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Sample records for biphasic synaptic ca

  1. Pycnogenol protects CA3-CA1 synaptic function in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

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    Norris, Christopher M; Sompol, Pradoldej; Roberts, Kelly N; Ansari, Mubeen; Scheff, Stephen W

    2016-02-01

    Pycnogenol (PYC) is a patented mix of bioflavonoids with potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Previously, we showed that PYC administration to rats within hours after a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury significantly protects against the loss of several synaptic proteins in the hippocampus. Here, we investigated the effects of PYC on CA3-CA1 synaptic function following CCI. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats received an ipsilateral CCI injury followed 15 min later by intravenous injection of saline vehicle or PYC (10 mg/kg). Hippocampal slices from the injured (ipsilateral) and uninjured (contralateral) hemispheres were prepared at seven and fourteen days post-CCI for electrophysiological analyses of CA3-CA1 synaptic function and induction of long-term depression (LTD). Basal synaptic strength was impaired in slices from the ipsilateral, relative to the contralateral, hemisphere at seven days post-CCI and susceptibility to LTD was enhanced in the ipsilateral hemisphere at both post-injury timepoints. No interhemispheric differences in basal synaptic strength or LTD induction were observed in rats treated with PYC. The results show that PYC preserves synaptic function after CCI and provides further rationale for investigating the use of PYC as a therapeutic in humans suffering from neurotrauma. PMID:26607913

  2. Isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle exocytosis through reduced Ca2+ influx, not Ca2+-exocytosis coupling.

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    Baumgart, Joel P; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Hara, Masato; Cook, Daniel C; Hoppa, Michael B; Ryan, Timothy A; Hemmings, Hugh C

    2015-09-22

    Identifying presynaptic mechanisms of general anesthetics is critical to understanding their effects on synaptic transmission. We show that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis at nerve terminals in dissociated rat hippocampal neurons through inhibition of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx without significantly altering the Ca(2+) sensitivity of SV exocytosis. A clinically relevant concentration of isoflurane (0.7 mM) inhibited changes in [Ca(2+)]i driven by single action potentials (APs) by 25 ± 3%, which in turn led to 62 ± 3% inhibition of single AP-triggered exocytosis at 4 mM extracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]e). Lowering external Ca(2+) to match the isoflurane-induced reduction in Ca(2+) entry led to an equivalent reduction in exocytosis. These data thus indicate that anesthetic inhibition of neurotransmitter release from small SVs occurs primarily through reduced axon terminal Ca(2+) entry without significant direct effects on Ca(2+)-exocytosis coupling or on the SV fusion machinery. Isoflurane inhibition of exocytosis and Ca(2+) influx was greater in glutamatergic compared with GABAergic nerve terminals, consistent with selective inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission. Such alteration in the balance of excitatory to inhibitory transmission could mediate reduced neuronal interactions and network-selective effects observed in the anesthetized central nervous system. PMID:26351670

  3. Acetylcholine sensitivity of biphasic Ca2+ mobilization induced by nicotinic receptor activation at the mouse skeletal muscle endplate

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    Dezaki, Katsuya; Kimura, Ikuko

    1998-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) was locally applied onto the endplate region in a mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm muscle preparation to measure intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) entry through nicotinic ACh receptors (AChRs) by use of Ca2+-aequorin luminescence.ACh (0.1–3 mM, 20 μl) elicited biphasic elevation of [Ca2+]i (fast and slow Ca2+ mobilization) in muscle cells. The peak amplitude of the slow Ca2+ mobilization (not accompanied by twitch tension) was concentration-dependently increased by ACh, wh...

  4. Synaptic neuropeptide release induced by octopamine without Ca2+ entry into the nerve terminal

    OpenAIRE

    Shakiryanova, Dinara; Zettel, Geoffrey M.; Gu, Tingting; Hewes, Randall S.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic release of neurotransmitters is evoked by activity-dependent Ca2+ entry into the nerve terminal. However, here it is shown that robust synaptic neuropeptide release from Drosophila motoneurons is evoked in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ by octopamine, the arthropod homolog to norepinephrine. Genetic and pharmacology experiments demonstrate that this surprising peptidergic transmission requires cAMP-dependent protein kinase, with only a minor contribution of exchange protein activa...

  5. The temporoammonic input to the hippocampal CA1 region displays distinctly different synaptic plasticity compared to the Schaffer collateral input in vivo: significance for synaptic information processing

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    Ayla eAksoy Aksel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In terms of its sub-regional differentiation, the hippocampal CA1 region receives cortical information directly via the perforant (temporoammonic path (pp-CA1 synapse and indirectly via the tri-synaptic pathway where the last relay station is the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse (Sc-CA1 synapse. Research to date on pp-CA1 synapses has been conducted predominantly in vitro and never in awake animals, but these studies hint that information processing at this synapse might be distinct to processing at the Sc-CA1 synapse. Here, we characterized synaptic properties and synaptic plasticity at the pp-CA1 synapse of freely behaving adult rats. We established that field excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the pp-CA1 have longer onset latencies and a shorter time-to-peak compared to the Sc-CA1 synapse. LTP (> 24h was successfully evoked by tetanic afferent stimulation of pp-CA1 synapses. Low frequency stimulation evoked synaptic depression at Sc-CA1 synapses, but did not elicit LTD at pp-CA1 synapses unless the Schaffer collateral afferents to the CA1 region had been severed. Paired-pulse responses also showed significant differences. Our data suggest that synaptic plasticity at the pp-CA1 synapse is distinct from the Sc-CA1 synapse and that this may reflect its specific role in hippocampal information processing.

  6. CaMKII Activity in the Ventral Tegmental Area Gates Cocaine-Induced Synaptic Plasticity in the Nucleus Accumbens

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaojie; Liu, Yong; Zhong, Peng; Wilkinson, Brianna; Qi, Jinshun; Olsen, Christopher M; Bayer, K. Ulrich; Liu, Qing-song

    2013-01-01

    Addictive drugs such as cocaine induce synaptic plasticity in discrete regions of the reward circuit. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether cocaine-evoked synaptic plasticity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) is causally linked. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a central regulator of long-term synaptic plasticity, learning, and drug addiction. We examined whether blocking CaMKII activity in the VTA affected cocaine conditio...

  7. θ frequency stimulation up-regulates the synaptic strength of the pathway from CA1 to subiculum region of hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yan-You; Kandel, Eric R.

    2004-01-01

    The subiculum (SB) is the principal target of the axons of the CA1 pyramidal cells and serves as the final relay in the trisynaptic loop between the entorhinal cortex and the hippocampus. We have examined synaptic plasticity in the synaptic pathway between the CA1 pyramidal cells and the SB in hippocampal slices and compared it under the same experimental condition with the synaptic plasticity in Shaffer collateral pathway (CA3-CA1). We find that the frequency response curve of synaptic stren...

  8. Removal of Synaptic Ca2+-Permeable AMPA Receptors during Sleep.

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich, Daniel; ROWAN, MICHAEL

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED here is accumulating evidence that sleep contributes to memory formation and learning, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are incompletely understood. To investigate the impact of sleep on excitatory synaptic transmission, we obtained whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from layer V pyramidal neurons in acute slices of somatosensory cortex of juvenile rats (postnatal days 21-25). In animals after the dark period, philanthotoxin 74 (PhTx)-sensitive calcium-permeable AMPA recepto...

  9. Cholinergic-mediated IP3-receptor activation induces long-lasting synaptic enhancement in CA1 pyramidal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández de Sevilla, D.; Núñez Molina, Ángel; Borde, M.; Malinow, R.; Buño, Washinton

    2008-01-01

    Cholinergic-glutamatergic interactions influence forms of synaptic plasticity that are thought to mediate memory and learning. We tested in vitro the induction of long-lasting synaptic enhancement at Schaffer collaterals by acetylcholine (ACh) at the apical dendrite of CA1 pyramidal neurons and in vivo by stimulation of cholinergic afferents. In vitro ACh induced a Ca2+ wave and synaptic enhancement mediated by insertion of AMPA receptors in spines. Activation of muscarinic ACh receptors (mAC...

  10. Endocannabinoids differentially modulate synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

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    Jian-Yi Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons receive two excitatory glutamatergic synaptic inputs: their most distal dendritic regions in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare (SLM are innervated by the perforant path (PP, originating from layer III of the entorhinal cortex, while their more proximal regions of the apical dendrites in the stratum radiatum (SR are innervated by the Schaffer-collaterals (SC, originating from hippocampal CA3 neurons. Endocannabinoids (eCBs are naturally occurring mediators capable of modulating both GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic transmission and plasticity via the CB1 receptor. Previous work on eCB modulation of excitatory synapses in the CA1 region largely focuses on the SC pathway. However, little information is available on whether and how eCBs modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission and plasticity at PP synapses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By employing somatic and dendritic patch-clamp recordings, Ca(2+ uncaging, and immunostaining, we demonstrate that there are significant differences in low-frequency stimulation (LFS- or DHPG-, an agonist of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs, induced long-term depression (LTD of excitatory synaptic transmission between SC and PP synapses in the same pyramidal neurons. These differences are eliminated by pharmacological inhibition with selective CB1 receptor antagonists or genetic deletion of the CB1 receptor, indicating that these differences likely result from differential modulation via a CB1 receptor-dependent mechanism. We also revealed that depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE, a form of short-term synaptic plasticity, and photolysis of caged Ca(2+-induced suppression of Excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs were less at the PP than that at the SC. In addition, application of WIN55212 (WIN induced a more pronounced inhibition of EPSCs at the SC when compared to that at the PP. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest

  11. Dendritic spines as individual neuronal compartments for synaptic Ca2+ responses.

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    Müller, W; Connor, J A

    1991-11-01

    The possibility that postsynaptic spines on neuronal dendrites are discrete biochemical compartments for Ca(2+)-activated processes involved in synaptic plasticity is a widely proposed concept that has eluded experimental demonstration. Using microfluorometry on CA3 neurons in hippocampal slices, we show here that with weak presynaptic stimulation of associative/commissural fibres, Ca2+ accumulates in single postsynaptic spines but not in the parent dendrite. Stronger stimulation also promotes changes in dendrites. The NMDA-receptor antagonist AP-5 blocks changes in Ca2+ in spines. Sustained steep Ca2+ gradients between single spines and the parent dendrite, often lasting several minutes, develop with repeated stimulation. The observed compartmentalization allows for the specificity, cooperativity and associativity displayed by memory models such as long-term potentiation. PMID:1682815

  12. Regulation of Astroglia on Synaptic Plasticity in the CA1 Region of Rat Hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The regulation of astroglia on synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region of rat hippocampus was examined. Rats were divided into three groups: the newly born (<24 h), the juvenile (28-30days) and the adult groups (90-100 days), with each group having 20 animals. The CA1 region of rat hippocampus was immunohistochemically and electron-microscopically examined, respectively,for the growth of astroglia and the ultrastructure of synapses. The high performance liquid chromatography was employed to determine the cholesterol content of rat hippocampus. In the newly-born rats, a large number of neurons were noted in the hippocampal CA1 region of the newly-born rats,and few astroglia and no synaptic structure were observed. In the juvenile group, a few astroglias and some immature synapses were found, which were less than those in adult rats (P<0.01). The cholesterol content was 2.92±0.03 mg/g, 11.20± 3.41 mg/g and 12.91 ± 1.25 mg/g for newly born, the juvenile and the adult groups, respectively, with the differences among them being statistically significant (P<0.01). Our study suggests that the astrocytes may play an important role in the synaptic formation and functional maturity of hippocampal neurons, which may be related to the secretion of cholesterol from astrocytes.

  13. Novel nootropic dipeptide Noopept increases inhibitory synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal cells.

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    Kondratenko, Rodion V; Derevyagin, Vladimir I; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2010-05-31

    Effects of newly synthesized nootropic and anxiolytic dipeptide Noopept on inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells were investigated using patch-clamp technique in whole-cell configuration. Bath application of Noopept (1 microM) significantly increased the frequency of spike-dependant spontaneous IPSCs whereas spike-independent mIPSCs remained unchanged. It was suggested that Noopept mediates its effect due to the activation of inhibitory interneurons terminating on CA1 pyramidal cells. Results of current clamp recording of inhibitory interneurons residing in stratum radiatum confirmed this suggestion. PMID:20382202

  14. Synaptic remodeling in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex of mice: effects of deprived rearing and voluntary running.

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    Schaefers, Andrea T U; Grafen, Keren; Teuchert-Noodt, Gertraud; Winter, York

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal cell proliferation is strongly increased and synaptic turnover decreased after rearing under social and physical deprivation in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). We examined if a similar epigenetic effect of rearing environment on adult neuroplastic responses can be found in mice (Mus musculus). We examined synaptic turnover rates in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex. No direct effects of deprived rearing on rates of synaptic turnover were found in any of the studied regions. However, adult wheel running had the effect of leveling layer-specific differences in synaptic remodeling in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1, but not in the entorhinal cortex and subiculum of animals of both rearing treatments. Epigenetic effects during juvenile development affected adult neural plasticity in mice, but seemed to be less pronounced than in gerbils. PMID:20508828

  15. Synaptic Remodeling in the Dentate Gyrus, CA3, CA1, Subiculum, and Entorhinal Cortex of Mice: Effects of Deprived Rearing and Voluntary Running

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    Andrea T. U. Schaefers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal cell proliferation is strongly increased and synaptic turnover decreased after rearing under social and physical deprivation in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus. We examined if a similar epigenetic effect of rearing environment on adult neuroplastic responses can be found in mice (Mus musculus. We examined synaptic turnover rates in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex. No direct effects of deprived rearing on rates of synaptic turnover were found in any of the studied regions. However, adult wheel running had the effect of leveling layer-specific differences in synaptic remodeling in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1, but not in the entorhinal cortex and subiculum of animals of both rearing treatments. Epigenetic effects during juvenile development affected adult neural plasticity in mice, but seemed to be less pronounced than in gerbils.

  16. M-type potassium channels modulate Schaffer collateral-CA1 glutamatergic synaptic transmission.

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    Sun, Jianli; Kapur, Jaideep

    2012-08-15

    Previous studies have suggested that muscarinic receptor activation modulates glutamatergic transmission. M-type potassium channels mediate the effects of muscarinic activation in the hippocampus, and it has been proposed that they modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission. We tested whether M1 muscarinic receptor activation enhances glutamatergic synaptic transmission via the inhibition of the M-type potassium channels that are present in Schaffer collateral axons and terminals. Miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) were recorded from CA1 pyramidal neurons. The M1 receptor agonist, NcN-A-343, increased the frequency of mEPSCs, but did not alter their amplitude. The M-channel blocker XE991 and its analogue linopirdine also increased the frequency of mEPSCs. Flupirtine, which opens M-channels, had the opposite effect. XE991 did not enhance mEPSCs frequency in a calcium-free external medium. Blocking P/Q- and N-type calcium channels abolished the effect of XE991 on mEPSCs. These data suggested that the inhibition of M-channels increases presynaptic calcium-dependent glutamate release in CA1 pyramidal neurons. The effects of these agents on the membrane potentials of presynaptic CA3 pyramidal neurons were studied using current clamp recordings; activation of M1 receptors and blocking M-channels depolarized neurons and increased burst firing. The input resistance of CA3 neurons was increased by the application of McN-A-343 and XE991; these effects were consistent with the closure of M-channels. Muscarinic activation inhibits M-channels in CA3 pyramidal neurons and its efferents – Schaffer collateral, which causes the depolarization, activates voltage-gated calcium channels, and ultimately elevates the intracellular calcium concentration to increase the release of glutamate on CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:22674722

  17. Melamine Alters Glutamatergic Synaptic Transmission of CA3-CA1 Synapses Presynaptically Through Autophagy Activation in the Rat Hippocampus.

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    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Hui; Xiao, Xi; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Melamine is an industrial chemical that can cause central nervous system disorders including excitotoxicity and cognitive impairment. Its illegal use in powdered baby formula was the focus of a milk scandal in China in 2008. One of our previous studies showed that melamine impaired glutamatergic transmission in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. However, the underlying mechanism of action of melamine is unclear, and it is unknown if the CA3-CA1 pathway is directly involved. In the present study, a whole-cell patch-clamp technique was employed to investigate the effect of melamine on the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway in vitro. Both the evoked excitatory postsynaptic current (eEPSC) and the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) were recorded. Furthermore, we examined whether autophagy was involved in glutamatergic transmission alterations induced by melamine. Our data showed that melamine significantly increased the amplitude of eEPSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor did not prevent the increase in eEPSC amplitude. In addition, the PPR was remarkably decreased by a melamine concentration of 5 × 10(-5) g/mL. It was found that autophagy could be activated by melamine and an autophagy inhibitor, 3-MA, prevented the melamine-induced increase in eEPSC amplitude. Overall, our results show that melamine presynaptically alters glutamatergic synaptic transmission of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses in vitro and this is likely associated with autophagy alteration. PMID:26530910

  18. Molecular evidence of synaptic pathology in the CA1 region in schizophrenia

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    Matosin, Natalie; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca; Lum, Jeremy S; Engel, Martin; Andrews, Jessica L; Gassen, Nils C; Wagner, Klaus V; Schmidt, Mathias V; Newell, Kelly A

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of postsynaptic density (PSD)95-complex proteins in schizophrenia ostensibly induce deficits in synaptic plasticity, the molecular process underlying cognitive functions. Although some PSD95-complex proteins have been previously examined in the hippocampus in schizophrenia, the status of other equally important molecules is unclear. This is especially true in the cornu ammonis (CA)1 hippocampal subfield, a region that is critically involved in the pathophysiology of the illness. We thus performed a quantitative immunoblot experiment to examine PSD95 and several of its associated proteins in the CA1 region, using post mortem brain samples derived from schizophrenia subjects with age-, sex-, and post mortem interval-matched controls (n=20/group). Our results indicate a substantial reduction in PSD95 protein expression (−61.8%). Further analysis showed additional alterations to the scaffold protein Homer1 (Homer1a: +42.9%, Homer1b/c: −24.6%), with a twofold reduction in the ratio of Homer1b/c:Homer1a isoforms (P=0.011). Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) protein levels were significantly reduced (−32.7%), and Preso, a protein that supports interactions between Homer1 or PSD95 with mGluR1, was elevated (+83.3%). Significant reduction in synaptophysin (−27.8%) was also detected, which is a validated marker of synaptic density. These findings support the presence of extensive molecular abnormalities to PSD95 and several of its associated proteins in the CA1 region in schizophrenia, offering a small but significant step toward understanding how proteins in the PSD are altered in the schizophrenia brain, and their relevance to overall hippocampal and cognitive dysfunction in the illness. PMID:27430010

  19. SCRAPPER regulates the thresholds of long-term potentiation/depression, the bidirectional synaptic plasticity in hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses.

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    Takagi, Hiroshi; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Ito, Seiji; Yao, Ikuko

    2012-01-01

    SCRAPPER, which is an F-box protein encoded by FBXL20, regulates the frequency of the miniature excitatory synaptic current through the ubiquitination of Rab3-interacting molecule 1. Here, we recorded the induction of long-term potentiation/depression (LTP/LTD) in CA3-CA1 synapses in E3 ubiquitin ligase SCRAPPER-deficient hippocampal slices. Compared to wild-type mice, Scrapper-knockout mice exhibited LTDs with smaller magnitudes after induction with low-frequency stimulation and LTPs with larger magnitudes after induction with tetanus stimulation. These findings suggest that SCRAPPER regulates the threshold of bidirectional synaptic plasticity and, therefore, metaplasticity. PMID:23316391

  20. SCRAPPER Regulates the Thresholds of Long-Term Potentiation/Depression, the Bidirectional Synaptic Plasticity in Hippocampal CA3-CA1 Synapses

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    Hiroshi Takagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available SCRAPPER, which is an F-box protein encoded by FBXL20, regulates the frequency of the miniature excitatory synaptic current through the ubiquitination of Rab3-interacting molecule 1. Here, we recorded the induction of long-term potentiation/depression (LTP/LTD in CA3-CA1 synapses in E3 ubiquitin ligase SCRAPPER-deficient hippocampal slices. Compared to wild-type mice, Scrapper-knockout mice exhibited LTDs with smaller magnitudes after induction with low-frequency stimulation and LTPs with larger magnitudes after induction with tetanus stimulation. These findings suggest that SCRAPPER regulates the threshold of bidirectional synaptic plasticity and, therefore, metaplasticity.

  1. Astragaloside Ⅳ inhibits spontaneous synaptic transmission and synchronized Ca2+ oscillations on hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-qing ZHU; Lei QI; Yan-fang RUI; Ru-xin LI; Xiang-ping HE; Zuo-ping XIE

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the changes in the spontaneous neuronal excitability in-duced by astragaloside Ⅳ (AGS-Ⅳ) in the cultured hippocampal network. Methods: Hippocampal neurons in culture for 9-11 d were used for this study. The sponta-neous synaptic activities of these hippocampal neurons were examined by Ca2+ imaging and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. In total, 40 mg/L AGS-Ⅳ dis-solved in DMSO and 2 mL/L DMSO were applied to the neurons under a micro-scope while the experiments were taking place. Results: AGS-Ⅳ inhibited the frequencies of synchronized spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations to 59.39%+3.25% (mean+SEM), the spontaneous postsynaptic currents to 43.78%±7.72% (mean±SEM), and the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents to 49.25%±7.06% (mean±SEM) of those of the control periods, respectively, at 16 min after the AGS-Ⅳ applications. AGS-Ⅳ also decreased the peak values of the voltage-gated K+ and Na+ channel currents at that time point. Conclusion: These results indicate that AGS-Ⅳ suppresses the spontaneous neuronal excitabilities effectively. Such a modulation of neuronal activity could represent new evidence for AGS-Ⅳ as a neuroprotector.

  2. CAPS1 stabilizes the state of readily releasable synaptic vesicles to fusion competence at CA3–CA1 synapses in adult hippocampus

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    Shinoda, Yo; Ishii, Chiaki; Fukazawa, Yugo; Sadakata, Tetsushi; Ishii, Yuki; Sano, Yoshitake; Iwasato, Takuji; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) regulates exocytosis of dense-core vesicles in neuroendocrine cells and of synaptic vesicles in neurons. However, the synaptic function of CAPS1 in the mature brain is unclear because Caps1 knockout (KO) results in neonatal death. Here, using forebrain-specific Caps1 conditional KO (cKO) mice, we demonstrate, for the first time, a critical role of CAPS1 in adult synapses. The amplitude of synaptic transmission at CA3–CA1 synapses was strongly reduced, and paired-pulse facilitation was significantly increased, in acute hippocampal slices from cKO mice compared with control mice, suggesting a perturbation in presynaptic function. Morphological analysis revealed an accumulation of synaptic vesicles in the presynapse without any overall morphological change. Interestingly, however, the percentage of docked vesicles was markedly decreased in the Caps1 cKO. Taken together, our findings suggest that CAPS1 stabilizes the state of readily releasable synaptic vesicles, thereby enhancing neurotransmitter release at hippocampal synapses. PMID:27545744

  3. Neuronal glutamate transporters regulate synaptic transmission in single synapses on CA1 hippocampal neurons.

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    Kondratskaya, Elena; Shin, Min-Chul; Akaike, Norio

    2010-01-15

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in CNS although it causes severe brain damage by pathologic excitotoxicity. Efficient neurotransmission is controlled by powerful protection and support afforded by specific high-affinity glutamate transporters in neurons and glia, clearing synaptic glutamate. While the role of glial cells in glutamate uptake is well defined, the role of neuronal transporters remains poorly understood. The evaluation of impact of neuronal transporters on spontaneous and evoked EPSC in hippocampal CA1 neurons within a model 'single bouton preparation' by pre- and postsynaptic uptake was addressed. In whole-cell patch clamp experiments the influence of blocking, pre- or both pre- and postsynaptic glutamate transporters (GluT) on spontaneous and evoked postsynaptic currents (sEPSC and eEPSC), was examined by manipulating the content of intracellular solution. Suppressing GluT by non-transportable inhibitor TBOA (10 microM) led to remarkable alteration of glutamate uptake process and was reflected in measurable changes of general properties of synaptic currents. Elimination of intracellular K(+) concentration required for glutamate transporter operation by using Cs(+)-based internal solution (postsynaptic GluTs are non-functional apriori), causes the deficient of presynaptic glutamate transporters. Applied in such conditions glutamate transporter inhibitor TBOA (10 microM) affected the occurrence of synaptic event and thus unregulated the transmitter release. eEPSCs were generally suppressed both in amplitude (to 48.73+/-7.03% vs. control) and in success rate (R(suc)) by TBOA (from 91.1+/-7.5% in control to 79.57+/-13.2%). In contrast, with K(+)-based solution in patch pipette (pre- and postsynaptic GluT are intact), amplitude of eEPSC was substantially potentiated by pre-treatment with TBOA (152.1+/-11%), whereas (R(suc)) was reduced to 79.8+/-8.3% in average. The identical reduction of event success rate as well as increased pair

  4. Synaptic vesicle pool size, release probability and synaptic depression are sensitive to Ca2+ buffering capacity in the developing rat calyx of Held

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    R.M. Leão

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The calyx of Held, a specialized synaptic terminal in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, undergoes a series of changes during postnatal development that prepares this synapse for reliable high frequency firing. These changes reduce short-term synaptic depression during tetanic stimulation and thereby prevent action potential failures during a stimulus train. We measured presynaptic membrane capacitance changes in calyces from young postnatal day 5-7 (p5-7 or older (p10-12 rat pups to examine the effect of calcium buffer capacity on vesicle pool size and the efficiency of exocytosis. Vesicle pool size was sensitive to the choice and concentration of exogenous Ca2+ buffer, and this sensitivity was much stronger in younger animals. Pool size and exocytosis efficiency in p5-7 calyces were depressed by 0.2 mM EGTA to a greater extent than with 0.05 mM BAPTA, even though BAPTA is a 100-fold faster Ca2+ buffer. However, this was not the case for p10-12 calyces. With 5 mM EGTA, exocytosis efficiency was reduced to a much larger extent in young calyces compared to older calyces. Depression of exocytosis using pairs of 10-ms depolarizations was reduced by 0.2 mM EGTA compared to 0.05 mM BAPTA to a similar extent in both age groups. These results indicate a developmentally regulated heterogeneity in the sensitivity of different vesicle pools to Ca2+ buffer capacity. We propose that, during development, a population of vesicles that are tightly coupled to Ca2+ channels expands at the expense of vesicles more distant from Ca2+ channels.

  5. Synaptic plasticity in area CA1 of rat hippocampal slices following intraventricular application of albumin.

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    Salar, Seda; Lapilover, Ezequiel; Müller, Julia; Hollnagel, Jan-Oliver; Lippmann, Kristina; Friedman, Alon; Heinemann, Uwe

    2016-07-01

    Epileptogenesis following insults to the brain may be triggered by a dysfunctional blood-brain barrier (BBB) associated with albumin extravasation and activation of astrocytes. Using ex vivo recordings from the BBB-disrupted hippocampus after neocortical photothrombotic stroke, we previously demonstrated abnormal activity-dependent accumulation of extracellular potassium with facilitated generation of seizure like events and spreading depolarizations. Similar changes could be observed after intracerebroventricular (icv) application of albumin. We hypothesized that alterations in extracellular potassium and glutamate homeostasis might lead to alterations in synaptic interactions. We therefore assessed the effects of icv albumin on homo- and heterosynaptic plasticity in hippocampal CA1, 24h after a single injection or 7days after continuous infusion of icv albumin. We demonstrate alterations in both homo- and heterosynaptic plasticity compared to control conditions in ex vivo slice studies. Albumin-treated tissue reveals (1) reduced long-term depression following low-frequency stimulation; (2) increased long-term potentiation of population spikes in response to 20Hz stimulation; (3) potentiated responses to Schaffer collateral stimulation following high-frequency stimulation of the direct cortical input and low-frequency stimulation of alveus and finally, (4) TGFβ receptor II (TGFβR-II) involvement in albumin-induced homosynaptic plasticity changes. We conclude that albumin-induced network hyperexcitability is associated with abnormal homo- and heterosynaptic plasticity that could partly be reversed by interference with TGFβR-II-mediated signaling and therefore it might be an important factor in the process of epileptogenesis. PMID:26972679

  6. Changes in synaptic plasticity and expression of glutamate receptor subunits in the CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus after transient global ischemia.

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    Han, Xin-Jia; Shi, Zhong-Shan; Xia, Luo-Xing; Zhu, Li-Hui; Zeng, Ling; Nie, Jun-Hua; Xu, Zao-Cheng; Ruan, Yi-Wen

    2016-07-01

    Excess glutamate release from the presynaptic membrane has been thought to be the major cause of ischemic neuronal death. Although both CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons receive presynaptic glutamate input, transient cerebral ischemia induces CA1 neurons to die while CA3 neurons remain relatively intact. This suggests that changes in the properties of pyramidal cells may be the main cause related to ischemic neuronal death. Our previous studies have shown that the densities of dendritic spines and asymmetric synapses in the CA1 area are increased at 12h and 24h after ischemia. In the present study, we investigated changes in synaptic structures in the CA3 area and compared the expression of glutamate receptors in the CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions of rats after ischemia. Our results demonstrated that the NR2B/NR2A ratio became larger after ischemia although the expression of both the NR2B subunit (activation of apoptotic pathway) and NR2A subunit (activation of survival pathway) decreased in the CA1 area from 6h to 48h after reperfusion. Furthermore, expression of the GluR2 subunit (calcium impermeable) of the AMPA receptor class significantly decreased while the GluR1 subunit (calcium permeable) remained unchanged at the same examined reperfusion times, which subsequently caused an increase in the GluR1/GluR2 ratio. Despite these notable differences in subunit expression, there were no obvious changes in the density of synapses or expression of NMDAR and AMPAR subunits in the CA3 area after ischemia. These results suggest that delayed CA1 neuronal death may be related to the dramatic fluctuation in the synaptic structure and relative upregulation of NR2B and GluR1 subunits induced by transient global ischemia. PMID:27090818

  7. Boosting of synaptic potentials and spine Ca transients by the peptide toxin SNX-482 requires alpha-1E-encoded voltage-gated Ca channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Giessel

    Full Text Available The majority of glutamatergic synapses formed onto principal neurons of the mammalian central nervous system are associated with dendritic spines. Spines are tiny protuberances that house the proteins that mediate the response of the postsynaptic cell to the presynaptic release of glutamate. Postsynaptic signals are regulated by an ion channel signaling cascade that is active in individual dendritic spines and involves voltage-gated calcium (Ca channels, small conductance (SK-type Ca-activated potassium channels, and NMDA-type glutamate receptors. Pharmacological studies using the toxin SNX-482 indicated that the voltage-gated Ca channels that signal within spines to open SK channels belong to the class Ca(V2.3, which is encoded by the Alpha-1E pore-forming subunit. In order to specifically test this conclusion, we examined the effects of SNX-482 on synaptic signals in acute hippocampal slices from knock-out mice lacking the Alpha-1E gene. We find that in these mice, application of SNX-482 has no effect on glutamate-uncaging evoked synaptic potentials and Ca influx, indicating that that SNX-482 indeed acts via the Alpha-1E-encoded Ca(V2.3 channel.

  8. Synaptic Vesicle Tethering and the CaV2.2 Distal C-terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona K Wong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available . Evidence that synaptic vesicles (SVs can be gated by a single voltage sensitive calcium channel (CaV2.2 predict a molecular linking mechanism or ‘tether’[Stanley 1993]. Recent studies have proposed that the SV binds to the distal C-terminal on the CaV2.2 calcium channel [Kaeser et al. 2011;Wong, Li, and Stanley 2013] while genetic analysis proposed a double tether mechanism via RIM: directly to the C terminus PDZ ligand domain or indirectly via a more proximal proline rich site [Kaeser et al. 2011]. Using a novel in vitro SV-PD binding assay, we reported that SVs bind to a fusion protein comprising the C-terminal distal third (C3, aa 2137-2357 [Wong, Li, and Stanley 2013]. Here we limit the binding site further to the last 58 aa, beyond the proline rich site, by the absence of SV capture by a truncated C3 fusion protein (aa 2137-2299. To test PDZ-dependent binding we generated two C terminus-mutant C3 fusion proteins and a mimetic blocking peptide (H-WC, aa 2349-2357 and validated these by elimination of MINT-1 or RIM binding. Persistence of SV capture with all three fusion proteins or with the full length C3 protein but in the presence of the blocking peptide, demonstrated that SVs can bind to the distal C-terminal via a PDZ-independent mechanism. These results were supported in situ by normal SV turnover in H-WC-loaded synaptosomes, as assayed by a novel peptide cryoloading method. Thus, SVs tether to the CaV2.2 C-terminal within a 49 aa region immediately prior to the terminus PDZ ligand domain. Long tethers that could reflect extended C termini were imaged by electron microscopy of synaptosome ghosts. To fully account for SV tethering we propose a model where SVs are initially captured, or ‘grabbed’, from the cytoplasm by a binding site on the distal region of the channel C-terminal and are then retracted to be ‘locked’ close to the channel by a second attachment mechanism in preparation for single channel domain gating.

  9. Corticosterone rapidly increases thorns of CA3 neurons via synaptic/extranuclear glucocorticoid receptor in rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyuki Yoshiya

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrated rapid effects (~ 1 h of CORT on the density of thorns, by imaging Lucifer Yellow-injected neurons in adult male rat hippocampal slices. Thorns of thorny excrescences of CA3 hippocampal neurons are post-synaptic regions whose presynaptic partners are mossy fiber terminals. The application of CORT at 100, 500 and 1000 nM induced a rapid increase in the density of thorns in the stratum lucidum of CA3 pyramidal neurons. Co-administration of RU486, an antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (GR, abolished the effect of CORT. Blocking a single kinase, including MAPK, PKA or PKC, suppressed CORT-induced enhancement of thorn-genesis. On the other hand, GSK-3β was not involved in the signaling of thorn-genesis. Blocking AMPA receptors suppressed the CORT effect. Expression of CA3 synaptic/extranuclear GR was demonstrated by immunogold electron microscopic analysis. From these results, stress levels of CORT (100-1000 nM might drive the rapid thorn-genesis via synaptic/extranuclear GR and multiple kinase pathways, although a role of nuclear GRs cannot be completely excluded.

  10. SCRAPPER Regulates the Thresholds of Long-Term Potentiation/Depression, the Bidirectional Synaptic Plasticity in Hippocampal CA3-CA1 Synapses

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi Takagi; Mitsutoshi Setou; Seiji Ito; Ikuko Yao

    2012-01-01

    SCRAPPER, which is an F-box protein encoded by FBXL20, regulates the frequency of the miniature excitatory synaptic current through the ubiquitination of Rab3-interacting molecule 1. Here, we recorded the induction of long-term potentiation/depression (LTP/LTD) in CA3-CA1 synapses in E3 ubiquitin ligase SCRAPPER-deficient hippocampal slices. Compared to wild-type mice, Scrapper-knockout mice exhibited LTDs with smaller magnitudes after induction with low-frequency stimulation and LTPs with la...

  11. Voluntary running depreciates the requirement of Ca2+-stimulated cAMP signaling in synaptic potentiation and memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fei; Zhang, Ming; Ding, Qi; Sethna, Ferzin; Yan, Lily; Moon, Changjong; Yang, Miyoung; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-08-01

    Mental health and cognitive functions are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Although having active lifestyle with physical exercise improves learning and memory, how it interacts with the specific key molecular regulators of synaptic plasticity is largely unknown. Here, we examined the effects of voluntary running on long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory formation in mice lacking type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1), a neurospecific synaptic enzyme that contributes to Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP production. Following 1 mo of voluntary running-wheel exercise, the impaired LTP and object recognition memory in AC1 knockout (KO) mice were significantly attenuated. Running up-regulated exon II mRNA level of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), though it failed to increase exon I and IV mRNAs in the hippocampus of AC1 KO mice. Intrahippocampal infusion of recombinant BDNF was sufficient to rescue LTP and object recognition memory defects in AC1 KO mice. Therefore, voluntary running and exogenous BDNF application overcome the defective Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP signaling. Our results also demonstrate that alteration in Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP can affect the molecular outcome of physical exercise. PMID:27421897

  12. Regulation of Presynaptic Ca2+, Synaptic Plasticity and Contextual Fear Conditioning by a N-terminal β-Amyloid Fragment

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, James L.M.; Tong, Mei; Alfulaij, Naghum; Sherrin, Tessi; Contarino, Mark; White, Michael M.; Bellinger, Frederick P.; Todorovic, Cedomir; Nichols, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Soluble β-amyloid has been shown to regulate presynaptic Ca2+ and synaptic plasticity. In particular, picomolar β-amyloid was found to have an agonist-like action on presynaptic nicotinic receptors and to augment long-term potentiation (LTP) in a manner dependent upon nicotinic receptors. Here, we report that a functional N-terminal domain exists within β-amyloid for its agonist-like activity. This sequence corresponds to a N-terminal fragment generated by the combined action of α- and β-secr...

  13. Effect of acute fentanyl treatment on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal CA1 region in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Hai; Xu, Yueming; Liu, Fucun; Wang, Guowei; Hu, Sanjue

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), mainly characterized by short-term decline of learning and memory, occurs after operations under anesthesia. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The μ-opioid receptors (MOR) are highly expressed in interneurons of hippocampus, and is believed to be critical for the dysfunction of synaptic plasticity between hippocampal neurons. Therefore, we investigated the effect of fentanyl, a strong agonist of MOR and often used for anesthe...

  14. The functional nature of synaptic circuitry is altered in area CA3 of the hippocampus in a mouse model of Down's syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jesse E; Blank, Martina; Valenzuela, Ricardo A; Garner, Craig C; Madison, Daniel V

    2007-01-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) is the most common cause of mental retardation, and memory impairments are more severe in DS than in most if not all other causes of mental retardation. The Ts65Dn mouse, a genetic model of DS, exhibits phenotypes of DS, including memory impairments indicative of hippocampal dysfunction. We examined functional synaptic connectivity in area CA3 of the hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice using organotypic slice cultures as a model. We found reductions in multiple measures of synaptic function in both excitatory and inhibitory inputs to pyramidal neurons in CA3 of the Ts65Dn hippocampus. However, associational synaptic connections between pyramidal neurons were more abundant and more likely to be active rather than silent in the Ts65Dn hippocampus. Synaptic potentiation was normal in these associational connections. Decreased overall functional synaptic input onto pyramidal neurons expressed along with the specific hyperconnectivity of associational connections between pyramidal neurons will result in predictable alterations of CA3 network function, which may contribute to the memory impairments seen in DS. PMID:17158177

  15. Genistein Inhibits Aβ25-35-Induced Synaptic Toxicity and Regulates CaMKII/CREB Pathway in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yuan-Di; Zhang, Dan-Di; Ding, Juan; Yu, Huan-Ling; Yuan, Lin-Hong; Ma, Wei-Wei; Han, Jing; Xiao, Rong

    2016-10-01

    Genistein (Gen), as a functional food in human diet, has shown many beneficial effects on neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). But the neuroprotective mechanism of Gen is not clear. Because synaptic failure is considered as the earliest phase in the pathogenesis of AD, we try to validate our hypothesis that synapse may be one target of Gen on protecting neurons. In this study, SH-SY5Y cells were pre-incubated with or without Gen for 2 h followed by the incubation with Aβ25-35 (25 μmol/L) for another 24 h. Flow cytometry, Western Blots, and RT-PCR analysis were used to test the synaptic factors. The data showed that Gen pre-treatment could reverse the Aβ25-35-induced down-regulation of synaptophysin and postsynaptic marker postsynaptic density-95. In addition, the down-regulation of NR1 and NR2B induced by Aβ25-35 which are subunits of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor also could be antagonized by pre-treatment of Gen. Moreover, the factors of CaMKII/CREB signaling pathway were detected. The results showed that mRNA and protein expressions of (Ca(2+))/calmodulin(CaM), CaMKII/pCaMKII, and CREB/pCREB were significantly down-regulated by Aβ25-35, but they were all restored by the pre-treatment of Gen. Furthermore, Gen also maintained the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration which was disturbed by Aβ25-35. In conclusion, these results suggested that Gen could protect synaptic dysfunction induced by Aβ, and the mechanism might be associated with the regulation of synaptic markers and Ca(2+) level through activating CaM/CaMK/CREB signaling pathway. PMID:26658733

  16. Complexin inhibits spontaneous release and synchronizes Ca2+-triggered synaptic vesicle fusion by distinct mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Ying; Diao, Jiajie; Cipriano, Daniel J.; Zhang, Yunxiang; Pfuetzner, Richard A.; Padolina, Mark S; Brunger, Axel T.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we showed that fast Ca2+-triggered vesicle fusion with reconstituted neuronal SNAREs and synaptotagmin-1 begins from an initial hemifusion-free membrane point contact, rather than a hemifusion diaphragm, using a single vesicle–vesicle lipid/content mixing assay (Diao et al., 2012). When complexin-1 was included, a more pronounced Ca2+-triggered fusion burst was observed, effectively synchronizing the process. Here we show that complexin-1 also reduces spontaneous fusion in the same...

  17. Baclofen and adenosine inhibition of synaptic transmission at CA3-CA1 synapses display differential sensitivity to K+ channel blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skov, Jane; Andreasen, Mogens; Hablitz, John J; Nedergaard, Steen

    2011-05-01

    The metabotropic GABA(B) and adenosine A(1) receptors mediate presynaptic inhibition through regulation of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, whereas K(+) channel regulation is believed to have no role at the CA3-CA1 synapse. We show here that the inhibitory effect of baclofen (20 μM) and adenosine (300 μM) on field EPSPs are differentially sensitive to Cs(+) (3.5 mM) and Ba(2+) (200 μM), but not 4-aminopyridine (100 μM). Barium had no effect on paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) in itself, but gave significant reduction (14 ± 5%) when applied in the presence of baclofen, but not adenosine, suggesting that the effect is presynaptic and selective on the GABA(B) receptor-mediated response. The effect of Ba(2+) on PPF was not mimicked by tertiapin (30 nM), indicating that the underlying mechanism does not involve GIRK channels. Barium did not affect PPF in slices from young rats (P7-P8), suggesting developmental regulation. The above effects of Ba(2+) on adult tissue were reproduced when measuring evoked whole-cell EPSCs from CA1 pyramidal neurons: PPF was reduced by 22 ± 3% in the presence of baclofen and unaltered in adenosine. In contrast, Ba(2+) caused no significant change in frequency or amplitude of miniature EPSCs. The Ba(2+)-induced reduction of PPF was antagonized by LY341495, suggesting metabotropic glutamate receptor involvement. We propose that these novel effects of Ba(2+) and Cs(+) are exerted through blockade of inwardly rectifying K(+) channels in glial cells, which are functionally interacting with the GABA(B) receptor-dependent glutamate release that generates heterosynaptic depression. PMID:21274618

  18. Deoxyschisandrin modulates synchronized Ca2+ oscillations and spontaneous synaptic transmission of cultured hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min FU; Zhao-hui SUN; Min ZONG; Xiang-ping HE; Huan-cong ZUO; Zuo-ping XIE

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Deoxyschisandrin is one of the most effective composites of Schisandra chinensis, a famous Chinese medicine widely used as an antistress, anti-aging, and neurological performance-improving herb. In this study, we examined its spe- cific mechanisms of action on cultured hippocampal neurons. Methods: Hippoc- ampal neurons, primarily cultured for 9-11 d in vitro, were used for this study. DS were dissolved in DMSO and applied to calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamp. Results: The application of 3 mg/L DS decreased the frequency of sponta- neous and synchronous oscillations of intracellular Ca2+ to 72%±2% (mean±SEM), and the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents to 60%±3% (mean±SEM). The inhibitory concentraton 50% (IC50) for the effect of DS on calcium oscillations was 3.8 mg/L. DS also depressed the high voltage-gated Ca2+ channel and the voltage-gated Na+ channel currents at the same time point. It had no effect, however, on voltage-gated K+ and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Conclusion: DS inhibited the spontaneous and synchronous oscillations of intra- cellular Ca2+ through the depression of influx of extracellular calcium and the initiation of action potential. By repressing the spontaneous neurotransmitter release, DS modulated the neuronal network activities.

  19. TRPM4-dependent post-synaptic depolarization is essential for the induction of NMDA receptor-dependent LTP in CA1 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menigoz, Aurélie; Ahmed, Tariq; Sabanov, Victor; Philippaert, Koenraad; Pinto, Silvia; Kerselaers, Sara; Segal, Andrei; Freichel, Marc; Voets, Thomas; Nilius, Bernd; Vennekens, Rudi; Balschun, Detlef

    2016-04-01

    TRPM4 is a calcium-activated but calcium-impermeable non-selective cation (CAN) channel. Previous studies have shown that TRPM4 is an important regulator of Ca(2+)-dependent changes in membrane potential in excitable and non-excitable cell types. However, its physiological significance in neurons of the central nervous system remained unclear. Here, we report that TRPM4 proteins form a CAN channel in CA1 neurons of the hippocampus and we show that TRPM4 is an essential co-activator of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDAR) during the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). Disrupting the Trpm4 gene in mice specifically eliminates NMDAR-dependent LTP, while basal synaptic transmission, short-term plasticity, and NMDAR-dependent long-term depression are unchanged. The induction of LTP in Trpm4 (-/-) neurons was rescued by facilitating NMDA receptor activation or post-synaptic membrane depolarization. Accordingly, we obtained normal LTP in Trpm4 (-/-) neurons in a pairing protocol, where post-synaptic depolarization was applied in parallel to pre-synaptic stimulation. Taken together, our data are consistent with a novel model of LTP induction in CA1 hippocampal neurons, in which TRPM4 is an essential player in a feed-forward loop that generates the post-synaptic membrane depolarization which is necessary to fully activate NMDA receptors during the induction of LTP but which is dispensable for the induction of long-term depression (LTD). These results have important implications for the understanding of the induction process of LTP and the development of nootropic medication. PMID:26631168

  20. Effects of movement training on synaptic interface structure in the sensorimotor cortex and hippocampal CA3 area of the ischemic hemisphere in cerebral infarction rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Yang; Jiyan Cheng

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Movement is an effective way to provide sensory, movement and reflectivity afferent stimulation to the central nervous system. Movement plays an important role in functional recombination and compensation in the brain. OBJECTIVE: To observe movement training effects on texture parameters of synaptic interfaces in the sensorimotor cortex and hippocampal CA3 area of the ischemic hemisphere and on motor function in cerebral infarction rats. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This neural morphology and pathology randomized controlled animal experiment was performed at the Center Laboratory, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, China from November 2004 to April 2005. MATERIALS: A total of 32 healthy male Wistar rats aged 8 weeks were equally and randomly assigned into model and movement training groups. METHODS: Rat models of right middle cerebral artery occlusion were established using the suture occlusion method in both groups. Rats in the movement training group underwent balance training, screen training, and rotating rod training starting on day 5 after surgery, for 40 minutes every day, 6 days per week, for 4 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Texture parameters of synaptic interfaces were determined using a transmission electron microscope and image analyzer during week 5 following model induction. The following parameters were measured: synaptic cleft width; postsynaptic density thickness; synaptic interface curvature; and active zone length. Motor function was assessed using balance training, screen training, and rotating rod training. The lower score indicated a better motor function. RESULTS: The postsynaptic density thickness, synaptic interface curvature, and active zone length were significantly increased in the sensorimotor cortex and hippocampal CA3 area of the ischemic hemisphere of rats from the movement training group compared with the model group (P < 0.05 or 0.01). Curved synapses and perforated synapses were seen in the sensorimotor cortex

  1. Propofol ameliorates electroconvulsive shock-induced learning and memory impairment by regulation of synaptic metaplasticity via autophosphorylation of CaMKIIa at Thr 305 in stressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Li; Zhang, Fan; Min, Su; Hao, Xuechao; Qin, Peipei; Zhu, Xianlin

    2016-06-30

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for depression, but it can induce learning and memory impairment. Our previous study found propofol (γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor agonist) could ameliorate electroconvulsive shock (ECS, an analog of ECT to animals)-induced cognitive impairment, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of propofol on metaplasticity and autophosphorylation of CaMKIIa in stressed rats receiving ECS. Depressive-like behavior and learning and memory function were assessed by sucrose preference test and Morris water test respectively. LTP were tested by electrophysiological experiment, the expression of CaMKIIa, p-T305-CaMKII in hippocampus and CaMKIIα in hippocampal PSD fraction were evaluated by western blot. Results suggested ECS raised the baseline fEPSP and impaired the subsequent LTP, increased the expression of p-T305-CaMKII and decreased the expression of CaMKIIα in hippocampal PSD fraction, leading to cognitive dysfunction in stressed rats. Propofol could down-regulate the baseline fEPSP and reversed the impairment of LTP partly, decreased the expression of p-T305-CaMKII and increased the expression of CaMKIIα in hippocampal PSD fraction and alleviated ECS-induced learning and memory impairment. In conclusion, propofol ameliorates ECS-induced learning and memory impairment, possibly by regulation of synaptic metaplasticity via p-T305-CaMKII. PMID:27104927

  2. Astrocytes optimize synaptic fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Suhita; Jung, Peter; Levine, Herbert

    2007-03-01

    Most neuronal synapses in the central nervous system are enwrapped by an astrocytic process. This relation allows the astrocyte to listen to and feed back to the synapse and to regulate synaptic transmission. We combine a tested mathematical model for the Ca^2+ response of the synaptic astrocyte and presynaptic feedback with a detailed model for vesicle release of neurotransmitter at active zones. The predicted Ca^2+ dependence of the presynaptic synaptic vesicle release compares favorably for several types of synapses, including the Calyx of Held. We hypothesize that the feedback regulation of the astrocyte onto the presynaptic terminal optimizes the fidelity of the synapse in terms of information transmission.

  3. Distinct synaptic and neurochemical changes to the granule cell-CA3 projection in Bassoon mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Dieni

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Proper synaptic function depends on a finely-tuned balance between events such as protein synthesis and structural organization. In particular, the functional loss of just one synaptic-related protein can have a profound impact on overall neuronal network function. To this end, we used a mutant mouse model harboring a mutated form of the presynaptic scaffolding protein Bassoon (Bsn, which is phenotypically characterized by: (i spontaneous generalized epileptic seizure activity, representing a chronically-imbalanced neuronal network, and (ii a dramatic increase in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF protein concentration, a key player in synaptic plasticity. Detailed morphological and neurochemical analyses revealed that the increased BDNF levels are associated with: I. modified neuropeptide distribution, II. perturbed expression of selected markers of synaptic activation or plasticity, III. subtle changes to microglial structure, and IV. morphological alterations to the mossy fiber synapse. These findings emphasize the important contribution of Bassoon protein to normal hippocampal function, and further characterize the Bsn mutant as a useful model for studying the effects of chronic changes to network activity.

  4. Different Compartments of Apical CA1 Dendrites Have Different Plasticity Thresholds for Expressing Synaptic Tagging and Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Korte, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The consolidation process from short- to long-term memory depends on the type of stimulation received from a specific neuronal network and on the cooperativity and associativity between different synaptic inputs converging onto a specific neuron. We show here that the plasticity thresholds for inducing LTP are different in proximal and distal…

  5. Norepinephrine Causes a Biphasic Change in Mammalian Pinealocye Membrane Potential: Role of alfa1B-Adrenoreceptors, Phospholipase C, and Ca2plus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemková, Hana; Stojilkovič, S.S.; Klein, D. C.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 152, č. 10 (2011), s. 3842-3851. ISSN 0013-7227 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Ca2plus-activated Kplus channels * voltage-gated Ca2plus channels * electrical activity * pineal ocyte Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.459, year: 2011

  6. Dynamic range of GSK3α not GSK3β is essential for bidirectional synaptic plasticity at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses.

    OpenAIRE

    Shahab, L; F. Plattner; Irvine, E. E.; Cummings, D. M.; Edwards, F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3), particularly the isoform GSK3β, has been implicated in a wide range of physiological systems and neurological disorders including Alzheimer's Disease. However, the functional importance of GSK3α has been largely untested. The multifunctionality of GSK3 limits its potential as a drug target because of inevitable side effects. Due to its greater expression in the CNS, GSK3β rather than GSK3α has also been assumed to be of primary importance in synaptic plastic...

  7. A Mathematical Model of Tripartite Synapse: Astrocyte Induced Synaptic Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Tewari, Shivendra; Majumdar, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a biologically detailed mathematical model of tripartite synapses, where astrocytes modulate short-term synaptic plasticity. The model consists of a pre-synaptic bouton, a post-synaptic dendritic spine-head, a synaptic cleft and a peri-synaptic astrocyte controlling Ca2+ dynamics inside the synaptic bouton. This in turn controls glutamate release dynamics in the cleft. As a consequence of this, glutamate concentration in the cleft has been modeled, in which glutamate ...

  8. 术中机械通气对小鼠海马CA1区突触可塑性的影响%Effect of mechanical ventilation on synaptic plasticity in hippocampal CA1 region of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈婷; 张宗泽; 陈畅; 彭勉; 许鑫; 陈凯; 王焱林

    2015-01-01

    目的 评价术中机械通气对小鼠海马CA1区突触可塑性的影响.方法 健康雄性C57BL/6小鼠36只,8~10周龄,体重20~25 g,采用随机数字表法,将其分成2组(n=18):对照组(C组)和机械通气组(M组).小鼠在麻醉后气管插管并行胫骨骨折切开复位内固定术.C组术后拔除气管导管,放入麻醉箱6h,通入1.5%异氟醚维持麻醉;M组术后继续机械通气6h,吸入1.5%异氟醚维持麻醉.于机械通气结束后2h、1和3d时,取6只小鼠进行恐惧条件化实验,记录僵直时间百分比.于机械通气结束后1d时取6只小鼠开始进行新物体识别实验,第4天时间隔5 min、2h和1d时,计算优先指数.于机械通气结束后1d时处死3只小鼠,取海马组织,电镜下观察海马超微结构,并记录突触数量.于机械通气结束后1d时处死3只小鼠,取全脑组织,进行高尔基染色,测定树突棘密度.结果 与C组比较,M组术后2h和1d时僵直时间百分比降低,不同时间间隔优先指数降低,海马CA1区突触数量减少,顶树突棘密度和基树突棘密度降低(P<0.01).结论 术中机械通气可改变小鼠海马CA1区突触可塑性.%Objective To evaluate the effect of mechanical ventilation on synaptic plasticity in hippocampal CA1 region of mice.Methods Thirty-six male C57BL/6 mice,aged 8-10 weeks,weighing 20-25 g,were randomly divided into 2 groups (n =18 each) using a random number table:control group (group C) and mechanical ventilation group (group M).After anesthesia,endotracheal intubation was carried out,and open reduction and internal fixation was performed after tibial fracture was induced in mice.In C group,the endotracheal tube was removed after operation,and then the mice were exposed to 1.5% isoflurane for 6 h in a chamber.In M group,the mice were mechanically ventilated continuously for 6 h,and 1.5% isoflurane was inhaled to maintain the level of anesthesia.At 2 h and 1 and 3 days after the end of ventilation,6 mice were

  9. Astroglial networks scale synaptic activity and plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Pannasch, Ulrike; Vargová, Lydia; Reingruber, Jürgen; Ezan, Pascal; Holcman, David; Giaume, Christian; Syková, Eva; Rouach, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes dynamically interact with neurons to regulate synaptic transmission. Although the gap junction proteins connexin 30 (Cx30) and connexin 43 (Cx43) mediate the extensive network organization of astrocytes, their role in synaptic physiology is unknown. Here we show, by inactivating Cx30 and Cx43 genes, that astroglial networks tone down hippocampal synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Gap junctional networking facilitates extracellular glutamate and potassium removal during...

  10. Cortical synaptic transmission in CaV2.1 knockin mice with the S218L missense mutation which causes a severe familial hemiplegic migraine syndrome in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dania eVecchia

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1 is caused by gain-of-function mutations in CaV2.1 (P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. Knockin (KI mice carrying the FHM1 R192Q missense mutation show enhanced cortical excitatory synaptic transmission at pyramidal cell synapses but unaltered cortical inhibitory neurotransmission at fast-spiking interneuron synapses. Enhanced cortical glutamate release was shown to cause the facilitation of cortical spreading depression (CSD in R192Q KI mice. It, however, remains unknown how other FHM1 mutations affect cortical synaptic transmission. Here, we studied neurotransmission in cortical neurons in microculture from KI mice carrying the S218L mutation, which causes a severe FHM syndrome in humans and an allele-dosage dependent facilitation of experimental CSD in KI mice, which is larger than that caused by the R192Q mutation. We show gain-of-function of excitatory neurotransmission, due to increased action-potential evoked Ca2+ influx and increased probability of glutamate release at pyramidal cell synapses, but unaltered inhibitory neurotransmission at multipolar interneuron synapses in S218L KI mice. In contrast with the larger gain-of-function of neuronal CaV2.1 current in homozygous than heterozygous S218L KI mice, the gain-of-function of evoked glutamate release, the paired-pulse ratio and the Ca2+ dependence of the EPSC were all similar in homozygous and heterozygous S218L KI mice, suggesting compensatory changes in the homozygous mice. Furthermore, we reveal a unique feature of S218L KI cortical synapses which is the presence of a fraction of mutant CaV2.1 channels being open at resting potential. Our data suggest that, while the gain-of-function of evoked glutamate release may explain the facilitation of CSD in heterozygous S218L KI mice, the further facilitation of CSD in homozygous S218L KI mice is due to other CaV2.1-dependent mechanisms, that likely include Ca2+ influx at voltages sub-threshold for action

  11. EDITORIAL: Synaptic electronics Synaptic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna; Gimzewski, James K.; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Conventional computers excel in logic and accurate scientific calculations but make hard work of open ended problems that human brains handle easily. Even von Neumann—the mathematician and polymath who first developed the programming architecture that forms the basis of today's computers—was already looking to the brain for future developments before his death in 1957 [1]. Neuromorphic computing uses approaches that better mimic the working of the human brain. Recent developments in nanotechnology are now providing structures with very accommodating properties for neuromorphic approaches. This special issue, with guest editors James K Gimzewski and Dominique Vuillaume, is devoted to research at the serendipitous interface between the two disciplines. 'Synaptic electronics', looks at artificial devices with connections that demonstrate behaviour similar to synapses in the nervous system allowing a new and more powerful approach to computing. Synapses and connecting neurons respond differently to incident signals depending on the history of signals previously experienced, ultimately leading to short term and long term memory behaviour. The basic characteristics of a synapse can be replicated with around ten simple transistors. However with the human brain having around 1011 neurons and 1015 synapses, artificial neurons and synapses from basic transistors are unlikely to accommodate the scalability required. The discovery of nanoscale elements that function as 'memristors' has provided a key tool for the implementation of synaptic connections [2]. Leon Chua first developed the concept of the 'The memristor—the missing circuit element' in 1971 [3]. In this special issue he presents a tutorial describing how memristor research has fed into our understanding of synaptic behaviour and how they can be applied in information processing [4]. He also describes, 'The new principle of local activity, which uncovers a minuscule life-enabling "Goldilocks zone", dubbed the

  12. Data-Driven Modeling of Synaptic Transmission and Integration

    OpenAIRE

    Rothman, Jason S.; Silver, R. Angus

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe how to create mathematical models of synaptic transmission and integration. We start with a brief synopsis of the experimental evidence underlying our current understanding of synaptic transmission. We then describe synaptic transmission at a particular glutamatergic synapse in the mammalian cerebellum, the mossy fiber to granule cell synapse, since data from this well-characterized synapse can provide a benchmark comparison for how well synaptic properties are ca...

  13. EDITORIAL: Synaptic electronics Synaptic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna; Gimzewski, James K.; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Conventional computers excel in logic and accurate scientific calculations but make hard work of open ended problems that human brains handle easily. Even von Neumann—the mathematician and polymath who first developed the programming architecture that forms the basis of today's computers—was already looking to the brain for future developments before his death in 1957 [1]. Neuromorphic computing uses approaches that better mimic the working of the human brain. Recent developments in nanotechnology are now providing structures with very accommodating properties for neuromorphic approaches. This special issue, with guest editors James K Gimzewski and Dominique Vuillaume, is devoted to research at the serendipitous interface between the two disciplines. 'Synaptic electronics', looks at artificial devices with connections that demonstrate behaviour similar to synapses in the nervous system allowing a new and more powerful approach to computing. Synapses and connecting neurons respond differently to incident signals depending on the history of signals previously experienced, ultimately leading to short term and long term memory behaviour. The basic characteristics of a synapse can be replicated with around ten simple transistors. However with the human brain having around 1011 neurons and 1015 synapses, artificial neurons and synapses from basic transistors are unlikely to accommodate the scalability required. The discovery of nanoscale elements that function as 'memristors' has provided a key tool for the implementation of synaptic connections [2]. Leon Chua first developed the concept of the 'The memristor—the missing circuit element' in 1971 [3]. In this special issue he presents a tutorial describing how memristor research has fed into our understanding of synaptic behaviour and how they can be applied in information processing [4]. He also describes, 'The new principle of local activity, which uncovers a minuscule life-enabling "Goldilocks zone", dubbed the

  14. Hydroformylation in fluorous biphasic media

    OpenAIRE

    Mathison, Clare R.

    2007-01-01

    The hydroformylation of oct-1-ene is investigated under fluorous biphasic conditions, utilising the facile catalyst recovery that is provided by the temperature dependent miscibility of the perfluorinated solvent with normal organic solvents. High conversions and selectivities have been obtained in the batch process and the system is now described under continuous-flow conditions in a custom built reactor. The continuous-flow reactor was successfully run for 46 hours, with conversions to...

  15. Synaptic plasticity and phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hey-Kyoung

    2006-01-01

    A number of neuronal functions, including synaptic plasticity, depend on proper regulation of synaptic proteins, many of which can be rapidly regulated by phosphorylation. Neuronal activity controls the function of these synaptic proteins by exquisitely regulating the balance of various protein kinase and protein phosphatase activity. Recent understanding of synaptic plasticity mechanisms underscores important roles that these synaptic phosphoproteins play in regulating both pre- and post-syn...

