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Sample records for biphasic human insulin

  1. Biphasic Insulin Aspart 30/70: Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Compared With Once-Daily Biphasic Human Insulin and Basal-Bolus Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Tim; Heinemann, Lutz; Hövelmann, Ulrike; Brauns, Bianca; Nosek, Leszek; Haahr, Hanne L.; Olsen, Klaus J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Pharmacological profiles of biphasic insulin aspart 30/70 (BIAsp 30) once daily (OD), twice daily (b.i.d.), and three times daily (t.i.d.) were compared with other insulin regimens in two crossover glucose clamp studies of insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGNS AND METHODS Study 1 consisted of BIAsp 30 OD, b.i.d., and t.i.d. versus biphasic human insulin 30/70 (BHI 30), OD (n = 24). Study 2 examined BIAsp 30 t.i.d. versus basal-bolus therapy (insulin glargine OD plus insulin glulisine t.i.d.) (n = 24). Pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) were investigated over 24 h. RESULTS Study 1: PK and PD were markedly different between BIAsp 30 OD and BHI 30 OD: the maximum insulin concentration and glucose infusion rate (GIR) were higher for BIAsp 30; time to maximum metabolism was 1.7 h sooner for BIAsp 30. Study 2: both regimens showed three distinct prandial-related GIR peaks. GIR 24-h area under the curve for BIAsp t.i.d. was higher than for basal-bolus therapy: 2,585.2 vs. 2,289.2 mg/kg. CONCLUSIONS BIAsp had pharmacological advantages over BHI. BIAsp t.i.d. had a similar PD profile to basal-bolus therapy. PMID:19487640

  2. Insulin therapy and body weight: benefits of biphasic human insulin analogue NovoMix 30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E V Surkova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Body weight (BW excess is a characteristic problem for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM both as its pathogenetic feature and as a side effect of blood glucose lowering therapy. In the latter case reduction of glycosuria and frequent hypoglycemic events are primarily blamed for BW gain, but additional factors like direct effect of insulin on lipogenesis and influence of its supraphysiologic levels on regulation of appetite via CNS structures are also under discussion.Advances of the last years have brought new hope due to introduction of drug classes that do not affect BW. However, fraction of patients dependent on exogenous insulin shows stable trend for growth. Deterioration of β-cell secretory capacity makes insulin an ultimately indispensable tool in the foreseeable future. As so, insulin therapy modalities with minimal impact on BW are preferable. In this regard human insulin analogues of both rapid and prolonged action have certain advantages.Current article addresses influence of pre-mixed insulin preparation NovoMix 30 (Novo Nordisk, Denmark on BW. A summary of several studies of substantial duration (up to 3 years suggests a neutral effect on BW in various categories of T2DM patients (including obese and elder patients.Therapy with pre-mixed preparations is an adequately safe and effective T2DM treatment modality and is advantageous for patients in whom BW gain is particularly unfavorable.

  3. Clinical experience of switching from biphasic human insulin to biphasic insulin aspart 30 in Indian patients with type 2 diabetes in the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the following study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of switching from biphasic human insulin (BHI to biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30 in Indian patients with type 2 diabetes as a sub-analysis of the 24-week, non-interventional A 1 chieve study. Materials and Methods: Indian patients switching from BHI to BIAsp 30 based on the physicians′ decisions were included. The primary outcome was the incidence of serious adverse drug reactions (SADRs, including major hypoglycemic events; secondary outcomes included changes in hypoglycemia in the 4 weeks preceding baseline and week 24 and changes from baseline to week 24 in glycated hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c , fasting plasma glucose (FPG, postprandial plasma glucose (PPPG, body weight and quality of life (QoL. Results: Overall, 1976 patients (mean ± standard deviation age, 55.1 ± 10.6 years and diabetes duration, 10.1 ± 5.3 years on a mean pre-study BHI dose of 0.44 ± 0.18 U/kg were included. The mean BIAsp 30 dose was 0.43 ± 0.17 U/kg at baseline and 0.44 ± 0.17 U/kg at week 24. No SADRs were reported. The proportion of patients reporting overall hypoglycemic events reduced significantly from baseline to week 24 (15.0% vs. 2.9%, P < 0.0001. The mean HbA 1c level improved significantly from 9.1 ± 1.4% at baseline to 7.5 ± 1.0% at week 24, along with improvements in FPG, post-breakfast PPPG and QoL (P < 0.001. The mean body weight decreased from 69.3 ± 10.8 kg at baseline to 69.1 ± 10.4 kg at week 24 (P = 0.003. Conclusion: Switching from BHI to BIAsp 30 therapy was well-tolerated and was associated with improved glycemic control.

