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Sample records for birmingham hip resurfacing

  1. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis of peri-prosthetic stress shielding in the Birmingham resurfacing hip replacement.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harty, J A

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Numerous reports in the literature refer to the femoral neck fracture rate in hip resurfacing. The aim of this study was to determine the bone mineral density and evidence of stress shielding around the femoral component of the Birmingham resurfacing prosthesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with primary unilateral osteoarthritis had a Birmingham resurfacing prosthesis. DEXA analysis of the proximal femur and femoral neck was performed and compared with the opposite unaffected side. RESULTS: Total periprosthetic bone mineral density was 0.49% greater than the control, but this did not achieve statistical significance. Although the BMD of the femoral neck was slightly increased on the prosthetic side (1.002 g\\/cm2) as opposed to the control side, this difference did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSION: The Birmingham resurfacing prosthesis does not appear to reduce femoral neck bone mineral density in comparison to the normal femoral neck bone density. We conclude that femoral neck fractures are unlikely to be due to stress shielding related to the prosthesis.

  2. Biomimetic Composite-Metal Hip Resurfacing Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habiba Bougherara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hip resurfacing technique is a conservative arthroplasty used in the young patient in which the femoral head is reshaped to accept metal cap with small guide stem. In the present investigation, a hybrid composite-metal resurfacing implant is proposed. The cup is made of carbon fiber/polyamide 12 (CF/PA12 covered with a thin layer of cobalt chrome (Co-Cr. Finite element (FE method was applied to analyze and compare the biomechanical performances of the hybrid hip resurfacing (HHR and the conventional Birmingham (BHR. Results of the finite element analysis showed that the composite implant leads to an increase in stresses in the cancellous bone by more than 15% than BHR, indicating a lower potential for stress shielding and bone fracture and higher potential for bone apposition with the HHR.

  3. Comparison of acetabular reamings during hip resurfacing versus uncemented total hip arthroplasty.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, S A

    2009-04-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the quantity of bone removed from the acetabulum during resurfacing hip arthroplasty versus uncemented total hip arthroplasty (THA). METHODS: 62 consecutive patients with osteoarthritis of the hip were prospectively studied. 24 men and 7 women aged 40 to 86 (mean, 59) years underwent Birmingham hip resurfacing. 13 men and 18 women aged 34 to 88 (mean, 61) years underwent uncemented THA using the trident acetabular cup. Obese elderly women at risk of femoral neck fracture and patients with large subchondral pseudocysts or a history of avascular necrosis of the femoral head were assigned to uncemented THA. Acetabular reamings were collected; marginal osteophytes were not included. The reamings were dehydrated, defatted, and weighed. RESULTS: The mean weight of acetabular reamings was not significantly different between patients undergoing hip resurfacing and uncemented THA (p=0.57). CONCLUSION: In hip resurfacing, the use of an appropriately small femoral component avoids oversizing the acetabular component and removal of excessive bone stock.

  4. Hip Resurfacing: An Alternative to Conventional Hip Replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is hip resurfacing a good alternative to hip replacement? Answers from Mark Spangehl, M.D. Hip resurfacing has lost favor with many surgeons ... women with poor bone quality. Unlike traditional hip replacement, hip resurfacing doesn't completely replace the "ball" ...

  5. Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty and Perioperative Blood Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Cook

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is standard practice in many institutions to routinely perform preoperative and postoperative haemoglobin level testing in association with hip joint arthroplasty procedures. It is our observation, however, that blood transfusion after uncomplicated primary hip arthroplasty in healthy patients is uncommon and that the decision to proceed with blood transfusion is typically made on clinical grounds. We therefore question the necessity and clinical value of routine perioperative blood testing about the time of hip resurfacing arthroplasty. We present analysis of perioperative blood tests and transfusion rates in 107 patients undertaking unilateral hybrid hip resurfacing arthroplasty by the senior author at a single institution over a three-year period. We conclude that routine perioperative testing of haemoglobin levels for hip resurfacing arthroplasty procedures does not assist in clinical management. We recommend that postoperative blood testing only be considered should the patient demonstrate clinical signs of symptomatic anaemia or if particular clinical circumstances necessitate.

  6. Primary total hip replacement versus hip resurfacing - hospital considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, William G; Carter, Christina J; Barone, Marisa; Jinnah, Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Multiple factors regarding surgical procedures and patient selection affect hospital staffing needs as well as hospital revenues. In order to better understand the potential impact on hospitals that hip arthroplasty device selection (standard total hip arthroplasty vs. resurfacing) creates, a review of all primary hip arthroplasties performed at one institution was designed to identify factors that impacted hospital staffing needs and revenue generation. All primary hip arthroplasties undertaken over three fiscal years (2008 to 2010) were reviewed, utilizing only hospital business office data and medical records data that had been previously extracted prior for billing purposes. Analysis confirmed differing demographics for two hip arthroplasty populations, with the resurfacing patients (compared to the conventional total hip arthroplasty population) consisting of younger patients (mean age, 50 vs. 61 years), who were more often male (75% vs. 45%), were more likely to have osteoarthritis as their primary diagnosis (83 vs. 67%) and were more often covered by managed care or commercial insurance (83 vs. 34%). They also had shorter hospital stays (mean length of stay, 2.3 vs. 4.1 days) and consequently provided a more favorable financial revenue stream to the hospital on a per patient basis. Several trends appeared during the study periods. There was a steady increase in all procedures in all groups except for the resurfacings, which decreased 26% in males and 53% in females between 2009 and 2010. Differences were observed in the demographics of patients presenting for resurfacing, compared to those presenting for conventional total hip arthroplasty. In addition to the revenue stream considerations, institutions undertaking a resurfacing program must commit the resources and planning in order to rehabilitate these patients more expeditiously than is usually required with conventional hip arthroplasty patients.

  7. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip...

  8. Femoral component loosening after hip resurfacing arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zustin, Jozef; Sauter, Guido; Hahn, Michael; Morlock, Michael M.; Ruether, Wolfgang; Amling, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Before the re-introduction of the current generation of total hip resurfacing arthroplasty, component loosening and osteolysis were of great concern to the orthopaedic community. Early, mid- and long-term clinical results are encouraging, but component loosening still exists. Macroscopic, contact radiographic and histopathological analyses after undecalcified preparation of bone tissue specimens were performed. To investigate the frequency and morphological patterns of the loosening of the femoral component, we analysed a series of 190 retrieved femoral remnants that were revised for aseptic failures. Thirty-five (18.4%) hips were revised for clinical and/or radiographic loosening of the femoral component. Pseudoarthrosis (n = 17; median in situ time: 16 weeks, interquartile range [IQR]: 9 to 34), collapsed osteonecrosis (n = 5; median in situ time: 79 weeks, IQR: 63 to 97), cement-socket debonding (n = 3; median in situ time: 89 weeks, IQR: 54 to 97) and at later follow-up bone-cement loosening (n = 10; median in situ time: 175 weeks; IQR 112 to 198; p =0.005) were distinct patterns of the femoral remnant-implant loosening. Fibrocartilaginous metaplasia of interface bone trabeculae (n = 38; median in situ time: 61 weeks, IQR: 32 to 138) was strongly associated with femoral component loosening (p = 0.009). Both the trabecular hyperosteoidosis (n = 32; median in situ time: 71 weeks, IQR 50 to 129) and excessive intraosseous lymphocyte infiltration (n = 12; median in situ time: 75 weeks, IQR 51 to 98) at the bone-cement interface correlated strongly with fibrocartilaginous metaplasia (p = 0.001 and p = 0.016 respectively) and all three lesions were associated with the female gender (p = 0.021, p = 0.009, and p = 0.051). Femoral component loosening at early follow-up was mostly caused by pathological changes of the femoral remnant bone tissue: pseudoarthrosis and collapsed osteonecrosis. Fibrocartilaginous metaplasia was frequently observed in hips with femoral

  9. Hip resurfacing in a district general hospital: 6-year clinical results using the ReCap hip resurfacing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Weegen Walter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of our study was to prospectively report the clinical results of 280 consecutive hips (240 patients who received a ReCap Hip Resurfacing System implant (Biomet Inc., Warsaw, USA in a single district general hospital. Literature reports a large variation in clinical results between different resurfacing designs and published results using this particular design are scarce. Methods Mean follow up was 3.3 years (1.0 to 6.3 and four patients were lost to follow-up. All patients were diagnosed with end-stage hip osteoarthritis, their mean age was 54 years and 76.4% of all patients were male. Results There were 16 revisions and four patients reported a Harris Hip Score Conclusions This independent series confirms that hip resurfacing is a demanding procedure, and that implant survival of the ReCap hip resurfacing system is on a critical level in our series. In non-revised patients, reported outcomes are generally excellent. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00603395

  10. Short-term clinical experience with hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieliński, Łukasz; Kusz, Damian; Wojciechowski, Piotr; Dziuba, Anna

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the authors' experience with hip resurfacing arthroplasty. Although introduced many years ago, the method did not gain wide popularity because of poor long-term outcomes. At present, owing to the introduction of metal-on-metal bearings and hybrid fixation techniques, short- and mid-term results are very good and encourage wider use of this technique, especially in the younger and more active patients whose results with standard total hip replacements would be unsatisfactory. We performed 13 hip resurfacing arthroplasties at our institution between August 1, 2005, and May 1, 2006. Twelve patients reported for the scheduled follow-up and were included in the study. Treatment outcomes were assessed according to the Harris Hip Score. The short-term outcomes of hip resurfacing arthroplasties are encouraging. In the study group there were no intraoperative complications, infections, peripheral nerve palsy, hip dislocations or clinically overt vein thrombosis. All of the patients reported complete or major pain relief. Clinical assessment according to the Harris Hip Score revealed improvement from an average of 57.7 (20.1) points preoperatively to an average of 87.7 (12) points after the surgery. Crutches were used for a maximum of 6 weeks postoperatively. All of the patients are currently able to walk without crutches with full weight-bearing. 1) Hip resurfacing arthroplasty seems to be an advisable method of operative management of younger, active patients, in whom standard THR would be associated with a high risk of failure; it allows THR to be postponed and carried out as a revision surgery with the acetabular component already in place. 2) Despite the good short- and mid-term results, the utility of this method should be evaluated with caution due to the lack of adequate long-term follow-up data.

  11. Metal-on-metal hip resurfacings. A radiological perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhongbo; Pandit, Hemant; Taylor, Adrian; Gill, Harinderjit; Murray, David; Ostlere, Simon

    2011-01-01

    It is important to be aware of the various complications related to resurfacing arthroplasty of the hip (RSA) and the spectrum of findings that may be encountered on imaging. The bone conserving metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing has become increasingly popular over the last ten years, especially in young and active patients. Initial reports have been encouraging, but long-term outcome is still unknown. Early post operative complications are rare and have been well documented in the literature. Medium and long term complications are less well understood. A rare but important problem seen at this stage is the appearance of a cystic or solid periarticular reactive mass, which occurs predominately in women and usually affects both hips when seen in patients with bilateral RSAs. The following imaging findings are illustrated and their significance discussed; Uncomplicated hip resurfacing arthroplasty, radiolucency around the femoral peg, femoral neck fracture, loosening and infection, suboptimal component position, femoral notching, dislocation, heterotopic ossification, femoral neck thinning and reactive masses. The radiologist should be aware of the normal radiographic appearances and the variety of complications that may occur following RSA and should recommend ultrasound or MRI in patients with an unexplained symptomatic hip and normal radiographs. (orig.)

  12. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty: current status and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Corten

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA is a concept of hip replacement that allows treating young active patients with a femoral bone preserving procedure. The proposed advantages of resuming an active lifestyle with increased frequency and duration of sports activities have been shown to be realistic. The 30-year cost-effectiveness in young male patients has been shown to be higher in resurfacing compared to conventional total hip replacement (THA. However, prognosticators of an inferior outcome have also been identified. The most important patient related factors are secondary osteoarthritis as the indication for surgery such as post-childhood hip disorders or AVN, female gender, smaller component sizes and older age (>65 years for males and >55 years for females. In addition, surgical technique (approach and cementing technique and component design are also important determinant factors for the risk of failure. Moreover, concerns have surfaced with respect to high metal ion concentrations and metal ion hypersensitivities. In addition, the presumed ease of revising HRA has not reflected in improved or equal survivorship in comparison to a primary THA. This highlights the importance of identifying patient-, surgery-, and implant-related prognosticators for success or failure of HRA. Rather than vilifying the concept of hip resurfacing, detailed in depth analysis should be used to specify indications and improve implant design and surgical techniques.

  13. High-impact sport after hip resurfacing: The Ironman triathlon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, J; Lons, A; Pommepuy, T; Isida, R; Benad, K; Putman, S

    2017-09-01

    Returning to high-impact sport is an increasingly frequent functional demand following hip replacement. The literature, however, is sparse on the subject and nonexistent regarding triathlon. We therefore conducted a retrospective study of hip resurfacing in triathlon players, to determine: (1) whether it is possible to return to this kind of sport; (2) if so, whether it is possible to return to the same level; and (3) how a resurfaced hip behaves under these conditions. Hip resurfacing allows return to competition level in long-distance triathlon. A single-center single-operator retrospective study included patients undergoing hip resurfacing with the Conserve Plus implant inserted through a posterolateral approach, who had ceased long-distance triathlon practice due to osteoarthritis of the hip. Fifty-one of the 1688 patients undergoing resurfacing during the inclusion period were long-distance triathlon players. The series comprised 48 patients: 51 implants; 43 male, 5 female; mean age, 44.8 years (range, 28.2-58.9 years). At a mean 4.7 years' follow-up (range, 2.2-7.6 years), all clinical scores showed significant improvement; Merle d'Aubigné and Harris scores rose respectively from 12.3 (5-16) and 42 (37-56) preoperatively to 17.5 (13-18) and 93.2 (73-100) (Pdistance=70.3km and 19 with distance=140.6km. At follow-up, 28 patients had taken part in an Ironman competition: 21 with distance=70.3km and 7 with distance=140.6km. Mean competition performance did not differ between pre and postoperative periods. Return-to-sport rates were good following hip resurfacing. Non-impact sports (swimming, cycling) predominated postoperatively, whereas the rate of impact sport (running) diminished. Return to competition-level sport (extreme triathlon) was possible for 28/48 patients (58%). Implant survival seemed unaffected by this high-impact sports activity at a mean 4.7 years' follow-up. IV, retrospective, non-controlled. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights

  14. The Role of Hip Arthroscopy in Investigating and Managing the Painful Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei-Dan, Omer; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Moreira, Brett; McConkey, Mark O; Young, David A

    2016-03-01

    To determine the safety and efficacy of hip arthroscopy performed in the peripheral compartment as a diagnostic and therapeutic treatment option for patients with hip pain after hip resurfacing surgery. Indications for hip arthroscopy after hip resurfacing included patients with a symptomatic hip-resurfaced arthroplasties who did not respond to nonoperative treatment. Patients who underwent a hip arthroscopy after a painful hip resurfacing were included with a minimum of 1 year follow-up. Subgroup analysis was performed according to whether an established diagnosis was made before arthroscopic intervention or not. Subjective measures were based on Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) scores, and results were calculated and analyzed. We included 68 patients (26 male [38%] and 42 female [62%]) who underwent subsequent hip arthroscopy from a population of 978 consecutive hip-resurfaced arthroplasties performed between 1999 and 2010. The average age was 58 (range, 37 to 78 years). The mean follow-up after hip arthroscopy was 3.4 years (range, 12 months to 5.8 years). Patients who had an established diagnosis (n = 41) before hip arthroscopy showed statistical improvement in their WOMAC scores (7 to 2, P arthroscopy showed statistical worsening of the WOMAC (15 to 21, P = .002). Ten (37%) of these 27 patients without a diagnosis failed and needed to be converted to a THR. A significant correlation was found between the collections found on ultrasound (psoas bursa and/or in the hip joint) and the need for synovectomy (P = .01). The overall revision rate to THR after hip resurfacing in our group of patients was 1.3% (n = 13). Female patients were more likely to require postresurfacing hip arthroscopy with 42 (60%) female to only 26 (40%) male patients undergoing this procedure. In our study population, 70% (14/21, P arthroscopy. Hip arthroscopy is a safe surgical treatment option for those patients with a painful hip resurfacing

  15. Confronting hip resurfacing and big femoral head replacement gait analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis K. Karampinas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Improved hip kinematics and bone preservation have been reported after resurfacing total hip replacement (THRS. On the other hand, hip kinematics with standard total hip replacement (THR is optimized with large diameter femoral heads (BFH-THR. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the functional outcomes of THRS and BFH-THR and correlate these results to bone preservation or the large femoral heads. Thirty-one patients were included in the study. Gait speed, postural balance, proprioception and overall performance. Our results demonstrated a non-statistically significant improvement in gait, postural balance and proprioception in the THRS confronting to BFH-THR group. THRS provide identical outcomes to traditional BFH-THR. The THRS choice as bone preserving procedure in younger patients is still to be evaluated.

  16. "Tripolar" hip arthroplasty for failed hip resurfacing: nineteen years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheerlinck, T; Casteleyn, P P

    2001-10-01

    The authors describe the case of a 37-year-old patient who sustained a subcapital femoral neck fracture six months after ICLH double-cup hip resurfacing. As the polyethylene acetabular resurfacing component was undamaged and well fixed, a standard femoral stem with a bipolar head was inserted. The outer diameter of the bipolar head was chosen to fit the resurfacing socket. The "tripolar" hip arthroplasty has functioned well for 19 years and was revised for aseptic cup loosening. The cemented femoral stem was still well fixed and was not revised. Although the "tripolar" hip has functioned well in our case, we believe it is not indicated for metal on metal bearings. In this case the use of an appropriate modular head with a correct head-socket clearance is preferred.

  17. Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this review was to assess the safety and effectiveness of metal on metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty for young patients compared with that of total hip replacement (THR) in the same population. Clinical Need Total hip replacement has proved to be very effective for late middle-aged and elderly patients with severe degenerative diseases of the hips. As indications for THR began to include younger patients and those with a more active life style, the longevity of the implant became a concern. Evidence suggests that these patients experience relatively higher rates of early implant failure and the need for revision. The Swedish hip registry, for example, has demonstrated a survival rate in excess of 80% at 20 years for those aged over 65 years, whereas this figure was 33% by 16 years in those aged under 55 years. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a bone-conserving alternative to THR that restores normal joint biomechanics and load transfer. The technique has been used around the world for more than 10 years, specifically in the United Kingdom and other European countries. The Technology Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty is an alternative procedure to conventional THR in younger patients. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is less invasive than THR and addresses the problem of preserving femoral bone stock at the initial operation. This means that future hip revisions are possible with THR if the initial MOM arthroplasty becomes less effective with time in these younger patients. The procedure involves the removal and replacement of the surface of the femoral head with a hollow metal hemisphere, which fits into a metal acetabular cup. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a technically more demanding procedure than is conventional THR. In hip resurfacing, the femoral head is retained, which makes it much more difficult to access the acetabular cup. However, hip resurfacing arthroplasty has several advantages over a

  18. Intertrochanteric Fracture After Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty Managed with a Reconstruction Nail

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    Jason Chow

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Periprosthetic fractures after hip resurfacings are rare occurrences that can pose a challenge to orthopaedic surgeons. With hip resurfacings becoming more common, the prevalence of these fractures is likely to increase because these patients are usually younger and more active. We report a case of traumatic periprosthetic proximal femur fracture treated with a reconstruction intramedullary nail technique.

  19. Editorial Commentary: Hip Arthroscopy Plays a Role in Painful Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty but a Prearthroscopy Diagnosis Is Critical to Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Whereas hip arthroscopy plays a role in the investigation and treatment of the painful hip resurfacing arthroplasty, a diagnosis before arthroscopy is critical to improved outcome. The rate of conversion to total hip arthroplasty jumps from 7% to 37% when a pre-arthroscopy diagnosis is not known. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of a patient specific femoral alignment guide for hip resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Michael; Naudie, Douglas D; Edwards, Max R; Sellan, Michael E; McCalden, Richard W; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2014-03-01

    A novel alternative to conventional instrumentation for femoral component insertion in hip resurfacing is a patient specific, computed tomography based femoral alignment guide. A benchside study using cadaveric femora was performed comparing a custom alignment guide to conventional instrumentation and computer navigation. A clinical series of twenty-five hip resurfacings utilizing a custom alignment guide was conducted by three surgeons experienced in hip resurfacing. Using cadaveric femora, the custom guide was comparable to conventional instrumentation with computer navigation proving superior to both. Clinical femoral component alignment accuracy was 3.7° and measured within ± 5° of plan in 20 of 24 cases. Patient specific femoral alignment guides provide a satisfactory level of accuracy and may be a better alternative to conventional instrumentation for initial femoral guidewire placement in hip resurfacing. Crown Copyright © 2014. All rights reserved.

  1. Bone mineral density of the femoral neck in resurfacing hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Østergaard; Ovesen, Ole; Brixen, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Resurfacing total hip arthroplasty (RTHA) may preserve the femoral neck bone stock postoperatively. Bone mineral density (BMD) may be affected by the hip position, which might bias longitudinal studies. We investigated the dependency of BMD precision on type of ROI and hip position....

  2. Inflammatory pseudotumor causing deep vein thrombosis after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Memon, Adeel Rasool

    2013-01-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacings have recently been associated with a variety of complications resulting from adverse reaction to metal debris. We report a case of extensive soft tissue necrosis associated with a huge pelvic mass causing extensive deep vein thrombosis of the lower limb secondary to mechanical compression of the iliac vein. This is a rare and unusual cause of deep vein thrombosis after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

  3. 21 CFR 888.3410 - Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer... Devices § 888.3410 Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semi-constrained resurfacing...

  4. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty in treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyda, Michał; Koczy, Bogdan; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Widuchowska, Małgorzata; Stołtny, Tomasz; Mielnik, Michał; Hermanson, Jacek

    2015-01-25

    Hip resurfacing is a conservative type of total hip arthroplasty but its use is controversial, especially in patients with osteonecrosis. The aim of this study was analysis of the clinical and radiographic outcomes of hip resurfacing in patients with osteonecrosis. Between 2007 and 2008, 30 hip resurfacing arthroplasties were performed due to osteoarthritis secondary to avascular necrosis of femoral head staged as Ficat III and IV. Patients were qualified to resurfacing arthroplasty when the extent of avascular necrosis using Kerboul's method was avascular necrosis and head-neck junction was >20°. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically before and 60 months after the operation. The mean Harris Hip Score (HHS) score increased from 47.8 to 94.25 (p<0.05). Physical activity level (University of California, Los Angeles activity score--UCLA activity score) improved from 3.7 to 7.55 (p<0.05). No implant migration was observed. Management of osteonecrosis of the hip with resurfacing arthroplasty seems to be effective in strictly-selected patients.

  5. Periacetabular Bone Mineral Density Changes After Resurfacing Hip Arthroplasty Versus Conventional Total Hip Arthroplasty. A Randomized Controlled DEXA Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, J.M.H.; Pakvis, D.F.; Hendrickx, B.W.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; van Susante, J.L.C.

    2013-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to evaluate acetabular bone mineral density (BMD) changes after hip resurfacing (RHA) versus an established conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 71 patients were allocated randomly to receive either an RHA press-fit cobalt–chromium cup (n

  6. Patient-reported outcome of hip resurfacing arthroplasty and standard total hip replacement after short-term follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Nina; Douw, Karla; Overgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate patientreported outcome in terms of satisfaction in two study groups that had undergone hip resurfacing arthro-plasty (HRA) or total hip replacement (THR). The procedure consists of placing a hollow, mushroom-shaped metal cap over the femoral head whil...... a matching metal cup is placed in the acetabulum (pelvis socket)....

  7. Computer navigation experience in hip resurfacing improves femoral component alignment using a conventional jig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, Zachary; Mehra, Akshay; Olsen, Michael; Donnelly, Michael; Schemitsch, Emil

    2013-11-01

    The use of computer navigation has been shown to improve the accuracy of femoral component placement compared to conventional instrumentation in hip resurfacing. Whether exposure to computer navigation improves accuracy when the procedure is subsequently performed with conventional instrumentation without navigation has not been explored. We examined whether femoral component alignment utilizing a conventional jig improves following experience with the use of imageless computer navigation for hip resurfacing. Between December 2004 and December 2008, 213 consecutive hip resurfacings were performed by a single surgeon. The first 17 (Cohort 1) and the last 9 (Cohort 2) hip resurfacings were performed using a conventional guidewire alignment jig. In 187 cases, the femoral component was implanted using the imageless computer navigation. Cohorts 1 and 2 were compared for femoral component alignment accuracy. All components in Cohort 2 achieved the position determined by the preoperative plan. The mean deviation of the stem-shaft angle (SSA) from the preoperatively planned target position was 2.2° in Cohort 2 and 5.6° in Cohort 1 (P = 0.01). Four implants in Cohort 1 were positioned at least 10° varus compared to the target SSA position and another four were retroverted. Femoral component placement utilizing conventional instrumentation may be more accurate following experience using imageless computer navigation.

  8. Computer navigation experience in hip resurfacing improves femoral component alignment using a conventional jig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Morison

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:The use of computer navigation has been shown to improve the accuracy of femoral component placement compared to conventional instrumentation in hip resurfacing. Whether exposure to computer navigation improves accuracy when the procedure is subsequently performed with conventional instrumentation without navigation has not been explored. We examined whether femoral component alignment utilizing a conventional jig improves following experience with the use of imageless computer navigation for hip resurfacing. Materials and Methods:Between December 2004 and December 2008, 213 consecutive hip resurfacings were performed by a single surgeon. The first 17 (Cohort 1 and the last 9 (Cohort 2 hip resurfacings were performed using a conventional guidewire alignment jig. In 187 cases, the femoral component was implanted using the imageless computer navigation. Cohorts 1 and 2 were compared for femoral component alignment accuracy. Results:All components in Cohort 2 achieved the position determined by the preoperative plan. The mean deviation of the stem-shaft angle (SSA from the preoperatively planned target position was 2.2° in Cohort 2 and 5.6° in Cohort 1 ( P = 0.01. Four implants in Cohort 1 were positioned at least 10° varus compared to the target SSA position and another four were retroverted. Conclusions: Femoral component placement utilizing conventional instrumentation may be more accurate following experience using imageless computer navigation.

  9. The Tribology of Explanted Hip Resurfacings Following Early Fracture of the Femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, James K; Langton, David J; Nargol, Antoni V F; Meek, R M Dominic; Joyce, Thomas J

    2015-10-15

    A recognized issue related to metal-on-metal hip resurfacings is early fracture of the femur. Most theories regarding the cause of fracture relate to clinical factors but an engineering analysis of failed hip resurfacings has not previously been reported. The objective of this work was to determine the wear volumes and surface roughness values of a cohort of retrieved hip resurfacings which were removed due to early femoral fracture, infection and avascular necrosis (AVN). Nine resurfacing femoral heads were obtained following early fracture of the femur, a further five were retrieved due to infection and AVN. All fourteen were measured for volumetric wear using a co-ordinate measuring machine. Wear rates were then calculated and regions of the articulating surface were divided into "worn" and "unworn". Roughness values in these regions were measured using a non-contacting profilometer. The mean time to fracture was 3.7 months compared with 44.4 months for retrieval due to infection and AVN. Average wear rates in the early fracture heads were 64 times greater than those in the infection and AVN retrievals. Given the high wear rates of the early fracture components, such wear may be linked to an increased risk of femoral neck fracture.

  10. The Tribology of Explanted Hip Resurfacings Following Early Fracture of the Femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Lord

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A recognized issue related to metal-on-metal hip resurfacings is early fracture of the femur. Most theories regarding the cause of fracture relate to clinical factors but an engineering analysis of failed hip resurfacings has not previously been reported. The objective of this work was to determine the wear volumes and surface roughness values of a cohort of retrieved hip resurfacings which were removed due to early femoral fracture, infection and avascular necrosis (AVN. Nine resurfacing femoral heads were obtained following early fracture of the femur, a further five were retrieved due to infection and AVN. All fourteen were measured for volumetric wear using a co-ordinate measuring machine. Wear rates were then calculated and regions of the articulating surface were divided into “worn” and “unworn”. Roughness values in these regions were measured using a non-contacting profilometer. The mean time to fracture was 3.7 months compared with 44.4 months for retrieval due to infection and AVN. Average wear rates in the early fracture heads were 64 times greater than those in the infection and AVN retrievals. Given the high wear rates of the early fracture components, such wear may be linked to an increased risk of femoral neck fracture.

  11. Influence of bone density on the cement fixation of femoral hip resurfacing components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsch, Rudi G; Jäger, Sebastian; Lürssen, Marcus; Loidolt, Travis; Schmalzried, Thomas P; Clarius, Michael

    2010-08-01

    In clinical outcome studies, small component sizes, female gender, femoral shape, focal bone defects, bad bone quality, and biomechanics have been associated with failures of resurfacing arthroplasties. We used a well-established experimental setup and human bone specimens to analyze the effects of bone density on cement fixation of femoral hip resurfacing components. Thirty-one fresh frozen femora were prepared for resurfacing using the original instruments. ASR resurfacing prostheses were implanted after dual-energy X-ray densitometer scans. Real-time measurements of pressure and temperature during implantation, analyses of cement penetration, and measurements of micro motions under torque application were performed. The associations of bone density and measurement data were examined calculating regression lines and multiple correlation coefficients; acceptability was tested with ANOVA. We found significant relations between bone density and micro motion, cement penetration, cement mantle thickness, cement pressure, and interface temperature. Mean bone density of the femora was 0.82 +/- 0.13 g/cm(2), t-score was -0.7 +/- 1.0, and mean micro motion between bone and femoral resurfacing component was 17.5 +/- 9.1 microm/Nm. The regression line between bone density and micro motion was equal to -56.7 x bone density + 63.8, R = 0.815 (p density scans are most helpful for patient selection in hip resurfacing, and a better bone quality leads to higher initial component stability. A sophisticated cementing technique is recommended to avoid vigorous impaction and incomplete seating, since increasing bone density also results in higher cement pressures, lower cement penetration, lower interface temperatures, and thicker cement mantles. Copyright 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Ten different hip resurfacing systems: biomechanical analysis of design and material properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisel, Christian; Kleinhans, Jennifer A; Menge, Michael; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2009-08-01

    This study gives an overview of the main macro- and microstructural differences of ten commercially available total hip resurfacing implants. The heads and cups of resurfacing hip implants from ten different manufacturers were analysed. The components were measured in a coordinate measuring machine. The microstructure of the heads and cups was inspected by scanning electron microscopy. The mean radial clearance was 84.86 microm (range: 49.47-120.93 microm). The implants were classified into three groups (low, medium and high clearance). All implants showed a deviation of roundness of less than 10 microm. It was shown that all implants differ from each other and a final conclusion about the ideal design and material combination cannot be given based on biomechanical data. Widespread use of specific designs can only be recommended if clinical long-term follow-up studies are performed and analysed for each design.

  13. Periprosthetic fractures in the resurfaced hip--A case report and review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Traumatic periprosthetic fractures adjacent a hip resurfacing prosthesis are rare. When proximal fractures are encountered the obvious surgical solution is to revise to a large head stemmed femoral component. A previously well functioning implant may however be retained as various non-operative and operative treatment options exist. This paper reports the case history of a traumatic periprosthetic fracture successfully treated with cannulated screw fixation and reviews the current literature.

  14. Direct to consumer advertising via the Internet, a study of hip resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunwale, B; Clarke, J; Young, D; Mohammed, A; Patil, S; Meek, R M D

    2009-02-01

    With increased use of the internet for health information and direct to consumer advertising from medical companies, there is concern about the quality of information available to patients. The aim of this study was to examine the quality of health information on the internet for hip resurfacing. An assessment tool was designed to measure quality of information. Websites were measured on credibility of source; usability; currentness of the information; content relevance; content accuracy/completeness and disclosure/bias. Each website assessed was given a total score, based on number of scores achieved from the above categories websites were further analysed on author, geographical origin and possession of an independent credibility check. There was positive correlation between the overall score for the website and the score of each website in each assessment category. Websites by implant companies, doctors and hospitals scored poorly. Websites with an independent credibility check such as Health on the Net (HoN) scored twice the total scores of websites without. Like other internet health websites, the quality of information on hip resurfacing websites is variable. This study highlights methods by which to assess the quality of health information on the internet and advocates that patients should look for a statement of an "independent credibility check" when searching for information on hip resurfacing.

  15. Impact of implant size on cement filling in hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Roel; Buls, Nico; Scheerlinck, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Larger proportions of cement within femoral resurfacing implants might result in thermal bone necrosis. We postulate that smaller components are filled with proportionally more cement, causing an elevated failure rate. A total of 19 femoral heads were fitted with polymeric replicas of ReCap (Biomet) resurfacing components fixed with low-viscosity cement. Two specimens were used for each even size between 40 and 56 mm and one for size 58 mm. All specimens were imaged with computed tomography, and the cement thickness and bone density were analyzed. The average cement mantle thickness was 2.63 mm and was not correlated with the implant size. However, specimen with low bone density had thicker cement mantles regardless of size. The average filling index was 36.65% and was correlated to both implant size and bone density. Smaller implants and specimens with lower bone density contained proportionally more cement than larger implants. According to a linear regression model, bone density but not implant size influenced cement thickness. However, both implant size and bone density had a significant impact on the filling index. Large proportions of cement within the resurfacing head have the potential to generate thermal bone necrosis and implant failure. When considering hip resurfacing in patients with a small femoral head and/or osteoporotic bone, extra care should be taken to avoid thermal bone necrosis, and alternative cementing techniques or even cementless implants should be considered. This study should help delimiting the indications for hip resurfacing and to choose an optimal cementing technique taking implant size into account.

  16. What Is the Rerevision Rate After Revising a Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty? Analysis From the AOANJRR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, James Min-Leong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Graves, Stephen; de Steiger, Richard

    2015-11-01

    More than 15,000 primary hip resurfacing arthroplasties have been recorded by the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJRR) with 884 primary procedures requiring revision for reasons other than infection, a cumulative percent revision rate at 12 years of 11%. However, few studies have reported the survivorship of these revision procedures. (1) What is the cumulative percent rerevision rate for revision procedures for failed hip resurfacings? (2) Is there a difference in rerevision rate among different types of revision or bearing surfaces? The AOANJRR collects data on all primary and revision hip joint arthroplasties performed in Australia and after verification against health department data, checking of unmatched procedures, and subsequent retrieval of unreported procedures is able to obtain an almost complete data set relating to hip arthroplasty in Australia. Revision procedures are linked to the known primary hip arthroplasty. There were 15,360 primary resurfacing hip arthroplasties recorded of which 884 had undergone revision and this was the cohort available to study. The types of revisions were acetabular only, femoral only, or revision of both acetabular and femoral components. With the exception of the acetabular-only revisions, all revisions converted hip resurfacing arthroplasties to conventional (stemmed) total hip arthroplasties (THAs). All initial revisions for infection were excluded. The survivorship of the different types of revisions and that of the different bearing surfaces used were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using Cox proportional hazard models. Cumulative percent revision was calculated by determining the complement of the Kaplan-Meier survivorship function at that time multiplied by 100. Of the 884 revisions recorded, 102 underwent further revision, a cumulative percent rerevision at 10 years of 26% (95% confidence interval, 19.6-33.5). There was no difference in the rate of

  17. High incidence of pseudotumours after hip resurfacing even in low risk patients; results from an intensified MRI screening protocol.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weegen, W. van der; Smolders, J.M.; Sijbesma, T.; Hoekstra, H.J.; Brakel, K.; Susante, J.L.C. van

    2013-01-01

    We intensified our screening protocol for the presence of pseudotumours in a consecutive series of patients with a hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA), to establish whether we should be alert to the presence of 'silent' pseudotumours. Patients categorised with high risk (11 hips) and low risk (10

  18. Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty: An Evidence-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this review was to assess the safety and effectiveness of metal on metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty for young patients compared with that of total hip replacement (THR) in the same population. Total hip replacement has proved to be very effective for late middle-aged and elderly patients with severe degenerative diseases of the hips. As indications for THR began to include younger patients and those with a more active life style, the longevity of the implant became a concern. Evidence suggests that these patients experience relatively higher rates of early implant failure and the need for revision. The Swedish hip registry, for example, has demonstrated a survival rate in excess of 80% at 20 years for those aged over 65 years, whereas this figure was 33% by 16 years in those aged under 55 years. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a bone-conserving alternative to THR that restores normal joint biomechanics and load transfer. The technique has been used around the world for more than 10 years, specifically in the United Kingdom and other European countries. Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty is an alternative procedure to conventional THR in younger patients. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is less invasive than THR and addresses the problem of preserving femoral bone stock at the initial operation. This means that future hip revisions are possible with THR if the initial MOM arthroplasty becomes less effective with time in these younger patients. The procedure involves the removal and replacement of the surface of the femoral head with a hollow metal hemisphere, which fits into a metal acetabular cup. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a technically more demanding procedure than is conventional THR. In hip resurfacing, the femoral head is retained, which makes it much more difficult to access the acetabular cup. However, hip resurfacing arthroplasty has several advantages over a conventional THR with a small (28 mm) ball. First, the large

  19. Similar range of motion and function after resurfacing large-head or standard total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Østergaard; Ovesen, Ole; Varmarken, Jens-Erik

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Large-size hip articulations may improve range of motion (ROM) and function compared to a 28-mm THA, and the low risk of dislocation allows the patients more activity postoperatively. On the other hand, the greater extent of surgery for resurfacing hip arthroplasty (RHA......° (35), 232° (36), and 225° (30) respectively, but the differences were not statistically significant. The 3 groups were similar regarding Harris hip score, UCLA activity score, step rate, and sick leave. INTERPRETATION: Head size had no influence on range of motion. The lack of restriction allowed...... for large articulations did not improve the clinical and patient-perceived outcomes. The more extensive surgical procedure of RHA did not impair the rehabilitation. This project is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under # NCT01113762....

  20. Recovery in mechanical muscle strength following resurfacing vs standard total hip arthroplasty - a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten; Aagaard, Per; Overgaard, S

    2011-01-01

    rather than implant design per se. Thus, the present data failed to support the hypothesis that R-THA would result in an enhanced strength rehabilitation compared to S-THA. Further, between-limb asymmetry remained present for hip flexors and adductors after 52 wks. Trial registration: NCT01229293....... randomised into (A) standard total hip arthroplasty (S-THA) and (B) resurfacing total hip arthroplasty (R-THA). Pre-surgery assessment and follow-up were conducted (8, 26 and 52 wks). Maximal isometric muscle strength (Nm) and between-limb asymmetry for the knee extensors/flexors, hip adductors....../abductors, hip extensors/flexors were analysed. RESULTS: Maximal knee extensor and hip abductor strength were higher in S-THA than R-THA at 52 wks post-surgery (P ≤ 0.05) and hip extensors tended to be higher in S-THA at 52 wks (P = 0.06). All muscle groups showed substantial between-limb strength asymmetry (7...

  1. Augmented Reality Based Navigation for Computer Assisted Hip Resurfacing: A Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Auvinet, Edouard; Giles, Joshua; Rodriguez Y Baena, Ferdinando

    2018-05-23

    Implantation accuracy has a great impact on the outcomes of hip resurfacing such as recovery of hip function. Computer assisted orthopedic surgery has demonstrated clear advantages for the patients, with improved placement accuracy and fewer outliers, but the intrusiveness, cost, and added complexity have limited its widespread adoption. To provide seamless computer assistance with improved immersion and a more natural surgical workflow, we propose an augmented-reality (AR) based navigation system for hip resurfacing. The operative femur is registered by processing depth information from the surgical site with a commercial depth camera. By coupling depth data with robotic assistance, obstacles that may obstruct the femur can be tracked and avoided automatically to reduce the chance of disruption to the surgical workflow. Using the registration result and the pre-operative plan, intra-operative surgical guidance is provided through a commercial AR headset so that the user can perform the operation without additional physical guides. To assess the accuracy of the navigation system, experiments of guide hole drilling were performed on femur phantoms. The position and orientation of the drilled holes were compared with the pre-operative plan, and the mean errors were found to be approximately 2 mm and 2°, results which are in line with commercial computer assisted orthopedic systems today.

  2. How accurate is image-free computer navigation for hip resurfacing arthroplasty? An anatomical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnurr, C.; Nessler, J.; Koenig, D.P.; Meyer, C.; Schild, H.H.; Koebke, J.

    2009-01-01

    The existing studies concerning image-free navigated implantation of hip resurfacing arthroplasty are based on analysis of the accuracy of conventional biplane radiography. Studies have shown that these measurements in biplane radiography are imprecise and that precision is improved by use of three-dimensional (3D) computer tomography (CT) scans. To date, the accuracy of image-free navigation devices for hip resurfacing has not been investigated using CT scans, and anteversion accuracy has not been assessed at all. Furthermore, no study has tested the reliability of the navigation software concerning the automatically calculated implant position. The purpose of our study was to analyze the accuracy of varus-valgus and anteversion using an image-free hip resurfacing navigation device. The reliability of the software-calculated implant position was also determined. A total of 32 femoral hip resurfacing components were implanted on embalmed human femurs using an image-free navigation device. In all, 16 prostheses were implanted with the proposed position generated by the navigation software; the 16 prostheses were inserted in an optimized valgus position. A 3D CT scan was undertaken before and after operation. The difference between the measured and planned varus-valgus angle averaged 1 deg (mean±standard deviation (SD): group I, 1 deg±2 deg; group II, 1 deg±1 deg). The mean±SD difference between femoral neck anteversion and anteversion of the implant was 4 deg (group I, 4 deg±4 deg; group II, 4 deg±3 deg). The software-calculated implant position differed 7 deg±8 deg from the measured neck-shaft angle. These measured accuracies did not differ significantly between the two groups. Our study proved the high accuracy of the navigation device concerning the most important biomechanical factor: the varus-valgus angle. The software calculation of the proposed implant position has been shown to be inaccurate and needs improvement. Hence, manual adjustment of the

  3. A randomised controlled trial of total hip arthroplasty versus resurfacing arthroplasty in the treatment of young patients with arthritis of the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achten, Juul; Parsons, Nick R; Edlin, Richard P; Griffin, Damian R; Costa, Matthew L

    2010-01-14

    Hip replacement (arthroplasty) surgery is a highly successful treatment for patients with severe symptomatic arthritis of the hip joint. For older patients, several designs of Total Hip Arthroplasty have shown excellent results in terms of both function and value for money. However, in younger more active patients, there is approximately a 50% failure rate at 25 years for traditional implants. Hip resurfacing is a relatively new arthroplasty technique. In a recent review of the literature on resurfacing arthroplasty it was concluded that the short-term functional results appear promising but some potential early disadvantages were identified, including the risk of femoral neck fracture and collapse of the head of the femur. The aim of the current study is to assess whether there is a difference in functional hip scores at one year post-operation between Total Hip Arthroplasty and Resurfacing Arthroplasty. Secondary aims include assessment of complication rates for both procedures as well cost effectiveness. All patients medically fit for surgery and deemed suitable for a resurfacing arthroplasty are eligible to take part in this study. A randomisation sequence will be produced and administered independently. After consenting, all patients will be clinically reviewed and hip function, quality of life and physical activity level will be assessed through questionnaires. The allocated surgery will then be performed with the preferred technique of the surgeon. Six weeks post-operation hip function will be assessed and complications recorded. Three, six and 12 months post-operation hip function, quality of life and physical activity level will be assessed. Additional information about patients' out-of-pocket expenses will also be collected. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN33354155. UKCLRN portfolio ID 4093.

  4. Reliability of using DXA around RTHAs. Bone Mineral Density of the femoral neck in resurfacing hip arthroplasty. Precision biased by region of interest and rotation of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Østergaard; Varmarken, Jens-Erik; Ovesen, Ole

    2009-01-01

      Introduction:  Resurfacing Total Hip Arthroplasty (RTHA) may preserve the femoral neck bone-stock post-operatively. Bone Mineral Density (BMD), could theoretically be affected by the hip-position, and bias longitudinal studies. We aimed to investigate BMD precision dependency on type of ROI...... the hip was rotated in increments of 15° and 30°, the mean CVs rose to 7.2%, 7.3% and 11.8%.  Rotation affected the precision most in the model that divided the neck in 6 sub regions, predominantly in the lateral and distal regions. For larger-region models, some rotation could be allowed without...

  5. Reliability of using DXA around RTHAs. Bone Mineral Density of the femoral neck in resurfacing hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Østergaard; Ovesen, Ole; Brixen, Kim

    2010-01-01

      Background and purpose: Resurfacing Total Hip Arthroplasty (RTHA) may preserve the femoral neck bone-stock post-operatively. Bone Mineral Density (BMD), could theoretically be affected by the hip-position, and bias longitudinal studies. We aimed to investigate BMD precision dependency on type...... was rotated in increments of 15° and 30°, the mean CVs rose to 7.2%, 7.3% and 11.8%.  Rotation affected the precision most in the model that divided the neck in 6 sub regions, predominantly in the lateral and distal regions. For larger-region models, some rotation could be allowed without compromising...

  6. Center of Mass Compensation during Gait in Hip Arthroplasty Patients: Comparison between Large Diameter Head Total Hip Arthroplasty and Hip Resurfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Bouffard

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare center of mass (COM compensation in the frontal and sagittal plane during gait in patients with large diameter head total hip arthroplasty (LDH-THA and hip resurfacing (HR. Design. Observational study. Setting. Outpatient biomechanical laboratory. Participants. Two groups of 12 patients with LDH-THA and HR recruited from a larger randomized study and 11 healthy controls. Interventions. Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures. To compare the distance between the hip prosthetic joint center (HPJC and the COM. The ratio (RHPJC-COM and the variability (CVHPJC-COM were compared between groups. Hip flexor, abductor, and adductor muscle strength was also correlated between groups while radiographic measurements were correlated with the outcome measures. Results. In the frontal plane, HR shows less variability than healthy controls at push-off and toe-off and RHPJC-COM is correlated with the muscle strength ratios (FRABD at heel contact, maximal weight acceptance, and mid stance. In the sagittal plane, LDH-THA has a higher RHPJC-COM than healthy controls at push-off, and CVHPJC-COM is significantly correlated with FRFLEX. Conclusions. One year after surgery, both groups of patients, LDH-THA and HR, demonstrate minor compensations at some specific instant of the gait cycle, in both frontal and sagittal planes. However, their locomotion pattern is similar to the healthy controls.

  7. The effect of motion patterns on edge-loading of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S J; Kwon, Y-M; Glyn-Jones, S; Murray, D W; Gill, H S

    2011-12-01

    The occurrence of pseudotumours (soft tissue masses relating to the hip joint) following metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty (MoMHRA) has been associated with high serum metal ion levels and consequently higher than normal bearing wear. We investigated the relationship between serum metal ion levels and contact stress on the acetabular component of MoMHRA patients for two functional activities; gait and stair descent. Four subjects with MoMHRA, who had their serum metal ion levels measured, underwent motion analysis followed by CT scanning. Their motion capture data was combined with published hip contact forces and finite element models representing 14% (peak force) and 60% (end of stance) of the gait cycle and 52% (peak force) of stair descent activity were created. The inclination angle of the acetabular component was increased by 10° in 1° intervals and the contact stresses were determined at each interval for each subject. When the inclination angle was altered in such a way as to cause the hip contact force to pass through the edge of the acetabular component edge-loading occurred. Edge-loading increased the contact stress by at least 50%; the maximum increase was 108%. Patients with low serum metal ion levels showed no increase in contact stress at peak force during gait or stair descent. Patients with high serum metal ion levels exhibited edge-loading with an increase to the inclination angle of their acetabular components. The increase in inclination angle that induced edge-loading for these subjects was less than the inter-subject variability in the angle of published hip contact forces. The results of this study suggest that high serum metal ion levels are the result of inclination angle influenced edge-loading but that edge-loading cannot be attributed to inclination angle alone and that an individual's activity patterns can reduce or even override the influence of a steep acetabular component and prevent edge-loading. Copyright © 2011 IPEM

  8. Inferior outcome after hip resurfacing arthroplasty than after conventional arthroplasty. Evidence from the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) database, 1995 to 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johanson, Per-Erik; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Furnes, Ove

    2010-01-01

    The reported outcomes of hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) vary. The frequency of this procedure in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden is low. We therefore determined the outcome of HRA in the NARA database, which is common to all 3 countries, and compared it to the outcome of conventional total hip...

  9. Comparison of hip function and quality of life of total hip arthroplasty and resurfacing arthroplasty in the treatment of young patients with arthritis of the hip joint at 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Matthew L; Achten, Juul; Foguet, Pedro; Parsons, Nicholas R

    2018-03-12

    To compare the medium-term clinical effectiveness of total hip arthroplasty and resurfacing arthroplasty. Single centre, two-arm, parallel group, assessor blinded, randomised controlled trial with 1:1 treatment allocation. A large teaching hospital in England. 122 patients older than 18 years with severe arthritis of the hip joint, suitable for resurfacing arthroplasty of the hip. Patients were excluded if they were considered to be unable to adhere to trial procedures or complete questionnaires. Total hip arthroplasty (replacement of entire femoral head and neck); hip resurfacing arthroplasty (replacement of the articular surface of femoral head only, femoral neck remains intact). Both procedures replaced the articular surface of the acetabulum. The outcome measures were hip function assessed using the Oxford Hip Score (OHS) and health-related quality of life assessed using the EuroQol (EQ-5D). Patients were followed up annually for a minimum of 5 years. Outcome data were modelled using the generalised estimating equation methodology to explore temporal variations during follow-up. 60 patients were randomly assigned to hip resurfacing arthroplasty and 62 to total hip arthroplasty. 95 (78%) of the 122 original study participants provided data at 5 years. There was a small decrease in both hip functions and quality of life in both groups of patients each year during the 5-year follow-up period. However, there was no evidence of a significant difference between treatments group in the OHS (P=0.333) or the EQ-5D (P=0.501). We previously reported no difference in outcome in the first year after surgery. The current medium-term results also show no evidence of a difference in hip function or health-related quality of life in the 5 years following a total hip arthroplasty versus resurfacing arthroplasty. ISRCTN33354155. UKCRN 4093. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use

  10. Indications for MARS-MRI in Patients Treated With Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, James W; Galea, Vincent P; Matuszak, Sean J; Madanat, Rami; Muratoglu, Orhun; Malchau, Henrik

    2018-06-01

    Currently, there are no universally accepted guidelines on when to obtain metal artifact reduction sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MARS-MRI) in metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) patients. Our primary aims were to identify which patient and clinical factors are predictive of adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) and create an algorithm for indicating MARS-MRI in patients with Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) HRA. The secondary aim was to compare our algorithm to existing guidelines on when to perform MARS-MRI in MoM HRA patients. The study cohort consisted of 182 patients with unilateral ASR HRA from a prospective, multicenter study. Subjects received MARS-MRI at a mean of 7.8 years from surgery, regardless of symptoms. We determined which variables were predictive of ALTR and generated cutoffs for each variable. Finally, we created an algorithm to predict ALTR and indicate MARS-MRI in ASR HRA patients using these cutoffs and compared it to existing guidelines. We found high blood cobalt (Co) (odds ratio = 1.070; P = .011) and high blood chromium (Cr) (odds ratio = 1.162; P = .002) to be significant predictors of ALTR presence. Our algorithm using a blood Co cutoff of 1.15 ppb and a Cr cutoff of 1.09 ppb achieved 96.6% sensitivity and 35.3% specificity in predicting ALTR, which outperformed the existing guidelines. Blood Co and Cr levels are predictive of ALTR in ASR HRA patients. Our algorithm considering blood Co and Cr levels predicts ALTR in ASR HRA patients with higher sensitivity than previously established guidelines. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Revision rates for metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty – a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ras Sørensen, Sofie-amalie L.; Jørgensen, Henrik L.; Sporing, Sune L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare revision rates of metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacing (HRS) and MoM total hip arthroplasty (THA), as well as the primary causes for revisions. Methods The PubMed database was queried for potentially relevant articles addressing MoMTHA and MoMHRS, a total of 51 articles were....... The odds ratio was 1.25 (1.03:1.53) 95% CI (p = 0.03) (MoMHRS vs. MoMTHA). The studies of hip prostheses were separated into 2 categories of short- and long-term (more or less than 5 years). Short-term revision rate for MoMTHA was 4.5% after 4.8 years, and for MoMHRS 4.0% after 4.2 years. The odds ratio...

  12. Revision of failed hip resurfacing to total hip arthroplasty rapidly relieves pain and improves function in the early post operative period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muirhead-Allwood Sarah K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We reviewed the results of 25 consecutive patients who underwent revision of a hip resurfacing prosthesis to a total hip replacement. Revisions were performed for recurrent pain and effusion, infection and proximal femoral fractures. Both components were revised in 20 cases. There were 12 male and 13 female patients with average time to revision of 34.4 and 26.4 months respectively. The mean follow up period was 12.7 months (3 to 31. All patients reported relief of pain and excellent satisfaction scores. Two patients experienced stiffness up to three months post operatively. Pre operative Oxford, Harris and WOMAC hip scores were 39.1, 36.4 and 52.2 respectively. Mean post operative scores at last follow up were 17.4, 89.8 and 6.1 respectively (p

  13. Adverse reaction to metal debris in a consecutive series of DUROM™ hip resurfacing: pseudotumour incidence and metal ion concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Albrecht; Kieback, Jan-Dirk; Lützner, Jörg; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Goronzy, Jens

    2017-07-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) in a consecutive series of DUROM™ Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty (HRA) at mid-term follow-up. Between October 2003 and March 2007 a total of 134 consecutive DUROM™ HRA in 121 patients were performed at our institution. Follow-up could be obtained in 101 unrevised patients (83%) at a mean time of 8.51 ± 0.97 years postoperatively and included patient-related outcome measurement, plain radiographs, MARS-MRI as well as whole blood metal ion assessment. 17 (16.5%) out of 103 hips revealed pseudotumour occurrence in MRI investigation, 1 (10.6%) with a diameter of ≥2 cm. Higher incidence of pseudotumours was found patients with femoral component size 7 μg/l. In contrast to cobalt determination, only elevated chromium values showed a positive association with pseudotumour occurrence and size. A significant proportion of patients developed pseudotumours and metal ion elevation in a consecutive cohort of DUROM™ HRA after mid-term follow-up. The incidence, however, seems not to differ from results of other well performing resurfacing brands; clinical relevance of our findings is unclear. Regarding potential local as well as systemic effects of metal particle release, close follow-up of patients is essential, even with clinically well-performing implants.

  14. Metal release and metal allergy after total hip replacement with resurfacing versus conventional hybrid prosthesis 5-year follow-up of 52 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafson, Klas; Jakobsen, Stig S; Lorenzen, Nina D

    2014-01-01

    to an increased incidence of metal allergy. METHODS: 52 hips in 52 patients (median age 60 (51-64) years, 30 women) were randomized to either a MOM hip resurfacing system (ReCap) or a standard MOP total hip arthoplasty (Mallory Head/Exeter). Spot urine samples were collected preoperatively, postoperatively, after....... RESULTS: A statistically significant 10- to 20-fold increase in urinary levels of cobalt and chromium was observed throughout the entire follow-up in the MOM group. The prevalence of metal allergy was similar between groups. INTERPRETATION: While we observed significantly increased levels of metal ions...

  15. Usefulness of metal artifact reduction with WARP technique at 1.5 and 3T MRI in imaging metal-on-metal hip resurfacings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazik, Andrea; Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Theysohn, Jens M. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Landgraeber, Stefan; Schulte, Patrick [University Hospital Essen, Department of Orthopedics, Essen (Germany); Kraff, Oliver [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2015-03-25

    To evaluate the usefulness of the metal artifact reduction technique ''WARP'' in the assessment of metal-on-metal hip resurfacings at 1.5 and 3T in the context of image quality and imaging speed. Nineteen patients (25 hip resurfacings) were randomized for 1.5 and 3T MRI, both including T1 and T2 turbo spin-echo as well as turbo inversion recovery magnitude sequences with and without view angle tilting and high bandwidth. Additional 3T sequences were acquired with a reduced number of averages and using the parallel acquisition technique for accelerating imaging speed. Artifact size (diameter, area), image quality (5-point scale) and delineation of anatomical structures were compared among the techniques, sequences and field strengths using the Wilcoxon sign-rank and paired t-test with Bonferroni correction. At both field strengths, WARP showed significant superiority over standard sequences regarding image quality, artifact size and delineation of anatomical structures. At 3T, artifacts were larger compared to 1.5T without affecting diagnostic quality, and scanning time could be reduced by up to 64 % without quality degradation. WARP proved useful in imaging metal-on-metal hip resurfacings at 1.5T as well as 3T with better image quality surrounding the implants. At 3T imaging could be considerably accelerated without losing diagnostic quality. (orig.)

  16. Usefulness of metal artifact reduction with WARP technique at 1.5 and 3T MRI in imaging metal-on-metal hip resurfacings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazik, Andrea; Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Theysohn, Jens M.; Landgraeber, Stefan; Schulte, Patrick; Kraff, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of the metal artifact reduction technique ''WARP'' in the assessment of metal-on-metal hip resurfacings at 1.5 and 3T in the context of image quality and imaging speed. Nineteen patients (25 hip resurfacings) were randomized for 1.5 and 3T MRI, both including T1 and T2 turbo spin-echo as well as turbo inversion recovery magnitude sequences with and without view angle tilting and high bandwidth. Additional 3T sequences were acquired with a reduced number of averages and using the parallel acquisition technique for accelerating imaging speed. Artifact size (diameter, area), image quality (5-point scale) and delineation of anatomical structures were compared among the techniques, sequences and field strengths using the Wilcoxon sign-rank and paired t-test with Bonferroni correction. At both field strengths, WARP showed significant superiority over standard sequences regarding image quality, artifact size and delineation of anatomical structures. At 3T, artifacts were larger compared to 1.5T without affecting diagnostic quality, and scanning time could be reduced by up to 64 % without quality degradation. WARP proved useful in imaging metal-on-metal hip resurfacings at 1.5T as well as 3T with better image quality surrounding the implants. At 3T imaging could be considerably accelerated without losing diagnostic quality. (orig.)

  17. Bone mineral density of the proximal femur after hip resurfacing arthroplasty: 1-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anttila Esa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA is considered a bone-preserving procedure and may eliminate proximal femoral stress shielding and osteolysis. However, in addition to implant-related stress-shielding factors, various patient-related factors may also have an effect on bone mineral density (BMD of the proximal femur in patients with HRA. Thus, we studied the effects of stem-neck angle, demographic variables, and physical functioning on the BMD of the proximal femur in a one-year follow-up. Methods Thirty three patients (9 females and 24 males with a mean (SD age of 55 (9 years were included in the study. BMD was measured two days and 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively and 10 regions of interest (ROI were used. Stem-neck angle was analyzed from anteroposterior radiographs. Results Three months postoperatively, BMD decreased in six out of 10 regions of interest (ROI on the side operated on and in one ROI on the control side (p Conclusions After an early drop, the BMD of the upper femur was restored and even exceeded the preoperative level at one year follow-up. From a clinical standpoint, the changes in BMD in these HRA patients could not be explained by stem-neck angle or patient related factors.

  18. [Ex vivo microCT analysis of possible microfractures of the femoral head during implantation of a cementless hip resurfacing femoral component].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, M; Olender, G; von der Höh, N; Thorey, F; von Lewinski, G; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Windhagen, H; Hurschler, C

    2009-01-01

    Microfractures of the femoral head during implantation of the femoral components are suspected to be a cause of fractures at the implant/neck junction which represent a common failure mode in hip resurfacing arthroplasty. Callus formation observed in femoral head retrievals suggests the occurrence of microfractures inside the femoral head, which might be inadvertently caused by the surgeon during implantation. The aim of this biomechanical study was to analyse whether or not the implantation of a cementless femoral component hip resurfacing system causes microfractures in the femoral head. After the preparation of 20 paired human cadaveric femoral heads, the cementless femoral component ESKA Typ BS (ESKA Implants GmbH & Co., Lübeck) was implanted on 9 specimens with an impaction device that generates 4.5 kN impaction force. On 9 specimens the femoral component was implanted by hand. One head was used as a fracture model, 1 specimen served as control without manipulation. The femoral component used for impaction was equipped with hinges to enable its removal without further interfering with the bone stock. Specimens were scanned with a microCT device before and after impaction and the microCT datasets before and after impaction were compared to identify possible microfractures. Twenty strikes per hand or with the impaction device provided sufficient implant seating. Neither the macroscopic examination nor the 2-dimensional microCT analysis revealed any fractures of the femoral heads after impaction. At least macroscopically and in the 2-dimensional microCT analysis, implantation of the cementless hip resurfacing femoral component ESKA Typ BS with 4.5 kN or by hand does not seem to cause fractures of the femoral head. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  19. Advanced metal artifact reduction MRI of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty implants: compressed sensing acceleration enables the time-neutral use of SEMAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, Jan; Thawait, Gaurav K.; Fritz, Benjamin; Raithel, Esther; Nittka, Mathias; Gilson, Wesley D.; Mont, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) acceleration has been theorized for slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC), but has not been shown to be feasible. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that CS-SEMAC is feasible for MRI of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing implants. Following prospective institutional review board approval, 22 subjects with metal-on-metal hip resurfacing implants underwent 1.5 T MRI. We compared CS-SEMAC prototype, high-bandwidth TSE, and SEMAC sequences with acquisition times of 4-5, 4-5 and 10-12 min, respectively. Outcome measures included bone-implant interfaces, image quality, periprosthetic structures, artifact size, and signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios (SNR and CNR). Using Friedman, repeated measures analysis of variances, and Cohen's weighted kappa tests, Bonferroni-corrected p-values of 0.005 and less were considered statistically significant. There was no statistical difference of outcomes measures of SEMAC and CS-SEMAC images. Visibility of implant-bone interfaces and pseudocapsule as well as fat suppression and metal reduction were ''adequate'' to ''good'' on CS-SEMAC and ''non-diagnostic'' to ''adequate'' on high-BW TSE (p < 0.001, respectively). SEMAC and CS-SEMAC showed mild blur and ripple artifacts. The metal artifact size was 63 % larger for high-BW TSE as compared to SEMAC and CS-SEMAC (p < 0.0001, respectively). CNRs were sufficiently high and statistically similar, with the exception of CNR of fluid and muscle and CNR of fluid and tendon, which were higher on intermediate-weighted high-BW TSE (p < 0.005, respectively). Compressed sensing acceleration enables the time-neutral use of SEMAC for MRI of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing implants when compared to high-BW TSE and image quality similar to conventional SEMAC. (orig.)