  16. Methamphetamine blunts Ca(2+) currents and excitatory synaptic transmission through D1/5 receptor-mediated mechanisms in the mouse medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Betina; Rivero-Echeto, Celeste; Muñiz, Javier A; Cadet, Jean Lud; García-Rill, Edgar; Urbano, Francisco J; Bisagno, Verónica

    2016-05-01

    Psychostimulant addiction is associated with dysfunctions in frontal cortex. Previous data demonstrated that repeated exposure to methamphetamine (METH) can alter prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent functions. Here, we show that withdrawal from repetitive non-contingent METH administration (7 days, 1 mg/kg) depressed voltage-dependent calcium currents (ICa ) and increased hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH ) amplitude and the paired-pulse ratio of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in deep-layer pyramidal mPFC neurons. Most of these effects were blocked by systemic co-administration of the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0.5 and 0.05 mg/kg). In vitro METH (i.e. bath-applied to slices from naïve-treated animals) was able to emulate its systemic effects on ICa and evoked EPSCs paired-pulse ratio. We also provide evidence of altered mRNA expression of (1) voltage-gated calcium channels P/Q-type Cacna1a (Cav 2.1), N-type Cacna1b (Cav 2.2), T-type Cav 3.1 Cacna1g, Cav 3.2 Cacna1h, Cav 3.3 Cacna1i and the auxiliary subunit Cacna2d1 (α2δ1); (2) hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels Hcn1 and Hcn2; and (3) glutamate receptors subunits AMPA-type Gria1, NMDA-type Grin1 and metabotropic Grm1 in the mouse mPFC after repeated METH treatment. Moreover, we show that some of these changes in mRNA expression were sensitive D1/5 receptor blockade. Altogether, these altered mechanisms affecting synaptic physiology and transcriptional regulation may underlie PFC functional alterations that could lead to PFC impairments observed in METH-addicted individuals. PMID:25871318

  17. Third Trimester Equivalent Alcohol Exposure Reduces Modulation of Glutamatergic Synaptic Transmission by 5-HT1A Receptors in the Rat Hippocampal CA3 Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Russell A.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure has been associated with many neuropsychiatric disorders that have been linked to altered serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) signaling, including depression and anxiety. During the first 2 weeks of postnatal life in rodents (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy) 5-HT neurons undergo significant functional maturation and their axons reach target regions in the forebrain (e.g., cortex and hippocampus). The objective of this study was to identify the effects of third trimester ethanol (EtOH) exposure on hippocampal 5-HT signaling. Using EtOH vapor inhalation chambers, we exposed rat pups to EtOH for 4 h/day from postnatal day (P) 2 to P12. The average serum EtOH concentration in the pups was 0.13 ± 0.04 g/dl (legal intoxication limit in humans = 0.08 g/dl). We used brain slices to assess the modulatory actions of 5-HT on field excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the hippocampal CA3 region at P13-P15. Application of the GABAA/glycine receptor antagonist, picrotoxin, caused broadening of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), an effect that was reversed by application of 5-HT in slices from air exposed rats. However, this effect of 5-HT was absent in EtOH exposed animals. In slices from naïve animals, application of a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist blocked the effect of 5-HT on the fEPSPs recorded in presence of picrotoxin, suggesting that third trimester ethanol exposure acts by inhibiting the function of these receptors. Studies indicate that 5-HT1A receptors play a critical role in the development of hippocampal circuits. Therefore, inhibition of these receptors by third trimester ethanol exposure could contribute to the pathophysiology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. PMID:27375424

  18. Huperzine A enhances excitatory synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal neurons of adult rat hippocampal slices%石杉碱甲增强大鼠海马脑片CA1锥体神经元的兴奋性突触传递

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小未; 王邦安; 汪萌芽

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effects of huperzine A (Hup-A) on excitatory synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal neurons of adult rat hippocampal slices and to gain an insight into the cellular electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the potentiation of learning and memory by Hup-A. METHODS: The intracellular recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices related to learning and memory were made to analyze mechanisms of Hup-A actions on cell electrophysiological properties and excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) evoked by stimulating Schaffer collaterals. RESULTS; (1) During bath of Hup-A (1 μmol/L), the changes of cell electrophysiological properties were not significant (P>0. 05). (2) Superfu-sion of Hup-A (0. 3 - 3. 0 μmol/L, 15 min) in- creased amplitude, duration and area under curve of EPSPs, which was concentration-dependent, recoverable, but sensitive to atropine pretreatment (10 μmol/L, n = 4). (3) Hup-A did not result in remarkable changes of depolarizing response induced by exogenous glutamate (n=5). CONCLUSION, By the facilitation of the synaptic transmissions, Hup-A may potentiate the activities of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, and its actions on EPSP is related to the excitation of muscarinic type of acetylcholin-ergic receptors.%目的:观察石杉碱甲(Hup-A)对海马CA1锥体神经元兴奋性突触传递的影响,以探讨其增强学习记忆功能的神经细胞电生理机制.方法:应用大鼠海马脑片CA1锥体神经元细胞内记录技术,观察Hup-A对大鼠海马CA1锥体神经元膜电性质和刺激Schaffer侧支诱发的兴奋性突触后电位( EPSP)的影响.结果:(1) Hup-A(1 μmol/L)灌流15 min对CA1锥体神经元的膜电性质没有显著性影响.(2) Hup-A (0.3~3.0 μmol/L)浓度依赖性使EPSP幅度升高、时程延长、曲线下面积增大,该作用可被阿托品(10μmol/L)预处理取消.(3)Hup-A对外源性谷氨酸诱导的去极化反应无明显影响.结论:Hup-A可增强CA1

  19. Biphasic calcium phosphate in periapical surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Suneelkumar, Chinni; Datta, Krithika; Manali R Srinivasan; Kumar, Sampath T

    2008-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics like hydroxyapatite and β -tricalcium phosphate (β -TCP) possess mineral composition that closely resembles that of the bone. They can be good bone substitutes due to their excellent biocompatibility. Biphasic calcium phosphate is a bone substitute which is a mixture of hydroxyapatite and β -tricalcium phosphate in fixed ratios. Studies have demonstrated the osteoconductive potential of this composition. This paper highlights the clinical use of biphasic calcium pho...

  20. Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenberg, Eduardo Ekman; Alexandre, João Felipe Morel; Filev, Renato; Cravo, Andre Mascioli; Sato, João Ricardo; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Yonamine, Maurício; Waguespack, Marian; Lomnicka, Izabela; Barker, Steven A; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Ritual use of ayahuasca, an amazonian Amerindian medicine turned sacrament in syncretic religions in Brazil, is rapidly growing around the world. Because of this internationalization, a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action of the brew and the neural correlates of the modified states of consciousness it induces is important. Employing a combination of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings and quantification of ayahuasca's compounds and their metabolites in the systemic circulation we found ayahuasca to induce a biphasic effect in the brain. This effect was composed of reduced power in the alpha band (8-13 Hz) after 50 minutes from ingestion of the brew and increased slow- and fast-gamma power (30-50 and 50-100 Hz, respectively) between 75 and 125 minutes. Alpha power reductions were mostly located at left parieto-occipital cortex, slow-gamma power increase was observed at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal and right frontal cortices while fast-gamma increases were significant at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal, right frontal and right parieto-occipital cortices. These effects were significantly associated with circulating levels of ayahuasca's chemical compounds, mostly N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine and some of their metabolites. An interpretation based on a cognitive and emotional framework relevant to the ritual use of ayahuasca, as well as it's potential therapeutic effects is offered. PMID:26421727

  1. Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ekman Schenberg

    Full Text Available Ritual use of ayahuasca, an amazonian Amerindian medicine turned sacrament in syncretic religions in Brazil, is rapidly growing around the world. Because of this internationalization, a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action of the brew and the neural correlates of the modified states of consciousness it induces is important. Employing a combination of electroencephalogram (EEG recordings and quantification of ayahuasca's compounds and their metabolites in the systemic circulation we found ayahuasca to induce a biphasic effect in the brain. This effect was composed of reduced power in the alpha band (8-13 Hz after 50 minutes from ingestion of the brew and increased slow- and fast-gamma power (30-50 and 50-100 Hz, respectively between 75 and 125 minutes. Alpha power reductions were mostly located at left parieto-occipital cortex, slow-gamma power increase was observed at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal and right frontal cortices while fast-gamma increases were significant at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal, right frontal and right parieto-occipital cortices. These effects were significantly associated with circulating levels of ayahuasca's chemical compounds, mostly N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT, harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine and some of their metabolites. An interpretation based on a cognitive and emotional framework relevant to the ritual use of ayahuasca, as well as it's potential therapeutic effects is offered.

  2. A mathematical model of the tripartite synapse: astrocyte-induced synaptic plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Tewari, Shivendra G.; Majumdar, Kaushik Kumar

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a biologically detailed mathematical model of tripartite synapses, where astrocytes modulate short-term synaptic plasticity. The model consists of a pre-synaptic bouton, a post-synaptic dendritic spine-head, a synaptic cleft and a peri-synaptic astrocyte controlling Ca2 +  dynamics inside the synaptic bouton. This in turn controls glutamate release dynamics in the cleft. As a consequence of this, glutamate concentration in the cleft has been modeled, in which glutama...

  3. Synaptic Homeostasis and Restructuring across the Sleep-Wake Cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo Blanco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is critical for hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. However, the underlying mechanisms of synaptic plasticity are poorly understood. The central controversy is on whether long-term potentiation (LTP takes a role during sleep and which would be its specific effect on memory. To address this question, we used immunohistochemistry to measure phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKIIα in the rat hippocampus immediately after specific sleep-wake states were interrupted. Control animals not exposed to novel objects during waking (WK showed stable pCaMKIIα levels across the sleep-wake cycle, but animals exposed to novel objects showed a decrease during subsequent slow-wave sleep (SWS followed by a rebound during rapid-eye-movement sleep (REM. The levels of pCaMKIIα during REM were proportional to cortical spindles near SWS/REM transitions. Based on these results, we modeled sleep-dependent LTP on a network of fully connected excitatory neurons fed with spikes recorded from the rat hippocampus across WK, SWS and REM. Sleep without LTP orderly rescaled synaptic weights to a narrow range of intermediate values. In contrast, LTP triggered near the SWS/REM transition led to marked swaps in synaptic weight ranking. To better understand the interaction between rescaling and restructuring during sleep, we implemented synaptic homeostasis and embossing in a detailed hippocampal-cortical model with both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Synaptic homeostasis was implemented by weakening potentiation and strengthening depression, while synaptic embossing was simulated by evoking LTP on selected synapses. We observed that synaptic homeostasis facilitates controlled synaptic restructuring. The results imply a mechanism for a cognitive synergy between SWS and REM, and suggest that LTP at the SWS/REM transition critically influences the effect of sleep: Its lack determines synaptic homeostasis, its presence causes

  4. Synaptic Homeostasis and Restructuring across the Sleep-Wake Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Wilfredo; Pereira, Catia M; Cota, Vinicius R; Souza, Annie C; Rennó-Costa, César; Santos, Sharlene; Dias, Gabriella; Guerreiro, Ana M G; Tort, Adriano B L; Neto, Adrião D; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2015-05-01

    Sleep is critical for hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. However, the underlying mechanisms of synaptic plasticity are poorly understood. The central controversy is on whether long-term potentiation (LTP) takes a role during sleep and which would be its specific effect on memory. To address this question, we used immunohistochemistry to measure phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKIIα) in the rat hippocampus immediately after specific sleep-wake states were interrupted. Control animals not exposed to novel objects during waking (WK) showed stable pCaMKIIα levels across the sleep-wake cycle, but animals exposed to novel objects showed a decrease during subsequent slow-wave sleep (SWS) followed by a rebound during rapid-eye-movement sleep (REM). The levels of pCaMKIIα during REM were proportional to cortical spindles near SWS/REM transitions. Based on these results, we modeled sleep-dependent LTP on a network of fully connected excitatory neurons fed with spikes recorded from the rat hippocampus across WK, SWS and REM. Sleep without LTP orderly rescaled synaptic weights to a narrow range of intermediate values. In contrast, LTP triggered near the SWS/REM transition led to marked swaps in synaptic weight ranking. To better understand the interaction between rescaling and restructuring during sleep, we implemented synaptic homeostasis and embossing in a detailed hippocampal-cortical model with both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Synaptic homeostasis was implemented by weakening potentiation and strengthening depression, while synaptic embossing was simulated by evoking LTP on selected synapses. We observed that synaptic homeostasis facilitates controlled synaptic restructuring. The results imply a mechanism for a cognitive synergy between SWS and REM, and suggest that LTP at the SWS/REM transition critically influences the effect of sleep: Its lack determines synaptic homeostasis, its presence causes synaptic

  5. 消退训练对大鼠条件性恐惧行为及海马CA1区突触超微结构的影响%Effects of extinction training on conditioned fear behaviour and synaptic structure in hippocampal CA1 area in fear conditioned rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽丽; 李培培; 李敏; 韦美; 彭李

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of fear extinction training on the behaviours and the ultrastructure of hippocampal CA1 area in fear conditioned rats. Methods Forty male adult SD rats were randomly divided into native group (re =8), extinction control group (re = 16) and extinction group (re = 16). In 24 h after fear condition was established by reference instruction in the later 2 groups, extinction training was carried out in the extinction group and extinction retention test was performed in 7 and 21 d after fear extinction. The test was performed in 8 and 22 d in extinction control group. The changes of synaptic structure in CA1 of hippocampus were observed at 7 and 21 d after fear extinction. Results Compared with the extinction control group, the scores of extinction retention was significantly increased (P<0.01) at 7 and 21 d after extinction in the extinction group. There was no significant difference between extinction group and native group at 7 and 21 d. At 7 d after extinction training, the synaptic density was significantly higher in extinction group than that in the extinction control group (P <0.05 ) , and there was no difference among groups at 21 d. Compared with native group, the width of synaptic gap was significantly lower at 7 and 21 d after extinction training in extinction group ( P <0.01, 0. 05 ). At 21 d, the width of synaptic gap was significantly lower in the extinction group than that in the control group (P <0. 05). But there was no significant difference between the extinction control group and native group at 7 and 21 d after extinction. Compared with native group, at 7 and 21 d after extinction training, postsynaptic density (PSD) was significantly thicker in extinction group (P<0.01). And at 21 d, the density was significantly thicker in extinction group than that in the extinction control group (P < 0.05 ). There was no significant difference among the groups in active zone length. Conclusion Fear extinction training changes

  6. Synaptic Plasticity and Nociception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenJianguo

    2004-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is one of the fields that progresses rapidly and has a lot of success in neuroscience. The two major types of synaptie plasticity: long-term potentiation ( LTP and long-term depression (LTD are thought to be the cellular mochanisms of learning and memory. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that, besides serving as a cellular model for learning and memory, the synaptic plasticity involves in other physiological or pathophysiological processes, such as the perception of pain and the regulation of cardiovascular system. This minireview will focus on the relationship between synaptic plasticity and nociception.

  7. Astrocytes: Orchestrating synaptic plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pittà, M; Brunel, N; Volterra, A

    2016-05-26

    Synaptic plasticity is the capacity of a preexisting connection between two neurons to change in strength as a function of neural activity. Because synaptic plasticity is the major candidate mechanism for learning and memory, the elucidation of its constituting mechanisms is of crucial importance in many aspects of normal and pathological brain function. In particular, a prominent aspect that remains debated is how the plasticity mechanisms, that encompass a broad spectrum of temporal and spatial scales, come to play together in a concerted fashion. Here we review and discuss evidence that pinpoints to a possible non-neuronal, glial candidate for such orchestration: the regulation of synaptic plasticity by astrocytes. PMID:25862587

  8. Effect of different Intensity Exercises in Treadmill on Learning and Memory and The Synaptic Ultrastructure in Hippocampal CA3 Area in Rats%不同强度跑台运动对大鼠学习记忆能力及海马CA3区突触超微结构的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚云

    2012-01-01

    Effect of the different intensity treadmill exercise on learning and memory ability and hippocampal CA3 area ultrastructure was studied in rats.40 SD rats were randomly divided into four groups(control group,low-intensity exercise group,medium-intensity exercise group and high-intensity exercise group),after 60d exercise according to their respective intensity,through the one-trial passive avoidance response,the time to step-through lateney(STL) of rats was measured in every exercise group.Then 5 rats were chosen from every group,through normal ultrathin section made method,hippocampal CA3 area was observed under JEM-1230EX transmission electron microscope and photographed.The results showed that: 24 hours of STL period after electrical shock was significantly longer(P0.05) in low-intensity exercise group rats,and the hippocampal CA3 area postsynaptic density material became significantly thicker(P0.01).The curved type of synaptic interface could be divided into positively curved,negatively curved and flat,the flat type was the main.As a result,low-intensity exercise can increase memory capacity,and make the neuron synapse occurring plastic changes in the hippocampal CA3 area.The thickness of postsynaptic density material came into being a positive correlation with the strength of memory.%探讨不同强度跑台运动对大鼠学习记忆能力及海马CA3区超微结构的影响。40只Wister大鼠随机被分为4组(对照组、低强度运动组、中强度运动组、高强度运动组,各10只),按各自强度运动60 d后,通过一次性被动回避反应实验,逐只测量其步入潜伏期的时间(STL);后每组任选5只大鼠,取右侧海马CA3区按常规方法制作超薄切片,60K倍透射电镜观察并拍照,Motic Images Advanced 3.1软件测量相关突触界面结构。结果表明:低强度运动组大鼠,电击后24 h步入潜伏期的时间显著延长(P〈0.05),海马CA3区突触后膜致密

  9. Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Südhof, Thomas C; Rizo, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Presynaptic nerve terminals release neurotransmitters by synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Membrane fusion mediating synaptic exocytosis and other intracellular membrane traffic is affected by a universal machinery that includes SNARE (for “soluble NSF-attachment protein receptor”) and SM (for “Sec1/Munc18-like”) proteins. During fusion, vesicular and target SNARE proteins assemble into an α-helical trans-SNARE complex that forces the two membranes tightly together, and SM proteins likely wrap aro...

  10. Glucose rapidly induces different forms of excitatory synaptic plasticity in hypothalamic POMC neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hu

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic POMC neurons are required for glucose and energy homeostasis. POMC neurons have a wide synaptic connection with neurons both within and outside the hypothalamus, and their activity is controlled by a balance between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Brain glucose-sensing plays an essential role in the maintenance of normal body weight and metabolism; however, the effect of glucose on synaptic transmission in POMC neurons is largely unknown. Here we identified three types of POMC neurons (EPSC(+, EPSC(-, and EPSC(+/- based on their glucose-regulated spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs, using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Lowering extracellular glucose decreased the frequency of sEPSCs in EPSC(+ neurons, but increased it in EPSC(- neurons. Unlike EPSC(+ and EPSC(- neurons, EPSC(+/- neurons displayed a bi-phasic sEPSC response to glucoprivation. In the first phase of glucoprivation, both the frequency and the amplitude of sEPSCs decreased, whereas in the second phase, they increased progressively to the levels above the baseline values. Accordingly, lowering glucose exerted a bi-phasic effect on spontaneous action potentials in EPSC(+/- neurons. Glucoprivation decreased firing rates in the first phase, but increased them in the second phase. These data indicate that glucose induces distinct excitatory synaptic plasticity in different subpopulations of POMC neurons. This synaptic remodeling is likely to regulate the sensitivity of the melanocortin system to neuronal and hormonal signals.

  11. Pannexin 1 regulates bidirectional hippocampal synaptic plasticity in adult mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiles, Alvaro O.; Flores-Muñoz, Carolina; Toro-Ayala, Gabriela; Cárdenas, Ana M.; Palacios, Adrian G.; Muñoz, Pablo; Fuenzalida, Marco; Sáez, Juan C.; Martínez, Agustín D.

    2014-01-01

    The threshold for bidirectional modification of synaptic plasticity is known to be controlled by several factors, including the balance between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, postsynaptic free Ca2+ concentration and NMDA receptor (NMDAR) composition of GluN2 subunits. Pannexin 1 (Panx1), a member of the integral membrane protein family, has been shown to form non-selective channels and to regulate the induction of synaptic plasticity as well as hippocampal-dependent learning. Although Panx1 channels have been suggested to play a role in excitatory long-term potentiation (LTP), it remains unknown whether these channels also modulate long-term depression (LTD) or the balance between both types of synaptic plasticity. To study how Panx1 contributes to excitatory synaptic efficacy, we examined the age-dependent effects of eliminating or blocking Panx1 channels on excitatory synaptic plasticity within the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus. By using different protocols to induce bidirectional synaptic plasticity, Panx1 channel blockade or lack of Panx1 were found to enhance LTP, whereas both conditions precluded the induction of LTD in adults, but not in young animals. These findings suggest that Panx1 channels restrain the sliding threshold for the induction of synaptic plasticity and underlying brain mechanisms of learning and memory. PMID:25360084

  12. Calmodulin as a major calcium buffer shaping vesicular release and short-term synaptic plasticity: facilitation through buffer dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Yulia Timofeeva; Kirill Volynski

    2015-01-01

    Action potential-dependent release of synaptic vesicles and short-term synaptic plasticity are dynamically regulated by the endogenous Ca(2+) buffers that shape [Ca(2+)] profiles within a presynaptic bouton. Calmodulin is one of the most abundant presynaptic proteins and it binds Ca(2+) faster than any other characterized endogenous neuronal Ca(2+) buffer. Direct effects of calmodulin on fast presynaptic Ca(2+) dynamics and vesicular release however have not been studied in detail. Using expe...

  13. Synaptic control of motoneuronal excitability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Funk, G D; Bayliss, D A;

    2000-01-01

    Movement, the fundamental component of behavior and the principal extrinsic action of the brain, is produced when skeletal muscles contract and relax in response to patterns of action potentials generated by motoneurons. The processes that determine the firing behavior of motoneurons are therefore...... important in understanding the transformation of neural activity to motor behavior. Here, we review recent studies on the control of motoneuronal excitability, focusing on synaptic and cellular properties. We first present a background description of motoneurons: their development, anatomical organization......, cationic inward current, hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ca(2+) channels, or presynaptic release processes. Together, these numerous inputs mediate and modify incoming motor commands, ultimately generating the coordinated firing patterns that underlie muscle contractions during motor behavior....

  14. A Framework for the Modelling of Biphasic Reacting Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anantpinijwatna, Amata; Sin, Gürkan; O’Connell, John P.;

    2014-01-01

    Biphasic reacting systems have a broad application range from organic reactions in pharmaceutical and agro-bio industries to CO 2 capture. However, mathematical modelling of biphasic reacting systems is a formidable challenge due to many phenomena underlying the process such as chemical equilibrium......, biphasic equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and transport/mixing. In this study, a framework for modelling biphasic reacting systems is proposed to fa cilitate the model development in support of model-based process design-analysis. This framework is successfully applied to describe two biphasic reaction...

  15. [Peptidergic modulation of the hippocampus synaptic activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrebitskiĭ, V G; Kondratenko, R V; Povarov, I S; Dereviagin, V I

    2011-11-01

    Effects of two newly synthesized nootropic and anxiolytic dipeptides: Noopept and Selank on inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells were investigated using patch-clamp technique in whole-cell configuration. Bath application of Noopept (1 microM) or Selank (2 microM) significantly increased the frequency of spike-dependent spontaneous m1PSCs, whereas spike-independent mlPSCs remained unchanged. It was suggested that both peptides mediated their effect sue to activation of inhibitory interneurons terminating on CA1 pyramidal cells. Results of current clamp recording of inhibitory interneurons residing in stratum radiatum confirmed this suggestion, at least for Noonent. PMID:22390072

  16. Brief dendritic calcium signals initiate long-lasting synaptic depression in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Konnerth, A.; Dreessen, J; Augustine, G J

    1992-01-01

    We have performed experiments designed to test the hypothesis that long-term depression (LTD) of excitatory synaptic transmission in the cerebellar cortex is caused by a rise in postsynaptic Ca concentration. These experiments combined measurements of synaptic efficacy, performed with the thin slice patch clamp technique, with fura-2 measurements of intracellular Ca concentration ([Ca]i) in single cerebellar Purkinje cells. Simultaneous activation of the climbing fiber and parallel fibers inn...

  17. Biphasic synovial sarcoma of oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synovial sarcoma is a mesenchymal spindle cell tumour, which is unrelated to synovium and shows variable epithelial differentiation. Typically, synovial sarcoma arises in the soft tissues of the extremities but cases in the head and neck region are less common and oral cavity involvement is extremely rare. A 17-year-old girl presented with a gradually increasing swelling on the right cheek for 2 years, which on biopsy, revealed a biphasic tumour comprising fascicles of spindle shaped cells with gland formation by epithelial cells and scattered masts cells. Histological diagnosis of biphasic synovial sarcoma was confirmed on immunohistochemistry by strong positivity for EMA, S-100 and CD-99 in both epithelial as well as spindle cell areas. (author)

  18. Metal separations using aqueous biphasic partitioning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous biphasic extraction (ABE) processes offer the potential for low-cost, highly selective separations. This countercurrent extraction technique involves selective partitioning of either dissolved solutes or ultrafine particulates between two immiscible aqueous phases. The extraction systems that the authors have studied are generated by combining an aqueous salt solution with an aqueous polymer solution. They have examined a wide range of applications for ABE, including the treatment of solid and liquid nuclear wastes, decontamination of soils, and processing of mineral ores. They have also conducted fundamental studies of solution microstructure using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). In this report they review the physicochemical fundamentals of aqueous biphase formation and discuss the development and scaleup of ABE processes for environmental remediation

  19. Primary biphasic synovial sarcoma of the orbit.

    OpenAIRE

    Ratnatunga, N.; Goodlad, J. R.; Sankarakumaran, N.; Seimon, R.; Nagendran, S.; Fletcher, C D

    1992-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is one of the most common soft tissue malignancies of adolescents and young adults. Despite its name, it is no longer thought to be histogenetically derived from the synovium. What seems to be the first case of synovial sarcoma to arise in the orbit presented in a 21 year old woman as a slowly enlarging subconjunctival mass. Although this tumour was typically biphasic, the monophasic spindle cell variant arising at this site could easily be confused with less aggressive orbit...

  20. Lavandula angustifolia extract improves deteriorated synaptic plasticity in an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Masoud Soheili; Mostafa Rezaei Tavirany; Mahmoud Salami

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Neurodegenerative Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with profound deficits in synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. Long-term potentiation (LTP), an experimental form of synaptic plasticity, is intensively examined in hippocampus. In this study we evaluated the effect of aqueous extract of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) on induction of LTP in the CA1 area of hippocampus. In response to stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals the baseline or tetanized field extra...

  1. Synapse geometry and receptor dynamics modulate synaptic strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Freche

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission relies on several processes, such as the location of a released vesicle, the number and type of receptors, trafficking between the postsynaptic density (PSD and extrasynaptic compartment, as well as the synapse organization. To study the impact of these parameters on excitatory synaptic transmission, we present a computational model for the fast AMPA-receptor mediated synaptic current. We show that in addition to the vesicular release probability, due to variations in their release locations and the AMPAR distribution, the postsynaptic current amplitude has a large variance, making a synapse an intrinsic unreliable device. We use our model to examine our experimental data recorded from CA1 mice hippocampal slices to study the differences between mEPSC and evoked EPSC variance. The synaptic current but not the coefficient of variation is maximal when the active zone where vesicles are released is apposed to the PSD. Moreover, we find that for certain type of synapses, receptor trafficking can affect the magnitude of synaptic depression. Finally, we demonstrate that perisynaptic microdomains located outside the PSD impacts synaptic transmission by regulating the number of desensitized receptors and their trafficking to the PSD. We conclude that geometrical modifications, reorganization of the PSD or perisynaptic microdomains modulate synaptic strength, as the mechanisms underlying long-term plasticity.

  2. Bilinearity in spatiotemporal integration of synaptic inputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songting Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons process information via integration of synaptic inputs from dendrites. Many experimental results demonstrate dendritic integration could be highly nonlinear, yet few theoretical analyses have been performed to obtain a precise quantitative characterization analytically. Based on asymptotic analysis of a two-compartment passive cable model, given a pair of time-dependent synaptic conductance inputs, we derive a bilinear spatiotemporal dendritic integration rule. The summed somatic potential can be well approximated by the linear summation of the two postsynaptic potentials elicited separately, plus a third additional bilinear term proportional to their product with a proportionality coefficient [Formula: see text]. The rule is valid for a pair of synaptic inputs of all types, including excitation-inhibition, excitation-excitation, and inhibition-inhibition. In addition, the rule is valid during the whole dendritic integration process for a pair of synaptic inputs with arbitrary input time differences and input locations. The coefficient [Formula: see text] is demonstrated to be nearly independent of the input strengths but is dependent on input times and input locations. This rule is then verified through simulation of a realistic pyramidal neuron model and in electrophysiological experiments of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons. The rule is further generalized to describe the spatiotemporal dendritic integration of multiple excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. The integration of multiple inputs can be decomposed into the sum of all possible pairwise integration, where each paired integration obeys the bilinear rule. This decomposition leads to a graph representation of dendritic integration, which can be viewed as functionally sparse.

  3. Astrocytes Potentiate Synaptic Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Suhita

    2005-03-01

    A recent experimental study shows that astrocytes, a subtype of glia, are able to influence the spontaneous activity in the brain via calcium dependent glutamate release. We model the coupling mechanism between an astrocyte and a neuron based on experimental data. This coupling is dynamic and bi-directional, such that the modulations in intracellular calcium concentrations in astrocytes affect neuronal excitability and vice versa via a glutamatergic pathway. We demonstrate through simple neural-glial circuits that increases in the intracellular calcium concentration in astrocytes nearby can enhance spontaneous activity in a neuron, a significant mechanism said to be involved in plasticity and learning. The pattern of this marked increase in spontaneous firing rate in our model quantitatively follows that observed in the experiment. Further, depending on the type of synaptic connections diverging from the neuron, it can either inhibit or excite the ensuing dynamics and potentiate synaptic transmission, thus reinstating the integral role played by astrocytes in normal neuronal dynamics.

  4. Kidins220/ARMS is a novel modulator of short-term synaptic plasticity in hippocampal GABAergic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Scholz-Starke

    Full Text Available Kidins220 (Kinase D interacting substrate of 220 kDa/ARMS (Ankyrin Repeat-rich Membrane Spanning is a scaffold protein highly expressed in the nervous system. Previous work on neurons with altered Kidins220/ARMS expression suggested that this protein plays multiple roles in synaptic function. In this study, we analyzed the effects of Kidins220/ARMS ablation on basal synaptic transmission and on a variety of short-term plasticity paradigms in both excitatory and inhibitory synapses using a recently described Kidins220 full knockout mouse. Hippocampal neuronal cultures prepared from embryonic Kidins220(-/- (KO and wild type (WT littermates were used for whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of spontaneous and evoked synaptic activity. Whereas glutamatergic AMPA receptor-mediated responses were not significantly affected in KO neurons, specific differences were detected in evoked GABAergic transmission. The recovery from synaptic depression of inhibitory post-synaptic currents in WT cells showed biphasic kinetics, both in response to paired-pulse and long-lasting train stimulation, while in KO cells the respective slow components were strongly reduced. We demonstrate that the slow recovery from synaptic depression in WT cells is caused by a transient reduction of the vesicle release probability, which is absent in KO neurons. These results suggest that Kidins220/ARMS is not essential for basal synaptic transmission and various forms of short-term plasticity, but instead plays a novel role in the mechanisms regulating the recovery of synaptic strength in GABAergic synapses.

  5. Differential regulation of synaptic transmission by pre- and postsynaptic SK channels in the spinal locomotor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanou, Evanthia; Alpert, Michael H; Alford, Simon; El Manira, Abdeljabbar

    2013-06-01

    The generation of activity in the central nervous system requires precise tuning of cellular properties and synaptic transmission. Neural networks in the spinal cord produce coordinated locomotor movements. Synapses in these networks need to be equipped with multiple mechanisms that regulate their operation over varying regimes to produce locomotor activity at different frequencies. Using the in vitro lamprey spinal cord, we explored whether Ca(2+) influx via different routes in postsynaptic soma and dendrites and in presynaptic terminals can activate apamin-sensitive Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels and thereby shape synaptic transmission. We show that postsynaptic SK channels are tightly coupled to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA receptors. Activation of these channels by synaptically induced NMDA-dependent Ca(2+) transients restrains the time course of the synaptic current and the amplitude of the synaptic potential. In addition, presynaptic SK channels are activated by Ca(2+) influx via voltage-gated channels and control the waveform of the action potential and the resulting Ca(2+) dynamics in the axon terminals. The coupling of SK channels to different Ca(2+) sources, pre- and postsynaptically, acts as a negative feedback mechanism to shape synaptic transmission. Thus SK channels can play a pivotal role in setting the dynamic range of synapses and enabling short-term plasticity in the spinal locomotor network. PMID:23554432

  6. Synaptic Homeostasis and Restructuring across the Sleep-Wake Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Wilfredo Blanco; Catia M Pereira; Vinicius R Cota; Annie C Souza; César Rennó-Costa; Sharlene Santos; Gabriella Dias; Guerreiro, Ana M. G.; Tort, Adriano B. L.; Adrião D Neto; Sidarta Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is critical for hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. However, the underlying mechanisms of synaptic plasticity are poorly understood. The central controversy is on whether long-term potentiation (LTP) takes a role during sleep and which would be its specific effect on memory. To address this question, we used immunohistochemistry to measure phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKIIα) in the rat hippocampus immediately after specific sleep-wake states...

  7. Biphasic mini-reactor for characterization of biocatalyst performance

    OpenAIRE

    Van Den Wittenboer, Anne; Schmidt, Thomas; Müller, Pia; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion Bettina; Greiner, Lasse

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Biphasic reaction media are extending the scope of technical biocatalysis. Thorough investigation of the factors affecting catalyst performance under these conditions is of key importance for the successful implementation of catalytic processes. Here, we present a reactor setup suitable for comprehensive systematic characterization and optimization of biocatalyzed reactions in biphasic systems with distinct phases. It is distinguished by small volumes allowing reproducible...

  8. AQUEOUS BIPHASE EXTRACTION FOR PROCESSING OF FINE COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Osseo-Asare; X. Zeng

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to develop an aqueous biphase extraction process for the treatment of fine coals. Aqueous biphase extraction is an advanced separation technology that relies on the ability of an aqueous system consisting of a water-soluble polymer and another component, e.g., another polymer, an inorganic salt, or a nonionic surfactant, to separate into two immiscible aqueous phases. The principle behind the partition of solid particles in aqueous biphase systems is the physicochemical interaction between the solid surface and the surrounding liquid solution. In order to remove sulfur and mineral matter from fine coal with aqueous biphasic extraction, it is necessary to know the partitioning behavior of coal, as well as the inorganic mineral components. Therefore, in this research emphasis was placed on the partitioning behavior of fine coal particles as well as model fine inorganic particles in aqueous biphase systems.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of magnesium substituted biphasic mixtures of controlled hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper investigates the preparation of magnesium (Mg) substituted biphasic mixtures of different hydroxyapatite (HAP)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ratios through aqueous precipitation method. The concentrations of added magnesium (Mg) were varied with the calcium in order to obtain constant (Ca+Mg)/P ratios of 1.67 ranging from 1.62+0.05, 1.58+0.09 and 1.54+0.13, respectively. The as prepared powders were calcined at different temperatures to study the phase behaviour and thermal stability. The powders were characterized by the following analytical techniques: TG-DTA, X-ray diffraction and FT-IR. The results have shown that substitution of Mg in the calcium-deficient apatites resulted in the formation of biphasic mixtures of different HAP/β-TCP ratios after heating above 700 deg. C. The ratios of the formation of phase mixtures were dependent on the calcium deficiency in the apatites with the higher deficiency having the strongest impact on the increased formation of β-TCP and the substituted Mg was found to stabilize the β-TCP phase. - Graphical abstract: Role of Mg in the behaviour of calcium-deficient apatites during calcination to form biphasic mixtures

  10. Rapid glucocorticoid-induced activation of TRP and CB1 receptors causes biphasic modulation of glutamate release in gastric-related hypothalamic preautonomic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BretN.Smith

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids rapidly regulate synaptic input to neuroendocrine cells in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN by inducing the retrograde release of endogenous messengers. Here we investigated the rapid effects of dexamethasone (DEX on excitatory synaptic input to feeding-related, preautonomic PVN neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. In ~50% of identified gastric-related preautonomic PVN neurons, DEX elicited a biphasic synaptic response characterized by an initial rapid and transient increase in the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs, followed by a decrease in mEPSC frequency within 9 min; remaining cells displayed only a decrease in mEPSC frequency. The late-phase decrease in mEPSC frequency was mimicked by the cannabinoid receptor agonists anandamide and WIN 55,212-2, and it was blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251. The biphasic DEX effect was mimicked by anandamide (AEA. The early increase in mEPSCs was mimicked by activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 receptors with capsaicin and by activation of TRPV4 receptors with 4-α-PDD. The increase was reduced, but not blocked, by selective TRPV1 antagonists and in TRPV1-knockout mice; it was blocked completely by the broad-spectrum TRPV antagonist ruthenium red and by combined application of selective TRPV1 and TRPV4 antagonists. The DEX effects were prevented entirely by intracellular infusion of the G-protein inhibitor, GDPβS. Thus, DEX biphasically modulates synaptic glutamate onto a subset of gastric-related PVN neurons, which is likely mediated by induction of a retrograde messenger. The effect includes a TRPV1/4 receptor-mediated transient increase and subsequent CB1 receptor-mediated suppression of glutamate release. Multiphasic modulation of glutamate input to PVN neurons represents a previously unappreciated complexity of control of autonomic output by glucocorticoids and eCBs.

  11. Archaerhodopsin Selectively and Reversibly Silences Synaptic Transmission through Altered pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gaby, Mohamady; Zhang, Yu; Wolf, Konstantin; Schwiening, Christof J; Paulsen, Ole; Shipton, Olivia A

    2016-08-23

    Tools that allow acute and selective silencing of synaptic transmission in vivo would be invaluable for understanding the synaptic basis of specific behaviors. Here, we show that presynaptic expression of the proton pump archaerhodopsin enables robust, selective, and reversible optogenetic synaptic silencing with rapid onset and offset. Two-photon fluorescence imaging revealed that this effect is accompanied by a transient increase in pH restricted to archaerhodopsin-expressing boutons. Crucially, clamping intracellular pH abolished synaptic silencing without affecting the archaerhodopsin-mediated hyperpolarizing current, indicating that changes in pH mediate the synaptic silencing effect. To verify the utility of this technique, we used trial-limited, archaerhodopsin-mediated silencing to uncover a requirement for CA3-CA1 synapses whose afferents originate from the left CA3, but not those from the right CA3, for performance on a long-term memory task. These results highlight optogenetic, pH-mediated silencing of synaptic transmission as a spatiotemporally selective approach to dissecting synaptic function in behaving animals. PMID:27524609

  12. Synaptic Gain-of-Function Effects of Mutant Cav2.1 Channels in a Mouse Model of Familial Hemiplegic Migraine Are Due to Increased Basal [Ca2+]i

    OpenAIRE

    Di Guilmi, Mariano N.; Wang, Tiantian; Inchauspe, Carlota Gonzalez; Forsythe, Ian D; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Borst, J. Gerard G.; Uchitel, Osvaldo D.

    2014-01-01

    Specific missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes a subunit of voltage-gated CaV2.1 channels, are associated with familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), a rare monogenic subtype of common migraine with aura. We used transgenic knock-in (KI) mice harboring the human pathogenic FHM1 mutation S218L to study presynaptic Ca2+ currents, EPSCs, and in vivo activity at the calyx of Held synapse. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of presynaptic terminals from S218L KI mice showed a s...

  13. AQUEOUS BIPHASE EXTRACTION FOR PROCESSING OF FINE COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Osseo-Asare

    2000-06-02

    Ever-stringent environmental constraints dictate that future coal cleaning technologies be compatible with micron-size particles. This research program seeks to develop an advanced coal cleaning technology uniquely suited to micron-size particles, i.e., aqueous biphase extraction. The partitioning behavior of fly ash in the PEG-2000 Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O system was studied and the solid in each fraction was characterized by CHN analysis (carbon content), X-ray diffraction (XRD; crystal component), and inductively coupled plasma spectrophotometry (ICP; elemental composition in the ash). In the pH range from 2 to 5, the particles separated into two different layers, i.e., the polymer-rich (top) and salt-rich (bottom) layers. However, above pH 5, the particles in the polymer-rich phase split into two zones. The percent carbon content of the solids in the upper zone ({approximately}80 wt%) was higher than that in the parent sample (63.2 wt%), while the lower zone in the polymer-rich phase had the same percent ash content as the original sample. The particles in the salt-rich phase were mainly composed of ash (with < 4 wt% carbon content). However, when the solid concentration in the whole system increased from 1 wt% to 2 wt%, this 3-fraction phenomenon only occurred above pH 10. XRD results showed that the main crystal components in the ash included quartz, hematite, and mullite. The ICP results showed that Si, Al, and Fe were the major elements in the fly ash, with minor elements of Na, K, Ca, Mg, and Ba. The composition of the ash in the lower zone of the polymer-rich phase remained almost the same as that in the parent fly ash. The largest amount of product ({approximately}60% yield) with the highest carbon content ({approximately}80 wt% C) was obtained in the range pH 6-9. Based on the experimental results obtained, a flowsheet is proposed for the beneficiation of high-carbon fly ash with the aqueous biphase extraction process.

  14. Biphasic synovial sarcoma in mandibular region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Wadhwan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The term synovioma was coined by Smith in 1927, and later in 1936 Knox suggested the name synovial sarcoma. It occurs primarily in the paraarticular regions, usually in close association with tendon sheaths, bursae, and joint capsules. On rare occasions it may be seen in areas without any apparent relationship to synovial structures as in parapharyngeal region or the abdominal cavity. The first description of synovial sarcoma in the head and neck region was by Pack and Ariel in 1950. The majority of these tumors seem to take origin from paravertebral connective tissue spaces and manifest as solitary retropharyngeal or parapharyngeal masses near the carotid bifurcation. Synovial sarcoma has been reported in soft palate, tongue, maxillofacial region, angle of mandible, sternoclavicular region, scapular region, and the esophagus. We report a case of 28-year-old male patient with synovial sarcoma in mandibular region with biphasic pattern.

  15. Obtaining of ceramics biphasic dense and porous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the bioceramic hydroxyapatite (HAP) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) are materials commonly used in biomedical field. Their combined properties result in a material with absorbable and at the same time with bioactive surface. Called biphasic ceramics such materials respond more quickly when exposed to physiological environment. In this work, powders of HAP/beta-TCP were obtained by chemical precipitation. After obtaining the post-phase was added at a ratio of 0, 15% and 30w% aqueous solutions of corn starch in order to obtain porous bodies. After mixing the resulting solutions were dried, resigned in tablet form and sintered at 1300 deg C. The initial powder was characterized by X-ray diffraction with Rietveld refinement to quantify the phases present. Bodies-of-evidence has been characterized by calculating the bulk density, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and diametral compression. (author)

  16. Synaptic gain-of-function effects of mutant Cav2.1 channels in a mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine are due to increased basal [Ca2+]i

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Di Guilmi (Mariano); T. Wang (Teng); C.G. Inchauspe (Carlota Gonzalez); I.D. Forsythe (Ian); M.D. Ferrari (Michel); A.M.J.M. van der Maagdenberg (Arn M. J.); J.G.G. Borst (Gerard); O.D. Uchitel (Osvaldo)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractSpecific missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes a subunit of voltage-gated CaV2.1 channels, are associated with familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), a rare monogenic subtype of common migraine with aura. We used transgenic knock-in (KI) mice harboring the human path

  17. Synaptic electronics: materials, devices and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the recent progress of synaptic electronics is reviewed. The basics of biological synaptic plasticity and learning are described. The material properties and electrical switching characteristics of a variety of synaptic devices are discussed, with a focus on the use of synaptic devices for neuromorphic or brain-inspired computing. Performance metrics desirable for large-scale implementations of synaptic devices are illustrated. A review of recent work on targeted computing applications with synaptic devices is presented. (topical review)

  18. A Model of Synaptic Reconsolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, David B.; Schwalger, Tilo; Ziegler, Lorric; Gerstner, Wulfram

    2016-01-01

    Reconsolidation of memories has mostly been studied at the behavioral and molecular level. Here, we put forward a simple extension of existing computational models of synaptic consolidation to capture hippocampal slice experiments that have been interpreted as reconsolidation at the synaptic level. The model implements reconsolidation through stabilization of consolidated synapses by stabilizing entities combined with an activity-dependent reservoir of stabilizing entities that are immune to protein synthesis inhibition (PSI). We derive a reduced version of our model to explore the conditions under which synaptic reconsolidation does or does not occur, often referred to as the boundary conditions of reconsolidation. We find that our computational model of synaptic reconsolidation displays complex boundary conditions. Our results suggest that a limited resource of hypothetical stabilizing molecules or complexes, which may be implemented by protein phosphorylation or different receptor subtypes, can underlie the phenomenon of synaptic reconsolidation. PMID:27242410

  19. Calmodulin as a major calcium buffer shaping vesicular release and short-term synaptic plasticity: facilitation through buffer dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Timofeeva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Action potential-dependent release of synaptic vesicles and short-term synaptic plasticity are dynamically regulated by the endogenous Ca2+ buffers that shape [Ca2+] profiles within a presynaptic bouton. Calmodulin is one of the most abundant presynaptic proteins and it binds Ca2+ faster than any other characterized endogenous neuronal Ca2+ buffer. Direct effects of calmodulin on fast presynaptic Ca2+ dynamics and vesicular release however have not been studied in detail. Using experimentally constrained three-dimensional diffusion modeling of Ca2+ influx–exocytosis coupling at small excitatory synapses we show that, at physiologically relevant concentrations, Ca2+ buffering by calmodulin plays a dominant role in inhibiting vesicular release and in modulating short-term synaptic plasticity. We also propose a novel and potentially powerful mechanism for short-term facilitation based on Ca2+-dependent dynamic dislocation of calmodulin molecules from the plasma membrane within the active zone.

  20. 大鼠海马星形胶质细胞对突触可塑性的影响%The relation between structurely synaptic plasticity and astroglia in the CA1 region of rat hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭来勋; 孙圣刚; 段申汉; 王细林; 吴秀枝

    2005-01-01

    目的研究星形胶质细胞在神经系统发育成熟过程中对突触可塑性的调控规律.方法取健康初生、幼年和成年大鼠各10只,每只取脑切片,用免疫组织化学方法观察其海马CA1区的S100、胶质纤维酸性蛋白(GFAP)和P38免疫反应产物强度;HE染色法显示神经元胞体.结果初生大鼠海马CA1区中神经元大量存在,但S100、GFAP和P38表达均少,幼鼠的表达增加,但仍显著少于成鼠的表达(P<0.01).结论大鼠海马CA1区星形胶质细胞增殖与突触出现时间、突触数目增加及功能成熟有关.

  1. Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylation of kinesin heavy chain on beta-granules in pancreatic beta-cells. Implications for regulated beta-granule transport and insulin exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelan, Matthew J.; Morfini, Gerardo; Julyan, Richard; Sommers, Scott; Hays, Lori; Kajio, Hiroshi; Briaud, Isabelle; Easom, Richard A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Brady, Scott T.; Rhodes, Christopher J.

    2002-01-01

    The specific biochemical steps required for glucose-regulated insulin exocytosis from beta-cells are not well defined. Elevation of glucose leads to increases in cytosolic [Ca2+]i and biphasic release of insulin from both a readily releasable and a storage pool of beta-granules. The effect of elevated [Ca2+]i on phosphorylation of isolated beta-granule membrane proteins was evaluated, and the phosphorylation of four proteins was found to be altered by [Ca2+]i. One (a 18/20-kDa doublet) was a Ca2+-dependent increase in phosphorylation, and, surprisingly, three others (138, 42, and 36 kDa) were Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylations. The 138-kDa beta-granule phosphoprotein was found to be kinesin heavy chain (KHC). At low levels of [Ca2+]i KHC was phosphorylated by casein kinase 2, but KHC was rapidly dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2B beta (PP2Bbeta) as [Ca2+]i increased. Inhibitors of PP2B specifically reduced the second, microtubule-dependent, phase of insulin secretion, suggesting that dephosphorylation of KHC was required for transport of beta-granules from the storage pool to replenish the readily releasable pool of beta-granules. This is distinct from synaptic vesicle exocytosis, because neurotransmitter release from synaptosomes did not require a Ca2+-dependent KHC dephosphorylation. These results suggest a novel mechanism for regulating KHC function and beta-granule transport in beta-cells that is mediated by casein kinase 2 and PP2B. They also implicate a novel regulatory role for PP2B/calcineurin in the control of insulin secretion downstream of a rise in [Ca2+]i.

  2. Effects of ATP on calcium binding to synaptic plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of labeled norepinephrine from preloaded synaptosomes requires the presence of potassium and calcium. ATP-dependent binding of calcium to synaptic plasma membranes (SPM) may provide a means of maintaining the cation in a readily available pool for the triggering of transmitter release. A high Ca-binding capacity was demonstrated in SPM. The Km for calcium is 5.5 X 10(-5) M. The dependence of the system on the gamma phosphate of ATP was demonstrated by an increase in Ca-binding with increasing ATP concentration and by competitive inhibition of binding by ADP and AMP. Magnesium is also required for ATP-dependent Ca-binding. The optimum pH for the Ca binding was 7.0. Pretreatment of SPM with phospholipase A2 lowered the binding capacity. Sulfhydryl groups are also critical for ATP-dependent Ca binding to occur. A model for ATP-dependent Ca-binding was proposed

  3. The Relative Contribution of NMDARs to Excitatory Postsynaptic Currents is Controlled by Ca2+-Induced Inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Valiullina, Fliza; Zakharova, Yulia; Mukhtarov, Marat; Draguhn, Andreas; Burnashev, Nail; Rozov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are important mediators of excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity. A hallmark of these channels is their high permeability to Ca2+. At the same time, they are themselves inhibited by the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. It is unclear however, whether the Ca2+ entry associated with single NMDAR mediated synaptic events is sufficient to self-inhibit their activation. Such auto-regulation would have important effects on the dynamics of synaptic exci...

  4. The relative contribution of NMDARs to excitatory postsynaptic currents is controlled by Ca2+-induced inactivation.

    OpenAIRE

    Fliza eValiullina; Yulia eZakharova; Andreas eDraguhn; Marat eMukhtarov; Nail eBurnashev; Andrei eRozov

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are important mediators of excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity. A hallmark of these channels is their high permeability to Ca2+. At the same time, they are themselves inhibited by the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. It is unclear however, whether the Ca2+ entry associated with single NMDAR mediated synaptic events is sufficient to self-inhibit their activation. Such auto-regulation would have important effects on the dynamics of synaptic exci...

  5. Biphasic responses in multi-site phosphorylation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Suwanmajo, Thapanar; Krishnan, J.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-site phosphorylation systems are repeatedly encountered in cellular biology and multi-site modification is a basic building block of post-translational modification. In this paper, we demonstrate how distributive multi-site modification mechanisms by a single kinase/phosphatase pair can lead to biphasic/partial biphasic dose–response characteristics for the maximally phosphorylated substrate at steady state. We use simulations and analysis to uncover a hidden competing effect which is r...

  6. Biphasic Janus particles with nanoscale anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Kyung-Ho; Martin, David C.; Lahann, Joerg

    2005-10-01

    Advances in the field of nanotechnology have fuelled the vision of future devices spawned from tiny functional components that are able to assemble according to a master blueprint. In this concept, the controlled distribution of matter or `patchiness' is important for creating anisotropic building blocks and introduces an extra design parameter - beyond size and shape. Although the reliable and efficient fabrication of building blocks with controllable material distributions will be of interest for many applications in research and technology, their synthesis has been addressed only in a few specialized cases. Here we show the design and synthesis of polymer-based particles with two distinct phases. The biphasic geometry of these Janus particles is induced by the simultaneous electrohydrodynamic jetting of parallel polymer solutions under the influence of an electrical field. The individual phases can be independently loaded with biomolecules or selectively modified with model ligands, as confirmed by confocal microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The fact that the spatial distribution of matter can be controlled at such small length scales will provide access to unknown anisotropic materials. This type of nanocolloid may enable the design of multicomponent carriers for drug delivery, molecular imaging or guided self-assembly.

  7. Synaptic dynamics in analog VLSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolozzi, Chiara; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2007-10-01

    Synapses are crucial elements for computation and information transfer in both real and artificial neural systems. Recent experimental findings and theoretical models of pulse-based neural networks suggest that synaptic dynamics can play a crucial role for learning neural codes and encoding spatiotemporal spike patterns. Within the context of hardware implementations of pulse-based neural networks, several analog VLSI circuits modeling synaptic functionality have been proposed. We present an overview of previously proposed circuits and describe a novel analog VLSI synaptic circuit suitable for integration in large VLSI spike-based neural systems. The circuit proposed is based on a computational model that fits the real postsynaptic currents with exponentials. We present experimental data showing how the circuit exhibits realistic dynamics and show how it can be connected to additional modules for implementing a wide range of synaptic properties. PMID:17716003

  8. High-frequency stimulation-induced synaptic potentiation in dorsal and ventral CA1 hippocampal synapses: the involvement of NMDA receptors, mGluR5, and (L-type) voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodoropoulos, Costas; Kouvaros, Stylianos

    2016-09-01

    The ability of the ventral hippocampus (VH) for long-lasting long-term potentiation (LTP) and the mechanisms underlying its lower ability for short-lasting LTP compared with the dorsal hippocampus (DH) are unknown. Using recordings of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) from the CA1 field of adult rat hippocampal slices, we found that 200-Hz stimulation induced nondecremental LTP that was maintained for at least 7 h and was greater in the DH than in the VH. The interaction of NMDA receptors with L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels appeared to be more effective in the DH than in the VH. Furthermore, the LTP was significantly enhanced in the DH only, between 2 and 5 h post-tetanus. Furthermore, the mGluR5 contributed to the post-tetanic potentiation more in the VH than in the DH. PMID:27531836

  9. Temporal profiles of synaptic plasticity-related signals in adult mouse hippocampus with methotrexate treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miyoung Yang; Juhwan Kim; Sung-Ho Kim; Joong-Sun Kim; Taekyun Shin; Changjong Moon

    2012-01-01

    Methotrexate, which is used to treat many malignancies and autoimmune diseases, affects brain functions including hippocampal-dependent memory function. However, the precise mechanisms underlying methotrexate-induced hippocampal dysfunction are poorly understood. To evaluate temporal changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals, the expression and activity of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, cAMP responsive element-binding protein, glutamate receptor 1, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor were examined in the hippocampi of adult C57BL/6 mice after methotrexate (40 mg/kg) intraperitoneal injection. Western blot analysis showed biphasic changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals in adult hippocampi following methotrexate treatment. N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1, cal-cium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and glutamate receptor 1 were acutely activated dur-ing the early phase (1 day post-injection), while extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and cAMP responsive element-binding protein activation showed biphasic increases during the early (1 day post-injection) and late phases (7-14 days post-injection). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor expression increased significantly during the late phase (7-14 days post-injection). Therefore, methotrexate treatment affects synaptic plasticity-related signals in the adult mouse hippocampus, suggesting that changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals may be associated with neuronal survival and plasticity-related cellular remodeling.

  10. Dopamine Regulates Aversive Contextual Learning and Associated In Vivo Synaptic Plasticity in the Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, John I; Yang, Kechun; Levine, Amber T; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Jenson, Daniel; Cao, Fei; Garcia, Isabella; Arenkiel, Benjamin R; Zhou, Fu-Ming; De Biasi, Mariella; Dani, John A

    2016-03-01

    Dopamine release during reward-driven behaviors influences synaptic plasticity. However, dopamine innervation and release in the hippocampus and its role during aversive behaviors are controversial. Here, we show that in vivo hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the CA3-CA1 circuit underlies contextual learning during inhibitory avoidance (IA) training. Immunohistochemistry and molecular techniques verified sparse dopaminergic innervation of the hippocampus from the midbrain. The long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) underlying the learning of IA was assessed with a D1-like dopamine receptor agonist or antagonist in ex vivo hippocampal slices and in vivo in freely moving mice. Inhibition of D1-like dopamine receptors impaired memory of the IA task and prevented the training-induced enhancement of both ex vivo and in vivo LTP induction. The results indicate that dopamine-receptor signaling during an aversive contextual task regulates aversive memory retention and regulates associated synaptic mechanisms in the hippocampus that likely underlie learning. PMID:26904943

  11. Stoichiometric implications of a biphasic life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiegs, Scott D; Berven, Keith A; Carmack, Douglas J; Capps, Krista A

    2016-03-01

    Animals mediate flows of elements and energy in ecosystems through processes such as nutrient sequestration in body tissues, and mineralization through excretion. For taxa with biphasic life cycles, the dramatic shifts in anatomy and physiology that occur during ontogeny are expected to be accompanied by changes in body and excreta stoichiometry, but remain little-explored, especially in vertebrates. Here we tested stoichiometric hypotheses related to the bodies and excreta of the wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) across life stages and during larval development. Per-capita rates of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) excretion varied widely during larval ontogeny, followed unimodal patterns, and peaked midway through development (Taylor-Kollros stages XV and XII, respectively). Larval mass did not increase steadily during development but peaked at stage XVII and declined until the termination of the experiment at stage XXII. Mass-specific N and P excretion rates of the larvae decreased exponentially during development. When coupled with population-biomass estimates, population-level excretion rates were greatest at stages VIII-X. Percent carbon (C), N, and C:N of body tissue showed weak trends across major life stages; body P and C:P, however, increased sixfold during development from egg to adult. Our results demonstrate that intraspecific ontogenic changes in nutrient contents of excretion and body tissues can be significant, and that N and P are not always excreted proportionally throughout life cycles. These results highlight the dynamic roles that species play in ecosystems, and how the morphological and physiological changes that accompany ontogeny can influence ecosystem-level processes. PMID:26589522

  12. Super-resolution microscopy of the synaptic active zone

    OpenAIRE

    Markus Sauer; Kittel, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Brain function relies on accurate information transfer at chemical synapses. At the presynaptic active zone (AZ) a variety of specialised proteins are assembled to complex architectures, which set the basis for speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Calcium (Ca2+) channels are pivotal for the initiation of excitation-secretion coupling and, correspondingly, capture a central position at the AZ. Combining quantitative functional studies with modelling approaches has prov...

  13. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  14. Biphasic catalysis in water/carbon dioxide micellar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Gunilla B.; Tumas, William; Johnston, Keith P.

    2002-01-01

    A process is provided for catalyzing an organic reaction to form a reaction product by placing reactants and a catalyst for the organic reaction, the catalyst of a metal complex and at least one ligand soluble within one of the phases of said aqueous biphasic system, within an aqueous biphasic system including a water phase, a dense phase fluid, and a surfactant adapted for forming an emulsion or microemulsion within the aqueous biphasic system, the reactants soluble within one of the phases of the aqueous biphasic system and convertible in the presence of the catalyst to a product having low solubility in the phase in which the catalyst is soluble; and, maintaining the aqueous biphasic system under pressures, at temperatures, and for a period of time sufficient for the organic reaction to occur and form the reaction product and to maintain sufficient density on the dense phase fluid, the reaction product characterized as having low solubility in the phase in which the catalyst is soluble.

  15. Cell Assembly Signatures Defined by Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity in Cortical Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Lopez-Huerta, Violeta G; Garcia-Munoz, Marianela; Theiss, Stephan; Arbuthnott, Gordon W

    2015-11-01

    The cell assembly (CA) hypothesis has been used as a conceptual framework to explain how groups of neurons form memories. CAs are defined as neuronal pools with synchronous, recurrent and sequential activity patterns. However, neuronal interactions and synaptic properties that define CAs signatures have been difficult to examine because identities and locations of assembly members are usually unknown. In order to study synaptic properties that define CAs, we used optical and electrophysiological approaches to record activity of identified neurons in mouse cortical cultures. Population analysis and graph theory techniques allowed us to find sequential patterns that represent repetitive transitions between network states. Whole cell pair recordings of neurons participating in repeated sequences demonstrated that synchrony is exhibited by groups of neurons with strong synaptic connectivity (concomitant firing) showing short-term synaptic depression (STD), whereas alternation (sequential firing) is seen in groups of neurons with weaker synaptic connections showing short-term synaptic facilitation (STF). Decreasing synaptic weights of a network promoted the generation of sequential activity patterns, whereas increasing synaptic weights restricted state transitions. Thus in simple cortical networks of real neurons, basic signatures of CAs, the properties that underlie perception and memory in Hebb's original description, are already present. PMID:26173906

  16. Synaptic determinants of Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena M B Boggio

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available There is mounting evidence showing that the structural and molecular organization of synaptic connections are affected both in human patients and in animal models of neurological and psychiatric diseases. As a consequence of these experimental observations, it has been introduced the concept of synapsopathies, a notion describing brain disorders of synaptic function and plasticity. A close correlation between neurological diseases and synaptic abnormalities is especially relevant for those syndromes including also mental retardation in their symptomatology, such as Rett Syndrome (RS. RS (MIM312750 is an X-linked dominant neurological disorder that is caused, in the majority of cases by mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2. This review will focus on the current knowledge of the synaptic alterations produced by mutations of the gene MeCP2 in mouse models of RS and will highlight prospects experimental therapies currently in use. Different experimental approaches have revealed that RS could be the consequence of an impairment in the homeostasis of synaptic transmission in specific brain regions. Indeed, several forms of experience-induced neuronal plasticity are impaired in the absence of MeCP2. Based on the results presented in this review, it is reasonable to propose that understanding how the brain is affected by diseases such as RS is at reach. This effort will bring us closer to identify the neurobiological bases of human cognition.

  17. Therapeutic hypothermia protects against ischemia-induced impairment of synaptic plasticity following juvenile cardiac arrest in sex-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, R M; Deng, G; Orfila, J E; Hui, X; Traystman, R J; Herson, P S

    2016-06-14

    Pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) often leads to poor neurologic outcomes, including deficits in learning and memory. The only approved treatment for CA is therapeutic hypothermia, although its utility in the pediatric population remains unclear. This study analyzed the effect of mild therapeutic hypothermia after CA in juvenile mice on hippocampal neuronal injury and the cellular model of learning and memory, termed long-term potentiation (LTP). Juvenile mice were subjected to cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR) followed by normothermia (37°C) and hypothermia (30°C, 32°C). Histological injury of hippocampal CA1 neurons was performed 3days after resuscitation using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were recorded from acute hippocampal slices 7days after CA/CPR to determine LTP. Synaptic function was impaired 7days after CA/CPR. Mice exposed to hypothermia showed equivalent neuroprotection, but exhibited sexually dimorphic protection against ischemia-induced impairment of LTP. Hypothermia (32°C) protects synaptic plasticity more effectively in females, with males requiring a deeper level of hypothermia (30°C) for equivalent protection. In conclusion, male and female juvenile mice exhibit equivalent neuronal injury following CA/CPR and hypothermia protects both males and females. We made the surprising finding that juvenile mice have a sexually dimorphic response to mild therapeutic hypothermia protection of synaptic function, where males may need a deeper level of hypothermia for equivalent synaptic protection. PMID:27033251

  18. Progress on the biphase turbine at Cerro Prieto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerini, D.; Hays, L.; Studhalter, W. [Douglas Energy Company, Placentia, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The status of a Biphase turbine power plant being installed at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field is presented. The major modules for the power plant are completed except for a back pressure steam turbine. The power plant will be started in April 1997 with the Biphase turbine alone followed by the addition of the steam turbine module two months later. The current power plant performance level is 2780 kWe due to a decline in the well. An increase in power output to 4060 kWe by adding the flow from another well is planned. The addition of five Biphase power plants with a total power output of 21.2 megawatts is described.

  19. Effects of baclofen on synaptically-induced cell firing in the rat hippocampal slice.

    OpenAIRE

    Ault, B.; Nadler, J V

    1983-01-01

    The effects of baclofen on the synaptically-induced firing of pyramidal and granule cell populations were tested in the rat hippocampal slice. Population spikes were evoked by stimulating excitatory pathways in the presence and absence of bath-applied drug. (+/-)-Baclofen (20 microM) completely blocked the firing of CA1 or CA3 hippocampal pyramidal cells subsequent to stimulation of projections that originate in area CA3. In contrast, the firing of dentate granule cells evoked by stimulation ...

  20. Dynamic inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission by astrocyte-derived ATP in hippocampal cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Koizumi, Schuichi; Fujishita, Kayoko; Tsuda, Makoto; Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2003-01-01

    Originally ascribed passive roles in the CNS, astrocytes are now known to have an active role in the regulation of synaptic transmission. Neuronal activity can evoke Ca2+ transients in astrocytes, and Ca2+ transients in astrocytes can evoke changes in neuronal activity. The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate has been shown to mediate such bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. We demonstrate here that ATP, a primary mediator of intercellular Ca2+ signaling among astroc...

  1. Case Report: Multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jose Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    A multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma in a 68-year-old man is reported. Four different peripheral tumor nodules were identified on gross examination. A fifth central tumor corresponded to a conventional clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma is a rare tumor that has been very recently characterized as a distinct histotype within the spectrum of papillary renal cell carcinoma. Immunostaining with cyclin D1 seems to be specific of this tumor subtype. This is the first reported case with multifocal presentation. PMID:27158455

  2. Inflammation subverts hippocampal synaptic plasticity in experimental multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Nisticò

    Full Text Available Abnormal use-dependent synaptic plasticity is universally accepted as the main physiological correlate of memory deficits in neurodegenerative disorders. It is unclear whether synaptic plasticity deficits take place during neuroinflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS and its mouse model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. In EAE mice, we found significant alterations of synaptic plasticity rules in the hippocampus. When compared to control mice, in fact, hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP induction was favored over long-term depression (LTD in EAE, as shown by a significant rightward shift in the frequency-synaptic response function. Notably, LTP induction was also enhanced in hippocampal slices from control mice following interleukin-1β (IL-1β perfusion, and both EAE and IL-1β inhibited GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSC without affecting glutamatergic transmission and AMPA/NMDA ratio. EAE was also associated with selective loss of GABAergic interneurons and with reduced gamma-frequency oscillations in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Finally, we provided evidence that microglial activation in the EAE hippocampus was associated with IL-1β expression, and hippocampal slices from control mice incubated with activated microglia displayed alterations of GABAergic transmission similar to those seen in EAE brains, through a mechanism dependent on enhanced IL-1β signaling. These data may yield novel insights into the basis of cognitive deficits in EAE and possibly of MS.

