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Sample records for bipolar-i disorder patients

  1. Impulse control disorder comorbidity among patients with bipolar I disorder.

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    Karakus, Gonca; Tamam, Lut

    2011-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with mood instability, behavioral problems, and action without planning in patients with bipolar disorder. Increased impulsivity levels are reported at all types of mood episodes. This association suggests a high comorbidity between impulse control disorders (ICDs) and bipolar disorder. The aim of this study is to compare the prevalence of ICDs and associated clinical and sociodemographic variables in euthymic bipolar I patients. A total of 124 consecutive bipolar I patients who were recruited from regular attendees from the outpatient clinic of our Bipolar Disorder Unit were included in the study. All patients were symptomatically in remission. Diagnosis of bipolar disorder was confirmed using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Impulse control disorders were investigated using the modified version of the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview. Impulsivity was measured with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale Version 11. Furthermore, all patients completed the Zuckerman Sensation-Seeking Scale Form V. The prevalence rate of all comorbid ICDs in our sample was 27.4% (n = 34). The most common ICD subtype was pathologic skin picking, followed by compulsive buying, intermittent explosive disorder, and trichotillomania. There were no instances of pyromania or compulsive sexual behavior. There was no statistically significant difference between the sociodemographic characteristics of bipolar patients with and without ICDs with regard to age, sex, education level, or marital status. Comorbidity of alcohol/substance abuse and number of suicide attempts were higher in the ICD(+) group than the ICD(-) group. Length of time between mood episodes was higher in the ICD(-) group than the ICD(+) group. There was a statistically significant difference between the total number of mood episodes between the 2 groups, but the number of depressive episodes was higher in the ICD(+) patients

  2. Psychotropic drug prescription patterns among patients with bipolar I disorder.

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    Levine, J; Chengappa, K N; Brar, J S; Gershon, S; Yablonsky, E; Stapf, D; Kupfer, D J

    2000-06-01

    Combination treatment, rather than monotherapy, is prevalent in the treatment of subjects with bipolar disorder, probably due to the complex and phasic nature of the illness. In general, prescription patterns may be influenced by the demographic characteristics of patients as well. We evaluated prescription patterns and the influence of demographic variables on these patterns in a voluntary registry of subjects with bipolar disorder. A subset of data from a larger voluntary registry was extracted for demographic variables and psychotropic medication use that had been reported in the month prior to registration by ambulatory, non-hospitalized subjects with bipolar I disorder in 1995/96 (n = 457). Among the thymoleptic agents, lithium was prescribed in over 50% of subjects, valproate in approximately 40%, and carbamazepine in 11% of subjects. Eighteen percent of subjects had no prescription for thymoleptic agents. Nearly one-third of all subjects were receiving antipsychotic agents, of whom two-thirds were receiving the traditional neuroleptic agents. More than half of all subjects were receiving concomitant antidepressants, of whom nearly 50% received the SSRI antidepressants and nearly 25% received buproprion. Approximately 40% of subjects received benzodiazepines. Only 18% of subjects received monotherapy, and nearly 50% received three or more psychotropic agents. In general, no associations were noted between demographic parameters including age, gender, marital or educational status, and psychotropic prescriptions. Consistent with the anecdotal reports, these data confirm that combination treatment is far more common than monotherapy. Demography appears to have a minimal impact on cross-sectional prescription patterns in subjects with bipolar disorder. Given that combination treatments are the rule rather than the exception, we should strive to achieve rational, yet pragmatic, treatment guidelines and algorithms to minimize the risks while maximizing the

  3. Comparison of metabolic syndrome prevalence in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder.

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    Nayerifard, Razieh; Bureng, Majid Akbari; Zahiroddin, Alireza; Namjoo, Massood; Rajezi, Sepideh

    2017-11-01

    Research has shown that the metabolic syndrome is more prevalent among patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder. Given the scarcity of research on the disorders, this paper aims to compare the prevalence of the syndrome among the two groups of patients. A total of 120 individuals participated in this cross sectional study: 60 patients with schizophrenia (26 males and 34 females) and 60 patients with bipolar I disorder (32 males and 28 females). The psychological disorders were diagnosed by some experienced psychiatrists according to the DSM-V. Furthermore, metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to ATP III guidelines. Metabolic syndrome prevalence among schizophrenic and bipolar I patients was 28 and 36 percent, respectively; the disparity in prevalence is not significant. According to the results, compared to their male counterparts, females were more prone significant to metabolic syndrome. Moreover, diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher among bipolar I patients. On the other hand, schizophrenic males were observed to have higher fasting blood sugar levels in comparison to bipolar I males patients. Age, consumption of second generation antipsychotics or antidepressants, and the duration of the disorder were found to be related to metabolic syndrome. This study showed that metabolic syndrome is not more prevalent among bipolar I patients, compared to those with schizophrenia. Also, women are more likely to be affected by the syndrome. A number of factors such as age, consumption of medication, and duration of the disorder are associated with the likelihood of the syndrome. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Lower switch rate in depressed patients with bipolar II than bipolar I disorder treated adjunctively with second-generation antidepressants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altshuler, LL; Suppes, T; Nolen, WA; Leverich, G; Keck, PE; Frye, MA; Kupka, R; McElroy, SL; Grunze, H; Kitchen, CMR; Post, R; Black, D.O.

    Objectives: The authors compared the switch rate into hypomania/mania in depressed patients treated with second-generation antidepressants who had either bipolar I or bipolar II disorder. Method: In a 10-week trial, 184 outpatients with bipolar depression (134 with bipolar I disorder, 48 with

  5. Episode cycles with increasing recurrences in first-episode bipolar-I disorder patients.

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    Baldessarini, R J; Salvatore, P; Khalsa, H-M K; Imaz-Etxeberria, H; Gonzalez-Pinto, A; Tohen, M

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary review of a century of studies of the course of manic-depressive syndromes produced 40 reports, of which approximately one-third report evidence of shortening wellness intervals or cycle-lengths with more recurrences, and two-thirds did not. We evaluated inter-episode intervals (cycle-length) in 128 clinically-treated, DSM-IV bipolar-I disorder patients followed prospectively and systematically over 5.7 years, with 6.5 episodes/person. As expected, cycle-length varied inversely with total cycle-count/person; however, multivariate linear regression found only longer initial hospitalization and fewer total cycles to be associated with cycle-length, whereas cycle-number (1, 2, 3, etc.), sex, intake-age, and first-episode polarity were not. Regression of within-subject cycle-length versus cycle-number yielded individual slope-functions with pseudo-random distribution (28% fell within ±1 month/cycle of the null [zero-slope]). Mean duration of early and late euthymic intervals (cycles 2 vs. 5) in patients with matched recurrence-counts was nearly identical. The course of bipolar-I disorder from onset was largely random or chaotic over nearly 6 years from onset. Only a minority of patients showed either cycle-acceleration or slowing, without changes in wellness intervals. The findings may be influenced by treatment-effects, but seem to indicate that most current bipolar-I disorder patients are unlikely to show progressive shortening of recurrence-cycles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Correlates of current suicide risk among Thai patients with bipolar I disorder: findings from the Thai Bipolar Disorder Registry

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    Suttajit S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sirijit Suttajit,1 Suchat Paholpak,2 Somrak Choovanicvong,3 Khanogwan Kittiwattanagul,4 Wetid Pratoomsri,5 Manit Srisurapanont1On behalf of the Thai Bipolar Registry Group1Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 2Department of Psychiatry, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 3Srithanya Hospital, Nonthaburi, 4Khon Kaen Rajanagarindra Psychiatric Hospital, Khon Kaen, 5Chachoengsao Hospital, Chachoengsao, ThailandBackground: The Thai Bipolar Disorder Registry was a prospective, multisite, naturalistic study conducted in 24 hospitals across Thailand. This study aimed to examine the correlates of current suicide risk in Thai patients with bipolar I disorder.Methods: Participants were adult inpatients or outpatients with bipolar disorder, based on the Diagnosis and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition. All were assessed by using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, version 5. The severity of current suicide risk was determined by using the total score of the MINI suicidality module. Mood symptoms were assessed by using the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale.Results: The data of 383 bipolar I disorder patients were included in the analyses. Of these, 363 (94.8% were outpatients. The mean (standard deviation of the MINI suicide risk score was 1.88 (5.0. The demographic/clinical variables significantly associated with the MINI suicide risk scores included age, number of overall previous episodes, the Young Mania Rating Scale score, the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores, and the Clinical Global Impression Severity of Illness Scale for Bipolar Disorder mania score, depression score, and overall score. The variables affecting the differences of suicide risk scores between or among groups were type of first mood episode, a history of rapid cycling, anxiety disorders, and alcohol use disorders. The stepwise multiple linear regression model revealed

  7. Cognitive functions and cognitive styles in young euthymic patients with bipolar I disorder.

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    Fakhry, Hala; El Ghonemy, Soheir H; Salem, Afra

    2013-10-01

    Recent evidences suggest that bipolar disorder patients do not return to premorbid functioning levels during the inter-episode periods. Cognitive deficits may impair patients working and functioning status and may also have negative impact on other aspects of thinking. To assess the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in patients with bipolar disorder in euthymic state and to explore any evident cognitive style problems. Case-control naturalistic study 60 patients with bipolar I disorder in euthymic state according to DSM-IV were recruited and subdivided into two groups each contains of 30 patients; (Group BPM) euthymic patients with recent manic episode, and Group BPD euthymic patients with recent depressive episode. Both groups were further compared with control group (Group C) consisted of 30 frequency matched healthy volunteers. Groups were subjected to the following: 1-clinical psychiatric examination, 2-Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD-17) and Bech-Rafaelsen Melancholia Scale (MES) for patients' group (BPD), 3-Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Bech-Rafaelsen Mania Scale (MAS) for patients' group (BPM), 4-assessment of euthymic state of mood included both MAS and MES, 5-MMSE, MTS and CDT were performed to assess cognitive functions, 6-cognitive styles evaluation included Fear of Failure, Hopelessness Scale, (the Social Dysfunction and Aggression Scale SDAS-9 and Arabic Anger Scale. Definite cognitive function impairment and different patterns of cognitive style were detected in case groups. MMSE, MTS and CDT scores were statistically significant. Fear of Failure Scale Scores were higher in BPM; 16 (53.33%) reported severe intensity compared to 16 (53.33%) of BPD Group reporting moderate intensity and 30 (100%) of the control group reporting only mild intensity of fear of failure with statistically significant differences. Although patients were in euthymic state; Hopelessness Scale discriminated between those with affective disorders and controls and other

  8. Effects of Omega-3 Supplement in the Treatment of Patients with Bipolar I Disorder.

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    Shakeri, Jalal; Khanegi, Maryam; Golshani, Sanobar; Farnia, Vahid; Tatari, Faeze; Alikhani, Mostafa; Nooripour, Roghih; Ghezelbash, Mohammad Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids play various physiological roles in the organism; they are crucial for the structure of cell membranes, metabolic processes, transmission of nerve impulses and brain functions. In recent years, particular attention has been paid to the rich sources of omega-3 for the treatment of many diseases, especially mental illnesses. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of omega-3 supplement in the treatment of patients with bipolar I disorder (BID). In this double-blind clinical trial, 100 patients suffering from BIDs were randomly divided into two, i.e. control (n = 50) and experimental (n = 50) groups. In addition to the other standard treatments, 1000 mg of omega-3 supplement was given to the experimental group on daily basis for 3 months and placebo was given to the control group. The Young Mania Rating Scale was completed for both groups before and after the intervention. Afterward, data were analyzed using paired t-test, independent t-test, and Chi-square test. Before intervention, mean severity of mania in the experimental group (23.50 ± 7.02) and control group (23.70 ± 8.09) was not significant (P ≤ 0.89). The difference after the intervention in the experimental group (10.64 ± 3.3) and control group (20.12 ± 6.78) was significant (P < 0.01). The mean intensity of mania before (23.50 ± 7.02) and after (10.64 ± 3.3) intervention reported to be significant at P < 0.05. Since omega-3 supplement was effective for the treatment of BID, it is suggested to use omega-3 supplements as an adjuvant therapy along with the other pharmacotherapies.

  9. Effects of omega-3 supplement in the treatment of patients with bipolar I disorder

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    Jalal Shakeri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatty acids play various physiological roles in the organism; they are crucial for the structure of cell membranes, metabolic processes, transmission of nerve impulses and brain functions. In recent years, particular attention has been paid to the rich sources of omega-3 for the treatment of many diseases, especially mental illnesses. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of omega-3 supplement in the treatment of patients with bipolar I disorder (BID. Methods: In this double-blind clinical trial, 100 patients suffering from BIDs were randomly divided into two, i.e. control (n = 50 and experimental (n = 50 groups. In addition to the other standard treatments, 1000 mg of omega-3 supplement was given to the experimental group on daily basis for 3 months and placebo was given to the control group. The Young Mania Rating Scale was completed for both groups before and after the intervention. Afterward, data were analyzed using paired t-test, independent t-test, and Chi-square test. Results: Before intervention, mean severity of mania in the experimental group (23.50 ± 7.02 and control group (23.70 ± 8.09 was not significant (P ≤ 0.89. The difference after the intervention in the experimental group (10.64 ± 3.3 and control group (20.12 ± 6.78 was significant (P < 0.01. The mean intensity of mania before (23.50 ± 7.02 and after (10.64 ± 3.3 intervention reported to be significant at P < 0.05. Conclusions: Since omega-3 supplement was effective for the treatment of BID, it is suggested to use omega-3 supplements as an adjuvant therapy along with the other pharmacotherapies.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of asenapine in the treatment of bipolar I disorder patients with mixed episodes.

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    Sawyer, Laura; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Chang, Stacey; Rinciog, Claudia; Guiraud-Diawara, Alice; Marre, Caroline; Hansen, Karina

    2014-07-01

    Around one-third of patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) experience mixed episodes, characterized by both mania and depression, which tend to be more difficult and costly to treat. Atypical antipsychotics are recommended for the treatment of mixed episodes, although evidence of their efficacy, tolerability, and cost in these patients is limited. This study evaluates, from a UK National Health Service perspective, the cost-effectiveness of asenapine vs olanzapine in BD-I patients with mixed episodes. Cost-effectiveness was assessed using a Markov model. Efficacy was informed by a post-hoc analysis of two short-term clinical trials, with response measured as a composite Young Mania Rating Score and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale end-point. Probabilities of discontinuation and relapse to manic, mixed, and depressive episodes were sourced from published meta-analyses. Direct costs (2012-2013 values) included drug acquisition, monitoring, and resource use related to bipolar disorder as well as selected adverse events. Benefits were measured as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). For treating mixed episodes, asenapine generated 0.0187 more QALYs for an additional cost of £24 compared to olanzapine over a 5-year period, corresponding to a £1302 incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. The higher acquisition cost of asenapine was roughly offset by the healthcare savings conferred through its greater efficacy in treating these patients. The model shows that benefits were driven by earlier response to asenapine during acute treatment and were maintained during longer-term follow-up. RESULTS were sensitive to changes in key parameters including short and longer-term efficacy, unit cost, and utilities, but conclusions remained relatively robust. RESULTS suggest that asenapine is a cost-effective alternative to olanzapine in mixed episode BD-I patients, and may have specific advantages in this population, potentially leading to healthcare sector savings and

  11. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with comorbid cannabis use disorders (CUDs) in hospitalized patients with bipolar I disorder.

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    Weinstock, Lauren M; Gaudiano, Brandon A; Wenze, Susan J; Epstein-Lubow, Gary; Miller, Ivan W

    2016-02-01

    Published data suggest that cannabis use is associated with several negative consequences for individuals with bipolar disorder (BD), including new manic episode onset, psychosis, and functional disability. Yet much less is known about cannabis use disorders (CUDs) in this population, especially in more acutely symptomatic groups. To evaluate correlates of CUD comorbidity in BD, a retrospective chart review was conducted for 230 adult patients with bipolar I disorder (BDI) who were admitted to a university-affiliated private psychiatric hospital. Using a computer algorithm, a hospital administrator extracted relevant demographic and clinical data from the electronic medical record for analysis. Thirty-six (16%) had a comorbid CUD. CUD comorbidity was significantly associated with younger age, manic/mixed episode polarity, presence of psychotic features, and comorbid nicotine dependence, alcohol use disorder (AUD), and other substance use disorders, but was associated with decreased likelihood of anxiety disorder comorbidity. With the exception of manic/mixed polarity and AUD comorbidity, results from multivariate analyses controlling for the presence of other SUDs were consistent with univariate findings. Patients with BD and comorbid CUDs appear to be a complex population with need for enhanced clinical monitoring. Given increasing public acceptance of cannabis use, and the limited availability of evidenced-based interventions targeted toward CUDs in BD, psychoeducation and other treatment development efforts appear to be warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neurocognitive function in clinically stable individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder: Comparisons with schizophrenia patients and controls.

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    Lin, Pei-Yun; Wang, Peng-Wei; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2017-05-01

    This study compared the levels of the five domains of neurocognitive function-executive function, attention, memory, verbal comprehension, and perceptual organization-among clinically stable individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder, individuals with long-term schizophrenia, and a group of controls. We recruited a total of 93 clinically stable individuals with bipolar I disorder, 94 individuals with schizophrenia, and 106 controls in this study. Their neurocognitive function was measured using a series of neurocognitive function tests: the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III), Line Cancellation Test, Visual Form Discrimination, Controlled Oral Word Association Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Continuous Performance Task, and Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition. Neurocognitive function was compared among the three groups through a multivariate analysis of variance. The results indicated that when the effect of age was controlled, clinically stable individuals with bipolar I disorder and those with schizophrenia demonstrated poor neurocognitive function on all tests except for the WAIS-III Similarity and Information and the Line Cancellation Test. The individuals with bipolar I disorder had similar levels of neurocognitive function compared with the schizophrenia group, but higher levels of neurocognitive function on the WAIS-III Comprehension, Controlled Oral Word Association Test, and Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition Auditory Immediate and Delayed Index and Visual Immediate and Delayed Index. The conclusions of this study suggest that compared with controls, individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder and those with long-term schizophrenia have poorer neurocognitive function, even when clinically stable. Individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder and those with long-term schizophrenia have similar levels of deficits in several domains of neurocognitive function. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  13. Neurocognitive function in clinically stable individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder: Comparisons with schizophrenia patients and controls

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    Pei-Yun Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the levels of the five domains of neurocognitive function—executive function, attention, memory, verbal comprehension, and perceptual organization—among clinically stable individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder, individuals with long-term schizophrenia, and a group of controls. We recruited a total of 93 clinically stable individuals with bipolar I disorder, 94 individuals with schizophrenia, and 106 controls in this study. Their neurocognitive function was measured using a series of neurocognitive function tests: the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale—Third Edition (WAIS-III, Line Cancellation Test, Visual Form Discrimination, Controlled Oral Word Association Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Continuous Performance Task, and Wechsler Memory Scale—Third Edition. Neurocognitive function was compared among the three groups through a multivariate analysis of variance. The results indicated that when the effect of age was controlled, clinically stable individuals with bipolar I disorder and those with schizophrenia demonstrated poor neurocognitive function on all tests except for the WAIS-III Similarity and Information and the Line Cancellation Test. The individuals with bipolar I disorder had similar levels of neurocognitive function compared with the schizophrenia group, but higher levels of neurocognitive function on the WAIS-III Comprehension, Controlled Oral Word Association Test, and Wechsler Memory Scale—Third Edition Auditory Immediate and Delayed Index and Visual Immediate and Delayed Index. The conclusions of this study suggest that compared with controls, individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder and those with long-term schizophrenia have poorer neurocognitive function, even when clinically stable. Individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder and those with long-term schizophrenia have similar levels of deficits in several domains of neurocognitive function.

  14. Response to inhaled loxapine in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder: PANSS-EC responder analyses.

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    Zeller, Scott; Zun, Leslie; Cassella, James V; Spyker, Daniel A; Yeung, Paul P

    2017-11-01

    Efficacy of inhaled loxapine 5 or 10 mg in treating agitation was shown using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale - Excited Component (PANSS-EC) in two Phase III randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in 344 agitated patients with schizophrenia and 314 patients with bipolar I disorder (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00628589, NCT00721955). To examine the five individual items comprising the PANSS-EC and the percentage of patients achieving a clinical response (reduction of ≥40%) in PANSS-EC (Response-40) for these two studies. Response-40 was examined at the primary end-point (2 h) and over time. Response-40 and each PANSS-EC item score were statistically significant v. placebo at 2 h and at each assessment time point for both doses. Inhaled loxapine produced rapid improvement in agitated patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder, achieving Response-40 at the first assessment (10 min post dose). These results highlight the effectiveness of loxapine across all components of agitation as measured by the PANSS-EC. S.Z. is a member of the speakers bureau for Grupo Ferrer. L.Z. has been a speaker and grant recipient for Teva Pharmaceuticals. J.V.C. and D.A.S. were employees of Alexza Pharmaceuticals during execution of the studies, and are currently paid consultants for and have received stock and/or stock options from Alexza Pharmaceuticals. P.P.Y. is a full-time employee and receives stock options from Teva Pharmaceuticals. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license.

  15. No neuronal autoantibodies detected in plasma of patients with a bipolar I disorder.

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    Snijders, Gijsje; Titulaer, Maarten J; Bergink, Veerle; Bastiaansen, Anna E; Schreurs, Marco W J; Ophoff, Roel A; Boks, Marco P; Kahn, René S; de Witte, Lot D

    2018-01-01

    A subpopulation of patients with bipolar disorder type I (BD-I) might suffer from undiagnosed autoimmune encephalitis. We tested plasma of 104 BD-I patients with a current or recent manic episode in the past 2 years for the presence of neuronal autoantibodies using immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry and cell-based assay (CBA). Neuronal antibodies were not detected in any of the BD type I. This finding suggests that the frequency of an undiagnosed autoimmune encephalitis in patients with BD I is less than 1%. However, these findings need to be confirmed in cerebrospinal fluid and/or blood of acutely ill manic patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β activity and cognitive functioning in patients with bipolar I disorder

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    Munkholm, Klaus; Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica; Jacoby, Anne Sophie

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are common in patients with bipolar disorder (BD) in remission and may be associated with glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) activity, which is inhibited by lithium. GSK-3 may be a relevant treatment target for interventions tailored at cognitive disturbances in BD...... ratio (serine-9-pGSK-3β /total GSK-3β), was negatively associated with sustained attention (p = 0.009 and p = 0.042, respectively), but not with other cognitive domains or global cognition. A crossover interaction between lithium treatment and the GSK activity was observed, indicating that lower pGSK-3β...... but the relation between GSK-3 activity, cognition and lithium treatment is unknown. We therefore investigated the possible association between GSK-3 activity and cognition and whether lithium treatment moderates this association in patients with BD. In a prospective 6-12 month follow-up study, GSK- 3β activity...

  17. Biological dysrhythm in remitted bipolar I disorder.

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    Iyer, Aishwarya; Palaniappan, Pradeep

    2017-12-01

    Recent treatment guidelines support treatment of biological rhythm abnormalities as a part of treatment of bipolar disorder, but still, literature examining various domains (Sleep, Activity, Social, and Eating) of biological rhythm and its clinical predictors are less. The main aim of our study is to compare various domains of biological rhythm among remitted bipolar I subjects and healthy controls. We also explored for any association between clinical variables and biological rhythm among bipolar subjects. 40 subjects with Bipolar I disorder and 40 healthy controls who met inclusion and exclusion criteria were recruited for the study. Diagnoses were ascertained by a qualified psychiatrist using MINI 5.0. Sociodemographic details, biological rhythm (BRIAN-Biological Rhythm Interview of assessment in Neuropsychiatry) and Sleep functioning (PSQI- Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) were assessed in all subjects. Mean age of the Bipolar subjects and controls were 41.25±11.84years and 38.25±11.25 years respectively. Bipolar subjects experienced more biological rhythm disturbance when compared to healthy controls (total BRIAN score being 34.25±9.36 vs 28.2±6.53) (p=0.002). Subsyndromal depressive symptoms (HDRS) had significant positive correlation with BRIAN global scores(r=0.368, p=0.02). Linear regression analysis showed that number of episodes which required hospitalization (β=0.601, t=3.106, P=0.004), PSQI (β=0.394, t=2.609, p=0.014), HDRS (β=0.376, t=2.34, t=0.036) explained 31% of variance in BRIAN scores in remitted bipolar subjects. Biological rhythm disturbances seem to persist even after clinical remission of bipolar illness. More studies to look into the impact of subsyndromal depressive symptoms on biological rhythm are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased DNA and RNA damage by oxidation in patients with bipolar I disorder.

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    Jacoby, A S; Vinberg, M; Poulsen, H E; Kessing, L V; Munkholm, K

    2016-08-09

    The mechanisms underlying bipolar disorder (BD) and the associated medical burden are unclear. Damage generated by oxidation of nucleosides may be implicated in BD pathophysiology; however, evidence from in vivo studies is limited and the extent of state-related alterations is unclear. This prospective study investigated for we believe the first time the damage generated by oxidation of DNA and RNA strictly in patients with type I BD in a manic or mixed state and subsequent episodes and remission compared with healthy control subjects. Urinary excretion of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-guanosine (8-oxoGuo), valid markers of whole-body DNA and RNA damage by oxidation, respectively, was measured in 54 patients with BD I and in 35 healthy control subjects using a modified ultraperformance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry assay. Repeated measurements were evaluated in various affective phases during a 6- to 12-month period and compared with repeated measurements in healthy control subjects. Independent of lifestyle and demographic variables, a 34% (PRNA damage by oxidation across all affective states, including euthymia, was found in patients with BD I compared with healthy control subjects. Increases in DNA and RNA oxidation of 18% (PDNA and RNA damage by oxidation in BD pathophysiology and a potential for urinary 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGuo to function as biological markers of diagnosis, state and treatment response in BD.

  19. The role of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy in improving occupational functioning in patients with bipolar I disorder.

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    Frank, Ellen; Soreca, Isabella; Swartz, Holly A; Fagiolini, Andrea M; Mallinger, Alan G; Thase, Michael E; Grochocinski, Victoria J; Houck, Patricia R; Kupfer, David J

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies demonstrate the poor psychosocial outcomes associated with bipolar disorder. Occupational functioning, a key indicator of psychosocial disability, is often severely affected by the disorder. The authors describe the effect of acute treatment with interpersonal and social rhythm therapy on occupational functioning over a period of approximately 2.5 years. Patients with bipolar I disorder were randomly assigned to receive either acute and maintenance interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, acute and maintenance intensive clinical management, acute interpersonal and social rhythm therapy and maintenance intensive clinical management, or acute intensive clinical management and maintenance interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, all with appropriate pharmacotherapy. Occupational functioning was measured with the UCLA Social Attainment Scale at baseline, at the end of acute treatment, and after 1 and 2 years of maintenance treatment. The main effect of treatment did not reach conventional levels of statistical significance; however, the authors observed a significant time by initial treatment interaction. Participants initially assigned to interpersonal and social rhythm therapy showed more rapid improvement in occupational functioning than those initially assigned to intensive clinical management, primarily accounted for by greater improvement in occupational functioning during the acute treatment phase. At the end of 2 years of maintenance treatment, there were no differences between the treatment groups. A gender effect was also observed, with women who initially received interpersonal and social rhythm therapy showing more marked and rapid improvement. There was no effect of maintenance treatment assignment on occupational functioning outcomes. In this study, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, with its emphasis on amelioration of interpersonal and role functioning, improved occupational functioning significantly more rapidly than did a

  20. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β in patients with bipolar I disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacoby, Anne S; Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The enzyme glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) is involved in the mechanisms of action of lithium and may play a role in relation to affective states in bipolar disorder. The objectives of the present study were to compare the activity of GSK-3β (measured as levels of phosphorylated GSK...

  1. Increased DNA and RNA damage by oxidation in patients with bipolar I disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacoby, Anne Sophie; Vinberg, M; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen

    2016-01-01

    . This prospective study investigated for we believe the first time the damage generated by oxidation of DNA and RNA strictly in patients with type I BD in a manic or mixed state and subsequent episodes and remission compared with healthy control subjects. Urinary excretion of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8......-oxo-guanosine (8-oxoGuo), valid markers of whole-body DNA and RNA damage by oxidation, respectively, was measured in 54 patients with BD I and in 35 healthy control subjects using a modified ultraperformance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry assay. Repeated measurements were evaluated...... with BD I compared with healthy control subjects. Increases in DNA and RNA oxidation of 18% (P

  2. Compare of Executive Function in Bipolar I Disorder and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza khodaei-Ardakani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is evidence for differential executive function in Bipolar I Disorder (BID and schizophrenia that may tend different cognitive deficits and abnormalities. The objective of this sudsy was to compare the executive function of BID and schizophrenic patients. Materials & Methods: We studied 50 patients with BID, and 50 with schizophrenia participants in outpatients' clinic of Rouzbeh hospital. All participants completed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST the Persian version. The participants were mach in three basic variables which had most contributions in cognitive conditions in patients. They were Age, educational status and period of illness. Results: The two patient groups had compared performance on the WCST in compared with general population (P<0/05. In the WCST, schizophrenic patients showed impairment executive function than BID patients (P<0/05. Conclusion: findings indicated that schizophrenic patients had more dysfunctions executive function than the Bipolar disorder I patients. Although, both disorders may show impairment in executive function, but the dysfunction in schizophrenia greater than Bipolar I Disorder patients.

  3. Successful and rapid response to electroconvulsive therapy of a suicidal patient with comorbid bipolar I disorder and histrionic personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Serata, Daniele; Del Casale, Antonio; Simonetti, Alessio; Milioni, Mara; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Scatena, Paola; Fensore, Claudio; Carbonetti, Paolo; Kotzalidis, Giorgio D; Tatarelli, Roberto; Pompili, Maurizio; Girardi, Paolo

    2012-03-01

    A woman with bipolar disorder I, histrionic personality disorder, and suicidal ideation with repeated suicide attempts, who had been treated for 2 years with mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and benzodiazepines, received a total of 8 bitemporal-biparietal electroconvulsive therapy sessions. Her suicidal ideation and self-harm behavior disappeared immediately after the first session and her psychopathology soon after. This supports the existence of a relatively independent suicidal syndrome and confirms data on its immediate responsiveness to electroconvulsive therapy. Electroconvulsive therapy must not be long withheld from patients with such characteristics to reduce unnecessary sufferance and suicidality.

  4. Comorbidity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Tourette's syndrome and bipolar I disorder in an adolescent patient with schizencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chou-Yu; Wang, Liang-Jen; Huang, Yu-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    There is compelling evidence for an association between structural brain deformities and psychiatric disorders. We report the case of an adolescent boy who was diagnosed with both attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and Tourette's syndrome. A full-blown manic episode occurred when he was 13 years old. During his admission to a psychiatric ward, closed-lip schizencephaly in the left frontal lobe and the right parietal lobe was identified through brain imaging. Effective control of his manic symptoms was achieved with quetiapine monotherapy within 3 weeks. This case report implies that the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, especially in young patients with multiple comorbid conditions, may be associated with abnormalities in the anatomical and functional development of the brain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hypnotic susceptibility and affective states in bipolar I and II disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingren; Wang, Jiawei; Zhu, Qisha; Ma, Guorong; Shen, Chanchan; Fan, Hongying; Wang, Wei

    2017-11-09

    Highly hypnotizable individuals have impaired executive function, elevated motor impulsivity and increased emotional sensitivity, which are sometimes found in bipolar disorder patients. It is then reasonable to assume that certain aspects of hypnotic susceptibility differ with the types of bipolar disorder. The Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSS:C) test, the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ), the Hypomanic Checklist-32 (HCL-32) and the Plutchick-van Praag Depression Inventory (PVP) were applied to 62 patients with bipolar I disorder, 33 bipolar II disorder, and 120 healthy volunteers. The passing rate of the SHSS:C 'Moving hands apart' item was higher in bipolar I patients than in controls, whereas for 'Mosquito hallucination' the rate was lower. Bipolar I and II patients scored significantly higher on MDQ, HCL-32 and PVP scales than controls. The passing rates of 'Mosquito hallucination' in controls, 'Arm rigidity' in bipolar I, and 'Age regression' in bipolar II predicted the respective MDQ scores. In contrast to cognitive suggestions, bipolar I patients followed motor suggestions more often under hypnosis. Furthermore, both bipolar disorder patients and healthy volunteers demonstrated associations between mania levels and certain hypnotic susceptibility features. Our study aids in better understanding the altered conscious states in bipolar disorders, and encourages the use of related psychotherapy for these patients.

  6. Effects of asenapine on depressive symptoms in patients with bipolar I disorder experiencing acute manic or mixed episodes: a post hoc analysis of two 3-week clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nations Kari R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asenapine demonstrated superiority over placebo for mania in bipolar I disorder patients experiencing acute current manic or mixed episodes in 2 randomized, placebo-and olanzapine-controlled trials. We report the results of exploratory pooled post hoc analyses from these trials evaluating asenapine's effects on depressive symptoms in patients from these trials with significant baseline depressive symptoms. Methods In the original trials (A7501004 [NCT00159744], A7501005 [NCT00159796], 977 patients were randomized to flexible-dose sublingual asenapine (10 mg twice daily on day 1; 5 or 10 mg twice daily thereafter, placebo, or oral olanzapine 5-20 mg once daily for 3 weeks. Three populations were defined using baseline depressive symptoms: (1 Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS total score ≥20 (n = 132; (2 Clinical Global Impression for Bipolar Disorder-Depression (CGI-BP-D scale severity score ≥4 (n = 170; (3 diagnosis of mixed episodes (n = 302 by investigative site screening. For each population, asenapine and olanzapine were independently compared with placebo using least squares mean change from baseline on depressive symptom measures. Results Decreases in MADRS total score were statistically greater with asenapine versus placebo at days 7 and 21 in all populations; differences between olanzapine and placebo were not significant. Decreases in CGI-BP-D score were significantly greater with asenapine versus placebo at day 7 in all categories and day 21 in population 1; CGI-BP-D score reductions were significantly greater with olanzapine versus placebo at day 21 in population 1 and day 7 in populations 2 and 3. Conclusions These post hoc analyses show that asenapine reduced depressive symptoms in bipolar I disorder patients experiencing acute manic or mixed episodes with clinically relevant depressive symptoms at baseline; olanzapine results appeared to be less consistent. Controlled studies of asenapine in

  7. Information Processing in Adolescents with Bipolar I Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Jane; Joormann, Jutta; Gotlib, Ian H.; Kelley, Ryan G.; Acquaye, Tenah; Howe, Meghan; Chang, Kiki D.; Singh, Manpreet K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cognitive models of bipolar I disorder (BD) may aid in identification of children who are especially vulnerable to chronic mood dysregulation. Information-processing biases related to memory and attention likely play a role in the development and persistence of BD among adolescents; however, these biases have not been extensively…

  8. Self Stigma Among People with Bipolar-I Disorder in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Sadighi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Psychiatric stigma refers to systemic and internalized stereotypical negative attitudes against individual with mental illness. This article describes the level of self stigma, stereotype endorsement and perceived discrimination experienced by patients with Bipolar-I disorder in Tehran. Methods: Data were collected from a total of 126 patients with Bipolar-I disorder who responded to acute phase treatment using the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness scale. The ISMI scale has five subscales: Alienation, Stereotype Endorsement, Perceived Discrimination, Social Withdrawal and Stigma Resistance. Results: In this study 26.7% of participants reported moderate to high levels of self stigma, 57.49% moderate to high levels of stigma resistance and 18.3% moderate to high levels of Perceived discrimination. Discussion: The results suggest that, self stigma appears in over one fifth of individuals with Bipolar-I disorder in Iran. The symptoms of Bipolar-I disorder has profound impacts on the quality of life of affected patients. Psychosocial functioning and self-esteem is impaired in people with Bipolar-I disorder. Interventions are required to reduce the negative effects of internalized stigma in this group.

  9. Lower Orbital Frontal White Matter Integrity in Adolescents with Bipolar I Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafantaris, Vivian; Kingsley, Peter; Ardekani, Babak; Saito, Ema; Lencz, Todd; Lim, Kelvin; Szeszko, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Patients with bipolar I disorder demonstrated white matter abnormalities in white matter regions as seen through the use of diffusion tensor imaging. The findings suggest that white matter abnormalities in pediatric bipolar disorder may be useful in constructing neurobiological models of the disorder.

  10. Ziprasidone for maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovsky, Steven L; Dubovsky, Amelia N

    2011-04-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are increasingly used in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. This review addresses the evidence supporting the use of one of these medications for this indication in order to place available data in perspective for the clinician. The approval of ziprasidone for maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder was based on two open-label extensions of industry-sponsored 3-week monotherapy trials in mania, involving a total of 189 patients and an industry-sponsored study using sample enrichment of 584 outpatients who had either ziprasidone or a placebo added to lithium or valproate. Patients enrolled in maintenance studies did not have refractory mood disorders or comorbid conditions or risk of dangerousness, and they were able to give sustained consent. Ziprasidone is generally well tolerated, but should be taken with food. Primary interactions of concern are those with other serotonergic medications and other medications that prolong the QT interval. Although antipsychotic drugs are used frequently for maintenance treatment, current guidelines recommend that an attempt be made to withdraw them after acute treatment. The use of these medications as part of a maintenance regimen is most appropriate in cases of persistent psychosis or failure to respond to standard mood stabilizer combinations.

  11. Sex differences in the risk of rapid cycling and other indicators of adverse illness course in patients with bipolar I and II disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Almila; Winham, Stacey J; McElroy, Susan L; Frye, Mark A; Prieto, Miguel L; Cuellar-Barboza, Alfredo B; Fuentes, Manuel; Geske, Jennifer; Mori, Nicole; Biernacka, Joanna M; Bobo, William V

    2015-09-01

    To examine the independent effects of sex on the risk of rapid cycling and other indicators of adverse illness course in patients with bipolar I disorder (BP-I) or bipolar II disorder (BP-II). We analyzed data from the first 1,225 patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Individualized Medicine Biobank for Bipolar Disorder. Demographic and clinical variables were ascertained using standardized questionnaires; height and weight were assessed to determine body mass index (BMI). Rates of rapid cycling, cycle acceleration, and increased severity of mood episodes over time were compared between women and men overall and within subgroups defined by bipolar disorder subtype (BP-I or BP-II). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the independent effect of sex on the risk of these indicators of adverse illness course. Women had significantly higher rates of rapid cycling than men. Overall rates of rapid cycling were higher in patients with BP-II than BP-I; and sex differences in the rate of rapid cycling were more pronounced in patients with BP-II than BP-I, although the power to detect statistically significant differences was reduced due to the lower sample size of subjects with BP-II. Female sex was a significant predictor of rapid cycling, cycle acceleration, and increased severity of mood episodes over time after adjusting for age, bipolar disorder subtype, BMI, having any comorbid psychiatric disorder, and current antidepressant use. Female sex was associated with significantly higher risk of rapid cycling, cycle acceleration, and increased severity of mood episodes over time in a sample of 1,225 patients with bipolar disorders. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Neurocognitive functioning, clinical course and functional outcome in first-treatment bipolar I disorder patients with and without clinical relapse: A 1-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmo, Christine; Lagerberg, Trine V; Kvitland, Levi R; Aminoff, Sofie R; Hellvin, Tone; Simonsen, Carmen; Haatveit, Beathe; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid; Ueland, Torill

    2017-11-09

    Due to limited research on the association between recurrence of mood episodes and the longitudinal course of neurocognitive functioning in early phase bipolar I disorder (BD I), the impact of recurrence on neurocognition remains unclear. Further, a strong correlation between neurocognitive impairment and functional impairment has been demonstrated. The longitudinal relationship between neurocognitive impairment and functional outcome in relation to recurrence is, however, not established. The current study investigated the longitudinal relationship between neurocognition, recurrence of mood episodes and functional outcome in a sample of first-treatment (FT) BD I patients (N = 42), with and without relapse, during a 1-year follow-up period. The longitudinal course of neurocognitive functioning in the patients was also compared to that of a group of healthy controls (N = 143). Compared to both patients with relapse and healthy controls, no-relapse patients showed neurocognitive improvements. The polarity of the relapse episodes was mostly depressive, and for the no-relapse patients, reduction of symptoms was associated with neurocognitive improvement. No-relapse patients showed better global and occupational functioning. The current study found different neurocognitive and functional trajectories in FT BD I patients with and without relapse, with differences at follow-up to some degree being mediated by current symptoms. The current findings highlight the importance of treatment focusing on neurocognition and symptom states with the aim of improving functional recovery. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Polarity of the first episode and time to diagnosis of bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Boseok; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Ha, Tae Hyon; Chang, Jae Seung; Ha, Kyooseob

    2009-06-01

    The current study explored the relationship between the polarity of the first episode and the timing of eventual diagnosis of bipolar I disorder, and associated clinical implications. Twelve years of clinical data from the medical records of 258 inpatients meeting DSM-III-R or DSM-IV criteria for bipolar I disorder were analyzed. Subjects were divided into two groups according to the polarity of the first episode: those with depressive polarity (FE-D), and those with manic polarity (FE-M). Comparisons were made between the two groups on variables associated with the timing of diagnosis and related outcomes. In population with bipolar I disorder, a significant longer time lapse from the first major mood episode to the confirmed diagnosis was associated with the FE-D group compared to the FE-M group [5.6 (+/-6.1) vs. 2.5 (+/-5.5) years, pschizophrenia and major depressive disorder while FE-M subjects tended to have prior diagnoses of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. A significantly higher rate of suicide attempts was associated with the FE-D group compared to the FE-M group (12.7 vs. 1.7%, pdepressive polarity is likely to be followed by a considerable delay until an eventual confirmed diagnosis of bipolar I disorder. Given that first-episode depressive patients are particularly vulnerable to unfavorable clinical outcomes such as suicide attempts, a more systematic approach is needed to differentiate bipolar disorder among depressed patients in their early stages.

  14. Poorer sustained attention in bipolar I than bipolar II disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shih-Heng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nearly all information processing during cognitive processing takes place during periods of sustained attention. Sustained attention deficit is among the most commonly reported impairments in bipolar disorder (BP. The majority of previous studies have only focused on bipolar I disorder (BP I, owing to underdiagnosis or misdiagnosis of bipolar II disorder (BP II. With the refinement of the bipolar spectrum paradigm, the goal of this study was to compare the sustained attention of interepisode patients with BP I to those with BP II. Methods In all, 51 interepisode BP patients (22 with BP I and 29 with BP II and 20 healthy controls participated in this study. The severity of psychiatric symptoms was assessed by the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Young Mania Rating Scale. All participants undertook Conners' Continuous Performance Test II (CPT-II to evaluate sustained attention. Results After controlling for the severity of symptoms, age and years of education, BP I patients had a significantly longer reaction times (F(2,68 = 7.648, P = 0.001, worse detectability (d' values (F(2,68 = 6.313, P = 0.003 and more commission errors (F(2,68 = 6.182, P = 0.004 than BP II patients and healthy controls. BP II patients and controls scored significantly higher than BP I patients for d' (F = 6.313, P = 0.003. No significant difference was found among the three groups in omission errors and no significant correlations were observed between CPT-II performance and clinical characteristics in the three groups. Conclusions These findings suggested that impairments in sustained attention might be more representative of BP I than BP II after controlling for the severity of symptoms, age, years of education and reaction time on the attentional test. A longitudinal follow-up study design with a larger sample size might be needed to provide more information on chronological sustained attention deficit in BP patients, and to illustrate

  15. Is subclinical anxiety an endophenotype for bipolar I patients? A study from a Costa Rican sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Javier; Hare, Elizabeth; Pacheco, Adriana; Escamilla, Michael; Raventos, Henriette

    2010-05-01

    Although genetic influences on bipolar I disorder are well established, localization of genes that predispose to the illness has been difficult. Some genes predisposing to bipolar I disorder may be transmitted without expression of the categorical clinical phenotype. One strategy to overcome this obstacle is the use of quantitative endophenotypes, as has been done for other medical disorders. We analyzed 30 bipolar I extended families (300 subjects, average family size 10.34 members, range: 2-31) and 20 unrelated healthy controls from a Costa Rican sample. Heritability and genetic correlation of the state and trait scale from the Anxiety State and Trait Inventory was computed by using the general linear model (SOLAR package software). We also assessed variation of both scores among groups (patients, relatives and controls) and tested independence of affection status. Heritability for state is 0.45 (SE=0.11, p=0.0000001) and for trait is 0.89 (SE=0.06, p=6.22e-29). Genetic correlation for state and trait is 0.29, (SE=0.12, p=0.038-3.19e-8). Bipolar I patients showed the highest trait score (F=12.17 [5,24], p=0.002), (bipolar I patients>relatives with other pathologies, >healthy relatives>unrelated healthy controls) with normal distribution in healthy individuals and no difference regarding depression and mania current status, (F=0.230, df=1, p=0.632 and F=1.401, df=1, p=0.238, respectively), contrary to the state score. Confounding factors such as comorbid disorders could affect the interaction of subclinical anxiety with mania. Due to our limited budget we were not able to re-evaluate the subjects and conduct a test retest to assess the STAI reliability and mood state independence of anxiety traits over different times. Further research is needed to evaluate if anxiety traits are specially related to bipolar I disorder in comparison with other traits such as anger, attention or response inhibition deficit, pathological impulsivity or low self-directedness. Anxiety

  16. Influence of birth cohort on age of onset cluster analysis in bipolar I disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, M.; Glenn, T.; Alda, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Two common approaches to identify subgroups of patients with bipolar disorder are clustering methodology (mixture analysis) based on the age of onset, and a birth cohort analysis. This study investigates if a birth cohort effect will influence the results of clustering on the age of onset......, using a large, international database. Methods: The database includes 4037 patients with a diagnosis of bipolar I disorder, previously collected at 36 collection sites in 23 countries. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to adjust the data for country median age, and in some models, birth...... for birth cohort (three subgroups), family history and polarity of the first episode could not be distinguished between the middle and oldest subgroups. Conclusion: These results using international data confirm prior findings using single country data, that there are subgroups of bipolar I disorder based...

  17. Effectiveness of the Dader Method for pharmaceutical care in patients with bipolar I disorder: EMDADER-TAB: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Ospina, Andrea; Amariles, Pedro; Benjumea, Dora M; Gutierrez, Francisco; Faus, Maria J; Rodriguez, Luis F

    2014-05-20

    Bipolar I disorder (BD-I) is a chronic mental illness characterized by the presence of one or more manic episodes, or both depressive and manic episodes, usually separated by asymptomatic intervals. Pharmacists can contribute to the management of BD-I, mainly with the use of effective and safe drugs, and improve the patient's life quality through pharmaceutical care. Some studies have shown the effect of pharmaceutical care in the achievement of therapeutic goals in different illnesses; however, to our knowledge, there is a lack of randomized controlled trials designed to assess the effect of pharmacist intervention in patients with BD. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of the Dader Method for pharmaceutical care in patients with BD-I. Randomized, controlled, prospective, single-center clinical trial with duration of 12 months will be performed to compare the effect of Dader Method of pharmaceutical care with the usual care process of patients in a psychiatric clinic. Patients diagnosed with BD-I aged between 18 and 65 years who have been discharged or referred from outpatients service of the San Juan de Dios Clinic (Antioquia, Colombia) will be included. Patients will be randomized into the intervention group who will receive pharmaceutical care provided by pharmacists working in collaboration with psychiatrists, or into the control group who will receive usual care and verbal-written counseling regarding BD. Study outcomes will be assessed at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after randomization. The primary outcome will be to measure the number of hospitalizations, emergency service consultations, and unscheduled outpatient visits. Effectiveness, safety, adherence, and quality of life will be assessed as secondary outcomes. Statistical analyses will be performed using two-tailed McNemar tests, Pearson chi-square tests, and Student's t-tests; a P value pharmaceutical care in patients with BD-I and it could generate valuable information

  18. Brain network analysis reveals affected connectome structure in bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Guusje; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Abramovic, Lucija; Vreeker, Annabel; de Reus, Marcel A; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Boks, Marco P M; Ophoff, Roel A; Kahn, René S

    2016-01-01

    The notion that healthy brain function emerges from coordinated neural activity constrained by the brain's network of anatomical connections--i.e., the connectome--suggests that alterations in the connectome's wiring pattern may underlie brain disorders. Corroborating this hypothesis, studies in schizophrenia are indicative of altered connectome architecture including reduced communication efficiency, disruptions of central brain hubs, and affected "rich club" organization. Whether similar deficits are present in bipolar disorder is currently unknown. This study examines structural connectome topology in 216 bipolar I disorder patients as compared to 144 healthy controls, focusing in particular on central regions (i.e., brain hubs) and connections (i.e., rich club connections, interhemispheric connections) of the brain's network. We find that bipolar I disorder patients exhibit reduced global efficiency (-4.4%, P =0.002) and that this deficit relates (r = 0.56, P 0.1). These findings highlight a role for aberrant brain network architecture in bipolar I disorder with reduced global efficiency in association with disruptions in interhemispheric connectivity, while the central "rich club" system appears not to be particularly affected. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effectiveness of the Dader Method for Pharmaceutical Care on Patients with Bipolar I Disorder: Results from the EMDADER-TAB Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Ospina, Andrea; Amariles, Pedro; Hincapié-García, Jaime A; González-Avendaño, Sebastián; Benjumea, Dora M; Faus, Maria José; Rodriguez, Luis F

    2017-01-01

    Bipolar I disorder (BD-I) is a chronic illness characterized by relapses alternating with periods of remission. Pharmacists can contribute to improved health outcomes in these patients through pharmaceutical care in association with a multidisciplinary health team; however, more evidence derived from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is needed to demonstrate the effect of pharmaceutical care on patients with BD-I. To assess the effectiveness of a pharmaceutical intervention using the Dader Method on patients with BD-I, measured by the decrease in the number of hospitalizations, emergency service consultations, and unscheduled outpatient visits from baseline through 1 year of follow-up. This study is based on the EMDADER-TAB trial, which was an RCT designed to compare pharmaceutical care with the usual care given to outpatients with BD-I in a psychiatric clinic. The main outcome was the use of health care services, using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression. The trial protocol was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier NCT01750255). 92 patients were included in the EMDADER-TAB study: 43 pharmaceutical care patients (intervention group) and 49 usual care patients (control group). At baseline, no significant differences in demographic and clinical characteristics were found across the 2 groups. After 1 year of follow-up, the risk of hospitalizations and emergencies was higher for the control group than for the intervention group (HR = 9.03, P = 0.042; HR = 3.38, P = 0.034, respectively); however, the risk of unscheduled outpatient visits was higher for the intervention group (HR = 4.18, P = 0.028). There was no "placebo" treatment, and patients in the control group might have produced positive outcomes and reduced the magnitude of differences compared with the intervention group. Compared with usual care, pharmaceutical care significantly reduced hospitalizations and emergency service consultations by outpatients with BD-I. This study received funding from

  20. A prospective study examining the effects of gender and sexual/physical abuse on mood outcomes in patients with co-occurring bipolar I and substance use disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Christina S.; McDonald, Leah J.; Graff, Fiona S.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Griffin, Margaret L.; Weiss, Roger D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Prior research suggests possible gender differences in the longitudinal course of bipolar disorder (BD). This study prospectively examined gender differences in mood outcomes and tested the effects of sexual/physical abuse and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Methods Participants (49 men, 41 women) with co-occurring bipolar I and substance use disorders (92% alcohol, 42% drug) were enrolled in a group treatment trial. They were followed for 8 months, with monthly assessments, yielding 32 weeks of data. Primary outcome measures were number of weeks in each mood state, recurrences to depression or mania, and polarity shifts from depression to mania or vice versa. Negative binomial regression was used to examine the effects of gender, lifetime abuse, and PTSD on these outcomes. Results Participants met syndromal criteria for a mood episode on a mean of 27% of 32 weeks, with depression occurring most frequently. Compared to men, women reported significantly more weeks of mixed mania (RR = 8.53), fewer weeks of euthymia (RR = 0.58), more recurrences to mania (RR = 1.96), and more direct polarity shifts (RR = 1.49) (all p sexual or physical abuse (68% vs. 33%), which partially explained the relationships between gender and mixed mania and direct polarity shifts. Conclusions Participants experienced persistent mood symptoms over time. Women consistently reported poorer mood outcomes, and lifetime abuse may help explain observed gender differences in mood outcomes. Further research is necessary to better understand the treatment implications of these findings. PMID:19392857

  1. Informing DSM-5: biological boundaries between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Victoria E; Suppes, Trisha

    2013-05-14

    The fifth version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) opted to retain existing diagnostic boundaries between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia. The debate preceding this decision focused on understanding the biologic basis of these major mental illnesses. Evidence from genetics, neuroscience, and pharmacotherapeutics informed the DSM-5 development process. The following discussion will emphasize some of the key factors at the forefront of the debate. Family studies suggest a clear genetic link between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia. However, large-scale genome-wide association studies have not been successful in identifying susceptibility genes that make substantial etiological contributions. Boundaries between psychotic disorders are not further clarified by looking at brain morphology. The fact that symptoms of bipolar I disorder, but not schizophrenia, are often responsive to medications such as lithium and other anticonvulsants must be interpreted within a larger framework of biological research. For DSM-5, existing nosological boundaries between bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia were retained and schizoaffective disorder preserved as an independent diagnosis since the biological data are not yet compelling enough to justify a move to a more neurodevelopmentally continuous model of psychosis.

  2. Risperidone long-acting injectable monotherapy in the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Jorge A; Yatham, Lakshmi N; Palumbo, Joseph M; Karcher, Keith; Kushner, Stuart; Kusumakar, Vivek

    2010-07-15

    Treatment adherence is a significant problem in patients with bipolar disorder. This study was designed to determine the efficacy of risperidone long-acting injectable (LAI) in the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder. Eligible patients with current or recent manic or mixed episodes (n = 559, aged 18-65 years) were treated with open-label oral risperidone for 3 weeks (period II) and open-label risperidone LAI for 26 weeks (n = 501; period III). Patients who maintained response (n = 303) were randomly allocated 1:1 to placebo injections (n = 149) or to continue risperidone LAI (n = 154) for up to 24 months (period IV). Most (77%) patients on risperidone LAI received a dose of 25 mg every 2 weeks during period IV. Time to recurrence for any mood episode (primary outcome variable) was significantly longer in the risperidone LAI group versus placebo (p or = 7% (compared with the period's baseline) occurred in 15% of patients in period III; in 12% of patients on risperidone LAI and 3% of patients on placebo in period IV. Risperidone LAI monotherapy significantly delayed the time to recurrence of mood episodes, versus placebo, in this controlled, randomized study in patients with bipolar I disorder. Risperidone LAI was tolerable and no new safety concerns emerged compared with previous studies of risperidone LAI. Copyright 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Asenapine for the Acute Treatment of Pediatric Manic or Mixed Episode of Bipolar I Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findling, Robert L; Landbloom, Ronald L; Szegedi, Armin; Koppenhaver, Janelle; Braat, Sabine; Zhu, Qi; Mackle, Mary; Chang, Kiki; Mathews, Maju

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate asenapine versus placebo in 403 patients aged 10 to 17 years with bipolar I disorder currently in manic or mixed episodes. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, international trial, patients were randomized 1:1:1:1 to placebo, asenapine 2.5, 5, or 10 mg b.i.d. (twice daily). Primary efficacy measure was change from baseline in Young-Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) total score at day 21. Analyses of patients with/without attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and with/without stimulant use were performed. The mean difference in asenapine versus placebo in YMRS was -3.2 (p = .0008), -5.3 (p bipolar I disorder in manic or mixed states. Increases in weight and fasting insulin were associated with asenapine. Clinical trial registration information-Efficacy and Safety of Asenapine Treatment for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder; http://clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01244815. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Three times more days depressed than manic or hypomanic in both bipolar I and bipolar II disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kupka, Ralph W.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Nolen, Willem A.; Suppes, Trisha; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Frye, Mark A.; Keck, Paul E.; McElroy, Susan L.; Grunze, Heinz; Post, Robert M.

    Objectives: To assess the proportion of time spent in mania, depression and euthymia in a large cohort of bipolar subjects studied longitudinally, and to investigate depression/mania ratios in patients with bipolar I versus bipolar II disorder. Methods: Clinician-adjusted self-ratings of mood were

  5. Cannabis use in first-treatment bipolar I disorder: relations to clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitland, Levi R; Melle, Ingrid; Aminoff, Sofie R; Lagerberg, Trine V; Andreassen, Ole A; Ringen, Petter A

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between recent cannabis use, current symptomatology and age at onset of first manic, depressive and psychotic episodes in a large sample with first-treatment bipolar I disorder (BD I). One hundred one patients with first-treatment Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) bipolar I disorder were included as part of the Thematically Organized Psychosis study. The Structural Clinical Interview for DSM-IV was used for DSM-IV diagnosis and identification of episodes of illness. Earlier suicide attempts were recorded. Manic, depressive and psychotic symptoms were rated using the Young Mania Rating Scale, Inventory of Depressive Symptoms and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale correspondingly. Cannabis use within the six last months was recorded. After controlling for confounders, recent cannabis use was significantly associated with lower age at onset of first manic and psychotic episode, but not with onset of first depressive episode (both P cannabis use and a lower age at onset. Recent cannabis use was also associated with more lifetime suicide attempts. The current findings suggest that recent cannabis use is associated with a more severe course of illness in the early phase of BD I. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Association study of 21 circadian genes with bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Hader A; Talkowski, Michael E; Wood, Joel; Chowdari, Kodavali V; McClain, Lora; Prasad, Konasale; Montrose, Debra; Fagiolini, Andrea; Friedman, Edward S; Allen, Michael H; Bowden, Charles L; Calabrese, Joseph; El-Mallakh, Rif S; Escamilla, Michael; Faraone, Stephen V; Fossey, Mark D; Gyulai, Laszlo; Loftis, Jennifer M; Hauser, Peter; Ketter, Terence A; Marangell, Lauren B; Miklowitz, David J; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Patel, Jayendra; Sachs, Gary S; Sklar, Pamela; Smoller, Jordan W; Laird, Nan; Keshavan, Matcheri; Thase, Michael E; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris; Lewis, David; Monk, Tim; Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David J; Devlin, Bernie; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L

    2009-11-01

    Published studies suggest associations between circadian gene polymorphisms and bipolar I disorder (BPI), as well as schizoaffective disorder (SZA) and schizophrenia (SZ). The results are plausible, based on prior studies of circadian abnormalities. As replications have not been attempted uniformly, we evaluated representative, common polymorphisms in all three disorders. We assayed 276 publicly available 'tag' single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 21 circadian genes among 523 patients with BPI, 527 patients with SZ/SZA, and 477 screened adult controls. Detected associations were evaluated in relation to two published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Using gene-based tests, suggestive associations were noted between EGR3 and BPI (p = 0.017), and between NPAS2 and SZ/SZA (p = 0.034). Three SNPs were associated with both sets of disorders (NPAS2: rs13025524 and rs11123857; RORB: rs10491929; p < 0.05). None of the associations remained significant following corrections for multiple comparisons. Approximately 15% of the analyzed SNPs overlapped with an independent study that conducted GWAS for BPI; suggestive overlap between the GWAS analyses and ours was noted at ARNTL. Several suggestive, novel associations were detected with circadian genes and BPI and SZ/SZA, but the present analyses do not support associations with common polymorphisms that confer risk with odds ratios greater than 1.5. Additional analyses using adequately powered samples are warranted to further evaluate these results.

  7. An actigraphy study investigating sleep in bipolar I patients, unaffected siblings and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkooijen, Sanne; van Bergen, Annet H; Knapen, Stefan E; Vreeker, Annabel; Abramovic, Lucija; Pagani, Lucia; Jung, Yoon; Riemersma-van der Lek, Rixt; Schoevers, Robert A; Takahashi, Joseph S; Kahn, René S; Boks, Marco P M; Ophoff, Roel A

    2017-01-15

    Disturbances in sleep and waking patterns are highly prevalent during mood episodes in bipolar disorder. The question remains whether these disturbances persist during phases of euthymia and whether they are heritable traits of bipolar disorder. The current study investigates objective sleep measures in a large sample of bipolar I patients, non-affected siblings and controls. A total of 107 bipolar disorder I patients, 74 non-affected siblings, and 80 controls were included. Sleep was measured with actigraphy over the course of 14 days. Seven sleep parameters were analyzed for group differences and their relationship with age at onset, number of episodes and psychotic symptoms using linear mixed model analysis to account for family dependencies. Patients had a longer sleep duration and later time of sleep offset compared to the non-affected siblings but these differences were entirely attributable to differences in mood symptoms. We found no difference between patients and controls or siblings and controls when the analyses were restricted to euthymic patients. None of the bipolar illness characteristics were associated with sleep. Medication use was not taken into account which may have influenced our findings and controls were younger compared to non-affected siblings. In the largest study to date, our findings suggest that recovered bipolar I patients and their siblings do not experience clinically significant sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbances are primarily a reflection of current mood state, but are unrelated to the course of the disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cytokines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and C-reactive protein in bipolar I disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacoby, Anne Sophie; Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj

    2016-01-01

    of BDNF, hsCRP, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-18 and TNF-α in 60 patients with bipolar I disorder with an acute severe manic index episode and in subsequent euthymic and depressive and manic states and compared with repeated measurements in healthy control subjects. Data were analysed with linear mixed effects...... model and with adjustment for gender, age, BMI, alcohol intake and smoking. RESULTS: From inclusion to end of the 6-12 months follow-up, samples of blood were drawn from the 60 patients during a total of 180 affective states, comprising 57 manic, 11 mixed, 23 depressive and 89 states of euthymia...... overall compared with healthy control subjects. However, in adjusted models, no statistically significant differences were found in any measure between patients and control individuals. Levels of hsCRP in depressive states were decreased with 40% (95% CI: 5-62%, p=0.029) compared with euthymia and with 48...

