly more likely than forward-caste children to die young. While this observation largely mirrors caste differences in socioeconomic conditions, low socioeconomic status is found to be only a partial explanation for higher infant mortalit...

  16. Early Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation and Mortality Among Infants Diagnosed With HIV in the First 12 Weeks of Life: Experiences From Kinshasa, DR Congo and Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheahan, Anna; Feinstein, Lydia; Dube, Queen; Edmonds, Andrew; Chirambo, Chawanangwa Mahebere; Smith, Emily; Behets, Frieda; Heyderman, Robert; Van Rie, Annelies

    2017-07-01

    Based on clinical trial results, the World Health Organization recommends infant HIV testing at age 4-6 weeks and immediate antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in all HIV-infected infants. Little is known about the outcomes of HIV-infected infants diagnosed with HIV in the first weeks of life in resource-limited settings. We assessed ART initiation and mortality in the first year of life among infants diagnosed with HIV by 12 weeks of age. Cohort of HIV-infected infants in Kinshasa and Blantyre diagnosed before 12 weeks to estimate 12-month cumulative incidences of ART initiation and mortality, accounting for competing risks. Multivariate models were used to estimate associations between infant characteristics and timing of ART initiation. One hundred and twenty-one infants were diagnosed at a median age of 7 weeks (interquartile range, 6-8). The cumulative incidence of ART initiation was 46% [95% confidence interval (CI), 36%, 55%] at 6 months and 70% (95% CI 60%, 78%) at 12 months. Only age at HIV diagnosis was associated with ART initiation by age 6 months, with a subdistribution hazard ratio of 0.70 (95% CI 0.52, 0.91) for each week increase in age at DNA polymerase chain reaction test. The 12-month cumulative incidence of mortality was 20% (95% CI 13%, 28%). Despite early diagnosis of HIV, ART initiation was slow and mortality remained high, underscoring the complexity in translating clinical trial findings and World Health Organization's guidance into real-life practice. Novel and creative health system interventions will be required to ensure that all HIV-infected infants achieve optimal treatment outcomes under routine care settings.

  17. ?Look at the Whole Me?: A Mixed-Methods Examination of Black Infant Mortality in the US through Women?s Lived Experiences and Community Context

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Maeve E.; Green, Carmen; Richardson, Lisa; Theall, Katherine; Crear-Perry, Joia

    2017-01-01

    In the US, the non-Hispanic Black infant mortality rate exceeds the rate among non-Hispanic Whites by more than two-fold. To explore factors underlying this persistent disparity, we employed a mixed methods approach with concurrent quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis. Eighteen women participated in interviews about their experience of infant loss. Several common themes emerged across interviews, grouped by domain: individual experiences (trauma, grieving and counseling; ...

  18. Early BCG-Denmark and Neonatal Mortality Among Infants Weighing <2500 g: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Sofie; Aaby, Peter; Lund, Najaaraq

    2017-01-01

    Background. BCG vaccine may reduce overall mortality by increasing resistance to nontuberculosis infections. In 2 randomized trials in Guinea-Bissau of early BCG-Denmark (Statens Serum Institut) given to low-weight (LW) neonates (... ratios (MRRs). We had prespecified an analysis censoring follow-up at oral poliovirus vaccine campaigns. Results. Early administration of BCG-Denmark was associated with a nonsignificant reduction in neonatal mortality rate (MRR, 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], .47–1.04) and a 34% reduction (0.......66; .44–1.00) when censoring for oral poliovirus vaccine campaigns. There was no reduction in mortality rate for noninfectious diseases, but a 43% reduction in infectious disease mortality rate (MRR, 0.57; 95% CI, .35–.93). A meta-analysis of 3 BCG trials showed that early BCG-Denmark reduced mortality...

  19. The effectiveness of antenatal care programmes to reduce infant mortality and preterm birth in socially disadvantaged and vulnerable women in high-income countries: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brocklehurst Peter

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infant mortality has shown a steady decline in recent years but a marked socioeconomic gradient persists. Antenatal care is generally thought to be an effective method of improving pregnancy outcomes, but the effectiveness of specific antenatal care programmes as a means of reducing infant mortality in socioeconomically disadvantaged and vulnerable groups of women has not been rigorously evaluated. Methods We conducted a systematic review, focusing on evidence from high income countries, to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative models of organising or delivering antenatal care to disadvantaged and vulnerable groups of women vs. standard antenatal care. We searched Medline, Embase, Cinahl, PsychINFO, HMIC, CENTRAL, DARE, MIDIRS and a number of online resources to identify relevant randomised and observational studies. We assessed effects on infant mortality and its major medical causes (preterm birth, congenital anomalies and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS Results We identified 36 distinct eligible studies covering a wide range of interventions, including group antenatal care, clinic-based augmented care, teenage clinics, prenatal substance abuse programmes, home visiting programmes, maternal care coordination and nutritional programmes. Fifteen studies had adequate internal validity: of these, only one was considered to demonstrate a beneficial effect on an outcome of interest. Six interventions were considered 'promising'. Conclusions There was insufficient evidence of adequate quality to recommend routine implementation of any of the programmes as a means of reducing infant mortality in disadvantaged/vulnerable women. Several interventions merit further more rigorous evaluation.

  20. Antibiotics at the time of removal of central venous catheter to reduce morbidity and mortality in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, Rowena L; Gordon, Adrienne

    2018-03-07

    Late-onset sepsis is associated with increased rates of mortality and morbidity in newborn infants, in addition to poorer long-term developmental outcomes and increased length of stay and hospital costs. Central line-associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) is the most common cause of late-onset sepsis in hospitalised infants, and prevention of CLABSI is a key objective in neonatal care. Increased frequency of CLABSI around the time of removal of central venous catheters (CVCs) has been reported, and use of antibiotics at the time of removal may reduce the incidence and impact of late-onset sepsis in vulnerable newborn infants. To determine the efficacy and safety of giving antibiotics at the time of removal of a central venous catheter (CVC) for reduction of morbidity and mortality in newborn infants, in particular effects on late-onset sepsis. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group without language restriction to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 3), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 6 April 2017), Embase (1980 to 6 April 2017), and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1982 to 6 April 2017). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. Randomised, quasi-randomised, and cluster-randomised trials considering use of any antibiotic or combination of antibiotics at the time of CVC removal in newborn infants compared with placebo, no antibiotics, or another antibiotic or combination of antibiotics. We extracted data using standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. Two review authors independently selected, assessed the quality of, and extracted data from the included study. Only one randomised controlled trial was eligible for inclusion in this analysis. Forty-four of a total of 88 infants received two doses of cephazolin

  1. Infant and juvenile mortality at Algiers. Results of the survey organized by WHO and the Ministry of Public Health in 1974-1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    A Ministry of Public Health/World Health Organization survey, both retrospective and follow-up, was undertaken in Algiers to assess the level and causes of infant and child mortality in the city. The survey showed that, even in an environment of relative well-being from the health point of view, infant and child mortality remains high. Tables present collected information on the causes of death correlated with age of the child. As in all countries, mortality declines rapidly with age during the 1st years of life. Weaning effects are noted in the mortality statistics after the 3rd or 4th month. 40% of all deaths in children from 0-5 years of age were related to childbirth and/or pregnancy. Such factors as the duration of gestation, prenatal care, single or multiple birth, the infant's health status and weight at birth, the conditions of delivery, and postnatal care are included as factors which affect mortality. Factors causing mortality, in fact, vary with the age of the child. 85% of the deaths before the age of 1 month are due to causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. From 1-11 months, diarrheal diseases cause 43% of all deaths and diseases of the respiratory system and measles follow with 32%. 39% of all mortality for 1-4-year olds is caused by measles and respiratory disease, followed by diarrheal diseases in 24% of the cases.

  2. Effects of a Birth Hospital's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Level and Annual Volume of Very Low-Birth-Weight Infant Deliveries on Morbidity and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Erik A; Lorch, Scott A

    2015-08-01

    The annual volume of deliveries of very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants has a greater effect on mortality risk than does neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) level. The differential effect of these hospital factors on morbidity among VLBW infants is uncertain. To assess the independent effects of a birth hospital's annual volume of VLBW infant deliveries and NICU level on the risk of several neonatal morbidities and morbidity-mortality composite outcomes that are predictive of future neurocognitive development. Retrospective, population-based cohort study (performed in 2014) of all VLBW infants without severe congenital anomalies delivered in all hospitals in California, Missouri, and Pennsylvania between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2009 (N = 72,431). Risk-adjusted odds ratios and risk-adjusted probabilities were determined by logistic regression. The primary study outcomes were the individual composites of death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia, necrotizing enterocolitis, retinopathy of prematurity, and severe intraventricular hemorrhage. Among the 72,431 VLBW infants in the present study, birth at a hospital with 10 or less deliveries of VLBW infants per year was associated with the highest risk-adjusted probability of death (15.3% [95% CI, 14.4%-16.3%]), death or severe intraventricular hemorrhage (17.5% [95% CI, 16.5%-18.6%]), and death or necrotizing enterocolitis (19.3% [95% CI, 18.1%-20.4%]). These complications were also more common among infants born at hospitals with a level I or II NICU compared with infants delivered at hospitals with a level IIIB/C NICU. The risk-adjusted probability of death or retinopathy of prematurity was highest among infants born at hospitals with a level IIIB/C NICU and lowest among infants born at hospitals with a level IIIA NICU. When the effects of NICU level and annual volume of VLBW infant deliveries were evaluated simultaneously, the annual volume of deliveries was the stronger contributor to the risk of death, death or

  3. Maternal bipolar disorder increased low birthweight and preterm births: a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Chien; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2010-02-01

    To investigate pregnancy outcomes, including low birthweight, preterm births, and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) among women with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia compared with women with no history of mental illness using nationwide population-based data. This study linked the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Dataset with the national birth certificate registry. A total of 528,398 singleton births between 2001 and 2003 were included; 337 were diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out to examine the relationship between maternal bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and the odds of low birthweight, preterm births, and SGA, after adjusting for characteristics of infant, mother and father. It shows that pregnant women with bipolar disorder were more likely to have LBW infants (9.8% vs. 5.7%), preterm births (14.2% vs. 6.9%) and SGA (22.3% vs. 15.7%) than pregnant women with no history of mental illness. The adjusted odds of low birthweight for women with bipolar disorder was 1.66 times (95% CI, 1.16-2.38) that of women with no history of mental illness. In terms of preterm births and SGA, the adjusted odds ratios were 2.08 (95% CI, 1.53-2.83) and 1.47 (95% CI, 1.14-1.91) respectively, for women with bipolar disorder, compared to their counterparts with no history of mental illness. We conclude that women with bipolar disorder had increased risk of low birthweight, preterm births, and SGA than women without a history of mental illness. More active monitoring and early intervention to counter potential adverse pregnancy outcomes for pregnant women with bipolar disorder should be initiated. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors associated with mortality in newborn infants with meconium aspiration syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asril Aminullah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS is still one of the common causes of morbidity and mortality in neonatal period. A retrospective study was conducted from January 1993 to December 1999, to identify factors associated with mortality in MAS. Univariate analysis disclosed that preeclampsia/eclampsia, sex, Apgar scores, consistency of meconium, and use of mechanical ventilation were significantly associated with mortality in MAS, while gestational age, mode of delivery, hypertension, birth weight, tracheal suctioning, blood cultures, and complications were not. Logistic regression analysis showed that mode of delivery, preeclampsia/eclampsia, Apgar scores, consistency of meconium, and use of mechanical ventilation were associated with mortality in MAS, while other variables were not.

  5. Infant and Child Mortality in India in the Last Two Decades: A Geospatial Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Abhishek; Pathak, Praveen Kumar; Chauhan, Rajesh Kumar; Pan, William

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies examining the intricate interplay between poverty, female literacy, child malnutrition, and child mortality are rare in demographic literature. Given the recent focus on Millennium Development Goals 4 (child survival) and 5 (maternal health), we explored whether the geographic regions that were underprivileged in terms of wealth, female literacy, child nutrition, or safe delivery were also grappling with the elevated risk of child mortality; whether there were any spatial o...

  6. Birthweight distribution in ART singletons resulting from embryo culture in two different culture media compared with the national population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmen, J G; Pinborg, A; Rasmussen, S; Ziebe, S

    2014-10-10

    Is there a difference in birthweight distribution in ART singletons born after IVF culture in two different culture media? There is no effect of culture media on both crude and adjusted birthweight distributions in ART singletons from nulliparous mothers. Studies on human ART singletons have reported a difference in birthweight in singletons following IVF culture in different culture media. However, other studies comparing different culture media have not shown any significant differences in birthweight. This study was a retrospective comparison of birthweights in IVF/ICSI singletons conceived after fresh embryo transfer following embryo culture in Cook or Medicult medium and in a national cohort of naturally conceived singletons in nulliparous women. The study compares four independent groups consisting of singletons in nulliparous women from Cook-d2: 2-day culture in Cook medium at Rigshospitalet (n = 974), Medicult-d2: 2-day culture in Medicult EmbryoAssist medium at Rigshospitalet (n = 147), Medicult-d3: 3-day culture in Medicult EmbryoAssist medium with and without added GM-CSF (n = 204), and DK: pregnancies from the Danish birth registry (n = 106842). The study compares the birthweights of singletons from nulliparous women in the four independent groups mentioned above; Cook-d2: Medicult-d2: Medicult-d3: and DK. In addition, distributions of large and small for gestational age infants were compared between the groups and a multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine which factors determined birthweight. We found no significant difference in the crude birthweight distributions between singletons born after culture in Cook-d2 or Medicult-groups. Singleton girls from the Cook-d2 group weighed 3302 ± 28 g, versus 3252 ± 76 in the Medicult-d2 group (difference 50 g; P = 0.547). Singleton boys from the Cook-d2 group weighed 3430 ± 27 g, versus 3354 ± 56 in the Medicult-d2 group (difference 76 g; P = 0.279). In the background population, mean

  7. Respiratory severity score on day of life 30 is predictive of mortality and the length of mechanical ventilation in premature infants with protracted ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkar, Manish B; Gardner, William P; Mandy, George T; Stenger, Michael R; Nelin, Leif D; Shepherd, Edward G; Welty, Stephen E

    2015-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that Respiratory Severity Score (RSS) on day of life 30 is predictive of mortality and length of mechanical ventilation in premature infants on prolonged mechanical ventilation. A retrospective chart review was performed using the Nationwide Children's Hospital medical record and Vermont-Oxford Network databases. The primary outcome variable was survival to hospital discharge and the secondary outcome was length of mechanical ventilation after day of life 30. We identified 199 neonates admitted to Nationwide Children's Hospital between 2004 and 2007 with birth weight less than 1,500 g that received prolonged mechanical ventilation in the first 30 days of their life. A total of 184 infants were included in the analysis, excluding 14 patients with congenital anomalies and one infant with incomplete data. RSS on day of life 30 was significantly greater in the group of infants that died compared to those that survived (P = 0.003, 95% CI = [0.08, 0.40]). Further analysis demonstrated that the maximum difference in mortality was obtained with a threshold RSS of 6. Of the 109 patients who had RSS less than 6 on day of life 30, mortality rate was 4.6% (5/109) while those greater than or equal to 6 had a mortality rate of 21.3% (16/75). Both Kaplan-Meier survival curves comparing mortality and length of mechanical ventilation in infants with RSS ventilation after day of life 30 (P mechanical ventilation in premature infants requiring mechanical ventilation through 30 days of life. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Integrated approaches to improve birth outcomes: perinatal periods of risk, infant mortality review, and the Los Angeles Mommy and Baby Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Shin Margaret; Donatoni, Giannina; Bemis, Cathleen; Donovan, Kevin; Harding, Cynthia; Davenport, Deborah; Gilbert, Carol; Kasehagen, Laurin; Peck, Magda G

    2010-11-01

    This article provides an example of how Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) can provide a framework and offer analytic methods that move communities to productive action to address infant mortality. Between 1999 and 2002, the infant mortality rate in the Antelope Valley region of Los Angeles County increased from 5.0 to 10.6 per 1,000 live births. Of particular concern, infant mortality among African Americans in the Antelope Valley rose from 11.0 per 1,000 live births (7 cases) in 1999 to 32.7 per 1,000 live births (27 cases) in 2002. In response, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health Programs partnered with a community task force to develop an action plan to address the issue. Three stages of the PPOR approach were used: (1) Assuring Readiness; (2) Data and Assessment, which included: (a) Using 2002 vital records to identify areas with the highest excess rates of feto-infant mortality (Phase 1 PPOR), and (b) Implementing Infant Mortality Review (IMR) and the Los Angeles Mommy and Baby (LAMB) Project, a population-based study to identify potential factors associated with adverse birth outcomes. (Phase 2 PPOR); and (3) Strategy and Planning, to develop strategic actions for targeted prevention. A description of stakeholders' commitments to improve birth outcomes and monitor infant mortality is also given. The Antelope Valley community was engaged and ready to investigate the local rise in infant mortality. Phase 1 PPOR analysis identified Maternal Health/Prematurity and Infant Health as the most important periods of risk for further investigation and potential intervention. During the Phase 2 PPOR analyses, IMR found a significant proportion of mothers with previous fetal loss (45%) or low birth weight/preterm (LBW/PT) birth, late prenatal care (39%), maternal infections (47%), and infant safety issues (21%). After adjusting for potential confounders (maternal age, race, education level, and marital status), the

  9. [Teenage pregnancy and other risk factors for fetal and infant mortality in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Elaine Fernandes Viellas de; Gama, Silvana Granado Nogueira da; Silva, Cosme Marcelo Furtado Passos da

    2010-03-01

    This article analyzes teenage pregnancy and other risk factors for fetal and infant mortality in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The study included a sample of births in Rio de Janeiro, and exposure variables were organized hierarchically. For fetal death, the results showed the protective effect of adequate prenatal care, while maternal morbidity increased the risk. For neonatal death, adequate prenatal care and female gender in the newborn were protective factors, while black or brown maternal skin color, history of stillbirth, maternal morbidity, and physical aggression during the index pregnancy increased the risk. Low birth weight and prematurity were corroborated as determinants of fetal and neonatal death. Risk of post-neonatal death was highest with increased parity, intra-gestational morbidity, and low birth weight. Teenage pregnancy itself was an independent factor for post-neonatal death. The findings reaffirm the relevance of social and health policies targeting adolescents, as well as improvements in prenatal care.

  10. Infant twin mortality and hospitalisations after the perinatal period - a prospective cohort study from Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard-Andersen, M; Biering-Sørensen, S; Gomes, G M

    2014-01-01

    at the National Hospital Simão Mendes in the capital Bissau. Children were examined clinically at enrolment. Maternal, pregnancy and obstetric information was collected and HIV testing offered at birth. Follow-up occurred at home at 2, 6 and 12 months and through linkage with the paediatric admission register...... at the National Hospital. RESULTS: About 495 twins and 333 singletons were alive on day 7 after birth. In total, 36 twins and 12 singletons died during follow-up, the post-perinatal infant mortality rate being 91/1000 person-years for twins and 42/1000 for singletons (HR = 2.11, 95% CI: 1.......09-4.07). In a multivariable analysis among twins only, birth weight

  11. Strategies developed and implemented by women's groups to improve mother and infant health and reduce mortality in rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, M; Malamba, F; Kunyenge, B; Phiri, T; Mwansambo, C; Kazembe, P; Costello, A; Lewycka, S

    2012-09-01

    We evaluated the strategies to tackle maternal and infant health problems developed by women's groups in rural Malawi. Quantitative data were analyzed on strategies developed by 184 groups at two of the meetings in the community action cycle (attended by 3365 and 3047 women). Data on strategies implemented was collected through a survey of the 197 groups active in January 2010. Qualitative data on the identification and implementation of strategies was collected through 17 focus group discussions and 12 interviews with men and women. To address the maternal and child health problems identified the five most common strategies identified were: health education sessions, bicycle ambulances, training of traditional birth attendants, wetland vegetable garden (dimba garden) cultivation and distribution of insecticide treated bednets (ITNs). The five most common strategies actually implemented were: dimba garden cultivation, health education sessions, ITN distribution, health programme radio listening clubs and clearing house surroundings. The rationale behind the strategies and the factors facilitating and hindering implementation are presented. The potential impact of the strategies on health is discussed. Women's groups help communities to take control of their health issues and have the potential to reduce neonatal, infant and maternal mortality and morbidity in the longer term.

  12. Surgical findings during exploratory laparotomy are closely related to mortality in premature infants with necrotising enterocolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M L; Juhl, S M; Fonnest, G

    2017-01-01

    at Rigshospitalet, Denmark, from 2006 to 2015, who underwent a laparotomy for acute NEC. They were classified according to the locality and extent of intestinal necrosis by a paediatric surgeon, based on the surgical findings. We correlated the surgical findings with postoperative outcomes, namely death and, or......AIM: This study investigated whether a correlation existed between surgical findings during the first laparotomy for necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) and death and, or, disease progression. METHODS: We included infants admitted within one day of birth to our tertiary neonatal department...

  13. Public Health Service Act Infant Mortality Amendments of 1987. Report from the Committee on Labor and Human Resources (To accompany S. 1441). 100th Congress, 1st Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Edward M.