  3. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase IV contributes to translation-dependent early synaptic potentiation in the anterior cingulate cortex of adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyoda Hiroki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CaMKIV phosphorylates the major transcription factor, cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB, which plays key roles in synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. Our previous study showed that long-term potentiation (LTP in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC was significantly enhanced in transgenic mice overexpressing CaMKIV. Considering that the CaMKIV-CREB pathway plays a central role in the protein synthesis-dependent LTP, it is possible that upregulation of CaMKIV contributes to enhancement of LTP by promoting protein synthesis. To test this possibility, we examined the effects of transcription and translation inhibitors on synaptic potentiation induced by pairing of synaptic activity with postsynaptic depolarization (paired training in ACC pyramidal neurons of wild-type and CaMKIV transgenic mice. We found that synaptic potentiation induced by paired training was partially inhibited by transcription or translation inhibitors both in wild-type and CaMKIV transgenic mice; the extent of inhibition was markedly larger in the CaMKIV transgenic mice than in the wild-type mice. Biochemical and immunohistochemical studies revealed that CaMKIV was distributed in the membrane, cytosol and nucleus of ACC neurons. Our results reveal in the first time a transcription- and translation-dependent component of early synaptic LTP in adult ACC synapses, and demonstrate that CaMKIV enhances early synaptic potentiation by activating new protein synthesis.

  4. PKMzeta inhibition reverses learning-induced increases in hippocampal synaptic strength and memory during trace eyeblink conditioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Madroñal

    Full Text Available A leading candidate in the process of memory formation is hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP, a persistent enhancement in synaptic strength evoked by the repetitive activation of excitatory synapses, either by experimental high-frequency stimulation (HFS or, as recently shown, during actual learning. But are the molecular mechanisms for maintaining synaptic potentiation induced by HFS and by experience the same? Protein kinase Mzeta (PKMzeta, an autonomously active atypical protein kinase C isoform, plays a key role in the maintenance of LTP induced by tetanic stimulation and the storage of long-term memory. To test whether the persistent action of PKMzeta is necessary for the maintenance of synaptic potentiation induced after learning, the effects of ZIP (zeta inhibitory peptide, a PKMzeta inhibitor, on eyeblink-conditioned mice were studied. PKMzeta inhibition in the hippocampus disrupted both the correct retrieval of conditioned responses (CRs and the experience-dependent persistent increase in synaptic strength observed at CA3-CA1 synapses. In addition, the effects of ZIP on the same associative test were examined when tetanic LTP was induced at the hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapse before conditioning. In this case, PKMzeta inhibition both reversed tetanic LTP and prevented the expected LTP-mediated deleterious effects on eyeblink conditioning. Thus, PKMzeta inhibition in the CA1 area is able to reverse both the expression of trace eyeblink conditioned memories and the underlying changes in CA3-CA1 synaptic strength, as well as the anterograde effects of LTP on associative learning.

  5. Preparation and in vitro bioactivity of hydroxyapatite/solgel glass biphasic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragel, C V; Vallet-Regí, M; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, L M

    2002-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite/solgel glass biphasic material has been obtained in order to improve the bioactivity of the hydroxyapatite (OHAp). A mixture of stoichiometric OHAp and the precursor gel of a solgel glass, with nominal composition in mol% CaO-26, SiO2-70, P205-4, has been prepared. The amounts of components used have been selected to obtain a final relationship for OHAp/solgel glass of 60/40 on heating. Two different thermal treatments have been used: (i) 700 degrees C, temperature of solgel glass stabilisation and (ii) 1000 degrees C, lower temperature of hydroxyapatite sintering. The bioactivity of the resulting materials has been examined in vitro by immersion in simulated body fluid at 37 degrees C. The results obtained show that both materials are bioactive. The apatite-like layer grown is greater for the new materials than for the OHAp and the solgel glass themselves. PMID:11950057

  6. Intrinsically Stretchable Biphasic (Solid–Liquid) Thin Metal Films

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Arthur Edouard; Michaud, Hadrien Olivier; Gerratt, Aaron Powers; Mulatier, Séverine; Lacour, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    Stretchable biphasic conductors are formed by physical vapor deposition of gallium onto an alloying metal film. The properties of the photolithography-compatible thin metal films are highlighted by low sheet resistance (0.5 Ω sq−1) and large stretchability (400%). This novel approach to deposit and pattern liquid metals enables extremely robust, multilayer and soft circuits, sensors, and actuators.

  7. Intrinsically Stretchable Biphasic (Solid-Liquid) Thin Metal Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Arthur; Michaud, Hadrien O; Gerratt, Aaron P; de Mulatier, Séverine; Lacour, Stéphanie P

    2016-06-01

    Stretchable biphasic conductors are formed by physical vapor deposition of gallium onto an alloying metal film. The properties of the photolithography-compatible thin metal films are highlighted by low sheet resistance (0.5 Ω sq(-1) ) and large stretchability (400%). This novel approach to deposit and pattern liquid metals enables extremely robust, multilayer and soft circuits, sensors, and actuators. PMID:26923313

  8. Biphasic survival analysis of trypanotolerance QTL in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudandé, O D; Thomson, P C; Bovenhuis, H; Iraqi, F; Gibson, J P; van Arendonk, J A M

    2008-04-01

    A marker-assisted introgression (MAI) experiment was conducted to transfer trypanotolerance quantitative trait loci (QTL) from a donor mouse strain, C57BL/6, into a recipient mouse strain, A/J. The objective was to assess the effect of three previously identified chromosomal regions on mouse chromosomes 1 (MMU1), 5 (MMU5) and 17 (MMU17) in different genetic backgrounds on the survival pattern following infection with Trypanosoma congolense. An exploratory data analysis revealed a biphasic pattern of time to death, with highly distinct early and late mortality phases. In this paper, we present survival analysis methods that account for the biphasic mortality pattern and results of reanalyzing the data from the MAI experiment. The analysis with a Weibull mixture model confirmed the biphasic pattern of time to death. Mortality phase, an unobserved variable, appears to be an important factor influencing survival time and is modeled as a binary outcome variable using logistic regression analysis. Accounting for this biphasic pattern in the analysis reveals that a previously observed sex effect on average survival is rather an effect on proportion of mice in the two mortality phases. The C57BL/6 (donor) QTL alleles on MMU1 and MMU17 act dominantly in the late mortality phase while the A/J (recipient) QTL allele on MMU17 acts dominantly in the early mortality phase. From this study, we found clear evidence for a biphasic survival pattern and provided models for its analysis. These models can also be used when studying defense mechanisms against other pathogens. Finally, these approaches provide further information on the nature of gene actions. PMID:18253157

  9. Super-resolution microscopy of the synaptic active zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Sauer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain function relies on accurate information transfer at chemical synapses. At the presynaptic active zone (AZ a variety of specialised proteins are assembled to complex architectures, which set the basis for speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Calcium (Ca2+ channels are pivotal for the initiation of excitation-secretion coupling and, correspondingly, capture a central position at the AZ. Combining quantitative functional studies with modelling approaches has provided predictions of channel properties, numbers and even positions on the nanometre scale. However, elucidating the nanoscopic organisation of the surrounding protein network requires direct ultrastructural access. Without this information, knowledge of molecular synaptic structure-function relationships remains incomplete. Recently, super-resolution microscopy techniques have begun to enter the neurosciences. These approaches combine high spatial resolution with the molecular specificity of fluorescence microscopy. Here, we discuss how super-resolution microscopy can be used to obtain information on the organisation of AZ proteins.

  10. Different pH-dependencies of the two synaptic adhesion molecules N-cadherin and cadherin-11 and the possible functional implication for long-term potentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgartner, Werner; Osmanagic, Armin; Gebhard, Marita;

    2013-01-01

    Ca(2+) -dependent adhesion molecules, cadherins, localised at synaptic sites are critically involved in long-term potentiation (LTP). N-cadherin is thought to promote LTP whereas cadherin-11 seems to counteract LTP. Since high synaptic activity is accompanied by local transient changes of the pH ...

  11. Open Syntaxin Docks Synaptic Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Marc Hammarlund; Mark T Palfreyman; Shigeki Watanabe; Shawn Olsen; Erik M. Jorgensen

    2007-01-01

    Author Summary Like Olympic swimmers crouched on their starting blocks, synaptic vesicles prepare for fusion with the neuronal plasma membrane long before the starting gun fires. This preparation enables vesicles to fuse rapidly, synchronously, and in the correct place when the signal finally arrives. A well-known but poorly understood part of vesicle preparation is docking, in which vesicles prepare for release by attaching to the plasma membrane at the eventual site of release. Here, we out...

  12. Dynamic inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission by astrocyte-derived ATP in hippocampal cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Schuichi; Fujishita, Kayoko; Tsuda, Makoto; Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2003-09-01

    Originally ascribed passive roles in the CNS, astrocytes are now known to have an active role in the regulation of synaptic transmission. Neuronal activity can evoke Ca2+ transients in astrocytes, and Ca2+ transients in astrocytes can evoke changes in neuronal activity. The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate has been shown to mediate such bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. We demonstrate here that ATP, a primary mediator of intercellular Ca2+ signaling among astrocytes, also mediates intercellular signaling between astrocytes and neurons in hippocampal cultures. Mechanical stimulation of astrocytes evoked Ca2+ waves mediated by the release of ATP and the activation of P2 receptors. Mechanically evoked Ca2+ waves led to decreased excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmission in an ATP-dependent manner. Exogenous application of ATP does not affect postsynaptic glutamatergic responses but decreased presynaptic exocytotic events. Finally, we show that astrocytes exhibit spontaneous Ca2+ waves mediated by extracellular ATP and that inhibition of these Ca2+ responses enhanced excitatory glutamatergic transmission. We therefore conclude that ATP released from astrocytes exerts tonic and activity-dependent down-regulation of synaptic transmission via presynaptic mechanisms.

  13. Fragile X mental retardation protein controls synaptic vesicle exocytosis by modulating N-type calcium channel density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Cassidy, John S.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2014-04-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common heritable form of mental retardation, is characterized by synaptic dysfunction. Synaptic transmission depends critically on presynaptic calcium entry via voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels. Here we show that the functional expression of neuronal N-type CaV channels (CaV2.2) is regulated by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). We find that FMRP knockdown in dorsal root ganglion neurons increases CaV channel density in somata and in presynaptic terminals. We then show that FMRP controls CaV2.2 surface expression by targeting the channels to the proteasome for degradation. The interaction between FMRP and CaV2.2 occurs between the carboxy-terminal domain of FMRP and domains of CaV2.2 known to interact with the neurotransmitter release machinery. Finally, we show that FMRP controls synaptic exocytosis via CaV2.2 channels. Our data indicate that FMRP is a potent regulator of presynaptic activity, and its loss is likely to contribute to synaptic dysfunction in FXS.

  14. Statistical theory of synaptic connectivity in the neocortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Gina

    Learning and long-term memory rely on plasticity of neural circuits. In adult cerebral cortex plasticity can be mediated by modulation of existing synapses and structural reorganization of circuits through growth and retraction of dendritic spines. In the first part of this thesis, we describe a theoretical framework for the analysis of spine remodeling plasticity. New synaptic contacts appear in the neuropil where gaps between axonal and dendritic branches can be bridged by dendritic spines. Such sites are termed potential synapses. We derive expressions for the densities of potential synapses in the neuropil. We calculate the ratio of actual to potential synapses, called the connectivity fraction, and use it to find the number of structurally different circuits attainable with spine remodeling. These parameters are calculated in four systems: mouse occipital cortex, rat hippocampal area CA1, monkey primary visual (V1), and human temporal cortex. The neurogeometric results indicate that a dendritic spine can choose among an average of 4-7 potential targets in rodents, while in primates it can choose from 10-20 potential targets. The potential of the neuropil to undergo circuit remodeling is found to be highest in rat CA1 (4.9-6.0 nats/mum 3) and lowest in monkey V1 (0.9-1.0 nats/mum3). We evaluate the lower bound of neuron selectivity in the choice of synaptic partners and find that post-synaptic excitatory neurons in rodents make synaptic contacts with more than 21-30% of pre-synaptic axons encountered with new spine growth. Primate neurons appear to be more selective, making synaptic connections with more than 7-15% of encountered axons. Another plasticity mechanism is included in the second part of this work: long-term potentiation and depression of excitatory synaptic connections. Because synaptic strength is correlated with the size of the synapse, the former can be inferred from the distribution of spine head volumes. To this end we analyze and compare 166

  15. The Relative Contribution of NMDARs to Excitatory Postsynaptic Currents is Controlled by Ca2+-Induced Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiullina, Fliza; Zakharova, Yulia; Mukhtarov, Marat; Draguhn, Andreas; Burnashev, Nail; Rozov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are important mediators of excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity. A hallmark of these channels is their high permeability to Ca2+. At the same time, they are themselves inhibited by the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. It is unclear however, whether the Ca2+ entry associated with single NMDAR mediated synaptic events is sufficient to self-inhibit their activation. Such auto-regulation would have important effects on the dynamics of synaptic excitation in several central neuronal networks. Therefore, we studied NMDAR-mediated synaptic currents in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Postsynaptic responses to subthreshold Schaffer collateral stimulation depended strongly on the absence or presence of intracellular Ca2+ buffers. Loading of pyramidal cells with exogenous Ca2+ buffers increased the amplitude and decay time of NMDAR mediated EPSCs (EPSPs) and prolonged the time window for action potential (AP) generation. Our data indicate that the Ca2+ influx mediated by unitary synaptic events is sufficient to produce detectable self-inhibition of NMDARs even at a physiological Mg2+ concentration. Therefore, the contribution of NMDARs to synaptic excitation is strongly controlled by both previous synaptic activity as well as by the Ca2+ buffer capacity of postsynaptic neurons. PMID:26858606

  16. The Relative Contribution of NMDARs to Excitatory Postsynaptic Currents is Controlled by Ca(2+)-Induced Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiullina, Fliza; Zakharova, Yulia; Mukhtarov, Marat; Draguhn, Andreas; Burnashev, Nail; Rozov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are important mediators of excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity. A hallmark of these channels is their high permeability to Ca(2+). At the same time, they are themselves inhibited by the elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. It is unclear however, whether the Ca(2+) entry associated with single NMDAR mediated synaptic events is sufficient to self-inhibit their activation. Such auto-regulation would have important effects on the dynamics of synaptic excitation in several central neuronal networks. Therefore, we studied NMDAR-mediated synaptic currents in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Postsynaptic responses to subthreshold Schaffer collateral stimulation depended strongly on the absence or presence of intracellular Ca(2+) buffers. Loading of pyramidal cells with exogenous Ca(2+) buffers increased the amplitude and decay time of NMDAR mediated EPSCs (EPSPs) and prolonged the time window for action potential (AP) generation. Our data indicate that the Ca(2+) influx mediated by unitary synaptic events is sufficient to produce detectable self-inhibition of NMDARs even at a physiological Mg(2+) concentration. Therefore, the contribution of NMDARs to synaptic excitation is strongly controlled by both previous synaptic activity as well as by the Ca(2+) buffer capacity of postsynaptic neurons. PMID:26858606

  17. The relative contribution of NMDARs to excitatory postsynaptic currents is controlled by Ca2+-induced inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fliza eValiullina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available NMDA receptors (NMDARs are important mediators of excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity. A hallmark of these channels is their high permeability to Ca2+. At the same time, they are themselves inhibited by the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. It is unclear however, whether the Ca2+ entry associated with single NMDAR mediated synaptic events is sufficient to self-inhibit their activation. Such auto-regulation would have important effects on the dynamics of synaptic excitation in several central networks. Therefore, we studied NMDAR-mediated synaptic currents in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Postsynaptic responses to subthreshold Schaffer collateral stimulation depended strongly on the absence or presence of intracellular Ca2+ buffers. Loading of pyramidal cells with exogenous Ca2+ buffers increased the amplitude and decay time of NMDAR mediated EPSCs (EPSP and prolonged the time window for action potential generation.Our data indicate that the Ca2+ influx mediated by unitary synaptic events is sufficient to produce detectable self-inhibition of NMDARs even at a physiological Mg2+ concentration. Therefore, the contribution of NMDARs to synaptic excitation is strongly controlled by both previous synaptic activity as well as by the Ca2+ buffer capacity of postsynaptic neurons.

  18. Thermoreversible (Ionic-Liquid-Based) Aqueous Biphasic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Helena; Luís, Andreia; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2016-02-01

    The ability to induce reversible phase transitions between homogeneous solutions and biphasic liquid-liquid systems, at pre-defined and suitable operating temperatures, is of crucial relevance in the design of separation processes. Ionic-liquid-based aqueous biphasic systems (IL-based ABS) have demonstrated superior performance as alternative extraction platforms, and their thermoreversible behaviour is here disclosed by the use of protic ILs. The applicability of the temperature-induced phase switching is further demonstrated with the complete extraction of two value-added proteins, achieved in a single-step. It is shown that these temperature-induced mono(bi)phasic systems are significantly more versatile than classical liquid-liquid systems which are constrained by their critical temperatures. IL-based ABS allow to work in a wide range of temperatures and compositions which can be tailored to fit the requirements of a given separation process.

  19. Traumatic brain injury impairs synaptic plasticity in hippocampus in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bao-liang; CHEN Xin; TAN Tao; YANG Zhuo; CARLOS Dayao; JIANG Rong-cai; ZHANG Jian-ning

    2011-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBl) often causes cognitive deficits and remote symptomatic epilepsy.Hippocampal regional excitability is associated with the cognitive function. However, little is known about injury-induced neuronal loss and subsequent alterations of hippocampal regional excitability. The present study was designed to determine whether TBl may impair the cellular circuit in the hippocampus.Methods Forty male Wistar rats were randomized into control (n=20) and TBl groups (n=20). Long-term potentiation,extracellular input/output curves, and hippocampal parvalbumin-immunoreactive and cholecystokinin-immunoreactive interneurons were compared between the two groups.Results TBI resulted in a significantly increased excitability in the dentate gyrus (DG), but a significantly decreased excitability in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) area. Using design-based stereological injury procedures, we induced interneuronal loss in the DG and CA3 subregions in the hippocampus, but not in the CA1 area.Conclusions TBl leads to the impairment of hippocampus synaptic plasticity due to the changing of interneuronal interaction. The injury-induced disruption of synaptic efficacy within the hippocampal circuit may underlie the observed cognitive deficits and symptomatic epilepsy.

  20. Biphasic positive airway pressure ventilation (PeV+) in children

    OpenAIRE

    Jaarsma, Anneke S; Knoester, Hennie; van Rooyen, Frank; Bos, Albert P.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Biphasic positive airway pressure (BIPAP) (also known as PeV+) is a mode of ventilation with cycling variations between two continuous positive airway pressure levels. In adults this mode of ventilation is effective and is being accepted with a decrease in need for sedatives because of the ability to breathe spontaneously during the entire breathing cycle. We studied the use of BIPAP in infants and children. Methods: We randomized 18 patients with respiratory failure for ventilati...

  1. Actinide recovery using aqueous biphasic extraction: Initial developmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous biphasic extraction systems are being developed to treat radioactive wastes. The separation technique involves the selective partitioning of either solutes or colloid-size particles between two scible aqueous phases. Wet grinding of plutonium residues to an average particle size of one micron will be used to liberate the plutonium from the bulk of the particle matrix. The goal is to produce a plutonium concentrate that will integrate with existing and developing chemical recovery processes. Ideally, the process would produce a nonTRU waste stream. Coupling physical beneficiation with chemical processing will result in a substantial reduction in the volume of mixed wastes generated from dissolution recovery processes. As part of this program, we will also explore applications of aqueous biphasic extraction that include the separation and recovery of dissolved species such as metal ions and water-soluble organics. The expertise and data generated in this work will form the basis for developing more cost-effective processes for handling waste streams from environmental restoration and waste management activities within the DOE community. This report summarizes the experimental results obtained during the first year of this effort. Experimental efforts were focused on elucidating the surface and solution chemistry variables which govern partitioning behavior of plutonium and silica in aqueous biphasic extraction systems. Additional efforts were directed toward the development of wet grinding methods for producing ultrafine particles with diameters of one micron or less

  2. Actinide recovery using aqueous biphasic extraction: Initial developmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiko, D.J.; Mensah-Biney, R.; Mertz, C.J.; Rollins, A.N.

    1992-08-01

    Aqueous biphasic extraction systems are being developed to treat radioactive wastes. The separation technique involves the selective partitioning of either solutes or colloid-size particles between two scible aqueous phases. Wet grinding of plutonium residues to an average particle size of one micron will be used to liberate the plutonium from the bulk of the particle matrix. The goal is to produce a plutonium concentrate that will integrate with existing and developing chemical recovery processes. Ideally, the process would produce a nonTRU waste stream. Coupling physical beneficiation with chemical processing will result in a substantial reduction in the volume of mixed wastes generated from dissolution recovery processes. As part of this program, we will also explore applications of aqueous biphasic extraction that include the separation and recovery of dissolved species such as metal ions and water-soluble organics. The expertise and data generated in this work will form the basis for developing more cost-effective processes for handling waste streams from environmental restoration and waste management activities within the DOE community. This report summarizes the experimental results obtained during the first year of this effort. Experimental efforts were focused on elucidating the surface and solution chemistry variables which govern partitioning behavior of plutonium and silica in aqueous biphasic extraction systems. Additional efforts were directed toward the development of wet grinding methods for producing ultrafine particles with diameters of one micron or less.

  3. Characterization and biocompatibility of fluoridated biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Z.L. [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Yu, H.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)], E-mail: yhyang6812@tfol.com; Zeng, Q. [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); He, H.W. [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2008-11-15

    Biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP) has been widely used in tooth and bone implants due to its excellent biocompatibility. Incorporation of fluorine ions in BCP has drawn much attention because of the beneficial role played by the fluorine ions in bone and tooth growth. The aim of this study was to obtain fluoridated biphasic calcium phosphate (FBCP) by immersing BCP into saturated ZnF{sub 2} solution with F{sup -} concentration of 3500 mg/l at different times. The phase and incorporation of fluoride into BCP were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The biomineralization and influence of FBCP on osteoblastic behavior were evaluated and compared with that of biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP). The results exhibited that the phase evolution of the BCP was affected by the fluoride incorporation and the FBCP significantly improved the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. These findings suggest that the FBCP would be very useful as a bone reconstructive material.

  4. Additive effects on the energy barrier for synaptic vesicle fusion cause supralinear effects on the vesicle fusion rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schotten, Sebastiaan; Meijer, Marieke; Walter, Alexander Matthias;

    2015-01-01

    supralinear effects on the fusion rate. To test this prediction experimentally, we developed a method to assess the number of releasable vesicles, rate constants for vesicle priming, unpriming, and fusion, and the activation energy for fusion by fitting a vesicle state model to synaptic responses induced by......-linear effects of genetic/pharmacological perturbations on synaptic transmission and a novel interpretation of the cooperative nature of Ca2+-dependent release....

  5. Regulation of synaptic connectivity by glia

    OpenAIRE

    Eroglu, Cagla; Barres, Ben A

    2010-01-01

    The human brain contains more than 100 trillion (1014) synaptic connections, which form all of its neural circuits. Neuroscientists have long been interested in how this complex synaptic web is weaved during development and remodelled during learning and disease. Recent studies have uncovered that glial cells are important regulators of synaptic connectivity. These cells are far more active than was previously thought and are powerful controllers of synapse formation, function, plasticity and...

  6. Extracellular ATP Hydrolysis Inhibits Synaptic Transmission by Increasing pH Buffering in the Synaptic Cleft

    OpenAIRE

    Vroman, Rozan; Klaassen, Lauw J.; Howlett, Marcus H C; Cenedese, Valentina; Klooster, Jan; Sjoerdsma, Trijntje; Kamermans, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    A slow mechanism of retinal synaptic inhibition involves hydrolysis of ATP released from pannexin 1 channels (from the tips of horizontal cell dendrites); the resulting protons and phosphates acidify the synaptic cleft, which inhibits neurotransmitter release.

  7. ABEC trademark resins: From aqueous biphasic novelties to selective aqueous biphasic extraction chromatographic resins for metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have recently been allowed patents on the use of polyethylene glycol-grafted resins for chaotropic metal ion separations based on the concepts of aqueous biphasic extraction. The concept and realization of the technology was developed by collaborative research between university and national laboratories. Commercialization of the technology was accomplished by licensing the technology to a specialty separations company itself started based on the foundation of technology transfer. This tripartite interaction was facilitated by the joint interest and membership of all involved parties in the Industrial ampersand Engineering Chemistry Division. This presentation will highlight the research which led to the adaptation of aqueous biphasic partitioning to ABEC trademark resins for metal ion separations. The role of the I ampersand EC Division and its Separation Science ampersand Technology Subdivision in facilitating such technology transfer will also be discussed

  8. Perinatal exposure to bisphenol-A inhibits synaptogenesis and affects the synaptic morphological development in offspring male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohong; Xie, Lingdan; Hong, Xing; Ruan, Qin; Lu, Hongfei; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Guangxia; Liu, Xingyi

    2013-05-01

    Our previous study indicated that perinatal exposure to low-dose BPA, one of the most common environmental endocrine disrupters, alters behavioral development in offspring mice. Given that synaptic structure of the hippocampus is closely related to behaviors, in the present study, we examined the effects of perinatal exposure to BPA (0.04, 0.4, and 4.0 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) on the synaptic density and the synaptic structural modification of pyramidal cells in hippocampus region CA1 and the expressions of synaptic proteins such as synapsin I and PSD-95 and glutamate NMDA and AMPA receptors in male offspring mice on postnatal day (PND) 14, 21, and 56. The results of electron microscope measurement showed that BPA significantly reduced the numeric synaptic density and altered the structural modification of synaptic interface of pyramidal cells with the enlarged synaptic cleft, the shortened active zone, and the thinned postsynaptic density (PSD) on PND 14, 21, and 56 and the increased curvature of synaptic interface on PND 14 and 21. Further analyses of Western blot indicated that BPA markedly reduced the levels of synapsin I and PSD-95 on PND 14, 21, and 56 and down-regulated NMDA receptor subunit NR1 and AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 during development and young adulthood. These results suggest that perinatal exposure to low level of BPA inhibits synaptogenesis and affects synaptic structural modification after birth. The reduced expressions of synaptic proteins synapsin I and PSD-95 and glutamate NMDA and AMPA receptors may be involved in the negative changes in the synaptic plasticity. PMID:23490186

  9. Synaptically evoked dendritic action potentials in rat neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, P C; Crill, W E

    1998-05-01

    In a previous study iontophoresis of glutamate on the apical dendrite of layer 5 pyramidal neurons from rat neocortex was used to identify sites at which dendritic depolarization evoked small, prolonged Ca2+ spikes and/or low-threshold Na+ spikes recorded by an intracellular microelectrode in the soma. These spikes were identified as originating in the dendrite. Here we evoke similar dendritic responses by electrical stimulation of presynaptic elements near the tip of the iontophoretic electrode with the use of a second extracellular electrode. In 9 of 12 recorded cells, electrically evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) above a minimum size triggered all-or-none postsynaptic responses similar to those evoked by dendritic glutamate iontophoresis at the same site. Both the synaptically evoked and the iontophoretically evoked depolarizations were abolished reversibly by blockade of glutamate receptors. In all recorded cells, the combination of iontophoresis and an EPSP, each of which was subthreshold for the dendritic spike when given alone, evoked a dendritic spike similar to that evoked by a sufficiently large iontophoresis. In one cell tested, dendritic spikes could be evoked by the summation of two independent subthreshold EPSPs evoked by stimulation at two different locations. We conclude that the dendritic spikes are not unique to the use of glutamate iontophoresis because similar spikes can be evoked by EPSPs. We discuss the implications of these results for synaptic integration and for the interpretation of recorded synaptic potentials. PMID:9582218

  10. Altered hippocampus synaptic function in selenoprotein P deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters Melinda M

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Selenium is an essential micronutrient that function through selenoproteins. Selenium deficiency results in lower concentrations of selenium and selenoproteins. The brain maintains it's selenium better than other tissues under low-selenium conditions. Recently, the selenium-containing protein selenoprotein P (Sepp has been identified as a possible transporter of selenium. The targeted disruption of the selenoprotein P gene (Sepp1 results in decreased brain selenium concentration and neurological dysfunction, unless selenium intake is excessive However, the effect of selenoprotein P deficiency on the processes of memory formation and synaptic plasticity is unknown. In the present studies Sepp1(-/- mice and wild type littermate controls (Sepp1(+/+ fed a high-selenium diet (1 mg Se/kg were used to characterize activity, motor coordination, and anxiety as well as hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Normal associative learning, but disrupted spatial learning was observed in Sepp1(-/- mice. In addition, severe alterations were observed in synaptic transmission, short-term plasticity and long-term potentiation in hippocampus area CA1 synapses of Sepp1(-/- mice on a 1 mg Se/kg diet and Sepp1(+/+ mice fed a selenium-deficient (0 mg Se/kg diet. Taken together, these data suggest that selenoprotein P is required for normal synaptic function, either through presence of the protein or delivery of required selenium to the CNS.

  11. Investigation of Synaptic Tagging/Capture and Cross-capture using Acute Hippocampal Slices from Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Mahesh Shivarama; Sharma, Mahima; Hui, Neo Sin; Dasgupta, Ananya; Gopinadhan, Suma; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic tagging and capture (STC) and cross-tagging are two important mechanisms at cellular level that explain how synapse-specificity and associativity is achieved in neurons within a specific time frame. These long-term plasticity-related processes are the leading candidate models to study the basis of memory formation and persistence at the cellular level. Both STC and cross-tagging involve two serial processes: (1) setting of the synaptic tag as triggered by a specific pattern of stimulation, and (2) synaptic capture, whereby the synaptic tag interacts with newly synthesized plasticity-related proteins (PRPs). Much of the understanding about the concepts of STC and cross-tagging arises from the studies done in CA1 region of the hippocampus and because of the technical complexity many of the laboratories are still unable to study these processes. Experimental conditions for the preparation of hippocampal slices and the recording of stable late-LTP/LTD are extremely important to study synaptic tagging/cross-tagging. This video article describes the experimental procedures to study long-term plasticity processes such as STC and cross-tagging in the CA1 pyramidal neurons using stable, long-term field-potential recordings from acute hippocampal slices of rats. PMID:26381286

  12. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro study of magnetic biphasic calcium sulfate-bioactive glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium sulfate-bioactive glass (CSBG) composites doped with 5, 10 and 20 mol% Fe were synthesized using quick alkali sol–gel method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of samples heated at 700 °C revealed the presence of anhydrite, while field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) characterization confirmed the formation of nano-sized CSBGs. The UV–vis studies confirmed that the main iron species in 5% Fe and 10% Fe doped CSBGs were tetrahedral Fe(III) whereas that in 20% Fe doped CSBG were extra-framework FeOx oligomers or iron oxide phases. Measurement of magnetic properties of the samples by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) showed very narrow hysteresis loop with zero coercivity and remanence for 10% Fe and 20% Fe doped CSBG, indicating that they are superparamagnetic in nature. All samples induced the formation of apatite layer with Ca/P ratio close to the stoichiometric HA in simulated body fluid (SBF) assessment. - Highlights: • Biphasic calcium sulphate-bioactive glass containing iron was prepared. • Composite bioglass was superparamagnetic in nature. • All samples promoted the growth of apatite layer with Ca/P close to 1.67

  13. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro study of magnetic biphasic calcium sulfate-bioactive glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, Yi-Fan; Akram, Muhammad; Alshemary, Ammar Z. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor, Darul Ta' zim (Malaysia); Hussain, Rafaqat, E-mail: rafaqat@kimia.fs.utm.my [Ibnu Sina Institute for Fundamental Science Studies, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor Darul Ta' zim (Malaysia)

    2015-08-01

    Calcium sulfate-bioactive glass (CSBG) composites doped with 5, 10 and 20 mol% Fe were synthesized using quick alkali sol–gel method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of samples heated at 700 °C revealed the presence of anhydrite, while field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) characterization confirmed the formation of nano-sized CSBGs. The UV–vis studies confirmed that the main iron species in 5% Fe and 10% Fe doped CSBGs were tetrahedral Fe(III) whereas that in 20% Fe doped CSBG were extra-framework FeO{sub x} oligomers or iron oxide phases. Measurement of magnetic properties of the samples by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) showed very narrow hysteresis loop with zero coercivity and remanence for 10% Fe and 20% Fe doped CSBG, indicating that they are superparamagnetic in nature. All samples induced the formation of apatite layer with Ca/P ratio close to the stoichiometric HA in simulated body fluid (SBF) assessment. - Highlights: • Biphasic calcium sulphate-bioactive glass containing iron was prepared. • Composite bioglass was superparamagnetic in nature. • All samples promoted the growth of apatite layer with Ca/P close to 1.67.

  14. Control of phase composition in hydroxyapatite/tetracalcium phosphate biphasic thin coatings for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, H.; CAMATA, R. P.; Vohra, Y. K.; LACEFIELD, W. R.

    2005-01-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphates comprising well-controlled mixtures of nonresorbable hydroxyapatite and other resorbable calcium phosphate phases often exhibit a combination of enhanced bioactivity and mechanical stability that is difficult to achieve in single-phase materials. This makes these biphasic bioceramics promising substrate materials for applications in bone tissue regeneration and repair. In this paper we report the synthesis of highly crystalline, biphasic coatings of hydroxyapatite/...

  15. Effect of Xiao Yao San on synaptic structural plasticity of hippocampal CA3 region of rats under multi-stress model%逍遥散对应激大鼠海马CA3区突触体结构可塑性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐志伟; 敖海清; 吴丽丽; 严灿; 王文竹

    2006-01-01

    目的观察逍遥散对多相性应激大鼠海马CA3区神经元结构的影响,探究逍遥散抗应激损伤大鼠海马神经突触结构可塑性的机制.方法Wistar大鼠随机分为空白对照组、病理对照1组、病理对照2组、治疗1组、治疗2组,每组10只.采用慢性多相性应激模型,透射电镜观测比较各组大鼠CA3区神经突触超微结构变化.结果病理对照1组及病理对照2组大鼠海马神经元突触的数密度[(3.066±2.032),(3.785±2.162)]与面密度[(0.100±0.056),(0.129±0.064)]较空白对照组[(5.707±2.268),(0.234±0.102)]均有明显降低(P<0.01),突触连接带的平均面积则无明显变化(P>0.05),而治疗1组与治疗2组大鼠海马神经元突触的数密度与空白对照组相比无明显差异(P>0.05);面密度则均有明显减小(P<0.01).与病理对照1组相比,治疗1组大鼠海马神经元突触的数密度与面密度均明显增大(P<0.01);治疗2组大鼠海马神经元突触的数密度明显增大(P<0.01),面密度也有所增大(P<0.05).结论多相性应激可以损伤大鼠的神经突触结构,影响突触间的相互连接.而逍遥散则可能是通过减少应激对原有的突触及突触连接的损伤,以及促进新的突触与突触连接的形成.

  16. Experimental demonstration of a second-order memristor and its ability to biorealistically implement synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungho; Du, Chao; Sheridan, Patrick; Ma, Wen; Choi, ShinHyun; Lu, Wei D

    2015-03-11

    Memristors have been extensively studied for data storage and low-power computation applications. In this study, we show that memristors offer more than simple resistance change. Specifically, the dynamic evolutions of internal state variables allow an oxide-based memristor to exhibit Ca(2+)-like dynamics that natively encode timing information and regulate synaptic weights. Such a device can be modeled as a second-order memristor and allow the implementation of critical synaptic functions realistically using simple spike forms based solely on spike activity. PMID:25710872

  17. Facilitation of AMPA receptor synaptic delivery as a molecular mechanism for cognitive enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knafo, Shira; Venero, César; Sánchez-Puelles, Cristina;

    2012-01-01

    ) that enhances spatial learning and memory in rats. We have now investigated the cellular and molecular basis of this cognitive enhancement, using biochemical, morphological, electrophysiological, and behavioral analyses. We have found that FGL triggers a long-lasting enhancement of synaptic...... transmission in hippocampal CA1 neurons. This effect is mediated by a facilitated synaptic delivery of AMPA receptors, which is accompanied by enhanced NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP). Both LTP and cognitive enhancement are mediated by an initial PKC activation, which is followed by...

  18. DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator) contributes to synaptic depression and contextual fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Long-Jun; Mellström, Britt; Wang, Hansen; Ren, Ming; Domingo, Sofia; Kim, Susan S; Li, Xiang-Yao; Chen, Tao; Naranjo, Jose R; Zhuo, Min

    2010-01-01

    The downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, binds specifically to DNA and several nucleoproteins regulating gene expression and with proteins outside the nucleus to regulate membrane excitability or calcium homeostasis. DREAM is highly expressed in the central nervous system including the hippocampus and cortex; however, the roles of DREAM in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity have not been investigated. Taking advantage of transgenic mice overexpressing a Ca2+-insensitive DREAM mutant (TgDREAM), we used integrative methods including electrophysiology, biochemistry, immunostaining, and behavior tests to study the function of DREAM in synaptic transmission, long-term plasticity and fear memory in hippocampal CA1 region. We found that NMDA receptor but not AMPA receptor-mediated current was decreased in TgDREAM mice. Moreover, synaptic plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD) but not long-term potentiation (LTP), was impaired in TgDREAM mice. Biochemical experiments found that DREAM interacts with PSD-95 and may inhibit NMDA receptor function through this interaction. Contextual fear memory was significantly impaired in TgDREAM mice. By contrast, sensory responses to noxious stimuli were not affected. Our results demonstrate that DREAM plays a novel role in postsynaptic modulation of the NMDA receptor, and contributes to synaptic plasticity and behavioral memory. PMID:20205763

  19. DREAM (Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator contributes to synaptic depression and contextual fear memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM, a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, binds specifically to DNA and several nucleoproteins regulating gene expression and with proteins outside the nucleus to regulate membrane excitability or calcium homeostasis. DREAM is highly expressed in the central nervous system including the hippocampus and cortex; however, the roles of DREAM in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity have not been investigated. Taking advantage of transgenic mice overexpressing a Ca2+-insensitive DREAM mutant (TgDREAM, we used integrative methods including electrophysiology, biochemistry, immunostaining, and behavior tests to study the function of DREAM in synaptic transmission, long-term plasticity and fear memory in hippocampal CA1 region. We found that NMDA receptor but not AMPA receptor-mediated current was decreased in TgDREAM mice. Moreover, synaptic plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD but not long-term potentiation (LTP, was impaired in TgDREAM mice. Biochemical experiments found that DREAM interacts with PSD-95 and may inhibit NMDA receptor function through this interaction. Contextual fear memory was significantly impaired in TgDREAM mice. By contrast, sensory responses to noxious stimuli were not affected. Our results demonstrate that DREAM plays a novel role in postsynaptic modulation of the NMDA receptor, and contributes to synaptic plasticity and behavioral memory.

  20. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  1. Learning and reconsolidation implicate different synaptic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Meloni, Edward G; Carlezon, William A; Milad, Mohammed R; Pitman, Roger K; Nader, Karim; Bolshakov, Vadim Y

    2013-03-19

    Synaptic mechanisms underlying memory reconsolidation after retrieval are largely unknown. Here we report that synapses in projections to the lateral nucleus of the amygdala implicated in auditory fear conditioning, which are potentiated by learning, enter a labile state after memory reactivation, and must be restabilized through a postsynaptic mechanism implicating the mammalian target of rapamycin kinase-dependent signaling. Fear-conditioning-induced synaptic enhancements were primarily presynaptic in origin. Reconsolidation blockade with rapamycin, inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin kinase activity, suppressed synaptic potentiation in slices from fear-conditioned rats. Surprisingly, this reduction of synaptic efficacy was mediated by post- but not presynaptic mechanisms. These findings suggest that different plasticity rules may apply to the processes underlying the acquisition of original fear memory and postreactivational stabilization of fear-conditioning-induced synaptic enhancements mediating fear memory reconsolidation. PMID:23487762

  2. Programmable synaptic chip for electronic neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moopenn, A.; Langenbacher, H.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    A binary synaptic matrix chip has been developed for electronic neural networks. The matrix chip contains a programmable 32X32 array of 'long channel' NMOSFET binary connection elements implemented in a 3-micron bulk CMOS process. Since the neurons are kept off-chip, the synaptic chip serves as a 'cascadable' building block for a multi-chip synaptic network as large as 512X512 in size. As an alternative to the programmable NMOSFET (long channel) connection elements, tailored thin film resistors are deposited, in series with FET switches, on some CMOS test chips, to obtain the weak synaptic connections. Although deposition and patterning of the resistors require additional processing steps, they promise substantial savings in silicon area. The performance of synaptic chip in a 32-neuron breadboard system in an associative memory test application is discussed.

  3. Imaging Exocytosis of Single Synaptic Vesicles at a Fast CNS Presynaptic Terminal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Mitsuharu; Sakaba, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic vesicles are tethered to the active zone where they are docked/primed so that they can fuse rapidly upon Ca(2+) influx. To directly study these steps at a CNS presynaptic terminal, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy at the live isolated calyx of Held terminal and measured the movements of single synaptic vesicle just beneath the plasma membrane. Only a subset of vesicles within the TIRF field underwent exocytosis. Following exocytosis, new vesicles (newcomers) approached the membrane and refilled the release sites slowly with a time constant of several seconds. Uniform elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) using flash photolysis elicited an exocytotic burst followed by the sustained component, representing release of the readily releasable vesicles and vesicle replenishment, respectively. Surprisingly, newcomers were not released within a second of high Ca(2+). Instead, already-tethered vesicles became release-ready and mediated the replenishment. Our results reveal an important feature of conventional synapses. PMID:26539890

  4. A new kinetic biphasic approach applied to biodiesel process intensification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, V.; Tesser, R.; Di Serio, M.; Santacesaria, E. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    Many different papers have been published on the kinetics of the transesterification of vegetable oil with methanol, in the presence of alkaline catalysts to produce biodiesel. All the proposed approaches are based on the assumption of a pseudo-monophasic system. The consequence of these approaches is that some experimental aspects cannot be described. For the reaction performed in batch conditions, for example, the monophasic approach is not able to reproduce the different plateau obtained by using different amount of catalyst or the induction time observed at low stirring rates. Moreover, it has been observed by operating in continuous reactors that micromixing has a dramatic effect on the reaction rate. At this purpose, we have recently observed that is possible to obtain a complete conversion to biodiesel in less than 10 seconds of reaction time. This observation is confirmed also by other authors using different types of reactors like: static mixers, micro-reactors, oscillatory flow reactors, cavitational reactors, microwave reactors or centrifugal contactors. In this work we will show that a recently proposed biphasic kinetic approach is able to describe all the aspects before mentioned that cannot be described by the monophasic kinetic model. In particular, we will show that the biphasic kinetic model can describe both the induction time observed in the batch reactors, at low stirring rate, and the very high conversions obtainable in a micro-channel reactor. The adopted biphasic kinetic model is based on a reliable reaction mechanism that will be validated by the experimental evidences reported in this work. (orig.)

  5. Biphasic synovial sarcoma in the cervical spine: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Foreman Stephen M; Stahl Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Synovial sarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm of soft tissue that typically arising near large joints of the upper and lower extremities in young adult males. Only 3% of these neoplasms have been found to arise in the head and neck region. To our knowledge, there are limited reports in the literature of this neoplasm in the cervical spine. A case of biphasic synovial sarcoma of the cervical spine is reviewed. A 29 year-old male presented with pain on the left side of the cervical spi...

  6. Macrophage and osteoblast responses to biphasic calcium phosphate microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellah, Borhane Hakim; Delorme, Bruno; Sohier, Jérôme; Magne, David; Hardouin, Pierre; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate in vitro the biological events leading to ectopic bone formation in contact with microporous biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics. After implantation, microparticles may arise from their degradation and induce an inflammatory response involving macrophages. The secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines may affect the differentiation of osteoblasts. Mouse macrophage-like (J774) and osteoblast-like (MC3T3-E1) cells were cultured in the presence of BCP microparticles of different sizes (response initiated by BCP microparticles may have both detrimental and beneficial effects on osteogenesis. PMID:20014296

  7. The biphasic response of rat vesical smooth muscle to ATP.

    OpenAIRE

    Bolego, C; Pinna, C.; Abbracchio, M. P.; Cattabeni, F.; Puglisi, L.

    1995-01-01

    1. Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is known to exert a variety of biological effects via the activation of either ionotropic P2x- or G-protein coupled P2Y-purinoceptor subtypes. In this study the effects induced by ATP and ATP analogues on rat bladder strips were characterized at resting tone and in carbachol-prestimulated tissues. 2. ATP exerted a clear concentration-dependent biphasic response, which was maximal at 1 mM concentration and was characterized by an immediate and transient contr...

  8. Estrous Cycle-Dependent Phasic Changes in the Stoichiometry of Hippocampal Synaptic AMPA Receptors in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Hirobumi Tada; Mayu Koide; Wakana Ara; Yusuke Shibata; Toshiya Funabashi; Kumiko Suyama; Takahisa Goto; Takuya Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive function can be affected by the estrous cycle. However, the effect of the estrous cycle on synaptic functions is poorly understood. Here we show that in female rats, inhibitory-avoidance (IA) task (hippocampus-dependent contextual fear-learning task) drives GluA2-lacking Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) into the hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses during all periods of the estrous cycle except the proestrous period, when estrogen levels are high. In addition, IA task failed to dri...

  9. Higher-Order Architecture of Cell Adhesion Mediated by Polymorphic Synaptic Adhesion Molecules Neurexin and Neuroligin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Tanaka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphic adhesion molecules neurexin and neuroligin (NL mediate asymmetric trans-synaptic adhesion, which is crucial for synapse development and function. It is not known whether or how individual synapse function is controlled by the interactions between variants and isoforms of these molecules with differing ectodomain regions. At a physiological concentration of Ca2+, the ectodomain complex of neurexin-1 β isoform (Nrx1β and NL1 spontaneously assembled into crystals of a lateral sheet-like superstructure topologically compatible with transcellular adhesion. Correlative light-electron microscopy confirmed extracellular sheet formation at the junctions between Nrx1β- and NL1-expressing non-neuronal cells, mimicking the close, parallel synaptic membrane apposition. The same NL1-expressing cells, however, did not form this higher-order architecture with cells expressing the much longer neurexin-1 α isoform, suggesting a functional discrimination mechanism between synaptic contacts made by different isoforms of neurexin variants.

  10. Biphasic synovial sarcoma in the cervical spine: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foreman Stephen M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Synovial sarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm of soft tissue that typically arising near large joints of the upper and lower extremities in young adult males. Only 3% of these neoplasms have been found to arise in the head and neck region. To our knowledge, there are limited reports in the literature of this neoplasm in the cervical spine. A case of biphasic synovial sarcoma of the cervical spine is reviewed. A 29 year-old male presented with pain on the left side of the cervical spine. Physical examination revealed a global loss of cervical motion and large, palpable mass in the left paravertebral area. The long-delayed Magnetic Resonance (MR scan revealed a soft tissue mass measuring 8.3 centimeters (cm × 5.7 cm that was surgically removed. A malignant biphasic synovial sarcoma was diagnosed on pathologic examination. The clinical and imaging findings of an atypically located synovial sarcoma are reviewed. This case report emphasizes the consequences of a limited differential diagnosis, prolonged treatment and the failure to perform timely diagnostic imaging in the presence of a paraspinal mass.

  11. Facile catalyst separation without water: Fluorous biphase hydroformylation of olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, I.T.; Rabai, J. [Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ (United States)

    1994-10-07

    A novel concept for performing stoichiometric and catalytic chemical transformations has been developed that is based on the limited miscibility of partially or fully fluorinated compounds with nonfluorinated compounds. A fluorous biphase system (FBS) consists of a fluorous phase containing a dissolved reagent or catalyst and another phase, which could be any common organic or nonorganic solvent with limited or no solubility in the fluorous phase. The fluorous phase is defined as the fluorocarbon (mostly perfluorinated alkanes, ethers, and tertiary amines)-rich phase of a biphase system. An FBS compatible reagent or catalyst contains enough fluorous moieties that it will be soluble only or preferentially in the fluorous phase. The most effective fluorous moieties are linear or branched perfuoralkyl chains with high carbon number; they may also contain heteroatoms. The chemical transformation may occur either in the fluorous phase or at the interface of the two phases. The application of FBS has been demonstrated for the extraction of rhodium from toluene and for the hydroformylation of olefins. The ability to separate a catalyst or a reagent from the products completely at mild conditions could lead to industrial application of homogeneous catalysts or reagents and to the development of more environmentally benign processes.

  12. Biphasic cardiovascular and respiratory effects induced by β-citronellol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Filho, Helder Veras; de Souza Silva, Camila Meirelles; de Siqueira, Rodrigo JoséBezerra; Lahlou, Saad; Dos Santos, Armênio Aguiar; Magalhães, Pedro Jorge Caldas

    2016-03-15

    β-Citronellol is a monoterpene found in the essential oil of various plants with antihypertensive properties. In fact, β-citronellol possesses hypotensive actions due to its vasodilator abilities. Here we aimed to show that β-citronellol recruits airway sensory neural circuitry to evoke cardiorespiratory effects. In anesthetized rats, intravenous injection of β-citronellol caused biphasic hypotension, bradycardia and apnea. Bilateral vagotomy, perivagal capsaicin treatment or injection into the left ventricle abolished first rapid phase (named P1) but not delayed phase P2 of the β-citronellol effects. P1 persisted after pretreatment with capsazepine, ondansetron, HC-030031 or suramin. Suramin abolished P2 of apnea. In awake rats, β-citronellol induced biphasic hypotension and bradycardia being P1 abolished by methylatropine. In vitro, β-citronellol inhibited spontaneous or electrically-evoked contractions of rat isolated right or left atrium, respectively, and fully relaxed sustained contractions of phenylephrine in mesenteric artery rings. In conclusion, chemosensitive pulmonary vagal afferent fibers appear to mediate the cardiovascular and respiratory effects of β-citronellol. The transduction mechanism in P1 seems not to involve the activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin subtype 1 (TRPA1), purinergic (P2X) or 5-HT3 receptors located on airways sensory nerves. P2 of hypotension and bradycardia seems resulting from a cardioinhibitory and vasodilatory effect of β-citronellol and the apnea from a purinergic signaling. PMID:26872991

  13. Cell-material interactions on biphasic polyurethane matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicesare, Patrick; Fox, Wade M; Hill, Michael J; Krishnan, G Rajesh; Yang, Shuying; Sarkar, Debanjan

    2013-08-01

    Cell-matrix interaction is a key regulator for controlling stem cell fate in regenerative tissue engineering. These interactions are induced and controlled by the nanoscale features of extracellular matrix and are mimicked on synthetic matrices to control cell structure and functions. Recent studies have shown that nanostructured matrices can modulate stem cell behavior and exert specific role in tissue regeneration. In this study, we have demonstrated that nanostructured phase morphology of synthetic matrix can control adhesion, proliferation, organization and migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Nanostructured biodegradable polyurethanes (PU) with segmental composition exhibit biphasic morphology at nanoscale dimensions and can control cellular features of MSCs. Biodegradable PU with polyester soft segment and hard segment composed of aliphatic diisocyanates and dipeptide chain extender were designed to examine the effect polyurethane phase morphology. By altering the polyurethane composition, morphological architecture of PU was modulated and its effect was examined on MSC. Results show that MSCs can sense the nanoscale morphology of biphasic polyurethane matrix to exhibit distinct cellular features and, thus, signifies the relevance of matrix phase morphology. The role of nanostructured phases of a synthetic matrix in controlling cell-matrix interaction provides important insights for regulation of cell behavior on synthetic matrix and, therefore, is an important tool for engineering tissue regeneration. PMID:23255285

  14. Biphasic Catalysis with Disaccharide Phosphorylases: Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of alpha-D-Glucosides Using Sucrose Phosphorylase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Winter, K.; Desmet, T.; Devlamynck, T.; Van Renterghem, L.; Verhaeghe, T.; Pelantová, Helena; Křen, Vladimír; Soetaert, W.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 6 (2014), s. 781-787. ISSN 1083-6160 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E11011 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : biphasic systems * pyrogallol * biphasic catalysis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.528, year: 2014

  15. Distance-dependent homeostatic synaptic scaling mediated by A-type potassium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi T Ito

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Many lines of evidence suggest that the efficacy of synapses on CA1 pyramidal neuron dendrites increases as a function of distance from the cell body. The strength of an individual synapse is also dynamically modulated by activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, which raises the question as to how a neuron can reconcile individual synaptic changes with the maintenance of the proximal-to-distal gradient of synaptic strength along the dendrites. As the density of A-type potassium channels exhibits a similar gradient from proximal (low-to-distal (high dendrites, the A-current may play a role in coordinating local synaptic changes with the global synaptic strength gradient. Here we describe a form of homeostatic plasticity elicited by conventional activity blockade (with TTX coupled with a block of the A-type potassium channel. Following A-type potassium channel inhibition for 12 hrs, recordings from CA1 somata revealed a significantly higher miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC frequency, whereas in dendritic recordings, there was no change in mEPSC frequency. Consistent with mEPSC recordings, we observed a significant increase in AMPA receptor density in stratum pyramidale but not stratum radiatum. Based on these data, we propose that the differential distribution of A-type potassium channels along the apical dendrites may create a proximal-to-distal membrane potential gradient. This gradient may regulate AMPA receptor distribution along the same axis. Taken together, our results indicate that A-type potassium channels play an important role in controlling synaptic strength along the dendrites, which may help to maintain the computational capacity of the neuron.

  16. Estrous Cycle-Dependent Phasic Changes in the Stoichiometry of Hippocampal Synaptic AMPA Receptors in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirobumi Tada

    Full Text Available Cognitive function can be affected by the estrous cycle. However, the effect of the estrous cycle on synaptic functions is poorly understood. Here we show that in female rats, inhibitory-avoidance (IA task (hippocampus-dependent contextual fear-learning task drives GluA2-lacking Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs into the hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses during all periods of the estrous cycle except the proestrous period, when estrogen levels are high. In addition, IA task failed to drive CP-AMPARs into the CA3-CA1 synapses of ovariectomized rats only when estrogen was present. Thus, changes in the stoichiometry of AMPA receptors during learning depend on estrogen levels. Furthermore, the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP after IA task was prevented during the proestrous period, while intact LTP is still expressed after IA task during other period of the estrous cycle. Consistent with this finding, rats conditioned by IA training failed to acquire hippocampus-dependent Y-maze task during the proestrous period. On the other hand, during other estrous period, rats were able to learn Y-maze task after IA conditioning. These results suggest that high estrogen levels prevent the IA learning-induced delivery of CP-AMPARs into hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses and limit synaptic plasticity after IA task, thus preventing the acquisition of additional learning.

  17. Estrous Cycle-Dependent Phasic Changes in the Stoichiometry of Hippocampal Synaptic AMPA Receptors in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Hirobumi; Koide, Mayu; Ara, Wakana; Shibata, Yusuke; Funabashi, Toshiya; Suyama, Kumiko; Goto, Takahisa; Takahashi, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive function can be affected by the estrous cycle. However, the effect of the estrous cycle on synaptic functions is poorly understood. Here we show that in female rats, inhibitory-avoidance (IA) task (hippocampus-dependent contextual fear-learning task) drives GluA2-lacking Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) into the hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses during all periods of the estrous cycle except the proestrous period, when estrogen levels are high. In addition, IA task failed to drive CP-AMPARs into the CA3-CA1 synapses of ovariectomized rats only when estrogen was present. Thus, changes in the stoichiometry of AMPA receptors during learning depend on estrogen levels. Furthermore, the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) after IA task was prevented during the proestrous period, while intact LTP is still expressed after IA task during other period of the estrous cycle. Consistent with this finding, rats conditioned by IA training failed to acquire hippocampus-dependent Y-maze task during the proestrous period. On the other hand, during other estrous period, rats were able to learn Y-maze task after IA conditioning. These results suggest that high estrogen levels prevent the IA learning-induced delivery of CP-AMPARs into hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses and limit synaptic plasticity after IA task, thus preventing the acquisition of additional learning. PMID:26121335

  18. Age dependence of the rapid antidepressant and synaptic effects of acute NMDA receptor blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eNosyreva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a NMDA receptor antagonist that produces rapid antidepressant responses in individuals with major depressive disorder. The antidepressant action of ketamine has been linked to blocking NMDA receptor activation at rest, which inhibits eukaryotic elongation factor2 kinase leading to desuppression of protein synthesis and synaptic potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Here, we investigated ketamine mediated antidepressant response and the resulting synaptic potentiation in juvenile animals. We found that ketamine did not produce an antidepressant response in juvenile animals in the novelty suppressed feeding or the forced swim test. In addition ketamine application failed to trigger synaptic potentiation in hippocampal slices obtained from juvenile animals, unlike its action in slices from older animals (6-9 weeks old. The inability of ketamine to trigger an antidepressant response or subsequent synaptic plasticity processes suggests a developmental component to ketamine mediated antidepressant efficacy. We also show that the NMDAR antagonist AP5 triggers synaptic potentiation in mature hippocampus similar to the action of ketamine, demonstrating that global competitive blockade of NMDA receptors is sufficient to trigger this effect. These findings suggest that global blockade of NMDA receptors in developmentally mature hippocampal synapses are required for the antidepressant efficacy of ketamine.

  19. Synaptic network activity induces neuronal differentiation of adult hippocampal precursor cells through BDNF signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HarishBabu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is regulated by activity. But how do neural precursor cells in the hippocampus respond to surrounding network activity and translate increased neural activity into a developmental program? Here we show that long-term potential (LTP-like synaptic activity within a cellular network of mature hippocampal neurons promotes neuronal differentiation of newly generated cells. In co-cultures of precursor cells with primary hippocampal neurons, LTP-like synaptic plasticity induced by addition of glycine in Mg2+-free media for 5 min, produced synchronous network activity and subsequently increased synaptic strength between neurons. Furthermore, this synchronous network activity led to a significant increase in neuronal differentiation from the co-cultured neural precursor cells. When applied directly to precursor cells, glycine and Mg2+-free solution did not induce neuronal differentiation. Synaptic plasticity-induced neuronal differentiation of precursor cells was observed in the presence of GABAergic neurotransmission blockers but was dependent on NMDA-mediated Ca2+ influx. Most importantly, neuronal differentiation required the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF from the underlying substrate hippocampal neurons as well as TrkB receptor phosphorylation in precursor cells. This suggests that activity-dependent stem cell differentiation within the hippocampal network is mediated via synaptically evoked BDNF signaling.

  20. SynGAP regulates protein synthesis and homeostatic synaptic plasticity in developing cortical networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chieh Wang

    Full Text Available Disrupting the balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the developing brain has been causally linked with intellectual disability (ID and autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Excitatory synapse strength is regulated in the central nervous system by controlling the number of postsynaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs. De novo genetic mutations of the synaptic GTPase-activating protein (SynGAP are associated with ID and ASD. SynGAP is enriched at excitatory synapses and genetic suppression of SynGAP increases excitatory synaptic strength. However, exactly how SynGAP acts to maintain synaptic AMPAR content is unclear. We show here that SynGAP limits excitatory synaptic strength, in part, by suppressing protein synthesis in cortical neurons. The data presented here from in vitro, rat and mouse cortical networks, demonstrate that regulation of translation by SynGAP involves ERK, mTOR, and the small GTP-binding protein Rheb. Furthermore, these data show that GluN2B-containing NMDARs and the cognitive kinase CaMKII act upstream of SynGAP and that this signaling cascade is required for proper translation-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity of excitatory synapses in developing cortical networks.

  1. Estradiol rapidly modulates synaptic plasticity of hippocampal neurons: Involvement of kinase networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshitaka; Hojo, Yasushi; Kojima, Hiroki; Ikeda, Muneki; Hotta, Keisuke; Sato, Rei; Ooishi, Yuuki; Yoshiya, Miyuki; Chung, Bon-Chu; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Kawato, Suguru

    2015-09-24

    Estradiol (E2) is locally synthesized within the hippocampus in addition to the gonads. Rapid modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by E2 is essential for synaptic regulation. Molecular mechanisms of modulation through synaptic estrogen receptor (ER) and its downstream signaling, however, have been still unknown. We investigated induction of LTP by the presence of E2 upon weak theta burst stimulation (weak-TBS) in CA1 region of adult male hippocampus. Since only weak-TBS did not induce full-LTP, weak-TBS was sub-threshold stimulation. We observed LTP induction by the presence of E2, after incubation of hippocampal slices with 10nM E2 for 30 min, upon weak-TBS. This E2-induced LTP was blocked by ICI, an ER antagonist. This E2-LTP induction was inhibited by blocking Erk MAPK, PKA, PKC, PI3K, NR2B and CaMKII, individually, suggesting that Erk MAPK, PKA, PKC, PI3K and CaMKII may be involved in downstream signaling for activation of NMDA receptors. Interestingly, dihydrotestosterone suppressed the E2-LTP. We also investigated rapid changes of dendritic spines (=postsynapses) in response to E2, using hippocampal slices from adult male rats. We found 1nM E2 increased the density of spines by approximately 1.3-fold within 2h by imaging Lucifer Yellow-injected CA1 pyramidal neurons. The E2-induced spine increase was blocked by ICI. The increase in spines was suppressed by blocking PI3K, Erk MAPK, p38 MAPK, PKA, PKC, LIMK, CaMKII or calcineurin, individually. On the other hand, blocking JNK did not inhibit the E2-induced spine increase. Taken together, these results suggest that E2 rapidly induced LTP and also increased the spine density through kinase networks that are driven by synaptic ER. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID:25595055

  2. Oscillatory Motion of a Bi-Phasic Slug in a Teflon Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Milad; Jensen, Klavs

    2015-11-01

    Bi-phasic physical/chemical processes require transfer of solute/reagent molecules across the interface. Continuous multi-phase flow approaches (using gas as the continuous phase), usually fail in providing sufficient interfacial area for transfer of molecules between the aqueous and organic phases. In continuous segmented flow platforms (with a fluorinated polymer-based reactor), the higher surface tension of the aqueous phase compared to the organic phase of a bi-phasic slug, in combination with the low surface energy of the reactor wall result in a more facile motion of the aqueous phase. Thus, upon applying a pressure gradient across the bi-phasic slug, the aqueous phase of the slug moves through the organic phase and leads the bi-phasic slug, thereby limiting the available interfacial area for the bi-phasic mass transfer only to the semi-spherical interface between the two phases. Disrupting the quasi-equilibrium state of the bi-phasic slug through reversing the pressure gradient across the bi-phasic slug causes the aqueous phase to move back through the organic phase. In this work, we experimentally investigate the dynamics of periodic alteration of the pressure gradient across a bi-phasic slug, and characterize the resulting enhanced interfacial area on the bi-phasic mass transfer rate. We demonstrate the enhanced mass transfer rate of the oscillatory flow strategy compared to the continuous multi-phase approach using bi-phasic Pd catalyzed carbon-carbon and carbon-nitrogen cross coupling reactions. NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship, Novartis Center for Continuous Manufacturing.