  9. Cardiometabolic risks and omega-3 index in recent-onset bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulsin, Lawson R; Blom, Thomas J; Durling, Michelle; Welge, Jeffrey A; DelBello, Melissa P; Adler, Caleb M; McNamara, Robert K; Strakowski, Stephen M

    2018-02-26

    The aims of the present study were to characterize cardiometabolic risk factors in a cohort of bipolar disorder patients with limited exposure to psychotropic medications, and to evaluate their associations with mood symptoms and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) blood levels. Cardiometabolic risk assessments were compared in individuals with bipolar I disorder experiencing a first manic or mixed episode or an early depressive episode (n=117) and healthy subjects (n=56). Patients were medication free at assessment and had no or limited exposure to mood-stabilizer or antipsychotic medications prior to the current admission. Associations among cardiometabolic parameters and Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale (CGI-S), manic (Young Mania Rating Scale [YMRS]), and depressive (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS]) symptom ratings were evaluated within the bipolar group. Following adjustment for demographic variables (i.e., age, gender, and parental education), significantly higher fasting triglyceride levels were observed in the bipolar group compared to the healthy group (121.7 mg/dL vs 87.0 mg/dL; Pbipolar group and 6% of the healthy group met the criteria for metabolic syndrome (P=.23). The omega-3 index was lower in the bipolar group (3.4% vs 3.9%; Pbipolar group, no associations were found between the cardiometabolic parameters and CGI-S, YMRS, and HDRS symptom ratings. Recent-onset medication-free bipolar disorder is associated with higher triglyceride levels. These findings are suggestive of early metabolic dysregulation prior to long-term psychotropic medication exposure. Lower omega-3 PUFA levels in individuals with bipolar I disorder represent a potential therapeutic target for additional investigation. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Relationship of Prior Antidepressant Exposure to Long-Term Prospective Outcome in Bipolar I Disorder Outpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Robert M.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Frye, Mark A.; Suppes, Trisha; McElroy, Susan L.; Keck, Paul E.; Nolen, Willem A.; Rowe, Mike; Kupka, Ralph W.; Grunze, Heinz; Goodwin, Frederick K.

    Objective:The long-term impact of prior antidepressant exposure on the subsequent course of bipolar illness remains controversial. Method: 139 outpatients (mean age, 42 years) with bipolar I disorder diagnosed by DSM-IV criteria had a detailed retrospective examination of their prior course of

  11. Temperament and personality in bipolar I patients with and without mixed episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röttig, Dörthe; Röttig, Stephan; Brieger, Peter; Marneros, Andreas

    2007-12-01

    Personality and temperament are supposed to have an impact on the clinical expression and course of an affective disorder. There is some indication, that mixed episodes result from an admixture of inverse temperamental factors to a manic syndrome. In a preliminary report [Brieger, P., Roettig, S., Ehrt, U., Wenzel, A., Bloink, R., Marneros, A., 2003. TEMPS-a scale in 'mixed' and 'pure' manic episodes: new data and methodological considerations on the relevance of joint anxious-depressive temperament traits. J. Affect. Disord. 73, 99-104] we reported support for this assumption. The present study completes the preliminary results and compares patients with and without mixed episodes with respect to personality and personality disorders in addition. Patients who had been hospitalized for bipolar I disorder were reassessed after 4.8 years. We examined temperament (TEMPS-A), personality (NEO-FFI) and frequency of personality disorders (SCID-II). Furthermore, illness-related parameters like age at first treatment, depressive and manic symptomatology, frequency and type of episodes and level of functioning were obtained and patients with and without mixed episodes were compared. Patients with (n=49) and without mixed episodes (n=86) did not differ significantly with regard to the illness-related parameters and personality dimensions. The frequency of personality disorders was significantly higher in patients with prior mixed episodes. With respect to temperament, scores of the depressive, cyclothymic, irritable and anxious temperament were significantly higher in patients with mixed episodes. We were not able to assess premorbid temperament and premorbid personality. The findings of the present study support the assumption of Akiskal [Akiskal, H.S., 1992b. The distinctive mixed states of bipolar I, II, and III. Clin. Neuropharmacol. 15 Suppl 1 Pt A, 632-633.] that mixed episodes are more frequent in subjects with inverse temperament.

  12. Differences in clinical presentation between bipolar I and II disorders in the early stages of bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Mikkelsen, Rie Lambaek; Kirkegaard, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    AIM: In a naturalistic clinical study of patients in the early stages of bipolar disorders the aim was to assess differences between patients with bipolar I (BD I) and bipolar II (BD II) disorders on clinical characteristics including affective symptoms, subjective cognitive complaints, functional...... level, the presence of comorbid personality disorders and coping strategies. METHODS: Diagnoses were confirmed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders. Clinical symptoms were rated with the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and functional status...... using the Functional Assessment Short Test. Cognitive complaints were assessed using the Massachusetts General Hospital Cognitive and Physical Functioning Questionnaire, the presence of comorbid personality disorders using the Standardized Assessment of Personality - Abbreviated Scale and coping style...

  13. [Thinking organization and defense mechanisms in bipolar disorders. Clinical and psychopathological study on bipolar I and bipolar II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Baido, Rosa; Di Blasi, Marie; Alfano, Pietro; Audino, Palma; Bellavia, Carmela; Blando, Anna Antonia; Merendino, Adelaide; Messina, Rossana; Poma, Maria Luisa; La Grutta, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to explore the psychical functioning in bipolar I or bipolar II disorder people through the analysis and comparison of their thought styles and defense patterns. 29 bipolar I and bipolar II people afferent to Palermo University Policlinical Psychriatic Hospital Department were selected during the whole 2009-2010 year. The following tests were administred: Wechsler Adult Intelligent Scale-R (WAIS-R) in order to measure the general cognitive function; Defense Mechanisms Inventory (DMI) in order to measure defense patterns. Afterwards, the results of the two tests were analysed and compared. Bipolar disorder people use cognitive mechanisms and defense strategies that are very different from standard population. Bipolar I subjects show both wider and more serious cognitive deterioration and stricter defense mechanisms than bipolar II subjects. Generally bipolar patients show an immature personality based on archaic mechanisms that can be found in all the spheres of their personality: emotions, cognition, Ego-strength, adaptability to reality. The peculiar achieved cognitive and defense profile leads to important considerations about how psychological strategies can contribute to use "bespoke" treatments for these patients.

  14. Spotlight on once-monthly long-acting injectable aripiprazole and its potential as maintenance treatment for bipolar I disorder in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Llenza V

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanessa Torres-Llenza, Pooja Lakshmin, Daniel Z Lieberman Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: The lack of long-term medication adherence is a challenge in the treatment of bipolar disorder, particularly during the maintenance phase when symptoms are less prominent. The rate of nonadherence is ~20%–60% depending on how strict a definition is used. Nonadherence worsens the course of bipolar disorder and can add hundreds of thousands of dollars to the lifetime cost of treating the illness. Long-acting injectable (LAI medication is an attractive alternative to daily dosing of oral medication, especially among patients who are ambivalent about treatment. The purpose of this paper is to review the evidence for the safety and efficacy of LAI aripiprazole, which was recently approved for the treatment of bipolar disorder. The approval was based on a single double-blind, placebo-controlled, multisite trial that recruited participants from 103 sites in 7 countries. A total of 731 participants with bipolar disorder were enrolled in the study. Out of that total, 266 were successfully stabilized on LAI aripiprazole and entered the randomization phase. Treatment-emergent adverse events were, for the most part, mild to moderate. Akathisia was the most common adverse event, which, combined with restlessness, was experienced by 23% of the sample. At the end of the 52-week study period, nearly twice as many LAI-treated participants remained stable compared to those treated with placebo. Stability during the maintenance phase is arguably the most important goal of treatment. It is during this period of relative freedom from symptoms that patients are able to build a meaningful and satisfying life. The availability of a new treatment agent, particularly one that has the potential to enhance long-term adherence, is a welcome development. Keywords

  15. Reward Processing in Adolescents with Bipolar I Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manpreet K.; Chang, Kiki D.; Kelley, Ryan G.; Cui, Xu; Sherdell, Lindsey; Howe, Meghan E.; Gotlib, Ian H.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Bipolar disorder (BD) is a debilitating psychiatric condition that commonly begins in adolescence, a developmental period that has been associated with increased reward seeking. Because youth with BD are especially vulnerable to negative risk-taking behaviors, understanding the neural mechanisms by which dysregulated affect interacts…

  16. Initiation of stimulant and antidepressant medication and clinical presentation in juvenile bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Maria E; Demeter, Christine A; Faber, Jon E; Calabrese, Joseph R; Findling, Robert L

    2008-03-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which the initiation of stimulant and antidepressant medication was associated with the subsequent onset of juvenile bipolar I disorder (BP I). Another aim was to investigate differences in clinical presentation between youths prescribed stimulant or antidepressant medication before and after the onset of juvenile BP I disorder. Youths between the ages of 5 and 17 years meeting full, unmodified DSM-IV diagnostic symptom criteria for BP were included in this study. Data regarding the age of onset of BP I, psychiatric comorbidities, and current symptoms of mania and depression were obtained. Medication history was recorded as part of the assessment interview with parents and youths. Of the 245 youths with BP I, 65% (n = 160) were treated with stimulant medication; 32% (56/173) were treated after the onset of BP I, and 19% (32/173) were treated before the onset of BP I. Forty-six percent (113/245) were treated with antidepressant medication; 33% (67/206) were treated after the onset of BP I, and 3% (7/206) were treated before the onset of BP I. Patients who were treated with stimulants after the onset of BP I were significantly more likely to be younger (p presenting symptoms of depression or manic symptoms.

  17. Emotional intelligence and non-social cognition in schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frajo-Apor, B; Kemmler, G; Pardeller, S; Plass, T; Mühlbacher, M; Welte, A-S; Fleischhacker, W W; Hofer, A

    2017-01-01

    The different patterns of Emotional Intelligence (EI) deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder are are not yet well understood. This study compares EI levels among these groups and highlights the potential impact of non-social cognition on EI. Fifty-eight schizophrenia and 60 bipolar outpatients were investigated using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS). Analyses of covariance were performed with adjustment for the BACS composite score. Compared to bipolar subjects, schizophrenia patients showed significantly lower levels in both EI and non-social cognition. After adjustment for the BACS composite score, the difference in EI was lost. The mediation analysis revealed that differences between schizophrenia and bipolar patients in strategic EI are almost fully attributable to the mediating effect of non-social cognition. Our findings suggest that in both schizophrenia and bipolar patients EI is strongly influenced by non-social cognitive functioning. This has to be taken into account when interpreting MSCEIT data in comparative studies in serious mental illness and emphasizes the importance of cognitive remediation.

  18. Emotional intelligence and non-social cognition in schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frajo-Apor, B.; Kemmler, G.; Pardeller, S.; Plass, T.; Mühlbacher, M.; Welte, A.-S.; Fleischhacker, W. W.; Hofer, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background The different patterns of Emotional Intelligence (EI) deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder are are not yet well understood. This study compares EI levels among these groups and highlights the potential impact of non-social cognition on EI. Method Fifty-eight schizophrenia and 60 bipolar outpatients were investigated using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS). Analyses of covariance were performed with adjustment for the BACS composite score. Results Compared to bipolar subjects, schizophrenia patients showed significantly lower levels in both EI and non-social cognition. After adjustment for the BACS composite score, the difference in EI was lost. The mediation analysis revealed that differences between schizophrenia and bipolar patients in strategic EI are almost fully attributable to the mediating effect of non-social cognition. Conclusions Our findings suggest that in both schizophrenia and bipolar patients EI is strongly influenced by non-social cognitive functioning. This has to be taken into account when interpreting MSCEIT data in comparative studies in serious mental illness and emphasizes the importance of cognitive remediation. PMID:27640523

  19. Progression along the Bipolar Spectrum: A Longitudinal Study of Predictors of Conversion from Bipolar Spectrum Conditions to Bipolar I and II Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloy, Lauren B.; Urošević, Snežana; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Jager-Hyman, Shari; Nusslock, Robin; Whitehouse, Wayne G.; Hogan, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Little longitudinal research has examined progression to more severe bipolar disorders in individuals with “soft” bipolar spectrum conditions. We examine rates and predictors of progression to bipolar I and II diagnoses in a non-patient sample of college-age participants (n = 201) with high General Behavior Inventory scores and childhood or adolescent onset of “soft” bipolar spectrum disorders followed longitudinally for 4.5 years from the Longitudinal Investigation of Bipolar Spectrum (LIBS) project. Of 57 individuals with initial cyclothymia or bipolar disorder not otherwise specified (BiNOS) diagnoses, 42.1% progressed to a bipolar II diagnosis and 10.5% progressed to a bipolar I diagnosis. Of 144 individuals with initial bipolar II diagnoses, 17.4% progressed to a bipolar I diagnosis. Consistent with hypotheses derived from the clinical literature and the Behavioral Approach System (BAS) model of bipolar disorder, and controlling for relevant variables (length of follow-up, initial depressive and hypomanic symptoms, treatment-seeking, and family history), high BAS sensitivity (especially BAS Fun Seeking) predicted a greater likelihood of progression to bipolar II disorder, whereas early age of onset and high impulsivity predicted a greater likelihood of progression to bipolar I (high BAS sensitivity and Fun-Seeking also predicted progression to bipolar I when family history was not controlled). The interaction of high BAS and high Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS) sensitivities also predicted greater likelihood of progression to bipolar I. We discuss implications of the findings for the bipolar spectrum concept, the BAS model of bipolar disorder, and early intervention efforts. PMID:21668080

  20. Can Residual Symptoms During Inter-Episode Period after Partial Remission in Bipolar I Disorder Have Cyclic Patterns with Specific Frequencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, YongJun; Moon, Eunsoo; Park, Je-Min; Lee, Byung-Dae; Lee, Young-Min; Jeong, Hee-Jeong; Kang, Tae-Uk; Park, Jeonghyun; Choi, Yoonmi

    2018-03-01

    This case report aimed to describe cyclic patterns of residual mood symptoms in partially remitted bipolar I patient. In a 24-year-old woman with bipolar I disorder, residual mood symptoms measured by self-rated daily mood chart for 18 months were analyzed using wavelet analysis. A 146-day periodicity was prominent for the first 100 days after discharge. Between 100-200 days, 146-day periodicity was progressively diminished and 21- and 8-day periodicity was prominent. Between 200-516 days, 21-day periodicity was diminished and 85-day periodicity became prominent. This case suggest that bipolar patients might have cyclic residual symptoms with specific frequencies.

  1. Olanzapine approved for the acute treatment of schizophrenia or manic/mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in adolescent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann E Maloney

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ann E Maloney1,2, Linmarie Sikich31Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Scarborough, ME, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: Severe and persistent mental illnesses in children and adolescents, such as early-onset schizophrenia spectrum (EOSS disorders and pediatric bipolar disorder (pedBP, are increasingly recognized. Few treatments have demonstrated efficacy in rigorous clinical trials. Enduring response to current medications appears limited. Recently, olanzapine was approved for the treatment of adolescents with schizophrenia or acute manic/mixed episodes in pedBP.Methods: PubMed searches were conducted for olanzapine combined with pharmacology, schizophrenia, or bipolar disorder. Searches related to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were limited to children and adolescents. The bibliographies of the retrieved articles were hand-checked for additional relevant studies. The epidemiology, phenomenology, and treatment of EOSS and pedBP, and olanzapine’s pharmacology are reviewed. Studies of olanzapine treatment in youth with EOSS and pedBP are examined.Results: Olanzapine is efficacious for EOSS and pedBP. However, olanzapine is not more efficacious than risperidone, molindone, or haloperidol in EOSS and is less efficacious than clozapine in treatment-resistant EOSS. No comparative trials have been done in pedBP. Olanzapine is associated with weight gain, dyslipidemia, and transaminase elevations in youth. Extrapyramidal symptoms, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and blood dyscrasias have also been reported but appear rare.Conclusions: The authors conclude that olanzapine should be considered a second-line agent in EOSS and pedBP due to its risks for significant weight gain and lipid dysregulation. Awareness of the consistent weight and metabolic changes observed in olanzapine

  2. Differences in clinical presentation between bipolar I and II disorders in the early stages of bipolar disorder: A naturalistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinberg, Maj; Mikkelsen, Rie Lambaek; Kirkegaard, Thomas; Christensen, Ellen Margrethe; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2017-01-15

    In a naturalistic clinical study of patients in the early stages of bipolar disorders the aim was to assess differences between patients with bipolar I (BD I) and bipolar II (BD II) disorders on clinical characteristics including affective symptoms, subjective cognitive complaints, functional level, the presence of comorbid personality disorders and coping strategies. Diagnoses were confirmed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders. Clinical symptoms were rated with the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and functional status using the Functional Assessment Short Test. Cognitive complaints were assessed using the Massachusetts General Hospital Cognitive and Physical Functioning Questionnaire, the presence of comorbid personality disorders using the Standardized Assessment of Personality - Abbreviated Scale and coping style using the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations. In total, 344 patients were included (BD I (n=163) and BD II (n=181). Patients with BD II presented with significantly more depressive symptoms, more cognitive complaints, lower overall functioning, and a higher prevalence of comorbid personality disorders. Finally, they exhibited a trend towards using less adaptive coping styles. It cannot be omitted that some patients may have progressed from BD II to BD I. Most measures were based on patient self report. Overall, BD II was associated with a higher disease burden. Clinically, it is important to differentiate BD II from BD I and research wise, there is a need for tailoring and testing specific interventions towards BD II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Age-dependent decreases of high energy phosphates in cerebral gray matter of patients with bipolar I disorder: a preliminary phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Jonathan A; Lee, Jing-Huei; Durling, Michelle; Strakowski, Stephen M; Eliassen, James C

    2015-04-01

    To identify abnormalities in high energy phosphate cerebral metabolism in euthymic bipolar disorder. Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((31)P MRSI) data were acquired from the entire brain of 9 euthymic adults with bipolar disorder and 13 healthy adults. Estimates of phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in homogeneous gray and white matter were obtained by tissue regression analysis. Analyses of covariance revealed the effect of age to be significantly different between bipolar and healthy groups for concentrations of PCr (p=0.0018) and ATP (p=0.013) in gray matter. These metabolites were negatively correlated with age in gray matter in bipolar subjects while PCr was positively correlated with age in gray matter of healthy subjects. Additionally, age-corrected concentrations of PCr in gray matter were significantly elevated in bipolar subjects (p=0.0048). Given that this cross-sectional study possessed a small sample and potentially confounding effects of medication status, we recommend a larger, longitudinal study to more robustly study relationships between bioenergetic impairment and duration of disease. Our results suggest bioenergetic impairment related to mitochondrial function may be progressive in multi-episode bipolar subjects as they age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Epidemiology of DSM-5 bipolar I disorder: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions - III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Carlos; Compton, Wilson M; Saha, Tulshi D; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Ruan, W June; Huang, Boji; Grant, Bridget F

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to present 12-month and lifetime prevalence, correlates, comorbidity, treatment and disability of DSM-5 bipolar I disorder. Nationally representative U.S. adult sample (N = 36,309), the 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions - III. Prevalences of 12-month and lifetime DSM-5 bipolar I disorder were 1.5% and 2.1% and did not differ between men (1.6% and 2.2%) and women (1.5% and 2.0%). Prevalences of bipolar I disorder were greater among Native Americans, and lower among Blacks, Hispanics and Asians/Pacific Islanders than whites. Rates were also lower among younger than older individuals, those previously married than currently married and with lower education and income relative to higher education and income. Bipolar I disorder was more strongly related to borderline and schizotypal personality disorders (adjusted odds ratios (AORS) = 2.2-4.7)), than to anxiety disorders (AORs = 1.3-2.9), and substance use disorders (AORs = 1.3-2.1) overall and among men and women. Quality of life was lower among individuals with bipolar I disorder relative to those without the disorder. Treatment rates among individuals with bipolar I disorder were low in the total sample (46%, SE = 2.63), among men (36.7%, SE = 3.82) and among women (55.8%, SE = 3.32). Bipolar I disorder continues to be common disabling and highly comorbid disorder among men and women, contributing substantially to low quality of life and burden of disease in our society. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Elevated left mid-frontal cortical activity prospectively predicts conversion to bipolar I disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusslock, Robin; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Alloy, Lauren B.; Urosevic, Snezana; Goldstein, Kim; Abramson, Lyn Y.

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by a hypersensitivity to reward-relevant cues and a propensity to experience an excessive increase in approach-related affect, which may be reflected in hypo/manic symptoms. The present study examined the relationship between relative left-frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) activity, a proposed neurophysiological index of approach-system sensitivity and approach/reward-related affect, and bipolar course and state-related variables. Fifty-eight individuals with cyclothymia or bipolar II disorder and 59 healthy control participants with no affective psychopathology completed resting EEG recordings. Alpha power was obtained and asymmetry indices computed for homologous electrodes. Bipolar spectrum participants were classified as being in a major/minor depressive episode, a hypomanic episode, or a euthymic/remitted state at EEG recording. Participants were then followed prospectively for an average 4.7 year follow-up period with diagnostic interview assessments every four-months. Sixteen bipolar spectrum participants converted to bipolar I disorder during follow-up. Consistent with hypotheses, elevated relative left-frontal EEG activity at baseline 1) prospectively predicted a greater likelihood of converting from cyclothymia or bipolar II disorder to bipolar I disorder over the 4.7 year follow-up period, 2) was associated with an earlier age-of-onset of first bipolar spectrum episode, and 3) was significantly elevated in bipolar spectrum individuals in a hypomanic episode at EEG recording. This is the first study to identify a neurophysiological marker that prospectively predicts conversion to bipolar I disorder. The fact that unipolar depression is characterized by decreased relative left-frontal EEG activity suggests that unipolar depression and vulnerability to hypo/mania may be characterized by different profiles of frontal EEG asymmetry. PMID:22775582

  6. Cortisol levels in fingernails, neurocognitive performance and clinical variables in euthymic bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herane-Vives, Andres; Cleare, Anthony J; Chang, Chin-Kuo; de Angel, Valeria; Papadopoulos, Andrew; Fischer, Susanne; Halari, Rozmin; Cheung, Eric Y W; Young, Allan H

    2017-03-27

    Neurocognitive impairment has been found in bipolar patients. Hypercortisolemia is one possible cause but there has been no agreement on this. Previous sampling methods assessed only acute cortisol levels, whereas the association between cortisol and psychopathology might be better understood by investigating chronic levels. Fingernails are a novel method for measuring chronic cortisol concentration (CCC). Here, we measured CCC in euthymic bipolar disorder I (BD-I) patients and healthy controls using fingernails to investigate whether differences in CCC influenced neurocognitive performance. We also investigated whether differences in clinical illness variables influenced CCC in euthymic BD-I patients. A previous study demonstrated neurocognitive impairment in euthymic BD-I patients. The current study included a portion of this sample: 40 BD-I versus 42 matched controls who provided fingernail samples. There was no statistically significant difference in CCC between controls and BD-I (P = .09). Logistic regression analyses revealed that euthymic bipolar I subjects with more than five years of current euthymia had decreased odds of having higher fingernail cortisol concentration (>71.2 pg/mg) compared to those with less than 1.5 years (P = .04). There was no association between CCC and cognitive impairment in all domains before and after adjustment for age and sex. The current evidence suggests CCC is not a trait biomarker in euthymic BD-I (BD-I). Longer periods of stability in affective disorders are associated with lower CCC. Fingernail cortisol does not seem to be implicated in neurocognitive impairment and BD-I. Future studies may investigate CCC in different illness phases of BD-I.

  7. Normal Metabolic Levels in Prefrontal Cortex in Euthymic Bipolar I Patients with and without Suicide Attempts

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    Marlos Vasconcelos Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Objective. Evidence suggests that the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD, but few neurochemical studies have evaluated this region in bipolar patients and there is no information from BD suicide attempters using Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (H+MRS. The objective was to evaluate the metabolic function of the medial orbital frontal cortex in euthymic BD type I suicide and nonsuicide attempters compared to healthy subjects by H+MRS. Methods. 40 euthymic bipolar I outpatients, 19 without and 21 with history of suicide attempt, and 22 healthy subjects were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview with the DSM-IV axis I, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Young Mania Rating Scale, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 and underwent H+MRS. Results. We did not find any metabolic abnormality in medial orbital frontal regions of suicide and nonsuicide BD patients and BD patients as a group compared to healthy subjects. Conclusions. The combined chronic use of psychotropic drugs with neuroprotective or neurotrophic effects leading to a euthymic state for longer periods of time may improve neurometabolic function, at least measured by H+MRS, even in suicide attempters. Besides, these results may implicate mood dependent alterations in brain metabolic activity. However, more studies with larger sample sizes of this heterogeneous disorder are warranted to clarify these data.

  8. Impact of irritability: a 2-year observational study of outpatients with bipolar I or schizoaffective disorder.

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    Berk, Lesley; Hallam, Karen T; Venugopal, Kamalesh; Lewis, Andrew James; Austin, David W; Kulkarni, Jayashri; Dodd, Seetal; de Castella, Anthony; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Berk, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Many people experience irritability when manic, hypomanic, or depressed, yet its impact on illness severity and quality of life in bipolar and schizoaffective disorders is poorly understood. This study aimed to examine the relationship between irritability and symptom burden, functioning, quality of life, social support, suicidality, and overall illness severity in a naturalistic cohort of people with bipolar I or schizoaffective disorder. We used data from 239 adult outpatients with bipolar I or schizoaffective disorder in the Bipolar Comprehensive Outcomes Study (BCOS) - a non-interventional observational study with a 2-year follow-up period. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics of participants with and without irritability were compared. A mixed-model repeated measures analysis was conducted to examine the longitudinal effect of irritability on clinical and quality-of-life variables over follow-up using significant baseline variables. At baseline, 54% of participants were irritable. Baseline irritability was associated with illness severity, mania, depression, psychotic symptoms, suicidality, poor functioning, and quality of life, but not diagnosis (schizoaffective/bipolar disorder). Participants with irritability were less likely to have a partner and perceived less adequate social support. On average, over follow-up, those with irritability reported more symptoms, functional impairment, and suicidality. Furthermore, the effects of irritability could not be fully explained by illness severity. Irritability was associated with more negative symptomatic, functional, and quality-of-life outcomes and suicidality. The identification, monitoring, and targeted treatment of irritability may be worth considering, to enhance health and wellbeing outcomes for adults with bipolar and schizoaffective disorders. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Metabolic syndrome in Tunisian bipolar I patients | Ezzaher | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender, age, illness episode and treatment were not significantly associated with metabolic syndrome, while patients under lithium had higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than those under valproic acid, carbamazepine or antipsychotics. Patients with metabolic syndrome had significant higher levels of HOMA-IR and ...

  10. Bipolar I disorder and major depressive disorder show similar brain activation during depression.

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    Cerullo, Michael A; Eliassen, James C; Smith, Christopher T; Fleck, David E; Nelson, Erik B; Strawn, Jeffrey R; Lamy, Martine; DelBello, Melissa P; Adler, Caleb M; Strakowski, Stephen M

    2014-11-01

    Despite different treatments and courses of illness, depressive symptoms appear similar in major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar I disorder (BP-I). This similarity of depressive symptoms suggests significant overlap in brain pathways underlying neurovegetative, mood, and cognitive symptoms of depression. These shared brain regions might be expected to exhibit similar activation in individuals with MDD and BP-I during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). fMRI was used to compare regional brain activation in participants with BP-I (n = 25) and MDD (n = 25) during a depressive episode as well as 25 healthy comparison (HC) participants. During the scans, participants performed an attentional task that incorporated emotional pictures. During the viewing of emotional images, subjects with BP-I showed decreased activation in the middle occipital gyrus, lingual gyrus, and middle temporal gyrus compared to both subjects with MDD and HC participants. During attentional processing, participants with MDD had increased activation in the parahippocampus, parietal lobe, and postcentral gyrus. However, among these regions, only the postcentral gyrus also showed differences between MDD and HC participants. No differences in cortico-limbic regions were found between participants with BP-I and MDD during depression. Instead, the major differences occurred in primary and secondary visual processing regions, with decreased activation in these regions in BP-I compared to major depression. These differences were driven by abnormal decreases in activation seen in the participants with BP-I. Posterior activation changes are a common finding in studies across mood states in participants with BP-I. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. An estimate of the minimum economic burden of bipolar I and II disorders in the United States: 2009.

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    Dilsaver, Steven C

    2011-03-01

    To conduct an analysis yielding estimates of the direct and indirect costs accruing from bipolar I and II disorders in 2009. The last analysis of these costs pertained to 1991. The analysis presented is based on recent epidemiological data, a measure of the increase in the cost of health care services and commodities between 1991 and December 31, 2009, a measure of the increase in the cost of living after partialing out of the costs of health care between 1991 and December 31, 2009 and adjustment for growth in the population of the United States between 1991 and 2009 to calculate the direct and indirect costs of bipolar I and II disorders. The estimated direct and indirect costs of bipolar I and II disorders in 2009 were 30.7 and 120.3 billion dollars, respectively. The estimated total economic burden imposed by these disorders was 151.0 billion dollars. The increase in costs between 1991 and 2009 was not entirely due to inflation. Bipolar I and II disorders are now estimated to have a combined prevalence exceeding that used in the calculation of costs for 1991 by 1.6154-fold. Direct costs escalated out of proportion (2.2393-fold) to indirect costs (1.6148-fold). The analysis required the acceptance assumptions that likely resulted in a net-underestimation of costs and did not take the entirety of the bipolar spectrum into account. The findings have implications for the formulation of public policy. The lifetime prevalences of not only bipolar I and II disorders but also the high prevalence of the entire body of bipolar spectrum disorders, the suffering that they create and the economic burden imposed by them render them worthy of having a high priority in the formulation of plans for the delivery of health care services, planning educational programs for the public and informing policymakers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) associated with bipolar I disorder and executive functions in A Han Chinese population.

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    Ni, Peiyan; Ma, Xiaohong; Lin, Yin; Lao, Guohui; Hao, Xiaoyu; Guan, Lijie; Li, Xuan; Jiang, Zeyu; Liu, Yuping; Ye, Biyu; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Yingcheng; Zhao, Liansheng; Cao, Liping; Li, Tao

    2015-09-15

    The oxidative stress hypothesis proposed to explain bipolar I disorder (BD I) pathogenesis has gained growing attention based on its association with cognitive impairment. The aim of the present study was to explore the association of the methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) gene with BD I as well as executive functions of BD I patients. A total of 44 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the MsrA gene were selected to analyze gene association with BD I in 375 BD I patients and 475 controls in a Han Chinese population. The association of MsrA haplotypes with executive functions was analyzed in 157 clinically stable BD I patients and 210 controls. Allele frequencies of the rs4840463 polymorphism were significantly different between BD I patients and controls, and between patients with psychotic symptoms and controls. BD I patients performed more poorly in 11 of the 13 neurocognitive measurements compared with controls. Three MsrA haplotypes showed significant associations with different executive functions. The limited sample size requires a cautious conclusion, and further comprehensive approaches are needed to explore the mechanism of MsrA's effect on BD I. The rs4840463 polymorphism in the MsrA gene may be associated with the increased risk of BD I in a Chinese population. The association of MsrA haplotypes with executive functions indicated that MsrA is associated with executive function defects in BD I patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The association between social skills deficits and family history of mood disorder in bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Francy B F; Rocca, Cristiana C; Gigante, Alexandre D; Dottori-Silva, Paola R; Gerchmann, Luciana; Rossini, Danielle; Sato, Rodrigo; Lafer, Beny; Nery, Fabiano G

    2018-03-26

    To compare social skills and related executive functions among bipolar disorder (BD) patients with a family history of mood disorders (FHMD), BD patients with no FHMD and healthy control (HCs). We evaluated 20 euthymic patients with FHMD, 17 euthymic patients without FHMD, and 31 HCs using the Social Skills Inventory (SSI) and a neuropsychological battery evaluating executive function, inhibitory control, verbal fluency and estimated intelligence. Both BD groups had lower SSI scores than controls. Scores for one subfactor of the social skills questionnaire, conversational skills and social performance, were significantly lower among patients with FHMD than among patients without FHMD (p = 0.019). Both groups of BD patients exhibited significant deficits in initiation/inhibition, but only BD patients with FHMD had deficits in verbal fluency, both compared to HC. There were no associations between social skills questionnaire scores and measures of cognitive function. Euthymic BD patients have lower social skills and executive function performance than HC. The presence of FHMD among BD patients is specifically associated with deficits in conversational and social performance skills, in addition to deficits in verbal fluency. Both characteristics might be associated with a common genetically determined pathophysiological substrate.

  14. Relationship between personality disorder functioning styles and the emotional states in bipolar I and II disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiashu Yao

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder types I (BD I and II (BD II behave differently in clinical manifestations, normal personality traits, responses to pharmacotherapies, biochemical backgrounds and neuroimaging activations. How the varied emotional states of BD I and II are related to the comorbid personality disorders remains to be settled.We therefore administered the Plutchick - van Praag Depression Inventory (PVP, the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ, the Hypomanic Checklist-32 (HCL-32, and the Parker Personality Measure (PERM in 37 patients with BD I, 34 BD II, and in 76 healthy volunteers.Compared to the healthy volunteers, patients with BD I and II scored higher on some PERM styles, PVP, MDQ and HCL-32 scales. In BD I, the PERM Borderline style predicted the PVP scale; and Antisocial predicted HCL-32. In BD II, Borderline, Dependent, Paranoid (- and Schizoid (- predicted PVP; Borderline predicted MDQ; Passive-Aggressive and Schizoid (- predicted HCL-32. In controls, Borderline and Narcissistic (- predicted PVP; Borderline and Dependent (- predicted MDQ.Besides confirming the different predictability of the 11 functioning styles of personality disorder to BD I and II, we found that the prediction was more common in BD II, which might underlie its higher risk of suicide and poorer treatment outcome.

  15. History of psychosis and previous episodes as potential explanatory factors for neurocognitive impairment in first-treatment bipolar I disorder.

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    Demmo, Christine; Lagerberg, Trine Vik; Aminoff, Sofie R; Hellvin, Tone; Kvitland, Levi R; Simonsen, Carmen; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid; Ueland, Torill

    2016-03-01

    Explanatory factors for the observed neurocognitive impairment in early-stage bipolar I disorder (BD-I) have received little attention. The current study investigated neurocognitive functioning in first-treatment (FT) BD-I compared to FT schizophrenia (SCZ), and healthy controls (HCs), and the effect of history of psychosis and previous episodes in the two clinical groups. A total of 202 FT patients with BD-I (n = 101) and SCZ spectrum disorder (n = 101), in addition to HCs (n = 101), were included. A comprehensive neurocognitive test battery was used to assess verbal learning and memory, executive functioning, processing speed, and attention and working memory. Neurocognitive functioning and the effect of history of psychosis and number of previous episodes were analyzed using separate multivariate analyses of variance and correlation analysis. FT patients with BD-I performed intermediately between FT SCZ spectrum patients and HCs on all measures. Compared to HCs, FT BD-I showed impaired functioning across all neurocognitive domains. No differences in neurocognitive functioning were observed in psychotic versus nonpsychotic FT patients with BD-I. With the exception of an association between number of manic episodes and two measures of executive function in FT BD-I, no associations were found between number of episodes and neurocognitive performance. Neurocognitive impairments were present in FT BD-I, and were not explained by history of psychosis or number of previous psychotic or depressive episodes. There were indications that executive function could be associated with number of previous manic episodes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Incidence and predictors of suicide attempts in bipolar I and II disorders: A 5-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallaskorpi, Sanna; Suominen, Kirsi; Ketokivi, Mikko; Valtonen, Hanna; Arvilommi, Petri; Mantere, Outi; Leppämäki, Sami; Isometsä, Erkki

    2017-02-01

    Few long-term studies on bipolar disorder (BD) have investigated the incidence and risk factors of suicide attempts (SAs) specifically related to illness phases. We examined the incidence of SAs during different phases of BD in a long-term prospective cohort of bipolar I (BD-I) and bipolar II (BD-II) patients, and risk factors specifically for SAs during major depressive episodes (MDEs). In the Jorvi Bipolar Study (JoBS), 191 BD-I and BD-II patients were followed using life-chart methodology. Prospective information on SAs of 177 patients (92.7%) during different illness phases was available up to 5 years. The incidence of SAs and their predictors were investigated using logistic and Poisson regression models. Analyses of risk factors for SAs occurring during MDEs were conducted using two-level random-intercept logistic regression models. During the 5 years of follow-up, 90 SAs per 718 patient-years occurred. The incidence was highest, over 120-fold higher than in euthymia, during mixed states (765/1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] 461-1269 person-years), and also very high in MDEs, almost 60-fold higher than in euthymia (354/1000 person-years; 95% CI 277-451 person-years). For risk of SAs during MDEs, the duration of MDEs, severity of depression, and cluster C personality disorders were significant predictors. We confirmed in this long-term study that the highest incidences of SAs occur in mixed and major depressive illness phases. The variations in incidence rates between euthymia and illness phases were remarkably large, suggesting that the question "when" rather than "who" may be more relevant for suicide risk in BD. However, risk during MDEs is likely also influenced by personality factors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Differences in incidence of suicide attempts between bipolar I and II disorders and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holma, K Mikael; Haukka, Jari; Suominen, Kirsi; Valtonen, Hanna M; Mantere, Outi; Melartin, Tarja K; Sokero, T Petteri; Oquendo, Maria A; Isometsä, Erkki T

    2014-09-01

    Whether risk of suicide attempts (SAs) differs between patients with bipolar disorder (BD) and patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) is unclear. We investigated whether cumulative risk differences are due to dissimilarities in time spent in high-risk states, incidence per unit time in high-risk states, or both. Incidence rates for SAs during various illness phases, based on prospective life charts, were compared between patients from the Jorvi Bipolar Study (n = 176; 18 months) and the Vantaa Depression Study (n = 249; five years). Risk factors and their interactions with diagnosis were investigated with Cox proportional hazards models. By 18 months, 19.9% of patients with BD versus 9.5% of patients with MDD had attempted suicide. However, patients with BD spent 4.6% of the time in mixed episodes, and more time in major depressive episodes (MDEs) (35% versus 21%, respectively) and in subthreshold depression (39% versus 31%, respectively) than those with MDD. Compared with full remission, the combined incidence rates of SAs were 5-, 25-, and 65-fold in subthreshold depression, MDEs, and BD mixed states, respectively. Between cohorts, incidence of attempts was not different during comparable symptom states. In Cox models, hazard was elevated during MDEs and subthreshold depression, and among patients with preceding SAs, female patients, those with poor social support, and those aged < 40 years, but was unrelated to BD diagnosis. The observed higher cumulative incidence of SAs among patients with BD than among those with MDD is mostly due to patients with BD spending more time in high-risk illness phases, not to differences in incidence during these phases, or to bipolarity itself. BD mixed phases contribute to differences involving very high incidence, but short duration. Diminishing the time spent in high-risk phases is crucial for prevention. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Personality disorder symptom severity predicts onset of mood episodes and conversion to bipolar I disorder in individuals with bipolar spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tommy H; Burke, Taylor A; Stange, Jonathan P; Walshaw, Patricia D; Weiss, Rachel B; Urosevic, Snezana; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2017-04-01

    Although personality disorders (PDs) are highly comorbid with bipolar spectrum disorders (BSDs), little longitudinal research has been conducted to examine the prospective impact of PD symptoms on the course of BSDs. The aim of this study is to examine whether PD symptom severity predicts shorter time to onset of bipolar mood episodes and conversion to bipolar I disorder over time among individuals with less severe BSDs. Participants (n = 166) with bipolar II disorder, cyclothymia, or bipolar disorder not otherwise specified completed diagnostic interview assessments of PD symptoms and self-report measures of mood symptoms at baseline. They were followed prospectively with diagnostic interviews every 4 months for an average of 3.02 years. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses indicated that overall PD symptom severity significantly predicted shorter time to onset of hypomanic (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.42; p conversion to bipolar I disorder (HR = 2.51; p conversion to bipolar I disorder (HR = 2.77; p < .001), whereas cluster C severity (HR = 1.56; p < .001) predicted shorter time to onset of major depressive episodes. These results support predisposition models in suggesting that PD symptoms may act as a risk factor for a more severe course of BSDs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Common variations in ALG9 are not associated with bipolar I disorder: a family-based study

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    Bacanu Silviu-Alin

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A mannosyltransferase gene (ALG9, DIBD1 at chromosome band 11q23 was previously identified to be disrupted by a balanced chromosomal translocation t(9;11(p24;q23 co-segregating with bipolar affective disorder in a small family. Inborn ALG9 deficiency (congenital disorders of glycosylation type IL is associated with progressive microcephaly, seizures, developmental delay, and hepatomegaly. It is unknown whether common variations of ALG9 predispose to bipolar affective disorder. Methods We tested five polymorphic markers spanning ALG9 (three intragenic and one upstream microsatellite repeats and one common missense variation, V289I (rs10502151 for their association with bipolar I disorder in two pedigree series. The NIMH (National Institute of Mental Health pedigrees had a total of 166 families showing transmissions to 250 affected offspring, whereas The PITT (The University of Pittsburgh pedigrees had a total of 129 families showing transmissions to 135 cases. We used transmission disequilibrium test for the association analyses. Results We identified three common and distinct haplotypes spanning the ALG9 gene. We found no statistically-significant evidence of transmission disequilibrium of marker alleles or multi-marker haplotypes to the affected offspring with bipolar I disorder. Conclusion These results suggest that common variations in ALG9 do not play a major role in predisposition to bipolar affective disorder.

  20. Increased cooperative behavior across remitted bipolar I disorder and major depression: Insights utilizing a behavioral economic trust game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Desmond C; Zaki, Jamil; Gruber, June

    2017-01-01

    Mood disorders impact social functioning, but might contribute to experiences-like affective distress-that might result in increased cooperative behavior under certain circumstances. We recruited participants with a history of bipolar I disorder (n = 28), major depressive disorder (n = 30), and healthy controls (n = 27)-to play a well-validated behavioral economic Trust Game, a task that provides a well-controlled experimental scenario, to measure cooperative behavior for the first time across both groups. Both remitted mood-disordered groups cooperated significantly more than the control group, but did not differ from one another. These results suggest that, in some contexts, a history of mood disturbance can produce enhanced cooperation, even in the absence of current mood symptoms. We discuss the clinical significance of enhanced cooperation in mood disorders and point to key directions for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Prevalences of autoimmune diseases in schizophrenia, bipolar I and II disorder, and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremaschi, Laura; Kardell, Mathias; Johansson, Viktoria; Isgren, Anniella; Sellgren, Carl M; Altamura, A Carlo; Hultman, Christina M; Landén, Mikael

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies on the relationship between autoimmune diseases, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder are mainly based on hospital discharge registers with insufficient coverage of outpatient data. Furthermore, data is scant on the prevalence of autoimmune diseases in bipolar subgroups. Here we estimate the self-reported prevalences of autoimmune diseases in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder type I and II, and controls. Lifetime prevalence of autoimmune diseases was assessed through a structured interview in a sample of 9076 patients (schizophrenia N = 5278, bipolar disorder type I N = 1952, type II N = 1846) and 6485 controls. Comparative analyses were performed using logistic regressions. The prevalence of diabetes type 1 did not differ between groups. Hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism regardless of lithium effects, rheumatoid arthritis, and polymyalgia rheumatica were most common in bipolar disorder. Systemic lupus erythematosus was less common in bipolar disorder than in the other groups. The rate of autoimmune diseases did not differ significantly between bipolar subgroups. We conclude that prevalences of autoimmune diseases show clear differences between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not between the bipolar subgroups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Examining the comorbidity of bipolar disorder and autism spectrum disorders: a large controlled analysis of phenotypic and familial correlates in a referred population of youth with bipolar I disorder with and without autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Gagan; Biederman, Joseph; Petty, Carter; Goldin, Rachel L; Furtak, Stephannie L; Wozniak, Janet

    2013-06-01

    Although mood dysregulation is frequently associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and autistic traits are common in youth with bipolar disorder, uncertainties remain regarding the comorbid occurrence of bipolar disorder and ASD. This study examines the clinical and familial correlates of bipolar disorder when it occurs with and without ASD comorbidity in a well-characterized, research-referred population of youth with bipolar disorder. We hypothesized that in youth with bipolar disorder, the clinical and familial correlates of bipolar disorder will be comparable irrespective of the comorbidity with ASD. Clinical correlates and familial risk were assessed by secondary analysis of the data from a large family study of youth with bipolar I disorder (diagnosis based on DSM-IV criteria; probands n = 157, relatives n = 487; study period: November 1997-September 2002). Findings in bipolar I youth were compared with those in youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (diagnosis based on DSM-III-R criteria) without bipolar I disorder (probands n = 162, relatives n = 511) and age- and sex-matched controls without bipolar I disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (probands n = 136, relatives n = 411). All subjects were comprehensively assessed using structured diagnostic interviews and a wide range of nonoverlapping measures assessing multiple dimensions of functioning. Thirty percent (47/155) of the bipolar I probands met criteria for ASD (diagnosis based on DSM-III-R criteria). The mean ± SD age at onset of bipolar I disorder was significantly earlier in the presence of ASD comorbidity (4.7 ± 2.9 vs 6.3 ± 3.7 years; P = .01). The phenotypic and familial correlates of bipolar disorder were similar in youth with and without ASD comorbidity. A clinically significant minority of youth with bipolar I disorder suffers from comorbid ASD. Phenotypic and familial correlates of bipolar disorder were typical of the disorder in the presence of ASD

  3. Association of Per3 length polymorphism with bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeyan R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ramanujam Karthikeyan,1 Ganapathy Marimuthu,1 Chellamuthu Ramasubramanian,2 Gautham Arunachal,2 Ahmed S BaHammam,3 David Warren Spence,4 Daniel P Cardinali,5 Gregory M Brown,6 Seithikurippu R Pandi-Perumal7 1Department of Animal Behaviour and Physiology, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, India; 2MS Chellamuthu Trust and Research Foundation, KK Nagar, Madurai, India; 3University Sleep Disorders Center, College of Medicine, National Plan for Science and Technology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Independent researcher, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 5Department of Teaching and Research, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 6Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 7Center for Healthful Behavior Change (CHBC, Division of Health and Behavior, Department of Population Health, NYU Langone Medical Center, Clinical and Translational Research Institute, New York, New York, USA Background: Sleep–wake disturbances have frequently been reported in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and are considered to be caused by an underlying circadian rhythm disorder. The study presented here was designed to investigate the existence of Per3 polymorphism in bipolar disorder type I (BD-I and schizophrenic patients in South India.Methods: Blood samples were collected from 311 BD-I patients, 293 schizophrenia patients, and 346 age- and sex-matched normal controls. Per3 genotyping was performed on DNA by polymerase chain reaction using specific primers.Results: An increased prevalence of five repeat homozygotes was seen in BD-I patients as compared with healthy controls (odds ratio =1.72 [95% confidence interval: 1.08–2.76, P=0.02]. In BD-I patients, the frequency of the five repeat allele was higher (allele frequency =0.41, and that of the four repeat allele lower (allele frequency =0.36 (χ2=4.634; P<0.03 than in

  4. The role of asenapine in the treatment of manic or mixed states associated with bipolar I disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pompili M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Pompili1,2, Paola Venturini1, Marco Innamorati1, Gianluca Serafini1, Ludovica Telesforo1, David Lester3, Roberto Tatarelli1, Paolo Girardi11Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Functions, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 2McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, NJ, USABackground: Bipolar disorders (BD are of particular public health significance as they are prevalent, severe and disabling, and often associated with elevated risks of premature mortality. The aim of this concise overview is to investigate the role of asenapine in the treatment of manic and mixed states associated with BD type 1 disorder.Method: MedLine, Excerpta Medica and PsycINFO searches were performed to identify papers in English published over the past 7 years. Search terms were "asenapine", "manic" OR "mixed states", "bipolar I disorder". Subjects included in this study suffered from BD type 1 disorder.Results: To date, only four studies of asenapine for the treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with BD type 1 have been published.Conclusion: Research indicates that asenapine is generally well-tolerated, and that asenapine is efficacious and not inferior to olanzapine in the treatment of mixed or manic episodes associated with BD type 1 in the short-term and long-term.Keywords: asenapine, bipolar disorder, side effects

  5. A randomized controlled trial of risperidone, lithium, or divalproex sodium for initial treatment of bipolar I disorder, manic or mixed phase, in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Barbara; Luby, Joan L; Joshi, Paramjit; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Emslie, Graham; Walkup, John T; Axelson, David A; Bolhofner, Kristine; Robb, Adelaide; Wolf, Dwight V; Riddle, Mark A; Birmaher, Boris; Nusrat, Nasima; Ryan, Neal D; Vitiello, Benedetto; Tillman, Rebecca; Lavori, Philip

    2012-05-01

    There was a paucity of comparative pharmacological research for initial treatment of bipolar I disorder, manic or mixed phase, in children and adolescents. To investigate which medication to administer first to antimanic medication-naive subjects. The Treatment of Early Age Mania (TEAM) study recruited 6- to 15-year-old children and adolescents with DSM-IV bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed phase) at 5 US sites from 2003 to 2008 into a controlled, randomized, no-patient-choice, 8-week protocol. Blinded, independent evaluators conducted all baseline and end-point assessments. Subjects received a titrated schedule of lithium, divalproex sodium, or risperidone. Medications were increased weekly only if there was inadequate response, and no dose-limiting adverse effects, to maximum doses of lithium carbonate (1.1-1.3 mEq/L), divalproex sodium (111-125 μg/mL), and risperidone (4-6 mg). Primary outcome measures were the Clinical Global Impressions for Bipolar Illness Improvement-Mania and the Modified Side Effects Form for Children and Adolescents. There were 279 antimanic medication-naive subjects (mean [SD] age, 10.1 [2.8] years; 50.2% female) who had the following characteristics: 100% elated mood and/or grandiosity, 77.1% psychosis, 97.5% mixed mania, 99.3% daily rapid cycling, and mean (SD) mania duration of 4.9 (2.5) years. The mean (SD) titrated lithium level was 1.09 (0.34) mEq/L, and the mean (SD) divalproex sodium level was 113.6 (23.0) μg/mL. The mean (SD) titrated risperidone dose was 2.57 (1.21) mg. Higher response rates occurred with risperidone vs lithium (68.5% vs 35.6%; χ(2)(1) = 16.9, P serious metabolic effects. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00057681

  6. Creativity and executive function across manic, mixed and depressive episodes in bipolar I disorder.

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    Soeiro-de-Souza, Márcio Gerhardt; Dias, Vasco Videira; Bio, Danielle Soares; Post, Robert M; Moreno, Ricardo A

    2011-12-01

    Creativity is a complex construct involving affective and cognitive components. Bipolar Disorder (BD) has been associated with creativity and is characterized by a wide range of affective and cognitive symptoms. Although studies of creativity in BD have tended to focus on creativity as a trait variable in medicated euthymic patients, it probably fluctuates during symptomatic states of BD. Since creativity is known to involve key affective and cognitive components, it is plausible to speculate that cognitive deficits and symptoms present in symptomatic BD could interfere with creativity. Sixty-seven BD type I patients medication free, age 18-35 years and experiencing a maniac, mixed, or depressive episodes, were assessed for creativity, executive functioning, and intelligence. Manic and mixed state patients had higher creativity scores than depressive individuals. Creativity was influenced by executive function measures only in manic patients. Intelligence did not influence creativity for any of the mood episode types. We propose that creativity in BD might be linked to the putative hyperdopaminergic state of mania and be dependent on intact executive function. Future studies should further explore the role of dopaminergic mechanisms in creativity in BD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Family Intervention with a Case of Bipolar I Disorder with Family Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Kamlesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a major mental illness. Inherited treatment of bipolar disorder has been focused on pharmacological treatments. Though, psychosocial variables appear to be important antecedents of bipolar disorder, poor drug compliance, expressed emotion or faulty communication and life events play a vital role in relapse. Conflict is commonly…

  8. A gender-focused perspective on health service utilization in comorbid bipolar I disorder and alcohol use disorders: results from the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Benjamin I; Levitt, Anthony J

    2006-06-01

    This study compares health service utilization by individuals with comorbid lifetime bipolar I disorder and lifetime alcohol use disorders (AUD) to that of individuals with either diagnosis alone, using nationally representative data. The 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions was used to identify respondents with bipolar I disorder only (BD-only; N = 636), AUD only (N = 11,068), and comorbid bipolar I disorder and AUD (BD-AUD; N = 775). Diagnoses were generated using the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV Version. The 3 groups were compared with respect to self-reported health service utilization. For both men and women, respondents in the BD-AUD group were significantly more likely than AUD-only respondents to report any alcohol-related service utilization (p disorder-related hospital admissions as compared with BD-only respondents among males only (p = .009). Within the BD-AUD group, males reported significantly greater utilization of AUD treatment only (p disorder treatment only (p disorder services. As expected, individuals with comorbid bipolar I disorder and AUD utilize significantly more mental health services than individuals with either disorder alone. The primary original finding is that among those with comorbid bipolar I disorder and AUD, bipolar I disorder is more likely to go untreated among males and AUD is more likely to go untreated among females. Gender may be an important factor to consider in future health service planning for comorbid bipolar I disorder and AUD.

  9. The association between mood state and chronobiological characteristics in bipolar I disorder: a naturalistic, variable cluster analysis-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Robert; Suppes, Trisha; Zeitzer, Jamie; McClung, Colleen; Tamminga, Carol; Tohen, Mauricio; Forero, Angelica; Dwivedi, Alok; Alvarado, Andres

    2018-02-19

    Multiple types of chronobiological disturbances have been reported in bipolar disorder, including characteristics associated with general activity levels, sleep, and rhythmicity. Previous studies have focused on examining the individual relationships between affective state and chronobiological characteristics. The aim of this study was to conduct a variable cluster analysis in order to ascertain how mood states are associated with chronobiological traits in bipolar I disorder (BDI). We hypothesized that manic symptomatology would be associated with disturbances of rhythm. Variable cluster analysis identified five chronobiological clusters in 105 BDI subjects. Cluster 1, comprising subjective sleep quality was associated with both mania and depression. Cluster 2, which comprised variables describing the degree of rhythmicity, was associated with mania. Significant associations between mood state and cluster analysis-identified chronobiological variables were noted. Disturbances of mood were associated with subjectively assessed sleep disturbances as opposed to objectively determined, actigraphy-based sleep variables. No associations with general activity variables were noted. Relationships between gender and medication classes in use and cluster analysis-identified chronobiological characteristics were noted. Exploratory analyses noted that medication class had a larger impact on these relationships than the number of psychiatric medications in use. In a BDI sample, variable cluster analysis was able to group related chronobiological variables. The results support our primary hypothesis that mood state, particularly mania, is associated with chronobiological disturbances. Further research is required in order to define these relationships and to determine the directionality of the associations between mood state and chronobiological characteristics.

  10. Neuroanatomical Classification in a Population-Based Sample of Psychotic Major Depression and Bipolar I Disorder with 1 Year of Diagnostic Stability

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    Mauricio H. Serpa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of psychotic features in the course of a depressive disorder is known to increase the risk for bipolarity, but the early identification of such cases remains challenging in clinical practice. In the present study, we evaluated the diagnostic performance of a neuroanatomical pattern classification method in the discrimination between psychotic major depressive disorder (MDD, bipolar I disorder (BD-I, and healthy controls (HC using a homogenous sample of patients at an early course of their illness. Twenty-three cases of first-episode psychotic mania (BD-I and 19 individuals with a first episode of psychotic MDD whose diagnosis remained stable during 1 year of followup underwent 1.5 T MRI at baseline. A previously validated multivariate classifier based on support vector machine (SVM was employed and measures of diagnostic performance were obtained for the discrimination between each diagnostic group and subsamples of age- and gender-matched controls recruited in the same neighborhood of the patients. Based on T1-weighted images only, the SVM-classifier afforded poor discrimination in all 3 pairwise comparisons: BD-I versus HC; MDD versus HC; and BD-I versus MDD. Thus, at the population level and using structural MRI only, we failed to achieve good discrimination between BD-I, psychotic MDD, and HC in this proof of concept study.

  11. Brain network analysis reveals affected connectome structure in bipolar I disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collin, Guusje; van den Heuvel, Martijn P.; Abramovic, Lucija; Vreeker, Annabel; de Reus, Marcel A.; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Boks, Marco P M; Ophoff, Roel A.; Kahn, René S.

    The notion that healthy brain function emerges from coordinated neural activity constrained by the brain's network of anatomical connections-i.e., the connectome-suggests that alterations in the connectome's wiring pattern may underlie brain disorders. Corroborating this hypothesis, studies in

  12. Characterization and Factors Associated with Sleep Quality in Adolescents with Bipolar I Disorder

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    Roybal, Donna J.; Chang, Kiki D.; Chen, Michael C.; Howe, Meghan E.; Gotlib, Ian H.; Singh, Manpreet K.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is an early marker for bipolar disorder (BD) onset in youth. We characterized sleep quality in adolescents experiencing mania within the last 6-12 months. We examined the association between mood and sleep in 27 adolescents with BD and 24 matched healthy controls (HC). Subjects were assessed by parent and teen report of sleep, a…

  13. Aripiprazole in the acute and maintenance phase of bipolar I disorder

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    Zupancic M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanie Zupancic1, Misty L Gonzalez2,31Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 2Division of Medicine Psychiatry, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 3Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Pharmacy, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Springfield, IL, USAAbstract: Bipolar affective disorder is a disabling illness with substantial morbidity and many management challenges. Traditional mood stabilizers such as lithium, valproate, and carbamazepine are often inadequate in controlling symptoms both during the acute and maintenance phase of treatment. Aripiprazole is a second-generation antipsychotic with a unique mechanism of action. Evidence suggests that it is effective in acute manic and mixed states. There are limited data to suggest its efficacy as a maintenance agent. Future studies will be needed to better define the role of aripiprazole relative to other traditional pharmacologic agents.Keywords: aripiprazole, bipolar disorder, acute treatment, maintenance treatment

  14. Neuropsychological study of IQ scores in offspring of parents with bipolar I disorder.

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    Sharma, Aditya; Camilleri, Nigel; Grunze, Heinz; Barron, Evelyn; Le Couteur, James; Close, Andrew; Rushton, Steven; Kelly, Thomas; Ferrier, Ian Nicol; Le Couteur, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Studies comparing IQ in Offspring of Bipolar Parents (OBP) with Offspring of Healthy Controls (OHC) have reported conflicting findings. They have included OBP with mental health/neurodevelopmental disorders and/or pharmacological treatment which could affect results. This UK study aimed to assess IQ in OBP with no mental health/neurodevelopmental disorder and assess the relationship of sociodemographic variables with IQ. IQ data using the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) from 24 OBP and 34 OHC from the North East of England was analysed using mixed-effects modelling. All participants had IQ in the average range. OBP differed statistically significantly from OHC on Full Scale IQ (p = .001), Performance IQ (PIQ) (p = .003) and Verbal IQ (VIQ) (p = .001) but not on the PIQ-VIQ split. OBP and OHC groups did not differ on socio-economic status (SES) and gender. SES made a statistically significant contribution to the variance of IQ scores (p = .001). Using a robust statistical model of analysis, the OBP with no current/past history of mental health/neurodevelopmental disorders had lower IQ scores compared to OHC. This finding should be borne in mind when assessing and recommending interventions for OBP.

  15. Efficacy and safety of low- and high-dose cariprazine in acute and mixed mania associated with bipolar I disorder: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

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    Calabrese, Joseph R; Keck, Paul E; Starace, Anju; Lu, Kaifeng; Ruth, Adam; Laszlovszky, István; Németh, György; Durgam, Suresh

    2015-03-01

    This phase 3 trial evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of low- and high-dose cariprazine in patients meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for acute manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, fixed/flexible-dose study was conducted from February 2010 to December 2011. Patients were randomly assigned to placebo, cariprazine 3-6 mg/d, or cariprazine 6-12 mg/d for 3 weeks of double-blind treatment. Primary and secondary efficacy parameters were change from baseline to week 3 in Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) total score and Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness (CGI-S) score, respectively. Post hoc analysis examined change from baseline to week 3 in YMRS single items. A total of 497 patients were randomized; 74% completed the study. The least squares mean difference (LSMD) for change from baseline to week 3 in YMRS total score was statistically significant in favor of both cariprazine groups versus placebo (LSMD [95% CI]: 3-6 mg/d, -6.1 [-8.4 to -3.8]; 6-12 mg/d, -5.9 [-8.2, -3.6]; P placebo on all 11 YMRS single items (all comparisons, P placebo (LSMD [95% CI]: 3-6 mg/d, -0.6 [-0.9 to -0.4]; 6-12 mg/d, -0.6 [-0.9 to -0.3]; P placebo) treatment-related adverse events for cariprazine were akathisia (both groups) and nausea, constipation, and tremor (6-12 mg/d only). Results of this study demonstrated that both low- and high-dose cariprazine were more effective than placebo in the treatment of acute manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder. Cariprazine was generally well tolerated, although the incidence of akathisia was greater with cariprazine than with placebo. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01058668. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  16. Sleep in Adolescents With Bipolar I Disorder: Stability and Relation to Symptom Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Anda; Singh, Manpreet K

    2017-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common features of bipolar disorder (BD), yet little is known about trajectories of sleep disturbances in youth with BD. Using longitudinal data, this study assessed the stability of sleep disturbances and their ability to predict symptom progression in adolescents diagnosed with BD compared to controls. Thirteen- to 19-year-olds meeting diagnostic criteria for BD I (n = 19, 16.2 ± 1.75 years, 57.9 % female, 68.4% Caucasian) and psychiatrically healthy age-comparable controls (n = 21, 15.7 ± 1.48 years. 52.4% female, 57.1% Caucasian) were assessed for sleep onset latency, number of awakenings, and wake time, separately for weekdays and weekends using a self-report questionnaire. Sleep indices and symptoms of mania (Young Mania Rating Scale) and depression (Children's Depression Rating Scale) were assessed at two time points, T1 and T2, approximately 12 months apart. Correlations were used to examine stability of sleep indices across time points and regression models to examine the effects of T1 sleep on T2 symptoms. Adolescents with BD showed low stability on most sleep indices, whereas controls showed high stability on all sleep indices. After controlling for T1 depression symptoms, more T1 weekend awakenings and weekend wake time predicted significantly greater T2 depression symptoms in youth with BD but not in controls. No significant associations were found between T1 sleep and T2 mania symptoms. These findings suggest that increased awakenings and wakefulness on weekends may represent an important therapeutic target for reducing depression in adolescents with BD.