  20. Advanced metal artifact reduction MRI of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty implants: compressed sensing acceleration enables the time-neutral use of SEMAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, Jan; Thawait, Gaurav K. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fritz, Benjamin [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Raithel, Esther; Nittka, Mathias [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Gilson, Wesley D. [Siemens Healthcare USA, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States); Mont, Michael A. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Compressed sensing (CS) acceleration has been theorized for slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC), but has not been shown to be feasible. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that CS-SEMAC is feasible for MRI of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing implants. Following prospective institutional review board approval, 22 subjects with metal-on-metal hip resurfacing implants underwent 1.5 T MRI. We compared CS-SEMAC prototype, high-bandwidth TSE, and SEMAC sequences with acquisition times of 4-5, 4-5 and 10-12 min, respectively. Outcome measures included bone-implant interfaces, image quality, periprosthetic structures, artifact size, and signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios (SNR and CNR). Using Friedman, repeated measures analysis of variances, and Cohen's weighted kappa tests, Bonferroni-corrected p-values of 0.005 and less were considered statistically significant. There was no statistical difference of outcomes measures of SEMAC and CS-SEMAC images. Visibility of implant-bone interfaces and pseudocapsule as well as fat suppression and metal reduction were ''adequate'' to ''good'' on CS-SEMAC and ''non-diagnostic'' to ''adequate'' on high-BW TSE (p < 0.001, respectively). SEMAC and CS-SEMAC showed mild blur and ripple artifacts. The metal artifact size was 63 % larger for high-BW TSE as compared to SEMAC and CS-SEMAC (p < 0.0001, respectively). CNRs were sufficiently high and statistically similar, with the exception of CNR of fluid and muscle and CNR of fluid and tendon, which were higher on intermediate-weighted high-BW TSE (p < 0.005, respectively). Compressed sensing acceleration enables the time-neutral use of SEMAC for MRI of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing implants when compared to high-BW TSE and image quality similar to conventional SEMAC. (orig.)

  1. Cobalt deposition in mineralized bone tissue after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing: Quantitative μ-X-ray-fluorescence analysis of implant material incorporation in periprosthetic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Michael; Busse, Björn; Procop, Mathias; Zustin, Jozef; Amling, Michael; Katzer, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    Most resurfacing systems are manufactured from cobalt-chromium alloys with metal-on-metal (MoM) bearing couples. Because the quantity of particulate metal and corrosion products which can be released into the periprosthetic milieu is greater in MoM bearings than in metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) bearings, it is hypothesized that the quantity and distribution of debris released by the MoM components induce a compositional change in the periprosthetic bone. To determine the validity of this claim, nondestructive µ-X-ray fluorescence analysis was carried out on undecalcified histological samples from 13 femoral heads which had undergone surface replacement. These samples were extracted from the patients after gradient time points due to required revision surgery. Samples from nonintervened femoral heads as well as from a MoP resurfaced implant served as controls. Light microscopy and µ-X-ray fluorescence analyses revealed that cobalt debris was found not only in the soft tissue around the prosthesis and the bone marrow, but also in the mineralized bone tissue. Mineralized bone exposed to surface replacements showed significant increases in cobalt concentrations in comparison with control specimens without an implant. A maximum cobalt concentration in mineralized hard tissue of up to 380 ppm was detected as early as 2 years after implantation. Values of this magnitude are not found in implants with a MoP surface bearing until a lifetime of more than 20 years. This study demonstrates that hip resurfacing implants with MoM bearings present a potential long-term health risk due to rapid cobalt ion accumulation in periprosthetic hard tissue. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1855-1862, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Akanidomo ibanga University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corresponding author: Akanidomo Ibanga, Department of Psychology, University of Birmingham, ... sexual behaviour and lack of self-protection ... al abuse in childhood use drugs and alcohol to .... One of the primary aims was to examine the.

  3. Marker-based or model-based RSA for evaluation of hip resurfacing arthroplasty? A clinical validation and 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Nina Dyrberg; Stilling, Maiken; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Gustafson, Klas; Søballe, Kjeld; Baad-Hansen, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    The stability of implants is vital to ensure a long-term survival. RSA determines micro-motions of implants as a predictor of early implant failure. RSA can be performed as a marker- or model-based analysis. So far, CAD and RE model-based RSA have not been validated for use in hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA). A phantom study determined the precision of marker-based and CAD and RE model-based RSA on a HRA implant. In a clinical study, 19 patients were followed with stereoradiographs until 5 years after surgery. Analysis of double-examination migration results determined the clinical precision of marker-based and CAD model-based RSA, and at the 5-year follow-up, results of the total translation (TT) and the total rotation (TR) for marker- and CAD model-based RSA were compared. The phantom study showed that comparison of the precision (SDdiff) in marker-based RSA analysis was more precise than model-based RSA analysis in TT (p CAD RSA analysis (p = 0.002), but showed no difference between the marker- and CAD model-based RSA analysis regarding the TR (p = 0.91). Comparing the mean signed values regarding the TT and the TR at the 5-year follow-up in 13 patients, the TT was lower (p = 0.03) and the TR higher (p = 0.04) in the marker-based RSA compared to CAD model-based RSA. The precision of marker-based RSA was significantly better than model-based RSA. However, problems with occluded markers lead to exclusion of many patients which was not a problem with model-based RSA. HRA were stable at the 5-year follow-up. The detection limit was 0.2 mm TT and 1° TR for marker-based and 0.5 mm TT and 1° TR for CAD model-based RSA for HRA.

  4. Laser Resurfacing

    OpenAIRE

    Janik, Joseph P.; Markus, Jodi L.; Al-Dujaili, Zeena; Markus, Ramsey F.

    2007-01-01

    In a society desiring images of beauty and youthfulness, the world of cutaneous surgery offers the gifts of facial rejuvenation for those determined to combat the signs of aging. With the development of novel laser and plasma technology, pigmentary changes, scarring, and wrinkles can be conquered providing smoother, healthier, younger-looking skin. This review highlights five of the most popular resurfacing technologies in practice today including the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser, the erbium:yt...

  5. A Randomized Seven-Year Study on Performance of the Stemmed Metal M2a-Magnum and Ceramic C2a-Taper, and the Resurfacing ReCap Hip Implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Arne; Borgwardt, Lotte; Zerahn, Bo

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The large-diameter metal-on-metal hip prostheses were expected to have low wear and reduced dislocation rate compared to the traditional metal-on-polyethylene implants. We compare 2 such prostheses, the ReCap resurfacing implant and the M2a-Magnum stemmed implant, with the C2a ceramic......-on-ceramic stemmed implant as to clinical performance, serum concentrations of prosthesis metals, and the durability of the implants in a randomized, controlled clinical trial at 7 years of follow-up. METHODS: All included patients had osteoarthritis. Preoperatively, the size of the implants was estimated from...... of the soft tissue adjacent to the implant as well as MRI with metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS-MRI) when indicated. RESULTS: One hundred fifty-two hips in 146 patients were included. The serum cobalt and chromium concentrations were significantly higher for the 2 metal-on-metal prostheses than...

  6. Resurfacing Graphics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Patty K. Wongpakdee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available “Resurfacing Graphics” deals with the subject of unconventional design, with the purpose of engaging the viewer to experience the graphics beyond paper’s passive surface. Unconventional designs serve to reinvigorate people, whose senses are dulled by the typical, printed graphics, which bombard them each day. Today’s cutting-edge designers, illustrators and artists utilize graphics in a unique manner that allows for tactile interaction. Such works serve as valuable teaching models and encourage students to do the following: 1 investigate the trans-disciplines of art and technology; 2 appreciate that this approach can have a positive effect on the environment; 3 examine and research other approaches of design communications and 4 utilize new mediums to stretch the boundaries of artistic endeavor. This paper examines how visuals communicators are “Resurfacing Graphics” by using atypical surfaces and materials such as textile, wood, ceramics and even water. Such non-traditional transmissions of visual language serve to demonstrate student’s overreliance on paper as an outdated medium. With this exposure, students can become forward-thinking, eco-friendly, creative leaders by expanding their creative breadth and continuing the perpetual exploration for new ways to make their mark. 

  7. Resurfacing Graphics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Patty K. Wongpakdee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available “Resurfacing Graphics” deals with the subject of unconventional design, with the purpose of engaging the viewer to experience the graphics beyond paper’s passive surface. Unconventional designs serve to reinvigorate people, whose senses are dulled by the typical, printed graphics, which bombard them each day. Today’s cutting-edge designers, illustrators and artists utilize graphics in a unique manner that allows for tactile interaction. Such works serve as valuable teaching models and encourage students to do the following: 1 investigate the trans-disciplines of art and technology; 2 appreciate that this approach can have a positive effect on the environment; 3 examine and research other approaches of design communications and 4 utilize new mediums to stretch the boundaries of artistic endeavor. This paper examines how visuals communicators are “Resurfacing Graphics” by using atypical surfaces and materials such as textile, wood, ceramics and even water. Such non-traditional transmissions of visual language serve to demonstrate student’s overreliance on paper as an outdated medium. With this exposure, students can become forward-thinking, eco-friendly, creative leaders by expanding their creative breadth and continuing the perpetual exploration for new ways to make their mark.

  8. Laser resurfacing pearls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sonia; Alam, Murad

    2012-08-01

    Ablative skin resurfacing using the carbon dioxide laser was long considered the gold standard for treatment of photoaging, acne scars, and rhytids. However, conventional full-face carbon dioxide resurfacing is associated with significant risk of side effects and a prolonged postoperative recovery period. Fractional resurfacing has recently revolutionized laser surgery by offering close to comparable results with minimal side effects and a more rapid recovery. Although fractional devices have grown in popularity, and have essentially replaced traditional resurfacing, fractional resurfacing can still be a challenging modality to control precisely due to hardware variations across comparable devices, the range of settings that can be used, and patient-specific considerations. Certain precautions and rules of thumb can reduce the risk associated with fractional resurfacing, and increase the likelihood of a good outcome.

  9. Laser Resurfacing Pearls

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Sonia; Alam, Murad

    2012-01-01

    Ablative skin resurfacing using the carbon dioxide laser was long considered the gold standard for treatment of photoaging, acne scars, and rhytids. However, conventional full-face carbon dioxide resurfacing is associated with significant risk of side effects and a prolonged postoperative recovery period. Fractional resurfacing has recently revolutionized laser surgery by offering close to comparable results with minimal side effects and a more rapid recovery. Although fractional devices have...

  10. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin-Reyes, H; Wilson, J

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1 x 1 cm^2 ) silicon sensors.

  11. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dervan, P.; French, R.; Hodgson, P.; Marin-Reyes, H.; Wilson, J.

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1×1 cm 2 ) silicon sensors

  12. A Trojan Horse in Birmingham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarker, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    "Trojan Horse" has become journalistic shorthand for an apparent attempt by a small group in East Birmingham to secure control of local non-faith schools and impose policies and practices in keeping with the very conservative (Salafist and Wahhabi) version of Islam which they hold. In this article, Pat Yarker gives an account of two…

  13. Birmingham probes the Big Bang

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "The world's largest particle accelerator in Geneva is gearing up to begin work again. BBC Midlands Today science correspondent David Gregory went to see how scientists from the University of Birmingham are at the heart of trying to understand what makes our universe tick." (1 page)

  14. Imaging of hip arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Theodore T., E-mail: millertt@hss.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 E. 70th Street, New York, NY 10021 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The imaging evaluation of the prosthetic hip begins with radiography, but arthrography, aspiration, scintigraphy, sonography, CT and MR imaging all have roles in the evaluation of the painful prosthesis. This article will review the appearance of normal hip arthroplasty including hemiarthroplasty, total arthroplasty, and hip resurfacing, as well as the appearances of potential complications such as aseptic loosening and osteolysis, dislocation, infection, periprosthetic fracture, hardware failure, and soft tissue abnormalities.

  15. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Anesthesia Methods in Laser Resurfacing

    OpenAIRE

    Gaitan, Sergio; Markus, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Laser resurfacing technology offers the ability to treat skin changes that are the result of the aging process. One of the major drawbacks of laser resurfacing technologies is the pain associated with the procedure. The methods of anesthesia used in laser resurfacing to help minimize the pain include both noninvasive and invasive procedures. The noninvasive procedures can be divided into topical, cryoanesthesia, and a combination of both. The invasive methods of anesthesia include injected fo...

  17. Erythema after laser skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Esparza, J; Barba Gomez, J M; Gomez de la Torre, O L; David, L

    1998-01-01

    Erythema after laser skin resurfacing is seen by many as a necessary evil in order to get good results from the procedure. A critical review of widely accepted concepts may lead to diminishing the length of postoperative erythema in patients undergoing laser resurfacing. The authors report on two previously unrecognized factors in the causation of this problem.

  18. Histologic effects of resurfacing lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Joshua R; Greene, Ryan M; Green, Jeremy B

    2014-02-01

    By utilizing resurfacing lasers, physicians can significantly improve the appearance of sun-damaged skin, scars, and more. The carbon dioxide and erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers were the first ablative resurfacing lasers to offer impressive results although these earlier treatments were associated with significant downtime. Later, nonablative resurfacing lasers such as the neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser proved effective, after a series of treatments with less downtime, but with more modest results. The theory of fractional photothermolysis has revolutionized resurfacing laser technology by increasing the safety profile of the devices while delivering clinical efficacy. A review of the histologic and molecular consequences of the resurfacing laser-tissue interaction allows for a better understanding of the devices and their clinical effects. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Fractional laser skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2012-11-01

    Laser skin resurfacing (LSR) has evolved over the past 2 decades from traditional ablative to fractional nonablative and fractional ablative resurfacing. Traditional ablative LSR was highly effective in reducing rhytides, photoaging, and acne scarring but was associated with significant side effects and complications. In contrast, nonablative LSR was very safe but failed to deliver consistent clinical improvement. Fractional LSR has achieved the middle ground; it combined the efficacy of traditional LSR with the safety of nonablative modalities. The first fractional laser was a nonablative erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser that produced microscopic columns of thermal injury in the epidermis and upper dermis. Heralding an entirely new concept of laser energy delivery, it delivered the laser beam in microarrays. It resulted in microscopic columns of treated tissue and intervening areas of untreated skin, which yielded rapid reepithelialization. Fractional delivery was quickly applied to ablative wavelengths such as carbon dioxide, Er:YAG, and yttrium scandium gallium garnet (2,790 nm), providing more significant clinical outcomes. Adjustable laser parameters, including power, pitch, dwell time, and spot density, allowed for precise determination of percent surface area, affected penetration depth, and clinical recovery time and efficacy. Fractional LSR has been a significant advance to the laser field, striking the balance between safety and efficacy.

  20. Anesthesia Methods in Laser Resurfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, Sergio; Markus, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Laser resurfacing technology offers the ability to treat skin changes that are the result of the aging process. One of the major drawbacks of laser resurfacing technologies is the pain associated with the procedure. The methods of anesthesia used in laser resurfacing to help minimize the pain include both noninvasive and invasive procedures. The noninvasive procedures can be divided into topical, cryoanesthesia, and a combination of both. The invasive methods of anesthesia include injected forms (infiltrative, nerve blocks, and tumescent anesthesia) and supervised anesthesia (monitored anesthesia care and general anesthesia). In this review, the authors summarize the types of anesthesia used in laser resurfacing to aid the provider in offering the most appropriate method for the patient to have as painless a procedure as possible. PMID:23904819

  1. Focal femoral condyle resurfacing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, S A

    2013-03-01

    Focal femoral inlay resurfacing has been developed for the treatment of full-thickness chondral defects of the knee. This technique involves implanting a defect-sized metallic or ceramic cap that is anchored to the subchondral bone through a screw or pin. The use of these experimental caps has been advocated in middle-aged patients who have failed non-operative methods or biological repair techniques and are deemed unsuitable for conventional arthroplasty because of their age. This paper outlines the implant design, surgical technique and biomechanical principles underlying their use. Outcomes following implantation in both animal and human studies are also reviewed. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2013;95-B:301-4.

  2. Current role of resurfacing lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantash, B M; Gladstone, H B

    2009-06-01

    Resurfacing lasers have been the treatment of choice for diminishing rhytids and tightening skin. The carbon dioxide and erbium lasers have been the gold and silver standards. Despite their effectiveness, these resurfacing lasers have a very high risk profile including scarring, hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation. Because of these side effects, various practitioners have tried alternative settings for these lasers as well as alternative wavelengths, particularly in the infrared spectrum. These devices have had less downtime, but their effectiveness has been limited to fine wrinkles. As with selective photothemolysis, a major advance in the field has been fractionated resurfacing which incorporates grids of microthermal zones that spares islands of skin. This concept permits less tissue damage and quicker tissue regeneration. Initially, fractionated resurfacing was limited to the nonablative mid-infrared spectrum. These resurfacing lasers is appropriate for those patients with acne scars, uneven skin tone, mild to moderate photodamage, and is somewhat effective for melasma. Importantly, because there is less overall tissue damage and stimulation of melanocytes, these lasers can be used in darker skin types. Downtime is 2-4 days of erythema and scaling. Yet, these nonablative fractionated devices required 5-6 treatments to achieve a moderate effect. Logically, the fractionated resurfacing has now been applied to the CO2 and the Erbium:Yag lasers. These devices can treat deeper wrinkles and tighten skin. Downtime appears to be 5-7 days. The long term effectiveness and the question of whether these fractionated devices will approach the efficacy of the standard resurfacing lasers is still in question. Ultimately either integrated devices which may use fractionated resurfacing, radiofrequency and a sensitizer, or combining different lasers in a single treatment may prove to be the most effective in reducing rhtyides, smoothing the skin topography and tightening the

  3. Reflections on a Degree Initiative: The UK's Birmingham Royal Ballet Dancers Enter the University of Birmingham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Tansin

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides an opportunity to share experiences and perceptions of the first 5 years of a degree programme for professional dancers. A partnership developed in the mid-1990s between the UK's Birmingham Royal Ballet and the University of Birmingham, Westhill (now School of Education), to provide a part-time, post-experience, flexible study…

  4. 75 FR 10692 - Television Broadcasting Services; Birmingham, AL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ...] Television Broadcasting Services; Birmingham, AL AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final... Television Commission, the licensee of noncommercial educational station WBIQ(TV), channel *10, Birmingham... Part 73 Television, Television broadcasting. 0 For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Federal...

  5. 78 FR 75306 - Television Broadcasting Services; Birmingham, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ...] Television Broadcasting Services; Birmingham, Alabama AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... Television Commission (``AETC''), the licensee of station WBIQ(TV), channel *39, Birmingham, Alabama... freeze on the filing of petitions for rulemaking by television stations seeking channel substitutions in...

  6. Laser Resurfacing at the Time of Rhytidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, Jack F; Costa, Christopher R; Dauwe, Phillip B; Ramanadham, Smita R; Rohrich, Rod J

    2015-07-01

    Laser resurfacing with simultaneous rhytidectomy has been used to augment aesthetic results and decrease overall patient recuperative time, yet presents a potential dual insult to the microvasculature supply of facial skin flaps. This study describes the authors' experience with rhytidectomy and simultaneous laser resurfacing. Between May of 1999 and January of 2013, 85 face lifts with concomitant erbium laser resurfacing were reviewed retrospectively. Seven procedures were excluded for incomplete charting. Patient demographics, treatment zone, concomitant procedures, and secondary/tertiary face lifts were analyzed for associations with postoperative complications attributable to laser resurfacing. No complications were reported in the perioral resurfacing group. There was one instance of delayed wound healing and prolonged erythema in the full face group, and one instance of moderate hyperpigmentation in the central face group. No instances of hypopigmentation or flap necrosis attributable to laser resurfacing were noted. The overall complication rate was 3.8 percent. There was a statistically significant difference when comparing the number of complications between the facial laser resurfacing zones (p = 0.037). When analyzing zone of laser resurfacing as an independent risk factor for complications, no significant association was derived, but full face zone resurfacing approached statistical significance (p = 0.063). Although a significant difference in the number of complications between treatment groups existed, the authors were not able to definitively attribute this solely to the extent of laser resurfacing. Simultaneous laser resurfacing and rhytidectomy can be performed safely in select patients using ablative mode only over the undermined flap. Therapeutic, IV.

  7. Cryovolcanic Resurfacing on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, K. N.; Schenk, P.; White, O. L.; Moore, J. M.; McKinnon, W. B.; Grundy, W. M.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, A.; Cook, J. C.; Nimmo, F.; Howard, A. D.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Beyer, R. A.; Umurhan, O. M.; Lauer, T.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.

    2017-12-01

    Pluto displays several different young geologic terrains with few-to-no identifiable impact craters. Distinct terrains to the southwest of the informally named Sputnik Planitia may have been resurfaced by cryovolcanic processes, of a type and scale so far unique to Pluto [1,2]. The most prominent structures are two very large mounds with deep central depressions. The informally named Wright Mons stands 4 km high and the main mound spans 150 km and Piccard Mons is 7 km high and 225 km wide. Hummocky terrain with a characteristic wavelength of 8-12 km covers the flanks of Wright Mons and much of the surrounding terrain. Smaller boulders, blocks, slabs, or ridges on the order of a few km are superimposed on the hummocks. The large-scale slopes across the broad flanks of the Wright Mons are 3-5°. The central depression walls are typically 10°, but reach 20° in some locations. A number of other cavi or irregular depressions of various sizes (a few to 30 km) are scattered throughout the terrain and do not appear to be impact craters. There are few signs of potential individual flows but the large-scale hummocky texture is suggestive of viscous flow. We will explore a number of potential mechanisms for creation of Wright and Piccard Mons and the nearby terrains. These unique terrains present modeling challenges for building relatively young, large cryovolcanic constructs on outer solar system bodies. Tidal heating is thought to end early in Pluto-system history [3] and radiogenic heating levels are relatively low [4], although a subsurface ocean may still persist into the present day [5]. We will discuss the possible volcanic materials on Pluto and their mobility under different heating scenarios, as well as other possible emplacement processes. [1] Moore et al., (2016) Science 351, 1284-1293. [2] Singer et al. (2016) LPSC absract 47, 2276. [3] Cheng et al. (2014) Icarus 233, 242-258. [4] McKinnon et al. (1997) In: Stern, S.A., Tholen, D.J. (Eds.), Pluto and Charon

  8. Comparing return to sport activities after short metaphyseal femoral arthroplasty with resurfacing and big femoral head arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampinas, Panagiotis K; Papadelis, Eustratios G; Vlamis, John A; Basiliadis, Hlias; Pneumaticos, Spiros G

    2017-07-01

    Young patients feel that maintaining sport activities after total hip arthroplasty constitutes an important part of their quality of life. The majority of hip surgeons allow patients to return to low-impact activities, but significant caution is advised to taking part in high-impact activities. The purpose of this study is to compare and evaluate the post-operative return to daily living habits and sport activities following short-metaphyseal hip and high functional total hip arthroplasties (resurfacing and big femoral head arthroplasties). In a study design, 48 patients (55 hips) were enrolled in three different comparative groups, one with the short-metaphyseal arthroplasties, a second with high functional resurfacing arthroplasties and a third of big femoral head arthroplasties. Each patient experienced a clinical examination and evaluated with Harris Hip Score, WOMAC, Sf-36, UCLA activity score, satisfaction VAS, anteroposterior and lateral X-rays of the hip and were followed in an outpatient setting for 2 years. Statistical analysis revealed no notable differences between the three groups regarding their demographic data however significant differences have been found between preoperative and postoperative clinical scores of each group. Also, we fail to reveal any significant differences when comparing data of all three groups at the final 2 years postoperative control regarding their clinical scores. The overall outcome of all three groups was similar, all the patients were satisfied and returned to previous level of sport activities. Short metaphyseal hip arthroplasties in young patients intending to return to previous and even high impact sport activities, similar to high functional resurfacing, big femoral head arthroplasties. Short stems with hard on hard bearing surfaces might become an alternative to standard stems and hip resurfacing.

  9. Comparison of Patient-Reported Outcome from Neck-Preserving, Short-Stem Arthroplasty and Resurfacing Arthroplasty in Younger Osteoarthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Dettmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hip resurfacing has been considered a good treatment option for younger, active osteoarthritis patients. However, there are several identified issues concerning risk for neck fractures and issues related to current metal-on-metal implant designs. Neck-preserving short-stem implants have been discussed as a potential alternative, but it is yet unclear which method is better suited for younger adults. We compared hip disability and osteoarthritis outcome scores (HOOS from a young group of patients (n=52, age 48.9 ± 6.1 years who had received hip resurfacing (HR with a cohort of patients (n=73, age 48.2 ± 6.6 years who had received neck-preserving, short-stem implant total hip arthroplasty (THA. Additionally, durations for both types of surgery were compared. HOOS improved significantly preoperatively to last followup (>1 year in both groups (p<0.0001, η2=0.69; there were no group effects or interactions. Surgery duration was significantly longer for resurfacing (104.4 min ± 17.8 than MiniHip surgery (62.5 min ± 14.8, U=85.0, p<0.0001, η2=0.56. The neck-preserving short-stem approach may be preferable to resurfacing due to the less challenging surgery, similar outcome, and controversy regarding resurfacing implant designs.

  10. Skin resurfacing procedures: new and emerging options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Mathew M; Somani, Ally-Khan; Kingsley, Melanie M; Travers, Jeffrey B; Spandau, Dan F

    2014-01-01

    The demand for skin resurfacing and rejuvenating procedures has progressively increased in the last decade and has sparked several advances within the skin resurfacing field that promote faster healing while minimizing downtime and side effects for patients. Several technological and procedural skin resurfacing developments are being integrated into clinical practices today allowing clinicians to treat a broader range of patients' skin types and pathologies than in years past, with noteworthy outcomes. This article will discuss some emerging and developing resurfacing therapies and treatments that are present today and soon to be available.

  11. The treatment of hypopigmentation after skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, James E; Rahimi, A David; Mansoor, Sohail; Helton, Peter; Shitabata, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Hypopigmentation has plagued all methods of skin resurfacing. Whether the physician uses chemical peels, dermabrasion or laser resurfacing hypopigmentation can develop. To examine the pathogenesis and treatment of hypopigmentation after resurfacing. Areas of hypopigmentation after skin resurfacing were blended in with laser-assisted chemabrasion (LACA). The process begins with preconditioning of the skin with vitamin A/glycolic skin conditioning lotions. Then the area is resurfaced with the LACA. This resurfacing usually requires three to four freeze-sand cycles to remove the areas of hypopigmentation associated with dermal fibrosis. The resurfaced skin is then occluded with a combination of polyethylene/silicone sheeting during the acute phase of wound healing. Ultraviolet photography and histologic examination were used to demonstrate the improvement in dermal fibrosis and hypopigmentation. The LACA improved areas of hypopigmentation in the 22 cases studied. Under occlusive wound dressings, the melanocytes migrated into the areas of hypopigmentation, and the wounds healed without extensive fibrosis. This produced a blending of skin color. It is possible with skin preconditioning, LACA, and occlusive wound healing to provide for a wound healing environment that blends in areas of hypopigmentation that have developed after previous skin resurfacing.

  12. Upgrade to the Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin- Reyes; Parker, K; Wilson, J; Baca, M

    2015-01-01

    The Birmingham Irradiation Facility was developed in 2013 at the University of Birmingham using the Medical Physics MC40 cyclotron. It can achieve High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) fluences of 10^15 (1 MeV neutron equivalent (neq)) cm^-2 in 80 s with proton beam currents of 1 μA and so can evaluate effectively the performance and durability of detector technologies and new components to be used for the HL-LHC. Irradiations of silicon sensors and passive materials can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box which moves continuously through the homogenous beamspot. This movement is provided by a pre-configured XY-axis Cartesian robot scanning system. In 2014 the cooling system and cold box were upgraded from a recirculating glycol chiller system to a liquid nitrogen evaporative system. The new cooling system achieves a stable temperature of 50 1C in 30 min and aims to maintain sub-0 1C temperatures on the sensors during irradiations. This paper reviews the design, development, commissioning and perform...

  13. The spectrum of laser skin resurfacing: nonablative, fractional, and ablative laser resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2008-05-01

    The drive to attain cosmetic facial enhancement with minimal risk and rapid recovery has inspired the field of nonsurgical skin rejuvenation. Laser resurfacing was introduced in the 1980s with continuous wave carbon dioxide (CO(2)) lasers; however, because of a high rate of side effects, including scarring, short-pulse, high-peak power, and rapidly scanned, focused-beam CO(2) lasers and normal-mode erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet lasers were developed, which remove skin in a precisely controlled manner. The prolonged 2-week recovery time and small but significant complication risk prompted the development of non-ablative and, more recently, fractional resurfacing in order to minimize risk and shorten recovery times. Nonablative resurfacing produces dermal thermal injury to improve rhytides and photodamage while preserving the epidermis. Fractional resurfacing thermally ablates microscopic columns of epidermal and dermal tissue in regularly spaced arrays over a fraction of the skin surface. This intermediate approach increases efficacy as compared to nonablative resurfacing, but with faster recovery as compared to ablative resurfacing. Neither nonablative nor fractional resurfacing produces results comparable to ablative laser skin resurfacing, but both have become much more popular than the latter because the risks of treatment are limited in the face of acceptable improvement. At the completion of this learning activity, participants should be familiar with the spectrum of lasers and light technologies available for skin resurfacing, published studies of safety and efficacy, indications, methodologies, side effects, complications, and management.

  14. Skin resurfacing procedures: new and emerging options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loesch MM

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mathew M Loesch,1 Ally-Khan Somani,1 Melanie M Kingsley,1 Jeffrey B Travers,1–3 Dan F Spandau1,41Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 3Department of Pediatrics, 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USAAbstract: The demand for skin resurfacing and rejuvenating procedures has progressively increased in the last decade and has sparked several advances within the skin resurfacing field that promote faster healing while minimizing downtime and side effects for patients. Several technological and procedural skin resurfacing developments are being integrated into clinical practices today allowing clinicians to treat a broader range of patients' skin types and pathologies than in years past, with noteworthy outcomes. This article will discuss some emerging and developing resurfacing therapies and treatments that are present today and soon to be available.Keywords: rejuvenation, wounding, non-melanoma skin cancer, therapy

  15. On the DEAP-3600 resurfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampa, P.

    2018-01-01

    The DEAP-3600 experiment is a single-phase detector that can hold up to 3600 kg of liquid argon to search for dark matter at SNOLAB in Sudbury Canada, 6800 ft. underground. The projected sensitivity to the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section is 10-46 cm2 for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c2. One of the primary background sources to the WIMP search are alpha decays occurring on the surface of the experiment, which only deposit a tiny fraction of their energy in the argon. The work reported here focuses on the development and operation of a custom designed robot, the Resurfacer, which was used to remove 500 micrometers from the inner-most layer of the detector's acrylic cryostat, thus removing contaminations introduced during construction.

  16. Skin resurfacing procedures: new and emerging options

    OpenAIRE

    Loesch MM; Somani AK; Kingsley MM; Travers JB; Spandau DF

    2014-01-01

    Mathew M Loesch,1 Ally-Khan Somani,1 Melanie M Kingsley,1 Jeffrey B Travers,1–3 Dan F Spandau1,41Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 3Department of Pediatrics, 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USAAbstract: The demand for skin resurfacing and rejuvenating procedures has progressively increased in the last decade and has sparked several advances within the skin resurfacing fie...

  17. Report of Block Field Experience at Jefferson County Department of Health Bureau of Nutrition, Birmingham, Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Chamber of Commerce , "Climate and Geography, Birmingham Area", March, 1984. 2. Department of Economic and Community...Affairs, State of Alabama, "Estimated 1984 Population". *3. Birmingham Area Chamber of Commerce , "An Economic Overview of Birmingham, Alabama", June... Chamber of Commerce , "New Business License List", May, 1985. 6. Birmingham Area Chamber of Commerce , "Birmingham Facts and History", (undated).

  18. PMS49 – Empirical comparison of discrete choice experiment and best-worst scaling to estimate stakeholders' risk tolerance for hip replacement surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, J.D.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Karin; Marshall, D.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Empirical comparison of two preference elicitation methods, discrete choice experiment (DCE) and profile case best-worst scaling (BWS), regarding the estimation of the risk tolerance for hip replacement surgery (total hip arthroplasty and total hip resurfacing arthroplasty). Methods An

  19. Perioral Rejuvenation With Ablative Erbium Resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joel L

    2015-11-01

    Since the introduction of the scanning full-field erbium laser, misconceptions regarding ablative erbium resurfacing have resulted in its being largely overshadowed by ablative fractional resurfacing. This case report illustrates the appropriateness of full-field erbium ablation for perioral resurfacing. A patient with profoundly severe perioral photodamage etched-in lines underwent full-field ablative perioral resurfacing with an erbium laser (Contour TRL, Sciton Inc., Palo Alto, CA) that allows separate control of ablation and coagulation. The pre-procedure consultations included evaluation of the severity of etched-in lines, and discussion of patient goals, expectations, and appropriate treatment options, as well as a review of patient photos and post-treatment care required. The author generally avoids full-field erbium ablation in patients with Fitzpatrick type IV and above. For each of 2 treatment sessions (separated by approximately 4 months), the patient received (12 cc plain 2% lidodaine) sulcus blocks before undergoing 4 passes with the erbium laser at 150 μ ablation, no coagulation, and then some very focal 30 μ ablation to areas of residual lines still visualized through the pinpoint bleeding. Similarly, full-field ablative resurfacing can be very reliable for significant wrinkles and creping in the lower eyelid skin--where often a single treatment of 80 μ ablation, 50 μ coagulation can lead to a nice improvement. Standardized digital imaging revealed significant improvement in deeply etched rhytides without significant adverse events. For appropriately selected patients requiring perioral (or periorbital) rejuvenation, full-field ablative erbium resurfacing is safe, efficacious and merits consideration.

  20. Routine patellar resurfacing using an inset patellar technique.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurson, Conor

    2012-02-01

    The management of the patella in total knee arthroplasty still causes controversy. Whether or not to resurface the patella in primary total knee arthroplasty remains unclear. In this study we examined 220 consecutive total knee replacements, by a single surgeon, where the patella was routinely resurfaced using the inset technique. All patellae were suitable for resurfacing. Patellar thickness was not altered in 54.5% of patellae. In 97.2% the patella was within 2 mm of the original thickness. There were no significant complications. In this study we have found that the inset technique of patella resurfacing in total knee replacement is a simple and safe resurfacing procedure.

  1. Fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajirian, Ani L; Tarijian, Ani L; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Ablative laser technology has been in use for many years now. The large side effect profile however has limited its use. Fractional ablative technology is a newer development which combines a lesser side effect profile along with similar efficacy. In this paper we review fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing.

  2. Dorothy's Wars: School Leadership during the Birmingham Blitz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousmaniere, Kate

    2016-01-01

    This essay examines the school leadership experiences of an infant school head teacher in Birmingham, England, during the Second World War. Drawing on the letters of Dorothy Walker, the essay offers insights into school leadership wartime deprivations. The impact of an international war on the home front was not head teacher Dorothy Walker's only…

  3. 75 FR 3695 - Television Broadcasting Services; Birmingham, AL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ...] Television Broadcasting Services; Birmingham, AL AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed... Television Commission (``AETC''), the licensee of noncommercial educational station WBIQ (TV), channel *10... procedures for comments, see 47 CFR 1.415 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television...

  4. Hip, Hip, Soret!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Plathe, Florian

    Many years ago, Ludwig did detect the behaviour now called the Soret effect. Sodium sulphate in eighteen-fifty-six did not obediently follow Fick's first law. But if he cooled down one side the salt went left, the water to the right. He was surprised in every way. Hip, hip, Soret!

  5. Diagnosis and management of skin resurfacing-related complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Alexandra Y; Obagi, Suzan

    2009-02-01

    The field of skin resurfacing is undergoing rapid evolution with many new technologies that have developed, providing more choices for physicians and patients. Knowing the potential adverse effects associated with each skin resurfacing modality is paramount in selecting the appropriate approach for each candidate, thereby minimizing complications and achieving optimal results.

  6. Early rehabilitation in Resurfacing, standard and large head THA patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Østergaard; Varmarken, Jens-Erik; Ovesen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    in the resurfacing patient may impair the early rehabilitation. We aimed to investigate early differences in rehabilitation parameters amongst the different groups. Materials and methods We randomized to resurfacing (n=20), standard 28 mm THA (n=19) and large head MoM THA (n=12). We recorded operation time, blood...

  7. Carbon dioxide laser resurfacing of rhytides and photodamaged skin

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, KM; Nelson, JS

    1998-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) laser resurfacing has been used as a method to treat rhytides and photodamaged skin. This laser offers several advantages over previously utilised modalities but its use has several inherent risks. This article will review important aspects of CO 2 laser resurfacing including laser-skin interactions, patient selection, effective pre- and post-operative regimens and potential complications.

  8. Fractional nonablative laser resurfacing: is there a skin tightening effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauvar, Arielle N B

    2014-12-01

    Fractional photothermolysis, an approach to laser skin resurfacing that creates microscopic thermal wounds in skin separated by islands of spared tissue, was developed to overcome the high incidence of adverse events and prolonged healing times associated with full coverage ablative laser procedures. To examine whether fractional nonablative laser resurfacing induces skin tightening. A literature review was performed to evaluate the clinical and histologic effects of fractional nonablative laser resurfacing and full coverage ablative resurfacing procedures. Fractional nonablative lasers produce excellent outcomes with minimal risk and morbidity for a variety of clinical conditions, including photodamaged skin, atrophic scars, surgical and burn scars. Efforts to induce robust fibroplasia in histologic specimens and skin tightening in the clinical setting have yielded inconsistent results. A better understanding of the histology of fractional laser resurfacing will help to optimize clinical outcomes.

  9. Evolution of laser skin resurfacing: from scanning to fractional technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Arif; Alster, Tina S

    2014-11-01

    Laser skin resurfacing was popularized for photoaged and scarred skin 2 decades ago. Since then, several technologic advancements have led to a new generation of delivery systems that produce excellent clinical outcomes with reduced treatment risks and faster recovery times. To review the evolution of laser skin resurfacing from pulsed and scanned infrared laser technology to the latest techniques of nonablative and ablative fractional photothermolysis. All published literature regarding laser skin resurfacing was analyzed and collated. A comprehensive review of laser skin resurfacing was outlined and future developments in the field of fractionated laser skin treatment were introduced. Laser skin resurfacing has evolved such that excellent clinical outcomes in photodamaged and scarred skin are achieved with rapid wound healing. As newer devices are developed, the applications of this technology will have a dramatic effect on the delivery of medical and aesthetic dermatology.

  10. Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hip fractures in people of all ages. In older adults, a hip fracture is most often a result of a fall from a standing height. In people with very weak bones, a hip fracture can occur simply by standing on the leg and twisting. Risk factors The rate of hip fractures increases substantially with ...

  11. Current Status of Fractional Laser Resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniol, Paul J; Hamilton, Mark M; Carniol, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    Fractional lasers were first developed based on observations of lasers designed for hair transplantation. In 2007, ablative fractional laser resurfacing was introduced. The fractionation allowed deeper tissue penetration, leading to greater tissue contraction, collagen production and tissue remodeling. Since then, fractional erbium:YAG resurfacing lasers have also been introduced. These lasers have yielded excellent results in treating photoaging, acne scarring, and dyschromia. With the adjustment of microspot density, pulse duration, number of passes, and fluence, the surgeon can adjust the treatment effects. These lasers have allowed surgeons to treat patients with higher Fitzpatrick skin types (types IV to VI) and greater individualize treatments to various facial subunits. Immunohistochemical analysis has demonstrated remodeling effects of the tissues for several months, producing longer lasting results. Adjuvant treatments are also under investigation, including concomitant face-lift, product deposition, and platelet-rich plasma. Finally, there is a short recovery time from treatment with these lasers, allowing patients to resume regular activities more quickly. Although there is a relatively high safety profile for ablative fractionated lasers, surgeons should be aware of the limitations of specific treatments and the associated risks and complications.

  12. Culture confirmation of tuberculosis cases in Birmingham, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayer, Kalbir S; Sitch, Alice J; Dedicoat, Martin; Wood, Annette L

    2013-10-01

    The proportion of culture-confirmed tuberculosis (TB) cases in Birmingham had gradually decreased to less than 65% in 2008. Reasons for this were unclear, therefore this study assessed diagnostic methods used for confirming TB and reviewed factors involved in positive culture. A cross-sectional study was carried out. A list of notified TB cases for Birmingham in those aged 16 y and over in 2009 was collated. Where no positive culture was recorded, further data were collected from hospital databases and case notes. Of 449 TB cases, 419 (93%) had samples taken for culture testing. Of all cases, 309 (69%) were confirmed by culture testing; of those receiving culture testing, 73% were confirmed. Pulmonary TB was identified as a predictor of positive culture in both the unadjusted and adjusted analyses: odds ratio (OR) 2.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32-3.19, and OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.29-4.17, respectively. Gender, age, ethnicity, UK born, and treatment delay were not significantly associated with positive culture. Of 140 cases not confirmed by culture, 129 (92%) had their diagnosis supported by at least one other test. The vast majority of TB cases had microbiological specimens taken to help confirm the disease. Furthermore, culture confirmation rates in Birmingham were meeting national targets in 2009. However culture confirmation rates were significantly lower in extrapulmonary TB, therefore further work is suggested in this group. The role of other investigations (e.g. interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA), Mantoux) is unclear. Further collaboration between clinicians, histopathologists, and microbiologists is advised to ensure samples are sent appropriately and culture confirmation is optimized.

  13. A clinical, radiological and biomechanical study of the TARA hip prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal Malefijt, de M.C.; Huiskes, H.W.J.

    1993-01-01

    We reviewed 60 patients with 72 TARA (total articular replacement arthroplasty) resurfacing hip prostheses. To analyse the behaviour of the femoral component a radiographic study was done and a two-dimensional finite element model was constructed. The stem of the femoral component plays a role in

  14. Plasma skin resurfacing: personal experience and long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentkover, Stuart H

    2012-05-01

    This article presents a comprehensive clinical approach to plasma resurfacing for skin regeneration. Plasma technology, preoperative protocols, resurfacing technique, postoperative care, clinical outcomes, evidence-based results, and appropriate candidates for this procedure are discussed. Specific penetration depth and specific laser energy measurements are provided. Nitrogen plasma skin regeneration is a skin-resurfacing technique that offers excellent improvement of mild to moderate skin wrinkles and overall skin rejuvenation. It also provides excellent improvement in uniformity of skin color and texture in patients with hyperpigmentation with Fitzpatrick skin types 1 through 4. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hip pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from a chair, walking, climbing stairs, and driving Hamstring strain Iliotibial band syndrome Hip flexor strain Hip ... and cool down afterward. Stretch your quadriceps and hamstrings. Avoid running straight down hills. Walk down instead. ...

  16. 40 CFR 81.41 - Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.41 Section 81.41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.41 Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Alabama) has been revised to consist of the...

  17. The Rule of Law and Civil Disobedience: The Case behind King's Letter from a Birmingham Jail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Fifty years ago, the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." In exploring the story of the events behind the essay, and the Supreme Court case that resulted, "Walker v. Birmingham", 399 U.S. 307 (1967), educators will find a pedagogically powerful lens through which to review the seminal…

  18. Birmingham Rep, Youth and Community, and the Products and Possibilities of Precarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Birmingham Rep, a leading producing theatre based in the UK's "second city", has historically had a complex relationship with the cultural priorities of its home city. In recent years, Birmingham City Council has faced multiple challenges represented by debt burden, government-imposed cuts in public funding, scandals linked to failing…

  19. Fractionated laser skin resurfacing treatment complications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelitsa, Andrei I; Alster, Tina S

    2010-03-01

    Fractional photothermolysis represents a new modality of laser skin resurfacing that was developed to provide a successful clinical response while minimizing postoperative recovery and limiting treatment complications. To review all of the reported complications that develop as a result of fractional ablative and nonablative laser skin resurfacing. A literature review was based on a MEDLINE search (1998-2009) for English-language articles related to laser treatment complications and fractional skin resurfacing. Articles presenting the highest level of evidence and the most recent reports were preferentially selected. Complications with fractional laser skin resurfacing represent a full spectrum of severity and can be longlasting. In general, a greater likelihood of developing post-treatment complications is seen in sensitive cutaneous areas and in patients with intrinsically darker skin phototypes or predisposing medical risk factors. Although the overall rate of complications associated with fractional laser skin resurfacing is much lower than with traditional ablative techniques, recent reports suggest that serious complications can develop. An appreciation of all of the complications associated with fractional laser skin resurfacing is important, especially given that many of them can be potentially prevented. The authors have indicated no significant interest with commercial supporters.

  20. Hip joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hip arthroplasty; Total hip replacement; Hip hemiarthroplasty; Arthritis - hip replacement; Osteoarthritis - hip replacement ... Your hip joint is made up of 2 major parts. One or both parts may be replaced during surgery: ...

  1. Resurfacing the Penis of Complex Hypospadias Repair ("Hypospadias Cripples").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fam, Mina M; Hanna, Moneer K

    2017-03-01

    After the creation of a neourethra in a "hypospadias cripple," resurfacing the penis with healthy skin is a significant challenge because local tissue is often scarred and unusable. We reviewed our experience with various strategies to resurface the penis of hypospadias cripples. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 215 patients referred after multiple unsuccessful hypospadias repairs from 1981 to 2014. In 130 of 215 patients we performed resurfacing using local penile flaps using various techniques, including Byars flaps, Z-plasty or double Z-plasty, or a dorsal relaxing incision. Of the 215 patients 85 did not have adequate healthy local penile skin to resurface the penis after urethroplasty. Scrotal skin was used to resurface the penis in 54 patients, 6 underwent tissue expansion of the dorsal penile skin during a 12 to 16-week period prior to penile resurfacing, 23 underwent full-thickness skin grafting and another 4 received a split-thickness skin graft. Of the 56 patients who underwent fasciomyocutaneous rotational flaps, tissue expansion or a combination of both approaches 54 (96.4%) finally had a successful outcome. All 6 patients who underwent tissue expansion had a successful outcome without complications and were reported on previously. All 23 full-thickness skin grafts took with excellent results. All 4 patients who underwent fenestrated split-thickness skin grafting had 100% graft take but secondary contraction and ulceration were associated with sexual activity. In our experience scrotal skin flaps, tissue expansion of the dorsal penile skin and full-thickness skin grafts serve as reliable approaches in resurfacing the penis in almost any hypospadias cripple lacking healthy local skin. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of erythema after Er:YAG laser skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Na Young; Ahn, Hyo-Hyun; Kim, Soo-Nam; Kye, Young-Chul

    2007-11-01

    Postoperative erythema can be expected to occur in every patient after laser resurfacing, and pigmentary disturbances may be related to the intensity and the duration of erythema. This study was undertaken to assess the clinical features of erythema, the factors that influence its duration, and the relation between the duration of erythema and the incidence of hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation in skin of Asian persons after Er:YAG laser resurfacing. A total of 218 patients (skin phototypes III to V) were recruited and treated with a short-pulsed Er:YAG laser, a variable-pulsed Er:YAG laser, or a dual-mode Er:YAG laser for skin resurfacing. Clinical assessments were performed retrospectively using medical charts and serial photographs. Postoperative erythema was observed in all patients after Er:YAG laser resurfacing with a mean duration of 4.72 months. In 98.2% of patients, erythema faded completely within 12 months. Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation was observed in 38.1% of patients after Er:YAG laser resurfacing. Skin phototype, level of ablation, and depth of thermal damage caused by a long-pulsed laser appear to be important factors that affect the duration of erythema. Moreover, prolonged erythema was related to the risk of postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.

  3. Time series trends of the safety effects of pavement resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Juneyoung; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Wang, Jung-Han

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the safety performance of pavement resurfacing projects on urban arterials in Florida using the observational before and after approaches. The safety effects of pavement resurfacing were quantified in the crash modification factors (CMFs) and estimated based on different ranges of heavy vehicle traffic volume and time changes for different severity levels. In order to evaluate the variation of CMFs over time, crash modification functions (CMFunctions) were developed using nonlinear regression and time series models. The results showed that pavement resurfacing projects decrease crash frequency and are found to be more safety effective to reduce severe crashes in general. Moreover, the results of the general relationship between the safety effects and time changes indicated that the CMFs increase over time after the resurfacing treatment. It was also found that pavement resurfacing projects for the urban roadways with higher heavy vehicle volume rate are more safety effective than the roadways with lower heavy vehicle volume rate. Based on the exploration and comparison of the developed CMFucntions, the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) and exponential functional form of the nonlinear regression models can be utilized to identify the trend of CMFs over time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical and biomechanical assessment of patella resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Lisa; Benedetti, Maria Grazia; Ensini, Andrea; Catani, Fabio; Giannini, Sandro

    2006-07-01

    Currently there is a limited understanding of the factors influencing range of motion by comparing patellar resurfacing vs non-resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty during activities of daily living. A recent meta-analysis of patellar replacement confirms better outcome with patella resurfacing; however, the result can be influenced by many other factors, such as: component design, surgeon experience, and technical aspects of the surgery. This study compares the biomechanics of the knee in patients after total knee arthroplasty with and without patellar resurfacing during stair climbing. Forty-seven patients with total knee arthroplasty were assessed at the mean follow-up of 24 months. In all of them a posterior stabilised fixed bearing prosthesis (Optetrak PS, Exactech) was implanted. Twenty-six patients were treated without patellar resurfacing and 21 with patellar resurfacing. Clinical evaluations were performed using the International Knee Society and the Hospital for Special Surgery scores. Ten patients with patellar resurfacing and 10 patients without patellar resurfacing were also studied with motion analysis during stair climbing; 10 healthy subjects were studied for statistical comparison. Clinical passive knee flexion, International Knee Society Function and Hospital for Special Surgery scores were significantly higher in the patellar resurfacing group. During stair climbing, active knee joint range of motion during the stance phase was greater in patients with patellar resurfacing. The maximum adduction moment was significantly higher in the group without patellar resurfacing. Patients with patellar resurfacing demonstrated better clinical scores, and kinematic and kinetic data while ascending stairs.

  5. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  6. Biologic resurfacing of the patella: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scapinelli, Raphaele; Aglietti, Paolo; Baldovin, Marino; Giron, Francesco; Teitge, Robert

    2002-07-01

    The techniques of biologic resurfacing of the patella, like other joint surfaces, are still evolving. Currently none of them is free from criticism. In this regard it is our hope that progress in the basic science will offer in the near future new and more optimistic therapeutic possibilities (i.e., the restoration of a reparative cartilage that is structurally and functionally comparable to the native one). The greater expectancies come perhaps from the present experimental investigations about the combined use of tissue-engineered implants embedded with staminal cells and growth factors. Many problems remain to be solved, however, before reliable applicability in humans. From a general point of view, stem cells obtained from various sources (e.g., adult bone marrow, umbilical cord) offer the same finalities as the embryonic stem cells, without the ethical obstacles related to the latter. Therefore, it may be that restoration of part or all of the articular surface of a joint will be possible by way of these mesenchymal progenitors that have the ability to differentiate into the chondrogenic and osteogenic lines, which is required for the restoration of the various layers of a normal articular cartilage and subchondral bone.

  7. Adventure sports and sexual freedom hip replacement: the tripolar hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, James W

    2018-01-01

    Certain athletic activities and lifestyles require a completely stable and very mobile hip. Total hip replacement with a natural femoral head size and two mobile-bearing surfaces (i.e., a "tripolar" prosthesis) is the most stable prosthesis. Elegant design and wear-resistant bearing surfaces are the keys to long-term implant survivorship. The hypothesis is that a ceramic-coated tripolar prosthesis using highly cross-linked polyethylene can provide full function and complete stability with low wear. This study sought to determine: (1) patient-reported outcomes, (2) functional outcomes, (3) implant survivorship and complications, and (4) postoperative sexual limitations. Between 1998 and 2011, the author performed 160 primary total hip replacements using tripolar prostheses in patients participating in adventure sports and other physically demanding activities. The institutional review board approved this study. The inclusion criteria were patients who needed unrestricted activity and who were not candidates for or did not choose hip resurfacing. Patients were followed every second year and assessed with radiographs, Harris Hip Score, WOMAC, SF-12, and UCLA functional outcome scores. Patients were asked about symptoms of instability and satisfaction with their hip replacement. Patients were asked both preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively four questions about their sexual activity. Mean follow-up was 11 years. At 2 years' postoperatively, 98% of patients reported their satisfaction as excellent or good and 99% were not limited for sexual activity following surgery. Seventy-four percent of patients reported they were recovered within 6 weeks of surgery. There were no dislocations. There were three revision procedures for implant loosening, infection, and periprosthetic fracture, but there were no failures of the tripolar articulation. The mean postoperative UCLA score was the highly athletic score of 8. There were no signs of osteolysis, wear, or metal

  8. Nonablative fractional laser resurfacing in Asian skin--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Silonie

    2010-12-01

    Skin resurfacing has been a part of cosmetic dermatology for more than two decades now, and most of it has been ablative with traditional aggressive lasers including the CO(2) and erbium. The last few years have seen a revolutionary change with the invention of nonablative lasers for skin tightening. Fractional resurfacing is a new concept of cutaneous remodeling whereby laser-induced zones of microthermal injury are surrounded by normal untreated tissue that helps in quicker healing. The various wavelengths used are 1320, 1440, and 2940 nm with depth of penetration ranging from 25 μ to 1.2 mm. This article reviews the history of nonablative fractional laser resurfacing, its indications, contraindications, and a review of use in Asian skin with Fitzpatrick type III-VI. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Facelift combined with simultaneous fractional laser resurfacing: Outcomes and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Eric J; Struck, Steve K

    2015-10-01

    The combination of simultaneous surgical rhytidectomy with ablative resurfacing has been a controversial procedure due to the concern of postoperative wound healing. Traditional ablative resurfacing lasers are believed to have higher rates of complications, leading to delayed healing and skin flap loss when combined with face rhytidectomy surgeries. With the development of fractionated ablative laser therapy, there has been increased interest in combining these two procedures. The objective of this study is to evaluate the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing simultaneous full-face rhytidectomy in combination with fractionated ablative skin resurfacing. A retrospective chart analysis was performed for all patients who had a combined procedure of facelift and ablative fractional laser resurfacing from 2008 to 2013 by the senior author (SKS). Postoperative recovery and complications were recorded. The surgical technique used for performing the facelift was an extended supraplatysmal dissection with SMAS plication. Fraxel Re:Pair 10,600-nm fractional carbon dioxide laser was used to perform an ablative resurfacing including the elevated skin flaps. A total of 86 patients were included. Average age was 60.01 years (range of 45-78 years). Longest follow up was five years. The average size of the elevated skin flaps was 100 cm(2). Average skin type was a Fitzpatrick type 2. All patients had complete re-epithelialization by one week after their procedure. Four patients (4.6%) experienced acne outbreaks. Four patients (4.6%) had facial erythema that persisted greater than two weeks. Of these four patients, all resolved by five weeks postoperatively. There was no delayed wound healing or skin flap loss observed. Our results indicate that simultaneous rhytidectomy with fractionated ablative laser resurfacing does not cause an increase in wound healing or skin loss. Due to improved patient outcomes with combining these procedures, we believe that this can be increasingly

  10. The history of neurosurgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Paul M; Markert, James M; Diethelm, Arnold G; Hadley, Mark N

    2014-10-01

    : The Division of Neurosurgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham was formally founded in 1954 under the leadership of James Garber Galbraith. The following 60 years would see neurosurgery at the forefront of the development of a nationally recognized medical center in the heart of Birmingham, Alabama. The Department of Neurosurgery now employs 14 faculty members, performs more than 4500 neurosurgical procedures annually, is active in clinical and laboratory research, and boasts a contemporary, comprehensive residency training program.

  11. Resurfacing hemiarthroplasty compared to stemmed hemiarthroplasty for glenohumeral osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe V; Olsen, Bo S; Sorensen, Anne Kathrine

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to conduct a randomised, clinical trial comparing stemmed hemiarthroplasty and resurfacing hemiarthroplasty in the treatment of glenohumeral osteoarthritis. METHODS: A total of 40 shoulders (35 patients) were randomised to stemmed hemiarthroplasty or resurfacing...... hemiarthroplasty and evaluated three and 12 months postoperatively using the Constant-Murley score (CMS) and Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder (WOOS) index. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in age, gender or pre-operative scores except for WOOS at baseline. Two patients...

  12. Constraining Middle Pleistocene Glaciations in Birmingham, England; Using Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) Dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S. M.; Gibbard, P. L.; Bateman, M. D.; Boreham, S.

    2014-12-01

    Birmingham is built on a complex sequence of Middle Pleistocene sediments, representing at least three lowland glaciations (MIS12, MIS6, and MIS2). British Geological Survey mapping accounts 75% of the land mass as Quaternary deposits; predominantly glacial-sandy tills, glacial-fluvial sands, clays and organic silts and peats. Understanding the age of fluvial-glacial outwash, related to specific glaciations, is critical in establishing a Geochronology of Birmingham. Shotton (1953) found a series of Middle Pleistocene glacial sediments, termed the Wolstonian, intermediate in age between MIS11 and MIS5e Interglacial's. Uncertainty surrounding the relation to East Anglian sequences developed by Rose (1987) implies Birmingham sequences should be referred to MIS12. Despite this, younger Middle Pleistocene glacial sequences occur in Birmingham, yet uncertainty has deepened over our understanding of the complex, inaccessible sediments, especially as deposits have similar extent with MIS2 sequences. Five Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dates from three sites around Birmingham have been sampled. East of Birmingham, ice advanced from the Irish Sea and later the North East. In Wolston, a sample of outwash sand, associated with the Thurssington Till, is dated. In Meriden, two samples of outwash sands, associated with a distal Oadby Till, are dated. West of Birmingham, ice advanced from the Welsh Ice Sheet. In Seisdon, two samples of an Esker and outwash sand, associated with a Ridgeacre Till, are dated. Correlation of OSL dates provide an important constraint on understanding the history of Birmingham. Using GSI3D modeling to correlate geochronology and sedimentology, the significance of OSL dating can be understood within the complex sequences (and regional stratigraphy), complimented by Cosmogenic and Palynology dates taken in South West and North East. OSL dating on Birmingham's outwash sands, deposited by extensive repeated Middle Pleistocene glaciations, asserts the

  13. Hip ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinoli, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.martinoli@libero.it [Radiologia, DISC, Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Garello, Isabella; Marchetti, Alessandra; Palmieri, Federigo; Altafini, Luisa [Radiologia, DISC, Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Valle, Maura [Radiologia, Gaslini Children Hospital, Genova (Italy); Tagliafico, Alberto [Radiologia, National Institute for Cancer Research, Genoa (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    In newborns, US has an established role in the detection and management of developmental dysplasia of the hip. Later in childhood, when the limping child is a major diagnostic dilemma, US is extremely helpful in the identification of the varied disease processes underlying this condition, as transient synovitis, septic arthritis, Perthes disease and slipped femoral capital epiphysis. In adolescent practicing sporting activities, US is an excellent means to identify apophyseal injures about the pelvic ring, especially when avulsions are undisplaced and difficult-to-see radiographically. Later on, in the adulthood, US is an effective modality to diagnose tendon and muscle injuries about the hip and pelvis, identify effusion or synovitis within the hip joint or its adjacent bursae and guide the treatment of these findings. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the most common pathologic conditions about the hip, in which the contribution of US is relevant for the diagnostic work-up.

  14. Hip arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Antônio Berwanger de Amorim Cabrita

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hip arthroscopy is a safe method for treating a variety of pathological conditions that were unknown until a decade ago. Femoroacetabular impingement is the commonest of these pathological conditions and the one with the best results when treated early on. The instruments and surgical technique for hip arthroscopy continue to evolve. New indications for hip arthroscopy has been studied as the ligamentum teres injuries, capsular repair in instabilities, dissection of the sciatic nerve and repair of gluteal muscles tears (injuries to the hip rotator cuff, although still with debatable reproducibility. The complication rate is low, and ever-better results with fewer complications should be expected with the progression of the learning curve.

  15. Birmingham Urban Climate Change with Neighbourhood Estimates of Environmental Risk (buccaneer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, R.; Thornes, J.; Cai, X.; Rees, R.