  3. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Ca2+ Homeostasis Mediated by Concomitantly Produced Nitric Oxide via a Novel Synergistic Pathway in Exocrine Pancreas

    OpenAIRE

    Moustafa, Amira; Habara, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The present study was designed to explore the effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on Ca2+ homeostasis in rat pancreatic acini. Results: Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; an H2S donor) induced a biphasic increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a dose-dependent manner. The NaHS-induced [Ca2+]i elevation persisted with an EC50 of 73.3 μM in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ but was abolished by thapsigargin, indicating that both Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ release contributed to the in...

  4. The role of microglia in synaptic stripping and synaptic degeneration: a revised perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, V. Hugh; O'Connor, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Chronic neurodegenerative diseases of the CNS (central nervous system) are characterized by the loss of neurons. There is, however, growing evidence to show that an early stage of this process involves degeneration of presynaptic terminals prior to the loss of the cell body. Synaptic plasticity in CNS pathology has been associated with microglia and the phenomenon of synaptic stripping. We review here the evidence for the involvement of microglia in synaptic stripping and synapse degeneration...

  5. Prenatal cocaine reduces AMPA receptor synaptic expression through hyperphosphorylation of the synaptic anchoring protein GRIP

    OpenAIRE

    Bakshi, Kalindi; Gennaro, Serena; Chan, Christopher Y.; Kosciuk, Mary; Liu, Jingjing; Stucky, Andres; Trenkner, Ekkehart; FRIEDMAN, EITAN; Nagele, Robert G; Wang, Hoau-Yan

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure produces sustained neurobehavioral and brain synaptic changes closely resembling those of animals with defective alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-type glutamatergic receptors (AMPARs). We hypothesized that prenatal cocaine exposure attenuates AMPAR signaling by interfering with AMPAR synaptic targeting. AMPAR function is governed by receptor cycling on and off the synaptic membrane through its interaction with GRIP, a PDZ domain protein that i...

  6. Ocular dominance plasticity is stably maintained in the absence of α calcium calmodulin kinase II (αCaMKII) autophosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Sharif A Taha; Stryker, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    The molecule α calcium calmodulin kinase II (αCaMKII) is known to play a fundamental role in the induction of many forms of synaptic plasticity. A major theory of αCaMKII function proposes that autophosphorylation of the molecule mediates not only the induction but also the maintenance of synaptic plasticity. To test this hypothesis, we assessed ocular dominance plasticity in genetically engineered mice that carry a mutation preventing autophosphorylation of αCaMKII. These mutant mice are def...

  7. Modelling bidirectional modulations in synaptic plasticity: A biochemical pathway model to understand the emergence of long term potentiation (LTP) and long term depression (LTD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yao; Kulasiri, Don; Samarasinghe, Sandhya

    2016-08-21

    Synaptic plasticity induces bidirectional modulations of the postsynaptic response following a synaptic transmission. The long term forms of synaptic plasticity, named long term potentiation (LTP) and long term depression (LTD), are critical for the antithetic functions of the memory system, memory formation and removal, respectively. A common Ca(2+) signalling upstream triggers both LTP and LTD, and the critical proteins and factors coordinating the LTP/LTD inductions are not well understood. We develop an integrated model based on the sub-models of the indispensable synaptic proteins in the emergence of synaptic plasticity to validate and understand their potential roles in the expression of synaptic plasticity. The model explains Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) complex dependent coordination of LTP/LTD expressions by the interactions among the indispensable proteins using the experimentally estimated kinetic parameters. Analysis of the integrated model provides us with insights into the effective timescales of the key proteins and we conclude that the CaM pool size is critical for the coordination between LTP/LTD expressions. PMID:27185535

  8. Programmable synaptic devices for electronic neural nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moopenn, A.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1990-01-01

    The architecture, design, and operational characteristics of custom VLSI and thin film synaptic devices are described. The devices include CMOS-based synaptic chips containing 1024 reprogrammable synapses with a 6-bit dynamic range, and nonvolatile, write-once, binary synaptic arrays based on memory switching in hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. Their suitability for embodiment of fully parallel and analog neural hardware is discussed. Specifically, a neural network solution to an assignment problem of combinatorial global optimization, implemented in fully parallel hardware using the synaptic chips, is described. The network's ability to provide optimal and near optimal solutions over a time scale of few neuron time constants has been demonstrated and suggests a speedup improvement of several orders of magnitude over conventional search methods.

  9. Dopamine Regulates Aversive Contextual Learning and Associated In Vivo Synaptic Plasticity in the Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John I. Broussard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine release during reward-driven behaviors influences synaptic plasticity. However, dopamine innervation and release in the hippocampus and its role during aversive behaviors are controversial. Here, we show that in vivo hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the CA3-CA1 circuit underlies contextual learning during inhibitory avoidance (IA training. Immunohistochemistry and molecular techniques verified sparse dopaminergic innervation of the hippocampus from the midbrain. The long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP underlying the learning of IA was assessed with a D1-like dopamine receptor agonist or antagonist in ex vivo hippocampal slices and in vivo in freely moving mice. Inhibition of D1-like dopamine receptors impaired memory of the IA task and prevented the training-induced enhancement of both ex vivo and in vivo LTP induction. The results indicate that dopamine-receptor signaling during an aversive contextual task regulates aversive memory retention and regulates associated synaptic mechanisms in the hippocampus that likely underlie learning.

  10. Lavandula angustifolia extract improves deteriorated synaptic plasticity in an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Soheili

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Neurodegenerative Alzheimer’s disease (AD is associated with profound deficits in synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. Long-term potentiation (LTP, an experimental form of synaptic plasticity, is intensively examined in hippocampus. In this study we evaluated the effect of aqueous extract of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia on induction of LTP in the CA1 area of hippocampus. In response to stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals the baseline or tetanized field extracellular postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs were recorded in the CA1 area. Materials and Methods: The electrophysiological recordings were carried out in four groups of rats; two control groups including the vehicle (CON and lavender (CE treated rats and two Alzheimeric groups including the vehicle (ALZ and lavender (AE treated animals. Results: The extract inefficiently affected the baseline responses in the four testing groups. While the fEPSPs displayed a considerable LTP in the CON animals, no potentiation was evident in the tetanized responses in the ALZ rats. The herbal medicine effectively restored LTP in the AE group and further potentiated fEPSPs in the CE group. Conclusion:The positive effect of the lavender extract on the plasticity of synaptic transmission supports its previously reported behavioral effects on improvement of impaired spatial memory in the Alzheimeric animals.

  11. Facilitation of AMPA receptor synaptic delivery as a molecular mechanism for cognitive enhancement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira Knafo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion molecules and downstream growth factor-dependent signaling are critical for brain development and synaptic plasticity, and they have been linked to cognitive function in adult animals. We have previously developed a mimetic peptide (FGL from the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM that enhances spatial learning and memory in rats. We have now investigated the cellular and molecular basis of this cognitive enhancement, using biochemical, morphological, electrophysiological, and behavioral analyses. We have found that FGL triggers a long-lasting enhancement of synaptic transmission in hippocampal CA1 neurons. This effect is mediated by a facilitated synaptic delivery of AMPA receptors, which is accompanied by enhanced NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP. Both LTP and cognitive enhancement are mediated by an initial PKC activation, which is followed by persistent CaMKII activation. These results provide a mechanistic link between facilitation of AMPA receptor synaptic delivery and improved hippocampal-dependent learning, induced by a pharmacological cognitive enhancer.

  12. Brain circuitry outside the synaptic cleft

    OpenAIRE

    Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Alexander E Dityatev

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence suggests that astroglia, and possibly microglia, play an important part in regulating synaptic networking of the brain. It has also emerged that extracellular matrix (ECM) structures that enwrap synaptic connections can generate molecular signals affecting both neuronal and glial activity. Thus it appears that the mechanism of information processing in the brain, which has hitherto been associated almost exclusively with neural circuits, could also invo...

  13. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in synaptic vesicles.

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, D T; Wang, J K; Valtorta, F; Benfenati, F; Greengard, P.

    1988-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in purified synaptic vesicles from rat forebrain has been studied in the presence of Mn2+ and orthovanadate. High levels of endogenous protein tyrosine phosphorylation were observed. Four major phosphoproteins, with apparent molecular masses of 105, 94, 38, and 30 kDa, were shown to contain phosphotyrosine. The 38-kDa phosphoprotein was identified as synaptophysin (p38), a well-characterized integral membrane protein of synaptic vesicles. The three other phosp...

  14. Calcineurin, Synaptic Plasticity, and Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Weitlauf

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A long-held hypothesis in neuroscience holds that learning and memory mechanisms involve lasting changes in synaptic weights. Multiple mechanisms for producing such changes exist, of which NMDA-receptor–dependent long-term potentiation (LTP is the most widely studied. Curiously, the relatively simple hypothesis that LTP plays a role in learning and memory has proven difficult to test. A current experimental strategy is to generate genetically altered mice with mutations in genes thought to be involved in LTP and assess the effects of these mutations both on LTP and animal behavior[1,2]. A difficulty associated with these approaches has been that they are not temporally or spatially refined. To alleviate this problem, Dr. Isabelle Mansuy and colleagues used an inducible and reversible transgene expression system in which transgene expression could be controlled on a week-to-week timescale to assess the effects of genetic reduction of the activity of a protein phosphatase known as calcineurin or PP2B in adult mouse forebrain[3,4].

  15. The Impact of Stimulation Induced Short Term Synaptic Plasticity on Firing Patterns in the Globus Pallidus of the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenia eBugaysen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation in the globus pallidus (GP leads to complex modulations of neuronal activity in the stimulated nucleus. Multiple in-vivo studies have demonstrated the modulation of both firing rates and patterns during and immediately following the GP stimulation. Previous in-vitro studies, together with computational studies, have suggested the involvement of short-term synaptic plasticity (STP during the stimulation. The aim of the current study was to explore in-vitro the effects of STP on neuronal activity of GP neurons during local repetitive stimulation. We recorded synaptic potentials and assessed the modulations of spontaneous firing in a postsynaptic neuron in acute brain slices via a whole-cell pipette. Low-frequency repetitive stimulation locked the firing of the neuron to the stimulus. However, high-frequency repetitive stimulation in the GP generated a biphasic modulation of the firing frequency consisting of inhibitory and excitatory phases. Using blockers of synaptic transmission, we show that GABAergic synapses mediated the inhibitory and glutamatergic synapses the excitatory part of the response. Furthermore, we report that at high stimulation frequencies both types of synapses undergo short-term depression leading to a time dependent modulation of the neuronal firing. These findings indicate that STP modulates the dynamic responses of pallidal activity during electrical stimulation, and may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism underlying deep brain stimulation (DBS like protocols.

  16. Lateral regulation of synaptic transmission by astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covelo, A; Araque, A

    2016-05-26

    Fifteen years ago the concept of the "tripartite synapse" was proposed to conceptualize the functional view that astrocytes are integral elements of synapses. The signaling exchange between astrocytes and neurons within the tripartite synapse results in the synaptic regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity through an autocrine form of communication. However, recent evidence indicates that the astrocyte synaptic regulation is not restricted to the active tripartite synapse but can be manifested through astrocyte signaling at synapses relatively distant from active synapses, a process termed lateral astrocyte synaptic regulation. This phenomenon resembles the classical heterosynaptic modulation but is mechanistically different because it involves astrocytes and its properties critically depend on the morphological and functional features of astrocytes. Therefore, the functional concept of the tripartite synapse as a fundamental unit must be expanded to include the interaction between tripartite synapses. Through lateral synaptic regulation, astrocytes serve as an active processing bridge for synaptic interaction and crosstalk between synapses with no direct neuronal connectivity, supporting the idea that neural network function results from the coordinated activity of astrocytes and neurons. PMID:25732135

  17. Biphasic 201thallium scintgraphy after dipyridamole in mitral valve diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of biphasic 201thallium scintigraphy after dipyridamole i.v. could neither prove nor exclude the presence of small focal lesions in the myocardium of 17 patients with mitral valve diseases. The frequent finding of a decrease in activity in the anterolateral myocardium is probably due to a relative increase in activity in the region of the inferior wall with superimposed areas of the papillary muscle and right ventricular myocardium. If the right ventricle is visualized in stress- or redistribution images, an increase in mean pulmonary artery pressure can be accepted. According to Cohen's criteria, a grade 2 or 3 virtually proves the existence of pulmonary hypertension, a grade 1 makes this finding rather probable. The possibility of pulmonary hypertension can not be excluded if the right ventricular myocardium is not visualized. (orig.)

  18. Bioplastique: a new biphasic polymer for minimally invasive injection implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersek, R A; Beisang, A A

    1992-01-01

    The search for prosthetic materials that are biocompatible, nontoxic, and permanent led the authors to develop a micronized, inert, biphasic polymer particle for permanent soft tissue augmentation which neither migrates nor is absorbed by the body. Placed in a bioexcretable gel carrier, these textured microparticles are easily implanted using a specially designed blunt-tipped cannula with local anesthesia on an outpatient basis. Research using this implant material, Bioplastique (Bioplasty, St. Paul, MN), in rabbits has shown that when the textured particle size is maintained within a critical range, neither particle migration nor storage disease occurs. The gel carrier is rapidly phagocytized and replaced by fibrin matrix within a few days. Host collagen then gradually forms a fibrotic capsule around each textured particle, making use of the naturally occurring foreign body reaction to create a stable inplant. After being followed for over two years, Bioplastique has proven to be useful in many clinical applications with few complications. PMID:1734632

  19. Layer- and area-specific actions of norepinephrine on cortical synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Humberto; Treviño, Mario; Atzori, Marco

    2016-06-15

    The cerebral cortex is a critical target of the central noradrenergic system. The importance of norepinephrine (NE) in the regulation of cortical activity is underscored by clinical findings that involve this catecholamine and its receptor subtypes in the regulation of a large number of emotional and cognitive functions and illnesses. In this review, we highlight diverse effects of the LC/NE system in the mammalian cortex. Indeed, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral studies in the last few decades reveal that NE elicits a mixed repertoire of excitatory, inhibitory, and biphasic effects on the firing activity and transmitter release of cortical neurons. At the intrinsic cellular level, NE can produce a series of effects similar to those elicited by other monoamines or acetylcholine, associated with systemic arousal. At the synaptic level, NE induces numerous acute changes in synaptic function, and ׳gates' the induction of long-term plasticity of glutamatergic synapses, consisting in an enhancement of engaged and relevant cortical synapses and/or depression of unengaged synapses. Equally important in shaping cortical function, in many cortical areas NE promotes a characteristic, most often reversible, increase in the gain of local inhibitory synapses, whose extent and temporal properties vary between different areas and sometimes even between cortical layers of the same area. While we are still a long way from a comprehensive theory of the function of the LC/NE system, its cellular, synaptic, and plastic effects are consistent with the hypothesis that noradrenergic modulation is critical in coordinating the activity of cortical and subcortical circuits for the integration of sensory activity and working memory. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System. PMID:26820639

  20. Biphasic presence of fibrocytes in a porcine hypertrophic scar model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Taryn E; Mino, Matthew J; Moffatt, Lauren T; Mauskar, Neil A; Prindeze, Nicholas J; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Jordan, Marion H; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2015-01-01

    The duroc pig has been described as a promising animal model for use in the study of human wound healing and scar formation. However, little is known about the presence and chronology of the fibrocyte cell population in the healing process of these animals. Wounds known to form scar were created on red duroc swine (3" x 3") with a dermatome to a total depth of either 0.06 inches or 0.09 inches. These wounds were allowed to heal completely and biopsies were done at scheduled time points during the healing process. Biopsies were formalin fixed and paraffin embedded for immunohistochemical analysis. Porcine reactive antibodies to CD-45 and procollagen-1 and a human reactive antibody to LSP-1 were used to detect the presence of fibrocytes in immunohistochemistry, an immunocytochemistry. Initial immunohistochemical studies showed evidence of a biphasic presence of fibrocytes. Pigs with 0.06 inches deep wounds showed positive staining for CD-45 and LSP-1 within highly cellular areas at days 2 and 4 after wounding. Additional animals with 0.09 inches deep wounds showed positive staining within similar areas at days 56, 70, and 113 after wounding. There was no immunohistochemical evidence of fibrocytes in skin biopsies taken at days 14, 28, or 42. Procollagen-1 staining was diffused in all samples. Cultured cells were stained for CD-45, LSP-1, and procollagen-1 by immunocytochemistry. These data confirm that fibrocytes are indeed present in this porcine model. We conclude that these cells are present after initial wounding and later during scar formation and remodeling. We believe that this is an evidence of a biphasic presence of fibrocytes, first as an acute response to skin wounding followed by later involvement in the remodeling process, prompted by continued inflammation in a deep partial thickness wound. PMID:25051518

  1. AQUEOUS BIPHASE EXTRACTION FOR PROCESSING OF FINE COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Osseo-Asare; X. Zeng

    2001-06-30

    Ever-stringent environmental constraints dictate that future coal cleaning technologies be compatible with micron-size particles. This research program seeks to develop an advanced coal cleaning technology uniquely suited to micron-size particles, i.e., aqueous biphase extraction. The partitioning behaviors of hematite in the dextran (Dex)/Triton X-100 (TX100) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)/dextran systems were investigated and the effects of some ionic surfactants on solid partition were studied. In both biphase systems, the particles stayed in the bottom dextran-rich phase under all pH conditions. This behavior is attributable to the fact that the hydrophilic oxide particles prefer the more hydrophilic bottom phase. Also, the strong favorable interaction between dextran and ferric oxide facilitates the dispersion of the solids in the polysaccharide-rich phase. In the Dex/TX100 system, addition of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) or potassium oleate had no effect on the solid partition; on the other hand, addition of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) transferred the particles to the top phase or interface at high pH values. In the PEG/Dex system, the preferred location of hematite remained the bottom phase in the presence of either SDS or DTAB. The effects of anionic surfactants on the partition behavior are attributable to the fact that they are not able to replace the strongly adsorbed polysaccharide layer on the ferric oxide surface. The results with the cationic surfactant are due to electrostatic interaction between the cationic surfactant and the charged surface of the solid particles. The difference in solids partitioning in the two systems is the result of the different distribution of DTAB in these systems. In the Dex/TX100 system, DTAB prefers the top surfactant-rich phase, while it concentrates in the bottom phase in the PEG/dextran system.

  2. Curcumin improves synaptic plasticity impairment induced by HIV-1gp120 V3 loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-ling Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin has been shown to significantly improve spatial memory impairment induced by HIV-1 gp120 V3 in rats, but the electrophysiological mechanism remains unknown. Using extracellular microelectrode recording techniques, this study confirmed that the gp120 V3 loop could suppress long-term potentiation in the rat hippocampal CA1 region and synaptic plasticity, and that curcumin could antagonize these inhibitory effects. Using a Fura-2/AM calcium ion probe, we found that curcumin resisted the effects of the gp120 V3 loop on hippocampal synaptosomes and decreased Ca 2+ concentration in synaptosomes. This effect of curcumin was identical to nimodipine, suggesting that curcumin improved the inhibitory effects of gp120 on synaptic plasticity, ameliorated damage caused to the central nervous system, and might be a potential neuroprotective drug.

  3. DREAM (Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator) contributes to synaptic depression and contextual fear memory

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Long-Jun; Mellström Britt; Wang Hansen; Ren Ming; Domingo Sofia; Kim Susan S; Li Xiang-Yao; Chen Tao; Naranjo Jose R; Zhuo Min

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, binds specifically to DNA and several nucleoproteins regulating gene expression and with proteins outside the nucleus to regulate membrane excitability or calcium homeostasis. DREAM is highly expressed in the central nervous system including the hippocampus and cortex; however, the roles of DREAM in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity have not been investigated. Taking...

  4. Presenilin-1 Mutation Impairs Cholinergic Modulation of Synaptic Plasticity and Suppresses NMDA Currents in Hippocampus slices

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yue; Greig, Nigel H.; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Mattson, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    Presenilin-1 (PS1) mutations cause many cases of early-onset inherited Alzheimer's disease, in part, by increasing the production of neurotoxic forms of amyloid β-peptide (A β). However, Aβ -independent effects of mutant PS1 on neuronal Ca2+ homeostasis and sensitivity to excitatory neurotransmitters have been reported. Here we show that cholinergic modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity is impaired in PS1 mutant knockin (PS1KI) mice. Whereas activation of muscarinic receptors enhances...

  5. Differential regulation of synaptic transmission by pre- and postsynaptic SK channels in the spinal locomotor network

    OpenAIRE

    Nanou, Evanthia; Alpert, Michael H.; Alford, Simon; El Manira, Abdeljabbar

    2013-01-01

    The generation of activity in the central nervous system requires precise tuning of cellular properties and synaptic transmission. Neural networks in the spinal cord produce coordinated locomotor movements. Synapses in these networks need to be equipped with multiple mechanisms that regulate their operation over varying regimes to produce locomotor activity at different frequencies. Using the in vitro lamprey spinal cord, we explored whether Ca2+ influx via different routes in postsynaptic so...

  6. Synaptic Ribbons Require Ribeye for Electron Density, Proper Synaptic Localization, and Recruitment of Calcium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Caixia; Stewart, William J; Akanyeti, Otar; Frederick, Courtney; Zhu, Jie; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Sheets, Lavinia; Liao, James C; Zenisek, David

    2016-06-21

    Synaptic ribbons are structures made largely of the protein Ribeye that hold synaptic vesicles near release sites in non-spiking cells in some sensory systems. Here, we introduce frameshift mutations in the two zebrafish genes encoding for Ribeye and thus remove Ribeye protein from neuromast hair cells. Despite Ribeye depletion, vesicles collect around ribbon-like structures that lack electron density, which we term "ghost ribbons." Ghost ribbons are smaller in size but possess a similar number of smaller vesicles and are poorly localized to synapses and calcium channels. These hair cells exhibit enhanced exocytosis, as measured by capacitance, and recordings from afferent neurons post-synaptic to hair cells show no significant difference in spike rates. Our results suggest that Ribeye makes up most of the synaptic ribbon density in neuromast hair cells and is necessary for proper localization of calcium channels and synaptic ribbons. PMID:27292637

  7. A Hopfield-like hippocampal CA3 neural network model for studying associative memory in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wangxiong Zhao; Qingli Qiao; Dan Wang

    2010-01-01

    Associative memory, one of the major cognitive functions in the hippocampal CA3 region, includes auto-associative memory and hetero-associative memory. Many previous studies have shown that Alzheimer's disease (AD) can lead to loss of functional synapses in the central nervous system, and associative memory functions in patients with AD are often impaired, but few studies have addressed the effect of AD on hetero-associative memory in the hippocampal CA3 region. In this study, based on a simplified anatomical structure and synaptic connections in the hippocampal CA3 region, a three-layered Hopfield-like neural network model of hippocampal CA3 was proposed and then used to simulate associative memory functions in three circumstances: normal, synaptic deletion and synaptic compensation, according to Ruppin's synaptic deletion and compensation theory. The influences of AD on hetero-associative memory were further analyzed. The simulated results showed that the established three-layered Hopfield-like neural network model of hippocampal CA3 has both auto-associative and hetero-associative memory functions. With increasing synaptic deletion level, both associative memory functions were gradually impaired and the mean firing rates of the neurons within the network model were decreased. With gradual increasing synaptic compensation, the associative memory functions of the network were improved and the mean firing rates were increased. The simulated results suggest that the Hopfield-like neural network model can effectively simulate both associative memory functions of the hippocampal CA3 region. Synaptic deletion affects both auto-associative and hetero-associative memory functions in the hippocampal CA3 region, and can also result in memory dysfunction. To some extent, synaptic compensation measures can offset two kinds of associative memory dysfunction caused by synaptic deletion in the hippocampal CA3 area.

  8. Modeling synaptic transmission of the tripartite synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Suhita; Jung, Peter

    2007-03-01

    The tripartite synapse denotes the junction of a pre- and postsynaptic neuron modulated by a synaptic astrocyte. Enhanced transmission probability and frequency of the postsynaptic current-events are among the significant effects of the astrocyte on the synapse as experimentally characterized by several groups. In this paper we provide a mathematical framework for the relevant synaptic interactions between neurons and astrocytes that can account quantitatively for both the astrocytic effects on the synaptic transmission and the spontaneous postsynaptic events. Inferred from experiments, the model assumes that glutamate released by the astrocytes in response to synaptic activity regulates store-operated calcium in the presynaptic terminal. This source of calcium is distinct from voltage-gated calcium influx and accounts for the long timescale of facilitation at the synapse seen in correlation with calcium activity in the astrocytes. Our model predicts the inter-event interval distribution of spontaneous current activity mediated by a synaptic astrocyte and provides an additional insight into a novel mechanism for plasticity in which a low fidelity synapse gets transformed into a high fidelity synapse via astrocytic coupling.

  9. Cdk5 is a New Rapid Synaptic Homeostasis Regulator Capable of Initiating the Early Alzheimer-Like Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yanghui; Zhang, Lei; Su, Susan C; Tsai, Li-Huei; Julius Zhu, J

    2016-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a serine/threonine kinase implicated in synaptic plasticity, behavior, and cognition, yet its synaptic function remains poorly understood. Here, we report that physiological Cdk5 signaling in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons regulates homeostatic synaptic transmission using an unexpectedly rapid mechanism that is different from all known slow homeostatic regulators, such as beta amyloid (Aβ) and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc, aka Arg3.1). Interestingly, overproduction of the potent Cdk5 activator p25 reduces synapse density, and dynamically regulates synaptic size by suppressing or enhancing Aβ/Arc production. Moreover, chronic overproduction of p25, seen in Alzheimer's patients, induces initially concurrent reduction in synapse density and increase in synaptic size characteristic of the early Alzheimer-like pathology, and later persistent synapse elimination in intact brains. These results identify Cdk5 as the regulator of a novel rapid form of homeostasis at central synapses and p25 as the first molecule capable of initiating the early Alzheimer's synaptic pathology. PMID:26088971

  10. Biphasic influence of dexamethasone exposure on embryonic vertebrate skeleton development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xin; Chen, Jian-long; Ma, Zheng-lai; Zhang, Zhao-long; Lv, Shun; Mai, Dong-mei; Liu, Jia-jia [Department of Histology and Embryology, Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of the Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Chuai, Manli [Division of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH (United Kingdom); Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Wan, Chao [Stem Cell and Regeneration Thematic Research Programme, School of Biomedical Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin (Hong Kong); Yang, Xuesong, E-mail: yang_xuesong@126.com [Department of Histology and Embryology, Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of the Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Institute of Fetal-Preterm Labor Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2014-11-15

    increased in mesenchymal cell mass treated by low concentration of Dex. Mmp-13 expression was obviously up-regulated by Dex in both mesenchymal cells and primary chondrocyte cultures. And Col10a1 expression was also increased by Dex exposure in chondrocyte. In summary, we have revealed that different concentrations of Dex exposure during early gestation could exert a biphasic effect on vertebrate skeletal development. - Highlights: • Chick embryos occurred shortening of the long bone following Dex exposure. • Dex suppressed chondrocytes proliferation and promoted apoptosis. • Dex exposure decreased ALP production and up-regulated Runx-2 and Mmp-13. • Dex exhibited biphasic effects on chondrogenic proliferation and nodule formation. • The hypertrophy and ossification were accelerated by Dex both in vivo and in vitro.

  11. AQUEOUS BIPHASE EXTRACTION FOR PROCESSING OF FINE COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Osseo-Asare; X. Zeng

    2001-06-30

    Ever-stringent environmental constraints dictate that future coal cleaning technologies be compatible with micron-size particles. This research program seeks to develop an advanced coal cleaning technology uniquely suited to micron-size particles, i.e., aqueous biphase extraction. The partitioning behaviors of silica in the polyethylene glycol (PEG)/dextran (Dex) and dextran/Triton X-100 (TX100) systems have been investigated, and the effects of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) on solid partition have been studied. In both biphase systems, silica particles stayed in the top PEG-rich phase at low pH. With increase in pH, the particles moved from the top phase to the interface, then to the bottom phase. At very high pH, the solids preferred the top phase again. These trends are attributable to variations in the polymer/solid and nonionic surfactant/solid interactions. Addition of ionic surfactants into these two systems introduces a weakly charged environment, since ionic surfactants concentrate into one phase, either the top phase or the bottom phase. Therefore, coulombic forces also play a key role in the partition of silica particles because electrostatic attractive or repulsive forces are produced between the solid surface and the ionic-surfactant-concentrated phase. For the PEG/dextran system in the presence of SDS, SiO{sub 2} preferred the bottom dextran-rich phase above its pH{sub PZC}. However, addition of DTAB moved the oxide particles from the top phase to the interface, and then to the bottom phase, with increase in pH. These different behaviors are attributable to the fact that SDS and DTAB concentrated into the opposite phase of the PEG/dextran system. On the other hand, in the dextran/Triton X-100 system, both ionic surfactants concentrated in the top surfactant-rich phase and formed mixed micelles with TX100. Therefore, addition of the anionic surfactant, SDS, moved the silica particles from top phase to the

  12. Biphasic influence of dexamethasone exposure on embryonic vertebrate skeleton development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    mesenchymal cell mass treated by low concentration of Dex. Mmp-13 expression was obviously up-regulated by Dex in both mesenchymal cells and primary chondrocyte cultures. And Col10a1 expression was also increased by Dex exposure in chondrocyte. In summary, we have revealed that different concentrations of Dex exposure during early gestation could exert a biphasic effect on vertebrate skeletal development. - Highlights: • Chick embryos occurred shortening of the long bone following Dex exposure. • Dex suppressed chondrocytes proliferation and promoted apoptosis. • Dex exposure decreased ALP production and up-regulated Runx-2 and Mmp-13. • Dex exhibited biphasic effects on chondrogenic proliferation and nodule formation. • The hypertrophy and ossification were accelerated by Dex both in vivo and in vitro

  13. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is a ubiquitous molecule in human long-term memory synaptic plasticity: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Ataei

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The studies have shown the most important intracellular signal of long-term memory is calcium-dependent signals. Calcium linked calmodulin can activate CaMKII. After receiving information for learning and memory, CaMKII is activated by Glutamate, the most important neurotransmitter for memory-related plasticity. Glutamate activates CaMKII and it plays some important roles in synaptic plasticity modification and long-term memory.

  14. Micrometer-scale mixing with Pickering emulsions: biphasic reactions without stirring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Fu, Luman; Yang, Hengquan

    2014-02-01

    A general strategy that avoids stirring for organic/aqueous reactions involving solid catalysts is reported. The strategy involves converting a conventional biphasic system into a Pickering emulsion phase with micrometer-scale droplets ensuring good mixing. In test reactions, nitrotoluene reduction and epoxidation of allylic alcohols, the reaction efficiency is comparable to conventional stirrer-driven biphasic catalysis reaction systems. Short diffusion distances, arising from the compartmentalization of densely packed droplets, play an important role in boosting the reaction efficiency. PMID:24376132

  15. Oscillatory three-phase flow reactor for studies of bi-phasic catalytic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Milad; Bruno, Nicholas C; Jensen, Klavs F

    2015-05-28

    A multi-phase flow strategy, based on oscillatory motion of a bi-phasic slug within a fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tubular reactor, under inert atmosphere, is designed and developed to address mixing and mass transfer limitations associated with continuous slug flow chemistry platforms for studies of bi-phasic catalytic reactions. The technique is exemplified with C-C and C-N Pd catalyzed coupling reactions. PMID:25876959

  16. Novel incoherent scheme for photonic generation of biphase modulated UWB signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Gibbon, Timothy Braidwood; Zibar, Darko;

    2009-01-01

    A novel incoherent scheme for generation of direct-sequence binary biphase modulated ultrawideband (UWB) signals is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. There is no requirement for pulse shaper (optical filter) in our proposed system.......A novel incoherent scheme for generation of direct-sequence binary biphase modulated ultrawideband (UWB) signals is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. There is no requirement for pulse shaper (optical filter) in our proposed system....

  17. Selection of Xenobiotic-Degrading Microorganisms in a Biphasic Aqueous-Organic System

    OpenAIRE

    Ascon-Cabrera, Miguel; Lebeault, Jean-Michel

    1993-01-01

    Microbial selection on mixtures of chlorinated and nonchlorinated compounds that are poorly soluble in water and/or toxic to growing microbial cells was examined in both biphasic aqueous-organic and monophasic aqueous systems. A biphasic system in which silicone oil was used as the organic phase permitted the acceleration of acclimation, leading to rapid selection and to an increase in xenobiotic compound degradation. In contrast, acclimation, selection, and degradation were very slow in the ...

  18. A simulation study of the reaction of human heart to biphasic electrical shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Seemann Gunnar; Popp lulia M; Dössel Olaf

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background This article presents a study, which examines the effects of biphasic electrical shocks on human ventricular tissue. The effects of this type of shock are not yet fully understood. Animal experiments showed the superiority of biphasic shocks over monophasic ones in defibrillation. A mathematical computer simulation can increase the knowledge of human heart behavior. Methods The research presented in this article was done with different models representing a three-dimension...

  19. Oscillatory three-phase flow reactor for studies of bi-phasic catalytic reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Abolhasani, Milad; Bruno, Nicholas C.; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2015-01-01

    A multi-phase flow strategy, based on oscillatory motion of a bi-phasic slug within a fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tubular reactor, under inert atmosphere, is designed and developed to address mixing and mass transfer limitations associated with continuous slug flow chemistry platforms for studies of bi-phasic catalytic reactions. The technique is exemplified with C–C and C–N Pd catalyzed coupling reactions.

  20. NMDA receptors mediate synaptic competition in culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin She

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activity through NMDA type glutamate receptors sculpts connectivity in the developing nervous system. This topic is typically studied in the visual system in vivo, where activity of inputs can be differentially regulated, but in which individual synapses are difficult to visualize and mechanisms governing synaptic competition can be difficult to ascertain. Here, we develop a model of NMDA-receptor dependent synaptic competition in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: GluN1 -/- (KO mouse hippocampal neurons lacking the essential NMDA receptor subunit were cultured alone or cultured in defined ratios with wild type (WT neurons. The absence of functional NMDA receptors did not alter neuron survival. Synapse development was assessed by immunofluorescence for postsynaptic PSD-95 family scaffold and apposed presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter VGlut1. Synapse density was specifically enhanced onto minority wild type neurons co-cultured with a majority of GluN1 -/- neighbour neurons, both relative to the GluN1 -/- neighbours and relative to sister pure wild type cultures. This form of synaptic competition was dependent on NMDA receptor activity and not conferred by the mere physical presence of GluN1. In contrast to these results in 10% WT and 90% KO co-cultures, synapse density did not differ by genotype in 50% WT and 50% KO co-cultures or in 90% WT and 10% KO co-cultures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The enhanced synaptic density onto NMDA receptor-competent neurons in minority coculture with GluN1 -/- neurons represents a cell culture paradigm for studying synaptic competition. Mechanisms involved may include a retrograde 'reward' signal generated by WT neurons, although in this paradigm there was no 'punishment' signal against GluN1 -/- neurons. Cell culture assays involving such defined circuits may help uncover the rules and mechanisms of activity-dependent synaptic competition in the

  1. Stabilizing ER Ca2+ channel function as an early preventative strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreaya Chakroborty

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative condition with no known cure. While current therapies target late-stage amyloid formation and cholinergic tone, to date, these strategies have proven ineffective at preventing disease progression. The reasons for this may be varied, and could reflect late intervention, or, that earlier pathogenic mechanisms have been overlooked and permitted to accelerate the disease process. One such example would include synaptic pathology, the disease component strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Dysregulated Ca(2+ homeostasis may be one of the critical factors driving synaptic dysfunction. One of the earliest pathophysiological indicators in mutant presenilin (PS AD mice is increased intracellular Ca(2+ signaling, predominantly through the ER-localized inositol triphosphate (IP(3 and ryanodine receptors (RyR. In particular, the RyR-mediated Ca(2+ upregulation within synaptic compartments is associated with altered synaptic homeostasis and network depression at early (presymptomatic AD stages. Here, we offer an alternative approach to AD therapeutics by stabilizing early pathogenic mechanisms associated with synaptic abnormalities. We targeted the RyR as a means to prevent disease progression, and sub-chronically treated AD mouse models (4-weeks with a novel formulation of the RyR inhibitor, dantrolene. Using 2-photon Ca(2+ imaging and patch clamp recordings, we demonstrate that dantrolene treatment fully normalizes ER Ca(2+ signaling within somatic and dendritic compartments in early and later-stage AD mice in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the elevated RyR2 levels in AD mice are restored to control levels with dantrolene treatment, as are synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. Aβ deposition within the cortex and hippocampus is also reduced in dantrolene-treated AD mice. In this study, we highlight the pivotal role of Ca(2+ aberrations in AD, and propose a novel strategy to

  2. Biphasic flow: structure and upscaling, consequences on macroscopic transport properties

    CERN Document Server

    Toussaint, Renaud; Méheust, Yves; Løvoll, Grunde; Jankov, Mihailo; Schäfer, Gerhard; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2012-01-01

    In disordered porous media, two-phase flow of immiscible fluids (biphasic flow) is organized in patterns that sometimes exhibit fractal geometries over a range of length scales, depending on the capillary, gravitational and viscous forces at play. These forces, as well as the boundary conditions, also determine whether the flow leads to the appearance of fingering pathways, i.e., unstable flow, or not. We present here a short review of these aspects, focusing on drainage and summarizing when these flows are expected to be stable or not, what fractal dimensions can be expected, and in which range of scales. We base our review on experimental studies performed in two-dimensional Hele-Shaw cells, or addressing three dimensional porous media by use of several imaging techniques. We first present configurations in which solely capillary forces and gravity play a role. Next, we review configurations in which capillarity and viscosity are the main forces at play. Eventually, we examine how the microscopic geometry o...

  3. Biphasic oxidation of oxy-hemoglobin in bloodstains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf H Bremmer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In forensic science, age determination of bloodstains can be crucial in reconstructing crimes. Upon exiting the body, bloodstains transit from bright red to dark brown, which is attributed to oxidation of oxy-hemoglobin (HbO(2 to met-hemoglobin (met-Hb and hemichrome (HC. The fractions of HbO(2, met-Hb and HC in a bloodstain can be used for age determination of bloodstains. In this study, we further analyze the conversion of HbO(2 to met-Hb and HC, and determine the effect of temperature and humidity on the conversion rates. METHODOLOGY: The fractions of HbO(2, met-Hb and HC in a bloodstain, as determined by quantitative analysis of optical reflectance spectra (450-800 nm, were measured as function of age, temperature and humidity. Additionally, Optical Coherence Tomography around 1300 nm was used to confirm quantitative spectral analysis approach. CONCLUSIONS: The oxidation rate of HbO(2 in bloodstains is biphasic. At first, the oxidation of HbO(2 is rapid, but slows down after a few hours. These oxidation rates are strongly temperature dependent. However, the oxidation of HbO(2 seems to be independent of humidity, whereas the transition of met-Hb into HC strongly depends on humidity. Knowledge of these decay rates is indispensable for translating laboratory results into forensic practice, and to enable bloodstain age determination on the crime scene.

  4. Biphasic Effect of Rifampicin on Bilirubin- A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopi, Manigandan; Seshadri, Mandalam Subramanian

    2016-04-01

    Drug induced hepatitis is a major problem which a physician encounters in his clinical practice. In view of increasing incidence of tuberculosis in our country a large number of infected individuals are started on Antituberculous (ATT) drugs and rifampicin is invariably part of the regimen. One of the major adverse effects of ATT drugs is drug- induced hepatitis which is characterized by elevation of liver enzymes and bilirubin. Hepatotoxicity is usually idiosyncratic or dose-dependent. Rifampicin causes transient elevation of transaminases in 10-20 percent of individuals and this does not warrant dose adjustments of the drug. Rarely rifampicin can lead to severe hepatitis with hyperbilirubinaemia and marked elevations of SGOT and SGPT and in some patients this can be fatal. The exact mechanism of Rifampicin induced hepatotoxicity is not known but it is postulated to be due to idiosyncratic reaction to rifampicin metabolites which may be directly toxic or induce an immunologically mediated liver injury. Rarely rifampicin may cause hyperbilirubinaemia without enzyme elevation. Here we report a patient with bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis who developed transient severe indirect hyperbilirubinaemia on rifampicin. On review of relevant literature we find that rifampicin can have a biphasic effect on bilirubin, an initial increase in indirect bilirubin and later normalization of bilirubin. We have reported this case because of its rarity in clinical practice. PMID:27190870

  5. Sortilin-related receptor SORCS3 is a postsynaptic modulator of synaptic depression and fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiderhoff, Tilman; Christiansen, Gitte B; Pallesen, Lone T; Vaegter, Christian; Nykjaer, Anders; Holm, Mai Marie; Glerup, Simon; Willnow, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    SORCS3 is an orphan receptor of the VPS10P domain receptor family, a group of sorting and signaling receptors central to many pathways in control of neuronal viability and function. SORCS3 is highly expressed in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, but the relevance of this receptor for hippocampal activity remained absolutely unclear. Here, we show that SORCS3 localizes to the postsynaptic density and that loss of receptor activity in gene-targeted mice abrogates NMDA receptor-dependent and -independent forms of long-term depression (LTD). Consistent with a loss of synaptic retraction, SORCS3-deficient mice suffer from deficits in behavioral activities associated with hippocampal LTD, particularly from an accelerated extinction of fear memory. A possible molecular mechanism for SORCS3 in synaptic depression was suggested by targeted proteomics approaches that identified the ability of SORCS3 to functionally interact with PICK1, an adaptor that sorts glutamate receptors at the postsynapse. Faulty localization of PICK1 in SORCS3-deficient neurons argues for altered glutamate receptor trafficking as the cause of altered synaptic plasticity in the SORCS3-deficient mouse model. In conclusion, our studies have identified a novel function for VPS10P domain receptors in control of synaptic depression and suggest SORCS3 as a novel factor modulating aversive memory extinction. PMID:24069373

  6. Short-term environmental enrichment enhances synaptic plasticity in hippocampal slices from aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Liana R; O'Dell, Kazuko A; Funatsu, Michiyo; Zorumski, Charles F; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2016-08-01

    Age-associated changes in cognition are mirrored by impairments in cellular models of memory and learning, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In young rodents, environmental enrichment (EE) can enhance memory, alter LTP and LTD, as well as reverse cognitive deficits induced by aging. Whether short-term EE can benefit cognition and synaptic plasticity in aged rodents is unclear. Here, we tested if short-term EE could overcome age-associated impairments in induction of LTP and LTD. LTP and LTD could not be induced in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices in control, aged rats using standard stimuli that are highly effective in young rats. However, exposure of aged littermates to EE for three weeks enabled successful induction of LTP and LTD. EE-facilitated LTP was dependent upon N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). These alterations in synaptic plasticity occurred with elevated levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein and vascular endothelial growth factor, but in the absence of changes in several other synaptic and cellular markers. Importantly, our study suggests that even a relatively short period of EE is sufficient to alter synaptic plasticity and molecular markers linked to cognitive function in aged animals. PMID:27208617

  7. Upregulation of transmitter release probability improves a conversion of synaptic analogue signals into neuronal digital spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiandong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Action potentials at the neurons and graded signals at the synapses are primary codes in the brain. In terms of their functional interaction, the studies were focused on the influence of presynaptic spike patterns on synaptic activities. How the synapse dynamics quantitatively regulates the encoding of postsynaptic digital spikes remains unclear. We investigated this question at unitary glutamatergic synapses on cortical GABAergic neurons, especially the quantitative influences of release probability on synapse dynamics and neuronal encoding. Glutamate release probability and synaptic strength are proportionally upregulated by presynaptic sequential spikes. The upregulation of release probability and the efficiency of probability-driven synaptic facilitation are strengthened by elevating presynaptic spike frequency and Ca2+. The upregulation of release probability improves spike capacity and timing precision at postsynaptic neuron. These results suggest that the upregulation of presynaptic glutamate release facilitates a conversion of synaptic analogue signals into digital spikes in postsynaptic neurons, i.e., a functional compatibility between presynaptic and postsynaptic partners.

  8. Flexible Proton-Gated Oxide Synaptic Transistors on Si Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li Qiang; Wan, Chang Jin; Gao, Ping Qi; Liu, Yang Hui; Xiao, Hui; Ye, Ji Chun; Wan, Qing

    2016-08-24

    Ion-conducting materials have received considerable attention for their applications in fuel cells, electrochemical devices, and sensors. Here, flexible indium zinc oxide (InZnO) synaptic transistors with multiple presynaptic inputs gated by proton-conducting phosphorosilicate glass-based electrolyte films are fabricated on ultrathin Si membranes. Transient characteristics of the proton gated InZnO synaptic transistors are investigated, indicating stable proton-gating behaviors. Short-term synaptic plasticities are mimicked on the proposed proton-gated synaptic transistors. Furthermore, synaptic integration regulations are mimicked on the proposed synaptic transistor networks. Spiking logic modulations are realized based on the transition between superlinear and sublinear synaptic integration. The multigates coupled flexible proton-gated oxide synaptic transistors may be interesting for neuroinspired platforms with sophisticated spatiotemporal information processing. PMID:27471861

  9. Leptin Induces a Novel Form of NMDA Receptor-Dependent LTP at Hippocampal Temporoammonic-CA1 Synapses 1,2,3

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Xiao; McGregor, Gemma; Irving, Andrew J; Harvey, Jenni

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It is well documented that the hormone leptin regulates many central functions and that hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are a key target for leptin action. Indeed, leptin modulates excitatory synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity at the Schaffer-collateral input to CA1 neurons. However the impact of leptin on the direct temporoammonic (TA) input to CA1 neurons is not known. Here we show that leptin evokes a long-lasting increase [long-term potentiation (LTP)] in excitatory ...

  10. K(Ca)2 and k(ca)3 channels in learning and memory processes, and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Els F E; Nelemans, Ad; Luiten, Paul; Nijholt, Ingrid; Dolga, Amalia; Eisel, Uli

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-activated potassium (K(Ca)) channels are present throughout the central nervous system as well as many peripheral tissues. Activation of K(Ca) channels contribute to maintenance of the neuronal membrane potential and was shown to underlie the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) that regulates action potential firing and limits the firing frequency of repetitive action potentials. Different subtypes of K(Ca) channels were anticipated on the basis of their physiological and pharmacological profiles, and cloning revealed two well defined but phylogenetic distantly related groups of channels. The group subject of this review includes both the small conductance K(Ca)2 channels (K(Ca)2.1, K(Ca)2.2, and K(Ca)2.3) and the intermediate-conductance (K(Ca)3.1) channel. These channels are activated by submicromolar intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations and are voltage independent. Of all K(Ca) channels only the K(Ca)2 channels can be potently but differentially blocked by the bee-venom apamin. In the past few years modulation of K(Ca) channel activation revealed new roles for K(Ca)2 channels in controlling dendritic excitability, synaptic functioning, and synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, K(Ca)2 channels appeared to be involved in neurodegeneration, and learning and memory processes. In this review, we focus on the role of K(Ca)2 and K(Ca)3 channels in these latter mechanisms with emphasis on learning and memory, Alzheimer's disease and on the interplay between neuroinflammation and different neurotransmitters/neuromodulators, their signaling components and K(Ca) channel activation. PMID:22701424

  11. P2X Receptors and Synaptic Plasticity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pankratov, Y.; Lalo, U.; Krishtal, A.; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 158, č. 1 (2009), s. 137-148. ISSN 0306-4522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : ATP * P2X receptors * synaptic plasticity Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.292, year: 2009

  12. Retinal synaptic regeneration via microfluidic guiding channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ping-Jung; Liu, Zongbin; Zhang, Kai; Han, Xin; Saito, Yuki; Xia, Xiaojun; Yokoi, Kenji; Shen, Haifa; Qin, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    In vitro culture of dissociated retinal neurons is an important model for investigating retinal synaptic regeneration (RSR) and exploring potentials in artificial retina. Here, retinal precursor cells were cultured in a microfluidic chip with multiple arrays of microchannels in order to reconstruct the retinal neuronal synapse. The cultured retinal cells were physically connected through microchannels. Activation of electric signal transduction by the cells through the microchannels was demonstrated by administration of glycinergic factors. In addition, an image-based analytical method was used to quantify the synaptic connections and to assess the kinetics of synaptic regeneration. The rate of RSR decreased significantly below 100 μM of inhibitor glycine and then approached to a relatively constant level at higher concentrations. Furthermore, RSR was enhanced by chemical stimulation with potassium chloride. Collectively, the microfluidic synaptic regeneration chip provides a novel tool for high-throughput investigation of RSR at the cellular level and may be useful in quality control of retinal precursor cell transplantation. PMID:26314276

  13. Synaptic plasticity and the warburg effect

    KAUST Repository

    Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Functional brain imaging studies show that in certain brain regions glucose utilization exceeds oxygen consumption, indicating the predominance of aerobic glycolysis. In this issue, Goyal et al. (2014) report that this metabolic profile is associated with an enrichment in the expression of genes involved in synaptic plasticity and remodeling processes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  14. Fragile X mental retardation protein and synaptic plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Sidorov, Michael S.; Auerbach, Benjamin D.; Bear, Mark F.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of the translational repressor FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome. In healthy neurons, FMRP modulates the local translation of numerous synaptic proteins. Synthesis of these proteins is required for the maintenance and regulation of long-lasting changes in synaptic strength. In this role as a translational inhibitor, FMRP exerts profound effects on synaptic plasticity.

  15. Differential Modulation of Synaptic Strength and Timing Regulate Synaptic Efficacy in a Motor Network

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce R Johnson; Brown, Jessica M; Kvarta, Mark D.; Lu, Jay Y. J.; Schneider, Lauren R.; Nadim, Farzan; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M

    2010-01-01

    Neuromodulators modify network output by altering neuronal firing properties and synaptic strength at multiple sites; however, the functional importance of each site is often unclear. We determined the importance of monoamine modulation of a single synapse for regulation of network cycle frequency in the oscillatory pyloric network of the lobster. The pacemaker kernel of the pyloric network receives only one chemical synaptic feedback, an inhibitory synapse from the lateral pyloric (LP) neuro...

  16. Calcineurin proteolysis in astrocytes: Implications for impaired synaptic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleiss, Melanie M; Sompol, Pradoldej; Kraner, Susan D; Abdul, Hafiz Mohmmad; Furman, Jennifer L; Guttmann, Rodney P; Wilcock, Donna M; Nelson, Peter T; Norris, Christopher M

    2016-09-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that astrocyte activation, found in most forms of neural injury and disease, is linked to the hyperactivation of the protein phosphatase calcineurin. In many tissues and cell types, calcineurin hyperactivity is the direct result of limited proteolysis. However, little is known about the proteolytic status of calcineurin in activated astrocytes. Here, we developed a polyclonal antibody to a high activity calcineurin proteolytic fragment in the 45-48kDa range (ΔCN) for use in immunohistochemical applications. When applied to postmortem human brain sections, the ΔCN antibody intensely labeled cell clusters in close juxtaposition to amyloid deposits and microinfarcts. Many of these cells exhibited clear activated astrocyte morphology. The expression of ΔCN in astrocytes near areas of pathology was further confirmed using confocal microscopy. Multiple NeuN-positive cells, particularly those within microinfarct core regions, also labeled positively for ΔCN. This observation suggests that calcineurin proteolysis can also occur within damaged or dying neurons, as reported in other studies. When a similar ΔCN fragment was selectively expressed in hippocampal astrocytes of intact rats (using adeno-associated virus), we observed a significant reduction in the strength of CA3-CA1 excitatory synapses, indicating that the hyperactivation of astrocytic calcineurin is sufficient for disrupting synaptic function. Together, these results suggest that proteolytic activation of calcineurin in activated astrocytes may be a central mechanism for driving and/or exacerbating neural dysfunction during neurodegenerative disease and injury. PMID:27212416

  17. Design and evaluation of lornoxicam bilayered tablets for biphasic release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songa Ambedkar Sunil

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation was to develop bilayered tablets of lornoxicam to achieve biphasic release pattern. A bilayered tablet, consisting of an immediate and controlled release layer, was prepared by direct compression technique. The controlled release effect was achieved by using various hydrophilic natural, semi synthetic and synthetic controlled release polymers such as xanthan gum, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC and polyethylene oxide (PEO to modulate the release of the drug. The in vitro drug release profiles showed the biphasic release behavior in which the immediate release (IR layer containing the lornoxicam was released within 15 minutes, whereas the controlled release (CR layer controlled the drug release for up to 24 h. All the bilayered tablets formulated have followed the zero order release with non-Fickian diffusion controlled release mechanism after the initial burst release. FTIR studies revealed that there was no interaction between the drug and polymers used in the study. Statistical analysis (ANOVA showed no significant difference in the cumulative amount of drug release after 15 min, but significant difference (p O objetivo do presente trabalho foi desenvolver comprimidos bicamada de lornoxicam para atingir padrão de liberação bifásica. Preparou-se, por compressão direta, comprimido bicamada, consistindo de uma camada de liberação imediata e uma de liberação controlada. A liberação controlada foi obtida pelo uso de vários polímeros naturais hidrofílicos, semi-sintéticos e sintéticos, tais como goma xantana, hidroxipropilmetil celulose (HPMC e óxido de polietileno (PEO para modular a liberação do fármaco. Os perfis de liberação in vitro mostraram comportamento bifásico em que a camada de liberação imediata (IR contendo lornoxicam foi liberada em 15 minutos, enquanto a camada de liberação controlada (CR liberou o fármaco em mais de 24 horas, Todos os comprimidos bicamada

  18. Phosphorylation and regulation of glutamate receptors by CaMKII

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Li-Min; Jin, Dao-Zhong; Xue, Bing; Chu, Xiang-Ping; WANG, John Q.

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is the most abundant kinase within excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. It interacts with and phosphorylates a large number of synaptic proteins, including major ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), to constitutively and/or activity-dependently regulate trafficking, subsynaptic localization, and function of the receptors. Among iGluRs, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)...

  19. GABAergic synaptic transmission regulates calcium influx during spike-timing dependent plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Balena

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Coincident pre- and postsynaptic activity of hippocampal neurons alters the strength of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA-mediated inhibition through a Ca2+-dependent regulation of cation-chloride cotransporters. This long-term synaptic modulation is termed GABAergic spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP. In the present study, we examined whether the properties of the GABAergic synapses themselves modulate the required postsynaptic Ca2+ influx during GABAergic STDP induction. To do this we first identified GABAergic synapses between cultured hippocampal neurons based on their relatively long decay time constants and their reversal potentials which lay close to the resting membrane potential. GABAergic STDP was then induced by coincidentally (± 1 ms firing the pre- and postsynaptic neurons at 5 Hz for 30 seconds, while postsynaptic Ca2+ was imaged with the Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye Fluo4-AM. In all cases, the induction of GABAergic STDP increased postsynaptic Ca2+ above resting levels. We further found that the magnitude of this increase correlated with the amplitude and polarity of the GABAergic postsynaptic current (GPSC; hyperpolarizing GPSCs reduced the Ca2+ influx in comparison to both depolarizing GPSCs, and postsynaptic neurons spiked alone. This relationship was influenced by both the driving force for Cl- and GABAA conductance (which had positive correlations with the Ca2+ influx. The spike-timing order during STDP induction did not influence the correlation between GPSC amplitude and Ca2+ influx, which is likely accounted for by the symmetrical GABAergic STDP window.

  20. Influence of saline solution on hydration behavior of β-dicalcium silicate in comparison with biphasic calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite bio-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of using saline solution as mixing and curing liquid on some characteristics of β-dicalcium silicate (β-C2S) and biphasic compound tri-calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HAp) bio-ceramics was investigated. β-C2S (27–30 nm) was prepared by solid state reaction at 1450 °C, while biphasic compound TCP/HAp (7–15 nm) was synthesized from an aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and (NH4)2HPO4·12H2O by chemical precipitation method. Setting times, compressive strength, pH values, X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were investigated. The evaluation of cytotoxicity of both calcium silicate and biphasic compounds to human gingival fibroblasts was carried out. The use of saline solution as mixing and immersing liquid shortened the setting time for the two bio-cements. TCP/HAp did not show any mechanical strength but β-C2S showed good strength values. Both synthesized compounds showed a moderate cytotoxicity and both materials were effective in a no significant way. - Highlights: • The dissolution and hydration of β-C2S and TCP/HAp in distilled water and saline solution were studied. • TCP/HAp did not show mechanical strength, while β-C2S showed good mechanical strength. • The use of saline solution did enhances the dissolution & hydration rate. • An increase in pH values was detected when using saline solution. • Both materials showed a moderate cytotoxicity in no significant way

  1. Influence of saline solution on hydration behavior of β-dicalcium silicate in comparison with biphasic calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite bio-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radwan, M.M., E-mail: mmahmoudradwan@yahoo.com [Ceramics Dept, National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt); Abd El-Hamid, H.K. [Ceramics Dept, National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt); Mohamed, A.F. [The Holding Company for Production of Vaccines, Sera and Drugs (EGYVAC) (Egypt)

    2015-12-01

    The influence of using saline solution as mixing and curing liquid on some characteristics of β-dicalcium silicate (β-C{sub 2}S) and biphasic compound tri-calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HAp) bio-ceramics was investigated. β-C{sub 2}S (27–30 nm) was prepared by solid state reaction at 1450 °C, while biphasic compound TCP/HAp (7–15 nm) was synthesized from an aqueous solution of Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·12H{sub 2}O by chemical precipitation method. Setting times, compressive strength, pH values, X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were investigated. The evaluation of cytotoxicity of both calcium silicate and biphasic compounds to human gingival fibroblasts was carried out. The use of saline solution as mixing and immersing liquid shortened the setting time for the two bio-cements. TCP/HAp did not show any mechanical strength but β-C{sub 2}S showed good strength values. Both synthesized compounds showed a moderate cytotoxicity and both materials were effective in a no significant way. - Highlights: • The dissolution and hydration of β-C{sub 2}S and TCP/HAp in distilled water and saline solution were studied. • TCP/HAp did not show mechanical strength, while β-C{sub 2}S showed good mechanical strength. • The use of saline solution did enhances the dissolution & hydration rate. • An increase in pH values was detected when using saline solution. • Both materials showed a moderate cytotoxicity in no significant way.

  2. Multiple personalities: synaptic target cells as introverts and extroverts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzenthaler, S; Chiba, A

    2001-10-01

    The intricate process of wiring a neuronetwork requires a high degree of accuracy in the communication between pre- and post-synaptic cells. While presynaptic cells have been widely recognized for their dynamic role in synaptic matchmaking, post-synaptic cells have historically been overlooked as passive targets. Recent studies in the Drosophila embryonic neuromuscular system provide compelling evidence that post-synaptic cells participate actively in the synaptogenic process. Endocytosis allows them to quickly modify the array of molecular cues they provide on their surfaces and the extension of dynamic filopodia allows post-synaptic cells to engage in direct long-distance communication. By making use of familiar cellular mechanisms such as endocytosis and filopodia formation, post-synaptic cells may be able to communicate more effectively with potential synaptic partners. PMID:11576167

  3. Experimental validation of a new biphasic model of the contact mechanics of the porcine hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junyan; Wang, Qianqian; Jin, Zhongmin; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Wilcox, Ruth K

    2014-05-30

    Hip models that incorporate the biphasic behaviour of articular cartilage can improve understanding of the joint function, pathology of joint degeneration and effect of potential interventions. The aim of this study was to develop a specimen-specific biphasic finite element model of a porcine acetabulum incorporating a biphasic representation of the articular cartilage and to validate the model predictions against direct experimental measurements of the contact area in the same specimen. Additionally, the effect of using a different tension-compression behaviour for the solid phase of the articular cartilage was investigated. The model represented different radial clearances and load magnitudes. The comparison of the finite element predictions and the experimental measurement showed good agreement in the location, size and shape of the contact area, and a similar trend in the relationship between contact area and load was observed. There was, however, a deviation of over 30% in the magnitude of the contact area, which might be due to experimental limitations or to simplifications in the material constitutive relationships used. In comparison with the isotropic solid phase model, the tension-compression solid phase model had better agreement with the experimental observations. The findings provide some confidence that the new biphasic methodology for modelling the cartilage is able to predict the contact mechanics of the hip joint. The validation provides a foundation for future subject-specific studies of the human hip using a biphasic cartilage model. PMID:24878736

  4. Synaptic devices based on purely electronic memristors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Ruobing [Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Institute of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Li, Jun; Zhuge, Fei, E-mail: zhugefei@nimte.ac.cn, E-mail: h-cao@nimte.ac.cn; Zhu, Liqiang; Liang, Lingyan; Zhang, Hongliang; Gao, Junhua; Cao, Hongtao, E-mail: zhugefei@nimte.ac.cn, E-mail: h-cao@nimte.ac.cn; Fu, Bing; Li, Kang [Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2016-01-04

    Memristive devices have been widely employed to emulate biological synaptic behavior. In these cases, the memristive switching generally originates from electrical field induced ion migration or Joule heating induced phase change. In this letter, the Ti/ZnO/Pt structure was found to show memristive switching ascribed to a carrier trapping/detrapping of the trap sites (e.g., oxygen vacancies or zinc interstitials) in ZnO. The carrier trapping/detrapping level can be controllably adjusted by regulating the current compliance level or voltage amplitude. Multi-level conductance states can, therefore, be realized in such memristive device. The spike-timing-dependent plasticity, an important Hebbian learning rule, has been implemented in this type of synaptic device. Compared with filamentary-type memristive devices, purely electronic memristors have potential to reduce their energy consumption and work more stably and reliably, since no structural distortion occurs.

  5. Filamentary Switching: Synaptic Plasticity through Device Volatility

    CERN Document Server

    La Barbera, Selina; Alibart, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    Replicating the computational functionalities and performances of the brain remains one of the biggest challenges for the future of information and communication technologies. Such an ambitious goal requires research efforts from the architecture level to the basic device level (i.e., investigating the opportunities offered by emerging nanotechnologies to build such systems). Nanodevices, or, more precisely, memory or memristive devices, have been proposed for the implementation of synaptic functions, offering the required features and integration in a single component. In this paper, we demonstrate that the basic physics involved in the filamentary switching of electrochemical metallization cells can reproduce important biological synaptic functions that are key mechanisms for information processing and storage. The transition from short- to long-term plasticity has been reported as a direct consequence of filament growth (i.e., increased conductance) in filamentary memory devices. In this paper, we show tha...

  6. Synaptic devices based on purely electronic memristors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memristive devices have been widely employed to emulate biological synaptic behavior. In these cases, the memristive switching generally originates from electrical field induced ion migration or Joule heating induced phase change. In this letter, the Ti/ZnO/Pt structure was found to show memristive switching ascribed to a carrier trapping/detrapping of the trap sites (e.g., oxygen vacancies or zinc interstitials) in ZnO. The carrier trapping/detrapping level can be controllably adjusted by regulating the current compliance level or voltage amplitude. Multi-level conductance states can, therefore, be realized in such memristive device. The spike-timing-dependent plasticity, an important Hebbian learning rule, has been implemented in this type of synaptic device. Compared with filamentary-type memristive devices, purely electronic memristors have potential to reduce their energy consumption and work more stably and reliably, since no structural distortion occurs

  7. Reduced endogenous Ca2+ buffering speeds active zone Ca2+ signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvendahl, Igor; Jablonski, Lukasz; Baade, Carolin; Matveev, Victor; Neher, Erwin; Hallermann, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Fast synchronous neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic active zone is triggered by local Ca(2+) signals, which are confined in their spatiotemporal extent by endogenous Ca(2+) buffers. However, it remains elusive how rapid and reliable Ca(2+) signaling can be sustained during repetitive release. Here, we established quantitative two-photon Ca(2+) imaging in cerebellar mossy fiber boutons, which fire at exceptionally high rates. We show that endogenous fixed buffers have a surprisingly low Ca(2+)-binding ratio (∼ 15) and low affinity, whereas mobile buffers have high affinity. Experimentally constrained modeling revealed that the low endogenous buffering promotes fast clearance of Ca(2+) from the active zone during repetitive firing. Measuring Ca(2+) signals at different distances from active zones with ultra-high-resolution confirmed our model predictions. Our results lead to the concept that reduced Ca(2+) buffering enables fast active zone Ca(2+) signaling, suggesting that the strength of endogenous Ca(2+) buffering limits the rate of synchronous synaptic transmission. PMID:26015575

  8. Gender differences in human cortical synaptic density

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso-Nanclares, L.; Gonzalez-Soriano, J.; Rodriguez, J. R.; DeFelipe, J

    2008-01-01

    Certain cognitive functions differ in men and women, although the anatomical and functional substrates underlying these differences remain unknown. Because neocortical activity is directly related with higher brain function, numerous studies have focused on the cerebral cortex when searching for possible structural correlates of cognitive gender differences. However, there are no studies on possible gender differences at the synaptic level. In the present work we have used stereological and c...