  17. Temperament and character profiles in bipolar I, bipolar II and major depressive disorder: Impact over illness course, comorbidity pattern and psychopathological features of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaninotto, Leonardo; Souery, Daniel; Calati, Raffaella; Di Nicola, Marco; Montgomery, Stuart; Kasper, Siegfried; Zohar, Joseph; Mendlewicz, Julien; Robert Cloninger, C; Serretti, Alessandro; Janiri, Luigi

    2015-09-15

    Studies comparing temperament and character traits between patients with mood disorders and healthy individuals have yielded variable results. The Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) was administered to 101 bipolar I (BP-I), 96 bipolar II (BP-II), 123 major depressive disorder (MDD) patients, and 125 HS. A series of generalized linear models were performed in order to: (a) compare the TCI dimensions across groups; (b) test any effect of the TCI dimensions on clinical features of mood disorders; and (c) detect any association between TCI dimensions and the psychopathological features of a major depressive episode. Demographic and clinical variables were also included in the models as independent variables. Higher Harm Avoidance was found in BP-II and MDD, but not in BP-I. Higher Self-Transcendence was found in BP-I. Our models also showed higher Self-Directedness in HS, either vs MDD or BP-II. No association was found between any TCI dimension and the severity of symptoms. Conversely, a positive association was found between Harm Avoidance and the overall burden of depressive episodes during lifetime. The cross-sectional design and the heterogeneity of the sample may be the main limitations of our study. In general, our sample seems to support the view of a similar profile of temperament and character between MDD and BP-II, characterized by high Harm Avoidance and low Self-Directedness. In contrast, patients with BP-I only exhibit high Self-Transcendence, having a near-normal profile in terms of Harm Avoidance or Self-Directedness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An Integrated Risk Reduction Intervention can reduce body mass index in individuals being treated for bipolar I disorder: results from a randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Ellen; Wallace, Meredith L; Hall, Martica; Hasler, Brant; Levenson, Jessica C; Janney, Carol A; Soreca, Isabella; Fleming, Matthew C; Buttenfield, Joan; Ritchey, Fiona C; Kupfer, David J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We conducted a randomized, controlled trial comparing the efficacy of an Integrated Risk Reduction Intervention (IRRI) to a control condition with the objective of improving mood stability and psychosocial functioning by reducing cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight/obese patients with bipolar I disorder. Methods A total of 122 patients were recruited from our outpatient services and randomly allocated to IRRI (n = 61) or psychiatric care with medical monitoring (n = 61). Individuals allocated to IRRI received psychiatric treatment and assessment, medical monitoring by a nurse, and a healthy lifestyle program from a lifestyle coach. Those allocated to the control condition received psychiatric treatment and assessment and referral, if indicated, for medical problems. A mixed-effects model was used to examine the impact of the interventions on body mass index (BMI). Exploratory moderator analyses were used to characterize those individuals likely to benefit from each treatment approach. Results Analyses were conducted on the IRRI (n = 58) and control (n = 56) participants with ≥ 1 study visit. IRRI was associated with significantly greater rate of decrease in BMI (d = −0.51, 95% confidence interval: −0.91 to −0.14). Three variables (C-reactive protein, total cholesterol, and instability of total sleep time) contributed to a combined moderator of faster decrease in BMI with IRRI treatment. Conclusions Overweight/obese patients with bipolar disorder can make modest improvements in BMI, even when taking medications with known potential for weight gain. Our finding that a combination of three baseline variables provides a profile of patients likely to benefit from IRRI will need to be tested further to evaluate its utility in clinical practice. PMID:25495748

  19. The use of 15-point hypomanic checklist in differentiating bipolar I and bipolar II disorder from major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongbo; Xu, Guiyun; Sun, Bin; Ouyang, Huiyi; Dang, Yamei; Guo, Yangbo; Miao, Guodong; Rios, Catherine; Akiskal, Hagop S; Lin, Kangguang

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with bipolar disorder (BP) are often misdiagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD). In this study, we developed a Chinese version of 15-point hypomania scale (HCL-15) in order to determine its sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of BP and BP-II in particular. A total of 623 individuals suffering a major depressive episode (MDE) were systematically interviewed with both Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders, Patient Edition, and HCL-15. A cutoff score of 8 or more in HCL-15 was suggested for BP. Of the 623 depressed patients, 115 (18.5%) actually required a diagnosis of BP-I, and another 159 (25.5%) could be more appropriately diagnosed with BP-II, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria. The sensitivity of 15-HCL in detection of BP-II was 0.78 and 0.46 for BP-I; the specificity was 0.9 and 0.69, respectively. The specificity of HCL-15 for BP versus MDD was as high as 0.93. Approximately 60%-80% of all questions in the HCL-15 questionnaire revealed positive responses from patients, while items 11 and 12, measuring the consumption of alcohol, coffee and cigarettes, demonstrated a low positive response rate. The HCL-15 assessment scale was fairly sensitive and highly specific for a BP-II diagnosis but not for a BP-I diagnosis. Some items in the HCL-15 symptom list need to be further modified to better fit Chinese culture and customs. The HCL-15 scale could be a useful tool in clinical practice for screening individuals with BP-II in order to avoid a misdiagnosis of MDD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An actigraphy study investigating sleep in bipolar I patients, unaffected siblings and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, Sanne; van Bergen, Annet H.; Knapen, Stefan E.; Vreeker, Annabel; Abramovic, Lucija; Pagani, Lucia; Jung, Yoon; Riemersma-van der Lek, Rixt; Schoevers, Robert A.; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Kahn, René S.; Boks, Marco P.M.; Ophoff, Roel A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Disturbances in sleep and waking patterns are highly prevalent during mood episodes in bipolar disorder. The question remains whether these disturbances persist during phases of euthymia and whether they are heritable traits of bipolar disorder. The current study investigates objective

  1. An actigraphy study investigating sleep in bipolar I patients, unaffected siblings and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, Sanne; van Bergen, Annet H.; Knapen, Stefan E.; Vreeker, Annabel; Abramovic, Lucija; Pagani, Lucia; Jung, Yoon; Riemersma-van der Lek, Rixt; Schoevers, Robert A.; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Kahn, Rene S.; Boks, Marco P. M.; Ophoff, Roel A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Disturbances in sleep and waking patterns are highly prevalent during mood episodes in bipolar disorder. The question remains whether these disturbances persist during phases of euthymia and whether they are heritable traits of bipolar disorder. The current study investigates objective

  2. American tertiary clinic-referred bipolar II disorder versus bipolar I disorder associated with hastened depressive recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Shah, Saloni; Do, Dennis; Yuen, Laura D; Hooshmand, Farnaz; Wang, Po W; Miller, Shefali; Ketter, Terence A

    2017-12-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic, frequently comorbid condition characterized by high rates of mood episode recurrence and suicidality. Little is known about prospective longitudinal characterization of BD type II (BD II) versus type I (BD I) in relation to time to depressive recurrence and recovery from major depressive episode. We therefore assessed times to depressive recurrence/recovery in tertiary clinic-referred BD II versus I patients. Outpatients referred to Stanford BD Clinic during 2000-2011 were assessed with Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for BD (STEP-BD) Affective Disorders Evaluation and with Clinical Monitoring Form during up to 2 years of naturalistic treatment. Prevalence and clinical correlates of bipolar subtype in recovered (euthymic ≥8 weeks) and depressed patients were assessed. Kaplan-Meier analyses assessed the relationships between bipolar subtype and longitudinal depressive severity, and Cox proportional hazard analyses assessed the potential mediators. BD II versus BD I was less common among 105 recovered (39.0 vs. 61.0%, p = 0.03) and more common among 153 depressed (61.4 vs. 38.6%, p = 0.006) patients. Among recovered patients, BD II was associated with 6/25 (24.0%) baseline unfavorable illness characteristics/mood symptoms/psychotropics and hastened depressive recurrence (p = 0.015). Among depressed patients, BD II was associated with 8/25 (33.0%) baseline unfavorable illness characteristics/mood symptoms/psychotropics, but only non-significantly associated with delayed depressive recovery. BD II versus BD I was significantly associated with current depression and hastened depressive recurrence, but only non-significantly associated with delayed depressive recovery. Research on bipolar subtype relationships with depressive recurrence/recovery is warranted to enhance clinical management of BD patients.

  3. Treatment and outcomes of an Australian cohort of outpatients with bipolar I or schizoaffective disorder over twenty-four months: implications for clinical practice

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    Kulkarni Jayashri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bipolar Comprehensive Outcomes Study (BCOS is a 2-year, prospective, non-interventional, observational study designed to explore the clinical and functional outcomes associated with ‘real-world’ treatment of participants with bipolar I or schizoaffective disorder. All participants received treatment as usual. There was no study medication. Methods Participants prescribed either conventional mood stabilizers (CMS; n = 155 alone, or olanzapine with, or without, CMS (olanzapine ± CMS; n = 84 were assessed every 3 months using several measures, including the Young Mania Rating Scale, 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Clinical Global Impressions Scale – Bipolar Version, and the EuroQol Instrument. This paper reports 24-month longitudinal clinical, pharmacological, functional, and socioeconomic data. Results On average, participants were 42 (range 18 to 79 years of age, 58%; were female, and 73%; had a diagnosis of bipolar I. Polypharmacy was the usual approach to pharmacological treatment; participants took a median of 5 different psychotropic medications over the course of the study, and spent a median proportion of time of 100%; of the study on mood stabilizers, 90%; on antipsychotics, 9%; on antidepressants, and 5%; on benzodiazepines/hypnotics. By 24 months, the majority of participants had achieved both symptomatic and syndromal remission of both mania and depression. Symptomatic relapse rates were similar for both the CMS alone (65%; and the olanzapine ± CMS (61%; cohorts. Conclusions Participants with bipolar I or schizoaffective disorder in this study were receiving complex medication treatments that were often discordant with recommendations made in contemporary major treatment guidelines. The majority of study participants demonstrated some clinical and functional improvements, but not all achieved remission of symptoms or syndrome.

  4. Impairment in emotion perception from body movements in individuals with bipolar I and bipolar II disorder is associated with functional capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaskinn, Anja; Lagerberg, Trine Vik; Bjella, Thomas D; Simonsen, Carmen; Andreassen, Ole A; Ueland, Torill; Sundet, Kjetil

    2017-12-01

    Individuals with bipolar disorder present with moderate impairments in social cognition during the euthymic state. The impairment extends to theory of mind and to the perception of emotion in faces and voices, but it is unclear if emotion perception from body movements is affected. The main aim of this study was to examine if participants with bipolar disorder perform worse than healthy control participants on a task using point-light displays of human full figures moving in a manner indicative of a basic emotion (angry, happy, sad, fearful, neutral/no emotion). A secondary research question was whether diagnostic subtypes (bipolar I, bipolar II) and history of psychosis impacted on this type of emotion perception. Finally, symptomatic, neurocognitive, and functional correlates of emotion perception from body movements were investigated. Fifty-three individuals with bipolar I (n = 29) or bipolar II (n = 24) disorder, and 84 healthy control participants were assessed for emotion perception from body movements. The bipolar group also underwent clinical, cognitive, and functional assessment. Research questions were analyzed using analyses of variance and bivariate correlations. The bipolar disorder group differed significantly from healthy control participants for emotion perception from body movements (Cohen's d = 0.40). Analyses of variance yielded no effects of sex, diagnostic subtype (bipolar I, bipolar II), or history of psychosis. There was an effect of emotion, indicating that some emotions are easier to recognize. The lack of a significant group × emotion interaction effect points, however, to this being so regardless of the presence of bipolar disorder. Performance was unrelated to manic and depressive symptom load but showed significant associations with neurocognition and functional capacity. Individuals with bipolar disorder had a small but significant impairment in the ability to perceive emotions from body movement. The impairment was global, i

  5. Adjunctive armodafinil for major depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder: a randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Joseph R; Ketter, Terence A; Youakim, James M; Tiller, Jane M; Yang, Ronghua; Frye, Mark A

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of armodafinil, the longer-lasting isomer of modafinil, when used adjunctively in patients with bipolar depression. In this 8-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study conducted between June 2007 and December 2008, patients who were experiencing a major depressive episode associated with bipolar I disorder (according to DSM-IV-TR criteria) despite treatment with lithium, olanzapine, or valproic acid were randomly assigned to adjunctive armodafinil 150 mg/d (n = 128) or placebo (n = 129) administered once daily in the morning. The primary outcome measure was change from baseline in the total 30-item Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, Clinician-Rated (IDS-C₃₀) score. Secondary outcomes included changes from baseline in scores on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, among other psychological symptom scales. Statistical analyses were performed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), with study drug and concurrent mood stabilizer treatment for bipolar disorder as factors and the corresponding baseline value as a covariate. A prespecified sensitivity analysis was done using analysis of variance (ANOVA) if a statistically significant treatment-by-baseline interaction was found. Tolerability was also assessed. A significant baseline-by-treatment interaction in the total IDS-C₃₀ score (P = .08) was found. Patients administered adjunctive armodafinil showed greater improvement in depressive symptoms as seen in the greater mean ± SD change on the total IDS-C₃₀ score (-15.8 ± 11.57) compared with the placebo group (-12.8 ± 12.54) (ANOVA: P = .044; ANCOVA: P = .074). No differences between treatment groups were observed in secondary outcomes. Adverse events reported more frequently in patients receiving adjunctive armodafinil were headache, diarrhea, and insomnia. Armodafinil was not associated with an increased incidence and/or severity of suicidality, depression, or mania or with

  6. Comparing neurocognitive impairment in schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder using the Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Psychiatry Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana Gómez-Benito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del estudio fue comparar las propiedades psicométricas del test Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Psychiatry (SCIP en pacientes diagnosticados de esquizofrenia (n = 126 o trastorno bipolar I (n = 76. Además, el deterioro cognitivo se comparó con un grupo control (n = 83 empleando el SCIP y una batería neuropsicológica completa. El test SCIP es una escala que evalúa rápida y fácilmente el deterioro cognitivo en trastornos psiquiátricos graves. En términos de consistencia interna, estabilidad temporal, estructura dimensional y validez de criterio, el SCIP proporciona resultados al mismo nivel de fiabilidad y validez en pacientes con esquizofrenia o trastorno bipolar I. Además, demostró que el deterioro cognitivo diferencial entre los dos grupos de pacientes se produce solo en la memoria verbal, aunque el tamaño del efecto de esta diferencia es pequeño. Por último, y frente al grupo control, se confirma el deterioro cognitivo a todos los niveles en ambos grupos de pacientes utilizando tanto el SCIP como la batería neuropsicológica, lo que indica que el SCIP es una buena herramienta de detección para los déficits cognitivos en esquizofrenia y trastorno bipolar, y útil en la práctica clínica habitual para profesionales de la salud. © 2013 Asociación Española de Psicología Conductual. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L. Todos los derechos reservados.

  7. Disability in bipolar I disorder: the 36-item World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilera, Georgina; Gómez-Benito, Juana; Pino, Óscar; Rojo, Emilio; Vieta, Eduard; Cuesta, Manuel J; Purdon, Scot E; Bernardo, Miguel; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Franco, Manuel; Martínez-Arán, Anabel; Safont, Gemma; Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael; Rejas, Javier

    2015-03-15

    The WHODAS 2.0 is an ICF-based multidimensional instrument developed for measuring disability. The present study analyzes the utility of the 36-item interviewer-administered version in a sample of patients with bipolar disorder. There is no study to date that analyses how the scale works in a sample that only comprises such patients. A total of 291 patients with bipolar disorder (42.6% males) according to DSM-IV-TR criteria from a cross-sectional study conducted in outpatient psychiatric clinics were enrolled. In addition to the WHODAS 2.0, patients completed a comprehensive assessment battery including measures on psychopathology, functionality and quality of life. Analyses were centered on providing evidence on the validity and utility of the Spanish version of the WHODAS 2.0 in bipolar patients. Participation domain had the highest percentage of missing data (2.7%). Confirmatory factorial analysis was used to test three models formulated in the literature: six primary correlated factors, six primary factors with a single second-order factor, and six primary factors with two second-order factors. The three models were plausible, although the one formed by six correlated factors produced the best fit. Cronbach's alpha values ranged between .73 for the Self-care domain and .92 for Life activities, and the internal consistency of the total score was .96. Relationships between the WHODAS 2.0 and measures of psychopathology, functionality and quality of life were in the expected direction, and the scale was found to be able to differentiate among patients with different intensity of clinical symptoms and work situation. The percentage of euthymic patients was considerable. However, the assessment of euthymic patients is less influenced by mood. Some psychometric properties have not been studied, such as score stability and sensitivity to change. The Spanish version of the 36-item WHODAS 2.0 has suitable psychometric properties in terms of reliability and validity when

  8. Course of neurocognitive function in first treatment bipolar I disorder: One-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmo, Christine; Lagerberg, Trine Vik; Aminoff, Sofie R; Hellvin, Tone; Kvitland, Levi R; Simonsen, Carmen; Haatveit, Beathe; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid; Ueland, Torill

    2017-03-01

    Neurocognitive impairment has been found to be a marked feature in bipolar disorder (BD), also in the early phase of the illness. The longitudinal course of neurocognitive functioning, however, remains sparsely investigated. The aims of the study were to investigate the course of neurocognitive function in BD I, and to what degree neurocognitive change or stability is observed also on the individual level. Forty-two patients and 153 comparable healthy controls were assessed at baseline and one-year follow-up. Compared to the healthy control (HC) group BD I patients perform significantly poorer at both baseline and follow-up across all neurocognitive domains and on most neurocognitive subtests. Neurocognitive impairment remained stable for most patients from baseline to follow-up, both on a group level and when investigating individual trajectories, indicative of a relatively stable course of neurocognitive functioning in the early phase of BD I. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Predictors of adherence to psychopharmacological and psychosocial treatment in bipolar I or II disorders - an 18-month prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvilommi, Petri; Suominen, Kirsi; Mantere, Outi; Leppämäki, Sami; Valtonen, Hanna; Isometsä, Erkki

    2014-02-01

    Poor treatment adherence among patients with bipolar disorder (BD) is a common clinical problem. However, whether adherence is mostly determined by patient characteristics or attitudes, type of treatment or treatment side-effects remains poorly known. The Jorvi Bipolar Study (JoBS) is a naturalistic prospective 18-month study representing psychiatric in- and outpatients with DSM-IV BD I and II in three Finnish cities. During the 18-month follow-up we investigated the continuity of, attitudes towards and adherence to various types of psychopharmacological and psychosocial treatments among 168 psychiatric in- and outpatients with BD I or II. One-quarter of the patients using mood stabilizers or atypical antipsychotics discontinued medication during at least one treatment phase of the follow-up autonomously, mostly during depression. When pharmacotherapy continued, adherence was compromised in one-third. Rates of non-adherence to mood stabilizers or antipsychotics did not differ, but the predictors did. One-quarter of the patients receiving psychosocial treatments were non-adherent to them. Serum concentrations were not estimated. More than one-half of BD patients either discontinue pharmacotherapy or use it irregularly. Autonomous discontinuation takes place mostly in depression. Although rates of non-adherence do not necessarily differ between mood-stabilizing medications, the predictors for nonadherence do. Moreover, adherence to one medication does not guarantee adherence to another, nor does adherence at one time-point ensure later adherence. Attitudes towards treatments affect adherence to medications as well as to psychosocial treatments and should be repeatedly monitored. Non-adherence to psychosocial treatment should be given more attention. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. [Impact of a Multimodal Intervention on the Psychological Profile of Schizophrenic and Bipolar I Patients: A Study of PRISMA Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Zuluaga, Ana María; Vargas, Cristian; Duica, Kelly; Richard, Shanel; Palacio, Juan David; Agudelo Berruecos, Yuli; Ospina, Sigifredo; López-Jaramillo, Carlos

    Bipolar Disorder (BD) and schizophrenia are included in the group of severe mental illness and are main causes of disability and morbidity in the local population due to the bio-psycho-social implications in patients. In the last 20 years or so, adjunctive psychological interventions been studied with the purpose of decreasing recurrences, stabilising the course of the disease, and improving the functionality in these patients. To analyse the psychological effect of a multimodal intervention (MI) vs a traditional intervention (TI) program in BD I and schizophrenic patients. A prospective, longitudinal, therapeutic-comparative study was conducted with 302 patients (104 schizophrenic and 198 bipolar patients) who were randomly assigned to the MI or TI groups of a multimodal intervention program PRISMA. The MI group received care from psychiatry, general medicine, neuropsychology, family therapy, and occupational therapy. The TI group received care from psychiatry and general medicine. The Hamilton and Young scales, and the Scales for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) and Postive Symptoms (SAPS) were used on bipolar and schizophrenic patients, respectively. The scales AQ-12, TEMPS-A, FAST, Zuckerman sensation seeking scale, BIS-11, SAI-E and EEAG were applied to measure the psychological variables. The scales were performed before and after the interventions. The psychotherapy used in this study was cognitive behavioural therapy. There were statistically significant differences in socio-demographic and clinical variables in the schizophrenia and bipolar disorder group. There were no statistically significant differences in the psychological scales after conducting a multivariate analysis between the intervention groups and for both times (initial and final). This study did not show any changes in variables of psychological functioning variables between bipolar and schizophrenic groups, who were subjected to TI vs MI (who received cognitive behavioural therapy

  11. Differences in resting corticolimbic functional connectivity in bipolar I euthymia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Salvatore; Moody, Teena D; Vizueta, Nathalie; Thomason, Moriah E; Monti, Martin M; Townsend, Jennifer D; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Altshuler, Lori L

    2012-01-01

    Objective We examined resting state functional connectivity in the brain between key emotion regulation regions in bipolar I disorder to delineate differences in coupling from healthy subjects. Methods Euthymic subjects with bipolar I disorder (n = 20) and matched healthy subjects (n = 20) participated in a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Low frequency fluctuations in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal were correlated in the six connections between four anatomically-defined nodes: left and right amygdala and left and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC). Seed-to-voxel connectivity results were probed for commonly coupled regions. Following this, an identified region was included in a mediation analysis to determine the potential of mediation. Results The bipolar I disorder group exhibited significant hyperconnectivity between right amygdala and right vlPFC relative to healthy subjects. The connectivity between these regions in the bipolar I disorder group was partially mediated by activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Conclusions Greater coupling between right amygdala and right vlPFC and their partial mediation by the ACC were found in bipolar I disorder subjects in remission and in the absence of a psychological task. These findings have implications for a trait-related and clinically-important imaging biomarker. PMID:23347587

  12. [Expressed Emotions, Burden and Family Functioning in Schizophrenic and Bipolar I Patients of a Multimodal Intervention Program: PRISMA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Alexandra; Palacio, Juan David; Vargas, Cristian; Díaz-Zuluaga, Ana María; Duica, Kelly; Agudelo Berruecos, Yuli; Ospina, Sigifredo; López-Jaramillo, Carlos

    Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are causes of major suffering in patients. Nevertheless, they also affect family and caregiver functioning. This is important because the participation and involvement of families and caregivers is essential to achieve an optimal treatment. To describe the level of expressed emotions, burden, and family functioning of bipolar and schizophrenic patients and, to evaluate the efficacy of the multimodal intervention (MI) versus traditional intervention (TI) in family functioning and its perception by patients and caregivers. A prospective, longitudinal, therapeutic-comparative study was conducted with 302 patients (104 schizophrenic and 198 bipolar patients) who were randomly assigned to a MI or TI groups of a multimodal intervention program PRISMA. MI group received care from psychiatry, general medicine, neuropsychology, family therapy, and occupational therapy. TI group received care from psychiatry and general medicine. Hamilton, Young and SANS, SAPS scales were applied to bipolar and schizophrenic patients, respectively. The EEAG, FEICS, FACES III and ECF were also applied at the initial and final time. There were statistically significant differences in socio- demographic and clinical variables in schizophrenia vs bipolar group: 83% vs 32.2% were male, 37 vs 43 mean age, 96% vs 59% were single, 50% vs 20% unemployed, and 20% vs 40% had college studies. In addition, 2 vs 2.5 numbers of hospitalisations, 18 vs 16 mean age of substance abuse onset and, 55 vs 80 points in EEAG. There were no statistically significant differences in family scales after conducting a multivariate analysis on thr initial and final time in both groups. This study did not show changes in variables of burden and family functioning between bipolar and schizophrenic groups that were under TI vs MI. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence and correlates of eating disorders in 875 patients with bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McElroy, Susan L.; Frye, Mark A.; Hellemann, Gerhard; Altshuler, Lori; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Suppes, Trisha; Keck, Paul E.; Nolen, Willem A.; Kupka, Ralph; Post, Robert M.

    Objective: Relatively little is known about the co-occurrence of bipolar and eating disorders. We therefore assessed the prevalence and clinical correlates of eating disorders in 875 patients with bipolar disorder. Method: 875 outpatients with DSM-IV bipolar I or II disorder were evaluated with

  14. Relationship between Chinese adjective descriptors of personality and emotional symptoms in young Chinese patients with bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Enyan; Li, Huihui; Fan, Hongying; Gao, Qianqian; Tan, Yunfei; Lou, Junyao; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    To investigate whether personality traits are related to emotional symptoms (mania, hypomania, and depression) in Chinese patients with bipolar disorders. Patients with bipolar I and II disorders, and healthy volunteers, were assessed using the Chinese Adjective Descriptors of Personality (CADP) questionnaire, Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ), Hypomanic Checklist (HCL-32), and Plutchik-van Praag Depression Inventory (PVP). Seventy-three patients with bipolar I disorder, 35 with bipolar II disorder and 216 healthy controls were included. Bipolar I and II groups scored significantly higher on MDQ, HCL-32 and PVP scales than controls; the bipolar II group scored lower on the MDQ, but higher on the HCL-32 and PVP than bipolar I. In the bipolar I group, the CADP Intelligent trait (β, 0.25) predicted MDQ; Intelligent (β, -0.24), Agreeable (β, 0.22) and Emotional (β, 0.34) traits predicted PVP. In the bipolar II group, Intelligent (β, 0.22), Agreeable (β, -0.24) and Unsocial (β, 0.31) traits predicted MDQ; Intelligent (β, -0.20), Agreeable (β, -0.31) and Emotional (β, -0.26) traits predicted HCL-32. Four out of five Chinese personality traits were associated with emotional symptoms in patients with bipolar I or II disorder, but displayed different associations depending on disorder type. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Conversion from bipolar disorder not otherwise specified (BP-NOS) to bipolar I or II in youth with family history as a predictor of conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Molly S; Fristad, Mary A

    2013-06-01

    Bipolar disorder-not otherwise specified (BD-NOS) is an imprecise, heterogeneous diagnosis that is unstable in youth. This study reports rates of conversion from BD-NOS to BD-I or II in children aged 8-12, and investigates the impact of family history of bipolar disorder and depression on conversion. As part of the Multi-Family Psychoeducational Psychotherapy (MF-PEP) study, 27 children (6-12 years of age) diagnosed with BD-NOS at baseline were reassessed every 6 months over an 18-month period. Family history of bipolar disorder and depression was assessed at baseline. One-third of the sample converted from BD-NOS to BD-I or II over 18-months. Having a first-degree relative with symptoms of bipolar disorder and having a loaded pedigree for diagnosis of depression each were associated with conversion from BD-NOS to BD-I or II (odds ratio range: 1.09-3.14; relative risk range: 1.06-2.34). This study had very low power (range: 10-45) given the small sample size, precluding statistical significance of non-parametric Fisher's Exact test findings. This study replicates the previous finding of a high rate of conversion from BD-NOS to BD-I or II among youth, and suggests conversion is related to symptoms of bipolar disorder or depression diagnoses in the family history. Additional research is warranted in a larger sample with a longer follow-up period. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Recovery from Multiple Episodes of Bipolar I Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, David A; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Leon, Andrew C.; Coryell, William; Endicott, Jean; Li, Chunshan; Boland, Robert J.; Keller, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the duration of bipolar I major and minor depressive episodes and factors associated with time to recovery. Method 219 participants with bipolar I disorder based on Research Diagnostic Criteria analogs to DSM-IV-TR criteria were recruited from 1978–1981 and followed for up to 25 years. Psychopathology was assessed with the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. The probability of recovery over time from multiple successive depressive episodes was examined with survival analytic techniques, including mixed-effects grouped-time survival models. Results The median duration of major depressive episodes was 14 weeks, and over 70% recovered within 12 months of onset of the episode. The median duration of minor depressive episodes was 8 weeks, and approximately 90% recovered within 6 months of onset of the episode. Aggregated data demonstrated similar durations of the first three major depressive episodes. However, for each participant with multiple episodes of major depression or minor depression, the duration of each episode was not consistent (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.07 and 0.25 for major and minor depression, respectively). The total number of years in episode over follow-up with major plus minor depression prior to onset of a major depressive episode was significantly associated with a decreased probability of recovery from that episode; with each additional year, the likelihood of recovery was reduced by 7% (hazard ratio: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.89–0.98, p=0.002). Conclusions Bipolar I major depression generally lasts longer than minor depression, and the duration of multiple episodes within an individual varies. However, the probability of recovery over time from an episode of major depression appears to decline with each successive episode. PMID:23561241

  17. Preventing recurrence of bipolar I mood episodes and hospitalizations: family psychotherapy plus pharmacotherapy versus pharmacotherapy alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, David A; Keitner, Gabor I; Ryan, Christine E; Kelley, Joan; Miller, Ivan W

    2008-11-01

    This study compared the efficacy of three treatment conditions in preventing recurrence of bipolar I mood episodes and hospitalization for such episodes: individual family therapy plus pharmacotherapy, multifamily group therapy plus pharmacotherapy, and pharmacotherapy alone. Patients with bipolar I disorder were enrolled if they met criteria for an active mood episode and were living with or in regular contact with relatives or significant others. Subjects were randomly assigned to individual family therapy plus pharmacotherapy, multifamily group therapy plus pharmacotherapy, or pharmacotherapy alone, which were provided on an outpatient basis. Individual family therapy involved one therapist meeting with a single patient and the patient's family members, with the content of each session and number of sessions determined by the therapist and family. Multifamily group psychotherapy involved two therapists meeting together for six sessions with multiple patients and their respective family members, with the content of each session preset. All subjects were prescribed a mood stabilizer, and other medications were used as needed. Subjects were assessed monthly for up to 28 months. Following recovery from the index mood episode, subjects were assessed for recurrence of a mood episode and for hospitalization for such episodes. Of a total of 92 subjects that were enrolled in the study, 53 (58%) recovered from their intake mood episode. The analyses in this report focus upon these 53 subjects, 42 (79%) of whom entered the study during an episode of mania. Of the 53 subjects who recovered from their intake mood episode, the proportion of subjects within each treatment group who suffered a recurrence by month 28 did not differ significantly between the three treatment conditions. However, only 5% of the subjects receiving adjunctive multifamily group therapy required hospitalization, compared to 31% of the subjects receiving adjunctive individual family therapy and 38% of

  18. The safety and effectiveness of open-label extended-release carbamazepine in the treatment of children and adolescents with bipolar I disorder suffering from a manic or mixed episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Findling RL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Robert L Findling,1,2 Lawrence D Ginsberg31Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 2Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Red Oak Psychiatry Associates, PA, Houston, TX, USAObjective: To assess the safety and effectiveness of open-label treatment with extended-release carbamazepine (ERC in pediatric subjects suffering from bipolar I disorder.Method: Medically healthy youths aged 10–17 years suffering from an acute manic or mixed episode were eligible. After screening for study eligibility, the youths began a 5-week titration period in which doses of ERC were adjusted in order to optimize benefit whilst minimizing adverse events, at doses between 200–1,200 mg/day. Thereafter, subjects could continue to receive treatment during a subsequent 21-week period. Safety measures included spontaneously reported adverse events (AEs and laboratory assessments. The primary efficacy measure was the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS.Results: A total of 60 children (ages 10–12 and 97 adolescents (ages 13–17, with an overall average age of 13.4 years (standard deviation [SD] 2.0 years received ERC. The mean duration of study participation was 109.6 days (SD 70.2 days, with 66 (42% completing the entire study. At end of study participation (end point, the most prevalent dose of ERC was 1,200 mg: 31.7% of children and 24.7% of adolescents reached the 1,200 mg dose. The YMRS decreased from a mean of 28.6 (SD 6.2 at baseline to a mean of 13.8 (SD 9.4 (P<0.0001 at end point. A total of 26 subjects discontinued study participation because of AEs, the most common of which were rash (n=6, white blood cell count decreased (n=5, nausea (n=3, and vomiting (n=3. No deaths were reported. The most commonly reported AEs were headache (n=41, somnolence (n=30, nausea (n=22, dizziness (n=21, and fatigue (n=19.Conclusions: Open-label administration of ERC might be a safe

  19. Motor speed predicts stability of cognitive deficits in both schizophrenic and bipolar I patients at one-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar-Fraile, J.; Balanza-Martinez, V.; Selva-Vera, G.; Martínez-Arán, Anabel, 1971-; Sanchez-Moreno, J.; Rubio, C.; Vieta i Pascual, Eduard, 1963-; Gomez-Beneyto, M.; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Background: We examined whether motor speed assessed by the finger tapping test predicts generalized and specific stable deficits because of a common pathogenic process in bipolar and schizophrenic patients. Methods: One hundred and two patients underwent a battery of neuropsychological tests. Patients with a score of less than one standard deviation from their siblings', sample in two assessments with an interval of one year were defined as suffering from stable deficits because of a common ...

  20. Maudsley Bipolar Disorder Project: insights sobre o papel do córtex pré-frontal em pacientes com transtorno de humor bipolar tipo I Proyecto Maudsley para Trastorno Bipolar: insights sobre el rol del córtex prefrontal en casos de disturbio bipolar I The Maudsley Bipolar Disorder Project: insights into the role of the prefrontal cortex in bipolar disorder I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Haldane

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O projeto Maudsley Bipolar Disorder foi criado para investigar características cognitivas e estruturais/funcionais do cérebro em pacientes com Transtorno de Humor Bipolar Tipo I (THB-I. MÉTODOS: Quarenta e três pacientes com THB-I foram selecionados em uma unidade de atendimento secundário, em um momento de remissão da doença, para participarem do estudo. Os pacientes foram pareados a controles sadios de acordo com idade, sexo, raça e nível de escolaridade. Cada participante foi submetido a uma extensa revisão clínica, com avaliação cognitiva e exame de ressonância magnética (RM para a obtenção de dados estruturais e funcionais do cérebro. RESULTADOS: Quando comparados aos controles, os pacientes demonstraram um sutil e difuso comprometimento com redução mais marcante no nível das funções executivas. Os pacientes também apresentaram decrementos volumétricos no córtex pré-frontal ventral (CPFV bilateralmente e córtex pré-frontal dorsal (CPFD esquerdo. O volume da amígdala estava bilateralmente aumentado. A ressonância magnética funcional (RMf mostrou anormalidades sutis no CPFD, com marcados decrementos de atividade tanto no CPFD como no CPFV durante tarefas que dependiam da interação funcional dessas regiões. CONCLUSÕES: Os resultados sugerem que ocorrem traços de déficits em funções executivas em pacientes com THB-I, assim como alteração de estrutura e funcionamento do córtex pré-frontal.OBJETIVO: El proyecto Maudsley para Trastorno Bipolar fue creado para investigar características cognitivas y estructurales/funcionales del cerebro en pacientes con Trastorno Bipolar I (TBI. MÉTODOS: Cuarenta y tres pacientes con TBI han sido elegidos en una unidad de atención secundaria para participar del estudio, en un momento de remisión de la enfermedad. Los pacientes han sido pareados a controles sanos conforme a edad, sexo, raza y nivel de escolaridad. Cada participante ha sido sometido a una

  1. Epidemiological and clinical characterization following a first psychotic episode in major depressive disorder: Comparisons with Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Disorder in the Cavan-Monaghan First Episode Psychosis Study (CAMFEPS).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owoeye, Olabisi

    2013-05-28

    While recent research on psychotic illness has focussed on the nosological, clinical, and biological relationships between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, little attention has been directed to the most common other psychotic diagnosis, major depressive disorder with psychotic features (MDDP). As this diagnostic category captures the confluence between dimensions of psychotic and affective psychopathology, it is of unappreciated heuristic potential to inform on the nature of psychotic illness. Therefore, the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of MDDP were compared with those of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder within the Cavan-Monaghan First Episode Psychosis Study (n = 370). Epidemiologically, the first psychotic episode of MDDP (n = 77) was uniformly distributed across the adult life span, while schizophrenia (n = 73) and bipolar disorder (n = 73) were primarily disorders of young adulthood; the incidence of MDDP, like bipolar disorder, did not differ between the sexes, while the incidence of schizophrenia was more common in males than in females. Clinically, MDDP was characterized by negative symptoms, executive dysfunction, neurological soft signs (NSS), premorbid intellectual function, premorbid adjustment, and quality of life similar to those for schizophrenia, while bipolar disorder was characterized by less prominent negative symptoms, executive dysfunction and NSS, and better quality of life. These findings suggest that what we currently categorize as MDDP may be more closely aligned with other psychotic diagnoses than has been considered previously. They indicate that differences in how psychosis is manifested vis-à-vis depression and mania may be quantitative rather than qualitative and occur within a dimensional space, rather than validating categorical distinctions.

  2. Clinical correlates of patients with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder and a recent history of substance use disorder: a subtype comparison from baseline data of 2 randomized, placebo-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Keming; Verduin, Marcia L; Kemp, David E; Tolliver, Bryan K; Ganocy, Stephen J; Elhaj, Omar; Bilali, Sarah; Brady, Kathleen T; Findling, Robert L; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2008-07-01

    To compare clinical variables in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar I or II disorder and a recent history of substance use disorder (SUD). Cross-sectional data from 2 studies of patients with rapid-cycling bipolar I disorder or rapid-cycling bipolar II disorder and a recent history of SUD were used to retrospectively assess the differences in clinical variables between the subtypes. The studies were conducted from November 1997 to February 2007 at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio. Extensive clinical interview and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview were used to ascertain DSM-IV diagnoses of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder, SUDs, and other Axis I disorders and to collect clinical variables. The Addiction Severity Index (ASI), Global Assessment Scale (GAS), and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey were used to measure the severity of impairment at the initial assessment. One-way analysis of variance or chi(2) was used for significance tests. A Bonferroni adjustment was applied for multiple comparisons. Of 245 patients with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder (rapid-cycling bipolar I disorder, N = 191; rapid-cycling bipolar II disorder, N = 54) and a recent history of SUD, the demographics were similar. A significantly higher rate of panic disorder was observed in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar I disorder than in those with rapid-cycling bipolar II disorder (odds ratio = 3.72, 95% CI = 1.66 to 8.32, p = .008). A significantly higher psychiatric composite score on the ASI was also found in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar I disorder than in those with rapid-cycling bipolar II disorder even after Bonferroni adjustment (p = .0007). There were no significant differences between the subtypes in the rates of previous hospitalization or suicide attempt, early childhood verbal, physical, or sexual abuse, lifetime substance abuse or dependence, the number of

  3. L-Methylfolate For Bipolar I depressive episodes: An open trial proof-of-concept registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierenberg, Andrew A; Montana, Rebecca; Kinrys, Gustavo; Deckersbach, Thilo; Dufour, Steven; Baek, Ji Hyun

    2017-01-01

    L-methylfolate is a compelling candidate to treat bipolar I major depressive episodes. While approved as an adjunct for unipolar major depressive disorder, no studies have been done to assess the tolerability, safety, and efficacy of L-methylfolate for bipolar depression. As a first step, we developed a registry of bipolar patients treated with L-methylfolate to examine tolerability and outcomes. Subjects (N=10) received treatment as usual plus daily L-methylfolate 15mg for 6 weeks in this open-label registry. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and manic symptoms with the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS). Effect size was measured with Cohen's d to provide an estimate of potential efficacy. The pre-treatment mean (SD) MADRS score was 23.4 (4.34); the post-treatment score was 13.9 (8.24). Cohen's d was 1.19. At post-treatment, 6/10 patients had at least 50% MADRS improvement, and 4/10 patients exhibited remission with MADRS≤10. The pre-treatment YMRS score was 3.2 (3.0); the post-treatment score was 2.7 (5.2). Cohen's d was 0.17. This registry was a small open-label clinical trial for a fluctuating disorder. We cannot rule out that our results are due to regression to the mean. A controlled trial is warranted. This first proof-of-concept open registry suggests that L-methylfolate in combination with treatment as usual has potential to treat bipolar depression. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Effectiveness of integrated care including therapeutic assertive community treatment in severe schizophrenia-spectrum and bipolar I disorders: Four-year follow-up of the ACCESS II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöttle, Daniel; Schimmelmann, Benno G; Ruppelt, Friederike; Bussopulos, Alexandra; Frieling, Marietta; Nika, Evangelia; Nawara, Luise Antonia; Golks, Dietmar; Kerstan, Andrea; Lange, Matthias; Schödlbauer, Michael; Daubmann, Anne; Wegscheider, Karl; Rohenkohl, Anja; Sarikaya, Gizem; Sengutta, Mary; Luedecke, Daniel; Wittmann, Linus; Ohm, Gunda; Meigel-Schleiff, Christina; Gallinat, Jürgen; Wiedemann, Klaus; Bock, Thomas; Karow, Anne; Lambert, Martin

    2018-01-01

    The ACCESS-model offers integrated care including assertive community treatment to patients with psychotic disorders. ACCESS proved more effective compared to standard care (ACCESS-I study) and was successfully implemented into clinical routine (ACCESS-II study). In this article, we report the 4-year outcomes of the ACCESS-II study. Between May 2007 and December 2013, 115 patients received continuous ACCESS-care. We hypothesized that the low 2-year disengagement and hospitalization rates and significant improvements in psychopathology, functioning, and quality of life could be sustained over 4 years. Over 4 years, only 10 patients disengaged from ACCESS. Another 23 left for practical reasons and were successfully transferred to other services. Hospitalization rates remained low (13.0% in year 3; 9.1% in year 4). Involuntary admissions decreased from 35% in the 2 years prior to ACCESS to 8% over 4 years in ACCESS. Outpatient contacts remained stably high at 2.0-2.4 per week. We detected significant improvements in psychopathology (effect size d = 0.79), illness severity (d = 1.29), level of functioning (d = 0.77), quality of life (d = 0.47) and stably high client satisfaction (d = 0.02) over 4 years. Most positive effects were observed within the first 2 years with the exception of illness severity, which further improved from year 2 to 4. Within continuous intensive 4-year ACCESS-care, sustained improvements in psychopathology, functioning, quality of life, low service disengagement and re-hospitalization rates, as well as low rates of involuntary treatment, were observed in contrast to other studies, which reported a decline in these parameters once a specific treatment model was stopped. Yet, stronger evidence to prove these results is required. Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT01888627.

  5. Mixed-state bipolar I and II depression: time to remission and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, In Hee; Woo, Young Sup; Jun, Tae-Youn; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2014-01-01

    We compared the time to achieve remission and the clinical characteristics of patients with bipolar depressive mixed state and those with bipolar depressive non-mixed state. The subjects (N=131) were inpatients diagnosed between 2006 and 2012 with bipolar I or II disorder, depression and were classified into the following three groups: "pure depressive state" (PD, n=70), "sub-threshold mixed state" (SMX, n=38), and "depressive mixed state" (DMX, n=23). Diagnosis of a DMX was in accordance with Benazzi's definition: three or more manic symptoms in a depressive episode. The subjects' charts were retrospectively reviewed to ascertain the time to achieve remission from the index episode and to identify other factors, such as demographic and clinical characteristics, specific manic symptoms, and pharmacological treatment, that may have contributed to remission. The time to achieve remission was significantly longer in the DMX (p=0.022) and SMX (p=0.035) groups than in the PD group. Adjustment for covariates using a Cox proportional hazards model did not change these results. Clinically, subjects with a DMX were more likely to have manic symptoms in the index episode, especially inflated self-esteem and psychomotor agitation than those in the PD. We investigated only inpatients and therefore could not comment on outpatients. These findings showed that sub-syndromal manic symptoms in bipolar depression had different clinical characteristics and a more severe illness course, including a longer time to achieve remission, than did a pure depressive state. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Coping and personality in older patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouws, Sigfried N T M; Paans, Nadine P G; Comijs, Hannie C; Dols, Annemiek; Stek, Max L

    2015-09-15

    Little is known about coping styles and personality traits in older bipolar patients. Adult bipolar patients show a passive coping style and higher neuroticism scores compared to the general population. Our aim is to investigate personality traits and coping in older bipolar patients and the relationship between coping and personality. 75 Older patients (age > 60) with bipolar I or II disorder in a euthymic mood completed the Utrecht Coping List and the NEO Personality Inventory FFI and were compared to normative data. Older bipolar patients show more passive coping styles compared to healthy elderly. Their personality traits are predominated by openness, in contrast conscientiousness and altruism are relatively sparse. Neuroticism was related to passive coping styles, whereas conscientiousness was related to an active coping style. Older bipolar patients have more passive coping styles. Their personality is characterized by openness and relatively low conscientiousness and altruism. Our sample represents a survival cohort; this may explain the differences in personality traits between older patients in this study and in adult bipolar patients in other studies. The association between coping styles and personality traits is comparable to reports of younger adult patients with bipolar disorder. Longitudinal studies are warranted to explore if coping and personality change with ageing in bipolar patients and to determine which coping style is most effective in preventing mood episodes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Adjunctive Methylphenidate in the Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa Co-occurring with Bipolar Disorder and Substance Dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Guerdjikova, Anna I.; McElroy, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa is associated with bipolar disorder, substance dependence, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and anxiety disorders. Few reports, however, have addressed the treatment of patients with all of these conditions. We describe a young woman with bulimia nervosa, bipolar I disorder, cocaine and alcohol dependence, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and panic disorder who achieved a sustained (>1 year) remission of her bulimia nervosa symptoms and significant improvemen...

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging in euthymic bipolar disorder - A tract-based spatial statistics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haarman, Bartholomeus C. M. ('Benno'); Riemersma-Van der Lek, Rixt F.; Burger, Huibert; de Groot, Jan Cees; Drexhage, Hemmo A.; Nolen, Willem A.; Cerliani, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the current DTI study we compared euthymic bipolar I disorder (BD-I) patients and healthy controls (HC). We subsequently divided the total patient group into lithium-users and non-lithium-users and estimated differences across the three groups. Methods: Twenty-one euthymic BD-I

  9. A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Divalproex Extended-Release in the Treatment of Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karen Dineen; Redden, Laura; Kowatch, Robert A.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Segal, Scott; Chang, Kiki; Wozniak, Patricia; Vigna, Namita V.; Abi-Saab, Walid; Saltarelli, Mario

    2009-01-01

    A double-blind study that involves 150 patients aged 10-17 on the effect of divalproex extended-release in the treatment of bipolar disorder shows that the drug was similar to placebo based on adverse events and that no treatment effect was observed in the drug. The drug is not suitable for treatment of youths with bipolar I disorder, mixed or…

  10. Comparison of associated features and drug treatment between co-occurring unipolar and bipolar disorders in depressed eating disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chang, Chin-Hao; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Hsi-Chung

    2017-02-27

    To examine the differences of associated characteristics and prescription drug use between co-occurring unipolar and bipolar disorders in patients with eating disorders (EDs). Patients with EDs and major depressive episode (MDE) were recruited from psychiatric outpatient clinics. They were interviewed and completed self-administered measures assessing eating and general psychopathology. The prescribed drugs at the index outpatient visit were recorded. Clinical characteristics and prescription drugs of groups with major depressive disorder (ED-MDD), MDE with lifetime mania (ED-BP I), and MDE with lifetime hypomania (ED-BP II) were compared. Continuous variables between groups were compared using generalized linear regression with adjustments of age, gender, and ED subtype for pair-wise comparisons. Multivariate logistic regression with adjustments of age, gender, and ED subtype was employed to estimate adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals between groups. Two hundred and twenty-seven patients with EDs had a current MDE. Among them, 17.2% and 24.2% experienced associated manic and hypomanic episodes, respectively. Bipolar I and II patients displayed significantly poorer weight regulation, more severe impulsivity and emotional lability, and higher rates of co-occurring alcohol use disorders than ED-MDD patients. ED-BP I patients were found to have the lowest IQ, poorest working memory, and the most severe depression, suicidality and functional impairment among all patients. Patients with ED-BP II shared affect and behavioral dysregulations with ED-BP I, but had less severe degrees of cognitive and functional impairments than ED-BP I. Patients with ED-BP I were significantly less likely than those in the ED-MDD and ED-BP II groups to be on antidepressant monotherapy, but a great rate (27%) of ED-BP I individuals taking antidepressant monotherapy had potential risk of mood switch during the course of treatment. Our study identified discriminative features

  11. Patients With Co-Occurring Bipolar Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Rapid Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerimele, Joseph M; Bauer, Amy M; Fortney, John C; Bauer, Mark S

    2017-05-01

    To summarize the current literature on epidemiology, clinical correlates, and treatment of individuals with co-occurring bipolar disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We conducted a focused, time-sensitive review called "rapid review" in November 2015, using keyword searches (including keywords bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD, and others) in PubMed for studies of adults with co-occurring bipolar disorder and PTSD. Results were sorted and systematically searched. An article was excluded if it did not describe adult patients with co-occurring PTSD and bipolar disorder or did not report original data on epidemiology, clinical correlates, or treatment. Information on study characteristics including population studied and key findings were extracted onto a data collection tool. Thirty-two articles were included. Over two-thirds of articles reported epidemiology of co-occurring bipolar disorder and PTSD. Prevalence of PTSD among individuals with bipolar disorder ranged from 4% to 40%, with women and those with bipolar I versus bipolar II disorder experiencing higher prevalence of PTSD. Prevalence of bipolar disorder among individuals with PTSD ranged from 6% to 55%. Baseline PTSD or bipolar disorder was associated with incidence of the other illness. Individuals with co-occurring bipolar disorder and PTSD experienced high symptom burden and low quality of life. No studies evaluated prospective treatment of patients with co-occurring bipolar disorder and PTSD. Bipolar disorder and PTSD commonly co-occur and result in greater symptom burden than either condition alone. Few published treatment strategies exist for patients with both conditions. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  12. Auditory M50 and M100 sensory gating deficits in bipolar disorder: a MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Feng, Yigang; Jia, Yanbin; Wang, Wensheng; Xie, Yanping; Guan, Yufang; Zhong, Shuming; Zhu, Dan; Huang, Li

    2014-01-01

    Auditory sensory gating deficits have been reported in subjects with bipolar disorder, but the hemispheric and neuronal origins of this deficit are not well understood. Moreover, gating of the auditory evoked components reflecting early attentive stage of information processing has not been investigated in bipolar disorder. The objectives of this study were to investigate the right and left hemispheric auditory sensory gating of the M50 (preattentive processing) and M100 (early attentive processing) in patients diagnosed with bipolar I disorder by utilizing magnetoencephalography (MEG). Whole-head MEG data were acquired during the standard paired-click paradigm in 20 bipolar I disorder patients and 20 healthy controls. The M50 and the M100 responses were investigated, and dipole source localizations were also investigated. Sensory gating were determined by measuring the strength of the M50 and the M100 response to the second click divided by that of the first click (S2/S1). In every subject, M50 and M100 dipolar sources localized to the left and right posterior portion of superior temporal gyrus (STG). Bipolar I disorder patients showed bilateral gating deficits in M50 and M100. The bilateral M50 S2 source strengths were significantly higher in the bipolar I disorder group compared to the control group. The sample size was relatively small. More studies with larger sample sizes are warranted. Bipolar subjects were taking a wide range of medications that could not be readily controlled for. These findings suggest that bipolar I disorder patients have auditory gating deficits at both pre-attentive and early attentive levels, which might be related to STG structural abnormality. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Factor analysis of temperament and personality traits in bipolar patients: Correlates with comorbidity and disorder severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Frank; Akiskal, Hagop S; Kelsoe, John R; Greenwood, Tiffany A

    2017-01-01

    Temperament and personality traits have been suggested as endophenotypes for bipolar disorder based on several lines of evidence, including heritability. Previous work suggested an anxious-reactive factor identified across temperament and personality inventories that produced significant group discrimination and could potentially be useful in genetic analyses. We have attempted to further characterize this factor structure in a sample of bipolar patients. A sample of 1195 subjects with bipolar I disorder was evaluated, all with complete data available. Dimension reduction across two inventories identified 18 factors explaining 39% of the variance. The two largest factors reflected affective instability and general anxiety/worry, respectively. Subsequent analyses of the clinical features associated with bipolar disorder revealed specificity for the factors in a predictable pattern. Cluster analysis of the factors identified a subgroup defined by a strong lack of general anxiety and low affective instability represented by the first two factors. The remaining subjects could be distinguished into two clusters by the presence of either more positive characteristics, including persistence/drive, spirituality, expressivity, and humor, or more negative characteristics of depression and anxiety. These analyses involved bipolar I subjects only and must be extended to other bipolar spectrum diagnoses, unaffected relatives, and individuals at risk. These results suggest that temperament and personality measures access latent traits associated with important clinical features of bipolar disorder. By translating clinical variables into quantitative traits, we may identify subgroups of bipolar patients with distinct clinical profiles, thereby facilitating both individual treatment strategies and genetic analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bipolar Treatment: Are Bipolar I and Bipolar II Treated Differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... management strategies. In addition to medications and other types of treatment, successful management of your bipolar disorder includes living a healthy lifestyle, such as getting enough sleep, eating a healthy diet and being physically active. ...

  15. The relationship between borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Morgan, Theresa A.

    2013-01-01

    It is clinically important to recognize both bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder (BPD) in patients seeking treatment for depression, and it is important to distinguish between the two. Research considering whether BPD should be considered part of a bipolar spectrum reaches differing conclusions. We reviewed the most studied question on the relationship between BPD and bipolar disorder: their diagnostic concordance. Across studies, approximately 10% of patients with BPD had bipolar I disorder and another 10% had bipolar II disorder. Likewise, approximately 20% of bipolar II patients were diagnosed with BPD, though only 10% of bipolar I patients were diagnosed with BPD. While the comorbidity rates are substantial, each disorder is nontheless diagnosed in the absence of the other in the vast majority of cases (80% to 90%). In studies examining personality disorders broadly, other personality disorders were more commonly diagnosed in bipolar patients than was BPD. Likewise, the converse is also true: other axis I disorders such as major depression, substance abuse, and post-traumatic stress disorder are also more commonly diagnosed in patients with BPD than is bipolar disorder. These findings challenge the notion that BPD is part of the bipolar spectrum. PMID:24174890

  16. The role of psychological factors in bipolar disorder: prospective relationships between cognitive style, coping style and symptom expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Kathryn; Parker, Gordon; Manicavasagar, Vijaya

    2014-04-01

    Psychological factors contribute to bipolar disorder illness course, representing targets for psychological intervention. Research to date has focused on bipolar I disorder, extrapolating results to bipolar II disorder. The current study addresses this discrepancy by exploring cognitive and coping styles in patients diagnosed with bipolar I or II disorder. Participants were recruited from the Sydney-based Black Dog Institute. Diagnoses were derived via the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Baseline cognitive and coping style measures were completed, and mood symptoms assessed over a 6-month period. Clinician-rated mood status was assessed at follow-up to determine the predictive utility of cognitive and coping styles. The follow-up sample comprised 151 participants. Differential relationships between cognitive style, coping styles and mood symptoms emerged across the bipolar sub-types. Some key differences were that a broader set of negative cognitive styles were associated with bipolar II depression symptoms; while few relationships were observed between coping styles and bipolar II symptoms. Differences in cognitive and coping style relationships with symptom expression across bipolar I and II disorder may provide clinicians with fruitful guides for directing treatment interventions when relevant maladaptive styles are observed. Further exploration of differences in cognitive and coping styles in bipolar I and II disorder is warranted.

  17. Heart rate variability and Omega-3 Index in euthymic patients with bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voggt, A; Berger, M; Obermeier, M; Löw, A; Seemueller, F; Riedel, M; Moeller, H J; Zimmermann, R; Kirchberg, F; Von Schacky, C; Severus, E

    2015-02-01

    Affective disorders are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, which, at least partly, appears to be independent of psychopharmacological treatments used to manage these disorders. Reduced heart rate variability (SDNN) and a low Omega-3 Index have been shown to be associated with increased risk for death after myocardial infarction. Therefore, we set out to investigate heart rate variability and the Omega-3 Index in euthymic patients with bipolar disorders. We assessed heart rate variability (SDNN) and the Omega-3 Index in 90 euthymic, mostly medicated patients with bipolar disorders (Bipolar-I, Bipolar-II) on stable psychotropic medication, free of significant medical comorbidity and in 62 healthy controls. Heart rate variability was measured from electrocardiography under a standardized 30 minutes resting state condition. Age, sex, BMI, smoking, alcohol consumption and caffeine consumption as potential confounders were also assessed. Heart rate variability (SDNN) was significantly lower in patients with bipolar disorders compared to healthy controls (35.4 msec versus 60.7 msec; Pheart rate variability (SDNN). Heart rate variability (SDNN) may provide a useful tool to study the impact of interventions aimed at reducing the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in euthymic patients with bipolar disorders. The difference in SDNN between cases and controls cannot be explained by a difference in the Omega-3 Index. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects, experiences, and impact of stigma on patients with bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mileva VR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Viktoria R Mileva,1 Gustavo H Vázquez,2 Roumen Milev31Psychology, School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK; 2Department of Neurosciences, University of Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 3Department of Psychiatry, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, CanadaBackground: Many people with mental illness experience stigma that has impacted their lives. In this study, we validated the Inventory of Stigmatizing Experiences (ISE as a tool to help quantify the stigma experienced by patients with bipolar disorder and its impact on their lives. The ISE has two components, ie, the Stigma Experiences Scale (SES and the Stigma Impact Scale (SIS, which were administered to a population of Argentinean patients with bipolar disorder. We characterized the differences between these two populations using the SES and SIS. Finally, we compared SES and SIS scores with those in a population of Canadian patients with bipolar disorder.Methods: The SES and SIS scales were administered to tertiary care patients with bipolar I and II disorder in Argentina (n = 178 and Canada (n = 214.Results: In this study, we validated both SES (Kuder–Richardson coefficient of reliability, 0.78 and SIS (Cronbach's alpha, 0.91 scales in a population of Argentinean patients with bipolar disorder. There were no significant differences in stigma between patients with bipolar I or II disorder on SES or SIS. However, over 50% of all respondents believed that the average person is afraid of those with mental illnesses, that stigma associated with mental illness has affected their quality of life, and that their self-esteem has suffered due to stigma. In comparison with the Canadian population, Argentinean participants scored lower on both the SES and SIS, which may be due to cultural differences or to differences in population characteristics.Conclusion: Stigma associated with mental illness is serious and pervasive. If we are to find successful strategies to mitigate

  19. A pilot, open-label, 8-week study evaluating the efficacy, safety and tolerability of adjunctive minocycline for the treatment of bipolar I/II depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soczynska, Joanna K; Kennedy, Sidney H; Alsuwaidan, Mohammad; Mansur, Rodrigo B; Li, Madeline; McAndrews, Mary Pat; Brietzke, Elisa; Woldeyohannes, Hanna O; Taylor, Valerie H; McIntyre, Roger S

    2017-05-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine if adjunctive minocycline mitigates depressive symptom severity and improves cognitive function in individuals with bipolar I/II disorder (BD). The study also aimed to determine if changes in depressive and/or cognitive symptoms over the course of treatment were associated with changes in circulating inflammatory cytokine levels. A total of 29 (intention-to-treat: n=27) adults meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for a major depressive episode as part of bipolar I or II disorder (i.e. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17-item [HAMD-17] ≥20) were enrolled in an 8-week, open-label study with adjunctive minocycline (100 mg bid). The primary outcome measure was the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The HAMD-17, Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S), cognitive test composite scores and plasma cytokines were secondary outcome measures. Plasma cytokines were measured with the 30 V-Plex Immunoassay from Meso Scale Discovery. Adjunctive minocycline was associated with a reduction in depressive symptom severity from baseline to week 8 on the MADRS (Pbipolar depression, possibly by targeting inflammatory cytokines. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Medication burden in bipolar disorder: a chart review of patients at psychiatric hospital admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Lauren M; Gaudiano, Brandon A; Epstein-Lubow, Gary; Tezanos, Katherine; Celis-Dehoyos, Cintly E; Miller, Ivan W

    2014-04-30

    Individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) often receive complex polypharmacy regimens as part of treatment, yet few studies have sought to evaluate patient characteristics associated with this high medication burden. This retrospective chart review study examined rates of complex polypharmacy (i.e., ≥4 psychotropic medications), patterns of psychotropic medication use, and their demographic and clinical correlates in a naturalistic sample of adults with bipolar I disorder (BDI; N=230) presenting for psychiatric hospital admission. Using a computer algorithm, a hospital administrator extracted relevant demographic, clinical, and community treatment information for analysis. Patients reported taking an average of 3.31 (S.D.=1.46) psychotropic medications, and 5.94 (S.D.=3.78) total medications at intake. Overall, 82 (36%) met criteria for complex polypharmacy. Those receiving complex polypharmacy were significantly more likely to be female, to be depressed, to have a comorbid anxiety disorder, and to have a history of suicide attempt. Women were significantly more likely than men to be prescribed antidepressants, benzodiazepines, and stimulants, even after controlling for mood episode polarity. Study data highlight the high medication burden experienced by patients with BD, especially those who are acutely symptomatic. Data also highlight the particularly high medication burden experienced by women with BD; a burden not fully accounted for by depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A prospective study of diagnostic conversion of major depressive disorder to bipolar disorder in pregnancy and postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Verinder; Xie, Bin; Campbell, M Karen; Penava, Debbie; Hampson, Elizabeth; Mazmanian, Dwight; Pope, Carley J

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the rate of, and risk factors for, a change in diagnosis from major depressive disorder to bipolar disorder, and from bipolar II disorder to bipolar I disorder in pregnancy and postpartum. Patients with a prior history of major depressive disorder or bipolar II disorder were recruited between 24 and 28 weeks' gestation and followed through to one year postpartum. Diagnostic interviews were conducted using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV at study intake and repeated using the Mini-International Psychiatric Interview at one, three, six, and 12 months after childbirth. Fisher's exact test was used to assess the association between various risk factors and diagnostic switch. A total of 146 participants completed the intake interview and at least one follow-up interview postpartum. Of these, 92 were diagnosed with major depressive disorder and 54 with bipolar II disorder at intake. Six women (6.52%) experienced a diagnostic change from major depressive disorder to bipolar II disorder during the first six months after childbirth. There were no cases of switching to bipolar I disorder, but in one participant the diagnosis changed from bipolar II disorder to bipolar I disorder during the three months after childbirth. Bipolar switch was associated with a family history of bipolar disorder. The postpartum period appears to be a time of high risk for a new onset of hypomania in women with major depressive disorder. Our rate of diagnostic switching to bipolar II disorder (6.52%) is at least 11- to 18-fold higher than the rates of switching in similar studies conducted in both men and women. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The association between meal timing and frequency with cardiometabolic profile in patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soreca, I; Wallace, M L; Hall, M H; Hasler, B P; Frank, E; Kupfer, D J

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the association of timing of and frequency of meals with markers of cardiometabolic risk in patients with bipolar disorder in out-patient maintenance treatment. We used Pittsburgh Sleep Diary and actigraphy measures for individuals with bipolar I disorder. Linear and logistic regression analyses were used to determine whether dinnertime, instability of dinnertime, and/or interval between meals were associated with metabolic syndrome and its components. Later dinnertime was associated with greater waist circumference (β = 0.25, P = 0.02) after adjusting for age, sex, dinner-to-bed interval, and sleep duration. Longer breakfast-to-lunch intervals were also associated with greater waist circumferences (β =-.35, P = .002) after adjusting for age, sex, and sleep duration. Neither instability of dinnertime nor number of meals per day was associated with the metabolic syndrome or its components. Weight gain is often perceived as inevitable side-effect of medications. While patients often need to be on medication to function, a more careful lifestyle assessment with attention to social rhythms and timing of activities may be critical not only for mood stability, but also to reduce cardiovascular risk. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Bipolar Affective Disorder and Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birk Engmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper consists of a case history and an overview of the relationship, aetiology, and treatment of comorbid bipolar disorder migraine patients. A MEDLINE literature search was used. Terms for the search were bipolar disorder bipolar depression, mania, migraine, mood stabilizer. Bipolar disorder and migraine cooccur at a relatively high rate. Bipolar II patients seem to have a higher risk of comorbid migraine than bipolar I patients have. The literature on the common roots of migraine and bipolar disorder, including both genetic and neuropathological approaches, is broadly discussed. Moreover, bipolar disorder and migraine are often combined with a variety of other affective disorders, and, furthermore, behavioural factors also play a role in the origin and course of the diseases. Approach to treatment options is also difficult. Several papers point out possible remedies, for example, valproate, topiramate, which acts on both diseases, but no first-choice treatments have been agreed upon yet.