    2011-12-01

    The BUCCANEER project is a knowledge transfer partnership between the University of Birmingham and Birmingham City Council to help ensure that the city is prepared for the impacts of climate change. The project will equip service areas such as planners and health protection agencies with the necessary information and tools needed to adapt. UK climate projections indicate a 3.7oC temperature increase for Birmingham, UK by 2080 (medium emissions scenario). The 2003 heat-wave that caused over 2000 deaths in England and Wales will become an average summer by 2040. By the end of the century, the 2003 heat wave will be considered a cool summer. The dense urban fabric of Birmingham, the UK's second largest city, creates a warming effect when compared to surrounding rural areas. Past studies have found the nature of this urban heat island (UHI) to be related to city size, moisture availability, land-use, anthropogenic emissions, building materials and geometry. The UHI effect can lead to heat stress and air pollution problems which are a major health concern. Birmingham's UHI is not currently modelled. More specifically the UK climate projections treat Birmingham as a homogeneous slab of grassland. The inclusions of the urban areas in a climate model will show an intensification of the likely heat risk in future projections. In the present study, the JULES (Joint UK Land Environment Simulator) model has been setup and run for Birmingham and surrounding areas. The UHI was found to be greater than 3.5oC in Birmingham when modelled during heat waves. The model's performance is evaluated against data from two UK Met Office standard sites: Edgbaston (urban) and Winterbourne (rural). The temperatures predicted by the model over a 12 month (2010) simulation show a strong correlation with the observations. The model also reproduces the diurnal UHI intensity averaged over a year reasonably well. The model evaluation is also complemented by a data set of tiny-tag data logger

  16. Detection of incorrect manufacturer labelling of hip components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand-Hill, Matthieu; Henckel, Johann; Skinner, John; Hart, Alister [University College London, Institute of Orthopaedics, London (United Kingdom); Burwell, Matthew [Royal United Hospital, Bath (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    We describe the case of a 53-year-old man who underwent a left metal-on-metal hip resurfacing in 2015. Component size mismatch (CSM) was suspected because of the patient's immediate post-operative mechanical symptoms and high metal ion levels. Surgical notes indicated the appropriate combinations of implants were used. However, we detected a mismatch using computed tomography. Revision was performed and subsequent measurements of explanted components confirmed the mismatch. To our knowledge, this case is the first report of a CT method being used in a patient to pre-operatively identify CSM. (orig.)

  17. A Star in the Western Sky: John Birmingham, Astronomer and Poet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, P.

    John Birmingham (1814-1884) of Millbrook, County Galway, was an outstanding amateur astronomer, now completely forgotten. He discovered the 1866 nova, T Coronae Borealis. Later his name was assigned to a feature near Anaxagoras on the Moon. In 1884 the Royal Irish Academy awarded him its Cunningham Gold Medal for his catalogue of the red variable stars. John Birmingham was not only an acute observer, he also wrote numerous semi-popular articles on many aspects of astronomy. He was also active in geology and railway surveying.

  18. 'I Never Did Anything Wrong'--Trojan Horse: A Qualitative Study Uncovering the Impact in Birmingham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Imran

    2018-01-01

    In 2014, the city of Birmingham (UK) became embroiled in a high-profile scandal that would bring it and the wider education system under disrepute. The 'Trojan Horse' affair, as it become known, began with an anonymised letter that claimed hard-line 'Islamists' were plotting and planning to take over a number of schools in Birmingham. Amongst the…

  19. Ablative skin resurfacing with a novel microablative CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotkin, Robert H; Sarnoff, Deborah S; Cannarozzo, Giovanni; Sadick, Neil S; Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene

    2009-02-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser skin resurfacing has been a mainstay of facial rejuvenation since its introduction in the mid 1990s. Recently, a new generation of fractional or microablative CO2 lasers has been introduced to the marketplace. According to the concept of fractional photothermolysis, these lasers ablate only a fraction of the epidermal and dermal architecture in the treatment area. An array of microscopic thermal wounds is created that ablates the epidermis and dermis within very tiny zones; adjacent to these areas, the epidermis and dermis are spared. This microablative process of laser skin resurfacing has proven safe and effective not only for facial rejuvenation, but elsewhere on the body as well. It is capable of improving wrinkles, acne scars, and other types of atrophic scars and benign pigmented lesions associated with elastotic, sun-damaged skin. Because of the areas of spared epidermis and dermis inherent in a procedure that employs fractional photothermolysis, healing is more rapid compared to fully ablative CO2 laser skin resurfacing and downtime is proportionately reduced. A series of 32 consecutive patients underwent a single laser resurfacing procedure with the a new microablative CO2 laser. All patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months and were asked to complete patient satisfaction questionnaires; a 6 month postoperative photographic evaluation by an independent physician, not involved in the treatment, was also performed. Both sets of data were graded and reported on a quartile scale. Results demonstrated greater than 50% improvement in almost all patients with those undergoing treatment for wrinkles, epidermal pigment or solar elastosis deriving the greatest change for the better (>75%).

  20. Commercialization of an electric propulsion unit for ecological ice resurfacers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giroux, M. [MG Service, L' Assomption, PQ (Canada); Sylvestre, P. [Environment Canada, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2000-03-01

    Community health departments (CHD) and the general public are greatly concerned about the air quality at indoor skating rinks. A solution now exists whereby municipalities can convert their internal combustion resurfacers to electricity, using a system proposed by MG Service. This electric propulsion unit was developed and designed by MG Service, in conjunction with the Centre d'experimentation des vehicules electriques du Quebec (CEVEQ) and TPR Inc., an engineering firm. The main advantage of this technology is the ease of integration into the chassis of conventional resurfacers currently in use throughout the various municipalities. The propulsion unit is battery-powered and designed to replace the internal combustion engine. As a result, it eliminates carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide emissions, and more than meets the requirements set by health boards with regard to air quality at indoor skating rinks. Recyclable, maintenance-free and manufactured according to the standards set by the Underwriters Laboratories of Canada (ULC), the gel-sealed batteries display great advantages. The cost effectiveness of the electric propulsion unit is more impressive when considering that electricity is clean and costs five times less than conventional fuels currently in use. Regular verifications and calibrations are not required and the maintenance is minimal. The ventilation requirements are also reduced, leading to savings in energy costs required for the aeration of the indoor skating rink. Finally, the elimination of tank rental and fuel costs represent an added benefit. A detailed description of the components is provided. Following a series of trials, the operators were impressed by the surface gripability, traction and manoeuvrability. The resurfacers also gave an impression of greater raw power and were very quiet and easy to use, resulting in better overall operation when compared to conventional resurfacers. 1 fig.

  1. Upper Eyelid Fractional CO2 Laser Resurfacing With Incisional Blepharoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlus, Brett S; Schwarcz, Robert M; Nakra, Tanuj

    2016-01-01

    Laser resurfacing, performed at the same time as blepharoplasty, has most commonly been applied to the lower eyelid skin but can effectively be used on the upper eyelid to reduce rhytidosis and improve skin quality. The authors evaluate the safety and efficacy of this procedure. Fractional CO2 laser resurfacing was performed in conjunction with incisional upper blepharoplasty. The ultrapulsed laser energy was applied to the sub-brow skin, the upper medial canthal skin, and the pretarsal skin in 30 patients. Photos were obtained preoperatively and at 3 months. All patients demonstrated reduction in upper eyelid rhytidosis without any serious complications. Independent rhytidosis grading (0-4) showed a mean improvement of 42%. One patient experienced wound dehiscence that satisfactorily resolved without intervention. Upper eyelid laser resurfacing is effective and can be safely performed at the same time as upper blepharoplasty. This approach reduces or eliminates the need for medial incisions to address medial canthal skin redundancy and rhytidosis and it directly treats upper eyelid wrinkles on residual eyelid and infra-brow skin during blepharoplasty.

  2. Hip dysplasia and congenital hip dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingg, G.; Nebel, G.; von Torklus, D.

    1981-11-01

    In human genetics and orthopedics quite different answers have been given to the question of hereditary transmission and frequency of hip dysplasia in families of children with congenital hip dislocation. We therefore have made roentgenometric measurements of 110 parents of children with congenital hip dislocation. In 25% we found abnormal flat acetabulae, whereas 12% had pathologic deep hips. This may propose a new concept of morphology of congenital hip dysplasia.

  3. Optimizing Outcomes in Pharyngoesophageal Reconstruction and Neck Resurfacing: 10-Year Experience of 294 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, Basel; Xue, Amy; Solari, Mario G; Boa, Olivier; Liu, Jun; Hanasono, Matthew M; Skoracki, Roman; Yu, Peirong; Selber, Jesse C

    2017-01-01

    Pharyngoesophageal reconstruction is a complex endeavor that poses many challenges. This 10-year series examines factors impacting the need for neck skin resurfacing and evaluates the impact of reconstructive modalities on outcomes. A review identified 294 patients who underwent pharyngoesophageal reconstruction from 2002 to 2012. Patients were divided based on neck skin resurfacing requirements. Patients undergoing neck resurfacing were further subdivided into reconstructive technique, including a second skin paddle or muscle component from the same free flap pedicle, a local flap, or a second free flap. All groups were compared by comorbidities, complications, and functional outcomes. Of 294 patients, 179 (60.9 percent) required neck skin resurfacing. In the resurfaced group, there were 90 circumferential defects (50.3 percent) and 89 partial defects (49.7 percent). In the resurfaced group, 110 (61.4 percent) underwent reconstruction with a second skin paddle from the same free flap pedicle, 21 (11.7 percent) underwent reconstruction with a muscle component from the same pedicle, and 25 (13.9 percent) received a pectoralis major flap. There were five external paddle flap losses in the resurfaced group (2.8 percent) and no internal flap losses. Overall complications were similar among groups. The resurfaced group had a lower pharyngocutaneous fistula rate (4.5 percent) compared with the primary closure group (11.3 percent) (p = 0.026). Prior neck surgery and radiation therapy were strong predictors of neck skin resurfacing (p resurfacing is often required in salvage pharyngoesophageal reconstruction. Providing additional vascularized tissue over the neoconduit is predictive of lower pharyngocutaneous fistula rates. An algorithmic approach to neck resurfacing is presented.

  4. Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference, Birmingham 3.–6. 7. 2014

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mráčková, Veronika; Baťa, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 51, 3-4 (2014), s. 414-417 ISSN 0018-7003. [Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference. Birmingham, 03.07.2014-06.07.2014] Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : conference * medieval * music Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  5. Listening to Students: Customer Journey Mapping at Birmingham City University Library and Learning Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Judith; Eade, Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    Birmingham City University's Library and Learning Resources' strategic aim is to improve student satisfaction. A key element is the achievement of the Customer Excellence Standard. An important component of the standard is the mapping of services to improve quality. Library and Learning Resources has developed a methodology to map these…

  6. The Work of Teachers and Others in and around a Birmingham Slum School 1891-1920

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Susannah

    2009-01-01

    The "Floodgate Street area" was a notorious slum district in the city of Birmingham in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This article presents a case study, drawing on the rich archival sources available for this area, to examine the language that local authority and voluntary workers used to describe the local area, and…

  7. The Consequences of the Trojan Horse Affair and a Possible Way Forward for Birmingham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Sarah; Hatcher, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The UK government seized the opportunity of the Trojan Horse affair to launch a damaging Islamophobic attack, eagerly relayed by a racist press, on the Muslim community in Birmingham and beyond, abusing Ofsted and the Prevent strategy as blatant instruments of ideologically-driven policy. The various reports found no evidence of radicalisation or…

  8. Context, Complexity and Contestation: Birmingham's Agreed Syllabuses for Religious Education since the 1970s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Stephen G.; Freathy, Rob J. K.

    2011-01-01

    The present article offers an historical perspective on the 1975, 1995 and 2007 Birmingham Agreed Syllabuses for Religious Education. It draws upon historical evidence uncovered as part of "The hidden history of curriculum change in religious education in English schools, 1969-1979" project, and curriculum history theories, especially…

  9. The Sociopolitical Context of Education in Post-Civil Rights Birmingham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loder-Jackson, Tondra L.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on scholarship from the politics and history of education, narrative and archival data, and the author's emic perspectives, this article examines social and political transformations in the Birmingham City Schools (BCS) and some of the surrounding metropolitan school districts during the pre- and post-classical phases of the American civil…

  10. Clinical and radiological evolution of Intervened patients of total arthroplasty of hip with prostheses of resuperficialization metal-metal - Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvan Villamarin, Fernando; Bernal Torres, Fabio A; Paez, Jose Mauricio and others

    2006-01-01

    The articular degeneration of the hip in young patients requires including therapeutical alternatives for the management of this population. The resurfacing prostheses with metal-metal surfaces is an alternative for this type of patients. Reports with short and medium follow up are very promising, besides the different studies of laboratory that bear, the theoretical bases for their success. In this descriptive study, observational cases series type is described the radiological and clinical evolution of patients intervened of total arthroplasty of hip with resurfacing prostheses metal-metal in the hospital el Tunal of Bogota. The results of 31 hips are presented (27 patients) with an age average of 50 years old and a medium follow up of 16 months, with a good post surgical functional result with a median of 96 in the Harris Scores. The complications presented in the patient series are described and their relation with the different factors analyzed

  11. Isolated patellofemoral arthroplasty reproduces natural patellofemoral joint kinematics when the patella is resurfaced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenneucker, Hilde; Labey, Luc; Vander Sloten, Jos; Desloovere, Kaat; Bellemans, Johan

    2016-11-01

    The objectives of this in vitro project were to compare the dynamic three-dimensional patellofemoral kinematics, contact forces, contact areas and contact pressures of a contemporary patellofemoral prosthetic implant with those of the native knee and to measure the influence of patellar resurfacing and patellar thickness. The hypothesis was that these designs are capable to reproduce the natural kinematics but result in higher contact pressures. Six fresh-frozen specimens were tested on a custom-made mechanical knee rig before and after prosthetic trochlear resurfacing, without and with patellar resurfacing in three different patellar thicknesses. Full three-dimensional kinematics were analysed during three different motor tasks, using infrared motion capture cameras and retroflective markers. Patellar contact characteristics were registered using a pressure measuring device. The patellofemoral kinematic behaviour of the patellofemoral arthroplasty was similar to that of the normal knee when the patella was resurfaced, showing only significant (p patellofemoral kinematics acceptable well when the patella was resurfaced. From a kinematic point of view, patellar resurfacing may be advisable. However, the substantially elevated patellar contact pressures remain a point of concern in the decision whether or not to resurface the patella. This study therefore not only adds a new point in the discussion whether or not to resurface the patella, but also supports the claimed advantage that a patellofemoral arthroplasty is capable to reproduce the natural knee kinematics.

  12. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made of...

  13. Bilateral hip arthroplasty: is 1-week staging the optimum strategy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis-Owen Charles A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Seventy-nine patients underwent bilateral hip arthroplasty staged either at 1 week (Group 1 or after greater intervals (as suggested by the patients, mean 44 weeks, range 16-88 weeks (Group 2, over a five year period at one Institution. Sixty-eight patients (29 bilateral hip resurfacings and 39 total hip replacements completed questionnaires regarding their post-operative recovery, complications and overall satisfaction with the staging of their surgery. There was no significant age or ASA grade difference between the patient groups. Complication rates in the two groups were similar and overall satisfaction rates were 84% in Group 1 (n = 32 and 89% in Group 2 (n = 36. Cumulative hospital lengths of stay were significantly longer in Group 1 patients (11.9 days vs 9.1 days(p The mean time to return to part-time work was 16.4 weeks for Group 1, and a cumulative 17.2 weeks (8.8 and 8.4 weeks for Group 2. The time to return to full-time work was significantly shorter for Group 1 patients (21.0 weeks, compared with a cumulative 29.7 weeks for Group 2(p Hip resurfacing patients in Group 2 had significantly shorter durations of postoperative pain and were able to return to part-time and full time work sooner than total hip arthroplasty patients. There was a general trend towards a faster recovery and resumption of normal activities following the second operation in Group 2 patients, compared with the first operation. Bilateral hip arthroplasty staged at a 1-week interval resulted in an earlier resolution of hip pain, and an earlier return to full-time work (particularly following total hip replacement surgery, with high levels of patient satisfaction and no increased risk in complications; however the hospital length of stay was significantly longer. The decision for the timing of staged bilateral surgery should be made in conjunction with the patient, making adjustments to accommodate their occupational needs and functional demands.

  14. Hip Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your hip is the joint where your femur (thigh bone) meets your pelvis (hip bone). There are two main parts: a ball ... fits in a socket in the pelvis. Your hip is known as a ball-and-socket joint. ...

  15. Hip Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Implants and Prosthetics Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants Hip Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Hip implants are medical devices intended to restore mobility ...

  16. Hip Replacement Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Outreach Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Hip Replacement Surgery Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB ... PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Hip Replacement Surgery Hip replacement surgery removes damaged or ...

  17. Resurfacing asteroids from YORP spin-up and failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Kevin J.; Minton, David A.; Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Carry, Benoit

    2018-04-01

    The spectral properties of S and Q-type asteroids can change over time due to interaction with the solar wind and micrometeorite impacts in a process known as 'space weathering.' Space weathering raises the spectral slope and decreases the 1 μm absorption band depth in the spectra of S and Q-type asteroids. Over time, Q-type asteroids, which have very similar spectra to ordinary chondrite meteorites, will change into S-type asteroids. Because there are a significant number of Q-type asteroids, there must be some process which is resurfacing S-type asteroids into Q-types. In this study, we use asteroid data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to show a trend between the slope through the g‧, r‧, and i‧ filters, called the gri-slope, and size that holds for all populations of S and Q-type asteroids in the inner solar system, regardless of orbit. We model the evolution of a suite of asteroids in a Monte Carlo YORP rotational evolution and space weathering model. We show that spin-up and failure from YORP is one of the key resurfacing mechanisms that creates the observed weathering trends with size. By varying the non-dimensional YORP coefficient and running time of the present model over the range 475-1425 Myr, we find a range of values for the space weathering timescale, τSW ≈ 19-80 Myr at 2.2 AU. We also estimate the time to weather a newly resurfaced Q-type asteroid into an S-complex asteroid at 1 AU, τQ → S(1AU) ≈ 2-7 Myr.

  18. Safety measures in hip arthroscopy and their efficacy in minimizing complications: a systematic review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Asheesh; Redmond, John M; Hammarstedt, Jon E; Schwindel, Leslie; Domb, Benjamin G

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the literature to determine complications of hip arthroscopy, with a secondary focus on how to minimize complications and risks. Two independent reviewers performed a search of PubMed for articles that contained at least 1 of the following terms: complications and hip arthroscopy, hip impingement, femoral acetabular impingement and complications, or femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and complications. The search was limited to articles published between 1999 and June 2013. An additional search was performed for articles evaluating techniques on how to minimize complications. We identified 81 studies (5,535 patients; 6,277 hips). The mean age was 35.48 years, and the mean body mass index was 25.20 kg/m(2). Of the participants, 52% were male and 48% were female. The majority of studies were Level IV Evidence (63%). A total of 285 complications were reported, for an overall rate of 4.5%. There were 26 major complications (0.41%) and a 4.1% minor complication rate. The overall reoperation rate was 4.03%. A total of 94 hips underwent revision arthroscopy. Regarding open procedures, 150 patients (93%) underwent either total hip arthroplasty or a hip resurfacing procedure. The conversion rate to total hip arthroplasty or a resurfacing procedure was 2.4%. Overall, primary hip arthroscopy is a successful procedure with low rates of major (0.41%) and minor (4.1%) complications. The reoperation rate was 4.03% in our review. There is admittedly a learning curve to performing hip arthroscopy, and we present a systematic review of the complications and how to minimize these complications with careful technique and planning. Level IV, systematic review of Level II to V studies. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Conditioning in laser skin resurfacing - betulin emulsion and skin recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelmann, Hans-Robert; Podmelle, Fred; Waite, Peter D; Müller-Debus, Charlotte Friederieke; Hammes, Stefan; Funk, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Laser skin resurfacing of the face by CO₂-laser ablation is causing superficial wounds that need rapid recovery to reduce the risk of infection, the risk of chronification and as a result the risk of unaesthetic scars. The question being addressed by this study is to demonstrate benefit of betulin emulsion skin care after CO₂-laser wounds. The outcome of this aesthetic comparison between betulin emulsion, moist wound dressing and gauze covering in promoting the recovery process in laser skin ablation is to demonstrate improved aesthetic benefit for the patient. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. First results from the BOXING (Birmingham-OCIW XMM and IMACS Nearby Groups) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, T. A.; Raychaudhury, S.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    We present the first results from the BOXING (Birmingham-OCIW XMM and IMACS Nearby Groups) project, a collaboration between the Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington (OCIW) and the University of Birmingham U.K. to study a sample of 25 galaxy groups (z ˜ 0.06) by means of optical photometry and spectroscopy (du Pont 2.5m; IMACS/Magellan) combined with x-ray observations (XMM). The combination of x-ray with optical data allows us to study the nature of the relationship between the properties of the groups and the galaxies that they contain. In this preliminary study, we present optical luminosity functions, which shows bimodal behavior in the poorer systems, interpreted as result of rapid merging. We also examine the dependence of galaxy morphology on local environment. Once spectroscopic observations are completed, we will be able to study velocity dispersions, star formation and nuclear activity in individual galaxies.

  1. Isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis treatment using resurfacing arthroplasty with scaphoid anchorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humada Álvarez, G; Simón Pérez, C; García Medrano, B; Faour Martín, O; Marcos Rodríguez, J J; Vega Castrillo, A; Martín Ferrero, M A

    The aim of this study is to show the results of scaphotrapeziotrapezoid (STT) joint osteoarthritis treatment performing resurfacing arthroplasty with scaphoid anchorage. An observational, descriptive and retrospective study was performed. Ten patients with isolated STT joint osteoarthritis were studied between 2013 and 2015. The mean follow-up time was 26months. Clinical results, functional and subjective scores were reviewed. The patients were satisfied, achieving an average of 2.1 (0-3) on the VAS score and 16 (2 to 28) in the DASH questionnaire, and returning to work in the first three months post-surgery. Recovery of range of motion compared to the contralateral wrist was 96% in extension, 95% in flexion, 87% in ulnar deviation and 91% in radial deviation. The average handgrip strength of the wrist was 95% and pinch strength was 95% compared to the contralateral side. There were no intraoperative complications or alterations in postoperative carpal alignment. Resurfacing arthroplasty is proposed as a good and novel alternative in treating isolated SST joint arthritis. Achieving the correct balance between the strength and mobility of the wrist, without causing carpal destabilisation, is important to obtain satisfactory clinical and functional results. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  2. Geology of the Birmingham, Gadsden, and Montgomery 10 x 20 NTMS Quadrangles, Alabama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, C.W.; Beg, M.A.

    1979-04-01

    This document is a facsimile edition (with accompanying maps) of geologic reports on the Birmingham, Gadsden, and Montgomery 1 0 x 2 0 NTMS quadrangles prepared for SRL by the Geological Survey of Alabama. The purpose of these reports is to provide background geologic information to aid in the interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance data. Each report includes descriptions of economic mineral localities as well as a mineral locality map and a geologic map

  3. Geology of the Birmingham, Gadsden, and Montgomery 10 x 20 NTMS quadrangles, Alabama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, C.W.; Beg, M.A.

    1979-04-01

    This document is a facsimile edition (with accompanying maps) of geologic reports on the Birmingham, Gadsden, and Montgomery 1 0 x 2 0 NTMS quadrangles prepared for SRL by the Geological Survey of Alabama. Purpose of these reports is to provide background geologic information to aid in the interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance data. Each report includes descriptions of economic mineral localities as well as a mineral locality map and a geologic map

  4. Philanthropy in Birmingham and Sydney, 1860-1914: class, gender and race

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis considers philanthropic activities directed towards new mothers and destitute children both “at home” and in a particular colonial context. Philanthropic encounters in Birmingham and Sydney are utilised as a lens through which to explore the intersections between discourses of race, gender and class in metropole and colony. Moreover, philanthropic and missionary efforts towards women and children facilitate a broader discussion of ideas of citizenship and nation. Du...

  5. The TAPin electronic libraries project and the experience at the University of Birmingham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy K. Mulvaney

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The TAPin Project and its implementation at the University of Birmingham is described. Local issues and key features of a hybrid approach to Networked Learner Support are addressed. The methods of NLS adopted included electronic mail and the Internet. The key role in NLS played by subject librarians is stressed. Transfer of skills to learners by means of targeted individual training and a web guide is discussed.

  6. Revision Hip Arthroscopy Indications and Outcomes: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardana, Vandit; Philippon, Marc J; de Sa, Darren; Bedi, Asheesh; Ye, Lily; Simunovic, Nicole; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2015-10-01

    To identify the indications and outcomes in patients undergoing revision hip arthroscopy. The electronic databases Embase, Medline, HealthStar, and PubMed were searched from 1946 to July 19, 2014. Two blinded reviewers searched, screened, and evaluated the data quality of the studies using the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies scale. Data were abstracted in duplicate. Agreement and descriptive statistics are presented. Six studies were included (3 prospective case series and 3 retrospective chart reviews), with a total of 448 hips examined. The most common indications for revision hip arthroscopy included residual femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), labral tears, and chondral lesions. The mean interval between revision arthroscopy and the index procedure was 25.6 months. Overall, the modified Harris Hip Score improved by a mean of 33.6% (19.3 points) from the baseline score at 1-year follow-up. In 14.6% of patients, further surgical procedures were required, including re-revision hip arthroscopy (8.0%), total hip replacement (5.6%), and hip resurfacing (1.0%). Female patients more commonly underwent revision hip arthroscopy (59.7%). The current evidence examined in this review supports revision hip arthroscopy as a successful intervention to improve functional outcomes (modified Harris Hip Score) and relieve pain in patients with residual symptoms after primary FAI surgery, although the outcomes are inferior when compared with a matched cohort of patients undergoing primary hip arthroscopy for FAI. The main indication for revision is a candidate who has symptoms due to residual cam- or pincer-type deformity that was either unaddressed or under-resected during the index operation. However, it is important to consider that the studies included in this review are of low-quality evidence. Surgeons should consider incorporating a minimum 2-year follow-up for individuals after index hip-preservation surgery because revisions tended to occur within this

  7. Structural-Geometric Functionalization of the Additively Manufactured Prototype of Biomimetic Multispiked Connecting Ti-Alloy Scaffold for Entirely Noncemented Resurfacing Arthroplasty Endoprostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Uklejewski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The multispiked connecting scaffold (MSC-Scaffold prototype, inspired by the biological system of anchorage of the articular cartilage in the periarticular trabecular bone by means of subchondral bone interdigitations, is the essential innovation in fixation of the bone in resurfacing arthroplasty (RA endoprostheses. The biomimetic MSC‐Scaffold, due to its complex geometric structure, can be manufactured only using additive technology, for example, selective laser melting (SLM. The major purpose of this work is determination of constructional possibilities for the structural-geometric functionalization of SLM‐manufactured MSC‐Scaffold prototype, compensating the reduced ability—due to the SLM technological limitations—to accommodate the ingrowing bone filling the interspike space of the prototype, which is important for the prototype bioengineering design. Confocal microscopy scanning of components of the SLM‐manufactured prototype of total hip resurfacing arthroplasty (THRA endoprosthesis with the MSC‐Scaffold was performed. It was followed by the geometric measurements of a variety of specimens designed as the fragments of the MSC-Scaffold of both THRA endoprosthesis components. The reduced ability to accommodate the ingrowing bone tissue in the SLM‐manufactured prototypes versus that in the corresponding CAD models has been quantitatively determined. Obtained results enabled to establish a way of compensatory structural‐geometric functionalization, allowing the MSC‐Scaffold adequate redesigning and manufacturing in additive SLM technology.

  8. Nonablative Fractional Laser Resurfacing in Skin of Color: Evidence-based Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik, Shivani B.; Alexis, Andrew F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Nonablative laser resurfacing represents one of the major advances in procedural dermatology over the past decade. However, its use in darker skin types is limited by safety concerns and a relative lack of available data.

  9. Histological evaluation of vertical laser channels from ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbølling Haak, Christina; Illes, Monica; Paasch, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) represents a new treatment potential for various skin conditions and new laser devices are being introduced. It is important to gain information about the impact of laser settings on the dimensions of the created laser channels for obtaining a safe...... and efficient treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to establish a standard model to document the histological tissue damage profiles after AFR and to test a new laser device at diverse settings. Ex vivo abdominal pig skin was treated with a MedArt 620, prototype fractional carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser...... (Medart, Hvidovre, Denmark) delivering single microbeams (MB) with a spot size of 165 µm. By using a constant pulse duration of 2 ms, intensities of 1-18 W, single and 2-4 stacked pulses, energies were delivered in a range from 2-144 mJ/MB. Histological evaluations included 3-4 high-quality histological...

  10. Histological evaluation of vertical laser channels from ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbølling Haak, Christina; Illes, Monica; Paasch, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) represents a new treatment potential for various skin conditions and new laser devices are being introduced. It is important to gain information about the impact of laser settings on the dimensions of the created laser channels for obtaining a safe...... and efficient treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to establish a standard model to document the histological tissue damage profiles after AFR and to test a new laser device at diverse settings. Ex vivo abdominal pig skin was treated with a MedArt 620, prototype fractional carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser...... (Medart, Hvidovre, Denmark) delivering single microbeams (MB) with a spot size of 165 μm. By using a constant pulse duration of 2 ms, intensities of 1-18 W, single and 2-4 stacked pulses, energies were delivered in a range from 2-144 mJ/MB. Histological evaluations included 3-4 high-quality histological...

  11. Biologic resurfacing of the patella bone versus patellectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motamedi M

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available In the past years, there was a tendency to excise the patella in pathologic conditions affecting this bone. The patella has many critical effects in the function of the knee joint. For example, after its exicision the force of quadriceps muscle decreases by forty percent (40% and the knee joint becomes prone to early osteoarthritic changes. For these reasons, in the recent years the "biologic resurfacing of patella" has been used in pathologic conditions instead of its complete removal. In this new method after resection of the diseased part of the bone, the fascia of the quadriceps muscle, with its intact base, is used to cover the resected part of the bone. In practice, after pain relief, the active motion of the joint is started. Then the limb is placed in a splint or brace and after a period of 3 weeks, passive motion is begun.

  12. Laser resurfacing of skin flaps: an experimental comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srdan Babovic

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The influence of Coherent Ultrapulse, TruPulse and Erbium: YAG laser skin resurfacing on survival of the skin flaps when performed simultaneously was evaluated. Material and methods. We used twelve female Yucatan minipigs in the study. Skin flaps including paniculus carnosus were raised on the animals’ back. The flaps were sutured into the defect under tension. We designed 4 experimental groups: Control-Flaps only, Group 2-Flaps + 4 immediate TruPulse laser passes, Group 3-Flaps + 2 immediate Coherent UltraPulse laser passes, Group 4-Flaps – immediate 50J/cm2 total fluence with Erbium: YAG laser. Results. Flap survival in Control group was 98.8%. There was no flap in Group 2 with complete survival. Survival of the flaps in Group 2 (Tru-Pulse ranged from 75-90%, with average flap survival area of 85.2%. In Group 3 (UltraPulse all 24 flaps had some area of necrosis. Flap survival in Group 3 ranged from 75-95%, with an average of 85.6%. In Group 4 (Erbium: YAG flap survival area ranged from 70-95%, with all 24 flaps with some area of necrosis, with average flap survival area of 87.3%. There is a significant statistical difference in flap survival area between groups 2, 3 and 4 versus Control (p<0.001. Conclusion. The results of our study suggest that laser resurfacing of skin flaps sutured under tension in the same operative session is detrimental for skin flap survival. We also found no significant difference in flap survival area between TruPulse, Coherent UltraPulse and Erbium: YAG laser treated flaps.

  13. HIP JOINT AND HIP ENDOPROSTHESIS BIOMECHANICS

    OpenAIRE

    Jakub Gryka

    2017-01-01

    This article contains a description of the basic issues related to anatomy, loading of hip joint and its endoprosthesis research methods. The methods of testing and simulating hip joint loads, factors that influence the selection of parameters during the design of prostheses, typical solutions to engineering problems related to this topic are presented. The article concludes with short summary of the finite element method for the design of hip replacements.

  14. Fractionated laser resurfacing corrects the inappropriate UVB response in geriatric skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandau, Dan F; Lewis, Davina A; Somani, Ally-Khan; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2012-06-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is a disease primarily afflicting geriatric patients as evidenced by the fact that 80% of all non-melanoma skin cancers are diagnosed in patients over the age of 60 years. As such, geriatric skin responds to cancer-inducing UVB irradiation in a manner that allows the establishment of tumor cells. Currently, the only effective treatment for non-melanoma skin cancer is the removal of the tumors after they appear, indicating the need for a more cost-effective prophylactic therapy. Geriatric volunteers were treated with fractionated laser resurfacing therapy on either sun-protected (upper buttocks) or chronically sun-exposed (dorsal forearm) skin. Fractionated laser resurfacing therapy was shown to decrease the occurrence of senescent fibroblasts in geriatric dermis, increase the dermal expression of IGF-1, and correct the inappropriate UVB response observed in untreated geriatric skin. These responses to fractionated laser resurfacing were equal to the effects seen previously using the more aggressive wounding following dermabrasion. Furthermore, fractionated laser resurfacing was equally effective in both sun-protected and sun-exposed skin. The ability of fractionated laser resurfacing treatment to protect against the occurrence of UVB-damaged proliferating keratinocytes indicates the potential of fractionated laser resurfacing to reduce or prevent aging-associated non-melanoma skin cancer.

  15. The sensitization potential of sunscreen after ablative fractional skin resurfacing using modified human repeated insult patch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonchai, Waranya; Sathaworawong, Angkana; Wongpraparut, Chanisada; Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima

    2015-10-01

    Ablative fractional skin resurfacing has become popular and proven to be useful in treating scars, photoaging and wrinkles. Although post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) is the most common complication especially in dark-skinned patients like Asian. Several modalities have been used to overcome the PIH. To determine the sensitization potential of sunscreen applied immediately after ablative fractional skin resurfacing. Sixty volunteers were recruited. Of these 30 subjects were from previous ablative fractional skin resurfacing study who applied broad-spectrum sunscreen containing anti-inflammatory agent starting on the first day after resurfacing and another 30 non-resurfacing subjects had applied the same sunscreen on the intact skin. All subjects were patch/photopatch tested for sensitization study by using modified human repeated insult patch test (HRIPT). There were significantly higher sensitization rate of UV-filter, octocrylene and the sunscreen in resurfacing group than in non-resurfacing group. Early application of sunscreen after ablative fractional skin resurfacing has increased the incidence of sensitization potential of sunscreen. The sunscreen is recommended to start using from D3 after fractional ablative skin resurfacing to ensure the complete recovery of skin barrier and minimize the risk of sensitization.

  16. Hip fracture - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - discharge ... in the hospital for surgery to repair a hip fracture, a break in the upper part of ...

  17. Hip joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100006.htm Hip joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The hip joint is made up of two major parts: ...

  18. Hip Labral Tear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that joint in the future. Prevention Hip labral tears are often associated with sports participation. If your sport puts a lot of strain on your hips, condition the surrounding muscles with strength and flexibility exercises. Try to avoid ...

  19. HPLC/DAD Intercomparison on Phytoplankton Pigments (HIP-1, HIP-2, HIP-3 and HIP-4)

    OpenAIRE

    CANUTI Elisabetta; RAS Josephine; GRUNG Merete; ROTTGERS Rudiger; COSTA GOELA Priscilla; ARTUSO Florinda; CATALDI Dario

    2016-01-01

    From 2009 to 2015, in the context of the MERIS (Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) validation activities, the JRC Marine Optical Laboratory organised four HPLC Intercomparison exercises for Phytoplankton Pigment measurements (HIP-1, HIP-2, HIP-3 and HIP-4), involving seven European accredited and reference laboratories. The objectives of these intercomparison exercises were: creating a reference community at European level for phytoplankton pigment analysis capable of supporting satel...

  20. TREATMENT OF HIP DYSPLASIA

    OpenAIRE

    Iulian ICLEANU; Mariana CORDUN

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, our purpose is to show that using physiotherapy on patients with hip dysplasia from the very beginning, in the first months of life, helps treating them faster. Common literature proposes to use physiotherapy on patients with hip dysplasia either after their recovery or in the terminal phase of recovery, claiming that any earlier intervention will prolong the hip recovery. The effects of hip dysplasia reflect over the whole musculoskeletal system, while it hinders the knees (g...

  1. Hip supporting device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for limiting movements in one or more anatomical joints, such as a device for limiting movement in the human hip joint after hip replacement surgery. This is provided by a device for limiting movement in the human hip joint, said device comprising: at least...

  2. Bursitis of the Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... difficile (C. diff.) InfectionHerpes Home Diseases and Conditions Bursitis of the Hip Condition Bursitis of the Hip Share Print Table of Contents1. ... Prevention5. Treatment6. Everyday Life7. Questions8. Resources What is bursitis of the hip? Bursitis is the painful swelling ...

  3. HIPs at Ten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuh, George; O'Donnell, Ken; Schneider, Carol Geary

    2017-01-01

    2017 is the anniversary of the introduction of what are now commonly known as high-impact practices (HIPs). Many of the specific activities pursued under the HIPs acronym have been around in some form for decades, such as study abroad, internships, and student-faculty research. It was about ten years ago that, after conferring HIPs at Ten with…

  4. Edge loading in metal-on-metal hips: low clearance is a new risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Richard J; Zografos, Angelos; Sayles, Ritchie S; Hart, Alister; Cann, Philippa

    2012-03-01

    The revision rate of large head metal-on-metal and resurfacing hips are significantly higher than conventional total hip replacements. The revision of these components has been linked to high wear caused by edge loading; which occurs when the head-cup contact patch extends over the cup rim. There are two current explanations for this; first, there is loss of entrainment of synovial fluid resulting in breakdown of the lubricating film and second, edge loading results in a large local increase in contact pressure and consequent film thickness reduction at the cup rim, which causes an increase in wear. This paper develops a method to calculate the distance between the joint reaction force vector and the cup rim--the contact patch centre to rim (CPCR) distance. However, the critical distance for the risk of edge loading is the distance from the contact patch edge to rim (CPER) distance. An analysis of explanted hip components, divided into edge worn and non-edge-worn components showed that there was no statistical difference in CPCR values, but the CPER value was significantly lower for edge worn hips. Low clearance hips, which have a more conformal contact, have a larger diameter contact patch and thus are more at risk of edge loading for similarly positioned hips.

  5. Management of metal-on-metal hip implant patients: Who, when and how to revise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Reshid; Skinner, John A; Hart, Alister J

    2016-05-18

    The debate on how best to manage patients with metal-on-metal (MOM) hip implants continues. With over 1 million patients affected worldwide, the impact is far reaching. The majority of the aggressive failures of MOM hip implants have been dealt with by revision hip surgery, leaving patients with a much more indolent pattern of failure of devices that have been in situ for more than 10 years. The longer-term outcome for such patients remains unknown, and much debate exists on how best to manage these patients. Regulatory guidance is available but remains open to interpretation due to the lack of current evidence and long-term studies. Metal ion thresholds for concern have been suggested at 7 ppb for hip resurfacing arthroplasty and below this level for large diameter total hip arthroplasties. Soft tissue changes including pseudotumours and muscle atrophy have been shown to progress, but this is not consistent. New advanced imaging techniques are helping to diagnose complications with metal hips and the reasons for failure, however these are not widely available. This has led to some centres to tackle difficult cases through multidisciplinary collaboration, for both surgical management decisions and also follow-up decisions. We summarise current evidence and consider who is at risk, when revision should be undertaken and how patients should be managed.

  6. Safety and efficacy of 2,790-nm laser resurfacing for chest photoaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunebaum, Lisa D; Murdock, Jennifer; Cofnas, Paul; Kaufman, Joely

    2015-01-01

    Chest photodamage is a common cosmetic complaint. Laser treatment of the chest may be higher risk than other areas. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of 2,790-nm chest resurfacing for photodamage. Twelve patients with Fitzpatrick skin types I-III were enrolled in this university IRB-approved study. Photo documentation was obtained at baseline and each visit. A test spot with the 2,790-nm resurfacing laser was performed on the chest. Patients who did not have adverse effects from the test spot went on to have a full chest resurfacing procedure. Patients were instructed on standardized aftercare, including sunscreen. A 5-point healing and photodamage improvement scale was used to rate improvement by both investigators and the patients and was obtained at 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months, and 3 months. One pass chest treatment with the 2,790-nm resurfacing laser at fluences greater than or equal to 3.0 mJ with 10% overlap leads to unacceptable rates of hyperpigmentation. Double pass chest treatment at fluences less than or equal to 2.5 mJ with 10% overlap leads to mild improvement in chest photodamage parameters without significant or persistent adverse effects. Laser treatment of aging/photodamaged chest skin remains a challenge due to the delicacy of chest skin. Mild improvement may be obtained with double pass resurfacing with the 2,790-nm wavelength.

  7. Fractional CO2 Laser Resurfacing as Monotherapy in the Treatment of Atrophic Facial Acne Scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Imran; Imran, Saher

    2014-04-01

    While laser resurfacing remains the most effective treatment option for atrophic acne scars, the high incidence of post-treatment adverse effects limits its use. Fractional laser photothermolysis attempts to overcome these limitations of laser resurfacing by creating microscopic zones of injury to the dermis with skip areas in between. The aim of the present study is to assess the efficacy and safety of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing in atrophic facial acne scars. Sixty patients with moderate to severe atrophic facial acne scars were treated with 3-4 sessions of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing at 6-week intervals. The therapeutic response to treatment was assessed at each follow up visit and then finally 6 months after the last laser session using a quartile grading scale. Response to treatment was labelled as 'excellent' if there was >50% improvement in scar appearance and texture of skin on the grading scale while 25-50% response and resurfacing as monotherapy is effective in treating acne scars especially rolling and superficial boxcar scars with minimal adverse effects.

  8. Keloid Skin Flap Retention and Resurfacing in Facial Keloid Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu; Liang, Weizhong; Song, Kexin; Wang, Youbin

    2018-02-01

    Facial keloids commonly occur in young patients. Multiple keloid masses often converge into a large lesion on the face, representing a significant obstacle to keloid mass excision and reconstruction. We describe a new surgical method that excises the keloid mass and resurfaces the wound by saving the keloid skin as a skin flap during facial keloid treatment. Forty-five patients with facial keloids were treated in our department between January 2013 and January 2016. Multiple incisions were made along the facial esthetic line on the keloid mass. The keloid skin was dissected and elevated as a skin flap with one or two pedicles. The scar tissue in the keloid was then removed through the incision. The wound was covered with the preserved keloid skin flap and closed without tension. Radiotherapy and hyperbaric oxygen were applied after surgery. Patients underwent follow-up examinations 6 and 12 months after surgery. Of the 45 total patients, 32 patients were cured and seven patients were partially cured. The efficacy rate was 88.9%, and 38 patients (84.4%) were satisfied with the esthetic result. We describe an efficacious and esthetically satisfactory surgical method for managing facial keloids by preserving the keloid skin as a skin flap. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  9. Potential role of resurfacing Subtropical Underwater in ENSO evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, T.; Chi, J.

    2017-12-01

    Results from a model of the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) have shown that the resurfacing of high salinity Subtropical Underwater contributes to the sea surface salinity variability in the equatorial Pacific. On interannual time scale, this contribution can account for as much as 25% of the surface freshwater flux anomalies and is believed to play a role in ENSO evolution. Having these results in mind, this study investigates the surface salinity budget and its primary controls in the equatorial Pacific using ECCO output for the period 1993-2016. Particular attention is paid to 2014/2015 and 2015/2016. Preliminary analyses of the model results suggest that enhanced subsurface processes and in particular enhanced entrainment of Subtropical Underwater are primarily responsible for the positive sea surface salinity anomalies in the central equatorial Pacific during 2014/2015, which represents an opposite phase of El Niño. These subsurface processes weakened during 2015/2016, diretly contributing to the development of the 2015/2016 El Niño. The mechanisms controlling these subsurface processes are discussed.

  10. Volcanic eruptions on Io: Heat flow, resurfacing, and lava composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Matson, Dennis L.; Veeder, Glenn J.

    1995-01-01

    We model an infrared outburst on Io as being due to a large, erupting lava flow which increased its area at a rate of 1.5 x 10(exp 5)/sq m and cooled from 1225 to 555 K over the 2.583-hr period of observation. The inferred effusion rate of 3 x 10(exp 5) cu m/sec for this eruption is very high, but is not unprece- dented on the Earth and is similar to the high eruption rates suggested for early lunar volcanism. Eruptions occur approxi- mately 6% of the time on Io. These eruptions provide ample resurfacing to explain Io's lack of impact craters. We suggest that the large total radiometric heat flow, 10(exp 14) W, and the size and temperature distribution of the thermal anomalies (McEwen et al. 1992; Veeder et al. 1994) can be accounted for by a series of silicate lava flows in various stages of cooling. We propose that the whole suite of Io's currently observed thermal anomalies was produced by multiple, high-eruptive-rate silicate flows within the past century.

  11. Direct quantitative comparison of molecular responses in photodamaged human skin to fractionated and fully ablative carbon dioxide laser resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orringer, Jeffrey S; Sachs, Dana L; Shao, Yuan; Hammerberg, Craig; Cui, Yilei; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2012-10-01

    Fractionated ablative laser resurfacing has become a widely used treatment modality. Its clinical results are often found to approach those of traditional fully ablative laser resurfacing. To directly compare the molecular changes that result from fractionated and fully ablative carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser resurfacing in photodamaged human skin. Photodamaged skin of 34 adult volunteers was focally treated at distinct sites with a fully ablative CO(2) laser and a fractionated CO(2) laser. Serial skin samples were obtained at baseline and several time points after treatment. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction technology and immunohistochemistry were used to quantify molecular responses to each type of laser treatment. Fully ablative and fractionated CO(2) laser resurfacing induced significant dermal remodeling and collagen induction. After a single treatment, fractionated ablative laser resurfacing resulted in collagen induction that was approximately 40% to 50% as pronounced as that induced by fully ablative laser resurfacing. The fundamental cutaneous responses that result from fully ablative and fractionated carbon dioxide laser resurfacing are similar but differ in magnitude and duration, with the fully ablative procedure inducing relatively greater changes including more pronounced collagen induction. However, the molecular data reported here provide substantial support for fractionated ablative resurfacing as an effective treatment modality for improving skin texture. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Art and Sonic Mining in the Archives: Methods for Investigating the Wartime History of Birmingham School of Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Sian

    2018-01-01

    "Absconditi Viscus" (or "Hidden Entries") is a series of sound compositions based on the history of Birmingham School of Art during the First World War. Sound artist Justin Wiggan explored the concept of historical sonic information that although lost could still potentially permeate the archival record and the fabric of the…

  13. Extremism and Neo-Liberal Education Policy: A Contextual Critique of the Trojan Horse Affair in Birmingham Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, James

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers new insights into the effects of neo-liberal education policies on some Muslim majority schools in Birmingham. It critically reveals how the implementation of neo-liberal education policies, pursued by both Labour and Conservative Governments, has contributed to the failure of some mechanisms of school leadership and governance.…

  14. The Art of ATLAS; multimedia installation by Neal Hartman and Claudia Marcelloni at Thinktank science museum in Birmingham, UK.

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2010-01-01

    The Art of ATLAS is an multimedia installation, developed by Neal Hartman and Claudia Marcelloni about the physicists, engineers and technicians behind the ATLAS Experiment. The installation will been shown at Planetarium entrance of the Thinktank science museum in Birmingham, UK from October 2010 until January 2011.

  15. Fractional versus ablative erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser resurfacing for facial rejuvenation: an objective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Domyati, Moetaz; Abd-El-Raheem, Talal; Abdel-Wahab, Hossam; Medhat, Walid; Hosam, Wael; El-Fakahany, Hasan; Al Anwer, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Laser is one of the main tools for skin resurfacing. Erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) was the second ablative laser, after carbon dioxide, emitting wavelength of 2940 nm. Fractional laser resurfacing has been developed to overcome the drawbacks of ablative lasers. We aimed to objectively evaluate the histopathological and immunohistochemical effects of Er:YAG 2940-nm laser for facial rejuvenation (multiple sessions of fractional vs single session of ablative Er:YAG laser). Facial resurfacing with single-session ablative Er:YAG laser was performed on 6 volunteers. Another 6 were resurfaced using fractional Er:YAG laser (4 sessions). Histopathological (hematoxylin-eosin, orcein, Masson trichrome, and picrosirius red stains) and immunohistochemical assessment for skin biopsy specimens were done before laser resurfacing and after 1 and 6 months. Histometry for epidermal thickness and quantitative assessment for neocollagen formation; collagen I, III, and VII; elastin; and tropoelastin were done for all skin biopsy specimens. Both lasers resulted in increased epidermal thickness. Dermal collagen showed increased neocollagen formation with increased concentration of collagen types I, III, and VII. Dermal elastic tissue studies revealed decreased elastin whereas tropoelastin concentration increased after laser resurfacing. Neither laser showed significant difference between their effects clinically and on dermal collagen. Changes in epidermal thickness, elastin, and tropoelastin were significantly more marked after ablative laser. The small number of patients is a limitation, yet the results show significant improvement. Multiple sessions of fractional laser have comparable effects to a single session of ablative Er:YAG laser on dermal collagen but ablative laser has more effect on elastic tissue and epidermis. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. TREATMENT OF HIP DYSPLASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian ICLEANU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this thesis, our purpose is to show that using physiotherapy on patients with hip dysplasia from the very beginning, in the first months of life, helps treating them faster. Common literature proposes to use physiotherapy on patients with hip dysplasia either after their recovery or in the terminal phase of recovery, claiming that any earlier intervention will prolong the hip recovery. The effects of hip dysplasia reflect over the whole musculoskeletal system, while it hinders the knees (genu valgum, the ankles (ankle valgus, calcaneal valgus and the spine (scoliosis especially at the lumbar level. The most spectacular are at the hip level, that is why we made an analytical evaluation only for this joint. To show the importance of physiotherapy for children with hip dysplasia we started from the hypothesis: untimely treatment for children with hip dysplasia has improved results in functional recovery and in obtaining a better stability, without the necessity of orthopedics or surgical interventions. The research methods used in this study are: the observation method, the bibliographic study method, the experimental method, the graphics method and the statistical mathematical method to process the data and to represent the results graphically. In the end, the results obtained are significantly different from the initial evaluations and we came to the conclusion that starting an untimely analytical kinetic treatment and globally personalizing it to every patient improves stability and biomechanical parameters for the hip.

  17. Hip arthroplasty for ochronosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerimoglu, S.; Onder, C.; Aynaci, O.; Malkoc, C. H.

    2005-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is a metabolic disorder in which homogentisic acid oxidase is absent. Therefore, homogentisic acid accumulates in cartilage and connective tissues. We can diagnose ochronotic arthropathy, a manifestation of long standing alkaptonuria, through careful radiological, physical, and laboratory examination. In this report, we describe 4 cases of ochronotic arthropathy to which we applied cementless total hip prosthesis due to severe hip involvement. (author)

  18. Taking care of your new hip joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hip arthroplasty - precautions; Hip replacement - precautions; Osteoarthritis - hip; Osteoarthritis - knee ... After you have hip replacement surgery, you will need to be careful how you move your hip, especially for the first few months ...

  19. Face resurfacing using a cervicothoracic skin flap prefabricated by lateral thigh fascial flap and tissue expander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingfeng; Zan, Tao; Gu, Bin; Liu, Kai; Shen, Guoxiong; Xie, Yun; Weng, Rui

    2009-01-01

    Resurfacing of facial massive soft tissue defect is a formidable challenge because of the unique character of the region and the limitation of well-matched donor site. In this report, we introduce a technique for using the prefabricated cervicothoracic skin flap for facial resurfacing, in an attempt to meet the principle of flap selection in face reconstructive surgery for matching the color and texture, large dimension, and thinner thickness (MLT) of the recipient. Eleven patients with massive facial scars underwent resurfacing procedures with prefabricated cervicothoracic flaps. The vasculature of the lateral thigh fascial flap, including the descending branch of the lateral femoral circumflex vessels and the surrounding muscle fascia, was used as the vascular carrier, and the pedicles of the fascial flap were anastomosed to either the superior thyroid or facial vessels in flap prefabrication. A tissue expander was placed beneath the fascial flap to enlarge the size and reduce the thickness of the flap. The average size of the harvested fascia flap was 6.5 x 11.7 cm. After a mean interval of 21.5 weeks, the expanders were filled to a mean volume of 1,685 ml. The sizes of the prefabricated skin flaps ranged from 12 x 15 cm to 15 x 32 cm. The prefabricated skin flaps were then transferred to the recipient site as pedicled flaps for facial resurfacing. All facial soft tissue defects were successfully covered by the flaps. The donor sites were primarily closed and healed without complications. Although varied degrees of venous congestion were developed after flap transfers, the marginal necrosis only occurred in two cases. The results in follow-up showed most resurfaced faces restored natural contour and regained emotional expression. MLT is the principle for flap selection in resurfacing of the massive facial soft tissue defect. Our experience in this series of patients demonstrated that the prefabricated cervicothoracic skin flap could be a reliable alternative

  20. Fractional resurfacing in the Asian patient: Current state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wat, Heidi; Wu, Douglas C; Chan, Henry Hin Lee

    2017-01-01

    Fractionated photothermolysis (FP) has revolutionized modern laser technology. By creating selective columns of microthermal damage, fractionated devices allows for greater treatment depths to be achieved without the prolonged downtime and risk of complications seen in traditional fully ablative laser resurfacing. Fractional resurfacing is a proven method to treat a variety of cutaneous conditions. In the Caucasian patient, a wide range of devices and treatment settings can be utilized safely and effectively. However, ethnic skin requires special consideration due to its unique pigmentary characteristics and clinical presentations. In this review article, we detail the current indications and strategies to optimize results and mitigate complications when utilizing fractional resurfacing for the Asian patient. A review of the MEDLINE English literature was conducted on fractionated laser devices studied in the Asian population. Articles included describe non-ablative devices including fractionated erbium glass, thulium fiber, diode, and radiofrequency devices; and ablative devices including fractionated carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) laser, erbium yttrium aluminum garnet and yttrium scandium gallium garnet (YSGG) laser. These data were integrated with the expert opinion of the authors. Taking into account the unique characteristics and cosmetic concerns of the Asian population, fractional resurfacing can be considered a safe and effective option for the treatment of atrophic and hypertrophic scarring, and photorejuvenation in ethnic skin types. Select cases of melasma may be treated with fractionated non-ablative devices, but utilized with caution. The predominant complication associated with fractional resurfacing for these conditions is post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) and rebound worsening of melasma. A greater number of treatments at lower density settings and wider treatment intervals typically produce the lowest risks of PIH without compromising treatment

  1. Early results of patellofemoral inlay resurfacing arthroplasty using the HemiCap Wave prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Akash; Haider, Zakir; Anand, Amarjit; Spicer, Dominic

    2017-01-01

    Common surgical treatment options for isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis include arthroscopic procedures, total knee replacement and patellofemoral replacement. The HemiCap Wave patellofemoral resurfacing prosthesis is a novel inlay design introduced in 2009 with scarce published data on its functional outcomes. We aim to prospectively evaluate early functional outcomes and complications, for patients undergoing a novel inlay resurfacing arthroplasty for isolated patellofemoral arthrosis in an independent centre. From 2010 to 2013, 16 consecutive patients underwent patellofemoral resurfacing procedures using HemiCap Wave (Arthrosurface Inc., Franklin, Massachusetts, USA) for anterior knee pain with confirmed radiologically and/or arthroscopically isolated severe patellofemoral arthrosis. Standardized surgical technique, as recommended by the implant manufacturer, was followed. Outcome measures included range of movement, functional knee scores (Oxford Knee Score (OKS), Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and Short Form-36 (SF-36)), radiographic disease progression, revision rates and complications. Eight men and eight women underwent patellofemoral HemiCap Wave resurfacing, with an average age of 63 years (range: 46-83). Average follow-up was 24.1 months (6-34). Overall, post-operative scores were excellent. There was a statistically significant improvement in the post-operative OKS, KOOS and SF-36 scores ( p patellofemoral resurfacing prosthesis has excellent early results in terms of functional outcomes, radiological outcomes and low complication rates. At the very least, early results show that the HemiCap Wave is comparable to more established onlay prostheses. The HemiCap Wave thus provides a safe and effective surgical option in the treatment of isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis in selected patients.

  2. Fractional CO 2 laser resurfacing as monotherapy in the treatment of atrophic facial acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Majid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: While laser resurfacing remains the most effective treatment option for atrophic acne scars, the high incidence of post-treatment adverse effects limits its use. Fractional laser photothermolysis attempts to overcome these limitations of laser resurfacing by creating microscopic zones of injury to the dermis with skip areas in between. Aim: The aim of the present study is to assess the efficacy and safety of fractional CO 2 laser resurfacing in atrophic facial acne scars. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with moderate to severe atrophic facial acne scars were treated with 3-4 sessions of fractional CO 2 laser resurfacing at 6-week intervals. The therapeutic response to treatment was assessed at each follow up visit and then finally 6 months after the last laser session using a quartile grading scale. Response to treatment was labelled as ′excellent′ if there was >50% improvement in scar appearance and texture of skin on the grading scale while 25-50% response and <25% improvement were labelled as ′good′ and ′poor′ response, respectively. The overall satisfaction of the patients and any adverse reactions to the treatment were also noted. Results: Most of the patients showed a combination of different morphological types of acne scars. At the time of final assessment 6 months after the last laser session, an excellent response was observed in 26 patients (43.3% while 15 (25% and 19 patients (31.7% demonstrated a good and poor response respectively. Rolling and superficial boxcar scars responded the best while pitted scars responded the least to fractional laser monotherapy. The commonest reported adverse effect was transient erythema and crusting lasting for an average of 3-4 and 4-6 days, respectively while three patients developed post-inflammatory pigmentation lasting for 8-12 weeks. Conclusions: Fractional laser resurfacing as monotherapy is effective in treating acne scars especially rolling and superficial boxcar

  3. Mock-up experiment at Birmingham University for BNCT project of Osaka University – Neutron flux measurement with gold foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, S.; Sakai, M.; Yoshihashi, S.; Manabe, M.; Zushi, N.; Murata, I.; Hoashi, E.; Kato, I.; Kuri, S.; Oshiro, S.; Nagasaki, M.; Horiike, H.

    2015-01-01

    Mock-up experiment for development of accelerator based neutron source for Osaka University BNCT project was carried out at Birmingham University, UK. In this paper, spatial distribution of neutron flux intensity was evaluated by foil activation method. Validity of the design code system was confirmed by comparing measured gold foil activities with calculations. As a result, it was found that the epi-thermal neutron beam was well collimated by our neutron moderator assembly. Also, the design accuracy was evaluated to have less than 20% error. - Highlights: • Accelerator based neutron source for BNCT is being developed in Osaka University. • Mock-up experiment was carried out at Birmingham University, UK. • Neutronics performance of our assembly was evaluated from gold foil activation. • Gold foil activation was determined by using HPGe detectors. • Validity of the neutronics design code system was confirmed.

  4. The Regional Autopsy Center: The University of Alabama at Birmingham Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Daniel Stephen; Reilly, Stephanie

    2017-09-01

    Rates of autopsied deaths have decreased significantly for the last several decades. It may not be practical for some institutions to maintain the facilities and staffing required to perform autopsies. In recent years, the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has established contracts to perform autopsies for several regional institutions including the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences (ADFS), the United States Veterans Affairs, the local prison system, local community hospitals, and with families for private autopsy services. Contracts and autopsy data from 2004 to 2015 were obtained and reviewed. Since 2004, the number of UAB hospital autopsies trended slightly downward. On average, UAB hospital cases comprised most yearly cases, and the ADFS was the second largest contributor of cases. Income generated from outside autopsies performed from 2006 to 2015 totaled just more than 2 million dollars, and most of the income was generated from referred ADFS cases. This study provides evidence that a centralized institution (regional autopsy center [RAC]) can provide regional autopsy service in a practical, feasible, and economically viable manner, and a RAC can benefit both the referring institutions as well as the RAC itself.

  5. Advancing City Sustainability via Its Systems of Flows: The Urban Metabolism of Birmingham and Its Hinterland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E. Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cities are dependent on their hinterlands for their function and survival. They provide resources such as people, materials, water, food and energy, as well as areas for waste disposal. Over the last 50 years, commerce and trade has become increasingly global with resources sourced from further afield often due to cheap labour costs, better transportation and a plentiful supply of energy and raw materials. However, the use and transportation of resources is becoming increasingly unsustainable as the global population increases, raw materials become increasing scarce, and energy costs rise. This paper builds on research undertaken in the Liveable Cities Programme on the resource flows of Birmingham, UK. It investigates how people, material, and food flows interact within regional, national, and international hinterlands through road and rail transportation and assesses their sustainability across all three pillars (economic, social, and environmental. The type and weight of goods is highlighted together with their costs and energy used. For a city to move with greatest effect towards sustainability it needs to: (i source as much as it can locally, to minimise transportation and energy costs; (ii adopt such principles as the “circular economy”; and (iii provide clean and efficient means to move people, especially public transportation.