  9. Morphological plasticity of astroglia: Understanding synaptic microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Heller, J. P.; Rusakov, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Memory formation in the brain is thought to rely on the remodeling of synaptic connections which eventually results in neural network rewiring. This remodeling is likely to involve ultrathin astroglial protrusions which often occur in the immediate vicinity of excitatory synapses. The phenomenology, cellular mechanisms, and causal relationships of such astroglial restructuring remain, however, poorly understood. This is in large part because monitoring and probing of the underpinning molecula...

  10. Signaling for Vesicle Mobilization and Synaptic Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Levitan, Edwin S.

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis that release of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides is facilitated by increasing the mobility of small synaptic vesicles (SSVs) and dense core vesicles (DCVs) could not be tested until the advent of methods for visualizing these secretory vesicles in living nerve terminals. In fact, fluorescence imaging studies have only since 2005 established that activity increases secretory vesicle mobility in motoneuron terminals and chromaffin cells. Mobilization of DCVs and SSVs...

  11. Cellular and synaptic network defects in autism

    OpenAIRE

    Peça, João; Feng, Guoping

    2012-01-01

    Many candidate genes are now thought to confer susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Here we review four interrelated complexes, each composed of multiple families of genes that functionally coalesce on common cellular pathways. We illustrate a common thread in the organization of glutamatergic synapses and suggest a link between genes involved in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Fragile X syndrome, Angelman syndrome and several synaptic ASD candidate genes. When viewed in this conte...

  12. Matrix metalloproteinases, synaptic injury, and multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ArekSzklarczyk

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a disease of the central nervous system in which immune mediated damage to myelin is characteristic. For an overview of this condition and its pathophysiology, please refer to one of many excellent published reviews. To follow, is a discussion focused on the possibility that synaptic injury occurs in at least a subset of patients, and that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs play a role in such.

  13. Retinal synaptic regeneration via microfluidic guiding channels

    OpenAIRE

    Ping-Jung Su; Zongbin Liu; Kai Zhang; Xin Han; Yuki Saito; Xiaojun Xia; Kenji Yokoi; Haifa Shen; Lidong Qin

    2015-01-01

    In vitro culture of dissociated retinal neurons is an important model for investigating retinal synaptic regeneration (RSR) and exploring potentials in artificial retina. Here, retinal precursor cells were cultured in a microfluidic chip with multiple arrays of microchannels in order to reconstruct the retinal neuronal synapse. The cultured retinal cells were physically connected through microchannels. Activation of electric signal transduction by the cells through the microchannels was demon...

  14. Matrix Metalloproteinases, Synaptic Injury, and Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Szklarczyk, Arek; Conant, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system in which immune mediated damage to myelin is characteristic. For an overview of this condition and its pathophysiology, please refer to one of many excellent published reviews (Sorensen and Ransohoff, 1998; Weiner, 2009). To follow, is a discussion focused on the possibility that synaptic injury occurs in at least a subset of patients, and that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a role in such.

  15. Structural elements that underlie Doc2β function during asynchronous synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Renhao; Gaffaney, Jon D; Chapman, Edwin R

    2015-08-01

    Double C2-like domain-containing proteins alpha and beta (Doc2α and Doc2β) are tandem C2-domain proteins proposed to function as Ca(2+) sensors for asynchronous neurotransmitter release. Here, we systematically analyze each of the negatively charged residues that mediate binding of Ca(2+) to the β isoform. The Ca(2+) ligands in the C2A domain were dispensable for Ca(2+)-dependent translocation to the plasma membrane, with one exception: neutralization of D220 resulted in constitutive translocation. In contrast, three of the five Ca(2+) ligands in the C2B domain are required for translocation. Importantly, translocation was correlated with the ability of the mutants to enhance asynchronous release when overexpressed in neurons. Finally, replacement of specific Ca(2+)/lipid-binding loops of synaptotagmin 1, a Ca(2+) sensor for synchronous release, with corresponding loops from Doc2β, resulted in chimeras that yielded slower kinetics in vitro and slower excitatory postsynaptic current decays in neurons. Together, these data reveal the key determinants of Doc2β that underlie its function during the slow phase of synaptic transmission. PMID:26195798

  16. Synaptic theory of Replicator-like melioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Loewenstein

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the theory of Melioration, organisms in repeated choice settings shift their choice preference in favor of the alternative that provides the highest return. The goal of this paper is to explain how this learning behavior can emerge from microscopic changes in the efficacies of synapses, in the context of two-alternative repeated-choice experiment. I consider a large family of synaptic plasticity rules in which changes in synaptic efficacies are driven by the covariance between reward and neural activity. I construct a general framework that predicts the learning dynamics of any decision-making neural network that implements this synaptic plasticity rule and show that melioration naturally emerges in such networks. Moreover, the resultant learning dynamics follows the Replicator equation which is commonly used to phenomenologically describe changes in behavior in operant conditioning experiments. Several examples demonstrate how the learning rate of the network is affected by its properties and by the specifics of the plasticity rule. These results help bridge the gap between cellular physiology and learning behavior.

  17. Three dimensional biphasic calcium phosphate nanocomposites for load bearing bioactive bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Subhadra; Sinha, Arvind

    2016-02-01

    Mimicking matrix mediated bio-mineralization process, three dimensional blocks of biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP, hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP)) nanocomposites, having three different stoichiometries have been synthesized for possible application as load bearing synthetic bone graft or scaffolds. Biphasic blocks with three weight ratios of 20:80, 25:75 and 30:70 of HA and TCP respectively have been synthesized. Detailed structural and chemical characterization of the samples revealed a strong dependence of porosity and mechanical properties on the stoichiometry of biphasic blocks. Effect of physiological medium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the three different blocks has also been studied. Bioactivity of the BCP block, exhibiting highest compressive strength in air as well as in physiological medium, has been evaluated through adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells using different markers. PMID:26652386

  18. Bi-phasic Simulation of Metal Injection Moulding:Constitutive Determinations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Baosheng(柳葆生); Barriere Thierry; Gelin Jean-Claude

    2003-01-01

    To predict the segregation effect in metal injection moulding (MIM) injection, a bi-phasic model based on mixture theory is adopted in simulation. An explicit algorithm is developed and realized by the authors, which conducts the simulation to be a cost-effective tool in MIM technology. In case of the bi-phasic simulation, the viscosity behaviours are necessary to be determined for the flows of each phase while only the viscosity of mixture is measurable by tests. It is a crucial problem for application of the bi-phasic simulation of MIM injection. A reasonable method is hence analysed and proposed to determine the viscosity behaviours of each phase. Even though this method may be furthermore modified in the future, it results in the practical simulation of segregation effects with reasonable parameters. The simulation results are compared with the measurements on injected specimens.

  19. Characterization and extraction of the synaptic apposition surface for synaptic geometry analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Juan; Rodríguez, Angel; Rodríguez, José-Rodrigo; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Geometrical features of chemical synapses are relevant to their function. Two critical components of the synaptic junction are the active zone (AZ) and the postsynaptic density (PSD), as they are related to the probability of synaptic release and the number of postsynaptic receptors, respectively. Morphological studies of these structures are greatly facilitated by the use of recent electron microscopy techniques, such as combined focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), and software tools that permit reconstruction of large numbers of synapses in three dimensions. Since the AZ and the PSD are in close apposition and have a similar surface area, they can be represented by a single surface—the synaptic apposition surface (SAS). We have developed an efficient computational technique to automatically extract this surface from synaptic junctions that have previously been three-dimensionally reconstructed from actual tissue samples imaged by automated FIB/SEM. Given its relationship with the release probability and the number of postsynaptic receptors, the surface area of the SAS is a functionally relevant measure of the size of a synapse that can complement other geometrical features like the volume of the reconstructed synaptic junction, the equivalent ellipsoid size and the Feret's diameter. PMID:23847474

  20. Characterization and extraction of the synaptic apposition surface for synaptic geometry analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Morales

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Geometrical features of chemical synapses are relevant to their function. Two critical components of the synaptic junction are the active zone and the postsynaptic density, as they are related to the probability of synaptic release and the number of postsynaptic receptors, respectively. Morphological studies of these structures are greatly facilitated by the use of recent electron microscopy techniques, such as combined focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM, and software tools that permit reconstruction of large numbers of synapses in three dimensions. Since the active zone and the postsynaptic density are in close apposition and have a similar surface area, they can be represented by a single surface — the synaptic apposition surface (SAS. We have developed an efficient computational technique to automatically extract this surface from synaptic junctions that have previously been three-dimensionally reconstructed from actual tissue samples imaged by automated FIB/SEM. Given its relationship with the release probability and the number of postsynaptic receptors, the surface area of the SAS is a functionally relevant measure of the size of a synapse that can complement other geometrical features like the volume of the reconstructed synaptic junction, the equivalent ellipsoid size and the Feret’s diameter.

  1. Cationic influences upon synaptic transmission at the hair cell-afferent fiber synapse of the frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    The concentrations of inorganic cations (K+, Na+, and Ca2+) bathing the isolated frog labyrinth were varied in order to assess their role in influencing and mediating synaptic transmission at the hair cell-afferent fiber synapse. Experiments employed intracellular recordings of synaptic activity from VIIIth nerve afferents. Recordings were digitized continuously at 50 kHz, and excitatory postsynaptic potentials were detected and parameters quantified by computer algorithms. Particular attention was focused on cationic effects upon excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency of occurrence and excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude, in order to discriminate between pre- and postsynaptic actions. Because the small size of afferents preclude long term stable recordings, alterations in cationic concentrations were applied transiently and their peak effects on synaptic activity were assessed. Increases in extracellular K+ concentration of a few millimolar produced a large increase in the frequency of occurrence of excitatory postsynaptic potentials with little change in amplitude, indicating that release of transmitter from the hair cell is tightly coupled to its membrane potential. Increasing extracellular Na+ concentration resulted in an increase in excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude with no significant change in excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency of occurrence, suggesting that the transmitter-gated subsynaptic channel conducts Na+ ions. Decreases in extracellular Ca2+ concentration had little effect upon excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency, but increased excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency and amplitude. These findings suggest that at higher concentrations Ca2+ act presynaptically to prevent transmitter release and postsynaptically to prevent Na+ influx during the generation of the excitatory postsynaptic potential. The influences of these ions on synaptic activity at this synapse are remarkably similar to those reported at the

  2. A Structurally and Functionally Biomimetic Biphasic Scaffold for Intervertebral Disc Tissue Engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Tsz Hang Choy

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering offers high hopes for the treatment of intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration. Whereas scaffolds of the disc nucleus and annulus have been extensively studied, a truly biomimetic and mechanically functional biphasic scaffold using naturally occurring extracellular matrix is yet to be developed. Here, a biphasic scaffold was fabricated with collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, two of the most abundant extracellular matrix components in the IVD. Following fabrication, the scaffold was characterized and benchmarked against native disc. The biphasic scaffold was composed of a collagen-GAG co-precipitate making up the nucleus pulposus-like core, and this was encapsulated in multiple lamellae of photochemically crosslinked collagen membranes comprising the annulus fibrosus-like lamellae. On mechanical testing, the height of our engineered disc recovered by ~82-89% in an annulus-independent manner, when compared with the 99% recovery exhibited by native disc. The annulus-independent nature of disc height recovery suggests that the fluid replacement function of the engineered nucleus pulposus core might mimic this hitherto unique feature of native disc. Biphasic scaffolds comprised of 10 annulus fibrosus-like lamellae had the best overall mechanical performance among the various designs owing to their similarity to native disc in most aspects, including elastic compliance during creep and recovery, and viscous compliance during recovery. However, the dynamic mechanical performance (including dynamic stiffness and damping factor of all the biphasic scaffolds was similar to that of the native discs. This study contributes to the rationalized design and development of a biomimetic and mechanically viable biphasic scaffold for IVD tissue engineering.

  3. Is there an Optimal Shape of the Defibrillation Shock: Constant Current vs. Pulsed Biphasic Waveforms

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Dotsinsky; Tsvetan Mudrov; Vessela Krasteva; Jecho Kostov

    2013-01-01

    Three waveforms for transthoracic defibrillation are assessed and compared: the Pulsed Biphasic Waveform (PBW), the Rectilinear Biphasic Waveform (RBW), and the "lossless" constant current (LLCC) pulses. Two indices are introduced: 1) kf = W/W0 - the ratio between the delivered energy W and the energy W0 of a rectangular pulse with the same duration and electric charge; 2) ηC = W/WC0 - the level of utilizing the initially loaded capacitor energy WC0. The envisioned comparative study shows tha...

  4. The standard biphasic-contrast examination of the stomach and duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A standard examination has been developed, called biphasic, because it combines the advantages of positive-contrast and double-contrast techniques. The theoretical background and technique of this examination are described and the basic interpretation of double-contrast studies stated. General remarks on the results and on the complementary role of radiological examination and endoscopy are included. A quantitative study of standard biphasic-contrast examinations in patients over a period of 3 years is presented. Finally a radiological atlas of common lesions of the stomach and duodenum is given. (C.F.)

  5. Mice Overexpressing Type 1 Adenylyl Cyclase Show Enhanced Spatial Memory Flexibility in the Absence of Intact Synaptic Long-Term Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Wang, Hongbing

    2013-01-01

    There is significant interest in understanding the contribution of intracellular signaling and synaptic substrates to memory flexibility, which involves new learning and suppression of obsolete memory. Here, we report that enhancement of Ca[superscript 2+]-stimulated cAMP signaling by overexpressing type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1) facilitated…

  6. Synaptic Contacts Enhance Cell-to-Cell Tau Pathology Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Calafate

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of insoluble Tau protein aggregates and stereotypical propagation of Tau pathology through the brain are common hallmarks of tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Propagation of Tau pathology appears to occur along connected neurons, but whether synaptic contacts between neurons are facilitating propagation has not been demonstrated. Using quantitative in vitro models, we demonstrate that, in parallel to non-synaptic mechanisms, synapses, but not merely the close distance between the cells, enhance the propagation of Tau pathology between acceptor hippocampal neurons and Tau donor cells. Similarly, in an artificial neuronal network using microfluidic devices, synapses and synaptic activity are promoting neuronal Tau pathology propagation in parallel to the non-synaptic mechanisms. Our work indicates that the physical presence of synaptic contacts between neurons facilitate Tau pathology propagation. These findings can have implications for synaptic repair therapies, which may turn out to have adverse effects by promoting propagation of Tau pathology.

  7. A role for Mints in transmitter release: Mint 1 knockout mice exhibit impaired GABAergic synaptic transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Angela; Morishita, Wade; Hammer, Robert E.; Malenka, Robert C.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2003-01-01

    Mints (also called X11-like proteins) are adaptor proteins composed of divergent N-terminal sequences that bind to synaptic proteins such as CASK (Mint 1 only) and Munc18-1 (Mints 1 and 2) and conserved C-terminal PTB- and PDZ-domains that bind to widely distributed proteins such as APP, presenilins, and Ca2+ channels (all Mints). We find that Mints 1 and 2 are similarly expressed in most neurons except for inhibitory interneurons that contain selectively high levels of Mint 1. Using knockout...

  8. Surface modification of porous polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds for bone regeneration in rat calvaria defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Hyun; Linh, Nguyen T B; Min, Young K; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2014-10-01

    In this study, polycaprolactone scaffolds fabricated by a salt-leaching process were loaded with biphasic calcium phosphate successfully to improve the osteoconductivity in bone regeneration. The surface of polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds was aminolyzed by 1,6-hexamethylenediamine to introduce amino groups onto the surface, which was verified qualitatively by ninhyrin staining. Collagen was further immobilized on the aminolyzed porous polycaprolactone via N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropy) carbodiimide hydrochloride/hydroxy-2,5-dioxopyrolidine-3-sulfonic acid sodium cross-linking. The pore size of polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate-collagen scaffolds was 200-300 µm, which was suitable for bone in-growth. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the coupling of collagen immobilized on the surface of polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate. In vitro results demonstrated that the spreading and viability of MC3T3-E1 cells were remarkably improved in the polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate-collagen scaffolds. The in vivo study was carried out by implanting the porous polycaprolactone, polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate, and polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate-collagen to the skulls of rats. Although the addition of biphasic calcium phosphate particles in the polycaprolactone scaffolds does not have a strong effect on the new bone formation, the immobilization of collagen on the polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds significantly improved the bone regeneration even though the implantation time was short, 6 weeks. The present results provide more evidence that functionalizing polycaprolactone with biphasic calcium phosphate and collagen may be a feasible way to improve the osteoconduction in bone regeneration. PMID:24939961

  9. Synthesis and characterization of porous biphasic calcium phosphate scaffold from different porogens for possible bone tissue engineering applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amera A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the wet precipitation method, Biphasic calcium phosphate granules were synthesized with Ca/P ratio1.52 and controlled porosity, pore size distribution, and granule size. Microporosity was then obtained by adjusting sintering temperature while macroporosity was prepared by adding 1:3 wt% ratio of two normally used porogens (naphthalene and sugar and 2 newly introduced porogens (sago and lentil. Samples from each ratio were pressed into pellets and were fired at 500ºC for 2 hours with 0.5°C/minute heating rate (for removal of porogens and further sintered at 850°C for 2 hours with 5°C/minute before cooling down to room temperature. The granules were prepared by crushing and sieving BCP sintered pellets to get granules of sizes ranging from 250-500μm. X-rays diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM, particle size and porosity analyses were employed in order to characterize the granules. A round to oval shape pores with 200-400 μm size were obtained and identical to the prepared porogens’ particle size. This approach gives the desirable properties near to normal bone leading to a perfect osteogenesis for the purpose tissue engineering.

  10. Emotional enhancement of memory: how norepinephrine enables synaptic plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Tully Keith; Bolshakov Vadim Y

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Changes in synaptic strength are believed to underlie learning and memory. We explore the idea that norepinephrine is an essential modulator of memory through its ability to regulate synaptic mechanisms. Emotional arousal leads to activation of the locus coeruleus with the subsequent release of norepineprine in the brain, resulting in the enhancement of memory. Norepinephrine activates both pre- and post-synaptic adrenergic receptors at central synapses with different functional outc...

  11. The impact of synapsins on synaptic plasticity and cognitive behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin ZHANG; Zhong-Xin ZHAO

    2006-01-01

    Synapsins are a family of phosphoproteins specifically associated with the cytoplasmic surface of the synaptic vesicle membrane, appearing to regulate neurotransmitter release, the formation and maintenance of synaptic contacts.They could induce the change of the synaptic plasticity to regulate various adaptation reactions, and change the cognitive behaviors. So we presume that if some cognitive behavior are damaged, synapsins would be changed as well. This gives us a new recognition of better diagnosis and therapy of cognitive disorder desease.

  12. Synaptic tagging and capture in a biophysical model

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Auffarth

    2014-01-01

    There is wide consensus that synaptic plasticity (prominently long-term potentiation; LTP) is the underlying mechanism for learning and memory storage (cf Nabavi 2014). Open issues include the molecular pathways and networks and structural processes leading to functional and structural changes at the synaptic and dendritic levels in terms of channels and spines. Synaptic tagging and capture (STC; Frey and Morris 1997; Redondo and Morris 2011) is a predominant model for investigating LTP. Acco...

  13. Roles of Synaptic MAGUK Proteins in Analgesia and Anesthesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Yuan-xiang

    2004-01-01

    @@ In the central nervous system, synapses, highly specialized sites of contact between neurons, are organized to facilitate the transmission of signals from the pre-synaptic terminal to the postsynaptic membrane and to activate subsequent signal transduction cascades that result in appropriate cellular events. Efficient and precise organization of synaptic proteins such as receptors, ion channels, and signaling molecules at both pre-synaptic and postsynaptic membranes is critical for proper signal transmission.

  14. A Voltage Mode Memristor Bridge Synaptic Circuit with Memristor Emulators

    OpenAIRE

    Leon Chua; Maheshwar Pd. Sah; Hyongsuk Kim; Changju Yang

    2012-01-01

    A memristor bridge neural circuit which is able to perform signed synaptic weighting was proposed in our previous study, where the synaptic operation was verified via software simulation of the mathematical model of the HP memristor. This study is an extension of the previous work advancing toward the circuit implementation where the architecture of the memristor bridge synapse is built with memristor emulator circuits. In addition, a simple neural network which performs both synaptic weighti...

  15. Restoration of synaptic function in sight for degenerative retinal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schubert, Timm; Wissinger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic disorganization is a prominent feature of many neurological diseases of the CNS, including Parkinson’s disease, intellectual development disorders, and autism. Although synaptic plasticity is critical for learning and memory, it is unclear whether this innate property helps restore synaptic function in disease once the primary cause of disease is abrogated. An answer to this question may come from a recent investigation in X-linked retinoschisis, a currently untreatable retinopathy. ...

  16. Neuroligins and Neurexins Link Synaptic Function to Cognitive Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Südhof, Thomas C.

    2008-01-01

    The brain processes information by transmitting signals at synapses, which connect neurons into vast networks of communicating cells. In these networks, synapses not only transmit, but also process and refine information. Neurexins and neuroligins are synaptic cell-adhesion molecules that connect pre- and postsynaptic neurons at synapses, mediate trans-synaptic signaling, and shape neural network properties by specifying synaptic functions. In humans, alterations in neurexin or neuroligin gen...

  17. Synapsin IIa controls the reserve pool of glutamatergic synaptic vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Gitler, Daniel; Cheng, Qing; Greengard, Paul; Augustine, George J.

    2008-01-01

    Synapsins regulate synaptic transmission by controlling the reserve pool of synaptic vesicles. Each of the three mammalian synapsin genes is subject to alternative splicing, yielding several isoforms whose roles are unknown. To investigate the function of these isoforms, we examined the synaptic effects of introducing each isoform into glutamatergic cultured hippocampal neurons from synapsin triple knock-out mice. Remarkably, we found that synapsin IIa was the only isoform that could rescue t...

  18. Concurrent Imaging of Synaptic Vesicle Recycling and Calcium Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Haiyan; Foss, Sarah M.; Dobryy, Yuriy L.; Park, C. Kevin; Hires, Samuel Andrew; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-sh...

  19. Concurrent imaging of synaptic vesicle recycling and calcium dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Haiyan eLi; Foss, Sarah M.; Yuriy eDobryy; C. Kevin ePark; Samuel Andrew Hires; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium-dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-...

  20. UBE3A Regulates Synaptic Plasticity and Learning and Memory by Controlling SK2 Channel Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiandong; Zhu, Guoqi; Liu, Yan; Standley, Steve; Ji, Angela; Tunuguntla, Rashmi; Wang, Yubin; Claus, Chad; Luo, Yun; Baudry, Michel; Bi, Xiaoning

    2015-07-21

    Gated solely by activity-induced changes in intracellular calcium, small-conductance potassium channels (SKs) are critical for a variety of functions in the CNS, from learning and memory to rhythmic activity and sleep. While there is a wealth of information on SK2 gating, kinetics, and Ca(2+) sensitivity, little is known regarding the regulation of SK2 subcellular localization. We report here that synaptic SK2 levels are regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase UBE3A, whose deficiency results in Angelman syndrome and overexpression in increased risk of autistic spectrum disorder. UBE3A directly ubiquitinates SK2 in the C-terminal domain, which facilitates endocytosis. In UBE3A-deficient mice, increased postsynaptic SK2 levels result in decreased NMDA receptor activation, thereby impairing hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. Impairments in both synaptic plasticity and fear conditioning memory in UBE3A-deficient mice are significantly ameliorated by blocking SK2. These results elucidate a mechanism by which UBE3A directly influences cognitive function. PMID:26166566

  1. Asymmetry of Neuronal Combinatorial Codes Arises from Minimizing Synaptic Weight Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibold, Christian; Monsalve-Mercado, Mauro M

    2016-08-01

    Synaptic change is a costly resource, particularly for brain structures that have a high demand of synaptic plasticity. For example, building memories of object positions requires efficient use of plasticity resources since objects can easily change their location in space and yet we can memorize object locations. But how should a neural circuit ideally be set up to integrate two input streams (object location and identity) in case the overall synaptic changes should be minimized during ongoing learning? This letter provides a theoretical framework on how the two input pathways should ideally be specified. Generally the model predicts that the information-rich pathway should be plastic and encoded sparsely, whereas the pathway conveying less information should be encoded densely and undergo learning only if a neuronal representation of a novel object has to be established. As an example, we consider hippocampal area CA1, which combines place and object information. The model thereby provides a normative account of hippocampal rate remapping, that is, modulations of place field activity by changes of local cues. It may as well be applicable to other brain areas (such as neocortical layer V) that learn combinatorial codes from multiple input streams. PMID:27348595

  2. Brief environmental enrichment elicits metaplasticity of hippocampal synaptic potentiation in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Manahan-Vaughan

    2012-12-01

    We assessed whether short-term EE elicits alterations in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and if social context may play a role. Adult mice were exposed to EE for 14 consecutive days. We found that robust late-LTP (>24h and short-term depression (<2h at Schaffer-collateral-CA1 synapses in freely behaving mice were unaltered, whereas early-LTP (E-LTP, <2h was significantly enhanced by EE. Effects were transient: E-LTP returned to control levels 1 week after cessation of EE. Six weeks later animals were re-exposed to EE for 14d. Under these conditions, E-LTP was facilitated into L-LTP (>24h, suggesting that metaplasticity was induced during the first EE experience and that EE-mediated modifications are cumulative. Effects were absent in mice that underwent solitary enrichment or were group-housed without EE. These data suggest that EE in naïve animals strengthens E-LTP, and also promotes L-LTP in animals that underwent EE in the past. This indicates that brief exposure to EE, particularly under social conditions can elicit lasting positive effects on synaptic strength that may have beneficial consequences for cognition that depends on synaptic plasticity.

  3. Statistical mechanics of attractor neural network models with synaptic depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synaptic depression is known to control gain for presynaptic inputs. Since cortical neurons receive thousands of presynaptic inputs, and their outputs are fed into thousands of other neurons, the synaptic depression should influence macroscopic properties of neural networks. We employ simple neural network models to explore the macroscopic effects of synaptic depression. Systems with the synaptic depression cannot be analyzed due to asymmetry of connections with the conventional equilibrium statistical-mechanical approach. Thus, we first propose a microscopic dynamical mean field theory. Next, we derive macroscopic steady state equations and discuss the stabilities of steady states for various types of neural network models.

  4. Experimental Implementation of a Biometric Laser Synaptic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Pisarchik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We fabricate a biometric laser fiber synaptic sensor to transmit information from one neuron cell to the other by an optical way. The optical synapse is constructed on the base of an erbium-doped fiber laser, whose pumped diode current is driven by a pre-synaptic FitzHugh–Nagumo electronic neuron, and the laser output controls a post-synaptic FitzHugh–Nagumo electronic neuron. The implemented laser synapse displays very rich dynamics, including fixed points, periodic orbits with different frequency-locking ratios and chaos. These regimes can be beneficial for efficient biorobotics, where behavioral flexibility subserved by synaptic connectivity is a challenge.

  5. A pivotal role of GSK-3 in synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarrisa A Bradley

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 has many cellular functions. Recent evidence suggests that it plays a key role in certain types of synaptic plasticity, in particular a form of long-term depression (LTD that is induced by the synaptic activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors. In the present article we summarise what is currently known concerning the roles of GSK-3 in synaptic plasticity at both glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses. We summarise its role in cognition and speculate on how alterations in the synaptic functioning of GSK-3 may be a major factor in certain neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Multi-gate synergic modulation in laterally coupled synaptic transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li Qiang; Xiao, Hui; Liu, Yang Hui; Wan, Chang Jin; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2015-10-01

    Laterally coupled oxide-based synaptic transistors with multiple gates are fabricated on phosphorosilicate glass electrolyte films. Electrical performance of the transistor can be evidently improved when the device is operated in a tri-gate synergic modulation mode. Excitatory post-synaptic current and paired pulse facilitation (PPF) behavior of biological synapses are mimicked, and PPF index can be effectively tuned by the voltage applied on the modulatory terminal. At last, superlinear to sublinear synaptic integration regulation is also mimicked by applying a modulatory pulse on the third modulatory terminal. The multi-gate oxide-based synaptic transistors may find potential applications in biochemical sensors and neuromorphic systems.

  7. Measurement of quantal secretion induced by ouabain and its correlation with depletion of synaptic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimann, C; Torri-Tarelli, F; Fesce, R; Ceccarelli, B

    1985-11-01

    Ouabain (0.1 and 0.05 mM) was applied to frog cutaneous pectoris nerve-muscle preparations bathed in modified Ringer's solution containing either 1.8 mM Ca2+ (and 4 mM Mg2+) or no added Ca2+ (4 mM Mg2+ and 1 mM EGTA). During the intense quantal release of acetylcholine (ACh) induced by ouabain, the parameters of the miniature endplate potentials (mepps) were deduced from the variance, skew, and power spectra of the endplate recordings by applying a recently described modification of classical fluctuation analysis. Often the high frequency of mepps is not stationary; therefore, the signal was high-pass filtered (time constant of the resistance-capacitance filter of 2 ms) to remove the errors introduced by nonstationarity. When ouabain was applied in the presence of Ca2+, mepp frequency started to rise exponentially after a lag of 1.5-2 h, reached an average peak frequency of 1,300/s in approximately 30 min, and then suddenly subsided to low level (10/s). In Ca2+-free solution, after a shorter lag (1-1.5 h), mepp frequency rose to peak rate of 700/s in approximately 20 min and then gradually subsided. In spite of the different time course of secretion in the two experimental conditions, the cumulative quantal release was not significantly different (7.4 +/- 1.3 X 10(5) in Ca2+-containing and 8.8 +/- 2.7 X 10(5) in Ca2+-free solutions). 60 min after the peak secretion, the muscles were fixed for observation in the electron microscope. Morphometric analysis on micrographs of neuromuscular junctions revealed in both cases a profound depletion of synaptic vesicles and deep infoldings of presynaptic membrane. This rapid depletion and the lack of uptake of horseradish peroxidase suggest that ouabain impairs the recycling process that tends to conserve the vesicle population during intense secretion of neurotransmitter. The good correlation observed between the reduction in the store of synaptic vesicles and the total number of quanta of ACh secreted in the absence of a

  8. Effect of biphase on dielectric properties of Bi-doped lead strontium titanate thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pb0.4Sr0.6TiO3 (PST) thin films doped with various concentration of Bi were prepared by a sol-gel method. The phase status, surface morphology and dielectric properties of these thin films were measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and impedance analyzer, respectively. Results showed that the thin films with the maximum dielectric constant and minimum dielectric loss were obtained for x=0.15. For x2Ti2O7 biphase were obtained. The thin films with pure Bi2Ti2O7 pyrochlore phase were obtained for x=0.67. The biphase thin films had high tunability and high figure of merit (FOM). The FOM of PST/Bi2Ti2O7 biphase thin film was about 6 times higher than that thin films formed with pure perovskite phase or pure pyrochlore phase. - Graphical abstract: The Bi-doped Pb0.4Sr0.6TiO3 (PST) thin films prepared by the sol-gel method showed a PST/Bi2Ti2O7 biphase structure for 0.2< x<0.4, and had the low dielectric capacitance and dielectric loss. Display Omitted

  9. Triple-channel microreactor for biphasic gas–liquid reactions: Photosensitized oxygenations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Awatar Maurya

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A triple-channel microreactor fabricated by means of a soft-lithography technique was devised for efficient biphasic gas–liquid reactions. The excellent performance of the microreactor was demonstrated by carrying out photosensitized oxygenations of α-terpinene, citronellol, and allyl alcohols.

  10. Triple-channel microreactor for biphasic gas–liquid reactions: Photosensitized oxygenations

    OpenAIRE

    Ram Awatar Maurya; Chan Pil Park; Dong-Pyo Kim

    2011-01-01

    A triple-channel microreactor fabricated by means of a soft-lithography technique was devised for efficient biphasic gas–liquid reactions. The excellent performance of the microreactor was demonstrated by carrying out photosensitized oxygenations of α-terpinene, citronellol, and allyl alcohols.

  11. A New Type of Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Cement as a Gentamicin Carrier for Osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yu Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis therapy is a long-term and inconvenient procedure for a patient. Antibiotic-loaded bone cements are both a complementary and alternative treatment option to intravenous antibiotic therapy for the treatment of osteomyelitis. In the current study, the biphasic calcium phosphate cement (CPC, called α-TCP/HAP (α-tricalcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite biphasic cement, was prepared as an antibiotics carrier for osteomyelitis. The developed biphasic cement with a microstructure of α-TCP surrounding the HAP has a fast setting time which will fulfill the clinical demand. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry analyses showed the final phase to be HAP, the basic bone mineral, after setting for a period of time. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a porous structure with particle sizes of a few micrometers. The addition of gentamicin in α-TCP/HAP would delay the transition of α-TCP but would not change the final-phase HAP. The gentamicin-loaded α-TCP/HAP supplies high doses of the antibiotic during the initial 24 hours when they are soaked in phosphate buffer solution (PBS. Thereafter, a slower drug release is produced, supplying minimum inhibitory concentration until the end of the experiment (30 days. Studies of growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in culture indicated that gentamicin released after 30 days from α-TCP/HAP biphasic cement retained antibacterial activity.

  12. Biphasic Catalytic(Hydroformylation of 1-Dodecene in Micellar System with Cationic Gemini Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min LI; Bin XU; Hua CHEN; Hong Jie ZHENG; Xue Yuan HUANG; Yao Zhong LI; Xian Jun LI

    2004-01-01

    The promotion effect of cationic gemini surfactants for the hydroformylation of 1-dodecene in the organic/aqueous biphasic catalytic system is reported. The hydroformylation reaction in the presence of gemini surfactant occurred with higher turnover frequency and higher selectivity for linear aldehyde than using conventional monomeric surfactant CTAB.

  13. Temperature dependence of microwave absorption phenomena in single and biphase soft magnetic microwires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    El Kammouni, R.; Vázquez, M.; Lezama, L.; Kurlyandskaya, G.; Kraus, Luděk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 368, Nov (2014), 126-132. ISSN 0304-8853 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic microwire * ferromagnetic resonance * microwave absorption * biphase magnetic system Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.970, year: 2014

  14. Phase Behaviors in Bi-phase Simulation of Powder Segregation in Metal Injection Molding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Baosheng; Fan Xiaoxin; Cheng Zhiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Powder segregation induced by mold filling is an important phenomenon that affects the final quality of metal injection molding (MIM). The prediction of segregation in MIM requires a bi-phase flow model to describe distinctly the flows of metallic powder and polymer binder. Viscous behaviors for the flows of each phase should hence be determined. The coefficient of interaction between the flows of two phases should also be evaluated. However, only viscosity of the mixed feedstock is measurable by capillary tests. Wall sticking is supposed in the traditional model for capillary tests, while the wall slip is important to be taken into account in MIM injection. Objective of the present paper is to introduce the slip effect in bi-phase simulation, and search the suitable way to determine the viscous behaviors for each phase with the consideration of wall slip in capillary tests. Analytical and numerical methods were proposed to realize such a specific purpose. The proposed method is based on the mass conservation between the capillary flows in mono-phase model for the mixed feedstock and in bi-phase model for the flows of two phases. Examples of the bi-phase simulation in MIM were realized with the software developed by research team. The results show evident segregation, which is valuable for improving the mould designs.

  15. Calculation of the valence electron structures of alloying cementite and its biphase interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The valence electron structures of alloying cementite θ-(Fe, M)3C and ε-(Fe, M)3C andthose of the biphase interfaces between them and α-Fe are calculated with Yu's empirical electrontheory of solid and molecules. The calculation results accord with the actual behavior of alloys.

  16. Activity-induced synaptic delivery of the GluN2A-containing NMDA receptor is dependent on endoplasmic reticulum chaperone Bip and involved in fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-min; Yan, Xun-yi; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Qian; Ye, Mao; Cao, Wei; Qiang, Wen-bin; Zhu, Li-jun; Du, Yong-lan; Xu, Xing-xing; Wang, Jia-sheng; Xu, Fei; Lu, Wei; Qiu, Shuang; Yang, Wei; Luo, Jian-hong

    2015-07-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in adult forebrain is a heterotetramer mainly composed of two GluN1 subunits and two GluN2A and/or GluN2B subunits. The synaptic expression and relative numbers of GluN2A- and GluN2B-containing NMDARs play critical roles in controlling Ca(2+)-dependent signaling and synaptic plasticity. Previous studies have suggested that the synaptic trafficking of NMDAR subtypes is differentially regulated, but the precise molecular mechanism is not yet clear. In this study, we demonstrated that Bip, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone, selectively interacted with GluN2A and mediated the neuronal activity-induced assembly and synaptic incorporation of the GluN2A-containing NMDAR from dendritic ER. Furthermore, the GluN2A-specific synaptic trafficking was effectively disrupted by peptides interrupting the interaction between Bip and GluN2A. Interestingly, fear conditioning in mice was disrupted by intraperitoneal injection of the interfering peptide before training. In summary, we have uncovered a novel mechanism for the activity-dependent supply of synaptic GluN2A-containing NMDARs, and demonstrated its relevance to memory formation. PMID:26088419

  17. Changes in synaptic and extrasynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated currents at early-stage epileptogenesis in adult mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juegang Ju; Sheng-tian Li

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are extensively involved in epilepsy genesis and recurrence.Recent studies have shown that synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play different, or even opposing, roles in various signaling pathways, including synaptic plasticity and neuronal death.The present study analyzed changes in synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated currents during epilepsy onset.Mouse models of lithium chloride pilocarpine-induced epilepsy were established, and hippocampal slices were prepared at 24 hours after the onset of status epilepticus.Synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory post-synaptic currents (NMDA-EPSCs) were recorded in CA1 pyramidal neurons by whole-cell patch clamp technique.Results demonstrated no significant difference in rise and delay time of synaptic NMDA-EPSCs compared with normal neurons.Peak amplitude, area-to-peak ratio,and rising time of extrasynaptic NMDA-EPSCs remained unchanged, but decay of extrasynaptic NMDA-EPSCs was faster than that of normal neurons.These results suggest that extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play a role in epileptogenesis.

  18. Velocity dependence of biphasic flow structuration: steady-state and oscillating flow effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tore Tallakstad, Ken; Jankov, Mihailo; Løvoll, Grunde; Toussaint, Renaud; Jørgen Mâløy, Knut; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Schäfer, Gerhard; Méheust, Yves; Arendt Knudsen, Henning

    2010-05-01

    We study various types of biphasic flows in quasi-two-dimensional transparent porous models. These flows imply a viscous wetting fluid, and a lowly viscous one. The models are transparent, allowing the displacement process and structure to be monitored in space and time. Three different aspects will be presented: 1. In stationary biphasic flows, we study the relationship between the macroscopic pressure drop (related to relative permeability) and the average flow rate, and how this arises from the cluster size distribution of the lowly viscous fluid [1]. 2. In drainage situations, we study how the geometry of the invader can be explained, and how it gives rise to apparent dynamic capillary effects. We show how these can be explained by viscous effects on evolving geometries of invading fluid [2]. 3. We study the impact of oscillating pressure fields superimposed to a background flow over the flow regimes patterns [3]. Steady-State Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media: Statistics and Transport Properties. First, in stationary flow with a control of the flux of both fluids, we show how the pressure drop depends on the flow rate. We will show that the dynamics is dominated by the interplay between a viscous pressure field from the wetting fluid and bubble transport of a less viscous, nonwetting phase. In contrast with more studied displacement front systems, steady-state flow is in equilibrium, statistically speaking. The corresponding theoretical simplicity allows us to explain a data collapse in the cluster size distribution of lowly viscous fluid in the system, as well as the relation |?P|∞√Ca--. This allows to explain so called relative permeability effects by the morphological changes of the cluster size distribution. Influence of viscous fingering on dynamic saturation-pressure curves in porous media. Next, we study drainage in such models, and investigate the relationship between the pressure field and the morphology of the invading fluid. This allows to model

  19. Tissue-type plasminogen activator induces synaptic vesicle endocytosis in cerebral cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, M; Wu, F; Torre, E; Cuellar-Giraldo, D; Jia, D; Cheng, L

    2016-04-01

    The release of the serine proteinase tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) from the presynaptic terminal of cerebral cortical neurons plays a central role in the development of synaptic plasticity, adaptation to metabolic stress and neuronal survival. Our earlier studies indicate that by inducing the recruitment of the cytoskeletal protein βII-spectrin and voltage-gated calcium channels to the active zone, tPA promotes Ca(2+)-dependent translocation of synaptic vesicles (SVs) to the synaptic release site where they release their load of neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments to investigate whether this effect leads to depletion of SVs in the presynaptic terminal. Our data indicate that tPA promotes SV endocytosis via a mechanism that does not require the conversion of plasminogen into plasmin. Instead, we show that tPA induces calcineurin-mediated dynamin I dephosphorylation, which is followed by dynamin I-induced recruitment of the actin-binding protein profilin II to the presynaptic membrane, and profilin II-induced F-actin formation. We report that this tPA-induced sequence of events leads to the association of newly formed SVs with F-actin clusters in the endocytic zone. In summary, the data presented here indicate that following the exocytotic release of neurotransmitters tPA activates the mechanism whereby SVs are retrieved from the presynaptic membrane and endocytosed to replenish the pool of vesicles available for a new cycle of exocytosis. Together, these results indicate that in murine cerebral cortical neurons tPA plays a central role coupling SVs exocytosis and endocytosis. PMID:26820595

  20. Impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity and NR2A/2B expression ratio in remifentanil withdrawal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Yi; Liu, Shichang; Zhang, Nan; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Yinguo

    2016-03-01

    Remifentanil is a kind of synthetic opioid which has gained wide clinical acceptance by anesthesiologists. In this study, we attempted to test whether withdrawal effects on learning mechanisms can be triggered by repeated low-dose remifentanil treatment. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to remifentanil (50μg/kgs.c.) twice per day at 12h intervals for 15 days. When the animals of remifentanil group were withdrawn from remifentanil at 10h after the last injection, changes in open field test, Morris water maze test (MWM) and synaptic efficacy were examined in each group. We demonstrated that repeated exposure to 50μg/kg remifentanil produced enhanced locomotor activity indicating that a remifentanil addiction animal model in rats was established. MWM results showed that exposure to remifentanil had no influence on the spatial cognition. After withdrawal of remifentanil rats showed impaired spatial cognition. In electrophysiology test, remifentanil group rats showed a trend for a rightward shift of input/output relationship and significant deficits in maintenance of STP and LTP. Immunohistochemistry results demonstrated increased NR2A/NR2B ratio that should be included depression of LTP. In the whole-cell patch-clamp recording, after elimination from remifentanil incubation, mEPSC frequency was down regulated in hippocampal CA1 neurons, indicating that basal synaptic transmission were affected by remifentanil withdrawal. Taken together, the current findings demonstrate that the remifentanil withdrawn rats exhibit obvious impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory and synaptic plasticity. Increased hippocampal NR2A/NR2B expression ratio and the changes of basal synaptic transmission may participate in the impairment of LTP. PMID:26777139

  1. First effects of rising amyloid-β in transgenic mouse brain: synaptic transmission and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Damian M; Liu, Wenfei; Portelius, Erik; Bayram, Sevinç; Yasvoina, Marina; Ho, Sui-Hin; Smits, Hélène; Ali, Shabinah S; Steinberg, Rivka; Pegasiou, Chrysia-Maria; James, Owain T; Matarin, Mar; Richardson, Jill C; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John A; Salih, Dervis A; Edwards, Frances A

    2015-07-01

    Detecting and treating Alzheimer's disease, before cognitive deficits occur, has become the health challenge of our time. The earliest known event in Alzheimer's disease is rising amyloid-β. Previous studies have suggested that effects on synaptic transmission may precede plaque deposition. Here we report how relative levels of different soluble amyloid-β peptides in hippocampus, preceding plaque deposition, relate to synaptic and genomic changes. Immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry was used to measure the early rise of different amyloid-β peptides in a mouse model of increasing amyloid-β ('TASTPM', transgenic for familial Alzheimer's disease genes APP/PSEN1). In the third postnatal week, several amyloid-β peptides were above the limit of detection, including amyloid-β40, amyloid-β38 and amyloid-β42 with an intensity ratio of 6:3:2, respectively. By 2 months amyloid-β levels had only increased by 50% and although the ratio of the different peptides remained constant, the first changes in synaptic currents, compared to wild-type mice could be detected with patch-clamp recordings. Between 2 and 4 months old, levels of amyloid-β40 rose by ∼7-fold, but amyloid-β42 rose by 25-fold, increasing the amyloid-β42:amyloid-β40 ratio to 1:1. Only at 4 months did plaque deposition become detectable and only in some mice; however, synaptic changes were evident in all hippocampal fields. These changes included increased glutamate release probability (P < 0.001, n = 7-9; consistent with the proposed physiological effect of amyloid-β) and loss of spontaneous action potential-mediated activity in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) and dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus (P < 0.001, n = 7). Hence synaptic changes occur when the amyloid-β levels and amyloid-β42:amyloid-β40 ratio are still low compared to those necessary for plaque deposition. Genome-wide microarray analysis revealed changes in gene expression at 2-4 months including synaptic genes being strongly

  2. Synaptic Democracy and Vesicular Transport in Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Levien, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Synaptic democracy concerns the general problem of how regions of an axon or dendrite far from the cell body (soma) of a neuron can play an effective role in neuronal function. For example, stimulated synapses far from the soma are unlikely to influence the firing of a neuron unless some sort of active dendritic processing occurs. Analogously, the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to proximal synapses. Both of these phenomena reflect fundamental limitations of transport processes based on a localized source. In this Letter, we show that a more democratic distribution of proteins along an axon can be achieved by making the transport process less efficient. This involves two components: bidirectional or "stop-and-go" motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection-diffusion), and reversible interactions between motor-cargo complexes and synaptic targets. Both of these features have recently been observed experimentally. Our model suggests that, just as in human societies, there needs to be a balance between "efficiency" and "equality".

  3. Presynaptic size of associational/commissural CA3 synapses is controlled by fibroblast growth factor 22 in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasaoglu, Taliha; Schikorski, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Associational/commissural CA3-CA3 synapses define the recurrent CA3 network that generates the input to CA1 pyramidal neurons. We quantified the fine structure of excitatory synapses in the stratum radiatum of the CA3d area in adult wild type (WT) and fibroblast growth factor 22 knock-out (FGF22KO) mice by using serial 3D electron microscopy. WT excitatory CA3 synapses are rather small yet range 10 fold in size. Spine size, however, was small and uniform and did not correlate with the size of the synaptic junction. To reveal mechanisms that regulate presynaptic structure, we investigated the role of FGF22, a target-derived signal specific for the distal part of area CA3 (CA3d). In adult FGF22KO mice, postsynaptic properties of associational CA3 synapses were unaltered. Presynaptically, the number of synaptic vesicles (SVs), the bouton volume, and the number of vesicles in axonal regions (the super pool) were reduced. This concurrent decrease suggests concerted control by FGF22 of presynaptic size. This hypothesis is supported by the finding that WT presynapses in the proximal part of area CA3 (CA3p) that do not receive FGF22 signaling in WT mice were smaller than presynapses in CA3d in WT but of comparable size in CA3d of FGF22KO mice. Docked SV density was decreased in CA1, CA3d, and CA3p in FGF22KO mice. Because CA1 and CA3p are not directly affected by the loss of FGF22, the smaller docked SV density may be an adaptation to activity changes in the CA3 network. Thus, docked SV density potentially is a long-term regulator for the synaptic release probability and/or the strength of short-term depression in vivo. PMID:26222899

  4. Effect of developmental lead exposure on synaptic plasticity and N—methyl—D—aspartate receptor subunit in rat hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RuanDY; SuiL

    2002-01-01

    Chronic lead(Pb) exposure is known to be associated with learning and memory,and cognitive dysfunction in children.Previous studies have demonstrated that Pb exposure may impair neuronal process underlying synaptic plasticity via a direct interaction with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors(NMDARs).The studies described here were carried out to investigate effect of developmental Pb exposure on long-term potentiation(LTP),long-tern depression(LTD) and NMDAs subunits in rat hippocampus.The results are listed as follows:(1)low-level Pb exposture can impair the induction and maintenance of LTP in vivo and in vitro;(2)the Pb-induced impairment of LTD magnitude was an age-related decline in area CA1 of rat hippocampus;(3)chronic Pb exposure affected two components,voltage-gated calcium channel-dependent LTD and NMDARs-dependent LTD,of LTD induction in area CA1 of rat hippocampus;(4)different effects of developmental Pb exposure on NMDA receptor NR1,NR2A,NR2B,NR2C,NR2D and NR3A subunits in area CA1,CA2,CA3 and CA4 of rat hippocampus were observed;(5)the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors enriched in area CA1,CA3 and dentate gyrus and kainite receptors enriched in area CA1 and dentate gyrus of rat hippocampus were impaired by Pb exposure.

  5. Autophosphorylation of [alpha]CaMKII is Differentially Involved in New Learning and Unlearning Mechanisms of Memory Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Ryoichi; Silva, Alcino J.; Ohno, Masuo

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates the key role of [alpha]-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II ([alpha]CaMKII) in synaptic plasticity and learning, but it remains unclear how this kinase participates in the processing of memory extinction. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which [alpha]CaMKII may mediate extinction by using…

  6. Synaptic signaling and aberrant RNA splicing in autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan M Smith; Wolfgang eSadee

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between presynaptic and postsynaptic cellular adhesion molecules drive synapse maturation during development. These trans-synaptic interactions are regulated by alternative splicing of cellular adhesion molecule RNAs, which ultimately determines neurotransmitter phenotype. The diverse assortment of RNAs produced by alternative splicing generates countless protein isoforms necessary for guiding specialized cell-to-cell connectivity. Failure to generate the appropriate synaptic ...

  7. Synaptic Tagging, Evaluation of Memories, and the Distal Reward Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papper, Marc; Kempter, Richard; Leibold, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity exhibits distinct phases. The synaptic tagging hypothesis suggests an early phase in which synapses are prepared, or "tagged," for protein capture, and a late phase in which those proteins are integrated into the synapses to achieve memory consolidation. The synapse specificity of the tags is consistent with…

  8. Glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the mesocorticolimbic system in addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huib Mansvelder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Addictive drugs remodel the brain’s reward circuitry, the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, by inducing widespread adaptations of glutamatergic synapses. This drug-induced synaptic plasticity is thought to contribute to both the development and the persistence of addiction. This review highlights the synaptic modifications that are induced by in vivo exposure to addictive drugs and describes how these drug-induced synaptic changes may contribute to the different components of addictive behaviour, such as compulsive drug use despite negative consequences and relapse. Initially, exposure to an addictive drug induces synaptic changes in the ventral tegmental area (VTA. This drug-induced synaptic potentiation in the VTA subsequently triggers synaptic changes in downstream areas of the mesocorticolimbic system, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc and the prefrontal cortex (PFC, with further drug exposure. These glutamatergic synaptic alterations are then thought to mediate many of the behavioural symptoms that characterize addiction. The later stages of glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the NAc and in particular in the PFC play a role in maintaining addiction and drive relapse to drug-taking induced by drug-associated cues. Remodelling of PFC glutamatergic circuits can persist into adulthood, causing a lasting vulnerability to relapse. We will discuss how these neurobiological changes produced by drugs of abuse may provide novel targets for potential treatment strategies for addiction.

  9. Synaptic Signaling and Aberrant RNA Splicing in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Ryan M; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between presynaptic and postsynaptic cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) drive synapse maturation during development. These trans-synaptic interactions are regulated by alternative splicing of CAM RNAs, which ultimately determines neurotransmitter phenotype. The diverse assortment of RNAs produced by alternative splicing generates countless protein isoforms necessary for guiding specialized cell-to-cell connectivity. Failure to generate the appropriate synaptic adhesion proteins i...

  10. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Ashok N.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) has emerged as a new molecular mechanism that controls wide-ranging functions in the nervous system, including fine-tuning of synaptic connections during development and synaptic plasticity in the adult organism. In the UPP, attachment of a small protein, ubiquitin, tags the substrates for…

  11. Phosphodiesterase Inhibition to Target the Synaptic Dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Kelly R.; Plath, Niels; Svenstrup, Niels; Menniti, Frank S.

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a disease of synaptic dysfunction that ultimately proceeds to neuronal death. There is a wealth of evidence that indicates the final common mediator of this neurotoxic process is the formation and actions on synaptotoxic b-amyloid (Aβ). The premise in this review is that synaptic dysfunction may also be an initiating factor in for AD and promote synaptotoxic Aβ formation. This latter hypothesis is consistent with the fact that the most common risk factors for AD, apolipoprotein E (ApoE) allele status, age, education, and fitness, encompass suboptimal synaptic function. Thus, the synaptic dysfunction in AD may be both cause and effect, and remediating synaptic dysfunction in AD may have acute effects on the symptoms present at the initiation of therapy and also slow disease progression. The cyclic nucleotide (cAMP and cGMP) signaling systems are intimately involved in the regulation of synaptic homeostasis. The phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a superfamily of enzymes that critically regulate spatial and temporal aspects of cyclic nucleotide signaling through metabolic inactivation of cAMP and cGMP. Thus, targeting the PDEs to promote improved synaptic function, or 'synaptic resilience', may be an effective and facile approach to new symptomatic and disease modifying therapies for AD. There continues to be a significant drug discovery effort aimed at discovering PDE inhibitors to treat a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we review the current status of those efforts as they relate to potential new therapies for AD.

  12. Water/Oil Biphasic Hydroformylation of Higher Olefins over a TPPTS-Rh/SiO2 Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hejun Zhu; Yunjie Ding; Fu Yang; Li Yan; Jianmin Xiong; Hongmei Yin; Liwu Lin

    2004-01-01

    A novel TPPTS-Rh/SiO2 catalyst, prepared by directly modifying a heterogeneous highsurface-area Rh/SiO2 catalyst with water-soluble TPPTS ligands, could decrease the resistance of mass transfer in water/oil biphasic media for the hydroformylation of higher olefins. The catalytic performance for hydroformylation on this biphasic TPPTS-Rh/SiO2 catalyst system was higher than those of the traditional biphasic HRhCO(TPPTS)3 systems, owing to the chemical bonds between the highly dispersed Rh metal particles and the TPPTS ligands. The catalyst system is applicable for hydroformylation of higher olefins such as 1-dodecene.

  13. Orexin A induces bidirectional modulation of synaptic plasticity: Inhibiting long-term potentiation and preventing depotentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guan-Ling; Lee, Chia-Hsu; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2016-08-01

    The orexin system consists of two peptides, orexin A and B and two receptors, OX1R and OX2R. It is implicated in learning and memory regulation while controversy remains on its role in modulating hippocampal synaptic plasticity in vivo and in vitro. Here, we investigated effects of orexin A on two forms of synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP) and depotentiation of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), at the Schaffer Collateral-CA1 synapse of mouse hippocampal slices. Orexin A (≧30 nM) attenuated LTP induced by theta burst stimulation (TBS) in a manner antagonized by an OX1R (SB-334867), but not OX2R (EMPA), antagonist. Conversely, at 1 pM, co-application of orexin A prevented the induction of depotentiation induced by low frequency stimulation (LFS), i.e. restoring LTP. This re-potentiation effect of sub-nanomolar orexin A occurred at LFS of 1 Hz, but not 2 Hz, and with LTP induced by either TBS or tetanic stimulation. It was significantly antagonized by SB-334867, EMPA and TCS-1102, selective OX1R, OX2R and dual OXR antagonists, respectively, and prevented by D609, SQ22536 and H89, inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), adenylyl cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA), respectively. LFS-induced depotentiation was antagonized by blockers of NMDA, A1-adenosine and type 1/5 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu1/5) receptors, respectively. However, orexin A (1 pM) did not affect chemical-induced depotentiation by agonists of these receptors. These results suggest that orexin A bidirectionally modulates hippocampal CA1 synaptic plasticity, inhibiting LTP via OX1Rs at moderate concentrations while inducing re-potentiation via OX1Rs and OX2Rs, possibly through PLC and AC-PKA signaling at sub-nanomolar concentrations. PMID:26965217

  14. EFFECT OF ELECTROACUPUNCTURE ON SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY OF HPPOCAMPAL NEURONS IN CEREBRAL ISCHEMIA RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨卓欣; 于海波; 王玲; 张家维

    2004-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on synaptic structure of hippocampal nerve felts and synaptophysin(SYN)expression in rats with cerebral ischemic injury. Methods: Sixty Wistar rats were randomized into sham-operation group, cerebral ischemia (CI) group and EA group, each of which was further divided into 1week (W) and 5W subgroups. CI injury model was established by occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries. "Baihui"(百会 GV 20), "Dazhui" (大椎 GV 14), "Renzhong"(人中 GV 26) and "Guanyuan"(关元 CV 4) were punctured and stimulated electrically. The brain tissue sections containing hippocampus region were stained with immunohistochemical technique and observed under light microscope and transmission electronic microscope. Results: After CI, the ischemic injury as degeneration of the presynapse compositions, decrease of the synaptic numeral density, and low expression of SYN were observed in hippocampal CA1 area. By the 5th week after CI, the neonatal synapses of CI and EA groups appeared, and SYN expression was upregulated. In EA group, the recovery of the numeral density of synapses was especially noticeable, being 93.8% of that of sham-operation group and significantly higher than that in CI group (P<0.01). Compared with sham-operation group, the calibrated optical density (COD) values of SYN increased to 70% in CI group, and 93.3% in EA group, and COD value in EA group was significantly higher than that in CI group (P<0.01). Conclusion: EA can function in promoting synaptic regeneration and enhancing and perfecting the actions of the reconstructed synapses in hippocampal CA1 area in CI rats.

  15. Age-dependent impairment of cognitive and synaptic function in the htau mouse model of tau pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polydoro, Manuela; Acker, Christopher M; Duff, Karen; Castillo, Pablo E; Davies, Peter

    2009-08-26

    A hallmark feature of Alzheimer's disease pathology is the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which are intracellular aggregates of conformationally abnormal and hyperphosphorylated tau. The presence of NFTs in the forebrain is associated with impairments of cognitive function, supporting a central role for tau in dementia. The significance of the accumulation of NFTs for neuronal and cognitive function is still obscure. It is possible that NFTs disrupt synaptic transmission and plasticity, leading to memory deficits and cognitive malfunction. To elucidate the relationship between the development of tau pathology and synaptic and cognitive functions, we performed behavioral tests and electrophysiological experiments in the htau mouse. Here we report age-dependent cognitive and physiological impairments in htau mice that preceded neurodegeneration. Twelve-month-old htau mice with moderate tau pathology, but not 4-month-old mice with early-stage tau pathology, presented cognitive deficits in an object recognition memory task in which the visual recognition memory of a novel object was disrupted. Moreover, only 12-month-old htau mice exhibit spatial memory deficits, as indicated by the impaired performance in the Morris water maze. In addition, we report that basal synaptic transmission and induction of long-term potentiation with high-frequency stimulation, but not theta burst stimulation, is perturbed in hippocampal CA1 region of old but not young htau mice. Our results suggest that tau pathology may underlie an age-dependent learning impairment through disruption of synaptic function. PMID:19710325

  16. MPTP-meditated hippocampal dopamine deprivation modulates synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson's disease (PD)-like symptoms including learning deficits are inducible by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Therefore, it is possible that MPTP may disturb hippocampal memory processing by modulation of dopamine (DA)- and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. We demonstrate here that intraperitoneal (i.p.) MPTP injection reduces the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) within 7 days. Subsequently, the TH expression level in SN and hippocampus and the amount of DA and its metabolite DOPAC in striatum and hippocampus decrease. DA depletion does not alter basal synaptic transmission and changes pair-pulse facilitation (PPF) of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) only at the 30 ms inter-pulse interval. In addition, the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) is impaired whereas the duration of long-term depression (LTD) becomes prolonged. Since both LTP and LTD depend critically on activation of NMDA and DA receptors, we also tested the effect of DA depletion on NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. Seven days after MPTP injection, the NMDA receptor-mediated fEPSPs are decreased by about 23%. Blocking the NMDA receptor-mediated fEPSP does not mimic the MPTP-LTP. Only co-application of D1/D5 and NMDA receptor antagonists during tetanization resembled the time course of fEPSP potentiation as observed 7 days after i.p. MPTP injection. Together, our data demonstrate that MPTP-induced degeneration of DA neurons and the subsequent hippocampal DA depletion alter NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. - Highlights: → I.p. MPTP-injection mediates death of dopaminergic neurons. → I.p. MPTP-injection depletes DA and DOPAC in striatum and hippocampus. → I.p. MPTP-injection does not alter basal synaptic transmission. → Reduction of LTP and enhancement of LTD after i.p. MPTP-injection. → Attenuation of NMDA-receptors mediated

  17. Nicotinic mechanisms influencing synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andon Nicholas PLACZEK; Tao A ZHANG; John Anthony DANI

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed throughout the hippocampus, and nicotinic signaling plays an important role in neuronal function. In the context of learning and memory related behaviors associated with hippocampal function, a potentially significant feature of nAChR activity is the impact it has on synaptic plasticity. Synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons has long been considered a contributing cellular mechanism of learning and memory. These same kinds of cellular mechanisms are a factor in the development of nicotine addiction. Nicotinic signaling has been demonstrated by in vitro studies to affect synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons via multiple steps, and the signaling has also been shown to evoke synaptic plasticity in vivo. This review focuses on the nAChRs subtypes that contribute to hippocampal synaptic plasticity at the cellular and circuit level. It also considers nicotinic influences over long-term changes in the hippocampus that may contribute to addiction.