    This report provides a summary of the Public Health Service Act Infant Mortality Amendments of 1987 (S. 1441), background information and rationale for the legislation, the text of the bill as reported, views of the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources, a statement of approval by the Committee, the Congressional Budget Office cost…

  14. Effect of 50 000 IU vitamin A given with BCG vaccine on mortality in infants in Guinea-Bissau: randomised placebo controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diness, B.R.; Roth, A.; Nante, E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of high dose vitamin A supplementation given with BCG vaccine at birth in an African setting with high infant mortality. Design Randomised placebo controlled trial. Setting Bandim Health Project's demographic surveillance system in Guinea-Bissau, covering appro...

  15. Morbidity and Mortality among Infants with Normal Birth Weight in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the 286 babies admitted to the unit during this period, the major causes of morbidity were septicaemia in 35.9 percent, neonatal jaundice in 19 percent, tetanus in 13 percent and birth asphyxia in 10.9 percent. There were 52 deaths, an overall mortality of 18 percent. Neonatal tetanus was the leading cause of death in this ...

  16. Tritium releases from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station and birth defects and infant mortality in nearby communities 1971-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.C.; Rouleau, J.

    1991-10-01

    This study was commissioned to examine whether there were elevated rates of stillbirth, birth defects, or death in the first year of life between 1971 and 1988 among offspring of residents of communities within a 25-kilometre radius of the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station. The study was also to investigate whether there were any statistical associations between the monthly airborne or waterborne tritium emissions from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station and the rates of these reproductive outcomes. Overall analysis did not support a hypothesis of increased rates of stillbirths, neonatal mortality or infant mortality near the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, or a hypothesis of increased birth prevalence of birth defects for 21 of 22 diagnostic categories. The prevalence of Down Syndrome was elevated in both Pickering and Ajax; however, there was no consistent pattern between tritium release levels and Down Syndrome prevalence, chance could not be ruled out for the associations between Down Syndrome and tritium releases or ground-monitored concentrations, the association was detected in an analysis where multiple testing was done which may turn up significant associations by change, and maternal residence at birth and early in pregnancy needs to be verified. The association between Down Syndrome and low-level radiation remains indeterminate when existing evidence from epidemiological studies is summed. The estimated radiation exposure from the nuclear plant for residents of Pickering and Ajax is lower by a factor of 100 than the normal natural background radiation. Further study is recommended. (21 tabs., 29 figs., 5 maps, 37 refs.)

  17. Declínio e desigualdades sociais na mortalidade infantil por diarréia Decline and social inequalities of infant mortality from diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuleica Antunes Guimarães

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo ecológico, temporal e espacial descreve a evolução da mortalidade infantil por doenças infecciosas intestinais (DII em Salvador, Bahia, no período de 1977 a 1998 e a distribuição dessa mortalidade segundo condições de vida, em 1991. As Zonas de Informação (ZI, da cidade, foram agrupadas segundo um índice de condições de vida (ICV, em quartis. Foram calculados os seguintes indicadores: Mortalidade Infantil Proporcional (MIP, Coeficiente de Mortalidade Infantil (CMI e Razão de Mortalidade pela referida causa. A análise dos dados foi feita através do cálculo de médias móveis e do teste de qui-quadrado de tendência. Entre 1977 e 1998 o CMI/DII reduziu-se em 91,9%. A razão entre o CMI/DII do estrato de condições de vida "elevadas" para aquele onde as mesmas eram "muito baixas" foi de 1,9 e a MIP foi mais elevada onde eram piores as condições de vida o que requer reorientação das políticas de controle do problema na direção do enfrentamento das causas.This ecological study describes the temporal trend from 1977 to 1998, and spatial patterns of infant mortality from diarrhea in the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil. The annual proportional of infant mortality and specific-cause mortality rate were estimated. Spatial units of geographical zones within the city's urban area were utilized for administrative purposes, which were aggregated according to quartile of living conditions indicators. Over the study period, the diarrhea-induced infant mortality rate decreased 91.9%. The mortality risk from diarrhea in the lowest living condition strata was 90% greater than in the highest conditions. Also, infant mortality due to diarrhea increases proportionally as living conditions worsen, which necessitates a review of the control policies concerning this important public health problem. Although the infant mortality rate declined during the study period, social inequalities related to infant mortality due to

  18. A sibling study of whether maternal exposure to different types of natural space is related to birthweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Elizabeth A; Shortt, Niamh K; Mitchell, Richard; Pearce, Jamie

    2018-02-01

    Birthweight is an important determinant of health across the life course. Maternal exposure to natural space has been linked to higher birthweight, but stronger evidence of a causal link is needed. We use a quasi-experimental sibling study design to investigate if change in the mother's exposure to natural space between births was related to birthweight, in urban Scotland. Amount (% area) of total natural space, total accessible (public) natural space, parks, woodlands and open water within 100 m of the mother's postcode was calculated for eligible births (n = 40 194; 1991-2010) in the Scottish Longitudinal Study (a semi-random 5.3% sample of the Scottish population). Associations between natural space and birthweight were estimated, using ordinary least squares and fixed effects models. Birthweight was associated with the total amount of natural space around the mother's home (+8.2 g for interquartile range increase), but was unrelated to specific types of natural space. This whole-sample relationship disappeared in the sibling analysis, indicating residual confounding. The sibling models showed effects for total natural space with births to women who already had children (+20.1 g), and to those with an intermediate level of education (+14.1 g). The importance of total natural space for birthweight suggests that benefits can be experienced near to as well as within natural space. Ensuring expectant mothers have good access to high quality neighbourhood natural space has the potential to improve the infant's start in life, and consequently their health trajectory over the life course. © The Author 2017; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association

  19. The mixed effects of migration: community-level migration and birthweight in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Erin R; Choi, Kate H

    2015-05-01

    Research on the relationship between migration and infant health in Mexico finds that migration has mixed impacts on the risk of low birthweight (LBW). Whereas the departure and absence of household and community members are harmful, remittances are beneficial. We extend this work by considering a different measure of infant health in addition to LBW: macrosomia (i.e., heavy birthweight), which is associated with infant, child, and maternal morbidities but has a different social risk profile from LBW. We link the 2008 and 2009 Mexican birth certificates with community data from the 2000 Mexican census to analyze the association between various dimensions of community-level migration (i.e., rates of out-migration, receipt of remittances, and return migration) and the risk of LBW and macrosomia. We examine this association using two sets of models which differ in the extent to which they account for endogeneity. We find that the health impacts of migration differ depending not only on the dimension of migration, but also on the measure of health, and that they are robust to potential sources of endogeneity. Whereas community remittances and return migration are associated with lower risk of LBW, they are associated with increased risk of macrosomia. By contrast, out-migration is associated with increased risk of LBW and lower risk of macrosomia. Our analysis of endogeneity suggests that bias resulting from unmeasured differences between communities with different levels of migration may result in an underestimate of the impacts of community migration on birthweight. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Maternal "junk food" diet during pregnancy as a predictor of high birthweight: findings from the healthy beginnings trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li Ming; Simpson, Judy M; Rissel, Chris; Baur, Louise A

    2013-03-01

    A high infant birthweight is associated with future risk of a range of adverse health consequences. This study sought to determine whether maternal "junk food" diet (energy-dense, nutrient-poor) predicts high birthweight in first-time mothers in southwest Sydney, Australia. A community-based longitudinal study was conducted with a total of 368 first-time mothers and their newborns. Information about maternal "junk food" diet, including high consumption of soft drink, fast food, and/or processed meat and chips, and self-reported prepregnant weight and height of first-time mothers was collected by a face-to-face interview with mothers between 24 and 34 weeks of pregnancy. Birthweight was measured in hospital and reported by the mother, together with gestational age, when the baby was 6 months old. Logistic regression modeling was used to determine the factors predicting birthweight greater than 4.0 kg. Eleven percent of newborns weighed more than 4.0 kg (12% boys, 9% girls). Compared with mothers who had a "junk food" diet, mothers who had not consumed "junk food" during pregnancy were significantly less likely to have a newborn weighing more than 4.0 kg, with adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.36, 95 percent confidence interval (CI) 0.14-0.91, p = 0.03, after adjusting for maternal weight status and gestational age. Compared with healthy and underweight mothers, overweight or obese mothers were more likely to have a newborn weighing more than 4.0 kg (AOR overweight 3.03, 95% CI 1.35-6.80; obese 3.79, 95% CI 1.41-10.25) after allowing for "junk food" diet and gestational age. Maternal "junk food" diet during pregnancy and prepregnant overweight and obesity were independent predictors of high infant birthweight. Early childhood obesity interventions should consider addressing these factors. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Hypospadias: Prevalence, birthweight and associated major congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Karin Baekgaard; Udesen, Ann; Garne, Ester

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of hypospadias over 24 years in a Danish population and to describe the relation to birthweight and associated major congenital anomalies. It is a population-based study of all cases (live births, fetal deaths and elective terminations of pregnancy) with hypospadias born in the period 1986-2009 in Funen County and reported to the EUROCAT registry of congenital anomalies. Cases were included only if surgery for hypospadias was performed. 223 cases of hypospadias were registered during the period 1986-2009 with an overall prevalence of 16.9 per 10 000 births. The prevalence was significantly higher in 2000-2009 compared to 1986-1999 (P hypospadias. Infants with isolated hypospadias were more likely to have mild hypospadias (68%) while cases with associated major congenital anomalies were less likely to have mild hypospadias (42%) (P Hypospadias was associated with VLBW and the severity of the defect was related to the presence of major congenital anomalies. The prevalence of hypospadias has increased during the study period. The relation to VLBW could indicate a causal relationship for hypospadias or a shared pathogenic factor. © 2014 Japanese Teratology Society.

  2. Does consumption of different categories of seafood affect birthweight? The HUMIS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fristad, R.F.; Eggesboe, M.; Stigum, H.; Magnus, P. [Norwegian Inst. of Public Health, Oslo (Norway)

    2004-09-15

    Seafood is an important part of a healthy diet. Polyunsaturated fatty acids present in seafood play an essential role in the development of the central nervous system, of special importance to the brain development. The long chain n-3 fatty acids have also been reported to increase gestational length. Fish intake during pregnancy has been associated with both increased birthweight and gestational length. Birthweight is considered to be a predictor of a number of disorders in infant and adult life. However, negative effects may arise in connection with fish and shellfish intake. Seafood can be a major source of environmental contaminants, and correspondingly, adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes have been reported. In contrast, in a publication review carried out on the relationship between PCBs and related chemicals on several pregnancy outcomes, Kimbrough and Krouskas claim that none of the reviewed studies provided evidence on the existence of adverse effects on birthweight. Distinction between consumption of different types of seafood and its relation to pregnancy outcomes is scarce in the literature. Since the source of environmental contaminants is mainly in the marine fat, and that fat content potentially differ in the various categories of seafood items, it is plausible that different categories of seafood may have distinct health effects on fetal growth and gestational length. The objective of this study was to investigate the consumption of three major categories of seafood (fatty fish, lean/half-fatty fish and shellfish), potentially differing in their content of environmental toxicants, and its effects on pregnancy outcomes, specifically, birthweight and gestational length.

  3. Association between birthweight and later body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelenkovic, Aline; Yokoyama, Yoshie; Sund, Reijo

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that birthweight is positively associated with body mass index (BMI) in later life, but it remains unclear whether this is explained by genetic factors or the intrauterine environment. We analysed the association between birthweight and BMI from infancy to adulthood ...

  4. Explaining educational inequalities in birthweight: The Generation R Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W. Jansen (Pauline); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); A. Hofman (Albert); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); H. Raat (Hein)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAlthough low socio-economic status has consistently been associated with lower birthweight, little is known about the factors whereby socio-economic disadvantage influences birthweight. We therefore examined explanatory mechanisms that may underlie the association between the educational

  5. Headlights on tobacco road to low birthweight outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christian M.; Bache, Stefan Holst; Kristensen, Johannes Tang

    2013-01-01

    Low birthweight outcomes are associated with considerable social and economic costs, and therefore the possible determinants of low birthweight are of great interest. One such determinant which has received considerable attention is maternal smoking. From an economic perspective this is in part d...

  6. Preventable infant mortality and quality of health care: maternal perception of the child's illness and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salime Hadad

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This study used a qualitative methodology to analyze the discourse of mothers from Greater Metropolitan Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, whose infant children had died from what were considered avoidable causes (diarrhea, malnutrition, and pneumonia, seeking to elucidate the factors associated with utilization of health care services. Identification of the illness by the mother was related to perception of specific alterations in the child's state of health. Analysis of the alterations helped identify the principal characteristics ascribed to each alteration and their relationship to the search for treatment. The authors also studied the mother's assessment of treatment received at health care facilities; 43.0% of the cases involved problems related to the structure of health care services or the attending health care professionals. In 46.0% of the cases, mothers associated the child's death with flaws in the health care service. The study group showed a variety of interpretations of illness, often distinct from the corresponding biomedical concepts. The fact that attending health care personnel overlooked or underrated the mother's perception of the illness and the lack of communications between health care personnel and the child's family had an influence on the child's evolution and subsequent death.

  7. Ambient air pollution and low birthweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie; Giorgis-Allemand, Lise; Bernard, Claire

    2013-01-01

    birthweight at term (weight PM2·5), less than 10 μm (PM10), and between 2·5 μm and 10 μm during pregnancy were estimated at maternal home addresses with temporally...... adjusted land-use regression models, as was PM2·5 absorbance and concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides. We also investigated traffic density on the nearest road and total traffic load. We calculated pooled effect estimates with random-effects models. FINDINGS: A 5 μg/m(3) increase...... in concentration of PM2·5 during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of low birthweight at term (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1·18, 95% CI 1·06-1·33). An increased risk was also recorded for pregnancy concentrations lower than the present European Union annual PM2·5 limit of 25 μg/m(3) (OR for 5 μg/m(3...

  8. The impact of Neonatal Resuscitation Program courses on mortality and morbidity of newborn infants with perinatal asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Ridvan; Aladağ, Nükhet; Vatansever, Ulfet; Süt, Necdet; Acunaş, Betül

    2008-01-01

    Neonatal care provided within the first few minutes of life plays a major role in the reduction of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) courses had been held since 1996. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the NRP on morbidity and mortality of newborn infants with perinatal asphyxia. This retrospective study comprised newborn infants who were born in hospitals at Trakya region of Turkey during the last 3 years and were diagnosed as perinatal asphyxia and were referred to our Neonatal Unit. Those patients who were referred before NRP course (pretraining period) were designated as Group 1, those who were referred after the first NRP course (transition period) as Group 2, and those who were referred after the second NRP course (post-training period) as Group 3. Chart review was performed with regard to gestational age, birth weight, Apgar scores, resuscitation type, stage of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), existence of meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS), progress of the disease, duration of hospitalization. The study comprised 66 patients; 35 in Group 1, 18 in Group 2 and 13 in Group 3. The number of cases who had not been resuscitated was 10 in the pretraining period, 3 in the transition period and 1 in the post-training period which decreased significantly. The first minute Apgar scores in three groups were as follows; 2.08+/-1.2, 2.2+/-1.1 and 3.7+/-1.4, and this increase was statistically significant. The fifth minute Apgar scores also increased from 5.43+/-1.5 in the pretraining period to 6.5+/-1.9 in the post-training period, but this increase was not statistically significant. The number of patients with Stage 1 and 2 HIE decreased more in Group 3 (n=11 in Stage 1 HIE, n=17 in Stage 2 HIE) compared to those in Group 1 (n=7 in Stage 1 HIE, n=5 in Stage 2 HIE) but the difference was not statistically significant. The duration of hospitalization decreased in post-training period (15.1+/-10.3 days in

  9. Research report--Volunteer infant feeding and care counselors: a health education intervention to improve mother and child health and reduce mortality in rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Mikey; Lewycka, Sonia; Mwansambo, Charles; Kazembe, Peter; Phiri, Tambosi; Chapota, Hilda; Vergnano, Stefania; Newell, Marie-Louise; Osrin, David; Costello, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this report is to describe a health education intervention involving volunteer infant feeding and care counselors being implemented in Mchinji district, Malawi. The intervention was established in January 2004 and involves 72 volunteer infant feeding and care counselors, supervised by 24 government Health Surveillance Assistants, covering 355 villages in Mchinji district. It aims to change the knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of women to promote exclusive breastfeeding and other infant care practices. The main target population are women of child bearing age who are visited at five key points during pregnancy and after birth. Where possible, their partners are also involved. The visits cover exclusive breastfeeding and other important neonatal and infant care practices. Volunteers are provided with an intervention manual and picture book. Resource inputs are low and include training allowances and equipment for counselors and supervisors, and a salary, equipment and materials for a coordinator. It is hypothesized that the counselors will encourage informational and attitudinal change to enhance motivation and risk reduction skills and self-efficacy to promote exclusive breastfeeding and other infant care practices and reduce infant mortality. The impact is being evaluated through a cluster randomised controlled trial and results will be reported in 2012.

  10. The impact of prenatal care quality on neonatal, infant and child mortality in Zimbabwe: evidence from the demographic and health surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makate, Marshall; Makate, Clifton

    2017-04-01

    The impact of the quality of prenatal care on child mortality outcomes has received less attention in sub-Saharan Africa. This study endeavoured to explore the effect of the quality of prenatal care and its individual components on neonatal, infant and under-five mortality. The empirical analysis uses data from the three most recent waves of the nationally representative Demographic and Health Survey for Zimbabwe conducted in 1999, 2005/06 and 2010/11. The results indicate that a one-unit increase in the quality of prenatal care lowers the prospect of neonatal, infant and under-five mortality by approximately 42.33, 30.86 and 28.65%, respectively. These findings remained roughly the same even after adjusting for potential mediating factors. Examining the effect of individual prenatal care components on child mortality revealed that women who receive information on possible complications arising during pregnancy are less liable to experience a neonatal death. Similarly, women who had blood pressure checks and tetanus immunizations were less likely to experience an infant or under-five death. We did not find any statistically meaningful impact on child mortality outcomes of blood and urine sample checks, iron tablet consumption, and the receipt of malarial tablets. Overall, our results suggest the need for public health policymakers to focus on ensuring high-quality prenatal care to enhance the survival prospects of Zimbabwe's infants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Secular trends in gestational age and birthweight in twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, M; van Beijsterveldt, C E M; Derom, C; Vlietinck, R; Nijhuis, J G; Zeegers, M P A; Boomsma, D I

    2010-09-01

    In recent decades, the overall rate of preterm births has increased. The aim of the present study was to examine whether this trend is also seen for multiple gestations. More specifically, we examined if there has been a decrease in gestational age for live born monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins and if there has been a simultaneous change in birthweight. The contributions of fertility treatments and Caesarean sections were taken into consideration. All analyses were carried out in two large European twin cohorts. Cross-sectional study of 6310 live born twin pairs, born between 1964-2007, from the Belgian East Flanders Prospective Twin Survey and 14,712 twin pairs, born between 1990-2006, from the Netherlands Twin Register. Multiple regression analyses were performed with gestational age as outcome variable, and multilevel analysis with birthweight as outcome variable. All analyses were performed with and without adjustment for zygosity, parity, maternal age, mode of conception and delivery and, for the analyses of birthweight, gestational age. Gestational age decreased in a linear fashion from 1964 to 2007 with a decrease of 0.25 days per year in a similar way for MZ and DZ twins. Changes in birthweight depended on gestational age: up to 32 weeks, birthweight decreased and after 32 weeks birthweight increased. The frequency of infertility treatment and Caesarean sections, primiparity and advanced maternal age increased over the years, but none of these factors influenced the secular trends in gestational age and birthweight. The decrease in gestational age and change in birthweight in twins are sources of concern, especially for very preterm twins, for whom birthweight decreased. For twins born after 32 weeks, an increase in birthweight was observed and this is very likely the explanation for the decrease in gestational age.

  12. The decline of infant and child mortality among Spanish Gitanos or Calé (1871−2005: A microdemographic study in Andalusia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Gamella

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most Romani groups in Europe have experienced a decline in childhood mortality during recent decades. These crucial transformations are rarely addressed in research or public policy. Objective: This paper analyzes the timing and structure of the decline of childhood mortality among the Gitano people of Spain. Methods: The paper is based on the family and genealogy reconstitution of the Gitano population of 22 contiguous localities in Southern Spain. Registry data from over 19,100 people and 3,501 reconstituted families was included in a dense genealogical grid ranging over 150 years. From this database we produced annual time series of infant and child mortality and of the registered causes of death from 1871 to 2005. Results: The analyzed data shows a rapid decline in infant and child mortality from about 1949 to 1970. The onset of the definitive decline occurred in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Child mortality was higher in the pre-transitional period and started to decline earlier, although it took longer to converge with majority rates. The mortality transition in the Gitano minority paralleled that of the dominant majority, but with important delays and higher mortality rates. The causes of death show the deprivation suffered by Gitano people. Conclusions: The childhood mortality decline facilitated the most important changes experienced recently by the Gitano minority, including its fertility transition and the transformation of Gitanos' gender and family systems. Contribution: This is one of the first historical reconstructions of the mortality transition of a Romani population.