  6. Factors associated with work productivity among people with COPD: Birmingham COPD Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Kiran K; Adab, Peymané; Ayres, Jon G; Siebert, W Stanley; Sadhra, Steven S; Sitch, Alice J; Fitzmaurice, David A; Jordan, Rachel E

    2017-12-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are more likely to take time off work (absenteeism) and report poor performance at work (presenteeism) compared to those without COPD. Little is known about the modifiable factors associated with these work productivity outcomes. To assess the factors associated with work productivity among COPD patients. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a subsample (those in paid employment) of the Birmingham COPD Cohort study. Absenteeism was defined by self-report over the previous 12 months. Presenteeism was assessed using the Stanford Presenteeism Scale. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the effects of sociodemographic, clinical and occupational characteristics on work productivity. Among 348 included participants, increasing dyspnoea was the only factor associated with both absenteeism and presenteeism (p for trend<0.01). Additionally, increasing history of occupational exposure to vapours, gases, dusts or fumes (VGDF) was independently associated with presenteeism (p for trend<0.01). This is the first study to identify important factors associated with poor work productivity among patients with COPD. Future studies should evaluate interventions aimed at managing breathlessness and reducing occupational exposures to VGDF on work productivity among patients with COPD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Transient osteoporosis of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWalter, Patricia; Hassan Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip is an uncommon cause of hip pain, mostly affecting healthy middle-aged men and also women in the third trimester of pregnancy. We present a case of transient osteoporosis of the hip in a 33-year-old non-pregnant female patient. This case highlights the importance of considering a diagnosis of transient osteoporosis of the hip in patients who present with hip pain. (author)

  8. Transient osteoporosis of hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh M Choudhary

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH in a 50-year-old man including the clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, management, and clinical progress. TOH is a rare self-limiting condition that typically affects middle-aged men or, less frequently, women in the third trimester of pregnancy. Affected individuals present clinically with acute hip pain, limping gait, and limited ranges of hip motion. TOH may begin spontaneously or after a minor trauma. Radiographs are typically unremarkable but magnetic resonance (MR imaging studies yield findings consistent with bone marrow edema. TOH is referred to as regional migratory osteoporosis (RMO if it travels to other joints or the contralateral hip. TOH often resembles osteonecrosis but the two conditions must be differentiated due to different prognoses and management approaches. The term TOH is often used interchangeably and synonymously with transient bone marrow edema (TBME.

  9. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten; Maagaard, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) was initiated in 2012 as a web-based prospective registry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and report the epidemiologic and perioperative data of the first 2000 procedures in a Danish hip arthroscopy population and to describe the development of DHAR...... was 0.65 and HAGOS sub-scores were 51 (pain), 49 (symptoms), 53 (ADL), 35 (sport), 20 (physical activity) and 29, respectively. We conclude that patients undergoing hip arthroscopy report considerable pain, loss of function, reduced level of activity and reduced quality-of-life prior to surgery....... The problems with development and maintaining a large clinical registry are described and further studies are needed to validate data completeness. We consider the development of a national clinical registry for hip arthroscopy as a successful way of developing and maintaining a valuable clinical...

  10. Osteoarthritis of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubo, Takashi; Takatori, Yoshio; Sasaki, Yasuhito

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for evaluation of joint disease. Forty-one hips in 33 patients with osteoarthritis of the hip joint were examined by MRI and the features were analyzed. MR examinations were performed on a 1.5 T superconducting unit using the spin echo (SE) technique with short TR (600 ms)/short TE (23, 28, 35 ms) and short TR (600 ms)/long TE (70, 75 ms) sequences. MRI revealed deformity of the femoral head in all hips. Some outgrowths, which were isointense with normal bone marrow, were shown on the periphery of the femoral head in 22 hips (54%). These outgrowths represented marginal osteophytes. Short TE images showed hypointense areas, which varied in size, in the superior or supero-anterior aspect of the femoral head in all hips, and in the opposite position of the acetabulum in 38 hips (93%). These lesions showed a heterogenous signal with predominant low signal on long TE images. These images may indicate the presence of several components including subchondral cysts, bony sclerosis and fibrous tissue. In the joint space, areas of low signal intensity were shown on short TE images, which were high to intermediate signal intensity on long TE images in 16 hips (39%). These areas were presumably consistent with synovial proliferation, cartilageous hypertrophy or joint effusion. Both MR images revealed a mass locating just anterior to the femoral head in 2 hips (5%). The mass showed a low signal on short TE images and a high signal on long TE images, representing the distended iliopsoas bursa. (author)

  11. Athletic Hip Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, T Sean; Bedi, Asheesh; Larson, Christopher M

    2017-04-01

    Historically, athletic hip injuries have garnered little attention; however, these injuries account for approximately 6% of all sports injuries and their prevalence is increasing. At times, the diagnosis and management of hip injuries can be challenging and elusive for the team physician. Hip injuries are seen in high-level athletes who participate in cutting and pivoting sports that require rapid acceleration and deceleration. Described previously as the "sports hip triad," these injuries consist of adductor strains, osteitis pubis, athletic pubalgia, or core muscle injury, often with underlying range-of-motion limitations secondary to femoroacetabular impingement. These disorders can happen in isolation but frequently occur in combination. To add to the diagnostic challenge, numerous intra-articular disorders and extra-articular soft-tissue restraints about the hip can serve as pain generators, in addition to referred pain from the lumbar spine, bowel, bladder, and reproductive organs. Athletic hip conditions can be debilitating and often require a timely diagnosis to provide appropriate intervention.

  12. Standard guidelines of care: CO2 laser for removal of benign skin lesions and resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupashankar, D S

    2008-01-01

    Resurfacing is a treatment to remove acne and chicken pox scars, and changes in the skin due to ageing. MACHINES: Both ablative and nonablative lasers are available for use. CO 2 laser is the gold standard in ablative lasers. Detailed knowledge of the machines is essential. INDICATIONS FOR CO 2 LASER: Therapeutic indications: Actinic and seborrheic keratosis, warts, moles, skin tags, epidermal and dermal nevi, vitiligo blister and punch grafting, rhinophyma, sebaceous hyperplasia, xanthelasma, syringomas, actinic cheilitis angiofibroma, scar treatment, keloid, skin cancer, neurofibroma and diffuse actinic keratoses. CO 2 laser is not recommended for the removal of tattoos. AESTHETIC INDICATIONS: Resurfacing for acne, chicken pox and surgical scars, periorbital and perioral wrinkles, photo ageing changes, facial resurfacing. PHYSICIANS' QUALIFICATIONS: Any qualified dermatologist (DVD or MD) may practice CO 2 laser. The dermatologist should possess postgraduate qualification in dermatology and should have had specific hands-on training in lasers either during postgraduation or later at a facility which routinely performs laser procedures under a competent dermatologist/plastic surgeon, who has experience and training in using lasers. For the use of CO 2 lasers for benign growths, a full day workshop is adequate. As parameters may vary in different machines, specific training with the available machine at either the manufacturer's facility or at another centre using the machine is recommended. CO 2 lasers can be used in the dermatologist's minor procedure room for the above indications. However, when used for full-face resurfacing, the hospital operation theatre or day care facility with immediate access to emergency medical care is essential. Smoke evacuator is mandatory. Detailed counseling with respect to the treatment, desired effects, possible postoperative complications, should be discussed with the patient. The patient should be provided brochures to study and

  13. Standard guidelines of care: CO 2 laser for removal of benign skin lesions and resurfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupashankar D

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Resurfacing is a treatment to remove acne and chicken pox scars, and changes in the skin due to ageing. Machines : Both ablative and nonablative lasers are available for use. CO 2 laser is the gold standard in ablative lasers. Detailed knowledge of the machines is essential. Indications for CO 2 laser: Therapeutic indications: Actinic and seborrheic keratosis, warts, moles, skin tags, epidermal and dermal nevi, vitiligo blister and punch grafting, rhinophyma, sebaceous hyperplasia, xanthelasma, syringomas, actinic cheilitis angiofibroma, scar treatment, keloid, skin cancer, neurofibroma and diffuse actinic keratoses. CO 2 laser is not recommended for the removal of tattoos. Aesthetic indications: Resurfacing for acne, chicken pox and surgical scars, periorbital and perioral wrinkles, photo ageing changes, facial resurfacing. Physicians′ qualifications: Any qualified dermatologist (DVD or MD may practice CO 2 laser. The dermatologist should possess postgraduate qualification in dermatology and should have had specific hands-on training in lasers either during postgraduation or later at a facility which routinely performs laser procedures under a competent dermatologist/plastic surgeon, who has experience and training in using lasers. For the use of CO 2 lasers for benign growths, a full day workshop is adequate. As parameters may vary in different machines, specific training with the available machine at either the manufacturer′s facility or at another centre using the machine is recommended. Facility: CO 2 lasers can be used in the dermatologist′s minor procedure room for the above indications. However, when used for full-face resurfacing, the hospital operation theatre or day care facility with immediate access to emergency medical care is essential. Smoke evacuator is mandatory. Preoperative counseling and Informed consent Detailed counseling with respect to the treatment, desired effects, possible postoperative complications, should be

  14. Outcome, revision rate and indication for revision following resurfacing hemiarthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the shoulder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, J V; Polk, A; Sorensen, A K

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated patient-reported outcomes, the rate of revision and the indications for revision following resurfacing hemiarthroplasty of the shoulder in patients with osteoarthritis. All patients with osteoarthritis who underwent primary resurfacing hemiarthroplasty and reported...... to the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry (DSR), between January 2006 and December 2010 were included. There were 772 patients (837 arthroplasties) in the study. The Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder (WOOS) index was used to evaluate patient-reported outcome 12 months (10 to 14) post......-operatively. The rates of revision were calculated from the revisions reported to the DSR up to December 2011 and by checking deaths with the Danish National Register of Persons. A complete questionnaire was returned by 688 patients (82.2%). The mean WOOS was 67 (0 to 100). A total of 63 hemiarthroplasties (7...

  15. Assessment of the Item Selection and Weighting in the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score for Wegener's Granulomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAHR, ALFRED D.; NEOGI, TUHINA; LAVALLEY, MICHAEL P.; DAVIS, JOHN C.; HOFFMAN, GARY S.; MCCUNE, W. JOSEPH; SPECKS, ULRICH; SPIERA, ROBERT F.; ST.CLAIR, E. WILLIAM; STONE, JOHN H.; MERKEL, PETER A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score for Wegener's Granulomatosis (BVAS/WG) with respect to its selection and weighting of items. Methods This study used the BVAS/WG data from the Wegener's Granulomatosis Etanercept Trial. The scoring frequencies of the 34 predefined items and any “other” items added by clinicians were calculated. Using linear regression with generalized estimating equations in which the physician global assessment (PGA) of disease activity was the dependent variable, we computed weights for all predefined items. We also created variables for clinical manifestations frequently added as other items, and computed weights for these as well. We searched for the model that included the items and their generated weights yielding an activity score with the highest R2 to predict the PGA. Results We analyzed 2,044 BVAS/WG assessments from 180 patients; 734 assessments were scored during active disease. The highest R2 with the PGA was obtained by scoring WG activity based on the following items: the 25 predefined items rated on ≥5 visits, the 2 newly created fatigue and weight loss variables, the remaining minor other and major other items, and a variable that signified whether new or worse items were present at a specific visit. The weights assigned to the items ranged from 1 to 21. Compared with the original BVAS/WG, this modified score correlated significantly more strongly with the PGA. Conclusion This study suggests possibilities to enhance the item selection and weighting of the BVAS/WG. These changes may increase this instrument's ability to capture the continuum of disease activity in WG. PMID:18512722

  16. Outcomes of burns in the elderly: revised estimates from the Birmingham Burn Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearn, Christopher; Hardwicke, Joseph; Kitsios, Andreas; Siddons, Victoria; Nightingale, Peter; Moiemen, Naiem

    2015-09-01

    Outcomes after burn have continued to improve over the last 70 years in all age groups including the elderly. However, concerns have been raised that survival gains have not been to the same magnitude in elderly patients compared to younger age groups. The aims of this study were to analyze the recent outcomes of elderly burn injured patients admitted to the Birmingham Burn Centre, compare data with a historical cohort and published data from other burn centres worldwide. A retrospective review was conducted of all patients ≥65 years of age, admitted to our centre with cutaneous burns, between 2004 and 2012. Data was compared to a previously published historical cohort (1999-2003). 228 patients were included. The observed mortality for the study group was 14.9%. The median age of the study group was 79 years, the male to female ratio was 1:1 and median Total Body Surface Area (TBSA) burned was 5%. The incidence of inhalation injury was 13%. Median length of stay per TBSA burned for survivors was 2.4 days/% TBSA. Mortality has improved in all burn size groups, but differences were highly statistically significant in the medium burn size group (10-20% TBSA, p≤0.001). Burn outcomes in the elderly have improved over the last decade. This reduction has been impacted by a reduction in overall injury severity but is also likely due to general improvements in burn care, improved infrastructure, implementation of clinical guidelines and increased multi-disciplinary support, including Geriatric physicians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Systematic assessment of apraxia and functional predictions from the Birmingham Cognitive Screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickerton, Wai-Ling; Riddoch, M Jane; Samson, Dana; Balani, Alex Bahrami; Mistry, Bejal; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2012-05-01

    The validity and functional predictive values of the apraxia tests in the Birmingham Cognitive Screen (BCoS) were evaluated. BCoS was developed to identify patients with different forms of praxic deficit using procedures designed to be inclusive for patients with aphasia and/or spatial neglect. Observational studies were conducted from a university neuropsychological assessment centre and from acute and rehabilitation stroke care hospitals throughout an English region. Volunteers from referred patients with chronic acquired brain injuries, a consecutive hospital sample of patients within 3 months of stroke (n=635) and a population based healthy control sample (n=100) were recruited. The main outcome measures used were the Barthel Index, the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living Scale as well as recovery from apraxia. There were high inter-rater reliabilities and correlations between the BCoS apraxia tasks and counterpart tests from the literature. The vast majority (88.3%) of the stroke survivors were able to complete the screen. Pantomime and gesture recognition tasks were more sensitive in differentiating between individuals with left hemisphere damage and right hemisphere damage whereas the Multistep Object Use test and the imitation task had higher functional correlates over and above effects of hemiplegia. Together, the initial scores of the four tasks enabled predictions with 75% accuracy, the recovery of apraxia and independence level at 9 months. As a model based assessment, BCoS offers a quick and valid way to detect apraxia and predict functional recovery. It enables early and informative assessment of most stroke patients for rehabilitation planning.

  18. Understanding the dispensary workflow at the Birmingham Free Clinic: a proposed framework for an informatics intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Arielle M; Herbert, Mary I; Douglas, Gerald P

    2016-02-19

    The Birmingham Free Clinic (BFC) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA is a free, walk-in clinic that serves medically uninsured populations through the use of volunteer health care providers and an on-site medication dispensary. The introduction of an electronic medical record (EMR) has improved several aspects of clinic workflow. However, pharmacists' tasks involving medication management and dispensing have become more challenging since EMR implementation due to its inability to support workflows between the medical and pharmaceutical services. To inform the design of a systematic intervention, we conducted a needs assessment study to identify workflow challenges and process inefficiencies in the dispensary. We used contextual inquiry to document the dispensary workflow and facilitate identification of critical aspects of intervention design specific to the user. Pharmacists were observed according to contextual inquiry guidelines. Graphical models were produced to aid data and process visualization. We created a list of themes describing workflow challenges and asked the pharmacists to rank them in order of significance to narrow the scope of intervention design. Three pharmacists were observed at the BFC. Observer notes were documented and analyzed to produce 13 themes outlining the primary challenges pharmacists encounter during dispensation at the BFC. The dispensary workflow is labor intensive, redundant, and inefficient when integrated with the clinical service. Observations identified inefficiencies that may benefit from the introduction of informatics interventions including: medication labeling, insufficient process notification, triple documentation, and inventory control. We propose a system for Prescription Management and General Inventory Control (RxMAGIC). RxMAGIC is a framework designed to mitigate workflow challenges and improve the processes of medication management and inventory control. While RxMAGIC is described in the context of the BFC

  19. Urbanization effects on stream habitat characteristics in Boston, Massachusetts; Birmingham, Alabama; and Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, T.M.; Giddings, E.M.P.; Zappia, H.; Coles, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Relations between stream habitat and urban land-use intensity were examined in 90 stream reaches located in or near the metropolitan areas of Salt Lake City, Utah (SLC); Birmingham, Alabama (BIR); and Boston, Massachusetts (BOS). Urban intensity was based on a multi-metric index (urban intensity index or UII) that included measures of land cover, socioeconomic organization, and urban infrastructure. Twenty-eight physical variables describing channel morphology, hydraulic properties, and streambed conditions were examined. None of the habitat variables was significantly correlated with urbanization intensity in all three study areas. Urbanization effects on stream habitat were less apparent for streams in SLC and BIR, owing to the strong influence of basin slope (SLC) and drought conditions (BIR) on local flow regimes. Streamflow in the BOS study area was not unduly influenced by similar conditions of climate and physiography, and habitat conditions in these streams were more responsive to urbanization. Urbanization in BOS contributed to higher discharge, channel deepening, and increased loading of fine-grained particles to stream channels. The modifying influence of basin slope and climate on hydrology of streams in SLC and BIR limited our ability to effectively compare habitat responses among different urban settings and identify common responses that might be of interest to restoration or water management programs. Successful application of land-use models such as the UII to compare urbanization effects on stream habitat in different environmental settings must account for inherent differences in natural and anthropogenic factors affecting stream hydrology and geomorphology. The challenge to future management of urban development is to further quantify these differences by building upon existing models, and ultimately develop a broader understanding of urbanization effects on aquatic ecosystems. ?? 2005 by the American Fisheries Society.

  20. The Birmingham pituitary database: auditing the outcome of the treatment of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, D; O'Brien, I; Johnson, A; Shakespear, R; Sheppard, M C; Stewart, P M

    1995-11-01

    Reduction of GH concentrations in acromegalic subjects may improve the increased mortality associated with the condition. Audit of the biochemical outcome of the management of acromegaly is, therefore, important. (1) To audit the biochemical 'cure' rate of acromegalic patients treated by surgery and/or radiotherapy under the care of the South Birmingham Endocrine Clinic. (2) To assess the correlation between random or basal GH with IGF-I and nadir GH during an oral glucose tolerance test. Ascertainment of acromegalic patients from a pituitary database. Mode of therapy, pretreatment GH, pretreatment tumour size, post-treatment GH, post-treatment IGF-I and post-treatment nadir GH were recorded. Biochemical cure was defined as a most recent random or basal GH < 5 mU/l. Cure rates were determined. Eighty-nine acromegalic patients were identified as having received surgery and/or radiotherapy. In 35/89 (39%) the most recent GH was < 5 mU/l. The cure rate following surgery was 26/78 (33%). This was not significantly associated with tumour size, but was associated with pretreatment GH concentration (chi 2 = 7.1, 2d.f., P < 0.05). Random/basal GH showed a log-linear association with IGF-I, r = 0.72, and a linear association with nadir GH, r = 0.93. Biochemical cure of acromegaly was more strongly associated with pretreatment GH than with tumour size. Random/basal GH measurements are useful and convenient for the audit of treatment outcome in acromegaly. Ways of improving the biochemical outcome of acromegaly should be sought.

  1. Molecular effects of fractional carbon dioxide laser resurfacing on photodamaged human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Michael J; Cohen, Marc; Hokugo, Akishige; Keller, Gregory S

    2010-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the sequential changes in protein expression that play a role in the clinically beneficial results seen with fractional carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser resurfacing of the face and neck. Methods Nine healthy volunteers were recruited for participation from the senior author's facial plastic surgery practice. After informed consent was obtained, each volunteer underwent a 2-mm punch biopsy from a discrete area of infra-auricular neck skin prior to laser treatment. Patients then immediately underwent laser resurfacing of photodamaged face and neck skin at a minimal dose (30 W for 0.1 second) with the Pixel Perfect fractional CO(2) laser. On completion of the treatment, another biopsy specimen was taken adjacent to the first site. Additional biopsy specimens were subsequently taken from adjacent skin at 2 of 3 time points (day 7, day 14, or day 21). RNA was extracted from the specimens, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and protein microarray analysis were performed. Comparisons were then made between time points using pairwise comparison testing. Results We found statistically significant changes in the gene expression of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The data demonstrate a consistent up-regulation of MMPs 1, 3, 9, and 13, all of which have been previously reported for fully ablative CO(2) laser resurfacing. There was also a statistically significant increase in MMP-10 and MMP-11 levels in this data set. Conclusion This study suggests that the molecular mechanisms of action are similar for both fractional and fully ablative CO(2) laser resurfacing.

  2. Evaluation of periprosthetic bone mineral density and postoperative migration of humeral head resurfacing implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mechlenburg, Inger; Klebe, Thomas Martin; Døssing, Kaj Verner

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implant migration, bone mineral density (BMD), length of glenohumeral offset (LGHO), and clinical results were compared for the Copeland (Biomet Inc, Warsaw, IN, USA) and the Global C.A.P. (DePuy Int, Warsaw, IN, USA) humeral head resurfacing implants (HHRIs). METHODS: The study...... improved over time for both implant groups (P migration and good clinical results. Periprosthetic BMD and LGHO both increased for the Copeland HHRI more than for the Global C.A.P HHRI....

  3. Implant Optimisation for Primary Hip Replacement in Patients over 60 Years with Osteoarthritis: A Cohort Study of Clinical Outcomes and Implant Costs Using Data from England and Wales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon S Jameson

    Full Text Available Hip replacement is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures worldwide; hundreds of implant configurations provide options for femoral head size, joint surface material and fixation method with dramatically varying costs. Robust comparative evidence to inform the choice of implant is needed. This retrospective cohort study uses linked national databases from England and Wales to determine the optimal type of replacement for patients over 60 years undergoing hip replacement for osteoarthritis.Implants included were the commonest brand from each of the four types of replacement (cemented, cementless, hybrid and resurfacing; the reference prosthesis was the cemented hip procedure. Patient reported outcome scores (PROMs, costs and risk of repeat (revision surgery were examined. Multivariable analyses included analysis of covariance to assess improvement in PROMs (Oxford hip score, OHS, and EQ5D index (9159 linked episodes and competing risks modelling of implant survival (79,775 procedures. Cost of implants and ancillary equipment were obtained from National Health Service procurement data.EQ5D score improvements (at 6 months were similar for all hip replacement types. In females, revision risk was significantly higher in cementless hip prostheses (hazard ratio, HR = 2.22, p<0.001, when compared to the reference hip. Although improvement in OHS was statistically higher (22.1 versus 20.5, p<0.001 for cementless implants, this small difference is unlikely to be clinically important. In males, revision risk was significantly higher in cementless (HR = 1.95, p = 0.003 and resurfacing implants, HR = 3.46, p<0.001, with no differences in OHS. Material costs were lowest with the reference implant (cemented, range £1103 to £1524 and highest with cementless implants (£1928 to £4285. Limitations include the design of the study, which is intrinsically vulnerable to omitted variables, a paucity of long-term implant survival data (reflecting the

  4. The Hyperflexible Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Alexander E.; Bedi, Asheesh; Tibor, Lisa M.; Zaltz, Ira; Larson, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Dance, gymnastics, figure skating, and competitive cheerleading require a high degree of hip range of motion. Athletes who participate in these sports use their hips in a mechanically complex manner. Evidence Acquisition: A search of the entire PubMed database (through December 2013) and additional searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Whether innate or acquired, dancers and gymnasts have some hypermobility that allows their hips to be placed in potentially impinging or unstable positions required for their given activity. Such extremes of motion can result in both intra-articular and extra-articular impingement as well as compensatory osseous and muscular pathology. In addition, dancers and gymnasts are susceptible to impingement-induced instability. Dancers with innate generalized hyperlaxity are at increased risk of injury because of their activities and may require longer recovery times to return to play. Both nonoperative and operative treatments (arthroscopic and open) have an important role in returning flexibility athletes to their preoperative levels of sport and dance. Conclusion: Because of the extreme hip motion required and the compensatory soft tissue laxity in dancers and gymnasts, these athletes may develop instability, impingement, or combinations of both. This frequently occurs in the setting of subtle pathoanatomy or in patients with normal bony anatomy. With appropriate surgical indications and the correct operative technique, the treating surgeon can anticipate high levels of return to play for the gymnast and dancer with hip pain. PMID:26137181

  5. Complications in Hip Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Naoki; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Recent developments in hip arthroscopic techniques and technology have made it possible in many cases to avoid open surgical dislocation for treating a variety of pathology in the hip. Although early reports suggest favourable results’ using hip arthroscopy and it has been shown to be a relatively safe procedure, complications do exist and can sometimes lead to significant morbidity. Methods This is a review article. The aim of this manuscript is to present the most frequent and/or serious complications that could occur at or following hip arthroscopy and some guidelines to avoid these complications. Conclusion Most complications of hip arthroscopy are minor or transient but serious complications can occur as well. A lot of complication e.g. acetabular labral puncture go unreported. Appropriate education and training, precise and meticulous surgical technique with correct instrumentation, the right indication in the right patient and adherence to advice from mentors and experienced colleagues are all essential factors for a successful outcome. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066747

  6. A new patient classification for laser resurfacing and peels: predicting responses, risks, and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanous, Nabil

    2002-01-01

    Traditional classifications for skin treatment modalities are based on skin characteristics, the most important being skin color. Other factors are considered as well, such as oiliness, thickness, pathology, and sensitivity. While useful, these classifications are occasionally inadequate in predicting and explaining the outcome of some peels, dermabrasions, or laser resurfacing procedures. Why, for example, would a Korean patient with a light white skin inadvertently develop more hyperpigmentation than his darker skinned French counterpart? The new classification introduced here is based on the racial and genetic origins of patients. It suggests that racial genetic predisposition is the determining factor in human response to skin injury, including skin treatments. This classification takes into account both skin and features, rather than skin alone. It offers a new approach in evaluating patients scheduled for skin peels or laser resurfacing, in the hope of helping physicians to better predict reactions, select the appropriate type and intensity of the skin treatment and, ultimately, better control the outcome. Six categories (sub-races) are described: Nordics, Europeans, Mediterraneans, Indo-Pakistanis, Africans, and Asians. The reaction of each sub-race to peels, laser resurfacing, or dermabrasion is analyzed. The risks associated with each group are noted. This new classification provides physicians with a practical way to evaluate patients prior to treatment, with a view to determining each patient's suitability, postoperative reaction, the likelihood of complications, and likely result.

  7. Prefabricated neck expanded skin flap with the superficial temporal vessels for facial resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeri, Davide; Su, Weijie; Qian, Yunliang; Messmer, Caroline; Agostini, Tommaso; Spinelli, Giuseppe; Marcus, Jeffrey R; Levin, L Scott; Zenn, Micheal R; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2013-05-01

    The achievement of a normal-appearing face after surgical resurfacing remains an elusive goal. This is due in part to insufficient color matching, restoration of contours, and the persistence of visible scars. Flap prefabrication is a staged procedure that provides an independent axial blood supply to local expanded tissues. We describe a new reconstructive alternative with superior reconstructive surgical options for facial resurfacing that better matches damaged or discarded facial tissues. A superficial temporal fascial flap was harvested as the vascular supply of the prefabricated neck flap and located in a subcutaneous neck pocket over a tissue expander. After a 5-month period for expansion and maturation, the prefabricated skin flap was raised, islanded, and rotated to resurface the facial defect. Four patients with hemifacial postburn contracture and two patients affected by hemifacial vascular malformations aged 17 to 42 years (mean 29 years) were successfully treated with no major complication after a mean period of 15 months. Prefabricated neck-expanded skin flap demonstrated an excellent color and texture match with facial skin that surrounded the repair sites, and optimal aesthetic results were obtained. Importantly, facial expression was completely maintained due to thinness and pliability of the rotated skin. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. The use of a prosthetic inlay resurfacing as a salvage procedure for a failed cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhollander, Aad Alfons Maria; Almqvist, Karl Fredrik; Moens, Kris; Vandekerckhove, Pieter-Jan; Verdonk, René; Verdonk, Peter; Victor, Jan

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to describe the clinical and radiographical outcome of the HemiCAP(®) resurfacing system as a salvage treatment for a failed index cartilage procedure. Fourteen patients were treated consecutively and clinically prospectively followed for a mean period of 26.1 ± 12.8 months. All patients were previously treated for their cartilage lesion. Radiographical data were analysed based on the Kellgren and Lawrence system. The patients involved in this study demonstrated a gradual clinical improvement in time. However, radiographically significant osteoarthritic changes were observed during the follow-up period. The position of the HemiCAP(®) resurfacing system was adequate in all cases, and no signs of loosening were observed during the follow-up period. The HemiCAP(®) resurfacing system is feasible as a salvage treatment for a failed index cartilage procedure and resulted in a gradual clinical improvement. However, the favourable clinical outcome was not confirmed by the radiographical findings. IV.

  9. Hip Replacement: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... invasive hip replacement (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Hip Replacement updates ... replacement - precautions Minimally invasive hip replacement Related Health Topics Hip Injuries and Disorders National Institutes of Health ...

  10. Sonography for hip joint effusion in adults with hip pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M.; Bohnen, A. M.; Verhaar, J. A.; Prins, A.; Ginai-Karamat, A. Z.; Laméris, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    To study the prevalence of ultrasonic hip joint effusion and its relation with clinical, radiological and laboratory (ESR) findings in adults with hip pain. Patients (n = 224) aged 50 years or older with hip pain, referred by the general practitioner for radiological investigation, underwent a

  11. Sonography for hip joint effusion in adults with hip pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); A.M. Bohnen (Arthur); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); A. Prins (Ad); J.S. Lameris; A.Z. Ginai (Abida)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To study the prevalence of ultrasonic hip joint effusion and its relation with clinical, radiological and laboratory (ESR) findings in adults with hip pain. METHODS: Patients (n = 224) aged 50 years or older with hip pain, referred by the general

  12. The prevalence and risk factors of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation after fractional resurfacing in Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Henry H L; Manstein, D; Yu, C S; Shek, S; Kono, T; Wei, W I

    2007-06-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing is considered to be the main therapeutic option for the treatment of wrinkles and acne scarring. However, in Asians, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) is a common adverse effect of laser resurfacing. Fractional resurfacing is a new concept of skin rejuvenation whereby zones of micro thermal injury are generated in the skin with the use of a 1,540-nm laser. The risk and prevalence of hyperpigmentation in dark-skinned patients using this approach have not been studied. To assess the prevalence and risk factors of PIH that is associated with the use of fractional resurfacing in Asians. A retrospective study of 37 Chinese patients who were treated with fractional resurfacing for acne scarring, skin rejuvenation, and pigmentation was carried out. In all of the cases, pre- and post-treatment clinical photographs (from standardized and cross-polarized views) were taken using the Canfield CR system. Two independent observers assessed the photographs. A prospective study of treatments of nine different density and energy levels that were applied to the forearms of 18 volunteers was also performed. Clinical photographs were assessed pre- and post-treatment for evidence of PIH. In the retrospective study, 119 treatment sessions were performed. Sixty-eight treatment sessions were high energy, low density; 51 sessions were low energy, high density. Patients who underwent a high energy but low-density treatment (range of energy 7-20 mJ; average energy 16.3 mJ, 1,000 MTZ) were associated with a lower prevalence of generalized PIH (7.1% vs. 12.4%) than those who underwent a low energy but high-density (range of energy 6-12 mJ; average energy 8.2 mJ, 2,000 MTZ) treatment. However, the difference was not statistically significant. Localized PIH occurred in the peri-oral area among patients who did not receive air cooling as an adjunctive therapy. Both the density and energy of the treatment determines the risk of PIH in dark-skinned patients

  13. Hip joint pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tijssen, M; van Cingel, R E H; de Visser, E

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to (a) describe the clinical presentation of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and hip labral pathology; (b) describe the accuracy of patient history and physical tests for FAI and labral pathology as confirmed by hip arthroscopy. Patients (18......-65 years) were included if they were referred to a physical therapist to gather pre-operative data and were then diagnosed during arthroscopy. Results of pre-operative patient history and physical tests were collected and compared to arthroscopy. Data of 77 active patients (mean age: 37 years) were...

  14. A new approach to managing patients with problematic metal hip implants: the use of an Internet-enhanced multidisciplinary team meeting: AAOS exhibit selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Reshid; Pappas, Yannis; Khoo, Michael; Miles, Jonathan; Carrington, Richard; Skinner, John; Hart, Alister

    2015-02-18

    Over one million patients worldwide are estimated to have a metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty. To improve the management of these patients and reduce surgeon uncertainty regarding decision-making, we designed an Internet-enhanced multidisciplinary team (iMDT) working approach. From August 2012 to April 2014, the iMDT discussed 215 patients with 266 metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties. Of these, 236 primary arthroplasties (132 hip resurfacing and 104 total hip) were analyzed. The remaining thirty cases involved problematic revised hips and were therefore excluded. The possible recommendations of the iMDT were monitoring, further investigation, or surgery. The concordance between the recommendation and the actual management was used to assess the usefulness of this approach in reducing uncertainty in surgeon-level decision-making. The median Oxford Hip Score was 35 (range, 4 to 48), and median cobalt and chromium levels in whole blood were 3.54 ppb (range, 0.18 to 161.46 ppb) and 3.17 ppb (range, 0.20 to 100.67 ppb), respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed abductor muscle atrophy in ninety-two (39%) of the hips and a pseudotumor in eighty (34%). The iMDT recommended monitoring of 146 (61.9%) of the hips, further investigation of thirty (12.7%), and surgery in sixty (25.4%). The actual outcome was concordant with the recommendation in 211 (91.7%) of the hips. Our iMDT approach to the metal-on-metal hip burden combines the tacit knowledge of an expert panel, regulatory guidance, and up-to-date evidence to improve decision-making among surgeons. The high level of concordance between the recommendation and the actual outcome, combined with the feasibility of the methods used, suggest that this method effectively reduces uncertainty among surgeons and may lead to improved patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  15. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Hip What's in this article? What It Is Why ... You Have Questions Print What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  16. Viscous relaxation as a prerequisite for tectonic resurfacing on Ganymede: Insights from numerical models of lithospheric extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Michael T.; McKinnon, William B.

    2018-05-01

    Ganymede's bright terrain formed during a near-global resurfacing event (or events) that produced both heavily tectonized and relatively smooth terrains. The mechanism(s) by which resurfacing occurred on Ganymede (e.g., cryovolcanic or tectonic), and the relationship between the older, dark and the younger, bright terrain are fundamental to understanding the geological evolution of the satellite. Using a two-dimensional numerical model of lithospheric extension that has previously been used to successfully simulate surface deformation consistent with grooved terrain morphologies, we investigate whether large-amplitude preexisting topography can be resurfaced (erased) by extension (i.e., tectonic resurfacing). Using synthetically produced initial topography, we show that when the total relief of the initial topography is larger than 25-50 m, periodic groove-like structures fail to form. Instead, extension is localized in a few individual, isolated troughs. These results pose a challenge to the tectonic resurfacing hypothesis. We further investigate the effects of preexisting topography by performing suites of simulations initialized with topography derived from digital terrain models of Ganymede's surface. These include dark terrain, fresh (relatively deep) impact craters, smooth bright terrain, and a viscously relaxed impact crater. The simulations using dark terrain and fresh impact craters are consistent with our simulations using synthetic topography: periodic groove-like deformation fails to form. In contrast, when simulations were initialized with bright smooth terrain topography, groove-like deformation results from a wide variety of heat flow and surface temperature conditions. Similarly, when a viscously relaxed impact crater was used, groove-like structures were able to form during extension. These results suggest that tectonic resurfacing may require that the amplitude of the initial topography be reduced before extension begins. We emphasize that viscous

  17. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Lund, Bent; Nielsen, Torsten Grønbech

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Predictors of outcome after femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) surgery are not well-documented. This study presents data from the Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) for such analyses. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of poor outcome after FAI surgery in a Danish FAI...

  18. Do large heads enhance stability and restore native anatomy in primary total hip arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Adolph V; Skeels, Michael D; Berend, Keith R; Adams, Joanne B; Franchi, Orlando J

    2011-06-01

    Dislocation remains a serious complication in hip arthroplasty. Resurfacing proponents tout anatomic femoral head restoration as an advantage over total hip arthroplasty. However, advances in bearings have expanded prosthetic head options from traditional sizes of 22, 26, 28, and 32 mm to diameters as large as 60 mm. Large heads reportedly enhance stability owing to increased range of motion before impingement and increased jump distance to subluxation. Available larger diameter material combinations include metal- or ceramic-on-highly crosslinked polyethylene and metal-on-metal, each with distinct advantages and disadvantages. We sought to determine (1) if using larger diameter heads has lowered our dislocation rate; and (2) how closely an anatomic metal-on-metal bearing with diameters to 60 mm replicates native femoral head size. We retrospectively reviewed 2020 primary arthroplasties performed with large heads (≥ 36 mm) in 1748 patients and noted dislocation incidence. In a prospective subset of 89 cases using anatomic heads, native femoral head diameter was measured intraoperatively with calipers by an independent observer and later compared with implanted size. One dislocation has occurred in 2020 hips for an incidence of 0.05%. The prosthetic head averaged 0.7 mm larger than the native head with 68 of 89 (76%) reconstructed to within ± 2 mm of native size. Larger diameter heads have contributed to lower dislocation rates and large-diameter metal-on-metal articulation can provide close anatomic restoration in primary THA.

  19. BLEPHAROPLASTY AND PERIOCULAR SKIN RESURFACING WITH NEW GENERATION ER:YAG LASER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigita Drnovšek-Olup

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. In this study, a new type of Er:YAG laser, emitting irradiation with variable pulse duration, has been used for blepharoplasty and skin resurfacing in periocular region.More than 40 patients have been treated with second generation Er:YAG laser (Fotona Fidelis for blepharoplasty and skin resurfacing. A focused laser beam (diameter 0.4 mm with very short pulse width (100 µs, that is significantly below the thermal relaxation time of skin, leads to a precise cut with no observable thermal effect on surrounding tissue. The depth of the cut is approximately 1–2 mm, precision comparable to a surgical scalpel. The high repetition rate of consecutive laser pulses (50 Hz at 120 mJ energy accounts for accumulation of thermal load in tissue, and thus leads to complete hemostasis of the cut tissue. Due to improved cutting abilities of the Er:YAG laser, excision of orbital fat is also performed with one pass of the laser beam. By changing the laser parameters to short pulses (300 µs, energy 500 mJ, spot diameter 5 mm and repetition rate 12–15 Hz, skin resurfacing was performed. No special pretreatment therapy was used. Anesthesia: 2% Xylocain inj. subcutaneously. Non adhesive dressing for 24 hours was applied after surgery.Epithelisation was complete after ten days. Redness persists up to 5 weeks. Discomfort of patients was mild. Cosmetic results are satisfying.Conclusions. New generation of Er:YAG laser offers a possibility to cut and coagulate the tissue simultaneously, and by changing the parameters to ablate the tissue with heating influence on skin collagen.

  20. Nonablative Fractional Laser Resurfacing in Skin of Color: Evidence-based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Shivani B; Alexis, Andrew F

    2017-06-01

    Background: Nonablative laser resurfacing represents one of the major advances in procedural dermatology over the past decade. However, its use in darker skin types is limited by safety concerns and a relative lack of available data. Aim: To provide evidence-based recommendations for the use of fractional lasers in darker skin types. Evidence review: A broad literature search of PubMed/Medline database was conducted in April 2016 using the term fractional lasers. A free text search of keywords including fractional resurfacing, nonablative lasers, skin type, skin of color, ethnic skin, Fitzpatrick skin type, Asian skin, African Americans, Afro-Caribbean, and Hispanics was also executed. An in-depth review of all the relevant articles fitting the authors' inclusion/exclusion criteria was performed. Thereafter, each study was assigned levels of evidence per the Modified Criteria by Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. A recommendation was made for a specific treatment based on the presence of at least one Level 1 study or more than three Level 2 or 3 studies that had concordant results. Findings: The available evidence strongly suggests that fractional lasers are a favorable treatment option for a variety of dermatological diseases in Fitzpatrick skin phototypes IV to VI. Level 1 evidence was found for the use of fractional lasers for treating acne, striae and skin rejuvenation. Level 2 evidence was found for their use in acne scars, melasma, and surgical/traumatic scars. Conclusion: Fractional resurfacing is a safe and efficacious treatment option for various dermatological disorders in darker skin types; however, there is a paucity of high-quality studies involving skin types V and VI.

  1. Use of 1540nm fractionated erbium:glass laser for split skin graft resurfacing: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narinesingh, S; Lewis, S; Nayak, B S

    2013-09-01

    The field of laser skin resurfacing has evolved rapidly over the past two decades from ablative lasers, to nonablative systems using near-infrared, intense-pulsed light and radio-frequency systems, and most recently fractional laser resurfacing. Although fractional thermolysis is still in its infancy, its efficacy in in the treatment of skin disorders have been clearly demonstrated. Here we present a case report on the safety and efficacy of a 1540nm erbium:glass laser in the treatment of the waffle pattern of a meshed skin graft in a 38-year-old patient with type V skin in the Caribbean.

  2. The Effects of a Daily Skincare Regimen on Maintaining the Benefits Obtained from Previous Chemical Resurfacing Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Suzanne; Roberts, Wendy; Teller, Craig; Colvan, Lora

    2016-09-01

    Chemical peels are versatile treatments that involve chemical exfoliation of the skin for cosmetic improvement. Deeper peels produce more significant results, but can be associated with longer healing time and potential complications. Novel chemical resurfacing treatments (AGE and MELA) were developed in Europe to produce skin resurfacing via controlled inflammation to promote cell regeneration with minimum negative effects associated with conventional peelings. The AGE Resurfacing regimen is indicated for the treatment of photoaging, and consists of multi-ingredient peeling solution with trichloroacetic acid, pyruvic acid, salicylic acid, mandelic acid, and lactobionic acid. The MELA Resurfacing regimen addresses hyperpigmentation concerns and contains mandelic acid, potassium azeloyl diglycinate, retinol, salicylic acid, phytic acid, lactobionic acid, and lactic acid. Results of previously conducted US clinical experience trial of AGE and MELA resurfacing protocols rated 81% of subjects with some level of improvement according to physician assessment. To evaluate whether a daily skin care regimen used for 12 weeks could maintain the benefits achieved with AGE and MELA chemical resurfacing treatments. Subjects who completed participation in the AGE and MELA skin resurfacing clinical trial were recruited to participate in a continuation trial and used a daily regimen of MDRejuvena facial products for 12 weeks. No other facial products were permitted. Physicians assessed the severity of individual skin parameters at baseline and week 12 and provided global assessment. Subjects assessed improvement of individual skin parameters at week 12 and provided an overall assessment. Thirteen subjects participated in the 12-week continuation trial. According to the physician's global assessment, all subjects demonstrated some level of improvement at week 12 compared to baseline. Physician assessment showed a decrease in severity of all skin parameters assessed at week 12

  3. Facial resurfacing with a monoblock full-thickness skin graft after multiple malignant melanomas excision in xeroderma pigmentosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Selahattin; Uygur, Safak; Eryilmaz, Tolga; Ak, Betul

    2012-09-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum is an autosomal recessive disease, characterized by vulnerability of the skin to solar radiation. Increase in sunlight-induced cancer is a direct consequence of an increase in mutated cells of the skin of patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. There is no specific technique for facial resurfacing in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. In this article, a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum with multiple malignant melanomas on her face and radical excision of total facial skin followed by facial resurfacing with monoblock full-thickness skin graft from the abdomen is presented.

  4. Spine–hip relations in patients with hip osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, Charles; Lazic, Stefan; Dagneaux, Louis; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; Cobb, Justin; Muirhead-Allwood, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    Patients with hip osteoarthritis often have an abnormal spine-hip relation (SHR), meaning the presence of a clinically deleterious spine-hip and/or hip-spine syndrome. Definition of the individual SHR is ideally done using the EOS® imaging system or, if not available, with conventional lumbopelvic lateral radiographs. By pre-operatively screening patients with abnormal SHR, it is possible to refine total hip replacement (THR) surgical planning, which may improve outcomes. An important component of the concept of kinematically aligned total hip arthroplasty (KA THA) consists of defining the optimal acetabular cup design and orientation based on the assessment of an individual’s SHR, and use of the transverse acetabular ligament to adjust the cup positioning. The Bordeaux classification might advance the understanding of SHR and hopefully help improve THR outcomes. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2018;3:39-44. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.3.170020 PMID:29657844

  5. An alternative method for facial resurfacing: supraclavicular skin prefabrication by perforator fascia flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocaoğlu, Emre

    2014-01-01

    Prefabrication of supraclavicular skin provides a useful source for flaps congruent with the face skin. Among various vascular sources that have been used for this purpose, anterolateral thigh fascia seems to represent a greater value because of having a long and strong vascular pedicle and negligible donor-site morbidity. In this regard, we present a technical report on using the lateral circumflex femoral artery perforator flap harvest technique in preparing an anterolateral thigh fascia flap for the prefabrication of the supraclavicular skin. The technique proved successful in resurfacing the facial skin of a young female patient with a giant congenital melanocytic hairy nevus on the left side of her face.

  6. Hypertrophic Scarring of the Neck Following Ablative Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser Resurfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, Mathew M.; Tope, Whitney D.; Yu, Thomas; Szachowicz, Edward; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Background Ablative fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser treatments have gained popularity due to their efficacy, shortened downtime, and decreased potential for scarring in comparison to traditional ablative CO2 resurfacing. To date, scarring with fractional CO2 lasers has not been reported. Objective Five patients treated with the same fractional CO2 laser technology for photodamage of the neck were referred to our practices 1–3 months after treatment. Each patient developed scarring. Of the five cases, two are discussed in detail. The first was treated under general anesthesia on the face and anterior neck at a pulse energy of 30 mJ (859 μm depth) with 25% coverage. Eleven days after treatment, three non-healing areas along the horizontal skin folds of the anterior neck were noted. At 2 weeks after CO2 ablative fractional resurfacing, these areas had become thickened. These raised areas were treated with a non-ablative fractionated 1,550 nm laser to modify the wound healing milieu. One week later, distinct firm pale papules in linear arrays with mild hypopigmentation had developed along involved neck skin folds. Skin biopsy was performed. For the second patient, the neck was treated at a pulse energy of 20 mJ (630 μm depth) with 30% coverage of the exposed skin, with a total treatment energy of 5.0 kJ. Minimal crusting was noted on the neck throughout the initial healing phase of 2 weeks. She then experienced tightness on her neck. Approximately 3 weeks after treatment, she developed multiple vertical and horizontal hypertrophic scars (HS). Results Histopathology for the first case confirmed the presence of a hypertrophic scar. The papules in this case completely resolved with mild residual hypopigmentation after treatment with topical corticosteroids. HS failed to resolve in the second case to date after 1 month. Conclusion As with traditional ablative CO2 laser resurfacing, HS is a potential complication of ablative fractional CO2 laser resurfacing

  7. Breast milk metal ion levels in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelis, Raymond; de Waal Malefijt, Jan; Gosens, Taco

    2013-01-01

    Metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty of the hip has been used increasingly over the last 10 years in younger active patients. The dissolution of the metal wear particles results in measurable increases in cobalt and chromium ions in the serum and urine of patients with a metal-on-metal bearing. We measured the cobalt, chromium, and molybdenum ion levels in urine; serum; and breast milk in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis after a pathologic fracture of the femoral neck. Metal-on-metal hip prosthesis leads to increasing levels of molybdenum in breast milk in the short-term follow-up. There are no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt ions in breast milk. Besides the already known elevated concentrations in serum of chromium and cobalt after implantation of a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis, we found no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt in urine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Revision hip preservation surgery with hip arthroscopy: clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domb, Benjamin G; Stake, Christine E; Lindner, Dror; El-Bitar, Youseff; Jackson, Timothy J

    2014-05-01

    To analyze and report the clinical outcomes of a cohort of patients who underwent revision hip preservation with arthroscopy and determine predictors of positive and negative outcomes. During the study period from April 2008 to December 2010, all patients who underwent revision hip preservation with arthroscopy were included. This included patients who had previous open surgery and underwent revision with arthroscopy. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores were obtained preoperatively and at 3-month, 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year follow-up time points. Any revision surgeries and conversions to total hip arthroplasty were noted. A multiple regression analysis was performed to look for positive and negative predictive factors for improvement in PROs after revision hip arthroscopy. Forty-seven hips in 43 patients had completed 2 years' follow-up or needed total hip arthroplasty. The mean length of follow-up was 29 months (range, 24 to 47 months). Of the hips, 31 (66%) had either unaddressed or incompletely treated femoroacetabular impingement. There was a significant improvement in all PRO scores at a mean of 29 months after revision (P arthroscopy can achieve moderately successful outcomes and remains a viable treatment strategy after failed primary hip preservation surgery. Preoperative predictors of success after revision hip arthroscopy include segmental labral defects, unaddressed or incompletely addressed femoroacetabular impingement, heterotopic ossification, and previous open surgery. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Preliminary findings on the reliability and validity of the Cantonese Birmingham Cognitive Screen in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan X

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoping Pan,1,* Haobo Chen,1,2,* Wai-Ling Bickerton,2 Johnny King Lam Lau,2 Anthony Pak Hin Kong,3 Pia Rotshtein,2 Aihua Guo,1 Jianxi Hu,1 Glyn W Humphreys4 1Department of Neurology, Guangzhou First People’s Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; 3Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA; 4Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: There are no currently effective cognitive assessment tools for patients who have suffered stroke in the People’s Republic of China. The Birmingham Cognitive Screen (BCoS has been shown to be a promising tool for revealing patients’ poststroke cognitive deficits in specific domains, which facilitates more individually designed rehabilitation in the long run. Hence we examined the reliability and validity of a Cantonese version BCoS in patients with acute ischemic stroke, in Guangzhou.Method: A total of 98 patients with acute ischemic stroke were assessed with the Cantonese version of the BCoS, and an additional 133 healthy individuals were recruited as controls. Apart from the BCoS, the patients also completed a number of external cognitive tests, including the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Test (MoCA, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, Albert’s cancellation test, the Rey–Osterrieth Complex Figure Test, and six gesture matching tasks. Cutoff scores for failing each subtest, ie, deficits, were computed based on the performance of the controls. The validity and reliability of the Cantonese BCoS were examined, as well as interrater and test–retest reliability. We also compared the proportions of cases being classified as deficits in controlled attention, memory, character writing, and praxis, between patients with and without spoken language impairment

  10. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular...

  12. The prevalence of food insecurity and associated factors among households with children in Head Start programs in Houston, Texas and Birmingham, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study measured food security and hunger of households enrolled in Head Start in Houston, Texas, and Birmingham, Alabama and assessed factors that could affect food security. Interviewers collected data from primary caregivers on demographic characteristics, dietary intake, and the six-item US f...

  13. Pop-up Library at the University of Birmingham: Extending the Reach of an Academic Library by Taking "The Library" to the Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, James; Bull, Stephen; Cooper, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Aligning with student engagement and promotional strategies, a Pop-Up Library project was initiated at the University of Birmingham. This involved setting up temporary, staffed stalls in different locations across campus in order to informally communicate with students and effectively take "the Library" to them. This article discusses…

  14. Social inequality and hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvey, N. C.; Hansen, L.; Judge, A.

    2015-01-01

    Social inequality appears to be increasing in many countries. We explored whether risk of hip fracture was associated with markers of inequality and whether these relationships changed with time, using data from Danish Health Registries. Methods: All patients 60 years or older with a primary hip...... fracture (ICD10: S720, S721, S722 and S729) were identified from 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2011. Hip fracture patients were matched 1:1 on age, gender and year of fracture to a non-hip fracture control. An individual's education attainment was defined as basic, secondary or higher, and their income...

  15. Economically and environmentally informed policy for road resurfacing: tradeoffs between costs and greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reger, Darren; Madanat, Samer; Horvath, Arpad

    2014-01-01

    As road conditions worsen, users experience an increase in fuel consumption and vehicle wear and tear. This increases the costs incurred by the drivers, and also increases the amount of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that vehicles emit. Pavement condition can be improved through rehabilitation activities (resurfacing) to reduce the effects on users, but these activities also have significant cost and GHG emission impacts. The objective of pavement management is to minimize total societal (user and agency) costs. However, the environmental impacts associated with the cost-minimizing policy are not currently accounted for. We show that there exists a range of potentially optimal decisions, known as the Pareto frontier, in which it is not possible to decrease total emissions without increasing total costs and vice versa. This research explores these tradeoffs for a system of pavement segments. For a case study, a network was created from a subset of California’s highways using available traffic data. It was shown that the current resurfacing strategy used by the state’s transportation agency, Caltrans, does not fall on the Pareto frontier, meaning that significant savings in both total costs and total emissions can be achieved by switching to one of the optimal policies. The methods presented in this paper also allow the decision maker to evaluate the impact of other policies, such as reduced vehicle kilometers traveled or better construction standards. (letter)

  16. In vivo animal histology and clinical evaluation of multisource fractional radiofrequency skin resurfacing (FSR) applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadick, Neil S; Sato, Masaki; Palmisano, Diana; Frank, Ido; Cohen, Hila; Harth, Yoram

    2011-10-01

    Acne scars are one of the most difficult disorders to treat in dermatology. The optimal treatment system will provide minimal downtime resurfacing for the epidermis and non-ablative deep volumetric heating for collagen remodeling in the dermis. A novel therapy system (EndyMed Ltd., Cesarea, Israel) uses phase-controlled multi-source radiofrequency (RF) to provide simultaneous one pulse microfractional resurfacing with simultaneous volumetric skin tightening. The study included 26 subjects (Fitzpatrick's skin type 2-5) with moderate to severe wrinkles and 4 subjects with depressed acne scars. Treatment was repeated each month up to a total of three treatment sessions. Patients' photographs were graded according to accepted scales by two uninvolved blinded evaluators. Significant reduction in the depth of wrinkles and acne scars was noted 4 weeks after therapy with further improvement at the 3-month follow-up. Our data show the histological impact and clinical beneficial effects of simultaneous RF fractional microablation and volumetric deep dermal heating for the treatment of wrinkles and acne scars.

  17. Nonablative Fractional Laser Resurfacing for Acne Scarring in Patients With Fitzpatrick Skin Phototypes IV-VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexis, Andrew F; Coley, Marcelyn K; Nijhawan, Rajiv I; Luke, Janiene D; Shah, Sejal K; Argobi, Yahya A; Nodzenski, Michael; Veledar, Emir; Alam, Murad

    2016-03-01

    There is a paucity of studies investigating laser resurfacing in Fitzpatrick skin phototypes (SPT) IV to VI. To assess the efficacy and safety of fractional nonablative laser resurfacing in the treatment of acne scarring in patients with SPT IV to VI. The authors conducted a randomized, investigator-blinded and rater-blinded, split-face comparative study of adults with SPT IV to VI and facial acne scars treated with 2 different density settings and the same fluence. Quantitative global scarring grading system (QGSGS) scores were significantly improved from baseline at 16 and 24 weeks (p = .0277). Improvements in QGSGS scores after higher and lower density treatments were statistically similar (p = .96). The live-blinded dermatologist, the blinded dermatologist photoraters, and the patients rated scars as being significantly more improved by visual analog scale at weeks 16 and 24 compared with baseline (p skin types IV to VI. Self-limited postinflammatory hyperpigmentation was a common occurrence, especially with higher treatment densities.

  18. Polydeoxyribonucleotide improves wound healing of fractional laser resurfacing in rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mi; Lee, Jun Young

    2017-02-01

    Polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) is an active compound that can promote wound healing. PDRN stimulates wound healing by enhancing angiogenesis and increasing fibroblast growth rates. Laser skin resurfacing is a popular cosmetic procedure for skin rejuvenation. Despite excellent improvement of photo-damaged skin and acne scarring, it is accompanied with drawbacks, such as prolonged erythema and crusting. This study was designed to assess the effect of PDRN on wounds induced by fractional laser resurfacing. Twelve male rats aged 8 weeks were randomly assigned to the PDRN treatment group and the control group. Wounds were induced using a fractional ablative CO 2 laser. The treatment group received daily injections of PDRN and the control group received injections of the vehicle. Wound healing assessed by clinical features and histopathologic findings. The process of wound healing was faster in the treatment group than in the control group. In the histopathological examination, the granulation tissue thickness score of the treatment group was significantly higher than that of the control group. Results of immunohistochemical staining showed a marked increase of VEGF-positive cells and PECAM-1/CD31-positive microvessels in the treatment group. PDRN may be a beneficial option to promote wound healing after laser treatment.

  19. Random fractional ultrapulsed CO2 resurfacing of photodamaged facial skin: long-term evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretti Clementoni, Matteo; Galimberti, Michela; Tourlaki, Athanasia; Catenacci, Maximilian; Lavagno, Rosalia; Bencini, Pier Luca

    2013-02-01

    Although numerous papers have recently been published on ablative fractional resurfacing, there is a lack of information in literature on very long-term results. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the efficacy, adverse side effects, and long-term results of a random fractional ultrapulsed CO2 laser on a large population with photodamaged facial skin. Three hundred twelve patients with facial photodamaged skin were enrolled and underwent a single full-face treatment. Six aspects of photodamaged skin were recorded using a 5 point scale at 3, 6, and 24 months after the treatment. The results were compared with a non-parametric statistical test, the Wilcoxon's exact test. Three hundred one patients completed the study. All analyzed features showed a significant statistical improvement 3 months after the procedure. Three months later all features, except for pigmentations, once again showed a significant statistical improvement. Results after 24 months were similar to those assessed 18 months before. No long-term or other serious complications were observed. From the significant number of patients analyzed, long-term results demonstrate not only how fractional ultrapulsed CO2 resurfacing can achieve good results on photodamaged facial skin but also how these results can be considered stable 2 years after the procedure.

  20. Implications of the Utopia Gravity Anomaly for the Resurfacing of the Northern Plains of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerdt, W. B.

    2004-01-01

    Whereas the surface units of the northern plain of Mars generally exhibit ages ranging from late Hesperian to Amazonian, interpretation of precise topographic measurements indicate that the age of the underlying "basement" is early Noachian, or almost as old as the southern highlands. This suggests that widespread but relatively superficial resurfacing has occurred throughout the northern plains since the end of early heavy bombardment. In this abstract I examine some of the possible implications of the subsurface structure inferred for the Utopia basin from gravity data on the nature of this resurfacing. The large, shallow, circular depression in Utopia Planitia has been identified as a huge impact basin, based on both geological evidence and detailed analysis of MOLA topography. Its diameter (approx. 3000 km) is equivalent to that of the Hellas basin, as is its inferred age (early Noachian). However, whereas Hellas is extremely deep with rough terrain and large slopes, the Utopia basin is a smooth, shallow, almost imperceptible bowl. Conversely, Utopia displays one of the largest (non-Tharsis-related) positive geoid anomalies on Mars, in contrast to a much more subdued negative anomaly over Hellas.

  1. "Palmar pivot flap" for resurfacing palmar lateral defects of the fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Andrew; Peng, Yeong-Pin; Pho, Robert Wan-Heng

    2008-12-01

    Soft tissue defects on the lateral borders of the digits are difficult to reconstruct using local or local-regional flaps. We describe a "palmar pivot flap" to resurface an adjacent defect on the palmar-lateral aspect of the digit. The surgical technique is described. This flap is an axial pattern flap based on the subcutaneous transverse branches of the digital artery. The flap is pivoted up to 90 degrees on the neurovascular bundle in its base, into an adjacent defect. The flap can be raised from either the proximal or the middle phalangeal segments. It can cover defects sited from the level of the proximal interphalangeal joint up to the fingertip. The donor defect is limited to the same digit and is covered with a full-thickness skin graft. We have used this flap on 3 patients with defects at the middle phalangeal segment, the distal interphalangeal joint, and the fingertip. All healed primarily. One patient had a mild flexion contracture of the proximal interphalangeal joint, whereas the other 2 had no complications. The patients with distal interphalangeal joint and fingertip defects had excellent sensation in the flap (2-point discrimination of 5-6 mm). The palmar pivot flap is useful for resurfacing otherwise difficult defects on the lateral borders of the digits around and distal to the proximal interphalangeal joint, including those at the fingertip. It provides sensate, glabrous skin. The donor defect is on the same digit and is well hidden, producing an aesthetic and functional reconstruction.

  2. Economically and environmentally informed policy for road resurfacing: tradeoffs between costs and greenhouse gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, Darren; Madanat, Samer; Horvath, Arpad

    2014-10-01

    As road conditions worsen, users experience an increase in fuel consumption and vehicle wear and tear. This increases the costs incurred by the drivers, and also increases the amount of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that vehicles emit. Pavement condition can be improved through rehabilitation activities (resurfacing) to reduce the effects on users, but these activities also have significant cost and GHG emission impacts. The objective of pavement management is to minimize total societal (user and agency) costs. However, the environmental impacts associated with the cost-minimizing policy are not currently accounted for. We show that there exists a range of potentially optimal decisions, known as the Pareto frontier, in which it is not possible to decrease total emissions without increasing total costs and vice versa. This research explores these tradeoffs for a system of pavement segments. For a case study, a network was created from a subset of California’s highways using available traffic data. It was shown that the current resurfacing strategy used by the state’s transportation agency, Caltrans, does not fall on the Pareto frontier, meaning that significant savings in both total costs and total emissions can be achieved by switching to one of the optimal policies. The methods presented in this paper also allow the decision maker to evaluate the impact of other policies, such as reduced vehicle kilometers traveled or better construction standards.

  3. Interprofessional academic health center leadership development: the case of the University of Alabama at Birmingham's Healthcare Leadership Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Grant T; Duncan, W Jack; Knowles, Kathy L; Nelson, Kathleen; Rogers, David A; Kennedy, Karen N

    2014-05-01

    The study describes the genesis of the University of Alabama at Birmingham's Healthcare Leadership Academy (HLA), highlights the HLA's outcomes, discloses how the HLA has changed, and delineates future directions for academic health center (AHC) interprofessional leadership training. While interprofessional training is recognized as an important component of the professional education for health professionals, AHCs have not focused on interprofessional leadership training to prepare future AHC leaders. As professional bureaucracies, AHCs require leadership distributed across different professions; these leaders not only should be technical experts, but also skilled at interprofessional teamwork and collaborative governance. The HLA is examined using the case method, which is supplemented with a descriptive analysis of program evaluation data and outcomes. The HLA has created a networked community of AHC leaders; the HLA's interprofessional team projects foster innovative problem solving. Interprofessional leadership training expands individuals' networks and has multiple organizational benefits. © 2014.