  18. Synaptic pathology: A shared mechanism in neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henstridge, Christopher M; Pickett, Eleanor; Spires-Jones, Tara L

    2016-07-01

    Synaptic proteomes have evolved a rich and complex diversity to allow the exquisite control of neuronal communication and information transfer. It is therefore not surprising that many neurological disorders are associated with alterations in synaptic function. As technology has advanced, our ability to study the anatomical and physiological function of synapses in greater detail has revealed a critical role for both central and peripheral synapses in neurodegenerative disease. Synapse loss has a devastating effect on cellular communication, leading to wide ranging effects such as network disruption within central neural systems and muscle wastage in the periphery. These devastating effects link synaptic pathology to a diverse range of neurological disorders, spanning Alzheimer's disease to multiple sclerosis. This review will highlight some of the current literature on synaptic integrity in animal models of disease and human post-mortem studies. Synaptic changes in normal brain ageing will also be discussed and finally the current and prospective treatments for neurodegenerative disorders will be summarised. PMID:27108053

  19. Low energy 40Ca + 40Ca collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the classical microscopic study of 40Ca + 40Ca collisions. Fusion cross-sections (σsub(CF)) for various incident energies, energy variations with time, shape deformation and the life time of resonance scattering (T) have been studied. Comparison of 40Ca + 40Ca results with those of 16O + 16O have also been made. (author)

  20. Vesicular glutamate transporter 1 orchestrates recruitment of other synaptic vesicle cargo proteins during synaptic vesicle recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ping-Yue; Marrs, Julia; Ryan, Timothy A

    2015-09-11

    A long standing question in synaptic physiology is how neurotransmitter-filled vesicles are rebuilt after exocytosis. Among the first steps in this process is the endocytic retrieval of the transmembrane proteins that are enriched in synaptic vesicles (SVs). At least six types of transmembrane proteins must be recovered, but the rules for how this multiple cargo selection is accomplished are poorly understood. Among these SV cargos is the vesicular glutamate transporter (vGlut). We show here that vGlut1 has a strong influence on the kinetics of retrieval of half of the known SV cargos and that specifically impairing the endocytosis of vGlut1 in turn slows down other SV cargos, demonstrating that cargo retrieval is a collective cargo-driven process. Finally, we demonstrate that different cargos can be retrieved in the same synapse with different kinetics, suggesting that additional post-endocytic sorting steps likely occur in the nerve terminal. PMID:26224632

  1. Synaptic reverberation underlying mnemonic persistent activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X J

    2001-08-01

    Stimulus-specific persistent neural activity is the neural process underlying active (working) memory. Since its discovery 30 years ago, mnemonic activity has been hypothesized to be sustained by synaptic reverberation in a recurrent circuit. Recently, experimental and modeling work has begun to test the reverberation hypothesis at the cellular level. Moreover, theory has been developed to describe memory storage of an analog stimulus (such as spatial location or eye position), in terms of continuous 'bump attractors' and 'line attractors'. This review summarizes new studies, and discusses insights and predictions from biophysically based models. The stability of a working memory network is recognized as a serious problem; stability can be achieved if reverberation is largely mediated by NMDA receptors at recurrent synapses. PMID:11476885

  2. Alzheimer's disease: synaptic dysfunction and Abeta

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shankar, Ganesh M

    2009-11-23

    Abstract Synapse loss is an early and invariant feature of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) and there is a strong correlation between the extent of synapse loss and the severity of dementia. Accordingly, it has been proposed that synapse loss underlies the memory impairment evident in the early phase of AD and that since plasticity is important for neuronal viability, persistent disruption of plasticity may account for the frank cell loss typical of later phases of the disease. Extensive multi-disciplinary research has implicated the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in the aetiology of AD and here we review the evidence that non-fibrillar soluble forms of Aβ are mediators of synaptic compromise. We also discuss the possible mechanisms of Aβ synaptotoxicity and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  3. Synaptic Transmission An Information-Theoretic Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Manwani, A

    1998-01-01

    Here we analyze synaptic transmission from an information-theoretic perspective. We derive closed-form expressions for the lower-bounds on the capacity of a simple model of a cortical synapse under two explicit coding paradigms. Under the ``signal estimation'' paradigm, we assume the signal to be encoded in the mean firing rate of a Poisson neuron. The performance of an optimal linear estimator of the signal then provides a lower bound on the capacity for signal estimation. Under the ``signal detection'' paradigm, the presence or absence of the signal has to be detected. Performance of the optimal spike detector allows us to compute a lower bound on the capacity for signal detection. We find that single synapses (for empirically measured parameter values) transmit information poorly but significant improvement can be achieved with a small amount of redundancy.

  4. Elimination of redundant synaptic inputs in the absence of synaptic strengthening

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Zhong-wei

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic refinement, a developmental process that consists of selective elimination and strengthening of immature synapses, is essential for the formation of precise neuronal circuits and proper brain function. At glutamatergic synapses in the brain, activity-dependent recruitment of AMPA receptors (AMPAR) is a key mechanism underlying the strengthening of immature synapses. Studies using receptor over-expression have shown that the recruitment of AMPARs is subunit specific. With the notable ...

  5. Synaptic protein levels altered in vascular dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Lindsey I; Tayler, Hannah M; Love, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral ischaemia is the defining pathophysiological abnormality in most forms of vascular dementia (VAD), but the pathogenesis of the dementia remains poorly understood. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is early loss of synaptic proteins, but these have been little studied in VAD. Materials and Methods We measured synaptophysin, postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), drebrin, synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in superior temporal cortex from 11 patients with VAD and, initially, 11 non-dementia controls. We corrected for neuronal content by measurement of neuron-specific enolase. A further 11 controls were subsequently used in a validation study. Simulation of post-mortem delay found that PSD-95 was stable at 4°C but declined slightly at RT. SNAP-25 and drebrin showed good post-mortem stability. Previous studies had shown good post-mortem preservation of synaptophysin and VEGF. Results The VAD cases had lower synaptophysin (but P > 0.05 in initial study), significantly lower SNAP-25 (P = 0.024) and significantly higher drebrin (P = 0.020). On comparison with the second control group, the reduction in synaptophysin was significant (P = 0.008), and the other results were confirmed. Conclusion There is probably a reduction in presynaptic proteins in the temporal cortex in VAD, although not as marked as in AD. In VAD, there is also an increase in drebrin, which may be a response to reduced synaptic input. PMID:25559750

  6. Synaptic variability in a cortical neuromorphic circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahvash, Mohammad; Parker, Alice C

    2013-03-01

    Variable behavior has been observed in several mechanisms found in biological neurons, resulting in changes in neural behavior that might be useful to capture in neuromorphic circuits. This paper presents a neuromorphic cortical neuron with synaptic neurotransmitter-release variability, which is designed to be used in neural networks as part of the Biomimetic Real-Time Cortex project. This neuron has been designed and simulated using carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors, which is one of several nanotechnologies under consideration to meet the challenges of scale presented by the cortex. Some research results suggest that some instances of variability are stochastic, while others indicate that some instances of variability are chaotic. In this paper, both possible sources of variability are considered by embedding either Gaussian noise or a chaotic signal into the neuromorphic or synaptic circuit and observing the simulation results. In order to embed chaotic behavior into the neuromorphic circuit, a chaotic signal generator circuit is presented, implemented with CNT transistors that could be embedded in the electronic neural circuit, and simulated using CNT SPICE models. The circuit uses a chaotic piecewise linear 1-D map implemented by switched-current circuits. The simulation results presented in this paper illustrate that neurotransmitter-release variability plays a beneficial role in the reliability of spike generation. In an examination of this reliability, the precision of spike timing in the CNT circuit simulations is found to be dependent on stimulus (postsynaptic potential) transients. Postsynaptic potentials with low neurotransmitter release variability or without neurotransmitter release variability produce imprecise spike trains, whereas postsynaptic potentials with high neurotransmitter-release variability produce spike trains with reproducible timing. PMID:24808313

  7. CaM Kinases: From Memories to Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christian P; Quednow, Boris B; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Kornhuber, Johannes; Schumann, Gunter; Giese, K Peter

    2016-02-01

    Drug addiction is a major psychiatric disorder with a neurobiological basis that is still insufficiently understood. Initially, non-addicted, controlled drug consumption and drug instrumentalization are established. They comprise highly systematic behaviours acquired by learning and the establishment of drug memories. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) are important Ca(2+) sensors translating glutamatergic activation into synaptic plasticity during learning and memory formation. Here we review the role of CaMKs in the establishment of drug-related behaviours in animal models and in humans. Converging evidence now shows that CaMKs are a crucial mechanism of how addictive drugs induce synaptic plasticity and establish various types of drug memories. Thereby, CaMKs are not only molecular relays for glutamatergic activity but they also directly control dopaminergic and serotonergic activity in the mesolimbic reward system. They can now be considered as major molecular pathways translating normal memory formation into establishment of drug memories and possibly transition to drug addiction. PMID:26674562

  8. Long-Term Memory Deficits in Pavlovian Fear Conditioning in Ca2+/Calmodulin Kinase Kinase α-Deficient Mice▿

    OpenAIRE

    Blaeser, Frank; Sanders, Matthew J.; Truong, Nga; Ko, Shanelle; Wu, Long Jun; Wozniak, David F.; Fanselow, Michael S.; Zhuo, Min; Chatila, Talal A.

    2006-01-01

    Signaling by the Ca2+/calmodulin kinase (CaMK) cascade has been implicated in neuronal gene transcription, synaptic plasticity, and long-term memory consolidation. The CaM kinase kinase α (CaMKKα) isoform is an upstream component of the CaMK cascade whose function in different behavioral and learning and memory paradigms was analyzed by targeted gene disruption in mice. CaMKKα mutants exhibited normal long-term spatial memory formation and cued fear conditioning but showed deficits in context...

  9. Astrocyte IP3R2-dependent Ca2+ signaling is not a major modulator of neuronal pathways governing behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Petravicz, Jeremy; Boyt, Kristen M.; McCarthy, Ken D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-dependent release of gliotransmitters by astrocytes is reported to play a critical role in synaptic transmission and be necessary for long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD) and other forms of synaptic modulation that are correlates of learning and memory. Further, physiological processes reported to be dependent on Ca2+ fluxes in astrocytes include functional hyperemia, sleep, and regulation of breathing. The preponderance of findings indicate that most, if not all, ...

  10. Rapid increase of spines by dihydrotestosterone and testosterone in hippocampal neurons: Dependence on synaptic androgen receptor and kinase networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Yusuke; Hojo, Yasushi; Mukai, Hideo; Murakami, Gen; Komatsuzaki, Yoshimasa; Kim, Jonghyuk; Ikeda, Muneki; Hiragushi, Ayako; Kimoto, Tetsuya; Kawato, Suguru

    2015-09-24

    Rapid modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by locally synthesized androgen is important in addition to circulating androgen. Here, we investigated the rapid changes of dendritic spines in response to the elevation of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone (T), by using hippocampal slices from adult male rats, in order to clarify whether these signaling processes include synaptic/extranuclear androgen receptor (AR) and activation of kinases. We found that the application of 10nM DHT and 10nM T increased the total density of spines by approximately 1.3-fold within 2h, by imaging Lucifer Yellow-injected CA1 pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, DHT and T increased different head-sized spines. While DHT increased middle- and large-head spines, T increased small-head spines. Androgen-induced spinogenesis was suppressed by individually blocking Erk MAPK, PKA, PKC, p38 MAPK, LIMK or calcineurin. On the other hand, blocking CaMKII did not inhibit spinogenesis. Blocking PI3K altered the spine head diameter distribution, but did not change the total spine density. Blocking mRNA and protein synthesis did not suppress the enhancing effects induced by DHT or T. The enhanced spinogenesis by androgens was blocked by AR antagonist, which AR was localized postsynaptically. Taken together, these results imply that enhanced spinogenesis by DHT and T is mediated by synaptic/extranuclear AR which rapidly drives the kinase networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID:25511993

  11. The effect of two lipophilic gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake blockers in CA1 of the rat hippocampal slice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Jahnsen, H; Mosfeldt Laursen, A

    1990-01-01

    the blood. 2. We have investigated the effect of these two uptake inhibitors on the responses to exogenous GABA and on GABA-mediated inhibitory synaptic potentials in pyramidal neurones of the CA1 region in the rat hippocampal slice. 3. We found that both drugs increased the amplitude and duration of...... responses to exogenous GABA. Furthermore, the inhibitory synaptic potentials increased in amplitude. This increase was seen in both early and late phases of the synaptic potentials. We conclude that NO-05-0328 and NO-05-0329, at least in vitro, are more effective than older GABA uptake inhibitors such as...

  12. Size and receptor density of glutamatergic synapses: a viewpoint from left-right asymmetry of CA3-CA1 connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Shinohara

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity is considered to be the main mechanism for learning and memory. Excitatory synapses in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus undergo plastic changes during development and in response to electric stimulation. It is widely accepted that this process is mediated by insertion and elimination of various glutamate receptors. In a series of recent investigations on left-right asymmetry of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses, glutamate receptor subunits have been found to have distinctive expression patterns that depend on the postsynaptic density (PSD area. Particularly notable are the GluR1 AMPA receptor subunit and NR2B NMDA receptor subunit, where receptor density has either a supra-linear (GluR1 AMPA or inverse (NR2B NMDAR relationship to the PSD area. We review current understanding of structural and physiological synaptic plasticity and propose a scheme to classify receptor subtypes by their expression pattern with respect to PSD area.

  13. Pseudo-biphasic extraction and liquid membrane transport of ionic solutes using micelle-based processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different aspects between micellar extraction and solvent extraction were discussed. One way of using micellar systems to perform metal ion extraction consists in solubilizing lipophilic complexing agents in the hydrophobic core of the micelles, similarly to their solubilization in the organic phase in classical biphasic extraction. Metal ions dissolved in the continuous phase will be complexed or not, depending on their affinity for the micelle-solubilized extractant, the microscopic micelle/water interface playing a part analogous to the macroscopic organic/water interface in biphasic extraction. The yields of extraction (after ultrafiltration of the micellar pseudo-phase) when parameters such as the extractant/metal ratio or the extractant hydrophobicity are changed, show similar trends as those reported in the case of solvent extraction, but only diluted solutions can be treated that way. 14 refs

  14. Ionic liquid-salt based aqueous biphasic system separation of 109Cd from silver target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Aqueous Biphasic Systems (ABS) is becoming more important from green chemistry point of view replacing conventional liquid-liquid extraction system. The most of the aqueous biphasic systems reported in the literature are based on Polyethylene glycol (PEG) with different salts. Although ABS based on water soluble room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium Chloride ((bmim)CI) and concentrated solutions of kosmotropic salt K2HPO4 was reported in 2007 but the efficiency of this system for metal partitioning has been rarely explored. We report for the first time separation of no-carrier-added (NCA) 109Cd from the α-particle irradiated Ag target using this ABS

  15. A method for separating water soluble organics from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiko, David J.; Mego, William A.

    1997-12-01

    The present invention relates to a method for separating water-miscible organic species from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction. In particular, the method includes extracting the organic species into a polymer-rich phase of an aqueous biphase system in which the process stream comprises the salt-rich phase, and, next, separating the polymer from the extracted organic species by contacting the loaded, polymer-rich phase with a water-immiscible organic phase. Alternatively, the polymer can be separated from the extracted organic species by raising the temperature of the loaded, polymer-rich phase above the cloud point, such that the polymer and the water-soluble organic species separate into two distinct aqueous phases. In either case, a substantially salt-free, concentrated aqueous solution containing the organic species is recovered.

  16. Enhanced dibenzothiophene biodesulfurization by immobilized cells of Brevibacterium lutescens in n-octane-water biphasic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yong; Shao, Rong; Qi, Gang; Ding, Bin-Bin

    2014-11-01

    In this study, it was the first report that the Brevibacterium lutescens CCZU12-1 was employed as a sulfur removing bacteria. Using dibenzothiophene (DBT) as the sole sulfur source, B. lutescens could selectively degrade DBT into 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) via the "4S" pathway. In the basal salt medium (BSM) supplemented with 0.25 mM DBT and 0.5 g/L Tween-80, high desulfurization rate (100 %) was obtained by growth cells after 60 h. Furthermore, the n-octane-water (10:90, v/v) biphasic system was built for the biodesulfurization by resting cells. Moreover, a combination of magnetic nano Fe3O4 particles with calcium alginate immobilization was used for enhancing biodesulfurization. In this n-octane-water biphasic system, immobilized B. lutescens cells could be reused for not less than four times. Therefore, B. lutescens CCZU12-1 shows high potential in the biodesulfurization. PMID:25173674

  17. Biphasic Insulin Aspart 30/70: Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Compared With Once-Daily Biphasic Human Insulin and Basal-Bolus Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Tim; Heinemann, Lutz; Hövelmann, Ulrike; Brauns, Bianca; Nosek, Leszek; Haahr, Hanne L.; Olsen, Klaus J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Pharmacological profiles of biphasic insulin aspart 30/70 (BIAsp 30) once daily (OD), twice daily (b.i.d.), and three times daily (t.i.d.) were compared with other insulin regimens in two crossover glucose clamp studies of insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGNS AND METHODS Study 1 consisted of BIAsp 30 OD, b.i.d., and t.i.d. versus biphasic human insulin 30/70 (BHI 30), OD (n = 24). Study 2 examined BIAsp 30 t.i.d. versus basal-bolus therapy (insulin glargine OD plus insulin glulisine t.i.d.) (n = 24). Pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) were investigated over 24 h. RESULTS Study 1: PK and PD were markedly different between BIAsp 30 OD and BHI 30 OD: the maximum insulin concentration and glucose infusion rate (GIR) were higher for BIAsp 30; time to maximum metabolism was 1.7 h sooner for BIAsp 30. Study 2: both regimens showed three distinct prandial-related GIR peaks. GIR 24-h area under the curve for BIAsp t.i.d. was higher than for basal-bolus therapy: 2,585.2 vs. 2,289.2 mg/kg. CONCLUSIONS BIAsp had pharmacological advantages over BHI. BIAsp t.i.d. had a similar PD profile to basal-bolus therapy. PMID:19487640

  18. Efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart and biphasic insulin lispro mix in patients with type 2 diabetes: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) represents an escalating burden worldwide, particularly in China and India. Compared with Caucasians, Asian people with diabetes have lower body mass index, increased visceral adiposity, and postprandial glucose (PPG)/insulin resistance. Since postprandial hyperglycemia contributes significantly to total glycemic burden and is associated with heightened cardiovascular risk, targeting PPG early in T2D is paramount. Premixed insulin regimens are widely used in Asia due to their convenience and effectiveness. Data from randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30) with biphasic insulin lispro mix (LM 25/50) and versus other insulin therapies or oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) in T2D demonstrated that BIAsp 30 and LM 25/50 were associated with similar or greater improvements in glycemic control versus comparator regimens, such as basal-bolus insulin, in insulin-naÏve, and prior insulin users. Studies directly comparing BIAsp 30 and LM 25 provided conflicting glycemic control results. Safety data generally showed increased hypoglycemia and weight gain with premixed insulins versus basal-bolus insulin or OADs. However, large observational trials documented improvements in glycated hemoglobin, PPG, and hypoglycemia with BIAsp 30 in multi-ethnic patient populations. In summary, this literature review demonstrates that premixed insulin regimens are an appropriate and effective treatment choice in T2D. PMID:27186543

  19. Efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart and biphasic insulin lispro mix in patients with type 2 diabetes: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D represents an escalating burden worldwide, particularly in China and India. Compared with Caucasians, Asian people with diabetes have lower body mass index, increased visceral adiposity, and postprandial glucose (PPG/insulin resistance. Since postprandial hyperglycemia contributes significantly to total glycemic burden and is associated with heightened cardiovascular risk, targeting PPG early in T2D is paramount. Premixed insulin regimens are widely used in Asia due to their convenience and effectiveness. Data from randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30 with biphasic insulin lispro mix (LM 25/50 and versus other insulin therapies or oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs in T2D demonstrated that BIAsp 30 and LM 25/50 were associated with similar or greater improvements in glycemic control versus comparator regimens, such as basal–bolus insulin, in insulin-naÏve, and prior insulin users. Studies directly comparing BIAsp 30 and LM 25 provided conflicting glycemic control results. Safety data generally showed increased hypoglycemia and weight gain with premixed insulins versus basal–bolus insulin or OADs. However, large observational trials documented improvements in glycated hemoglobin, PPG, and hypoglycemia with BIAsp 30 in multi-ethnic patient populations. In summary, this literature review demonstrates that premixed insulin regimens are an appropriate and effective treatment choice in T2D.

  20. Case Report: Multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Ignacio Lopez

    2016-01-01

    A multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma in a 68-year-old man is reported. Four different peripheral tumor nodules were identified on gross examination. A fifth central tumor corresponded to a conventional clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma is a rare tumor that has been very recently characterized as a distinct histotype within the spectrum of papillary renal cell carcinoma. Immunostaining with cyclin D1 seems to be specific of...

  1. A biphasic finite element study on the role of the articular cartilage superficial zone in confined compression

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Hongqiang; Maher, Suzanne A; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the superficial zone on the mechanical behavior of articular cartilage. Confined compression of articular cartilage was modeled using a biphasic finite element analysis to calculate the one-dimensional deformation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and movement of the interstitial fluid through the ECM and articular surface. The articular cartilage was modeled as an inhomogeneous, nonlinear hyperelastic biphasic material with depth and strai...

  2. [Recent advance in research for myasthenia gravis, in relation to various antibodies affecting synaptic structure and function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamori, Masaharu

    2009-11-01

    Autoantibodies impair acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in myasthenia gravis (MG) and P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS). (1) Some of MG and LEMS patients are "seronegative" for respective antibodies or modified by antibodies that recognize other proteins than AChR and VGCC such as MuSK, AChR allosteric site, membrane Na+ channel and ryanodine receptor-1 (RyR1) in MG, and synaptotagmin-1 in LEMS. (2) Autoimmune responses affect the proteins participating in the mechanisms to compensate for synaptic disorders on the basis of presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis provided by VGCC and non-VGCC (receptor-operated TRPCs): they act as enhancers of Ca(2+) -mediated ACh release via phospholipase C signaling pathways including M1-type presynaptic muscarinic AChR, neurotrophin receptor (TrkB), and fast-mode of synaptic vesicle recycling. (3) The pathophysiology contributive to contractile fatigue in MG includes RyR1 and also TRPC3. The TRPC3 also forms a complex with STIM1 and Orail to make up for Ca2+ after sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release. The prevalent detection of anti-TRPC3 antibodies in MG with thymoma could affect muscle contractile machineries in addition to anti-RyR1-induced affection. (4) When one faces "seronegative" MG, one should be cautious to conformation-specific antibodies and also congenital myasthenic syndromes. PMID:20030211

  3. Biphasic gastroretentive drug delivery system of acyclovir: formulation and in vitro evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Bandari, Suresh; Yamsani, Madhusudan R.

    2010-01-01

    A biphasic gastroretentive drug delivery system of acyclovir consisted of loading dose tablet and floating multiple matrix tablets was prepared by direct compression process. The delivery system was designed by hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose as retardant polymer with an effervescent component to get the desired buoyant and sustained release characteristics. All formulations compile within the limits. The FTIR studies did not show any evidence of an interaction between acyclovir a...

  4. A biphasic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes and ketones using a simplified packed-bed microreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Bogdan; D. Tyler McQuade

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the preparation and characterization of a simplified packed-bed microreactor using an immobilized TEMPO catalyst shown to oxidize primary and secondary alcohols via the biphasic Anelli-Montanari protocol. Oxidations occurred in high yields with great stability over time. We observed that plugs of aqueous oxidant and organic alcohol entered the reactor as plugs but merged into an emulsion on the packed-bed. The emulsion coalesced into larger plugs upon exiting the reactor, leavi...

  5. Ultra-rapid growth of biphasic nanowires in micro- and hypergravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, Michael; Lee, Juseok; Schmid, Herbert; Aktas, Cenk

    2013-04-01

    Aluminium/aluminium oxide wires form under microgravity, earth conditions, and hypergravity in different forms. While under 0.04 G the biphasic wires are predominantly linear, they form bundles of wires of high curvature at 1 G and 1.8 G. The absence (0.04 G) and presence (1 G, 1.8 G) of gradients are reflected by the agglomeration and growth direction of the nanowires. PMID:23239577

  6. Biphasic parapharyngeal synovial sarcoma: a cytologic and immunocytologic report of a case

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadianpanah Mohammad; Daneshbod Yahya; Negahban Shahrzad; Daneshbod Khosrow; Ashraf Mohammad; Khademi Bijan; Kaviani Massud

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Synovial sarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma in the head and neck region and parapharyngeal space. There is no previous cytologic report of synovial sarcoma of parapharynx. The cytologic and immunocytochemical findings of a parapharyngeal biphasic synovial sarcoma together with diagnostic pitfalls are described. Case report A 21-year-old girl presented with a 6-month history of progressive right arm pain, neck mass and upper aerodigestive tract obstruction. On physical e...

  7. Primary pulmonary sarcoma with morphologic features of biphasic synovial sarcoma: a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, G. S.; Park, S Y; Kang, G. H.; Kim, O. J.

    1998-01-01

    We report an unusual primary case of pulmonary sarcoma that developed in the lung of a 36-year-old woman. The tumor had histologic, immunologic and ultrastructural features identical to those of biphasic synovial sarcoma of the soft tissue. It consisted of an intimate admixture of cytokeratin and epithelial membrane antigen(EMA)-positive neoplastic epithelial cells and vimentin-positive fibroblast-like spindle cells with areas of hyalinization. The patient had a lobectomy and showed no eviden...

  8. Changes in biphasic electrode impedance with protein adsorption and cell growth

    OpenAIRE

    Newbold, Carrie; Richardson, Rachael; Millard, Rodney; Huang, Christie; Milojevic, Dusan; Shepherd, Robert; Cowan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the contribution of protein adsorption and cell growth to increases in electrode impedance that occur immediately following implantation of cochlear implant electrodes and other neural stimulation devices. An in vitro model of the electrode-tissue interface was used. Radiolabelled albumin in phosphate buffered saline was added to planar gold electrodes and electrode impedance measured using a charge-balanced biphasic current pulse. The polarisation impedanc...

  9. Localized biphasic type malignant mesothelioma arising in the peritoneum: Report of a case

    OpenAIRE

    Kohno, Mikihiro; Maruyama, Riichiroh; Kitagawa, Dai; Sugimachi, Keishi; Kinjo, Mitsuru; Higashi, Hidefumi

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of localized malignant biphasic (mixed epithelioid and sarcomatoid) mesothelioma arising in the peritoneum. A 69-year-old male with a history of asbestos exposure, complaining of a painful mass in the left chest wall, was found via computed tomography (CT) to have a tumor in the left peritoneum. The resected tumor was histologically and immunohistochemically consistent with a malignant mesothelioma with mixed epithelioid and sarcomatoid type and no distant me...

  10. Dehydration of xylose to furfural over niobium phosphate catalyst in biphasic solvent system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Boonrat; Pholjaroen; Ning; Li; Zhiqiang; Wang; Aiqin; Wang; Tao; Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoric acid treated niobic acid(NbP)was used for the dehydration of xylose to furfural in biphasic solvent system,which was found to exhibit the best performance among the tested catalysts.The excellent performance of NbP could be explained by the better synergistic cooperation between Bro¨nsted and Lewis acid sites.Moreover,NbP showed good stability and no obvious deactivation or leaching of Nb could be observed after six continuous recycles.

  11. A biphase shift keying (BPSK), direct sequence, spread spectrum modem for Petite Amateur Navy Satellite (PANSAT).

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The development of a bi-phase shift keying (BPSK), direct sequence, spread spectrum modem is conducted for the purpose of creating a prototype design to be implemented in the Petite Amateur Navy Satellite (PANSAT). The design discussion includes the hardware used in the functional realization of a working design. The design itself encompasses selection of components and demonstrates (through circuit diagrams and waveform...

  12. A simulation study of the reaction of human heart to biphasic electrical shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seemann Gunnar

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article presents a study, which examines the effects of biphasic electrical shocks on human ventricular tissue. The effects of this type of shock are not yet fully understood. Animal experiments showed the superiority of biphasic shocks over monophasic ones in defibrillation. A mathematical computer simulation can increase the knowledge of human heart behavior. Methods The research presented in this article was done with different models representing a three-dimensional wedge of ventricular myocardium. The electrophysiology was described with Priebe-Beuckelmann model. The realistic fiber twist, which is specific to human myocardium was included. Planar electrodes were placed at the ends of the longest side of the virtual cardiac wedge, in a bath medium. They were sources of electrical shocks, which varied in magnitude from 0.1 to 5 V. In a second arrangement ring electrodes were placed directly on myocardium for getting a better view on secondary electrical sources. The electrical reaction of the tissue was generated with a bidomain model. Results The reaction of the tissue to the electrical shock was specific to the initial imposed characteristics. Depolarization appeared in the first 5 ms in different locations. A further study of the cardiac tissue behavior revealed, which features influence the response of the considered muscle. It was shown that the time needed by the tissue to be totally depolarized is much shorter when a biphasic shock is applied. Each simulation ended only after complete repolarization was achieved. This created the possibility of gathering information from all states corresponding to one cycle of the cardiac rhythm. Conclusions The differences between the reaction of the homogeneous tissue and a tissue, which contains cleavage planes, reveals important aspects of superiority of biphasic pulses. ...

  13. Development of bioprocesses based in biphasic media involving the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, N.; Gonçalves, C; Lopes, M.; Aguedo, Mario; Teixeira, J. A.; M. Mota; Belo, I.

    2008-01-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica has been intensively used in our research group to develop different bioprocesses based in the ability of this yeast to use hydrophobic substrates. Work has been focused in the optimization of the production of y-decalactone and lipase, and to degrade and detoxify olive oil wastewater producing simultaneously high-value compounds, such as enzymes. Studies of the oxygen mass transfer phenomenon in biphasic media was also conducted and applied to select the mo...

  14. Triclocarban-induced change in intracellular Ca²⁺ level in rat thymocytes: cytometric analysis with Fluo-3 under Zn²⁺-free conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Yukari; Chen, Xiaohui; Yamada, Saki; Sugihara, Aya; Enkhjargal, Molomjamts; Sun, Yuanzhi; Kuroda, Keiko; Satoh, Masaya; Oyama, Yasuo

    2014-03-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is an antimicrobial used in personal hygiene products. Recent health concerns arose after TCC was detected in the blood of human subjects who showered with soap containing TCC. In this study, the effect of TCC on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in rat thymocytes was examined using Fluo-3, an indicator of intracellular Ca(2+). TCC at concentrations ranging from 0.1 μM to 3 μM increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration biphasically: first by releasing Ca(2+) from intracellular Ca(2+) stores and then inducing Ca(2+) influx through store-operated Ca(2+) channels. The threshold TCC concentration to increase intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in this study was lower than the maximum TCC concentrations reported in human blood samples. Therefore, we anticipate that TCC at concentrations reported in human blood samples might disturb intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in human lymphocytes. PMID:24562054

  15. Short-term versus long-term water maze training effects on hippocampal neuronal synaptic plasticity in a rat model of senile dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guogui Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in synaptic plasticity might underlie senile dementia, and might be the neurobiological basis for learning and memory dysfunctions in patients with Alzheimer's Disease. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of water maze training on hippocampal neuronal synaptic plasticity in rats with senile dementia, and to compare changes in synaptic plasticity between short- and long-term water maze training sessions.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled, neuromorphological observation with animal models of senile dementia was performed at the laboratory of College of Pharmacy, Chongqing Medical University between November 2006 and April 2007.MATERIALS: Fifty male, Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into five groups, with 10 rats per group: model, control, sham-operated, short-term water maze training, and long-term water maze training. METHODS: In the model group, senile dementia was induced by fimbria-fornix lesion method. The control rats remained untreated. In the sham-operated group, water maze training was performed without fimbria-fornix lesion induction. Rats from the short-term water maze training group underwent 20-day water maze training from day 26 after fimbria-fornix lesion induction. The long-term water maze training group underwent 40-day water maze training beginning at day 6 following fimbria-fornix lesion induction. Beginning at day 41, each group underwent 5-day spatial learning and memory training. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Following experimentation, the morphological parameters of synapses, including synaptic numerical density, synaptic surface density, and the average synapse size were stereologically measured. Through the use of an electron microscope, synaptic morphological changes in the hippocampai CA3 region were observed.RESULTS: Compared with the control group, synaptic numerical and surface densities were significantly decreased in the model group (P < 0.01). Synaptic numerical and surface densities significantly

  16. Myosin light chain kinase facilitates endocytosis of synaptic vesicles at hippocampal boutons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Wu, Xiaomei; Yue, Hai-Yuan; Zhu, Yong-Chuan; Xu, Jianhua

    2016-07-01

    At nerve terminals, endocytosis efficiently recycles vesicle membrane to maintain synaptic transmission under different levels of neuronal activity. Ca(2+) and its downstream signal pathways are critical for the activity-dependent regulation of endocytosis. An activity- and Ca(2+) -dependent kinase, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) has been reported to regulate vesicle mobilization, vesicle cycling, and motility in different synapses, but whether it has a general contribution to regulation of endocytosis at nerve terminals remains unknown. We investigated this issue at rat hippocampal boutons by imaging vesicle endocytosis as the real-time retrieval of vesicular synaptophysin tagged with a pH-sensitive green fluorescence protein. We found that endocytosis induced by 200 action potentials (5-40 Hz) was slowed by acute inhibition of MLCK and down-regulation of MLCK with RNA interference, while the total amount of vesicle exocytosis and somatic Ca(2+) channel current did not change with MLCK down-regulation. Acute inhibition of myosin II similarly impaired endocytosis. Furthermore, down-regulation of MLCK prevented depolarization-induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain, an effect shared by blockers of Ca(2+) channels and calmodulin. These results suggest that MLCK facilitates vesicle endocytosis through activity-dependent phosphorylation of myosin downstream of Ca(2+) /calmodulin, probably as a widely existing mechanism among synapses. Our study suggests that MLCK is an important activity-dependent regulator of vesicle recycling in hippocampal neurons, which are critical for learning and memory. The kinetics of vesicle membrane endocytosis at nerve terminals has long been known to depend on activity and Ca(2+) . This study provides evidence suggesting that myosin light chain kinase increases endocytosis efficiency at hippocampal neurons by mediating Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of myosin. The authors propose that this signal cascade may serve as

  17. Synchronized oscillations of dimers in biphasic charged fd-virus suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, K.; Piao, S. H.; Choi, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    Micron-sized colloidal spheres that are dispersed in an isotropic-nematic biphasic host suspension of charged rods (fd-virus particles) are shown to spontaneously form dimers, which exhibit a synchronized oscillatory motion. Dimer formation is not observed in the monophase of isotropic and nematic suspensions. The synchronized oscillations of dimers are connected to the inhomogeneous state of the host suspension of charged rods (fd viruses) where nematic domains are in coexistence with isotropic regions. The synchronization of oscillations occurs in bulk states, in the absence of an external field. With a low field strength of an applied electric field, the synchronization is rather reduced, but it recovers again when the field is turned off. In this Rapid Communication, we report this observation as an example of the strange attractor, occurring in the mixture of PS (polystyrene) dimers in an isotropic-nematic coexistence biphasic fd-virus network. Furthermore, we highlight that the synchronization of PS-dimer oscillations is the result of a global bifurcation diagram, driven by a delicate balance between the short-attractive "twisted" interaction of PS dimers and long-ranged electrostatic repulsive interactions of charged fd rods. The interest is then in the local enhancement of "twist-nematic" elasticity in reorientation of the dimer oscillations. An analysis of image-time correlations is provided with the data movies and Fourier transforms of averaged orientations for the synchronized oscillations of dimers in the biphasic I -N coexistence concentration of charged fd-virus suspensions.

  18. A Voltage Mode Memristor Bridge Synaptic Circuit with Memristor Emulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Chua

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A memristor bridge neural circuit which is able to perform signed synaptic weighting was proposed in our previous study, where the synaptic operation was verified via software simulation of the mathematical model of the HP memristor. This study is an extension of the previous work advancing toward the circuit implementation where the architecture of the memristor bridge synapse is built with memristor emulator circuits. In addition, a simple neural network which performs both synaptic weighting and summation is built by combining memristor emulators-based synapses and differential amplifier circuits. The feasibility of the memristor bridge neural circuit is verified via SPICE simulations.

  19. Spikes Synchronization in Neural Networks with Synaptic Plasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Borges, Rafael R; Batista, Antonio M; Caldas, Iberê L; Borges, Fernando S; Lameu, Ewandson L

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the neural spikes synchronisation in a neural network with synaptic plasticity and external perturbation. In the simulations the neural dynamics is described by the Hodgkin Huxley model considering chemical synapses (excitatory) among neurons. According to neural spikes synchronisation is expected that a perturbation produce non synchronised regimes. However, in the literature there are works showing that the combination of synaptic plasticity and external perturbation may generate synchronised regime. This article describes the effect of the synaptic plasticity on the synchronisation, where we consider a perturbation with a uniform distribution. This study is relevant to researches of neural disorders control.

  20. Receptor actions of synaptically released glutamate: the role of transporters on the scale from nanometers to microns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kaiyu; Scimemi, Annalisa; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2008-11-15

    Actions of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate inside and outside the synaptic cleft determine the activity of neural circuits in the brain. However, to what degree local glutamate transporters affect these actions on a submicron scale remains poorly understood. Here we focus on hippocampal area CA1, a common subject of synaptic physiology studies. First, we use a two-photon excitation technique to obtain an estimate of the apparent (macroscopic) extracellular diffusion coefficient for glutamate, approximately 0.32 mum(2)/ms. Second, we incorporate this measurement into a Monte Carlo model of the typical excitatory synapse and examine the influence of distributed glutamate transporter molecules on signal transmission. Combined with the results of whole-cell recordings, such simulations argue that, although glutamate transporters have little effect on the activation of synaptic alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors, this does not rule out the occurrence of up to several dozens of transporters inside the cleft. We further evaluate how the expression pattern of transporter molecules (on the 10-100 nm scale) affects the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid or metabotropic glutamate receptors in the synaptic vicinity. Finally, we extend our simulations to the macroscopic scale, estimating that synaptic activity sufficient to excite principal neurons could intermittently raise extracellular glutamate to approximately 1 muM only at sparse (microns apart) hotspots. Greater rises of glutamate occur only when astrocyte fails). The results provide a quantitative framework for a better understanding of the relationship between glutamate transporters and glutamate receptor signaling. PMID:18689452

  1. Fabrication and materials properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE)/biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) hybrid bone plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biphasic calcium phosphate-reinforced high-density polyethylene (BCP/HDPE) hybrid composite is a new orthopedic biomaterial, which was made to simulate a natural bone composition. Calcium phosphate systems and HDPE hybrid composites have been used in biomedical applications without any inflammatory response. Differences in natural bone of both materials have motivated the use of coupling agents to improve their interfacial interfacial interactions. The composites were prepared using medical grade BCP powder and granular polyethylene. This material was produced by replacing the mineral component and collagen soft tissue of the bone with BCP and HDPE, respectively. As expected, increased volume fraction of either reinforcement type over 0 ∼ 50 vol.% resulted in a increased Vickers hardness and Young's modulus. Thus, BCP particle-reinforced HDPE composites possessed improved material and mechanical properties. BCP particles-reinforced composites were anisotropic due to an alignment of the particles in the matrix during a processing. On the other hand, bending and tensile strength was dramatically changed in the matrix. To change the material and mechanical properties of HDPE/BCP composites, the process of a blending was used, and its effect on the microstructure and mechanical proprieties of HDPE/BCP composites were investigated by means of FT-IR/ATR spectroscopy, XRD, FE-SEM, Vickers Hardness Testing Machine, Universal Testing Machine, Mercury Porosimeter and Ultrasonic Flaw Detector at room temperature. For the evaluation of the cell viability and proliferation onto the external surface of HDPE/BCP hybrid plates with a HaCaT cell line, which is a multipotent cell line able to differentiate towards different phenotypes under the action of biological factors, has been evaluated with in vitro studies and quantified by colormetric assays. These findings indicate that the HDPE/BCP hybrid plates are biocompatible and non-toxic

  2. Phase diagrams of ionic liquids-based aqueous biphasic systems as a platform for extraction processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Novel ABS based in ionic liquids were determined as a platform for distinct extraction processes. • The effect of pH, IL cation core, alkyl side chain length, IL anion nature, and salt nature on the ABS formation was investigated. • The ability to form ABS increases with the pH and alkyl chain length for all systems studied. • The ILs cation core and anion nature effect on the ABS formation is dominated by the IL (hydrophobic/hydrophilic) nature. • The effect of the different salts depends of the ionic liquid nature and salt valency. - Abstract: In the past few years, ionic liquid-based aqueous biphasic systems have become the subject of considerable interest as a promising technique for the extraction and purification of several macro/biomolecules. Aiming at developing guidelines for more benign and efficient extraction processes, phase diagrams for aqueous biphasic systems composed of ionic liquids and inorganic/organic salts are here reported. Several combinations of ionic liquid families (imidazolium, pyridinium, phosphonium, quaternary ammonium and cholinium) and salts [potassium phosphate buffer (KH2PO4/K2HPO4 at pH 7), potassium citrate buffer (C6H5K3O7/C6H8O7 at pH 5, 6, 7 and 8) and potassium carbonate (K2CO3 at pH ∼13)] were evaluated to highlight the influence of the ionic liquid structure (cation core, anion and alkyl chain length), the pH and the salt nature on the formation of aqueous biphasic systems. The binodal curves and respective tie-lines reported for these systems were experimentally determined at (298 ± 1) K. In general, the ability to promote the aqueous biphasic systems formation increases with the pH and alkyl chain length. While the influence of the cation core and anion nature of the ionic liquids on their ability to form aqueous biphasic systems closely correlates with ionic liquids capacity to be hydrated by water, the effect of the different salts depends of the ionic liquid nature and salt valency

  3. Characterizing synaptic protein development in human visual cortex enables alignment of synaptic age with rat visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua G.A Pinto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although many potential neuroplasticity based therapies have been developed in the lab, few have translated into established clinical treatments for human neurologic or neuropsychiatric diseases. Animal models, especially of the visual system, have shaped our understanding of neuroplasticity by characterizing the mechanisms that promote neural changes and defining timing of the sensitive period. The lack of knowledge about development of synaptic plasticity mechanisms in human cortex, and about alignment of synaptic age between animals and humans, has limited translation of neuroplasticity therapies. In this study, we quantified expression of a set of highly conserved pre- and post-synaptic proteins (Synapsin, Synaptophysin, PSD-95, Gephyrin and found that synaptic development in human primary visual cortex continues into late childhood. Indeed, this is many years longer than suggested by neuroanatomical studies and points to a prolonged sensitive period for plasticity in human sensory cortex. In addition, during childhood we found waves of inter-individual variability that are different for the 4 proteins and include a stage during early development (<1 year when only Gephyrin has high inter-individual variability. We also found that pre- and post-synaptic protein balances develop quickly, suggesting that maturation of certain synaptic functions happens within the first year or two of life. A multidimensional analysis (principle component analysis showed that most of the variance was captured by the sum of the 4 synaptic proteins. We used that sum to compare development of human and rat visual cortex and identified a simple linear equation that provides robust alignment of synaptic age between humans and rats. Alignment of synaptic ages is important for age-appropriate targeting and effective translation of neuroplasticity therapies from the lab to the clinic.

  4. Synaptic remodeling of neuronal circuits in early retinal degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina eSoto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Photoreceptor degenerations are a major cause of blindness and among the most common forms of neurodegeneration in humans. Studies of mouse models revealed that synaptic dysfunction often precedes photoreceptor degeneration, and that abnormal synaptic input from photoreceptors to bipolar cells causes circuits in the inner retina to become hyperactive. Here, we provide a brief overview of frequently used mouse models of photoreceptor degenerations. We then discuss insights into circuit remodeling triggered by early synaptic dysfunction in the outer and hyperactivity in the inner retina. We discuss these insights in the context of other experimental manipulations of synaptic function and activity. Knowledge of the plasticity and early remodeling of retinal circuits will be critical for the design of successful vision rescue strategies.

  5. Synaptic unreliability facilitates information transmission in balanced cortical populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatys, Leon A.; Ecker, Alexander S.; Tchumatchenko, Tatjana; Bethge, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    Synaptic unreliability is one of the major sources of biophysical noise in the brain. In the context of neural information processing, it is a central question how neural systems can afford this unreliability. Here we examine how synaptic noise affects signal transmission in cortical circuits, where excitation and inhibition are thought to be tightly balanced. Surprisingly, we find that in this balanced state synaptic response variability actually facilitates information transmission, rather than impairing it. In particular, the transmission of fast-varying signals benefits from synaptic noise, as it instantaneously increases the amount of information shared between presynaptic signal and postsynaptic current. Furthermore we show that the beneficial effect of noise is based on a very general mechanism which contrary to stochastic resonance does not reach an optimum at a finite noise level.

  6. Synaptic remodeling of neuronal circuits in early retinal degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Florentina; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptor degenerations are a major cause of blindness and among the most common forms of neurodegeneration in humans. Studies of mouse models revealed that synaptic dysfunction often precedes photoreceptor degeneration, and that abnormal synaptic input from photoreceptors to bipolar cells causes circuits in the inner retina to become hyperactive. Here, we provide a brief overview of frequently used mouse models of photoreceptor degenerations. We then discuss insights into circuit remodeling triggered by early synaptic dysfunction in the outer and hyperactivity in the inner retina. We discuss these insights in the context of other experimental manipulations of synaptic function and activity. Knowledge of the plasticity and early remodeling of retinal circuits will be critical for the design of successful vision rescue strategies. PMID:26500497

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Unbounded Cellular Compartments: Synaptic Clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Ken H; Stawski, Philipp S; Draycott, Austin S; Udeshi, Namrata D; Lehrman, Emily K; Wilton, Daniel K; Svinkina, Tanya; Deerinck, Thomas J; Ellisman, Mark H; Stevens, Beth; Carr, Steven A; Ting, Alice Y

    2016-08-25

    Cellular compartments that cannot be biochemically isolated are challenging to characterize. Here we demonstrate the proteomic characterization of the synaptic clefts that exist at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Normal brain function relies on the careful balance of these opposing neural connections, and understanding how this balance is achieved relies on knowledge of their protein compositions. Using a spatially restricted enzymatic tagging strategy, we mapped the proteomes of two of the most common excitatory and inhibitory synaptic clefts in living neurons. These proteomes reveal dozens of synaptic candidates and assign numerous known synaptic proteins to a specific cleft type. The molecular differentiation of each cleft allowed us to identify Mdga2 as a potential specificity factor influencing Neuroligin-2's recruitment of presynaptic neurotransmitters at inhibitory synapses. PMID:27565350

  8. Compatibility between itinerant synaptic receptors and stable postsynaptic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Sekimoto, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The density of synaptic receptors in front of presynaptic release sites is stabilized in the presence of scaffold proteins, but the receptors and scaffold molecules have local exchanges with characteristic times shorter than that of the receptor-scaffold assembly. We propose a mesoscopic model to account for the regulation of the local density of receptors as quasiequilibrium. It is based on two zones (synaptic and extrasynaptic) and multi-layer (membrane, sub-membrane and cytoplasmic) topological organization. The model includes the balance of chemical potentials associated with the receptor and scaffold protein concentrations in the various compartments. The model shows highly cooperative behavior including a "phase change" resulting in the formation of well-defined post-synaptic domains. This study provides theoretical tools to approach the complex issue of synaptic stability at the synapse, where receptors are transiently trapped yet rapidly diffuse laterally on the plasma membrane.

  9. ZD7288, a selective hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel blocker, inhibits hippocampal synaptic plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-xue Zhang; Xiao-chun Min; Xu-lin Xu; Min Zheng; Lian-jun Guo

    2016-01-01

    The selective hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker 4-(N-ethyl-N-phenylamino)-1,2-dimeth-yl-6-(methylamino) pyrimidinium chloride (ZD7288) blocks the induction of long-term potentiation in the perforant path–CA3 region in rat hippocampusin vivo. To explore the mechanisms underlying the action of ZD7288, we recorded excitatory postsynaptic potentials in perforant path–CA3 synapses in male Sprague-Dawley rats. We measured glutamate content in the hippocampus and in cultured hip-pocampal neurons using high performance liquid chromatography, and determined intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) using Fura-2. ZD7288 inhibited the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation, and these effects were mirrored by the nonspeciifc HCN channel blocker cesium. ZD7288 also decreased glutamate release in hippocampal tissue and in cultured hippocampal neurons. Further-more, ZD7288 attenuated glutamate-induced rises in [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner and reversed 8-Br-cAMP-mediated facilitation of these glutamate-induced [Ca2+]i rises. Our results suggest that ZD7288 inhibits hippocampal synaptic plasticity both gluta-mate release and resultant [Ca2+]i increases in rat hippocampal neurons.

  10. Operation and Performance of a Biphase Turbine Power Plant at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, Lance G. [Douglas Energy Company, Placentia, CA (United States)

    2000-09-01

    A full scale, wellhead Biphase turbine was manufactured and installed with the balance of plant at Well 103 of the Cerro Prieto geothermal resource in Baja, California. The Biphase turbine was first synchronized with the electrical grid of Comision Federal de Electricidad on August 20, 1997. The Biphase power plant was operated from that time until May 23, 2000, a period of 2 years and 9 months. A total of 77,549 kWh were delivered to the grid. The power plant was subsequently placed in a standby condition pending replacement of the rotor with a newly designed, higher power rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals. The maximum measured power output of the Biphase turbine, 808 kWe at 640 psig wellhead pressure, agreed closely with the predicted output, 840 kWe. When combined with the backpressure steam turbine the total output power from that flow would be increased by 40% above the power derived only from the flow by the present flash steam plant. The design relations used to predict performance and design the turbine were verified by these tests. The performance and durability of the Biphase turbine support the conclusion of the Economics and Application Report previously published, (Appendix A). The newly designed rotor (the Dual Pressure Rotor) was analyzed for the above power condition. The Dual Pressure Rotor would increase the power output to 2064 kWe by incorporating two pressure letdown stages in the Biphase rotor, eliminating the requirement for a backpressure steam turbine. The power plant availability was low due to deposition of solids from the well on the Biphase rotor and balance of plant problems. A great deal of plant down time resulted from the requirement to develop methods to handle the solids and from testing the apparatus in the Biphase turbine. Finally an online, washing method using the high pressure two-phase flow was developed which completely eliminated the solids problem. The availability of the Biphase turbine itself was 100

  11. Corticosteroid Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity in the Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Maggio; Menahem Segal

    2010-01-01

    Stress, via release of steroid hormones, has been shown to affect several cellular functions in the brain, including synaptic receptors and ion channels. As such, corticosteroids were reported to modulate plasticity, expressed as long-term changes in reactivity to afferent stimulation. The classical view of the effects of stress on synaptic plasticity and cognitive functions assumes an inverted U-shape curve, such that a low stress level facilitates and a high stress level (i.e., corticostero...

  12. Activity-dependent modulation of neural circuit synaptic connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Tessier, Charles R.; Kendal Broadie

    2009-01-01

    In many nervous systems, the establishment of neural circuits is known to proceed via a two-stage process; 1) early, activity-independent wiring to produce a rough map characterized by excessive synaptic connections, and 2) subsequent, use-dependent pruning to eliminate inappropriate connections and reinforce maintained synapses. In invertebrates, however, evidence of the activity-dependent phase of synaptic refinement has been elusive, and the dogma has long been that invertebrate circ...

  13. Synaptic Contacts Enhance Cell-to-Cell Tau Pathology Propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Calafate; Arjan Buist; Katarzyna Miskiewicz; Vinoy Vijayan; Guy Daneels; Bart de Strooper; Joris de Wit; Patrik Verstreken; Diederik Moechars

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of insoluble Tau protein aggregates and stereotypical propagation of Tau pathology through the brain are common hallmarks of tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Propagation of Tau pathology appears to occur along connected neurons, but whether synaptic contacts between neurons are facilitating propagation has not been demonstrated. Using quantitative in vitro models, we demonstrate that, in parallel to non-synaptic mechanisms, synapses, but not merely the close dista...

  14. Synaptic plasticity in sleep: learning, homeostasis, and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Gordon; Grone, Brian; Colas, Damien; Appelbaum, Lior; Mourrain, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is a fundamental and evolutionarily conserved aspect of animal life. Recent studies have shed light on the role of sleep in synaptic plasticity. Demonstrations of memory replay and synapse homeostasis suggest that one essential role of sleep is in the consolidation and optimization of synaptic circuits to retain salient memory traces despite the noise of daily experience. Here, we review this recent evidence, and suggest that sleep creates a heightened state of plasticity, which may be ...

  15. Nonequivalent release sites govern synaptic depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hua; McGinley, Matthew J; Mandel, Gail; Brehm, Paul

    2016-01-19

    Synaptic depression is prominent among synapses, but the underlying mechanisms remain uncertain. Here, we use paired patch clamp recording to study neuromuscular transmission between the caudal primary motor neuron and target skeletal muscle in zebrafish. This synapse has an unusually low number of release sites, all with high probabilities of release in response to low-frequency stimulation. During high-frequency stimulation, the synapse undergoes short-term depression and reaches steady-state levels of transmission that sustain the swimming behavior. To determine the release parameters underlying this steady state, we applied variance analysis. Our analysis revealed two functionally distinct subclasses of release sites differing by over 60-fold in rates of vesicle reloading. A slow reloading class requires seconds to recover and contributes to depression onset but not the steady-state transmission. By contrast, a fast reloading class recovers within tens of milliseconds and is solely responsible for steady-state transmission. Thus, in contrast to most current models that assign levels of steady-state depression to vesicle availability, our findings instead assign this function to nonuniform release site kinetics. The duality of active-site properties accounts for the highly nonlinear dependence of steady-state depression levels on frequency. PMID:26715759

  16. Long-term Potentiation at Temporoammonic Path-CA1 Synapses in Freely Moving Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jossina; Villarreal, Desiree M; Morales, Isaiah S; Derrick, Brian E

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal area CA1 receives direct entorhinal layer III input via the temporoammonic path (TAP) and recent studies implicate TAP-CA1 synapses are important for some aspects of hippocampal memory function. Nonetheless, as few studies have examined TAP-CA1 synaptic plasticity in vivo, the induction and longevity of TAP-CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP) has not been fully characterized. We analyzed CA1 responses following stimulation of the medial aspect of the angular bundle and investigated LTP at medial temporoammonic path (mTAP)-CA1 synapses in freely moving rats. We demonstrate monosynaptic mTAP-CA1 responses can be isolated in vivo as evidenced by observations of independent current sinks in the stratum lacunosum moleculare of both areas CA1 and CA3 following angular bundle stimulation. Contrasting prior indications that TAP input rarely elicits CA1 discharge, we observed mTAP-CA1 responses that appeared to contain putative population spikes in 40% of our behaving animals. Theta burst high frequency stimulation of mTAP afferents resulted in an input specific and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent LTP of mTAP-CA1 responses in behaving animals. LTP of mTAP-CA1 responses decayed as a function of two exponential decay curves with time constants (τ) of 2.7 and 148 days to decay 63.2% of maximal LTP. In contrast, mTAP-CA1 population spike potentiation longevity demonstrated a τ of 9.6 days. To our knowledge, these studies provide the first description of mTAP-CA1 LTP longevity in vivo. These data indicate TAP input to area CA1 is a physiologically relevant afferent system that displays robust synaptic plasticity. PMID:26903815

  17. Extracellular Ca2+ Acts as a Mediator of Communication from Neurons to Glia

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Arnulfo; Wang, Fushun; Xu, Qiwu; Fujita, Takumi; Dobrowolski, Radoslaw; Willecke, Klaus; Takano, Takahiro; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2012-01-01

    Defining the pathways through which neurons and astrocytes communicate may contribute to the elucidation of higher central nervous system functions. We investigated the possibility that decreases in extracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]e) that occur during synaptic transmission might mediate signaling from neurons to glia. Using noninvasive photolysis of the photolabile Ca2+ buffer diazo-2 {N-[2-[2-[2-[bis(carboxymethyl)amino]-5-(diazoacetyl)phenoxy]ethoxy]-4-methylphenyl]-N-(carbox...

  18. Imaging synaptic density in the living human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnema, Sjoerd J; Nabulsi, Nabeel B; Eid, Tore; Detyniecki, Kamil; Lin, Shu-Fei; Chen, Ming-Kai; Dhaher, Roni; Matuskey, David; Baum, Evan; Holden, Daniel; Spencer, Dennis D; Mercier, Joël; Hannestad, Jonas; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E

    2016-07-20

    Chemical synapses are the predominant neuron-to-neuron contact in the central nervous system. Presynaptic boutons of neurons contain hundreds of vesicles filled with neurotransmitters, the diffusible signaling chemicals. Changes in the number of synapses are associated with numerous brain disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. However, all current approaches for measuring synaptic density in humans require brain tissue from autopsy or surgical resection. We report the use of the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) radioligand [(11)C]UCB-J combined with positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify synaptic density in the living human brain. Validation studies in a baboon confirmed that SV2A is an alternative synaptic density marker to synaptophysin. First-in-human PET studies demonstrated that [(11)C]UCB-J had excellent imaging properties. Finally, we confirmed that PET imaging of SV2A was sensitive to synaptic loss in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Thus, [(11)C]UCB-J PET imaging is a promising approach for in vivo quantification of synaptic density with several potential applications in diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27440727

  19. Cerebellar Synaptic Plasticity and the Credit Assignment Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörntell, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism by which a learnt synaptic weight change can contribute to learning or adaptation of brain function is a type of credit assignment problem, which is a key issue for many parts of the brain. In the cerebellum, detailed knowledge not only of the local circuitry connectivity but also of the topography of different sources of afferent/external information makes this problem particularly tractable. In addition, multiple forms of synaptic plasticity and their general rules of induction have been identified. In this review, we will discuss the possible roles of synaptic and cellular plasticity at specific locations in contributing to behavioral changes. Focus will be on the parts of the cerebellum that are devoted to limb control, which constitute a large proportion of the cortex and where the knowledge of the external connectivity is particularly well known. From this perspective, a number of sites of synaptic plasticity appear to primarily have the function of balancing the overall level of activity in the cerebellar circuitry, whereas the locations at which synaptic plasticity leads to functional changes in terms of limb control are more limited. Specifically, the postsynaptic forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber synapses made on interneurons and Purkinje cells, respectively, are the types of plasticity that mediate the widest associative capacity and the tightest link between the synaptic change and the external functions that are to be controlled. PMID:25417189

  20. The origin of glutamatergic synaptic inputs controls synaptic plasticity and its modulation by alcohol in mice nucleus accumbens

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Xincai; Saha, Sucharita; Martin, Gilles E.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that long-lasting changes of synaptic strength in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain region involved in drug reward, mediate acute and chronic effects of alcohol. However, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the effects of alcohol on synaptic plasticity is limited by the fact that the NAc receives glutamatergic inputs from distinct brain regions (e.g., the prefrontal cortex (PFCx), the amygdala and the hippocampus), each region providing different informatio...

  1. The origin of glutamatergic synaptic inputs controls synaptic plasticity and its modulation by alcohol in mice nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xincai; Saha, Sucharita; Martin, Gilles E

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that long-lasting changes of synaptic strength in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain region involved in drug reward, mediate acute and chronic effects of alcohol. However, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the effects of alcohol on synaptic plasticity is limited by the fact that the NAc receives glutamatergic inputs from distinct brain regions (e.g., the prefrontal cortex (PFCx), the amygdala and the hippocampus), each region providing different information (e.g., spatial, emotional and cognitive). Combining whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and the optogenetic technique, we examined synaptic plasticity, and its regulation by alcohol, at cortical, hippocampal and amygdala inputs in fresh slices of mouse tissue. We showed that the origin of synaptic inputs determines the basic properties of glutamatergic synaptic transmission, the expression of spike-timing dependent long-term depression (tLTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term potentiation (tLTP) and their regulation by alcohol. While we observed both tLTP and tLTD at amygadala and hippocampal synapses, we showed that cortical inputs only undergo tLTD. Functionally, we provide evidence that acute Ethyl Alcohol (EtOH) has little effects on higher order information coming from the PFCx, while severely impacting the ability of emotional and contextual information to induce long-lasting changes of synaptic strength. PMID:26257641

  2. Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, Paola; Krishnan, Giri P; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network. PMID:27093059

  3. Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Malerba

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network.

  4. The immediately releasable pool of mouse chromaffin cell vesicles is coupled to P/Q-type calcium channels via the synaptic protein interaction site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanina D Álvarez

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that the immediately releasable pool is a group of readily releasable vesicles that are closely associated with voltage dependent Ca(2+ channels. We have previously shown that exocytosis of this pool is specifically coupled to P/Q Ca(2+ current. Accordingly, in the present work we found that the Ca(2+ current flowing through P/Q-type Ca(2+ channels is 8 times more effective at inducing exocytosis in response to short stimuli than the current carried by L-type channels. To investigate the mechanism that underlies the coupling between the immediately releasable pool and P/Q-type channels we transiently expressed in mouse chromaffin cells peptides corresponding to the synaptic protein interaction site of Cav2.2 to competitively uncouple P/Q-type channels from the secretory vesicle release complex. This treatment reduced the efficiency of Ca(2+ current to induce exocytosis to similar values as direct inhibition of P/Q-type channels via ω-agatoxin-IVA. In addition, the same treatment markedly reduced immediately releasable pool exocytosis, but did not affect the exocytosis provoked by sustained electric or high K(+ stimulation. Together, our results indicate that the synaptic protein interaction site is a crucial factor for the establishment of the functional coupling between immediately releasable pool vesicles and P/Q-type Ca(2+ channels.

  5. Control of synaptic plasticity and memory via suppression of poly(A)-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoutorsky, Arkady; Yanagiya, Akiko; Gkogkas, Christos G; Fabian, Marc R; Prager-Khoutorsky, Masha; Cao, Ruifeng; Gamache, Karine; Bouthiette, Frederic; Parsyan, Armen; Sorge, Robert E; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Nader, Karim; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2013-04-24

    Control of protein synthesis is critical for synaptic plasticity and memory formation. However, the molecular mechanisms linking neuronal activity to activation of mRNA translation are not fully understood. Here, we report that the translational repressor poly(A)-binding protein (PABP)-interacting protein 2A (PAIP2A), an inhibitor of PABP, is rapidly proteolyzed by calpains in stimulated neurons and following training for contextual memory. Paip2a knockout mice exhibit a lowered threshold for the induction of sustained long-term potentiation and an enhancement of long-term memory after weak training. Translation of CaMKIIα mRNA is enhanced in Paip2a⁻/⁻ slices upon tetanic stimulation and in the hippocampus of Paip2a⁻/⁻ mice following contextual fear learning. We demonstrate that activity-dependent degradation of PAIP2A relieves translational inhibition of memory-related genes through PABP reactivation and conclude that PAIP2A is a pivotal translational regulator of synaptic plasticity and memory. PMID:23622065

  6. Synaptic Remodeling Generates Synchronous Oscillations in the Degenerated Outer Mouse Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadood eHaq

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During neuronal degenerative diseases, neuronal microcircuits undergo severe structural alterations, leading to remodeling of synaptic connectivity. The functional consequences of such remodeling are mostly unknown. For instance, in mutant rd1 mouse retina, a common model for Retinitis Pigmentosa, rod bipolar cells (RBCs establish contacts with remnant cone photoreceptors (cones as a consequence of rod photoreceptor cell death and the resulting lack of presynaptic input. To assess the functional connectivity in the remodeled, light-insensitive outer rd1 retina, we recorded spontaneous population activity in retinal wholemounts using Ca2+ imaging and identified the participating cell types. Focusing on cones, RBCs and horizontal cells (HCs, we found that these cell types display spontaneous oscillatory activity and form synchronously active clusters. Overall activity was modulated by GABAergic inhibition from HCs. Many of the activity clusters comprised both cones and RBCs. Opposite to what is expected from the intact (wild-type cone-ON bipolar cell pathway, cone and RBC activity was positively correlated and, at least partially, mediated by glutamate transporters expressed on RBCs. Deletion of gap junctional coupling between cones reduced the number of clusters, indicating that electrical cone coupling plays a crucial role for generating the observed synchronized oscillations. In conclusion, degeneration-induced synaptic remodeling of the rd1 retina results in a complex self-sustained outer retinal oscillatory network, that complements (and potentially modulates the recently described inner retinal oscillatory network consisting of amacrine, bipolar and ganglion cells.