  13. National, regional, and global sex ratios of infant, child, and under-5 mortality and identification of countries with outlying ratios: a systematic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkema, Leontine; Chao, Fengqing; You, Danzhen; Pedersen, Jon; Sawyer, Cheryl C

    2014-09-01

    Under natural circumstances, the sex ratio of male to female mortality up to the age of 5 years is greater than one but sex discrimination can change sex ratios. The estimation of mortality by sex and identification of countries with outlying levels is challenging because of issues with data availability and quality, and because sex ratios might vary naturally based on differences in mortality levels and associated cause of death distributions. For this systematic analysis, we estimated country-specific mortality sex ratios for infants, children aged 1-4 years, and children under the age of 5 years (under 5s) for all countries from 1990 (or the earliest year of data collection) to 2012 using a Bayesian hierarchical time series model, accounting for various data quality issues and assessing the uncertainty in sex ratios. We simultaneously estimated the global relation between sex ratios and mortality levels and constructed estimates of expected and excess female mortality rates to identify countries with outlying sex ratios. Global sex ratios in 2012 were 1·13 (90% uncertainty interval 1·12-1·15) for infants, 0·95 (0·93-0·97) for children aged 1-5 years, and 1·08 (1·07-1·09) for under 5s, an increase since 1990 of 0·01 (-0·01 to 0·02) for infants, 0·04 (0·02 to 0·06) for children aged 1-4 years, and 0·02 (0·01 to 0·04) for under 5s. Levels and trends varied across regions and countries. Sex ratios were lowest in southern Asia for 1990 and 2012 for all age groups. Highest sex ratios were seen in developed regions and the Caucasus and central Asia region. Decreasing mortality was associated with increasing sex ratios, except at very low infant mortality, where sex ratios decreased with total mortality. For 2012, we identified 15 countries with outlying under-5 sex ratios, of which ten countries had female mortality higher than expected (Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, India, Iran, Jordan, Nepal, and Pakistan). Although excess female

  14. A new birthweight reference in Guangzhou, southern China, and its comparison with the global reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian-Rong; Xia, Hui-Min; Liu, Yu; Xia, Xiao-Yan; Mo, Wei-Jian; Wang, Ping; Cheng, Kar Keung; Leung, Gabriel M; Feng, Qiong; Schooling, C Mary; Qiu, Xiu

    2014-12-01

    To formulate a new birthweight reference for different gestational ages in Guangzhou, southern China, and compare it with the currently used reference in China and the global reference. All singleton live births of more than 26 weeks' gestational age recorded in the Guangzhou Perinatal Health Care and Delivery Surveillance System for the years 2009, 2010 and 2011 (n=510 837) were retrospectively included in the study. In addition, the study sample was supplemented by all singleton live births (n=3538) at gestational ages 26-33 weeks from 2007 and 2008. We used Gaussian mixture models and robust regression to exclude outliers of birth weight and then applied Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale, and Shape (GAMLSS) to generate smoothed percentile curves separately for gender and parity. Of infants defined as small for gestational age (SGA) in the new reference, 15.3-47.7% (depending on gestational age) were considered appropriate for gestational age (AGA) by the currently used reference of China. Of the infants defined as SGA by the new reference, 9.2% with gestational ages 34-36 weeks and 14.3% with 37-41 weeks were considered AGA by the global reference. At the 50th centile line, the new reference curve was similar to that of the global reference for gestational ages 26-33 weeks and above the global reference for 34-40 weeks. The new birthweight reference based on birthweight data for neonates in Guangzhou, China, differs from the reference currently used in China and the global reference, and appears to be more relevant to the local population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Determinants of infant mortality in the Jequitinhonha Valley and in the North and Northeast regions of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Maria do Carmo; Bittencourt, Sonia Duarte de Azevedo; Torres, Raquel Maria Cardoso; Niquini, Roberta Pereira; Souza, Paulo Roberto Borges de

    2017-03-02

    This study aims to identify the social and demographic determinants, in addition to the determinants of reproductive health and use of health services, associated with infant mortality in small and medium-sized cities of the North, Northeast and Southeast regions of Brazil. This is a case-control study with 803 cases of death of children under one year and 1,969 live births (controls), whose mothers lived in the selected cities in 2008. The lists of the names of cases and controls were extracted from the Sistema de Informação sobre Mortalidade (SIM - Mortality Information System) and the Sistema de Informação sobre Nascidos Vivos (SINASC - Live Birth Information System) and supplemented by data obtained by the research of "active search of death and birth". Data was collected in the household using a semi-structured questionnaire, and the analysis was carried out using multiple logistic regression. The final model indicates that the following items are positively and significantly associated with infant mortality: family working in agriculture, mother having a history of fetal and infant losses, no prenatal or inadequate prenatal, and not being associated to the maternity hospital during the prenatal period. We have observed significant interactions to explain the occurrence of infant mortality between race and socioeconomic score and between high-risk pregnancy and pilgrimage for childbirth. The excessive number of home deliveries and pilgrimage for childbirth indicates flaws in the line of maternity care and a lack of collaboration between the levels of outpatient and hospital care. The study reinforces the need for an integrated management of the health care networks, leveraging the capabilities of cities in meeting the needs of pregnancy, delivery and birth with quality. Identificar os determinantes sociais, demográficos, da saúde reprodutiva e de utilização dos serviços de saúde associados ao óbito infantil em municípios de pequeno e médio porte

  16. [Estimation of infant mortality and life expectancy in the time of the Roman Empire: a methodological examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, G

    1998-01-01

    "The first available written source in human history relating to the description of the life expectancy of a living population is a legal text which originates from the Roman jurist Ulpianus (murdered in AD 228). In contrast to the prevailing opinion in demography, I not only do consider the text to be of ¿historical interest'...but to be a document of inestimable worth for evaluating the population survival probability in the Roman empire. The criteria specified by Ulpianus are in line with the ¿pan-human' survival function as described by modern model life tables, when based on adulthood. Values calculated from tomb inscriptions follow the lowest level of the model life tables as well and support Ulpianus' statements. The specifications by Ulpianus for the population of the Roman world empire as a whole in the ¿best fit' with modern life tables lead to an average level of 20 years of life expectancy. As a consequence a high infant mortality rate of almost 400 [per thousand] can be concluded resulting in no more than three children at the age of five in an average family in spite of a high fertility rate." (EXCERPT)

  17. Threshold Levels of Infant and Under-Five Mortality for Crossover between Life Expectancies at Ages Zero, One and Five in India: A Decomposition Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Manisha; Ram, Usha; Ram, Faujdar

    2015-01-01

    Under the prevailing conditions of imbalanced life table and historic gender discrimination in India, our study examines crossover between life expectancies at ages zero, one and five years for India and quantifies the relative share of infant and under-five mortality towards this crossover. We estimate threshold levels of infant and under-five mortality required for crossover using age specific death rates during 1981-2009 for 16 Indian states by sex (comprising of India's 90% population in 2011). Kitagawa decomposition equations were used to analyse relative share of infant and under-five mortality towards crossover. India experienced crossover between life expectancies at ages zero and five in 2004 for menand in 2009 for women; eleven and nine Indian states have experienced this crossover for men and women, respectively. Men usually experienced crossover four years earlier than the women. Improvements in mortality below ages five have mostly contributed towards this crossover. Life expectancy at age one exceeds that at age zero for both men and women in India except for Kerala (the only state to experience this crossover in 2000 for men and 1999 for women). For India, using life expectancy at age zero and under-five mortality rate together may be more meaningful to measure overall health of its people until the crossover. Delayed crossover for women, despite higher life expectancy at birth than for men reiterates that Indian women are still disadvantaged and hence use of life expectancies at ages zero, one and five become important for India. Greater programmatic efforts to control leading causes of death during the first month and 1-59 months in high child mortality areas can help India to attain this crossover early.

  18. Threshold Levels of Infant and Under-Five Mortality for Crossover between Life Expectancies at Ages Zero, One and Five in India: A Decomposition Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Dubey

    Full Text Available Under the prevailing conditions of imbalanced life table and historic gender discrimination in India, our study examines crossover between life expectancies at ages zero, one and five years for India and quantifies the relative share of infant and under-five mortality towards this crossover.We estimate threshold levels of infant and under-five mortality required for crossover using age specific death rates during 1981-2009 for 16 Indian states by sex (comprising of India's 90% population in 2011. Kitagawa decomposition equations were used to analyse relative share of infant and under-five mortality towards crossover.India experienced crossover between life expectancies at ages zero and five in 2004 for menand in 2009 for women; eleven and nine Indian states have experienced this crossover for men and women, respectively. Men usually experienced crossover four years earlier than the women. Improvements in mortality below ages five have mostly contributed towards this crossover. Life expectancy at age one exceeds that at age zero for both men and women in India except for Kerala (the only state to experience this crossover in 2000 for men and 1999 for women.For India, using life expectancy at age zero and under-five mortality rate together may be more meaningful to measure overall health of its people until the crossover. Delayed crossover for women, despite higher life expectancy at birth than for men reiterates that Indian women are still disadvantaged and hence use of life expectancies at ages zero, one and five become important for India. Greater programmatic efforts to control leading causes of death during the first month and 1-59 months in high child mortality areas can help India to attain this crossover early.

  19. Underascertainment of child abuse fatalities in France: retrospective analysis of judicial data to assess underreporting of infant homicides in mortality statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursz, Anne; Crost, Monique; Gerbouin-Rérolle, Pascale; Cook, Jon M

    2010-07-01

    Test the hypothesis of an underestimation of infant homicides in mortality statistics in France; identify its causes; examine data from the judicial system and their contribution in correcting this underestimation. A retrospective, cross-sectional study was carried out in 26 courts in three regions of France of cases of infant deaths submitted to the courts, 1996-2000, with follow-up of their files until case closing (1996-2008). For each case, cause of death established by the courts was compared with ICD cause of death as coded in official mortality statistics. We examined 247 cases. Shortcomings in investigations were noted (autopsies: 75% of cases; fundus examination: 11%; diagnosis of sudden infant death syndrome [SIDS] without autopsy: 41%). Eighty deaths were considered homicides by the courts. Homicide rates in the court study are 2-3.6 times higher than those in mortality statistics. Nearly 1/3 of "accidental" deaths and 1/4 of deaths from unknown cause in mortality statistics are homicides. Mechanisms of underascertainment are: physicians' inappropriate death certification and underreporting of suspicious cases; inadequate investigation of cases; incomplete communication of final medical and forensic results to the mortality statistics department. In a country where neither transportation of the body to a hospital nor autopsy is obligatory, judicial data can make an important contribution to correcting mortality statistics. This study led to the first French protocol for investigating sudden unexpected deaths in infancy (SUDI). The protocol includes a physician "training" section focused on understanding the symptomatology and risk factors of violence, as well as the quality of death certification. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A mortalidade do prematuro extremo em nosso meio: realidade e desafios Mortality of very low birth weight preterm infants in Brazil: reality and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel de Carvalho

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este trabalho apresenta uma revisão da literatura sobre os indicadores epidemiológicos e a estrutura organizacional da assistência perinatal no sistema de saúde brasileiro, enfatizando os aspectos ligados aos neonatos com peso ao nascer OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article is to review and discuss the medical literature on epidemiological indicators and organizational structure of the Brazilian perinatal health system concerning the care of very low birth weight premature infants (< 1,500 g. DATA SOURCES: Electronic search of the MEDLINE, Lilacs and SciELO databases from 1990 to 2004, with a selection made of the most relevant articles. Documents and reports from the Ministry of Health (Mortality Information System - SIM and Live Births Information System - SINASC. SUMMARY OF FINDINGS: The decrease in infant mortality rates and the high incidence of maternal deaths, observed since 1990, prompted de Brazilian government to focus its strategies on the organization and delivery of care to pregnant women and their newborn infants. However, a critical analysis of the actions aimed at the care of premature infants reveals that the coverage and utilization of these services are not uniform and that the records on birth and death rates are not reliable. The availability of neonatal beds is very limited and does not meet the demand, especially for those requiring high levels of complexity. Important challenges must be overcome to adequately deal with the incorporation of inappropriate technology, the limited number of qualified health professionals and utilization of evidence-based best practices to improve perinatal care. CONCLUSIONS: A reduction in the rates of morbidity and mortality of premature infants requires more effective planning and intervention in the prenatal care system. To meet the demand, increases in the number of neonatal intensive care beds should be implemented through specialized perinatal centers rather than

  1. Parenteral glutamine supplementation does not reduce the risk of mortality or late-onset sepsis in extremely low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, Brenda B; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Stoll, Barbara J; Wright, Linda L; Poole, W Kenneth; Oh, William; Bauer, Charles R; Papile, Lu-Ann; Tyson, Jon E; Carlo, Waldemar A; Laptook, Abbot R; Narendran, Vivek; Stevenson, David K; Fanaroff, Avroy A; Korones, Sheldon B; Shankaran, Seetha; Finer, Neil N; Lemons, James A

    2004-05-01

    Glutamine is one of the most abundant amino acids in both plasma and human milk, yet it is not included in standard intravenous amino acid solutions. Previous studies have suggested that parenteral nutrition (PN) supplemented with glutamine may reduce sepsis and mortality in critically ill adults. Whether glutamine supplementation would provide a similar benefit to extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants is not known. We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-masked, clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of early PN supplemented with glutamine in decreasing the risk of death or late-onset sepsis in ELBW infants. Infants 401 to 1000 g were randomized within 72 hours of birth to receive either TrophAmine (control) or an isonitrogenous study amino acid solution with 20% glutamine whenever they received PN up to 120 days of age, death, or discharge from the hospital. The primary outcome was death or late-onset sepsis. Of the 721 infants who were assigned to glutamine supplementation, 370 (51%) died or developed late-onset sepsis, as compared with 343 of the 712 infants (48%) assigned to control (relative risk: 1.07; 95% confidence interval: 0.97-1.17). Glutamine had no effect on tolerance of enteral feeds, necrotizing enterocolitis, or growth. No significant adverse events were observed with glutamine supplementation. Parenteral glutamine supplementation as studied did not decrease mortality or the incidence of late-onset sepsis in ELBW infants. Consequently, although no harm was demonstrated, routine use of parenteral glutamine supplementation cannot be recommended in this population.

  2. Sex-differential effect on infant mortality of oral polio vaccine administered with BCG at birth in Guinea-Bissau. A natural experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Stabell Benn

    Full Text Available The policy to provide oral polio vaccine (OPV at birth was introduced in low-income countries to increase coverage. The effect of OPV at birth on overall child mortality was never studied. During a trial of vitamin A supplementation (VAS at birth in Guinea-Bissau, OPV was not available during several periods. We took advantage of this "natural experiment" to test the effect on mortality of receiving OPV at birth.Between 2002 and 2004, the VAS trial randomised normal-birth-weight infants to 50,000 IU VAS or placebo administered with BCG. Provision of OPV at birth was not part of the trial, but we noted whether the infants received OPV or not. OPV was missing during several periods in 2004. We used Cox proportional hazards models to compute mortality rate ratios (MRR of children who had received or not received OPV at birth.A total of 962 (22.1% of the 4345 enrolled children did not receive OPV at birth; 179 children died within the first year of life. Missing OPV at birth was associated with a tendency for decreased mortality (adjusted MRR = 0.69 (95% CI = 0.46-1.03, the effect being similar among recipients of VAS and placebo. There was a highly significant interaction between OPV at birth and sex (p = 0.006. Not receiving OPV at birth was associated with a weak tendency for increased mortality in girls (1.14 (0.70-1.89 but significantly decreased mortality in boys (0.35 (0.18-0.71.In our study OPV at birth had a sex-differential effect on mortality. Poliovirus is almost eradicated and OPV at birth contributes little to herd immunity. A randomised study of the effect of OPV at birth on overall mortality in both sexes is warranted.

  3. Maternal smoking as a model for environmental epigenetic changes affecting birthweight and fetal programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Melissa A; Anders, Amber M; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2013-01-01

    Although the association between maternal smoking and low birthweight infants has been well established, the mechanisms behind reduced fetal growth are still being elucidated. While many infants are exposed to tobacco smoke in utero, not all are born growth restricted or small for gestational age. Many hypotheses have emerged to explain the differential response to in utero maternal tobacco smoke exposure (MTSE). Studies have shown that both maternal and fetal genotypes may contribute to the discrepant outcomes. However, the contribution of epigenetic changes cannot be ignored. In this review we address two important questions regarding the effect of MTSE on the fetal epigenome. First, does exposure to maternal tobacco smoke in utero alter the fetal epigenome? Secondly, could these alterations be associated with the reduced fetal growth observed with MTSE?

  4. The effect of changes in health sector resources on infant mortality in the short-run and the long-run: a longitudinal econometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Mansour; Subramanian, S V; Canning, David

    2009-06-01

    While countries with higher levels of human resources for health typically have better population health, the evidence that increases in the level of human resources for health leads to improvements in population health is limited. We use a dynamic regression model to obtain estimates of both the short-run and long-term effects of changes in physicians per capita, our measure of health system resources, on infant mortality. Using a dataset of 99 countries at 5-year intervals from 1960-2000, we estimate that increasing the number of physicians by one per 1000 population (roughly a doubling of current levels of provision) decreases the infant mortality rate by 15% within 5 years and by 45% in the long-run with half the long-run gain being achieved in 15 years. We conclude that the long-run effects of heath system resources are substantially larger than previously estimated. Our results suggest, however, that countries that have delayed action on the Millennium Development Goal of reducing infant and child mortality rate by two-thirds by 2015 (relative to 1990) may have difficulty meeting this goal even if they rapidly increase resources now.

  5. Domestic violence as a risk factor for infant and child mortality: a community-based case-control study from southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, S; Prasad, J H; Jacob, K S

    2013-01-01

    Violence against women may have an impact on infant and child mortality. We aimed to determine whether domestic violence is a risk factor for infant and child death. Eighty infant and child deaths (under 5 years of age) were identified from a central register of a comprehensive community health programme in rural southern India; controls were matched for age, gender and street of residence. Domestic violence during the lifetime (OR 2.63, 95% CI 1.39-4.99), which was severe (OR 4.00, 95% CI 2.02-7.94) and during pregnancy (OR 5.69, 95% CI 2.03-15. 93) and father's smoking status (OR 3.81, 95% CI 1.92-7.55) were significantly related to infant and child death while immunization being completed for age (OR 0.04, 95% CI 0.01-0.19) and having at least one boy child in the family (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.14-0.59) were protective. These variables remained statistically significantly associated with outcome after adjusting for other determinants using conditional logistic regression. There is evidence for an association between domestic violence in mothers, and infant and child death. Copyright 2013, NMJI.

  6. Common polymorphism in H19 associated with birthweight and cord blood IGF-II levels in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Clive J; Ong, Ken K; Barratt, Bryan J; Wingate, Diane; Cordell, Heather J; Ring, Susan M; Pembrey, Marcus E; Reik, Wolf; Todd, John A; Dunger, David B

    2005-01-01

    Background Common genetic variation at genes that are imprinted and exclusively maternally expressed could explain the apparent maternal-specific inheritance of low birthweight reported in large family pedigrees. We identified ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in H19, and we genotyped three of these SNPs in families from the contemporary ALSPAC UK birth cohort (1,696 children, 822 mothers and 661 fathers) in order to explore associations with size at birth and cord blood IGF-II levels. Results Both offspring's and mother's H19 2992C>T SNP genotypes showed associations with offspring birthweight (P = 0.03 to P = 0.003) and mother's genotype was also associated with cord blood IGF-II levels (P = 0.0003 to P = 0.0001). The offspring genotype association with birthweight was independent of mother's genotype (P = 0.01 to P = 0.007). However, mother's untransmitted H19 2992T allele was also associated with larger birthweight (P = 0.04) and higher cord blood IGF-II levels (P = 0.002), suggesting a direct effect of mother's genotype on placental IGF-II expression and fetal growth. The association between mother's untransmitted allele and cord blood IGF-II levels was more apparent in offspring of first pregnancies than subsequent pregnancies (P-interaction = 0.03). Study of the independent Cambridge birth cohort with available DNA in mothers (N = 646) provided additional support for mother's H19 2992 genotype associations with birthweight (P = 0.04) and with mother's glucose levels (P = 0.01) in first pregnancies. Conclusion The common H19 2992T allele, in the mother or offspring or both, may confer reduced fetal growth restraint, as indicated by associations with larger offspring birth size, higher cord blood IGF-II levels, and lower compensatory early postnatal catch-up weight gain, that are more evident among mother's smaller first-born infants. PMID:15885138

  7. Common polymorphism in H19 associated with birthweight and cord blood IGF-II levels in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petry Clive J

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common genetic variation at genes that are imprinted and exclusively maternally expressed could explain the apparent maternal-specific inheritance of low birthweight reported in large family pedigrees. We identified ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in H19, and we genotyped three of these SNPs in families from the contemporary ALSPAC UK birth cohort (1,696 children, 822 mothers and 661 fathers in order to explore associations with size at birth and cord blood IGF-II levels. Results Both offspring's and mother's H19 2992C>T SNP genotypes showed associations with offspring birthweight (P = 0.03 to P = 0.003 and mother's genotype was also associated with cord blood IGF-II levels (P = 0.0003 to P = 0.0001. The offspring genotype association with birthweight was independent of mother's genotype (P = 0.01 to P = 0.007. However, mother's untransmitted H19 2992T allele was also associated with larger birthweight (P = 0.04 and higher cord blood IGF-II levels (P = 0.002, suggesting a direct effect of mother's genotype on placental IGF-II expression and fetal growth. The association between mother's untransmitted allele and cord blood IGF-II levels was more apparent in offspring of first pregnancies than subsequent pregnancies (P-interaction = 0.03. Study of the independent Cambridge birth cohort with available DNA in mothers (N = 646 provided additional support for mother's H19 2992 genotype associations with birthweight (P = 0.04 and with mother's glucose levels (P = 0.01 in first pregnancies. Conclusion The common H19 2992T allele, in the mother or offspring or both, may confer reduced fetal growth restraint, as indicated by associations with larger offspring birth size, higher cord blood IGF-II levels, and lower compensatory early postnatal catch-up weight gain, that are more evident among mother's smaller first-born infants.