  4. The imperial welfare state? Decolonisation, education and professional interventions on immigrant children in Birmingham, 1948–1971

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydesen, Christian; Myers, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This article approaches debates about how the history of the post-1945 English welfare state might be written. It argues that professionals’ interventions on immigrant children can serve as a prism for understanding the crafting of the modern English welfare state. In this sense the article engages...... multiculturalism. Due to its influential impact on the development of immigrant education policies in England and because of its extensive education archive the article uses the Birmingham Local Education Administration (LEA) as an empirical and historical case. The significant British Nationality Act of 1948...... and the Immigration Act of 1971 serve as demarcations of the period treated. The article concludes that the immigrant child, and the child’s background, were consistently presented as educational problems and as the cause of both poor academic attainment and a more intangible unwillingness to assimilate. In this lens...

  5. Management of Older Inpatients Who Refuse Nonpsychiatric Medication Within Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust: Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umotong, Eno

    2016-12-01

    The effects of poor medication compliance are well documented and include increased morbidity, early mortality, and financial costs to the society. According to national guidelines, when a competent patient refuses medication, the doctor on duty has a responsibility to ensure the patient understands their proposed course of action. The aims of this audit were to evaluate whether this consultation was taking place within older in-patient units across Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust when patients refuse nonpsychiatric medicines. Poor compliance was defined as more than five refusals of a nonpsychiatric medication over a 4-week period. A discussion with the duty doctor occurred in 75% of cases (27/36), which resulted in a change in prescription or compliance in 59% (16/27 patients). After patient refusal of medication, a consultation with the duty doctor is likely to improve compliance and uncover salient issues particularly in regards to capacity and drug suitability.

  6. Leadership lessons in global nursing and health from the Nightingale Letter Collection at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Doreen C; Davey, Kimberly S; Fordham, Pamela N

    2014-03-01

    This article analyzes the components of Florence Nightingale's visionary leadership for global health and nursing within the historical context of Great Britain's colonization of India. The descriptive study used the qualitative approach of narrative analysis to analyze selected letters in the Nightingale Letter Collection at the University of Alabama at Birmingham that Nightingale wrote to or about Dr. Thomas Gillham Hewlett, a physician and health officer in Bombay, India. The authors sought to increase understanding of Nightingale's visionary leadership for global nursing and health through a study of the form and content of the letters analyzed as temporally contextualized data, focusing on how the narratives are composed and what is conveyed. Several recurring themes central to Nightingale's leadership on global nursing and health emerge throughout these letters, including health and sanitation reform, collaborative partnerships, data-driven policy development, and advocacy for public health. These themes are illustrated through her letters to and testimony about Dr. Thomas Gillham Hewlett in her vivid descriptions of health education and promotion, data-driven policy documents, public health and sanitation advice, and collaboration with citizens, medicine, policy makers, and governments to improve the health and welfare of the people of India. The focus on leadership in nursing as a global construct highlights the lessons learned from University of Alabama at Birmingham's Nightingale Letter Collection that has relevance for the future of nursing and health care, particularly Nightingale's collaboration with policy leaders, her analysis of data to set policy agendas, and public health reform centered on improving the health and well-being of underserved populations.

  7. Manual resurfacing and trichloroacetic acid for the treatment of patients with widespread actinic damage. Clinical and histologic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, J E; Casey, D L; Kauffman, C L

    1997-05-01

    A facial resurfacing regimen combining manual abrasion of the skin and 25% trichloroacetic acid has been reported to produce excellent results, but the histologic depth of injury produced by this technique has not been studied. To describe our experience with this technique treating patients with extensive actinic damage and to determine the histologic depth of injury produced. We treated 40 patients using manual resurfacing and trichloroacetic acid, primarily for widespread actinic keratoses. Resurfacing tools included silicone carbide sandpaper, drywall screen, electrocautery tip cleaners, abrasive pads, scalpel blades, and curettes. Four patients underwent sequential biopsies to evaluate the depth of wounding using this technique. Manual resurfacing combined with trichloroacetic acid consistently produced excellent cosmetic results and nearly complete eradication of actinic keratoses. Histologically, treated areas showed replacement of the dermal elastotic band by newly formed collagen, a significantly deeper level of wounding than the Jessner's/35% trichloroacetic acid peel. There was no evidence for foreign body granulomas clinically or histologically as a result of the abrasive materials. The deeper level of this peel explains the improved cosmetic outcome and greater eradication of actinic keratoses. This treatment is particularly well suited for patients with extensive photodamage and widespread actinic keratoses.

  8. Resultados de artroplastia total de joelho com e sem implante de recapeamento (resurfacing patelar Results of total knee replacement with/without resurfacing of the patella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Khan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar a diferença de dor, estalido e crepitação patelofemoral no pós-operatório em pacientes com ou sem recapeamento patelar após 5 anos, os quais tinham dor patelofemoral antes da cirurgia. Estudar a incidência de dor, estalido e crepitação patelofemoral depois de pateloplastia em ambos os grupos. MÉTODOS: Revisão retrospectiva de 765 pacientes submetidos a artroplastia total do joelho (ATJ com ou sem recapeamento patelar. Os pacientes foram perguntados sobre dor pré e pós-operatória, 5 anos depois da cirurgia. Foram examinados por enfermeiro especializado 5 anos, após a cirurgia para verificar estalidos ou crepitação patelofemoral (PF. RESULTADOS: 688 pacientes (89,9% tinham dor PF pré-operatória. De 688 pacientes, 449 tinham recapeamento patelar (R e 239 não tinham (NR. Trinta e seis pacientes do grupo NR tinham pateloplastia. A incidência de dor PF pós-operatória foi 13,3% no grupo R e 13,6% no grupo NR. A incidência de estalido PF pós-operatório no grupo R foi 10,4% e apenas 1,3% no grupo NR (estatisticamente significante, p OBJECTIVE: To study the difference of post-op patellofemoral pain, clunk and crepitus in patients with/without resurfacing at 5 years who had pre-op patellofemoral pain. To study the incidence of post-operative patellofemoral pain, clunk and crepitus following patelloplasty in both the groups. METHODS: Retrospective review of 765 patients who had total knee replacement with/without resurfacing.Patients were asked about both pre-operative pain and also post-operative pain 5 years after the operation. Patients were examined by a specialist nurse at 5 years post-operatively to check for any patellofemoral clunk/crepitus. RESULTS: 688 patients (89.9% had preoperative PF pain. Of 688 patients, 449 had patellar resurfacing and 239 had not (NR. Thirty-six patients from the NR group had patelloplasty. The incidence of postoperative PF pain was 13.3% in the R group and 13.6% in the NR group

  9. Patellar resurfacing versus nonresurfacing in total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis: experience at a tertiary care institution in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakdawala RH

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Akil Fazal1, Riaz H Lakdawala21Clinical Fellow, NYU Hospital for Joint Disease, New York, US; 2Associate Professor and Chief, Section of Orthopedics, Department of Surgery, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, PakistanObjective: To determine the effect of patellar resurfacing in patients offered total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis.Design: Randomized control study.Place and duration of study: The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan from January 3, 2005 to January 9, 2010.Patients and methods: Patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis were assigned to either the patellar resurfacing or nonresurfacing arm using systematic sampling. This consisted of patients undergoing unilateral and bilateral knee arthroplasty. Preoperatively, Knee Society Knee and Function Scores were calculated. After a minimum of 3 years postoperatively Knee Society Knee and Function Scores as well as the Clinical Anterior Knee Pain Rating were calculated and analysis done to check for differences.Results: Seventy-five patients were recruited in each arm; 135 patients had bilateral and 15 had unilateral knee arthroplasty. The mean preoperative knee score was 40.4 for the resurfacing group and 40.60 for the nonresurfacing group (P = 0.45. This improved postoperatively to 93.67 and 94.23 respectively, with no difference between the two groups (P = 0.67. The mean preoperative function score was 45.50 for resurfaced patellae and 45.83 for nonresurfaced. This improved to 89.67 and 90.50, respectively, again with no difference (P = 0.51. Postoperative Clinical Anterior Knee Pain Rating was a mean of 0.1 for resurfaced and 0.13 for nonresurfaced patellas, with no difference on analysis (P = 0.06. However, patients who had bilateral knee arthroplasty had a slightly higher Clinical Anterior Knee Pain Rating than those who had single knee surgery (P = 0.046 irrespective of whether the patellar was resurfaced or not.Conclusion: In

  10. High mid-term revision rate after treatment of large, full-thickness cartilage lesions and OA in the patellofemoral joint using a large inlay resurfacing prosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jens Ole

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The HemiCAP-Wave® implant for the patellofemoral resurfacing treatment of large cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis (OA) was introduced in 2009. The outcome of a prospective cohort study of 18 patients with large trochlea lesions or isolated OA treated with the HemiCAP-Wave® implant...... pain but high mid-term revision rate after patellofemoral inlay resurfacing using the HemiCAP-Wave® implant. Patellofemoral resurfacing implantation treatment with a large inlay prosthesis can offer temporary treatment for large isolated patellofemoral cartilage lesions or OA in younger patients...

  11. Gluteal tendinopathy and hip osteoarthritis: Different pathologies, different hip biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kim; Hall, Michelle; Hodges, Paul W; Wrigley, Tim V; Vicenzino, Bill; Pua, Yong-Hao; Metcalf, Ben; Grimaldi, Alison; Bennell, Kim L

    2018-03-01

    Gluteal tendinopathy (GT) and hip osteoarthritis (OA) are the most common causes of hip pain and associated disability in older adults. Pain and altered walking biomechanics are common to both conditions. This study aimed to compare three-dimensional walking biomechanics between individuals with unilateral, symptomatic GT and HOA. Sixty individuals with symptomatic unilateral GT confirmed by magnetic-resonance-imaging and 73 individuals with symptomatic unilateral HOA (Kellgren-Lawrence Grade ≥ 2) underwent three-dimensional gait analysis. Maximum and minimum values of the external sagittal hip moment, the first peak, second peak and mid-stance minimum of the hip adduction moment (HAM), sagittal plane hip excursion and hip joint angles, pelvic obliquity and trunk lean, at the three HAM time points during stance phase of walking were compared between groups. Compared to individuals with HOA, those with GT exhibited a greater hip peak extension moment (P < 0.001) and greater HAM throughout the stance phase of walking (P = 0.01-P < 0.001), greater hip adduction (P < 0.001) and internal rotation (P < 0.01-P < 0.001) angles and lower hip flexion angles and excursion (P = 0.02 - P < 0.001). Individuals with HOA exhibited a greater forward trunk lean (P ≤ 0.001) throughout stance, and greater ipsilateral trunk lean in the frontal plane (P < 0.001) than those with GT. Despite presence of pain in both conditions, hip kinematics and kinetics differ between individuals with symptomatic unilateral GT and those with symptomatic unilateral HOA. These condition-specific impairments may be targets for optimization of management of HOA and GT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Hip-Hop Education Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Marcella Runell

    2009-01-01

    Hip-hop music and culture are often cited as being public pedagogy, meaning the music itself has intrinsic educational value. Non-profit organizations and individual educators have graciously taken the lead in utilizing hip-hop to educate. As the academy continues to debate its effectiveness, teachers and community organizers are moving forward.…

  13. Total hip arthroplasty in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Alma Becic; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Overgaard, Søren

    2005-01-01

    The annual number of total hip arthroplasties (THA) has increased in Denmark over the past 15 years. There is, however, limited detailed data available on the incidence of THAs.......The annual number of total hip arthroplasties (THA) has increased in Denmark over the past 15 years. There is, however, limited detailed data available on the incidence of THAs....

  14. The Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundtoft, Per Hviid; Varnum, Claus; Pedersen, Alma Becic

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register (DHR) is to continuously monitor and improve the quality of treatment of primary and revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHR is a Danish nationwide arthroplasty register established in January 1995...

  15. Hip sonography in the newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riboni, G.; Serantoni, S.; De Simoni, M.; Bascape', P.; Facchini, R.; Pirovano, G.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report the data relative to 1507 cases studied with clinical and US examinations, in the neonatal period, in order to exclude hip dysplasia dislocation. US examination was carried out according to Graf's technique and the newborns were classified according to US hip type, to clinical examination and to possible risk factors. The patients were included in a protocol including orthopedic and US controls. Seventeen treated infants were considered as pathologic. Ten of them had IIc or D hips ar birth; the other 7, with IIa hips at birth, presented a X-ray pathologic hip after the 4th months of life. At about one year of age all infants could normally walk, excpet for one who was being treated with herness. No statistically significant differences were observed between the number of pathologic infants in the risk group (1.7%) and that in the no-risk group (0.8%). Clinical examination of the newborn has low sensitivity in detecting pathologic hips. On the basis of their results, thw authors belive US examination of the newborn to be a valuable screening method to diagnose hip dysplasia/dislocation. Moreover, Graf's morphologic method is the best one for US screening of the hip in the neonatal period

  16. Results of Lateral Retinacular Release Plus Circumpatellar Electrocautery in Total Knee Arthroplasty without Patellar Resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Sun, Jun-Ying; Zha, Guo-Chun

    2017-03-01

    Anterior knee pain (AKP) is integral to the overall success of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) without patellar resurfacing. Numerous studies have evaluated various factors that may contribute to AKP, including patellofemoral design, surgical technique, characteristics of the patient, and degree of chondromalacia. This study aims to explore whether patients who received lateral retinacular release (LRR) plus circumpatellar electrocautery (CE) in TKA attain a low incidence of AKP and whether the LRR plus CE increases postoperative complications. Between February 2001 and February 2009, all patients undergoing TKA without patellar resurfacing and LRR plus CE were evaluated. In total, 286 TKAs in 259 (88.7%) patients were available for assessment, with a mean of 9.3 ± 2.5 years (range: 6-14 years) after the index TKA. The patients were evaluated with a VAS and the Kujala patellofemoral score (KPS) for AKP and the Knee Society's clinical scoring system (KSS) for the clinical function. Satisfaction and LRR-related complications were also assessed. The mean KPS and KSS improved from 45.2 ± 12.9 and 75.4 ± 26.8 points preoperatively to 82.8 ± 10.0 and 151.6 ± 17.3 points at the final follow-up ( p  < 0.001), respectively. Subjectively, 5.6% (16 of 286) of patients suffered from AKP and 88.1% (252 of 286) were satisfied or very satisfied. Postoperative complications occurred in 15 (5.2%) patients, but these complications were mild and did not require reoperation. None of patients exhibited aseptic and septic prosthesis loosening and required revision surgery in the final follow-up. LRR plus CE appears to be a reasonable option in TKA without patellar resurfacing. It may achieve adequate mid-term results, with a low incidence of AKP and postoperative complications.The level of evidence of the study is therapeutic level IV. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Clinical Evaluation of Fused/Ankylosed Hip with Severe Flexion Deformity after Conversion to Total Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Kumar Suwal

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: THA is an effective treatment for ankylosed hip with severe flexion deformity although complications are noted more than routine hip arthroplasties. Keywords: ankylosed hip; fused hip; severe flexion deformity; total hip arthroplasty. | PubMed

  18. Choice of implant combinations in total hip replacement: systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, José A; Humphriss, Rachel L; Beswick, Andrew D; Thom, Howard H Z; Hunt, Linda P; Burston, Amanda; Fawsitt, Christopher G; Hollingworth, William; Higgins, Julian P T; Welton, Nicky J; Blom, Ashley W; Marques, Elsa M R

    2017-11-02

    Objective  To compare the survival of different implant combinations for primary total hip replacement (THR). Design  Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Data sources  Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and the EU Clinical Trials Register. Review methods  Published randomised controlled trials comparing different implant combinations. Implant combinations were defined by bearing surface materials (metal-on-polyethylene, ceramic-on-polyethylene, ceramic-on-ceramic, or metal-on-metal), head size (large ≥36 mm or small meta-analysis for revision. There was no evidence that the risk of revision surgery was reduced by other implant combinations compared with the reference implant combination. Although estimates are imprecise, metal-on-metal, small head, cemented implants (hazard ratio 4.4, 95% credible interval 1.6 to 16.6) and resurfacing (12.1, 2.1 to 120.3) increase the risk of revision at 0-2 years after primary THR compared with the reference implant combination. Similar results were observed for the 2-10 years period. 31 studies (2888 patients) were included in the analysis of Harris hip score. No implant combination had a better score than the reference implant combination. Conclusions  Newer implant combinations were not found to be better than the reference implant combination (metal-on-polyethylene (not highly cross linked), small head, cemented) in terms of risk of revision surgery or Harris hip score. Metal-on-metal, small head, cemented implants and resurfacing increased the risk of revision surgery compared with the reference implant combination. The results were consistent with observational evidence and were replicated in sensitivity analysis but were limited by poor reporting across studies. Systematic review registration  PROSPERO CRD42015019435. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  19. Skin resurfacing in a circumferential full thickness burn to the penis: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabir, Shehab; Frew, Quentin; Thompson, Richard; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-08-13

    A circumferential full-thickness burn to the penis is a rarely encountered injury. However, when it does occur, it proves a management challenge to the plastic and burns surgeon in terms of reconstruction. This is due to the need of not only regaining adequate function of the organ, but also because of the need for a pleasing aesthetic outcome. Split-skin grafts have been utilised successfully to resurface full thickness burns of the penis and have given good results. Yet the success of split-skin grafts, especially those applied to an anatomically challenging region of the body such as the penis, depends on a number of carefully thought-out steps. We discuss the case of a circumferential full-thickness burn to the penis which was treated with split-skin grafting and highlight important pitfalls that the plastic and burns surgeon need to be aware of to ensure a successful outcome.

  20. The Resurfacing of Bepridil Hydrochloride on the World Stage as an Antiarrhythmic Drug for Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Nakazato, MD, PhD

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bepridil hydrochloride is a multiple ion channel blocker with relatively strong suppressive effects for various K+ channels. Recent clinical studies mainly done in Japan have revealed the eficacy of the agent for the management of atrial fibrillation (AF. The pharmacological conversion effect for persistent AF seems particularly promising. The agent also has robust effects in maintaining sinus rhythm after pharmacological or electrical conversion, as well as suppressing recurrent attacks of paroxysmal AF. Though torsades de pointes may develop due to QT prolongation, an appropriate dosage and careful follow-up can prevent this serious complication. Now that the antiarrhythmic eficacy of bepridil for AF is recognized in Japan, the agent is poised to resurface on the world stage as a treatment for AF.

  1. Extensive nevus comedonicus, complicated with recurrent abscesses, successfully treated with surgical resurfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narender Manikavachakan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nevus comedonicus is a rare epidermal abnormality of the pilosebaceous unit, which is congenital in most patients but may also appear early in childhood. It may be localized or have an extensive involvement, the latter showing a unilateral predominance with only a few cases presenting bilaterally. Extensive nevus comedonicus can be associated with musculoskeletal defects, eye and neurological involvement, which constitutes nevus comedonicus syndrome. Uncomplicated nevus comedonicus can be treated with topical keratolytics, diode, erbium laser, and ultrapulse CO2 laser. Surgical excision can be performed to ensure complete removal and nonrecurrence. This case report refers to a young male patient with extensive nevus comedonicus present over left chest, left axilla, and left upper back without systemic involvement, treated with staged surgical excision and resurfacing.

  2. Current Laser Resurfacing Technologies: A Review that Delves Beneath the Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissig, Jason; Hamilton, Kristy; Markus, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Numerous laser platforms exist that rejuvenate the skin by resurfacing its upper layers. In varying degrees, these lasers improve the appearance of lentigines and rhytides, eliminate photoaging, soften scarring due to acne and other causes, and treat dyspigmentation. Five major classes of dermatologic lasers are currently in common use: ablative and nonablative lasers in both fractionated and unfractionated forms as well as radiofrequency technologies. The gentler nonablative lasers allow for quicker healing, whereas harsher ablative lasers tend to be more effective. Fractionating either laser distributes the effect, increasing the number of treatments but minimizing downtime and complications. In this review article, the authors seek to inform surgeons about the current laser platforms available, clarify the differences between them, and thereby facilitate the identification of the most appropriate laser for their practice. PMID:23904818

  3. The pelvis and hips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.; Coventry, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic evaluation of joint replacements requires close communication between the radiologist and referring physician. Routine films, radioisotope scans, and subtraction arthrography (including aspiration and injection of the pseudocapsule) may be indicated in different clinical situations. This paper summarizes the accuracy of these modalities. Most patients present with pain. One must exclude loosening, infection, and other problems. The arthrogram is most useful in defining anatomy and most causes of hip pain. Culture studies and diagnostic injections add to the versatility of subtraction arthrography and increase its accuracy. If plain films are negative, a Tc-99m scan can be obtained. If this is negative, loosening is unlikely. If pain persists or if the scan is positive, an arthrogram should be performed. Pain may be secondary to bursitis rather than loosening, and the arthrogram will assist in diagnosis and treatment. When films suggest loosening, arthrography is the procedure of choice to confirm the diagnosis and to exclude infection

  4. Hip complications following chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, P.J.; Sebag Montefiore, D.J.; Arnott, S.J. [Saint Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-01

    Chemoradiotherapy protocols are a recent development in the management of tumours where preservation of organ function is important. It is now recognized that such combined treatment may produce adverse effects below the accepted dose thresholds for either modality. This enhancement of toxicity is generally thought to reflect depletion of stem cells within the tissue concerned. We report four patients who have developed avascular necrosis or fractures of the hip following chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the vulva or anus. These complications developed after a radiation dose of 4500 cGy in 20 fractions. The possible role of cytotoxic agents in sensitizing bone to radiation damage is discussed, and a novel mechanism is proposed to account for this phenomenon. (author).

  5. Hip complications following chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, P.J.; Sebag Montefiore, D.J.; Arnott, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy protocols are a recent development in the management of tumours where preservation of organ function is important. It is now recognized that such combined treatment may produce adverse effects below the accepted dose thresholds for either modality. This enhancement of toxicity is generally thought to reflect depletion of stem cells within the tissue concerned. We report four patients who have developed avascular necrosis or fractures of the hip following chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the vulva or anus. These complications developed after a radiation dose of 4500 cGy in 20 fractions. The possible role of cytotoxic agents in sensitizing bone to radiation damage is discussed, and a novel mechanism is proposed to account for this phenomenon. (author)

  6. Multisource radiofrequency for fractional skin resurfacing-significant reduction of wrinkles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Serge; Rousseaux, Isabelle; Cartier, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    Skin roughness, color change, wrinkles and skin laxity are the main characteristics of aging skin. Dermatologists and plastic surgeons look for a treatment that will provide both epidermal resurfacing for the improvement of skin roughness and deep volumetric heating that will trigger collagen remodeling in the dermis to reduce wrinkles and skin laxity. These goals should be achieved with minimal pain and downtime. The study included 10 subjects (Fitzpatrick's skin type 2-3) with Fitzpatrick wrinkle and elastosis scale of 5-8 (average 7.3). Treatment was done with the Fractional skin resurfacing handpiece of the EndyMed PRO multisource radiofrequency system (EndyMed Ltd, Cesarea, Israel). Treatment was repeated each month up to a total of three treatment sessions. Patients photographs were graded according to accepted scales by a board certified dermatologists. Patients' pain and satisfaction were scored using dedicated questionnaires. Doctors' satisfaction was also evaluated. Post treatment skin erythema was noted in all treated patients, lasting up to 10 hours. Fifty six percent of patients reported no pain after treatment, and the rest (44%) reported minimal pain. All patients showed significant reduction in the Fitzpatrick wrinkle score. Average Fitzpatrick wrinkle score was 7.3 at baseline, 4.9 at 1 month after the first treatment, 4.2 at 1 month after the second treatment, and 4.1 at 1 month after the third treatment. The score was similar at 3 months after the third treatment with a score of 4.1. When asked at the end of three treatment sessions, all patients answered they will recommend the treatment to their friends (66% "definitely yes" and 33% "yes"). When asked the same question 3 months after the end of treatment, all patients (100%) answered "definitely yes".

  7. Fractional ablative carbon dioxide laser resurfacing for skin rejuvenation and acne scars in Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Nicola P Y; Ho, Stephanie G Y; Yeung, Chi K; Shek, Samantha Y N; Chan, Henry H

    2010-11-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) is a new modality for photorejuvenation and acne scars which combines carbon dioxide (CO₂) laser ablation with fractional photothermolysis. The objective is to evaluate the efficacy and side effects of a new fractional CO₂ ablative device (Fraxel Re:pair) for skin rejuvenation and acne scars in Asians. Nine patients underwent one full-face treatment. The energy levels ranged from 30-70 mJ with coverage between 30% and 45%. Improvement in skin texture, laxity, wrinkles, enlarged pores, overall pigmentation irregularity, and adverse effects were assessed up to 6 months post-treatment. Standardized photographs using the Canfield Visia CR system® were assessed by two independent observers. Subjective improvement was assessed by patient questionnaires. Nine Chinese patients (skin types III and IV, mean age 44.8) were included. Statistically significant improvements were seen for skin texture, skin laxity, wrinkles, enlarged pores, and acne scars. The post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation rate was 55.5% and 11.1% at 1 and 6 months post-treatment, respectively. Eighty-six percent of patients were overall satisfied to very satisfied with the treatment. Ablative fractional CO₂ laser resurfacing was overall safe and effective for skin rejuvenation and acne scars in Asians. However, in view of the high post-inflammatory rate and the statistically significant but only mild to moderate improvement after a single treatment as observed in this study, there is a need to review the current role of fractional ablative CO₂ laser treatment as compared to fractional non-ablative for skin rejuvenation and acne scar treatment in Asians. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. A pilot study of treatment of striae distensae with variable square pulse Erbium: YAG laser resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Meeprathom, Walailak; Manuskiatti, Woraphong

    2017-12-01

    Striae distensae (SD) are a frequent skin condition for which treatment remains a challenge. Various laser treatments have been employed to remove the epidermis and cause dermal wound and heating with subsequent dermal collagen remodeling. To determine the efficacy and safety of a variable square pulse Erbium: YAG (VSP Er:YAG) laser for the treatment of striae in skin phototypes III-IV. Twenty-one women with SD were treated monthly for 2 months with VSP Er:YAG laser resurfacing using a 7-mm spot size. One side of their striae was randomly treated with one pass of 400 mJ in short pulse (SP) mode with 50% overlapping and one pass of 2.2 J/cm 2 in smooth (SM) mode with nonoverlapping. The other side of their striae was treated with two passes of 400 mJ in SP mode with 50% overlapping. Objective and subjective assessments were obtained at baseline and 1-, 3-, and 6-month after treatment. In both SP&SM and SP only group, volume of SD measured by Visioscan VC98 reduced significantly at 6-month follow-up visit (P=.017 and P=.034, respectively). There were no statistically significant differences in skin roughness (SER), skin smoothness (SESM), and surface measured by Visioscan VC98. Transient postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) is the common side effect found in patients with darker skin tone even in nonsun exposure areas and can last as long as 6 months. VSP Er:YAG laser resurfacing is a promising treatment option for SD. Lower fluence should be used in patients with darker skin phototype to avoid the risk of PIH. In addition, pre- and post-treatment with topical preparations for PIH prevention may be needed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. 100-μsec pulsed CO2 laser resurfacing of lower eyelids: erythema and rhytides reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thomas; Harris, David M.; Schachter, Daniel; Burkart, John

    1997-05-01

    Lower eyelid skin is very thin with a low density of adnexal structures. Attempts to remove rhytides and improve surface appearance with chemical peels and dermabrasion have been disappointing. Laser resurfacing offers a new modality that may improve the outcome. We evaluated a very short duration (100 microsecond(s) ec) pulsed carbon-dioxide laser (Tru-PulseTM) in terms of healing time (duration of erythema) and efficacy (wrinkle reduction). Female patients aged 35 - 75 received laser resurfacing in a variety of cosmetic zones but only data from lower lids are reported here. Dosimetry varied from total fluences of 5 to 20 J/cm2 (9 mm2 spot, 250 - 500 mJ pulse, 1 to 4 passes). Patients followed a strict regime of post-op wound care. Pre-treatment and follow-up photographs were taken in a studio with constant photographic parameters. Projected 35 mm slides were evaluated side-by-side for clinical improvement and presence of erythema. Within the first 4 days post-op all (100%) lower eyelids exhibited erythema and swelling, at 7 days: 71%, 12 days: 60%, 3 weeks: 25%, and one (1) month or longer 7%. In our sample the longest duration of post-op lower lid erythema lasted 5 weeks. Most patients experienced 70 -80% wrinkle reduction with a range of 0 - 100%. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationships between percent wrinkle reduction and the treatment, demographic, and evaluation variables. There was a significant trend for wrinkles to improve over the 3 to 9 month evaluation period. Older patients improved slightly more than younger patients. There was no relationship between total energy density and wrinkle reduction.

  10. A randomised, controlled trial of circumpatellar electrocautery in total knee replacement without patellar resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Jonbergen, H P W; Scholtes, V A B; van Kampen, A; Poolman, R W

    2011-08-01

    The efficacy of circumpatellar electrocautery in reducing the incidence of post-operative anterior knee pain is unknown. We conducted a single-centre, outcome-assessor and patient-blinded, parallel-group, randomised, controlled trial to compare circumpatellar electrocautery with no electrocautery in total knee replacement in the absence of patellar resurfacing. Patients requiring knee replacement for primary osteoarthritis were randomly assigned circumpatellar electrocautery (intervention group) or no electrocautery (control group). The primary outcome measure was the incidence of anterior knee pain. A secondary measure was the standardised clinical and patient-reported outcomes determined by the American Knee Society scores and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis index. A total of 131 knees received circumpatellar electrocautery and 131 had no electrocautery. The overall incidence of anterior knee pain at follow-up at one year was 26% (20% to 31%), with 19% (12% to 26%) in the intervention group and 32% (24% to 40%) in the control group (p = 0.02). The relative risk reduction from electrocautery was 40% (9% to 61%) and the number needed to treat was 7.7 (4.3 to 41.4). The intervention group had a better mean total WOMAC score at follow-up at one year compared with the control group (16.3 (0 to 77.7) versus 21.6 (0 to 76.7), p = 0.04). The mean post-operative American Knee Society knee scores and function scores were similar in the intervention and control groups (knee score: 92.4 (55 to 100) versus 90.4 (51 to 100), respectively (p = 0.14); function score: 86.5 (15 to 100) versus 84.5 (30 to 100), respectively (p = 0.49)). Our study suggests that in the absence of patellar resurfacing electrocautery around the margin of the patella improves the outcome of total knee replacement.

  11. Chronic infections in hip arthroplasties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Jeppe; Troelsen, Anders; Thomsen, Reimar W

    2012-01-01

    Two-stage revision is regarded by many as the best treatment of chronic infection in hip arthroplasties. Some international reports, however, have advocated one-stage revision. No systematic review or meta-analysis has ever compared the risk of reinfection following one-stage and two-stage revisi......Two-stage revision is regarded by many as the best treatment of chronic infection in hip arthroplasties. Some international reports, however, have advocated one-stage revision. No systematic review or meta-analysis has ever compared the risk of reinfection following one-stage and two......-stage revisions for chronic infection in hip arthroplasties....

  12. Traumatic injuries of the hip.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marshall, Nina

    2009-11-01

    Traumatic lesions of the hip in athletes may be clinically challenging because of the overlap in clinical presentation due to differing pathologies and the presence of multiple injuries. Imaging of the hip in the athlete has undergone a recent resurgence of interest and understanding related to the increasing accessibility and use of hip arthroscopy, which expands the treatment options available for intra-articular pathology. MR imaging and MR arthrography have a unique role in diagnosis of these pathologies, guiding the surgeon, arthroscopist, and referring clinician in their management of bony and soft tissue injury.

  13. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bent; Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    The Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) was initiated in January 2012 as a web-based prospective registry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and report the first registry based outcome data of a national population with radiological and clinical femoroacetabular impingement (FAI......) undergoing hip arthroscopic treatment. Our primary hypothesis was that patients undergoing hip arthroscopy would improve significantly in pain, quality of life and sports related outcome measurements in Patient Related Outcome Measures (PROM). Peri-operative data and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROM......-5 D demonstrated improvement after 1 and 2 years from 0.66 pre-op to 0.78 at 2 years. HSAS improved significantly from 2.5 to 3.3. Pain score data demonstrated improvement in NRS-rest 39 to 17 and NRS Walk 49 to 22 at follow-up. We conclude that patients with FAI undergoing hip arthroscopy...

  14. Indicadores de stress nutricional en una población infantil de la ciudad industrial de Wolverhampton, Birmingham, Inglaterra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponce, Paola

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La revolución industrial brindó a Inglaterra importantes desarrollos en el campo del transporte, comercio e industria. Por otro lado, también generó nuevos problemas sociales y medioambientales tales como polución atmosférica, superpoblación de areas urbanas sin adecuados recursos sanitarios, servicios cloacales y condiciones de trabajo extenuantes e inhumanas. Como los niños son los miembros más vulnerables de la sociedad, es esperado que sean los más severamente afectados por estas condiciones de vida limitantes y consequentemente muestren más indicadores de stress. El objetivo de este trabajo es analizar la presencia de enfermedades relacionadas con deficiencias vitamínicas tales como raquitismo, escorbuto, criba orbitalia e hipoplasia dentaria así como evaluar su prevalencia e interpretar sus posibles causas en una población infantil de 56 individuos que datan del S. XIX de la ciudad de Wolverhampton, en Birmingham, Inglaterra.

  15. Combined fractional resurfacing (10600 nm/1540 nm): Tridimensional imaging evaluation of a new device for skin rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzana, Paolo; Valeriani, Maurizio; Valeriani, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    In this study were described the results, by tridimensional imaging evaluation, of the new "Combined Fractional Resurfacing" technique with the first fractional laser that overtakes the limits of traditional ablative, nonablative fractional resurfacing by combining CO 2 ablative and GaAs nonablative lasers. These two wavelengths can work separately or in a mixed modality to give the best treatment choice to all the patients. In this study, it is demonstrated that the simultaneous combination of the CO 2 wavelength (10600 nm) and GaAs wavelength (1540 nm) reduced the downtime, reduced pain during the treatment, and produced better results on fine wrinkles reduction and almost the same results on pigmentation as seen with 3D analysis by Antera (Miravex).

  16. Is Electrocautery of Patella Useful in Patella Non-Resurfacing Total Knee Arthroplasty?: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sae Kwang; Nguku, Levis; Han, Chang Dong; Koh, Yong-Gon; Kim, Dong-Wook; Park, Kwan Kyu

    2015-12-01

    There is controversy over the need for electrocauterization of the patella in non-resurfacing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We investigated whether this procedure is beneficial through a prospective randomized controlled trial. Fifty patients who underwent electrocautery were compared with 50 patients who did not undergo this procedure. We determined cartilage status, preoperative and postoperative American Knee Society (AKS) score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities score (WOMAC) and the Patellofemoral (PF) scores for a minimum of 5 years. The two groups did not differ significantly in demographics, intraoperative cartilage status, or preoperative or postoperative outcomes. No complications were detected in either group. We found no benefits of electrocautery of the patella in patellar non-resurfacing TKA up to 5 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Imaging of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karantanas, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Standard radiographs represent the basic tool of hip joint imaging. For detailed analysis of abnormalities related to bone marrow, articular cartilage, labrum and periarticular soft tissues, MRI has become the method of choice. MR arthrography is superior to standard MRI with regard to depicting the intra-articular abnormalities. CT is supporting plain radiographs for accurate depiction of subtle bone details. Ultrasound is commonly used in postoperative hematoma, bursitis, initial diagnosis of cysts and solid soft tissue tumors as well as for image guided injections and biopsies. Bone scintigraphy is suitable for the mapping of multifocal disease, such as osseous metastatic deposits. PET and PET/CT may be able to differentiate malignant neoplasm and infection from other abnormalities. A common disorder often requested for evaluation, is osteoarthritis. MRI is able to depict early degenerative changes which are occult on plain radiographs. CT- or MR arthrography provide a better evaluation of these changes but should only be performed in cases in which conservative surgery is considered to offer a significant clinical improvement for the patient. These cases include cam type femoroacetabular impingement and traumatic chondrolysis. MRI is an imaging technique that allows direct visualization of the bone marrow. Marrow disorders of the hip may induce a variety of imaging findings and frequently are not detected by conventional radiographic techniques until they have reached an advanced clinical stage. The excellent spatial and contrast resolution provided by MRI facilitates early detection and evaluation of various disorders allowing thus prompt treatment. Imaging findings may alter or guide the correct treatment. In addition, the association of marrow changes and pain such as in osteonecrosis and osteoarthritis is clinically relevant. For imaging the bone marrow, we use a combination of pulse sequences, including T1-w spin echo, PD/T2-w turbo spin echo

  18. Recent Advances in Fractional Laser Resurfacing: New Paradigm in Optimal Parameters and Post-Treatment Wound Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Francis C.; Bock, Gerald N.; Eisen, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Laser plays an increasingly prominent role in skin rejuvenation. The advent of fractional photothermolysis revolutionizes its application. Microcolumns of skin are focally injured, leaving intervening normal skin to facilitate rapid wound healing and orderly tissue remodeling. The Problem Even with the popularity of fractional laser devices, we still have limited knowledge about the ideal treatment parameters and postlaser wound care. Basic/Clinical Science Advances Many clinicians believe that higher microbream energy in fractional laser devices results in better clinical outcome. Two recent studies argue against this assumption. One article demonstrates that lower fluence can induce comparable molecular changes with fewer side effects. Another study corroborates this by showing that lower-density settings produce similar clinical outcome in scar remodeling as higher-density ones, but with fewer side effects. To shed light on the optimal post-treatment wound care regimen from fractional ablative resurfacing, another paper shows that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) can reduce transepidermal water loss and skin color changes within 1 month after treatment. Clinical Care Relevance For fractional nonablative resurfacing, lower settings in fluence or density may produce similar dermal remodeling as higher settings and with a better side-effect profile. Moreover, autologous PRP appears to expedite wound healing after fractional ablative resurfacing. Conclusion Lower microbeam energy in fractional laser resurfacing produces similar molecular changes and clinical outcome with fewer side effects. The findings might portend a shift in the paradigm of treatment parameters. Autologous PRP can facilitate better wound healing, albeit modestly. Long-term follow-ups and larger studies are necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:24527307

  19. Distribution of Early, Middle, and Late Noachian cratered surfaces in the Martian highlands: Implications for resurfacing events and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Rossman P.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Robbins, Stuart J.

    2013-02-01

    Most of the geomorphic changes on Mars occurred during the Noachian Period, when the rates of impact crater degradation and valley network incision were highest. Fluvial erosion around the Noachian/Hesperian transition is better constrained than the longer-term landscape evolution throughout the Noachian Period, when the highland intercrater geomorphic surfaces developed. We interpret highland resurfacing events and processes using a new global geologic map of Mars (at 1:20,000,000 scale), a crater data set that is complete down to 1 km in diameter, and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter topography. The Early Noachian highland (eNh) unit is nearly saturated with craters of 32-128 km diameter, the Middle Noachian highland (mNh) unit has a resurfacing age of ~4 Ga, and the Late Noachian highland unit (lNh) includes younger composite surfaces of basin fill and partially buried cratered terrain. These units have statistically distinct ages, and their distribution varies with elevation. The eNh unit is concentrated in the high-standing Hellas basin annulus and in highland terrain that was thinly mantled by basin ejecta near 180° longitude. The mNh unit includes most of Arabia Terra, the Argyre vicinity, highland plateau areas between eNh outcrops, and the Thaumasia range. The lNh unit mostly occurs within highland basins. Crater depth/diameter ratios do not vary strongly between the eNh and mNh units, although crater losses to Noachian resurfacing appear greater in lower lying areas. Noachian resurfacing was spatially non-uniform, long-lived, and gravity-driven, more consistent with arid-zone fluvial and aeolian erosion and volcanism than with air fall mantling or mass wasting.

  20. A Comparison of the Outcomes for Cartilage Defects of the Knee Treated With Biologic Resurfacing Versus Focal Metallic Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Daley, Erika; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J

    2017-02-01

    To compare the results of focal metallic resurfacing with biologic procedures in patients more than 35 years of age with isolated, full thickness defects of the femoral condyle. A total of 61 patients met the selection criteria resulting in 30 patients treated with biological procedures, including debridement, microfracture, osteochondral autograft transplantation, osteochondral allograft, and autologous chondrocyte implantation (BIO group), and 32 patients treated with focal metallic resurfacing (CAP group). The BIO and CAP groups were matched according to treatment location, defect grade and size, and age profile. Outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Short Form-12, and satisfaction. The primary combination endpoint was determined as a 20% improvement (minimum clinically important difference-20) on WOMAC pain and function at 2 years and no additional index lesion-related surgical intervention. Safety and effectiveness were also reported. Thirty patients in the BIO group (mean age of 44.6, range 35-64) had an average follow-up of 2.6 years and 32 patients in the CAP group (mean age 47.9, range 37-68) were followed for 2.0 years. Fifty-three percent in the BIO group and 75% in the CAP group achieved success per the endpoint definition. The mean total WOMAC score improved significantly for both groups (BIO: 57-78; P metal resurfacing procedures for the treatment of isolated focal chondral lesions of the femoral condyle in the knee. Focal metallic resurfacing results in similar clinical outcomes and provides excellent success rates at short-term follow-up. Level III comparative study. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Patellofemoral arthritis treated with resurfacing implant: Clinical outcome and complications at a minimum two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Astoul Bonorino, Juan; Carbo, Lisandro; Costa-Paz, Matias

    2017-12-01

    This study evaluated the clinical and radiographic outcomes of a series of patients treated with an anatomic inlay resurfacing implant, with a minimum two-year follow-up. Fifteen patients underwent patellofemoral-resurfacing procedures using a HemiCAP Wave Patellofemoral Inlay Resurfacing implant from 2010 to 2013. Clinical outcomes included: Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Lysholm score, Knee Society Score (KSS), and evaluation of Kujala, and Hospital for Special Surgery Patellofemoral score (HSS-PF). The postoperative complications were analyzed. Nineteen knees were evaluated; the average follow-up was 35.2months. Fourteen were women, with an average age of 54years. The pre-operative/postoperative clinical results presented a significant improvement: VAS 8/2.5, Lysholm 31.9/85.8, KSS 39.8/82.5, Kujala 32.1/79.3 and Hospital for Special Surgery Patellofemoral score (HSS-PF) 15.9/90.6. A total of 87% of patients were either satisfied or very satisfied with the overall outcome. There were no radiographic signs of loosening. Seven postoperative complications were recorded: two presented ongoing knee pain, one postoperative stiffness, one patellar bounce due to maltracking, two ilio-tibial band syndrome, and one tibial anterior tuberosity osteotomy nonunion. Two patients underwent a total knee arthroplasty conversion and were considered a failure. None of these complications were implant related. Patellofemoral inlay resurfacing for isolated patellofemoral arthritis was an effective and safe procedure with high levels of patient satisfaction. No mechanical implant failure was seen at a minimum two-year follow-up. This implant design appeared to be an alternative to the traditional patellofemoral prostheses. Concomitant osteochondral lesions, patellofemoral dysplasia or patellar maltracking might be poor prognostic factors for this type of implant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Hip morphology predicts posterior hip impingement in a cadaveric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, William Z; Fowers, Cody A; Weinberg, Douglas S; Millis, Michael B; Tu, Leigh-Anne; Liu, Raymond W

    2018-05-01

    Posterior hip impingement is a recently-identified cause of hip pain. The purpose of this study is to characterise posterior femoroacetabular and ischiofemoral impingement and identify its predisposing morphologic traits. Two hundred and six cadaveric hips were randomly selected and taken through controlled motion in two pure axes associated with posterior hip impingement: external rotation (through the mechanical axis) and adduction (coronal plane). The range of motion and location of impingement was noted for each specimen. Morphologic traits including femoral/acetabular version, and true neck-shaft angle (TNSA) were also measured. External rotation impingement occurred between the femoral neck and acetabulum in 83.0% of hips, and between the lesser trochanter and ischial tuberosity in 17.0%. Adduction impingement occurred between the lesser trochanter and ischial tuberosity in 78.6% of hips, and between the femoral neck and acetabulum in 21.4%. Multiple regression revealed that increased femoral/acetabular version predicted earlier external rotation and adduction impingement. Unstandardised betas ranging from -0.39 to -0.64 reflect that each degree of increased femoral/acetabular version individually accounts for a loss of external rotation or adduction of approximately half a degree before impingement ( p < 0.001 for each). Increased TNSA was associated with earlier adduction impingement only (unstandardised beta -0.35, p = 0.005). Relative femoral/acetabular anteversion was associated with earlier posterior hip impingement. Coxa valga was associated with earlier adduction impingement, but protective against external rotation impingement. These findings highlight the importance of monitoring correction during femoral/acetabular osteotomies, as overcorrection of retroversion may predispose to earlier posterior impingement.

  3. Hip Hip Hurrah! Hip size inversely related to heart disease and total mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, B L; Lissner, L

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade a series of published reports have examined the value of studying the relation between hip circumferences and cardiovascular end points. Specifically, in a series of recent studies the independent effects of hip circumference have been studied after adjustment for general o...... for women than men, but is evident in both genders. In this 'viewpoint', we wish to draw attention to the emerging body of evidence and to encourage researchers to continue collecting measures of lower body size in their surveys....... obesity and/or waist circumference. These studies have been remarkable in terms of their consistency, and in the unexpected finding of an adverse effect of small hip size, after statistically correcting for differences in general and abdominal size. The hazard related to a small hip size may be stronger...

  4. Multicenter Analysis of Midterm Clinical Outcomes of Arthroscopic Labral Repair in the Hip: Minimum 5-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevesi, Mario; Krych, Aaron J; Johnson, Nick R; Redmond, John M; Hartigan, David E; Levy, Bruce A; Domb, Benjamin G

    2018-02-01

    The technique of hip arthroscopic surgery is advancing and becoming more commonly performed. However, most current reported results are limited to short-term follow-up, and therefore, the durability of the procedure is largely unknown. To perform a multicenter analysis of mid-term clinical outcomes of arthroscopic hip labral repair and determine the risk factors for patient outcomes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Prospectively collected data of primary hip arthroscopic labral repair performed at 4 high-volume centers between 2008 and 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively with the visual analog scale (VAS), modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), and Hip Outcome Score-Sports-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS) at a minimum of 5 years' follow-up. Factors including age, body mass index (BMI), Tönnis grade, and cartilage grade were analyzed in relation to outcome scores, and revision rates were determined. Failure was defined as subsequent ipsilateral hip surgery, including revision arthroscopic surgery and open hip surgery. A total of 303 patients (101 male, 202 female) with a mean age of 32.0 years (range, 10.7-58.9 years) were followed for a mean of 5.7 years (range, 5.0-7.9 years). Patients achieved mean improvements in VAS of 3.5 points, mHHS of 20.1 points, and HOS-SSS of 29.3 points. Thirty-seven patients (12.2%) underwent revision arthroscopic surgery, and 12 (4.0%) underwent periacetabular osteotomy, resurfacing, or total hip arthroplasty during the study period. Patients with a BMI >30 kg/m 2 had a mean mHHS score 9.5 points lower and a mean HOS-SSS score 15.9 points lower than those with a BMI ≤30 kg/m 2 ( P 35 years at surgery had a mean mHHS score 4.5 points lower and a HOS-SSS score 6.7 points lower than those aged ≤35 years ( P = .03). Patients with Tönnis grade 2 radiographs demonstrated a 12.5-point worse mHHS score ( P = .02) and a 23.0-point worse HOS-SSS score ( P SSS scores after arthroscopic

  5. Does the grading of chondromalacia patellae influence anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Guo-Chun; Feng, Shuo; Chen, Xiang-Yang; Guo, Kai-Jin

    2018-03-01

    The influence of chondromalacia patellae (CMP) on post-operative anterior knee pain (AKP) following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains controversial, and few studies have focused on the relationship between them. The purpose of this study was to determine whether different CMP grades affect the incidence of AKP after TKA without patellar resurfacing. We performed a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on 290 TKAs with the use of the low contact stress mobile-bearing prosthesis, without patellar resurfacing in 290 patients from February 2009 to January 2013. Patients were assessed by the Outerbridge classification for CMP, visual analog scale for AKP, the Knee Society clinical scoring system of knee score (KS), function score (FS), the patellar score (PS) for clinical function, and patients' satisfaction. The intra-operative grading of CMP: grade I in 30 patients, grade II in 68 patients, grade III in 97 patients, and grade IV in 95 patients. The incidence of AKP at 36-month follow-up was 10.3% (30/290). No statistical difference was detected among the different CMP grades in terms of the incidence of AKP (p = 0.995), patients' satisfaction (p = 0.832), KS (p = 0.228), FS (p = 0.713), and PS (p = 0.119) at 36-month follow-up. The findings may suggest no relevant influence of CMP grading on the incidence of AKP after TKA without patellar resurfacing.

  6. Problems and complications of full-face carbon dioxide laser resurfacing for pathological lesions of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read-Fuller, Andrew M; Yates, David M; Vu, David D; Hoopman, John E; Finn, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Facial resurfacing with a CO 2 laser has been used for treatment of pathologic lesions and for cosmetic purposes. Postoperative complications and problems after laser resurfacing include infections, acneiform lesions, and pigment changes. This retrospective study describes the most common problems and complications in 105 patients and assesses postoperative pain in 38 patients. All patients received CO 2 laser resurfacing for treatment of malignant/premalignant lesions and had postoperative follow-up to assess problems and complications. Some had follow-up to assess postoperative pain. All patients had Fitzpatrick I-III skin types and underwent the same perioperative care regimen. There were 11 problems and 2 complications. Problems included infection, acneiform lesion/milia, and uncontrolled postoperative pain. Complications included hyperpigmentation. Among the postoperative pain group, 53% reported no pain and the rest had mild or moderate pain. Complications are rare. Infection and acneiform lesions/milia were the most common problems, as previously reported. Most patients do not experience postoperative pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Numerical evaluation of bone remodelling and adaptation considering different hip prosthesis designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levadnyi, Ievgen; Awrejcewicz, Jan; Gubaua, José Eduardo; Pereira, Jucélio Tomás

    2017-12-01

    The change in mechanical properties of femoral cortical bone tissue surrounding the stem of the hip endoprosthesis is one of the causes of implant instability. We present an analysis used to determine the best conditions for long-term functioning of the bone-implant system, which will lead to improvement of treatment results. In the present paper, a finite element method coupled with a bone remodelling model is used to evaluate how different three-dimensional prosthesis models influence distribution of the density of bone tissue. The remodelling process begins after the density field is obtained from a computed tomography scan. Then, an isotropic Stanford model is employed to solve the bone remodelling process and verify bone tissue adaptation in relation to different prosthesis models. The study results show that the long-stem models tend not to transmit loads to proximal regions of bone, which causes the stress-shielding effect. Short stems or application in the calcar region provide a favourable environment for transfer of loads to the proximal region, which allows for maintenance of bone density and, in some cases, for a positive variation, which causes absence of the aseptic loosening of an implant. In the case of hip resurfacing, bone mineral density changes slightly and is closest to an intact femur. Installation of an implant modifies density distribution and stress field in the bone. Thus, bone tissue is stimulated in a different way than before total hip replacement, which evidences Wolff's law, according to which bone tissue adapts itself to the loads imposed on it. The results suggest that potential stress shielding in the proximal femur and cortical hypertrophy in the distal femur may, in part, be reduced through the use of shorter stems, instead of long ones, provided stem fixation is adequate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, B.; Jonsson, K.; Redlund-Johnell, I.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical and radiological characteristics of osteochondritis dissecans (OD) of the hip and the outcome of this condition after treatment. Material and Methods: Twelve male and 3 female patients with OD were retrospectively studied. Six patients had a history of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD) and among them 2 also had had a trauma to the hip. A further 5 had had trauma and 1 a developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH). The remaining 3 patients had no history of previous hip disease or trauma. All patients were examined with plain radiography, 7 with MR, 3 with CT and 2 with hip arthrography. Results: All OD lesions were detected at plain radiography, and most of them were located near the fovea. At MR the lesions had low signal intensity at T1-weighted sequences, and 6/7 had edema or fluid collection in or adjacent to the lesion on T2-weighted sequences. The early treatment in 7 patients was surgery, 2 had had conservative treatment and 6 no treatment. At follow-up 12 years after radiological diagnosis, 5 patients had hip arthrosis, 4 of whom were treated with arthroplasty. All but 3 had reduced hip rotation and all but 2 (with arthroplasty) had load pain. Three of the patients with earlier surgery had not developed arthrosis. Conclusions: OD lesions are usually well seen with plain radiography. There is a great risk of developing early arthrosis and it seems that early surgery is connected with arthrosis development. Thus only symptomatic treatment is recommended

  9. Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, B. [Hoeglands Hospital, Eksjoe (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery; Jonsson, K. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology; Redlund-Johnell, I. [Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2003-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical and radiological characteristics of osteochondritis dissecans (OD) of the hip and the outcome of this condition after treatment. Material and Methods: Twelve male and 3 female patients with OD were retrospectively studied. Six patients had a history of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD) and among them 2 also had had a trauma to the hip. A further 5 had had trauma and 1 a developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH). The remaining 3 patients had no history of previous hip disease or trauma. All patients were examined with plain radiography, 7 with MR, 3 with CT and 2 with hip arthrography. Results: All OD lesions were detected at plain radiography, and most of them were located near the fovea. At MR the lesions had low signal intensity at T1-weighted sequences, and 6/7 had edema or fluid collection in or adjacent to the lesion on T2-weighted sequences. The early treatment in 7 patients was surgery, 2 had had conservative treatment and 6 no treatment. At follow-up 12 years after radiological diagnosis, 5 patients had hip arthrosis, 4 of whom were treated with arthroplasty. All but 3 had reduced hip rotation and all but 2 (with arthroplasty) had load pain. Three of the patients with earlier surgery had not developed arthrosis. Conclusions: OD lesions are usually well seen with plain radiography. There is a great risk of developing early arthrosis and it seems that early surgery is connected with arthrosis development. Thus only symptomatic treatment is recommended.

  10. Emerging topics on the hip: Ligamentum teres and hip microinstability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerezal, Luis; Arnaiz, Javier; Canga, Ana; Piedra, Tatiana; Altónaga, José R.; Munafo, Ricardo; Pérez-Carro, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Microinstability and ligament teres lesions are emergent topics on the hip pathology. These entities are an increasingly recognized cause of persistent hip pain and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the patient with hip pain. Conventional (non-arthrographic) CT and MR have a very limited role in the evaluation of these entities. CTa and MRa have emerged as the modalities of choice for pre-operative imaging of ligamentum teres injuries and microinstability. To date, pre-operative imaging detection of these pathologies is not widespread but with appropriate imaging and a high index of suspicion, preoperative detection should improve. This article discusses current concepts regarding anatomy, biomechanics, clinical findings, diagnosis and treatment of ligament teres lesions and microinstability.

  11. Brief concept of hip preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev S. Madan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of the anatomy of the hip joint and biomechanics across it, carry the immense importance to prevent future osteoarthritis of the joint. The aim of this review is to provide the brief concept of the methods to preserve the hip, especially in young adults. Attempts to preserve the hips start with the intense preoperative planning of the corrective procedure. Different parameters regarding the femur and acetabulum in all 3 dimensions need to be assessed. Especially, measurement of the anteversion of the femur and acetabulum is a significant step to avoid osteoarthritis. In addition, the suprapelvic and infrapelvic (spine and lower limb lengths alignment needs to be considered in the planning. Correction of the femoral side of the hip needs the understanding of the blood supply of the proximal femur which carries the risk of avascular necrosis more so with intracapsular osteotomies. Acetabular reorientation, to re-distribute the forces over the weight bearing part, can be carried out with re-directional osteotomy such as periacetabular osteotomy. It needs the understanding of the acetabular anatomy and the force distribution in it. To conclude, correction of both femoral and acetabular side parameters need to be considered in decision making depending on the alterations due to various etiologies causing the hip disorders.

  12. Traumatic hip dislocations in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minhas, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate clinical features, treatment and relationship to the time period between dislocation, reduction and early complications of traumatic dislocation of hip in children. Methods: Case series conducted at Jinnah Post Graduate Medical Centre Karachi from July 2005 to August 2009. Children with traumatic hip dislocation up to fifteen years of age who presented in last four years were included in this study. Their clinical information, etiology, associated injuries, duration, method of reduction and early complications are evaluated through emergency room proforma and indoor record. Follow up of patient was updated in outpatient department. Results: We had eight patients, six boys and two girls. Youngest 2.4 years and eldest was 12 years with mean age of 6.2 +- 3.8 years. All presented with posterior hip dislocation. Etiology was road traffic accident in two and history of fall in remaining six patients. Average duration of time between dislocation and reduction was 19 hours range 3-72 hours. Dislocated hips were reduced under General Anaesthesia in two patients and under sedation analgesia in six patients. No complications were noted in eight cases with mean 18.75 +- 13.23 months follows up. Conclusion: Traumatic hip dislocation in children is not rare. Slight trauma causes dislocation in younger age and immediate closed reduction and Immobilization reduces complications. (author

  13. The Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score as a Measure of Disease Activity in Patients with Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermani, TA; Cuthbertson, D; Carette, S; Hoffman, GS; Khalidi, NA; Koening, CL; Langford, CA; McKinnon-Maksimowicz, K; McAlear, CA; Monach, PA; Seo, P; Warrington, KJ; Ytterberg, SR; Merkel, PA; Matteson, EL

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS) in the assessment of disease activity in giant cell arteritis (GCA). Methods Patients with GCA enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal study with symptoms of active vasculitis during any visit were included. Spearman’s rank correlation was used to explore the association of the BVAS with other measures of disease activity. Results During a mean (SD) follow-up of 2.3 (1.6) years, symptoms of active GCA were present in 236 visits in 136 subjects (100 female, 74%). Median (range) BVAS1 (new/worse symptoms) was 1 (0–10) and median (range) BVAS2 (persistent symptoms) was 0 (0–5). Median (range) physician global assessment (PGA) was 4 (0–9) for disease activity in the past 28 days and 2 (0–9) for activity on the day of the visit. Important ischemic manifestations of active vasculitis not captured by the BVAS included tongue/jaw claudication (27%), upper extremity claudication (15%), lower extremity claudication (5%), carotidynia (7%), ischemic retinopathy (5%). During 25 visits (11%) with active disease, all symptoms of active vasculitis were captured in the “Other” category yet still resulted in a BVAS 1 and BVAS 2 of 0. BVAS1 moderately correlated with PGA for the past 28 days (Spearman’s correlation 0.50) and physician-rated disease activity for the past 28 days (Spearman’s correlation 0.46). Conclusions The BVAS has limited utility in GCA. Patients with active GCA can have a BVAS of 0. Many important ischemic symptoms attributable to active vasculitis are not captured in the composite score. PMID:27036388

  14. Electricity Consumption Risk Map - The use of Urban Climate Mapping for smarter analysis: Case study for Birmingham, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes Azevedo, Juliana; Burghardt, René; Chapman, Lee; Katzchner, Lutz; Muller, Catherine L.

    2015-04-01

    Climate is a key driving factor in energy consumption. However, income, vegetation, building mass structure, topography also impact on the amount of energy consumption. In a changing climate, increased temperatures are likely to lead to increased electricity consumption, affecting demand, distribution and generation. Furthermore, as the world population becomes more urbanized, increasing numbers of people will need to deal with not only increased temperatures from climate change, but also from the unintentional modification of the urban climate in the form of urban heat islands. Hence, climate and climate change needs to be taken into account for future urban planning aspects to increase the climate and energy resilience of the community and decrease the future social and economic costs. Geographical Information Systems provide a means to create urban climate maps as part of the urban planning process. Geostatistical analyses linking these maps with demographic and social data, enables a geo-statistical analysis to identify linkages to high-risk groups of the community and vulnerable areas of town and cities. Presently, the climatope classification is oriented towards thermal aspects and the ventilation quality (roughness) of the urban areas but can also be adapted to take into account other structural "environmental factors". This study aims to use the climatope approach to predict areas of potential high electricity consumption in Birmingham, UK. Several datasets were used to produce an average surface temperature map, vegetation map, land use map, topography map, building height map, built-up area roughness calculations, an average air temperature map and a domestic electricity consumption map. From the correlations obtained between the layers it is possible to average the importance of each factor and create a map for domestic electricity consumption to understand the influence of environmental aspects on spatial energy consumption. Based on these results city

  15. Preliminary findings on the reliability and validity of the Cantonese Birmingham Cognitive Screen in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoping; Chen, Haobo; Bickerton, Wai-Ling; Lau, Johnny King Lam; Kong, Anthony Pak Hin; Rotshtein, Pia; Guo, Aihua; Hu, Jianxi; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2015-01-01

    There are no currently effective cognitive assessment tools for patients who have suffered stroke in the People's Republic of China. The Birmingham Cognitive Screen (BCoS) has been shown to be a promising tool for revealing patients' poststroke cognitive deficits in specific domains, which facilitates more individually designed rehabilitation in the long run. Hence we examined the reliability and validity of a Cantonese version BCoS in patients with acute ischemic stroke, in Guangzhou. A total of 98 patients with acute ischemic stroke were assessed with the Cantonese version of the BCoS, and an additional 133 healthy individuals were recruited as controls. Apart from the BCoS, the patients also completed a number of external cognitive tests, including the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Test (MoCA), Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Albert's cancellation test, the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test, and six gesture matching tasks. Cutoff scores for failing each subtest, ie, deficits, were computed based on the performance of the controls. The validity and reliability of the Cantonese BCoS were examined, as well as interrater and test-retest reliability. We also compared the proportions of cases being classified as deficits in controlled attention, memory, character writing, and praxis, between patients with and without spoken language impairment. Analyses showed high test-retest reliability and agreement across independent raters on the qualitative aspects of measurement. Significant correlations were observed between the subtests of the Cantonese BCoS and the other external cognitive tests, providing evidence for convergent validity of the Cantonese BCoS. The screen was also able to generate measures of cognitive functions that were relatively uncontaminated by the presence of aphasia. This study suggests good reliability and validity of the Cantonese version of the BCoS. The Cantonese BCoS is a very promising tool for the detection of cognitive problems in

  16. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Gabarre, Sergio; Más, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality. PMID:25802848

  17. Developmental hip dysplasia in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors define adolescence and developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH. Special attention is paid to pathological findings characteristic of DDH in adolescence (unrecognized and untreated DDH; treated DDH, but non-terminated treatment; DDH diagnosed with delay, inadequately treated, with complications. The authors emphasise that DDH treatment has to be successfully terminated well before the adolescence; possibilities are explained on management modes at the time of adolescence, and possible persons guilty for the persistence of later hip problems are indicated. Based on the authors' experience and having in mind all surgical possibilities for the treatment (pelvic osteotomies, femoral osteotomies, trochanteroplasties, leg length equalization procedures the authors propose treatment protocols. The intention is to provide better treatment results and to prevent secondary hip arthrosis. Furthermore, how to improve the struggle against DDH is suggested.