  4. Neural correlates of emotional distractibility in bipolar disorder patients, unaffected relatives, and individuals with hypomanic personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanske, Philipp; Heissler, Janine; Schönfelder, Sandra; Forneck, Johanna; Wessa, Michèle

    2013-12-01

    Neuropsychological deficits and emotion dysregulation are present in symptomatic and euthymic patients with bipolar disorder. However, there is little evidence on how cognitive functioning is influenced by emotion, what the neural correlates of emotional distraction effects are, and whether such deficits are a consequence or a precursor of the disorder. The authors used functional MRI (fMRI) to investigate these questions. fMRI was used first to localize the neural network specific to a certain cognitive task (mental arithmetic) and then to test the effect of emotional distractors on this network. Euthymic patients with bipolar I disorder (N=22), two populations at high risk for developing the disorder (unaffected first-degree relatives of individuals with bipolar disorder [N=17]), and healthy participants with hypomanic personality traits [N=22]) were tested, along with three age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy comparison groups (N=22, N=17, N=24, respectively). There were no differences in performance or activation in the task network for mental arithmetic. However, while all participants exhibited slower responses when emotional distractors were present, this response slowing was greatly enlarged in bipolar patients. Similarly, task-related activation was generally increased under emotional distraction; however, bipolar patients exhibited a further increase in right parietal activation that correlated positively with the response slowing effect. The results suggest that emotional dysregulation leads to exacerbated neuropsychological deficits in bipolar patients, as evidenced by behavioral slowing and task-related hyperactivation. The lack of such a deficit in high-risk populations suggests that it occurs only after disease onset, rather than representing a vulnerability marker.

  5. Paraneoplastic disorders in thymoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Eric; Evoli, Amelia

    2014-01-01

    Thymic malignancy is often associated with paraneoplastic neurological diseases (PNDs) and recognition of these disorders is important for physicians who treat these patients. The most common thymoma-associated PNDs are myasthenia gravis, acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), encephalitis, Morvan's syndrome, and myositis. Diagnosis of these disorders is complex but often aided by testing for specific autoantibodies, including those to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) for myasthenia gravis and to Caspr2, protein of the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex, in patients with acquired neuromyotonia, Morvan's syndrome, or encephalitis. Patients who manifest these disorders should be screened for thymoma at diagnosis, and worsening of these PNDs may be associated with recurrent thymoma. These disorders can cause profound disability but usually respond to immunotherapy, and often improve with thymoma treatment. Close cooperation among a team of specialists is required to properly care for these patients. PMID:25396312

  6. Psychotic and Bipolar Disorders: Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Sarah D

    2017-04-01

    Bipolar disorder is a severe chronic mental illness that affects a large number of individuals. This disorder is separated into two major types, bipolar I disorder, with mania and typically recurrent depression, and bipolar II disorder, with recurrent major depression and hypomania. Patients with bipolar disorder spend the majority of time experiencing depression, and this typically is the presenting symptom. Because outcomes are improved with earlier diagnosis and treatment, physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for bipolar disorder. The most effective long-term treatments are lithium and valproic acid, although other drugs also are used. In addition to referral to a mental health subspecialist for initiation and management of drug treatment, patients with bipolar disorder should be provided with resources for psychotherapy. Several comorbidities commonly associated with bipolar disorder include other mental disorders, substance use disorders, migraine headaches, chronic pain, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Family physicians who care for patients with bipolar disorder should focus their efforts on prevention and management of comorbidities. These patients should be assessed continually for risk of suicide because they are at high risk and their suicide attempts tend to be successful. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  7. Affective Disorders among Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjåstad, Hege Nordem; Gråwe, Rolf W.; Egeland, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Background The high co-occurrence between borderline personality disorder and affective disorders has led many to believe that borderline personality disorder should be considered as part of an affective spectrum. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the prevalence of affective disorders are higher for patients with borderline personality disorder than for patients with other personality disorders. Methods In a national cross-sectional study of patients receiving mental health treatment in Norway (N = 36 773), we determined whether psychiatric outpatients with borderline personality disorder (N = 1 043) had a higher prevalence of affective disorder in general, and whether they had an increased prevalence of depression, bipolar disorder or dysthymia specifically. They were compared to patients with paranoid, schizoid, dissocial, histrionic, obsessive-compulsive, avoidant, dependent, or unspecified personality disorder, as well as an aggregated group of patients with personality disorders other than the borderline type (N = 2 636). Odds ratios were computed for the borderline personality disorder group comparing it to the mixed sample of other personality disorders. Diagnostic assessments were conducted in routine clinical practice. Results More subjects with borderline personality disorder suffered from unipolar than bipolar disorders. Nevertheless, borderline personality disorder had a lower rate of depression and dysthymia than several other personality disorder groups, whereas the rate of bipolar disorder tended to be higher. Odds ratios showed 34% lower risk for unipolar depression, 70% lower risk for dysthymia and 66% higher risk for bipolar disorder in patients with borderline personality disorder compared to the aggregated group of other personality disorders. Conclusions The results suggest that borderline personality disorder has a stronger association with affective disorders in the bipolar spectrum than disorders in the unipolar

  8. Affective disorders among patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjåstad, Hege Nordem; Gråwe, Rolf W; Egeland, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The high co-occurrence between borderline personality disorder and affective disorders has led many to believe that borderline personality disorder should be considered as part of an affective spectrum. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the prevalence of affective disorders are higher for patients with borderline personality disorder than for patients with other personality disorders. In a national cross-sectional study of patients receiving mental health treatment in Norway (N = 36 773), we determined whether psychiatric outpatients with borderline personality disorder (N = 1 043) had a higher prevalence of affective disorder in general, and whether they had an increased prevalence of depression, bipolar disorder or dysthymia specifically. They were compared to patients with paranoid, schizoid, dissocial, histrionic, obsessive-compulsive, avoidant, dependent, or unspecified personality disorder, as well as an aggregated group of patients with personality disorders other than the borderline type (N = 2 636). Odds ratios were computed for the borderline personality disorder group comparing it to the mixed sample of other personality disorders. Diagnostic assessments were conducted in routine clinical practice. More subjects with borderline personality disorder suffered from unipolar than bipolar disorders. Nevertheless, borderline personality disorder had a lower rate of depression and dysthymia than several other personality disorder groups, whereas the rate of bipolar disorder tended to be higher. Odds ratios showed 34% lower risk for unipolar depression, 70% lower risk for dysthymia and 66% higher risk for bipolar disorder in patients with borderline personality disorder compared to the aggregated group of other personality disorders. The results suggest that borderline personality disorder has a stronger association with affective disorders in the bipolar spectrum than disorders in the unipolar spectrum. This association may reflect

  9. Affective disorders among patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hege Nordem Sjåstad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The high co-occurrence between borderline personality disorder and affective disorders has led many to believe that borderline personality disorder should be considered as part of an affective spectrum. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the prevalence of affective disorders are higher for patients with borderline personality disorder than for patients with other personality disorders. METHODS: In a national cross-sectional study of patients receiving mental health treatment in Norway (N = 36 773, we determined whether psychiatric outpatients with borderline personality disorder (N = 1 043 had a higher prevalence of affective disorder in general, and whether they had an increased prevalence of depression, bipolar disorder or dysthymia specifically. They were compared to patients with paranoid, schizoid, dissocial, histrionic, obsessive-compulsive, avoidant, dependent, or unspecified personality disorder, as well as an aggregated group of patients with personality disorders other than the borderline type (N = 2 636. Odds ratios were computed for the borderline personality disorder group comparing it to the mixed sample of other personality disorders. Diagnostic assessments were conducted in routine clinical practice. RESULTS: More subjects with borderline personality disorder suffered from unipolar than bipolar disorders. Nevertheless, borderline personality disorder had a lower rate of depression and dysthymia than several other personality disorder groups, whereas the rate of bipolar disorder tended to be higher. Odds ratios showed 34% lower risk for unipolar depression, 70% lower risk for dysthymia and 66% higher risk for bipolar disorder in patients with borderline personality disorder compared to the aggregated group of other personality disorders. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that borderline personality disorder has a stronger association with affective disorders in the bipolar spectrum than

  10. Factors associated with stigma among caregivers of patients with bipolar disorder in the STEP-BD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jodi M; Perlick, Deborah A; Miklowitz, David J; Kaczynski, Richard; Hernandez, Melissa; Rosenheck, Robert A; Culver, Jenifer L; Ostacher, Michael J; Bowden, Charles L

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the factors contributing to mental illness stigma among caregivers of people with bipolar disorder. A total of 500 caregivers of patients participating in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) study were interviewed in a cross-sectional design on measures of stigma, mood, burden, and coping. Relatives and friends with bipolar disorder were assessed on measures of diagnosis and clinical status, determined by a days-well measure derived from psychiatrist ratings of DSM-IV episode status. Because patients' clinical status varied widely, separate models were run for patients who were euthymic for at least three-fourths of the past year (well group) and for those who met criteria for an affective episode for at least one-fourth of the previous year (unwell group). Stepwise multiple regression was used to identify patient, illness, and caregiver characteristics associated with caregiver stigma. In the unwell group, greater mental illness stigma was associated with bipolar I (versus II) disorder, less social support for the caregiver, fewer caregiver social interactions, and being a caregiver of Hispanic descent. In the well group, greater stigma was associated with being a caregiver who is the adult child of a parent with bipolar disorder, who has a college education, who has fewer social interactions, and who cares for a female bipolar patient. Mental illness stigma was found to be prevalent among caregivers of persons with bipolar disorder who have active symptoms as well as for caregivers of those who have remitted symptoms. Stigma is typically associated with factors identifying patients as "different" during symptomatic periods. Research is needed to understand how the stigma experienced by caregivers during stable phases of illness differs from the stigma experienced during patients' illness states.

  11. Bariatric surgery: a viable treatment option for patients with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Sarah R; Labott, Susan; Stout, Rebecca A

    2015-01-01

    Although bariatric surgery has become a recognized treatment for obesity, its utility among patients with severe psychiatric disorders has not been extensively studied. A few studies have reported similar weight loss outcomes in these patients, but psychiatric status after bariatric surgery has been studied only minimally, and it is unknown if exacerbation of the mental illness affects weight loss. The aim of this study was to shed greater light on the issue of serious mental illness and bariatric surgery. Specifically, do patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar I, and bipolar II have poorer weight loss outcomes postbariatric surgery than the general bariatric surgery population? Also, do patients with these diagnoses experience an exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms after bariatric surgery, and if so, is the exacerbation of these disorders linked to poorer weight loss results? Midwest university medical center. A medical record review of approximately 1500 bariatric patients in a Midwest university medical center was conducted to identify those patients with diagnoses of schizophrenia, bipolar I, and bipolar II. Information was gathered on bariatric surgery outcomes and changes in psychiatric status postsurgery. Eighteen patients were identified as undergoing bariatric surgery and having a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar I, or bipolar II. Weight loss in this group was significant and comparable to expected outcomes of absolute weight lost, changes in body mass index, and percentage excess weight loss for patients in the typical bariatric population. Postsurgery psychiatric status was known on 10 patients. All 10 patients experienced some exacerbation of psychiatric problems yet weight loss outcomes were still as expected. Bariatric surgery is a viable obesity treatment option for patients with schizophrenia, bipolar I, and bipolar II disorders. Symptom exacerbations occurred postsurgery, although it is not clear if these were due to the surgery or

  12. Personality Disorders in patients with disorders in eating behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Carina Góngora

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The interest for the systematic study of personality disorder in patients with eating disorders starts in 1980 with the edition of the DSM III multiaxial classification system. Since then, several publications have been focused on the prevalence and the effect on treatment of personality disorders in bulimic and anorexic patients. These researches showed inconsistent results due to conceptual and methodological divergences. In this paper, the more relevant findings of these studies are presented and the possible sources of discrepancy are analyzed. In general, there is a moderate comorbidity between personality disorders and eating disorders. The most frequent disorders are borderline, histrionic, obsessive-compulsive, dependent and avoidant personality disorders. Borderline and histrionic personality disorders are more frequently associated with bulimia, whereas avoidant and obsessive- compulsive personality disorders are more characteristic of anorexia nervosa. Nevertheless, the effect of the relationship between eating disorders and personality disorders in treatment remains uncertain, giving raise to several controversies and researches. 

  13. Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients

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    N. V. Vakhnina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common vascular diseases. The brain as target organs in hypertension is damaged more often and earlier. Neurological complications due to hypertension are frequently hyperdiagnosed in Russian neurological practice. Thus, headache, dizziness, impaired recall of recent events, nocturnal sleep disorders, and many other complaints in a hypertensive patient are usually regarded as a manifestation of dyscirculatory encephalopathy. At the same time headaches (tension headache and migraine in hypertensive patients are predominantly primary; headache associated with dramatic marked elevations in blood pressure is encountered in only a small number of patients. The role of cerebrovascular diseases in the development of dizziness in hypertensive patients is also overestimated. The vast majority of cases, patients with this complaint are in fact identified to have benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, Mеniеre’s disease, vestibular neuronitis, or vestibular migraine. Psychogenic disorders or multisensory insufficiency are generally responsible for non-systemic vertigo in hypertensive patients. Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency may cause non-systemic vertigo as a subjective equivalent of postural instability.Cognitive impairments (CIs are the most common and earliest manifestation of cerebrovascular lesion in hypertension. In most cases, CIs in hypertension were vascular and associated with cerebrovascular lesion due to lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis. However, mixed CIs frequently occur when hypertensive patients are also found to have signs of a degenerative disease, most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease.

  14. Temporomandibular disorders in headache patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Christiane-Espinola-Bandeira; Oliveira, José-Luiz-Góes; Jesus, Alan-Chester-Feitosa; Maia, Mila-Leite-de Moraes; de Santana, Jonielly-Costa-Vasconcelos; Andrade, Loren-Suyane-Oliveira; Siqueira Quintans, Jullyana-de Souza; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo-José; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its seve-rity in individuals with headache. Study Design: 60 adults divided into three groups of 20 individuals: chronic daily headache (CDH), episodic headache (EH) and a control group without headache (WH). Headache diagnosis was performed according to the criteria of International Headache Society and the signs and symptoms of TMD were achieved by using a clinical exam and an anamnestic questionnaire. The severity of TMD was defined by the temporomandibular index (TMI). Results: The TMD signs and symptoms were always more frequent in individuals with headache, especially report of pain in TMJ area (CDH, n=16; EH, n=12; WH, n=6), pain to palpation on masseter (CDH, n=19; EH, n=16; WH, n=11) which are significantly more frequent in episodic and chronic daily headache. The mean values of temporomandibular and articular index (CDH patients) and muscular index (CDH and EH patients) were statistically higher than in patients of the control group, notably the articular (CDH=0.38; EH=0.25;WH=0.19) and muscular (CDH=0.46; EH=0.51; WH=0.26) indices. Conclusions: These findings allow us to speculate that masticatory and TMJ pain are more common in headache subjects. Besides, it seems that the TMD is more severe in headache patients. Key words:Temporomandibular dysfunction, headache disorders. PMID:22926473

  15. Religiosity and psychological resilience in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: an international cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Y; Hofer, A; Frajo-Apor, B; Wartelsteiner, F; Kemmler, G; Pardeller, S; Suzuki, T; Mimura, M; Fleischhacker, W W; Uchida, H

    2018-04-01

    The impact of religious/spiritual activities on clinical outcomes in patients with serious mental illnesses remains controversial, which was addressed in this international cross-sectional study. Three-hundred sixty-nine subjects were recruited from Austria (n = 189) and Japan (n = 180), consisting of 112 outpatients with paranoid schizophrenia, 120 with bipolar I disorder (DSM-IV), and 137 healthy controls. Religiosity was assessed in terms of attendance and importance of religious/spiritual activities, while resilience was assessed using the 25-item Resilience Scale. General linear models were used to test whether higher religiosity will be associated with higher resilience, higher social functioning, and lower psychopathology. The association between levels of spiritual well-being and resilience was also examined. Attendance of religious services (F [4,365] = 0.827, P = 0.509) and importance of religion/spirituality (F [3,365] = 1.513, P = 0.211) did not show significant associations with resilience. Regarding clinical measures, a modest association between higher importance of religion/spirituality and residual manic symptoms was observed in bipolar patients (F [3,118] = 3.120, P = 0.029). In contrast to the findings regarding religiosity, spiritual well-being showed a strong positive correlation with resilience (r = 0.584, P resilience, social functioning, and psychopathology was not evident in our sample. Spiritual well-being appears more relevant to resilience than religiosity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Psychiatric disorders of patients seeking obesity treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hung-Yen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obese and overweight people have a higher risk of both chronic physical illness and mental illness. Obesity is reported to be positively associated with psychiatric disorders, especially in people who seek obesity treatment. At the same time, obesity treatment may be influenced by psychological factors or personality characteristics. This study aimed to understand the prevalence of mental disorders among ethnic Chinese who sought obesity treatment. Methods Subjects were retrospectively recruited from an obesity treatment center in Taiwan. The obesity treatments included bariatric surgery and non-surgery treatment. All subjects underwent a standardized clinical evaluation with two questionnaires and a psychiatric referral when needed. The psychiatric diagnosis was made thorough psychiatric clinic interviews using the SCID. A total of 841 patients were recruited. We compared the difference in psychiatric disorder prevalence between patients with surgical and non-surgical treatment. Results Of the 841 patients, 42% had at least one psychiatric disorder. Mood disorders, anxiety disorders and eating disorders were the most prevalent categories of psychiatric disorders. Females had more mood disorders and eating disorders than males. The surgical group had more binge-eating disorder, adjustment disorder, and sleep disorders than the non-surgical group. Conclusion A high prevalence of psychiatric disorders was found among ethnic Chinese seeking obesity treatment. This is consistent with study results in the US and Europe.

  17. Psychiatric disorders of patients seeking obesity treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Yen; Huang, Chih-Kun; Tai, Chi-Ming; Lin, Hung-Yu; Kao, Yu-Hsi; Tsai, Ching-Chung; Hsuan, Chin-Feng; Lee, Su-Long; Chi, Shu-Ching; Yen, Yung-Chieh

    2013-01-02

    Obese and overweight people have a higher risk of both chronic physical illness and mental illness. Obesity is reported to be positively associated with psychiatric disorders, especially in people who seek obesity treatment. At the same time, obesity treatment may be influenced by psychological factors or personality characteristics. This study aimed to understand the prevalence of mental disorders among ethnic Chinese who sought obesity treatment. Subjects were retrospectively recruited from an obesity treatment center in Taiwan. The obesity treatments included bariatric surgery and non-surgery treatment. All subjects underwent a standardized clinical evaluation with two questionnaires and a psychiatric referral when needed. The psychiatric diagnosis was made thorough psychiatric clinic interviews using the SCID. A total of 841 patients were recruited. We compared the difference in psychiatric disorder prevalence between patients with surgical and non-surgical treatment. Of the 841 patients, 42% had at least one psychiatric disorder. Mood disorders, anxiety disorders and eating disorders were the most prevalent categories of psychiatric disorders. Females had more mood disorders and eating disorders than males. The surgical group had more binge-eating disorder, adjustment disorder, and sleep disorders than the non-surgical group. A high prevalence of psychiatric disorders was found among ethnic Chinese seeking obesity treatment. This is consistent with study results in the US and Europe.

  18. Adjunctive Methylphenidate in the Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa Co-occurring with Bipolar Disorder and Substance Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerdjikova, Anna I; McElroy, Susan L

    2013-02-01

    Bulimia nervosa is associated with bipolar disorder, substance dependence, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and anxiety disorders. Few reports, however, have addressed the treatment of patients with all of these conditions. We describe a young woman with bulimia nervosa, bipolar I disorder, cocaine and alcohol dependence, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and panic disorder who achieved a sustained (>1 year) remission of her bulimia nervosa symptoms and significant improvement of her attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms with adjunctive methylphenidate after her bipolar, substance use, and panic disorders were successfully treated with hospitalization, intensive psychotherapy, quetiapine, and lamotrigine. Further research into the use of stimulants in bulimia nervosa, including in patients with complex comorbidity, is required.

  19. Psychiatric and physical comorbidities and their impact on the course of bipolar disorder: A prospective, naturalistic 4-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Benedikt L; Radua, Joaquim; Wunsch, Christian; König, Barbara; Simhandl, Christian

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to increase the available evidence on how physical and psychiatric comorbidities influence the long-term outcome in bipolar I and II disorder. We examined the prevalence of comorbid physical (metabolic, cardiovascular, thyroid, and neurological) diseases and psychiatric (neurotic, stress-related, somatoform, and personality) disorders and their impact on the risk of relapse in bipolar disorder. A total of 284 consecutively admitted patients with ICD-10 bipolar I (n=161) and II (n=123) disorder were followed up naturalistically over a period of 4 years. Globally, 22.0% patients had metabolic, 18.8% cardiovascular, 18.8% thyroid, and 7.6% neurological diseases; 15.5% had neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform disorders; 12.0% had personality disorders; and 52.9% had nicotine dependence. We did not find any effect of comorbid metabolic, cardiovascular or neurological diseases or psychiatric disorders on the relapse risk. However, the presence of thyroid diseases, and especially hypothyroidism, was associated with an increased risk of manic relapse in bipolar disorder I (thyroid disease: hazard ratio [HR]=2.7; P=.003; hypothyroidism: HR=3.7;, Pbipolar disorder with more manic episodes, and the importance of its detection and treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Capgras' syndrome in first-episode psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Paola; Bhuvaneswar, Chaya; Tohen, Mauricio; Khalsa, Hari-Mandir K; Maggini, Carlo; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2014-01-01

    Misidentification phenomena, including the delusion of 'imposters' named after Joseph Capgras, occur in various major psychiatric and neurological disorders but have rarely been studied systematically in broad samples of modern patients. This study investigated the prevalence and correlated clinical factors of Capgras' phenomenon in a broad sample of patient-subjects with first-lifetime episodes of psychotic affective and nonaffective disorders. We evaluated 517 initially hospitalized, first-episode psychotic-disorder patients for the prevalence of Capgras' phenomenon and its association with DSM-IV-TR diagnoses including schizophreniform, brief psychotic, unspecified psychotic, delusional, and schizoaffective disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar-I disorder and major depression with psychotic features, and with characteristics of interest including antecedent psychiatric and neurological morbidity, onset type and presenting psychopathological phenomena, using standard bivariate and multivariate statistical methods. Capgras' syndrome was identified in 73/517 (14.1%) patients (8.2-50% across diagnoses). Risk was greatest with acute or brief psychotic disorders (schizophreniform psychoses 50%, brief psychoses 34.8%, or unspecified psychoses 23.9%), intermediate in major depression (15%), schizophrenia (11.4%) and delusional disorder (11.1%), and lowest in bipolar-I (10.3%) and schizoaffective disorders (8.2%). Associated were somatosensory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations, Schneiderian (especially delusional perception), and cycloid features including polymorphous psychotic phenomena, rapidly shifting psychomotor and affective symptoms, pananxiety, ecstasy, overconcern with death, and perplexity or confusion, as well as rapid onset, but not sex, age, abuse history, dissociative features, or indications of neurological disorders. Capgras' syndrome was prevalent across a broad spectrum of first-episode psychotic disorders, most often in acute psychoses of rapid onset.

  1. Capgras Syndrome in First-Episode Psychotic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Paola; Bhuvaneswar, Chaya; Tohen, Mauricio; Khalsa, Hari-Mandir K.; Maggini, Carlo; Baldessarini, Ross J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Misidentification phenomena, including the delusion of “imposters” named after Joseph Capgras, occur in various major psychiatric and neurological disorders but have rarely been studied systematically in broad samples of modern patients. This study investigated the prevalence and correlated clinical factors of Capgras phenomenon in a broad sample of patient-subjects with first-lifetime episodes of psychotic affective and non affective disorders. Methods We evaluated 517 initially hospitalized, first-episode psychotic-disorder patients for prevalence of Capgras phenomenon and its association with DSM-IV-TR diagnoses including schizophreniform, brief psychotic, unspecified psychotic, delusional, and schizoaffective disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar-I disorder and major depression with psychotic features, and with characteristics of interest including antecedent psychiatric and neurological morbidity, onset-type and presenting psychopathological phenomena, using standard bivariate and multivariate statistical methods. Results Capgras syndrome was identified in 73/517 (14.1%) patients (8.2%–50% across diagnoses). Risk was greatest with acute or brief psychotic disorders (schizophreniform [50%], brief [34.8%], or unspecified [23.9%] psychoses), intermediate in major depression (15%), schizophrenia (11.4%) and delusional disorder (11.1%), and lowest in bipolar-I (10.3%) and schizoaffective disorders (8.2%). Associated were somatosensory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations, Schneiderian (especially delusional perception), and cycloid features as described by Perris and Brockington including polymorphous psychotic phenomena, rapidly shifting psychomotor and affective symptoms, pan-anxiety, ecstasy, over-concern with death, and perplexity or confusion, as well as rapid-onset, but not sex, age, abuse-history, dissociative features, or indications of neurological disorders. Conclusions Capgras syndrome was prevalent across a broad spectrum of first

  2. Mucocutaneous disorders in Hiv positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar H

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty eight HIV positive patients were included in this study. They were evaluated for their mucocutaneous disorders, sexually transmitted diseases and other systemic disorders between 1994-95 in the department of Dermatology and STD Dr R M L Hospital of New Delhi. The heterosexual contact with commercial sex workers (CSWs was the most common route of HIV transmission. Chancroid, syphilis and genital warts were common STDs found in HIV positive patients. Oral thrush (67.9% was the commonest mucocutaneous disorder found in these patients followed by herpes zoster (25% and seborrhoeic dermatitis (21.4%. There was no unusual clinical presentation seen in mucocutaneous disorders and STDs.

  3. Personality disorder: still the patients psychiatrists dislike?

    OpenAIRE

    Chartonas, Dimitrios; Kyratsous, Michalis; Dracass, Sarah; Lee, Tennyson; Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2017-01-01

    Aims and method In 1988, Lewis and Appleby demonstrated that psychiatrists hold negative attitudes towards patients with personality disorder. We assessed the attitudes of psychiatry trainees towards patients with borderline personality disorder and depression, expecting an improvement. 166 trainees were block randomised to receive one of four case vignettes that varied by diagnosis and ethnic group. We used Lewis and Appleby's original questionnaire and the Attitudes to Personality Disorder ...

  4. Comorbidity of obsessive compulsive disorder in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennkh, C; Strnad, A; Bailer, U; Biener, D; Fodor, G; de Zwaan, M

    1998-03-01

    We investigated the prevalence of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) among patients with eating disorders (ED). 66 female inpatients who met the DSM-IV criteria for anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN) participated in the study. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM III-R diagnoses (SCID), the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI), the revised 90-item Symptom-Checklist (SCL-90-R), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) were carried out. Twelve patients (18.2%) met the DSM-III-R criteria for lifetime OCD: 7 had a current OCD and 5 had a past history of OCD. These patients had significantly higher (more pathological) mean scores on the EDI and the SCL-90-R total scales. Analyses of the EDI subscales revealed significantly higher scores for ineffectiveness, perfectionism, interoceptive awareness, and maturity fears. As expected, analyses of the SCL-90-R subscales revealed significantly higher scores for OCD. In addition, there was a trend towards higher somatization scores in patients with comorbid OCD. We could not find any significant differences in the BDI and the TAS total scores. In addition, patients with comorbid OCD showed a significantly higher lifetime prevalence of bipolar disorder, simple phobia, and somatoform disorders. Our results confirm previous reports of a strong association between ED and OCD and suggest that the prevalence of OCD may be correlated with a higher severity of the eating disorder and general psychopathological parameters.

  5. [Management of patients with conversion disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Marinus; Hoekstra, Jan; Kuipers-van Kooten, Mariëtte J; van der Linden, Els A M

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of conversion disorder are not due to conscious simulation. There should be no doubt that the symptoms of conversion disorder are genuine, even if scans do not reveal any abnormalities. The management of patients with conversion disorder starts with an explanation of the diagnosis. The essence of this explanation is that patients first hear about what the diagnosis actually means and only after this about what they do not have. When explaining the diagnosis it is a good idea to use metaphors. The treatment of patients with conversion disorder is carried out together with a physical therapist. The collaboration of healthcare professionals who are involved in the treatment of a patient with conversion disorder should preferably be coordinated by the patient's general practitioner.

  6. The impact of neurocognitive impairment on occupational recovery of clinically stable patients with bipolar disorder: a prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearden, Carrie E; Shih, Vivian H; Green, Michael F; Gitlin, Michael; Sokolski, Kenneth N; Levander, Eric; Marusak, Susan; Hammen, Constance; Sugar, Catherine A; Altshuler, Lori L

    2011-01-01

    Objective Many patients with bipolar disorder do not regain their premorbid level of occupational functioning even after mood episodes have resolved. The reasons for this are not well understood. We evaluated the relationship between neurocognition and occupational function in bipolar disorder patients, following symptomatic recovery. Methods A total of 79 previously employed adults with bipolar I disorder who achieved symptomatic recovery (i.e., at least six weeks clinically euthymic) following a manic episode underwent a neurocognitive evaluation and assessment of occupational functioning. Study participants were evaluated every three months thereafter for up to nine months. Factor analysis was applied to reduce the initial set of neurocognitive variables to five domains: episodic memory, working memory/attention, executive function, visual scanning, and speed of processing. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the joint predictive values of these domains for determining occupational recovery. Results At the time of symptomatic recovery, four of five neurocognitive factors were significant predictors of concomitant occupational recovery and the fifth, executive function, showed a trend in the same direction. For those not occupationally recovered at baseline, longitudinal analyses revealed that changes between baseline and the three-month follow-up timepoint in most cognitive domains were robust and highly significant predictors of occupational recovery at three months. Conclusions These findings indicate that better neurocognitive function in multiple domains and improvement in these domains over time are strongly predictive of subsequent occupational recovery. Treatments that target cognitive deficit may therefore have potential for improving long-term vocational functioning in bipolar illness. PMID:21843272

  7. Gastrointestinal symptoms and disorders in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yasuhiro; Fukudo, Shin

    2015-10-01

    The two most clinically serious eating disorders are anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. A drive for thinness and fear of fatness lead patients with anorexia nervosa either to restrict their food intake or binge-eat then purge (through self-induced vomiting and/or laxative abuse) to reduce their body weight to much less than the normal range. A drive for thinness leads patients with bulimia nervosa to binge-eat then purge but fail to reduce their body weight. Patients with eating disorders present with various gastrointestinal disturbances such as postprandial fullness, abdominal distention, abdominal pain, gastric distension, and early satiety, with altered esophageal motility sometimes seen in patients with anorexia nervosa. Other common conditions noted in patients with eating disorders are postprandial distress syndrome, superior mesenteric artery syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, and functional constipation. Binge eating may cause acute gastric dilatation and gastric perforation, while self-induced vomiting can lead to dental caries, salivary gland enlargement, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and electrolyte imbalance. Laxative abuse can cause dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Vomiting and/or laxative abuse can cause hypokalemia, which carries a risk of fatal arrhythmia. Careful assessment and intensive treatment of patients with eating disorders is needed because gastrointestinal symptoms/disorders can progress to a critical condition.

  8. Role of extended release quetiapine in the management of bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan K Al Jurdi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Rayan K Al Jurdi1,2, Lena A Dixit1, Martha Sajatovic3 1Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Houston, Texas, USA; 2South Central Mental Illness Research and Clinical Core, Department of Veterans Affairs, Houston, Texas; 3Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Atypical antipsychotics have become a widely utilized component of the bipolar disorder treatment armamentarium, with approximately 45% of bipolar patients prescribed atypicals. Over the last decade all atypical drugs except for clozapine have received a Food and Drug Administration (FDA bipolar indication. In October 2008, the FDA approved quetiapine XR monotherapy for the treatment of acute depressive episodes of bipolar disorder and acute manic or mixed episodes in bipolar I disorder based on two placebo-control trials. Quetiapine was also approved as adjunct therapy with lithium and divalproex for the treatment of acute manic or mixed episodes as well as maintenance of bipolar I disorder. In contrast to immediate release quetiapine which may require a twice-daily regimen, the XR formulation is intended for once-daily administration. This drug profile of quetiapine XR will address chemistry, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, safety and tolerability and clinical trials in bipolar disorder.Keywords: quetiapine XR, bipolar disorder

  9. Internet use by patients with bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable international interest in online education of patients with bipolar disorder, yet little understanding of how patients use the Internet and other sources to seek information. 1171 patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in 17 countries completed a paper-based, anonymous...... survey. 81% of the patients used the Internet, a percentage similar to the general public. Older age, less education, and challenges in country telecommunications infrastructure and demographics decreased the odds of using the Internet. About 78% of the Internet users looked online for information...... for information on bipolar disorder consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 2.3 other information sources such as books, physician handouts, and others with bipolar disorder. Patients not using the Internet consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 1.6 other information sources. The percentage...

  10. Personality characteristics in patients with somatized disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Anatolyevna Tolkach

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study personality characteristics, behavioral style, and modes of relations with their people in patients with somatized disorder. Subjects and methods. Eighty-six patients diagnosed as having somatized disorder were examined using Leary's interpersonal diagnosis system. Results. The author revealed the following personality characteristics and behavioral styles: a depressed need for authoritarianism, dominance, autonomy, aggressiveness, a display of qualities, such as superfriendliness, benevolence, submissiveness, dependency, and suspiciousness. These characteristics give an insight into the development of somatization in patients with somatized disorder.

  11. Schottky bipolar I-MOS: An I-MOS with Schottky electrodes and an open-base BJT configuration for reduced operating voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, N.; Kumar, M. Jagadesh

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a novel impact ionization MOS (I-MOS) structure, called the Schottky bipolar I-MOS, with Schottky source and drain electrodes and utilizing the open-base bipolar junction transistor (BJT) configuration for achieving reduction in the operating voltage of the I-MOS transistor. We report, using 2-D simulations, a low operating voltage (∼1.1 V) and a low subthreshold swing (∼3.6 mV/Decade). For the corresponding p-i-n I-MOS, the operating voltage is ∼5.5 V. The operating voltage of the Schottky bipolar I-MOS is the lowest reported operating voltage for silicon based I-MOS transistors. The nearly 80% reduction in the operating voltage of the Schottky bipolar I-MOS makes it suitable for applications requiring low operating voltages. The Schottky bipolar I-MOS is also expected to have an improved reliability over the p-i-n I-MOS since high energy carriers, induced by impact ionization near the drain, do not have to pass under the gate region in the channel. The use of Schottky contacts instead of heavily doped source and drain regions and the low channel doping level reduces the required thermal budget for device fabrication. The low operating voltage, low subthreshold swing and possibly improved reliability of the Schottky bipolar I-MOS, makes it a potential solution for applications where steep subthreshold slope transistors are being explored as alternative to the conventional MOS transistor.

  12. Micronucleus frequency among Iraqi thyroid disorder patients

    OpenAIRE

    AlFaisal, Abdul Hussein Moyet; AL-Ramahi, Intesar Jawad Kahdoom; Abdul-Hassan, Ismail Abdul Redah

    2012-01-01

    Micronucleus (MN) assay has been extensively used in detection of DNA damage, instability in cancer, and genetic disorders. In the current study, MN, binucleated cells, and nuclear division index (NDI) were investigated in Iraqi patients with thyroid disorders. The results indicated significantly (p 

  13. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Task Force Report on Antidepressant Use in Bipolar Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Bond, David J.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Nolen, Willem A.; Grunze, Heinz; Licht, Rasmus W.; Post, Robert M.; Berk, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M.; Sachs, Gary S.; Tondo, Leonardo; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Tohen, Mauricio; Undurraga, Juan; González-Pinto, Ana; Goldberg, Joseph F.; Yildiz, Ayşegül; Altshuler, Lori L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Thase, Michael E.; Koukopoulos, Athanasios; Colom, Francesc; Frye, Mark A.; Malhi, Gin S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Vázquez, Gustavo; Perlis, Roy H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Cassidy, Frederick; Akiskal, Hagop; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Valentí, Marc; Mazzei, Diego Hidalgo; Lafer, Beny; Kato, Tadafumi; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Martínez-Aran, Anabel; Parker, Gordon; Souery, Daniel; Özerdem, Ayşegül; McElroy, Susan L.; Girardi, Paolo; Bauer, Michael; Yatham, Lakshmi N.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kanba, Shigenobu; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Serretti, Alessandro; Rihmer, Zoltan; Young, Allan H.; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Rybakowski, Janusz; Ha, Kyooseob; Perugi, Giulio; Kasper, Siegfried; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Hirschfeld, Robert M.; Kapczinski, Flávio; Vieta, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Objective The risk-benefit profile of antidepressant medications in bipolar disorder is controversial. When conclusive evidence is lacking, expert consensus can guide treatment decisions. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to seek consensus recommendations on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorders. Method An expert task force iteratively developed consensus through serial consensus-based revisions using the Delphi method. Initial survey items were based on systematic review of the literature. Subsequent surveys included new or reworded items and items that needed to be rerated. This process resulted in the final ISBD Task Force clinical recommendations on antidepressant use in bipolar disorder. Results There is striking incongruity between the wide use of and the weak evidence base for the efficacy and safety of antidepressant drugs in bipolar disorder. Few well-designed, long-term trials of prophylactic benefits have been conducted, and there is insufficient evidence for treatment benefits with antidepressants combined with mood stabilizers. A major concern is the risk for mood switch to hypomania, mania, and mixed states. Integrating the evidence and the experience of the task force members, a consensus was reached on 12 statements on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorder. Conclusions Because of limited data, the task force could not make broad statements endorsing antidepressant use but acknowledged that individual bipolar patients may benefit from antidepressants. Regarding safety, serotonin reuptake inhibitors and bupropion may have lower rates of manic switch than tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants and norepinephrine-serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The frequency and severity of antidepressant-associated mood elevations appear to be greater in bipolar I than bipolar II disorder. Hence, in bipolar I patients antidepressants should be prescribed only as an adjunct to mood-stabilizing medications

  14. [Treatments of sleep disorders in dementia patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Nobuo

    2014-02-01

    In elderly, biological changes cause circadian rhythm disturbance, and sleep disorders are often observed. The risk of sleep disorders is higher in dementia patients, sleep disorders are causes of care burden increase. In treatments of sleep disorders in dementia patients, it is important to evaluate correctly about sleep disorders and to check BPSD which merges to insomnia. In clinical, nonpharmacological therapies, such as an improvement of a lifestyle and cause removal of insomnia, are first choices. In medication, when other psychological symptoms and BPSDs merge, use of an easy sleeping drug is avoided, and medication of antidepressants or atypical antipsychotics is considered, but these medications use requires cautions about insurance adaptation and side effects.

  15. [Dream contents of sleep disordered patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schredl, M; Kraft, B; Morlock, M; Bozzer, A

    1998-02-01

    The present study investigates dreams reports of patients with sleep disorders. Whereas, the findings scarcely showed specific dream contents for different sleep disorders, e.g. problematic dreams in insomniacs, breathing-related dreams in sleep-apnea-patients, a remarkable relationship between waking life and dream contents did occur. Private problems and occupational stress are reflected in dreams by means of increased negative feelings, aggression and occupational themes. The results suggest that dreams can be made use of in psychological invention methods in sleep disorders, e.g. stress management.

  16. Autism spectrum disorders in propionic acidemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Bâtie, Caroline Dejean; Barbier, Valérie; Roda, Célina; Brassier, Anaïs; Arnoux, Jean-Baptiste; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Guemann, Anne-Sophie; Pontoizeau, Clément; Gobin, Stéphanie; Habarou, Florence; Lacaille, Florence; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Canouï, Pierre; Ottolenghi, Chris; De Lonlay, Pascale; Ouss, Lisa

    2017-08-30

    Propionic acidemia is the result of a deficiency in propionyl-CoA carboxylase activity. Chronic neurologic and cognitive complications frequently occur, but the psychiatric evolution of the disorder is not well documented. We conducted a pedopsychiatric evaluation of 19 children, adolescents and young adults, aged between 2 and 25 years, using ADI-R, CARS-T, as well as ADOS when autism spectrum disorder was suspected. Previous psychometric examinations were also taken into consideration. Thirteen patients had an IQ propionic acidemia. These patients should undergo in-depth psychiatric evaluation and be screened for autism spectrum disorder. Further studies are needed to understand the underlying mechanisms.

  17. Dealing with bipolar disorder in general practice | Rodseth | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... it is in the general realm of specialist diagnosis and care, general practitioners can play an important role in early identification of the disorder and long-term management, in shared care with the psychiatrist. Keywords: bipolar disorder, mania, hypomania, depression, DSM-IV criteria, bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder ...

  18. Course of Subthreshold Bipolar Disorder in Youth: Diagnostic Progression from Bipolar Disorder Not Otherwise Specified

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Strober, Michael A.; Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Ha, Wonho; Gill, Mary Kay; Goldstein, Tina R.; Yen, Shirley; Hower, Heather; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Liao, Fangzi; Iyengar, Satish; Dickstein, Daniel; Kim, Eunice; Ryan, Neal D.; Frankel, Erica; Keller, Martin B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the rate of diagnostic conversion from an operationalized diagnosis of bipolar disorder not otherwise specified (BP-NOS) to bipolar I disorder (BP-I) or bipolar II disorder (BP-II) in youth over prospective follow-up and to identify factors associated with conversion. Method: Subjects were 140 children and adolescents…

  19. Self-Reported Long-Term Benefits of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy in Patients with Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Béatrice; Sala, Loretta; Gex-Fabry, Marianne; Docteur, Aurélie; Gorwood, Philip; Cordera, Paolo; Bondolfi, Guido; Jermann, Françoise; Aubry, Jean-Michel; Mirabel-Sarron, Christine

    2017-07-01

    This study focused on patients with bipolar disorder (BD), several years after their participation in mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). It aimed at documenting sustained mindfulness practice, perceived long-term benefit from the program, and changes regarded as direct consequences of the intervention. This cross-sectional survey took place at least 2 years after MBCT for 70.4% of participants. It was conducted in two specialized outpatient units for BDs that are part of the Geneva University Hospitals (Switzerland) and the Sainte-Anne Hospital in Paris (France). Eligibility criteria were a diagnosis of BD according to DSM-IV and participation in at least four MBCT sessions. Response rate was 66.4%. The final sample included 71 outpatients (71.8% bipolar I, 28.2% bipolar II). A questionnaire retrospectively assessed patient-perceived change, benefit from MBCT, and current mindfulness practice. Proportions of respondents who practiced mindfulness at least once a week were 54.9% for formal practice (body scan, sitting meditation, mindful walking, or movements) and 57.7% for informal practice (mindful daily activities). Perceived benefit for the prevention of relapse was moderate, but patients acknowledged long-lasting effects and persistent changes in their way of life. Formal mindfulness practice at least once a week tended to be associated with increased long-lasting effects (p = 0.052), whereas regular informal practice and mindful breathing were significantly associated with persistent changes in daily life (p = 0.038) and better prevention of depressive relapse (p = 0.035), respectively. The most frequently reported positive change was increased awareness of being able to improve one's health. Despite methodological limitations, this survey allowed documenting mindfulness practice and perceived sustained benefit from MBCT in patients with BD. Participants particularly valued increased awareness that they can influence their own health. Both

  20. Asenapine effects on individual Young Mania Rating Scale items in bipolar disorder patients with acute manic or mixed episodes: a pooled analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cazorla P

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pilar Cazorla, Jun Zhao, Mary Mackle, Armin Szegedi Merck, Rahway, NJ, USA Background: An exploratory post hoc analysis was conducted to evaluate the potential differential effects over time of asenapine and olanzapine compared with placebo on the eleven individual items comprising the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS in patients with manic or mixed episodes in bipolar I disorder. Methods: Data were pooled from two 3-week randomized, controlled trials in which the eleven individual items comprising the YMRS were measured over 21 days. An analysis of covariance model adjusted by baseline value was used to test for differences in changes from baseline in YMRS scores between groups. Results: Each of the eleven individual YMRS item scores was significantly reduced compared with placebo at day 21. After 2 days of treatment, asenapine and olanzapine were superior to placebo for six of the YMRS items: disruptive/aggressive behavior, content, irritability, elevated mood, sleep, and speech. Conclusion: Reduction in manic symptoms over 21 days was associated with a broad-based improvement across all symptom domains with no subset of symptoms predominating. Keywords: asenapine, Young Mania Rating Scale, bipolar disorder, YMRS, antipsychotic, olanzapine

  1. Ventricular enlargement in patients with affective disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murashita, Jun; Kato, Tadafumi; Shioiri, Toshiki; Hamakawa, Inubushi, Toshiro; Hiroshi; Takahashi, Saburo

    1994-01-01

    Ventricular enlargement was determined using linear measurement on MR images in a total of 71 patients with affective disorders, including bipolar affective disorder (41) and depression (30). Fourty-one healthy persons served as controls. Evans ratio, Huckman number and minimum distance of caudate nuclei (MDCN) were used as indices for ventricular enlargment. No significant difference in Evans ratio was observed between both the group of bipolar affective disorder and the group of depression and the control group. Nor did it correlate with age in any of the groups. Huckman number was significantly higher in the group of bipolar affective disorder than the other two groups. It positively correlated with age in the group of depression. MDCN was significantly increased in the group of bipolar affective disorder, as compared with the control group; and there was a positive correlation between MDCN and age in both the group of dipolar affective disorder and the group of depression. In conclusion, ventricular enlargement was dependent upon aging in affetive disorder patients. This tendency was more noticeable in the group of depression. In addition, atrophy of the caudate nuclei was likely to be severer in the group of dipolar affective disorder than the group of depression. (N.K.)

  2. Comorbid personality disorders among patients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wongpakaran N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nahathai Wongpakaran, Tinakon Wongpakaran, Vudhichai Boonyanaruthee, Manee Pinyopornpanish, Suthi Intaprasert Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand Purpose: To investigate the personality disorders (PDs diagnosed in patients with depressive disorders.Material and methods: This study included a cross-sectional analysis, and was an extension of the Thai Study of Affective Disorder (THAISAD project. Eighty-five outpatients with depressive disorders were interviewed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Inventory to assess for depression, in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision and using the Thai version of the Structured Clinical Interview for PDs to assess for PD.Results: Seventy-seven percent of the patients had at least one PD, 40% had one PD and 60% had two or more PDs (mixed cluster. The most common PDs found were borderline PD (20% and obsessive–compulsive PD (10.6%, while the occurrence of avoidant PD was low when compared to the findings of previous, related studies. Among the mixed cluster, cluster A combined with cluster C was the common mix. Both dysthymic disorder and double depression were found to have a higher proportion of PDs than major depressive disorder (85.7% versus 76.1%. Dependent PD was found to be less common in this study than in previous studies, including those carried out in Asia.Conclusion: The prevalence of PDs among those with depressive disorder varied, and only borderline PD seems to be consistently high within and across cultures. Mixed cluster plays a prominent role in depression, so more attention should be paid to patients in this category. Keywords: personality disorders, depressive disorder, prevalence, Asian, mixed cluster, SCID-II

  3. Alexithymia in patients with conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulpek, Demet; Kelemence Kaplan, Figen; Kesebir, Sermin; Bora, Ozlem

    2014-07-01

    In the recent years, it has been observed that alexithymia is not specified for the psychosomatic disorders. It is known that alexithymia is observed frequently in various psychiatric disorders especially in the somatoform disorders. The aim of this study is to evaluate alexithymia in the patients with the conversion disorder. The study was performed in the Psychiatry Outpatients Clinics of the Izmir Atatürk Training and Research Hospital and Erenköy Psychiatry Education and Research Hospital. A total of 93 cases-47 outpatients who were diagnosed with conversion disorder according to the DSM-IV criteria and 46 age, gender and educational level matched healthy controls-were included in the study. All the cases were assessed by a Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and were evaluated with a questionnaire (which included demographics and clinical data), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale and the Somatosensory Amplification Scale. When the two groups were compared, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale scores (except "externally oriented thinking" subscale) and the Somatosensory Amplification Scale score of the conversion disorder group were statistically significantly higher than the control group. The number of the alexithymic cases of the patient group was significantly higher than the control group's. The level of alexithymia in conversion disorder patients, without any other psychiatric disorder, is higher than that of the healthy controls. During the evaluation of the psychological state of patients with conversion disorder, it could be useful to keep in mind the probability of them having alexithymia to determine the type of suitable therapy.

  4. [Clinical Handling of Patients with Dissociative Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Kenichiro

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the way informed psychiatrists are expected to handle dissociative patients in clinical situations, with a specific focus on dissociative identity disorders and dissociative fugue. On the initial interview with dissociative patients, information on their history of trauma and any nascent dissociative symptoms in their childhood should be carefully obtained. Their level of stress in their current life should also be assessed in order to understand their symptomatology, as well as to predict their future clinical course. A psychoeducational approach is crucial; it might be helpful to give information on dissociative disorder to these patients as well as their family members in order to promote their adherence to treatment. Regarding the symptomatology of dissociative disorders, detailed symptoms and the general clinical course are presented. It was stressed that dissociative identity disorder and dissociative fugue, the most high-profile dissociative disorders, are essentially different in their etiology and clinical presentation. Dissociative disorders are often confused with and misdiagnosed as psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia. Other conditions considered in terms of the differential diagnosis include borderline personality disorder as well as temporal lobe epilepsy. Lastly, the therapeutic approach to dissociative identity disorder is discussed. Each dissociative identity should be understood as potentially representing some traumatically stressful event in the past. The therapist should be careful not to excessively promote the creation or elaboration of any dissociative identities. Three stages are proposed in the individual psychotherapeutic process. In the initial stage, a secure environment and stabilization of symptoms should be sought. The second stage consists of aiding the "host" personality to make use of other more adaptive coping skills in their life. The third stage involves coaching as well as continuous awareness of

  5. Temporomandibular disorders in headache patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mello, Christiane-Espinola-Bandeira; Oliveira, José-Luiz-Góes; Jesus, Alan-Chester-Feitosa; Maia, Mila-Leite-de Moraes; de Santana, Jonielly-Costa-Vasconcelos; Andrade, Loren-Suyane-Oliveira; Siqueira Quintans, Jullyana-de Souza; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo-José; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo-Rigoldi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its seve-rity in individuals with headache. Study Design: 60 adults divided into three groups of 20 individuals: chronic daily headache (CDH), episodic headache (EH) and a control group without headache (WH). Headache diagnosis was performed according to the criteria of International Headache Society and the signs and symptoms of TMD were achieved by using a clinical exam and an anamnestic quest...

  6. Body dysmorphic disorder in the dermatology patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblenzer, Caroline S

    Body dysmorphic disorder is primarily a psychiatric disorder, in which the patient believes that some normal or very near normal aspect of his or her physical appearance is distorted or ugly. Should there be a minor abnormality, it is grossly exaggerated in the mind of the patient, causing feelings of shame and embarrassment and leading daily to spending hours at the mirror, or any reflecting surface, as the patient tries to conceal or remove the perceived abnormality through the development of ritualistic behavior. Although other organs can be involved-for example, the shape of the nose or a portion of an ear- the skin, hair, and nails are most commonly involved, while the patient constantly seeks reassurance about appearance from friends and family. There is a broad spectrum of severity in body dysmorphic disorder, ranging from obsessional worry to frank delusion, and the psychiatric comorbidities-anxiety, depression, and personality disorder-are prominent parts of the picture. Unfortunately, the psychiatric comorbidities and the negative impact on every aspect of the patient's life may not be recognized by dermatologists and other non-psychiatric physicians, so that effective treatment is often not instituted or appropriate referrals made. This paper describes the incidence, possible etiologies, and clinical picture of body dysmorphic disorder in dermatology patients and discusses interpersonal approaches that may permit appropriate treatment or referral to take place. Specific treatments and prognosis are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Disorders of water homeostasis in neurosurgical patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Mark J

    2012-05-01

    Context: Disorders of water balance are common in neurosurgical patients and usually manifest as hypo- or hypernatremia. They are most commonly seen after subarachnoid hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, with intracranial tumors, and after pituitary surgery. Setting: We reviewed the experience of endocrine evaluation and management of disorders of salt and water balance in a large cohort of inpatients attending the national neurosciences referral centre in Dublin, Ireland, and compared this experience with findings from other studies. Patients: The study group included unselected neurosurgical patients admitted to our centre and requiring endocrine evaluation. Interventions: We conducted investigations to determine the underlying mechanistic basis for disorders of salt and water balance in neurosurgical patients and treatment to restore normal metabolism. Main Outcome Measures: Morbidity and mortality associated with deranged salt and water balance were measured. Results: The underlying pathophysiology of disordered water balance in neurosurgical patients is complex and varied and dictates the optimal therapeutic approach. Conclusions: A systematic and well-informed approach is needed to properly diagnose and manage disorders of salt and water balance in neurosurgical patients.

  8. Differences in body mass index according to fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO) genotype in Mexican patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Anzaldúa, Adriana; Ocampo-Mendoza, Yolanda; Hernández-Lagunas, José Octavio; Díaz-Madrid, Federico Alejandro; Romo-Nava, Francisco; Juárez-García, Francisco; Ortega-Ortiz, Hiram; Díaz-Anzaldúa, Alejandro; Gutiérrez-Mora, Doris; Becerra-Palars, Claudia; Berlanga-Cisneros, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of obesity has dramatically increased in many countries and it is particularly high in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). A region in the first intron of the fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO) gene, encompassing markers rs9939973, rs8050136, and rs9939609, has been consistently associated with obesity and body mass index (BMI) in different populations. We sought to determine whether FTO is associated with BMI and/or obesity in patients with BD. The sample included 129 Mexican Mestizo patients with bipolar I or bipolar II disorder. After obtaining informed consent, participants were evaluated with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders and weight, height, and body measurements were recorded. DNA was extracted from a 5-mL blood sample and real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed. The results were analyzed with Haploview v4.2 and SPSS v21. Differences in mean BMI were explained by rs8050136 and rs9939609 genotypes, especially by comparing non-carriers and carriers of two copies of the risk allele (Tukey's p ≤ 0.019), with a mean difference in BMI as high as 7.81 kg/m(2) . Differences in BMI were also explained by the interaction of the genotype (rs8050136 and/or rs9939609), the use of second-generation antipsychotics, and the use of mood stabilizers (p ≤ 0.41). Obesity was also associated with these two markers when patients with and without obesity were compared. In patients with BD, differences in BMI may be affected by the presence of FTO risk alleles, especially in homozygous individuals for these variants. Besides evaluating the possible metabolic effects of certain antipsychotics or mood stabilizers, it is important to evaluate the role of other factors such as FTO risk alleles. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Personality profiles in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomotake, Masahito; Ohmori, Tetsuro

    2002-08-01

    The present review focused on the personality profiles of patients with eating disorders. Studies using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Personality Disorder showed high rates of diagnostic co-occurrence between eating disorders and personality disorders. The most commonly observed were histrionic, obsessive-compulsive, avoidant, dependent and borderline personality disorders. Studies using the Cloninger's personality theory suggested that high Harm Avoidance might be relevant to the pathology of anorexia nervosa and high Novelty Seeking and Harm Avoidance to bulimia nervosa. Moreover, high Self-Directedness was suggested to be associated with favorable outcome in bulimia nervosa. The assessment of personality in a cross-sectional study, however, might be influenced by the various states of the illness. Therefore, a sophisticated longitudinal study will be required to advance this area of research.

  10. Impulse control disorders in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamam, Lut; Bican, Mehtap; Keskin, Necla

    2014-05-01

    There is no epidemiological study on the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in the elderly population. The studies on ICDs in elderly patients are limited and some of them are case reports about pathological gambling and kleptomania. The comorbidity of other psychiatric disorders makes diagnosis difficult and has negative effects on both treatment and the prognosis of ICDs. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of ICDs among elderly patients and to evaluate the related sociodemographic and clinical features. A total of 76 patients aged 60 and over who have been referred to our outpatient clinics in a one-year period were included in the study. A demographic data form was completed. The Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) was used to determine axis I psychiatric disorders. The prevalence of ICDs was investigated by using the modified version of the Minnesota Impulse Disorders Interview (MIDI). Impulsivity was measured with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale Version 11 (BIS-11). The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) test was performed to evaluate the cognitive status of patients and to exclude the diagnosis of dementia. In addition, all patients completed Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-90). The prevalence rate of at least one comorbid ICD in our sample was 17%. When patients with a diagnosis of ICDs not otherwise specified (ICD-NOS) were included, the prevalence rate increased to 22.4%. The most common ICD was intermittent explosive disorder (15.8%), followed by pathological gambling (9.2%). The majority of the sample was men (54%), married (80%), had a high school education (51%), and mid-level socioeconomic status (79%). The only statistically significant difference between the sociodemographic characteristics of patients with or without ICDs was gender. The lifetime prevalence of ICDs was 34.1% in men and 8.6% in women. The prevalence of childhood conduct disorder

  11. Neurocognitive Functioning in Overweight and Obese Patients With Bipolar Disorder: Data From the Systematic Treatment Optimization Program for Early Mania (STOP-EM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Leonardo E; Kozicky, Jan-Marie; Muralidharan, Kesavan; Bücker, Joana; Torres, Ivan J; Bond, David J; Kapczinski, Flavio; Kauer-Sant’Anna, Marcia; Lam, Raymond W; Yatham, Lakshmi N

    2014-01-01

    Objective Obesity is frequent in people with bipolar I disorder (BD I) and has a major impact on the course of the illness. Although obesity negatively influences cognitive function in patients with BD, its impact in the early phase of the disorder is unknown. We investigated the impact of overweight and obesity on cognitive functioning in clinically stable patients with BD recently recovered from their first manic episode. Method: Sixty-five patients with BD (25 overweight or obese and 40 normal weight) recently remitted from a first episode of mania and 37 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects (9 overweight or obese and 28 normal weight) were included in this analysis from the Systematic Treatment Optimization Program for Early Mania (commonly referred to as STOP-EM). All subjects had their cognitive function assessed using a standard neurocognitive battery. We compared cognitive function between normal weight patients, overweight–obese patients, and normal weight healthy control subjects. Results: There was a negative affect of BD diagnosis on the domains of attention, verbal memory, nonverbal memory, working memory, and executive function, but we were unable to find an additional effect of weight on cognitive functioning in patients. There was a trend for a negative correlation between body mass index and nonverbal memory in the patient group. Conclusions: These data suggest that overweight–obesity does not negatively influence cognitive function early in the course of BD. Given that there is evidence for a negative impact of obesity later in the course of illness, there may be an opportunity to address obesity early in the course of BD. PMID:25702364

  12. Atypical depression is associated with suicide attempt in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gistau, V; Colom, F; Mané, A; Romero, S; Sugranyes, G; Vieta, E

    2009-07-01

    There is a dearth of research focusing on factors associated with suicide attempts. High rates of atypical depression have been reported in studies including unipolar and bipolar II patients. In this study, the association between suicide attempt and atypical depression, in addition to other major risk factors, was evaluated in 390 bipolar I and II out-patients. Variables were defined according to DSM-IV criteria, and assessed with a Structured Interview for DSM-IV (axis I and II). History of suicide attempt was obtained through interviews with patients and relatives. Attempters and non-attempters were compared using univariate and multivariate analysis. Attempters showed significantly higher rates of atypical depression, family history of completed suicide, depression at index episode and cluster B personality disorder. Our results highlight the relevance of atypical depression in bipolar disorder. A more accurate identification of potential attempters may contribute to the development of effective preventive treatment strategies.

  13. Family History in Patients with Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Osman; Coşkun, Salih; Aktan Mutlu, Elif; Özdemir, Pınar Güzel; Atli, Abdullah; Yilmaz, Ekrem; Keskin, Sıddık

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to better understand the genetic transmission of bipolar disorder by examining the family history of patients. Sixty-three patients with bipolar disorder and their families were included. The final sample comprised 156 bipolar patients and their family members. An inclusion criterion was the presence of bipolar disorder history in the family. The diagnosis of other family members was confirmed by analyzing their files, hospital records, and by calling them to the hospital. Sixty-five patients were women (41.6%) and 91 were men (58.3%) (ratio of men/women: 1.40). When analyzing the results in terms of the transition of disease from the mother's or father's side, similar results were obtained: 25 patients were from the mother's side and 25 patients were from the father's side in 63 cases. The results of our study support the fact that a significant relationship exists between the degree of kinship and the heritability of bipolar disorder and, furthermore, that the effect of the maternal and paternal sides is similar on the transmission of genetic susceptibility.