  8. Role of Federal Food Assistance Programs in Strategies To Reduce Infant Mortality. Hearing before the Domestic Task Force of the Select Committee on Hunger. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Hunger.

    This document presents oral and written testimony concerning the effectiveness of federal assistance programs in reducing infant mortality. In opening statements, members of the House Select Committee on Hunger voiced their concern over the persistence of high infant death rates among minorities, the rural poor, and urban populations, despite…

  9. Associations between birthweight, gestational age at birth and subsequent type 1 diabetes in children under 12: a retrospective cohort study in England, 1998-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldacre, Raphael R

    2018-03-01

    With genetics thought to explain only 40-50% of the total risk of type 1 diabetes, environmental risk factors in early life have been proposed. Previous findings from studies of type 1 diabetes incidence by birthweight and gestational age at birth have been inconsistent. This study aimed to investigate the relationships between birthweight, gestational age at birth and subsequent type 1 diabetes in England. Data were obtained from a population-based database comprising linked mother-infant pairs using English national Hospital Episode Statistics from 1998 to 2012. In total, 3,834,405 children, categorised by birthweight and gestational age at birth, were followed up through record linkage to compare their incidence of type 1 diabetes through calculation of multivariable-adjusted HRs. Out of 3,834,405 children, 2969 had a subsequent hospital diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in childhood. Children born preterm (age experienced higher incidence of type 1 diabetes than children born at medium birthweight (3000-3499 g) (HR 1.13 [95% CI 1.03, 1.23] and 1.16 [95% CI 1.02, 1.31], respectively), while children at low birthweight (age and low gestational age at birth are both independently associated with subsequent type 1 diabetes. These findings help contextualise the debate about the potential role of gestational and early life environmental risk factors in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, including the potential roles of insulin sensitivity and gut microbiota.

  10. Desigualdades socioeconómicas y mortalidad infantil en Bolivia Socioeconomic inequalities and infant mortality in Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Maydana

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analizar las desigualdades socioeconómicas y su relación con la mortalidad infantil en los municipios de Bolivia en 2001. MÉTODOS: Estudio ecológico a partir de los datos del Censo Nacional de Población y Vivienda de 2001 para los 327 municipios de los nueve departamentos de Bolivia. La variable dependiente fue la tasa de mortalidad infantil (TMI y las independientes fueron indicadores socioeconómicos indirectos (la proporción de analfabetos mayores de 15 años y las características constructivas y sanitarias de las viviendas. Se describió la distribución geográfica por indicador y se analizó la relación entre la TMI y los indicadores socioeconómicos mediante el coeficiente de correlación de Spearman y el ajuste de modelos de regresión de Poisson. RESULTADOS: La TMI estimada para Bolivia en 2001 fue de 67 por 1 000 nacidos vivos. Las tasas fluctuaron entre OBJECTIVES: To evaluate socioeconomic inequalities and its relation to infant mortality in Bolivia's municipalities in 2001. METHODS: An ecological study based on data from the 2001 National Census on Population and Housing (Censo Nacional de Población y Vivienda covering the 327 municipalities in Bolivia's nine departments. The dependent variable was the infant mortality rate (IMR; the independent variables were indirect socioeconomic indicators (the percentage of illiterates older than 15 years of age, and the building materials and sanitation features of the houses. The geographic distribution of each indicator was determined and the associations between IMR and each socioeconomic indicator were calculate using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and adjusted with Poisson regression models. RESULTS: The resulting IMR for Bolivia in 2001 was 67 per 1 000 live births. Rates ranged from < 0.1 per 1 000 live births in the Magdalena municipality, Beni department, to 170.0 per 1 000 live births in the Caripuyo municipality, Potosí department. The mean rate of

  11. Fatores de erros na mensuração da mortalidade infantil Error factors in the measurement of infant mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruy Laurenti

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available Dentre os indicadores de saúde tradicionalmente utilizados a mortalidade infantil destaca-se como um dos mais importantes. Frequentemente é utilizada por profissionais de saúde pública na caracterização do nível de saúde e em avaliações de programas. Existem, porém, vários fatores de erros que afetam o seu valor e dentre esses são destacados: a definição dos nascidos vivos e sua aplicação na prática, o sub-registro de óbito e de nascimento, o registro do óbito por local de ocorrência, a definição de nascido vivo no ano e a declaração errada na idade. Existem também erros qualitativos que dizem respeito, principalmente, a declarações erradas da causa de morte. Vários desses fatores foram medidos para São Paulo.Among the traditionally used health indices the infant mortality rate is distinguished as the most important one. Frequently it is used by the public health professionals for health level characterization and for the evaluation of programmes. There are, however, several error factors that affect its value, among which are the live birth definition and its true use; underregistration of deaths and births; the death register by place of occurrence; live birth definition in the year, and the wrong age information. There are also qualitative errors due to wrong information as regards the causes of death. Several of these factors were discussed for S. Paulo.

  12. Factores de riesgo de bajo peso al nacer Risk factors for low birthweight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Bortman

    1998-05-01

    infant mortality. In spite of the sharp decrease in infant mortality rates and of the rise in survival rates for children with LBW, no important decrease in LBW rates has been observed in Neuquen, Argentina. The purpose of this study was to try to understand the risk factors for LBW, the frequency of LBW in the population, and the role of prenatal care in its prevention, as well as to develop a risk factor scale that could be used to identify women at higher risk of giving birth to a child with LBW. With this in mind we performed a cross-sectional study based on 50% of the data entered into the Perinatal Information System for 1988­1995 by the 29 hospitals in Neuquen province (46 171 births. The distribution of birthweight and the frequency of potential risk factors for LBW were examined. The relationship between such factors and LBW was studied using a logistic regression model. On the basis of the results obtained, an additive scale was drawn up and validated with the remaining 50% of the data for registered births. The highest odds ratio (OR was seen in women who had no prenatal care (OR = 8,78; 95%CI: 6,7 to 11,4. ORs for inadequate prenatal care, lateness in attending the first prenatal visit, preeclampsia or eclampsia, hemorrhage and anomalies of the placenta or placental membranes, and a history of a previous child with LBW were greater than 2,0. The risk of having children with LBW was also higher in women over the age of 40, women under 20, single women, smoking mothers, women with an intergenesic interval of less than 18 months, and women with a body mass index of less than 20. Finally, there was a direct linear relationship between points on the risk scale and the risk of having a LBW infant.

  13. Adult glucose metabolism in extremely birthweight-discordant monozygotic twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, M; Petersen, I; Brixen, K

    2012-01-01

    Low birthweight (BW) is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. We compared glucose metabolism in adult BW-discordant monozygotic (MZ) twins, thereby controlling for genetic factors and rearing environment....

  14. Changes in the incidence of pneumonia, bacterial meningitis, and infant mortality 5 years following introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in a "3+0" schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Blette, Bryan; Briceño, Rafaela; Alemán, Jorge; Hudgens, Michael G; Moreno, Gilberto; Ordoñez, Ana; Rocha, Julio; Weber, David J; Amaya, Erick

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes about 826,000 deaths of children in the world each year and many health facility visits. To reduce the burden of pneumococcal disease, many nations have added pneumococcal conjugate vaccines to their national immunization schedules. Nicaragua was the first country eligible for GAVI Alliance funding to introduce the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in 2010, provided to infants at 2, 4, and 6 months of age. The goal of this study was to evaluate the population impact of the first five years of the program. Numbers of visits for pneumonia, pneumonia-related deaths, and bacterial meningitis in both children and adults, and infant deaths between 2008 and 2015 were collected from all 107 public health facilities in León Department. Vital statistics data provided additional counts of pneumonia-related deaths that occurred outside health facilities. Adjusted incidence rates and incidence rate ratios (IRRa) in the vaccine (2011-2015) and pre-vaccine periods (2008-2010) were estimated retrospectively using official population estimates as exposure time. The IRRa for pneumonia hospitalizations was 0.70 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.66, 0.75) for infants, and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.85, 0.99) for one year-olds. The IRRa for post-neonatal infant mortality was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.41, 0.77). In the population as a whole, ambulatory visits and hospitalizations for pneumonia, as well as pneumonia-related mortality and rates of bacterial meningitis were lower in the vaccine period. During the first five years of program implementation, reductions were observed in health facility visits for pneumonia in immunized age groups and infant mortality, which would be hard to achieve with any other single public health intervention. Future study is warranted to understand whether the lack of a booster dose (e.g., at 12 months) may be responsible for the small reductions in pneumonia hospitalizations observed in one year-olds as compared to infants.

  15. Changes in the incidence of pneumonia, bacterial meningitis, and infant mortality 5 years following introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in a "3+0" schedule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Becker-Dreps

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae causes about 826,000 deaths of children in the world each year and many health facility visits. To reduce the burden of pneumococcal disease, many nations have added pneumococcal conjugate vaccines to their national immunization schedules. Nicaragua was the first country eligible for GAVI Alliance funding to introduce the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 in 2010, provided to infants at 2, 4, and 6 months of age. The goal of this study was to evaluate the population impact of the first five years of the program.Numbers of visits for pneumonia, pneumonia-related deaths, and bacterial meningitis in both children and adults, and infant deaths between 2008 and 2015 were collected from all 107 public health facilities in León Department. Vital statistics data provided additional counts of pneumonia-related deaths that occurred outside health facilities. Adjusted incidence rates and incidence rate ratios (IRRa in the vaccine (2011-2015 and pre-vaccine periods (2008-2010 were estimated retrospectively using official population estimates as exposure time.The IRRa for pneumonia hospitalizations was 0.70 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.66, 0.75 for infants, and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.85, 0.99 for one year-olds. The IRRa for post-neonatal infant mortality was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.41, 0.77. In the population as a whole, ambulatory visits and hospitalizations for pneumonia, as well as pneumonia-related mortality and rates of bacterial meningitis were lower in the vaccine period.During the first five years of program implementation, reductions were observed in health facility visits for pneumonia in immunized age groups and infant mortality, which would be hard to achieve with any other single public health intervention. Future study is warranted to understand whether the lack of a booster dose (e.g., at 12 months may be responsible for the small reductions in pneumonia hospitalizations observed in one year-olds as compared to

  16. A new multidimensional population health indicator for policy makers: absolute level, inequality and spatial clustering - an empirical application using global sub-national infant mortality data

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    Benn K.D. Sartorius

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The need for a multidimensional measure of population health that accounts for its distribution remains a central problem to guide the allocation of limited resources. Absolute proxy measures, like the infant mortality rate (IMR, are limi- ted because they ignore inequality and spatial clustering. We propose a novel, three-part, multidimensional mortality indi- cator that can be used as the first step to differentiate interventions in a region or country. The three-part indicator (MortalityABC index combines absolute mortality rate, the Theil Index to calculate mortality inequality and the Getis-Ord G statistic to determine the degree of spatial clustering. The analysis utilises global sub-national IMR data to empirically illu- strate the proposed indicator. The three-part indicator is mapped globally to display regional/country variation and further highlight its potential application. Developing countries (e.g. in sub-Saharan Africa display high levels of absolute mortality as well as variable mortality inequality with evidence of spatial clustering within certain sub-national units (“hotspots”. Although greater inequality is observed outside developed regions, high mortality inequality and spatial clustering are com- mon in both developed and developing countries. Significant positive correlation was observed between the degree of spatial clustering and absolute mortality. The proposed multidimensional indicator should prove useful for spatial allocation of healthcare resources within a country, because it can prompt a wide range of policy options and prioritise high-risk areas. The new indicator demonstrates the inadequacy of IMR as a single measure of population health, and it can also be adapted to lower administrative levels within a country and other population health measures.

  17. Mineração de dados e características da mortalidade infantil Data mining and characteristics of infant mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Cristina Xavier Ferreira Vianna

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O estudo busca identificar padrões de características materno-fetais na predição da mortalidade infantil, por meio da incorporação de técnicas inovadoras, como a Mineração de Dados, que se mostram relevantes em Saúde Pública. Foi elaborada uma base de dados, com óbitos infantis analisados pelos Comitês de Prevenção da Mortalidade Infantil de 2000 a 2004, a partir da integração dos Sistemas de Informações de Nascidos Vivos, da Mortalidade e da Investigação da Mortalidade Infantil no Estado do Paraná. O programa da mineração foi o WEKA, de uso livre. A mineração faz busca em banco de dados e fornece regras que devem ser analisadas para transformação em informação útil. Após a mineração, selecionaram-se 4.230 regras, por exemplo: mãe adolescente e peso ao nascer This study aims to identify patterns in maternal and fetal characteristics in the prediction of infant mortality by incorporating innovative techniques like data mining, with proven relevance for public health. A database was developed with infant deaths from 2000 to 2004 analyzed by the Committees for the Prevention of Infant Mortality, based on integration of the Information System on Live Births (SINASC, Mortality Information System, and Investigation of Infant Mortality in the State of Paraná. The data mining software was WEKA (open source. The data mining conducts a database search and provides rules to be analyzed to transform the data into useful information. After mining, 4,230 rules were selected: teenage pregnancy plus birth weight < 2,500g, or post-term birth plus teenage mother with a previous child or intercurrent conditions increase the risk of neonatal death. The results highlight the need for greater attention to teenage mothers, newborns with birth weight < 2,500g, post-term neonates, and infants of mothers with intercurrent conditions, thus corroborating other studies.

  18. Mortalidade infantil em município da região Centro-Oeste Paulista, Brasil, 1990 a 1992 Infant mortality in a midwest city of Southeastern Brazil, 1990 to 1992

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime de O. Gomes

    1997-08-01

    étrica no trabalho de parto e atenção pediátrica por baixo peso ao nascer, entre outras. A análise por causas múltiplas mostra que 76,05% dos óbitos têm as causas básicas relacionadas a causas perinatais e confirma a relação entre as deficiências de peso e as complicações respiratórias do recém-nascido. As complicações maternas também relacionaram-se com o baixo peso. Identificaram-se grandes diferenças no coeficiente de mortalidade infantil entre as áreas da zona urbana não somente restritas aos valores, como também ao tipo de doenças responsáveis pela ocorrência do óbito. Conclui-se haver vantagem no uso associado das quatro técnicas que são complementares, tanto para estudo, como para planejamento de ações dirigidas à prevenção da mortalidade infantil.INTRODUCTION: Infant mortality was studied in an urban area of Southeastern Brazil in the period from 1990 to 1992 using data from death certificates collected at the registry office, by the application of methods for obtaining a collective diagnosis which will assist in the identification and choice of strategies for the control of local problems. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The original data were corrected using documental research into health services and household interviews. Data of the Live Birth Information System (SINASC was used to study variables such as maternal age and birthweight. The quality of original death certificates was initially analyzed using the amount of information, sensitivity, specificity and Kappa value. RESULTS: The global sensitivity for the underlying cause was 78.84% and Kappa 71.32% for the total of causes. One hundred and eighty-nine deaths occurred, 66.15% of them in the neonatal period, (41.28% during the first day of life and 33.85% in late childhood. The birthweight of 58.28% of deaths was less than 2,500g. The underlying causes of death were studied the by possibility, of their avoidance (a method developed by Erica Taucher, by a "reduced" group of causes

  19. Stressful life events, social health issues and low birthweight in an Australian population-based birth cohort: challenges and opportunities in antenatal care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutherland Georgina A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investment in strategies to promote 'a healthy start to life' has been identified as having the greatest potential to reduce health inequalities across the life course. The aim of this study was to examine social determinants of low birthweight in an Australian population-based birth cohort and consider implications for health policy and health care systems. Methods Population-based survey distributed by hospitals and home birth practitioners to >8000 women six months after childbirth in two states of Australia. Participants were women who gave birth to a liveborn infant in Victoria and South Australia in September/October 2007. Main outcome measures included stressful life events and social health issues, perceived discrimination in health care settings, infant birthweight. Results 4,366/8468 (52% of eligible women returned completed surveys. Two-thirds (2912/4352 reported one or more stressful life events or social health issues during pregnancy. Women reporting three or more social health issues (18%, 768/4352 were significantly more likely to have a low birthweight infant ( Conclusions There is a window of opportunity in antenatal care to implement targeted preventive interventions addressing potentially modifiable risk factors for poor maternal and infant outcomes. Developing the evidence base and infrastructure necessary in order for antenatal services to respond effectively to the social circumstances of women's lives is long overdue.

  20. Stressful life events, social health issues and low birthweight in an Australian population-based birth cohort: challenges and opportunities in antenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephanie J; Yelland, Jane S; Sutherland, Georgina A; Baghurst, Peter A; Robinson, Jeffrey S

    2011-03-30

    Investment in strategies to promote 'a healthy start to life' has been identified as having the greatest potential to reduce health inequalities across the life course. The aim of this study was to examine social determinants of low birthweight in an Australian population-based birth cohort and consider implications for health policy and health care systems. Population-based survey distributed by hospitals and home birth practitioners to >8000 women six months after childbirth in two states of Australia. Participants were women who gave birth to a liveborn infant in Victoria and South Australia in September/October 2007. Main outcome measures included stressful life events and social health issues, perceived discrimination in health care settings, infant birthweight. 4,366/8468 (52%) of eligible women returned completed surveys. Two-thirds (2912/4352) reported one or more stressful life events or social health issues during pregnancy. Women reporting three or more social health issues (18%, 768/4352) were significantly more likely to have a low birthweight infant (overseas in non-English speaking countries also had a higher risk of having a low birthweight infant (Adj OR = 1.85, 95% CI 1.2-2.9). Women reporting three or more stressful life events/social health issues were more likely to attend antenatal care later in pregnancy (OR = 2.06, 95% CI 1.3-3.1), to have fewer antenatal visits (OR = 2.17, 95% CI 1.4-3.4) and to experience discrimination in health care settings (OR = 2.69, 95% CI 2.2-3.3). There is a window of opportunity in antenatal care to implement targeted preventive interventions addressing potentially modifiable risk factors for poor maternal and infant outcomes. Developing the evidence base and infrastructure necessary in order for antenatal services to respond effectively to the social circumstances of women's lives is long overdue.

  1. The effects of embryo culture media on the birthweight of singletons via fresh or frozen-thawed embryo transfer: a large-scale retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Fang; Deng, Mingfen; Gao, Jun; Wang, Zilian; Ding, Chenhui; Xu, Yanwen; Zhou, Canquan

    2016-09-19

    Embryo culture media used for IVF treatment might affect fetal growth and thus birthweight of the newborns. A retrospective study was conducted in South China using data from 2370 singleton neonates born after IVF/ICSI between 2009 and 2012. Two culture media, i.e., either Vitrolife or SAGE were used as embryo culture media during the study period. Neonates' birthweights were compared between the two embryo culture media groups. Among the 2370 singletons, 1755 cases came from fresh cleavage embryo transfer while 615 were from frozen-thawed cleavage embryo transfer. Within the fresh embryo transfer newborns, no statistical difference was observed in either birthweight (mean ± SD: 3196.0 ± 468.9 versus 3168.4 ± 462.0g, p > 0.05) or adjusted birthweight controlled for gestational age and gender (z-score mean ± SD: 0.11 ± 1.02 versus 0.11 ± 0.99 g, P > 0.05) between the Vitrolife (n = 419) and the SAGE group (n = 1336). Likewise within frozen embryo transfer neotates, no statistical difference of the birthweight (3300.6 ± 441.3 vs.3256.0 ± 466.7 g, P > 0.05) and adjusted birthweight (0.30 ± 0.99 g versus 0.29 ± 0.97 g, P > 0.05) was found between the Vitrolife (n = 202) and the SAGE group (n = 413). The sex ratio [OR1.17, 95 % CI (0.94-1.46)/OR1.1, 95 % CI (0.78-1.54)], rate of small for gestational age [OR1.14, 95 % CI (0.82-1.59)/OR1.06, 95 % CI (0.56-2.02)] and large for gestational age [OR1.07, 95 % CI (0.64-1.76)/OR0.98, 95 % CI (0.47-2.02)] in fresh and frozen-thawed subgourps are all comparable respectively between the two culture media. No group differences were found in the rate of low birthweight and macosomia. Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that maternal weight, gestational age, frozen-thawed embryo transfer and infant gender were significantly related to neonatal birthweight (P cultured in SAGE or Vitrolife media after fresh or frozen-thawed cleavage

  2. Effect of early infant feeding practices on infection-specific neonatal mortality: an investigation of the causal links with observational data from rural Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, Karen M; Kirkwood, Betty R; Amenga-Etego, Seeba; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Hurt, Lisa S

    2007-10-01

    Strong associations between delayed initiation of breastfeeding and increased neonatal mortality (2-28 d) were recently reported in rural Ghana. Investigation into the biological plausibility of this relation and potential causal pathways is needed. The objective was to assess the effect of early infant feeding practices (delayed initiation, prelacteal feeding, established neonatal breastfeeding) on infection-specific neonatal mortality in breastfed neonates aged 2-28 d. This prospective observational cohort study was based on 10 942 breastfed singleton neonates born between 1 July 2003 and 30 June 2004, who survived to day 2, and whose mothers were visited in the neonatal period. Verbal autopsies were used to ascertain the cause of death. One hundred forty neonates died from day 2 to day 28; 93 died of infection and 47 of noninfectious causes. The risk of death as a result of infection increased with increasing delay in initiation of breastfeeding from 1 h to day 7; overall late initiation (after day 1) was associated with a 2.6-fold risk [adjusted odds ratio (adj OR): 2.61; 95% CI: 1.68, 4.04]. Partial breastfeeding was associated with a 5.7-fold adjusted risk of death as a result of infectious disease (adj OR: 5.73; 95% CI: 2.75, 11.91). No obvious associations were observed between these feeding practices and noninfection-specific mortality. Prelacteal feeding was not associated with infection (adj OR: 1.11; 95% CI: 0.66, 1.86) or noninfection-specific (adj OR: 1.33; 95% CI: 0.55, 3.22) mortality. This study provides the first epidemiologic evidence of a causal association between early breastfeeding and reduced infection-specific neonatal mortality in young human infants.