  18. MRI of the hip joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerny, C.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.M.; Imhof, H.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed to diagnose many pathologic conditions affecting the hip joint. Either conventional MRI (without contrast enhancement of the joint cavity) or MR arthrography is used to detect and most accurately differentiate hip joint pathologies. Conventional MRI is performed in cases of bone marrow edema, necrosis, arthrosis and especially the so-called ''activated arthrosis'', as well as in inflammatory and tumorous entities. MR arthography, which has only recently become available for use, is excellently suited for diagnosing lesions of the acetabular labrum, cartilage lesions, and free articular bodies. This article provides an overview about MRI characteristics and their accuracy of hip joint diseases and the impact on the therapeutic procedure. (orig.)

  19. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA, calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality.

  20. Histological evaluation of vertical laser channels from ablative fractional resurfacing: an ex vivo pig skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovbølling Haak, Christina; Illes, Monica; Paasch, Uwe; Hædersdal, Merete

    2011-07-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) represents a new treatment potential for various skin conditions and new laser devices are being introduced. It is important to gain information about the impact of laser settings on the dimensions of the created laser channels for obtaining a safe and efficient treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to establish a standard model to document the histological tissue damage profiles after AFR and to test a new laser device at diverse settings. Ex vivo abdominal pig skin was treated with a MedArt 620, prototype fractional carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser (Medart, Hvidovre, Denmark) delivering single microbeams (MB) with a spot size of 165 μm. By using a constant pulse duration of 2 ms, intensities of 1-18 W, single and 2-4 stacked pulses, energies were delivered in a range from 2-144 mJ/MB. Histological evaluations included 3-4 high-quality histological measurements for each laser setting (n = 28). AFR created cone-shaped laser channels. Ablation depths varied from reaching the superficial dermis (2 mJ, median 41 μm) to approaching the subcutaneous fat (144 mJ, median 1,943 μm) and correlated to the applied energy levels in an approximate linear relation (r(2) = 0.84, p skin model to characterize AFR laser channels histologically.

  1. One-sheet spiraling full thickness skin graft for penile resurfacing after paraffinoma excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theddeus O.H. Prasetyono

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the midst of on-going non-illicit practice of silicone or paraffin injection to enlarge penis, the author reported 3 cases of surgical treatment to resurface the body of the penis after excision of the destructed penile skin using full thickness skin graft. The skin excision was performed technically through penile body degloving procedure. Full thickness skin graft was then applied as a single sheet donor tissue to cover the denuded penile body spirally. The full thickness graft, which is relatively easy to be performed, is no doubt much thinner than a skin flap, while it also bears a smaller degree of secondary contraction than split skin graft. The color of the skin is considerably matched as it comes from the groin, which is a nearby area of penis. The size and skin sensitization of the penis looks to be natural. The only disadvantage is the common possibility of either spiral or circular junctional scar in between graft edges and between the graft and the penile mucosa and skin to develop hypertrophic scar. However, this possible scar problem applies also to any other surgical scar with any donor tissue. Fortunately, the 3 cases posed no scar problem and normal appearance. All the patients have also regained their normal sexual function. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:222-5Keywords: full thickness skin graft, paraffinoma, siliconoma, sexual function

  2. Complications and posttreatment care following invasive laser skin resurfacing: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Lin, Shi-Bin; Cheng, Biao

    2018-06-01

    Laser skin resurfacing (LSR) has been used for facial rejuvenation for the last 20 years. Posttreatment care after LSR is essential to decrease the risk of complications. Currently, no unified standards or criteria exist for invasive LSR posttreatment care. We aimed to identify the optimal wound care timing and choice of specific local, systemic, and general medical measures required to decrease complications. We performed a systematic search of the PubMed/MEDLINE electronic databases and included only articles written and published in the English language, with no restrictions on the publication time (year). The search yielded 316 potentially relevant articles, 133 of which met our review criteria. Most of the studies on this topic have focused on wound care during the early stage, typically the first 2 weeks. Closed dressings may offer a more ideal, moist wound environment. The use of medications must be judicious. The ongoing emergence of new methods and products warrants evaluation in future large clinical trials. Familiarity with the complications following invasive LSR and the provision of optimal, effective, and timely posttreatment care may substantially decrease the risks associated with the treatment modality.

  3. Evidence and Considerations in the Application of Chemical Peels in Skin Disorders and Aesthetic Resurfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, Diane S.; Cohen, Joel L.; Roberts, Wendy E.; Starker, Isaac; Wang, Beatrice

    2010-01-01

    Chemical peeling is a popular, relatively inexpensive, and generally safe method for treatment of some skin disorders and to refresh and rejuvenate skin. This article focuses on chemical peels and their use in routine clinical practice. Chemical peels are classified by the depth of action into superficial, medium, and deep peels. The depth of the peel is correlated with clinical changes, with the greatest change achieved by deep peels. However, the depth is also associated with longer healing times and the potential for complications. A wide variety of peels are available, utilizing various topical agents and concentrations, including a recent salicylic acid derivative, β-lipohydroxy acid, which has properties that may expand the clinical use of peels. Superficial peels, penetrating only the epidermis, can be used to enhance treatment for a variety of conditions, including acne, melasma, dyschromias, photodamage, and actinic keratoses. Medium-depth peels, penetrating to the papillary dermis, may be used for dyschromia, multiple solar keratoses, superficial scars, and pigmentary disorders. Deep peels, affecting reticular dermis, may be used for severe photoaging, deep wrinkles, or scars. Peels can be combined with other in-office facial resurfacing techniques to optimize outcomes and enhance patient satisfaction and allow clinicians to tailor the treatment to individual patient needs. Successful outcomes are based on a careful patient selection as well as appropriate use of specific peeling agents. Used properly, the chemical peel has the potential to fill an important therapeutic need in the dermatologist's and plastic surgeon's armamentarium. PMID:20725555

  4. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is normal to lose blood during and after hip or knee replacement surgery. Some people need a ... clot form are higher during and soon after hip or knee replacement surgery. Sitting or lying down ...

  5. Exercise therapy may postpone total hip replacement surgery in patients with hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svege, Ida; Nordsletten, Lars; Fernandes, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Exercise treatment is recommended for all patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA), but its effect on the long-term need for total hip replacement (THR) is unknown.......Exercise treatment is recommended for all patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA), but its effect on the long-term need for total hip replacement (THR) is unknown....

  6. Reverse hybrid total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangen, Helge; Havelin, Leif I.; Fenstad, Anne M

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose - The use of a cemented cup together with an uncemented stem in total hip arthroplasty (THA) has become popular in Norway and Sweden during the last decade. The results of this prosthetic concept, reverse hybrid THA, have been sparsely described. The Nordic Arthroplasty....... Patients and methods - From the NARA, we extracted data on reverse hybrid THAs from January 1, 2000 until December 31, 2013. 38,415 such hips were studied and compared with cemented THAs. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analyses were used to estimate the prosthesis survival and the relative risk...

  7. Computed tomography in abnormalities of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, J.D.; Jonkers, A.; Klasen, H.J. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Hillen, B. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Lab. voor Anatomie en Embryologie)

    1982-06-26

    The value of computed tomography in the assessment of abnormalities of the hip is demonstrated with the aid of an anatomical preparation and in patients with, respectively, congenital dislocation of a hip, dislocation of the hip in spina bifida, an acetabular fracture and a Ewing tumour. The anteversion of the acetabulum and femur and the instability index of the hip joint can be measured by means of computed tomography.

  8. Treatment of tuberculosis of the hip.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The common presentation was a swollen hip, a limp, decreased range of hip movements, fixed flexion deformity and pain. Three patients had protrusio acetabuli and three had subluxed or dislocated hips. Twenty-three patients were anaemic and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was raised in all (mean. 6 5 d h r ...

  9. Hip-Hop and the Academic Canon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Daudi

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, the hip-hop movement has risen from the margins to become the preeminent force in US popular culture. In more recent times academics have begun to harness the power of hip-hop culture and use it as a means of infusing transformative knowledge into the mainstream academic discourse. On many college campuses, hip-hop's…

  10. Ultrasonography of the painful hip in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G.F. Robben (Simon)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThere are many diseases in childhood that affect the hip joint. Some diseases are systemic in origin and initially may present themselves as hip disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis. other diseases are localized specifically in the hip joint, such as transient synovitis and Perthes'

  11. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a two-part...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a two...

  13. An evaluation of Birmingham Own Health® telephone care management service among patients with poorly controlled diabetes. a retrospective comparison with the General Practice Research Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adab Peymané

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telephone-based care management programmes have been shown to improve health outcomes in some chronic diseases. Birmingham Own Health® is a telephone-based care service (nurse-delivered motivational coaching and support for self-management and lifestyle change for patients with poorly controlled diabetes, delivered in Birmingham, UK. We used a novel method to evaluate its effectiveness in a real-life setting. Methods Retrospective cohort study in the UK. 473 patients aged ≥ 18 years with diabetes enrolled onto Birmingham Own Health® (intervention cohort and with > 90 days follow-up, were each matched by age and sex to up to 50 patients with diabetes registered with the General Practice Research Database (GPRD to create a pool of 21,052 controls (control cohort. Controls were further selected from the main control cohort, matching as close as possible to the cases for baseline test levels, followed by as close as possible length of follow-up (within +/-30 days limits and within +/-90 days baseline test date. The aim was to identify a control group with as similar distribution of prognostic factors to the cases as possible. Effect sizes were computed using linear regression analysis adjusting for age, sex, deprivation quintile, length of follow-up and baseline test levels. Results After adjusting for baseline values and other potential confounders, the intervention showed significant mean reductions among people with diabetes of 0.3% (95%CI 0.1, 0.4% in HbA1c; 3.5 mmHg (1.5, 5.5 in systolic blood pressure, 1.6 mmHg (0.4, 2.7 in diastolic blood pressure and 0.7 unit reduction (0.3, 1.0 in BMI, over a mean follow-up of around 10 months. Only small effects were seen on average on serum cholesterol levels (0.1 mmol/l reduction (0.1, 0.2. More marked effects were seen for each clinical outcome among patients with worse baseline levels. Conclusions Despite the limitations of the study design, the results are consistent with the

  14. Hip-Hop Pop Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Clarence, Sr.

    2011-01-01

    Art has a way of helping students better understand and appreciate the world around them, particularly the things that are most important to them. Hip hop is one of those generational genres that capture the attention of young students like few other things do. Drawing on this genre to get students to create art is an excellent way to demonstrate…

  15. Improving hip surgery patients’ outcomes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Bettan; Poulsen, Dorthe Varning; Taylor Kelly, Hélène

    This presentation focuses upon the improvement of hip surgery patients’ outcomes with respect to health promotion and rehabilitation. The overall aims of the EU financed orthopedic nursing project will be introduced. Speakers highlight the project’s contribution to: -the development of nurse...

  16. Imaging of hip joint arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E.; Fruehwald-Pallamar, J.; Czerny, C.

    2009-01-01

    The hip joint is the largest joint in the human body and consequently, its evaluation by diagnostic imaging is highly important. This includes imaging of hip joint arthroplasty, which is used to avoid joint immobility following a wide spectrum of diseases, such as end-stage degenerative disease, avascular necrosis of the femoral head or post-traumatic fractures. Conventional radiography is still the standard imaging modality for the evaluation of hip arthroplasty both directly following surgery and for periodical follow-up. In the majority of cases conventional radiography enables adequate assessment of early and late complications that can arise following hip arthroplasty, such as loosening, prosthetic or periprosthetic fracture, luxation, infection and soft tissue calcification. If the diagnosis cannot be established by means of radiography, advanced imaging methods such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with or without injection of contrast media, may provide additional information. This is particularly true for the depiction of inflammatory processes. Regardless of the imaging modality used patients' clinical symptoms must also be taken into account in order to establish the correct diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  17. Recurrent Hip Fracture Prevention With Osteoporosis Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahla

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:Osteoporosis is a major public health threat,and hip fracture is a serious consequence of osteoporosis.Apatient with an osteoporosis-related hip fracture has an increased risk for a second hip fracture.The effect of osteoporosis management on the risk of recurrent hip fracture was evaluated in this study.Methods:58 hip fracture patients older than 50yr and BMD < 2.5 were discharged from hospital with Ca-Vitamin D- Alendronate prescriptions, and followed up for 4 years to determine the rate of recurrent hip fractures. Rate of second hip fractures was compared with 58 hip fractures in the control group (without osteoporosis treatment which were also followed for 4 years. Results:72% of patients continued treatment for 2 years. There were no second hip fractures in the critical first 12 months in the treated group.Overall second hip fractures in osteoporosis treated and control groups were 3.4% and 8.6%(p<0.03, respectively.Conclusion:Management of hip fractures in the elderly should include bone mineral density determination and osteoporosis treatment to prevent further fractures.

  18. Femoral head fracture without hip dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Aditya K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Femoral head fractures without dislocation or subluxation are extremely rare injuries. We report a neglected case of isolated comminuted fracture of femoral head without hip dislocation or subluxation of one year duration in a 36-year-old patient who sustained a high en- ergy trauma due to road traffic accident. He presented with painful right hip and inability to bear full weight on right lower limb with Harris hip score of 39. He received cementless total hip replacement. At latest follow-up of 2.3 years, functional outcome was excellent with Harris hip score of 95. Such isolated injuries have been described only once in the literature and have not been classified till now. The purpose of this report is to highlight the extreme rarity, possible mechanism involved and a novel classification system to classify such injuries. Key words: Femur head; Hip dislocation; Classification; Arthroplasty, replacement, hip

  19. Hip Imaging in Athletes: Sports Imaging Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agten, Christoph A; Sutter, Reto; Buck, Florian M; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2016-08-01

    Hip or groin pain in athletes is common and clinical presentation is often nonspecific. Imaging is a very important diagnostic step in the work-up of athletes with hip pain. This review article provides an overview on hip biomechanics and discusses strategies for hip imaging modalities such as radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MR arthrography and traction MR arthrography). The authors explain current concepts of femoroacetabular impingement and the problem of high prevalence of cam- and pincer-type morphology in asymptomatic persons. With the main focus on MR imaging, the authors present abnormalities of the hip joint and the surrounding soft tissues that can occur in athletes: intraarticular and extraarticular hip impingement syndromes, labral and cartilage disease, microinstability of the hip, myotendinous injuries, and athletic pubalgia. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  20. Evolution of the hip and pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogervorst, Tom; Bouma, Heinse W; de Vos, John

    2009-08-01

    Man's evolution features two unique developments: growing a huge brain and upright gait. Their combination makes the pelvis the most defining skeletal element to read human evolution. Recent revival in joint preserving hip surgery have brought to attention morphological variations of the human hip that appear similar to hips of extant mammals. In man, such variations can produce hip osteoarthrosis through motion. We reviewed the evolution of the hip and pelvis with special interest in morphology that can lead to motion induced osteoarthrosis in man. The combination of giving birth to big brained babies and walking upright has produced marked differences between the sexes in pelvis and hip morphology, each having their characteristic mode of hip impingement and osteoarthrosis.

  1. Escuela Greenfield, en Birmingham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith, Eberle M.

    1959-11-01

    Full Text Available Había que proyectar para un suburbio una escuela del grado primero al sexto, con 18 clases, dos jardines de infancia, biblioteca, amplio salón de actos, sala de arte y de música, clínica y oficina de administración; todo ello sin contar con ampliaciones en el futuro. La exigencia especial del cliente era la separación de la zona de juego para los cursos inferiores y superiores, y acceso fácil al jardín de infancia para las madres que traen sus niños en coche.

  2. Resurfacing glabrous skin defects in the hand: the thenar base donor site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Chris S; Thirkannad, Sunil M

    2014-06-01

    Defects of the glabrous skin surfaces of the palm and fingers result from numerous causes including larger fingertip injuries, unhealed burns, and after surgery for diverse pathologies. The qualities of glabrous skin are specifically tailored to the functional requirements of high-shear strength and robustness. Despite these unique properties, graft reconstruction of defects in the glabrous regions of the hand is frequently achieved with skin from nonglabrous donor sites such as the medial forearm. Nonglabrous skin has a poor color and texture match for such applications and is frequently associated with tender and unsightly donor scars. We describe our experiences of harvesting full-thickness grafts from the glabrous skin centered over the proximal flexion crease at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb. We have utilized this site to harvest skin grafts of up to 2 cm in width for the resurfacing of small-sized to medium-sized defects on the palmar surfaces of the hands and fingers in 28 patients under both traumatic and elective circumstances. The skin has an excellent type-match to the defect and is quick and easy to harvest due to its adjacent location to the defect. The donor scar matures quickly, and as it lies along the thumb base crease, it runs along one of the least used contact surfaces, thereby limiting the potential discomfort associated with FTSG harvest sites from other areas. Patient satisfaction with the procedure has been high, and it represents a useful alternative to traditional nonglabrous skin graft donor sites for small-sized to medium-sized defects.

  3. Micro-fractional ablative skin resurfacing with two novel erbium laser systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierickx, Christine C; Khatri, Khalil A; Tannous, Zeina S; Childs, James J; Cohen, Richard H; Erofeev, Andrei; Tabatadze, David; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V; Altshuler, Gregory B

    2008-02-01

    Fractional ablation offers the potential benefits of full-surface ablative skin resurfacing while minimizing adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety, damage profile, and efficacy of erbium fractional lasers. Histology from animal and human skin as well as clinical evaluations were conducted with erbium YAG (2,940 nm) and erbium YSGG (2,790 nm) fractional lasers varying pulse width, microbeam (microb) energy, number of passes, and stacking of pulses. Single-pulse treatment parameters from 1 to 12 mJ per 50-70 microm diameter microbeam and 0.25-5 milliseconds pulse widths produced microcolumns of ablation with border coagulation of up to 100 microm width and 450 microm depth. Stacking of pulses generated deeper microcolumns. Clinical observations and in vivo histology demonstrate rapid re-epithelization and limited adverse side effects. Facial treatments were performed in the periorbital and perioral areas using 1-8 passes of single and stacked pulses. Treatments were well-tolerated and subjects could resume their normal routine in 4 days. A statistically significant reduction in wrinkle scores at 3 months was observed for both periorbital and perioral wrinkles using blinded grading. For periorbital treatments of four passes or more, over 90% had > or =1 score wrinkle reduction (0-9 scale) and 42% had > or =2. For perioral wrinkles, over 50% had substantial improvements (> or =2). The clinical observations and histology findings demonstrate that micro-fractional ablative treatment with 2,790 and 2,940 nm erbium lasers resulted in safe and effective wrinkle reduction with minimal patient downtime. The depth and width of the ablated microcolumns and varying extent of surrounding coagulation can be controlled and used to design new treatment procedures targeted for specific indications and areas such as moderate to severe rhytides and photodamaged skin.

  4. Fractional ablative and nonablative radiofrequency for skin resurfacing and rejuvenation of Thai patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanasarnaksorn, Wilai; Siramangkhalanon, Vorapot; Duncan, Diane Irvine; Belenky, Inna

    2018-04-01

    Fractional radiofrequency (RF) technology is often the preferable skin resurfacing treatment, especially among Asian patients. Second generation fractional RF technology has exclusive capability to produce separate biological responses (ablation, coagulation, or a combination of both) with 3 distinguished penetration depth programs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a fractional RF handpiece such as this, on the Thai population. Fifty-five Thai patients were treated with a fractional RF handpiece. The clinical assessment included a pain score, satisfaction survey, physician assessment, a combined patient and physician's assessment of skin condition, and clinical photographic assessments. The wound healing response was evaluated according to 5-time points: immediately after applying a pulse, post 24 hours, post 7 days, post 1 month and post 8 weeks. The obtained patient satisfaction score was "very satisfied" among 74% of the patients, post 3 sessions. Positive correlation was found between patient satisfaction and the physician's assessment. The skin condition assessment showed an increase from an average of 4.2 to 7.9. All treated symptoms improved after each treatment and the clinical outcome lasted at least up to 3-5 months. No significant adverse events were recorded. The in vivo prospective study showed a dose-related response in the deepness of the coagulation injury. In addition, there was evidence for a progressive healing process beginning shortly after exposure and completed within a week. This study clinically and histologically supports the efficacy of fractional RF handpiece in question with a high safety profile. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Non-ablative fractionated laser skin resurfacing for the treatment of aged neck skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencini, Pier Luca; Tourlaki, Athanasia; Galimberti, Michela; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    Aging of the neck skin includes poikiloderma of Civatte, skin laxity and wrinkles. While the vascular alterations of poikiloderma of Civatte can be effectively treated with lasers or intense pulsed light, a successful treatment of dyschromia, skin laxity and wrinkles is still difficult to achieve. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of non-ablative fractional 1540 erbium glass laser for the treatment of aged neck skin, also by means of in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). A prospective study for neck resurfacing in 18 women with aged neck skin. Six laser treatments were performed in 4-week intervals with a 1540-nm erbium-glass fiber laser. By using a 6-point grading scale, the mean score (±SD; range) at baseline was 3.6 (±1.5; 1-6) for skin dyschromia, 2.9 (±1.4; 1-6) for laxity and 3.3 (±1.3; 1-5) for wrinkles. Three months after the last laser session, we found a significant clinical improvement of dyschromia (p = 0.0002; Wilcoxon test), and wrinkles (p = 0.0004; Wilcoxon test), with a mean (±SD) reduction of 2.5 (±1.0) and 1.9 (±1.1) points in the 6-point grading scale, respectively. No change was observed in laxity. These results were also supported by structural changes documented by RCM. Non-ablative fractional 1540 erbium glass laser was both safe and effective for the treatment of dyschromia and wrinkles, but not effective for the laxity of the neck skin.

  6. THERAPEUTIC OF SKIN AGING WITH CARBON DIOXIDE LASER SKIN RESURFACING AND COMBINATION WITH AIR COOLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NKA Maya Damayanti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 So far, a lot of people who want their face skin always looks young though age continued to grow. It cannot be denied that aging will occur in everyone although some faster or later occur. Various ways were developed by scientists to fix this issue. Laser Skin Resurfacing (LSR technique to tighten facial skin is a procedure that is popular among the public and the practice of medicine. CO2 LSR technique is still a gold standard was used. Pain during surgery can be reduced when this technique was combined with air cooling. In addition, the adverse effects of post-operative might be tolerated.   /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  7. Hip fractures. Epidemiology, risk factors, falls, energy absorption, hip protectors, and prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, J B

    1997-01-01

    have a high risk of hip fracture (annual rate of 5-6%), and the incidence of falls is about 1,500 falls/1,000 persons/year. Most hip fractures are a result of a direct trauma against the hip. The incidence of falls on the hip among nursing home residents is about 290 falls/1,000 persons/year and about......%, corresponding to 9 out of 247 residents saved from sustaining a hip fracture. The review points to the essentials of the development of hip fracture, which constitutes; risk of fall, type of fall, type of impact, energy absorption, and lastly bone strength, which is the ultimate and last permissive factor......The present review summarizes the pathogenic mechanisms leading to hip fracture based on epidemiological, experimental, and controlled studies. The estimated lifetime risk of hip fracture is about 14% in postmenopausal women and 6% in men. The incidence of hip fractures increases exponentially...

  8. Use of medical tourism for hip and knee surgery in osteoarthritis: a qualitative examination of distinctive attitudinal characteristics among Canadian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Valorie A; Cameron, Keri; Chouinard, Vera; Johnston, Rory; Snyder, Jeremy; Casey, Victoria

    2012-11-21

    Medical tourism is the term that describes patients' international travel with the intention of seeking medical treatment. Some medical tourists go abroad for orthopaedic surgeries, including hip and knee resurfacing and replacement. In this article we examine the findings of interviews with Canadian medical tourists who went abroad for such surgeries to determine what is distinctive about their attitudes when compared to existing qualitative research findings about patients' decision-making in and experiences of these same procedures in their home countries. Fourteen Canadian medical tourists participated in semi-structured phone interviews, all of whom had gone abroad for hip or knee surgery to treat osteoarthritis. Transcripts were coded and thematically analysed, which involved comparing emerging findings to those in the existing qualitative literature on hip and knee surgery. Three distinctive attitudinal characteristics among participants were identified when interview themes were compared to findings in the existing qualitative research on hip and knee surgery in osteoarthritis. These attitudinal characteristics were that the medical tourists we spoke with were: (1) comfortable health-related decision-makers; (2) unwavering in their views about procedure necessity and urgency; and (3) firm in their desires to maintain active lives. Compared to other patients reported on in the existing qualitative hip and knee surgery literature, medical tourists are less likely to question their need for surgery and are particularly active in their pursuit of surgical intervention. They are also comfortable with taking control of health-related decisions. Future research is needed to identify motivators behind patients' pursuit of care abroad, determine if the attitudinal characteristics identified here hold true for other patient groups, and ascertain the impact of these attitudinal characteristics on surgical outcomes. Arthritis care providers can use the attitudinal

  9. Use of medical tourism for hip and knee surgery in osteoarthritis: a qualitative examination of distinctive attitudinal characteristics among Canadian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crooks Valorie A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical tourism is the term that describes patients’ international travel with the intention of seeking medical treatment. Some medical tourists go abroad for orthopaedic surgeries, including hip and knee resurfacing and replacement. In this article we examine the findings of interviews with Canadian medical tourists who went abroad for such surgeries to determine what is distinctive about their attitudes when compared to existing qualitative research findings about patients’ decision-making in and experiences of these same procedures in their home countries. Methods Fourteen Canadian medical tourists participated in semi-structured phone interviews, all of whom had gone abroad for hip or knee surgery to treat osteoarthritis. Transcripts were coded and thematically analysed, which involved comparing emerging findings to those in the existing qualitative literature on hip and knee surgery. Results Three distinctive attitudinal characteristics among participants were identified when interview themes were compared to findings in the existing qualitative research on hip and knee surgery in osteoarthritis. These attitudinal characteristics were that the medical tourists we spoke with were: (1 comfortable health-related decision-makers; (2 unwavering in their views about procedure necessity and urgency; and (3 firm in their desires to maintain active lives. Conclusions Compared to other patients reported on in the existing qualitative hip and knee surgery literature, medical tourists are less likely to question their need for surgery and are particularly active in their pursuit of surgical intervention. They are also comfortable with taking control of health-related decisions. Future research is needed to identify motivators behind patients’ pursuit of care abroad, determine if the attitudinal characteristics identified here hold true for other patient groups, and ascertain the impact of these attitudinal characteristics on

  10. Artroplastía de superficie en cadera. Resultados iniciales favorables en pacientes selectos. [Hip resurfacing arthroplasty: favorable initial results in selected patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Martín Comba; Gerardo Zanotti; Martín Buttaro; Francisco Piccaluga

    2013-01-01

    In­tro­duc­ción El objetivo del presente trabajo es reportar los resultados clínicos y radiológicos iniciales de una serie consecutiva de pacientes selectos tratados en nuestra institución con un único diseño de artroplastia de superficie, comparando además la tasa de revisión temprana con un grupo control de pacientes tratados en el mismo lapso con una artroplastia total de cadera no cementada. Material y ­Métodos Cuarenta y siete pacientes de sexo masculino (49 caderas) con diag...

  11. Artroplastía de superficie en cadera. Resultados iniciales favorables en pacientes selectos. [Hip resurfacing arthroplasty: favorable initial results in selected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Martín Comba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In­tro­duc­ción El objetivo del presente trabajo es reportar los resultados clínicos y radiológicos iniciales de una serie consecutiva de pacientes selectos tratados en nuestra institución con un único diseño de artroplastia de superficie, comparando además la tasa de revisión temprana con un grupo control de pacientes tratados en el mismo lapso con una artroplastia total de cadera no cementada. Material y ­Métodos Cuarenta y siete pacientes de sexo masculino (49 caderas con diagnóstico de artrosis de cadera que fueron tratados quirúrgicamente con una artroplastia híbrida de superficie, entre noviembre de 2006 y julio de 2009. La edad promedio fue de 44,5 años (rango de 21 a 57. En todos los casos, la indicación de la artroplastia de superficie se realizó en pacientes jóvenes con alta expectativa funcional y siguiendo estrictos criterios de selección radiológicos. Se efectuó un seguimiento clínico y un meticuloso análisis radiológico. Resultados La escala funcional posoperatoria de Merle D’Aubigné-Postel fue, en promedio, de 17,3 puntos a los 43 meses de seguimiento promedio (rango 24-62 meses. El 85% de los pacientes refirió que practicaba alguna actividad deportiva con una escala UCLA promedio de 9,5 (rango 8-10. Un paciente requirió una cirugía de revisión (2,04% por fractura de cuello femoral. No existieron diferencias estadísticamente significativas en cuanto a la tasa de revisión temprana comparando con el grupo control (p = 0,55. Conclusiones En nuestra experiencia inicial con artroplastia de superficie, obtuvimos resultados a corto plazo favorables, en una serie de hombres con artrosis y alta demanda funcional, estrictamente seleccionados.

  12. Hip dysplasia: a significant risk factor for the development of hip osteoarthritis. A cross-sectional survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2005-01-01

    joint space width (JSW) /=60 yr of age. Of factors entered into logistic regression analyses, only age (P LT 0.001 for right hips and P LT 0.001 for left hips) and hip dysplasia (P LT 0.001 for right hips and P = 0.004 for left hips) were significantly associated with hip OA prevalence in women. In men......, only hip dysplasia was associated with hip OA prevalence, P LT 0.001 in right hips and P = 0.001 in left hips. CONCLUSIONS: Of the individual risk factors investigated in this study, only age and hip dysplasia were associated with the development of hip osteoarthritis.......OBJECTIVES: The aim of this cross-sectional survey of 2232 women and 1336 men (age range 20-91 yr) was to investigate individual risk factors for hip joint osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Standardized, weight-bearing pelvic radiographs were evaluated. Radiological hip joint OA was defined as minimum...

  13. Unconstrained tripolar hip implants: effect on hip stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyen, Olivier; Chen, Qing Shan; Bejui-Hugues, Jacques; Berry, Daniel J; An, Kai-Nan

    2007-02-01

    Tripolar implants were developed to treat unstable total hip arthroplasties. However, there is limited confirmation that they achieve this purpose despite their increasing use. Because they have a larger effective head size, these implants are expected to increase range of motion to impingement and improve stability in situations at risk for impingement compared with conventional implants. We assessed the range of motion to impingement using a tripolar implant mounted to an automated hip simulator using 22.2-mm and 28-mm femoral head sizes. The 22 and 28-mm tripolar implants provided increases of 30.5 degrees in flexion, 15.4 degrees in adduction, and 22.4 degrees in external rotation compared with the conventional 22.2-mm femoral head diameter implant. At the critical position of 90 degrees hip flexion, there was an increase of 45.2 degrees in internal rotation. At 0 degrees and 30 degrees external rotation, extension increases were 18.8 degrees and 7.8 degrees, respectively. Bony impingement was the limiting factor. Tripolar implants increased the arc of motion before impingement in positions at risk for dislocation and are expected to provide greater stability.

  14. BILATERAL PATHOLOGICAL HIP DISLOCATION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy E. Garkavenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pathological dislocation of the hip is one of the most severe complications of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis. The program of treatment for children with pathological hip dislocation is complex, but it has been sufficiently developed and implemented very successfully. At the same time, the available literature provides no cases of treating children with bilateral pathological hip dislocations after hematogenous osteomyelitis. There is no information on the incidence of such cases or in regards to remote functional results. Materials and methods. The results of the treatment of 18 children with bilateral pathological dislocation of the hip after hematogenous osteomyelitis are presented, which constituted 23.1% of the total number of patients (78 who underwent surgery in 2000–2016 for the diagnosis of pathological hip dislocation. Both hip joints were surgically operated on in 12 patients, while one hip joint was operated on in 6 patients. To assess the anatomical and functional state of hip joints, the clinical and roentgenological diagnostic techniques were used. Results and discussion. To stabilize and restore the function of the hip joints, 18 children underwent 30 surgical interventions: simple open hip reduction (19 and open hip reduction with hip arthroplasty with one (6 or two (5 demineralized osteochondral allogeneic grafts. The decision regarding the possibility of performing surgical intervention on the second hip joint was made only after a child's check-up examination was complete and after positive information about the anatomical and functional state of the operated hip joint was obtained. According to these criteria, 14 (77.8% children underwent surgical treatment of the second hip joint 1–1.5 years after the course of conservative measures to restore the range of motion in the previously operated hip joint. Over a period of 1–12 years, 17 patients were examined, 10 of which underwent an operation on both

  15. Economic viability of geriatric hip fracture centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, R Carter; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir; Bernstein, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Management of geriatric hip fractures in a protocol-driven center can improve outcomes and reduce costs. Nonetheless, this approach has not spread as broadly as the effectiveness data would imply. One possible explanation is that operating such a center is not perceived as financially worthwhile. To assess the economic viability of dedicated hip fracture centers, the authors built a financial model to estimate profit as a function of costs, reimbursement, and patient volume in 3 settings: an average US hip fracture program, a highly efficient center, and an academic hospital without a specific hip fracture program. Results were tested with sensitivity analysis. A local market analysis was conducted to assess the feasibility of supporting profitable hip fracture centers. The results demonstrate that hip fracture treatment only becomes profitable when the annual caseload exceeds approximately 72, assuming costs characteristic of a typical US hip fracture program. The threshold of profitability is 49 cases per year for high-efficiency hip fracture centers and 151 for the urban academic hospital under review. The largest determinant of profit is reimbursement, followed by costs and volume. In the authors’ home market, 168 hospitals offer hip fracture care, yet 85% fall below the 72-case threshold. Hip fracture centers can be highly profitable through low costs and, especially, high revenues. However, most hospitals likely lose money by offering hip fracture care due to inadequate volume. Thus, both large and small facilities would benefit financially from the consolidation of hip fracture care at dedicated hip fracture centers. Typical US cities have adequate volume to support several such centers.

  16. Hip fractures in old men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Rondanelli, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    Describe 289 hip fractures that were admitted at Hospital Universitario del Valle between November 1, 2003 and June 30, 2004. The patients had the first appointment at 2.7 days after the fallen, 60% the patients were women, at he age average were 75 years. In the hospital 228 patients were operated (79%). The surgery was realized in average at the twelve days after than they were admitted at the hospital. The days in the hospital were in average 17.5 days. The index of Katz at the admission was 3.96 and the Parker index was 6.56. The mortality in the hospital was of 30 patients (11%). The following during six months was in 114 patients of the people that were operated; we found loss of initial reduction the hip fracture in 10% and infection in 4%

  17. Pathogenesis of osteoporotic hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClung, Michael R

    2003-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized late in the course of the disease by an increased risk of fracture, particularly in the elderly. It occurs in both sexes, affecting approximately 8 million women and 2 million men aged > or = 50 years (1). While low bone density is a predictor of fractures, it is not the only determinant of fracture risk. Other factors include advanced age, altered bone quality, a personal or family history of falls, frailty, poor eyesight, debilitating diseases, and high bone turnover. A diet with sufficient calcium and vitamin D is important to minimize bone loss and, along with regular exercise, to maintain muscle strength. Bisphosphonates have been shown to reduce the risk of hip fracture. For elderly patients, the use of hip protectors may be used as a treatment of last resort. Regardless of the age of the patient, individual patient risk factors must be considered to target appropriate treatment and prevent fracture.

  18. A retrospective chart review to assess the safety of nonablative fractional laser resurfacing in Fitzpatrick skin types IV to VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charlotte M; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Alexis, Andrew F

    2013-04-01

    Laser resurfacing in patients with Fitzpatrick skin phototypes (SPT) IV to VI is associated with a higher risk of pigmentary alteration. There is a paucity of studies evaluating optimum treatment parameters for fractional lasers in darkly pigmented skin types. This is a retrospective review of medical records for patients with SPT IV to VI who were treated with a 1,550 nm erbium-doped fractional nonablative laser (Fraxel Re:Store SR 1550; Solta Medical, Hayword, CA). Data were collected from patient charts and the clinic laser logbook from January 2008 to January 2012. The frequency of treatment-associated postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) and treatment settings used were evaluated. A total of 115 total laser sessions (45 patients) were included in our analysis. Five of the sessions (4%) were accompanied by PIH, 2 of which occurred in a single patient. Only 1 episode of PIH lasted longer than 1 month (2 months). Two of the 5 cases had only transient PIH (≤7 days), one of which was reported by the patient and not clinically evident on examination. The 1,550 nm erbium-doped fractional laser is well tolerated in SPT IV to VI. Fractional laser resurfacing, with the settings used and pretreatment and posttreatment hydroquinone 4% cream, was associated with a low risk of PIH in darker skin types.

  19. Osteoporotic Hip and Spine Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Cannada, Lisa K.; Hill, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Hip and spine fractures represent just a portion of the burden of osteoporosis; however, these fractures require treatment and often represent a major change in lifestyle for the patient and their family. The orthopedic surgeon plays a crucial role, not only in the treatment of these injuries but also providing guidance in prevention of future osteoporotic fractures. This review provides a brief epidemiology of the fractures, details the surgical techniques, and outlines the current treatment...

  20. Hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Rima; Domb, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to give a general overview of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and how it could be treated arthroscopically, with some details about indications, the procedure itself and some of the complications associated with the surgery. FAI is a dynamic condition of the hip that can be a source of pain and disability and could potentially lead to arthritis. When symptomatic, and if conservative treatment fails, FAI can be addressed surgically. The goal of surgical treatment for FAI is to recreate the spherical contour of the femoral head, improve femoral offset, normalize coverage of the acetabulum, repair/reconstruct chondral damage and repair/reconstruct the labrum to restore normal mechanics and joint sealing. Advances in equipment and technique have contributed to an increase in the number of hip arthroscopy procedures performed worldwide and have made it one of the more common treatment options for symptomatic FAI. Hip arthroscopy is a procedure with an extremely steep and long learning curve. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2018;3:121-129. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.3.170041 PMID:29780619

  1. [Technology of cementless hip endoprosthetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungethüm, M; Blömer, W

    1987-06-01

    The success achieved with non-cemented hip arthroplasty depends mainly on the stability of the fixation, the quality of the stabilizing bone being just as important as favourable biomechanical conditions. The results of the intensive research and development with respect to the particular features of a non-cemented hip endoprosthesis can be divided into the following basic categories: Biomechanical aspects with special reference to bone related to the design of the prosthesis; material characteristics, such as fatigue strength, tribology, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility; and development of new materials and coatings to permit direct bonding of implant and bone. With regard to the stem of hip prostheses, the different design parameters of various types are examined to determine their typical design characteristics, such as bearing surface of the collar, geometry of cross section, anatomically adapted shaping, and surface of the implant forming the contact with the bone. The latter can be divided into macroprofiles and macro- and micro-porous coated surfaces. On the other hand, the methods of cementless fixation of acetabular cups can be primarily divided into conical and spherical screw fixation and pegged fixation with additional macroprofiles of porous surfaces. In a separate study of the biomechanical aspects of screwed sockets, the special importance of socket shape and thread geometry are presented with reference to primary stability and long-term fixation of prostheses.

  2. A Hip Implant Energy Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancharoen, K.; Zhu, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a kinetic energy harvester designed to be embedded in a hip implant which aims to operate at a low frequency associated with body motion of patients. The prototype is designed based on the constrained volume available in a hip prosthesis and the challenge is to harvest energy from low frequency movements (< 1 Hz) which is an average frequency during free walking of a patient. The concept of magnetic-force-driven energy harvesting is applied to this prototype considering the hip movements during routine activities of patients. The magnetic field within the harvester was simulated using COMSOL. The simulated resonant frequency was around 30 Hz and the voltage induced in a coil was predicted to be 47.8 mV. A prototype of the energy harvester was fabricated and tested. A maximum open circuit voltage of 39.43 mV was obtained and the resonant frequency of 28 Hz was observed. Moreover, the power output of 0.96 μW was achieved with an optimum resistive load of 250Ω.

  3. A Hip Implant Energy Harvester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancharoen, K; Zhu, D; Beeby, S P

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a kinetic energy harvester designed to be embedded in a hip implant which aims to operate at a low frequency associated with body motion of patients. The prototype is designed based on the constrained volume available in a hip prosthesis and the challenge is to harvest energy from low frequency movements (< 1 Hz) which is an average frequency during free walking of a patient. The concept of magnetic-force-driven energy harvesting is applied to this prototype considering the hip movements during routine activities of patients. The magnetic field within the harvester was simulated using COMSOL. The simulated resonant frequency was around 30 Hz and the voltage induced in a coil was predicted to be 47.8 mV. A prototype of the energy harvester was fabricated and tested. A maximum open circuit voltage of 39.43 mV was obtained and the resonant frequency of 28 Hz was observed. Moreover, the power output of 0.96 μW was achieved with an optimum resistive load of 250Ω

  4. Metal Ion Concentrations in Body Fluids after Implantation of Hip Replacements with Metal-on-Metal Bearing – Systematic Review of Clinical and Epidemiological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Albrecht; Hannemann, Franziska; Lützner, Jörg; Seidler, Andreas; Drexler, Hans; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Schmitt, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The use of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) increased in the last decades. A release of metal products (i.e. particles, ions, metallo-organic compounds) in these implants may cause local and/or systemic adverse reactions. Metal ion concentrations in body fluids are surrogate measures of metal exposure. Objective To systematically summarize and critically appraise published studies concerning metal ion concentrations after MoM THA. Methods Systematic review of clinical trials (RCTs) and epidemiological studies with assessment of metal ion levels (cobalt, chromium, titanium, nickel, molybdenum) in body fluids after implantation of metalliferous hip replacements. Systematic search in PubMed and Embase in January 2012 supplemented by hand search. Standardized abstraction of pre- and postoperative metal ion concentrations stratified by type of bearing (primary explanatory factor), patient characteristics as well as study quality characteristics (secondary explanatory factors). Results Overall, 104 studies (11 RCTs, 93 epidemiological studies) totaling 9.957 patients with measurement of metal ions in body fluids were identified and analyzed. Consistently, median metal ion concentrations were persistently elevated after implantation of MoM-bearings in all investigated mediums (whole blood, serum, plasma, erythrocytes, urine) irrespective of patient characteristics and study characteristics. In several studies very high serum cobalt concentrations above 50 µg/L were measured (detection limit typically 0.3 µg/L). Highest metal ion concentrations were observed after treatment with stemmed large-head MoM-implants and hip resurfacing arthroplasty. Discussion Due to the risk of local and systemic accumulation of metallic products after treatment with MoM-bearing, risk and benefits should be carefully balanced preoperatively. The authors support a proposed „time out“ for stemmed large-head MoM-THA and recommend a restricted indication for hip

  5. Metal ion concentrations in body fluids after implantation of hip replacements with metal-on-metal bearing--systematic review of clinical and epidemiological studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Hartmann

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of metal-on-metal (MoM total hip arthroplasty (THA increased in the last decades. A release of metal products (i.e. particles, ions, metallo-organic compounds in these implants may cause local and/or systemic adverse reactions. Metal ion concentrations in body fluids are surrogate measures of metal exposure. OBJECTIVE: To systematically summarize and critically appraise published studies concerning metal ion concentrations after MoM THA. METHODS: Systematic review of clinical trials (RCTs and epidemiological studies with assessment of metal ion levels (cobalt, chromium, titanium, nickel, molybdenum in body fluids after implantation of metalliferous hip replacements. Systematic search in PubMed and Embase in January 2012 supplemented by hand search. Standardized abstraction of pre- and postoperative metal ion concentrations stratified by type of bearing (primary explanatory factor, patient characteristics as well as study quality characteristics (secondary explanatory factors. RESULTS: Overall, 104 studies (11 RCTs, 93 epidemiological studies totaling 9.957 patients with measurement of metal ions in body fluids were identified and analyzed. Consistently, median metal ion concentrations were persistently elevated after implantation of MoM-bearings in all investigated mediums (whole blood, serum, plasma, erythrocytes, urine irrespective of patient characteristics and study characteristics. In several studies very high serum cobalt concentrations above 50 µg/L were measured (detection limit typically 0.3 µg/L. Highest metal ion concentrations were observed after treatment with stemmed large-head MoM-implants and hip resurfacing arthroplasty. DISCUSSION: Due to the risk of local and systemic accumulation of metallic products after treatment with MoM-bearing, risk and benefits should be carefully balanced preoperatively. The authors support a proposed "time out" for stemmed large-head MoM-THA and recommend a restricted

  6. Cost-effectiveness of hip protectors in frail institutionalized elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schoor, N.M.; de Bruyne, M.C.; van der Roer, N.; Lommerse, E.; van Tulder, M.; Bouter, L.M.; Lips, P.T.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to examine the cost-effectiveness of external hip protectors in the prevention of hip fractures. Since the hip protectors were not effective in preventing hip fractures in our study, the main objective became to examine whether the use of hip protectors

  7. Complete horizontal skin cell resurfacing and delayed vertical cell infiltration into porcine reconstructive tissue matrix compared to bovine collagen matrix and human dermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirastschijski, Ursula; Kerzel, Corinna; Schnabel, Reinhild; Strauss, Sarah; Breuing, Karl-Heinz

    2013-10-01

    Xenogenous dermal matrices are used for hernia repair and breast reconstruction. Full-thickness skin replacement is needed after burn or degloving injuries with exposure of tendons or bones. The authors used a human skin organ culture model to study whether porcine reconstructive tissue matrix (Strattice) is effective as a dermal tissue replacement. Skin cells or split-thickness skin grafts were seeded onto human deepidermized dermis, Strattice, and Matriderm. Cellular resurfacing and matrix infiltration were monitored by live fluorescence imaging, histology, and electron microscopy. Proliferation, apoptosis, cell differentiation, and adhesion were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Epithelial resurfacing and vertical proliferation were reduced and delayed with both bioartificial matrices compared with deepidermized dermis; however, no differences in apoptosis, cell differentiation, or basement membrane formation were found. Vertical penetration was greatest on Matriderm, whereas no matrix infiltration was found on Strattice in the first 12 days. Uncompromised horizontal resurfacing was greatest with Strattice but was absent with Matriderm. Strattice showed no stimulatory effect on cellular inflammation. Matrix texture and surface properties governed cellular performance on tissues. Although dense dermal compaction delayed vertical cellular ingrowth for Strattice, it allowed uncompromised horizontal resurfacing. Dense dermal compaction may slow matrix decomposition and result in prolonged biomechanical stability of the graft. Reconstructive surgeons should choose the adequate matrix substitute depending on biomechanical requirements at the recipient site. Strattice may be suitable as a dermal replacement at recipient sites with high mechanical load requirements.

  8. New application of the long-pulsed Nd-YAG laser as an ablative resurfacing tool for skin rejuvenation: a 7-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshami, Mohammad Ali

    2013-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and erbium-yttrium aluminum garnet (Er-YAG) lasers are the gold standards in ablative skin resurfacing. Neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd-YAG) laser is considered a nonablative skin resurfacing laser whose usage is limited due to its high cost. To assess the efficacy and safety of Nd-YAG as an ablative resurfacing laser and to compare the results with those previously published for CO2 and Erbium-YAG lasers. A total of 296 patients (251 female and 45 male) with Fitzpatrick skin types III-IV and dermatological conditions amenable to ablative skin resurfacing participated in this study. Nd-YAG laser parameters assessed were wavelength (1064 nm), pulse duration (5 ms), fluence (10 J/cm(2) ), and spot size (8-10 mm). Efficacy of Nd-YAG laser was assessed by comparing pre- and posttreatment photographs. An improvement of 30-80% was observed in treated patients. The degree of improvement correlated positively with the number of laser sessions. The most common side effect was hyperpigmentation. Other side effects were less common and mild in intensity compared with published results for gold standard ablative lasers. Not only was the Nd-YAG laser found to be as effective as Er-YAG and CO2 lasers, but treated patients also had shorter recovery and treatment times, and at lower cost. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Hip Strength Testing of Soccer Players With Long-Standing Hip and Groin Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafn, Bolette S; Tang, Lars; Nielsen, Peter Martin

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether self-reported pain during hip strength testing correlates to a large degree with hip muscle strength in soccer players with long-standing unilateral hip and groin pain. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Clinical assessments at Sports Orthopaedic Research...... Center-Copenhagen (SORC-C), Arthroscopic Centre Amager, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-four male soccer players with unilateral long-standing hip and groin pain. INTERVENTIONS: The soccer players performed 5 reliable hip muscle strength tests (isometric hip flexion...... strength (Spearman rho = -0.44, P = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported pain during testing does not seem to correlate with the majority of hip muscle strength tests used in soccer players with long-standing hip and groin pain....

  10. Imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Kyle [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Leslie, Michael [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, New Haven, CT (United States); Menn, Kirsten; Haims, Andrew [Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Anterior hip dislocations are rare orthopedic emergencies resulting from high-energy trauma and have unique imaging characteristics on radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging findings on CT and MRI allow for the prompt recognition and classification of anterior hip dislocations, which guides patient management and reduces complications. The purpose of this article is to review imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations, specifically focusing on CT and MRI. (orig.)

  11. Hip biomechanics during stair ascent and descent in people with and without hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michelle; Wrigley, Tim V; Kean, Crystal O; Metcalf, Ben R; Bennell, Kim L

    2017-07-01

    Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is often associated with pain and impaired function. Understanding biomechanical alterations in patients with hip OA during challenging activities such as stair use is important to inform treatments. The aim of this study was to determine whether kinematics and kinetics during stair ambulation differed between people with hip OA and healthy controls. Fifteen participants with symptomatic and radiographic hip OA and 15 asymptomatic healthy controls underwent 3-D motion analysis during stair ascent and descent. Trunk, pelvis, and hip kinematics as well as hip kinetics were evaluated. Analyses were performed unadjusted and adjusted for speed and leg length. In both the unadjusted and adjusted analyses, participants with hip OA ascended stairs with less hip range of motion in all three planes and a lower peak external rotation moment compared to controls. In the unadjusted analysis, hip OA participants descended stairs with greater ipsilateral trunk lean, less sagittal plane range of motion, lower peak extension moment, lower peak external rotation moment, and greater hip adduction moment impulse compared to controls. In the adjusted results, peak internal rotation moment and hip adduction moment impulse were greater in hip OA participants compared to controls. Findings show that individuals with hip OA display limited range of hip joint movement, particularly during stair ascent, and overall indicate the use of strategies (e.g., trunk lean; lower peak external rotation moment; higher adduction moment impulse) that implicate altered hip abductor function. Future research is required to further understand the implications of these findings on hip OA. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1505-1514, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Birmingham COPD Cohort: a cross-sectional analysis of the factors associated with the likelihood of being in paid employment among people with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rai KK

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Kiran K Rai,1 Rachel E Jordan,1 W Stanley Siebert,2 Steven S Sadhra,3 David A Fitzmaurice,1 Alice J Sitch,1 Jon G Ayres,1,3 Peymané Adab1 1Institute of Applied Health Research, 2The Department of Business and Labour Economics, 3Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK Background: Employment rates among those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are lower than those without COPD, but little is known about the factors that affect COPD patients’ ability to work. Methods: Multivariable analysis of the Birmingham COPD Cohort Study baseline data was used to assess the associations between lifestyle, clinical, and occupational characteristics and likelihood of being in paid employment among working-age COPD patients. Results: In total, 608 of 1,889 COPD participants were of working age, of whom 248 (40.8% were in work. Older age (60–64 years vs 30–49 years: odds ratio [OR] =0.28; 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.12–0.65, lower educational level (no formal qualification vs degree/higher level: OR =0.43; 95% CI =0.19–0.97, poorer prognostic score (highest vs lowest quartile of modified body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise (BODE score: OR =0.10; 95% CI =0.03–0.33, and history of high occupational exposure to vapors, gases, dusts, or fumes (VGDF; high VGDF vs no VGDF exposure: OR =0.32; 95% CI =0.12–0.85 were associated with a lower probability of being employed. Only the degree of breathlessness of BODE was significantly associated with employment. Conclusion: This is the first study to comprehensively assess the characteristics associated with employment in a community sample of people with COPD. Future interventions should focus on managing breathlessness and reducing occupational exposures to VGDF to improve the work capability among those with COPD. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, work, employed, breathlessness, severity, VGDF, UK

  13. COMPLEX FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF THE HIP JOINT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya S. Krastanova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In relation to the study reporting the effects of applying phased complex rehabilitation in patients with total hip arthroplasty, it has been concluded that the everyday clinical practice in Bulgaria does not apply complex examination, giving an objective picture about the extent of functional status of patients with trauma and diseases of the hip. Aim: The main goal of this report is to present a test which incorporates all known and routine research and in which the total number of points determines the functional status of patients with trauma and diseases of the hip. Material and Methods: Based on the Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, the Harris Hip Score modified test, scale D’Aubigne and Postel and Iowa’s test for complex functional evaluation of the hip joint, we have developed a test including information about the degree of pain; goniometry and manual muscle testing of the hip; locomotor test – type of gait and adjuvants; test for Daily Activities of Life. The test has been developed on the basis of expert assessment by doctors and physiotherapists of the proposed indicators for evaluation and determination of the weighting factors’ contribution to the general condition of the patient. Conclusion: The developed and tested method of complex functional assessment of the hip joint enables our colleagues, dealing with trauma and diseases of the hip, to use it in various research and scientific projects, as well as in general medical practice.

  14. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2015-07-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  15. Hip dislocations after 2,734 elective unilateral fast-track total hip arthroplasties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christoffer Calov; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Kehlet, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review of prospectively collected data. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence of hip dislocation 90 days after total hip arthroplasty in relation to time after surgery, mechanism of dislocation and predisposing factors. METHODS: Prospective data on preoperative patient.......31-3.40)] but not hospital stay of hip...

  16. Resolving controversies in hip fracture care: the need for large collaborative trials in hip fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Sprague, Sheila; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Einhorn, Thomas; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Haidukewych, George; Keating, John; Koval, Kenneth; Rosen, Clifford; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Walter, Stephen D.; Motsitsi, Silas; Pei, Fuxing; Yang, Tian-fu; Zhou, Zong-ke; Arora, Shobha; Babhulkar, Sushrut; Bhargava, Rakesh; Desai, Mohan M.; Dhillon, Mandeep S.; Gill, Harpreet Singh; Goel, S. C.; Reddy, A. V. Gurava; Jain, Anil K.; Kalore, Niraj V.; Kammatkar, Nitin; Kumar, Vijay; Malhorta, Rajesh; Marthandam, S. S. K.; Pankaj, Amite; Patinharayil, Gopinathan; Rai, B. Sachidanand; Ramteke, Alankar Ambadas; Sancheti, Parag K.; Thakkar, Navin N.; Thomas, George S.; Robinson, Dror; Steinberg, Ely; Higuchi, Fujio; Kawamura, Sumito; Ohashi, Hirotsugu; Sawaguchi, Takeshi; Park, Myung-Sik; Yun, Ho Hyun; Poduval, Murali; Siddiqui, Ahmed; Chang, Je-Ken; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Goslings, J. Carel

    2009-01-01

    Hip fractures are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the burden of disability associated with hip fractures globally vindicate the need for high-quality research to advance the care of patients with hip fractures. Historically, large, multi-centre randomized controlled

  17. Influence of hip dysplasia on the development of osteoarthritis of the hip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Lievense (Annet); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBackground: It has been suggested that in some patients with primary hip osteoarthritis (OA), the disease occurs as a consequence of acetabular dysplasia or hip dysplasia (HD). Objective: To carry out a systematic review to investigate the association between acetabular dysplasia and hip

  18. Surgical hip dislocation for treatment of cam femoroacetabular impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milind M Chaudhary

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Cam femoroacetabular Impingement causing pain and limitation of hip movements was treated by open osteochondroplasty after surgical hip dislocation. This reduced pain, improved hip motion and gave good to excellent results in the short term.

  19. Comparison of the responsiveness of the Harris Hip Score with generic measures for hip function in osteoarthritis of the hip.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Ronday, H.K.; Heering, A.; Breedveld, F.C.; Dekker, J.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare responsiveness of the Harris Hip Score with generic measures (that is, the Short Form-36 (SF-36), and a test of walking speed and pain during walking) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. METHOD: The first 75 cases within the population of a randomised clinical

  20. Unilateral hip osteoarthritis: can we predict the outcome of the other hip?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vossinakis, I.C.; Georgiades, G.; Hartofilakidis, G.; Kafidas, D.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to define, in unilateral hip osteoarthritis (OA), factors predicting the outcome of the other hip. We examined the anteroposterior radiographs of the pelvis of 95 white patients with unilateral idiopathic (56 patients) or secondary to congenital hip diseases (39 patients) OA. The other hip was free from symptoms (pain or limping) at the initial examination and without radiographic evidence of OA; it was what we call a ''normal'' hip. Two parameters were evaluated: (1) the type of osteoarthritis of the involved hip and (2) the range of four radiographic indices of the contralateral hip: the sourcil inclination (weight-bearing surface), the acetabular angle, the Wiberg's center-edge angle, and the neck-shaft angle. Follow-up radiographs for the hips that remained OA-free were available for 10 to 35 years and for those that developed OA, at the time of initial symptoms, range 2 to 31 years. Logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of idiopathic OA in one hip had a statistically significant effect on the development of OA on the other hip (p<0.001). Minor deviations of radiographic indices of the contralateral hip is not a predictive factor for its outcome. When the radiographic indices are examined together with the pathology of the involved hip, only WBS was shown to have a significant effect to the development of OA and its type (p < 0.001). The following conclusions can be drawn from this study: 1. Patient with idiopathic OA of one hip is at increased risk of developing OA in the other hip. 2. The outcome of the other hip cannot be predicted only on the basis of the evaluation of its radiographic indices. 3. Among the different indices, WBS seems to have a strong influence toward the development of OA. (orig.)