  14. Alexithymia in female patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montebarocci, O; Codispoti, M; Surcinelli, P; Franzoni, E; Baldaro, B; Rossi, N

    2006-03-01

    Previous studies indicate that patients with eating disorders have alexithymic characteristics, as revealed by the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS). The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of negative affect (anxiety and depression) in the relationship between eating disorders and alexithymia. In addition, we have evaluated whether the relationship between negative affect and alexithymia varies according to the type of eating disorder (anorexia and bulimia). Eighteen female patients and 16 female patients who met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) diagnostic criteria for restrictive anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, respectively, and 18 healthy female controls matched by age and education were submitted to Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory to assess depression and anxiety and the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and the Bermond Vorst Alexithymia Questionnaire (BVAQ) to evaluate alexithymic characteristics. The findings indicated that, although anorexic and bulimic patients showed higher alexithymia scores compared to controls, this result could be mainly related to negative affect. In fact, taking negative affect into account, anorexic and bulimic patients did not show higher TAS-20 and BVAQ scores compared to controls. The only variable useful to discriminate among anorexics, bulimics and controls is the perceived inability to experience emotional feelings, which is higher in anorexic patients compared to the other two groups.

  15. Psychiatric disorders in bone marrow transplant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.G.; Irfan, M.; Shamsi, T.S.; Hussain, M.

    2007-01-01

    To identify the psychiatric illnesses in patients with hematological/oncological disorders encountered during blood and bone marrow transplantation. All consecutive patients, aged 15 years and above, who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria and underwent blood and bone marrow transplantation, were enrolled in this study. Psychiatric assessment comprised of a semi-structured interview based on Present Status Examination (PSE). The psychiatric diagnosis was made on the basis of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) system of classification devised by W.H.O. Eighty patients, who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, were inducted in this study. Thirty (37.5%) cases were found to have psychiatric disorders. Out of the total, 60 (75%) were males and 20 (25%) females. Adjustment disorder was the most frequent diagnosis (n=12), followed by major depression (n=7). Rest of the diagnoses made were generalized anxiety disorder, acute psychotic disorder, delirium and depressive psychosis. High psychiatric morbidity associated with blood and bone marrow transplantation was observed. It indicates the importance of psychiatric intervention during the isolation period of BMT as well as pre-transplant psychiatric assessment and counseling regarding procedure. (author)

  16. BrainAGE score indicates accelerated brain aging in schizophrenia, but not bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadić, Igor; Dietzek, Maren; Langbein, Kerstin; Sauer, Heinrich; Gaser, Christian

    2017-08-30

    BrainAGE (brain age gap estimation) is a novel morphometric parameter providing a univariate score derived from multivariate voxel-wise analyses. It uses a machine learning approach and can be used to analyse deviation from physiological developmental or aging-related trajectories. Using structural MRI data and BrainAGE quantification of acceleration or deceleration of in individual aging, we analysed data from 45 schizophrenia patients, 22 bipolar I disorder patients (mostly with previous psychotic symptoms / episodes), and 70 healthy controls. We found significantly higher BrainAGE scores in schizophrenia, but not bipolar disorder patients. Our findings indicate significantly accelerated brain structural aging in schizophrenia. This suggests, that despite the conceptualisation of schizophrenia as a neurodevelopmental disorder, there might be an additional progressive pathogenic component. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Body dysmorphic disorder in Iranian orthodontic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soghra Yassaei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Patient's preoccupations with perceived defect in appearance or excessive concern about minimal flaws are among diagnostic criteria of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD. Sufferers usually seek cosmetic procedures such as orthodontic treatment. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of BDD among a sample of Iranian orthodontic patients. A total of 270 orthodontic patients were evaluated with BDD-YBOCS questionnaire for the diagnosis of BDD. Fifteen patients (5.5% were screened positive for BDD. BDD was more frequent among females, singles and in younger patients. Most of the BDD patients experienced multiple previous orthodontic evaluations. The relative high prevalence of BDD among orthodontic patients in Iran offers that orthodontists should take psychologically based problems such as BDD into account while evaluating patient's orthodontic problems.

  18. Impulse control disorders in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frauke; Körber, Stephanie; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in morbidly obese individuals. One hundred bariatric surgery candidates were examined using a module of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV that has been developed for ICDs. Nineteen per cent suffered from at least one current ICD and 27% met the criteria for any lifetime ICD, most frequently skin picking (current, 8%; lifetime, 9%), compulsive buying (current 6%, lifetime 8%), and intermittent explosive disorder (current, 5%; lifetime, 10%). Patients with regular binge eating (N = 25) reported significantly more often a history of at least one ICD compared with those without binge eating. The results indicate a high prevalence of ICDs among morbidly obese prebariatric surgery patients that are related to regular binge eating. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  19. Constipation in elderly patients with psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Nebhinani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Constipation is a common complaint among the elderly patients with psychiatric disorders because of age.related physiologic and anatomical changes, lifestyle factors, comorbid physical and surgical disorders, medications, including psychotropics, and polypharmacy. Lack of timely reporting by patients as well as inadequate expertise of physician may contribute to significant delay in treatment and poor quality of life. Primary constipation is amenable to lifestyle modification. (dietary changes, exercise, and physical activity, fiber intake, and laxatives when necessary. Secondary constipation should be treated with managing underlying pathology or predisposing factors, including effective treatment of psychiatric disorders and rationalizing psychotropic prescription. This review article focuses on the definition, etiology, assessment, treatment, and prevention of constipation in elderly population with mental illness.

  20. [Outpatient treatment for patients with eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of eating disorders, patients in either the acute or chronic stage are generally treated on outpatient basis as much as possible in the living condition of daily life. This paper describes the flow of diagnosis and treatment, first examination and introduction into treatment, way of parents treating their child, parental counseling, criteria for admission (immediate hospitalization or not), and outpatient therapy.

  1. [Psychoeducation and interpersonal and social rhythm therapy for bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Hiroko

    2011-01-01

    In treating bipolar disorder, specific psychotherapies in adjunct to pharmacotherapy have been shown to be effective in preventing new episodes and treating depressive episodes. Among those, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) developed by Frank, amalgamation of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) with behavioral therapy focused on social rhythm has been shown to be an efficacious adjunct to mediation in preventing new episodes in bipolar I patients and in treating depression in bipolar I arid II disorder. IPSRT has also been shown to enhance total functioning, relationship functioning and life satisfaction among patients with bipolar disorder, even after pretreatment functioning and concurrent depression were covaried. IPSRT was designed to directly address the major pathways to recurrence in bipolar disorder, namely medication nonadherence, stressful life events, and disruptions in social rhythms. IPT, originated by Klerman et al., is a strategic time-limited psychotherapy focused on one or two of four current interpersonal problem areas (ie, grief, interpersonal role disputes, role transitions, and interpersonal dificits). In IPSRT, the fifth problem area "grief for the lost healthy self" has been added in order to promote acceptance of the diagnosis and the need for life-long treatment. Social rhythm therapy is a behavioral approach aiming at increasing regularity of social rhythms using the Social Rhythm Metric (SRM), a chart to record daily social activities including how stimulating they were, developed from observation that disruptions in social rhythms often trigger affective episodes in patients with bipolar disorder. IPSRT also appears to be a promising intervention for a subset of individuals with bipolar II depression as monotherapy for the acute treatment.

  2. Impact of depressive episodes on cognitive deficits in early bipolar disorder: data from the Systematic Treatment Optimization Programme for Early Mania (STOP-EM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Kesavan; Torres, Ivan J; Silveira, Leonardo E; Kozicky, Jan-Marie; Bücker, Joana; Fernando, Nadeesha; Yatham, Lakshmi N

    2014-07-01

    Although manic episodes reportedly contribute to cognitive deficits in bipolar I disorder, the contribution of depressive episodes is poorly researched. We investigated the impact of depressive episodes on cognitive function early in the course of bipolar I disorder. A total of 68 patients and 38 controls from the Systematic Treatment Optimization Programme for Early Mania (STOP-EM) first-episode mania programme were examined. We conducted (a) a cross-sectional analysis of the impact of prior depressive episodes on baseline cognitive function and (b) a prospective analysis assessing the contribution of depression recurrence within 1 year following a first episode of mania on cognitive functioning. The cross-sectional analysis showed no significant differences between patients with past depressive episodes compared with those without, on overall or individual domains of cognitive function (all P>0.09). The prospective analysis failed to reveal a significant group×time interaction for cognitive decline from baseline to 1 year (P = 0.99) in patients with a recurrence of depressive episodes compared with those with no recurrence. However, impaired verbal memory at baseline was associated with a depression recurrence within 1 year. Although deficits in all domains of cognitive function are seen in patients early in the course of bipolar disorder, depressive episodes do not confer additional burden on cognitive function. However, poorer verbal memory may serve as a marker for increased susceptibility to depression recurrence early in the course of illness. Royal College of Psychiatrists.

  3. Have personality disorders been overdiagnosed among eating disorder patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lojewski, Astrid; Fisher, Anna; Abraham, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    There is persuasive evidence for a relationship between eating disorders (EDs) and personality disorders (PDs). Research studies over the last three decades have used various tools to explore PDs in EDs with differing results. We investigated PDs derived from an interview--the International Personality Disorder Examination. 132 female inpatients with restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN-R), binge-purging AN, bulimia nervosa (BN) and ED not otherwise specified were interviewed. MANCOVA was used to test for differences in dimensional PD scores for the ED diagnostic and behavioural groups. Twenty-one percent of patients had a definite DSM-IV PD diagnosis and 37% of patients had ≥1 definite or probable DSM-IV PD diagnoses. Cluster C PDs were most commonly found [avoidant (25%), obsessive-compulsive (9%), dependent (2%)], followed by cluster B PDs [borderline (13%), histrionic (2%)]. Comparison of PD dimensional scores revealed significantly lower PD scores for borderline PD in AN-R when compared to the other diagnostic groups; and significantly higher scores for histrionic, narcissistic, antisocial, and not otherwise specified PDs for BN when compared to the other diagnostic groups. Self-induced vomiting was the only behaviour significantly associated with any PD dimensional scores (borderline and narcissistic). Assessment of PDs using a highly structured interview administered by trained interviewers results in less PD diagnoses compared with previous studies of inpatients with an ED. Avoidance is the most common PD and those patients who induce vomiting are more likely to have borderline features. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Screening for bipolar disorders in patients with alcohol or substance use disorders: Performance of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zaane, Jan; van den Berg, Belinda; Draisma, Stasja; Nolen, Willem A.; van den Brink, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Background: Screening properties of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) to detect bipolar disorder (BD) in patients with substance use disorders are unknown. Methods: 403 treatment seeking patients with a substance use disorder completed the MDQ and subsequently 111 MDQ positives and 59 MDQ

  5. Screening for bipolar disorders in patients with alcohol or substance use disorders : Performance of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zaane, Jan; van den Berg, Belinda; Draisma, Stasja; Nolen, Willem A.; van den Brink, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Background: Screening properties of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) to detect bipolar disorder (BD) in patients with substance use disorders are unknown. Methods: 403 treatment seeking patients with a substance use disorder completed the MDQ and subsequently 111 MDQ positives and 59 MDQ

  6. Maturation in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levallius, Johanna; Rydén, Göran; Norring, Claes

    2015-08-30

    Patients with borderline personality disorder have a characteristic and extreme personality associated with psychopathology. The aim was to investigate personality change in relation to suicidality following treatment. 21 patients were assessed before and after psychotherapy on personality (NEO PI-R) and suicidality (SUAS). At follow-up, Neuroticism and Conscientiousness normalized along with six lower-order facets; Depression, Impulsiveness, Competence, Achievement Striving, Self-Discipline and Deliberation. Thirteen patients showed a positive personality development paralleled by a lesser degree of suicidality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical features of bipolar disorder comorbid with anxiety disorders differ between men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Erika F H; Fitzgerald, Kate D; Zhang, Peng; McInnis, Melvin G

    2012-08-01

    Anxiety disorders are commonly comorbid with bipolar disorder (BP) and may worsen course of illness, but differential impact of specific anxiety disorders in men and women remains unknown. We measured the impact of comorbid panic disorder (PD), social phobia, specific phobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in 460 women and 276 men with Bipolar I Disorder (BPI) or schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type from the National Institute of Mental Health Bipolar Genetics Initiative. We compared clinical characteristics in BP with and without each anxiety disorder in men and women separately correcting for family relatedness. Comorbid PD, OCD, and specific phobia were more common in women with BP than men. Comorbid social phobia correlated with increased risk of alcohol abuse in BP women, but not men. Women with comorbid PD attended fewer years of school. Comorbidity with OCD was associated with earlier age at the onset of BP for both genders. Comorbid PD, OCD, and specific phobia were associated with more antidepressant trials in BP, across both genders, compared to BP patients without these anxiety disorders. In BP, comorbid anxiety disorders are associated with increased risk for functional impairment, and women had differently associated risks than men. Clinicians should be aware of an increased risk for comorbid PD, OCD, and specific phobia in women with BP, and an increased risk of alcohol abuse in women with BD and comorbid social phobia. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Postoperative conversion disorder in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Amy; Spielman, Fred

    2010-11-01

    According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (DSM IV), conversion disorder is classified as a somatoform illness and defined as an alteration or loss of physical function because of the expression of an underlying psychological ailment. This condition, previously known as hysteria, hysterical neurosis, or conversion hysteria occurs rarely, with an incidence of 11-300 cases per 100,000 people (American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 4th edn. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Presentation after an anesthetic is exceptional. After thorough review of the literature, fewer than 20 cases have been documented, with only two instances in patients younger than 18 years of age after general anesthesia; both were mild in nature. We present a severe case of postoperative conversion disorder that developed upon emergence from anesthesia in a previously healthy 16-year-old girl following direct laryngoscopy with vocal fold injection. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Attempted suicide in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portzky, Gwendolyn; van Heeringen, Kees; Vervaet, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Suicide is a major cause of mortality for patients with eating disorders (ED), especially for patients with anorexia nervosa. Attempted suicide is also relatively common in patients with anorexia or bulimia nervosa. This study aimed at examining associations between attempted suicide and trait- and state-dependent characteristics in a large clinical population of ED patients. The sample consisted of 1,436 in- and outpatients of the Centre for Eating Disorders of the Ghent University Hospital. Measures of ED symptoms, psychopathology, and personality traits were compared between ED patients with and ED patients without a history of attempted suicide. A history of attempted suicide was found in 11.8% of the ED patients and lifetime suicidal ideation was reported by 43.3%. Multivariate analyses showed that a history of attempted suicide was associated with higher scores on depression, purging symptomatology, early-developed cognitive schemes (impaired autonomy and increased inhibition), and social insecurity. These findings support the increased risk of suicidal behavior in ED. The presence of particular personality traits, of cognitive schemes, and of purging and depressive symptoms should increase vigilance for suicidal behavior.

  10. Randomized, controlled trial of Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy for young people with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inder, Maree L; Crowe, Marie T; Luty, Suzanne E; Carter, Janet D; Moor, Stephanie; Frampton, Christopher M; Joyce, Peter R

    2015-03-01

    This randomized, controlled clinical trial compared the effect of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) to that of specialist supportive care (SSC) on depressive outcomes (primary), social functioning, and mania outcomes over 26-78 weeks in young people with bipolar disorder receiving psychopharmacological treatment. Subjects were aged 15-36 years, recruited from a range of sources, and the patient groups included bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, and bipolar disorder not otherwise specified. Exclusion criteria were minimal. Outcome measures were the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation and the Social Adjustment Scale. Paired-sample t-tests were used to determine the significance of change from baseline to outcome period. Analyses of covariance were used to determine the impact of therapy, impact of lifetime and current comorbidity, interaction between comorbidity and therapy, and impact of age at study entry on depression. A group of 100 participants were randomized to IPSRT (n = 49) or SSC (n = 51). The majority had bipolar I disorder (78%) and were female (76%), with high levels of comorbidity. After treatment, both groups had improved depressive symptoms, social functioning, and manic symptoms. Contrary to our hypothesis, there was no significant difference between therapies. There was no impact of lifetime or current Axis I comorbidity or age at study entry. There was a relative impact of SSC for patients with current substance use disorder. IPSRT and SSC used as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy appear to be effective in reducing depressive and manic symptoms and improving social functioning in adolescents and young adults with bipolar disorder and high rates of comorbidity. Identifying effective treatments that particularly address depressive symptoms is important in reducing the burden of bipolar disorder. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The Mood Disorder Questionnaire improves recognition of bipolar disorder in psychiatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leppämäki Sami

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated our translation of The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ as a screening instrument for bipolar disorder in a psychiatric setting in Finland. Methods In a pilot study for the Jorvi Bipolar Study (JoBS, 109 consecutive non-schizophrenic psychiatric out- and inpatients in Espoo, Finland, were screened for bipolar disorder using the Finnish translation of the MDQ, and 38 of them diagnostically interviewed with the SCID. Results Forty subjects (37% were positive in the MDQ screen. In the SCID interview, twenty patients were found to suffer from bipolar disorder, of whom seven (70% of ten patients with bipolar I but only two (20% of ten with bipolar II disorder had been previously clinically correctly diagnosed. The translated MDQ was found internally consistent (alpha 0.79 and a feasible screening tool. Conclusions Bipolar disorder, particularly type II, remains commonly unrecognized in psychiatric settings. The Mood Disorder Questionnaire is a feasible screen for bipolar disorder, which could well be integrated into psychiatric routine practice.

  12. A Comparison of Sexual Dysfunctions in Female Patients with Major Depressive Disorder and Panic Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Tonguç Demir Berkol; Süheyla Doðan Bulut; Esra Alataþ; Dicle Görkem; Esra Çavdar; Ýlker Özyýldýrým

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is assessment of sexual dysfunction in female patients with major depressive disorder and panic disorder and compare the two groups. Methods: Total 76 female patients with primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder ( 46 patients) and panic disorder ( 30 patients) according to DSM-IV, who is sexually active and not use psychotropic medication were inclued. Sociodemographic data aqcusition form and the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX) were adminis...

  13. Sleep disorders in the older patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avidan, Alon Y

    2005-06-01

    Sleep changes dramatically with old age. Subjective and objective measures demonstrate an increase in sleep and wake disturbances with advancing age. The older person has a more fragmented sleep, sleeps less deeply, and tends to experience early morning awakenings. When older patients have sleep disorders, they often present with excessive daytime sleepiness, insomnia, or abnormal motor activity. In making the appropriate diagnosis, the role of the provider is to review the patient's medical history,psychiatric history, medications, underlying medical illnesses, and sleep-wake pattern. The aging process itself does not cause sleep problems and sleep requirements do not decrease with advanced age. The prevalence of insomnia, sleep-related breathing disorder, PLMS, and RLS increases with age and may lead to poor sleep quality. Because many sleep disorders are potentially reversible, it is the responsibility of the primary care provider to screen for these problems. A carefully planned clinical decision-making process when encountering a sleep disturbance in the older patient can greatly enhance quality of life and daytime function.

  14. Screening for anxiety disorders in patients with coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunevicius, A.; Staniute, M.; Brozaitiene, J.; Pop, V.J.M.; Neverauskas, J.; Bunevicius, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are prevalent and associated with poor prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, studies examining screening of anxiety disorders in CAD patients are lacking. In the present study we evaluated the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients with

  15. Needs assessments of memory disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Kate J; Gonzalez, Elizabeth W; Edwards, Carolyn Y; Lippa, Carol F

    2014-12-01

    Previous research shows that informal caregivers of individuals with a memory disorder experience financial strain, declining physical health, and psychological distress. Various resources and services have been developed to address and/or prevent these potential outcomes, yet caregivers continue to be negatively affected by the demands of caregiving. We hypothesize that better identification and clarification of concrete patient and caregiver needs will aid in the modification and improvement of the available resources. The purpose of this study is to determine the psychosocial needs of the cognitively impaired population and their caregivers. A one-page Needs Assessment was created to address areas of potential concern for the individual with a memory disorder and the caregiver. This assessment was administered during visits to an outpatient clinic in Philadelphia. A total of 204 Needs Assessments were collected. The significant needs found in our study cohort include sleep, exercise, clinical trials, education, and assistance with ADLs and IADLs. This study satisfied the initial identification of caregiver and patient needs; now each must be explored further to determine how to successfully meet such needs. If the primary needs of the patient can be met by a focused service, the caregiver will no longer be the sole provider of meeting the specific need. This will decrease the involved role of the caregiver, maximize patient homecare, minimize caregiver stress, and increase the quality of life for both the patient and caregiver. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. The prevalence and significance of substance use disorders in bipolar type I and II disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strakowski Stephen M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the literature examining the epidemiology, outcome, and treatment of patients with bipolar disorder and co-occurring substance use disorders (SUDs. Articles for this review were initially selected via a comprehensive Medline search and further studies were obtained from the references in these articles. Given the lack of research in this field, all relevant studies except case reports were included. Prior epidemiological research has consistently shown that substance use disorders (SUDs are extremely common in bipolar I and II disorders. The lifetime prevalence of SUDs is at least 40% in bipolar I patients. Alcohol and cannabis are the substances most often abused, followed by cocaine and then opioids. Research has consistently shown that co-occurring SUDs are correlated with negative effects on illness outcome including more frequent and prolonged affective episodes, decreased compliance with treatment, a lower quality of life, and increased suicidal behavior. Recent research on the causal relationship between the two disorders suggests that a subgroup of bipolar patients may develop a relatively milder form of affective illness that is expressed only after extended exposure to alcohol abuse. There has been very little treatment research specifically targeting this population. Three open label medication trials provide limited evidence that quetiapine, aripiprazole, and lamotrigine may be effective in treating affective and substance use symptoms in bipolar patients with cocaine dependence and that aripiprazole may also be helpful in patients with alcohol use disorders. The two placebo controlled trials to date suggest that valproate given as an adjunct to lithium in bipolar patients with co-occurring alcohol dependence improves both mood and alcohol use symptoms and that lithium treatment in bipolar adolescents improves mood and SUD symptoms. Given the high rate of SUD co

  17. Shame in patients with narcissistic personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Kathrin; Vater, Aline; Rüsch, Nicolas; Schröder-Abé, Michela; Schütz, Astrid; Fydrich, Thomas; Lammers, Claas-Hinrich; Roepke, Stefan

    2014-02-28

    Shame has been described as a central emotion in narcissistic personality disorder (NPD). However, there is a dearth of empirical data on shame in NPD. Patients with NPD (N=28), non-clinical controls (N=34) and individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD, N=31) completed self-report measures of state shame, shame-proneness, and guilt-proneness. Furthermore, the Implicit Association Test (IAT) was included as a measure of implicit shame, assessing implicit shame-self associations relative to anxiety-self associations. Participants with NPD reported higher levels of explicit shame than non-clinical controls, but lower levels than patients with BPD. Levels of guilt-proneness did not differ among the three study groups. The implicit shame-self associations (relative to anxiety-self associations) were significantly stronger among patients with NPD compared to nonclinical controls and BPD patients. Our findings indicate that shame is a prominent feature of NPD. Implications for diagnosis and treatment are discussed. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Genetic structure of personality factors and bipolar disorder in families segregating bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Elizabeth; Contreras, Javier; Raventos, Henriette; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Nicolini, Humberto; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Almasy, Laura; Escamilla, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) has been associated with variations in personality dimensions, but the nature of this relationship has been unclear. In this study, the heritabilities of BPD and the Big Five personality factors and the genetic correlations between BPD and personality factors are reported. The participants in this study were 1073 individuals from 172 families of Mexican or Central American ancestry. Heritabilities and genetic correlations were calculated under a polygenic model using the maximum-likelihood method of obtaining variance components implemented in the SOLAR software package. Heritabilities of 0.49, 0.43, and 0.43 were found for the narrowest phenotype (schizoaffective bipolar and bipolar I), the intermediate phenotype (schizoaffective bipolar, bipolar I, and bipolar II), and the broadest phenotype (schizoaffective bipolar, bipolar I, bipolar II, and recurrent depression), respectively. For the Big Five personality factors, heritabilities were 0.25 for agreeableness, 0.24 for conscientiousness, 0.24 for extraversion, 0.23 for neuroticism, and 0.32 for openness to experience. For the narrowest phenotype, a significant negative correlation (-0.32) with extraversion was found. For the broadest phenotype, negative correlations were found for agreeableness (-0.35), conscientiousness (-0.39), and extraversion (-0.44). A positive correlation (0.37) was found with neuroticism. It is not possible to determine whether aspects of personality are factors in the development of bipolar disorder or vice versa. The short form of the NEO does not provide the ability to examine in detail which facets of extraversion are most closely related to bipolar disorder or to compare our results with studies that have used the long version of the scale. This study establishes a partial genetic basis for the Big Five personality factors in this set of families, while the environmental variances demonstrate that non-genetic factors are also important in their influence on

  19. Cancer immunotherapy in patients with preexisting autoimmune disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Pedersen, Magnus; Svane, Inge Marie

    2017-01-01

    Patients with preexisting active autoimmune disorders were excluded from clinical trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors. However, patients with autoimmune disorders are diagnosed with cancer at least as frequently as the global population, and clinicians treating patients outside clinical trials...... have generally been reluctant to offer cancer immunotherapy to this patient group. In this brief article, we review the most recent literature on the efficacy and safety of CTLA-4- and PD-1-blocking antibodies in patients with preexisting autoimmune disorders....

  20. Compulsive masturbation in a patient with delusional disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Karia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Compulsive masturbation is a type of paraphilia related disorder in which a person engages in masturbatory behavior to such an extent that it causes socio-occupational dysfunction. The psychiatric co-morbidities associated with it include mood and anxiety disorders, substance use disorders, etc. Here, we report a case of a patient with the delusional disorder having compulsive masturbation.

  1. Examining the Validity of Cyclothymic Disorder in a Youth Sample: Replication and Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meter, Anna; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Demeter, Christine; Findling, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    DSM-IV-TR defines four subtypes of bipolar disorder (BP): bipolar I, bipolar II, cyclothymic disorder and bipolar not otherwise specified (NOS). However, cyclothymic disorder in children is rarely researched, or often subsumed in an "NOS" category. The present study tests the replicability of findings from an earlier study, and expands on the…

  2. Psychiatric Disorders Among Patients Seeking Treatment for Co-Occurring Chronic Pain and Opioid Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Declan T; Cutter, Christopher J; Beitel, Mark; Kerns, Robert D; Liong, Christopher; Schottenfeld, Richard S

    2016-10-01

    Psychiatric comorbidities complicate treatment of patients with chronic pain and opioid use disorder, but the prevalence of specific comorbid psychiatric disorders in this population has not been systematically investigated. 170 consecutive participants entering a treatment research program for co-occurring chronic pain and opioid use disorder between March 2009 and July 2013 were evaluated with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders (SCID-I/P) and the Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (DIPD-IV). The prevalence of any lifetime (and current) comorbid Axis I disorder was 91% (75%); 52% met criteria for lifetime anxiety disorder (48% current), 57% for lifetime mood disorder (48% current), and 78% for lifetime nonopioid substance use disorder (34% current). Common current anxiety diagnoses were posttraumatic stress disorder (21%), generalized anxiety disorder (16%), and panic disorder without agoraphobia (16%). Common current mood diagnoses were major depressive disorder (40%) and dysthymia (11%). A majority of patients had a personality disorder (52%). High rates and persistence of co-occurring psychiatric disorders, including anxiety or mood disorders, may explain in part the difficulty providers have treating patients with co-occurring opioid use disorder and chronic pain and suggest possible targets for improving treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: buprenorphine/naloxone treatment (NCT00634803), opioid treatment program-based methadone maintenance treatment (NCT00727675). © Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  3. Life satisfaction in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Marczak, Milena; Ginszt, Michał; Berger, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Marczak Milena, Ginszt Michał, Berger Marcin. Life satisfaction in patients with temporomandibular disorders. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2017;7(9):349-356. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.998955 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/4896 The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Education parametric evaluation. Part B item 1223 (26.01.2017). 1223 Journal of Education, Health and...

  4. STRESS AND MENTAL DISORDERS IN HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH AKOOCHEKIAN

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic renal failure and dialysis are complicated situations that affect on somatic and mental status of patients. In this study, relation between stress, renal diseas, dialysis and mental disorders was determined. Methods. In a case control study in Noor hospital"s dialysis ward (affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Health Services the mental status of 30 end stage renal disease (ESRD patients were compaired with well matched control group by MMPI. Results. Hypochondriasis (Hs, depression (D, hysteria (Hy psychastenia (Pt and schizophrenia (Sc were observed in ESRD patients more than controls (P < 0.05. Means of sociopathy (Pd, paranoia (Pa and hypomania (Ma had no difference between groups (P > 0.05. Realy sadness and dysphoria, rumintion with illness, obsession, anxiety, compulsion, impaired process of thinking, isolation tendency and odd sensation in patients were more than control group (P < 0.05. Discussion. Chronic diseases have psychological complication and as a stress must cope and adjust with it. So, these patients and their families must be educated about coping mechanism. When the patients and their families have good coping mechanism, they would be able tolerate these streses.

  5. Exploring eating disorder quality of life and functional gastrointestinal disorders among eating disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Suzanne; Kellow, John

    2011-04-01

    Functional gastrointestinal-like disorders (FGIDs) are prevalent among eating disorder (ED) patients. The aims are to explore the relationship between quality of life related to eating disorders (QOL ED) and FGIDs. Consecutive ED patients, 18-45 years old, completed the Rome II, QOL ED, Irritable Bowel Syndrome QOL (IBS-QOL) and Bowel Symptom Severity Index (BSSI) questionnaires on admission to hospital for treatment of their ED. Despite the high prevalence of FGIDs (93%), only IBS is clearly correlated with QOL ED scores. The QOL ED subscores significantly related are ED feelings, psychological feelings and effect on daily living. These subscores contain items such as fearing loss of control over your body and feelings, being preoccupied with thoughts of body weight and shape, feeling confused and that eating and exercise have a negative effect on work/study. There were no relationships between QOL ED behavior and individual FGIDs or categories of FGIDs. The QOL ED and IBS-QOL are highly correlated, and there is a positive linear relationship between the QOL ED global and IBS-QOL total and BSSI scores. The presence of IBS (but not other FGIDs) in ED patients is strongly related to eating disordered and psychological feelings. The poorer the QOL ED is, the poorer the IBS-QOL is and the more severe the IBS symptoms are. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Personality disorders and traits in patients with body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, K A; McElroy, S L

    2000-01-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) have been postulated to have schizoid, narcissistic, and obsessional personality traits and to be sensitive, introverted, perfectionistic, and insecure. However, data on personality traits and disorders in BDD are limited. This study assessed 148 subjects with BDD, 26 of whom participated in a fluvoxamine treatment study; 74 subjects were assessed for personality disorders with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSMIII-R Personality Disorders (SCID-II), 100 subjects completed the NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), and 51 subjects completed the Rathus Assertiveness Scale. Forty-two subjects (57%) had one or more personality disorders, with avoidant personality disorder (43%) being most common, followed by dependent (15%), obsessive-compulsive (14%), and paranoid (14%) personality disorders. On the NEO-FFI, the mean scores were in the very high range for neuroticism, the low range for extraversion and conscientiousness, the low-average range for agreeableness, and the average range for openness to experience. On the Rathus Assertiveness Scale, the mean score was -17.1 +/- 32.0 for women and -17.0 +/- 32.3 for men. Among fluvoxamine responders, the number of personality disorders significantly decreased between the study baseline and endpoint. These findings suggest that the rate of personality disorders in BDD is relatively high, with avoidant personality disorder being most common. The high neuroticism scores and low extraversion scores are consistent with this finding.

  7. Management of mental health disorders in HIV-positive patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These guidelines are intended as a reference document to assist HIV nurse and doctor clinicians in managing mental health disorders. It is intended to improve awareness, knowledge and capacity to support patients living with HIV and mental health disorders.

  8. Dreams in patients with sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schredl, Michael

    2009-06-01

    Dreaming is defined as mental activity which occurs during sleep. This review will focus on sleep disorders which have been studied in relation to dreaming: insomnia, sleep apnea syndrome, narcolepsy, and the restless legs syndrome. Dream recall is heightened in patients with insomnia and their dreams reflect current stressors. Whereas breathing-related dreams in sleep apnea patients are rare, the deregulation of the REM sleep system in narcolepsy also manifests in dreams which are more bizarre and more negatively toned. Overall, the findings support the arousal-retrieval model of dream recall but also clearly indicate that other factors like cognitive impairment or micro-arousal might affect the dreaming process. The content analytic findings support the continuity hypothesis of dreaming which states that waking-life issues are reflected in dreams. The number of studies in this field is still very small, however, and further research is needed to confirm and expand the reviewed findings.

  9. Treatment modalities for patients with gambling disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sam-Wook; Shin, Young-Chul; Kim, Dai-Jin; Choi, Jung-Seok; Kim, Seohee; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Youn, HyunChul

    2017-01-01

    Gambling disorder (GD) is defined as persistent and recurrent problematic gambling behavior leading to clinically significant impairment or distress. The prevalence of GD has been shown to be 1.2-7.1% in the general population. GD can severely impact on personal and vocational wellbeing as well as lead to financial problems, and has been known to be difficult to treat. This review describes the available pharmacotherapy/psychosocial treatments for GD patients, and summarizes data on the effectiveness of these GD treatments. This review refers to newly as well as previously published studies and guidelines. The description of pharmacotherapy mainly focuses on opioid receptor antagonists, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and mood stabilizers. Psychosocial treatments/strategies mainly include cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, and Gamblers Anonymous. We also introduce relatively novel treatment modalities. This review can help clinicians to decide treatment plans for their GD patients. In addition, it can be used as a reference for designing future research.

  10. Cortisol stress response in post-traumatic stress disorder, panic disorder, and major depressive disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Susann; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Böhme, Carsten; Petrowski, Katja

    2017-09-01

    Previous research has focussed extensively on the distinction of HPA-axis functioning between patient groups and healthy volunteers, with relatively little emphasis on a direct comparison of patient groups. The current study's aim was to analyse differences in the cortisol stress response as a function of primary diagnosis of panic disorder (PD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and major depressive disorder (MDD). A total of n=30 PD (mean age±SD: 36.07±12.56), n=23 PTSD (41.22±10.17), n=18 MDD patients (39.00±14.93) and n=47 healthy control (HC) individuals (35.51±13.15) participated in this study. All the study participants were female. The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) was used for reliable laboratory stress induction. Blood sampling accompanied the TSST for cortisol and ACTH assessment. Panic-related, PTSD-specific questionnaires and the Beck Depression Inventory II were handed out for the characterisation of the study groups. Repeated measure ANCOVAs were conducted to test for main effects of time or group and for interaction effects. Regression analyses were conducted to take comorbid depression into account. 26.7% of the PD patients, 43.5% of the PTSD patients, 72.2% of the MDD patients and 80.6% of the HC participants showed a cortisol stress response upon the TSST. ANCOVA revealed a cortisol hypo-responsiveness both in PD and PTSD patients, while no significant group differences were seen in the ACTH concentrations. Additional analyses showed no impact of comorbid depressiveness on the cortisol stress response. MDD patients did not differ in the hormonal stress response neither compared to the HC participants nor to the PD and PTSD patients. Our main findings provide evidence of a dissociation between the cortisol and ACTH concentrations in response to the TSST in PTSD and in PD patients, independent of comorbid depression. Our results further support overall research findings of a cortisol hypo-responsiveness in PD patients. A hypo

  11. Parental representation in eating disorder patients with suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, N; Kobayashi, J; Tachikawa, H; Sato, S; Hori, M; Suzuki, T; Shiraishi, H

    2000-08-01

    We examined parental, personality, and symptomatological characteristics in relation to suicide attempts among eating disorder patients. Fifty-one eating disorder inpatients, divided into two groups according to lifetime suicide attempts, and 107 non-psychiatric subjects were compared on the following variables: Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), Global Clinical Score (GCS), Eating Disorder Inventory-91 (EDI-91), Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT), clinical and personality characteristics, and family backgrounds. Suicidal patients reported significantly higher overprotection by both parents than non-suicidal patients and non-psychiatric subjects. Suicidal patients had a more prevalent history of child abuse, affective instability, unstable self-image, avoidance of abandonment, maladaptive perfectionism, personality disorder, and mood disorder. There were no differences in symptomatological factors or the severity of the eating disorders. The results suggest that high overprotection is associated with suicidal behaviour in eating disorder patients. The association between overprotective parenting and personality characteristics, and methods of suicide prevention are discussed briefly.

  12. Psychopathology and comorbidity of psychiatric disorders in patients with kleptomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylé, Franck J; Caci, Hervé; Millet, Bruno; Richa, Sami; Olié, Jean-Pierre

    2003-08-01

    This study compared patients with kleptomania, patients with alcohol abuse or dependence, and psychiatric patients without impulse-control disorders or substance-related disorders on several key psychopathological dimensions. In addition, the comorbidity of kleptomania with other psychiatric disorders was examined. Eleven patients with kleptomania recruited over a cumulative 2-year period and 60 patients with alcohol abuse or dependence and 29 psychiatric comparison patients recruited over a consecutive 6-month period participated in structured clinical interviews to determine the presence of impulse-control and substance-related disorders and of other psychiatric disorders that were comorbid with kleptomania. Psychopathological dimensions were measured with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, the Sensation Seeking Scale, the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, and the anxiety and depression subscales of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Significant group effects were found for the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale total and cognitive impulsivity scores, with the patients with kleptomania having higher impulsivity scores than the other groups. Significant group differences were found on the Sensation Seeking Scale total and disinhibition scores. No significant group effects were found for the mood and anxiety measures. Patients with kleptomania had high rates of comorbid psychiatric disorders, particularly mood disorders, other impulse-control disorders, and substance abuse or dependence (mainly nicotine dependence). Kleptomania presented a specific psychopathological profile that distinguished patients with this disorder from patients with alcohol abuse or dependence and other psychiatric comparison patients. Impulsivity was the major psychopathological feature of kleptomania. A link between kleptomania and affective disorder was supported by the high rate of comorbid affective disorders in patients with kleptomania and a specific pattern of variation in

  13. Treating nonspecific anxiety and anxiety disorders in patients with bipolar disorder: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakofsky, Jeffrey J; Dunlop, Boadie W

    2011-01-01

    To review the evidence for treating anxiety in patients with bipolar disorder. A literature search from 1950 to week 1 of August 2009 was conducted via OVID and the National Institutes of Health's clinical trials online databases. Search terms included anxiety, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, social anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, specific phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, and treatment. Reference lists of identified articles were also searched. Fourteen treatment studies that included patients with bipolar disorder with either a syndrome-defined anxiety disorder or nonspecific anxiety were selected. Sample size, bipolar disorder subtype, comorbid anxiety disorders, baseline anxiety, treatment interventions, and outcome measurements were extracted. The majority of studies focus on treating anxiety disorders and nonspecific anxiety occurring during bipolar mood episodes. Studies of syndrome-defined anxiety disorders reveal that risperidone monotherapy did not separate from placebo and that olanzapine was superior to lamotrigine when used to augment lithium treatment. A study using open-label divalproex sodium and an uncontrolled study of group cognitive-behavioral therapy both suggest some benefit from these treatments in patients with bipolar disorder with panic disorder. Studies of nonspecific anxiety reveal some benefit for divalproex, quetiapine, olanzapine, and olanzapine-fluoxetine combination. Weaker evidence supports the use of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, and observational studies suggest potential efficacy for gabapentin and valproate. Nonspecific anxiety symptoms occurring during a mood episode improve with treatment of the mood disturbance, though divalproex may be the mood stabilizer of choice for anxious patients with bipolar disorder. Given their reduced risk for manic induction and episode cycling, psychotherapy, benzodiazepines, and certain atypical antipsychotics

  14. Resilience in patients with psychotic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozikas, V; Parlapani, E

    2016-01-01

    The recovery movement differentiated clinical, which is related to disorder's symptoms, from personal recovery, which is outlined by a subjectively defined wellness state, characterised by hope and self-management. Schizophrenia research has long focused on risk factors and symptoms. The recovery movement triggered a focus shift from psychopathology towards better adjustment and growth despite living with schizophrenia. The recovery movement flourished parallel with positive psychology, the scientific study of ordinary human strengths and virtues investigating human motives and potentials. Understanding of human strengths could contribute to prevention or lessening of psychiatric disorders' devastating consequences, since optimism, sense of personal control and many other positive processes promote psychological health. Lately, the concepts of positive psychology have been implemented in schizophrenia research. Positive self-appraisals moderated suicidal ideation, even when patients experienced high levels of hopelessness.1 Additionally, among other factors, better self-images, internal locus of control (i.e. the perception that events in one's life relate to one's actions) and emphasis on personal efforts predicted a more favourable outcome in functioning of unmedicated patients.2 The concept of "resilience" is closely related to positive psychology. The American Psychological Association defines resilience as ''the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, threats or significant sources of stress''. The concept of resilience includes rebound from adversity.3 Determinants of resilience include biological, psychological, social and cultural factors that interact in a complex manner. The major manifestations of personal resilience are social competence, problem solving, autonomy and sense of purpose.5 Personality strengths that relate to resilience include high self-esteem, extroversion and optimism. Internal assets and personal competencies

  15. Temporomandibular disorders dysfunction in headache patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Christiane-Espinola-Bandeira; Oliveira, José-Luiz-Góes; Jesus, Alan-Chester-Feitosa; Maia, Mila-Leite-de Moraes; de Santana, Jonielly-Costa-Vasconcelos; Andrade, Loren-Suyane-Oliveira; Quintans, Jullyana-de Souza Siqueira; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo-José; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo-Rigoldi

    2012-11-01

    To identify the frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its severity in individuals with headache. 60 adults divided into three groups of 20 individuals: chronic daily headache (CDH), episodic headache (EH) and a control group without headache (WH). Headache diagnosis was performed according to the criteria of International Headache Society and the signs and symptoms of TMD were achieved by using a clinical exam and an anamnestic questionnaire. The severity of TMD was defined by the temporomandibular index (TMI). The TMD signs and symptoms were always more frequent in individuals with headache, especially report of pain in TMJ area (CDH, n=16; EH, n=12; WH, n=6), pain to palpation on masseter (CDH, n=19; EH, n=16; WH, n=11) which are significantly more frequent in episodic and chronic daily headache. The mean values of temporomandibular and articular index (CDH patients) and muscular index (CDH and EH patients) were statistically higher than in patients of the control group, notably the articular (CDH=0.38; EH=0.25;WH=0.19) and muscular (CDH=0.46; EH=0.51; WH=0.26) indices. These findings allow us to speculate that masticatory and TMJ pain are more common in headache subjects. Besides, it seems that the TMD is more severe in headache patients.

  16. The frequency of personality disorders in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Chelminski, Iwona; Young, Diane

    2008-09-01

    Community-based epidemiological studies of psychiatric disorders provide important information about the public health burden of these problems; however, because seeking treatment is related to a number of clinical and demographic factors, studies of the frequency and correlates of psychiatric disorders in the general population should be replicated in clinical populations to provide the practicing clinician with information that might have more direct clinical utility. Diagnosing co-occuring personality disorders in psychiatric patients with an Axis I disorder is clinically important because of their association with the duration, recurrence, and outcome of Axis I disorders. This article reviews clinical epidemiological studies of personality disorders and finds that in studies using semi-structured diagnostic interviews, approximately half of the patients interviewed have a personality disorder. Thus, as a group, personality disorders are among the most frequent disorders treated by psychiatrists.

  17. Prevalence and correlates of bipolar disorders in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chang, Chin-Hao; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Hsi-Chung

    2016-01-15

    To investigate the prevalence and correlates of bipolar disorders in patients with eating disorders (EDs), and to examine differences in effects between major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder on these patients. Sequential attendees were invited to participate in a two-phase survey for EDs at the general psychiatric outpatient clinics. Patients diagnosed with EDs (n=288) and controls of comparable age, sex, and educational level (n=81) were invited to receive structured interviews for psychiatric co-morbidities, suicide risks, and functional level. All participants also completed several self-administered questionnaires assessing general and eating-related pathology and impulsivity. Characteristics were compared between the control, ED-only, ED with major depressive disorder, and ED with bipolar disorder groups. Patients with all ED subtypes had significantly higher rates of major depressive disorder (range, 41.3-66.7%) and bipolar disorder (range, 16.7-49.3%) than controls did. Compared to patients with only EDs, patients with comorbid bipolar disorder and those with comorbid major depressive disorder had significantly increased suicidality and functional impairments. Moreover, the group with comorbid bipolar disorder had increased risks of weight dysregulation, more impulsive behaviors, and higher rates of psychiatric comorbidities. Participants were selected in a tertiary center of a non-Western country and the sample size of individuals with bipolar disorder in some ED subtypes was small. Bipolar disorders were common in patients with EDs. Careful differentiation between bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder in patients with EDs may help predict associated psychopathology and provide accurate treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of childhood trauma on working memory in affective and non-affective psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quidé, Yann; O'Reilly, Nicole; Rowland, Jesseca E; Carr, Vaughan J; Elzinga, Bernet M; Green, Melissa J

    2017-06-01

    Childhood trauma is a significant risk factor for the development of psychotic disorders, and may influence executive brain functions. We thus set out to investigate the long-term effects of childhood trauma exposure on brain function of adult chronic patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and (psychotic) bipolar-I disorder while performing a standard 2/0-back working memory task. Participants were 50 cases diagnosed with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder (SCZ), 42 cases with bipolar-I disorder (BD), and 47 healthy controls (HC). Among this sample, 56 clinical cases (SCZ = 32; BD = 24) and 17 HC reported significant levels of childhood trauma, while 36 clinical cases (SCZ = 18; BD = 18) and 30 HC did not. Effects of childhood trauma on working memory-related brain activation were examined in combined samples of clinical cases (independently of diagnosis) relative to HCs, as well as within each diagnostic category. Case-control analyses revealed increased activation of the left inferior parietal lobule as a main effect of trauma exposure. In addition, trauma exposure interacted with a diagnosis of SCZ or BD to reveal trauma-related increased activation in the cuneus in clinical cases and decreased activation in this region in controls. Disorder-specific functional alterations were also evident in the SCZ sample, but not BD. Childhood trauma exposure elicits aberrant function of parietal regions involved in working memory performance regardless of clinical status, as well as task-relevant visual regions that participates to attentional processes. Childhood trauma may therefore contribute to alterations in attention in SCZ and BD while performing an n-back working memory task.

  19. Increased risk of hyperthyroidism among patients hospitalized with bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anders F; Kessing, Lars V

    2005-01-01

    . METHODS: We conducted a historical cohort study using the Danish register data. The observational period was 1977--99. Three study cohorts were identified: all patients with a first hospital admission with resulting index discharge diagnoses of depression, bipolar disorder, or osteoarthritis. The risks......OBJECTIVES: Hyperthyroidism has been associated with affective disorder in many cross-sectional studies, but longitudinal studies in this connection are scarce. We assessed whether hospitalization with depressive disorder or bipolar disorder was a risk factor for development of hyperthyroidism...... with depressive disorder did not have an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, whereas patients with bipolar disorder had an increased of risk on the margin of statistical significance, when compared to patients with osteoarthritis. Patients with bipolar disorder had a significantly increased risk of hyperthyroidism...

  20. Increased sexual arousal in patients with movement disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Teive, Hélio A. G.; Moro, Adriana; Moscovich, Mariana; Munhoz, Renato P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Increased of sexual arousal (ISA) has been described in different neurological diseases. The purpose of this study was present a case series of ISA in patients with movement disorders. Method Fifteen patients with different forms of movement disorders (Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Tourette´s syndrome, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3), were evaluated in the Movement Disorders Unit of the Federal University of Paraná. Results Among Parkinson’s disease patients there were ...

  1. Childhood onset neuropsychiatric disorders in adult eating disorder patients. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, Elisabet; Lacey, J Hubert; Waller, Glenn; Råstam, Maria; Turk, Jeremy; Gillberg, Christopher

    2005-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have been suggested to be overrepresented in anorexia nervosa. This study aimed to explore the comorbidity of ASD and other childhood onset neuropsychiatric disorders (COND) [attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) and tic disorders] in a group of severe eating disorder (ED) patients. Thirty female ED patients from a specialist hospital clinic were examined on measures tapping into COND and personality disorders. In our group of longstanding ED, 53% had at least one COND diagnosis; 23% had ASD, 17% had AD/HD, and 27% had a tic disorder. These preliminary data suggest that COND may be common in patients with severe ED and should be kept in mind when treating these patients.

  2. Satisfaction with treatment among patients with depressive and bipolar disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Hansen, Hanne Vibe; Ruggeri, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    , the Verona Service Satisfaction Scale-Affective, was mailed to a large population of patients with depressive or bipolar disorders representative of outpatients treated at their first contact to hospital settings in Denmark. RESULTS: Among the 1,005 recipients, 49.9% responded to the letter. Overall....... There was no difference in satisfaction between genders or between patients with depressive disorder and patients with bipolar disorder. CONCLUSION: There is a need to strengthen outpatient treatment for patients discharged from a psychiatric hospital diagnosed of having affective disorders, focusing more on information...

  3. Using the mood disorder questionnaire and bipolar spectrum diagnostic scale to detect bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder among eating disorder patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Screening scales for bipolar disorder including the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) and Bipolar Spectrum Diagnostic Scale (BSDS) have been plagued by high false positive rates confounded by presence of borderline personality disorder. This study examined the accuracy of these scales for detecting bipolar disorder among patients referred for eating disorders and explored the possibility of simultaneous assessment of co-morbid borderline personality disorder. Methods Participants were 78 consecutive female patients who were referred for evaluation of an eating disorder. All participants completed the mood and eating disorder sections of the SCID-I/P and the borderline personality disorder section of the SCID-II, in addition to the MDQ and BSDS. Predictive validity of the MDQ and BSDS was evaluated by Receiver Operating Characteristic analysis of the Area Under the Curve (AUC). Results Fifteen (19%) and twelve (15%) patients fulfilled criteria for bipolar II disorder and borderline personality disorder, respectively. The AUCs for bipolar II disorder were 0.78 (MDQ) and 0.78 (BDSD), and the AUCs for borderline personality disorder were 0.75 (MDQ) and 0.79 (BSDS). Conclusions Among patients being evaluated for eating disorders, the MDQ and BSDS show promise as screening questionnaires for both bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder. PMID:23443034

  4. Personality Disorders in a Non-Patient Population in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Studies of the epidemiology of personality disorders in Nigeria are scanty. From clinical experience, diagnoses of personality disorders are hardly ever made in both out patients and inpatients in our mental health department. It is unclear whether the non-diagnosis of personality disorders in our psychiatric ...

  5. Management of mental health disorders in HIV-positive patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is helpful to establish whether the SMD (psychosis or manic epi- sode) is due to an underlying primary mental disorder or is secondary to HIV infection. Primary disorders require the initiation of psycho- tropic treatment and an assessment of whether HIV disease is currently contributing to the disorder. If patients do not ...

  6. Psychiatric comorbidities in patients with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaipisuttikul P

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Papan Thaipisuttikul, Pichai Ittasakul, Punjaporn Waleeprakhon, Pattarabhorn Wisajun, Sudawan Jullagate Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand Background: Psychiatric comorbidities are common in major depressive disorder (MDD. They may worsen outcome and cause economic burden. The primary objective was to examine the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in MDD. The secondary objectives were to compare the presence of comorbidities between currently active and past MDD, and between patients with and without suicidal risk.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 250 patients with lifetime MDD and age ≥18 years were enrolled. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, Thai version, was used to confirm MDD diagnosis and classify comorbidities. MDD diagnosis was confirmed in 190, and 60 patients were excluded due to diagnosis of bipolar disorder.Results: Of the 190 MDD patients, 25.8% had current MDD and 74.2% had past MDD. Eighty percent were women. The mean age at enrollment was 50 years, and at MDD onset was 41 years. Most patients were married (53.2%, employed (54.8%, and had ≥12 years of education (66.9%. There were 67 patients (35.3% with one or more psychiatric comorbidities. Comorbidities included dysthymia (19.5%, any anxiety disorders (21.1% (panic disorder [6.8%], agoraphobia [5.8%], social phobia [3.7%], obsessive–compulsive disorder [OCD] [4.7%], generalized anxiety disorder [5.3%], and post-traumatic stress disorder [4.2%], alcohol dependence (0.5%, psychotic disorder (1.6%, antisocial personality (1.1%, and eating disorders (0%. Compared with past MDD, the current MDD group had significantly higher OCD (P<0.001, psychotic disorder (P=0.048, past panic disorder (P=0.017, and suicidal risk (P<0.001. Suicidal risk was found in 32.1% of patients. Patients with suicidal risk had more comorbid anxiety disorder of any type (P=0.019 and

  7. A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial evaluating the effect of intranasal insulin on neurocognitive function in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Roger S; Soczynska, Joanna K; Woldeyohannes, Hanna O; Miranda, Andrew; Vaccarino, Anthony; Macqueen, Glenda; Lewis, Gary F; Kennedy, Sidney H

    2012-11-01

    Neurocognitive deficits are prevalent, persistent, and implicated as mediators of functional impairment in adults with bipolar disorder. Notwithstanding progress in the development of pharmacological treatments for various phases of bipolar disorder, no available treatment has been proven to be reliably efficacious in treating neurocognitive deficits. Emerging evidence indicates that insulin dysregulation may be pertinent to neurocognitive function. In keeping with this view, we tested the hypothesis that intranasal insulin administration would improve measures of neurocognitive performance in euthymic adults with bipolar disorder. Sixty-two adults with bipolar I/II disorder (based on the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview 5.0) were randomized to adjunctive intranasal insulin 40 IU q.i.d. (n = 34) or placebo (n = 28) for eight weeks. All subjects were prospectively verified to be euthymic on the basis of a total score of ≤ 3 on the seven-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-7) and ≤ 7 on the 11-item Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) for a minimum of 28 consecutive days. Neurocognitive function and outcome was assessed with a neurocognitive battery. There were no significant between-group differences in mean age of the subjects {i.e., mean age 40 [standard deviation (SD) = 10.15] years in the insulin and 39 [SD = 10.41] in the placebo groups, respectively}. In the insulin group, n = 27 (79.4%) had bipolar I disorder, while n = 7 (21.6%) had bipolar II disorder. In the placebo group, n = 25 (89.3%) had bipolar I disorder, while n = 3 (10.7%) had bipolar II disorder. All subjects received concomitant medications; medications remained stable during study enrollment. A significant improvement versus placebo was noted with intranasal insulin therapy on executive function (i.e., Trail Making Test-Part B). Time effects were significant for most California Verbal Learning Test indices and the Process Dissociation Task-Habit Estimate, suggesting an

  8. Increased proapoptotic serum activity in patients with chronic mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Pierluigi; Brondino, Natascia; Emanuele, Enzo

    2008-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests that endothelial dysfunction may be present in patients with chronic mood disorders. We hypothesized that circulating factors in the sera of patients with chronic mood disorders could induce vascular endothelial damage that in turn may be responsible for increased vascular risk. In this study, we sought to determine whether serum of patients with chronic mood disorders could directly induce apoptosis in human endothelial cells. We examined the proapoptotic activity by an ex vivo proapoptotic activity assay in the serum of 100 individuals: 25 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and no lifetime diagnosis of anxiety disorder, 25 patients with bipolar disorder (BPD) with a current comorbid anxiety disorder, 25 patients with BPD and no anxiety, and 25 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The proapoptotic serum activity of all mood disorder patients was significantly higher than that of the control group (all p values<0.01). This association was found to be independent from potential confounders including age, gender, smoking status, body mass index, blood pressure parameters, family history of cardiovascular disease, serum creatinine, plasma glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, NT-proBNP, and C-reactive protein (beta=0.44, t=2.93, p=0.012). Together our findings indicate that chronic mood disorders are associated with higher proapoptotic serum capacity. Although subject to future confirmation, it is possible that the increased systemic proapoptotic activity of the serum in these patients could exert deleterious vascular effects resulting in endothelial dysfunction.

  9. Mood disorders in eating disorder patients: Prevalence and chronology of ONSET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godart, N; Radon, L; Curt, F; Duclos, J; Perdereau, F; Lang, F; Venisse, J L; Halfon, O; Bizouard, P; Loas, G; Corcos, M; Jeammet, Ph; Flament, M F

    2015-10-01

    In a clinical population, we estimated the frequency of mood disorders among 271 patients suffering from Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and Bulimia Nervosa (BN) in comparison to a control group matched for age and gender. The frequency of mood disorders was measured using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), DSM-IV version. Mood disorders were more frequent among eating disorder (ED) patients than among controls, with a global prevalence of the order of 80% for each ED group. The majority of the mood disorders comorbid with ED were depressive disorders (MDD and dysthymia). The relative chronology of onset of these disorders was equivocal, because mood disorders in some cases preceded and in others followed the onset of the eating disorders. Our sample was characterized by patients with severe ED and high comorbidities, and thus do not represent the entire population of AN or BN. This also may have resulted in an overestimation of prevalence. Mood disorders appear significantly more frequently in patients seeking care for ED than in controls. These results have implications for the assessment and treatment of ED patients, and for the aetio-pathogenesis of these disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Oral health in female patients with eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazurek Mateusz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate oral health in women with eating disorders. The clinical study covered 30 patients aged 14-36 years suffering from diagnosed eating disorders and treated in closed psychiatric institutions. The control group comprised 30 healthy women at the mean age corresponding to that of the patient group. No relationships were confirmed between eating disorders and the intensity of dental caries. Eating disorders contribute to increased loss of dental hard tissues. In women suffering from eating disorders non-specific lesions in oral cavity are more common than in healthy women.

  11. Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Patients Presenting for Cosmetic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Altintas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Body dysmorphic disorder is an obsessive-compulsive related psychiatric disorder characterized by excessive preoccupation about an imagined or slight defect in appearance. Preoccupation of the appearance with the skin, hair and nose are most common. Impairment of the quality of life, comorbidity of the psychiatric and personality disorder are related with body dysmorphic disorder. Nowadays, cosmetic procedure has become increasingly popular especially among women. The prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder among patients seeking cosmetic treatment in surgery or dermatology clinics is higher than general population. As postoperatively some patients dissatisfied with the surgery, dermatologists and surgeons should be informed about body dysmorphic disorder. This aim of this review was to assess prevalance, clinical features, motivational factors of patients with body dysmorphic disorder presenting for cosmetic medical treatments. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(3.000: 324-338

  12. Common Dermatoses in Patients with Obsessive Compulsive Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Tampa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a chronic, debilitating syndrome, consisting of intrusive thoughts- which are experienced as inappropriate by the patient and are producing anxiety- and compulsions, defined as repetitive behaviours produced to reduce anxiety. While patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder typically have xerosis, eczema or lichen simplex chronicus, as a result of frequent washing or rubbing their skin, several other disorders which are included in the group of factitious disorders have also been associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder. A close collaboration between the dermatologist and the psychiatrist is therefore mandatory in order to achieve favourable outcomes for these patients. The aim of the article is to present the most frequent dermatological disorders associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder and to look over some of the rare ones.

  13. Nail disorder among patients on maintenance hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Charkhchian

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of nail disorder in this study was correlated with age, DM, and gender. To decrease the prevalence of nail disorder, attention to duration of HD, age, male sex, and DM is very important.

  14. Symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) among adult eating disorder patients

    OpenAIRE

    Svedlund, Nils Erik; Norring, Claes; Ginsberg, Ylva; von Hausswolff-Juhlin, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Background Very little is known about the prevalence of ADHD symptoms in Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder and even less in other eating disorders. This knowledge gap is of clinical importance since stimulant treatment is proven effective in Binge Eating Disorder and discussed as a treatment possibility for Bulimia Nervosa. The objective of this study was to explore the prevalence and types of self-reported ADHD symptoms in an unselected group of eating disorder patients assessed in a...

  15. Depression and anxiety among patients with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, and other depressive/anxiety disorders in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Lieh; Chen, Tzu-Ting; Chen, I-Ming; Ma, Huei-Mei; Lee, Ming-Tzu; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Gau, Shur-Fen

    2016-07-30

    The aim of this study is to compare the severity of depression and anxiety in individuals with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, other depressive/anxiety disorders, and healthy controls in a Han Chinese population. According to the DSM-IV-TR-based diagnostic interviews, we recruited 152 subjects with somatoform disorders (SG), 56 with panic disorder (PG), 85 with other depressive/anxiety disorders (OG), and 179 without any psychiatric disorder (NG). The four groups reported on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) for depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively. Correlation analysis and multivariate regression analysis were used to determine the effects of demographic factors and psychiatric diagnoses on depressive and anxiety symptoms separately. BDI-II scores were not significantly different in SG, PG, and OG but were higher than NG. SG and PG had the highest BAI scores, whereas NG had the lowest. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that the associated factors for BDI-II were gender, residential location, somatoform disorders, panic disorder, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder, whereas BAI was significantly associated with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, and MDD. Our results strongly suggest the inclusion of clinical assessment of depressive and anxious symptoms in patients with somatoform disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 7. Bipolar disorder in child psychiatric practice.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ESEM

    old Memory's sister diagnosed with bipolar I disorder and generalized ... Memory was dressed provocatively, in a bright shirt and her skirt painted with colored ink. While talking she was absent-minded, inattentive, it was clear that it took efforts to keep the attention on the ... The girl denies auditory or visual hallucinations and.

  17. Eating disorders in the female patient: pathophysiology and treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Gayle Tutone; Karlis, Vasiliki

    2007-05-01

    Eating disorders are common in girls and women. Two common eating disorders--anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa--have significant medical complications. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons must be cognizant of the signs, symptoms, and medical consequences of these disorders. The increased incidence of these diseases has implications in the surgical management the oral and maxillofacial surgery patient. A review of the literature and guidelines in the perioperative management of these surgical patients are presented in this article.

  18. Plasma kynurenine and related measures in tic disorder patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Anderson, George M.; Troost, Pieter W.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Minderaa, Ruud B.

    Objective Increased plasma kynurenine has been reported in tic disorder patients, and this observation has been suggested to be indicative of immune dysregulation. In the present study, we examined plasma levels of kynurenine and related molecules in a group of tic disorder patients. Methods Plasma

  19. What do patients with psychotic and mood disorders know about ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-07-29

    Jul 29, 2008 ... knowledge about, and insight into, their illness and its treatment. This knowledge enables them to cope more ... In patients with a bipolar disorder, psychoeducation has been shown to enhance adherence to treatment. Training ... with mood or anxiety disorders. Most patients wanted to know their diagnosis ...

  20. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging among patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Desmond, Alan N

    2012-03-01

    There are concerns about levels of radiation exposure among patients who undergo diagnostic imaging for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), compared with other gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We quantified imaging studies and estimated the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation received by patients with organic and functional GI disorders. We also identified factors and diagnoses associated with high CEDs.