  3. Applying Collaborative Learning and Quality Improvement to Public Health: Lessons from the Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network (CoIIN) to Reduce Infant Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandour, Reem M; Flaherty, Katherine; Hirai, Ashley; Lee, Vanessa; Walker, Deborah Klein; Lu, Michael C

    2017-06-01

    Infant mortality remains a significant public health problem in the U.S. The Collaborative Improvement & Innovation Network (CoIIN) model is an innovative approach, using the science of quality improvement and collaborative learning, which was applied across 13 Southern states in Public Health Regions IV and VI to reduce infant mortality and improve birth outcomes. We provide an in-depth discussion of the history, development, implementation, and adaptation of the model based on the experience of the original CoIIN organizers and participants. In addition to the political genesis and functional components of the initiative, 8 key lessons related to staffing, planning, and implementing future CoIINs are described in detail. This paper reports the findings from a process evaluation of the model. Data on the states' progress toward reducing infant mortality and improving birth outcomes were collected through a survey in the final months of a 24-month implementation period, as well as through ongoing team communications. The peer-to-peer exchange and platform for collaborative learning, as well as the sharing of data across the states, were major strengths and form the foundation for future CoIIN efforts. A lasting legacy of the initiative is the unique application and sharing of provisional "real time" data to inform "real time" decision-making. The CoIIN model of collaborative learning, QI, and innovation offers a promising approach to strengthening partnerships within and across states, bolstering data systems to inform and track progress more rapidly, and ultimately accelerating improvement toward healthier communities, States, and the Nation as a whole.

  4. Evolución de la mortalidad infantil en la ciudad de Barcelona (1983-1998 Trends in infant mortality in Barcelona [Spain], 1983-1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Albacar

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analizar las tendencias de la mortalidad infantil, teniendo en cuenta sus componentes y las principales causas de defunción entre los años 1983 y 1998 en la ciudad de Barcelona. Métodos: Se han calculado las tasas globales y por sexos de la mortalidad infantil, posneonatal, neonatal, neonatal tardía y neonatal precoz de los residentes de la ciudad de Barcelona entre los años 1983 y 1998, con los datos procedentes de los registros de mortalidad y natalidad. Los datos se han agrupado en períodos de 4 años y se han ajustado los modelos de regresión de Poisson con la finalidad de calcular los riesgos relativos de mortalidad que comparen estos períodos. También se ha calculado la variación porcentual entre las tasas de los períodos definidos. Resultados: En total, durante estos 16 años hubo 1.564 muertes. De éstas, 896 corresponden a niños (57,3% y las 668 restantes a niñas (42,7%. Las tasas de mortalidad infantil oscilan entre 10,5 por 1.000 nacidos vivos en el año 1986 y 3,4 10 años después, en el año 1996. Entre los años 1983 y 1988 se observa un estancamiento de la mortalidad infantil, y a partir del año 1989 se nota una disminución en las tasas de mortalidad infantil. La tasa de mortalidad neonatal, y sobre todo la neonatal precoz, experimentan un descenso más pronunciado que la mortalidad posneonatal. Las causas de defunción más frecuentes son las debidas a defectos congénitos (47,4% seguidas por las causas perinatales (32,1%. Conclusiones: Tras analizar la tendencia de la mortalidad infantil y haber observado la de años anteriores, se concluye que las tasas de mortalidad infantil han disminuido durante el período estudiado, aunque no con la misma intensidad que en décadas anteriores.Objective: To analyze trends in infant mortality, taking into account its main components and the principal causes of death between 1983 and 1998 in the city of Barcelona (Spain. Methods: We calculated overall mortality rates

  5. Oral immunoglobulin for the treatment of rotavirus infection in low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, P; Haque, K

    2003-01-01

    reported: All cause mortality during hospital stay, mortality due to rotavirus infection during hospital stay, duration of diarrhoea, need for rehydration, duration of viral excretion, duration of infection control measures, length of hospital stay in days, recurrent diarrhoea or chronic diarrhoea The two reviewers were to independently abstract data from eligible trials. No data analysis was possible at this point. No eligible randomised controlled trials were found. We found no randomised controlled trials which assessed the effectiveness or safety of oral immunoglobulin preparations for the treatment of rotavirus infections in hospitalised low birthweight infants.

  6. Is yolk sac tumor related to the pathophysiology of low birthweight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Hiroyuki; Shimono, Ryuichi; Suzuki, Hiromi; Fuke, Noriko; Okada, Hitoshi; Iwase, Takashi; Kusaka, Takashi; Hanaoka, Uiko; Kanenishi, Kenji; Hata, Toshiyuki; Kozan, Hiroko; Tanaka, Aya; Fujii, Takayuki; Katsuki, Naomi; Kushida, Yoshio; Haba, Reiji

    2016-06-01

    An 8-year-old Japanese girl was admitted with an ovarian yolk sac tumor. Regarding birth history, the patient had been delivered by cesarean section at 25 weeks of gestation with a birthweight of 711g. She had required neonatal intensive care including oxygenation, various medications, and tests. After surgery and chemotherapy, there was no recurrence for 2 years, at the time of writing. Yolk sac tumor, which is a malignant germ cell tumor, is rare in children. Although the cause and risk factors are unclear, it has been reported that malignant germ cell tumors in childhood have been associated with pathophysiology at birth. Given that premature infants are more likely to survive due to advances in perinatal care, it is expected that such cases will increase in the near future. We suggest that children born prematurely require careful follow up. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. Continuous distending airway pressure for respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J J; Subramaniam, P; Henderson-Smart, D J; Davis, P G

    2000-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the single most important cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants (Greenough 1998, Bancalari 1992). Intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) with surfactant is the standard treatment for the condition. The major difficulty with IPPV is that it is invasive, resulting in airway and lung injury and contributing to the development of chronic lung disease. In spontaneously breathing preterm infants with RDS, to determine if continuous distending airway pressure (CDAP) reduces the need for IPPV and associated morbidity without adverse effects. The standard search strategy of the Neonatal Review group was used. This included searches of the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, previous reviews including cross references, abstracts, conference and symposia proceedings, expert informants, journal hand searching mainly in the English language. All trials using random or quasi-random patient allocation of newborn infants with RDS were eligible. Interventions were continuous distending airway pressure including continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) by mask, nasal prong, nasopharnygeal tube, or endotracheal tube, or continuous negative pressure (CNDP) via a chamber enclosing the thorax and lower body, compared with standard care. Standard methods of the Cochrane Collaboration and its Neonatal Review Group, including independent assessment of trial quality and extraction of data by each author, were used. CDAP is associated with a lower rate of failed treatment (death or use of assisted ventilation), overall mortality, and mortality in infants with birthweights above 1500 g. The use of CDAP is associated with an increased rate of pneumothorax. In preterm infants with RDS the application of CDAP either as CPAP or CNDP is associated with some benefits, particularly in infants with birthweights over 1500 gms. The extent of this benefit is difficult to assess given the

  8. Effects of prenatal micronutrient and early food supplementation on maternal hemoglobin, birth weight, and infant mortality among children in Bangladesh: the MINIMat randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Lars Åke; Arifeen, Shams; Ekström, Eva-Charlotte; Rasmussen, Kathleen M; Frongillo, Edward A; Yunus, Md

    2012-05-16

    Nutritional insult in fetal life and small size at birth are common in low-income countries and are associated with serious health consequences. To test the hypothesis that prenatal multiple micronutrient supplementation (MMS) and an early invitation to food supplementation would increase maternal hemoglobin level and birth weight and decrease infant mortality, and to assess whether a combination of these interventions would further enhance these outcomes. A randomized trial with a factorial design in Matlab, Bangladesh, of 4436 pregnant women, recruited between November 11, 2001, and October 30, 2003, with follow-up until June 23, 2009. Participants were randomized into 6 groups; a double-masked supplementation with capsules of 30 mg of iron and 400 μg of folic acid, 60 mg of iron and 400 μg of folic acid, or MMS containing a daily allowance of 15 micronutrients, including 30 mg of iron and 400 μg of folic acid, was combined with food supplementation (608 kcal 6 days per week) randomized to either early invitation (9 weeks' gestation) or usual invitation (20 weeks' gestation). Maternal hemoglobin level at 30 weeks' gestation, birth weight, and infant mortality. Under 5-year mortality was also assessed. Adjusted maternal hemoglobin level at 30 weeks' gestation was 115.0 g/L (95% CI, 114.4-115.5 g/L), with no significant differences among micronutrient groups. Mean maternal hemoglobin level was lower in the early vs usual invitation groups (114.5 vs 115.4 g/L; difference, -0.9 g/L; 95% CI, -1.7 to -0.1; P = .04). There were 3625 live births out of 4436 pregnancies. Mean birth weight among 3267 singletons was 2694 g (95% CI, 2680-2708 g), with no significant differences among groups. The early invitation with MMS group had an infant mortality rate of 16.8 per 1000 live births vs 44.1 per 1000 live births for usual invitation with 60 mg of iron and 400 μg of folic acid (hazard ratio [HR], 0.38; 95% CI, 0.18-0.78). Early invitation with MMS group had an under 5

  9. Determinants of Birthweight Outcomes: Quantile Regressions Based on Panel Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Stefan Holst; Dahl, Christian Møller; Kristensen, Johannes Tang

    to the possibility that smoking habits can be influenced through policy conduct. It is widely believed that maternal smoking reduces birthweight; however, the crucial difficulty in estimating such effects is the unobserved heterogeneity among mothers. We consider extensions of three panel data models to a quantile...... regression framework in order to control for heterogeneity and to infer conclusions about causality across the entire birthweight distribution. We obtain estimation results for maternal smoking and other interesting determinants, applying these to data obtained from Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby...

  10. Pulmonary diseases of the infants weighing under 1500 grams at birth: clinical and radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Hwa; Park, Jeong Mi; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1990-01-01

    Since the introduction of the intensive perinatal care, the survival rate of the infants weighing less than 1500 gm at birth has improved substantially. However, pulmonary diseases remain to be the major causes of the high mortality of these low birthweight infants. In order to systematically assess an epidemiologic distribution of the pulmonary diseases in these very low weight prematures, we have analyzed the chest x-rays of 102 infants weighing less than 1500 gm. These consisted of 30 with extreme low birth weight (ELBW) weighing less than 1000 gm and 72 with very low birth weight (VLBW) weighing 1001 - 1500 gm. The survival rate of ELBW and VLBW was 10% and 49%, respectively. Seventy of 102 infants had abnormal findings in the chest x-ray. Forty-eight had idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome (IRDS), 8 immature lung, 6 Wilson-Mikity syndrome, 4 pneumonia, 2 pulmonary hemorrhage, 1 congenital heart disease, and 1 suspicious Pierre-Robin syndrome. Seven out of 48 infants with IRDS had persistent ductus arteriosus, and in only 2(30%) of 7 cases were alive. Endotracheal intubation and assisted ventilation application for the treatment of IRDS resulted in pulmonary interstitial emphysema in 4 infants and pneumothorax and / or pneumomediastinum in 4 infants. Displacement of endotracheal intubation showed lobar and / or unilateral lung atelectasis in 8 infants and a case of accidental dislodgement of intubation tube into the esophagus resulted in air esophagogram and worsened lung aeration. In spite of the development of many sophisticated methods of diagnostic radiology, the chest x-ray was still the most valuable yet simple way of evaluating the pulmonary problems in these extreme and very low birth weight prematures

  11. FastStats: Birthweight and Gestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childbearing Deaths Deaths and Mortality Leading Causes of Death Life Expectancy Race and Ethnicity Health of American Indian or Alaska Native Population Health of Asian or Pacific Islander Population Health of Black or African American non-Hispanic Population Health of ...

  12. Vitamin A supplementation to prevent mortality and short- and long-term morbidity in very low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlow, Brian A; Graham, P J; Rojas-Reyes, Maria Ximena

    2016-08-22

    Vitamin A is necessary for normal lung growth and the integrity of respiratory tract epithelial cells. Preterm infants have low vitamin A status at birth and this has been associated with an increased risk of developing chronic lung disease. To evaluate supplementation with vitamin A on the incidence of death or neonatal chronic lung disease and long-term neurodevelopmental disability in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants compared with a control (placebo or no supplementation), and to consider the effect of the supplementation route, dose, and timing. For the original review and subsequent updates, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, Science Citation Index, and the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials. The reference lists of relevant trials, paediatric and nutrition journals, and conference abstracts and proceedings were handsearched up to 2010.For the 2016 update, we used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE via PubMed (1 May 2016), EMBASE (1 May 2016), and CINAHL (1 May 2016). We also searched clinical trials' databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. Randomised controlled trials comparing vitamin A supplementation with a control (placebo or no supplementation) or other dosage regimens in VLBW infants (birth weight ≤ 1500 grams or less than 32 weeks' gestation). Two review authors screened the search results, extracted data, and assessed the trials for risk of bias. Results were reported as risk ratios (RR), risk differences (RD), and number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB), all with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Trialists were contacted for additional data. Eleven trials met the inclusion criteria. Ten trials (1460 infants) compared vitamin A supplementation with a

  13. Association of Noninvasive Ventilation Strategies With Mortality and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Among Preterm Infants: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isayama, Tetsuya; Iwami, Hiroko; McDonald, Sarah; Beyene, Joseph

    2016-08-09

    Various noninvasive ventilation strategies are used to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) of preterm infants; however, the best mode is uncertain. To compare 7 ventilation strategies for preterm infants including nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) alone, intubation and surfactant administration followed by immediate extubation (INSURE), less invasive surfactant administration (LISA), noninvasive intermittent positive pressure ventilation, nebulized surfactant administration, surfactant administration via laryngeal mask airway, and mechanical ventilation. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane CENTRAL from their inceptions to June 2016. Randomized clinical trials comparing ventilation strategies for infants younger than 33 weeks' gestational age within 24 hours of birth who had not been intubated. Data were independently extracted by 2 reviewers and synthesized with Bayesian random-effects network meta-analyses. A composite of death or BPD at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age was the primary outcome. Death, BPD, severe intraventricular hemorrhage, and air leak by discharge were the main secondary outcomes. Among 5598 infants involved in 30 trials, the incidence of the primary outcome was 33% (1665 of 4987; including 505 deaths and 1160 cases of BPD). The secondary outcomes ranged from 6% (314 of 5587) for air leak to 26% (1160 of 4455) for BPD . Compared with mechanical ventilation, LISA had a lower odds of the primary outcome (odds ratio [OR], 0.49; 95% credible interval [CrI], 0.30-0.79; absolute risk difference [RD], 164 fewer per 1000 infants; 57-253 fewer per 1000 infants; moderate quality of evidence), BPD(OR, 0.53; 95% CrI, 0.27-0.96; absolute RD, 133 fewer per 1000 infants; 95% CrI, 9-234 fewer per 1000 infants; moderate-quality), and severe intraventricular hemorrhage (OR, 0.44; 95% CrI, 0.19-0.99; absolute RD, 58 fewer per 1000 births; 95% CrI, 1-86 fewer per 1000 births; moderate-quality). Compared with nasal CPAP alone, LISA had a lower odds

  14. Morbidity and outcome of low birthweight babies of adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morbidity and outcome of low birthweight babies of adolescent mothers at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. ... The babies were divided into two groups according to their mother's age and then compared with respect to episodes of illness, duration of hospital stay, and overall outcome. Results: One hundred and forty two ...

  15. Birthweight, good mothering and survival in the Nigerian small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study,birthweight, good mothering and survival in the Nigerian small ruminants were examined using a questionnaire administered by enumerators. Sheep and goat farmers in Nigeria were the respondents. In the year 1988, Nigeria had only 21 states plus the Federal Capital Territory (FCT), with each states having ...

  16. Mortalidad infantil en el Hospital Docente Ginecoobstétrico de Guanabacoa (1998-2010 Infant mortality in the Guanabacoa Gynecology-Obstetric Teaching Hospital (1998-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Asunción Álvarez Ponce

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La mortalidad infantil constituye un importante indicador que se utiliza para medir el estado de salud de la población. Entre sus componentes, la defunción neonatal precoz representa un reto para el ginecoobstetra, ya que su disminución está fundamentalmente relacionada con el seguimiento obstétrico durante el embarazo y el periodo del parto. Objetivo: Determinar el comportamiento de la tasa de mortalidad infantil, en el Hospital Docente Ginecoobstétrico de Guanabacoa, en el periodo comprendido entre el 1 de enero de 1998 y el 31 de diciembre del 2010. Métodos: Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, transversal y retrospectivo de todas las defunciones infantiles que ocurrieron en la institución. El universo de estudio estuvo conformado por las 74 defunciones infantiles de un total de 23 533 nacidos vivos. La información fue obtenida a partir del Comité de Mortalidad y de los registros del Departamento de Estadística de la Institución. Resultados: Se encontró que la tasa de mortalidad infantil durante esos 13 años fue de 3,9 x 1000 nacidos vivos, con tendencia al decrecimiento a partir de 2004. Las principales causas de muerte fueron infecciones, asfixia y malformaciones. Aunque predominó también el componente neonatal precoz, de 2,7 x 1000 nacidos vivos, este mostró una disminución en el periodo estudiado. Asimismo, vale señalar que desde el año 2008 no ha habido muertes neonatales tardías. Conclusiones: La tasa de mortalidad infantil del decenio fue 3,9 x 1000 nacidos vivos, con tendencia a la disminución del componente neonatal precoz. La sepsis constituyó el principal problema para la institución.Introduction: Infant mortality is an important indicator used to measure the population health status. Among its components, the early neonatal death is a challenge for the gynecology-obstetric specialist since its decrease is mainly related to the obstetric follow-up over pregnancy and delivery period. Objective

  17. Perinatal and Infant Health Among Rural and Urban American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Grossman, David C.; Casey, Susan; Hollow, Walter; Sugarman, Jonathan R.; Freeman, William L.; Hart, L. Gary

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to provide a national profile of rural and urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) maternal and infant health. Methods. In this cross-sectional study of all 1989–1991 singleton AI/AN births to US residents, we compared receipt of an inadequate pattern of prenatal care, low birthweight (< 2500 g), infant mortality, and cause of death for US rural and urban AI/AN and non-AI/AN populations. Results. Receipt of an inadequate pattern of prenatal care was significantly higher for rural than for urban mothers of AI/AN infants (18.1% vs 14.4%, P ≤ .001); rates for both groups were over twice that for Whites (6.8%). AI/AN postneonatal death rates (rural = 6.7 per 1000; urban = 5.4 per 1000) were more than twice that of Whites (2.6 per 1000). Conclusions. Preventable disparities between AI/ANs and Whites in maternal and infant health status persist. PMID:12197982

  18. Effects of Secondhand Smoke Exposure on the Health and Development of African American Premature Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Jada; Holditch-Davis, Diane; Weaver, Mark A.; Miles, Margaret Shandor; Engelke, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To explore the effects of secondhand smoke exposure on growth, health-related illness, and child development in rural African American premature infants through 24 months corrected age. Method. 171 premature infants (72 boys, 99 girls) of African American mothers with a mean birthweight of 1114 grams. Mothers reported on household smoking and infant health at 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months corrected age. Infant growth was measured at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, and developmental assessm...