  7. Ovariectomy does not exacerbate the negative effects of sleep deprivation on synaptic plasticity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajali, Vahid; Sheibani, Vahid; Mahani, Saeed E; Hajializadeh, Zahra; Shabani, Mohammad; Aliabadi, Hamzeh P; Saadati, Hakimeh; Esmaeilpour, Khadijeh

    2015-05-15

    In our previous work, we found that female rats showed more cognitive impairment than male rats following 72h sleep deprivation (SD). Here, we compared the intact female with ovariectomized (OVX) rats to assess the potential modulatory effects of endogenous female sex hormones against the 48h SD-induced cognitive and synaptic modulations. The multiple platform method was applied for SD induction and spatial performances were determined using Morris water maze (MWM) task. Early longterm potentiation (E-LTP) was evaluated in area CA1 of the hippocampus and PCR and western blotting assays were employed to assess hippocampal BDNF gene and protein expression. To reveal any influence of sleep loss on stress level, we also measured the plasma corticosterone levels of animals. Regardless of reproductive status, SD significantly impaired short-term memory and LTP, but did not significantly change the BDNF expression in the hippocampus. The corticosterone levels were decreased in both intact and OVX female rats following SD. These findings suggest that depletion of female sex steroid hormones does not lead to any heightened responsivity of female animals to the negative effects of SD on cognitive and synaptic functions. PMID:25748255

  8. Identification of Synaptic Targets of Drosophila Pumilio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulski, Michael; Sinha, Nishi; Barditch, Jody; Tully, Tim; Krainer, Adrian R.; Zhang, Michael Q.; Dubnau, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila Pumilio (Pum) protein is a translational regulator involved in embryonic patterning and germline development. Recent findings demonstrate that Pum also plays an important role in the nervous system, both at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and in long-term memory formation. In neurons, Pum appears to play a role in homeostatic control of excitability via down regulation of para, a voltage gated sodium channel, and may more generally modulate local protein synthesis in neurons via translational repression of eIF-4E. Aside from these, the biologically relevant targets of Pum in the nervous system remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that Pum might play a role in regulating the local translation underlying synapse-specific modifications during memory formation. To identify relevant translational targets, we used an informatics approach to predict Pum targets among mRNAs whose products have synaptic localization. We then used both in vitro binding and two in vivo assays to functionally confirm the fidelity of this informatics screening method. We find that Pum strongly and specifically binds to RNA sequences in the 3′UTR of four of the predicted target genes, demonstrating the validity of our method. We then demonstrate that one of these predicted target sequences, in the 3′UTR of discs large (dlg1), the Drosophila PSD95 ortholog, can functionally substitute for a canonical NRE (Nanos response element) in vivo in a heterologous functional assay. Finally, we show that the endogenous dlg1 mRNA can be regulated by Pumilio in a neuronal context, the adult mushroom bodies (MB), which is an anatomical site of memory storage. PMID:18463699

  9. Lipase in biphasic alginate beads as a biocatalyst for esterification of butyric acid and butanol in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Choong Hey; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Esterification of organic acids and alcohols in aqueous media is very inefficient due to thermodynamic constraints. However, fermentation processes used to produce organic acids and alcohols are often conducted in aqueous media. To produce esters in aqueous media, biphasic alginate beads with immobilized lipase are developed for in situ esterification of butanol and butyric acid. The biphasic beads contain a solid matrix of calcium alginate and hexadecane together with 5 mg/mL of lipase as the biocatalyst. Hexadecane in the biphasic beads serves as an organic phase to facilitate the esterification reaction. Under optimized conditions, the beads are able to catalyze the production of 0.16 mmol of butyl butyrate from 0.5 mmol of butyric acid and 1.5 mmol of butanol. In contrast, when monophasic beads (without hexadecane) are used, only trace amount of butyl butyrate is produced. One main application of biphasic beads is in simultaneous fermentation and esterification (SFE) because the organic phase inside the beads is very stable and does not leach out into the culture medium. SFE is successfully conducted with an esterification yield of 6.32% using biphasic beads containing iso-octane even though the solvent is proven toxic to the butanol-producing Clostridium spp. PMID:26672465

  10. Intervertebral Disc Tissue Engineering with Natural Extracellular Matrix-Derived Biphasic Composite Scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoshan Xu

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering has provided an alternative therapeutic possibility for degenerative disc diseases. However, we lack an ideal scaffold for IVD tissue engineering. The goal of this study is to fabricate a novel biomimetic biphasic scaffold for IVD tissue engineering and evaluate the feasibility of developing tissue-engineered IVD in vitro and in vivo. In present study we developed a novel integrated biphasic IVD scaffold using a simple freeze-drying and cross-linking technique of pig bone matrix gelatin (BMG for the outer annulus fibrosus (AF phase and pig acellular cartilage ECM (ACECM for the inner nucleus pulposus (NP phase. Histology and SEM results indicated no residual cells remaining in the scaffold that featured an interconnected porous microstructure (pore size of AF and NP phase 401.4 ± 13.1 μm and 231.6 ± 57.2 μm, respectively. PKH26-labeled AF and NP cells were seeded into the scaffold and cultured in vitro. SEM confirmed that seeded cells could anchor onto the scaffold. Live/dead staining showed that live cells (green fluorescence were distributed in the scaffold, with no dead cells (red fluorescence being found. The cell-scaffold constructs were implanted subcutaneously into nude mice and cultured for 6 weeks in vivo. IVD-like tissue formed in nude mice as confirmed by histology. Cells in hybrid constructs originated from PKH26-labeled cells, as confirmed by in vivo fluorescence imaging system. In conclusion, the study demonstrates the feasibility of developing a tissue-engineered IVD in vivo with a BMG- and ACECM-derived integrated AF-NP biphasic scaffold. As well, PKH26 fluorescent labeling with in vivo fluorescent imaging can be used to track cells and analyse cell--scaffold constructs in vivo.

  11. Biphasic modulation of Wnt signaling supports efficient foregut endoderm formation from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoepfner, Jeannine; Kleinsorge, Mandy; Papp, Oliver; Ackermann, Mania; Alfken, Susanne; Rinas, Ursula; Solodenko, Wladimir; Kirschning, Andreas; Sgodda, Malte; Cantz, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells) are of great promise in regenerative medicine, including molecular studies of disease mechanisms, if the affected cell type can be authentically generated during in vitro differentiation. Most existing protocols aim to mimic embryonic development steps by the supplementation of specific cytokines and small molecules, but the involved signaling pathways need further exploration. In this study, we investigated enhanced initial activation of Wnt signaling for definitive endoderm formation and subsequent rapid shutdown of Wnt signaling for proper foregut endoderm specification using 3 μM CHIR99021 and 0.5 μg/mL of secreted frizzled-related protein 5 (sFRP-5) for biphasic modulation of the Wnt pathway. The definitive endoderm and foregut endoderm differentiation capabilities of Wnt pathway-modulated cells were determined based on the expression levels of the endodermal transcription factors SOX17 and FOXA2 and those of the transcription activator GATA4 and the α-fetoprotein (AFP) gene, respectively. Furthermore, the resulting biphasic Wnt pathway modulation was investigated at the protein level by analyzing phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) and β-catenin. Finally, Wnt target gene expression was determined using an improved lentiviral reporter construct that enabled robust T-cell transcription factor 4 (TCF4)/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF1)-mediated luciferase expression in differentiating pluripotent stem cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated robust, homogeneous, and efficient derivation of foregut endodermal cells by inducing a biphasic modulation of the Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:26861571

  12. Transgenic mice expressing a truncated form of CREB-binding protein (CBP) exhibit deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and memory storage

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Marcelo A.; Kaplan, Michael P.; Park, Alice; Blanchard, Edward J.; Oliveira, Ana M.M.; Lombardi, Thomas L.; Abel, Ted

    2005-01-01

    Deletions, translocations, or point mutations in the CREB-binding protein (CBP) gene have been associated with Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome; a human developmental disorder characterized by retarded growth and reduced mental function. To examine the role of CBP in memory, transgenic mice were generated in which the CaMKIIα promoter drives expression of an inhibitory truncated CBP protein in forebrain neurons. Examination of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a form of synaptic plasticity t...

  13. Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II is a Ubiquitous Molecule in Human Long-term Memory Synaptic Plasticity: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Negar Ataei; Ali Mohammad Sabzghabaee; Ahmad Movahedian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term memory is based on synaptic plasticity, a series of biochemical mechanisms include changes in structure and proteins of brain′s neurons. In this article, we systematically reviewed the studies that indicate calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous molecule among different enzymes involved in human long-term memory and the main downstream signaling pathway of long-term memory. Methods: All of the observational, case-control and review studies were conside...

  14. SNAP-25 in hippocampal CA3 region is required for long-term memory formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SNAP-25 is a synaptosomal protein of 25 kDa, a key component of synaptic vesicle-docking/fusion machinery, and plays a critical role in exocytosis and neurotransmitter release. We previously reported that SNAP-25 in the hippocampal CA1 region is involved in consolidation of contextual fear memory and water-maze spatial memory (Hou et al. European J Neuroscience, 20: 1593-1603, 2004). SNAP-25 is expressed not only in the CA1 region, but also in the CA3 region, and the SNAP-25 mRNA level in the CA3 region is higher than in the CA1 region. Here, we provide evidence that SNAP-25 in the CA3 region is also involved in learning/memory. Intra-CA3 infusion of SNAP-25 antisense oligonucleotide impaired both long-term contextual fear memory and water-maze spatial memory, with short-term memory intact. Furthermore, the SNAP-25 antisense oligonucleotide suppressed the long-term potentiation (LTP) of field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP) in the mossy-fiber pathway (DG-CA3 pathway), with no effect on paired-pulse facilitation of the fEPSP. These results are consistent with the notion that SNAP-25 in the hippocampal CA3 region is required for long-term memory formation

  15. A Galerkin least-square stabilisation technique for hyperelastic biphasic soft tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Vignollet, Julien; Kaczmarczyk, Lukasz

    2011-01-01

    An hyperelastic biphasic model is presented. For slow-draining problems (permeability less than 1\\times10-2 mm4 N-1 s-1), numerical instabilities in the form of non-physical oscillations in the pressure field are observed in 3D problems using tetrahedral Taylor-Hood finite elements. As an alternative to considerable mesh refinement, a Galerkin least-square stabilization framework is proposed. This technique drastically reduces the pressure discrepancies and prevents these oscillations from propagating towards the centre of the medium. The performance and robustness of this technique are demonstrated on a 3D numerical example.

  16. Use of Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Premature Infant with Cleft Lip–Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Lovya; Jain, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants (PIs) often require respiratory support due to surfactant deficiency. Early weaning from mechanical ventilation to noninvasive respiratory support decreases ventilation-associated irreversible lung damage. This wean is particularly challenging in PIs with cleft lip and cleft palate due to anatomical difficulties encountered in maintaining an adequate seal for positive pressure ventilation. PI with a cleft lip and palate often fail noninvasive respiratory support and require continued intubation and mechanical ventilation. We are presenting the first case report of a PI with cleft lip and palate who was managed by biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26495158

  17. Use of Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Premature Infant with Cleft Lip–Cleft Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovya George

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Preterm infants (PIs often require respiratory support due to surfactant deficiency. Early weaning from mechanical ventilation to noninvasive respiratory support decreases ventilation-associated irreversible lung damage. This wean is particularly challenging in PIs with cleft lip and cleft palate due to anatomical difficulties encountered in maintaining an adequate seal for positive pressure ventilation. PI with a cleft lip and palate often fail noninvasive respiratory support and require continued intubation and mechanical ventilation. We are presenting the first case report of a PI with cleft lip and palate who was managed by biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

  18. Interaction between hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and biphasic calcium phosphate after steam sterilisation: capillary gas chromatography studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Bourges, Xavier; Schmitt, Michel; Amouriq, Yves; Daculsi, Guy; Legeay, Gilbert; Pierre WEISS

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to check the chemical stability of an injectable bone substitute (IBS) composed of a 50/50 w/w mixture of a 2.92% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) solution in deionised water containing biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) granules (60% hydroxyapatite/40% β-tricalcium phosphate w/w). After separation of the organic and mineral phases, capillary gas chromatography (GC) was used to study the possible modification of HPMC due to the contact with BCP granules followi...

  19. Biphasic Dose Response in Low Level Light Therapy – An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Carroll, James; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been known since 1967 but still remains controversial due to incomplete understanding of the basic mechanisms and the selection of inappropriate dosimetric parameters that led to negative studies. The biphasic dose-response or Arndt-Schulz curve in LLLT has been shown both in vitro studies and in animal experiments. This review will provide an update to our previous (Huang et al. 2009) coverage of this topic. In vitro mediators of LLLT such as adenos...

  20. Steroid biotransformations in biphasic systems with Yarrowia lipolytica expressing human liver cytochrome P450 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yarrowia lipolytica efficiently metabolizes and assimilates hydrophobic compounds such as n-alkanes and fatty acids. Efficient substrate uptake is enabled by naturally secreted emulsifiers and a modified cell surface hydrophobicity and protrusions formed by this yeast. We were examining the potential of recombinant Y. lipolytica as a biocatalyst for the oxidation of hardly soluble hydrophobic steroids. Furthermore, two-liquid biphasic culture systems were evaluated to increase substrate availability. While cells, together with water soluble nutrients, are maintained in the aqueous phase, substrates and most of the products are contained in a second water-immiscible organic solvent phase. Results For the first time we have co-expressed the human cytochromes P450 2D6 and 3A4 genes in Y. lipolytica together with human cytochrome P450 reductase (hCPR or Y. lipolytica cytochrome P450 reductase (YlCPR. These whole-cell biocatalysts were used for the conversion of poorly soluble steroids in biphasic systems. Employing a biphasic system with the organic solvent and Y. lipolytica carbon source ethyl oleate for the whole-cell bioconversion of progesterone, the initial specific hydroxylation rate in a 1.5 L stirred tank bioreactor was further increased 2-fold. Furthermore, the product formation was significantly prolonged as compared to the aqueous system. Co-expression of the human CPR gene led to a 4-10-fold higher specific activity, compared to the co-overexpression of the native Y. lipolytica CPR gene. Multicopy transformants showed a 50-70-fold increase of activity as compared to single copy strains. Conclusions Alkane-assimilating yeast Y. lipolytica, coupled with the described expression strategies, demonstrated its high potential for biotransformations of hydrophobic substrates in two-liquid biphasic systems. Especially organic solvents which can be efficiently taken up and/or metabolized by the cell might enable more

  1. Electrochemical assessment of water|ionic liquid biphasic systems towards cesium extraction from nuclear waste

    OpenAIRE

    Stockmann, T. Jane; Zhang, Jing; Montgomery, Anne-Marie; Ding, Zhifeng

    2014-01-01

    A room temperature ionic liquid (IL) composed of a quaternary alkylphosphonium (trihexyltetradecylphosphonium, P66614(+)) and tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl) borate anion (TB) was employed within a water| P66614TB (w|P66614TB or w|IL) biphasic system to evaluate cesium ion extraction in comparison to that with a traditional water|organic solvent (w|o) combination. Cs-137 is a major contributor to the radioactivity of spent nuclear fuel as it leaves the reactor, and its extraction efficiency is th...

  2. Extraction of Biomolecules Using Phosphonium-Based Ionic Liquids + K3PO4 Aqueous Biphasic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Louros, Cláudia L. S.; Cláudio, Ana Filipa M.; Neves, Catarina M. S. S.; Freire, Mara G.; Marrucho, Isabel M.; Jérôme Pauly; Coutinho, João A. P.

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) provide an alternative and efficient approach for the extraction, recovery and purification of biomolecules through their partitioning between two liquid aqueous phases. In this work, the ability of hydrophilic phosphonium-based ionic liquids (ILs) to form ABS with aqueous K3PO4 solutions was evaluated for the first time. Ternary phase diagrams, and respective tie-lines and tie-lines length, formed by distinct phosphonium-based ILs, water, and K3PO4 at 298 K, we...

  3. Activated microglia in acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yuji; Takanashi, Jun-Ichi; Takei, Haruka; Ota, Setsuo; Fujii, Katsunori; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Masaharu

    2016-07-15

    Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) is the most common subtype of infectious pediatric encephalopathy in Japan. The exact pathogenesis of and the best therapeutic strategy for AESD are uncertain. We firstly performed a brain biopsy in a 2-year-old boy with AESD associated with RS viral infection, which revealed activated ameoboid microglia accumulation around degenerated neuron, and astrogliosis in the affected cortex. Glutamate released from activated microglia may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AESD, which is compatible with the previous report of magnetic resonance spectroscopy showing elevated glutamate. PMID:27288783

  4. A Novel Ionic Liquid/water Biphasic System for the Preparation of Oximes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Mou LUO; Yi Qun LI; Wen Jie ZHENG

    2005-01-01

    A variety of carbonyl compounds can be converted into oximes efficiently and conveniently in a novel ionic liquid/water bi-phasic system in the presence of sodium bicarbonate at ambient temperature. The ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium hexafluorophosphate [bmim]PF6 is immiscible with water or diethyl ether and can be easily recycled for reuse without noticeable droping in activity after separation of the products. The protocol is rapid, the yields are excellent, the method is simple and the ionic liquid can be reused.

  5. Use of Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Premature Infant with Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Lovya; Jain, Sunil K

    2015-10-01

    Preterm infants (PIs) often require respiratory support due to surfactant deficiency. Early weaning from mechanical ventilation to noninvasive respiratory support decreases ventilation-associated irreversible lung damage. This wean is particularly challenging in PIs with cleft lip and cleft palate due to anatomical difficulties encountered in maintaining an adequate seal for positive pressure ventilation. PI with a cleft lip and palate often fail noninvasive respiratory support and require continued intubation and mechanical ventilation. We are presenting the first case report of a PI with cleft lip and palate who was managed by biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26495158

  6. Concurrent imaging of synaptic vesicle recycling and calcium dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan eLi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission involves the calcium-dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-shifted reporter of vesicle recycling based on a vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1-mOrange2 (VGLUT1-mOr2, and a presynaptically-localized green calcium indicator, synaptophysin-GCaMP3 (SyGCaMP3 with a large dynamic range. The fluorescence of VGLUT1-mOr2 is quenched by the low pH of synaptic vesicles. Exocytosis upon electrical stimulation exposes the luminal mOr2 to the neutral extracellular pH and relieves fluorescence quenching. Re-acidification of the vesicle upon endocytosis again reduces fluorescence intensity. Changes in fluorescence intensity thus monitor synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis, as demonstrated previously for the green VGLUT1-pHluorin. To monitor changes in calcium, we fused the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin to the recently improved calcium indicator GCaMP3. SyGCaMP3 is targeted to presynaptic varicosities, and exhibits changes in fluorescence in response to electrical stimulation consistent with changes in calcium concentration. Using real-time imaging of both reporters expressed in the same synapses, we determine the time course of changes in VGLUT1 recycling in relation to changes in presynaptic calcium concentration. Inhibition of P/Q- and N-type calcium channels reduces calcium levels, as well as the rate of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and the fraction of vesicles released.

  7. Concurrent Imaging of Synaptic Vesicle Recycling and Calcium Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Foss, Sarah M.; Dobryy, Yuriy L.; Park, C. Kevin; Hires, Samuel Andrew; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-shifted reporter of vesicle recycling based on a vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1-mOrange2 (VGLUT1-mOr2), and a presynaptically localized green calcium indicator, synaptophysin-GCaMP3 (SyGCaMP3) with a large dynamic range. The fluorescence of VGLUT1-mOr2 is quenched by the low pH of synaptic vesicles. Exocytosis upon electrical stimulation exposes the luminal mOr2 to the neutral extracellular pH and relieves fluorescence quenching. Reacidification of the vesicle upon endocytosis again reduces fluorescence intensity. Changes in fluorescence intensity thus monitor synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis, as demonstrated previously for the green VGLUT1-pHluorin. To monitor changes in calcium, we fused the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin to the recently improved calcium indicator GCaMP3. SyGCaMP3 is targeted to presynaptic varicosities, and exhibits changes in fluorescence in response to electrical stimulation consistent with changes in calcium concentration. Using real time imaging of both reporters expressed in the same synapses, we determine the time course of changes in VGLUT1 recycling in relation to changes in presynaptic calcium concentration. Inhibition of P/Q- and N-type calcium channels reduces calcium levels, as well as the rate of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and the fraction of vesicles released. PMID:22065946

  8. Acetyl-l-carnitine restores synaptic transmission and enhances the inducibility of stable LTP after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Kitti; Frank, Rita; Szabó, József; Knapp, Levente; Kis, Zsolt; Farkas, Tamás; Vécsei, László; Toldi, József

    2016-09-22

    Hypoxic circumstances result in functional and structural impairments of the brain. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) on hippocampal slices is a technique widely used to investigate the consequences of ischemic stroke and the potential neuroprotective effects of different drugs. Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC) is a naturally occurring substance in the body, and it can therefore be administered safely even in relatively high doses. In previous experiments, ALC pretreatment proved to be effective against global hypoperfusion. In the present study, we investigated whether ALC can be protective in an OGD model. We are not aware of any earlier study in which the long-term potentiation (LTP) function on hippocampal slices was measured after OGD. Therefore, we set out to determine whether an effective ALC concentration has an effect on synaptic plasticity after OGD in the hippocampal CA1 subfield of rats. A further aim was to investigate the mechanism underlying the protective effect of this compound. The experiments revealed that ALC is neuroprotective against OGD in a dose-dependent manner, which is manifested not only in the regeneration of the impaired synaptic transmission after the OGD, but also in the inducibility and stability of the LTP. In the case of the most effective concentration of ALC (500μM), use of a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002) revealed that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway has a key role in the restoration of the synaptic transmission and plasticity reached by ALC treatment. PMID:27378558

  9. Phosphatidylinositol turnover (PI) during synaptic activation results from the release of a stimulatory and in inhibitory agonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PI has been implicated in the process of synaptic transmission and is increased by agonists. It has been suggested that PI is involved in cellular Ca++ mobilization and the process represents a series of hydrolytic reactions with inositol as the final product. Hence, the rate of release of 3H-inositol (3H-Ins) from prelabelled inositol phospholipids can be used as an index of PI. In the 3H-inositol prelabelled frog sympathetic ganglia, they studied the effect of synaptic activity on PI. PI did not change during orthodromic stimulation (20 Hz, 5 min). However, upon cessation of the stimulation, PI increased rapidly and remained elevated for at least 30 min. This increase in PI was reduced by suffusing the ganglia with either acetylcholine or adenosine. In the presence of atropine (5 μM), orthodromic stimulation increased PI. They hypothesized that synaptic activation releases a long-lasting stimulatory agonist and a short-lived inhibitory (Ach/adenosine) agonist(s) affecting PI. To test this idea, 2 sympathetic ganglia were used. One was prelabelled with 3H-inositol and the other was not. The two ganglia were placed together in a 5 μl drop of Ringers solution containing atropine. Orthodromic stimuli were applied to the non-labelled ganglion and elicited release of 3H-Ins from the non-stimulated ganglion

  10. The neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+ alters hippocampal excitatory synaptic transmission by modulation of the GABAergic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YuYing eHuang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP induces Parkinson’s disease (PD-like symptoms following administration to mice, monkeys and humans. A common view is that MPTP is metabolized to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+ to induce its neurodegenerative effects on dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Moreover, the hippocampus contains dopaminergic fibers, which are projecting from the ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra and pars compacta and contain the whole machinery required for dopamine synthesis making them sensitive to MPTP and MPP+. Here we present data showing that acute bath-application of MPP+ elicited a dose-dependent facilitation followed by a depression of synaptic transmission of hippocampal Schaffer collaterals-CA1 synapses in mice. The effects of MPP+ were not mediated by D1/D5- and D2-like receptor activation. Inhibition of the dopamine transporters (DAT did not prevent but increased the depression of excitatory postsynaptic field potentials. In the search for a possible mechanism, we observed that MPP+ reduced the appearance of polyspikes in population spikes recorded in str. pyramidale and increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents. The acute effect of MPP+ on synaptic transmission was attenuated by co-application of a GABAA receptor antagonist. Taking these data together, we suggest that MPP+ affects hippocampal synaptic transmission by enhancing some aspects of

  11. Synaptic transmission changes in fear memory circuits underlie key features of an animal model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Marie; Varin, Christophe; Hrupka, Brian; Pemberton, Darrel J; Steckler, Thomas; Shaban, Hamdy

    2012-02-01

    Non-competitive antagonists of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) such as phencyclidine (PCP) elicit schizophrenia-like symptoms in healthy individuals. Similarly, PCP dosing in rats produces typical behavioral phenotypes that mimic human schizophrenia symptoms. Although schizophrenic behavioral phenotypes of the PCP model have been extensively studied, the underlying alterations of intrinsic neuronal properties and synaptic transmission in relevant limbic brain microcircuits remain elusive. Acute brain slice electrophysiology and immunostaining of inhibitory neurons were used to identify neuronal circuit alterations of the amygdala and hippocampus associated with changes in extinction of fear learning in rats following PCP treatment. Subchronic PCP application led to impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) and marked increases in the ratio of NMDA to 2-amino-3(5-methyl-3-oxo-1,2-oxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor-mediated currents at lateral amygdala (LA) principal neurons without alterations in parvalbumin (PV) as well as non-PV, glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD 67) immunopositive neurons. In addition, LTP was impaired at the Schaffer collateral to CA1 hippocampal pathway coincident with a reduction in colocalized PV and GAD67 immunopositive neurons in the CA3 hippocampal area. These effects occurred without changes in spontaneous events or intrinsic membrane properties of principal cells in the LA. The impairment of LTP at both amygdalar and hippocampal microcircuits, which play a key role in processing relevant survival information such as fear and extinction memory concurred with a disruption of extinction learning of fear conditioned responses. Our results show that subchronic PCP administration in rats impairs synaptic functioning in the amygdala and hippocampus as well as processing of fear-related memories. PMID:22085880

  12. Remodeling of inhibitory synaptic connections in developing ferret visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalva Matthew B

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the visual cortex, as in many other regions of the developing brain, excitatory synaptic connections undergo substantial remodeling during development. While evidence suggests that local inhibitory synapses may behave similarly, the extent and mechanisms that mediate remodeling of inhibitory connections are not well understood. Results Using scanning laser photostimulation in slices of developing ferret visual cortex, we assessed the overall patterns of developing inhibitory and excitatory synaptic connections converging onto individual neurons. Inhibitory synaptic inputs onto pyramidal neurons in cortical layers 2 and 3 were already present as early as postnatal day 20, well before eye opening, and originated from regions close to the recorded neurons. During the ensuing 2 weeks, the numbers of synaptic inputs increased, with the numbers of inhibitory (and excitatory synaptic inputs peaking near the time of eye opening. The pattern of inhibitory inputs refined rapidly prior to the refinement of excitatory inputs. By uncaging the neurotransmtter GABA in brain slices from animals of different ages, we find that this rapid refinement correlated with a loss of excitatory activity by GABA. Conclusion Inhibitory synapses, like excitatory synapses, undergo significant postnatal remodeling. The time course of the remodeling of inhibitory connections correlates with the emergence of orientation tuning in the visual cortex, implicating these rearrangements in the genesis of adult cortical response properties.

  13. Cell-specific synaptic plasticity induced by network oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnadze, Shota; Bäuerle, Peter; Santos-Torres, Julio; Böhm, Claudia; Schmitz, Dietmar; Geiger, Jörg Rp; Dugladze, Tamar; Gloveli, Tengis

    2016-01-01

    Gamma rhythms are known to contribute to the process of memory encoding. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and network levels. Using local field potential recording in awake behaving mice and concomitant field potential and whole-cell recordings in slice preparations we found that gamma rhythms lead to activity-dependent modification of hippocampal networks, including alterations in sharp wave-ripple complexes. Network plasticity, expressed as long-lasting increases in sharp wave-associated synaptic currents, exhibits enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in pyramidal cells that is induced postsynaptically and depends on metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 activation. In sharp contrast, alteration of inhibitory synaptic strength is independent of postsynaptic activation and less pronounced. Further, we found a cell type-specific, directionally biased synaptic plasticity of two major types of GABAergic cells, parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. Thus, we propose that gamma frequency oscillations represent a network state that introduces long-lasting synaptic plasticity in a cell-specific manner. PMID:27218453

  14. Synaptic contacts impaired by styrene-7,8-oxide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styrene-7,8-oxide (SO), a chemical compound widely used in industrial applications, is a potential hazard for humans, particularly in occupational settings. Neurobehavioral changes are consistently observed in occupationally exposed individuals and alterations of neurotransmitters associated with neuronal loss have been reported in animal models. Although the toxic effects of styrene have been extensively documented, the molecular mechanisms responsible for SO-induced neurotoxicity are still unclear. A possible dopamine-mediated effect of styrene neurotoxicity has been previously demonstrated, since styrene oxide alters dopamine neurotransmission in the brain. Thus, the present study hypothesizes that styrene neurotoxicity may involve synaptic contacts. Primary striatal neurons were exposed to styrene oxide at different concentrations (0.1-1 mM) for different time periods (8, 16, and 24 h) to evaluate the dose able to induce synaptic impairments. The expression of proteins crucial for synaptic transmission such as Synapsin, Synaptophysin, and RAC-1 were considered. The levels of Synaptophysin and RAC-1 decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, morphological alterations, observed at the ultrastructural level, primarily involved the pre-synaptic compartment. In SO-exposed cultures, the biochemical cascade of caspases was activated affecting the cytoskeleton components as their target. Thus the impairments in synaptic contacts observed in SO-exposed cultures might reflect a primarily morphological alteration of neuronal cytoskeleton. In addition, our data support the hypothesis developed by previous authors of reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiating events of SO cytotoxicity

  15. Synaptic membrane rafts: traffic lights for local neurotrophin signalling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Minichiello

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts, cholesterol and lipid rich microdomains, are believed to play important roles as platforms for the partitioning of transmembrane and synaptic proteins involved in synaptic signalling, plasticity and maintenance. There is increasing evidence of a physical interaction between post-synaptic densities and post-synaptic lipid rafts. Localization of proteins within lipid rafts is highly regulated, and therefore lipid rafts may function as traffic lights modulating and fine-tuning neuronal signalling. The tyrosine kinase neurotrophin receptors (Trk and the low-affinity p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR are enriched in neuronal lipid rafts together with the intermediates of downstream signalling pathways, suggesting a possible role of rafts in neurotrophin signalling. Moreover, neurotrophins and their receptors are involved in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol is an important component of lipid rafts and its depletion leads to gradual loss of synapses, underscoring the importance of lipid rafts for proper neuronal function. Here, we review and discuss the idea that translocation of neurotrophin receptors in synaptic rafts may account for the selectivity of their transduced signals.

  16. Synaptic Mechanisms of Blast-Induced Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekwas, Andrzej; Somayaji, Mahadevabharath R; Gupta, Raj K

    2016-01-01

    Blast wave-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common injuries to military personnel. Brain tissue compression/tension due to blast-induced cranial deformations and shear waves due to head rotation may generate diffuse micro-damage to neuro-axonal structures and trigger a cascade of neurobiological events culminating in cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders. Although diffuse axonal injury is regarded as a signature wound of mild TBI (mTBI), blast loads may also cause synaptic injury wherein neuronal synapses are stretched and sheared. This synaptic injury may result in temporary disconnect of the neural circuitry and transient loss in neuronal communication. We hypothesize that mTBI symptoms such as loss of consciousness or dizziness, which start immediately after the insult, could be attributed to synaptic injury. Although empirical evidence is beginning to emerge; the detailed mechanisms underlying synaptic injury are still elusive. Coordinated in vitro-in vivo experiments and mathematical modeling studies can shed light into the synaptic injury mechanisms and their role in the potentiation of mTBI symptoms. PMID:26834697

  17. Ablation of Ca(V2.1 voltage-gated Ca²⁺ channels in mouse forebrain generates multiple cognitive impairments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Theodor Mallmann

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Ca(V2.1 (P/Q-type Ca²⁺ channels located at the presynaptic membrane are known to control a multitude of Ca²⁺-dependent cellular processes such as neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity. Our knowledge about their contributions to complex cognitive functions, however, is restricted by the limited adequacy of existing transgenic Ca(V2.1 mouse models. Global Ca(V2.1 knock-out mice lacking the α1 subunit Cacna1a gene product exhibit early postnatal lethality which makes them unsuitable to analyse the relevance of Ca(V2.1 Ca²⁺ channels for complex behaviour in adult mice. Consequently we established a forebrain specific Ca(V2.1 knock-out model by crossing mice with a floxed Cacna1a gene with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the control of the NEX promoter. This novel mouse model enabled us to investigate the contribution of Ca(V2.1 to complex cognitive functions, particularly learning and memory. Electrophysiological analysis allowed us to test the specificity of our conditional knock-out model and revealed an impaired synaptic transmission at hippocampal glutamatergic synapses. At the behavioural level, the forebrain-specific Ca(V2.1 knock-out resulted in deficits in spatial learning and reference memory, reduced recognition memory, increased exploratory behaviour and a strong attenuation of circadian rhythmicity. In summary, we present a novel conditional Ca(V2.1 knock-out model that is most suitable for analysing the in vivo functions of Ca(V2.1 in the adult murine forebrain.

  18. CaMKII binding to GluN2B is important for massed spatial learning in the Morris water maze

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Ivar S.; Donaldson, Michaela S.; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-01-01

    Learning and memory as well as long-term potentiation (LTP) depend on Ca 2+ influx through the NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR) and the resulting activation of the Ca 2+ and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII). Ca 2+ influx via the NMDAR triggers CaMKII binding to the NMDAR for enhanced CaMKII accumulation at post-synaptic sites that experience heightened activity as occurring during LTP. Previously, we generated knock-in (KI) mice in which we replaced two residues in the NMDAR G...

  19. Usefulness of biphasic contrast injection in multidetector CT of the head and neck: A comparison with monophasic contrast injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of biphasic injection of contrast media in a CT of the head and neck. In the first step, vessel and tissue attenuation was measured in four different protocol groups: M1 (monophasic, injection rate: 100 mL at 3 mL/sec, delay time: 70 sec); B1 (biphasic, 100 mL at 3 mL/sec, 70 sec); M2 (monophasic, 100 mL at 2 mL/sec, 70 sec); and B2 (biphasic, 100 mL at 2 mL/sec, 120 sec). The biphasic injection protocol was an initial volus injection of 50 mL contrast medium and an additional volus injection of 50 mL contrast medium at 35 sec after initial injection. In the second step, the tissue attenuation of two groups was measured with a different contrast media volume and phase: M3 (monophasic, 100 mL at 2 mL/sec, 90 sec) and B3 (biphasic, 80 mL at 2 mL/sec, 90 sec, initial volus injection of 40 mL and an additional volus injection of 40 mL at 55 sec after initial injection). The measured CT numbers from vessels and tissues were compared between the different protocol groups. The vessel attenuation of B1 was higher than that of M1 and B2 (p < 0.05). Despite a longer delay time, the vessel attenuation of B2 was not significantly different from that of M1 and M2. There was no significant differentiation of tissue attenuation between each group. In the second study, the attenuation of vessel and tissue was not different between B3 and M3. Biphasic contrast injection leads to an increased attenuation of the vessel and also delays the optimal scan window

  20. Genetic evidence for a protein-kinase-A-mediated presynaptic component in NMDA-receptor-dependent forms of long-term synaptic potentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yan-You; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Schoch, Susanne; Kaeser, Pascal S.; JANZ, ROGER; Südhof, Thomas C; Siegelbaum, Steven A.; Kandel, Eric R.

    2005-01-01

    The synaptic vesicle protein Rab3A is a small GTP-binding protein that interacts with rabphilin and RIM1α, two presynaptic substrates of protein kinase A (PKA). Mice lacking RIM1α and Rab3A have a defect in PKA-dependent and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-independent presynaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal mossy-fiber and cerebellar parallel-fiber synapses. In contrast, the NMDAR-dependent and PKA-independent early phase of LTP at hippocampal CA3–CA1 synapses does not require these pre...

  1. Storage capacity diverges with synaptic efficiency in an associative memory model with synaptic delay and pruning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Seiji; Okada, Masato

    2004-09-01

    It is known that storage capacity per synapse increases by synaptic pruning in the case of a correlation-type associative memory model. However, the storage capacity of the entire network then decreases. To overcome this difficulty, we propose decreasing the connectivity while keeping the total number of synapses constant by introducing delayed synapses. In this paper, a discrete synchronous-type model with both delayed synapses and their prunings is discussed as a concrete example of the proposal. First, we explain the Yanai-Kim theory by employing statistical neurodynamics. This theory involves macrodynamical equations for the dynamics of a network with serial delay elements. Next, considering the translational symmetry of the explained equations, we rederive macroscopic steady-state equations of the model by using the discrete Fourier transformation. The storage capacities are analyzed quantitatively. Furthermore, two types of synaptic prunings are treated analytically: random pruning and systematic pruning. As a result, it becomes clear that in both prunings, the storage capacity increases as the length of delay increases and the connectivity of the synapses decreases when the total number of synapses is constant. Moreover, an interesting fact becomes clear: the storage capacity asymptotically approaches 2/pi due to random pruning. In contrast, the storage capacity diverges in proportion to the logarithm of the length of delay by systematic pruning and the proportion constant is 4/pi. These results theoretically support the significance of pruning following an overgrowth of synapses in the brain and may suggest that the brain prefers to store dynamic attractors such as sequences and limit cycles rather than equilibrium states. PMID:15484896

  2. Differential Biphasic Transcriptional Host Response Associated with Coevolution of Hemagglutinin Quasispecies of Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchanda, Himanshu; Seidel, Nora; Blaess, Markus F.; Claus, Ralf A.; Linde, Joerg; Slevogt, Hortense; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Guthke, Reinhard; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Severe influenza associated with strong symptoms and lung inflammation can be caused by intra-host evolution of quasispecies with aspartic acid or glycine in hemagglutinin position 222 (HA-222D/G; H1 numbering). To gain insights into the dynamics of host response to this coevolution and to identify key mechanisms contributing to copathogenesis, the lung transcriptional response of BALB/c mice infected with an A(H1N1)pdm09 isolate consisting HA-222D/G quasispecies was analyzed from days 1 to 12 post infection (p.i). At day 2 p.i. 968 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected. The DEG number declined to 359 at day 4 and reached 1001 at day 7 p.i. prior to recovery. Interestingly, a biphasic expression profile was shown for the majority of these genes. Cytokine assays confirmed these results on protein level exemplarily for two key inflammatory cytokines, interferon gamma and interleukin 6. Using a reverse engineering strategy, a regulatory network was inferred to hypothetically explain the biphasic pattern for selected DEGs. Known regulatory interactions were extracted by Pathway Studio 9.0 and integrated during network inference. The hypothetic gene regulatory network revealed a positive feedback loop of Ifng, Stat1, and Tlr3 gene signaling that was triggered by the HA-G222 variant and correlated with a clinical symptom score indicating disease severity. PMID:27536272

  3. Is there an Optimal Shape of the Defibrillation Shock: Constant Current vs. Pulsed Biphasic Waveforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Dotsinsky

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Three waveforms for transthoracic defibrillation are assessed and compared: the Pulsed Biphasic Waveform (PBW, the Rectilinear Biphasic Waveform (RBW, and the "lossless" constant current (LLCC pulses. Two indices are introduced: 1 kf = W/W0 - the ratio between the delivered energy W and the energy W0 of a rectangular pulse with the same duration and electric charge; 2 ηC = W/WC0 - the level of utilizing the initially loaded capacitor energy WC0. The envisioned comparative study shows that ηC index is favorable for both PBW and LLCC, while kf of both RBW and LLCC demonstrates advantage over the PBW in the range of small inter-electrode thoracic impedances below 80 Ω. Some design considerations are also discussed. The attractive LLCC concept needs large and heavy inductive coil to support the constant current amplitude, besides it is capable to induce strong electromagnetic influences due to the complex current control. The RBW technology controls the delivery of current through a series of internal resistors which are, however, a source of high heat losses. The PBW implements controlled duty cycle of high-frequency chopped pulses to adapt the energy delivery in respect of the patient impedance measured at the beginning of the shock. PBW technology makes use of small capacitors which allows the construction of light weight and small-size portable devices for transthoracic defibrillation.

  4. Fabrication of nano structural biphasic materials from phosphogypsum waste and their in vitro applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Khaled R., E-mail: Kh_rezk966@yahoo.com [Biomaterials Department, National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Mousa, Sahar M. [Chemistry Department, Science and Art College, King Abdulaziz University, Rabigh Campus, P.O. Box 344, 21911 Rabigh (Saudi Arabia); Inorganic Chemistry Department, National Research Centre, Dokki, P.O. Box 12622, 11787 Cairo (Egypt); El Bassyouni, Gehan T. [Biomaterials Department, National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Medical Physics Department, College of Medicine, Taif University (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: (a) Schema of the process, (b) TEM of nano particles of biphasic materials and (c) SEM of post-immersion. - Highlights: • Ratio of HA and β-TCP phases were controlled by thermal treatment. • HA partially decomposed into β-TCP with other bioactive phases. • Calcined HA at 900 °C is the best for the bioactivity behavior. - Abstract: In this study, a novel process of preparing biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) is proposed. Also its bioactivity for the utilization of the prepared BCP as a biomaterial is studied. A mixture of calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) could be obtained by thermal treatment of HAP which was previously prepared from phosphogypsum (PG) waste. The chemical and phase composition, morphology and particle size of prepared samples was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Infrared spectroscopy (IR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The bioactivity was investigated by soaking of the calcined samples in simulated body fluid (SBF). Results confirmed that the calcination temperatures played an important role in the formation of calcium phosphate (CP) materials. XRD results indicated that HAP was partially decomposed into β-TCP. The in vitro data confirmed that the calcined HAP forming BCP besides other phases such as pyrophosphate and silica are bioactive materials. Therefore, BCP will be used as good biomaterials for medical applications.

  5. Charge-balanced biphasic electrical stimulation inhibits neurite extension of spiral ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Na; Liang, Qiong; Liu, Yuehong; Lai, Bin; Li, Wen; Wang, Zhengmin; Li, Shufeng

    2016-06-15

    Intracochlear application of exogenous or transgenic neurotrophins, such as neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), could promote the resprouting of spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) neurites in deafened animals. These resprouting neurites might reduce the gap between cochlear implant electrodes and their targeting SGNs, allowing for an improvement of spatial resolution of electrical stimulation. This study is to investigate the impact of electrical stimulation employed in CI on the extension of resprouting SGN neurites. We established an in vitro model including the devices delivering charge-balanced biphasic electrical stimulation, and spiral ganglion (SG) dissociated culture treated with BDNF and NT-3. After electrical stimulation with varying durations and intensities, we quantified neurite lengths and Schwann cell densities in SG cultures. Stimulations that were greater than 50μA or longer than 8h significantly decreased SG neurite length. Schwann cell density under 100μA electrical stimulation for 48h was significantly lower compared to that in non-stimulated group. These electrical stimulation-induced decreases of neurite extension and Schwann cell density were attenuated by various types of voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) blockers, or completely prevented by their combination, cadmium or calcium-free medium. Our study suggested that charge-balanced biphasic electrical stimulation inhibited the extension of resprouting SGN neurites and decreased Schwann cell density in vitro. Calcium influx through multiple types of VDCCs was involved in the electrical stimulation-induced inhibition. PMID:27163199

  6. Biphasic electrical currents stimulation promotes both proliferation and differentiation of fetal neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keun-A Chang

    Full Text Available The use of non-chemical methods to differentiate stem cells has attracted researchers from multiple disciplines, including the engineering and the biomedical fields. No doubt, growth factor based methods are still the most dominant of achieving some level of proliferation and differentiation control--however, chemical based methods are still limited by the quality, source, and amount of the utilized reagents. Well-defined non-chemical methods to differentiate stem cells allow stem cell scientists to control stem cell biology by precisely administering the pre-defined parameters, whether they are structural cues, substrate stiffness, or in the form of current flow. We have developed a culture system that allows normal stem cell growth and the option of applying continuous and defined levels of electric current to alter the cell biology of growing cells. This biphasic current stimulator chip employing ITO electrodes generates both positive and negative currents in the same culture chamber without affecting surface chemistry. We found that biphasic electrical currents (BECs significantly increased the proliferation of fetal neural stem cells (NSCs. Furthermore, BECs also promoted the differentiation of fetal NSCs into neuronal cells, as assessed using immunocytochemistry. Our results clearly show that BECs promote both the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of fetal NSCs. It may apply to the development of strategies that employ NSCs in the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  7. Biphasic products of dicalcium phosphate-rich cement with injectability and nondispersibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Chia-Ling [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, Taichung, 407, Taiwan (China); Dental Medical Devices and Materials Research Center, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jian-Chih [Department of Orthopaedics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopaedics, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Jen-Chyan [Dental Medical Devices and Materials Research Center, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Tien, Yin-Chun [Department of Orthopaedics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopaedics, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Cheng, E-mail: wencchen@fcu.edu.tw [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, Taichung, 407, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a calcium phosphate cement was developed using tetracalcium phosphate and surface-modified dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA). This developed injectable bone graft substitute can be molded to the shape of the bone cavity and set in situ through the piping system that has an adequate mechanical strength, non-dispersibility, and biocompatibility. The materials were based on the modified DCPA compositions of calcium phosphate cement (CPC), where the phase ratio of the surface-modified DCPA is higher than that of the conventional CPC for forming dicalcium phosphate (DCP)-rich cement. The composition and morphology of several calcium phosphate cement specimens during setting were analyzed via X-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectroscopy system. The compressive strength of DCP-rich CPCs was greater than 30 MPa after 24 h of immersion in vitro. The reaction of the CPCs produced steady final biphasic products of DCPs with apatite. The composites of calcium phosphate cements derived from tetracalcium phosphate mixed with surface-modified DCPA exhibited excellent mechanical properties, injectability, and interlocking forces between particles, and they also featured nondispersive behavior when immersed in a physiological solution. - Highlights: • Bone cement precursor with nanocrystals is characterized. • DCP-rich CPCs with nanocrystals exhibited biphasic product phases. • Nanocrystals in cement significantly affected the interlocking ability. • Nanocrystals in cement exhibited higher strength and anti-dispersion. • DCP-rich CPCs increase the potential of bioresorption after reaction.

  8. Online Epileptic Seizure Prediction Using Wavelet-Based Bi-Phase Correlation of Electrical Signals Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, Zahra; Amirfattahi, Rasoul; Shayegh, Farzaneh; Ghassemi, Fahimeh

    2015-09-01

    Considerable efforts have been made in order to predict seizures. Among these methods, the ones that quantify synchronization between brain areas, are the most important methods. However, to date, a practically acceptable result has not been reported. In this paper, we use a synchronization measurement method that is derived according to the ability of bi-spectrum in determining the nonlinear properties of a system. In this method, first, temporal variation of the bi-spectrum of different channels of electro cardiography (ECoG) signals are obtained via an extended wavelet-based time-frequency analysis method; then, to compare different channels, the bi-phase correlation measure is introduced. Since, in this way, the temporal variation of the amount of nonlinear coupling between brain regions, which have not been considered yet, are taken into account, results are more reliable than the conventional phase-synchronization measures. It is shown that, for 21 patients of FSPEEG database, bi-phase correlation can discriminate the pre-ictal and ictal states, with very low false positive rates (FPRs) (average: 0.078/h) and high sensitivity (100%). However, the proposed seizure predictor still cannot significantly overcome the random predictor for all patients. PMID:26126613

  9. Acute exercise induces biphasic increase in respiratory mRNA in skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) promotes the expression of oxidative enzymes in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that activation of the p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in response to exercise was associated with exercise-induced PGC-1α and respiratory enzymes expression and aimed to demonstrate this under the physiological level. We subjected mice to a single bout of treadmill running and found that the exercise induced a biphasic increase in the expression of respiratory enzymes mRNA. The second phase of the increase was accompanied by an increase in PGC-1α protein, but the other was not. Administration of SB203580 (SB), an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suppressed the increase in PGC-1α expression and respiratory enzymes mRNA in both phases. These data suggest that p38 MAPK is associated with the exercise-induced expression of PGC-1α and biphasic increase in respiratory enzyme mRNAs in mouse skeletal muscle under physiological conditions

  10. Efficient One-Pot Synthesis of 5-Chloromethylfurfural (CMF from Carbohydrates in Mild Biphasic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris S. Argyropoulos

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 5-Halomethylfurfurals can be considered as platform chemicals of high reactivity making them useful for the preparation of a variety of important compounds. In this study, a one-pot route for the conversion of carbohydrates into 5-chloromethylfurfural (CMF in a simple and efficient (HCl-H3PO4/CHCl3 biphasic system has been investigated. Monosaccharides such as D-fructose, D-glucose and sorbose, disaccharides such as sucrose and cellobiose and polysaccharides such as cellulose were successfully converted into CMF in satisfactory yields under mild conditions. Our data shows that when using D-fructose the optimum yield of CMF was about 47%. This understanding allowed us to extent our work to biomaterials, such as wood powder and wood pulps with yields of CMF obtained being comparable to those seen with some of the enumerated mono and disaccharides. Overall, the proposed (HCl-H3PO4/CHCl3 optimized biphasic system provides a simple, mild, and cost-effective means to prepare CMF from renewable resources.

  11. Biphasic products of dicalcium phosphate-rich cement with injectability and nondispersibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a calcium phosphate cement was developed using tetracalcium phosphate and surface-modified dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA). This developed injectable bone graft substitute can be molded to the shape of the bone cavity and set in situ through the piping system that has an adequate mechanical strength, non-dispersibility, and biocompatibility. The materials were based on the modified DCPA compositions of calcium phosphate cement (CPC), where the phase ratio of the surface-modified DCPA is higher than that of the conventional CPC for forming dicalcium phosphate (DCP)-rich cement. The composition and morphology of several calcium phosphate cement specimens during setting were analyzed via X-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectroscopy system. The compressive strength of DCP-rich CPCs was greater than 30 MPa after 24 h of immersion in vitro. The reaction of the CPCs produced steady final biphasic products of DCPs with apatite. The composites of calcium phosphate cements derived from tetracalcium phosphate mixed with surface-modified DCPA exhibited excellent mechanical properties, injectability, and interlocking forces between particles, and they also featured nondispersive behavior when immersed in a physiological solution. - Highlights: • Bone cement precursor with nanocrystals is characterized. • DCP-rich CPCs with nanocrystals exhibited biphasic product phases. • Nanocrystals in cement significantly affected the interlocking ability. • Nanocrystals in cement exhibited higher strength and anti-dispersion. • DCP-rich CPCs increase the potential of bioresorption after reaction

  12. Aqueous biphasic extraction of uranium and thorium from contaminated soils. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiko, D.J.; Gartelmann, J.; Henriksen, J.L.; Krause, T.R.; Deepak; Vojta, Y.; Thuillet, E.; Mertz, C.J.

    1995-07-01

    The aqueous biphasic extraction (ABE) process for soil decontamination involves the selective partitioning of solutes and fine particulates between two immiscible aqueous phases. The biphase system is generated by the appropriate combination of a water-soluble polymer (e.g., polyethlene glycol) with an inorganic salt (e.g., sodium carbonate). Selective partitioning results in 99 to 99.5% of the soil being recovered in the cleaned-soil fraction, while only 0.5 to 1% is recovered in the contaminant concentrate. The ABE process is best suited to the recovery of ultrafine, refractory material from the silt and clay fractions of soils. During continuous countercurrent extraction tests with soil samples from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site (Fernald, OH), particulate thorium was extracted and concentrated between 6- and 16-fold, while the uranium concentration was reduced from about 500 mg/kg to about 77 mg/kg. Carbonate leaching alone was able to reduce the uranium concentration only to 146 mg/kg. Preliminary estimates for treatment costs are approximately $160 per ton of dry soil. A detailed flowsheet of the ABE process is provided.

  13. Aqueous biphasic extraction of uranium and thorium from contaminated soils. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aqueous biphasic extraction (ABE) process for soil decontamination involves the selective partitioning of solutes and fine particulates between two immiscible aqueous phases. The biphase system is generated by the appropriate combination of a water-soluble polymer (e.g., polyethlene glycol) with an inorganic salt (e.g., sodium carbonate). Selective partitioning results in 99 to 99.5% of the soil being recovered in the cleaned-soil fraction, while only 0.5 to 1% is recovered in the contaminant concentrate. The ABE process is best suited to the recovery of ultrafine, refractory material from the silt and clay fractions of soils. During continuous countercurrent extraction tests with soil samples from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site (Fernald, OH), particulate thorium was extracted and concentrated between 6- and 16-fold, while the uranium concentration was reduced from about 500 mg/kg to about 77 mg/kg. Carbonate leaching alone was able to reduce the uranium concentration only to 146 mg/kg. Preliminary estimates for treatment costs are approximately $160 per ton of dry soil. A detailed flowsheet of the ABE process is provided

  14. Biphasic kinetics of growth and bacteriocin production with Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471 occur under stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neysens, Patricia; Messens, Winy; Gevers, Dirk; Swings, Jean; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-04-01

    Micro-organisms used during the production of fermented foods are subjected to several abiotic stresses. Microbial survival during these processes strongly depends on the ability of the cells to adapt and become more tolerant to the environmental conditions. Cultivation of Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471, a potential strain for use during type II sourdough fermentations, at low temperatures, unfavourable pH and high salt concentrations resulted in biphasic growth patterns. In addition, two separate bacteriocin peaks, as well as a dramatic change in cellular morphology, were observed. In general, an increase of the specific bacteriocin production occurred during the second growth phase. Finally, the observed sugar consumption profiles were affected by the applied fermentation temperature. Moreover, the highest bacteriocin activity occurred during maltose consumption at a low constant temperature of 28 degrees C and a constant pH of 5.4. Plate counts from both growth phases revealed the existence of two colony types. Irregular colonies were found to outnumber smoother colonies during the first growth phase, while the second growth phase was characterized by a greater number of smooth colonies. Electron microscopy was used to investigate the observed morphological switch at the single-cell level. Single, rod-shaped cells changed into elongated cells that grew in chains. Colony and cell morphology changes coincided with the biphasic growth pattern. PMID:12686649

  15. On the appropriateness of modelling brain parenchyma as a biphasic continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavner, A C R; Roy, T Dutta; Hor, K W W; Majimbi, M; Joldes, G R; Wittek, A; Bunt, S; Miller, K

    2016-08-01

    Computational methods originally developed for analysis in engineering have been applied to the analysis of biological materials for many years. One particular application of these engineering tools is the brain, allowing researchers to predict the behaviour of brain tissue in various traumatic, surgical and medical scenarios. Typically two different approaches have been used to model deformation of brain tissue: single-phase models which treat the brain as a viscoelastic material, and biphasic models which treat the brain as a porous deformable medium through which liquid can move. In order to model the brain as a biphasic continuum, the hydraulic conductivity of the solid phase is required; there are many theoretical values for this conductivity in the literature, with variations of up to three orders of magnitude. We carried out a series of simple experiments using lamb and sheep brain tissue to establish the rate at which cerebrospinal fluid moves through the brain parenchyma. Mindful of possible variations in hydraulic conductivity with tissue deformation, our intention was to carry out our experiments on brain tissue subjected to minimal deformation. This has enabled us to compare the rate of flow with values predicted by some of the theoretical values of hydraulic conductivity from the literature. Our results indicate that the hydraulic conductivity of the brain parenchyma is consistent with the lowest theoretical published values. These extremely low hydraulic conductivities lead to such low rates of CSF flow through the brain tissue that in effect the material behaves as a single-phase deformable solid. PMID:27136087

  16. Superabsorbent biphasic system based on poly(lactic acid) and poly(acrylic acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartore, Luciana; Pandini, Stefano; Baldi, Francesco; Bignotti, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    In this research work, biocomposites based on crosslinked particles of poly(acrylic acid), commonly used as superabsorbent polymer (SAP), and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) were developed to elucidate the role of the filler (i.e., polymeric crosslinked particles) on the overall physico-mechanical behavior and to obtain superabsorbent thermoplastic products. Samples prepared by melt-blending of components in different ratios showed a biphasic system with a regular distribution of particles, with diameter ranging from 5 to 10 μm, within the PLLA polymeric matrix. The polymeric biphasic system, coded PLASA i.e. superabsorbent poly(lactic acid), showed excellent swelling properties, demonstrating that cross-linked particles retain their superabsorbent ability, as in their free counterparts, even if distributed in a thermoplastic polymeric matrix. The thermal characteristics of the biocomposites evidence enhanced thermal stability in comparison with neat PLLA and also mechanical properties are markedly modified by addition of crosslinked particles which induce regular stiffening effect. Furthermore, in aqueous environments the particles swell and are leached from PLLA matrix generating very high porosity. These new open-pore PLLA foams, produced in absence of organic solvents and chemical foaming agents, with good physico-mechanical properties appear very promising for several applications, for instance in tissue engineering for scaffold production.

  17. Biphasic pulses enhance bleomycin efficacy in a spontaneous canine genital tumor model of chemoresistance: Sticker sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citro Gennaro

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sticker's sarcoma (also known as transmissible venereal tumor is a horizontally transmitted neoplasm of the dog, that is passed with coitus. It is a locally aggressive tumor with a low tendency to metastatic spread. The most common locations are the genitals, the nose, the perianal area. Standard treatment consists with chemotherapy with vincristine, however other therapies such as, cryotherapy, immunotherapy or, in selected cases, radiation therapy, have been reported. In this article we describe the outcome of a small cohort of canine patients, with chemotherapy resistant transmissible venereal tumor (TVT, treated with bleomycin selectively driven by trains of biphasic pulses (electrochemotherapy. Three canine patients, with refractory TVT, entered the study and received two sessions of ECT under sedation. The pets had local injection of bleomycin at the concentration of 1.5 mg/ml and five minutes after the chemotherapy, trains of 8 biphasic electric pulses lasting 50 + 50 μs each, with 1 ms interpulse intervals, were delivered by means of modified caliper or, for difficult districts, through paired needle electrode. All the patients responded to the treatment and are still in remission at different times. Electrochemotherapy appears as a safe and efficacious modality for the treatment of TVT and warrants further investigations.

  18. Biphasic dose-effect relationships in experimental studies of radiation cancer in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biphasic dose-effect relationships in radiation cancer are characterized by a decrease in cancer rate at low doses, a minimum and an increase at higher doses (inversion or radiation hormesis). A simple and argumentative methodology of proving such relationships is a model-free analysis which is based exclusively on the observed changes in cancer rate in dependence on dose without using special fitting functions. It is tested by means of well-known statistical tests whether the changes in cancer rate observed both in the low dose range and at higher doses are statistically significant. The model-free analysis of experimental results obtained in radiation cancer studies on RFM/Un-mice of both sexes and on female BC3F1-mice in the dose range 0.. 3 Gy by two independent research groups at Oak Ridge (ORNL) and at Casaccio near Rome leads for gamma radiation and X-rays to a statistically significant decrease of the cancer rate at low doses and therefore to biphasic relationships for tumors of the reticular tissue, for several solid tumors as well as for cancer as a whole. (orig.)

  19. Clinical experience of switching from biphasic human insulin to biphasic insulin aspart 30 in Indian patients with type 2 diabetes in the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the following study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of switching from biphasic human insulin (BHI to biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30 in Indian patients with type 2 diabetes as a sub-analysis of the 24-week, non-interventional A 1 chieve study. Materials and Methods: Indian patients switching from BHI to BIAsp 30 based on the physicians′ decisions were included. The primary outcome was the incidence of serious adverse drug reactions (SADRs, including major hypoglycemic events; secondary outcomes included changes in hypoglycemia in the 4 weeks preceding baseline and week 24 and changes from baseline to week 24 in glycated hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c , fasting plasma glucose (FPG, postprandial plasma glucose (PPPG, body weight and quality of life (QoL. Results: Overall, 1976 patients (mean ± standard deviation age, 55.1 ± 10.6 years and diabetes duration, 10.1 ± 5.3 years on a mean pre-study BHI dose of 0.44 ± 0.18 U/kg were included. The mean BIAsp 30 dose was 0.43 ± 0.17 U/kg at baseline and 0.44 ± 0.17 U/kg at week 24. No SADRs were reported. The proportion of patients reporting overall hypoglycemic events reduced significantly from baseline to week 24 (15.0% vs. 2.9%, P < 0.0001. The mean HbA 1c level improved significantly from 9.1 ± 1.4% at baseline to 7.5 ± 1.0% at week 24, along with improvements in FPG, post-breakfast PPPG and QoL (P < 0.001. The mean body weight decreased from 69.3 ± 10.8 kg at baseline to 69.1 ± 10.4 kg at week 24 (P = 0.003. Conclusion: Switching from BHI to BIAsp 30 therapy was well-tolerated and was associated with improved glycemic control.

  20. Case Report: Multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Ignacio Lopez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma in a 68-year-old man is reported. Four different peripheral tumor nodules were identified on gross examination. A fifth central tumor corresponded to a conventional clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma is a rare tumor that has been very recently characterized as a distinct histotype within the spectrum of papillary renal cell carcinoma. Immunostaining with cyclin D1 seems to be specific of this tumor subtype. This is the first reported case with multifocal presentation.

  1. Propofol, but not etomidate, increases corticosterone levels and induces long-term alteration in hippocampal synaptic activity in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changqing; Seubert, Christoph N; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Martynyuk, Anatoly E

    2016-04-01

    Animal studies provide strong evidence that general anesthetics (GAs), administered during the early postnatal period, induce long-term cognitive and neurological abnormalities. Because the brain growth spurt in rodents is delayed compared to that in humans, a fundamental question is whether the postnatal human brain is similarly vulnerable. Sevoflurane and propofol, GAs that share positive modulation of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) function cause marked increase in corticosterone levels and induce long-term developmental alterations in synaptic activity in rodents. If synaptogenesis is affected, investigation of mechanisms of the synaptic effects of GAs is of high interest because synaptogenesis in humans continues for several years after birth. Here, we compared long-term synaptic effects of etomidate with those of propofol. Etomidate and propofol both positively modulate GABAAR activity, but in contrast to propofol, etomidate inhibits the adrenal synthesis of corticosterone. Postnatal day (P) 4, 5, or 6 rats received five injections of etomidate, propofol, or vehicle control during 5h of maternal separation. Endocrine effects of the anesthetics were evaluated by measuring serum levels of corticosterone immediately after anesthesia or maternal separation. The frequency and amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons were measured at P24-40 and P≥80. Only propofol caused a significant increase in serum corticosterone levels (F(4.26)=17.739, P<0.001). In contrast to increased frequency of mIPSCs in the propofol group (F(4.23)=8.731, p<0.001), mIPSC activity in the etomidate group was not different from that in the vehicle groups. The results of this study together with previously published data suggest that anesthetic-caused increase in corticosterone levels is required for GABAergic GAs to induce synaptic effects in the form of a long-term increase in the frequency of hippocampal m

  2. Maternal dietary loads of alpha-tocopherol increase synapse density and glial synaptic coverage in the hippocampus of adult offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Salucci

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An increased intake of the antioxidant α-Tocopherol (vitamin E is recommended in complicated pregnancies, to prevent free radical damage to mother and fetus. However, the anti-PKC and antimitotic activity of α-Tocopherol raises concerns about its potential effects on brain development. Recently, we found that maternal dietary loads of α-Tocopherol through pregnancy and lactation cause developmental deficit in hippocampal synaptic plasticity in rat offspring. The defect persisted into adulthood, with behavioral alterations in hippocampus-dependent learning. Here, using the same rat model of maternal supplementation, ultrastructural morphometric studies were carried out to provide mechanistic interpretation to such a functional impairment in adult offspring by the occurrence of long-term changes in density and morphological features of hippocampal synapses. Higher density of axo-spinous synapses was found in CA1 stratum radiatum of α-Tocopherol-exposed rats compared to controls, pointing to a reduced synapse pruning. No morphometric changes were found in synaptic ultrastructural features, i.e., perimeter of axon terminals, length of synaptic specializations, extension of bouton-spine contact. Glia-synapse anatomical relationship was also affected. Heavier astrocytic coverage of synapses was observed in Tocopherol-treated offspring, notably surrounding axon terminals; moreover, the percentage of synapses contacted by astrocytic endfeet at bouton-spine interface (tripartite synapses was increased. These findings indicate that gestational and neonatal exposure to supranutritional tocopherol intake can result in anatomical changes of offspring hippocampus that last through adulthood. These include a surplus of axo-spinous synapses and an aberrant glia-synapse relationship, which may represent the morphological signature of previously described alterations in synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent learning.