  1. Efficacy and Safety of Fractional CO2 Laser Resurfacing in Non-hypertrophic Traumatic and Burn Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Imran; Imran, Saher

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fractional photothermolysis is one of the most effective treatment options used to resurface scars of different aetiologies. Aim: To assess the efficacy and safety of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing treatment in the management of non-hypertrophic traumatic and burn scars. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients affected by non-hypertrophic traumatic and burn scars were treated with four sessions of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing treatment at 6-weekly intervals. Patients were photographed at each visit and finally, 3 months after the end of treatment schedule. Response to treatment was assessed clinically as well as by comparing the initial photograph of the patient with the one taken at the last follow-up visit 3-months after the final treatment session. Changes in skin texture, surface irregularity and pigmentation were assessed on a quartile grading scale and scored individually from 0 to 4. A mean of the three individual scores was calculated and the response was labelled as ‘excellent’ if the mean score achieved was >2. A score of 1-2 was labeled as good response while a score below 1 was labeled as ‘poor’ response. The subjective satisfaction of each patient with the treatment offered was also assessed at the last follow-up visit. Results: The commonest site of scarring treated was the face followed by hands. Response to treatment was rated as excellent in 60% (15/25) patients while 24% (6/25) and 16% (4/25) patients were labeled as good and poor responders, respectively. Skin texture showed better response than other variables with average score of 2.44. Linear post-traumatic scars were seen to respond less than other morphological types. Majority of the patients (19 out of 25) were highly satisfied with the treatment offered. No long-term adverse effects were noted in any patient. Conclusions: Fractional photothermolysis with a fractional CO2 laser gives excellent results in patients with post-burn scars with minimal adverse

  2. Fractional carbon dioxide laser resurfacing of rhytides and photoaged skin--a prospective clinical study on patient expectation and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Elisabeth; Meierhöfer, Julia; Koller, Michael; Zeman, Florian; Groesser, Leopold; Karrer, Sigrid; Hohenleutner, Ulrich; Landthaler, Michael; Hohenleutner, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    Fractional CO2 -laser resurfacing is increasingly used for treating rhytides and photoaged skin because of its favorable benefit-risk ratio. A key outcome measure and treatment goal in aesthetic laser therapy is patient satisfaction. However, few data are available on patient-reported outcomes after fractional ablative skin-resurfacing. To compare patient expectations before and patient satisfaction after three fractional CO2 -laser treatments and to correlate objectively measured wrinkle reduction with patient satisfaction after treatment. We investigated patient expectation and satisfaction using a 14-item questionnaire in 24 female patients. We assessed the skin-related quality of life and patient satisfaction with skin appearance. We profilometrically measured wrinkle size in four facial areas before and three months after treatment and investigated correlations between wrinkle reduction and patient satisfaction. The high patient expectations before treatment (ceiling effect) were actually slightly exceeded. The average score of 14 items delineating patient satisfaction with laser treatment was higher (4.64 ± 0.82; n = 24) than the respective expectations before treatment (4.43 ± 0.88; n = 24). Skin-related quality of life and patient satisfaction with skin appearance had significantly improved after the last treatment. Patients dissatisfied with their skin appearance before treatment (mean 2.1 ± 1.5; evaluated on a scale ranging from 0-6) were satisfied (mean 5.1 ± 1.2) (P skin appearance at the follow-up. Patient satisfaction with skin appearance was not correlated to the profilometrically measured reduction of wrinkle size of any facial area. Our results show high patient satisfaction with ablative fractional skin resurfacing, also regarding improved self-esteem and self-satisfaction despite high pre-treatment expectations. Skin-specific quality of life had significantly improved. Thus, this treatment modality can be recommended

  3. Efficacy and safety of fractional CO 2 laser resurfacing in non-hypertrophic traumatic and burn scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Majid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fractional photothermolysis is one of the most effective treatment options used to resurface scars of different aetiologies. Aim: To assess the efficacy and safety of fractional CO 2 laser resurfacing treatment in the management of non-hypertrophic traumatic and burn scars. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients affected by non-hypertrophic traumatic and burn scars were treated with four sessions of fractional CO 2 laser resurfacing treatment at 6-weekly intervals. Patients were photographed at each visit and finally, 3 months after the end of treatment schedule. Response to treatment was assessed clinically as well as by comparing the initial photograph of the patient with the one taken at the last follow-up visit 3-months after the final treatment session. Changes in skin texture, surface irregularity and pigmentation were assessed on a quartile grading scale and scored individually from 0 to 4. A mean of the three individual scores was calculated and the response was labelled as ′excellent′ if the mean score achieved was >2. A score of 1-2 was labeled as good response while a score below 1 was labeled as ′poor′ response. The subjective satisfaction of each patient with the treatment offered was also assessed at the last follow-up visit. Results: The commonest site of scarring treated was the face followed by hands. Response to treatment was rated as excellent in 60% (15/25 patients while 24% (6/25 and 16% (4/25 patients were labeled as good and poor responders, respectively. Skin texture showed better response than other variables with average score of 2.44. Linear post-traumatic scars were seen to respond less than other morphological types. Majority of the patients (19 out of 25 were highly satisfied with the treatment offered. No long-term adverse effects were noted in any patient. Conclusions: Fractional photothermolysis with a fractional CO 2 laser gives excellent results in patients with post-burn scars with

  4. Fasilitas Pelatihan dan Pergelaran Seni Tari Hip Hop di Surabaya

    OpenAIRE

    Yanuar, Sandy

    2014-01-01

    Fasilitas Pelatihan dan Pergelaran Seni Tari Hip Hop di Surabaya merupakan fasilitas yang disediakan bagi semua penari Hip Hop di Surabaya untuk berlatih menari dan mempertunjukan tarian Hip Hop. Fasilitas ini tersedia bagi semua penari Hip Hop termasuk penari difable, mengingat kaum difable juga dapat menari Hip Hop. Namun karena di Surabaya belum memiliki fasilitas yang memadai bagi semua penari Hip Hop termasuk penari difable untuk menari dan memiliki tempat pertunjukan yang berkarakter Hi...

  5. Conversion total hip arthroplasty: Primary or revision total hip arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Baghoolizadeh, Mahta

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an increasingly common procedure among elderly individuals. Although conversion THA is currently bundled in a diagnosis related group (DRG) with primary THA, there is a lack of literature supporting this classification and it has yet to be identified whether conversion THA better resembles primary or revision THA. This editorial analyzed the intraoperative and postoperative factors and functional outcomes following conversion THA, primary THA, and revision THA to understand whether the characteristics of conversion THA resemble one procedure or the other, or are possibly somewhere in between. The analysis revealed that conversion THA requires more resources both intraoperatively and postoperatively than primary THA. Furthermore, patients undergoing conversion THA present with poorer functional outcomes in the long run. Patients undergoing conversion THA better resemble revision THA patients than primary THA patients. As such, patients undergoing conversion THA should not be likened to patients undergoing primary THA when determining risk stratification and reimbursement rates. Conversion THA procedures should be planned accordingly with proper anticipation of the greater needs both in the operating room, and for in-patient and follow-up care. We suggest that conversion THA be reclassified in the same DRG with revision THA as opposed to primary THA as a step towards better allocation of healthcare resources for conversion hip arthroplasties. PMID:26601055

  6. Intra-urban and street scale variability of BTEX, NO 2 and O 3 in Birmingham, UK: Implications for exposure assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Solazzo, Efisio; Lumbreras, Julio

    2011-09-01

    Automatic monitoring networks have the ability of capturing air pollution episodes, as well as short- and long-term air quality trends in urban areas that can be used in epidemiological studies. However, due to practical constraints (e.g. cost and bulk of equipment), the use of automatic analysers is restricted to a limited number of roadside and background locations within a city. As a result, certain localised air pollution hotspots may be overlooked or overemphasised, especially near heavily trafficked street canyons and intersections. This has implications for compliance with regulatory standards and may cause exposure misclassification in epidemiological studies. Apart from automatic analysers, low cost passive diffusion tubes can be used to characterise the spatial variability of air pollution in urban areas. In this study, BTEX, NO 2 and O 3 data from a one-year passive sampling survey were used to characterise the intra-urban and street scale spatial variability of traffic-related pollutants in Birmingham (UK). In addition, continuous monitoring of NO 2, NO x, O 3, CO, SO 2, PM 10 and PM 2.5 from three permanent monitoring sites was used to identify seasonal and annual pollution patterns. The passive sampling measurements allowed us to evaluate the representativeness of a permanent roadside monitoring site that has recorded some of the highest NO 2 and PM 10 concentrations in Birmingham in recent years. Dispersion modelling was also used to gain further insight into pollutant sources and dispersion characteristics at this location. The strong spatial concentration gradients observed in busy streets, as well as the differences between roadside and urban background levels highlight the importance of appropriate positioning of air quality monitoring equipment in cities.

  7. A comparison of cardiovascular risk factors among Indo-Asian and caucasian patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Birmingham, England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanjal, T S; Lal, M; Haynes, R; Lip, G

    2001-12-01

    Indo-Asians in the UK are at an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD); this may be a reflection of their cardiovascular risk factor profile as well as of a more sedentary lifestyle. We hypothesised that Indo-Asians in Malaysia and the UK may exhibit a similar cardiovascular risk factor and physical activity profile, which would be more adverse compared with caucasians. We studied 70 consecutive Indo-Asian patients admitted to hospitals in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (n=42; 35 males; mean age 60.6 years, SD 11.8); and Birmingham, England (n=28; 20 males; mean age 60.8 years, SD 12.9). Both groups of Indo-Asian patients were compared with 20 caucasian patients (13 males; mean age 62.7 years, SD 9.4) admitted with myocardial infarction from Birmingham. There was a higher prevalence of diabetes among Indo-Asians in both countries than among caucasians (p=0.0225). By contrast, caucasians had a higher prevalence of hypercholesterolaemia (p=0.0113), peripheral vascular disease (p=0.0008), regular alcohol consumption (pleisure activity score (p=0.001) and total physical activity score (p=0.003) among Indo-Asians in both countries than among caucasians. This survey has demonstrated differences in cardiovascular risk factors among Indo-Asian and caucasian patients. The high prevalence of diabetes, as well as the lower physical activity and sedentary lifestyles among Indo-Asians, in both Malaysia and the UK, may in part contribute to the high incidence of CAD in this ethnic group.

  8. Outcomes After Diagnostic Hip Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, T Sean; Steinhaus, Michael E; Popkin, Charles A; Ahmad, Christopher S; Rosneck, James

    2016-08-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of outcomes associated with local anesthetic (LA) or LA and corticosteroid (CS) diagnostic hip injections, and how well response predicts subsequent operative success. A systematic review from database (PubMed, Medline, Scopus, Embase) inception to January 2015 for English-language articles reporting primary patient outcomes data was performed, excluding studies with >50% underlying osteoarthritis. Studies were assessed by 2 reviewers who collected pertinent data. Seven studies were included, reporting on a total 337 patients undergoing diagnostic hip injection. The mean age was 34.4 years, with 5 studies reporting 94 (35.2%) males and 173 (64.8%) females. One study examined the rate of pain relief with LA (92.5%); 2 CS studies reported relief on a scale from 0% to 100% (no to complete relief), ranging from 61% to 82.3%; and 3 studies used 10-point pain scales, with a CS study noting a pain score of 1.0, an LA study with a score of 3.03, and 1 study using either CS or LA scores of 3 to 5.6. Duration of pain relief was 9.8 (CS) and 2.35 days (LA). By pathology, greatest relief was achieved in acetabular chondral injury (93.3%) and least in cam impingement (81.6%), with clinical and imaging findings being unreliable predictors of relief. One study showed nonresponse to be a strong predictor of negative surgical outcome for femoroacetabular impingement. Diagnostic hip injections provide substantial pain relief for patients with various hip pathologies, with limited data to suggest greatest relief for those with chondral injury. Clinical and imaging findings are unreliable predictors of injection response, and nonresponse to injection is a strong negative predictor of surgical outcome. Future research should focus on elucidating differences by underlying pathology and predicting future operative success. Level IV, systematic review. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  9. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bent; Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    The Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) was initiated in January 2012 as a web-based prospective registry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and report the first registry based outcome data of a national population with radiological and clinical femoroacetabular impingement (FAI......) data from DHAR between January 2012 and November 2015 were extracted. Radiological pincer-type FAI was defined as LCE > 35° and cam FAI as alpha-angle > 55°. These data were combined with FAI surgical data such as osteochondroplasty and labral repair or resection. PROMs consisting of HAGOS, EQ-5 D...

  10. TREATMENT OF NEUROLOGICAL CONGENITAL HIP LUXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian ICLEANU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hip luxation is a disorder which evolves in time. Teratological hip dislocation is a distinct form of hip luxation, which usually appears with other disorders. These hips are dislocated before birth. In this thesis we will try to elaborate a recovery program, through physical exercises, which will help us realize our treatment objectives: diminishing articular stiffness, increasing articular mobility, increasing muscle strength, recalibration of agonist and antagonist balances and reeducating gait. The specific objectives of the study consist of the particularization of the recovery programs based on age, illness stage (dysplasia or luxation and either surgical or non-surgical intervention. To show the importance of physiotherapy in gait rehabilitation of a child with hip dislocation we started from the hypothesis: using an adequate rehabilitation program after an individualized methodology, optimizes the functional recovery and ensures the gains of hip stability and the formation of an engram of gait as close as it could be to the normal one. We present a case of neurological congenital hip dislocation where the treatment initiated early is showing good results. Results obtained are significantly different and we came to the conclusion that starting an untimely analytical kinetic treatment and globally personalizing it to every patient has better biomechanical results for the hip.

  11. Maximum potential preventive effect of hip protectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schoor, N.M.; Smit, J.H.; Bouter, L.M.; Veenings, B.; Asma, G.B.; Lips, P.T.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the maximum potential preventive effect of hip protectors in older persons living in the community or homes for the elderly. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING: Emergency departments in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Hip fracture patients aged 70 and older who

  12. Simultaneous and staged bilateral total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Martin; Joergensen, Christoffer Calov; Husted, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral total hip arthroplasty (BTHA) and bilateral simultaneous total hip arthroplasty (BSTHA) are done increasingly. Previous studies evaluating outcomes after bilateral procedures have found different results. The aim of this study was to investigate length of hospital stay (LOS), 30 days...

  13. CT and MRI of hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahir, J.G.; Toms, A.P.; Marshall, T.J.; Wimhurst, J.; Nolan, J.

    2007-01-01

    Plain films are the initial imaging method of choice for evaluation of hip arthroplasty. Recent advances in technology and imaging techniques have largely overcome the problems of beam hardening in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic susceptibility artefact in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT and MRI have now become useful imaging techniques in the assessment of hip arthroplasty

  14. Pressure ulcer risk in hip fracture patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, R. H.; Rozendaal, M; Wouters-Wesseling, W; Buskens, E.; Keller, P; Haalboom, JRE

    Hip fracture patients have a high risk of pressure ulcers (PU). We followed 121 hip fracture patients for the development of pressure ulcers and evaluated a risk assessment tool for sensitivity and specificity. More than half of the patients presented with PU, mostly stage I. Risk factors for PU

  15. Total hip arthroplasty for giant cell tumour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni S

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available A 32 month follow up of an uncommon case of a Giant Cell Tumour affecting the proximal end of femur is presented. Following a wide excision, the hip was reconstructed using Charnley type of low friction total hip arthroplasty. At a 32 month review, there was no recurrence and the function was good.

  16. Pertunjukan Teater Karo Hip Hop Kontemporer KAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Anggreni Purba

    2013-11-01

    Pertunjukan Teater Karo Hip Hop Kontemporer KAI. The performance of Karo Theater collaborated with Hip Hop stems from a simple idea to collaborate Karo cultural traditions with popular culture. The performances can be enjoyed without having limitation on the language and culture. The process of combining two different cultures is a form of hybrid culture, and it may occur due to the globalization process. Through the process of deposition of the observations and strong impression, this performance is then brought into the form of Hip Hop as a preferred form which is energetic, personal and global. This performance is part of a modern tragedy with its destructive character which has explored the emotion and has presented it to the audiences. The exploration of Karo cultural tradition and Hip Hop dance as a language of symbols is able to reinforce words. The movement is not revealed by the verbal phrase but is presented through the movement of Hip Hop dance. The interpretation of the legend and texts into movement is carried out through the training process at the laboratory as a searching process and experiment, and afterward can be realized by considering the basic elements of Hip Hop, Karo cultural elements and performance. Karo Hip Hop Theatre is expected to become a preferred aesthetic form of a modern theater without losing its tradition form. Keyword: a contemporary Karo theater, Hip Hop, hybrid culture.

  17. Hip-hop and urban studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaffe, R.

    2014-01-01

    How can urban studies research engage fruitfully with hip-hop? This contribution responds to the essays by David Beer and Martin Lamotte on ‘street music’, urban ethnography and ghettoized communities. It discusses how a social science engagement with hip-hop texts might differ from cultural studies

  18. The role of transforming growth factor β1 in fractional laser resurfacing with a carbon dioxide laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xia; Ge, Hongmei; Zhou, Chuanqing; Chai, Xinyu; Deng, Hui

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of transforming growth factor β1 in mechanisms of cutaneous remodeling induced by fractional carbon dioxide laser treatment. The dorsal skin of Kunming mice was exposed to a single-pass fractional CO2 laser treatment. Biopsies were taken at 1 h and at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 56 days after treatment. Transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 expression in skin samples was evaluated by ELISA, dermal thickness by hematoxylin-eosin staining, collagen and elastic fibers by Ponceau S and Victoria blue double staining, and types I and III collagens by ELISA. The level of TGF β1 in the laser-treated areas of skin was significantly increased compared with that in the control areas on days 1 (p skin of the laser-treated areas had increased significantly (p resurfacing.

  19. Fractional nonablative 1,540-nm laser resurfacing of atrophic acne scars. A randomized controlled trial with blinded response evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedelund, Lene; Moreau, Karen Estell R; Beyer, Ditte M

    2010-01-01

    as moderately or significantly improved. No differences were found in skin redness or pigmentation between before and after treatment. Patients experienced moderate pain, erythema, oedema, bullae, and crusts. No adverse effects were seen in untreated control areas. The nonablative 1,540-nm fractional laser......The efficacy of nonablative fractional laser resurfacing of acne scars has been described in case reports and uncontrolled trials. The present study is the first randomized controlled trial in this field. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy and adverse effects of 1,540-nm nonablative...... fractional laser treatment of acne scars. Ten patients with acne scars were included. Two intraindividual areas of similar size and appearance within contralateral anatomical regions were randomized to (1) 3-monthly laser treatments with a StarLux 1,540-nm fractional handpiece, and (2) no treatment. Blinded...

  20. Avascular necrosis of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, P.; Genant, H.K.; Lindquist, T.; Chafetz, N.; Steiger, P.; Sanny, J.; Rhodes, M.L.; Rothman, S.L.G.; Delamarter, R.; Kilgus, D.

    1988-01-01

    T1-weighted (repetition time [TR] = 450 msec, echo time [TE] = 20 msec), T2-weighted (TR = 1,800 msec, TE = 20 and 80 msec), and T2*-weighted gradient-echo gradient recalled acquisition in a steady state, TR = 70 msec, TE = 30 msec, theta = 15 0 ) MR images (General Electric Signa, 1.5 T) were generated in 11 patients with avascular necrosis of the hip. Three-dimensional MR image reconstruction was performed on an independent imaging system (IIS, Dimensional Medicine Inc). Pelvic and femoral bone contours were computed based on either the T1-weighted or the T2*-weighted images. Three-dimensional displays of necrotic zones and areas of granulation tissue were computed on the basis of the T2-weighted images. The tissues were simultaneously displayed in the three-dimensional images using different colors and transparencies. The three-dimensional MR images generated demonstrated the extent of the necrotic zone and adjacent granulation tissue and their position relative to the weight-bearing surface. They may soon prove to be useful in preoperative planning and intraoperative localization of complex surgical interventions in avascular necrosis of the hip

  1. Hip fracture in hospitalized medical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zapatero Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study is to analyze the incidence of hip fracture as a complication of admissions to internal medicine units in Spain. Methods We analyzed the clinical data of 2,134,363 adults who had been admitted to internal medicine wards. The main outcome was a diagnosis of hip fracture during hospitalization. Outcome measures included rates of in-hospital fractures, length of stay and cost. Results A total of 1127 (0.057% admittances were coded with an in-hospital hip fracture. In hospital mortality rate was 27.9% vs 9.4%; p  Conclusions In-hospital hip fracture notably increased mortality during hospitalization, doubling the mean length of stay and mean cost of admission. These are reasons enough to stress the importance of designing and applying multidisciplinary plans focused on reducing the incidence of hip fractures in hospitalized patients.

  2. [The hip joint in neuromuscular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobl, W M

    2009-07-01

    Physiologic motor and biomechanical parameters are prerequisites for normal hip development and hip function. Disorders of muscle activity and lack of weight bearing due to neuromuscular diseases may cause clinical symptoms such as an unstable hip or reduced range of motion. Disability and handicap because of pain, hip dislocation, osteoarthritis, gait disorders, or problems in seating and positioning are dependent on the severity of the disease, the time of occurrence, and the means of prevention and treatment. Preservation of pain-free and stable hip joints should be gained by balancing muscular forces and by preventing progressive dislocation. Most important is the exact indication of therapeutic options such as movement and standing therapy as well as drugs and surgery.

  3. Hip strength and range of motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosler, Andrea B.; Crossley, Kay M.; Thorborg, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the normal profiles for hip strength and range of motion (ROM) in a professional football league in Qatar, and examine the effect of leg dominance, age, past history of injury, and ethnicity on these profiles. Design Cross-sectional cohort study. Methods Participants...... values are documented for hip strength and range of motion that can be used as reference profiles in the clinical assessment, screening, and management of professional football players. Leg dominance, recent past injury history and ethnicity do not need to be accounted for when using these profiles...... included 394 asymptomatic, male professional football players, aged 18–40 years. Strength was measured using a hand held dynamometer with an eccentric test in side-lying for hip adduction and abduction, and the squeeze test in supine with 45° hip flexion. Range of motion measures included: hip internal...

  4. Improving the outcome of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing using a probiotic skin cream: Preliminary clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccali, Giovanni; Cinque, Benedetta; La Torre, Cristina; Lombardi, Francesca; Palumbo, Paola; Romano, Lucia; Mattei, Antonella; Orsini, Gino; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Giuliani, Maurizio

    2016-11-01

    As known, fractional CO 2 resurfacing treatments are more effective than non-ablative ones against aging signs, but post-operative redness and swelling prolong the overall downtime requiring up to steroid administration in order to reduce these local systems. In the last years, an increasing interest has been focused on the possible use of probiotics for treating inflammatory and allergic conditions suggesting that they can exert profound beneficial effects on skin homeostasis. In this work, the Authors report their experience on fractional CO 2 laser resurfacing and provide the results of a new post-operative topical treatment with an experimental cream containing probiotic-derived active principles potentially able to modulate the inflammatory reaction associated to laser-treatment. The cream containing DermaACB (CERABEST™) was administered post-operatively to 42 consecutive patients who were treated with fractional CO 2 laser. All patients adopted the cream twice a day for 2 weeks. Grades were given according to outcome scale. The efficacy of the cream containing DermaACB was evaluated comparing the rate of post-operative signs vanishing with a control group of 20 patients topically treated with an antibiotic cream and a hyaluronic acid based cream. Results registered with the experimental treatment were good in 22 patients, moderate in 17, and poor in 3 cases. Patients using the study cream took an average time of 14.3 days for erythema resolution and 9.3 days for swelling vanishing. The post-operative administration of the cream containing DermaACB induces a quicker reduction of post-operative erythema and swelling when compared to a standard treatment.

  5. Efficacy and safety of Erbium-doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet fractional resurfacing laser for treatment of facial acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan Nirmal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment of acne scars with ablative fractional laser resurfacing has given good improvement. But, data on Indian skin are limited. A study comparing qualitative, quantitative, and subjective assessments is also lacking. Aim: Our aim was to assess the improvement of facial acne scars with Erbium-doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Er:YAG 2940 nm fractional laser resurfacing and its adverse effects in 25 patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Methods: All 25 patients received four treatment sessions with Er:YAG fractional laser at 1-month interval. The laser parameters were kept constant for each of the four sittings in all patients. Qualitative and quantitative assessments were done using Goodman and Barron grading. Subjective assessment in percentage of improvement was also documented 1 month after each session. Photographs were taken before each treatment session and 1 month after the final session. Two unbiased dermatologists performed independent clinical assessments by comparing the photographs. The kappa statistics was used to monitor the agreement between the dermatologists and patients. Results: Most patients (96% showed atleast fair improvement. Rolling and superficial box scars showed higher significant improvement when compared with ice pick and deep box scars. Patient′s satisfaction of improvement was higher when compared to physician′s observations. No serious adverse effects were noted with exacerbation of acne lesions forming the majority. Conclusion: Ablative fractional photothermolysis is both effective and safe treatment for atrophic acne scars in Indian skin.Precise evaluation of acne scar treatment can be done by taking consistent digital photographs.

  6. Cartilage Health in Knees Treated with Metal Resurfacing Implants or Untreated Focal Cartilage Lesions: A Preclinical Study in Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Carranza, Nicolas; Hultenby, Kjell; Lagerstedt, Anne Sofie; Schupbach, Peter; Berg, Hans E

    2017-07-01

    Background Full-depth cartilage lesions do not heal and the long-term clinical outcome is uncertain. In the symptomatic middle-aged (35-60 years) patient, treatment with metal implants has been proposed. However, the cartilage health surrounding these implants has not been thoroughly studied. Our objective was to evaluate the health of cartilage opposing and adjacent to metal resurfacing implants. Methods The medial femoral condyle was operated in 9 sheep bilaterally. A metallic resurfacing metallic implant was immediately inserted into an artificially created 7.5 mm defect while on the contralateral knee the defect was left untreated. Euthanasia was performed at 6 months. Six animals, of similar age and study duration, from a previous study were used for comparison in the evaluation of cartilage health adjacent to the implant. Cartilage damage to joint surfaces within the knee, cartilage repair of the defect, and cartilage adjacent to the implant was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Results Six animals available for evaluation of cartilage health within the knee showed a varying degree of cartilage damage with no statistical difference between defects treated with implants or left untreated ( P = 0.51; 95% CI -3.7 to 6.5). The cartilage adjacent to the implant (score 0-14; where 14 indicates no damage) remained healthy in these 6 animals showing promising results (averaged 10.5; range 9-11.5, SD 0.95). Cartilage defects did not heal in any case. Conclusion Treatment of a critical size focal lesion with a metal implant is a viable alternative treatment.

  7. Outcomes of Hip Arthroscopy in Competitive Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perets, Itay; Hartigan, David E; Chaharbakhshi, Edwin O; Ashberg, Lyall; Ortiz-Declet, Victor; Domb, Benjamin G

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the minimum 2-year postoperative clinical outcomes and the rate of return to sports in athletes who underwent capsular plication for the treatment of ligamentous laxity and/or borderline dysplasia during hip arthroscopy for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement and labral pathology. Since 2008, data were prospectively collected on patients who underwent hip arthroscopy for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement and/or labral tears. Inclusion criteria were as follows: athlete at the high school, collegiate, or professional levels preoperatively, underwent capsular plication, and preoperatively recorded patient-reported outcome scores including modified Harris hip score (mHHS), nonarthritic athletic hip score (NAHS), hip outcome score-sports-specific subscale (HOS-SSS), and visual analog scale (VAS). Exclusion criteria were as follows: 1, and previous hip conditions. Sports activity and competitive levels were collected at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. Fifty-one hips (49 patients) met the inclusion criteria, and 41 hips (39 patients) had minimum 2-year follow-up (80.4% follow-up). Mean mHHS increased from 67.1 preoperatively to 83.5 (P arthroscopies allowed the patients to return to sports at follow-up. Thirty-four (82.9%) hip arthroscopies allowed the patients to maintain their competitive physical abilities at follow-up. Patient-reported outcomes and VAS in athletes significantly improved at a minimum of 2 years after capsular plication as a part of hip arthroscopy addressing varying pathologies. In addition, most patients returned to sports at similar or higher competitive levels. These results suggest that capsular plication is a favorable treatment option in athletes with ligamentous laxity and/or borderline dysplasia. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The efficacy of autologous platelet rich plasma combined with ablative carbon dioxide fractional resurfacing for acne scars: a simultaneous split-face trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Woong; Kim, Beom Joon; Kim, Myeung Nam; Mun, Seog Kyun

    2011-07-01

    Ablative carbon dioxide (CO(2) ) fractional resurfacing is a promising therapeutic intervention for the treatment of acne scars, although this technique is associated with prolonged surgical site erythema and edema, which may affect the daily lives of patients. Autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is known to enhance wound healing and has applications in many areas of medicine. To evaluate the synergistic effects of autologous PRP with CO(2) fractional resurfacing for acne scars. A split-face trial was conducted in 14 Korean participants with acne scars. All participants received one session of ablative CO(2) fractional resurfacing. Immediately after resurfacing, facial halves were randomly assigned to receive treatment with autologous PRP injections on one side (experimental side) and normal saline injections on the other side (control side). The participants were monitored for degree of recovery and resurfacing-associated adverse events, including prolonged erythema, edema, and other effects on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 15, and 30. The intensity of erythema was objectively measured using a chromometer at the same time intervals. After one additional treatment session using the same protocol, two independent dermatologists evaluated clinical improvement using a quartile grading scale. All participants completed the study. Erythema on the experimental side improved faster than on the control side and was significantly less at day 4 (p=.01). This difference was confirmed using a chromometer (p=.049). Total duration of erythema was an average of 10.4±2.7 days on the control side and 8.6±2.0 days on the experimental side (p=.047). Edema also improved faster on the experimental side than on the control side. The total duration of edema was an average of 7.1±1.5 days on the control side and 6.1±1.1 days on the experimental side (p=.04). Participants were also assessed for duration of post-treatment crusting, with a mean of 6.8±1.0 days on the control side and 5.9±1

  9. Reconstruction of the Acetabulum in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip in Total Hip Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Sakellariou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH or congenital hip dysplasia (CDH is the most prevalent developmental childhood hip disorder. It includes a wide spectrum of hip abnormalities ranging from dysplasia to subluxation and complete dislocation of the hip joint. The natural history of neglected DDH in adults is highly variable. The mean age of onset of symptoms is 34.5 years for dysplastic DDH, 32.5 years for low dislocation, 31.2 years for high dislocation with a false acetabulum, and 46.4 years for high dislocation without a false acetabulum. Thorough understanding of the bony and soft tissue deformities induced by dysplasia is crucial for the success of total hip arthroplasty. It is important to evaluate the existing acetabular deformity three-dimensionally, and customize the correction in accordance with the quantity and location of ace tabular deficiencies. Acetabular reconstruction in patients with DDH is hallenging. Interpretation of published data is difficult and should be done with caution because most series include patients with different types of hip disease. In general, the complication rate associated with THA is higher in patients with hip dysplasia than it is in patients with osteoarthritis. Overall, clinical and functional outcomes following THA in patients hip dysplasia (DDH differ from those treated for primary hip osteoarthritis, possibly due to the lower age and level of activity. Although function scores decline with age, the scores for pain and range of motion presented with a statistically significant improvement in the long-term.

  10. Hip instability: a review of hip dysplasia and other contributing factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeutler, Matthew J.; Garabekyan, Tigran; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Hip instability has classically been associated with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in newborns and children. However, numerous factors may contribute to hip instability in children, adolescents, and adults. Purpose This review aims to concisely present the literature on hip instability in patients of all ages in order to guide health care professionals in the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of the various disorders which may contribute to an unstable hip. Methods We reviewed the literature on the diagnosis and surgical management of hip dysplasia and other causes of hip instability. Conclusions Multiple intra- and extra-articular variables may contribute to hip instability, including acetabular bony coverage, femoral torsion, femoroacetabular impingement, and soft tissue laxity. Physical examination and advanced imaging studies are essential to accurately diagnose the pathology contributing to a patient’s unstable hip. Conservative management, including activity modification and physical therapy, may be used as a first-line treatment in patients with intra-articular hip pathology. Patients who continue to experience symptoms of pain or instability should proceed with arthroscopic or open surgical treatment aimed at correcting the underlying pathology. Level of evidence V. PMID:28066739

  11. Analysis of hip perfusion at early and reversible stages of aseptic hip necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Predic, P.; Dodig, D.; Karner, I.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: A proper early diagnosis of aseptic hip necrosis is very important for further therapy.Since there has always been a question of the amount of perfusion in hips at different stages of aseptic hip necrosis we tried to impartially examine the perfusion in hips at early and reversible stages of aseptic hip necrosis. Material and Methods:Study included 143 patients with aseptic hip necrosis.The 550-740 MBq of Tc-99m-DPD were on bolus injected.All patients were subjected to 3-phase scintigraphy of hips and quantitative calculation of relative perfusion in the artery phase (3T) at early and repeated at reversible stages of aseptic hip necrosis. Results: At the early stage of aseptic hip necrosis the obtained 3T was decreased from 0.94-0.69 (3T=0.80).Scintigrams showed a moderate increase or diffuse accumulation. At the reversible stages we obtained 3T decreased from 0.92-0.71 (3T=0.79) thus evidencing hypoperfusion.Scintigrams showed an diffuse increased accumulation. Conclusion: With the aseptic hip necrosis quantitative analysis of perfusion in the artery phase-3T indicates that the perfusion is decreased at all stages of the process which however shows a significantly falling trend with the progress of the disease

  12. Assessment of the hip reduction angle for predicting osteoarthritis of the hip in the Labrador Retriever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corfield, G S; Read, R A; Eastley, K A; Richardson, J L; Robertson, I D; Day, R

    2007-06-01

    Hip palpation has been used to provide semiquantitative information regarding passive joint laxity and susceptibility to hip dysplasia. The purpose of this study was to: (1) evaluate the intra- and inter-examiner repeatability of the hip reduction angle measured at 4 months of age by three examiners using manual goniometry and an electromagnetic tracking system; (2) compare the hip reduction angle measured with manual goniometry to the hip reduction angle measured with the electromagnetic tracking system; and (3) evaluate the hip reduction angle, distraction index and Ortolani manoeuvre at 4 months of age as predictors of the development of hip osteoarthritis at 12 months of age in 11 Labrador Retriever dogs. Intra- and inter-examiner repeatability was demonstrated for both the manual and electromagnetic goniometric measurement of the hip reduction angle (coefficient of variation goniometry was moderately correlated to the hip reduction angle measured by the electromagnetic tracking system (r = 0.603, P goniometry was a poor predictor of osteoarthritis at 12 months of age (r = 0.231, P < 0.062, and r = 0.321, P < 0.01). The distraction index was moderately correlated with the development of osteoarthritis by 12 months of age (r = 0.493, P < 0.0000). The Ortolani sign was sensitive (100%) but not specific (41%) for the development of osteoarthritis at 12 months of age. The hip reduction angle did not further quantify the Ortolani manoeuvre as a predictor of osteoarthritis in Labrador Retrievers.

  13. The effects of therapeutic hip exercise with abdominal core activation on recruitment of the hip muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mandy Ky; Chow, Ka Wai; Lai, Alfred Ys; Mak, Noble Kc; Sze, Jason Ch; Tsang, Sharon Mh

    2017-07-21

    Core stabilization has been utilized for rehabilitation and prevention of lower limb musculoskeletal injuries. Previous studies showed that activation of the abdominal core muscles enhanced the hip muscle activity in hip extension and abduction exercises. However, the lack of the direct measurement and quantification of the activation level of the abdominal core muscles during the execution of the hip exercises affect the level of evidence to substantiate the proposed application of core exercises to promote training and rehabilitation outcome of the hip region. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of abdominal core activation, which is monitored directly by surface electromyography (EMG), on hip muscle activation while performing different hip exercises, and to explore whether participant characteristics such as gender, physical activity level and contractile properties of muscles, which is assessed by tensiomyography (TMG), have confounding effect to the activation of hip muscles in enhanced core condition. Surface EMG of bilateral internal obliques (IO), upper gluteus maximus (UGMax), lower gluteus maximus (LGMax), gluteus medius (GMed) and biceps femoris (BF) of dominant leg was recorded in 20 young healthy subjects while performing 3 hip exercises: Clam, side-lying hip abduction (HABD), and prone hip extension (PHE) in 2 conditions: natural core activation (NC) and enhanced core activation (CO). EMG signals normalized to percentage of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) were compared between two core conditions with the threshold of the enhanced abdominal core condition defined as >20%MVIC of IO. Enhanced abdominal core activation has significantly promoted the activation level of GMed in all phases of clam exercise (P recruitment in Clam, HABD and PHE exercises, and this enhancement is correlated with higher physical activity and stiffer hip muscle. Our results suggest the potential application of abdominal core activation for

  14. Hip joint mobility in dancers: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drężewska, Marlena; Gałuszka, Renata; Sliwiński, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of dancing on hip joint mobility and to assess the relationship between active movements of the hips and injuries among dancers, which may be important in planning rehabilitation in this group. The sample comprised 49 dancers (37 women and 12 men) aged 15 to 32 years. The participants were the professional dancers of the Kielce Dance Theatre and members of two youth jazz dance teams from the Kielce Dance Theatre. The active range of motion of the hips was measured in three planes using a goniometer in order to assess the influence of dance training on hip joint mobility. A questionnaire-based survey was also conducted. The range of flexion, extension and external rotation was significantly greater in the group of long-time dancers (p <0.05). There was a significantly greater range of flexion, abduction and external rotation in previously injured hip joints (p<0.05). 1. Injuries to hip joints in dancers may result in increased ranges of motion, which may lead to disturbances of joint stability. 2. Being a long-time dancer and the female gender were associated with an increased range of hip joint motion.

  15. Mechanical Evaluation of Polymer Composite Hip Protectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Daniel Diniz Melo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hip fractures often result in serious health implications, particularly in the geriatric population, and have been related to long-term morbidity and death. In most cases, these fractures are caused by impact loads in the area of the greater trochanter, which are produced in a fall. This work is aimed at developing hip protectors using composite materials and evaluating their effectiveness in preventing hip fractures under high impact energy (120 J. The hip protectors were developed with an inner layer of energy absorbing soft material and an outer rigid shell of fiberglass-reinforced polymer composite. According to the experimental results, all tested configurations proved to be effective at reducing the impact load to below the average fracture threshold of proximal femur. Furthermore, an addition of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA to the impacted area of the composite shell proved to be beneficial to increase impact strength of the hip protectors. Thus, composite hip protectors proved to be a viable alternative for a mechanically efficient and cost-effective solution to prevent hip fractures.

  16. Instability after total hip arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C; Brown, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    Instability following total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an unfortunately frequent and serious problem that requires thorough evaluation and preoperative planning before surgical intervention. Prevention through optimal index surgery is of great importance, as the management of an unstable THA is challenging even for an experienced joints surgeon. However, even after well-planned surgery, a significant incidence of recurrent instability still exists. Non-operative management is often successful if the components are well-fixed and correctly positioned in the absence of neurocognitive disorders. If conservative management fails, surgical options include revision of malpositioned components; exchange of modular components such as the femoral head and acetabular liner; bipolar arthroplasty; tripolar arthroplasty; use of a larger femoral head; use of a constrained liner; soft tissue reinforcement and advancement of the greater trochanter. PMID:22919568

  17. Pain in the hip joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Aleksandrovich Olyunin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathological changes that develop in the hip joints (HJ have different origins and mechanisms of development, but their main manifestation is pain. The nature of this pain cannot be well established on frequent occasions. The English-language medical literature currently classifies such disorders as greater trochanter pain syndrome (GTPS. Its major signs are chronic pain and local palpatory tenderness in the outer part of HJ. The development of GTPS may be associated with inflammation of the synovial bursae situated in the greater tronchanter, as well as with tendinitis, myorrhexis, iliotibial band syndrome, and other local changes in the adjacent tissues or with systemic diseases. So GTPS may be characterized as regional pain syndrome that frequently mimics pain induced by different diseases, including myofascial pain syndrome, osteoarthrosis, spinal diseases, etc.

  18. Risk factors for osteoarthritis of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Karmela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Osteoarthritis of the hip is a degenerative disease of hip unknown origin, with pain, stiffness and diminished joint function. AIM: determine the influence of the load of the hip joint during professional activity and BMI as risk factors for the hip osteoarthritis. MATERIAL AND METHOD: We analysed 148 patients. Patients were divided into two groups ( I group with osteoarthritis of the hip, II group without osteoarthritis of the hip. In all, performed diagnostic procedure: anamnesis, physical examination (estimate of walking and hip joint movement, laboratory blood test and urine test radiological examination and taking data on the height and weight to calculated BMI. We assessed the data that is related to the load of the hip joint during professional activities (mostly sitting work and mostly standing job with carrying load. Statistical analysis was done using the software package SPSS 14.0, Microsoft Office Word 2003. RESULTS: In the first group, average age was 67.76 years, with females prevailing (67.6%. In this group the larger body mass was noted (81.82 ± 12.18, with statistically significant difference (T-test 2.923, p<0.01; the average BMI was higher the average BMI was higher (30.18 ± 4.6, with statistically significant difference (T-test 3.832, p<0.01. This group had more overweight patients (87.7%,with statistically significant difference (Fisher test, p<0.01. In I group 62,2% of patients were doing hard physical work (standing job with repeated carrying load and we found statistically significant difference between groups (Fisher test p<0,01. CONCLUSION: Patients with osteoarthritis of the hip had a higher body weight, higher BMI. Also we found the influence of hard physical labor at work, and they were performed mostly standing job with carrying load.

  19. Romani Music - Roma and the Hip-hop Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Dočkal, Tomáš

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is focused on Romani music and its importance for the Romani culture. It examines the popularity of hip-hop among the young Romani generation and Romani hip- hip production. It attempts to define the role of hip-hop culture in young Romanies' lives.

  20. Routine functional assessment for hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tonny J; Lauritsen, Jens M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Pre-fracture functional level has been shown to be a consistent predictor of rehabilitation outcomes in older hip fracture patients. We validated 4 overall pre-fracture functional level assessment instruments in patients aged 65 or more, used the prediction of outcome at 4...... months post-fracture, and assessed cutoff values for decision making in treatment and rehabilitation. Patients and methods - 165 consecutive patients with acute primary hip fracture were prospectively included in the study. Pre-fracture Barthel-20, Barthel-100, cumulated ambulation score, and new...... investigation of usage for guidance of clinical and rehabilitation decisions concerning hip fracture patients is warranted....

  1. The hip abductors at MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, A., E-mail: adrienne.hoffmann@balgrist.ch [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Balgrist, Forchstrasse 340, CH-8008 Zürich (Switzerland); Pfirrmann, C.W.A., E-mail: christian.pfirrmann@balgrist.ch [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Balgrist, Forchstrasse 340, CH-8008 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    Imaging of the hip abductors plays an increasing role for the evaluation of greater trochanteric pain in patients with and without total hip arthroplasty. This review article addresses the anatomy of the hip abductors and their intervening bursae. It highlights different possible imaging appearances such as tendinopathy or partial and full thickness tears of the gluteal tendons. Muscle atrophy or fatty degeneration of the gluteal muscles is an important reason for limping. Inflammatory diseases such as hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease or spondylarthritis have to be considered. Knowledge of these different entities is important to achieve optimal treatment and outcomes.

  2. Hip adduction and abduction strength profiles in elite soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Serner, Andreas; Petersen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    An ipsilateral hip adduction/abduction strength ratio of more than 90%, and hip adduction strength equal to that of the contralateral side have been suggested to clinically represent adequate strength recovery of hip adduction strength in athletes after groin injury. However, to what extent side-......-to-side symmetry in isometric hip adduction and abduction strength can be assumed in soccer players remains uncertain.......An ipsilateral hip adduction/abduction strength ratio of more than 90%, and hip adduction strength equal to that of the contralateral side have been suggested to clinically represent adequate strength recovery of hip adduction strength in athletes after groin injury. However, to what extent side...

  3. The prevalence of predisposing deformity in osteoarthritic hip joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Jakob; Gosvig, Kasper; Jacobsen, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    relationship in both sexes with the clinical presentation. The study cohort which fulfilled these inclusion criteria consisted of 322 females (149 right hips and 173 left hips) and 162 males (77 right hips and 85 left hips) with osteoarthritis. We found an overall prevalence of predisposing hip deformities...... in females of 62.4% and in males of 78.9%. Minor and major deformities showed the same prevalence. Both sexes had a comparable prevalence of minor and major hip joint deformity, except for pistol grip deformity, which was more prevalent in men. We concluded that 'idiopathic osteoarthritis' is uncommon......, and that even minor predisposing deformities are associated with hip osteoarthritis....

  4. In vivo effect of carbon dioxide laser-skin resurfacing and mechanical abrasion on the skin's microbial flora in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolis, Evangelos N; Tsakris, Athanassios; Kaklamanos, Ioannis; Markogiannakis, Antonios; Siomos, Konstadinos

    2006-03-01

    Although beam-scanning carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers have provided a highly efficient tool for esthetic skin rejuvenation there has been no comprehensive animal studies looking into microbial skin changes following CO2 laser skin resurfacing. To evaluate the in vivo effects of CO2 laser skin resurfacing in an experimental rat model in comparison with mechanical abrasion on the skin microbial flora. Four separate cutaneous sections of the right dorsal surface of 10 Wistar rats were treated with a CO2 laser, operating at 18 W and delivering a radiant energy of 5.76 J/cm2, while mechanical abrasions of the skin were created on four sections of the left dorsal surface using a scalpel. Samples for culture and biopsies were obtained from the skin surfaces of the rats on day 1 of application of the CO2 laser or mechanical abrasion, as well as 10, 30, and 90 days after the procedure. The presence of four microorganisms (staphylococci, streptococci, diphtheroids, and yeasts) was evaluated as a microbe index for the skin flora, and colony counts were obtained using standard microbiological methods. Skin biopsy specimens, following CO2 laser treatment, initially showed epidermal and papillary dermal necrosis and later a re-epithelization of the epidermis as well as the generation of new collagen on the upper papillary dermis. The reduction in microbial counts on day 1 of the CO2 laser-inflicted wound was statistically significant for staphylococci and diphtheroids compared with the baseline counts (p=.004 and pSkin resurfacing using CO2 lasers considerably reduces microbial counts of most microorganisms in comparison with either normal skin flora or a scalpel-inflicted wound. This might contribute to the positive clinical outcome of laser skin resurfacing.

  5. Large-Scale Skin Resurfacing of the Upper Extremity in Pediatric Patients Using a Pre-Expanded Intercostal Artery Perforator Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiao; Herrler, Tanja; Gu, Bin; Yang, Mei; Li, Qingfeng; Dai, Chuanchang; Xie, Feng

    2018-05-01

    The repair of extensive upper limb skin lesions in pediatric patients is extremely challenging due to substantial limitations of flap size and donor-site morbidity. We aimed to create an oversize preexpanded flap based on intercostal artery perforators for large-scale resurfacing of the upper extremity in children. Between March 2013 and August 2016, 11 patients underwent reconstructive treatment for extensive skin lesions in the upper extremity using a preexpanded intercostal artery perforator flap. Preoperatively, 2 to 4 candidate perforators were selected as potential pedicle vessels based on duplex ultrasound examination. After tissue expander implantation in the thoracodorsal area, regular saline injections were performed until the expanded flap was sufficient in size. Then, a pedicled flap was formed to resurface the skin lesion of the upper limb. The pedicles were transected 3 weeks after flap transfer. Flap survival, complications, and long-term outcome were evaluated. The average time of tissue expansion was 133 days with a mean final volume of 1713 mL. The thoracoabdominal flaps were based on 2 to 6 pedicles and used to resurface a mean skin defect area of 238 cm ranging from 180 to 357 cm. In all cases, primary donor-site closure was achieved. Marginal necrosis was seen in 5 cases. The reconstructed limbs showed satisfactory outcome in both aesthetic and functional aspects. The preexpanded intercostal artery perforator flap enables 1-block repair of extensive upper limb skin lesions. Due to limited donor-site morbidity and a pedicled technique, this resurfacing approach represents a useful tool especially in pediatric patients.

  6. Self-management behaviour and support among primary care COPD patients: cross-sectional analysis of data from the Birmingham Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ainee; Dickens, Andrew P; Adab, Peymane; Jordan, Rachel E

    2017-07-20

    Self-management support for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is recommended by UK national guidelines, but extent of implementation is unknown. We aimed to describe self-management behaviour and support among COPD patients and explore behaviour associated with having a self-management plan. We undertook cross-sectional analysis of self-reported data from diagnosed COPD patients in the Birmingham COPD Cohort study. Questionnaire items relevant to self-management behaviour, knowledge of COPD, receipt of self-management plans and advice from healthcare professionals were examined. Multiple regression models were used to identify behaviour associated with having a self-management plan. One-thousand seventy-eight participants (676 males, 62.7%, mean age 69.8 (standard deviation 9.0) years) were included. The majority reported taking medications as instructed (940, 94.0%) and receiving annual influenza vaccinations (962, 89.2%). Only 400 (40.4%) participants had self-management plans, 538 (49.9%) reported never having received advice on diet/exercise and 110 (42.7%) current smokers had been offered practical help to stop smoking in the previous year. General knowledge about COPD was moderate (mean total Bristol COPD Knowledge Questionnaire score: 31.5 (standard deviation 10.7); max score 65), corresponding to 48.5% of questions answered correctly. Having a self-management plan was positively associated with self-reported adherence to medication (odds ratio 3.10, 95% confidence interval 1.43 to 6.72), attendance at a training course (odds ratio 2.72, 95% confidence interval 1.81 to 4.12), attendance at a support group (odds ratio 6.28, 95% confidence interval 2.96 to 13.35) and better disease knowledge (mean difference 4.87, 95% confidence interval 3.16 to 6.58). Primary care healthcare professionals should ensure more widespread implementation of individualised self-management plans for all patients and improve the lifestyle advice provided. CALL FOR

  7. Comparison between the Harris- and Oxford Hip Score to evaluate outcomes one-year after total hip arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, Hanneke; Lindeboom, Robert; Kuipers, Sander E.; Vervest, Ton M. J. S.

    2017-01-01

    Harris Hip Score (HHS) is a surgeon administered measurement for assessing hip function before and after total hip arthroplasties (THA). Patient reported outcome measurements (PROMs) such as the Oxford Hip Score (OHS) are increasingly used. HHS was compaired to the OHS assessing whether the HHS can

  8. Randomized, Split-Face/Décolleté Comparative Trial of Procedure Enhancement System for Fractional non-Ablative Laser Resurfacing Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Deanne Mraz; Frulla, Ashton P

    2017-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: A topical proprietary procedural enhancement system (PES) containing a combination of active ingredients including a tripeptide and hexapeptide (TriHex Technology™, Alastin Procedure Enhancement Invasive System, ALASTIN Skincare™, Inc., Carlsbad, CA) has been used successfully to aid in healing and improve symptomatology following resurfacing procedures. METHODS: PES (Gentle Cleanser, Regenerating Skin Nectar with TriHex Technology™, Ultra Nourishing Moisturizer with TriHex Technology™, Soothe + Protect Recovery Balm, Broad Spectrum 30+ Sunscreen) was compared to a basic regimen (Aquaphor™, Cerave™ cleanser, Vanicream™, Alastin Broad Spectrum 30+ Sunscreen) in a split face/ décolleté trial following fractional non-ablative thulium-doped resurfacing treatment to the face or décolleté. The skin was pre-conditioned and treated during and after the procedure using the two regimens. RESULTS: A blinded investigator rated the PES statistically superior to the basic regimen on healing post-laser treatment on day 4 based on lentigines, texture, and Global Skin Quality. Subjects also reported 'better looking and feeling' skin on the PES side. CONCLUSION: PES appears to improve healing post-non ablative thulium-doped resurfacing treatment to the face/décolleté in comparison with standard of care. J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(7):707-710..

  9. Combination of microneedle radiofrequency (RF), fractional RF skin resurfacing and multi-source non-ablative skin tightening for minimal-downtime, full-face skin rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Haim; Kaplan, Lilach

    2016-12-01

    In the recent years, there is a growth in demand for radiofrequency (RF)-based procedures to improve skin texture, laxity and contour. The new generation of systems allow non-invasive and fractional resurfacing treatments on one platform. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a new treatment protocol using a multisource RF, combining 3 different modalities in each patient: [1] non-ablative RF skin tightening, [2] fractional skin resurfacing, and [3] microneedling RF for non-ablative coagulation and collagen remodelling. 14 subjects were enrolled in this study using EndyMed PRO ™ platform. Each patient had 8 non-ablative treatments and 4 fractional treatments (fractional skin resurfacing and Intensif). The global aesthetic score was used to evaluate improvement. All patients had improvement in skin appearance. About 43% had excellent or very good improvement above 50%, 18% had good improvement between 25 and 50%, and the rest 39% had a mild improvement of skin texture, skin laxity and wrinkle reduction achieved using RF treatment platform.

  10. The legacy of chlorinated solvents in the Birmingham aquifer, UK: observations spanning three decades and the challenge of future urban groundwater development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivett, Michael O; Turner, Ryan J; Glibbery Née Murcott, Penny; Cuthbert, Mark O

    2012-10-01

    Licensed abstraction well data collected during 1986-2008 from a total of 77 wells mainly located at industrial sites combined with historic land use data from 1975 has allowed insight into the legacy of chlorinated solvent contamination in the Birmingham aquifer that underlies the UK's second largest city. This legacy, expected to be reasonably symptomatic of those occurring in other urban aquifers, was characterised by: dominance of parent solvents, particularly TCE (trichloroethene) that widely exceeded drinking-water quality criteria; greater TCE occurrence in wells in proximity to increased historic land use by the metal/engineering solvent-user industry (the relationship providing a first-pass indicator of future resource development potential); regional groundwater vulnerability controls; well abstraction changes (over months to decades) influential of observed concentration transients and anticipated plume capture or release; persistence of contamination over decades (with less soluble PCE (perchloroethene) showing increased persistence relative to TCE) that was reasonably ascribed to slow contaminant release from DNAPL (dense non-aqueous phase liquid) sources and, or low permeability layers; presence of dechlorination products arising from solvent (bio)degradation, although this key attenuation process appeared to have moderate to weak influence regionally on plumes; and, inadvertent, but significant solvent mass removal from the aquifer by industrial abstractions. Key challenges to realising future urban groundwater development were identified based on the observed legacy and well capture zone simulations. Despite the extensive contamination of the aquifer, it should still be possible to develop wells of high (several megalitres per day) capacity for drinking water supply (or other lower grade uses) without the requirement for solvent treatment. In those areas with higher risk of contamination, our dataset, together with application of emergent risk

  11. Low revision rate after total hip arthroplasty in patients with pediatric hip diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engesæter, Lars B; Engesæter, Ingvild Ø; Fenstad, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Background The results of primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs) after pediatric hip diseases such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), or Perthes' disease have been reported to be inferior to the results after primary osteoarthritis of the hip (OA.......9%) were operated due to pediatric hip diseases (3.1% for Denmark, 8.8% for Norway, and 1.9% for Sweden) and 288,435 THAs (77.8%) were operated due to OA. Unadjusted 10-year Kaplan-Meier survival of THAs after pediatric hip diseases (94.7% survival) was inferior to that after OA (96.6% survival......). Consequently, an increased risk of revision for hips with a previous pediatric hip disease was seen (risk ratio (RR) 1.4, 95% CI: 1.3-1.5). However, after adjustment for differences in sex and age of the patients, and in fixation of the prostheses, no difference in survival was found (93.6% after pediatric hip...

  12. [Revision hip arthroplasty by Waldemar Link custom-made total hip prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medenica, Ivica; Luković, Milan; Radoicić, Dragan

    2010-02-01

    The number of patients undergoing hip arthroplasty revision is constantly growing. Especially, complex problem is extensive loss of bone stock and pelvic discontinuity that requires reconstruction. The paper presented a 50-year old patient, who ten years ago underwent a total cement artrhroplasty of the left hip. A year after the primary operation the patient had difficulties in walking without crutches. Problems intensified in the last five years, the patient had severe pain, totally limited movement in the left hip and could not walk at all. Radiographically, we found loose femoral component, massive loss of bone stock of proximal femur, acetabular protrusion and a consequent pelvic discontinuity. Clinically, a completely disfunctional left hip joint was registered (Harris hip score--7.1). We performed total rearthroplasty by a custom-made Waldemar Link total hip prosthesis with acetabular antiprotrusio cage and compensation of bone defects with a graft from the bone bank. A year after the operation, we found clinically an extreme improvement in Harris hip score--87.8. Radiographically, we found stability of implanted components, a complete graft integration and bone bridging across the site of pelvic discontinuity. Pelvic discontinuity and massive loss of proximal femoral bone stock is a challenging and complex entity. Conventional prostheses cannot provide an adequate fixation and stability of the hip. Application of custom-made prosthesis (measured specificaly for a patient) and additional alografting bone defects is a good method in revision surgery after unsuccessful hip arthroplasty with extensive bone defects.

  13. Revision hip arthroplasty by Waldemar Link custom-made total hip prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medenica Ivica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The number of patients undergoing hip arthroplasty revision is constantly growing. Especially, complex problem is extensive loss of bone stock and pelvic discontinuity that requires reconstruction. Case report. The paper presented a 50-year old patient, who ten years ago underwent a total cement artrhroplasty of the left hip. A year after the primary operation the patient had difficulties in walking without crutches. Problems intensified in the last five years, the patient had severe pain, totally limited movement in the left hip and could not walk at all. Radiographically, we found loose femoral component, massive loss of bone stock of proximal femur, acetabular protrusion and a consequent pelvic discontinuity. Clinically, a completely disfunctional left hip joint was registered (Harris hip score - 7.1. We performed total rearthroplasty by a custom- made Waldemar Link total hip prosthesis with acetabular antiprotrusio cage and compensation of bone defects with a graft from the bone bank. A year after the operation, we found clinically an extreme improvement in Harris hip score - 87.8. Radiographically, we found stability of implanted components, a complete graft integration and bone bridging across the site of pelvic discontinuity. Conclusion. Pelvic discontinuity and massive loss of proximal femoral bone stock is a challenging and complex entity. Conventional prostheses cannot provide an adequate fixation and stability of the hip. Application of custom-made prosthesis (measured specifically for a patient and additional alografting bone defects is a good method in revision surgery after unsuccessful hip arthroplasty with extensive bone defects.

  14. MR imaging of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: MRI has been shown to gain increasing importance in recent years in the evaluation of disorders of the hip and pelvis. Nowadays, conventional or fast spin echo (T1, Turbo (Fast) T2 (or PD)) MR imaging sequences are used most commonly to examine the hip and pelvis. Three dimensional (3D) gradient echo (GE) imaging allows acquisition of very thin (1 mm) sections. MR imaging with fat suppression technique (STIR, TIRM, FAT SAT T2) represent an effective screening technique for the assessment of fluid, hemorrhage, pus, or tumor in the marrow, joint or soft tissues. These techniques increase the sensitivity for the detection of a variety of pathologic processes. Fat suppression MR imaging, when combined with intravenous (or intraarticular) administration of a gadolinium compound, also is effective and often is employed when evaluating neoplastic or infectious diseases (intravenous injection), abnormalities of articular cartilage or labrum, or possible intraarticular osteocartilaginous bodies (intraarticular injection). A lesion of the acetabular labrum based is one cause of chronic hip pain in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hips, as well as in patients with a history of hip trauma or femoroacetabular impingement. MR imaging and, in particular, MR arthrography, however, have been shown to be highly accurate in the detection of subtle intraarticular abnormalities such as labral lesion. Conventional MR imaging has shown poor accuracy in detecting labral lesions, due to its inability to depict small tears and the difficulty in determining if intralabral signal abnormalities extend to the surface of the labrum. MR arthrography, however has been shown to overcome these difficulties and to have excellent accuracy in detecting labral pathology. As labral abnormalities are believed to be a precursor of osteoarthritis, orthopedic surgeons believe that surgical intervention will be influenced substantially by the type, extension and location of labral

  15. Atraumatic Anterior Dislocation of the Hip Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiko Ohtsuru

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dislocation of the hip joint in adults is usually caused by high-energy trauma such as road traffic accidents or falls from heights. Posterior dislocation is observed in most cases. However, atraumatic anterior dislocation of the hip joint is extremely rare. We present a case of atraumatic anterior dislocation of the hip joint that was induced by an activity of daily living. The possible causes of this dislocation were anterior capsule insufficiency due to developmental dysplasia of the hip, posterior pelvic tilt following thoracolumbar kyphosis due to vertebral fracture, and acetabular anterior coverage changes by postural factor. Acetabular anterior coverage changes in the sagittal plane were measured using a tomosynthesis imaging system. This system was useful for elucidation of the dislocation mechanism in the present case.

  16. A new algorithm for hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Krasheninnikoff, Michael; Holck, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Treatment of hip fracture patients is controversial. We implemented a new operative and supervision algorithm (the Hvidovre algorithm) for surgical treatment of all hip fractures, primarily based on own previously published results. Methods 2,000 consecutive patients over 50...... years of age who were admitted and operated on because of a hip fracture were prospectively included. 1,000 of these patients were included after implementation of the algorithm. Demographic parameters, hospital treatment, and reoperations within the first postoperative year were assessed from patient...... by reoperations was reduced from 24% of total hospitalization before the algorithm was introduced to 18% after it was introduced. Interpretation It is possible to implement an algorithm for treatment of all hip fracture patients in a large teaching hospital. In our case, the Hvidovre algorithm both raised...

  17. Traction-related problems after hip arthroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Lone; Lund, Bent; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    . The questionnaire included questions on patients' perceptions of traction-related problems in the groin area, at the knee and ankle and how patients had coped with these problems. A total of 100 consecutive patients undergoing hip arthroscopy filled out the questionnaire. Primary findings of this study were that 74......% of patients reported some sort of traction-related problems after hip arthroscopy. About 32% of the patients had problems in the groin area and 49% of the patients complained of symptoms in the knee joint. A total of 37% of the patients had experienced problems from the traction boot in the ankle area....... The complications were found to be temporary and disappeared after 2-4 weeks. Five patients still had complaints after 3 months. All five patients had a pre-existing knee injury prior to undergoing hip arthroscopy. Traction-related problems after hip arthroscopy are a challenge and our study showed that 74...

  18. Robotic hip arthroscopy in human anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kather, Jens; Hagen, Monika E; Morel, Philippe; Fasel, Jean; Markar, Sheraz; Schueler, Michael

    2010-09-01

    Robotic technology offers technical advantages that might offer new solutions for hip arthroscopy. Two hip arthroscopies were performed in human cadavers using the da Vinci surgical system. During both surgeries, a robotic camera and 5 or 8 mm da Vinci trocars with instruments were inserted into the hip joint for manipulation. Introduction of cameras and working instruments, docking of the robotic system and instrument manipulation was successful in both cases. The long articulating area of 5 mm instruments limited movements inside the joint; an 8 mm instrument with a shorter area of articulation offered an improved range of motion. Hip arthroscopy using the da Vinci standard system appears a feasible alternative to standard arthroscopy. Instruments and method of application must be modified and improved before routine clinical application but further research in this area seems justified, considering the clinical value of such an approach. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Hip-hop, Onegin - pop! / Tatjana Aleksandrova

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aleksandrova, Tatjana, 1945-

    2004-01-01

    Erateatrikooli KS, mida juhib Svetlana Krassman, lavastus A. Pushkini poeemi "Jevgeni Onegin" motiividel. Noortelavastuse muusikalises seades kasutatakse klassikalise muusika aranzheeringuid ja räppi, kostüümidraamat koos hip-hop rõivastiiliga

  20. Scintigraphic presentation of hip joint synovial chondromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwas, S T; Friedman, B; Nerubay, J

    1988-09-01

    A case of hip joint synovial chondromatosis with an unusual scintigraphic pattern is described. This pattern was suggestive of a hip joint destructive reactive articular process or late manifestations of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Concurrent radiographs were normal, as were laboratory investigations. Follow-up radiographs six months later showed radiolucencies and erosive bone changes in the diseased joint. Surgical and histopathological findings revealed well developed hip synovial chondromatosis (HSC) with thickened synovium and large, loose, cartilaginous bodies occupying and widening the tightened joint space, with destructive secondary juxta articular pressure and bone erosions. This and other scintigraphic patterns in HSC, and the differential diagnosis of the findings in patients with painful hip presentations are discussed.