  19. An approximation to data on mortality and out-of-pocket expenses for medical attention of infants <2 years old affiliated with the Medical Insurance Siglo XXI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Huerta, Samuel; Klünder-Klünder, Miguel; Martínez-Valverde, Silvia; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre

    Medical Insurance Siglo XXI (MISXXI) in Mexico provides funds for the medical and preventive care of children from households lacking any health insurance, thus seeking to reduce impoverishing due to health problems. This paper analyzes mortality of children expenses attributable to this event. An in-home survey addressed to determine the health conditions of children affiliated with MISXXI was carried out in all Mexican states. If the infant had died, information was collected with emphasis on diagnosis (death certificate), medical attention and out-of-pocket expenses. Diagnoses were classified in agreement with ICD-10. Of 9181 children, 74 died by the time during which the survey was gathered; 51% of children died before 28 days. Deaths were attributable to short gestation, low birth weight, asphyxia, or sepsis. In newborns who died before 7 days of age, 95.7% received medical care; however, among those who died between 7 and 28 days, only 58% received medical care. During the neonatal period, medical care was predominantly given in the Ministry of Health facilities. During the post-neonatal period, almost all children received medical care, predominantly in private facilities, a reason for households incurring in out-of-pocket expenditures. Mortality of infants who are beneficiaries of MISXXI mainly occurs during the neonatal period; however, households incurred in out-of-pocket expenditures, especially in the post-neonatal period. It seems convenient to boost the access of users to benefits provided by this medical insurance. Copyright © 2014 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. Nasal colonization among premature infants treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Hany; Hammad, Tarek A; Ozen, Maide; Sandhu, Inderjeet; Taylor, Chita; Olaode, Adenike; Mohamed, Mohamed; Keiser, John

    2011-04-01

    We examined the relationship between the use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and nasal colonization among low-birth-weight (LBW) infants. We prospectively cultured the nares of LBW infants on admission and weekly until hospital discharge. The modality of respiratory support during each culture was recorded. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to test the relationship between CPAP and nasal colonization. Analyses were repeated after stratifying infants into three birth-weight categories: 1500 to 2499 g, 1000 to 1499 g, and nasal cultures were obtained from 167 infants. Nasal colonization with gram-negative bacilli was increased with the use of CPAP in all birth-weight categories ( P Nasal colonization with any potential pathogen increased with the use of CPAP in all birth-weight categories ( P Nasal CPAP is associated with increased colonization with gram-negative bacilli. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  1. Culture-proven neonatal sepsis in preterm infants in a neonatal intensive care unit over a 7 year period: coagulase-negative Staphylococcus as the predominant pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Hilal; Cetinkaya, Merih; Koksal, Nilgün; Celebi, Solmaz; Hacımustafaoglu, Mustafa

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the causative agents in early, late- and very late-onset sepsis in preterm infants. The demographic features, risk factors, clinical and laboratory findings in sepsis types were also defined. A total of 151 preterm infants with culture-proven neonatal sepsis were enrolled in this prospective study. The infants were classified into three groups with regard to the onset of sepsis: early onset sepsis (EOS), late-onset sepsis (LOS) and very late-onset sepsis (VLOS). A sepsis screen including whole blood count, blood smear, infection markers and cultures was performed before initiating antibiotic therapy. EOS, LOS and VLOS groups consisted of 23, 86 and 42 infants, respectively. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CONS) was the most common organism in all sepsis groups. The main factors associated with EOS included presence of premature rupture of membranes, antibiotic use in pregnancy and choriamnionitis. Previous antibiotic use was the main factor associated with LOS, while low birthweight was the main factor in infants with VLOS. Although mortality rate due to Gram-negative bacteria and fungi was higher, CONS was an important cause of mortality in infants with LOS and VLOS. CONS was found to be the most common causative organism in three sepsis types in preterm neonates. Although the mortality rate due to CONS was lower in EOS, it was an important cause of mortality in LOS and VLOS. CONS seems to be the main pathogen in neonatal sepsis in developing countries, as in developed countries. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. The impact of hospital obstetric volume on maternal outcomes in term, non-low-birthweight pregnancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Jonathan M.; Cheng, Yvonne W.; Emeis, Cathy L.; Caughey, Aaron B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The impact of hospital obstetric volume specifically on maternal outcomes remains under-studied. We examined the impact of hospital obstetric volume on maternal outcomes in low-risk women delivering non-low-birthweight infants at term. Study Design We conducted a retrospective cohort study of term, singleton, non-low-birthweight live births between 2007 – 2008 in California. Deliveries were categorized by hospital obstetric volume categories, separately for non-rural hospitals (Category 1: 50 – 1,199 deliveries per year; Category 2: 1,200 – 2,399; Category 3: 2,400 – 3,599, and Category 4: ≥3,600) and rural hospitals (Category R1: 50 – 599 births per year; Category R2: 600 – 1,699; Category R3: ≥1,700). Maternal outcomes were compared using the chi-square test and multivariable logistic regression. Results There were 736,643 births in 267 hospitals that met study criteria. After adjusting for confounders, there were higher rates of postpartum hemorrhage in the lowest-volume rural hospitals (Category R1 aOR 3.06; 95% CI 1.51 – 6.23). Rates of chorioamnionitis, endometritis, severe perineal lacerations, and wound infection did not differ between volume categories. Longer lengths of stay were observed after maternal complications (e.g., chorioamnionitis) in the lowest-volume hospitals (16.9% prolonged length of stay in Category 1 hospitals versus 10.5% in Category 4 hospitals; aOR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.01 – 3.61 ). Conclusion After confounder adjustment, few maternal outcomes differed by hospital obstetric volume. However, elevated odds of postpartum hemorrhage in low-volume rural hospitals raises the possibility that maternal outcomes may differ by hospital volume and geography. Further research is needed on maternal outcomes in hospitals of different obstetric volumes. PMID:25263732

  3. The impact of hospital obstetric volume on maternal outcomes in term, non-low-birthweight pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Jonathan M; Cheng, Yvonne W; Emeis, Cathy L; Caughey, Aaron B

    2015-03-01

    The impact of hospital obstetric volume specifically on maternal outcomes remains under studied. We examined the impact of hospital obstetric volume on maternal outcomes in low-risk women who delivered non-low-birthweight infants at term. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of term singleton, non-low-birthweight live births from 2007-2008 in California. Deliveries were categorized by hospital obstetric volume categories and separately for nonrural hospitals (category 1: 50-1199 deliveries per year; category 2: 1200-2399; category 3: 2400-3599, and category 4: ≥3600) and rural hospitals (category R1: 50-599 births per year; category R2: 600-1699; category R3: ≥1700). Maternal outcomes were compared with the use of the chi-square test and multivariable logistic regression. There were 736,643 births in 267 hospitals that met study criteria. After adjustment for confounders, there were higher rates of postpartum hemorrhage in the lowest-volume rural hospitals (category R1 adjusted odds ratio, 3.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.51-6.23). Rates of chorioamnionitis, endometritis, severe perineal lacerations, and wound infection did not differ between volume categories. Longer lengths of stay were observed after maternal complications (eg, chorioamnionitis) in the lowest-volume hospitals (16.9% prolonged length of stay in category 1 hospitals vs 10.5% in category 4 hospitals; adjusted odds ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-3.61). After confounder adjustment, few maternal outcomes differed by hospital obstetric volume. However, elevated odds of postpartum hemorrhage in low-volume rural hospitals raises the possibility that maternal outcomes may differ by hospital volume and geography. Further research is needed on maternal outcomes in hospitals of different obstetric volumes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neonatal survival of infants less than 2000 grams born at Kenyatta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the birthweight specific neonatal survival of infants born weighing less than 2000 grams at Kenyatta National Hospital. Design: A cross sectional survey. Setting: Newborn Unit, Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. Main outcome measures: The proportion of infants surviving the first 28 days of life ...

  5. The protein source in embryo culture media influences birthweight: a comparative study between G1 v5 and G1-PLUS v5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinliang; Li, Ming; Chen, Lixue; Liu, Ping; Qiao, Jie

    2014-07-01

    Does protein source or human serum albumin (HSA) in embryo culture media influence the subsequent birthweight? A significant difference was observed in gestational age- and gender-adjusted birthweight (Z scores) and the proportion of large-for-gestational age (LGA) babies between embryos cultured in G1 v5 and those cultured in G1-PLUS v5 media. It has been reported that the birthweights of singletons born from embryos cultured in Vitrolife are significantly higher than those cultured in the Cook group of media, and that G1-PLUS (Vitrolife, Gothenburg, Sweden) is associated with increased birth and placenta weights compared with Medicult ISMI. This study was a retrospective analysis of neonatal birthweights, and included 1097 singletons born from fresh embryo transfer cycles at the Center for Reproductive Medicine of Peking University Third Hospital between January 2011 and August 2012. The number of singletons born from G1 v5 culture media was 489, and the number of singletons born from G1-PLUS v5 media was 608. Patients media groups. The absolute birthweights for singletons resulting from G1-PLUS v5 were not different from singletons resulting from G1 v5 (3375.9 ± 479.6 g versus 3333.2 ± 491.6 g, respectively; P = 0.14). However the Z scores for singletons from embryos cultured in G1-PLUS v5 were significantly higher than for singletons cultured in G1 v5 (0.28 ± 1.12 versus 0.09 ± 1.15, respectively; P = 0.04), and more LGA babies were born from G1-PLUS v5 culture compared with G1 v5 (16.8 versus 12.1%, respectively; P = 0.03) culture. Finally, multiple linear regression analysis suggested that female weight (P = 0.00), male height (P = 0.04), gestational age at birth (P = 0.00), infant gender (P = 0.00) and culture media (P = 0.04) all had significant effects on the birthweights of singleton newborns. This study was limited by its retrospective design. Our study suggests that protein source/HSA has a significant effect on birthweights of singleton newborns

  6. Comparing effects of Beractant and Poractant alfa in decreasing mortality rate due to respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeidi R

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Exogenous natural and synthetic surfactants is a rescue treatment for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS. The goals of the study were to compare the clinical response and side-effects of two frequently used surfactants, poractant alfa (Curosurf and beractant (Survanta, for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants."n "nMethods: This clinical trial study was performed during a two-year period in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Ghaem Hospital in Mashhad, Iran. Sample size calculated by a 95% confidence and power of 80, included 104 premature neonates, 74 in survanta and 30 in curosurf groups. The level of statistical significance was considered to be < 0.05."n "nResults: There were no statistically significant differences between the infants treated by survanta or cursurf groups regarding their mean gestational age (30.58 Vs. 29.00 weeks and birth weight (1388 Vs. 1330 g, (p=0.3 There were also no significant differences between the two groups regarding incidences of broncho- pulmonary dysplasia (BPD (40.5% Vs. 40%, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH grades III/IV (13.5% Vs. 13.3%, pneumothorax (both 20%, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA (28/3% Vs. 20% or death (28% Vs. 26.6% on the 28th day postpartum."n "nConclusion: This study showed that survanta and curosurf had similar therapeutic effects in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

  7. The persistent caste divide in India’s infant mortality: A study of Dalits (ex-untouchables, Adivasis (indigenous peoples, Other Backward Classes, and forward castes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bali Ram

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using data from two national surveys, this paper examines caste differences in infant mortality in India. We find that children from the three lower caste groups—Dalits (ex-untouchables, Adivasis (indigenous peoples, and Other Backward Classes—are significantly more likely than forward-caste children to die young. While this observation largely mirrors caste differences in socioeconomic conditions, low socioeconomic status is found to be only a partial explanation for higher infant mortality among lower castes. Higher mortality risks among backward-class children are almost entirely attributable to background characteristics. However, Dalit children are most vulnerable in the neonatal period even when all background characteristics are taken into account, whereas Adivasi children remain highly vulnerable in the post-neonatal period. Au moyen des données provenant des deux enquêtes nationales, cet article examine les différences dans la mortalité infantile par caste en Inde. Nous constatons que, par rapport aux enfants des castes élevées, ceux des trois castes inférieures, notamment les dalits (les ex-intouchables, les adivasis (peuples indigènes et autres classes défavorisées (plusieurs castes désignées comme appartenant à un groupe défavorisé courent un risque beaucoup plus grand de mourir jeunes. Bien que cette observation reflète largement les différences entre les castes sur le plan socioéconomique, le faible niveau socioéconomique n’explique qu’en partie le taux de mortalité plus élevé chez les castes inférieures. Les risques de mortalité des enfants des castes inférieures étaient presque entièrement attribuables aux caractéristiques des antécédents de la mère. Cependant, les enfants dalits demeurent les plus vulnérables pendant la période néonatale, bien que le risque de mortalité demeure le même que celui des enfants des castes supérieures pour la période post-néonatale. L’inverse est vrai

  8. Neonatal mortality and morbidity among infants between 24 to 31 complete weeks: a multicenter survey in China from 2013 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, XiangYong; Xu, FengDan; Wu, Rong; Wu, Hui; Ju, Rong; Zhao, XiaoLin; Tong, XiaoMei; Lv, HongYan; Ding, YanJie; Liu, Fang; Xu, Ping; Liu, WeiPeng; Cheng, HongBin; Chen, TieQiang; Zeng, ShuJuan; Jia, WenZheng; Li, ZhanKui; Qiu, HuiXian; Wang, Jin; Feng, ZhiChun

    2016-11-03

    . Mortality and morbidity were influenced by gestational age (OR = 0.891, 95 % CI: 0.796-0.999, p = 0.0047 and OR = 0.666, 95 % CI: 0.645-0.688, p = 0.000 respectively), birth weight (OR = 0.520, 95 % CI: 0.420-0.643, p = 0.000 and OR = 0.921, 95 % CI: 0.851-0.997, p = 0.041 respectively), SGA (OR = 1.861, 95 % CI: 1.148-3.017, p = 0.012 and OR = 1.511, 95 % CI: 1.300-1.755, p = 0.000 respectively), Apgar score infants with GAs ≥26 weeks survived, a high complication in survivors still can be observed. Rate of survival of GAs less than 26 weeks was still low, and quality improvement methods should be used to look into increasing the use of antenatal steroids in the very preterm births.

  9. Stressful life events, social health issues and low birthweight in an Australian population-based birth cohort: challenges and opportunities in antenatal care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Investment in strategies to promote 'a healthy start to life' has been identified as having the greatest potential to reduce health inequalities across the life course. The aim of this study was to examine social determinants of low birthweight in an Australian population-based birth cohort and consider implications for health policy and health care systems. Methods Population-based survey distributed by hospitals and home birth practitioners to >8000 women six months after childbirth in two states of Australia. Participants were women who gave birth to a liveborn infant in Victoria and South Australia in September/October 2007. Main outcome measures included stressful life events and social health issues, perceived discrimination in health care settings, infant birthweight. Results 4,366/8468 (52%) of eligible women returned completed surveys. Two-thirds (2912/4352) reported one or more stressful life events or social health issues during pregnancy. Women reporting three or more social health issues (18%, 768/4352) were significantly more likely to have a low birthweight infant (issues were more likely to attend antenatal care later in pregnancy (OR = 2.06, 95% CI 1.3-3.1), to have fewer antenatal visits (OR = 2.17, 95% CI 1.4-3.4) and to experience discrimination in health care settings (OR = 2.69, 95% CI 2.2-3.3). Conclusions There is a window of opportunity in antenatal care to implement targeted preventive interventions addressing potentially modifiable risk factors for poor maternal and infant outcomes. Developing the evidence base and infrastructure necessary in order for antenatal services to respond effectively to the social circumstances of women's lives is long overdue. PMID:21450106

  10. Auditing Neonatal Intensive Care: Is PREM a Good Alternative to CRIB for Mortality Risk Adjustment in Premature Infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Kilian; Vach, Werner; Kachel, Walter; Bruder, Ingo; Hentschel, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Comparing outcomes at different neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) requires adjustment for intrinsic risk. The Clinical Risk Index for Babies (CRIB) is a widely used risk model, but it has been criticized for being affected by therapeutic decisions. The Prematurity Risk Evaluation Measure (PREM) is not supposed to be prone to treatment bias, but has not yet been validated. We aimed to validate the PREM, compare its accuracy to that of the original and modified versions of the CRIB and CRIB-II, and examine the congruence of risk categorization. Very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants with a gestational age (GA) auditing. It could be useful to combine scores. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Transient hypothyroxinaemia associated with developmental delay in very preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, W.J.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.; Brand, R.; Brande, J.L. van den

    1992-01-01

    In 563 surviving very preterm (<32 weeks gestational age) and/or very low birthweight (<1500 g) infants the relationship between neonatal thyroxine concentration and psychomotor development at 2 years of age (corrected for preterm birth) was studied. A significant association was found between low

  12. Retinopathy of prematurity in infants with birth weight above 1500 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hypotension at birth and the non-use of surfactant were the only risk factors to be associated with disease. However, with logistic regression analysis, none of these were independently associated with ROP. Conclusion: ROP may occur in newborn infants of larger birthweight but with good prognosis, and oxygen therapy ...

  13. Asociación de los tipos de carencia y grado de desarrollo humano con la mortalidad infantil en México, 2008 Association between types of need, human development index, and infant mortality in Mexico, 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Sinoe Medina-Gómez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del artículo fue conocer la asociación entre los diferentes tipos de carencia social y económica y los niveles de mortalidad infantil reportados durante el 2008 en México. Se realizó un estudio ecológico, analizando la correlación y el riesgo relativo entre el índice de desarrollo humano y distintos niveles de carencias sociales y económicas con las tasas de mortalidad infantil reportadas a nivel nacional y estatal. Existe una fuerte correlación entre un mayor nivel de desarrollo humano con una menor tasa de mortalidad. La carencia educativa y el atraso en la calidad y espacio de la vivienda se asocian con una mayor tasa de mortalidad infantil. Si bien la mortalidad infantil en México ha disminuido notablemente en los últimos 28 años, su reducción no ha sido homogénea y se mantienen inequidades que determinan las tasas de mortalidad en relación a los niveles diferenciados de pobreza. Es necesario el diseño de programas con una visión transdisciplinaria que permitan disminuir las tasas de mortalidad con el pleno desarrollo de los individuos y sus familiasThe aim of this study was to assess the association between different types of economic and social deprivation and infant mortality rates reported in 2008 in Mexico. We conducted an ecological study analyzing the correlation and relative risk between the human development index and levels of social and economic differences in State and national infant mortality rates. There was a strong correlation between higher human development and lower infant mortality. Low schooling and poor housing and crowding were associated with higher infant mortality. Although infant mortality has declined dramatically in Mexico over the last 28 years, the decrease has not been homogeneous, and there are persistent inequalities that determine mortality rates in relation to different poverty levels. Programs with a multidisciplinary approach are needed to decrease infant mortality rates

  14. Term small-for-gestational-age infants from low risk women are at significantly greater risk of adverse neonatal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Jessie V; Flatley, Christopher J; Kumar, Sailesh

    2018-02-17

    Small-for-gestational age (SGA) infants (birthweight 37 weeks gestation). This is compounded by the fact that late pregnancy ultrasound is not the norm in many jurisdictions for this cohort of women. We thus investigated the relationship between birthweight age (AGA) (birthweight 10 th - 90 th centile) group at term. This was retrospective analysis of data from the Mater Mother's Hospital in Brisbane, Australia for women who birthed between January 2000 and December 2015. Women with multiple pregnancy, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, pre-term birth, major congenital anomalies and large for gestational age infants (>90 th centile for gestational age) were excluded. SGA infants were subdivided into 2 cohorts - infants with birthweights 5 th - age groups than controls. After stratification for gestational age at birth, the composite outcome remained significantly higher in both small-for-gestational-age cohorts and was highest in the ages in infants <5 th centile for birthweight, it is highest at early term gestation. Our findings highlight that early term birth does not necessarily improve outcomes and emphasize the importance of identifying this cohort of infants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evolução da mortalidade geral, infantil e proporcional no Brasil Trends in general, infant and proportional mortality in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Yunes

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudo da evolução da mortalidade geral, infantil e proporcional para o Brasil e Regiões Fisiográficas de 1941 a 1970. Nos últimos 30 anos a redução de mortalidade geral para o Brasil foi de 47,5%, tendo sido maior a queda na região Centro-Oeste. No último decênio observa-se o aumento do coeficiente em todas as regiões iniciando-se em diferentes períodos, sendo em parte devido ao aumento da mortalidade infantil. Ao se comparar a mortalidade geral do Brasil com a de países mais desenvolvidos, ela pode ser considerada elevada, uma vez que cerca de 42% da população tem menos de 14 anos de idade, indicando nível de saúde insatisfatório. Para a mortalidade infantil, em 30 anos houve uma redução de seu coeficiente em 46,2%, tendo sido maior esta queda na região Centro-Oeste. No último decênio, observa-se um aumento deste coeficiente, sugerindo, portanto, uma piora do nível de saúde e ao se comparar com outros países é notória a diferença observada. Ao se comparar a mortalidade proporcional (percentagem do total de óbitos de crianças menores de 1 ano de 1940/1970, observa-se uma elevação de 16,3%, sendo no último decênio o maior aumento para as regiões Centro-Oeste (57,7% e Sudeste (36,1%. Ao se comparar os dados do Brasil com o Estado e Município mais desenvolvido (São Paulo, observa-se sempre que estes indicadores para o país como um todo apresentam-se mais elevados, sugerindo um pior nível de saúde. Entre os principais fatores condicionantes da piora do nível de saúde do Brasil no último decênio, destaca-se o econômico onde ocorre um aumento na concentração da distribuição de renda, declíneo do salário mínimo real de 20%, com conseqüente diminuição do poder aquisitivo da população assalariada. Acresce-se ainda, o aumento da população descoberta dos recursos de saneamento básico.Study of the evolution of general mortality, infant mortality rate and mortality ratio in Brazil and

  16. Low birthweight in electoral wards: a useful health and social indicator at local level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, M; Wynn, A

    2000-01-01

    Greater use of electoral ward data is recommended for the guidance of allocation of resources to reduce low birthweight rates and for the monitoring of the health of communities. Ward data on low birthweight can be used for correlation studies to show the many associations of social, economic and health factors with low birthweight and with each other. A recent government report shows a substantial increase in the prevalence of disability since 1985 which is partly a consequence of an increase in low birthweight and of a deterioration in the nutritional status of an important minority of poor families who are concentrated in inner city wards.