  1. Perturbational Profiling of Metabolites in Patient Fibroblasts Implicates α-Aminoadipate as a Potential Biomarker for Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Joanne H.; Berkovitch, Shaunna S.; Iaconelli, Jonathan; Watmuff, Bradley; Park, Hyoungjun; Chattopadhyay, Shrikanta; McPhie, Donna; Öngür, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M.; Clish, Clary B.; Karmacharya, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Many studies suggest the presence of aberrations in cellular metabolism in bipolar disorder. We studied the metabolome in bipolar disorder to gain insight into cellular pathways that may be dysregulated in bipolar disorder and to discover evidence of novel biomarkers. We measured polar and nonpolar metabolites in fibroblasts from subjects with bipolar I disorder and matched healthy control subjects, under normal conditions and with two physiologic perturbations: low-glucose media and exposure to the stress-mediating hormone dexamethasone. Metabolites that were significantly different between bipolar and control subjects showed distinct separation by principal components analysis methods. The most statistically significant findings were observed in the perturbation experiments. The metabolite with the lowest p value in both the low-glucose and dexamethasone experiments was α-aminoadipate, whose intracellular level was consistently lower in bipolar subjects. Our study implicates α-aminoadipate as a possible biomarker in bipolar disorder that manifests under cellular stress. This is an intriguing finding given the known role of α-aminoadipate in the modulation of kynurenic acid in the brain, especially as abnormal kynurenic acid levels have been implicated in bipolar disorder. PMID:27606323

  2. Neuropsychological profile in patients with schizotypal personality disorder or schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mié; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Kato, Kanade; Yoneyama, Eiichi; Kurachi, Masayoshi

    2004-04-01

    Neuropsychological impairments have been consistently reported in patients with schizophrenia. As little is known whether subjects with schizotypal personality disorder exhibit neurocognitive dysfunction similar to that in schizophrenia, we assessed the neuropsychological profile of 15 subjects with schizotypal personality disorder and compared it with that for 15 patients with schizophrenia and for 15 psychiatrically normal volunteers. All participants were administered a standard neuropsychological battery assessing language ability, spatial ability, visuomotor function, verbal memory, visual memory, auditory attention, visual attention, and executive function. Performance on most of the cognitive domains was impaired in patients with schizotypal personality disorder but less than patients with schizophrenia. Specifically, impairment in verbal memory and visuomotor ability in patients with schizotypal personality disorder and patients with schizophrenia were comparable, while patients with schizophrenia performed worse on the test of executive function than did patients with schizotypal personality disorder. As a whole, cognitive deficits in patients with schizotypal personality disorder were qualitatively similar to, but quantitatively milder than, those for patients with schizophrenia. The results suggest that cognitive abilities related to frontotemporal lobe function are disturbed across these schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

  3. Prevalence of psychotic disorders in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Lieuwe; Dudek-Hodge, Christine; Verhoeven, Yolanda; Denys, Damiaan

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The co-occurrence of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in patients with schizophrenia and related disorders has been increasingly recognized. However, the rate of psychosis comorbidity in OCD patients has yet to be systematically evaluated. Methods: The prevalence of the Diagnostic

  4. Effectiveness of Inhaled Loxapine in Dual-Diagnosis Patients: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncero, Carlos; Ros-Cucurull, Elena; Grau-López, Lara; Fadeuilhe, Christian; Casas, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Episodes of psychotic agitation are frequent in patients with dual diagnosis, that is, in patients with concomitant psychiatric and substance use disorders. Rapid intervention is needed to treat the agitation at a mild stage to prevent the escalation to aggressive behavior. Inhaled loxapine has been demonstrated to rapidly improve symptoms of mild-to-moderate agitation in adults with psychiatric disorders (schizophrenia and bipolar disorder), but data on patients with dual diagnosis are scarce. This study is a retrospective review of data from a case series of patients with dual diagnosis, which were attended for symptoms of agitation while at the emergency room (n = 9), in the outpatient clinic (n = 4), or during hospitalization (n = 1) at 1 center in Spain. All patients received inhaled loxapine for treating the agitation episodes. Data from 14 patients with dual diagnosis were reviewed. All patients had 1 or more psychiatric disorders (schizophrenia, bipolar I disorder, drug-induced psychotic disorder, posttraumatic stress, borderline or antisocial personality disorder, depression, or anxiety) along with a variety of substance use disorders (alcohol, cocaine, cannabis, amphetamines, hypnotics and antianxiety drugs, caffeine, or street drugs). Overall, only 1 dose of inhaled loxapine (9.1 mg) was needed to calm each patient during an acute episode of agitation. Inhaled loxapine was rapid, effective, and well accepted in all dual-pathology patients presenting with acute agitation in the emergency setting. Inhaled loxapine facilitated both patient cooperation and an adequate management of his or her disease.

  5. Alcoholism and anxiety in bipolar illness : Differential lifetime anxiety comorbidity in bipolar I women with and without alcoholism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levander, Eric; Frye, Mark A.; McElroy, Susan; Suppes, Trisha; Grunze, Heinz; Nolen, Willem A.; Kupka, Ralph; Keck, Paul E.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Hwang, Sun; Mintz, Jim; Post, Robert M.

    Introduction: This study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence rate of anxiety comorbidity in bipolar subjects with and without alcohol use disorders (AUD). Methods: Bipolar men and women who entered the Stanley Foundation Bipolar Network (SFBN) underwent a Structured Clinical Interview for

  6. Childhood Trauma and Alexithymia in Patients with Conversion Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Anum; Yousaf, Aasma

    2016-07-01

    To determine the relationship between childhood trauma (physical, sexual, emotional abuse and neglect) and alexithymia in patients with conversion disorder, and to identify it as a predictor of alexithymia in conversion disorder. An analytical study. Multiple public sector hospitals in Lahore, from September 2012 to July 2013. Eighty women with conversion disorder were recruited on the basis of DSM IV-TR diagnostic criteria checklist to screen conversion disorder. Childhood abuse interview to measure childhood trauma and Bermond Vorst Alexithymia Questionnaire, DSM-IV TR Dianostic Criteria Checklist, and Childhood Abuse Interview to assess alexithymia were used, respectively. The mean age of the sample was 18 ±2.2 years. Thirty-six cases had a history of childhood trauma, physical abuse was the most reported trauma (f = 19, 23.8%) in their childhood. Patients with conversion disorder has a significant association with alexithymia (p conversion disorder. Strategies should be devised to reduce this disorder among women in Pakistani society.

  7. Comorbidity of mood and substance use disorders in patients with binge-eating disorder: Associations with personality disorder and eating disorder pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel F; Grilo, Carlos M

    2015-08-01

    Binge-eating disorder (BED) is associated with elevated rates of mood and substance use disorders, but the significance of such comorbidity is ambiguous. We compared personality disorder and eating disorder psychopathology in four subgroups of BED patients: those with mood disorders, those with substance use disorders, those with both, and those with neither. Subjects were 347 patients who met DSM-IV research criteria for BED. Semistructured interviews evaluated lifetime DSM-IV axis I disorders, DSM-IV personality disorder features, and eating disorder psychopathology. Among these patients, 129 had co-occurring mood disorder, 34 had substance use disorder, 60 had both, and 124 had neither. Groups differed on personality disorder features, with those having mood disorder and both mood and substance use disorders showing the highest frequencies. Although groups did not differ in body mass index or binge eating frequency, they did differ on eating disorder psychopathology-with the groups having mood disorder and both comorbidities demonstrating higher eating, weight, and shape concerns. No differences were observed between groups with respect to ages of onset for specific eating behaviors, but some differences were observed for ages of disorder onset. Mood and substance use disorders co-occur frequently among patients with BED. Compared with a previous work, the additional comparison group (those with both mood and substance use disorders) and the control group (those with neither) afforded better discrimination regarding the significance of these comorbidities. Our findings suggest approaches to subtyping BED based on psychiatric comorbidity, and may also have implications for treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comorbidity of mood and substance use disorders in patients with binge-eating disorder: associations with personality disorder and eating disorder pathology†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel F.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Binge-eating disorder (BED) is associated with elevated rates of mood and substance use disorders, but the significance of such comorbidity is ambiguous. We compared personality disorder and eating disorder psychopathology in four subgroups of BED patients: those with mood disorders, those with substance use disorders, those with both, and those with neither. Method Subjects were 347 patients who met DSM-IV research criteria for BED. Semistructured interviews evaluated lifetime DSM-IV axis I disorders, DSM-IV personality disorder features, and eating disorder psychopathology. Results Among these patients, 129 had co-occurring mood disorder, 34 had substance use disorder, 60 had both, and 124 had neither. Groups differed on personality disorder features, with those having mood disorder and both mood and substance use disorders showing the highest frequencies. Although groups did not differ on body mass index or binge eating frequency, they did differ on eating disorder psychopathology with the groups having mood disorder and both comorbidities demonstrating higher eating, weight, and shape concerns. No differences were observed between groups with respect to ages of onset for specific eating behaviors, but some differences were observed for ages of disorder onset. Conclusion Mood and substance use disorders co-occur frequently among patients with BED. Compared with previous work, the additional comparison group (those with both mood and substance use disorders) and the control group (those with neither) afforded better discrimination regarding the significance of these comorbidities. Our findings suggest approaches to subtyping BED based on psychiatric comorbidity, and may also have implications for treatment. PMID:25700727

  9. In-depth study of personality disorders in first-admission patients with substance use disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langås Anne-Marit

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessment of comorbid personality disorders (PDs in patients with substance use disorders (SUDs is challenging due to symptom overlap, additional mental and physical disorders, and limitations of the assessment methods. Our in-depth study applied methods to overcome these difficulties. Method A complete catchment area sample of 61 consecutively admitted patients with SUDs, with no previous history of specialized treatment (addiction clinics, psychiatry were studied, addressing PDs and associated clinical and demographic variables. The thorough assessments included the Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders. Results Forty-six percent of the SUD patients had at least one PD (16% antisocial [males only]; 13% borderline; and 8% paranoid, avoidant, and obsessive-compulsive, respectively. Cluster C disorders were as prevalent as Cluster B disorders. SUD patients with PDs were younger at the onset of their first SUD and at admission; used more illicit drugs; had more anxiety disorders, particularly social phobia; had more severe depressive symptoms; were more distressed; and less often attended work or school. Conclusion The psychiatric comorbidity and symptom load of SUD patients with PDs differed from those of SUD patients without PDs, suggesting different treatment needs, and stressing the value of the assessment of PDs in SUD patients.

  10. Prevalence of substance use disorders in psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftdahl, Nanna Gilliam; Nordentoft, Merete; Hjorthøj, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    obtained from several Danish population-based registers. The study population was defined as all individuals with incidents of schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder, other psychoses, bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD......PURPOSE: The present study established the national prevalence of substance use disorders (SUDs) among Danish psychiatric patients. Furthermore, patients with SUDs and those without SUDs were compared on a range of socio-demographic, clinical, and treatment characteristics. METHODS: Data were......), and personality disorders since 1969. The prevalence of SUDs was examined for the following psychoactive substances: alcohol, opioids, cannabis, sedatives, cocaine, psycho-stimulants and hallucinogens. RESULTS: A total of 463,003 patients were included in the analysis. The prevalence of any lifetime SUD was: 37...

  11. [Lack of assertiveness in patients with eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar A, Rosa; Manzo G, Rodrigo; Casanova Z, Dunny

    2006-03-01

    Low self-assertion has been noted as an important feature among patients with eating disorders. To verify, in a female population, if assertiveness is related or has a predictive capacity for the development of eating disorders. An structured clinical interview, the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40) and the Rathus Assertiveness Scale (RAS) were administered to 62 patients that fulfilled the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for eating disorders and to 120 female students without eating problems. Patients with eating disorders ranked significantly higher on the EAT-40 and its factors (p <0.001) and showed a lower level of assertiveness on the RAS (p <0.001). Assertiveness measured by RAS and its factors was inversely related to EAT-40 and its items (r= -0.21). The predictive capability of the lack of self-assertion in the development of an eating disorder reached 53%, when patients with eating disorders and subjects at risk were considered together and compared to students without such disorder. Lack of assertiveness is a significant trait in patients with eating disorders; it may worsen its outcome and even perpetuate symptoms. Low self-assertion may be considered a predictive factor in the development of an eating disorder and must be managed from a preventive or therapeutic point of view.

  12. [Spouses and bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellouze, F; Ayedi, S; Cherif, W; Ben Abla, T; M'rad, M F

    2011-02-01

    To assess the quality of life of a population of spouses of bipolar patients compared with a control population. We conducted a cross-sectional study which included two groups: a group of 30 spouses of patients followed for bipolar I disorder according to DSM IV criteria and a second group of 30 subjects from the general population. Both groups were matched by age, sex, marital status and socioeconomic level. This device was designed to limit the differences between the two groups solely those of the bipolar illness. Evaluating the quality of life was achieved using the quality of life scale: SF-36. This is a scale that has already been translated and validated in dialect Arabic. Regarding sociodemographic variables, the two study groups differed only for: recreation, friendly relations and the couple relationship that included more and better skills among the control group. In the categorical approach, the quality of life was impaired in 60% of spouses and 40% of controls with a statistically significant difference. The following standardized dimensions: mental health (D4), limitation due to mental health (D5), life and relationship with others (D6) and perceived health (D8) and mental component (CM) were significantly altered in patients' spouses compared to controls. We found significant differences between the two groups for: overall average score (51.1 vs. 68.2), mental health (D4), limitation due to mental health (D5), life and relationship with others (D6), perceived health (D8) and perceived health (D8) standards. The impairment of quality of life of bipolar patients' spouses is related to the extra responsibility, stress, financial problems and health problems, stigma, and loss of security of the person loved. Considering the consequences that the appearance of bipolar disorder on the patient's spouse may have, certain measures must be proposed to improve their quality of life. Copyright © 2010 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All

  13. Dissociative symptoms and dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Hasan; Ural, Cenk; Vardar, Melek Kanarya; Yesılyurt, Sema; Oncu, Fatıh

    2012-10-01

    The present study attempted to assess the dissociative symptoms and overall dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In addition, we examined the relationship between the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and dissociative symptoms. All patients admitted for the first time to the psychiatric outpatient unit were included in the study. Seventy-eight patients had been diagnosed as having OCD during the 2-year study period. Patients had to meet the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for OCD. Most (76.9%; n = 60) of the patients were female, and 23.1% (n = 18) of the patients were male. Dissociation Questionnaire was used to measure dissociative symptoms. The Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Dissociative Disorders interviews and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Checklist and Severity Scale were used. Eleven (14%) of the patients with OCD had comorbid dissociative disorder. The most prevalent disorder in our study was dissociative depersonalization disorder. Dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder were common as well. The mean Yale-Brown score was 23.37 ± 7.27 points. Dissociation Questionnaire scores were between 0.40 and 3.87 points, and the mean was 2.23 ± 0.76 points. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between Yale-Brown points and Dissociation Questionnaire points. We conclude that dissociative symptoms among patients with OCD should alert clinicians for the presence of a chronic and complex dissociative disorder. Clinicians may overlook an underlying dissociative process in patients who have severe symptoms of OCD. However, a lack of adequate response to cognitive-behavioral and drug therapy may be a consequence of dissociative process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Early Maladaptive Schemas in the Patients with Somatoform Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ýsmet Kýrpýnar

    2014-08-01

    Method: We investigated a total of 28 patients aged 18-65 years, were diagnosed as Hypochondriasis or Somatization Disorder according to DSM-IV and 30 healthy controls. All participitans were assessed with The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-1. Data were obtained by using a Sociodemographic Questionnaire and Young Schema Questionnaire-Short Form 3. Results: The main age of patients was 36,71 ± 10.39. Most of the patients were female, married and housewives. All early maladaptive schema scores of patients with somatoform disorders were higher than healthy controls. Conclusion: All early maladaptive schemas have been found to be related to somatoform disorders in this study. The role of not a specific one but a total of maladaptive schemas in etiology may reflect the unspecific general sources of the tendency to somatoform disorders. [JCBPR 2014; 3(2.000: 84-93

  15. Prevalence and correlates of DSM-5 eating disorders in patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Susan L; Crow, Scott; Blom, Thomas J; Biernacka, Joanna M; Winham, Stacey J; Geske, Jennifer; Cuellar-Barboza, Alfredo B; Bobo, William V; Prieto, Miguel L; Veldic, Marin; Mori, Nicole; Seymour, Lisa R; Bond, David J; Frye, Mark A

    2016-02-01

    To determine prevalence rates and clinical correlates of current DSM-5 eating disorders in patients with bipolar disorder (BP). Prevalence rates of current DSM-5- and DSM-IV-defined binge eating disorder (BED), bulimia nervosa (BN), and anorexia nervosa (AN) were assessed with the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (EDDS) in 1092 patients with BP. Psychiatric illness burden was evaluated with five proxy measures of BP illness severity. Medical illness burden was evaluated with the Cumulative Index Rating Scale (CIRS). Twenty-seven percent of patients had a current DSM-5 eating disorder: 12% had BED, 15% had BN, and 0.2% had AN. Rates of DSM-5-defined BED and BN were higher than clinical diagnosis rates and rates of DSM-IV-defined BED and BN. Compared with BP patients without an eating disorder, BP patients with a DSM-5 eating disorder were younger and more likely to be women; had an earlier age of onset of BP; had higher EDDS composite scores and higher degrees of suicidality, mood instability, and anxiety disorder comorbidity; and had a higher mean BMI, higher rate of obesity, and higher CIRS total scores. In a logistic regression model controlling for previously identified correlates of an eating disorder, younger age, female gender, and higher BMI remained significantly associated with an eating disorder. The EDDS has not been validated in BP patients. DSM-5-defined BED and BN are common in BP patients, possibly more common than DSM-IV-defined BED and BN, and associated with greater psychiatric and general medical illness burden. Further studies assessing DSM-5 eating disorders in people with BP are greatly needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Increased sexual arousal in patients with movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio A G; Moro, Adriana; Moscovich, Mariana; Munhoz, Renato P

    2016-04-01

    Increased of sexual arousal (ISA) has been described in different neurological diseases. The purpose of this study was present a case series of ISA in patients with movement disorders. Fifteen patients with different forms of movement disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3), were evaluated in the Movement Disorders Unit of the Federal University of Paraná. Among Parkinson's disease patients there were seven cases with different forms of ISA due to dopaminergic agonist use, levodopa abuse, and deep brain stimulation (DBS). In the group with hyperkinetic disorders, two patients with Huntington's disease, two with Tourette's syndrome, and four with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 presented with ISA. ISA in this group of patients had different etiologies, predominantly related to dopaminergic treatment or DBS in Parkinson's disease, part of the background clinical picture in Huntington's disease and Tourette's syndrome, and probably associated with cultural aspects in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

  17. Neuroimaging in patients with conversion disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, P.D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medically unexplained symptoms are not uncommon in the clinical setting. Conversion disorder is a psychological disorder in which there is no neurological explanation for patients’ physical symptoms. These physical symptoms can be both positive or negative, e.g. tremor or paresis. This

  18. Subthreshold autism spectrum disorder in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Osso, L; Carpita, B; Gesi, C; Cremone, I M; Corsi, M; Massimetti, E; Muti, D; Calderani, E; Castellini, G; Luciano, M; Ricca, V; Carmassi, C; Maj, M

    2018-02-01

    Increasingly data suggest a possible overlap between psychopathological manifestations of eating disorders (EDs) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of subthreshold autism spectrum symptoms, by means of a recently validated instrument, in a sample of participants with EDs, particularly comparing participants with or without binge eating behaviours. 138 participants meeting DSM-5 criteria for EDs and 160 healthy control participants (HCs), were recruited at 3 Italian University Departments of Psychiatry and assessed by the SCID-5, the Adult Autism Subthreshold Spectrum (AdAS Spectrum) and the Eating Disorders Inventory, version 2 (EDI-2). ED participants included: 46 with restrictive anorexia (AN-R); 24 with binge-purging type of Anorexia Nervosa (AN-BP); 34 with Bulimia Nervosa (BN) and 34 with Binge Eating Disorder (BED). The sample was split in two groups: participants with binge eating behaviours (BEB), in which were included participants with AN-BP, BN and BED, and participants with restrictive behaviours (AN-R). participants with EDs showed significantly higher AdAS Spectrum total scores than HCs. Moreover, EDs participants showed significantly higher scores on all AdAS Spectrum domains with the exception of Non verbal communication and Hyper-Hypo reactivity to sensory input for AN-BP participants, and Childhood/Adolescence domain for AN-BP and BED participants. Participants with AN-R scored significantly higher than participants with BEB on the AdAS Spectrum total score, and on the Inflexibility and adherence to routine and Restricted interest/rumination AdAS Spectrum domain scores. Significant correlations emerged between the Interpersonal distrust EDI-2 sub-scale and the Non verbal communication and the Restricted interest and rumination AdAS Spectrum domains; as well as between the Social insecurity EDI-2 sub-scale and the Inflexibility and adherence to routine and Restricted interest and rumination

  19. Comorbid personality disorders and violent behavior in psychotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volavka, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Schizophrenia without any comorbidity confers a modest, but statistically significant elevation of the risk for violence. That risk is considerably increased by comorbid antisocial personality disorder or psychopathy as well as by comorbid substance use disorders. These comorbidities are frequent. Conduct disorder and conduct disorder symptoms elevate the risk for aggressive behavior in patients with schizophrenia. Violence among adults with schizophrenia may follow at least two distinct pathways-one associated with premorbid conditions, including antisocial conduct, and another associated with the acute psychopathology of schizophrenia. Aggressive behavior in bipolar disorder occurs mainly during manic episodes, but it remains elevated in euthymic patients in comparison with controls. The risk of violent behavior is increased by comorbidity with borderline personality disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and substance use disorders. These comorbidities are frequent. Borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder are related in their phenomenology and response to medication. These two disorders share a tendency to impulsiveness, and impulsive behavior, including impulsive aggression, is particularly expressed when they co-occur.

  20. Clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients with mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinden, Yoshiaki; Kijima, Yuko; Hirata, Munetsugu; Nakajo, Akihiro; Tanoue, Kiyonori; Arigami, Takaaki; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Maemura, Kosei; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2017-12-01

    Severe mental disorders are thought to affect the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer because of their lower awareness and understanding of the disease and their reduced ability to cooperate with medical staff. We analyzed the clinical features of patients with breast cancer and pre-existing mental disorders such as schizophrenia, dementia, and intellectual disability. We reviewed the records of 46 patients who were diagnosed with schizophrenia, dementia, or intellectual disability, before being diagnosed with breast cancer. Three patients had more than 2 mental disorders. All patients underwent curative surgical treatment between September 1992 and January 2015. Patients' clinicopathological information was compared with a control group of 727 breast-cancer patients without mental disorders seen during the same period. Patients with mental disorders were less likely to be aware of their own breast cancer; the lesions were often found by other people such as family, care staff, and medical staff. Breast cancer patients with mental disorders had significantly more advanced T factors and overall stage at the time of surgery than their counterparts without mental illness, more patients underwent total mastectomy, and fewer patients underwent postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. Biological markers such as estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression were not significantly different between groups. Disease-free survival and overall survival were not significantly different between groups. Patients with mental disorders receive less postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy; however, their outcomes were not worse than those of patients without mental disorders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. PALLIATIVE CARE ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH SLEEPING DISORDERS ARE POORLY TREATED

    OpenAIRE

    Bellido-Estevez, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorders are frequent in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative-care, especially in elderly patients (1). Sleep disorders during palliative-care may be related with anxiety, opioids related central-sleep apnoea or corticoids therapy between others (2). Our aim was to quantify the effectiveness of hypnotic medication in the sleep quality in advanced cancer receiving palliative-care elderly patients. Material and methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was...

  2. Suicide in patients suffering from late-life anxiety disorders; a comparison with younger patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Veen, D.C. van der; Kapur, N.; Hunt, I.; Williams, A.; Pachana, N.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are assumed to increase suicide risk, although confounding by comorbid psychiatric disorders may be one explanation. This study describes the characteristics of older patients with an anxiety disorder who died by suicide in comparison to younger patients. METHOD: A

  3. Suicide in patients suffering from late-life anxiety disorders; a comparison with younger patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Voshaar, R. C.; van der Veen, D.C.; Kapur, N.; Hunt, I.; Williams, A.; Pachana, N. A.

    Background: Anxiety disorders are assumed to increase suicide risk, although confounding by comorbid psychiatric disorders may be one explanation. This study describes the characteristics of older patients with an anxiety disorder who died by suicide in comparison to younger patients. Method: A

  4. Suicide attempts and mortality in eating disorders: a follow-up study of eating disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suokas, Jaana T; Suvisaari, Jaana M; Grainger, Marjut; Raevuori, Anu; Gissler, Mika; Haukka, Jari

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the prevalence of hospital-treated suicide attempts in a large clinical population of eating disorder patients. Follow-up study of adults (N=2462, 95% women, age 18-62 years) admitted to the Eating Disorder Clinic of Helsinki University Central Hospital in the period 1995-2010. For each patient, four controls were selected and matched for age, sex and place of residence. The end point events were modeled using Cox's proportional hazard model, taking matching into account. We identified 156 patients with eating disorder (6.3%) and 139 controls (1.4%) who had required hospital treatment for attempted suicide. Of them, 66 (42.3%) and 37 (26.6%) had more than one attempt. The rate ratio (RR) for suicide attempt in patients with eating disorder was 4.70 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.41-15.74]. In anorexia nervosa, RR was 8.01 (95% CI 5.40-11.87), and in bulimia nervosa, it was 5.08 (95% CI 3.46-7.42). In eating disorder patients with a history of suicide attempt, the risk of death from any cause was 12.8%, suicide being the main cause in 45% of the deaths. Suicide attempts and repeated attempts are common among patients with eating disorders. Suicidal ideation should be routinely assessed from patients with eating disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of internet addiction in patient with panic disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Veruska; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; King, Anna Lucia Spear

    2015-01-01

    Problematic Internet use is a worldwide social issue and it can be found in any age, social, educational, or economic range. In some countries like China and South Korea internet addiction (IA) is considered a public health condition and this governments support research, education and treatment. Internet addiction has been associated with others psychiatric disorders. Panic disorder (PD) and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) are anxiety disorders that involve a lot of damages in patient's life. We report a treatment of a patient with Panic Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and internet addition involving pharmacotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy was conducted 1 time per week during 10 weeks and results suggest that the treatment was an effective treatment for the anxiety and for the internet addiction.

  6. Factors associated with overweight and obesity in schizophrenia, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Virginie-Anne; Pingali, Samira M; Chouinard, Guy; Henderson, David C; Mallya, Sonal G; Cypess, Aaron M; Cohen, Bruce M; Öngür, Dost

    2016-03-30

    Evidence suggests abnormal bioenergetic status throughout the body in psychotic disorders. The present study examined predictors of elevated body mass index (BMI) across diagnostic categories of schizophrenia, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders. In a cross-sectional study, we studied demographic and clinical risk factors for overweight and obesity in a well-characterized sample of 262 inpatients and outpatients with schizophrenia (n=59), schizoaffective disorder (n=81) and bipolar I disorder (n=122). Across the three diagnostic categories, the prevalence of overweight (29.4%) and obesity (33.2%) combined was 62.6% (164/262). Logistic regression analyses, adjusted for age, sex and ethnicity, showed that schizoaffective disorder, lifetime major depressive episode, presence of prior suicide attempt, and more than 5 lifetime hospitalizations were significantly associated with BMI≥25. Patients with schizophrenia had significantly lower risk for overweight and obesity. Overall, we found that affective components of illness were associated with elevated BMI in our cross-diagnostic sample. Our results show that patients with schizoaffective disorder have a greater risk for obesity. Identifying predictors of elevated BMI in patients with psychotic and mood disorders will help prevent obesity and related cardiovascular and cerebral complications. Future studies are needed to elucidate the mechanistic nature of the relationship between obesity and psychiatric illness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Personality Traits in Panic Disorder Patients With and Without Comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugliani, Morena M; Martin-Santos, Rocio; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Freire, Rafael Christophe

    2017-11-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is often correlated with high neuroticism and low extraversion. This study aims to ascertain whether PD patients differ from healthy controls in regard to personality traits and determine if these traits are correlated with comorbid disorders, anxiety, and depression symptoms. Personality traits of 69 PD patients and 42 controls were compared using the Maudsley Personality Inventory. In PD patients, comorbidities, anxiety, and depression symptoms were also evaluated. PD patients showed higher neuroticism and lower extraversion compared with healthy controls. Patients without comorbidities presented similar results to controls, whereas those with comorbidities presented higher neuroticism and lower extraversion scores. PD per se may be unrelated to deviant personality traits, although comorbidities with major depressive disorder and agoraphobia are probably associated with high neuroticism and low extraversion. These traits show a strong correlation with the accumulation and severity of these disorders.

  8. Continued antidepressant treatment and suicide in patients with depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergård, Lars; Lopez, Ana Garcia; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2007-01-01

    1995 to 2000, we investigated the relation between continued treatment with antidepressants and suicide in a population of all patients discharged from hospital psychiatry with a diagnosis of depressive disorder. Patients discharged from hospital psychiatry with a diagnosis of depressive disorder had...... of prescriptions. On individualized data from a cohort of patients with a known history of depressive disorder, continued antidepressant treatment was associated with reduced risk of suicide.......Antidepressant use in Denmark, as in many developed countries, has substantially increased during recent years, coinciding with a decreasing suicide rate. In a nationwide observational cohort study with linkage of registers of all prescribed antidepressants and recorded suicides in Denmark from...

  9. Multidisciplinary study: DCD method applied to patients with eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Conese

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders are quite common in clinical practice and can include out-of-control behaviours and thoughts that powerfully reinforce unhealthy eating patterns. They include anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder. We conducted a trial on 102 patients (89 females and 13 males to investigate the efficacy of “DCD method” (appropriate dietary education associated to New-Electrosculpture on patients with obesity and eating disorders. The study underlines the efficacy of “DCD method”, especially when supported by behavioural therapy, in obese and overweight patients.

  10. Correlates of impulsive and hostile behavior in patients with borderline personality disorder and bipolar II disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Shafiee-Kandjani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD suffer from a higher degree of impulsive and hostile behavior, compared with other psychiatric disorders. On the other hand, the impulsive behavior in these patients is different from the patients with type II bipolar disorder (BMD II. This study aimed to investigate the differences between patients with BPD and patients with bipolar disorder in the aggressiveness and impulsivity scales. Methods: A descriptive-analytical study through a convenience sampling method was conducted on 117 patients with BPD (30 patients and BMD II (87 patients who completed the Buss and Perry’s Aggression Questionnaire as well as the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. The obtained data was analyzed in SPSS using Student’s t-test, and its results were considered significant at P < 0.05 level. Results: The two groups were significantly different in terms of attention and cognitive complexity of Barratt Impulsiveness Scales, hostility, physical aggression, as well as in the total score of Buss and Perry’s aggression and hostility questionnaire, in which the scores in patients with BMD in the above-mentioned scales were higher, compared with the BPD and finally, the marital status variable was significantly correlated with age, physical aggression, anger, anxiety, cognitive complexity, and perseverance.Conclusion: The patients with BMD II experienced a higher degree of excitement in terms of hostility, violence and impulsivity measures; it is also different from the patients with borderline disorder in terms of type of aggressiveness.

  11. Stigmatizing experiences of patients with psychiatric disorders and their caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been extensive research on the stigma experienced by patients with psychiatric disorders and their family members. However, very few studies have attempted to compare both the perspectives. Aim: To measure and compare the stigma experienced by patients with psychiatric disorders and their caregivers. Materials and Methods: A total of 143 patients suffering from various psychiatric disorders (including substance use disorders who visited at the psychiatry out-patient clinic were included, along with their family members. In addition to the sociodemographic and clinical variables, they were assessed using a stigma scale (Hindi version. Results: Patients with psychiatric disorders scored significantly higher than their caregivers on the total stigma scale score as well as on the subscales for discrimination, disclosure and positive aspects. Patients with substance dependence as well as their caregivers had highest total stigma score. The mean difference among the patients and caregivers was highest among the obsessive compulsive disorder subgroup (P = 0.012 and lowest among the schizophrenia subgroup (P = 0.045. Conclusion: Stigma and discrimination are deeply rooted among patients and their caregivers. Tackling stigma and discrimination should form an integral part of the therapeutic process.

  12. Childhood abuse in patients with conversion disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, K.; Keijsers, G.P.J.; Hoogduin, C.A.L.; Näring, G.W.B.; Moene, F.C.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Despite the fact that the assumption of a relationship between conversion disorder and childhood traumatization has a long history, there is little empirical evidence to support this premise. The present study examined this relation and investigated whether hypnotic susceptibility

  13. Symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) among adult eating disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedlund, Nils Erik; Norring, Claes; Ginsberg, Ylva; von Hausswolff-Juhlin, Yvonne

    2017-01-17

    Very little is known about the prevalence of ADHD symptoms in Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder and even less in other eating disorders. This knowledge gap is of clinical importance since stimulant treatment is proven effective in Binge Eating Disorder and discussed as a treatment possibility for Bulimia Nervosa. The objective of this study was to explore the prevalence and types of self-reported ADHD symptoms in an unselected group of eating disorder patients assessed in a specialized eating disorder clinic. In total 1165 adults with an eating disorder were assessed with a battery of standardized instruments, for measuring inter alia ADHD screening, demographic variables, eating disorder symptoms and psychiatric comorbidity. Chi-square tests were used for categorical variables and Kruskal-Wallis tests for continuous variables. Almost one third (31.3 %) of the patients scored above the screening cut off indicating a possible ADHD. The highest prevalence rates (35-37 %) were found in Bulimia Nervosa and Anorexia Nervosa bingeing/purging subtype, while Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified type 1-4 and Binge Eating Disorder patients reported slightly below average (26-31 %), and Anorexia Nervosa restricting subtype patients even lower (18 %). Presence of binge eating, purging, loss of control over eating and non-anorectic BMI were related to results indicating a possible ADHD. Psychiatric comorbidity correlated to ADHD symptoms without explaining the differences between eating disorder diagnoses. There is a high frequency of ADHD symptoms in patients with binge eating/purging eating disorders that motivates further studies, particularly concerning the effects of ADHD medication. The finding that the frequency of ADHD symptoms in anorexia nervosa with binge eating/purging is as high as in bulimia nervosa highlights the need also for this group.

  14. Psychiatric disorders of patients seeking obesity treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Hung-Yen; Huang Chih-Kun; Tai Chi-Ming; Lin Hung-Yu; Kao Yu-Hsi; Tsai Ching-Chung; Hsuan Chin-Feng; Lee Su-Long; Chi Shu-Ching; Yen Yung-Chieh

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Obese and overweight people have a higher risk of both chronic physical illness and mental illness. Obesity is reported to be positively associated with psychiatric disorders, especially in people who seek obesity treatment. At the same time, obesity treatment may be influenced by psychological factors or personality characteristics. This study aimed to understand the prevalence of mental disorders among ethnic Chinese who sought obesity treatment. Methods Subjects were re...

  15. Potential risk factors for psychiatric disorders in patients with headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimnuan, Chaichana; Asawavichienjinda, Thanin; Srikiatkhachorn, Anan

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidities are common among patients with headache. These can compromise the quality of life of patients and may affect the result of treatment. No available systematic study concerning this problem has been conducted in Thailand. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and risk factors of psychiatric disorders in patients with headache in tertiary care facility. The study was conducted at the Headache Clinic, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand. One hundred and thirteen patients were enrolled. Diagnosis of headache was made based on International Classification of Headache Disorders II system. Mental disorders were assessed using Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders. Other possible risk factors were extracted using significant physical symptoms count and accumulated risk for mental disorder. Of the 113 samples analyzed, the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and somatoform disorder was found to be 29.2%, 9.7%, and 27.4%, respectively. No definite relationship between headache types and mental disorders was observed. High number of significant physical complaints and health concerns significantly increased the risk for depression (OR = 4.6, 95% CI = 1.6 to 13.5) while the level of possible risk for mental disorder was associated with an increased risk for somatoform disorder (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2 to 2.2). The study confirmed high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in patients with headache. The results of this study will raise the awareness of physicians to possible underlying mental disorders in patients with headache and facilitate appropriate treatment or psychiatric referral. © 2011 American Headache Society.

  16. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of quetiapine in patients with bipolar disorder, mixed or depressed phase, and alcohol dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. Sherwood; Domingo Davila, S.; Nakamura, Alyson; Carmody, Thomas J.; Rush, A. John; Lo, Alexander; Holmes, Traci; Adinoff, Bryon; Caetano, Raul; Swann, Alan C; Sunderajan, Prabha; Bret, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol dependence is common in bipolar disorder (BPD) and associated with treatment non-adherence, violence, and hospitalization. Quetiapine is a standard treatment for BPD. We previously reported improvement in depressive symptoms, but not alcohol use, with quetiapine in BPD and alcohol dependence. However, mean alcohol use was low and a larger effect size on alcohol-related measures was observed in those with higher levels of alcohol consumption. In this study, efficacy of quetiapine in patients with BPD and alcohol dependence was examined in patients with higher mean baseline alcohol use than in the prior study. Methods Ninety outpatients with bipolar I or II disorders, depressed or mixed mood state, and current alcohol dependence were randomized to 12 weeks of sustained release quetiapine (to 600 mg/day) add-on therapy or placebo. Drinking was quantified using the Timeline Follow Back method. Additional assessment tools included the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17), Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology–Self-Report (IDS-SR30), Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), Penn Alcohol Craving Scale (PACS), liver enzymes, and side effects. Alcohol use and mood were analyzed using a declining-effects random-regression model. Results Baseline and demographic characteristics in the two groups were similar. No significant between-group differences were observed on the primary outcome measure of drinks/day or other alcohol-related or mood measures (p>.05). Overall side effect burden, glucose and cholesterol were similar in the two groups. However, a significant weight increase was observed with quetiapine at week 6 (+2.9 lbs [SE 1.4] quetiapine vs. −2.0 lbs [SE 1.4], p=.03), but not at week 12. Scores on the Barnes Akathisia Scale increased significantly more (p=.04) with quetiapine (+0.40 (SE 0.3)) than placebo (−0.52 (SE 0.3)) at week 6 but not week 12. Retention (survival) in the study was similar in the groups. Conclusions Findings suggest that

  17. Psychosocial morbidity associated with bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder in psychiatric out-patients: comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Ellison, William; Morgan, Theresa A; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy

    2015-10-01

    The morbidity associated with bipolar disorder is, in part, responsible for repeated calls for improved detection and recognition. No such commentary exists for the improved detection of borderline personality disorder. Clinical experience suggests that it is as disabling as bipolar disorder, but no study has directly compared the two disorders. To compare the levels of psychosocial morbidity in patients with bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder. Patients were assessed with semi-structured interviews. We compared 307 patients with DSM-IV borderline personality disorder but without bipolar disorder and 236 patients with bipolar disorder but without borderline personality disorder. The patients with borderline personality disorder less frequently were college graduates, were diagnosed with more comorbid disorders, more frequently had a history of substance use disorder, reported more suicidal ideation at the time of the evaluation, more frequently had attempted suicide, reported poorer social functioning and were rated lower on the Global Assessment of Functioning. There was no difference between the two patient groups in history of admission to psychiatric hospital or time missed from work during the past 5 years. The level of psychosocial morbidity associated with borderline personality disorder was as great as (or greater than) that experienced by patients with bipolar disorder. From a public health perspective, efforts to improve the detection and treatment of borderline personality disorder might be as important as efforts to improve the recognition and treatment of bipolar disorder. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  18. Motivation for treatment in patients with personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Nicole; Verheul, Roel

    2008-02-01

    The primary objective of the present study is to investigate the association between DSM-IV personality disorders and motivation for treatment in a large sample of patients admitting for a variety of psychotherapeutic programs (n = 1083). Second, we examine whether and to what extent this association is accounted for by other relevant patient variables (i.e., demographics, subjective distress, and treatment history). We developed a brief questionnaire to measure the motivation for treatment: the Motivation for Treatment Questionnaire (MTQ-8). The MTQ-8 consists of two subscales, i.e., Need for help and Readiness to change. The results show that patients with various personality disorders were significantly more motivated for treatment than those without. No differences across specific personality disorders were apparent. The association between personality disorders and motivation for treatment appeared to be partly accounted for by the level of symptom distress. It is concluded that, among treatment-seeking patients, personality disorders are associated with motivation for treatment and this association can best be understood by the higher symptom distress in patients with personality disorders as compared to those without personality disorders.

  19. Intellectual functioning of adolescent and adult patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilder, Christina M T; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Snellen, Wim M; Sternheim, Lot C; Hoek, Hans W; Danner, Unna N

    2017-05-01

    Intelligence is a known vulnerability marker in various psychiatric disorders. In eating disorders (ED) intelligence has not been studied thoroughly. Small-scale studies indicate that intelligence levels might be above general population norms, but larger scale studies are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine intellectual functioning in ED patients and associations with severity of the disorder. Wechsler's Full scale IQ (FSIQ), Verbal IQ (VIQ) and Performance IQ (PIQ) of 703 adolescent and adult ED patients were compared with population norms. Exploratory analyzes were performed on associations between IQ and both somatic severity (BMI and duration of the disorder) and psychological/behavioral severity (Eating Disorder Inventory [EDI-II] ratings) of the ED. Mean IQ's were significantly higher than population means and effect-sizes were small-to-medium (d = .28, .16 and .23 for VIQ, PIQ, and FSIQ). No linear associations between IQ and BMI were found, but the most severely underweight adult anorexia nervosa (AN) patients (BMI ≤ 15) had higher VIQ (107.7) than the other adult AN patients (VIQ 102.1). In adult AN patients PIQ was associated with psychological/behavioral severity of the ED. Our findings suggest that, in contrast with other severe mental disorders where low intelligence is a risk factor, higher than average intelligence might increase the vulnerability to develop an ED. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:481-489). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Patients profiles and outcomes of care in temporomandibular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, N.

    2018-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are a frequent disease in general population. Patients with TMDs may have orofacial pain, jaw functional limitation and joint sounds, which may negatively affect patients’ physical and psychological wellbeing. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA) and

  1. The care needs of elderly patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, P.D.; Comijs, H.C.; Dröes, R.M.; de Haan, L.; Smit, J.H.; Eikelenboom, P.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Stek, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Elderly patients constitute the fastest growing segment of the schizophrenia population. Still, their needs for care are poorly understood. This study aimed to gain insight into the care needs of older patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Setting and Participants: Patients,

  2. Health Care Provider Accommodations for Patients with Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michael I.; Baylor, Carolyn; Dudgeon, Brian J.; Starks, Helene; Yorkston, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Health care providers can experience increased diffculty communicating with adult patients during medical interactions when the patients have communication disorders. Meeting the communication needs of these patients can also create unique challenges for providers. The authors explore Communication Accommodation Theory (H. Giles, 1979) as a guide…

  3. Suicidality in primary care patients with somatoform disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiborg, J.F.; Gieseler, D.; Fabisch, A.B.; Voigt, K.; Lautenbach, A.; Lowe, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine rates of suicidality in primary care patients with somatoform disorders and to identify factors that might help to understand and manage active suicidal ideation in these patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study screening 1645 primary care patients. In total, 142

  4. Social functioning in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saris, I M J; Aghajani, M; van der Werff, S J A; van der Wee, N J A; Penninx, B W J H

    2017-10-01

    Adaptive social functioning is severely impeded in depressive and anxiety disorders, even after remission. However, a comprehensive overview is still lacking. Using data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA), behavioural (network size, social activities, social support) and affective (loneliness, affiliation, perceived social disability) indicators of social functioning were analyzed in patients with anxiety (N = 540), depressive (N = 393), comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders ('comorbid', N = 748), remitted participants (N = 621), and healthy control subjects (N = 650). Analyses revealed an increasing trend of social dysfunction among patient groups, in patients with comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders, showing the most severe impairments, followed by depressed and anxious patients (P's social functioning indicators). Affective indicators showed the largest effect sizes (Cohen's d range from 0.13 to 1.76). We also found impairments in social functioning among remitted patients. Furthermore, perceived social disability among patients was predictive of still having a depressive and/or anxiety diagnosis 2 years later (P social functioning are impaired in patients with anxiety or depressive disorders and most in patients with comorbid disorders. After remission of affective psychopathology, residual impairments tend to remain, while social dysfunction in patients seems predictive of future psychopathology. © 2017The Authors. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Mental disorders in patients with acute necrotic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Dejan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The prognosis of patients with acute pancreatitis is still uncertain regardless of modern therapeutic procedures. It is even more emphasized if the acute pancreatitis is followed by psychic disorders. Objective The aim of the study was to provide an overview of the incidence of certain psychosomatic disorders in patients with acute pancreatitis and evaluate priority therapeutic procedures. Method In this study, we analyzed 16 patients with psychosomatic disorders followed by the episode of acute pancreatitis among 202 patients that were hospitalized in the period from 1993 until 2000. The diagnosis was based on anamnesis, clinical and laboratory findings and diagnostic procedures such as X-ray, US, CT and MRI. Results Among 16 patients with psychosomatic disorders followed by acute pancreatitis, 13 (81.25% patients were operated on and 3 (18.75% patients were medically treated. 6 patients experienced hallucinations, 5 memory deficiency, 16 disorientation and 14 confabulation. Conclusion Psychosomatic disorders in patients with acute pancreatitis require complex medical treatment. Due to the already mentioned complications, the management of these conditions is very difficult and with uncertain.

  6. Clinical Characteristics of Comorbid Narcissistic Personality Disorder in Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörz-Sagstetter, Susanne; Diamond, Diana; Clarkin, John F; Levy, Kenneth N; Rentrop, Michael; Fischer-Kern, Melitta; Cain, Nicole M; Doering, Stephan

    2017-07-31

    This study examines psychopathology and clinical characteristics of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and comorbid narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) from two international randomized controlled trials. From a combined sample of 188 patients with BPD, 25 also fulfilled criteria for a comorbid diagnosis of NPD according to DSM-IV. The BPD patients with comorbid NPD, compared to the BPD patients without comorbid NPD, showed significantly more BPD criteria (M = 7.44 vs. M = 6.55, p histrionic (M = 3.84 vs. M = 1.98, p personality disorders, and were more likely to meet criteria for full histrionic PD diagnosis (44.0% vs. 14.2%, p disorders (M = 2.68 vs. M = 3.75, p = .033). No differences could be found in general functioning, self-harming behavior, and suicide attempts.

  7. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Di Paolo, Carlo; D'Urso, Anna; Papi, Piero; Di Sabato, Francesco; Rosella, Daniele; Pompa, Giorgio; Polimeni, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs). The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD’s symptoms. Material and Methods. A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two group...

  8. Patient- and clinician- reported outcome in eating disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Laura Vad; Frølich, Jacob Stampe; Gudex, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome is increasingly applied in health sciences. Patients with eating disorders (EDs) characteristically have a different opinion of their needs to that of the health professionals, which can lead to ambivalence towards treatment and immense compliance difficulties. This cross......-sectional study compared data assessed by the clinician to patient-reported measures in patients with a history of EDs. We included data from a cohort of patients with EDs (n=544) referred to a specialized ED unit in Denmark. Patient-reported measures included the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2) and the Short...... Form 36 (SF-36), and clinical data included remission status and body mass index (BMI). We found a positive association between BMI and EDI-2 scores for anorexia nervosa (AN) and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS), reflecting increasing ED symptomatology with increasing BMI...

  9. Cardiovascular profiles of scleroderma patients with arrhythmias and conduction disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Muresan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Arrhythmias and conduction disorders are common among patients with scleroderma. Their early identification is important, since scleroderma patients with arrhythmias have a higher mortality risk compared with scleroderma patients without arrhythmias. The aim of this study was to characterize the cardiovascular profiles of scleroderma patients with different types of arrhythmias and conduction disorders. Methods One hundred and ten consecutive patients with a diagnosis of systemic sclerosis according to the ACR criteria were included in the study. Patients underwent a 12-lead ECG and a 24-hour Holter ECG monitoring for arrhythmias and conduction disorders identification. Blood sample testing, echocardiography, spirometry, chest X-ray and, when considered appropriate, high resolution chest CT were also performed. A subgroup of 21 patients underwent NT-pro BNP level measurements. Patients’ clinical and para-clinical characteristics were compared according to the presence or absence of arrhythmias and conduction disorders. Results The prevalence of arrhythmia and conduction disturbances was 60.9%. Patients with such disorders were older (54.4 ± 13.3 vs. 49.7 ± 10.1 years, p=0.05, had a higher prevalence of pulmonary hypertension (p=0.008, valve disease (p < 0.001, especially mitral and tricuspid regurgitation, chamber enlargement on echocardiography (left atrial and right ventricular, p = 0.012 and 0.005, respectively as well as higher NT-pro BNP levels: 265.5 ± 399.7 vs. 163 ± 264.3 pg/ml, p=0.04. Conclusion Arrhythmias and conduction disorders are common in patients with scleroderma. Patients with such disorders are older, have a higher prevalence of pulmonary hypertension, more severe mitral and tricuspid regurgitation, left atrial and right ventricular dilation on echocardiography.

  10. Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Patients Seeking Abdominoplasty, Rhinoplasty, and Rhytidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito, Maria José Azevedo; Nahas, Fábio Xerfan; Cordás, Táki Athanássios; Tavares, Hermano; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2016-02-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder may negatively affect self-perception of body shape and lead patients to seek cosmetic surgery. This study estimates the level of body dissatisfaction and prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms in candidates for three plastic surgical procedures. Three hundred patients of both sexes divided into three groups (abdominoplasty, n = 90; rhinoplasty, n =151; and rhytidectomy, n =59) were classified as having (n =51, n =79, and n =25, respectively) or not having (n =39, n =72, and n =34, respectively) body dysmorphic disorder symptoms, based on the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination, which was administered preoperatively. Prevalence rates of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms in the abdominoplasty, rhinoplasty, and rhytidectomy groups were 57, 52, and 42 percent, respectively. Significant between-group differences were observed regarding age (p body mass index (p = 0.001), and onset of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms (p body dysmorphic disorder severity were observed in the abdominoplasty (p Body dysmorphic disorder severity was significantly associated with degree of body dissatisfaction (mean Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination total scores; p < 0.001), avoidance behaviors (p< 0.001), sexual abuse (p = 0.026), suicidal ideation (p < 0.001), and suicide attempt (p = 0.012). Abdominoplasty candidates showed the highest prevalence; rhytidectomy candidates exhibited the highest percentage of severe cases, and rhinoplasty candidates had the lowest percentage of severe cases.

  11. Early maladaptive schemas in patients with bipolar and unipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdin, Selçuk; Sarisoy, Gökhan; Şahin, Ahmet Rıfat; Arik, Ali Cezmi; Özyıldız Güz, Hatice; Böke, Ömer; Karabekiroğlu, Aytül

    2018-06-01

    The aim of our study is to determine the difference between the bipolar disorder, unipolar disorder and control groups in terms of maladaptive schemes and childhood trauma. Two groups of patients under monitoring with a diagnosis of bipolar or unipolar disorder and one group of healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Each group consisted of 60 subjects. The Young Mania Rating Scale and Beck Depression Inventory were used to confirm that patients were in remission. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and Young Schema Questionnaire-Short Form 3 were used to identify childhood traumas and early maladaptive schemas. In bipolar disorder, a positive, low power correlation was observed between the vulnerability to threats schema and emotional, physical and sexual abuse. In the unipolar disorder group, there was a positive, low power correlation between the emotional inhibition, failure, approval seeking, dependence, abandonment and defectiveness schemas and social isolation, and a positive, moderate correlation between social isolation and emotional abuse. Individuals with bipolar disorder suffered greater childhood trauma compared to subjects with unipolar disorder and healthy individuals. Greater maladaptive schema activation were present in individuals with bipolar disorder compared to those with unipolar disorder and healthy individuals.

  12. Patient Selection in Plastic Surgery: Recognizing Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihan Sahin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Plastic surgery is a branch of medicine that provides significant improvements to the people with positive changes. But first of all, this branch has a characteristic which requires analysing patients' psychological situation very carefully. Plastic surgeons are often confronted by patients with mental disorders seeking aesthetic surgery. It is imperative for surgeons to recognize possible underlying psychiatric illnesses. Common psychiatric conditions seen in cosmetic surgery patients include body dysmorphic disorder (BDD, narcissistic personality disorder and histrionic personality disorders. BDD is of particular importance to plastic surgeons. Because outrageous dissatisfaction with one's appearance may conceal psychopathologic traits that are not always easily recognizable, and which, if neglected, may result in serious iatrogenic and medicolegal consequences, we hope that this paper will help plastic surgeons in ultimately preventing patient and surgeon dissatisfaction within the population of patients with psychiatric disorders, and should recognize the diagnostic features of body dysmorphic disorder and screen psychologically unstable patients who may never be satisfied with surgery. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(2.000: 109-115

  13. Proinflammatory cytokine levels in patients with conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiyekli, Utkan; Calıyurt, Okan; Tiyekli, Nimet Dilek

    2013-06-01

    It was aimed to evaluate the relationship between proinflammatory cytokine levels and conversion disorder both commonly known as stress regulated. Baseline proinflammatory cytokine levels-[Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6)]-were evaluated with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 35 conversion disorder patients and 30 healthy controls. Possible changes in proinflammatory cytokine levels were evaluated again, after their acute phase in conversion disorder patients. Statistically significant decreased serum TNF-α levels were obtained in acute phase of conversion disorder. Those levels increased after acute conversion phase. There were no statistically significant difference observed between groups in serum IL-1β and (IL-6) levels. Stress associated with conversion disorder may suppress immune function in acute conversion phase and may have diagnostic and therapeutic value.

  14. Cognitive distortions in obese patients with or without eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volery, M; Carrard, I; Rouget, P; Archinard, M; Golay, A

    2006-12-01

    In the normal weight population, cognitive distortions are more often found in people with eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia than in a control population. With these cognitive distortions, weight and body image become central elements in self-esteem. This exploratory study investigated cognitive distortions in obese patients suffering from binge eating disorder or not. The hypothesis was that the patients suffering from binge eating disorder would have more cognitive distortions. Twenty-nine obese women (11 without and 18 with binge eating disorder) and 13 non-obese female controls were selected. To evaluate the cognitive distortions, subjects completed the Mizes Anorectic Cognitions-Revised (MAC-R) questionnaire. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found no difference in evidence between the two obese groups with or without eating disorders. Possible perspectives for treatment are discussed.

  15. Rapid Relief of Catatonia in Mood Disorder by Lorazepam and Diazepam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chi Huang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Catatonia has risks of severe morbidity and mortality and needs early treatment. In this study, we investigated more patients to discuss the efficacy of this treatment in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD or bipolar I disorder (BPI. Methods: During a period of 9 years, we identified 12 catatonic patients with mood disorder, with MDD (n = 10 and BPI (n = 2 in the emergency department, inpatient and outpatient units of a general hospital. The patients received intramuscular injection (IMI of 2 mg lorazepam once or twice during the first 2 h. If intramuscular lorazepam failed, intravenous dripping (IVD of 10 mg diazepam in 500 mL normal saline every 8 h for 1 day was prescribed. Results: Eight patients had full remission of catatonia after receiving one dose of 2 mg lorazepam IMI. Two patients needed two doses of 2 mg lorazepam IMI. Two patients with BPI recovered from catatonia using one dose of 10 mg diazepam IVD over 8 h after they failed to respond to two doses of 2 mg lorazepam IMI. The response rate to lorazepam IMI was 83.3%. All catatonic features remitted in 24 h with 100% response rate. Conclusions: The lorazepam-diazepam treatment strategy is a safe and effective method to relieve catatonia in mood disorder within 1 day. Psychiatrist consultation is helpful for final diagnosis and rapid treatment of catatonia.

  16. INTERNET ADDICTION IN PATIENTS WITH SUBSTANCE USE DISORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariella Pass

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to further investigate the relationship between internet addiction and substance use disorder by exploring the prevalence of internet addiction among patients in a substance use disorder treatment clinic and to investigate the frequency with which internet addiction co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders in this population. Method: A survey, containing questions based on the nine criteria for internet gaming disorder proposed in the research appendix to DSM-5, was administered at 24 outpatient clinics for substance use disorders within the Stockholm Centre for Dependency Disorders. Data concerning additional psychiatric diagnoses was collected from patient medical records. A total of 569 patients participated, after excluding those with missing data as well as participants who primarily gambled online, the final sample size was N=462. Results: In total, 4.1% of the surveyed patients with substance use disorder met at least five out of nine internet addiction criteria at a level of “Fairly true” or higher, and reported at least “Some suffering” as a consequence of their internet use. An independent-samples t-test comparing the mean of the total internet addiction score between groups of patients with additional psychiatric diagnoses and the rest of the sample showed that participants with any one additional non-substance related psychiatric diagnose as well as those with an anxiety diagnose had significantly higher internet addiction scores than the rest of the sample. There were no significant differences in mean internet addiction scores between participants with ADHD or depression and the remaining sample. Conclusions: This study provides preliminary evidence to suggest that internet addiction does not constitute a major clinical issue for patients in treatment for substance use disorder, lending little support to the suggestion that internet-related problem behaviours share pathophysiology with

  17. Sleep disorders in pediatric chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabouli, Stella; Papadimitriou, Eleni; Printza, Nikoleta; Dotis, John; Papachristou, Fotios

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of sleep disorders during childhood has been estimated to range from 25 to 43 %. The aim of this review is to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders and possible associations with chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related factors and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in children with CKD. An electronic systematic literature search for sleep disorders in children with CKD in Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library Databases identified seven relevant articles for review, all of which reported an increased prevalence of sleep disorders in children with CKD. Five studies included children with CKD undergoing dialysis, and two studies included only non-dialysis patients. In all studies the presence of sleep disturbances was assessed by questionnaires; only one study compared the results of a validated questionnaire with laboratory-based polysomnography. The prevalence of any sleep disorder ranged from 77 to 85 % in dialysis patients, to 32-50 % in transplanted patients and 40-50 % in non-dialysis patients. The most commonly studied disorder was restless legs syndrome, which presented at a prevalence of 10-35 %. Three studies showed significant associations between presence of sleep disorders and HRQOL. We found consistent evidence of an increased prevalence of sleep disturbances in children with CKD, and these seemed to play a critical role in HRQOL.

  18. Assessment of Personality Problems among Patients with Substance Use Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien Ingebjørg Aspeland

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM – Several studies have shown that personality disorders (PDs are frequently occurring among patients with substance use disorders (SUDs. A development from research of co-occurrence estimates in this patient group investigates personality problems as dimensional constructs, which seek to capture the core of personality pathology. The aim of our study was to explore whether personality problems might be assessed among SUD patients in early stages of treatment. We also sought to investigate personality problem severity among Norwegian adult SUD patients.

  19. [Outcome of eating disorder patients treated in tertiary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suokas, Jaana; Gissler, Mika; Haukka, Jari; Linna, Milla; Raevuori, Anu; Suvisaari, Jaana

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the outcome of eating disorder patients treated in a specialized treatment setting. Register-based follow-up study of adults (n = 2 450, 95% women, age range 18-62 years). For each patient four background-matched controls were selected. The hazard ratio for all-cause mortality was 6.51 in anorexia, 2.97 in bulimia and 1.77 in BED. Autoimmune diseases were more common in patients than in controls. Bulimia and BED were associated with increased type 2 diabetes risk. Pregnancy and childbirth rates were lower among patients than among controls. Eating disorders are associated with multiple health problems and increased mortality risk.

  20. Seasonal concordance of recurrence in mood disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbini, B; Di Molfetta, D; Gasperini, M; Manfredonia, M; Smeraldi, E

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the seasonal pattern of recurrences and the concordance among first episode (index episode) versus the subsequent recurrences in a sample of 210 patients affected by mood disorders, referred to the Mood Disorder Unit of San Raffaele Hospital. The most depressive recurrences are in spring for unipolar subjects and in fall for bipolars. Manic episodes are more frequent in summer. Patients presented a high concordance rate between the first and the second episode, female patients were more concordant than male subjects, and patients with low cycle of illness (one episode every six or more years) were the most concordant ones.

  1. Hypnotic susceptibility in patients with conversion disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, K.; Hoogduin, C.A.L.; Keijsers, G.P.J.; Näring, G.W.B.; Moene, F.C.; Sandijck, P.

    2002-01-01

    Conversion disorder has been associated with hypnotic susceptibility for over a century and is currently still believed to be a form of autohypnosis. There is, however. little empirical evidence for the relation between hypnotic susceptibility and conversion symptoms. The authors compared 50

  2. Attachment and parenting in adult patients with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Angelo; Caroppo, Emanuele; Fabi, Elisa; Proietti, Serena; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Meldolesi, Giulio Nicolò; Martinotti, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The literature suggests that dysfunctional parenting and insecure attachment may increase risk of anxiety-related psychopathology. This study aimed at testing the association between anxiety disorders, attachment insecurity and dysfunctional parenting while controlling for factors usually not controlled for in previous studies, such as gender, age, and being ill. A sample of 32 non-psychotic inpatients with SCID-I diagnosis of an anxiety disorder, either alone or in comorbidity, was compared with two age- and sex-matched control groups consisting of 32 non-clinical participants and 32 in-patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Study measures included the Experience in Close Relationships questionnaire (ECR) and the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI). The patients with anxiety disorders scored significantly higher on attachment-related anxiety and avoidance than patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and non-clinical participants. These findings were independent of comorbidity for mood disorders. ECR scores did not differ among diagnostic subgroups (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, other anxiety disorders). Patients with anxiety disorders scored significantly lower on PBI mother's care and borderline significantly lower on PBI father's care than patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Although limitations such as the relatively small sample size and the cross-sectional nature suggest caution in interpreting these findings, they are consistent with the few previous adult studies performed on this topic and corroborate Bowlby's seminal hypothesis of a link between negative attachment-related experiences, attachment insecurity, and clinical anxiety. Attachment theory provides a useful theoretical framework for integrating research findings from several fields concerning the development of anxiety disorders and for planning therapeutic interventions.