  1. Epidemiology of hip fracture: Worldwide geographic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh K Dhanwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a major health problem, especially in elderly populations, and is associated with fragility fractures at the hip, spine, and wrist. Hip fracture contributes to both morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The demographics of world populations are set to change, with more elderly living in developing countries, and it has been estimated that by 2050 half of hip fractures will occur in Asia. This review conducted using the PubMed database describes the incidence of hip fracture in different regions of the world and discusses the possible causes of this wide geographic variation. The analysis of data from different studies show a wide geographic variation across the world, with higher hip fracture incidence reported from industrialized countries as compared to developing countries. The highest hip fracture rates are seen in North Europe and the US and lowest in Latin America and Africa. Asian countries such as Kuwait, Iran, China, and Hong Kong show intermediate hip fracture rates. There is also a north-south gradient seen in European studies, and more fractures are seen in the north of the US than in the south. The factors responsible of this variation are population demographics (with more elderly living in countries with higher incidence rates and the influence of ethnicity, latitude, and environmental factors. The understanding of this changing geographic variation will help policy makers to develop strategies to reduce the burden of hip fractures in developing countries such as India, which will face the brunt of this problem over the coming decades.

  2. 14th September 2010 - UK Birmingham University Vice Chancellor D. Eastwood signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers (CERN-HI-1009225 13-22)

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    (CERN-HI-1009225 02-12): visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Beams Department Head P. Collier; (CERN-HI-1009225 27-34): visiting the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti and Deputy D. Charlton, University of Birmingham. D.Eastwood is accompnied by Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Head of College (Engineering and Physical Sciences) N. Weatherill and Head of School, School of Physics & Astronomy A.Schofield.

  3. The Timing of Hip Arthroscopy After Intra-articular Hip Injection Affects Postoperative Infection Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dean; Camp, Christopher L; Ranawat, Anil S; Coleman, Struan H; Kelly, Bryan T; Werner, Brian C

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the association of preoperative intra-articular hip injection with surgical site infection after hip arthroscopy. A large administrative database was used to identify all patients undergoing hip arthroscopy from 2007 to 2015 within a single private insurer and from 2005 to 2012 within Medicare in the United States. Those that received an ipsilateral preoperative intra-articular hip injection were identified. The patients were then divided into the following groups based on the interval between preoperative injection and ipsilateral hip arthroscopy: (1) 12 months) of preoperative hip injection. Patients developing a surgical site infection within 6 months following hip arthroscopy were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, and Current Procedural Terminology codes associated with infection. Groups were compared using a multivariate logistic regression analysis to control for age, gender, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol usage, and multiple medical comorbidities including diabetes mellitus, hemodialysis use, inflammatory arthritis, and peripheral vascular disease. In total, 19% of privately insured and 6% of Medicare patients received a hip injection within 12 months of hip arthroscopy. The overall infection rate in privately insured and Medicare patients was 1.19% and 1.10%, respectively. Preoperative hip injection within 3 months of surgery was associated with a significantly higher risk of postoperative infection versus controls (2.16%, odds ratio [OR] 6.1, P arthroscopy increased when preoperative intra-articular hip injections were given within 3 months of surgery. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of in-person and telephone administration of the Mini-Mental State Examination in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Study of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Richard E; Williams, Courtney P; Sawyer, Patricia; Allman, Richard M; Crowe, Michael

    2014-10-01

    To validate the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) Telephone (MMSET) against the MMSE. Cross-sectional. Homes of community-dwelling older adults. African-American and non-Hispanic white adults aged 75 and older participating in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Study of Aging II, a longitudinal epidemiological study across the state of Alabama (N = 419). Cognition, measured using the MMSE, MMSET, and Six-Item Screener (SIS), and function, based on self-reported difficulty performing instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). Correlation and agreement coefficients were used to examine concordance of the MMSE and MMSET; linear and logistic regressions were used to test associations with clinical outcomes of IADL difficulty and verified diagnoses of dementia. The MMSET showed good internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.845), similar to the full MMSE, and strong correlation with the latter (Spearman ρ = 0.694, P < .001). The MMSET explained a similar proportion of IADL difficulty as the full MMSE (coefficient of variation = 0.201 and 0.189, respectively). The MMSET was also associated with verified dementia diagnoses (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.73), which was similar to the full MMSE. The MMSET is a brief, valid measure of cognition in older adults with psychometric properties similar to that of the full MMSE. Because it can be administered over the telephone, further use in epidemiological studies is promising. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Pressure sores and hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, S; Heinert, G; Parker, M J

    2008-02-01

    Development of pressure sores during hospital admission causes morbidity and distress to the patient, increases strain on nursing resources, delaying discharge and possibly increasing mortality. A hip fracture in elderly patients is a known high-risk factor for development of pressure sores. We aimed to determine the current incidence of pressure sores and identify those factors which were associated with an increased risk of pressure sores. We retrospectively analysed prospectively collected data of 4654 consecutive patients admitted to a single unit. One hundred and seventy-eight (3.8%) of our patients developed pressure sores. Patient factors that increased the risk of pressure sores were increased age, diabetes mellitus, a lower mental test score, a lower mobility score, a higher ASA score, lower admission haemoglobin and an intra-operative drop in blood pressure. The risk was higher in patients with an extracapsular neck of femur fracture and patients with an increased time interval between admission to hospital and surgery. Our studies indicate that while co-morbidities constitute a substantial risk in an elderly population, the increase in incidence of pressure sores can be reduced by minimising delays to surgery.

  6. Hip arthroplasty today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstutz, H C

    1987-12-01

    Acrylic-fixed total hip and surface replacement arthroplasty have been very effective in affording immediate relief of pain and providing improved function. Complications have been reduced by improvements in design, materials, and especially technique. They are now very low in the elderly, and the stem type acrylic-fixed design remains the procedure of choice. The failure rates in youthful patients and those with bone-stock deficiencies have been high in both THR and surface types, although the latter had the advantage of preserving femoral stock. On the femoral side, the new "macro" femoral designs from Europe and "micro" femoral porous designs have shown promise, but thigh pain, incomplete and difficult to predict bone ingrowth patterns, coupled with removal problems have influenced design and technique changes. Both press-fit stem types and porous surface replacements have produced promising initial results with less potential downside risks. On the acetabular side, both the cementless hemispherical with screw-type adjuvant fixation, or the chamfered cylinder designs, used primarily with the UCLA porous surface replacements, but also with stem-type devices, appear to achieve best short-term results, while the entire variety of screw rings are disappointing. The future will bring further refinements in technique and specific indications for certain types of replacement stem in specific types of bone stock deficiencies. The all ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-polyethylene bearings show promise of reducing wear and, hence, should improve longevity of implant fixation.

  7. HIP HOP for HIV Awareness: Using Hip Hop Culture to Promote Community-Level HIV Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Mandy J.; Hallmark, Camden J.; McNeese, Marlene; Blue, Nike; Ross, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to determine the effectiveness of the HIP HOP for HIV Awareness intervention, an innovative model utilising an exchange of an HIV test for a hip hop concert ticket, in a metropolitan city among African American youth and young adults. A subset of intervention participants participated in standardised testing, sex…

  8. Modular femoral component for conversion of previous hip surgery in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Wayne M; Branson, Jill J

    2005-09-01

    The conversion of previous hip surgery to total hip arthroplasty creates a durable construct that is anatomically accurate. Most femoral components with either cemented or cementless design have a fixed tapered proximal shape. The proximal femoral anatomy is changed due to previous hip surgery for fixation of an intertrochanteric hip fracture, proximal femoral osteotomy, or a fibular allograft for avascular necrosis. The modular S-ROM (DePuy Orthopaedics Inc., Warsaw, Ind) hip stem accommodates these issues and independently prepares the proximal and distal portion of the femur. In preparation and implantation, the S-ROM hip stem creates less hoop stresses on potentially fragile stress risers from screws and thin bone. The S-ROM hip stem also prepares a previously distorted anatomy by milling through cortical bone that can occlude the femoral medullar canals and recreate proper femoral anteversion and reduces the risk of intraoperative or postoperative periprosthetic fracture due to the flexible titanium-slotted stem. The S-ROM femoral stem is recommended for challenging total hip reconstructions.

  9. Don't forget the hip! Hip arthritis masquerading as knee pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian F. Dibra, MD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hip osteoarthritis typically manifests with groin or thigh pain. Other atypical pain patterns, including knee pain, have been described. Except for 2 case reports, there is no literature on this subject. Methods: From our institutional database, between 2011 and 2016, we identified 21 patients who were referred for treatment of knee pain but ultimately diagnosed with hip pathology as the cause of their pain. This group was evaluated for duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis, previous interventions, presence of walking aids, and symptom resolution after treatment of the hip pathology. Results: Fifteen of the 21 patients were referred from musculoskeletal providers (12 from orthopaedic surgeons. Prior to diagnosis of the hip etiology, 16 patients were reduced to major assistive devices including wheelchairs. Twelve of 21 patients had undergone surgical knee interventions, including total knee arthroplasty, with minimal to no relief of their pain. Seventeen of 21 referred patients underwent total hip arthroplasty at our institution. Fourteen patients had complete resolution of knee pain after total hip arthroplasty. Conclusions: Although knee pain referred from hip disease may be considered a basic and common knowledge, it continues to be an overlooked phenomenon. Most of the cases were misdiagnosed by musculoskeletal providers including orthopaedic surgeons and this highlights the need for continued education and awareness of this clinical scenario. Keywords: Hip pain, Knee pain, Referred pain, Delay in diagnosis, Unnecessary surgery

  10. Hip and ankle range of motion and hip muscle strength in young female ballet dancersand controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, K.; Khan, K. M.; Matthews, B.; De Gruyter, M.; Cook, E.; Holzer, K.; Wark, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the hip and ankle range of motion and hip muscle strength in 8-11 year old novice female ballet dancers and controls. METHODS: Subjects were 77 dancers and 49 controls (mean (SD) age 9.6 (0.8) and 9.6 (0.7) years respectively). Supine right active hip external rotation (ER) and internal rotation (IR) were measured using an inclinometer. A turnout protractor was used to assess standing active turnout range. The measure of ER achieved from below the hip during turnout (non-hip ER) was calculated by subtracting hip ER range from turnout range, and hip ER:IR was derived by dividing ER range by IR range. Range of right weight bearing ankle dorsiflexion was measured in a standing lunge using two methods: the distance from the foot to the wall (in centimetres) and the angle of the shank to the vertical via an inclinometer (in degrees). Right calf muscle range was measured in weight bearing using an inclinometer. A manual muscle tester was used to assess right isometric hip flexor, internal rotator, external rotator, abductor, and adductor strength. RESULTS: Dancers had less ER (pballetic training. 


 PMID:10522638

  11. Reliability and Validity of the Hip Stability Isometric Test (HipSIT): A New Method to Assess Hip Posterolateral Muscle Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; das Neves Rodrigues, Helena Larissa; de Freitas, Bruno Wesley; de Paula Lima, Pedro Olavo

    2017-12-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Background The Hip Stability Isometric Test (HipSIT) evaluates the strength of the hip posterolateral stabilizers in a position that favors greater activation of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius and lower activation of the tensor fascia lata. Objectives To check the validity and reliability of the HipSIT and to evaluate the HipSIT in women with patellofemoral pain (PFP). Methods The HipSIT was evaluated with a handheld dynamometer. During testing, the participants were sidelying, with their legs positioned at 45° of hip flexion and 90° of knee flexion. Participants were instructed to raise the knee of the upper leg while keeping the upper and lower heels in contact. To establish reliability and validity, 49 women were tested with the HipSIT by 2 different evaluators on day 1, and then again 7 days later. The strength of the hip extensors, abductors, and external rotators was also evaluated. Twenty women with unilateral PFP were also evaluated. Results The HipSIT has excellent intrarater and interrater reliability. The standard error of measurement was 0.01 kgf/kg, and the minimal detectable change was 0.036 kgf/kg. The HipSIT showed good validity in isolated hip abduction, external rotation, and extension (Pstrength deficits in women with PFP. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(12):906-913. Epub 9 Oct 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7274.

  12. Hip malformation is a very common finding in young patients scheduled for total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karimi, Dennis; Kallemose, Thomas; Troelsen, Anders

    2018-01-01

    and prevalences of hip malformations were; CAM-deformity 50.9 and 25.5%, coxa profunda 33 and 27.4%, acetabular retroversion 33 and 29.2%, and acetabular dysplasia 10.4 and 3.8%. All patients showed minimum of one malformation. Prevalences of Tönnis grade 0-1 were 22.6% and 2-3 were 77.4%. CONCLUSION: All......INTRODUCTION: In Denmark, 20% of all registered total hip arthroplasties (THA) from 1995 to 2014 has been patients younger than 60 years with primary idiopathic osteoarthritis (OA). It is speculated that hip malformations may be a major contributor to early OA development. It has been shown...... that hip malformation may compromise implant position and, therefore, identifying and knowing the incidence of malformations is important. Our aim was to assess the prevalence and type of hip malformations in a cohort of younger patients undergoing THA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this prospective two center...

  13. Automatic assessment of volume asymmetries applied to hip abductor muscles in patients with hip arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemt, Christian; Modat, Marc; Pichat, Jonas; Cardoso, M. J.; Henckel, Joahnn; Hart, Alister; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip arthroplasties have been utilised over the last 15 years to restore hip function for 1.5 million patients worldwide. Althoug widely used, this hip arthroplasty releases metal wear debris which lead to muscle atrophy. The degree of muscle wastage differs across patients ranging from mild to severe. The longterm outcomes for patients with MoM hip arthroplasty are reduced for increasing degrees of muscle atrophy, highlighting the need to automatically segment pathological muscles. The automated segmentation of pathological soft tissues is challenging as these lack distinct boundaries and morphologically differ across subjects. As a result, there is no method reported in the literature which has been successfully applied to automatically segment pathological muscles. We propose the first automated framework to delineate severely atrophied muscles by applying a novel automated segmentation propagation framework to patients with MoM hip arthroplasty. The proposed algorithm was used to automatically quantify muscle wastage in these patients.

  14. Hip fracture in hospitalized medical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapatero, Antonio; Barba, Raquel; Canora, Jesús; Losa, Juan E; Plaza, Susana; San Roman, Jesús; Marco, Javier

    2013-01-08

    The aim of the present study is to analyze the incidence of hip fracture as a complication of admissions to internal medicine units in Spain. We analyzed the clinical data of 2,134,363 adults who had been admitted to internal medicine wards. The main outcome was a diagnosis of hip fracture during hospitalization.Outcome measures included rates of in-hospital fractures, length of stay and cost. A total of 1127 (0.057%) admittances were coded with an in-hospital hip fracture. In hospital mortality rate was 27.9% vs 9.4%; p patients with a hip fracture (20.7 days vs 9.8 days; p hip-fracture patients (6927€ per hospitalization vs 3730€ in non fracture patients). Risk factors related to fracture were: increasing age by 10 years increments (OR 2.32 95% CI 2.11-2.56), female gender (OR 1.22 95% CI 1.08-1.37), admission from nursing home (OR 1.65 95% CI 1.27-2.12), dementia (1.55 OR 95% CI1.30-1.84), malnutrition (OR 2.50 95% CI 1.88-3.32), delirium (OR 1.57 95% CI 1.16-2.14), and anemia (OR 1.30 95%CI 1.12-1.49). In-hospital hip fracture notably increased mortality during hospitalization, doubling the mean length of stay and mean cost of admission. These are reasons enough to stress the importance of designing and applying multidisciplinary plans focused on reducing the incidence of hip fractures in hospitalized patients.

  15. Fractional nonablative 1,540-nm laser resurfacing of atrophic acne scars. A randomized controlled trial with blinded response evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedelund, Lene; Moreau, Karen Estell R; Beyer, Ditte M

    2010-01-01

    The efficacy of nonablative fractional laser resurfacing of acne scars has been described in case reports and uncontrolled trials. The present study is the first randomized controlled trial in this field. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy and adverse effects of 1,540-nm nonablative...... fractional laser treatment of acne scars. Ten patients with acne scars were included. Two intraindividual areas of similar size and appearance within contralateral anatomical regions were randomized to (1) 3-monthly laser treatments with a StarLux 1,540-nm fractional handpiece, and (2) no treatment. Blinded...... appeared more even and smooth than untreated control areas (4.5, 2-6.5, versus 6.5, 4.5-8, P=0.0156, at 4 weeks; 4.5, 2.5-6.5, versus 6.5, 4.5-8, at 12 weeks; P=0.0313). Patients were satisfied with the treatment (5.5, 1-7, after 12 weeks) and five of the ten patients evaluated their acne scars...

  16. Prospective, pilot evaluation of the performance of nanofractional radiofrequency for improvement of skin texture via skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Krista; Dorizas, Andrew; Sadick, Neil

    2018-02-01

    The latest generation of radiofrequency, nanofractional radiofrequency, allows the heat energy to be delivered through the use of pins or needles as electrodes, facilitating increased efficacy and reduced pain, downtime, and side effects. The objective of this prospective pilot clinical study was to evaluate the efficacy of nanofractional radiofrequency in skin resurfacing. Seventeen subjects were enrolled in the study, and each received three nanofractional radiofrequency (160-pin tip) treatments in the facial area at 3-week intervals. Follow-up visits were scheduled at 1 and 2 months after the final treatment. Clinical photography, patient, and investigator assessments were conducted during the treatment visits and follow-up. All subjects completed the study. At the 1- and 2-month follow-up, there was a moderate to significant improvement (2.6 and 3.5, respectively, P = .01) according to the investigator global esthetic improvement scale rating. Most subjects reported that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the outcome and level of comfort. Nanofractional radiofrequency is a safe and effective strategy for improving texture, tone, and skin laxity with high patient satisfaction and tolerable safety profile. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A Pilot Study of Skin Resurfacing Using the 2,790-nm Erbium:YSGG Laser System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhie, Jong Won; Shim, Jeong Su; Choi, Won Seok

    2015-01-01

    The erbium:yttrium scandium gallium garnet (Er:YSGG) laser differs from other laser techniques by having a faster and higher cure rate. Since the Er:YSGG laser causes an appropriate proportion of ablation and coagulation, it has advantages over the conventional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser and the erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser, including heating tendencies and explosive vaporization. This research was conducted to explore the effects and safety of the Er:YSGG laser. Twenty patients participated in the pilot study of a resurfacing system using a 2,790-nm Er:YSGG laser. All patients received facial treatment by the 2,790-nm Er:YSGG laser system (Cutera) twice with a 4-week interval. Wrinkle reduction, reduction in pigment inhomogeneity, and improvement in tone and texture were measured. Study subjects included 15 women and five men. Re-epithelization occurred in all subjects 3 to 4 days after treatment, and wrinkle reduction, reduction in pigment inhomogeneity, and improvement in tone and texture within 6 months of treatment. The 2,790-nm YSGG laser technique had fewer complications and was effective in the improvement of scars, pores, wrinkles, and skin tone and color with one or two treatments. We expect this method to be effective for people with acne scars, pore scars, deep wrinkles, and uneven skin texture and color.

  18. Do Changes in Patellofemoral Joint Offset Lead to Adverse Outcomes in Total Knee Arthroplasty With Patellar Resurfacing? A Radiographic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Jacob; Howard, James L; Morden, David J; MacDonald, Steven J; Teeter, Matthew G; Lanting, Brent A

    2017-03-01

    Patellofemoral joint biomechanics contribute to anterior knee pain, instability, and dysfunction following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Information about specific factors leading to anterior knee pain and dysfunction is currently limited. Changes in patellofemoral joint offset (PFO) refers to a mismatch between the preoperative and postoperative anteroposterior geometry of the patellofemoral joint. It remains unclear whether these changes lead to adverse outcomes in TKA. A retrospective radiographic review of 970 knees pre-TKA and post-TKA was completed to correlate the radiographic and clinical outcomes of changing the PFO using a posterior-stabilized single knee design with patellar resurfacing. A total of 970 patients were reviewed. Postoperatively, the anterior femoral offset, anteroposterior femoral size, and anterior patellar offset were changed in 40%, 60%, and 71% of knees, respectively, compared to preoperative values. The Western Ontario and McMasters Osteoarthritis Index total score as well as subscale scores for pain and function were not significantly affected by an increase or decrease in PFO. Similarly, Knee Society Scores and range of motion were not significantly affected. Increased anterior patellar offset was, however, associated with increased postoperative patellar tilt. Postoperative patellar tilt was not correlated with adverse patient satisfaction scores or loss of range of motion. Changes in PFO (decreased, maintained, or increased) are common post-TKA and are not associated with a difference in clinical outcomes. Increases in anterior patellar offset led to increased patellar tilt, which was not associated with adverse patient satisfaction scores. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gross and microscopic findings in patients submitted to nonablative full-face resurfacing using intense pulsed light: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pérez, Enrique; Ibiett, Erick Valencia

    2002-08-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) is a noncoherent, nonlaser, filtered flashlamp emitting a broadband visible light that has been shown to be effective in photoepilation, as well as in a number of vascular and pigmented lesions of the skin. Their efficacy has also been reported recently in the treatment of photodamaged facial skin. In the last condition, however, there are few studies showing the clinical and microscopic changes produced by IPL. To assess the gross and microscopic changes that occur in photodamaged skin submitted to nonablative full-face resurfacing (NAFFR) using IPL. Five women were submitted to five NAFFR sessions using IPL, one every 2 weeks. Skin biopsies and photographs were taken on all of the patients before the first procedure and after the last one, as well as weekly clinical assessment. Data concerning skin features (wrinkles, oiliness, thickness, dilated pores, and general appearance) were all assessed. Microscopic improvement of the aging features in the epidermis and dermis were all assessed. For the statistical analysis a t test for small samples was used. All the patients showed clinical and microscopic improvement in every one of the parameters assessed. The t test for small samples showed a statistically significant difference (P Facial photodamage was clinically and microscopically improved using IPL. Use of IPL as a rejuvenating method seems to be promising, with minimal side effects, a wide safety margin, and minimal downtime.

  20. A Pilot Study of Skin Resurfacing Using the 2,790-nm Erbium:YSGG Laser System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Won Rhie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe erbium:yttrium scandium gallium garnet (Er:YSGG laser differs from other laser techniques by having a faster and higher cure rate. Since the Er:YSGG laser causes an appropriate proportion of ablation and coagulation, it has advantages over the conventional carbon dioxide (CO2 laser and the erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG laser, including heating tendencies and explosive vaporization. This research was conducted to explore the effects and safety of the Er:YSGG laser.MethodsTwenty patients participated in the pilot study of a resurfacing system using a 2,790-nm Er:YSGG laser. All patients received facial treatment by the 2,790-nm Er:YSGG laser system (Cutera twice with a 4-week interval. Wrinkle reduction, reduction in pigment inhomogeneity, and improvement in tone and texture were measured.ResultsStudy subjects included 15 women and five men. Re-epithelization occurred in all subjects 3 to 4 days after treatment, and wrinkle reduction, reduction in pigment inhomogeneity, and improvement in tone and texture within 6 months of treatment.ConclusionsThe 2,790-nm YSGG laser technique had fewer complications and was effective in the improvement of scars, pores, wrinkles, and skin tone and color with one or two treatments. We expect this method to be effective for people with acne scars, pore scars, deep wrinkles, and uneven skin texture and color.

  1. Treatment of cosmetic tattoos using carbon dioxide ablative fractional resurfacing in an animal model: a novel method confirmed histopathologically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Chen; Huang, Chuen-Lin; Sue, Yuh-Mou; Lee, Shao-Chen; Leu, Fur-Jiang

    2013-04-01

    Treating cosmetic tattoos using quality-switched lasers is difficult. We used carbon dioxide ablative fractional resurfacing (CO2 AFR) to remove cosmetic tattoos and examined the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in this technique in an animal model. Twelve rats were tattooed on their backs with white and flesh-colored pigments. Half of each tattoo was treated with CO2 AFR (5 sessions at 1-month intervals), and the other half was the untreated control. An independent observer reviewed photographic documentation of clinical response. Serial skin samples obtained at baseline and at various times after laser treatment were evaluated using histologic and immunohistochemical methods. Four rats had excellent responses to laser treatment and eight had good responses. White and flesh-colored tattoos had similar clearance rates and tissue reactions. Histologic analysis showed immediate ablation of tattoo pigments in the microscopic ablation zones. Tattoo pigments in the microscopic coagulation zones migrated to the epidermis and became part of the microscopic exudative necrotic debris appearing on day 2 that was exfoliated after 5 days. Increased fibronectin expression around the microscopic treatment zones during the extrusion of tattoo pigments indicated that wound healing facilitates this action. CO2 AFR successfully removes cosmetic tattoos. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Efficacy analysis on hip replacement for hip-joint diseases with Parkinson disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi-Cai; Ru, Xuan-Liang; Xia, Yan-Fei; Liu, Xiao-Li; Song, Bai-Shan; Qiao, Song; Yan, Shi-Gui; Wang, Xiang-Hua

    2017-12-25

    To explore clinical efficacy of hip replacement for hip-joint diseases with Parkinson disease. From December 2011 to December 2016, 18 patients with hip-joint diseases with Parkinson disease treated by hip replacement, including 8 males and 10 females aged from 59 to 87 years old with an average of 71 years old. Among them, 3 cases were developmental dysplasia of hip, 3 cases were femoral head necrosis and 12 cases were femoral neck fracture. All patients manifested with obvious pain and limitation of stepping ability. Postoperative complications were observed and Harris score were used to compare hip joint function after operation. The incision were healed well, and pain were alleviated or disappeared, and hip joint function were improved. Eighteen patients were followed up from 1 to 3 years with an average of 2.3 years. At the latest follow up, 14 cases recovered freedom-walk, 2 cases could walk with walking stick, 1 case could walk with walking aid and 1 case was died. Among 18 patients, 2 cases were occurred dislocation, and 1 case were died for cardiac disease at 3 months after operation. Four patients were occurred slight pain. There were significant differences in Harris scores among preoperative (41.7±1.4), 6 months after operation(80.1±5.4) and the final follow-up (83.4±2.1), and 10 cases got excellent result, 4 good, 1 fair and 2 poor. Application of hip replacement for hip-joint diseases with Parkinson disease is a safe and effective clinical therapy, and has advantages of less complications and rapid recovery of hip joint function.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage and labrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Zilkens

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hip joint instability and impingement are the most common biomechanical risk factors that put the hip joint at risk to develop premature osteoarthritis. Several surgical procedures like periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia or hip arthroscopy or safe surgical hip dislocation for femoroacetabular impingement aim at restoring the hip anatomy. However, the success of joint preserving surgical procedures is limited by the amount of pre-existing cartilage damage. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques like delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC might help to monitor the effect of surgical or non-surgical procedures in the effort to halt or even reverse joint damage.

  4. RAZVOJ OBLAČIL V HIP HOP KULTURI

    OpenAIRE

    Marić, Sanja

    2010-01-01

    V diplomskem delu smo raziskovali, kako so se hip hop oblačila razvijala skozi obdobja v hip hop kulturi. V teoretičnem deli smo ugotavljali ozadje in dejavnike, ki so vplivali na razvoj hip hop kulture, v empiričnem delu diplomske naloge pa smo izvedli anketni vprašalnik z glavnimi akterji hip hop kulture na slovenski hip hop sceni. Rezultati, ki smo jih dobili, kažejo da so imela oblačila velik vpliv na prepoznavnost in razvoj hip hop kulture po celem svetu. K temu so največ pripomogli ustv...

  5. Hip morphologic measurements in an Egyptian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Tarek A

    2011-04-11

    The study of acetabular morphology has shown that there are geographic differences in the morphology and prevalence of acetabular dysplasia among different ethnic groups. However, few data exist on the shape of the acetabulum in various populations around the world. In this study, we examined samples of pelvic radiographs from Egyptian adults. Acetabular dysplasia in adults is characterized by a shallow and relatively vertical acetabulum.The aim of this study was to examine acetabular morphology to determine the prevalence of hip dysplasia in adult Egyptians. This included 244 adults, 134 men and 110 women between 18 and 60 years, who were used to measure center edge angle, acetabular Sharp angle, acetabular head index on anteroposterior radiographic views of the hip joints, and vertical center anterior margin angle on false profile views. The radiographs were taken of patients with no hip complaints at Tanta University Hospital.The results were statistically studied according to the age, height, and weight of patients. The prevalence of acetabular dysplasia was 2.25% for Egyptian men and 3.6% for women with respect to center edge angles, vertical center anterior margin angle, and acetabular head index.We concluded that gender variations in the morphology of the acetabulum and sex influences geometrical measurements of the acetabulum. Egyptian women were more dysplastic than men using the 4 parameters of hip measurements. There are also racial variations in hip morphology. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Schizophrenia, antipsychotics and risk of hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Jensen, Signe O W; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2013-01-01

    In a nationwide study using linkage of Danish hospital registers we examined predictors of hip fracture (ICD-10: S72) in 15,431 patients with schizophrenia (ICD-10: F20 or ICD-8: 295) and 3,807,597 population controls. Shorter education, disability pension, lifetime alcohol abuse, somatic co......-morbidity, antipsychotics (IRR=1.19; 95% CI 1.15-1.24), antidepressant (IRR=1.18; 95% CI 1.16-1.20), anticholinergics (IRR=1.29; 95% CI 1.22-1.36), benzodiazepines (IRR=1.06; 95% CI 1.04-1.08) and corticosteroids (IRR=1.44; 95% CI 1.36-1.53) were significant predictors. In 556 persons with schizophrenia and hip fracture...... (matched to 1:3 to schizophrenia controls without hip fracture), antipsychotic polypharmacy predicted hip fracture. Analyses among antipsychotic monotherapy patients showed no differential effect of individual antipsychotics. A dose-response relationship of hip fracture and lifetime antipsychotics...

  7. Cystic lesion around the hip joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukata, Kiminori; Nakai, Sho; Goto, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Shimaoka, Yasunori; Yamanaka, Issei; Sairyo, Koichi; Hamawaki, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a narrative review of cystic lesions around the hip and primarily consists of 5 sections: Radiological examination, prevalence, pathogenesis, symptoms, and treatment. Cystic lesions around the hip are usually asymptomatic but may be observed incidentally on imaging examinations, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Some cysts may enlarge because of various pathological factors, such as trauma, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or total hip arthroplasty (THA), and may become symptomatic because of compression of surrounding structures, including the femoral, obturator, or sciatic nerves, external iliac or common femoral artery, femoral or external iliac vein, sigmoid colon, cecum, small bowel, ureters, and bladder. Treatment for symptomatic cystic lesions around the hip joint includes rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration, needle aspiration, and surgical excision. Furthermore, when these cysts are associated with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and THA, primary or revision THA surgery will be necessary concurrent with cyst excision. Knowledge of the characteristic clinical appearance of cystic masses around the hip will be useful for determining specific diagnoses and treatments. PMID:26495246

  8. [Clinical pathway for hip fracture patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez López, Pilar; Sánchez Hernández, Natalia; Paniagua Tejo, Sonsoles; Valverde García, José Antonio; Montero Díaz, Margarita; Alonso García, Noelia; Freites Esteve, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Hip fracture in the elderly often occurs in patients with high co-morbidity. Effective management requires a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach. To evaluate the effect of a quality improvement intervention in the detection and treatment of complications in elderly patients admitted for hip fracture. A comparative study was conducted between two groups of patients admitted for hip fracture prior to 2010, and after a quality improvement intervention in 2013. The intervention consisted of implementing improved multidisciplinary measures in accordance with recent scientific evidence. The degree of compliance of the implemented measures was quantified. Patients admitted due to hip fracture in 2010 (216 patients) and 2013 (196 patients) were similar in age, sex, Barthel Index, and a reduced Charlson Index, although there were more comorbidities in 2013. After implementation of the protocols, the detection of delirium, malnutrition, anemia, and electrolyte disturbances increased. A larger number of patients in 2013 were precribed intravenous iron (24% more) and osteoporosis treatment (61.3% more). The average stay was reduced by 45.3% and surgical delay by 29.4%, achieving better functional efficiency. The implementation of a clinical pathway in geriatric patients with hip fracture is useful to detect and treat complications at an early stage, and to reduce pre-operative and overall stay, all without a negative clinical or functional impact. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Concomitant Hip Arthroscopy and Periacetabular Osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domb, Benjamin G; LaReau, Justin M; Hammarstedt, Jon E; Gupta, Asheesh; Stake, Christine E; Redmond, John M

    2015-11-01

    To detail our early experience using concomitant hip arthroscopy and periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) for the treatment of acetabular dysplasia. We prospectively collected and retrospectively reviewed the surgical and outcome data of 17 patients who underwent concomitant hip arthroscopy and PAO between October 2010 and July 2013. Preoperative and postoperative range of motion, outcome and pain scores, and radiographic data were collected. Intraoperative arthroscopic findings and postoperative complications were recorded. The group consisted of 3 male and 14 female patients with a mean follow-up period of 2.4 years. Three patients had undergone previous surgery on the affected hip. Chondrolabral pathology was identified in all 17 patients. Twelve patients underwent labral repair, and five patients underwent partial labral debridement. No patient was converted to total hip arthroplasty or required revision surgery at short-term follow-up. All 4 patient-reported outcome scores showed statistically significant changes from baseline to latest follow-up (P arthroscopy and PAO has been favorable. We noted that all our patients have evidence of chondrolabral damage at the time of PAO when the joint is distracted and evaluated. All patients in this series had intra-articular pathology treated arthroscopically and showed satisfactory mean clinical improvement. Hip arthroscopy with PAO did not appear to introduce complications beyond the PAO alone. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hip and Groin Injuries in Baseball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarek, Ryan A; Coleman, Struan H

    2018-03-01

    To discuss the clinical significance of the most common hip and groin injuries in baseball players, as well as an algorithmic approach to diagnosis and treatment of these injuries. (a) Limitations in throwing velocity, pitch control, and bat swing speed may be secondary to decreased mobility and strength within the proximal kinetic chain, which must harness power from the lower extremities and core. (b) Approximately 5.5% of all baseball injuries per year involve the hip/groin and may lead to a significant amount of time spent on the disabled list. Injuries involving the hip and groin are relatively common in baseball players. Our knowledge of the mechanics of overhead throwing continues to evolve, as does our understanding of the contribution of power from the lower extremities and core. It is paramount that the team physician be able to accurately diagnose and treat injuries involving the hip/groin, as they may lead to significant disability and inability to return to elite levels of play. This review focuses on hip- and groin-related injuries in the baseball player, including femoroacetabular impingement, core muscle injury, and osteitis pubis.

  11. Screening for congenital dislocation of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendel, H.

    1987-01-01

    Although the prevalence of (idiopathic) congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH) within the Member States of the European Community is not exactly known, it must be considered as a major problem of public health care and protection. By assessment of available data one can assume that between 1 and 2% of all newborns have dislocation or instability of one or both hips. There is a female predominance of 4:1 and some risk factors are known. The reasons of a higher prevalence in some areas are not yet well understood. Most of instable hips will spontaneously become stable within the first days or weeks of life. However, a considerable number of infants (less than 1%) will remain with instable hips which may dislocate. Dislocation either present at birth or as a result of persistent instability leads to subsequent hip deformation. This is a serious event for each affected individual, and is a heavy load on health care and social costs for the public. Treatment of CDH is easy and usually effective when started early, i.e. before the fourth month of life. The earlier treatment is started the easier, shorter, safer and less expensive it is and its impairment on child development and mother-child interaction can be held to a minimum. Screening for CDH is therefore the most important part of health protection in early infancy. However, this paper concludes that neither sonography nor X-ray examinations are appropriate for CDH screening

  12. Information for Patients Who Have Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... both the right and left sides) Patients with resurfacing systems with small femoral heads (device sizes less ... groin area, including the symptoms related to your skin, heart, nervous system, kidneys, or thyroid gland, it ...

  13. Hip arthroscopy: prevalence of intra-articular pathologic findings after traumatic injury of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Vickas; Harris, Adam; Farrokhyar, Forough; Choudur, Hema N; Wong, Ivan H

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to document and compare the incidence of intra-articular hip pathologic findings identified using arthroscopy versus conventional imaging in patients with acute trauma to the hip. This was a blinded prospective case series study designed to review the incidence of intra-articular pathologic disorders in patients with post-traumatic injury between the ages of 18 and 65 years who were referred to a single surgeon. Injuries included hip dislocation, proximal femur fracture, pelvic ring fracture, acetabular fracture, penetrating injury (gunshot wound), and soft tissue injury. Preoperative radiographs, computed tomographic (CT) scans, or magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance angiography (MRI/MRA) scans (or a combination of these) were obtained. Findings were documented and compared with intraoperative findings. A total of 29 post-traumatic hips were enrolled in this study. Hip arthroscopy identified 17 of 29 hips (59%) as having loose bodies, 11 of 29 (38%) hips as having an intra-articular step deformity, 14 of 29 (49%) hips as having an osteochondral lesion, and 27 of 29 (93%) hips as having a labral tear. Plain radiographs and CT scans yielded low sensitivity when compared with arthroscopy for the identification of loose bodies and step deformities. MRI/MRA comparison with arthroscopic findings suggest that MRI/MRA is an accurate tool for identification of labral tears, because 91% of tears seen on arthroscopy were also identified by MRI/MRA. In 4 hips, however, MRI/MRA failed to identify osteochondral lesions that were subsequently identified by arthroscopy. Traumatic injuries of the hip result in substantial intra-articular pathologic findings, including loose bodies, labral tears, step deformities, and osteochondral lesions. The arthroscope is a powerful tool in identifying these injuries. Plain radiographs and CT scans appear to underestimate the true incidence of loose bodies and step deformities within the joint when

  14. Abnormal hip physical examination findings in asymptomatic female soccer athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Devyani; Rho, Monica; Yemm, Ted; Fong, Kathryn; Brophy, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Examination of the hip provides information regarding risk for pre-arthritic hip disorders, knee injuries, and low back pain. The purpose of this study was to report a hip screening examination of asymptomatic female soccer athletes and to test the hypothesis that these findings vary by competition experience. Methods Asymptomatic females from a youth soccer club, a college, and a professional team were evaluated. Passive hip range of motion, hip abduction strength, and hip provocative tests were assessed. Data were compared for the grade/middle school, high school, college, and professional athletes. Results One hundred and seventy-two athletes with a mean age of 16.7 ± 5 years (range 10–30) participated. Professional athletes had less flexion (HF) for both hips (p hips as compared to all other groups (p hip abduction strength as compared to other groups (p hip tests were found in 22 % of all players and 36 % of the professionals. In professionals, a positive provocative test was associated with ipsilateral decreased HF (p = 0.04). Conclusion Asymptomatic elite female soccer athletes with the most competition experience had less bilateral hip flexion and preferred kicking leg IR than less-experienced athletes. Positive provocative hip tests were found in 22 % of athletes. Future studies are needed to show whether these findings link to risk for intra-articular hip or lumbar spine and knee disorders. Level of evidence III. PMID:24150125

  15. The association between eccentric hip abduction strength and hip and knee angular movements in recreational male runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brund, René B. Korsgaard; Rasmussen, Sten; Nielsen, Rasmus O.

    2018-01-01

    Weak hip abductors may be related with increased hip adduction and knee abduction angular movement, which may be risk factors of lower extremity injuries. As the role of eccentric hip abduction strength (EHAS) on hip adduction angular movement and knee abduction angular movement (KABD) remains...... and Codamotion active marker system. Using multiple linear regression models (n=186 legs), no relationships between EHAS and hip and knee kinematics were found. A possible reason for the lack of relationship between EHAS and hip and knee kinematics may be owing to differences in the running kinematics. Some...

  16. Investigation of water quality and aquatic-community structure in Village and Valley Creeks, City of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, 2000-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Ann K.; Abrahamsen, Thomas A.; Journey, Celeste A.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 16-month investigation of water quality, aquatic-community structure, bed sediment, and fish tissue in Village and Valley Creeks, two urban streams that drain areas of highly intensive residential, commercial, and industrial land use in Birmingham, Alabama. Water-quality data were collected between February 2000 and March 2001 at four sites on Village Creek, three sites on Valley Creek, and at two reference sites near Birmingham?Fivemile Creek and Little Cahaba River, both of which drain less-urbanized areas. Stream samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, fecal bacteria, trace and major elements, pesticides, and selected organic constituents. Bed-sediment and fish-tissue samples were analyzed for trace and major elements, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and additional organic compounds. Aquatic-community structure was evaluated by conducting one survey of the fish community and in-stream habitat and two surveys of the benthic-invertebrate community. Bed-sediment and fish-tissue samples, benthic-invertebrates, and habitat data were collected between June 2000 and October 2000 at six of the nine water-quality sites; fish communities were evaluated in April and May 2001 at the six sites where habitat and benthic-invertebrate data were collected. The occurrence and distribution of chemical constituents in the water column and bed sediment provided an initial assessment of water quality in the streams. The structure of the aquatic communities, the physical condition of the fish, and the chemical analyses of fish tissue provided an indication of the cumulative effects of water quality on the aquatic biota. Water chemistry was similar at all sites, characterized by strong calcium-bicarbonate component and magnesium components. Median concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus were highest at the headwaters of Valley Creek and lowest at the reference site on Fivemile Creek. In Village Creek, median

  17. The incidence of total hip arthroplasty after hip arthroscopy in osteoarthritic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haviv Barak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To assess the incidence of total hip arthroplasty (THA in osteoarthritic patients who were treated by arthroscopic debridement and to evaluate factors that might influence the time interval from the first hip arthroscopy to THA. Design Retrospective clinical series Methods Follow-up data and surgical reports were retrieved from 564 records of osteoarthritic patients that have had hip arthroscopy between the years 2002 to 2009 with a mean follow-up time of 3.2 years (range, 1-6.4 years. The time interval between the first hip arthroscopy to THA was modelled as a function of patient age; level of cartilage damage; procedures performed and repeated arthroscopies with the use of multivariate regression analysis. Results Ninety (16% of all participants eventually required THA. The awaiting time from the first arthroscopy to a hip replacement was found to be longer in patients younger than 55 years and in a milder osteoarthritic stage. Patients that experienced repeated hip scopes had a longer time to THA than those with only a single procedure. Procedures performed concomitant with debridement and lavage did not affect the time interval to THA. Conclusions In our series of arthroscopic treatment of hip osteoarthritis, 16% required THA over a period of 7 years. Factors that influence the time to arthroplasty were age, degree of osteoarthritis and recurrent procedures.

  18. Results of hip arthroplasty using Paavilainen technique in patients with congenitally dislocated hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Tikhilov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to analyze the medium- and long-term results of hip arthroplasty using Paavilainen technique in patients with the congenitally dislocated hip. Methods: From 2001 to 2012 180 operations were carried out were using the Paavilainen technique in 140 patients with high dislocation of the hip (Crowe IV. All patients were clinically evaluated using the Harris Hip Score (HHS, VAS and radiography. Statistical analysis was performed using the Pearson correlation coefficients, multiple regression analysis and classification trees analysis. Results: The average Harris score improved from preoperative 41.6 (40,3-43,5 to 79.3 (77,9-82,7 at final follow-up, and the difference was significant. Early complications were 9% (the most frequent were fractures of the proximal femur, later - 16.7% (pseudoarthrosis of the greater trochanter, 13.9%; disclocations-1,1%, aseptic loosening of the components - 1.7%, reoperation performed in 8.3% of cases. Such factors as age and limb length has statistically significant effect on functional outcomes. Established predictive model allows to get the best possible functional outcome in such patients with severe dysplasia. Conclusions: Total Hip arthroplasty using the Paavilainen technique is an effective method of surgical treatment in patients with the congenitally dislocated hip, but it is technically difficult operation with a high incidence of complications in comparison with standard primary total hip replacement.

  19. The incidence of total hip arthroplasty after hip arthroscopy in osteoarthritic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the incidence of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in osteoarthritic patients who were treated by arthroscopic debridement and to evaluate factors that might influence the time interval from the first hip arthroscopy to THA. Design Retrospective clinical series Methods Follow-up data and surgical reports were retrieved from 564 records of osteoarthritic patients that have had hip arthroscopy between the years 2002 to 2009 with a mean follow-up time of 3.2 years (range, 1-6.4 years). The time interval between the first hip arthroscopy to THA was modelled as a function of patient age; level of cartilage damage; procedures performed and repeated arthroscopies with the use of multivariate regression analysis. Results Ninety (16%) of all participants eventually required THA. The awaiting time from the first arthroscopy to a hip replacement was found to be longer in patients younger than 55 years and in a milder osteoarthritic stage. Patients that experienced repeated hip scopes had a longer time to THA than those with only a single procedure. Procedures performed concomitant with debridement and lavage did not affect the time interval to THA. Conclusions In our series of arthroscopic treatment of hip osteoarthritis, 16% required THA over a period of 7 years. Factors that influence the time to arthroplasty were age, degree of osteoarthritis and recurrent procedures. PMID:20670440

  20. Wear mechanisms in ceramic hip implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonaker, Matthew; Goswami, Tarun

    2004-01-01

    The wear in hip implants is one of the main causes for premature hip replacements. The wear affects the potential life of the prosthesis and subsequent removals of in vivo implants. Therefore, the objective of this article is to review various joints that show lower wear rates and consequently higher life. Ceramics are used in hip implants and have been found to produce lower wear rates. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of ceramics compared to other implant materials. Different types of ceramics that are being used are reviewed in terms of the wear characteristics, debris released, and their size together with other biological factors. In general, the wear rates in ceramics were lower than that of metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene combinations.

  1. Traumatic hip dislocation: early MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laorr, A.; Greenspan, A.; Anderson, M.W.; Moehring, H.D.; McKinley, T.

    1995-01-01

    Objective of this study was to present the spectrum of early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings following traumatic dislocation of the femoral head, and to identify any associated injuries. Prospective MRI of both hips was performed on 18 patients within 5 weeks of a traumatic femoral head dislocation. The interval between the time of injury and the imaging studies ranged from 2 to 35 days. Posterior dislocation was present in 14 patients and anterior dislocation in 4 patients. In the majority of cases, we performed axial T1, coronal T1, and coronal T2 * (MPGR) sequences. MRI can effectively identify and quantify the muscle injury and joint effusion that invariably accompany traumatic hip dislocations. It is also useful for demonstrating trabecular bone contusion (trabecular injury) and iliofemoral ligament injury, which occur commonly with acute hip dislocation. (orig./VHE)

  2. HIP technologies for fusion reactor blankets fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Marois, G.; Federzoni, L.; Bucci, P.; Revirand, P.

    2000-01-01

    The benefit of HIP techniques applied to the fabrication of fusion internal components for higher performances, reliability and cost savings are emphasized. To demonstrate the potential of the techniques, design of new blankets concepts and mock-ups fabrication are currently performed by CEA. A coiled tube concept that allows cooling arrangement flexibility, strong reduction of the machining and number of welds is proposed for ITER IAM. Medium size mock-ups according to the WCLL breeding blanket concept have been manufactured. The fabrication of a large size mock-up is under progress. These activities are supported by numerical calculations to predict the deformations of the parts during HIP'ing. Finally, several HIP techniques issues have been identified and are discussed

  3. Acute cognitive dysfunction after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitsch, M S; Foss, N B; Kristensen, B B

    2006-01-01

    hip fracture surgery in an optimized, multimodal, peri-operative rehabilitation regimen. METHODS: One hundred unselected hip fracture patients treated in a well-defined, optimized, multimodal, peri-operative rehabilitation regimen were included. Patients were tested upon admission and on the second......BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing hip fracture surgery often experience acute post-operative cognitive dysfunction (APOCD). The pathogenesis of APOCD is probably multifactorial, and no single intervention has been successful in its prevention. No studies have investigated the incidence of APOCD after......, fourth and seventh post-operative days with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) score. RESULTS: Thirty-two per cent of patients developed a significant post-operative cognitive decline, which was associated with several pre-fracture patient characteristics, including age and cognitive function...

  4. Osteoblastoma in the region of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yuan Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Osteoblastoma occurring in the region of the hip is very rare, and vague symptoms with uncharacteristic radiographic features often lead to misdiagnosis. Because of radiographic and histological similarities, it must be carefully distinguished from osteoid osteoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, giant cell tumor, and osteosarcoma. Computed tomography is the preferred imaging modality as it is able to detect the nidus and images will not exhibit the flare phenomenon caused by surrounding inflammation seen with magnetic resonance imaging. For hip joint lesions in weight-bearing areas, intralesional curettage may achieve satisfactory outcomes as compared with wide resection. We herein report two cases of osteoblastoma in the hip region in which diagnosis was delayed that were successfully treated with curettage and followed by high-speed burring.

  5. Arthroscopic approach and anatomy of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprato, Alessandro; Giachino, Matteo; Masse, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy has gained popularity among the orthopedic community and a precise assessment of indications, techniques and results is constantly brought on. In this chapter the principal standard entry portals for central and peripheral compartment are discussed. The description starts from the superficial landmarks for portals placement and continues with the deep layers. For each entry point an illustration of the main structures encountered is provided and the principal structures at risk for different portals are accurately examined. Articular anatomical description is carried out from the arthroscope point of view and sub-divided into central and peripheral compartment. The two compartments are systematically analyzed and the accessible articular areas for each portal explained. Moreover, some anatomical variations that can be found in the normal hip are reported. The anatomical knowledge of the hip joint along with a precise notion of the structures encountered with the arthroscope is an essential requirement for a secure and successful surgery. Level of evidence: V.

  6. Evaluating the effects of sevelamer carbonate on cardiovascular structure and function in chronic renal impairment in Birmingham: the CRIB-PHOS randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steeds Richard P

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serum phosphate is an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease and the general population. There is accumulating evidence that phosphate promotes arterial stiffening through structural vascular alterations such as medial calcification, which are already apparent in the early stages of chronic kidney disease. Aim To determine the effects of phosphate binding with sevelamer carbonate on left ventricular mass and function together with arterial stiffness in patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease. Methods/Design A single-centre, prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 120 subjects with stage 3 chronic kidney disease recruited from University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust. Baseline investigations include transthoracic echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to assess ventricular mass, volumes and function, applanation tonometry to determine pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis as surrogate measures of arterial stiffness and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning to determine bone density. During an open-label run in phase, subjects will receive 1600 mg sevelamer carbonate with meals for four weeks. They will then be randomised to either continue sevelamer carbonate or receive an identical placebo (60 subjects per arm for the remaining 36 weeks. Four-weekly monitoring of serum electrolytes and bone biochemistry will be performed. All baseline investigations will be repeated at the end of the treatment period. The primary endpoint of the study is a reduction in left ventricular mass after 40 weeks of treatment. Secondary endpoints are: i change in aortic compliance; ii change in arterial stiffness; iii change in arterial elastance; iv change in left ventricular systolic and diastolic elastance; v change in left ventricular function; and vi change in bone density. Trial Registration This trial is

  7. Dynamic ultrasound of the external snapping hip syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Sun; Song, Baek Yong; Paik, Sang Hyun; Lee, Tae Gyu; Yoon, Yong Kyu; Lee, Sung Moon

    2002-01-01

    Snapping hip syndrome has been described as a hip pain accompanied by an audible snapping during motion of the hip or while walking. The variable causes of its external, internal, and intra-articular origins have been described. The most common extemal snapping hip has been associated with a thickened posterior border of the iliotibial band or of the anterior border of the gluteus maximus muscle slipping over the greater trochanter. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dynamic ultrasound findings of external snapping hip syndrome with review of the literature. We studied 5 patients (7 cases) with external snapping hip and pain over the greater trochanter during walking or hip motion (3 males and 2 females, age range, 14-32 years; mean, 19 years). Two patients reported bilateral snapping hips.

  8. Getting your home ready - knee or hip surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hip or knee surgery - getting your home ready; Osteoarthritis - knee ... Cabrera JA, Cabrera AL. Total hip replacement. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  9. Iliotibial band syndrome following hip arthroscopy: An unreported complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Seijas

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: This is a newly described observation within followup of hip arthroscopy. These findings may help orthopedic surgeons when planning rehabilitation after hip arthroscopy, including stretching exercises to prevent this syndrome.

  10. Rehabilitation following hip arthroscopy - A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S Grzybowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Rehabilitation following hip arthroscopy is an integral component of the clinical outcome of the procedure. Given the increase in quantity, complexity, and diversity of procedures performed, a need exists to define the role of rehabilitation following hip arthroscopy.OBJECTIVES: 1 To determine the current rehabilitation protocols utilized following hip arthroscopy in the current literature, 2 to determine if clinical outcomes are significantly different based on different post-operative rehabilitation protocols; and 3 to propose the best-available evidence-based rehabilitation program following hip arthroscopy.DATA SOURCES: Per PRISMA guidelines and checklist, Medline, SciVerse Scopus, SportDiscus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched.STUDY SELECTION: Level I-IV evidence clinical studies with minimum two-year follow-up reporting outcomes of hip arthroscopy with post-operative rehabilitation protocols described were included. DATA EXTRACTION: All study, subject, and surgery parameters were collected. All elements of rehabilitation were extracted and analyzed. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Study methodological quality was analyzed using the Modified Coleman Methodology Score (MCMS.RESULTS: 18 studies were included (2,092 subjects; 52% male, mean age 35.1 +/- 10.6 years, mean follow-up 3.2 +/- 1.0 years. Labral tear and femoroacetabular impingement were the most common diagnoses treated and labral debridement and femoral/acetabular osteochondroplasty the most common surgical techniques performed. Rehabilitation protocol parameters (weight-bearing, motion, strengthening, and return-to-sport were poorly reported. Differences in clinical outcomes were unable to be assessed given heterogeneity in study reporting. Time-, phase-, goal-, and precaution-based guidelines were extracted and reported.CONCLUSIONS: The current literature of hip arthroscopy rehabilitation lacks high-quality evidence to support a

  11. Safe and effective one-session fractional skin resurfacing using a carbon dioxide laser device in super-pulse mode: a clinical and histologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelles, Mario A; Shohat, Michael; Urdiales, Fernando

    2011-02-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser ablative fractional resurfacing produces skin damage, with removal of the epidermis and variable portions of the dermis as well as associated residual heating, resulting in new collagen formation and skin tightening. The nonresurfaced epidermis helps tissue to heal rapidly, with short-term postoperative erythema. The results for 40 patients (8 men and 32 women) after a single session of a fractional CO(2) resurfacing mode were studied. The treatments included resurfacing of the full face, periocular upper lip, and residual acne scars. The patients had skin prototypes 2 to 4 and wrinkle degrees 1 to 3. The histologic effects, efficacy, and treatment safety in various clinical conditions and for different phototypes are discussed. The CO(2) laser for fractional treatment is used in super-pulse mode. The beam is split by a lens into several microbeams, and super-pulse repetition is limited by the pulse width. The laser needs a power adaptation to meet the set fluence per microbeam. Laser pulsing can operate repeatedly on the same spot or be moved randomly over the skin, using several passes to achieve a desired residual thermal effect. Low, medium, and high settings are preprogrammed in the device, and they indicate the strength of resurfacing. A single treatment was given with the patient under topical anesthesia. However, the anesthesia was injected on areas of scar tissue. Medium settings (2 Hz, 30 W, 60 mJ) were used, and two passes were made for dark skins and degree 1 wrinkles. High settings (2 Hz, 60 W, 120 mJ) were used, and three passes were made for degree 3 wrinkles and scar tissue. Postoperatively, resurfaced areas were treated with an ointment of gentamycin, Retinol Palmitate, and DL-methionine (Novartis; Farmaceutics, S.A., Barcelona, Spain). Once epithelialization was achieved, antipigment and sun protection agents were recommended. Evaluations were performed 15 days and 2 months after treatment by both patients and

  12. Do hip prosthesis related infection codes in administrative discharge registers correctly classify periprosthetic hip joint infection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Jeppe; Pedersen, Alma B; Troelsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Administrative discharge registers could be a valuable and easily accessible single-sources for research data on periprosthetic hip joint infection. The aim of this study was to estimate the positive predictive value of the International Classification of Disease 10th revision (ICD-10...... in future single-source register based studies, but preferably should be used in combination with alternate data sources to ensure higher validity....... decreased to 82% (95% CI: 72-89). CONCLUSIONS: Misclassification must be expected and taken into consideration when using administrative discharge registers for epidemiological research on periprosthetic hip joint infection. We believe that the periprosthetic hip joint infection diagnosis code can be of use...

  13. Ideologia hip-hopowa na przykładzie tekstów hip-hopowych

    OpenAIRE

    Kozłowska, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The article is asort of analysis of hip hop lyrics in the context of their importance for identity formation process of young generation. Rap music, as one of the elements of hip hop culture, is a kind of special innovation for its audience. With rising interest for this musical genre and hip hop culture the discussion on formulating the issues through the prism of rap music’s message has been increasing. The article presents certain aspects of making sense to the reality, w...

  14. Radiological evaluation of failed total hip replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raspa, V.; Aldrovandi, S.; Pompei, G.

    1988-01-01

    The retrospective study of 50 operated cases of cemented total hip replacement and a review of the literature enabled the authors to define the radiological features of the above-mentioned condition. These features include one or more of the following signs: calcar reabsorption, lacunar erosions, modified relatioships between the prosthesis components, sepsis and loosening, periarticular calcifications dislocation and fracture of prosthesis components. Careful evaluation of these radiological features is extremely important for both an early diagnosis of failed total hip replacement and the choice of an adequate surgical treatment

  15. Hip Arthroscopy: Common Problems and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casp, Aaron; Gwathmey, Frank Winston

    2018-04-01

    The use of hip arthroscopy continues to expand. Understanding potential pitfalls and complications associated with hip arthroscopy is paramount to optimizing clinical outcomes and minimizing unfavorable results. Potential pitfalls and complications are associated with preoperative factors such as patient selection, intraoperative factors such as iatrogenic damage, traction-related complications, inadequate correction of deformity, and nerve injury, or postoperative factors such as poor rehabilitation. This article outlines common factors that contribute to less-than-favorable outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hip fracture in hospitalized medical patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zapatero Antonio; Barba Raquel; Canora Jesús; Losa Juan E; Plaza Susana; San Roman Jesús; Marco Javier

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the present study is to analyze the incidence of hip fracture as a complication of admissions to internal medicine units in Spain. Methods We analyzed the clinical data of 2,134,363 adults who had been admitted to internal medicine wards. The main outcome was a diagnosis of hip fracture during hospitalization. Outcome measures included rates of in-hospital fractures, length of stay and cost. Results A total of 1127 (0.057%) admittances were coded with an in-hosp...

  17. Innovations in the management of hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdall, Robert D; Webb, Lawrence X

    2003-08-01

    Hip fractures include fractures of the head, neck, intertrochanteric, and subtrochanteric regions. Head fractures commonly accompany dislocations. Neck fractures and intertrochanteric fractures occur with greatest frequency in elderly patients with a low bone mineral density and are produced by low-energy mechanisms. Subtrochanteric fractures occur in a predominantly strong cortical osseous region that is exposed to large compressive stresses. Implants used to address these fractures must accommodate significant loads while the fractures consolidate. Complications secondary to hip fractures produce significant morbidity and include infection, nonunion, malunion, decubitus ulcers, fat emboli, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, stroke, and death.

  18. Hot-isostatic pressing (HIP). Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, E.; Moser, G.; Seilstorfer, H.

    1981-01-01

    After the description of the microstructure and strengthening mechanism of nickel- and cobalt-base superalloys, claims for the production of suitable powders for the HIP-technology are pointed out and methods to its realization are discussed. Taking the manufacture of turbine discs (ultrasonic form) as an example the possibilities of the near-net-shape-technology are shown. Investigations on mechanical properties and on microstructures are carried out to determine the effect of HIP-process-parameters on these features. (orig.) [de

  19. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O'hEireamhoin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Children affected by mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS type IH (Hurler Syndrome, an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, are known to experience a range of musculoskeletal manifestations including spinal abnormalities, hand abnormalities, generalised joint stiffness, genu valgum, and hip dysplasia and avascular necrosis. Enzyme therapy, in the form of bone marrow transplantation, significantly increases life expectancy but does not prevent the development of the associated musculoskeletal disorders. We present the case of a 23-year-old woman with a diagnosis of Hurler syndrome with a satisfactory result following uncemented total hip arthroplasty.

  20. Hip adduction and abduction strength profiles in elite soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Serner, Andreas; Petersen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    An ipsilateral hip adduction/abduction strength ratio of more than 90%, and hip adduction strength equal to that of the contralateral side have been suggested to clinically represent adequate strength recovery of hip adduction strength in athletes after groin injury. However, to what extent side-......-to-side symmetry in isometric hip adduction and abduction strength can be assumed in soccer players remains uncertain....