  17. Fetal heart rate accelerations and the risk of cerebral lesions and poor neurodevelopmental outcome in very low birthweight neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Emanuel J; Tomlinson, Tracy M; Bildirici, Ibrahim; Sreenarasimhaiah, Sreedevi; Yusuf, Kamran; Sadovsky, Yoel; Levy, Roni

    2007-02-01

    The risk of intraventricular hemorrhage and periventricular leukomalacia correlates with fetal brain immaturity. Given that the appearance of fetal heart rate (FHR) accelerations is associated with brain maturation, we tested the hypothesis that neonatal cerebral lesions and developmental delay in very low birthweight newborns are associated with absent reactivity of the FHR tracing prior to delivery. We analyzed the FHR tracing of 97 fetuses with birthweight < 1200 g who underwent head ultrasound at day 3 and Bayley Scales of Infant Development testing at age 1 year. We used multivariate analysis to adjust for confounding variables. We found that the absence of two FHR accelerations of 10 beats per minute (bpm) for 10 seconds twice in a 20-minute window 1 hour before delivery was associated with intraventricular hemorrhage and/or periventricular leukomalacia ( P < 0.01) and a significant risk for mental and psychomotor delays by Bayley testing ( P < 0.001). The absence of accelerations of 15 bpm for 15 seconds was not associated with these abnormalities. The absence of FHR accelerations before delivery suggests a greater risk for cerebral injury and developmental delay in the very premature neonate.

  18. Risk factors for low birth-weight in areas with varying malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Low birth weight (LBW) is a risk factor for infant mortality, morbidity, growth retardation, poor cognitive development, and chronic diseases. Maternal exposure to diseases such as malaria, HIV, ... There was high degree of preference of digits ending with 0/5 in reporting BW in the studied MCHs. In conclusion, a rate ...

  19. Risk factors for low birth-weight in areas with varying malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population residing in highland areas experience lower rates of malaria transmission than in ... Low birth weight (LBW) is a risk factor for infant mortality, morbidity, growth retardation, poor cog- nitive development, and chronic ..... College students exchange programme and Danish. International Development Agency.

  20. Impact of delivery room resuscitation on outcomes up to 18 months in very low birth weight infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeMauro, Sara B.; Roberts, Robin S.; Davis, Peter; Alvaro, Ruben; Bairam, Aida; Schmidt, Barbara; Schmidt, B.; D'Ilario, J.; Cairnie, J.; Dix, J.; Adams, B.; Davis, P.; Doyle, L.; Faber, B.; Callanan, K.; Davis, N.; Duff, J.; Ford, G.; Asztalos, E.; Golec, L.; Lacy, M.; Hohn, D.; Haslam, R.; Barnett, C.; Goodchild, L.; Lontis, R.; Fraser, S.; Keng, J.; Saunders, K.; Opie, G.; Kelly, E.; Bairam, A.; Ferland, S.; Laperriere, L.; Bélanger, S.; St-Amand, P.; Blayney, M.; Davis, D.; Frank, J.; Lemyre, B.; Solimano, A.; Singh, A.; Chalmers, M.; Ramsay, K.; Synnes, A.; Whitfield, M.; Rogers, M.; Tomlinson, J.; Offringa, M.; Nuytemans, D.; Vermeulen, E.; Kok, J.; van Wassenaer, A.; Arnon, S.; Chalaf, A.; Regev, R.; Netter, I.; Ohlsson, A.; Nesbitt, K.; O'Brien, K.; Hamilton, A. M.; Sankaran, K.; Morgan, S.; Proctor, P.; LaCorte, M.; LeBlanc, P.; Braithwaite, A.; Golan, A.; Barabi, T.; Goldstein, E.; Reynolds, G.; Dromgool, B.; Meskell, S.; McMillan, D.; Schaab, D.; Spellen, L.; Sauve, R.; Christianson, H.; Anseeuw-Deeks, D.; Alvaro, R.; Chiu, A.; Porter, C.; Turner, G.; Moddemann, D.; Granke, N.; Penner, K.; Mulder, T.; Ghys, A.; van der Hoeven, M.; Clarke, M.; Parfitt, J.; MacLean, H.; Nwaesei, C.; Kuhn, L.; Ryan, H.; Saunders, C.; Schulze, A.; Pudenz, P.; Muller, M.; Lagercrantz, H.; Bhiladvala, M.; Legnevall, L.; Herlenius, E.; Matthew, D.; Amos, W.; Tulsiani, S.; Tan-Dy, C.; Turner, M.; Shinwell, E.; Levine, R.; Juster-Reicher, A.; Barrington, K.; Kokkotis, T.; Khairy, M.; Grier, P.; Vachon, J.; Sinha, S.; Tin, W.; Fritz, S.; Walti, H.; Royer, D.; Halliday, H.; Millar, D.; Berry, A.; Mayes, C.; Cummings, C.; Fahnenstich, H.; Philipp, K.; Tillmann, B.; Weber, P.; Canning, R.; Wariyar, U.; Embleton, N.; Bucher, H.-U.; Fauchere, J.-C.; Pfister, R.; Launoy, V.; Huppi, P.; Poets, C.; Urschitz-Duprat, P.; Doyle, L. W.; Roberts, R. S.; Gent, M.; Fraser, W.; Hey, E.; Perlman, M.; Thorpe, K.; Gray, S.; Chambers, C.; Costantini, L.; McGean, E.; Scapinello, L.

    2011-01-01

    To examine the relationships between intensity of delivery room resuscitation and short- and long-term outcomes of very low birth weight infants enrolled in the Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity (CAP) Trial. The CAP Trial enrolled 2006 infants with birthweights between 500 and 1250 g who were

  1. Cerebellar Volume and Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy at Term, and Neurodevelopment at 2 Years of Age in Preterm Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kooij, Britt J. M.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Anbeek, Petronella; van Haastert, Ingrid C.; de Vries, Linda S.; Groenendaal, Floris

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess the relation between cerebellar volume and spectroscopy at term equivalent age, and neurodevelopment at 24 months corrected age in preterm infants. Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed around term equivalent age in 112 preterm infants (mean gestational age 28wks 3d [SD 1wk 5d]; birthweight 1129g [SD 324g]).…

  2. The Effects of Public Infrastructure and Household Characteristics on Inequality and Infant Mortality in Mexico: What Has Changed Between 1990 and 2005?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S MEINDL

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The reduction of infant mortality (IM continues to be a primary goal throughout much of the developing world, and a suite of methods have been proposed with which to achieve it. However, most attempts at IM reduction have taken place within the context of an almost bewilderingly complex regimen of simultaneous changes occurring in the physical environment, sociopolitical structure, and health care. Which of these various elements is truly causal in reducing IM and which may be merely a correlated but nonprimary agent? During the past two decades Mexico has constituted an extraordinary field laboratory with which to decipher the roles of these various potential agents of IM reduction. Health resources include community access to proper drainage, safe drinking water, electrical power, as well as a suite of individual, if highly intercorrelated, family and household characteristics. Despite considerable demographic and socioeconomic heterogeneity, dramatic reductions in IM have been achieved, and additional ones are certainly possible. We weigh the factors that have reduced infant mortality in this country. Particular infrastructure improvements in the Pacific South, the Gulf, and the Yucatan peninsula must be continued. This would impact both inequality and, in turn, infant health and survival in this country. Resumen La reducción de la mortalidad infantil (MI continúa siendo un objetivo primario en la mayoría de los países en vías de desarrollo, para lograrlo se ha propuesto un conjunto de métodos. Sin embargo, la mayoría de los esfuerzos para lograr la reducción de la mortalidad infantil ha tenido lugar dentro del contexto de un régimen complejo de cambios simultáneos que ocurren en el ambiente físico, en la estructura sociopolítica y en el cuidado de la salud. ¿Cuál de estos elementos tiene mayor peso en la reducción de la mortalidad infantil y cuál puede estar meramente correlacionado, pero no ser un agente primario

  3. Effect of GNI on Infant Mortality Rate in Low Income, Lower Middle Income, Upper Middle Income and High Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Sabeena; Khan, Najib Ullah; Younis, Mustafa Z

    2016-01-01

    Global disparities in health form a complex issue adversely affecting much of the world's population. What has been found is that national income and other general socio-economic factors are strong determinants of population health (Houweling, 2005 & Schell, 2007). In countries where resources are less, people are much less healthy than people living in rich countries. In wealthier countries that have made immense progress in health indicators, the resulting change in age structure and morbidity and mortality patterns portends even greater financial demands on the health sector. This study noted the trends in several health indicators versus economic indicators and related it to low income, lower middle income, upper middle income and high income countries. We noted that there is improvement in all health indicators along with an increasing GNI per Capita and GDP. In low income regions though, the rate of improvement is slower as opposed to high income countries. However, there is progress, which is leading to an increase in aging population.

  4. Vaccine schedule compliance among very low birth weight infants in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Theresa J; Zea-Vera, Alonso; Bautista, Rossana; Davila, Carmen; Salazar, José Antonio; Bazán, Carlos; López, Luis; Ecker, Lucie

    2015-01-03

    There is little information about vaccine schedule compliance in very-low-birth-weight infants in developing countries. The aim of the study was to describe the compliance with the vaccine schedule among this population in Lima, Peru. We conducted a prospective cohort study in four hospitals in Lima in infants with a birth-weight of less than 1500 g, followed from birth up to 12 months of age every 2 weeks. The date and age at administration of each vaccine was recorded 222 infants were enrolled. The median birth-weight was 1250 g (range 550-1499 g) and the median gestational age was 30.0 weeks (range 23-37 weeks). The mean age for the first pentavalent (DPT, Hib, HepB) and oral polio vaccine administration was 4.3 ± 1.4 months in infants with a birth-weight of vaccine. Only 35% had received the three doses of oral polio and pentavalent vaccine by seven months, although by nine months 81% had received these vaccines. Vaccination of very-low-birth-weight infants in Peru is significantly delayed, especially in infants with a birth-weight of vaccination rates and timing in these high risk populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of early administration of combined multi-strain and multi-species probiotics on gastrointestinal morbidities and mortality in preterm infants: A randomized controlled trial in a tertiary care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güney-Varal, İpek; Köksal, Nilgün; Özkan, Hilal; Bağcı, Onur; Doğan, Pelin

    2017-01-01

    Güney-Varal İ, Köksal N, Özkan H, Bağcı O, Doğan P. The effect of early administration of combined multi-strain and multi-species probiotics on gastrointestinal morbidities and mortality in preterm infants: A randomized controlled trial in a tertiary care unit. Turk J Pediatr 2017; 59: 13-19. Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a gastrointestinal emergency of the neonatal period. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the use of multistrain and multispecies probiotic on gastrointestinal morbidities and mortality. The study was organized as a randomized controlled, prospective study in premature infants (≤32 week and ≤1500 gram). The ready commercial preparations which contain multi-combined probiotics of Lactobacillus rhamnosus (4.1x10⁸ cfu) + Lactobacillus casei (8.2x10⁸ cfu) + Lactobacillus plantorum (4.1x10⁸ cfu) + Bifidobacterium animalis (4.1x10⁸ cfu) together with 383 mg of fructooligosaccharides and 100 mg of galactooligosaccharides as the prebiotic content, was administered enterally to the probiotic group (n=70); control group constituted of 40 preterms. Primary outcomes of the present study were ≥ Stage 2 NEC and the mortality. Secondary outcomes were culture-proven sepsis and days to reach full enteral feeding. All cases of NEC were seen in group 2 as 3.6% (n=4) of all infants. The mortality was found to be 1.4% (n=1) in Group 1 and 22.5% (n=9) in Group 2. The incidence of NEC and the mortality rate were found to be significantly lower in Group 1 (p=0.016, p=0.001, respectively). In Group 1, the NEC-related mortality rate and sepsis-related mortality rate were significantly lower than that of the control group (p=0.046, p=0.023). In this study, we showed that using probiotic strains in combined multistrain and multispecies forms at higher doses and for prolonged duration had positive effects on gastrointestinal complications, sepsis and mortality in premature infants.

  6. Mortality in the first 24h of very low birth weight preterm infants in the Northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Campos Monteiro de Castro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate factors associated with neonatal death within 24 hours after birth in very low birth weight preterm newborns. Methods: Prospective cohort of live births with gestational age of 230/7–316/7 weeks, birth weight of 500–1499g without malformations, in 19 public maternity hospitals in nine capitals in northeastern Brazil from July to December 2007. The 19 hospitals were assessed in relation to physical resources, equipment, human resources and aiming at quality in care initiatives. Hospital, maternal and neonatal characteristics, neonatal morbidity, neonatal procedures and interventions were compared between preterm newborns that died or survived up to 24 hours of life. The variables associated with death within 24 hours after birth were determined by logistic regression. Results: Of the 627 newborns enrolled in the study, 179 (29% died within 168 hours after birth, of which 59 (33% up to 24 hours and 97 (54% up to 48 hours after birth. The variables associated with death <24h were: weight <1000g (2.94; 1.32–6.53, 5th minute Apgar <7 (7.17; 3.46–14.88, male gender (2.99; 1.39–6.47. A better hospital structure was a protective factor for early neonatal death (odds ratio: 0.34; 95% confidence interval: 0.17–0.71. Conclusions: The high neonatal mortality on the first day of life in capital cities of Northeast Brazil is associated with biological variables such as weight and gender of the newborn, as well as low vitality at birth and a worse infrastructure of the hospital where the birth occurred.

  7. Prevalence of hypospadias in Italy according to severity, gestational age and birthweight: an epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnani Cinzia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypospadias is a congenital displacement of the urethral meatus in male newborns, being either an isolated defect at birth or a sign of sexual development disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence rate of hypospadias in different Districts of Italy, in order to make a comparison with other countries all over the world. Methods We reviewed all the newborns file records (years 2001–2004 in 15 Italian Hospitals. Results We found an overall hypospadias prevalence rate of 3.066 ± 0.99 per 1000 live births (82.48% mild hypospadias, 17.52% moderate-severe. In newborns Small for Gestational Age (birthweight th percentile of any gestational age the prevalence rate of hypospadias was 6.25 per 1000 live births. Performing multivariate logistic regression analysis for different degrees of hypospadias according to severity, being born SGA remained the only risk factor for moderate-severe hypospadias (p = 0.00898 but not for mild forms (p > 0.1. Conclusion In our sample the prevalence of hypospadias results as high as reported in previous European and American studies (3–4 per 1000 live births. Pathogenesis of isolated hypospadias is multifactorial (genetic, endocrine and environmental factors: however, the prevalence rate of hypospadias is higher in infants born small for gestational age than in newborns with normal birth weight.

  8. Infant mortality in three population-based cohorts in Southern Brazil: trends and differentials Mortalidade infantil em três coortes de base populacional no Sul do Brasil: tendências e diferenciais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iná S. Santos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied time trends in infant mortality and associated factors between three cohort studies carried out in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, in 1982, 1993, and 2004. All hospital births and deaths were determined by means of regular visits to hospitals, registrar's offices, and cemeteries. This data was used to calculate neonatal, post-neonatal, and infant mortality rates per thousand live births. Rates were also calculated according to cause of death, sex, birth weight, gestational age, and family income. The infant mortality rate fell from 36.4 per 1,000 live births in 1982 to 21.1 in 1993 and 19.4 in 2004. Major causes of infant mortality in 2004 were perinatal causes and respiratory infections. Mortality among low birth weight children from poor families fell 16% between 1993 and 2004; however, this rate increased by more than 100% among high-income families due to the increase in the number of preterm deliveries in this group. The stabilization of infant mortality in the last decade is likely to be due to excess medical interventions relating to pregnancies and delivery care.Os autores estudaram tendências temporais nas taxas de mortalidade infantil e fatores associados em três coortes em Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, de 1982, 1993 e 2004. Todos os nascimentos hospitalares e óbitos foram identificados através de visitas regulares aos hospitais, cartórios e cemitérios. Esses dados foram utilizados para calcular as taxas de mortalidade neonatal, pós-neonatal e infantil por mil nascidos vivos. Também foram calculadas as taxas específicas de acordo com causa de óbito, sexo, peso ao nascer, idade gestacional e renda familiar. O coeficiente de mortalidade infantil diminuiu de 36,4 por mil nascidos vivos em 1982 para 21,1 em 1993 e 19,4 em 2004. As principais causas de mortalidade infantil em 2004 foram causas perinatais e infecções respiratórias. Entre 1993 e 2004, houve uma redução de 16% na mortalidade entre

  9. Effect of in vitro culture of human embryos on birthweight of newborns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumoulin, John C.; Land, Jolande A.; Van Montfoort, Aafke P.; Nelissen, Ewka C.; Coonen, Edith; Derhaag, Josien G.; Schreurs, Inge L.; Dunselman, Gerard A.; Kester, Arnold D.; Geraedts, Joep P.; Evers, Johannes L.

    In animal models, in vitro culture of preimplantation embryos has been shown to be a risk factor for abnormal fetal outcome, including high and low birthweight. In the human, mean birthweight of singletons after in vitro fertilization (IVF) is considerably lower than after natural conception, but it

  10. Potential use of birthweight indicators in rural Tanzania for monitoring malaria control in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uddenfeldt Wort, Ulrika; Warsame, Marian; Brabin, Bernard J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Birthweight outcomes in rural Tanzania were determined in relation to place of delivery (hospital, dispensary or home), parity and maternal age (adolescent or non-adolescent) in order to evaluate the usefulness of birthweight data for monitoring malaria control in pregnancy. Study design:

  11. Parental diabetes and birthweight in 236 030 individuals in the UK biobank study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrrell, Jessica S; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Freathy, Rachel M; Hattersley, Andrew T; Frayling, Timothy M

    2013-12-01

    The UK Biobank study provides a unique opportunity to study the causes and consequences of disease. We aimed to use the UK Biobank data to study the well-established, but poorly understood, association between low birthweight and type 2 diabetes. We used logistic regression to calculate the odds ratio for participants' risk of type 2 diabetes given a one standard deviation increase in birthweight. To test for an association between parental diabetes and birthweight, we performed linear regression of self-reported parental diabetes status against birthweight. We performed path and mediation analyses to test the hypothesis that birthweight partly mediates the association between parental diabetes and participant type 2 diabetes status. Of the UK Biobank participants, 277 261 reported their birthweight. Of 257 715 individuals of White ethnicity and singleton pregnancies, 6576 had type 2 diabetes, 19 478 reported maternal diabetes (but not paternal), 20 057 reported paternal diabetes (but not maternal) and 2754 participants reported both parents as having diabetes. Lower birthweight was associated with type 2 diabetes in the UK Biobank participants. A one kilogram increase in birthweight was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.71, 0.76; P = 2 × 10(-57)). Paternal diabetes was associated with lower birthweight (45 g lower; 95% CI: 36, 54; P = 2 × 10(-23)) relative to individuals with no parental diabetes. Maternal diabetes was associated with higher birthweight (59 g increase; 95% CI: 50, 68; P = 3 × 10(-37)). Participants' lower birthweight was a mediator of the association between reported paternal diabetes and participants' type 2 diabetes status, explaining 1.1% of the association, and participants' higher birthweight was a mediator of the association between reported maternal diabetes and participants' type 2 diabetes status, explaining 1.2% of the association. Data from the UK Biobank provides the strongest evidence by

  12. The social gradient in birthweight at term: quantification of the mediating role of maternal smoking and body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Laust H; Diderichsen, Finn; Smith, George Davey

    2009-01-01

    Maternal education is associated with the birthweight of offspring. We sought to quantify the role of maternal body mass index (BMI) and smoking as intermediary variables between maternal education and birthweight at term.......Maternal education is associated with the birthweight of offspring. We sought to quantify the role of maternal body mass index (BMI) and smoking as intermediary variables between maternal education and birthweight at term....

  13. Does normal variation in birthweight confer susceptibility to health problems? A co-twin control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R. Harris m.fl

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available  ABSTRACTPopulation-based twin data were used to study whether normal variation in birthweight confersdisadvantage for a variety of health outcomes from birth through young adulthood. The sample consists of5,864 identical and fraternal twins and includes 2,570 intact pairs. Variation in birthweight may beassociated with an increased risk for epilepsy in males and with refractive disorders, chronic ear infectionsand intestinal problems in women. Two variants of the co-twin control design, based on identical twinsonly, were used to control for genetic and shared environmental effects that influence both birthweight andthe health outcome. Results indicated that the prevalence of health outcomes was not greater among thelighter twin from birthweight discordant pairs. Furthermore, intra-pair differences in birthweight betweenmembers of pairs who were health-discordant were significant only for nearsightedness among the MZmales. Due to lack of statistical power these results should be interpreted with caution.