  3. Lead Exposure Impairs Hippocampus Related Learning and Memory by Altering Synaptic Plasticity and Morphology During Juvenile Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Guan, Rui-Li; Liu, Ming-Chao; Shen, Xue-Feng; Chen, Jing Yuan; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Luo, Wen-Jing

    2016-08-01

    Lead (Pb) is an environmental neurotoxic metal. Pb exposure may cause neurobehavioral changes, such as learning and memory impairment, and adolescence violence among children. Previous animal models have largely focused on the effects of Pb exposure during early development (from gestation to lactation period) on neurobehavior. In this study, we exposed Sprague-Dawley rats during the juvenile stage (from juvenile period to adult period). We investigated the synaptic function and structural changes and the relationship of these changes to neurobehavioral deficits in adult rats. Our results showed that juvenile Pb exposure caused fear-conditioned memory impairment and anxiety-like behavior, but locomotion and pain behavior were indistinguishable from the controls. Electrophysiological studies showed that long-term potentiation induction was affected in Pb-exposed rats, and this was probably due to excitatory synaptic transmission impairment in Pb-exposed rats. We found that NMDA and AMPA receptor-mediated current was inhibited, whereas the GABA synaptic transmission was normal in Pb-exposed rats. NR2A and phosphorylated GluR1 expression decreased. Moreover, morphological studies showed that density of dendritic spines declined by about 20 % in the Pb-treated group. The spine showed an immature form in Pb-exposed rats, as indicated by spine size measurements. However, the length and arborization of dendrites were unchanged. Our results suggested that juvenile Pb exposure in rats is associated with alterations in the glutamate receptor, which caused synaptic functional and morphological changes in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, thereby leading to behavioral changes. PMID:26141123

  4. Maternal Dietary Loads of Alpha-Tocopherol Increase Synapse Density and Glial Synaptic Coverage in the Hippocampus of Adult Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salucci, S.; Ambrogini, P.; Lattanzi, D.; Betti, M.; Gobbi, P.; Galati, C.; Galli, F.; Cuppini, R.; Minelli, A.

    2014-01-01

    An increased intake of the antioxidant α-Tocopherol (vitamin E) is recommended in complicated pregnancies, to prevent free radical damage to mother and fetus. However, the anti-PKC and antimitotic activity of α-Tocopherol raises concerns about its potential effects on brain development. Recently, we found that maternal dietary loads of α-Tocopherol through pregnancy and lactation cause developmental deficit in hippocampal synaptic plasticity in rat offspring. The defect persisted into adulthood, with behavioral alterations in hippocampus-dependent learning. Here, using the same rat model of maternal supplementation, ultrastructural morphometric studies were carried out to provide mechanistic interpretation to such a functional impairment in adult offspring by the occurrence of long-term changes in density and morphological features of hippocampal synapses. Higher density of axo-spinous synapses was found in CA1 stratum radiatum of α-Tocopherol-exposed rats compared to controls, pointing to a reduced synapse pruning. No morphometric changes were found in synaptic ultrastructural features, i.e., perimeter of axon terminals, length of synaptic specializations, extension of bouton-spine contact. Gliasynapse anatomical relationship was also affected. Heavier astrocytic coverage of synapses was observed in Tocopherol-treated offspring, notably surrounding axon terminals; moreover, the percentage of synapses contacted by astrocytic endfeet at bouton-spine interface (tripartite synapses) was increased. These findings indicate that gestational and neonatal exposure to supranutritional Tocopherol intake can result in anatomical changes of offspring hippocampus that last through adulthood. These include a surplus of axo-spinous synapses and an aberrant gliasynapse relationship, which may represent the morphological signature of previously described alterations in synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent learning. PMID:24998923

  5. Calcium-sensing receptor activation depresses synaptic transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Cecilia G.; Harnett, Mark T.; Chen, Wenyan; Smith, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    At excitatory synapses, decreases in cleft [Ca] arising from activity-dependent transmembrane Ca flux reduce the probability of subsequent transmitter release. Intense neural activity, induced by physiological and pathological stimuli, disturb the external microenvironment reducing extracellular [Ca] ([Ca]o) and thus may impair neurotransmission. Increases in [Ca]o activate the extracellular calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) which in turn inhibits non-selective cation channels (NSCC) at the maj...

  6. Synapses, synaptic activity and intraneuronal Aβ in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Tampellini

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available β-amyloid peptide accumulation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Aberrant β-amyloid buildup in the brain has been shown to be present both in the extracellular space and within neurons. Synapses are important targets of β-amyloid, and alterations in synapses better correlate with cognitive impairment than amyloid plaques or neurofibrillary tangles. The link between β-amyloid and synapses became even tighter when it was discovered that β-amyloid accumulates within synapses and that synaptic activity modulates β-amyloid secretion. Currently, a central question in Alzheimer’s disease research is what role synaptic activity plays in the disease process, and how specifically β-amyloid is involved in the synaptic dysfunction that characterizes the disease.

  7. Synaptic signaling and aberrant RNA splicing in autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between presynaptic and postsynaptic cellular adhesion molecules drive synapse maturation during development. These trans-synaptic interactions are regulated by alternative splicing of cellular adhesion molecule RNAs, which ultimately determines neurotransmitter phenotype. The diverse assortment of RNAs produced by alternative splicing generates countless protein isoforms necessary for guiding specialized cell-to-cell connectivity. Failure to generate the appropriate synaptic adhesion proteins is associated with disrupted glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid signaling, resulting in loss of activity-dependent neuronal plasticity, and risk for developmental disorders, including autism. While the majority of genetic mutations currently linked to autism are rare variants that change the protein coding sequence of synaptic candidate genes, regulatory polymorphisms affecting constitutive and alternative splicing have emerged as risk factors in numerous other diseases, accounting for an estimated 40-60% of general disease risk. Here, we review the relationship between aberrant RNA splicing of synapse-related genes and autism spectrum disorders.

  8. Precise Synaptic Efficacy Alignment Suggests Potentiation Dominated Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Christoph; Miner, Daniel C; Triesch, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that parallel synapses from the same axonal branch onto the same dendritic branch have almost identical strength. It has been proposed that this alignment is only possible through learning rules that integrate activity over long time spans. However, learning mechanisms such as spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) are commonly assumed to be temporally local. Here, we propose that the combination of temporally local STDP and a multiplicative synaptic normalization mechanism is sufficient to explain the alignment of parallel synapses. To address this issue, we introduce three increasingly complex models: First, we model the idealized interaction of STDP and synaptic normalization in a single neuron as a simple stochastic process and derive analytically that the alignment effect can be described by a so-called Kesten process. From this we can derive that synaptic efficacy alignment requires potentiation-dominated learning regimes. We verify these conditions in a single-neuron model with independent spiking activities but more realistic synapses. As expected, we only observe synaptic efficacy alignment for long-term potentiation-biased STDP. Finally, we explore how well the findings transfer to recurrent neural networks where the learning mechanisms interact with the correlated activity of the network. We find that due to the self-reinforcing correlations in recurrent circuits under STDP, alignment occurs for both long-term potentiation- and depression-biased STDP, because the learning will be potentiation dominated in both cases due to the potentiating events induced by correlated activity. This is in line with recent results demonstrating a dominance of potentiation over depression during waking and normalization during sleep. This leads us to predict that individual spine pairs will be more similar after sleep compared to after sleep deprivation. In conclusion, we show that synaptic normalization in conjunction with coordinated

  9. A trans-synaptic nanocolumn aligns neurotransmitter release to receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ai-Hui; Chen, Haiwen; Li, Tuo P; Metzbower, Sarah R; MacGillavry, Harold D; Blanpied, Thomas A

    2016-08-11

    Synaptic transmission is maintained by a delicate, sub-synaptic molecular architecture, and even mild alterations in synapse structure drive functional changes during experience-dependent plasticity and pathological disorders. Key to this architecture is how the distribution of presynaptic vesicle fusion sites corresponds to the position of receptors in the postsynaptic density. However, while it has long been recognized that this spatial relationship modulates synaptic strength, it has not been precisely described, owing in part to the limited resolution of light microscopy. Using localization microscopy, here we show that key proteins mediating vesicle priming and fusion are mutually co-enriched within nanometre-scale subregions of the presynaptic active zone. Through development of a new method to map vesicle fusion positions within single synapses in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, we find that action-potential-evoked fusion is guided by this protein gradient and occurs preferentially in confined areas with higher local density of Rab3-interacting molecule (RIM) within the active zones. These presynaptic RIM nanoclusters closely align with concentrated postsynaptic receptors and scaffolding proteins, suggesting the existence of a trans-synaptic molecular 'nanocolumn'. Thus, we propose that the nanoarchitecture of the active zone directs action-potential-evoked vesicle fusion to occur preferentially at sites directly opposing postsynaptic receptor-scaffold ensembles. Remarkably, NMDA receptor activation triggered distinct phases of plasticity in which postsynaptic reorganization was followed by trans-synaptic nanoscale realignment. This architecture suggests a simple organizational principle of central nervous system synapses to maintain and modulate synaptic efficiency. PMID:27462810

  10. Defective glycinergic synaptic transmission in zebrafish motility mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Hirata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Recently, in vivo analysis of glycinergic synaptic transmission has been pursued in zebrafish using molecular genetics. An ENU mutagenesis screen identified two behavioral mutants that are defective in glycinergic synaptic transmission. Zebrafish bandoneon (beo mutants have a defect in glrbb, one of the duplicated glycine receptor (GlyR β subunit genes. These mutants exhibit a loss of glycinergic synaptic transmission due to a lack of synaptic aggregation of GlyRs. Due to the consequent loss of reciprocal inhibition of motor circuits between the two sides of the spinal cord, motor neurons activate simultaneously on both sides resulting in bilateral contraction of axial muscles of beo mutants, eliciting the so-called ‘accordion’ phenotype. Similar defects in GlyR subunit genes have been observed in several mammals and are the basis for human hyperekplexia/startle disease. By contrast, zebrafish shocked (sho mutants have a defect in slc6a9, encoding GlyT1, a glycine transporter that is expressed by astroglial cells surrounding the glycinergic synapse in the hindbrain and spinal cord. GlyT1 mediates rapid uptake of glycine from the synaptic cleft, terminating synaptic transmission. In zebrafish sho mutants, there appears to be elevated extracellular glycine resulting in persistent inhibition of postsynaptic neurons and subsequent reduced motility, causing the ‘twitch once’ phenotype. We review current knowledge regarding zebrafish ‘accordion’ and ‘twitch once’ mutants, including beo and sho, and report the identification of a new α2 subunit that revises the phylogeny of zebrafish GlyRs.

  11. Depression as a Glial-Based Synaptic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rial, Daniel; Lemos, Cristina; Pinheiro, Helena; Duarte, Joana M; Gonçalves, Francisco Q; Real, Joana I; Prediger, Rui D; Gonçalves, Nélio; Gomes, Catarina A; Canas, Paula M; Agostinho, Paula; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies combining pharmacological, behavioral, electrophysiological and molecular approaches indicate that depression results from maladaptive neuroplastic processes occurring in defined frontolimbic circuits responsible for emotional processing such as the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and ventral striatum. However, the exact mechanisms controlling synaptic plasticity that are disrupted to trigger depressive conditions have not been elucidated. Since glial cells (astrocytes and microglia) tightly and dynamically interact with synapses, engaging a bi-directional communication critical for the processing of synaptic information, we now revisit the role of glial cells in the etiology of depression focusing on a dysfunction of the "quad-partite" synapse. This interest is supported by the observations that depressive-like conditions are associated with a decreased density and hypofunction of astrocytes and with an increased microglia "activation" in frontolimbic regions, which is expected to contribute for the synaptic dysfunction present in depression. Furthermore, the traditional culprits of depression (glucocorticoids, biogenic amines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF) affect glia functioning, whereas antidepressant treatments (serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors, SSRIs, electroshocks, deep brain stimulation) recover glia functioning. In this context of a quad-partite synapse, systems modulating glia-synapse bidirectional communication-such as the purinergic neuromodulation system operated by adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine-emerge as promising candidates to "re-normalize" synaptic function by combining direct synaptic effects with an ability to also control astrocyte and microglia function. This proposed triple action of purines to control aberrant synaptic function illustrates the rationale to consider the interference with glia dysfunction as a mechanism of action driving the design of future pharmacological tools to

  12. Emergence of Functional Specificity in Balanced Networks with Synaptic Plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadra Sadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In rodent visual cortex, synaptic connections between orientation-selective neurons are unspecific at the time of eye opening, and become to some degree functionally specific only later during development. An explanation for this two-stage process was proposed in terms of Hebbian plasticity based on visual experience that would eventually enhance connections between neurons with similar response features. For this to work, however, two conditions must be satisfied: First, orientation selective neuronal responses must exist before specific recurrent synaptic connections can be established. Second, Hebbian learning must be compatible with the recurrent network dynamics contributing to orientation selectivity, and the resulting specific connectivity must remain stable for unspecific background activity. Previous studies have mainly focused on very simple models, where the receptive fields of neurons were essentially determined by feedforward mechanisms, and where the recurrent network was small, lacking the complex recurrent dynamics of large-scale networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Here we studied the emergence of functionally specific connectivity in large-scale recurrent networks with synaptic plasticity. Our results show that balanced random networks, which already exhibit highly selective responses at eye opening, can develop feature-specific connectivity if appropriate rules of synaptic plasticity are invoked within and between excitatory and inhibitory populations. If these conditions are met, the initial orientation selectivity guides the process of Hebbian learning and, as a result, functionally specific and a surplus of bidirectional connections emerge. Our results thus demonstrate the cooperation of synaptic plasticity and recurrent dynamics in large-scale functional networks with realistic receptive fields, highlight the role of inhibition as a critical element in this process, and paves the road for further computational

  13. Depression as a Glial-Based Synaptic Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eRial

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies combining pharmacological, behavioral, electrophysiological and molecular approaches indicate that depression results from maladaptive neuroplastic processing occurring in defined frontolimbic circuits responsible for emotional processing such as the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and ventral striatum. However, the exact mechanisms controlling synaptic plasticity that are disrupted to trigger depressive conditions have not been elucidated. Since glial cells (astrocytes and microglia tightly and dynamically interact with synapses, engaging a bi-directional communication critical for the processing of synaptic information, we now revisit the role of glial cells in the etiology of depression focusing on a dysfunction of the ‘quad-partite’ synapse. This interest is supported by the observations that depressive-like conditions are associated with a decreased density and hypofunction of astrocytes and with an increase microglia ‘activation’ in frontolimbic regions, which is expected to contribute for the synaptic dysfunction present in depression. Furthermore, the traditional culprits of depression (glucocorticoids, biogenic amines, BDNF affect glia functioning, whereas antidepressant treatments (SSRIs, electroshock, deep brain stimulation recover glia functioning. In this context of a quad-partite synapse, systems modulating glia-synapse bidirectional communication - such as the purinergic neuromodulation system operated by ATP and adenosine - emerge as promising candidates to re-normalize synaptic function by combining direct synaptic effects with an ability to also control astrocyte and microglia function. This proposed triple action of purines to control aberrant synaptic function illustrates the rationale to consider the interference with glia dysfunction as a mechanism of action driving the design of future pharmacological tools to manage depression.

  14. Detection of spontaneous synaptic events with an optimally scaled template.

    OpenAIRE

    Clements, J. D.; Bekkers, J M

    1997-01-01

    Spontaneous synaptic events can be difficult to detect when their amplitudes are close to the background noise level. Here we report a sensitive new technique for automatic detection of small asynchronous events. A waveform with the time course of a typical synaptic event (a template) is slid along the current or voltage trace and optimally scaled to fit the data at each position. A detection criterion is calculated based on the optimum scaling factor and the quality of the fit. An event is d...

  15. A memristor SPICE model accounting for synaptic activity dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingjiang Li

    Full Text Available In this work, we propose a new memristor SPICE model that accounts for the typical synaptic characteristics that have been previously demonstrated with practical memristive devices. We show that this model could account for both volatile and non-volatile memristance changes under distinct stimuli. We then demonstrate that our model is capable of supporting typical STDP with simple non-overlapping digital pulse pairs. Finally, we investigate the capability of our model to simulate the activity dependence dynamics of synaptic modification and present simulated results that are in excellent agreement with biological results.

  16. Short-lived diabetes in the young-adult ZDF rat does not exacerbate neuronal Ca(2+) biomarkers of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimaiti, Shaniya; DeMoll, Chris; Anderson, Katie L; Griggs, Ryan B; Taylor, Bradley K; Porter, Nada M; Thibault, Olivier

    2015-09-24

    Results from clinical studies provide evidence that cognitive changes relatively late in life may be traced to antecedent conditions including diabetes, obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, and an atherogenic diet. As such, several traits of Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) could be considered pathogenic factors of aging, contributing to age-dependent cognitive decline and our susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease. It appears that both the duration of metabolic condition and the age of the individual, together can contribute to the potential impact on peripheral as well as brain health. Because of robust evidence that in animal models of aging, Ca(2+) dysregulation alters neuronal health, synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory processes, we tested the hypothesis that peripheral metabolic dysregulation could exacerbate Ca(2+) dysfunction in hippocampal CA1 neurons. Using intracellular/ extracellular electrophysiological and Ca(2+) imaging techniques, we show that Ca(2+)levels at rest or during synaptic stimulation, the Ca(2+)-dependent afterhyperpolarization, baseline field potentials, and short-term synaptic plasticity were not significantly altered in young-adult male Zucker diabetic fatty rats compare to their lean counterparts. Our observations suggest that early phases of T2DM characterized by high levels of glucose and insulin may be too transient to alter hippocampal CA1 physiology in this animal model of diabetes. These results are supported by clinical data showing that longer T2DM duration can have greater negative impact on cognitive functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID:25451110

  17. A CaMK cascade activates CRE-mediated transcription in neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yoshishige; Corcoran, Ethan E.; Eto, Koh; Gengyo-Ando, Keiko; Muramatsu, Masa-aki; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Freedman, Jonathan H.; Mitani, Shohei; Hagiwara, Masatoshi; Means, Anthony R.; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signals regulate a diverse set of cellular responses, from proliferation to muscular contraction and neuro-endocrine secretion. The ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor, calmodulin (CaM), translates changes in local intracellular Ca2+ concentrations into changes in enzyme activities. Among its targets, the Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinases I and IV (CaMKs) are capable of transducing intraneuronal signals, and these kinases are implicated in neuronal gene regulation that mediates synaptic plasticity in mammals. Recently, the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) has been proposed as a target for a CaMK cascade involving not only CaMKI or CaMKIV, but also an upstream kinase kinase that is also CaM regulated (CaMKK). Here, we report that all components of this pathway are coexpressed in head neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. Utilizing a transgenic approach to visualize CREB-dependent transcription in vivo, we show that this CaMK cascade regulates CRE-mediated transcription in a subset of head neurons in living nematodes. PMID:12231504

  18. Fragile X Syndrome: Keys to the Molecular Genetics of Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombroso, Paul J.; Ogren, Marilee P.

    2008-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation is discussed. The relationship between specific impairments in synaptic plasticity and Fragile X syndrome is investigated as it strengthens synaptic contacts between neurons.

  19. Hippocampal hyperexcitability in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: Pathological sharp waves and excitatory/inhibitory synaptic imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Michal; Ramani, Meera; Dian, Josh; Florez, Carlos M; Mylvaganam, Shanthini; Brien, James; Reynolds, James; Kapur, Bhushan; Zoidl, Georg; Poulter, Michael O; Carlen, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) can lead to long-lasting neurological alterations that may predispose individuals to seizures and neurobehavioral dysfunction. To date, there exists limited information regarding the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. The hippocampal CA3 region generates excitatory population activity, called sharp waves (SPWs), that provide an ideal model to study perturbations in neuronal excitability at the network and cellular levels. In the present study, we utilized a mouse model of PAE and used dual extracellular and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from CA3 hippocampal pyramidal cells to evaluate the effect of 1st trimester-equivalent ethanol exposure (10% v/v) on SPW activity and excitatory/inhibitory balance. We observed that PAE significantly altered in vitro SPW waveforms, with an increased duration and amplitude, when compared to controls. In addition, PAE slices exhibited reduced pharmacological inhibition by the GABA-A receptor antagonist bicuculline (BMI) on SPW activity, and increased population spike paired-pulse ratios, all indicative of network disinhibition within the PAE hippocampus. Evaluation of PAE CA3 pyramidal cell activity associated with SPWs, revealed increased action potential cell firing, which was accompanied by an imbalance of excitatory/inhibitory synaptic drive, shifted in favor of excitation. Moreover, we observed intrinsic changes in CA3 pyramidal activity in PAE animals, including increased burst firing and instantaneous firing rate. This is the first study to provide evidence for hippocampal dysfunction in the ability to maintain network homeostasis and underlying cellular hyperexcitability in a model of PAE. These circuit and cellular level alterations may contribute to the increased propensity for seizures and neurobehavioral dysfunction observed in patients with a history of PAE. PMID:26996134

  20. Bi-phasic titanium dioxide nanoparticles doped with nitrogen and neodymium for enhanced photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Virginia; Bear, Joseph C.; McNaughter, Paul D.; McGettrick, James D.; Watson, Trystan; Charbonneau, Cecile; O'Brien, Paul; Barron, Andrew R.; Dunnill, Charles W.

    2015-10-01

    Bi-phasic or multi-phasic composite nanoparticles for use in photocatalysis have been produced by a new synthetic approach. Sol-gel methods are used to deposit multiple layers of active material onto soluble substrates. In this work, a layer of rutile (TiO2) was deposited onto sodium chloride pellets followed by an annealing step and a layer of anatase. After dissolving the substrate, bi-phasic nanoparticles containing half anatase and half rutile TiO2; with ``Janus-like'' characteristics are obtained. Nitrogen and neodymium doping of the materials were observed to enhance the photocatalytic properties both under UV and white light irradiation. The unique advantage of this synthetic method is the ability to systematically dope separate sides of the nanoparticles. Nitrogen doping was found to be most effective on the anatase side of the nanoparticle while neodymium was found to be most effective on the rutile side. Rhodamine B dye was effectively photodegraded by co-doped particles under white light.Bi-phasic or multi-phasic composite nanoparticles for use in photocatalysis have been produced by a new synthetic approach. Sol-gel methods are used to deposit multiple layers of active material onto soluble substrates. In this work, a layer of rutile (TiO2) was deposited onto sodium chloride pellets followed by an annealing step and a layer of anatase. After dissolving the substrate, bi-phasic nanoparticles containing half anatase and half rutile TiO2; with ``Janus-like'' characteristics are obtained. Nitrogen and neodymium doping of the materials were observed to enhance the photocatalytic properties both under UV and white light irradiation. The unique advantage of this synthetic method is the ability to systematically dope separate sides of the nanoparticles. Nitrogen doping was found to be most effective on the anatase side of the nanoparticle while neodymium was found to be most effective on the rutile side. Rhodamine B dye was effectively photodegraded by co

  1. Temperature dependence of microwave absorption phenomena in single and biphase soft magnetic microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Kammouni, Rhimou, E-mail: elkammounirhimou@gmail.com [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Vázquez, Manuel [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Lezama, Luis [Depto. Química Inorgánica, Universidad País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain); Kurlyandskaya, Galina [Depto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Universidad País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain); Dept. Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kraus, Ludek [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-11-15

    The microwave absorption phenomena of single and biphase magnetic microwires with soft magnetic behavior have been investigated as a function of DC applied magnetic field using two alternative techniques: (i) absorption measurements in the temperature range of 4–300 K using a spectrometer operating at X-band frequency, at 9.5 GHz, and (ii) room-temperature, RT, ferromagnetic resonance measurements in a network analyzer in the frequency range up to 20 GHz. Complementary low-frequency magnetic characterization was performed in a Vibrating Sample Magnetometer. Studies have been performed for 8 μm diameter small-magnetostriction amorphous CoFeSiB single-phase microwire, coated by micrometric Pyrex layer, and after electroplating an external shell, 2 µm or 4 µm thick, of FeNi alloys. For single phase CoFeSiB microwire, a single absorption is observed, whose DC field dependence of resonance frequency at RT fits to a Kittel-law behavior for in-plane magnetized thin film. The temperature dependence behavior shows a monotonic increase in the resonance field, H{sub r}, with temperature. A parallel reduction of the circular anisotropy field, H{sub K}, is deduced from the temperature dependence of hysteresis loops. For biphase, CoFeSiB/FeNi, microwires, the absorption phenomena at RT also follow the Kittel condition. The observed opposite evolution with temperature of resonance field, H{sub r}, in 2 and 4 µm thick FeNi samples is interpreted considering the opposite sign of magnetostriction of the respective FeNi layers. The stress-induced magnetic anisotropy field, H{sub K}, in the FeNi shell is deduced to change sign at around 130 K. - Highlights: • A single absorption phenomenon is observed for single phase CoFeSiB. • The T dependence of the microwave behavior shows a monotonic increase of H{sub r} with T. • The absorption at RT follows the Kittel condition for biphase CoFe/FeNi microwires. • The T dependence of resonant field of CoFe/FeNi is interpreted to be

  2. Plasmalemmal Na+/Ca2+ exchanger modulates Ca2+-dependent exocytotic release of glutamate from rat cortical astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reno C Reyes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Astroglial excitability operates through increases in Ca2+cyt (cytosolic Ca2+, which can lead to glutamatergic gliotransmission. In parallel fluctuations in astrocytic Na+cyt (cytosolic Na+ control metabolic neuronal-glial signalling, most notably through stimulation of lactate production, which on release from astrocytes can be taken up and utilized by nearby neurons, a process referred to as lactate shuttle. Both gliotransmission and lactate shuttle play a role in modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity. Consequently, we studied the role of the PMCA (plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase, NCX (plasma membrane Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and NKA (Na+/K+-ATPase in complex and coordinated regulation of Ca2+cyt and Na+cyt in astrocytes at rest and upon mechanical stimulation. Our data support the notion that NKA and PMCA are the major Na+ and Ca2+ extruders in resting astrocytes. Surprisingly, the blockade of NKA or PMCA appeared less important during times of Ca2+ and Na+ cytosolic loads caused by mechanical stimulation. Unexpectedly, NCX in reverse mode appeared as a major contributor to overall Ca2+ and Na+ homoeostasis in astrocytes both at rest and when these glial cells were mechanically stimulated. In addition, NCX facilitated mechanically induced Ca2+-dependent exocytotic release of glutamate from astrocytes. These findings help better understanding of astrocyte-neuron bidirectional signalling at the tripartite synapse and/or microvasculature. We propose that NCX operating in reverse mode could be involved in fast and spatially localized Ca2+-dependent gliotransmission, that would operate in parallel to a slower and more widely distributed gliotransmission pathway that requires metabotropically controlled Ca2+ release from the ER (endoplasmic reticulum.

  3. A dynamic model of interactions of Ca2+, calmodulin, and catalytic subunits of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Pepke

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available During the acquisition of memories, influx of Ca2+ into the postsynaptic spine through the pores of activated N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors triggers processes that change the strength of excitatory synapses. The pattern of Ca2+influx during the first few seconds of activity is interpreted within the Ca2+-dependent signaling network such that synaptic strength is eventually either potentiated or depressed. Many of the critical signaling enzymes that control synaptic plasticity,including Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, are regulated by calmodulin, a small protein that can bindup to 4 Ca2+ ions. As a first step toward clarifying how the Ca2+-signaling network decides between potentiation or depression, we have created a kinetic model of the interactions of Ca2+, calmodulin, and CaMKII that represents our best understanding of the dynamics of these interactions under conditions that resemble those in a postsynaptic spine. We constrained parameters of the model from data in the literature, or from our own measurements, and then predicted time courses of activation and autophosphorylation of CaMKII under a variety of conditions. Simulations showed that species of calmodulin with fewer than four bound Ca2+ play a significant role in activation of CaMKII in the physiological regime,supporting the notion that processing of Ca2+ signals in a spine involves competition among target enzymes for binding to unsaturated species of CaM in an environment in which the concentration of Ca2+ is fluctuating rapidly. Indeed, we showed that dependence of activation on the frequency of Ca2+ transients arises from the kinetics of interaction of fluctuating Ca2+with calmodulin/CaMKII complexes. We used parameter sensitivity analysis to identify which parameters will be most beneficial to measure more carefully to improve the accuracy of predictions. This model provides a quantitative base from which to build more complex dynamic

  4. Bone healing around nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, deproteinized bovine bone mineral, biphasic calcium phosphate, and autogenous bone in mandibular bone defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broggini, Nina; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Jensen, Simon S;

    2015-01-01

    with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA-SiO), deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM), biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) with a 60/40% HA/β-TCP (BCP 60/40) ratio, or particulate autogenous bone (A) for histological and histomorphometric analysis. At 2 weeks, percent filler amongst the test groups (DBBM (35.65%), HA...

  5. Electrocatalytic oxidation of alcohols and diols in a biphasic medium using CeIV methanesulfonate as mediator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some alcohols and diols were oxidized electro-catalytically in a biphasic system using cerium methanesulphonate as mediator. A mixture of methanesulphonic acid solution and benzene was used and aldehydes, ketones and diacids were some of the principal products obtained with yield varying from 27 to 98%. In several cases selectivity was obtained. (author)

  6. Autonomous CaMKII Mediates Both LTP and LTD Using a Mechanism for Differential Substrate Site Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Coultrap

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic strength requires Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII and other kinases, whereas long-term depression (LTD requires phosphatases. Here, we found that LTD also requires CaMKII and its phospho-T286-induced “autonomous” (Ca2+-independent activity. However, whereas LTP is known to induce phosphorylation of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR subunit GluA1 at S831, LTD instead induced CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation at S567, a site known to reduce synaptic GluA1 localization. GluA1 S831 phosphorylation by “autonomous” CaMKII was further stimulated by Ca2+/CaM, as expected for traditional substrates. By contrast, GluA1 S567 represents a distinct substrate class that is unaffected by such stimulation. This differential regulation caused GluA1 S831 to be favored by LTP-type stimuli (strong but brief, whereas GluA1 S567 was favored by LTD-type stimuli (weak but prolonged. Thus, requirement of autonomous CaMKII in opposing forms of plasticity involves distinct substrate classes that are differentially regulated to enable stimulus-dependent substrate-site preference.

  7. Intense synaptic activity enhances temporal resolution in spinal motoneurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rune W; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Hounsgaard, Jørn Dybkjær

    2008-01-01

    In neurons, spike timing is determined by integration of synaptic potentials in delicate concert with intrinsic properties. Although the integration time is functionally crucial, it remains elusive during network activity. While mechanisms of rapid processing are well documented in sensory systems...

  8. Cdk5 is essential for synaptic vesicle endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Timothy C; Valova, Valentina A; Malladi, Chandra S;

    2003-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE) is triggered by calcineurin-mediated dephosphorylation of the dephosphin proteins. SVE is maintained by the subsequent rephosphorylation of the dephosphins by unidentified protein kinases. Here, we show that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) phosphorylates dynami...

  9. How do astrocytes shape synaptic transmission? Insights from electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Rouach

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A major breakthrough in neuroscience has been the realization in the last decades that the dogmatic view of astroglial cells as being merely fostering and buffering elements of the nervous system is simplistic. A wealth of investigations now shows that astrocytes actually participate in the control of synaptic transmission in an active manner. This was first hinted by the intimate contacts glial processes make with neurons, particularly at the synaptic level, and evidenced using electrophysiological and calcium imaging techniques. Calcium imaging has provided critical evidence demonstrating that astrocytic regulation of synaptic efficacy is not a passive phenomenon. However, given that cellular activation is not only represented by calcium signaling, it is also crucial to assess concomitant mechanisms. We and others have used electrophysiological techniques to simultaneously record neuronal and astrocytic activity, thus enabling the study of multiple ionic currents and in depth investigation of neuro-glial dialogues. In the current review, we focus on the input such approach has provided in the understanding of astrocyte-neuron interactions underlying control of synaptic efficacy.

  10. Translational regulatory mechanisms in persistent forms of synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Raymond J; Govindarajan, Arvind; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2004-09-30

    Memory and synaptic plasticity exhibit distinct temporal phases, with long-lasting forms distinguished by their dependence on macromolecular synthesis. Prevailing models for the molecular mechanisms underlying long-lasting synaptic plasticity have largely focused on transcriptional regulation. However, a growing body of evidence now supports a crucial role for neuronal activity-dependent mRNA translation, which may occur in dendrites for a subset of neuronal mRNAs. Recent work has begun to define the signaling mechanisms coupling synaptic activation to the protein synthesis machinery. The ERK and mTOR signaling pathways have been shown to regulate the activity of the general translational machinery, while the translation of particular classes of mRNAs is additionally controlled by gene-specific mechanisms. Rapid enhancement of the synthesis of a diverse array of neuronal proteins through such mechanisms provides the components necessary for persistent forms of LTP and LTD. These findings have important implications for the synapse specificity and associativity of protein synthesis-dependent changes in synaptic strength. PMID:15450160

  11. Isoform Specificity of Protein Kinase Cs in Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossin, Wayne S.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are implicated in many forms of synaptic plasticity. However, the specific isoform(s) of PKC that underlie(s) these events are often not known. We have used "Aplysia" as a model system in order to investigate the isoform specificity of PKC actions due to the presence of fewer isoforms and a large number of documented…

  12. Dynamic microtubules regulate dendritic spine morphology and synaptic plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Jaworski; L.C. Kapitein; S. Montenegro Gouveia; B.R. Dortland; P.S. Wulf; I. Grigoriev; P. Camera; S.A. Spangler; P. Di Stefano; J. Demmers; H. Krugers; P. Defilippi; A. Akhmanova; C.C. Hoogenraad

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the major sites of excitatory synaptic input, and their morphological changes have been linked to learning and memory processes. Here, we report that growing microtubule plus ends decorated by the microtubule tip-tracking protein EB3 enter spines and can modulate spine morpholog

  13. Early synaptic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease: Insights from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirinzi, Tommaso; Madeo, Graziella; Martella, Giuseppina; Maltese, Marta; Picconi, Barbara; Calabresi, Paolo; Pisani, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The appearance of motor manifestations in Parkinson's disease (PD) is invariably linked to degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta. Traditional views on PD neuropathology have been grounded in the assumption that the prime event of neurodegeneration involves neuronal cell bodies with the accumulation of metabolic products. However, this view has recently been challenged by both clinical and experimental evidence. Neuropathological studies in human brain samples and both in vivo and in vitro models support the hypothesis that nigrostriatal synapses may indeed be affected at the earliest stages of the neurodegenerative process. The mechanisms leading to either structural or functional synaptic dysfunction are starting to be elucidated and include dysregulation of axonal transport, impairment of the exocytosis and endocytosis machinery, altered intracellular trafficking, and loss of corticostriatal synaptic plasticity. The aim of this review is to try to integrate different lines of evidence from both pathogenic and genetic animal models that, to different extents, suggest that early synaptic impairment may represent the key event in PD pathogenesis. Understanding the molecular and cellular events underlying such synaptopathy is a fundamental step toward developing specific biomarkers of early dopaminergic dysfunction and, more importantly, designing novel therapies targeting the synaptic apparatus of selective, vulnerable synapses. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27193205

  14. Depression as a Glial-Based Synaptic Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Rial, Daniel; Lemos, Cristina; Pinheiro, Helena; Duarte, Joana M.; Gonçalves, Francisco Q.; Real, Joana I.; Prediger, Rui D.; Gonçalves, Nélio; Gomes, Catarina A.; Canas, Paula M.; Agostinho, Paula; Cunha, Rodrigo A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies combining pharmacological, behavioral, electrophysiological and molecular approaches indicate that depression results from maladaptive neuroplastic processes occurring in defined frontolimbic circuits responsible for emotional processing such as the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and ventral striatum. However, the exact mechanisms controlling synaptic plasticity that are disrupted to trigger depressive conditions have not been elucidated. Since glial cells (astrocytes...

  15. Learning may need only a few bits of synaptic precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassi, Carlo; Gerace, Federica; Lucibello, Carlo; Saglietti, Luca; Zecchina, Riccardo

    2016-05-01

    Learning in neural networks poses peculiar challenges when using discretized rather then continuous synaptic states. The choice of discrete synapses is motivated by biological reasoning and experiments, and possibly by hardware implementation considerations as well. In this paper we extend a previous large deviations analysis which unveiled the existence of peculiar dense regions in the space of synaptic states which accounts for the possibility of learning efficiently in networks with binary synapses. We extend the analysis to synapses with multiple states and generally more plausible biological features. The results clearly indicate that the overall qualitative picture is unchanged with respect to the binary case, and very robust to variation of the details of the model. We also provide quantitative results which suggest that the advantages of increasing the synaptic precision (i.e., the number of internal synaptic states) rapidly vanish after the first few bits, and therefore that, for practical applications, only few bits may be needed for near-optimal performance, consistent with recent biological findings. Finally, we demonstrate how the theoretical analysis can be exploited to design efficient algorithmic search strategies.

  16. Spontaneous Activity Drives Local Synaptic Plasticity In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winnubst, Johan; Cheyne, Juliette E; Niculescu, Dragos; Lohmann, C.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous activity fine-tunes neuronal connections in the developing brain. To explore the underlying synaptic plasticity mechanisms, we monitored naturally occurring changes in spontaneous activity at individual synapses with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and simultaneous calcium imaging in t

  17. Spontaneous Activity Drives Local Synaptic Plasticity In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnubst, Johan; Cheyne, Juliette E; Niculescu, Dragos; Lohmann, Christian

    2015-07-15

    Spontaneous activity fine-tunes neuronal connections in the developing brain. To explore the underlying synaptic plasticity mechanisms, we monitored naturally occurring changes in spontaneous activity at individual synapses with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and simultaneous calcium imaging in the mouse visual cortex in vivo. Analyzing activity changes across large populations of synapses revealed a simple and efficient local plasticity rule: synapses that exhibit low synchronicity with nearby neighbors (depressed in their transmission frequency. Asynchronous electrical stimulation of individual synapses in hippocampal slices showed that this is due to a decrease in synaptic transmission efficiency. Accordingly, experimentally increasing local synchronicity, by stimulating synapses in response to spontaneous activity at neighboring synapses, stabilized synaptic transmission. Finally, blockade of the high-affinity proBDNF receptor p75(NTR) prevented the depression of asynchronously stimulated synapses. Thus, spontaneous activity drives local synaptic plasticity at individual synapses in an "out-of-sync, lose-your-link" fashion through proBDNF/p75(NTR) signaling to refine neuronal connectivity. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:26182421

  18. The Role of Short Term Synaptic Plasticity in Temporal Coding of Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Lakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Short term synaptic plasticity is a phenomenon which is commonly found in the central nervous system. It could contribute to functions of signal processing namely, temporal integration and coincidence detection by modulating the input synaptic strength. This dissertation has two parts. First, we study the effects of short term synaptic plasticity…

  19. Multiple CaMKII Binding Modes to the Actin Cytoskeleton Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahid; Conte, Ianina; Carter, Tom; Bayer, K Ulrich; Molloy, Justin E

    2016-07-26

    Localization of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) to dendritic spine synapses is determined in part by the actin cytoskeleton. We determined binding of GFP-tagged CaMKII to tag-RFP-labeled actin cytoskeleton within live cells using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking. Stepwise photobleaching showed that CaMKII formed oligomeric complexes. Photoactivation experiments demonstrated that diffusion out of the evanescent field determined the track lifetimes. Latrunculin treatment triggered a coupled loss of actin stress fibers and the colocalized, long-lived CaMKII tracks. The CaMKIIα (α) isoform, which was previously thought to lack F-actin interactions, also showed binding, but this was threefold weaker than that observed for CaMKIIβ (β). The βE' splice variant bound more weakly than α, showing that binding by β depends critically on the interdomain linker. The mutations βT287D and αT286D, which mimic autophosphorylation states, also abolished F-actin binding. Autophosphorylation triggers autonomous CaMKII activity, but does not impair GluN2B binding, another important synaptic protein interaction of CaMKII. The CaMKII inhibitor tatCN21 or CaMKII mutations that inhibit GluN2B association by blocking binding of ATP (βK43R and αK42M) or Ca(2+)/calmodulin (βA303R) had no effect on the interaction with F-actin. These results provide the first rationale for the reduced synaptic spine localization of the αT286D mutant, indicating that transient F-actin binding contributes to the synaptic localization of the CaMKIIα isoform. The track lifetime distributions had a stretched exponential form consistent with a heterogeneously diffusing population. This heterogeneity suggests that CaMKII adopts different F-actin binding modes, which is most easily rationalized by multiple subunit contacts between the CaMKII dodecamer and the F-actin cytoskeleton that stabilize the initial weak (micromolar

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Synaptic Release at the Photoreceptor Synapse

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, Gabriel; Rabl, Katalin; Gemp, Ian; Heidelberger, Ruth; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2010-01-01

    Exocytosis from the rod photoreceptor is stimulated by submicromolar Ca2+ and exhibits an unusually shallow dependence on presynaptic Ca2+. To provide a quantitative description of the photoreceptor Ca2+ sensor for exocytosis, we tested a family of conventional and allosteric computational models describing the final Ca2+-binding steps leading to exocytosis. Simulations were fit to two measures of release, evoked by flash-photolysis of caged Ca2+: exocytotic capacitance changes from individua...

  1. A biphasic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes and ketones using a simplified packed-bed microreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Bogdan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the preparation and characterization of a simplified packed-bed microreactor using an immobilized TEMPO catalyst shown to oxidize primary and secondary alcohols via the biphasic Anelli-Montanari protocol. Oxidations occurred in high yields with great stability over time. We observed that plugs of aqueous oxidant and organic alcohol entered the reactor as plugs but merged into an emulsion on the packed-bed. The emulsion coalesced into larger plugs upon exiting the reactor, leaving the organic product separate from the aqueous by-products. Furthermore, the microreactor oxidized a wide range of alcohols and remained active in excess of 100 trials without showing any loss of catalytic activity.

  2. Experimental study on bi-phase flow Air-Oil in Water Emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, Davide; Poesio, Pietro

    2015-11-01

    Bi-phase slug flow oil-in-water emulsion [5%-20%] and air through a horizontal pipe (inner diameter 22mm) is experimentally studied. A test with water and air has been performed as comparison. First we create and analyze the flow pattern map to identify slug flow liquid and air inlet conditions. Flow maps are similar for all the used liquid. A video analysis procedure using an high speed camera has been created to obtain all the characteristics of unit slugs: slug velocity, slug length, bubble velocity, bubbles length and slug frequency. We compare translational velocity and frequency with models finding a good agreement. We calculate the pdfs of the lengths to find the correlations between mean values and STD on different air and liquid superficial velocities. We also perform pressure measurements along the pipe. We conclude that the percentage of oil-in- water has no influence on results in terms of velocity, lengths, frequency and pressure drop.

  3. Perfluorinated quaternary ammonium salts of polyoxometalate anions: Fluorous biphasic oxidation catalysis with and without fluorous solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maayan, Galia; Fish, Richard H.; Neumann, Ronny

    2003-05-28

    Perfluorinated quaternary ammonium cations, [CF{sub 3}(CF{sub 2}){sub 7}(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sub 3}CH{sub 3}N{sup +} (RFN{sup +}), were synthesized and used as counter cations for the [WZnM{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(ZnW{sub 9}O{sub 34}){sub 2}]{sup 12-} (M = Mn(II), Zn(II)), polyoxometalate. The (RFN{sup +}){sub 12}[WZnM{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(ZnW9O{sub 34}){sub 2}] compounds were fluorous biphasic catalysts for alcohol and alkenol oxidation, and alkene epoxidation with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. Reaction protocols with or without a fluorous solvent were tested. The catalytic activity and selectivity was affected both by the hydrophobicity of the solvent and the substrate.

  4. Biphasic effects of direct, but not indirect, GABA mimetics and antagonists on haloperidol-induced catalepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worms, P; Lloyd, K G

    1980-03-01

    At very low doses the GABA agonists SL 76002 and muscimol diminish haloperidol-induced catalepsy. At somewhat higher doses these compounds potentiate catalepsy. Biphasic effects on DA-receptor mediated functions have previously been noted with bicuculline and picrotoxinin. In contrast, manipulation of GABA levels by enzyme inhibition induced only a monophasic effect on dopamine-mediated behaviour. The potentiation of GABA levels by enzyme inhibition induced only a monophasic effect on dopamine-mediated behaviour. The potentiation of haloperidol-induced catalepsy by GABA mimetics is also observed with dipropylacetate, delta-aminovaleric acid and gamma-acetylenic GABA. This GABA-mimetic potentiation of catakepsy was blocked by the coadministration of bicuculline. These results confirm and extend the hypothesis that GABA-neurons influence DA neuron function. Furthermore they suggest that more than one group of GABA receptors influence directly and/or indirectly DA neuronal function, with different resultant effects. PMID:7189827

  5. Enhanced refrigerant capacity in Gd-Al-Co microwires with a biphase nanocrystalline/amorphous structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H. X.; Xing, D. W.; Sánchez Llamazares, J. L.; Sánchez-Valdés, C. F.; Belliveau, H.; Wang, H.; Qin, F. X.; Liu, Y. F.; Sun, J. F.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.

    2016-02-01

    A class of biphase nanocrystalline/amorphous Gd(50+5x)Al(30-5x)Co20 (x = 0, 1, 2) microwires fabricated directly by melt-extraction is reported. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and Fourier function transform based analysis indicate the presence of a volume fraction (˜20%) of ˜10 nm sized nanocrystallities uniformly embedded in an amorphous matrix. The microwires possess excellent magnetocaloric properties, with large values of the isothermal entropy change (-ΔSM ˜ 9.7 J kg-1 K-1), the adiabatic temperature change (ΔTad ˜ 5.2 K), and the refrigerant capacity (RC ˜ 654 J kg-1) for a field change of 5 T. The addition of Gd significantly alters TC while preserving large values of the ΔSM and RC. The nanocrystallites allow for enhanced RC as well as a broader operating temperature span of a magnetic bed for energy-efficient magnetic refrigeration.

  6. Bullous variant of familial biphasic lichen amyloidosis: A unique combination of three rare presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalaxmi Veerabasappa Suranagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 55-year-old man presented with multiple, itchy papules and macules on the trunk and extremities. Histopathologic examination of biopsy specimens taken from three different lesions showed a subepidermal blister with amyloid deposits in the dermal papillae. No systemic disease or involvement of other organs was detected. The clinical and histological findings were compatible with a bullous variant of lichen amyloidosis (LA. Primary cutaneous localized amyloidosis usually presents with papular, macular or nodular lesions. Bullous lesions associated with LA are very rare. Furthermore, patient had seven other members in the family with similar lesions, which is also a rare occurrence. We report a case with a rare combination of biphasic, bullous variant of familial LA.

  7. Obtaining of ceramics biphasic dense and porous; Obtencao de ceramicas bifasicas densas e porosas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallone, E.M.J.A.; Rigo, E.C.S., E-mail: eliria@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FZEA/USP), Pirassununga, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Basicas; Silva, K.L. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Rezende, M.E. [Universidade Sao Francisco, Itatiba, SP (Brazil); Fraga, A.F. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (DEMa/UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais; Marques, R.F.C. [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIFAL), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Among the bioceramic hydroxyapatite (HAP) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) are materials commonly used in biomedical field. Their combined properties result in a material with absorbable and at the same time with bioactive surface. Called biphasic ceramics such materials respond more quickly when exposed to physiological environment. In this work, powders of HAP/beta-TCP were obtained by chemical precipitation. After obtaining the post-phase was added at a ratio of 0, 15% and 30w% aqueous solutions of corn starch in order to obtain porous bodies. After mixing the resulting solutions were dried, resigned in tablet form and sintered at 1300 deg C. The initial powder was characterized by X-ray diffraction with Rietveld refinement to quantify the phases present. Bodies-of-evidence has been characterized by calculating the bulk density, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and diametral compression. (author)

  8. Poly(ionic liquid)s as phase splitting promoters in aqueous biphasic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    João, Karen G; Tomé, Liliana C; Isik, Mehmet; Mecerreyes, David; Marrucho, Isabel M

    2015-11-01

    Aqueous biphasic systems (ABSs) provide a sustainable and efficient alternative to conventional liquid-liquid extraction techniques with volatile organic solvents, and can be used for the extraction, recovery, and purification of diverse solutes. In this work, and for the first time, ABSs composed of poly(ionic liquid)s (PILs) and inorganic salts were measured at 25 °C and atmospheric pressure. New PILs having pyrrolidinium polycations combined with different counter-anions, namely acetate [Ac](-), trifluoroacetate [TFAc](-), hexanoate [Hex](-), adipate [Adi](-), and citrate [Cit](-) were synthesized, by a simple and environmentally-friendly procedure, and characterized. The effect of the PIL features, namely molecular weight and anionic character, and other experimental variables, such as temperature, on the phase splitting ability was researched. The aptitude of the studied ABS to be implemented as separation technologies was also evaluated through the use of a model biomolecule, tryptophan. PMID:26421939

  9. Life threatening biphasic adverse reactions to desmopressin: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Chen, Ruijun; Tian, Fang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Li; Yu, Baojun; Huang, Xianwen; Zhang, Yuehui; Su, Shengyuan; Ma, Guangnian; Wang, Kaichen

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with desmopressin diacetate arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) and its withdrawal are associated with side effects. We present a rare case of severe biphasic adverse reactions induced by DDAVP and its withdrawal in a 63-year-old female patient. A lump in the left axillary region was biopsied, and she received DDAVP after surgery. The following day, she lost consciousness, with foaming at the mouth and seizures. Hypotonic encephalopathy was considered. DDAVP was ceased, and she received electrolytes. On day 1, she displayed low blood pressure and increased urine output. She received DDAVP and dopamine as well as electrolytes. The patient was ambulatory on day 7 and was discharged without brain abnormalities on MRI. In conclusion, severe hyponatremia induced by DDAVP and massive polyuria and hypovolemic shock induced by DDAVP withdrawal are life-threatening conditions. This case underlines the need to be vigilant when administering DDAVP and to monitor for any side effects. PMID:27142268

  10. Research on the Influence of Technological Forging Parameters on the Quality of Biphasic Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashekov, S. A.; Smaylova, N. T.; Alshynova, A. M.; Mashekova, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The deflected mode (DM) during the preparation of the broach in the flat and combined baizes and also on radial forging machine (RFM) was investigated for creating the rational technology of a broach and determining the optimum size of the angles of rotation and single squeeze reduction. The quantitative data was obtained by the method of final elements and the MSC.Super Forge program; the main consistent patterns of stress-strain state (SSS) distribution and temperature while modeling forging in flat and combined baizes, also on RFM with various angles of rotation and sizes of squeeze reduction were determined. The rational trial technology of forging of biphasic titanium alloys was developed and tested.

  11. A new biphasic osteoinductive calcium composite material with a negative Zeta potential for bone augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciejewski Oliver

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of the present study was to analyze the osteogenic potential of a biphasic calcium composite material (BCC with a negative surface charge for maxillary sinus floor augmentation. In a 61 year old patient, the BCC material was used in a bilateral sinus floor augmentation procedure. Six months postoperative, a bone sample was taken from the augmented regions before two titanium implants were inserted at each side. We analyzed bone neoformation by histology, bone density by computed tomography, and measured the activity of voltage-activated calcium currents of osteoblasts and surface charge effects. Control orthopantomograms were carried out five months after implant insertion. The BCC was biocompatible and replaced by new mineralized bone after being resorbed completely. The material demonstrated a negative surface charge (negative Zeta potential which was found to be favorable for bone regeneration and osseointegration of dental implants.

  12. Injectable Hydrogel Composite Based Gelatin-PEG and Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles for Bone Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Thuy Duong; Tran, Ngoc Quyen; Nguyen, Dai Hai; Nguyen, Cuu Khoa; Tran, Dai Lam; Nguyen, Phuong Thi

    2016-05-01

    Gelatin hydrogels have recently attracted much attention for tissue regeneration because of their biocompatibility. In this study, we introduce poly-ethylene glycol (PEG)—grafted gelatin containing tyramine moieties which have been utilized for in situ enzyme-mediated hydrogel preparation. The hydrogel can be used to load nanoparticles of biphasic calcium phosphate, a mixture of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate, and forming injectable bio-composites. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra indicated that tyramine-functionalized polyethylene glycol-nitrophenyl carbonate ester was conjugated to the gelatin. The hydrogel composite was rapidly formed in situ (within a few seconds) in the presence of horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide. In vitro experiments with bio-mineralization on the hydrogel composite surfaces was well-observed after 2 weeks soaking in simulated body fluid solution. The obtained results indicated that the hydrogel composite could be a potential injectable material for bone regeneration.

  13. Sympathetically evoked Ca2+ signaling in arterial smooth muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-jin ZANG; Joseph ZACHARIA; Christine LAMONT; Withrow Gil WIER

    2006-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system plays an essential role in the control of total peripheral vascular resistance and blood flow, by controlling the contraction of small arteries. Perivascular sympathetic nerves release ATP, norepinephrine (NE) and neuropeptide Y. This review summarizes our knowledge of the intracellular Ca2+ signals that are activated by ATP and NE, acting respectively on P2X1 and α1 adrenoceptors in arterial smooth muscle. Each neurotransmitter produces a unique type of post-synaptic Ca2+ signal and associated contraction. The neural release of ATP and NE is thought to vary markedly with the pattern of nerve activity, probably reflecting both pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms. Finally, we show that Ca2+ signaling during neurogenic contractions activated by trains of sympathetic nerve fiber action potentials are in fact significantly different from that elicited by simple bath application of exogenous neurotransmitters to isolated arteries (a common experimental technique), and end by identifying important questions remaining in our understanding of sympathetic neurotransmission and the physiological regulation of contraction of small arteries.

  14. Frequent biphasic cellular responses of permanent fish cell cultures to deoxynivalenol (DON)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination of animal feed with mycotoxins is a major problem for fish feed mainly due to usage of contaminated ingredients for production and inappropriate storage of feed. The use of cereals for fish food production further increases the risk of a potential contamination. Potential contaminants include the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) which is synthesized by globally distributed fungi of the genus Fusarium. The toxicity of DON is well recognized in mammals. In this study, we confirm cytotoxic effects of DON in established permanent fish cell lines. We demonstrate that DON is capable of influencing the metabolic activity and cell viability in fish cells as determined by different assays to indicate possible cellular targets of this toxin. Evaluation of cell viability by measurement of membrane integrity, mitochondrial activity and lysosomal function after 24 h of exposure of fish cell lines to DON at a concentration range of 0-3000 ng ml-1 shows a biphasic effect on cells although differences in sensitivity occur. The cell lines derived from rainbow trout are particularly sensitive to DON. The focus of this study lies, furthermore, on the effects of DON at different concentrations on production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the different fish cell lines. The results show that DON mainly reduces ROS production in all cell lines that were used. Thus, our comparative investigations reveal that the fish cell lines show distinct species-related endpoint sensitivities that also depend on the type of tissue from which the cells were derived and the severity of exposure. - Highlights: → DON uptake by cells is not extensive. → All fish cell lines are sensitive to DON. → DON is most cytotoxic to rainbow trout cells. → Biphasic cellular responses were frequently observed. → Our results are similar to studies on mammalian cell lines.

  15. Biphasic release of indomethacin from HPMC/pectin/calcium matrix tablet: I. Characterization and mechanistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baojian; Chen, Zhukang; Wei, Xiuli; Sun, Ningyun; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wei

    2007-11-01

    Calcium-induced crosslinking of pectin acts as the dominating factor controlling drug release from pectin-based matrices. The same interaction was employed to modify indomethacin release from HPMC/pectin/calcium matrix in this study. The aim was to characterize the release profiles, and to study the formulation variables and the underlying mechanisms. The matrix tablet was made up of pectin HM 70, calcium chloride and HPMC K4M, and prepared by the wet granulation method. In vitro release was performed in water and characterized by the power law. Matrix erosion was evaluated by studying the weight loss and pectin release. Biphasic release of indomethacin from the HPMC/pectin/calcium matrix tablet was observed, and extraordinary power law exponent n values of over 1.0 were observed. Increase in calcium amount led to more significant retardation on drug release. The two power law parameters, n and K, correlated to the amount of calcium in the matrix. A lag time of over 4 h can be achieved at HPMC/pectin/calcium chloride amount of 100 mg/100 mg/100 mg. Both matrix weight loss and pectin release were linearly correlated to indomethacin release, indicating erosion-controlled drug release mechanisms. The hybrid matrix showed retarded erosion and hydration rate, which served as the basis for retarded indomethacin release. It is concluded that the pectin/calcium interaction can be employed to modify drug release from HPMC/pectin/calcium matrix tablet with biphasic release patterns for potential timed or site-specific drug delivery. PMID:17540549

  16. Biphasic quantum dots of cubic and hexagonal Mn doped CdS; necessity of Rietveld analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiba, Zein K., E-mail: zein_kh@yahoo.com [Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt); Taif University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department (Saudi Arabia); Mohamed, Mohamed Bakr [Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt); Imam, N.G. [Experimental Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 13759 Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • Mn{sup 2+} doped CdS quantum dots (QDs) were prepared via a simple chemical synthesis procedure. • Biphasic composite of CdS QDs was revealed with maximum magnetism at 10 at.% of Mn{sup 2+}. • Rietveld structural analysis is a necessity for dealing with nano or quantum dots chalcogenides. • Full investigation of effects of Mn doping on the structural, optical and magnetic parameters. - Abstract: Mn{sup 2+} doped CdS quantum dots (QDs) were prepared via a simple chemical synthesis method. Incorporation of Mn ions into CdS QDs was monitored by structural, magnetic and optical spectroscopy analysis. Although the diffraction patterns seemed to be single wurtzite hexagonal structure, analysis revealed biphasic composite of CdS QDs hexagonal wurtzite and cubic zinc blende. The band gap, crystal phase and the morphology of CdS QDs were found not to be greatly affected by Mn{sup 2+} doping, however there was an optimal Mn{sup 2+} doping content of 10% where the magnetism is maximum. The recorded photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra, excited at 370 nm, depict emission lines in the UV and blue-shift regions. The emission band reveals that the band gap of pure CdS QDs is around 3 eV which is greater than that of bulk CdS (2.42 eV). The band gap of Mn:CdS QDs is almost independent of Mn content (x) and the crystallite size remains almost the same for all values of x. The observed structural, magnetic and optical properties have been explained on the basis of formation of two phases of CdS doped with Mn. This work aims to highlight recent advances in the synthesis of Mn:CdS diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dots and their wonderful performance.

  17. Regulation of the demographic structure in isomorphic biphasic life cycles at the spatial fine scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Manuel Nobre de Carvalho da Silva Vieira

    Full Text Available Isomorphic biphasic algal life cycles often occur in the environment at ploidy abundance ratios (Haploid:Diploid different from 1. Its spatial variability occurs within populations related to intertidal height and hydrodynamic stress, possibly reflecting the niche partitioning driven by their diverging adaptation to the environment argued necessary for their prevalence (evolutionary stability. Demographic models based in matrix algebra were developed to investigate which vital rates may efficiently generate an H:D variability at a fine spatial resolution. It was also taken into account time variation and type of life strategy. Ploidy dissimilarities in fecundity rates set an H:D spatial structure miss-fitting the ploidy fitness ratio. The same happened with ploidy dissimilarities in ramet growth whenever reproductive output dominated the population demography. Only through ploidy dissimilarities in looping rates (stasis, breakage and clonal growth did the life cycle respond to a spatially heterogeneous environment efficiently creating a niche partition. Marginal locations were more sensitive than central locations. Related results have been obtained experimentally and numerically for widely different life cycles from the plant and animal kingdoms. Spore dispersal smoothed the effects of ploidy dissimilarities in fertility and enhanced the effects of ploidy dissimilarities looping rates. Ploidy dissimilarities in spore dispersal could also create the necessary niche partition, both over the space and time dimensions, even in spatial homogeneous environments and without the need for conditional differentiation of the ramets. Fine scale spatial variability may be the key for the prevalence of isomorphic biphasic life cycles, which has been neglected so far.

  18. Biphasic hormonal responses to the adrenocorticolytic DDT metabolite 3-methylsulfonyl-DDE in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DDT metabolite 3-methylsulfonyl-DDE (3-MeSO2-DDE) has been proposed as a lead compound for an improved adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) treatment. ACC is a rare malignant disorder with poor prognosis, and the current pharmacological therapy o,p'-DDD (mitotane) has limited efficacy and causes severe adverse effects. 3-MeSO2-DDE is bioactivated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 11B1 in mice and causes formation of irreversibly bound protein adducts, reduced glucocorticoid secretion, and cell death in the adrenal cortex of several animal species. The present study was carried out to assess similarities and differences between mice and humans concerning the adrenocorticolytic effects of 3-MeSO2-DDE. The results support previous indications that humans are sensitive to the adrenocorticolytic actions of 3-MeSO2-DDE by demonstrating protein adduct formation and cytotoxicity in the human adrenocortical cell line H295R. However, neither the irreversible binding nor the cytotoxicity of 3-MeSO2-DDE in H295R cells was inhibited by the CYP11B1 inhibitor etomidate. We also report biphasic responses to 3-MeSO2-DDE in cortisol and aldosterone secretion as well as in mRNA levels of the steroidogenic genes StAR, CYP11B1 and CYP11B2. Hormone levels and mRNA levels were increased at lower concentrations of 3-MeSO2-DDE, while higher concentrations decreased hormone levels. These biphasic responses were not observed with o,p'-DDD or with the precursor DDT metabolite p,p'-DDE. Based on these results, 3-MeSO2-DDE remains a viable lead compound for drug design, although the adrenocorticolytic effects of 3-MeSO2-DDE in human cells seem more complex than in murine cells.

  19. Biphasic cultivation strategy to avoid Epo-Fc aggregation and optimize protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisermayer, Christian; Reinhart, David; Gili, Andreas; Chang, Martina; Aberg, Per-Mikael; Castan, Andreas; Kunert, Renate

    2016-06-10

    In biphasic cultivations, the culture conditions are initially kept at an optimum for rapid cell growth and biomass accumulation. In the second phase, the culture is shifted to conditions ensuring maximum specific protein production and the protein quality required. The influence of specific culture parameters is cell line dependent and their impact on product quality needs to be investigated. In this study, a biphasic cultivation strategy for a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line expressing an erythropoietin fusion protein (Epo-Fc) was developed. Cultures were run in batch mode and after an initial growth phase, cultivation temperature and pH were shifted. Applying a DoE (Design of Experiments) approach, a fractional factorial design was used to systematically evaluate the influence of cultivation temperature and pH as well as their synergistic effect on cell growth as well as on recombinant protein production and aggregation. All three responses were influenced by the cultivation temperature. Additionally, an interaction between pH and temperature was found to be related to protein aggregation. Compared with the initial standard conditions of 37°C and pH 7.05, a parameter shift to low temperature and acidic pH resulted in a decrease in the aggregate fraction from 75% to less than 1%. Furthermore, the synergistic effect of temperature and pH substantially lowered the cell-specific rates of glucose and glutamine consumption as well as lactate and ammonium production. The optimized culture conditions also led to an increase of the cell-specific rates of recombinant Epo-Fc production, thus resulting in a more economic bioprocess. PMID:27050504

  20. Synaptic plasticity and gravity: Ultrastructural, biochemical and physico-chemical fundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmann, H.; Slenzka, K.; Körtje, K. H.; Hilbig, R.

    On the basis of quantitative disturbances of the swimming behaviour of aquatic vertebrates (``loop-swimming'' in fish and frog larvae) following long-term hyper-g-exposure the question was raised whether or not and to what extent changes in the gravitational vector might influence the CNS at the cellular level. Therefore, by means of histological, histochemical and biochemical analyses the effect of 2-4 x g for 9 days on the gross morphology of the fish brain, and on different neuronal enzymes was investigated. In order to enable a more precise analysis in future-μg-experiments of any gravity-related effects on the neuronal synapses within the gravity-perceptive integration centers differentiated electron-microscopical and electronspectroscopical techniques have been developed to accomplish an ultrastructural localization of calcium, a high-affinity Ca2+-ATPase, creatine kinase and cytochrome oxidase. In hyper-g animals vs. 1-g controls, a reduction of total brain volume (15 %), a decrease in creatine kinase activity (20 %), a local increase in cytochrome oxidase activity, but no differences in Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase activities were observed. Ultrastructural peculiarities of synaptic contact formation in gravity-related integration centers (Nucleus magnocellularis) were found. These results are discussed on the basis of a direct effect of hyper-gravity not only on the gravity-sensitive neuronal integration centers but possibly also on the physico-chemical properties of the lipid bilayer of neuronal membranes in general.