  3. Cerebral glucose metabolic differences in patients with panic disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordahl, T.E.; Semple, W.E.; Gross, M.; Mellman, T.A.; Stein, M.B.; Goyer, P.; King, A.C.; Uhde, T.W.; Cohen, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Regional glucose metabolic rates were measured in patients with panic disorder during the performance of auditory discrimination. Those regions examined by Reiman and colleagues in their blood flow study of panic disorder were examined with a higher resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner and with the tracer [F-18]-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG). In contrast to the blood flow findings of Reiman et al., we did not find global gray metabolic differences between patients with panic disorder and normal controls. Consistent with the findings of Reiman et al., we found hippocampal region asymmetry. We also found metabolic decreases in the left inferior parietal lobule and in the anterior cingulate (trend), as well as an increase in the metabolic rate of the medial orbital frontal cortex (trend) of panic disorder patients. It is unclear whether the continuous performance task (CPT) enhanced or diminished findings that would have been noted in a study performed without task

  4. Pituitary volumes are changed in patients with conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Murad; Baykara, Sema; Mermi, Osman; Yildirim, Hanefi; Akaslan, Unsal

    2016-03-01

    Our study group previously measured pituitary volumes and found a relationship between somatoform disoders and pituitary volumes. Therefore, in conversion disorder, another somatoform disorder, we hypothesized that pituitary gland volumes would be reduced. Twenty female patients and healthy controls were recruited to the present investigation. The volumes of the pituitary gland were determined by using a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner. We found that the pituitary gland volumes of the patients with conversion disorder were significantly smaller than those of healthy control subjects. In the patients with conversion disorder but not in the healthy control group, a significant negative correlation between the duration of illness and pituitary gland volume was determined. In summary, in the present study, we suggest that the patients with conversion disorder have smaller pituitary volumes compared to those of healthy control subjects. Further studies should confirm our data and ascertain whether volumetric alterations determined in the patients with conversion disorder can be changed with treatment or if they change over time.

  5. [Personality disorders in adolescent patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottin, Julia; Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Schneider, Nora; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lenz, Klaus; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike

    2010-09-01

    The present study aimed to ascertain the occurrence of personality disorders (PD) in adolescent patients with anorexia (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II). 99 female adolescent patients (57 AN - restrictive type, 17 AN - binge-purging type, 25 BN; M(age) = 16.3 +/- 1.6) were consecutively assessed by means of SCID-II. Furthermore, the influence of age, axis-I-comorbidities, and type of treatment according to PD were examined. 30.3% of the patients met the criteria for PD according to SCID-II. AN patients of the binge-purging type showed higher prevalences of PD and higher dimensional scores than the other eating disorder groups. Moreover, our findings indicate that age and axis-I-comorbidities are associated with the development of PD. Significant differences in the occurrence of PD in the three eating disorder groups were found. Patients of the AN binge-purging type are more often affected than restricting AN or BN patients are. This, and also the influence of age and axis-I-comorbidities, should be taken into account in the treatment of patients with eating disorders.

  6. Depression and major depressive disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Tanaka, Teruaki; Nakagawa, Shin; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2010-01-15

    The prevalence of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) varies greatly. In this study, we investigated major depressive disorder (MDD) and depressive symptoms without MDD in patients with PD. The psychopathological characteristics of depressive symptoms were assessed by a psychiatric interview. A total of 105 Japanese patients with PD without dementia were included. The Japanese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) with a cutoff score of 13/14 was used to screen for depression. Using a structured interview, a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation of patients with BDI-II scores >13 (high BDI patients) was completed using the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR. Forty patients (38%) had a BDI-II >13, but 29 did not show any depressed mood. Five cases met the criteria for MDD (three current, two past) and one patient was diagnosed with minor depressive disorder. A slight depressed mood that was associated with worrying about PD was seen in 6 of 34 patients without any depressive disorder and fluctuated with aggravation of PD symptoms in two of these patients. For the diagnosis of MDD, the number of positive items from the DSM-IV-TR definition of MDD is most important and useful for differentiating MDD and non-MDD. The low-prevalence rate of MDD in our patient population suggests that PD may be a psychological stressor for MDD, but does not necessarily induce MDD.

  7. Suicide and suicide attempts in people with severe mental disorders in Butajira, Ethiopia: 10 year follow-up of a population-based cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background People with severe mental disorders (SMD) are at higher risk of suicide. However, research into suicide attempts and completed suicide in people with SMD in low- and middle-income countries is mostly limited to patients attending psychiatric facilities where selection bias is likely to be high. Methods A population-based cohort of 919 people with SMD from rural Ethiopia (who received standardized clinician diagnoses of schizophrenia (n = 358) major depressive disorder (n = 216) and bipolar I disorder (n = 345)) were followed up annually for an average of 10 years. The Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation chart was administered by psychiatrists and used to evaluate systematically suicidal behavior and risk factors, which may be amenable to intervention. Results Over the follow-up period, the cumulative risk of suicide attempt was 26.3% for major depression, 23.8% for bipolar I disorder and 13.1% for schizophrenia, (p suicide was 200.2/100,000 person-years (CI = 120.6, 312.5). Hanging was the most frequent method used (71.5%) for both attempters and completers. Most people who completed suicide were successful on the first attempt (84.2%), but the case-fatality rate for suicide attempt was 9.7%. In the adjusted logistic regression model, being currently married (Adjusted OR) =2.17, 95% CI = 1.21, 3.91), and having a diagnosis of bipolar I disorder (Adjusted OR = 2.59, 95% CI = 1.57, 4.26) or major depression (Adjusted OR = 2.71, 95% CI = 1.60, 4.58) were associated significantly with increased risk of suicide attempts. Conclusion In this sample of people with SMD from a rural setting, the rate of suicide was high. Initiatives to integrate mental health service into primary care need to focus on limiting access to suicide methods in people with SMD in addition to expanding access to mental health care. PMID:24886518

  8. A randomized, controlled, pilot study of dialectical behavior therapy skills in a psychoeducational group for individuals with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, Sheri; Jeffrey, Janet; Katz, Mark R

    2013-03-05

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic and disabling psychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of mania/hypomania and depression. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) techniques have been shown to effectively treat borderline personality disorder, a condition also marked by prominent affective disturbances. The utility of DBT techniques in treating BD has been largely unexplored. The purpose of this research was to conduct a pilot study of a DBT-based psychoeducational group (BDG) in treating euthymic, depressed, or hypomanic Bipolar I or II patients. In this experiment, 26 adults with bipolar I or II were randomized to intervention or wait-list control groups and completed the Beck depression inventory II, mindfulness-based self-efficacy scale, and affective control scale at baseline and 12 weeks. The BDG intervention consisted of 12 weekly 90-min sessions which taught DBT skills, mindfulness techniques, and general BD psychoeducation. Using RM-ANOVA, subjects in BDG demonstrated a trend toward reduced depressive symptoms, and significant improvement in several MSES subscales indicating greater mindful awareness, and less fear toward and more control of emotional states (ACS). These findings were supported with a larger sample of patients who completed the BDG. Furthermore, group attendees had reduced emergency room visits and mental health related admissions in the six months following BDG. The small sample size in RCT affects power to detect between group differences. How well improvements after the12-week BDG were maintained is unknown. There is preliminary evidence that DBT skills reduce depressive symptoms, improve affective control, and improve mindfulness self-efficacy in BD. Its application warrants further evaluation in larger studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Association between history of psychosis and cardiovascular disease in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Miguel L; McElroy, Susan L; Hayes, Sharonne N; Sutor, Bruce; Kung, Simon; Bobo, William V; Fuentes, Manuel E; Cuellar-Barboza, Alfredo B; Crow, Scott; Ösby, Urban; Chauhan, Mohit; Westman, Jeanette; Geske, Jennifer R; Colby, Colin L; Ryu, Euijung; Biernacka, Joanna M; Frye, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    To determine whether clinical features of bipolar disorder, such as history of psychosis, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors contribute to a higher risk of CVD among patients with bipolar disorder. This cross-sectional study included a sample of 988 patients with bipolar I or bipolar II disorder or schizoaffective bipolar type confirmed by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR disorders (SCID). Medical comorbidity burden was quantified utilizing the Cumulative Illness Severity Rating Scale (CIRS). This 13-item organ-based scale includes cardiac disease severity quantification. Confirmed by medical record review, patients who scored 1 (current mild or past significant problem) or higher in the cardiac item were compared by logistic regression to patients who scored 0 (no impairment), adjusting for CVD risk factors that were selected using a backwards stepwise approach or were obtained from the literature. In a multivariate model, age [odds ratio (OR) = 3.03, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.66-5.54, p bipolar disorder may reflect higher illness severity with associated cardiac comorbidity. Further studies are encouraged to clarify the effect of the disease burden (i.e., depression), lifestyle, and treatment interventions (i.e., atypical antipsychotics) on this risk association. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Executive function in cancer patients with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Guo, Juncheng; Jiang, Xiangling

    2017-03-01

    Background Cancer patients with posttraumatic stress disorder can lead to their noncompliant behaviors. However, less is known about the neurocognitive functioning of posttraumatic stress disorder in general cancer types or patient populations. The current study attempted to examine the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder and their relationships with executive function in individuals with cancer. Methods A total of 285 cancer patients with posttraumatic stress disorder and 150 healthy individuals were recruited for the present study. The Clinician Administered PTSD Scale, Tower of Hanoi, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised Chinese revision were administered to all participants. Results Significant differences in the score of Tower of Hanoi, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised Chinese revision were observed between the posttraumatic stress disorder group and the healthy control group ( p posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and executive function. Conclusions These findings suggest that individuals with cancer-related posttraumatic stress disorder exhibit more severe impairment in executive function than healthy controls do.

  11. Clinical characteristics of the respiratory subtype in panic disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hye-Min; Kim, Ji-Hae; Heo, Jung-Yoon; Yu, Bum-Hee

    2014-10-01

    Panic disorder has been suggested to be divided into the respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes in terms of its clinical presentations. The present study aimed to investigate whether there are any differences in treatment response and clinical characteristics between the respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes of panic disorder patients. Among the 48 patients those who completed the study, 25 panic disorder patients were classified as the respiratory subtype, whereas 23 panic disorder patients were classified as the non-respiratory subtype. All patients were treated with escitalopram or paroxetine for 12 weeks. We measured clinical and psychological characteristics before and after pharmacotherapy using the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS), Albany Panic and Phobic Questionnaire (APPQ), Anxiety Sensitivity Index-Revised (ASI-R), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T, STAI-S), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). The prevalence of the agoraphobia was significantly higher in the respiratory group than the non-respiratory group although there were no differences in gender and medication between the two groups. The respiratory group showed higher scores on the fear of respiratory symptoms of the ASI-R. In addition, after pharmacotherapy, the respiratory group showed more improvement in panic symptoms than the non-respiratory group. Panic disorder patients with the respiratory subtype showed more severe clinical presentations, but a greater treatment response to SSRIs than those with non-respiratory subtype. Thus, classification of panic disorder patients as respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes may be useful to predict clinical course and treatment response to SSRIs.

  12. Postanesthesia emergence in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umholtz, Matthew; Cilnyk, John; Wang, Christopher K; Porhomayon, Jahan; Pourafkari, Leili; Nader, Nader D

    2016-11-01

    Recovery from anesthesia may be complicated with development of severe panic symptoms and anxiety. Preexisting anxiety disorder has been reported as a risk factor for development of these symptoms. We aimed to examine the frequency of emergence delirium (EDL) among veterans diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSDs). Retrospective cohort. Postoperative recovery area. Perioperative information of 1763 consecutive patients who underwent a surgical procedure requiring general anesthesia were collected. The patients were grouped on the basis of previous diagnosis of PTSD. A total of 317 patients were identified with a positive history of PTSD and were compared to 1446 patients without such a history for the occurrence of EDL in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) as the primary endpoint. Duration of stay in PACU in minutes and the frequency of hospital admission were the secondary endpoints. Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the predictors of EDL among the veteran population. Emergence delirium was reported in 37 cases (2.1%) after general anesthesia. Fifteen (4.7%) of 317 patients with PTSD and 22 (1.5%) of 1446 patients without history of PTSD demonstrated symptoms related to EDL in the PACU (P=.002). After propensity matching, there were 8 patients with EDL in the PTSD group whereas there were only 2 patients with EDL among controls. Posttraumatic stress disorder was also an independent predictor of EDL in multivariate analysis with an odds ratio of 6.66 and a 95% confidence interval of 2.04 to 21.72 (P=.002). Posttraumatic stress disorder independently predicted the frequency of EDL even after correcting for preexisting depression and anxiety disorders. A relatively longer duration of PACU stay in PTSD patients may reflect raised awareness of the health care workers about this debilitating mental disorder. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Symptom dimensions of affective disorders in migraine patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louter, M. A.; Pijpers, J. A.; Wardenaar, K. J.; van Zwet, E. W.; van Hemert, A. M.; Zitman, F. G.; Ferrari, M. D.; Penninx, B. W.; Tervvindt, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A strong association has been established between migraine and depression. However, this is the first study to differentiate in a large sample of migraine patients for symptom dimensions of the affective disorder spectrum. Methods: Migraine patients (n = 3174) from the LUMINA (Leiden

  14. Schizophrenia and personality disorder patients' adherence to music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Niels Jørgensen; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard; Hestbæk, Trine Lundsfryd

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a random sample of patients receiving music therapy for variables predicting drop out from music therapy treatment. Method: All 27 pt with the diagnosis F 20 and F 60 were included. As explanatory variables were used 3 groups: Sociodemographic variables, psychiatric vari...... that patients with schizophrenia and personality disorder complete the music therapy treatment....

  15. Medical and mental disorders in elderly patients seen at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forty-one patients had more than one disease occurring in an individual. Cardiovascular diseases were the commonest occurring medical problems; degenerative, neoplastic and infectious diseases were also common. Mental disorders were diagnosed in only 2% of the patients with one case of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Effects of induced anger in patients with antisocial personality disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbestael, J.; Arntz, A.R.; Cima, M.; Chakhssi, F.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Anger is the main deregulated emotion in patients with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). The aim of this study was to examine emotional, cognitive and physiological correlates of anger and compare these between ASPD patients with varying degree of psychopathy (PP) and control

  17. Temporomandibular disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and type of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Materials and Methods: Fifty‑four patients having RA treatment at Cukurova University in Rheumatology Clinic were enrolled to the study. Demographic and rheumatologic ...

  18. Family Functionality and Coping Attitudes of Patients with Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çuhadar, Döndü; Savaş, Haluk Asuman; Ünal, Ahmet; Gökpınar, Fatma

    2015-10-01

    The coping of patients with prodromal syndromes prevents relapses, and the differences in coping strategies affect the results of bipolar disorder. The various functionality levels of bipolar disorder patients such as work, marital relations, parental abilities and social presentation are significantly related with how well they cope. The objective of this study was to determine the family functionality and coping attitudes of bipolar disorder patients. The study planned as a descriptive one was carried with 81 bipolar disorder patients. Personal description form, family assessment device and Coping Attitudes Scale were used as data acquisition tools. It was determined that the adaptive coping attitudes used most frequently by the patients were religious coping, positive reinterpretation, active coping, problem-focused coping and emotional focused coping, beneficial social support use, emotional social support use, planning, suppression of competing activities and restraint coping; maladaptive coping attitudes used most frequently by the patients were "focusing on the problem and venting of emotions and mental disengagement." It was determined that family functions affected the coping attitudes of patients and that the patients who evaluated family functions in a healthy manner made use of adaptive coping strategies more at a statistically significant level.

  19. Postoperative Conversion Disorder in Elderly Oral Cancer Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushiji, Takashi; Hayashi, Kamichika; Morikawa, Takamichi; Migita, Masashi; Ogane, Satoru; Muramatsu, Kyotaro; Kamio, Takashi; Shibahara, Takahiko; Takano, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    Conversion disorder is a condition in which psychological stress in response to difficult situations manifests as physical symptoms. Here, we report a case of postoperative coma due to conversion disorder in an elderly oral cancer patient. An 82-year-old woman was referred to Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital with a mass lesion on the tongue. A biopsy revealed a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Surgical treatment was performed for the tongue carcinoma and tracheotomy for management of the airway. On postoperative day 5, the patient exhibited loss of consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale: E1, VT, M1; Japan Coma Scale: III-300). The patient's vital signs were all normal, as were the results of a full blood count, brain-CT, MRI, and MRA. Only the arm dropping test was positive. Therefore, the cause of the coma was diagnosed as conversion disorder. Seven hours later, the patient showed a complete recovery.

  20. Emotional intelligence in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder, borderline personality disorder and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Katrin; Driessen, Martin; Behnia, Behnoush; Wingenfeld, Katja; Roepke, Stefan

    2018-03-30

    Emotional intelligence as a part of social cognition has, to our knowledge, never been investigated in patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), though the disorder is characterized by aspects of emotional dysfunctioning. PTSD often occurs with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) as a common comorbidity. Studies about social cognition and emotional intelligence in patients with BPD propose aberrant social cognition, but produced inconsistent results regarding emotional intelligence. The present study aims to assess emotional intelligence in patients with PTSD without comorbid BPD, PTSD with comorbid BPD, and BPD patients without comorbid PTSD, as well as in healthy controls. 71 patients with PTSD (41 patients with PTSD without comorbid BPD, 30 patients with PTSD with comorbid BPD), 56 patients with BPD without PTSD, and 63 healthy controls filled in the Test of Emotional Intelligence (TEMINT). Patients with PTSD without comorbid BPD showed impairments in emotional intelligence compared to patients with BPD without PTSD, and compared to healthy controls. These impairments were not restricted to specific emotions. Patients with BPD did not differ significantly from healthy controls. This study provides evidence for an impaired emotional intelligence in PTSD without comorbid BPD compared to BPD and healthy controls, affecting a wide range of emotions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship between patient characteristics and treatment allocation for patients with personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, J.G.; Andrea, H.; van den Eijnden, E.; Meerman, A.M.M.A.; Thunnissen, M.M.; Hamers, E.F.M.; Huson, N.; Ziegler, U.; Stijnen, T.; Busschbach, J.J.V.; Timman, R.; Verheul, R.

    2011-01-01

    Within a large multi-center study in patients with personality disorders, we investigated the relationship between patient characteristics and treatment allocation. Personality pathology, symptom distress, treatment history, motivational factors, and sociodemographics were measured at intake in 923

  2. Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Patients with Diabetes Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alireza Sajjadi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric disorders are important complications of chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus.Materials and method: In this descriptive study, 80 patients with diabetes type 2 referred to diabetes clinic of Zahedan in 2009. They were selected by simple randomized method, screened by General Health Questionnaire and assessed by psychiatric interview, if it was necessary.Results: Totally, 67.5% required an interview and 43.75% were diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder. Major depression were more prevalent (13.5% than adjustment disorders (15%.Conclusion: High prevalence of depression and adjustment disorder in diabetic patients needs psychiatric assessment and treatment as the main part, in the diabetes clinics

  3. Respiratory disorders in patients with polymyositis/dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Alekseyevna Antelava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM are rare disorders characterized by inflammatory lesions in skeletal muscles. These diseases include polymyositis (PM, dermatomyositis (DM, and inclusion body myositis, which exhibit clinicoimmunological heterogeneity and give different response to therapy. The most frequent manifestation in PM/DM patients is respiratory system dysfunction. The developing respiratory disorders are varied and may outpace the presentation of muscle pathology.

  4. Compulsive buying disorder: an untreated patient for 20 years

    OpenAIRE

    Gonca Karakus; Lut Tamam

    2017-01-01

    Compulsive buying disorder is characterized by impulsive drives and compulsive behaviors (buying unneeded things), personal distress, impaired social and vocational functioning and financial problems. In this case report, we presented diagnostic and treatment process of 49 year old, female patient who had complaints amnesia, weight loss and insomnia. In her medical history, she had compulsive buying disorder for nearly twenty years but untreated until her current evaluation. Comorbid psychi...

  5. Somatoform disorders in patients with chronic subjective tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Caner; Aras, Hatice İmer; Yilmaz, Mahmut Sinan

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation of psychiatric disorders with tinnitus and tinnitus handicap scores. A total of 30 patients and 30 otherwise healthy people were enrolled for the study. Somatoform disorder questionnaire SDQ-20 was filled in by both the study and the control group. Tinnitus handicap scores were filled in study group. Tinnitus handicap scores were 28.1 ± 19.8, and somatoform disorder questionnaire scores were 30.5 ± 7.3 in the tinnitus group. In the control group the somatoform disorder questionnaire scores were 25.4 ± 4.6. (1) We found a statistically significant difference between somatoform disorder questionnaire scores between groups (p tinnitus handicap scores and somatoform disorder questionnaire scores in study group (p = 0.0). The correlation between these tests was positively strong (R = 0.782). (3) There was no statistical difference between genders. We recommend investigating patients with long-lasting tinnitus for psychiatric comorbidity in relation to somatoform disorders in cooperation with psychiatric clinics.

  6. [Can music therapy for patients with neurological disorders?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myskja, Audun

    2004-12-16

    Recent developments in brain research and in the field of music therapy have led to the development of music-based methods specifically aimed at relieving symptoms of Parkinson's disease and other neurologic disorders. Rhythmic auditory stimulation uses external rhythmic auditory cues from song, music or metronome to aid patients improving their walking functioning and has been shown to be effective both within sessions and as a result of training over time. Melodic intonation therapy and related vocal techniques can improve expressive dysphasia and aid rehabilitation of neurologic disorders, particularly Parkinson's disease, stroke and developmental disorders.

  7. Compulsive buying disorder: an untreated patient for 20 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Karakus

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Compulsive buying disorder is characterized by impulsive drives and compulsive behaviors (buying unneeded things, personal distress, impaired social and vocational functioning and financial problems. In this case report, we presented diagnostic and treatment process of 49 year old, female patient who had complaints amnesia, weight loss and insomnia. In her medical history, she had compulsive buying disorder for nearly twenty years but untreated until her current evaluation. Comorbid psychiatric disorders started in the last two months which expedited her current referral. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 172-175

  8. Boosting Cognition With Music in Patients With Disorders of Consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Maïté; Tillmann, Barbara; Luauté, Jacques; Corneyllie, Alexandra; Dailler, Frédéric; André-Obadia, Nathalie; Perrin, Fabien

    2015-09-01

    Music listening conveys beneficial effects on cognitive processes in both normal and pathologic cerebral functioning. Surprisingly, no quantitative study has evaluated the potential effects of music on cognition and consciousness in patients with disorders of consciousness. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of music on cerebral processing in patients with disorders of consciousness. Using bedside electroencephalographic recording, we acquired in 13 patients with disorders of consciousness event-related potentials to the patient's first name after either an excerpt of the patient's preferred music (music condition) or a continuous sound (control condition). The cerebral response to the patient's first name was more often observed in the music condition, than in the control condition. Furthermore, the presence or absence of a discriminative response in the music condition seemed to be associated with a favorable or unfavorable outcome, respectively. These findings demonstrate for the first time that music has a beneficial effect on cognitive processes of patients with disorders of consciousness. The autobiographical characteristics of music, that is, its emotional and personal relevance, probably increase arousal and/or awareness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Eating disorder emergencies: understanding the medical complexities of the hospitalized eating disordered patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Martina M

    2004-12-01

    Eating disorders are maladaptive eating behaviors that typically develop in adolescence and early adulthood. Psychiatric maladies and comorbid conditions, especially insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, frequently co-exist with eating disorders. Serious medical complications affecting all organs and tissues can develop and result in numerous emergent hospitalizations. This article reviews the pathophysiologies of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and orthorexia nervosa and discusses the complexities associated with the treatment of medical complications seen in these patients.

  10. Pain Assessment Scale for Patients With Disorders of Consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Ingrid; Brix, Pia; Andersen, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with acquired brain injury undergoing rehabilitation are often unable to verbalize pain because of disorders of consciousness. Hence, observational pain assessment instruments are warranted for these patients. AIM: The aim of this study was to study interrater agreement...... and sensitivity to change over time of an assessment scale developed for the evaluation of pain in severely brain-injured patients with disorders of consciousness. METHODS: We developed a pain assessment scale based on scientific literature and clinical experience with severely brain-injured patients. It consists...... of four domains: physiological/autonomic, body language, verbal communication, and behavior. The domains consist of 27 items. Interrater reliability was tested through three experienced nurses who rated 26 patients with acquired brain injury. The patients were rated in two different situations: before...

  11. Osteoprotegerin levels in patients with severe mental disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Sigrun; Melle, Ingrid; Aukrust, Pål; Agartz, Ingrid; Lorentzen, Steinar; Steen, Nils Eiel; Djurovic, Srdjan; Ueland, Thor; Andreassen, Ole A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Severe mental disorders are associated with elevated levels of inflammatory markers. In the present study, we investigated whether osteoprotegerin (OPG), a member of the tumour necrosis factor receptor family involved in calcification and inflammation, is elevated in patients with severe mental disorders. Methods We measured the plasma levels of OPG in patients with severe mental disorders (n = 312; 125 with bipolar disorder and 187 with schizophrenia) and healthy volunteers (n = 239). Results The mean plasma levels of OPG were significantly higher in patients than in controls (t531 = 2.6, p = 0.01), with the same pattern in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The increase was significant after adjustment for possible confounding variables, including age, sex, ethnic background, alcohol consumption, liver and kidney function, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune diseases and levels of cholesterol, glucose and C-reactive protein. Limitations Owing to the cross-sectional design, it is difficult to determine causality. Conclusion Our results indicate that elevated OPG levels are associated with severe mental disorders and suggest that mechanisms related to calcification and inflammation may play a role in disease development. PMID:20569643

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of impulse control disorders in patients with movement disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Tiago A.; Strafella, Antonio P.; Thomsen, Teri; Voon, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Impulse control disorders are a psychiatric condition characterized by the failure to resist an impulsive act or behavior that may be harmful to self or others. In movement disorders, impulse control disorders are associated with dopaminergic treatment, notably dopamine agonists (DAs). Impulse control disorders have been studied extensively in Parkinson’s disease, but are also recognized in restless leg syndrome and atypical Parkinsonian syndromes. Epidemiological studies suggest younger age, male sex, greater novelty seeking, impulsivity, depression and premorbid impulse control disorders as the most consistent risk factors. Such patients may warrant special monitoring after starting treatment with a DA. Various individual screening tools are available for people without Parkinson’s disease. The Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease has been developed specifically for Parkinson’s disease. The best treatment for impulse control disorders is prevention. However, after the development of impulse control disorders, the mainstay intervention is to reduce or discontinue the offending anti-Parkinsonian medication. In refractory cases, other pharmacological interventions are available, including neuroleptics, antiepileptics, amantadine, antiandrogens, lithium and opioid antagonists. Unfortunately, their use is only supported by case reports, small case series or open-label clinical studies. Prospective, controlled studies are warranted. Ongoing investigations include naltrexone and nicotine. PMID:23634190

  13. Body dysmorphic disorder in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder: prevalence and clinical correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição Costa, Daniel Lucas; Chagas Assunção, Melissa; Arzeno Ferrão, Ygor; Archetti Conrado, Luciana; Hajaj Gonzalez, Christina; Franklin Fontenelle, Leonardo; Fossaluza, Victor; Constantino Miguel, Eurípedes; Rodrigues Torres, Albina; Gedanke Shavitt, Roseli

    2012-11-01

    The prevalence, sociodemographic aspects, and clinical features of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been previously addressed in primarily relatively small samples. We performed a cross-sectional demographic and clinical assessment of 901 OCD patients participating in the Brazilian Research Consortium on Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders. We used the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders; Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale; Dimensional Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (DY-BOCS); Brown Assessment of Beliefs Scale; Clinical Global Impression Scale; and Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories. The lifetime prevalence of BDD was 12.1%. The individuals with comorbid BDD (OCD-BDD; n = 109) were younger than were those without it. In addition, the proportions of single and unemployed patients were greater in the OCD-BDD group. This group of patients also showed higher rates of suicidal behaviors; mood, anxiety, and eating disorders; hypochondriasis; skin picking; Tourette syndrome; and symptoms of the sexual/religious, aggressive, and miscellaneous dimensions. Furthermore, OCD-BDD patients had an earlier onset of OC symptoms; greater severity of OCD, depression, and anxiety symptoms; and poorer insight. After logistic regression, the following features were associated with OCD-BDD: current age; age at OCD onset; severity of the miscellaneous DY-BOCS dimension; severity of depressive symptoms; and comorbid social phobia, dysthymia, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and skin picking. Because OCD patients might not inform clinicians about concerns regarding their appearance, it is essential to investigate symptoms of BDD, especially in young patients with early onset and comorbid social anxiety, chronic depression, skin picking, or eating disorders. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Executive Functions of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Panic Disorder Patients in Comparison to Healty Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Emel; Yildirim, Erol; Topçuoğlu, Volkan

    2017-12-01

    Patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) have impaired cognitive functions, including attention, verbal and visual memory, and visual-spatial abilities as well as executive function But some studies did not show any disturbance in executive function of patients with OCD. To date, only few studies have been conducted on neuropsychological functioning of patients with panic disorder (PD). There are limited studies to reach a definite conclusion on executive functions of patients with OCD and those with PD. In this study, we aimed to measure executive functions of patients with OCD and those with PD compared with those of healthy controls. Although there are many studies on cognitive functions of patients with OCD, there appears to be no consistency in results and no findings have been obtained to enable us to reach definite conclusions. Although there are very few studies on neuropsychological functions of patients with PD, impairments on a set of cognitive functions have been demonstrated. To date, no finding with respect to impairment in executive functions of patients with PD has been published. PD and OCD are disorders manifesting similar characteristics, with the presence of anxiety and avoidance behavior. Besides this, patients with OCD also have symptoms such as obsessions and compulsions that are characteristics of this disorder. We aim to compare executive functions in the three groups (patients with OCD, those with PD, and healthy controls) in this study. Seventeen patients with OCD and 15 patients with PD who were diagnosed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder -IV-TR (DSM-IV-TR) and 26 healthy control subjects were included in this study. Patients who used medication as well as those with medical illnesses and Axis-I comorbidities were excluded. The healthy control group subjects were matched with the patients in terms of age, gender, and education. Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis-I Disorders

  15. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  16. Excessive and premature new-onset cardiovascular disease among adults with bipolar disorder in the US NESARC cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Benjamin I; Schaffer, Ayal; Wang, Shuai; Blanco, Carlos

    2015-02-01

    Cross-sectional studies demonstrate increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among adults with bipolar disorder. However, there is a paucity of prospective data regarding new-onset CVD among adults with bipolar disorder. Analyses compared the 3-year incidence of CVD (via participant-reported physician diagnoses) among participants with DSM-IV diagnoses of bipolar I disorder (n = 1,047), bipolar II disorder (n = 392), major depressive disorder (MDD; n = 4,396), or controls (n = 26,266), who completed Wave 1 (2001-2002) and Wave 2 (2004-2005) of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Analyses also compared the age of participants with new-onset CVD across groups. Multivariable analyses controlled for age, sex, race, cigarette smoking, hypertension, obesity, and alcohol and drug use disorders. The 3-year incidence of CVD among adults with bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, MDD, and among controls was 6.30%, 5.74%, 3.98%, and 3.70%, respectively. The covariate-adjusted incidence of CVD was significantly greater among participants with bipolar I and II disorders versus controls and versus participants with MDD. Adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) were 2.58 (1.84-3.61; P bipolar I disorder vs controls; 2.76 (1.60-4.74; P = .0004) for bipolar II disorder vs controls; 2.11 (1.46-3.04; P = .0001) for bipolar I disorder vs MDD; 2.25 (1.26-4.01; P = .007) for bipolar II disorder vs MDD; and 1.22 (0.99-1.51; P = .06) for MDD vs controls. Bipolar I disorder participants with new-onset CVD were 10.70 ± 2.77 years younger than MDD participants with new-onset CVD and 16.78 ± 2.51 years younger than controls. Bipolar II disorder participants with new-onset CVD were 7.92 ± 3.27 years younger than MDD participants with new-onset CVD and 13.99 ± 2.79 years younger than controls. Adults with bipolar disorder are at significantly and meaningfully increased risk to develop CVD over the course of 3 years, even as compared to adults

  17. Understanding and coping with binge eating disorder: the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Susan L; Guerdjikova, Anna I

    2015-08-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most common of the 6 feeding and eating disorders recognized by the DSM-5 and a significant public health problem that can be successfully managed with appropriate help. Many patients, however, are hesitant to discuss the symptoms of BED with their providers because of embarrassment or because they simply do not recognize the behavior as a problem behavior. Clinicians need to increase their awareness of BED, its warning signs, and how and why patients might try to hide it leading to increased BED recognition and timely diagnosis. Then, given the right tools, clinicians can help patients to not only accept the diagnosis and look into various treatment options but also to move beyond it to recognize if any comorbid disorders are present and in need of treatment. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  18. Schizophrenia and personality disorder patients' adherence to music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Niels; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard; Hestbæk, Trine; Sørensen, Torben Egelund; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2012-12-01

    Music therapy is used in psychiatric treatment of severe psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, depression and personality disorder. To investigate adherence and predictors for adherence to music therapy treatment in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or personality disorder. Demographic, psychiatric and therapeutic data were collected for 27 patients receiving music therapy treatment over a 1-year observation period and a 1-year follow-up period. Predictors for adherence to music therapeutic treatment were determined by means of regression analysis. Drop-out from treatment was low (11.5%) and none of the variables significantly predicted adherence. Lack of significance may be because of type 2 error. Patients with severe mental disorder may adhere to music therapy treatment.

  19. Gender differences dominate sleep disorder patients' body problem complaints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted L. Rosenthal

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied it age, gender, diagnostic status, and psychiatric features affected 291 consecutive sleep disorder patient's body complaints on a brief checklist. Gender had a strong impact on all four (tested dependent measures, with women reporting more distress than men. Age produced significant regressions on two measures, with younger patients complaining more than older. Presence of psychiatric features was associated with more complaints on one dependent measure - previously found to reflect internal medicine patients' emotional distress. The results of regression analyses were largely supported by follow-up ANOVAs. However, contrasting insomniac versus hypersomniac versus all other sleep disorder diagnoses did not affect body complaints on any dependent measure. The results caution against combining males and females to compare self-reported distress between sleep disorders.

  20. Rationale and design of the PLACID study: a randomised trial comparing the efficacy and safety of inhaled loxapine versus IM aripiprazole in acutely agitated patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San, L; Estrada, G; Oudovenko, N; Vieta, E

    2017-04-04

    The management of acute agitation manifesting in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder requires swift pharmacological intervention to provide rapid symptomatic relief and prevent escalation to aggression and violence. Antipsychotic medications are widely used in this setting and the availability of an inhaled formulation with deep lung absorption of the antipsychotic loxapine has the potential to deliver a faster onset of therapeutic effect than the available intramuscular formulations of antipsychotics. The efficacy of inhaled loxapine and the alternative antipsychotic aripiprazole delivered via intramuscular (IM) injection will be compared in the Phase IIIb PLACID study. Adults (18-65 years) with a confirmed diagnosis of schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder presenting with acute agitation will be randomly assigned to open-label treatment in a 1:1 ratio. Clinical evaluation will be conducted by raters blinded to treatment assignment. The primary efficacy endpoint is time to response (defined as a Clinical Global Impression of Improvement [CGI-I] score of 1 [very much improved] or 2 [much improved]). Secondary endpoints will include the percentage of responders at different time points after dosing; the proportion of patients who receive 1 or 2 doses of study drug; time to second dose; time to rescue medication; satisfaction with study drug (evaluated using Item 14 of the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication); and safety and tolerability. Approximately 360 patients will be recruited with an interim analysis conducted once 180 patients have completed the study to decide whether to stop for futility or continue with or without an increase in the sample size up to additional 288 patients. The PLACID trial will assess the efficacy and safety of inhaled loxapine with deep lung absorption compared with the IM antipsychotic, aripiprazole, in acutely agitated patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. In the event that the median time to

  1. Add-on Lamotrigine Treatment for Subsyndromal Depression after Manic or Mixed States in Bipolar Disorder Improved the Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsumasa Muneoka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of patients experienced subsyndromal depression after manic or mixed hypomanic and depressive episodes due to bipolar I (case 1 and II (case 2 disorders prior to the use of lamotrigine. Case 1 showed episodes of mood switching induced by antidepressants and seasonal mood instability. Case 2 showed hippocampal atrophy and a persistent dull headache that preceded the use of lamotrigine. Both were successfully treated with add-on lamotrigine therapy, and the dull headache was effectively treated with olanzapine. Both patients improved in social activity and work performance after these add-on treatments. Thus, add-on treatment with lamotrigine alone or in combination with olanzapine was an effective strategy to improve the quality of life in bipolar depression. Subsyndromal depression that present after the disappearance of the manic or mixed state was suggested to be practical indication for the use of lamotrigine.

  2. Increased sexual arousal in patients with movement disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A. G. Teive

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Increased of sexual arousal (ISA has been described in different neurological diseases. The purpose of this study was present a case series of ISA in patients with movement disorders. Method Fifteen patients with different forms of movement disorders (Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Tourette´s syndrome, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, were evaluated in the Movement Disorders Unit of the Federal University of Paraná. Results Among Parkinson’s disease patients there were seven cases with different forms of ISA due to dopaminergic agonist use, levodopa abuse, and deep brain stimulation (DBS. In the group with hyperkinetic disorders, two patients with Huntington’s disease, two with Tourette’s syndrome, and four with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 presented with ISA. Conclusions ISA in this group of patients had different etiologies, predominantly related to dopaminergic treatment or DBS in Parkinson’s disease, part of the background clinical picture in Huntington’s disease and Tourette’s syndrome, and probably associated with cultural aspects in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

  3. Autism spectrum disorders are prevalent among patients with dystrophinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Haruo; Saito, Toshio; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Shibata, Saki; Iwata, Yuko; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Imura, Osamu

    2018-03-28

    Recent studies have reported a higher prevalence of autism spectrum disorders among patients with dystrophinopathies. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among those with dystrophinopathies. The possible role of dystrophin isoforms in patients was also explored. Fifty-six patients recruited from Toneyama National Hospital were included in this study (mean age = 12.9 years, SD = 5.2 years). Autistic symptoms were evaluated using the Pervasive Developmental Disorders/Autism Spectrum Disorders Rating Scale (PARS), a clinician rating scale. Eleven patients (19.6%; 95% confidence interval 10.2-32.4) met the criteria for ASD based on their PARS scores. Patients were separated into two groups based on the cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms predicted from the mutation location. The prevalence of ASD was examined between these groups. Infantile and current autistic symptoms did not differ between the groups, except on one subscale of the PARS. This study revealed that there was a high prevalence of ASD in patients with dystrophinopathies.

  4. Thiamine in septic shock patients with alcohol use disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Mathias Johan; Moskowitz, Ari; Patel, Parth Vijay

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Alcohol-use disorders (AUDs) have been associated with increased sepsis-related mortality. As patients with AUDs are often thiamine deficient, we investigated practice patterns relating to thiamine administration in patients with AUDs presenting with septic shock and explored...... the association between receipt of thiamine and mortality. MATERIALS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients presenting with septic shock between 2008 and 2014 at a single tertiary care center. We identified patients with an AUD diagnosis, orders for microbial cultures and use of antibiotics...... with AUDs admitted for septic shock do not receive thiamine. Thiamine administration in this patient population was associated with decreased mortality....

  5. Childhood history of anxiety disorders among adults with social phobia: rates, correlates, and comparisons with patients with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, M W; Pollack, M H; Maki, K M; Gould, R A; Worthington, J J; Smoller, J W; Rosenbaum, J F

    2001-01-01

    We examined the rates and correlates of a childhood history of anxiety disorders in 100 adults with a primary diagnosis of social phobia (social anxiety disorder). Adulthood and childhood disorders were assessed by experienced clinicians with structured clinical interviews. Rates of childhood anxiety disorders were evaluated to diagnostic comorbidity and a comparison group of patients with panic disorder. Onset of social phobia occurred before age 18 in 80% of the sample. Over half of the sample (54%) met criteria for one or more childhood anxiety disorders other than social phobia: 47% for overanxious disorder, 25% for avoidant disorder, 13% for separation anxiety disorder, and 1% for childhood agoraphobia. A history of childhood anxiety was associated with an early age of onset of social phobia, greater severity of fear and avoidance of social situations, greater fears of negative evaluation, and greater anxiety and depression morbidity. Rates of childhood social phobia, overanxious disorder, and avoidant disorder were significantly higher in patients with social phobia relative to our panic-disordered comparison group. We found approximately equal rates of a childhood history of separation anxiety disorder in patients with social phobia and panic disorder, providing further evidence against a unique relationship between separation anxiety disorder and panic disorder. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Imaging of the hip in patients with rheumatic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutry, Nathalie [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France)]. E-mail: nboutry@chru-lille.fr; Khalil, Chadi [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Jaspart, Matthieu [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Marie-Helene, Vieillard [Department of Rheumatology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Demondion, Xavier [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Cotten, Anne [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France)

    2007-07-15

    Hip joint abnormalities are commonly encountered in patients with rheumatic disorders. Although conventional radiography remains the mainstay for diagnosis of joint damage and subsequent follow-up, magnetic resonance imaging and, to a lesser extent, ultrasound have afforded the ability to detect early signs of articular involvement (i.e., synovitis and bone erosions), and to assess disease activity in treated patients. In more advanced stages of rheumatic disorders, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are both useful in assessing paraarticular involvement (i.e., bursitis and synovial cysts)

  7. Melatonin for Sleep Disorders in Patients with Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotti, Lynn Marie; Karroum, Elias G

    2016-07-01

    In patients with neurodegenerative diseases, sleep disorders are common; they impair the quality of life for patients and caregivers and are associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Melatonin has circadian, hypnotic, and free radical-scavenging effects, and preclinical data suggest benefits of melatonin on neurodegeneration. However, randomized, controlled trials of melatonin in patients with neurodegenerative diseases have not shown strong effects. Trials in Alzheimer's patients demonstrate a lack of benefit on sleep quantity. Subjective measures of sleep quality are mixed, with possible symptomatic improvements seen only on some measures or at some time points. Benefits on cognition have not been observed across several studies. In Parkinson's patients, there may be minimal benefit on objective sleep measures, but a suggestion of subjective benefit in few, small studies. Effective treatments for the sleep disorders associated with neurodegenerative diseases are urgently needed, but current data are insufficient to establish melatonin as such a treatment.

  8. Physical activity and fitness in patients with headache disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neusüss, K; Neumann, B; Steinhoff, B J; Thegeder, H; Bauer, A; Reimers, D

    1997-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that aerobic activities might reduce severity and/or frequency of migraine attacks. The present study was intended to investigate whether physical activities and fitness (aerobic endurance, flexibility, and muscle strength endurance) as well as body composition are different in patients with headache disorders and healthy control subjects. The study included 56 patients (aged 17-64 years) with headache disorders (migraine, tension-type, cluster, analgetics abuse, and other types of headache) and 145 age-matched volunteers without history of recurrent or chronic headache. A standardized questionnaire revealed similar self-esteem of physical activities in both groups. Objective physical fitness testing in a representative sample of 22 patients and 36 control subjects showed significantly reduced aerobic endurance in female and male patients as well as reduced flexibility in female patients as compared to control subjects, whereas muscle strength endurance was not significantly different between both groups. Female patients presented with a significantly higher total body fat as compared to control subjects. In conclusion, headache patients turned out to be less physically fit than control subjects. There was a discrepancy between self-esteem and objective test results regarding physical activity and fitness in patients with headache disorders.

  9. Non medical factors associated with psychological disorders in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, A.; Intikhab, K.; Saeed, K.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To find out major non-medial factors associated with psychological disorders in cancer patients. Design: An observational study conducted on adult cancer patients. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Center Lahore Pakistan from January 1999. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-four newly-diagnosed adult cancer patients were interviewed by the clinical psychologist and data was collected regarding non-medical causal factors, patients age, gender family support system, general home atmosphere and marital status. Collected data was analyzed by utilizing. SPSS for windows version 10.0. Results: Of the 224 patients 142 (63.4%) reported non-medical factors causing psychological distress and 82 (36.6%) reported that medical sources are the most distressing. Ten most common non-medical sources of developing psychological disorders were identified. It was observed that family support system and general home atmosphere were significantly associated with the development of psychological disorders whereas the other variables such as age, gender and marital status had no significant relationship with the non Medical factors. Conclusion: It was concluded that non-medical factors causing psychological problems are significant in cancer patients. The results suggest that we should identify these factors and target psychosocial intervention for those patients most at risk. (author)

  10. Incidence rates and risk factors of bipolar disorder in the general population: a population-based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jojanneke S.; Wohlfarth, Tamar D.; Dieleman, Jeanne; Sutterland, Arjen L.; Storosum, Jitschak G.; Denys, Damiaan; de Haan, Lieuwe; Sturkenboom, Mirjam C. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the incidence rates (IRs) of bipolar I and bipolar II disorders in the general population according to sociodemographic population characteristics. A cohort study (during the years 1996-2007) was conducted in a general practitioners research database with a longitudinal electronic record

  11. Childhood abuse in Chinese patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianjun; Yang, Yunping; Wu, Jiang; Napolitano, Lisa A; Xi, Yingjun; Cui, Yonghua

    2012-04-01

    This study examined (1) the relative prevalence of childhood abuse and other pathological childhood experiences in China reported by outpatients with borderline personality disorder (BPD), with other personality disorders, and without personality disorders; and, (2) whether the primary predictors of BPD in North America are associated with the development of BPD in China. The childhood experiences of 203 outpatients with BPD, 109 outpatients with other personality disorders, and 70 outpatients without Axis II diagnoses were assessed with the Chinese version of the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire (CECA.Q). Patients with BPD reported significantly more physical, emotional, and sexual abuse than either comparison group. Four types of childhood experiences were significant predictors of BPD: maternal neglect, paternal antipathy, sexual abuse, and maternal physical abuse. The findings suggest that maternal physical abuse is as strong a predictor of BPD in China as sexual abuse, a finding not replicated in North America.

  12. Association between REM sleep behaviour disorder and impulse control disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellosta Diago, E; Lopez Del Val, L J; Santos Lasaosa, S; López Garcia, E; Viloria Alebesque, A

    2017-10-01

    The relationship between impulse control disorder (ICD) and REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) has not yet been clarified, and the literature reports contradictory results. Our purpose is to analyse the association between these 2 disorders and their presence in patients under dopaminergic treatment. A total of 73 patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and treated with a single dopamine agonist were included in the study after undergoing clinical assessment and completing the single-question screen for REM sleep behaviour disorder and the short version of the questionnaire for impulsive-compulsive behaviours in Parkinson's disease. Mean age was 68.88 ± 7.758 years. Twenty-six patients (35.6%) were classified as probable-RBD. This group showed a significant association with ICD (P=.001) and had a higher prevalence of non-tremor akinetic rigid syndrome and longer duration of treatment with levodopa and dopamine agonists than the group without probable-RBD. We found a significant correlation between the use of oral dopamine agonists and ICD. Likewise, patients treated with oral dopamine agonists demonstrated a greater tendency toward presenting probable-RBD than patients taking dopamine agonists by other routes; the difference was non-significant. The present study confirms the association between RBD and a higher risk of developing symptoms of ICD in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical features of depressive disorders in patients with brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogorenko V.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the structure of psychopathology and clinical features of depressive disorders in patients with brain oncopathology. Polymorphic mental disorders of various clinical content and severity in most cases not only are comorbid to oncological pathology of the brain, but most often are the first clinical signs of early tumors. The study was conducted using the following methods: clinical psychiatric, questionnaire Simptom Check List- 90 -Revised-SCL- 90 -R, Luscher test and mathematical processing methods. Sample included 175 patients with brain tumors with non-psychotic level of mental disorders. The peculiarities of mental disorders and psychopathological structure of nonpsychotic depressive disorders have been a clinical option of cancer debut in patients with brain tumors. We found that nonpsychotic depression is characterized by polymorphism and syndromal incompletion; this causes ambiguity of diagnoses interpretation on stages of diagnostic period. Features of depressive symptoms depending on the signs of malignancy / nonmalignancy of brain tumor were defined.

  14. Cognitive functions in patients with panic disorder: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rodrigues Poubel Alves

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To conduct a review of the literature on the possible neuropsychological deficits present in patients with panic disorder. Methods: We performed a systematic review and search of the PubMed, ISI and PsycInfo scientific databases, with no time limits, using the following key words: cognitive, function, panic, and disorder. Of the 971 articles found, 25 were selected and 17 were included in this review. The inclusion criterion was at least one neuropsychological assessment task in patients with panic disorder. Results: The number of publications has grown gradually, especially those assessing executive functions, corresponding to the neurobiological model most widely accepted. Of all the functions evaluated, these patients had lower performance in memory tasks and higher performance in affective processing tasks related to the disorder. However, these data require further investigation due to the high rate of comorbidities, the small sample sizes of the included studies and little standardization of instruments used. Conclusion: The results showed a greater occurrence of deficits in memory and enhanced affective processing related to panic disorder.

  15. Cyclothymic and hyperthymic temperaments may predict bipolarity in major depressive disorder: a supportive evidence for bipolar II1/2 and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shinjiro; Terao, Takeshi; Hoaki, Nobuhiko; Wang, Yumei

    2011-03-01

    The concept of soft bipolar spectrum has not been fully confirmed. The aim of the present study is to investigate the validity of bipolar II1/2 and IV concept. The subjects were 46 consecutive outpatients. The individual temperament of each patient was recorded using the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego-Autoquestionnaire (TEMPS-A). The operational definition of bipolar II1/2 was those who had depression with cyclothymic temperament and that of bipolar IV was those who had depression with hyperthymic temperament. Finally, drug responses were investigated. DSM-IV-TR diagnoses were bipolar I (N=1), bipolar II (N=9), major depressive disorder (N=34) and depressive disorder not otherwise specified (N=2). Excluding one bipolar I patient, who had both cyclothymic and hyperthymic temperaments, patients with bipolar II1/2 (N=32) and IV (N=13) as well as bipolar II (N=9) were classified into the soft bipolar spectrum, although there was considerable overlap. The categorization of soft bipolar spectrum and unipolar depression significantly predicted depressive, cyclothymic, irritable, and anxious temperaments. Moreover, soft bipolar spectrum patients with lithium treatment were significantly more in remission than those without lithium treatment. In addition, more of those with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) had a significant tendency to lower remission than those without SSRIs. This is a cross-sectional study with a relatively small number of subjects. The present findings suggest that cyclothymic and hyperthymic temperaments may predict bipolarity, and the validity of bipolar II1/2 and IV concept is supported. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Coping styles in substance use disorder (SUD) patients with and without co-occurring attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kronenberg, Linda M.; Goossens, Peter J. J.; van Busschbach, Jooske; van Achterberg, Theo; van den Brink, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with a substance use disorder (SUD) and co-occurring attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often start using substances in an attempt to cope with the stress related to their ADHD or ASD. To improve treatment for these patient groups,

  17. Coping styles in substance use disorder (SUD) patients with and without co-occurring attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kronenberg, Linda M.; Goossens, Peter J. J.; van Busschbach, Jooske; van Achterberg, Theo; van den Brink, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Patients with a substance use disorder (SUD) and co-occurring attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often start using substances in an attempt to cope with the stress related to their ADHD or ASD. To improve treatment for these patient groups, it is

  18. Coping styles in substance use disorder (SUD) patients with and without co-occurring attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kronenberg, L.M.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Busschbach, J. van; Achterberg, T. van; Brink, W. van den

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with a substance use disorder (SUD) and co-occurring attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often start using substances in an attempt to cope with the stress related to their ADHD or ASD. To improve treatment for these patient groups,

  19. Emotional overeating and its associations with eating disorder psychopathology among overweight patients with binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masheb, Robin M; Grilo, Carlos M

    2006-03-01

    The current study examined emotional overeating in overweight patients with binge eating disorder (BED). A new measure--the Emotional Overeating Questionnaire (EOQ)--was developed to measure the frequency of overeating in response to emotions. The internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and factor structure of this measure were examined, and its associations with eating disorder psychopathology, depression, and gender were explored. Two hundred twenty consecutive overweight (body mass index [BMI] > or = 25) treatment-seeking BED patients (48 men and 172 women) were administered the EOQ, which assesses overeating frequency in response to six emotions (anxiety, sadness, loneliness, tiredness, anger, and happiness). A subset of patients (n = 83) completed the measure again approximately 1 week later. BMI was measured, and participants completed measures of eating disorder psychopathology. The EOQ was internally consistent (alpha =.85), its items were significantly and moderately correlated (range .32 to .70) with each other, and principal components analysis revealed one factor accounting for 58% of the variance. The EOQ items and total score were characterized by good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICCs] ranged from .62 to .73). Significant correlations were found between the emotional overeating items and total score, and binge frequency, eating disorder features, and depressive symptomatology. Emotional overeating was unrelated to BMI, and men and women reported similar rates of emotional overeating. Emotional overeating was significantly associated with binge frequency, eating disorder features, and depression, but was not related to BMI or gender.

  20. Thyroid disorders in Brazilian patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Kotze, Lorete Maria; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori; da Rosa Utiyama, Shirley Ramos; Piovezan, Gislaine Custodio; Kotze, Luiz Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) can develop a gluten related autoimmune disorder that affects not only the small intestine but other tissues as well. An increased prevalence of autoimmune diseases has been reported, particularly autoimmune thyroiditis. The aim of this study was to characterize thyroid disorders in patients with CD. Fifty-two patients with CD (43 female, 9 male; mean age, 41.1 years) were studied. Nine were on a gluten-free diet (GFD). They were divided into four groups: Group 1, without thyroid involvement (n=30); Groups 2A-C, with thyroid involvement (n=22); Group 2A, subclinical hypothyroidism (n=11); Group 2B, clinical hypothyroidism (n=10); and Group 2C, other thyroid disorders (n=1). CD was confirmed by serologic and histologic criteria. Thyroid involvement was detected by measurement of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO). Increased levels of TSH and/or anti-TPO levels were detected in Groups 2A (21.1%) and 2B (19.2%). The patients of Group 2B presented clinical symptoms of hypothyroidism before the diagnosis of CD, and 5 of these patients were receiving levothyroxine. One woman (Group 2C; 1.92%) had a medullary carcinoma. There was statistical significance between the age when thyroid disease was diagnosed (current age) and the age of CD diagnosis between Groups 1 and 2B. Patients with thyroid involvement presented associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus (2), Down's syndrome (2), ulcerative colitis (1), and dermatitis herpetiformis (2). Our findings demonstrated an increased prevalence of thyroid disorders (hypothyroidism, 19.2%; and subclinical hypothyroidism, 21.2%), and other associated diseases in celiac patients, even on a GFD, increasing with the age of the patients. Screening for associated diseases is recommended for patients with CD, independent of age at diagnosis or treatment duration.

  1. Mitochondrial disease in autism spectrum disorder patients: a cohort analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline R Weissman

    Full Text Available Previous reports indicate an association between autism spectrum disorders (ASD and disorders of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. One study suggested that children with both diagnoses are clinically indistinguishable from children with idiopathic autism. There are, however, no detailed analyses of the clinical and laboratory findings in a large cohort of these children. Therefore, we undertook a comprehensive review of patients with ASD and a mitochondrial disorder.We reviewed medical records of 25 patients with a primary diagnosis of ASD by DSM-IV-TR criteria, later determined to have enzyme- or mutation-defined mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC dysfunction. Twenty-four of 25 patients had one or more major clinical abnormalities uncommon in idiopathic autism. Twenty-one patients had histories of significant non-neurological medical problems. Nineteen patients exhibited constitutional symptoms, especially excessive fatigability. Fifteen patients had abnormal neurological findings. Unusual developmental phenotypes included marked delay in early gross motor milestones (32% and unusual patterns of regression (40%. Levels of blood lactate, plasma alanine, and serum ALT and/or AST were increased at least once in 76%, 36%, and 52% of patients, respectively. The most common ETC disorders were deficiencies of complex I (64% and complex III (20%. Two patients had rare mtDNA mutations of likely pathogenicity.Although all patients' initial diagnosis was idiopathic autism, careful clinical and biochemical assessment identified clinical findings that differentiated them from children with idiopathic autism. These and prior data suggest a disturbance of mitochondrial energy production as an underlying pathophysiological mechanism in a subset of individuals with autism.

  2. Some Aspects of Balance Disorder in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Burina

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze: frequency of balance disorder (vertigo and disequilibrium, frequency of abnormalities in auditory evoked potentials (AEP and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI changes of the brain in multiple sclerosis (MS patients with balance disorder, relation of patients disability status to balance disorder and relation of the changes in MRI of the brainstem to AEP abnormalities. It was analyzed 60 patients with relapsing-remitting form of MS. Two groups of patients were made consecutively under Expanded Disability Status Scale score (EDSS: A (EDSS <4,5 and B (EDSS >5,0. The study was retrospective-prospective. After the neurological exam AEP and MRI of the brain have been done. Balance disorder has been verified as initial symptom in 29 (48,4% and out of them disequilibrium experienced 24 (83,4% patients. During the relapses balance disorder experienced 48 (80% patients and in 37 (77,1% it was disequilibrium. Among them 33 (68,7% were with lower EDSS (<4,5 and 15 (31,3% with higher EDSS score (>5. There is no correlation between disability status and vertigo which means that vertigo is not more frequent in more disabled patients and vice-versa. The AEP were pathological in 57 (95% patients. Of all 29 patients with vertigo AEP were pathological in 28 (96,5% while in 31 patients without vertigo pathological AEP were in 29 (93,5% but it is not statistical significant. The most frequent characteristic of AEP changes were prolonged inter-peak latency III-V waves (48 patients or 80%. The plaque in brainstem visualized by MRI was found in 41 (71,8% of patients (38 or 92,6% of them had pathological AEP and in three patients AEP were normal. In group of patients with pathological AEP, 38 (66,6% of them had plaque in brainstem. In other three patients with normal AEP it was visualized plaque in brainstem. In the group of 29 patients with balance disorder, 20 (68,9% had plaque in brainstem as well as 21 (67,7% out of 31 patients

  3. Emotional perception in patients with eating disorders in comparison with depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joos, Andreas A B; Gille, Melanie; Hartmann, Armin; Unterbrink, Thomas; Wetzler-Burmeister, Edda; Scheidt, Carl; Waller, Elisabeth; Bauer, Joachim; Wirsching, Michael; Zeeck, Almut

    2012-11-01

    Emotion regulation is a key issue for many psychiatric and psychosomatic disorders, including eating disorders. Eating disordered patients (EDP) show high levels of depressive comorbidity, and there is much uncertainty about disorder-specific deficits. This study is aimed at delineating disorder-specific disturbances of emotional perception in EDP. Fifty-two EDP were compared with 35 depressed patients (DP) and 25 healthy controls. They rated their emotional experience when viewing visual emotional stimuli. Emphasis was placed on the patients' perception of their own emotions and not on the recognition of emotions in others. Severity of depression was assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory. Eating disordered patients and DP reported less anger than healthy controls-independent of the severity of depression. In addition, DP showed increased levels of disgust when confronted with anger stimuli. Happiness was rated less in EDP and DP, which was associated with severity of depression. There were no differences between the EDP subgroups bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa. Eating disordered patients and DP showed alterations of emotional perception of anger, an emotion which is closely linked to interpersonal difficulties. Alterations in emotional perception of EDP and DP might be due to more general emotion regulation disturbances. In order to detect more subtle differences between psychiatric subgroups, more sophisticated investigation tools are needed. Increased disgust ratings in DP merit further investigation. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  4. Sexual Functions in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Patients: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nergis LAPSEKİLİ

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, even if the patient’s obsession content is not related to sexuality, may be a problem in the sexual lives of individuals. In this article, sexual function in obsessive compulsive disorder patients is discussed based on an OCD case. Case: Male 36 years old and female 32 years old couple. Man had complaints of lack of control of ejaculation and woman had complaints of lack of orgasm. Man was diagnosed with premature ejaculation and woman was diagnosed with aversion and anorgasmia according to DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders criteria. During therapy, the female patient was diagnosed with OCD as well. Loss of control was not acceptable to the patient. Thus she was avoiding from exhilarating stimuli. After cognitive restructuring of her evaluations about control, sex therapy was continued. At the end of the therapy the avoidance of the patient disappeared and anorgasmia was treated and ejeculation time of the male patient was 15 minutes. Conclusion: Sexual dysfunction is a common problem in patients with OCD. Patient may have avoidance that may adversely affect her sexuality. If a patient has avoidance about sexuality, the reason of this avoidance may or may not be the usual and expected thought content like avoidance of contamination. The evaluations of OCD patients about control may also adversely affect their sexuallity. The thought leading to avoidance behavior, may vary from patient to patient. However, to identify these thoughts with cognitive interventions and work with them will improve.the patient.

  5. [Comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders in patients with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapfhammer, H-P

    2015-03-01

    Patients with cancer face a high risk of comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders that have to be paradigmatically considered within a complex biopsychosocial context. Several conceptual challenges have to be mastered in arriving at a correct clinical diagnosis. Coexistent affective and anxiety disorders in cancer patients include a more dramatic subjective suffering, reduced psychological coping, possible negative interference with somatic treatment and rehabilitation, impaired quality of life and higher grades of psychosocial disability. They may also lead to an overall increased risk of somatic morbidity, a more rapid progression of cancer and a higher cancer-related mortality in the course of the disease. Manifold psychological, psychosocial and existential, cancer and treatment-related stressors have to be considered with respect to common neurobiological, especially neuroendocrine and neuroinflammatory mechanisms. Complex psychosomatic, somatopsychic and somato-somatic effects must always be considered. Evidence-based approaches in psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy exist for the integrative treatment of comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders in cancer.

  6. Nibbling and picking in obese patients with Binge Eating Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masheb, Robin M; Roberto, Christina A; White, Marney A

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the clinical utility of nibbling behavior, defined as eating in an unplanned and repetitious manner between meals and snacks without a sense of loss of control, in obese patients with Binge Eating Disorder (BED). Two-hundred seventeen (N = 217) consecutive, treatment-seeking, obese patients with BED were assessed with the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE). Nibbling frequency was examined in relation to current weight, eating disorder psychopathology and eating patterns. Results found that nibbling/picking was not related to body mass index, objective bulimic, subjective bulimic, or overeating episodes, food avoidance, sensitivity to weight gain, or any subscales of the EDE. However, nibbling/picking was significantly related to frequency of morning and afternoon snacking (r = .21, p = .002; r = .27, p < .001). The assessment of nibbling/picking behaviors among individuals with BED might not provide clinically significant information. © 2013.