  14. Placental adaptation: what can we learn from birthweight:placental weight ratio?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Elizabeth Hayward

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate fetal growth relies upon adequate placental nutrient transfer. Birthweight:placental weight ratio (BW:PW ratio is often used as a proxy for placental efficiency, defined as the grams of fetus produced per gram placenta. An elevated BW:PW ratio in an appropriately grown fetus (small placenta is assumed to be due to up-regulated placental nutrient transfer capacity i.e. a higher nutrient net flux per gram placenta. In fetal growth restriction (FGR, where a fetus fails to achieve its genetically pre-determined growth potential, placental weight and BW:PW ratio are often reduced which may indicate a placenta that fails to adapt its nutrient transfer capacity to compensate for its small size. This review considers the literature on BW:PW ratio in both large cohort studies of normal pregnancies and those studies offering insight into the relationship between BW:PW ratio and outcome measures including stillbirth, FGR and subsequent postnatal consequences. The core of this review is the question of whether BW:PW ratio is truly indicative of altered placental efficiency, and whether changes in BW:PW ratio reflect those placentas which adapt their nutrient transfer according to their size. We consider this question using data from mice and humans, focusing upon studies that have measured the activity of the well characterized placental system A amino acid transporter, both in uncomplicated pregnancies and in FGR. Evidence suggests that BW:PW ratio is reduced both in FGR and in pregnancies resulting in a small for gestational age (SGA, birthweight <10th centile infant but this effect is more pronounced earlier in gestation (<28 weeks. In mice, there is a clear association between increased BW:PW ratio and increased placental system A activity. Additionally, there is good evidence in wild-type mice that small placentas upregulate placental nutrient transfer to prevent fetal undergrowth. In humans, this association between BW:PW ratio and

  15. Fetal growth versus birthweight: the role of placenta versus other determinants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Cecilie Paasche Roland

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Birthweight is used as an indicator of intrauterine growth, and determinants of birthweight are widely studied. Less is known about determinants of deviating patterns of growth in utero. We aimed to study the effects of maternal characteristics on both birthweight and fetal growth in third trimester and introduce placental weight as a possible determinant of both birthweight and fetal growth in third trimester. METHODS: The STORK study is a prospective cohort study including 1031 healthy pregnant women of Scandinavian heritage with singleton pregnancies. Maternal determinants (age, parity, body mass index (BMI, gestational weight gain and fasting plasma glucose of birthweight and fetal growth estimated by biometric ultrasound measures were explored by linear regression models. Two models were fitted, one with only maternal characteristics and one which included placental weight. RESULTS: Placental weight was a significant determinant of birthweight. Parity, BMI, weight gain and fasting glucose remained significant when adjusted for placental weight. Introducing placental weight as a covariate reduced the effect estimate of the other variables in the model by 62% for BMI, 40% for weight gain, 33% for glucose and 22% for parity. Determinants of fetal growth were parity, BMI and weight gain, but not fasting glucose. Placental weight was significant as an independent variable. Parity, BMI and weight gain remained significant when adjusted for placental weight. Introducing placental weight reduced the effect of BMI on fetal growth by 23%, weight gain by 14% and parity by 17%. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, we find that placental weight is an important determinant of both birthweight and fetal growth. Our findings indicate that placental weight markedly modifies the effect of maternal determinants of both birthweight and fetal growth. The differential effect of third trimester glucose on birthweight and growth parameters illustrates that

  16. Segmental absence of intestinal muscle with ileal web in an extremely low birth weight infant: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuktiryaki, Mehmet; Kanmaz, Hayriye G; Okur, Nilüfer; Ates, Ufuk; Sirvan, Ali L; Uras, Nurdan

    2016-04-01

    Spontaneous intestinal perforations are localized perforations without the typical clinical, radiological, and histopathological features of necrotizing enterocolitis. Spontaneous intestinal perforation is a recently defined clinical entity. The best-known risk factor is prematurity. It is seen 2-3% in very low birthweight infants and 5 % of extremely low birthweight infants. Herein we report an extremely low birthweight infant with spontaneous intestinal perforation, segmental absence of intestinal muscle and an ileal web as an underlying cause. We aimed to draw attention to the segmental absence of intestinal muscle which is rare but increasingly reported cause of spontaneous intestinal perforation and the importance of histopathologic examination of surgical specimens. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  17. Birth dimensions, parental mortality, and mortality in early adult age: a cohort study of Danish men born in 1953

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Osler, Merete

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Birthweight has, in several studies, been associated with mortality in adult age, even after adjustment for available socioeconomic factors. This association has been explained as a biological result of fetal undernutrition (fetal programming), by genetic predisposition, as a result...... in relative risk of cause-specific mortality, and the heterogeneity in the association between birth dimensions and maternal and paternal mortality, respectively, indicate that several mechanisms (factors related to social position, common genetic factors, and specific organ programming) may account...

  18. Mortality, Morbidity, and Developmental Outcomes in Infants Born to Women Who Received Either Mefloquine or Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine as Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria in Pregnancy: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupérez, María; González, Raquel; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor M; Sevene, Esperança; Ouédraogo, Smaïla; Kakolwa, Mwaka A; Vala, Anifa; Accrombessi, Manfred; Briand, Valérie; Aponte, John J; Manego Zoleko, Rella; Adegnika, Ayôla A; Cot, Michel; Kremsner, Peter G; Massougbodji, Achille; Abdulla, Salim; Ramharter, Michael; Macete, Eusébio; Menéndez, Clara

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about the effects of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) on the health of sub-Saharan African infants. We have evaluated the safety of IPTp with mefloquine (MQ) compared to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for important infant health and developmental outcomes. In the context of a multicenter randomized controlled trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of IPTp with MQ compared to SP in pregnancy carried out in four sub-Saharan countries (Mozambique, Benin, Gabon, and Tanzania), 4,247 newborns, 2,815 born to women who received MQ and 1,432 born to women who received SP for IPTp, were followed up until 12 mo of age. Anthropometric parameters and psychomotor development were assessed at 1, 9, and 12 mo of age, and the incidence of malaria, anemia, hospital admissions, outpatient visits, and mortality were determined until 12 mo of age. No significant differences were found in the proportion of infants with stunting, underweight, wasting, and severe acute malnutrition at 1, 9, and 12 mo of age between infants born to women who were on IPTp with MQ versus SP. Except for three items evaluated at 9 mo of age, no significant differences were observed in the psychomotor development milestones assessed. Incidence of malaria, anemia, hospital admissions, outpatient visits, and mortality were similar between the two groups. Information on the outcomes at 12 mo of age was unavailable in 26% of the infants, 761 (27%) from the MQ group and 377 (26%) from the SP group. Reasons for not completing the study were death (4% of total study population), study withdrawal (6%), migration (8%), and loss to follow-up (9%). No significant differences were found between IPTp with MQ and SP administered in pregnancy on infant mortality, morbidity, and nutritional outcomes. The poorer performance on certain psychomotor development milestones at 9 mo of age in children born to women in the MQ group compared to those in the SP group may deserve further

  19. Effect of maternal multiple micronutrient vs iron-folic acid supplementation on infant mortality and adverse birth outcomes in rural Bangladesh: the JiVitA-3 randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Keith P; Shamim, Abu Ahmed; Mehra, Sucheta; Labrique, Alain B; Ali, Hasmot; Shaikh, Saijuddin; Klemm, Rolf D W; Wu, Lee S-F; Mitra, Maithilee; Haque, Rezwanul; Hanif, Abu A M; Massie, Allan B; Merrill, Rebecca Day; Schulze, Kerry J; Christian, Parul

    Maternal micronutrient deficiencies may adversely affect fetal and infant health, yet there is insufficient evidence of effects on these outcomes to guide antenatal micronutrient supplementation in South Asia. To assess effects of antenatal multiple micronutrient vs iron-folic acid supplementation on 6-month infant mortality and adverse birth outcomes. Cluster randomized, double-masked trial in Bangladesh, with pregnancy surveillance starting December 4, 2007, and recruitment on January 11, 2008. Six-month infant follow-up ended August 30, 2012. Surveillance included 127,282 women; 44,567 became pregnant and were included in the analysis and delivered 28,516 live-born infants. Median gestation at enrollment was 9 weeks (interquartile range, 7-12). Women were provided supplements containing 15 micronutrients or iron-folic acid alone, taken daily from early pregnancy to 12 weeks postpartum. The primary outcome was all-cause infant mortality through 6 months (180 days). Prespecified secondary outcomes in this analysis included stillbirth, preterm birth (birth weight (births) in the iron-folic acid group and 741 deaths (51.6 per 1000 live births) in the multiple micronutrient group (relative risk [RR], 0.95; 95% CI, 0.86-1.06). Multiple micronutrient supplementation resulted in a non-statistically significant reduction in stillbirths (43.1 vs 48.2 per 1000 births; RR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.81-0.99; P = .02) and significant reductions in preterm births (18.6 vs 21.8 per 100 live births; RR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.80-0.91; P birth weight (40.2 vs 45.7 per 100 live births; RR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.85-0.91; P supplementation did not reduce all-cause infant mortality to age 6 months but resulted in a non-statistically significant reduction in stillbirths and significant reductions in preterm births and low birth weight. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00860470.

  20. Morbilidad y mortalidad en neonatos hijos de madres toxémicas Morbidity and mortality related to infants of toxemic mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanett Sarmiento Portal

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. La preeclampsia-eclampsia se caracteriza por edema, hipertensión arterial y proteinuria presente entre la vigésima semana de la gestación hasta 14 días después del parto. La presente investigación se realizó con el objetivo de analizar la morbilidad y mortalidad en neonatos hijos de madres toxémicas, en el Hospital «Abel Santamaría», en Pinar del Río. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio observacional, ambispectivo, longitudinal, descriptivo, en el período entre el 1 de enero de 2006 y el 31 de diciembre de 2007. Se estudiaron 129 neonatos cuyas madres presentaron hipertensión durante el embarazo. Se analizaron las variables: tipo de hipertensión, vía del nacimiento, prematuridad, Apgar, peso, crecimiento intrauterino, morbilidad y mortalidad. RESULTADOS. Predominó la hipertensión arterial (HTA inducida por el embarazo y el nacimiento por cesárea (74,4 %. La HTA crónica y con toxemia sobreañadida se relacionó con mayores porcentajes de prematuridad, crecimiento intrauterino retardado y Apgar bajo. La morbilidad predominante fue la hipoxia al nacer (22,5 %, seguida por la enterocolitis necrosante (12,4 % y el síndrome de dificultad respiratoria (10,8 %. La tasa de mortalidad fue de 1,3 por 1000 nacidos vivos y la de letalidad ascendió a 31 por cada 100 casos. CONCLUSIONES. La hipertensión arterial en el embarazo influye negativamente en una serie de parámetros perinatales, entre los cuales destacan en nuestro medio el incremento de las cesáreas, el bajo peso al nacer, el crecimiento intrauterino retardado y la hipoxia al nacer, entre otras patologías.INTRODUCTION: Pre-eclampsia-eclampsia is characterized by edema, high blood pressure and proteinuria present between the twentieth weeks of pregnancy up to 14 postpartum. Aim of present research was to analyze morbidity and mortality in infants of toxemic mothers at "Abel Santamiría Cuadrado' Hospital, Pinar del Río province. METHODS: A observational

  1. Anxiety in adolescents born preterm or with very low birthweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sømhovd, Mikael Julius; Hansen, Bo Mølholm; Brok, Jesper Sune

    2012-01-01

    Aim To determine if adolescents who are born very preterm (anxiety problems. Method We used a systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched the databases ISI Web...... of identified articles. We selected casecontrol studies of adolescents 11 to 20 years old who were very preterm/VLBW and had a matched reference group born at term with normal birthweight that reported a validated anxiety outcome measure. For data extraction, two authors independently reviewed titles, abstracts......, and full articles identified through the searches. Subsequently two authors independently extracted data. Results We included six studies with 1519 adolescents (787 very preterm/VLBW, 732 comparisons). The general risk of developing clinically significant anxiety problems was nearly doubled (p

  2. Low Birthweight and its Predictors in Primary Health Care Facilities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low birth weight is one of the major causes of perinatal mortality and ultimately underfive mortality. To achieve Millennium Development Goal of reducing this mortality, effort must be geared towards reducing perinatal mortality by identifying risk factors to low birth weight and provision of cost effective neonatal services.

  3. School Achievements, Behavioural Adjustments and Health at Nine Years of Age in a Population of Infants Who Were Born Preterm or Required Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohay, Heather; And Others

    The prevalence of subtle handicapping conditions, such as learning disabilities, behavior problems, and recurrent illness, in a population of 88 high-risk infants was investigated when the children reached 9 years of age. Infants had had birthweights of less than 1500 grams or had required prolonged mechanical ventilation in the neonatal period.…

  4. Infant Mortality and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Death Rate Hispanic/ Non- Hispanic White Ratio (1) Congenital malformations 1,166 129.4 2,443 114.7 ... Death Rate Mexican/ Non- Hispanic White Ratio (1) Congenital malformations 754 138.3 114.7 1.2 (2) ...

  5. The impact of prenatal care on birthweight: the case of Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, R Todd; Triunfo, Patricia

    2006-11-01

    This study analyzes prenatal care and birthweight in Uruguay. These data are unique since they represent a population of urban, poor women who gave birth in a health care system that provides both prenatal and obstetric care free of charge. This study finds a positive effect of increased prenatal care use on birthweight and evidence of bias in OLS estimates, similar to studies that use US data. The results highlight the usefulness of existing methodologies for estimating the effect of prenatal care on birthweight and the importance of extending these methodologies to data from countries other than the US. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. [The relationship between socioeconomic factors and maternal and infant health programs in 13 Argentine provinces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchegoyen, Graciela; Paganini, José María

    2007-04-01

    To analyze the relationship between maternal and infant health and socioeconomic, cultural, and sanitation factors in Argentina; to evaluate how health program quality affects the primary health indicators for mothers and infants. This is a cross-sectional study with multiple variables. The authors studied six indicators for maternal and infant health: rates for maternal, infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality; the percentage of newborns with low birthweight; and the percentage of premature newborns. The study was conducted in 79 administrative units in 13 provinces that represent different geographic regions of Argentina. They included (1) the provinces of Salta and Jujuy in northwest Argentina; (2) the provinces of Córdoba, Santa Fe, and Buenos Aires in central Argentina; (3) the provinces of Entre Ríos and Misiones in the Mesopotamia or northeast region; (4) the provinces of San Luis, San Juan, and Mendoza in the Cuyo or northwest, Andean region; and (5) the provinces of Neuquén, Río Negro, and Chubut in the south. The explanatory variable in the study was the quality of health programs, controlled by socioeconomic, cultural, and sanitation factors in 1999 and 2000. The definition of program quality ("poor," "average," "good," and "very good") was based on quantitative and qualitative analysis of selected variables such as policies, organization, and procedures as determined by the investigators. Documentation was obtained from secondary official sources. The investigators interviewed 117 health system managers (including supervisors of provincial and local health programs, administrators of maternal and child health programs, and hospital directors), who provided information on characteristics and indicators of the health programs. There were marked geographic differences in the levels of maternal and infant health, medical care, and socioeconomic, cultural, and sanitation factors. Only 10.0% of health programs were classified as "very good," 35.4% as

  7. Concurrent validity and reliability of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale in infants at dual risk for motor delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Patricia; Eason, Jane M; Philibert, Darbi; Ridgway, Andrea; McCaughey, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    Concurrent validity of scores for the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) and the Peabody Developmental Gross Motor Scale-2 (PDGMS-2) was examined with a sample of 35 infants at dual risk for motor delays or disabilities. Dual risk was defined as low birthweight ( 9 months of age. Novice examiners' scores on both measures closely approximated those of experienced examiners (ICC range = .98 to .99). The results support concurrent validity of the AIMS and PDGMS-2 for infants at dual risk and have implications for using the AIMS in high-risk follow-up programs, particularly in relation to evaluating functional components of motor performance and ease of administration.

  8. [Follow-up protocol for newborns of birthweight less than 1500 g or less than 32 weeks gestation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallás Alonso, Carmen; García González, Pilar; Jimenez Moya, Ana; Loureiro González, Begoña; Martín Peinador, Yolanda; Soriano Faura, Javier; Torres Valdivieso, María José; Ginovart Galiana, Gemma

    2018-04-01

    The mortality of children with a birthweight of less than 1500g or with a gestational age of less than 32 weeks (<1500<32) has decreased significantly in the last 20 years or so. Given the higher risk of disability in these children, follow-up after hospital discharge is considered essential. In this document, the Follow-Up Group of the Spanish Society of Neonatology, in collaboration with the Spanish Society of Paediatric Primary Care, propose a follow-up protocol specific for the<1500<32, which has as its aim to standardise the activities and evaluations according to good practice criteria. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Maternal Health Care Services Access Index and Infant Survival in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Infant mortality rate in Nigeria is among the highest world-wide. Utilization of modern health care facilities during pregnancy and at delivery reduces infant mortality rate. We examined the relationship between Infant Mortality (IM) and Maternal Health Care Services Access Index (MHCI) in Nigeria. Methods: This ...

  10. Maternal Health Care Services Access Index and Infant Survival in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Infant mortality rate in Nigeria is among the highest world-wide. Utilization of modern health care facilities during pregnancy and at delivery reduces infant mortality rate. We examined the relationship between Infant Mortality (IM) and Maternal Health Care Services Access Index (MHCI) in.

  11. Candida albicans septicemia in a premature infant successfully treated with oral fluconazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodé, S; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Lars; Hjelt, K

    1992-01-01

    A premature male infant, birth-weight 1460 g, was treated successfully for a Candida albicans septicemia with orally administered fluconazole for 20 days. Dosage was 5 mg/kg/day. No side effects were seen. Fluconazole may present a major progress in treatment of invasive C. albicans infections in...... in neonatology....

  12. Candida albicans septicemia in a premature infant successfully treated with oral fluconazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodé, S; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Lars; Hjelt, K

    1992-01-01

    A premature male infant, birth-weight 1460 g, was treated successfully for a Candida albicans septicemia with orally administered fluconazole for 20 days. Dosage was 5 mg/kg/day. No side effects were seen. Fluconazole may present a major progress in treatment of invasive C. albicans infections...

  13. Mortalidade infantil por causas evitáveis no Brasil: um estudo ecológico no período 2000-2002 Infant mortality from preventable causes in Brazil: an ecological study in 2000-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fernando Boing

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse estudo foi testar as associações entre a mortalidade infantil por causas evitáveis no Brasil com indicadores sócio-econômicos e de serviços e investimentos em saúde. Trata-se de um estudo ecológico, cujas unidades de análise foram os 296 municípios brasileiros com população superior a 80 mil habitantes. Realizaram-se os testes de Kruskall-Wallis e ANOVA para identificar diferenças significativas entre os quartis de mortalidade infantil segundo as variáveis independentes, e foram calculados os coeficientes de correlação de Pearson e de Spearman para testar as associações entre todas as variáveis. Os municípios que compuseram os quartis com maior mortalidade infantil por causas evitáveis apresentaram também menor Índice de Desenvolvimento Humano Municipal, Produto Interno Bruto per capita, pessoas que vivem em domicílios com banheiro e água encanada, despesa total com saúde por habitante e médicos por mil habitantes; e maior coeficiente de Gini. A compreensão do papel protagonista das condições sócio-econômicas e de investimentos em saúde sobre a mortalidade infantil por causas evitáveis deve permear as ações que visem à minimização da magnitude e da desigualdade desses óbitos.This study aims to test the associations between infant mortality from preventable causes in Brazil and socioeconomic factors, including those pertaining to health services and investments. This was an ecological study using 296 Brazilian counties (municipalities with more than 80,000 inhabitants each as the analytical units. Kruskall-Wallis and ANOVA tests were performed to compare independent variables according to infant mortality quartile, and Pearson and Spearman's correlation coefficients were computed to test the associations. As the infant mortality quartile from preventable causes increases, there is a gradual decrease in the municipal human development index, per capita gross domestic product, households with

  14. Patterning in birthweight in India: analysis of maternal recall and health card data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malavika A Subramanyam

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available National data on birthweight from birth certificates or medical records are not available in India. The third Indian National Family Health Survey included data on birthweight of children obtained from health cards and maternal recall. This study aims to describe the population that these data represent and compares the birthweight obtained from health cards with maternal recall data in terms of its socioeconomic patterning and as a risk factor for childhood growth failure.The analytic sample consisted of children aged 0 to 59 months with birthweight data obtained from health cards (n = 3227 and maternal recall (n = 16,787. The difference between the card sample and the maternal recall sample in the distribution across household wealth, parental education, caste, religion, gender, and urban residence was compared using multilevel models. We also assessed the ability of birthweight to predict growth failure in infancy and childhood in the two groups. The survey contains birthweight data from a majority of household wealth categories (>5% in every category for recall, both genders, all age groups, all caste groups, all religion groups, and urban and rural dwellers. However, children from the lowest quintile of household wealth were under-represented (4.73% in ca