  7. Management of bipolar disorder in the intercontinental region: an international, multicenter, non-interventional, cross-sectional study in real-life conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samalin, Ludovic; Vieta, Eduard; Okasha, Tarek Ahmed; Uddin, Mm Jalal; Ahmadi Abhari, Seyed Ali; Nacef, Fethi; Mishyiev, Vyacheslav; Aizenberg, Dovi; Ratner, Yaël; Melas-Melt, Lydie; Sedeki, Idir; Llorca, Pierre Michel

    2016-05-16

    Most of the existing data on real-life management of bipolar disorder are from studies conducted in western countries (mostly United States and Europe). This multinational, observational cohort study aimed to describe the management and clinical outcomes of bipolar patients in real-life conditions across various intercontinental countries (Bangladesh, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Tunisia, and Ukraine). Data on socio-demographic and disease characteristics, current symptomatology, and pharmacological treatment were collected. Comparisons between groups were performed using standard statistical tests. Overall, 1180 patients were included. The median time from initial diagnosis was 80 months. Major depressive disorder was the most common initial diagnosis. Mood stabilizers and antipsychotics were the most common drugs being prescribed at the time of the study. Antidepressants (mainly selective serotonin uptake inhibitors [SSRIs]) were administered to 36.1% of patients. Patients with bipolar I disorder received higher number of antipsychotics and anxiolytics than those with bipolar II disorder (p < 0.001). Presence of depressive symptoms was associated with an increase in antidepressant use (p < 0.001). Bipolar disorder real-life management practice, irrespective of region, shows a delay in diagnosis and an overuse of antidepressants. Clinical decision-making appears to be based on a multidimensional approach related to current symptomatology and type of bipolar disorder.

  8. Electroconvulsive therapy and subsequent epilepsy in patients with affective disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøg, Fie Krossdal; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) might increase the risk of epilepsy but the few patient studies with retrospective data from medical records do not support the hypothesis. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between ECT and subsequent incident...... epilepsy in patients with affective disorder. We also explored whether any association varied with number of ECTs and time since last treatment. METHODS: All 169,457 patients with first hospital contact for an affective disorder between January 2005 and December 2015 were identified in the Danish National...... Patient Registry and followed for incident epilepsy from January 2005 until November 2016. The association between ECT and epilepsy was examined using Cox proportional hazard regression with adjustment for gender, age, educational level, comorbid schizophrenia, previous stroke and antidepressant...

  9. [Intensive psychiatric care of patients with psychogenic eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltus, F; Janecková, E; Papezová, H

    1992-06-01

    The authors summarize their therapeutic results in anorexia nervosa achieved at the unit of specialized care for eating disorders at the Psychiatric Clinic of the First Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague. They find that applications for hospitalization of these patients have a rising trend and that in recent years in the unit mainly patients with severe forms of these diseases are admitted. During the past 7 years in the unit a total of 147 patients were hospitalized. By comprehensive regime treatment 84% of the patients with bulimia nervosa. As to basic symptoms, in bulimia nervosa the results were achieved in vomiting and bulimic attacks and in anorexia nervosa as regards appetite, hunger and general attitude to food. Finally the authors summarize the advantages of the unit specialized care for psychogenic eating disorders.

  10. The Influence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder on Treatment Outcomes of Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boritz, Tali; Barnhart, Ryan; McMain, Shelley F

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on treatment outcomes in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Participants were 180 individuals diagnosed with BPD enrolled in a randomized controlled trial that compared the clinical and cost effectiveness of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and general psychiatric management (GPM). Multilevel linear models and generalized linear models were used to compare clinical outcomes of BPD patients with and without PTSD. BPD patients with comorbid PTSD reported significantly higher levels of global psychological distress at baseline and end of treatment compared to their non-PTSD counterparts. Both groups evidenced comparable rates of change on suicide attempts and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), global psychological distress, and BPD symptoms over the course of treatment and post-treatment follow-up. DBT and GPM were effective for BPD patients with and without PTSD across a broad range of outcomes.

  11. affective, schizophrenic and mood disorders in patients admitted at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Findings from clinical, genetic, neuropsychological and neurophysiological studies have failed to highlight a clear demarcation between the two main psychotic syndromes i.e.. MD and SCZ12, while evidence from brain imaging,. The relationship between schizo- affective, schizophrenic and mood disorders in patients ...

  12. Heterogeneity Moderates Treatment Response among Patients with Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysko, Robyn; Hildebrandt, Tom; Wilson, G. Terence; Wilfley, Denise E.; Agras, W. Stewart

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore heterogeneity and differential treatment outcome among a sample of patients with binge eating disorder (BED). Method: A latent class analysis was conducted with 205 treatment-seeking, overweight or obese individuals with BED randomized to interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), behavioral weight loss…

  13. Candidaemia in patients with haematological disorders and stem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Candidaemia is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with malignant haematological disorders and stem cell transplant. The predominance of nonalbicans species of Candida especially C.krusei and C.tropicalis is alarming. The early administration of appropriate antifungal therapy and the removal of ...

  14. Neuromusculoskeletal disorders in patients with Type 2 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Usual line of management of diabetes patients is drug and diet with their physical needs usually receiving minimal attention. Among the physical needs, requiring attention is their neuromusculoskeletal disorders. This study was designed to investigate the effect of a twelve-week therapeutic exercise on ...

  15. Prevalence of tongue disorders among patients attending the oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Tongue lesions are health concern to both oral health care providers and the general public. This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of tongue disorders. Method: This was a retrospective study of the patients who presented at the Oral Medicine Clinic, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City ...

  16. The personal social networks of personality disordered forensic psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Haar-Pomp, Lydia; Spreen, Marinus; Bogaerts, Stefan; Volker, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Summary There has hardly been any examination of the personal social networks of personality disordered forensic psychiatric patients leading up to, and at the time of their offence. To shed light on this question, 36 male inpatients were interviewed by forensic social workers about their social

  17. Motivation for treatment in patients with personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, N.; Verheul, R.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study is to investigate the association between DSM-IV personality disorders and motivation for treatment in a large sample of patients admitting for a variety of psychotherapeutic programs (n = 1083). Second, we examine whether and to what extent this

  18. Predictors of outcome in patients with common mental disorders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: A randomized placebo-controlled trial of treatment for common mental disorders in Goa, India found that psychological treatment ... Conclusion: The severe nature of life problems faced by some patients with common mental .... the study period and were free to leave the study at any time. No restrictions were ...

  19. Hormonal status of diabetes mellitus patients with microcirculation disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubyatnikova, G.A.; Zhumatova, M.G.; Goryajnova, I.I.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the study of immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and anti-insular hormones show their correlation with homorheological disorders in patients with diabetic angiopathies. The results obtained indicate a possble involvement of the anti-insular hormones in the development of vascular changes in diabetes mellitus

  20. Limitations of Activities in Patients with Musculoskeletal Disorders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are the major cause of morbidity throughout the world, having a substantial influence on quality of life (QOL). We studied QOL ascertained by limitations of activities of daily living, impact on family and social relationships, and sleep disturbances among patients with MSD.

  1. Electronic monitoring of patients with bipolar affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacoby, Anne Sophie; Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Vinberg, Maj

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a great challenge to patients, relatives and clinicians, and there is a need for development of new methods to identify prodromal symptoms of affective episodes in order to provide efficient preventive medical and behavioural intervention. Clinical trials prove that electronic...... monitoring is a feasible, valid and acceptable method. Hence it is recommended, that controlled trials on the effect of electronic monitoring on patients' course of illness, level of function and quality of life are conducted....

  2. Difficulties in emotion regulation in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscitti, Catherine; Rufino, Katrina; Goodwin, Natalie; Wagner, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    A defining characteristic of eating disorders (EDs) is difficulty with emotion regulation (ER). Previous research indicates that ED subtypes demonstrate differing ER difficulties. Specifically, individuals with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) or Bulimia Nervosa (BN) show greater impairment in their ability to regulate emotions in areas such as achieving goals while upset, reacting impulsively to distress, and effectively using coping strategies, as compared to those with Binge Eating Disorder (BED). However, limited research includes the diagnostic category of Eating Disorder, Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS). The aim of this study was to better understand ER difficulties for all ED diagnoses, especially EDNOS. It was hypothesized that patients with EDs will demonstrate similar ER difficulties as psychiatric patients without EDs and that patients with EDNOS will be similar in their total level of ER difficulties but will differ in their specific types of difficulties in ER as compared to patients with other EDs. Participants included 404 adults presenting to an inpatient psychiatric hospital. Psychiatric diagnoses, including EDs, were determined using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders. Differences in specific and overall difficulties with ER were examined across psychiatric patients using the multidimensional Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale. Results of this study indicate that individuals with EDs have greater ER difficulties in most domains of ER and that those with BED and EDNOS demonstrate the most significant differences in ER as compared to psychiatric patients without EDs. Additionally, it was found that ED subtypes typically did not differ in terms of specific difficulties in ER. One exception emerged indicating that individuals with BED demonstrated significantly greater difficulty on the Limited Access to Emotion Regulation Strategies subscale as compared to those with EDNOS. Researchers were able to clarify difficulties in ER across ED

  3. Putative transcriptomic biomarkers in the inflammatory cytokine pathway differentiate major depressive disorder patients from control subjects and bipolar disorder patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R Powell

    Full Text Available Mood disorders consist of two etiologically related, but distinctly treated illnesses, major depressive disorder (MDD and bipolar disorder (BPD. These disorders share similarities in their clinical presentation, and thus show high rates of misdiagnosis. Recent research has revealed significant transcriptional differences within the inflammatory cytokine pathway between MDD patients and controls, and between BPD patients and controls, suggesting this pathway may possess important biomarker properties. This exploratory study attempts to identify disorder-specific transcriptional biomarkers within the inflammatory cytokine pathway, which can distinguish between control subjects, MDD patients and BPD patients. This is achieved using RNA extracted from subject blood and applying synthesized complementary DNA to quantitative PCR arrays containing primers for 87 inflammation-related genes. Initially, we use ANOVA to test for transcriptional differences in a 'discovery cohort' (total n = 90 and then we use t-tests to assess the reliability of any identified transcriptional differences in a 'validation cohort' (total n = 35. The two most robust and reliable biomarkers identified across both the discovery and validation cohort were Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 24 (CCL24 which was consistently transcribed higher amongst MDD patients relative to controls and BPD patients, and C-C chemokine receptor type 6 (CCR6 which was consistently more lowly transcribed amongst MDD patients relative to controls. Results detailed here provide preliminary evidence that transcriptional measures within inflammation-related genes might be useful in aiding clinical diagnostic decision-making processes. Future research should aim to replicate findings detailed in this exploratory study in a larger medication-free sample and examine whether identified biomarkers could be used prospectively to aid clinical diagnosis.

  4. Putative transcriptomic biomarkers in the inflammatory cytokine pathway differentiate major depressive disorder patients from control subjects and bipolar disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Timothy R; McGuffin, Peter; D'Souza, Ursula M; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Hosang, Georgina M; Martin, Charlotte; Matthews, Keith; Day, Richard K; Farmer, Anne E; Tansey, Katherine E; Schalkwyk, Leonard C

    2014-01-01

    Mood disorders consist of two etiologically related, but distinctly treated illnesses, major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BPD). These disorders share similarities in their clinical presentation, and thus show high rates of misdiagnosis. Recent research has revealed significant transcriptional differences within the inflammatory cytokine pathway between MDD patients and controls, and between BPD patients and controls, suggesting this pathway may possess important biomarker properties. This exploratory study attempts to identify disorder-specific transcriptional biomarkers within the inflammatory cytokine pathway, which can distinguish between control subjects, MDD patients and BPD patients. This is achieved using RNA extracted from subject blood and applying synthesized complementary DNA to quantitative PCR arrays containing primers for 87 inflammation-related genes. Initially, we use ANOVA to test for transcriptional differences in a 'discovery cohort' (total n = 90) and then we use t-tests to assess the reliability of any identified transcriptional differences in a 'validation cohort' (total n = 35). The two most robust and reliable biomarkers identified across both the discovery and validation cohort were Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 24 (CCL24) which was consistently transcribed higher amongst MDD patients relative to controls and BPD patients, and C-C chemokine receptor type 6 (CCR6) which was consistently more lowly transcribed amongst MDD patients relative to controls. Results detailed here provide preliminary evidence that transcriptional measures within inflammation-related genes might be useful in aiding clinical diagnostic decision-making processes. Future research should aim to replicate findings detailed in this exploratory study in a larger medication-free sample and examine whether identified biomarkers could be used prospectively to aid clinical diagnosis.

  5. Factor Structure of the Eating Disorder Examination Interview in Patients With Binge-eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Crosby, Ross D.; Peterson, Carol B.; Masheb, Robin M.; White, Marney A.; Crow, Scott J.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Mitchell, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) as a primary assessment instrument in studies of eating and weight disorders, little is known about the psychometric aspects of this interview measure. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the factor structure of the EDE interview in a large series of patients with binge-eating disorder (BED). Participants were 688 treatment-seeking patients with BED who were reliably administered the EDE interview by trained research clinicians at three research centers. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) performed on EDE interview data from a random split-half of the study group suggested a brief 7-item 3-factor structure. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) performed on the second randomly selected half of the study group supported this brief 3-factor structure of the EDE interview. The three factors were interpreted as Dietary Restraint, Shape/Weight Overvaluation, and Body Dissatisfaction. In this series of patients with BED, factor analysis of the EDE interview did not replicate the original subscales but revealed an alternative factor structure. Future research must further evaluate the psychometric properties, including the factor structure, of the EDE interview in this and other eating-disordered groups. The implications of these factor analytic findings for understanding and assessing the specific psychopathology of patients with BED are discussed. PMID:19798064

  6. Axis-I comorbidity in female patients with dissociative identity disorder and dissociative identity disorder not otherwise specified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodewald, Frauke; Wilhelm-Göling, Claudia; Emrich, Hinderk M; Reddemann, Luise; Gast, Ursula

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate axis-I comorbidity in patients with dissociative identity disorder (DID) and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (DDNOS). Using the Diagnostic Interview for Psychiatric Disorders, results from patients with DID (n = 44) and DDNOS (n = 22) were compared with those of patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (n = 13), other anxiety disorders (n = 14), depression (n = 17), and nonclinical controls (n = 30). No comorbid disorders were found in nonclinical controls. The average number of comorbid disorders in patients with depression or anxiety was 0 to 2. Patients with dissociative disorders averagely suffered from 5 comorbid disorders. The most prevalent comorbidity in DDNOS and DID was PTSD. Comorbidity profiles of patients with DID and DDNOS were very similar to those in PTSD (high prevalence of anxiety, somatoform disorders, and depression), but differed significantly from those of patients with depression and anxiety disorders. These findings confirm the hypothesis that PTSD, DID, and DDNOS are phenomenologically related syndromes that should be summarized within a new diagnostic category.

  7. Treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic v. standard out-patient treatment in the early course of bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Hansen, Hanne Vibe; Hvenegaard, Anne

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about whether treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic improves long-term prognosis for patients discharged from initial psychiatric hospital admissions for bipolar disorder. AIMS: To assess the effect of treatment in a specialised out-patient mood...... disorder clinic v. standard decentralised psychiatric treatment among patients discharged from one of their first three psychiatric hospital admissions for bipolar disorder. METHOD: Patients discharged from their first, second or third hospital admission with a single manic episode or bipolar disorder were...... randomised to treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic or standard care (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00253071). The primary outcome measure was readmission to hospital, which was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register. RESULTS: A total of 158 patients with mania/bipolar disorder...

  8. Patient- and clinician- reported outcome in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Laura Al-Dakhiel; Frølich, Jacob Stampe; Gudex, Claire; Hørder, Kirsten; Bilenberg, Niels; Støving, René Klinkby

    2017-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome is increasingly applied in health sciences. Patients with eating disorders (EDs) characteristically have a different opinion of their needs to that of the health professionals, which can lead to ambivalence towards treatment and immense compliance difficulties. This cross-sectional study compared data assessed by the clinician to patient-reported measures in patients with a history of EDs. We included data from a cohort of patients with EDs (n=544) referred to a specialized ED unit in Denmark. Patient-reported measures included the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2) and the Short Form 36 (SF-36), and clinical data included remission status and body mass index (BMI). We found a positive association between BMI and EDI-2 scores for anorexia nervosa (AN) and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS), reflecting increasing ED symptomatology with increasing BMI. This association was not observed in bulimia nervosa (BN). We did not find a correlation between SF-36 scores and BMI in any of the diagnostic groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Predictors of quality of life in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, J; Padierna, A; Loroño, A; Muñoz, P; Quintana, J M

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study were to analyse the quality of life (QoL) of a broad sample of patients with eating disorders (ED) and to identify potential factors that predict QoL. This prospective cohort study involved 528 patients diagnosed with ED and treated over a 15-year period in the Eating Disorders Outpatient Clinic. Information on sociodemographic and clinical data were gathered. Patients completed five self-administered instruments: the Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26); the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (EDDS); the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); the Short-Form 12 (SF-12); and the Quality of Life in ED-short form (HeRQoLED-s). Descriptive, univariate analyses and multivariate linear regression models were applied to identify factors associated with QoL. Predictive variables for a low level of QoL in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) included antidepressant treatment (P=0.009), substance abuse disorder, (P=0.03) and other organic comorbidities (Peating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS), they included anxiolytic treatment (P=0.003), having circulatory disease (P=0.001), more years since start of ED treatment (P=0.03) and living alone (P<0.0001). We found a significant difference in QoL between the diagnostic ED groups. With regard to the variables predicting QoL in ED patients, the findings of this study suggest that organic or psychiatric comorbidities and some data of social normality might be more relevant to QoL in ED than age, type of compensatory behaviour, BMI or number of visits to hospital emergency department. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Comparing Facial Emotional Recognition in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and Patients with Schizotypal Personality Disorder with a Normal Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Farsham

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: No research has been conducted on facial emotional recognition on patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD and schizotypal personality disorder (SPD. The present study aimed at comparing facial emotion recognition in these patients with the general population. The neurocognitive processing of emotions can show the pathologic style of these 2 disorders. Method:  Twenty BPD patients, 16 SPD patients, and 20 healthy individuals were selected by available sampling method. Structural Clinical Interview for Axis II, Millon Personality Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory and Facial Emotional Recognition Test was were conducted for all participants.Discussion: The results of one way ANOVA and Scheffe’s post hoc test analysis revealed significant differences in neuropsychology assessment of  facial emotional recognition between BPD and  SPD patients with normal group (p = 0/001. A significant difference was found in emotion recognition of fear between the 2 groups of BPD and normal population (p = 0/008. A significant difference was observed between SPD patients and control group in emotion recognition of wonder (p = 0/04(.The obtained results indicated a deficit in negative emotion recognition, especially disgust emotion, thus, it can be concluded that these patients have the same neurocognitive profile in the emotion domain.

  11. Comparing Facial Emotional Recognition in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and Patients with Schizotypal Personality Disorder with a Normal Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsham, Aida; Abbaslou, Tahereh; Bidaki, Reza; Bozorg, Bonnie

    2017-04-01

    Objective: No research has been conducted on facial emotional recognition on patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and schizotypal personality disorder (SPD). The present study aimed at comparing facial emotion recognition in these patients with the general population. The neurocognitive processing of emotions can show the pathologic style of these 2 disorders. Method: Twenty BPD patients, 16 SPD patients, and 20 healthy individuals were selected by available sampling method. Structural Clinical Interview for Axis II, Millon Personality Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory and Facial Emotional Recognition Test was were conducted for all participants. Discussion: The results of one way ANOVA and Scheffe's post hoc test analysis revealed significant differences in neuropsychology assessment of facial emotional recognition between BPD and SPD patients with normal group (p = 0/001). A significant difference was found in emotion recognition of fear between the 2 groups of BPD and normal population (p = 0/008). A significant difference was observed between SPD patients and control group in emotion recognition of wonder (p = 0/04(. The obtained results indicated a deficit in negative emotion recognition, especially disgust emotion, thus, it can be concluded that these patients have the same neurocognitive profile in the emotion domain.

  12. [Body image disorder in 100 Tunisian female breast cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faten, Ellouze; Nader, Marrakchi; Raies, Hend; Sana, Masmoudi; Amel, Mezlini; Fadhel, M'rad Mohamed

    2018-03-07

    This study aimed at tracking the prevalence of body image disorder in a population of Tunisian women followed for breast cancer and the factors associated with it. The cross-sectional study was conducted at Salah-Azaiez Institute in Tunis, over a period of four months. One hundred outpatients followed for confirmed breast cancer were recruited. The questionnaire targeted the women's sexuality and their couple relationships, along with their socio-demographic, clinical, and therapeutic characteristics. The scales used were BIS, HADS, and FSFI. The prevalence of body image disorder according to BIS was 45% with an average of 11.5±11.2 among the interrogated patients, 24.7% of which reported an alteration in their couple relationships and 47% in their sexual relations. In univariate analysis, body image disorder was associated with family support, change in couple relationship, depression and anxiety. Body image disorder and sexual dysfunction were interrelated: each of them fostered the prevalence of the other. Multivariate analysis showed that occupational activity was an independent predictor and the absence of anxiety an independent protective factor. Body image disorder was an independent predictive factor of depression and anxiety. The quality of couple relation and sexuality, along with the impact of the patient's surrounding are decisive for the protection or alteration of her body image. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychometric evaluation of disordered eating measures in bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Katrina; Mitchell, Sarah; O'Brien, Paul; Brennan, Leah

    2015-12-01

    Bariatric surgery is considered the most effective weight loss intervention for obese persons. However, accurate assessment is essential to identify disordered eating that may impair achievement of optimal post-surgical outcomes. Measures of disordered eating are yet to be thoroughly psychometrically evaluated in bariatric surgery patients, therefore their utility is unknown. Participants were 108 adults who completed psychological measures approximately 12 months after bariatric surgery. The fit of the original scale structures was tested using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) and alternative factor solutions were generated using Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA). Reliability (internal consistency) and construct validity (convergent and divergent) were also assessed. Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q), Questionnaire of Eating and Weight Patterns Revised (QEWP-R), Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) and Clinical Impairment Assessment (CIA). CFA revealed none of the original disordered eating measures met adequate fit statistics. EFA produced revised scales with improved reliability (original scales α=0.47-0.94; revised scales α=0.76-0.98) and correlational analyses with measures of psychological wellbeing and impairment demonstrated adequate convergent validity. Reported prevalence of disordered eating behaviours differed between the EDE-Q and QEWP-R. Psychometric evaluation did not support the use of the commonly used disordered eating measures in bariatric patients in their original form. The revised version of the EDE-Q replicates findings from recent research in bariatric surgery candidates. The alternate structures of the CIA and TFEQ suggest differences in the manifestation of disordered eating following surgery. Results suggest that revised measures are required to overcome the limitations of existing measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Recognizing disordered eating in primary care patients with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Sara A; Chiodi, Sarah N; Wee, Christina C

    2015-03-01

    In clinical practice, behavioral approaches to obesity treatment focus heavily on diet and exercise recommendations. However, these approaches may not be effective for patients with disordered eating behaviors. Little is known about the prevalence of disordered eating behaviors in primary care patients with obesity or whether they affect difficulty making dietary changes. We conducted a telephone interview of 337 primary care patients aged 18-65 years with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2) in Greater Boston, 2009-2011 (58% response rate, 69% women). We administered the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire R-18 (scores 0-100) and the Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite (IWQOL-Lite) (scores 0-100). We measured difficulty making dietary changes using four questions regarding perceived difficulty changing diet (Scores 0-10). 50% of the patients reported high emotional eating (score>50) and 28% reported high uncontrolled eating (score>50). Women were more likely to report emotional [OR=4.14 (2.90, 5.92)] and uncontrolled eating [OR=2.11 (1.44, 3.08)] than men. African-Americans were less likely than Caucasians to report emotional [OR=0.29 (95% CI: 0.19, 0.44)] and uncontrolled eating [OR=0.11 (0.07, 0.19)]. For every 10-point reduction in QOL score (IWQOL-lite), emotional and uncontrolled eating scores rose significantly by 7.82 and 5.48, respectively. Furthermore, participants who reported emotional and uncontrolled eating reported greater difficulty making dietary changes. Disordered eating behaviors are prevalent among obese primary care patients and disproportionately affect women, Caucasians, and patients with poor QOL. These eating behaviors may impair patients' ability to make clinically recommended dietary changes. Clinicians should consider screening for disordered eating behaviors and tailoring obesity treatment accordingly. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Recognizing Disordered Eating in Primary Care Patients with Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Sara A.; Chiodi, Sarah N.; Wee, Christina C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In clinical practice, behavioral approaches to obesity treatment focus heavily on diet and exercise recommendations. However, these approaches may not be effective for patients with disordered eating behaviors. Little is known about the prevalence of disordered eating behaviors in primary care patients with obesity or whether they affect difficulty making dietary changes. Methods We conducted a telephone interview of 337 primary care patients aged 18–65 years with BMI≥35kg/m2 in Greater-Boston, 2009–2011 (58% response rate, 69% women). We administered the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire R-18 (Scores 0–100) and the Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite (IWQOL-lite) (Scores 0–100). We measured difficulty making dietary changes using four questions regarding perceived difficulty changing diet (Scores 0–10). Results 50% of patients reported high emotional eating (score>50) and 28% reported high uncontrolled eating (score>50). Women were more likely to report emotional [OR=4.14 (2.90, 5.92)] and uncontrolled eating [OR=2.11 (1.44, 3.08)] than men. African Americans were less likely than Caucasians to report emotional [OR=0.29 (95% CI: 0.19, 0.44)] and uncontrolled eating [OR=0.11 (0.07, 0.19)]. For every 10-point reduction in QOL score (IWQOL-lite), emotional and uncontrolled eating scores rose significantly by 7.82 and 5.48, respectively. Furthermore, participants who reported emotional and uncontrolled eating reported greater difficulty making dietary changes. Conclusions Disordered eating behaviors are prevalent among obese primary care patients and disproportionately affect women, Caucasians, and patients with poor QOL. These eating behaviors may impair patients' ability to make clinically recommended dietary changes. Clinicians should consider screening for disordered eating behaviors and tailoring obesity treatment accordingly. PMID:25572624

  16. The CANMAT task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Ayal; McIntosh, Diane; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Rector, Neil A; McIntyre, Roger S; Beaulieu, Serge; Swinson, Richard; Yatham, Lakshmi N

    2012-02-01

    Comorbid mood and anxiety disorders are commonly seen in clinical practice. The goal of this article is to review the available literature on the epidemiologic, etiologic, clinical, and management aspects of this comorbidity and formulate a set of evidence- and consensus-based recommendations. This article is part of a set of Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) Comorbidity Task Force papers. We conducted a PubMed search of all English-language articles published between January 1966 and November 2010. The search terms were bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, cross-referenced with anxiety disorders/symptoms, panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Levels of evidence for specific interventions were assigned based on a priori determined criteria, and recommendations were developed by integrating the level of evidence and clinical opinion of the authors. Comorbid anxiety symptoms and disorders have a significant impact on the clinical presentation and treatment approach for patients with mood disorders. A set of recommendations are provided for the management of bipolar disorder (BD) with comorbid anxiety and major depressive disorder (MDD) with comorbid anxiety with a focus on comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder, use of cognitive-behavioral therapy across mood and anxiety disorders, and youth with mood and anxiety disorders. Careful attention should be given to correctly identifying anxiety comorbidities in patients with BD or MDD. Consideration of evidence- or consensus-based treatment recommendations for the management of both mood and anxiety symptoms is warranted.

  17. ESPECTRA: Searching the Bipolar Spectrum in Eating Disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Ricardo A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bipolar Disorder (BD is a chronic, recurrent and highly prevalent illness. Despite the need for correct diagnosis to allow proper treatment, studies have shown that reaching a diagnosis can take up to ten years due to the lack of recognition of the broader presentations of BD. Frequent comorbidities with other psychiatric disorders are a major cause of misdiagnosis and warrant thorough evaluation. Methods/Design ESPECTRA (Occurrence of Bipolar Spectrum Disorders in Eating Disorder Patients is a single-site cross-sectional study involving a comparison group, designed to evaluate the prevalence of bipolar spectrum in an eating disorder sample. Women aged 18-45 years will be evaluated using the SCID-P and Zurich criteria for diagnosis and the HAM-D, YOUNG, SCI-MOODS, HCL-32, BIS-11, BSQ, WHOQoL and EAS instruments for rating symptoms and measuring clinical correlates. Discussion The classificatory systems in psychiatry are based on categorical models that have been criticized for simplifying the diagnosis and leading to an increase in comorbidities. Some dimensional approaches have been proposed aimed at improving the validity and reliability of psychiatric disorder assessments, especially in conditions with high rates of comorbidity such as BD and Eating Disorder (ED. The Bipolar Spectrum (BS remains under-recognized in clinical practice and its definition is not well established in current diagnostic guidelines. Broader evaluation of psychiatric disorders combining categorical and dimensional views could contribute to a more realistic understanding of comorbidities and help toward establishing a prognosis.

  18. Childhood Traumatic Experiences, Dissociative Symptoms, and Dissociative Disorder Comorbidity Among Patients With Panic Disorder: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Cenk; Belli, Hasan; Akbudak, Mahir; Tabo, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed childhood trauma history, dissociative symptoms, and dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with panic disorder (PD). A total of 92 psychotropic drug-naive patients with PD, recruited from outpatient clinics in the psychiatry department of a Turkish hospital, were involved in the study. Participants were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D), Dissociation Questionnaire, Panic and Agoraphobia Scale, Panic Disorder Severity Scale, and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Of the patients with PD, 18 (19%) had a comorbid dissociative disorder diagnosis on screening with the SCID-D. The most prevalent disorders were dissociative disorder not otherwise specified, dissociative amnesia, and depersonalization disorders. Patients with a high degree of dissociation symptoms and dissociative disorder comorbidity had more severe PD than those without (p dissociation and PD. Among all of the subscales, the strongest relationship was with childhood emotional abuse. Logistic regression analysis showed that emotional abuse and severity of PD were independently associated with dissociative disorder. In our study, a significant proportion of the patients with PD had concurrent diagnoses of dissociative disorder. We conclude that the predominance of PD symptoms at admission should not lead the clinician to overlook the underlying dissociative process and associated traumatic experiences among these patients.

  19. [The efficacy and tolerability of pericyazine in the treatment of patients with schizotypal disorder, organic personality disorders and pathocharacterological changes within personality disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, D S

    To assess the efficacy and tolerability of pericyazine in the treatment of patients with mental disorders manifesting with psychopathic-like symptoms and correction of pathocharacterological disorders in patients with personality disorders during the short-term admission to the hospital or the long-term outpatient treatment. Sixty-three patients with schizotypal personality disorder and organic personality disorder with psychopathic-like symptoms and pathocharacterological changes within the diagnosis of dissocial personality disorder and borderline personality disorder were examined. Patients received pericyazine during the short-term admission to the hospital (6 weeks) or the long-term outpatient treatment (6 month). Efficacy, tolerability and compliance were assessed in the study. Treatment with pricyazine was effective in all patients. The improvement was seen in patients with organic personality disorders and patients with personality disorders (psychopathy). The maximal effect was observed in inpatients and this effect remained during outpatient treatment. The improvement of mental state of patients with schizotypal personality disorder achieved during inpatient treatment with pericyazine continued during the long-term outpatient treatment. Side-effects were restricted to extrapyramidal symptoms, the frequency of metabolic syndrome was low. During outpatient treatment, the compliance was higher if the patient was managed by the same psychiatrist during inpatient- and outpatient treatment.

  20. Huntington's Disease in a Patient Misdiagnosed as Conversion Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, João Machado; Franco, Ana Margarida; Mendes, Susana; Valadas, Anabela; Semedo, Cristina; Jesus, Gustavo

    2018-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited, progressive, and neurodegenerative neuropsychiatric disorder caused by the expansion of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) trinucleotide in Interested Transcript (IT) 15 gene on chromosome 4. This pathology typically presents in individuals aged between 30 and 50 years and the age of onset is inversely correlated with the length of the CAG repeat expansion. It is characterized by chorea, cognitive deficits, and psychiatric symptoms. Usually the psychiatric disorders precede motor and cognitive impairment, Major Depressive Disorder and anxiety disorders being the most common presentations. We present a clinical case of a 65-year-old woman admitted to our Psychiatric Acute Unit. During the 6 years preceding the admission, the patient had clinical assessments made several times by different specialties that focused only on isolated symptoms, disregarding the syndrome as a whole. In the course of her last admission, the patient was referred to our Neuropsychiatric Team, which made the provisional diagnosis of late-onset Huntington's disease, later confirmed by genetic testing. This clinical vignette highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to atypical clinical presentations and raises awareness for the relevance of investigating carefully motor symptoms in psychiatric patients.

  1. Religiousness and spirituality in patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fazio, Pasquale; Gaetano, Raffaele; Caroleo, Mariarita; Cerminara, Gregorio; Giannini, Francesca; Jaén Moreno, Maria Jose; Moreno Díaz, Maria Josè; Medina León, Antonio; Segura-García, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Religiousness and spirituality (R/S) are often neglected features among psychiatric patients but important both for quality of life and coping strategies for mental disorders. In patients affected by bipolar disorder (BD), R/S can sometimes be confused with symptoms related to the psychiatric disorder. This study aimed to perform a clinical review of the relationship between R/S and BD. Data sources included Medline (OvidSP), CINAHL (Ebsco), EMBASE (Ovid), PsychINFO (Ebsco), Angeline, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Database of Abstract of Reviews of Effects, searching for pertinent Keywords: 'religiousness', 'spirituality' and 'bipolar disorder'. Nine works were found but only five used homogeneous samples with BD patients. R/S were important when facing symptoms and relapses in the lifeworld. These beliefs influenced the relationship with psychiatrists and spiritual figures of reference. R/S play a role as a psychosocial variable in the course of BD. However, the hypothesis that the R/S factor can be relevant both in terms of providing a protective effect as well as a provocative element in depressive or hypomanic phases was not fully supported at the moment.

  2. Perceived control and voice handicap in patients with voice disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Patricia; Merians, Addie; Misono, Stephanie

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to replicate and extend previous research on the relation between perceived present control and voice handicap and to further examine the psychometric properties of a present control scale adapted for patients with voice disorders (Misono, Meredith, Peterson, & Frazier, 2016). Sample 1 consisted of 1,129 patients recruited from a voice disorder clinic who completed measures of perceived present control, distress, and voice handicap in the clinic. Sample 2 consisted of 62 patients from the same clinic who completed measures of present control, distress, voice handicap, and general control beliefs online at baseline and measures of present control and voice handicap again 3 weeks later (n = 59). With regard to the psychometric properties of the voice-adapted present control scale, alpha coefficients were above .80 and the 3-week test-reliability coefficient was .69. There was mixed support for the hypothesized 1-factor structure of the scale. In Sample 1, present control was more strongly associated with lower voice handicap than was distress and accounted for significant variance in voice handicap controlling for distress. In Sample 2, present control at baseline predicted later voice handicap, controlling for general control beliefs and distress. Present control appears to be a promising target for adjunctive interventions for patients with voice disorders. An evidence-based online present control intervention (Hintz, Frazier, & Meredith, 2015) is being adapted for this patient population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Childhood maltreatment and intimate partner violence in dissociative disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webermann, Aliya R; Brand, Bethany L; Chasson, Gregory S

    2014-01-01

    Childhood maltreatment (CM) is a risk factor for subsequent intimate partner violence (IPV) in adulthood, with high rates of retrospectively reported CM among IPV victims and perpetrators. A theorized mechanism of the link between CM and IPV is dissociation. Dissociation may allow perpetrators of violence to remain emotionally distant from their behavior and minimize empathy toward those they victimize, enabling them to commit acts of violence similar to their own experiences. Indeed, elevated rates of dissociation and dissociative disorders (DD) have been found among IPV survivors and perpetrators. In addition, in pilot studies, DD clinicians have reported high levels of violent behavior among DD patients. The present study investigates IPV among DD patients with Dissociative Identity Disorder and Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified, a group with CM rates of 80-95% and severe dissociative symptoms. DD clinicians reported on rates of CM and IPV among 275 DD patients in outpatient treatment. DD patients also completed a self-report measure of dissociation. Analyses assessed the associations between CM typologies and IPV, as well as trait dissociation and IPV. Physical and emotional child abuse were associated with physical IPV, and childhood witnessing of domestic violence (DV) and childhood neglect were associated with emotional IPV. The present study is the first to provide empirical support for a possible CM to adult IPV developmental trajectory among DD patients. Future research is needed to better understand the link between CM and IPV among those with trauma and DD.

  4. Childhood maltreatment and intimate partner violence in dissociative disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliya R. Webermann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood maltreatment (CM is a risk factor for subsequent intimate partner violence (IPV in adulthood, with high rates of retrospectively reported CM among IPV victims and perpetrators. A theorized mechanism of the link between CM and IPV is dissociation. Dissociation may allow perpetrators of violence to remain emotionally distant from their behavior and minimize empathy toward those they victimize, enabling them to commit acts of violence similar to their own experiences. Indeed, elevated rates of dissociation and dissociative disorders (DD have been found among IPV survivors and perpetrators. In addition, in pilot studies, DD clinicians have reported high levels of violent behavior among DD patients. Objective: The present study investigates IPV among DD patients with Dissociative Identity Disorder and Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified, a group with CM rates of 80–95% and severe dissociative symptoms. Methods: DD clinicians reported on rates of CM and IPV among 275 DD patients in outpatient treatment. DD patients also completed a self-report measure of dissociation. Analyses assessed the associations between CM typologies and IPV, as well as trait dissociation and IPV. Results: Physical and emotional child abuse were associated with physical IPV, and childhood witnessing of domestic violence (DV and childhood neglect were associated with emotional IPV. Conclusions: The present study is the first to provide empirical support for a possible CM to adult IPV developmental trajectory among DD patients. Future research is needed to better understand the link between CM and IPV among those with trauma and DD.

  5. Vestibular Rehabilitation in a Patient with Whiplash-associated Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwo-Shieng Tuo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Whiplash-associated disorders are characterized by multiple physical complaints after a flexion-extension trauma to the neck. They are difficult to treat, and they often result in great impact on the patient's quality of life. In this paper, the comprehensive treatment of a patient with whiplash-associated disorders is presented. The purpose is to highlight the importance of accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plans to improve patients' quality of life. This 23-year-old woman experienced a traffic accident which caused severely painful neck disability, numbness over bilateral upper limbs, dizziness, double vision and loss of balance. Among these symptoms, dizziness was the problem that bothered the patient most. She received a comprehensive rehabilitation program including physical modalities, trigger point injections for relief of pain, as well as a vestibular rehabilitation program, which included exercises challenging and improving her balance function, head-eye coordination exercise, visual-ocular control exercise and sensory substitution-promoting exercises. She resumed her previous full-time work after 3 weeks of treatment. This successfully treated case illustrates the importance of correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment for patients who suffer from whiplash-associated disorders.

  6. Electronic monitoring of patients with bipolar affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacoby, Anne Sophie; Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Vinberg, Maj

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a great challenge to patients, relatives and clinicians, and there is a need for development of new methods to identify prodromal symptoms of affective episodes in order to provide efficient preventive medical and behavioural intervention. Clinical trials prove that electronic...... monitoring is a feasible, valid and acceptable method. Hence it is recommended, that controlled trials on the effect of electronic monitoring on patients' course of illness, level of function and quality of life are conducted.......Bipolar disorder is a great challenge to patients, relatives and clinicians, and there is a need for development of new methods to identify prodromal symptoms of affective episodes in order to provide efficient preventive medical and behavioural intervention. Clinical trials prove that electronic...

  7. Online information seeking by patients with bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conell, Jörn; Bauer, Rita; Glenn, Tasha

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information seeking is an important coping mechanism for dealing with chronic illness. Despite a growing number of mental health websites, there is little understanding of how patients with bipolar disorder use the Internet to seek information. METHODS: A 39 question, paper......-based, anonymous survey, translated into 12 languages, was completed by 1222 patients in 17 countries as a convenience sample between March 2014 and January 2016. All patients had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder from a psychiatrist. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and generalized estimating...... search engine. The primary reasons for searching were drug side effects (51 %), to learn anonymously (43 %), and for help coping (39 %). About 1/3 rated their search skills as expert, and 2/3 as basic or intermediate. 59 % preferred a website on mental illness and 33 % preferred Wikipedia. Only 20 % read...

  8. Patient-reported outcomes in borderline personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Gregor; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Jacob, Gitta A.; Brändle, Laura S.; Schulte-Vels, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) refers to measures that emphasize the subjective view of patients about their health-related conditions and behaviors. Typically, PROs include self-report questionnaires and clinical interviews. Defining PROs for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is particularly challenging given the disorder's high symptomatic heterogeneity, high comorbidity with other psychiatric conditions, highly fluctuating symptoms, weak correlations between symptoms and functional outcomes, and lack of valid and reliable experimental measures to complement self-report data. Here, we provide an overview of currently used BPD outcome measures and discuss them from clinical, psychometric, experimental, and patient perspectives. In addition, we review the most promising leads to improve BPD PROs, including the DSM-5 Section III, the Recovery Approach, Ecological Momentary Assessments, and novel experimental measures of social functioning that are associated with functional and social outcomes. PMID:25152662

  9. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder Among Patients Seeking Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Drew B; Duggal, Claire S; Gabriel, Allen; Nahabedian, Maurice Y; Carlson, Grant W; Losken, Albert

    2014-07-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by a preoccupation with a slight or imagined defect in physical appearance. It has significant implications for patients who desire breast reconstruction, because patient satisfaction with the aesthetic outcome is a substantial contributor to the success of the procedure. The authors estimated the prevalence of BDD among women seeking breast reconstruction by surveying patients with the previously validated Dysmorphic Concerns Questionnaire (DCQ). One hundred eighty-eight women who presented for immediate or delayed breast reconstruction completed the DCQ anonymously, during initial consultation with a plastic surgeon. Two groups of respondents were identified: those who desired immediate reconstruction and those who planned to undergo delayed reconstruction. The prevalence of BDD among breast reconstruction patients was compared between the 2 groups, and the overall prevalence was compared with published rates for the general public. Body dysmorphic disorder was significantly more prevalent in breast reconstruction patients than in the general population (17% vs 2%; P < .001). It also was much more common among patients who planned to undergo delayed (vs immediate) reconstruction (34% vs 13%; P = .004). Relative to the general public, significantly more women who sought breast reconstruction were diagnosed as having BDD. Awareness of the potential for BDD will enable clinicians to better understand their patients' perspectives and discuss realistic expectations at the initial consultation. Future studies are warranted to examine the implications of BDD on patient satisfaction with reconstructive surgery. 3. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  10. Professionally responsible intrapartum management of patients with major mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Kriste E; Bailey, Kala J; Coverdale, John H; Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2014-01-01

    Pregnant women with major mental disorders present obstetricians with a range of clinical challenges, which are magnified when a psychotic or agitated patient presents in labor and there is limited time for decision making. This article provides the obstetrician with an algorithm to guide professionally responsible decision making with these patients. We searched for articles related to the intrapartum management of pregnant patients with major mental disorders, using 3 main search components: pregnancy, chronic mental illness, and ethics. No articles were found that addressed the clinical ethical challenges of decision making during the intrapartum period with these patients. We therefore developed an ethical framework with 4 components: the concept of the fetus as a patient; the presumption of decision-making capacity; the concept of assent; and beneficence-based clinical judgment. On the basis of this framework we propose an algorithm to guide professionally responsible decision making that asks 5 questions: (1) Does the patient have the capacity to consent to treatment?; (2) Is there time to attempt restoration of capacity?; (3) Is there an opportunity for substituted judgment?; (4) Is the patient accepting treatment?; (5) Is there an opportunity for active assent?; and (6) coerced clinical management as the least worst alternative. The algorithm is designed to support a deliberative, clinically comprehensive, preventive-ethics approach to guide obstetricians in decision making with this challenging population of patients. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Victimization of patients with schizophrenia and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Paul B; de Castella, A R; Filia, K M; Filia, S L; Benitez, J; Kulkarni, J

    2005-03-01

    Previous research has predominately focused on patients with mental illness as the instigators, rather than the victims, of violence and criminal activity. However, patients with schizophrenia appear to experience a higher degree of victimization compared to general community samples. We aimed to establish the 1-month prevalence of violent and non-violent victimization in a sample of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and to investigate the determinants of victimization. Reports of violent and non-violent victimization were recorded in 348 patients in Dandenong, an outer metropolitan suburb of Melbourne, Australia along with the subjective perception of patients as to their degree of protection from being robbed or attacked. Patients reporting victimization were compared with those who did not, across a range of clinical and psychosocial variables. 11.2% of the sample reported being the victim of non-violent crime and 4.3% the victim of violent crime in the 1-month period. 23.2% reported dissatisfaction with their protection against being attacked or robbed. The major determinant of victimization was the lack of any meaningful daily activity. Patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders are at increased risk of victimization, both of the violent and non-violent type. Further research is required to understand the pathways through which victimization occurs and to understand whether psychosocial interventions can reduce victimization in this patient population.

  12. Substrate kinetics in patients with disorders of skeletal muscle metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørngreen, Mette Cathrine

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of the following studies was to investigate pathophysiological mechanisms in fat and carbohydrate metabolism and effect of nutritional interventions in patients with metabolic myopathies and in patients with severe muscle wasting. Yet there is no cure for patients with skeletal muscle disorders. The group of patients is heterozygous and this thesis is focused on patients with metabolic myopathies and low muscle mass due to severe muscle wasting. Disorders of fatty acid oxidation (FAO) are, along with myophosphorylase deficiency (McArdle disease), the most common inborn errors of metabolism leading to recurrent episodes of rhabdomyolysis in adults. Prolonged exercise, fasting, and fever are the main triggering factors for rhabdomyolysis in these conditions, and can be complicated by acute renal failure. Patients with low muscle mass are in risk of loosing their functional skills and depend on a wheel chair and respiratory support. We used nutritional interventions and metabolic studies with stable isotope technique and indirect calorimetry in patients with metabolic myopathies and patients with low muscle mass to get information of the metabolism of the investigated diseases, and to gain knowledge of the biochemical pathways of intermediary metabolism in human skeletal muscle. We have shown that patients with fat metabolism disorders in skeletal muscle affecting the transporting enzyme of fat into the mitochondria (carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency) and affecting the enzyme responsible for breakdown of the long-chain fatty acids (very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency) have a normal fatty acid oxidation at rest, but enzyme activity is too low to increase fatty acid oxidation during exercise. Furthermore, these patients benefit from a carbohydrate rich diet. Oppositely is exercise capacity worsened by a fat-rich diet in these patients. The patients also benefit from IV glucose, however, when glucose is given orally just before

  13. [Pharmacological treatments in patients with pervasive developmental disorders: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béhérec, L; Quilici, G; Rosier, A; Gerardin, P; Campion, D; Guillin, O

    2014-04-01

    Pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) are neurodevelepmental disorders that are characterized by severe deficits in socialisation and communication, and the existence of repetitive and stereotyped interests and behaviours. It is estimated more than 60/100,000 children are suffering from PDD. Comorbid disorders are common in people with PDD, including intellectual deficiency, symptoms of attention deficit-hyperactivity, aggression and disruption, and pervasive repetitive behaviours or thoughts. These symptoms have a negative impact on the outcome and quality of life of the patients and their caregivers. The first-line management of comorbid disorders in PDD is behavioural intervention, but sometimes this is not sufficient, and the use of pharmacological treatment is needed. We conducted a review of studies of medical treatments used in patients with PDD to establish which treatments show good evidence of efficacy in PDD. We used the Medline database and the following keywords "pervasive development disorders" or "autism spectrum disorders" or "autistic disorder" and "therapy" or "treatment". The treatments that showed the best efficacy on irritability in well-designed studies are second generation antipsychotics, risperidone and aripiprazole. Some studies indicate that haloperidol is efficient as well, but the very high frequency of extra-pyramidal effects limits its use. Methylphenidate has shown some efficacy on impulsivity and hyperactivity in randomised placebo-controlled studies. First data concerning atomoxetine are promising but better-designed studies are needed. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors: fluvoxamine and fluoxetine have shown some efficacy in the treatment of serious and pervasive repetitive behaviours. Alpha-adrenergic treatments, clonidine and guanfacine, can help in the management of disruptive behaviours in patients with PDD. Data concerning naltrexone are contradictory, indeed many case reports of its efficacy on aggressive (mostly

  14. Synchronization of EEG activity in patients with bipolar disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panischev, O Yu; Demin, S A; Muhametshin, I G; Yu Demina, N

    2015-01-01

    In paper we apply the method based on the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) to determine the differences in frequency-phase synchronization of the cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) activities in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). We found that for healthy subjects the frequency-phase synchronization of EEGs from long-range electrodes was significantly better for BD patients. In BD patients a high synchronization of EEGs was observed only for short-range electrodes. Thus, the FNS is a simple graphical method for qualitative analysis can be applied to identify the synchronization effects in EEG activity and, probably, may be used for the diagnosis of this syndrome. (paper)

  15. Synchronization of EEG activity in patients with bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panischev, O. Yu; Demin, S. A.; Muhametshin, I. G.; Demina, N. Yu

    2015-12-01

    In paper we apply the method based on the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) to determine the differences in frequency-phase synchronization of the cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) activities in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). We found that for healthy subjects the frequency-phase synchronization of EEGs from long-range electrodes was significantly better for BD patients. In BD patients a high synchronization of EEGs was observed only for short-range electrodes. Thus, the FNS is a simple graphical method for qualitative analysis can be applied to identify the synchronization effects in EEG activity and, probably, may be used for the diagnosis of this syndrome.

  16. Psychosocial and Physical Assessment of Patients with Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha B

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to assess the prevalence of psychosocial disorders in patients with TMD, and to establish correlation between these, and symptoms and physical signs of TMD. Thirty patients were included in the study. TMD history and TMJ examination findings were recorded. Subsequently psychosocial assessment was carried out. Eighteen patients were in psychiatric morbid (PM group and 12 were in psychiatric nonmorbid (PNM group. Symptoms and signs of TMD were compared between PM and PNM group. Strong association was evident between presence of psychiatric morbidity and certain parameters viz. pain duration, VAS, bruxism, mouth opening.

  17. Minimal role of comorbid personality disorder on the quality of life in patients with anxiety spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaradova, Dana; Latalova, Klara; Prasko, Jan; Grambal, Ales; Sigmundova, Zuzana; Kasalova, Petra; Cakirpaloglu, Snezana

    2017-01-01

    There is no consensus on the definition of Quality of life (QoL). It is considered to be comprised of both psychological and somatical well-being. A variety of tools has been developed to measure subjective and objective (QoL). A number of factors, including demographical and medical may have an impact on QoL. The aim of our study was to compare the QoL in selected anxiety disorders and evaluate the influence of comorbid personality disorder. We evaluated data from 278 patients suffering from social phobia, panic disorder and/or agoraphobia, adjustment disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Personality disorders were diagnosed in 90 probands. The Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction (Q-LES-Q) was used to assess patients´perceived QoL. Up to our data there was no statistical difference in overall score of quality of life in selected anxiety disorders. The only significant difference between patients was found in subscale "household." Comorbid personality disorder had no influence on the overall score or any domain of Q-LES-Q. Our study proved that presence of anxiety disorder means a decrease in QoL. Particular anxiety disorders did not differ in overall scores of Q-LES-Q. Furthermore, comorbid personality disorder had no impact on quality of life of patients.

  18. Profile of nursing diagnoses in patients with respiratory disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naftale Alves dos Santos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Identify the profile of nursing diagnoses in patients with respiratory disorders. Methodology. A descriptive and cross-sectional study involving 38 patients with respiratory problems, of referral hospitals, in a city in northeastern Brazil, in the period from August to October, 2012. Data collection was performed using a form and diagnostic inference was made according with the Taxonomy II of NANDA I. Results. The average age of the patients was 46 years and males predominated (60.5%. The most frequent nursing diagnoses were: Risk for infection (97.3%, Acute pain (68.4%, Poor knowledge (68.4%, Sedentary lifestyle (65.7%, Ineffective airway clearance (65.7%, Risk-prone health behavior (63.1%, Activity intolerance (52.6% and Disturbed sleep pattern (33.3%. Evaluated patients exhibited an average of 8.6 nursing diagnoses (SD = 2.8. With respect to the defining characteristics and related factors the average per person was 7.2 and 9.3, respectively. Conclusion. In this group of patients the most frequent diagnoses were the domain activity/rest. Knowledge of nursing diagnoses profile presented by people with respiratory disorders is important, because it is part of the Nursing Process and nurses who take care of such patients should exercise them in their care practice. Knowledge of the mains nursing diagnosis presented by patients with respiratory disorders are important for the practice of nurses who care for these patients, because it allows the choice of responses to problems of their clientele.

  19. Effective mood stabilization with a chelated mineral supplement: an open-label trial in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, B J; Simpson, J S; Ferre, R C; Gorman, C P; McMullen, D M; Crawford, S G

    2001-12-01

    To determine in open trials the therapeutic benefit of a nutritional supplement for bipolar disorder. The sample consisted of 11 patients with DSM-IV-diagnosed bipolar disorder aged 19 to 46 years, who were taking a mean of 2.7 psychotropic medications each at study entry. Three additional patients dropped out prematurely. The intervention is a broad-based nutritional supplement of dietary nutrients, primarily chelated trace minerals and vitamins, administered in high doses. At study entry and periodically thereafter, patients were assessed with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), and the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS). For those who completed the minimum 6-month open trial, symptom reduction ranged from 55% to 66% on the outcome measures; need for psychotropic medications decreased by more than 50%. Paired t tests revealed treatment benefit on all measures for patients completing the trial: HAM-D mean score at entry = 19.0, mean score at last visit = 5.4, t = 5.59, df = 9, p .80) for each measure. The number of psychotropic medications decreased significantly to a mean +/- SD of 1.0+/-1.1 (t = 3.54, df = 10, p bipolar illness may be ameliorated by nutritional supplementation. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial in adults with bipolar I disorder is currently underway, as well as open trials in children.

  20. Evaluating the treatment of eating disorders from the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rie, Simone; Noordenbos, Greta; Donker, Marianne; van Furth, Eric

    2006-12-01

    This study investigated the evaluation of treatment of eating disorders (EDs) from the patient's perspective in a large community based sample in the Netherlands. It investigated perceived helpfulness of different types of treatment. Furthermore it investigated which patient and treatment characteristics contribute to the evaluation of treatment. The Eating Disorder Examination questionnaire was administered to 44 anorexia nervosa (AN), 43 bulimia nervosa (BN), 69 EDNOS (ED not otherwise specified), and 148 former ED patients. A questionnaire specifically designed for the purpose of this study addressing treatment history and patient's evaluation of their treatment was administered. There is a substantial patient and doctor delay in seeking and finding treatment. Treatment in specialized ED centers, self-help groups, and treatment with a partner were reported to be most helpful. Beneficial components of treatment reported in specialized ED centers refer to the communication skills of professionals, the therapist-patient working alliance, the contact with peers, and the focus of treatment on both ED symptoms as well as underlying issues. The patient's perspective on treatment of EDs does provide recommendations for the improvement of treatment of EDs that will facilitate clinical decision making and treatment planning. Copyright 2006 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Criminal behaviour and violent crimes in former inpatients with affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graz, Christian; Etschel, Eva; Schoech, Heinz; Soyka, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Several studies have reported criminal and violent behaviour in people with schizophrenia but few have investigated the association between affective disorders and violent behaviour. We reviewed the national crime register for records of criminal offences committed by 1561 patients with affective disorders treated between 1990 and 1995 in the Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Munich. The sample was divided into patients with bipolar I disorder, manic disorder and major depressive disorder. Sociodemographic and other risk factors for non-violent and violent criminal behaviour were analysed. Sixty-five (4.16%) patients had been convicted in the 7 to 12 years after discharge (307 cases). The rate of criminal behaviour and violent crimes was highest in the manic disorder group: 15.7% (14 of 89) were listed in the national crime register and 5.6% (5 of 89) were convicted of physical injury offences. Violence and criminality were comparatively rare in patients with major depressive disorder: only 1.42% (10 of 702) committed violent crimes. Male gender was a substantial risk factor for non-violent and especially violent behaviour: the rate of violent crimes was six times higher than in females. Marital status appeared to influence the prevalence of later delinquency: separated, divorced and widowed patients committed offences more frequently. A history of substance use problems before clinical treatment was reported by 21.2% (329 of 1561) of the sample. A wide range of different crimes were committed, with defalcation, theft and fraud being the most frequent. Twenty-one cases of physical assault and one case of later homicide were recorded. In contrast to other forensic studies, we did not find a significant effect of substance abuse on the risk of later delinquent behaviour. The frequency of criminal behaviour and violent crimes in individuals with affective disorder depends on much more than just the diagnosis. This study may stimulate further research to

  2. The comorbidity of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in bipolar disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaahmet, Elif; Konuk, Numan; Dalkilic, Alican; Saracli, Ozge; Atasoy, Nuray; Kurçer, Mehmet A; Atik, Levent

    2013-07-01

    High comorbidity ratio of bipolar mood disorder (BMD) with Axis I and Axis II diagnoses is reported in the literature. The possible relationship between BMD and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in all age groups has been attracting more attention of researchers due to highly overlapping symptoms such as excessive talking, attention deficit, and increased motor activity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of ADHD comorbidity in BMD patients and the clinical features of these patients. Of 142 patients, who presented to the Bipolar Disorder Unit of Zonguldak Karaelmas University Research and Application Hospital between the dates of August 1, 2008 and June 31, 2009 and diagnosed with BMD according to DSM-IV criteria consecutively, 118 patients signed informed consent and 90 of them completed the study. They all were in euthymic phase during the study evaluations. A sociodemographical data form, Wender-Utah Rating Scale (WURS), ADD/ADHD Diagnostic and Evaluation Inventory for Adults, and Structural Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders, Clinical Version (SCID-I) were applied to all participating patients. A total of 23.3% of all patients met the criteria for A-ADHD diagnosis along BMD. No difference was detected regarding sociodemographical features between the BMD+A-ADHD and the BMD without A-ADHD groups. The BMD+A-ADHD group had at least one extra educational year repetition than the other group and the difference was statistically significant. The BMD starting age in the BMD+A-ADHD group was significantly earlier (p=0.044) and the number of manic episodes was more frequent in the BMD+A-ADHD group (p=0.026) than the BMD without ADHD group. Panic disorder in the BMD+A-ADHD group (p=0.019) and obsessive-compulsive disorder in the BMD+C-ADHD group (p=0.001) were most frequent comorbidities. A-ADHD is a frequent comorbidity in BMD. It is associated with early starting age of BMD, higher number of manic episodes during the course

  3. Temporomandibular disorders in burning mouth syndrome patients: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsalini, Massimo; Di Venere, Daniela; Pettini, Francesco; Lauritano, Dorina; Petruzzi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disease characterized by absence of any lesions and burning of the oral mucosa associated to a sensation of dry mouth and/or taste alterations. The purpose of our study is to estimate signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in patients with BMS and to investigate for the existence of an association between BMS and TMD. Forty-four BMS patients were enrolled; BMS subtype was established according to the classification of Lamey. After a gnathological evaluation, according to the protocol of the European Academy of Craniomandibular Disorders, patients were classified by RDC/TMD criteria. The data were compared and analyzed using a chi-square test to describe the existence of an association between BMS and TMD. 65.9% the BMS patients showed disorders classified as primary signs and symptoms of TMD according to RDC / TMD criteria, and 72.7% showed parafunctional habits. The chi-square test revealed a statistically significant association (p = 0.035) between BMS and TMD. The data suggest that there is a possible relationship not yet well understood between BMS and TMD, may be for neurophatic alterations assumed for BMS that could be also engaged in TMD pathogenesis.

  4. Care plan for the patient with a dependent personality disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Ruiz Galán

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Personality is unique for each individual and can be defined as the dynamic collection of characteristics relative to emotions, thought and behaviour.Personality trout’s only mean a Personality Disorder (PD when they are inflexible and maladjusted and cause notable functional deterioration or uneasiness.According to Bermudez personality is “the enduring organization of structural and functional features, innate and acquired under the special conditions of each one’s development that shape the particular and specific collection of behaviour to face different situations”.According to the Diagnostic a Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV, a Personality Disorder is “an enduring pattern of inner experience and behavior that deviates markedly from the expectations of the person’s culture is pervasive and an inflexible, is stable over time and leads to distress or impairment. The onset of these patterns of behaviour is the beginning of the adulthood and, in rare instances, early adolescence”.There are several types of Personality Disorders (paranoid, schizoid, borderline, antisocial, dependent…. Dependent Personality Disorder is one of the most frequent in the Mental Health Services.People who suffer from this disorder are unable to take a decision by themselves because they don’t have confidence in themselves. They need a lot of social support and affection until the point of deny their individuality by subordinating their desires to other person’s desires and permitting these persons to manage their lives. Maybe they feel desolated by separation and loss and can support any situation, even maltreatment to keep a relationship.As we a deduce this diagnosis is sensible to cultural influences. This work aims to elaborate an standarized plan of cares for the patient with Dependent Personality Disorder by using nursing Diagnosis of NANDA II, Outcomes Criteria (NOC and Interventions Criteria (NIC.

  5. Patients with eating disorders. A high-risk group for fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Peter; Emborg, Charlotte; Støving, René K

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze fracture risk and bone mineral density in patients with eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders). DESIGN: Clinical overview. FINDINGS: Bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased in patients with anorexia nervosa....... In patients with bulimia nervosa, bone mineral is only marginally decreased and fracture risk marginally increased. In patients with other eating disorders (eating disorders not otherwise specified), bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased. CONCLUSIONS: Fracture risk is increased...... in patients with eating disorders. An eating disorder should be suspected in severely underweight young individuals (primarily girls) presenting with fractures, especially low-energy fractures....

  6. Patients with eating disorders - a high-risk group for fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, P.; Emborg, C.; Støving, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze fracture risk and bone mineral density in patients with eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders). DESIGN: Clinical overview. FINDINGS: Bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased in patients with anorexia nervosa....... In patients with bulimia nervosa, bone mineral is only marginally decreased and fracture risk marginally increased. In patients with other eating disorders (eating disorders not otherwise specified), bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased. CONCLUSIONS: Fracture risk is increased...... in patients with eating disorders. An eating disorder should be suspected in severely underweight young individuals (primarily girls) presenting with fractures, especially low-energy fractures....

  7. Psychosocial Functioning in Depressive Patients: A Comparative Study between Major