  4. Insulin therapy and body weight: benefits of biphasic human insulin analogue NovoMix 30

    OpenAIRE

    E V Surkova

    2013-01-01

    Body weight (BW) excess is a characteristic problem for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) both as its pathogenetic feature and as a side effect of blood glucose lowering therapy. In the latter case reduction of glycosuria and frequent hypoglycemic events are primarily blamed for BW gain, but additional factors like direct effect of insulin on lipogenesis and influence of its supraphysiologic levels on regulation of appetite via CNS structures are also under discussion.Advances of the last years...

  5. Intensification of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes: a retrospective, non- interventional cohort study of patients treated with insulin glargine or biphasic human insulin in daily clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of intensification of insulin treatment with insulin glargine and biphasic human insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes on concomitant therapy with oral antidiabetic drugs (OAD) in daily clinical practice. Methods A retrospective multicentre parallel two-arm study included 301 patients with type 2 diabetes already on treatment with biphasic human insulin twice daily (bd) in combination with OAD. Data were collected retrospectively from 142 patients who had been switched from biphasic human insulin to insulin glargine in a period of 6–12 months prior to their inclusion (active group) and compared to data collected retrospectively from 159 patients who continued treatment with biphasic human insulin bd for the same time period (control group). Our primary objective was to examine the efficacy of the two treatments, assessed as change in HbA1c. Secondary objectives were to examine for changes in fasting blood glucose (FBG), body weight, treatment with OAD or fast-acting insulin and safety, by assessing the frequency and severity of hypoglycaemic episodes. Results At the end of the study there was a significant reduction in HbA1c in both arms. The least squares (LS) mean [(95% confidence intervals (CI)] reduction in HbA1c was -1.13 (-0.96 to -1.30)% in the active and -0.59 (-0.41to -0.77)% in the control group [LS mean treatment difference 0.53 (0.31-0.76)%, p < 0.001]. Similarly, fasting blood glucose declined significantly in both arms. The LS mean decline in FBG was -47.02 (-37.89 to -56.14) mg/dl in the active and -19.73 (-11.57 to -27.89) mg/dl in the control group [LS mean treatment difference 27.85 (15.74-39.95) mg/dl, p < 0.001]. No significant difference in hypoglycaemic episodes and in body weight was found. In the active group, more patients received rapid-acting pre-meal insulin and used insulin secretagogues drugs. Conclusions Glargine alone or in combination with fast acting insulin

  6. The Impact of Initiating Biphasic Human Insulin 30 Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes Patients After Failure of Oral Antidiabetes Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yunjuan; Hou, Xuhong; Zhang, Lei; Pan, Jiemin; Cai, Qingxia; Bao, Yuqian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The present study evaluated the efficacy of biphasic human insulin 30 (BHI 30) in type 2 diabetes patients who had failed in therapy with two or more oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs). Methods This open-label, nonrandomized, 4-month, multicenter, clinical observational study was conducted in Shanghai, China. A total of 660 insulin-naive type 2 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] ≥7.5%), despite treatment with two or more OADs for more than 6 months, were recruited and received BHI 30 monotherapy or BHI 30 plus OAD(s) (metformin only, α-glucosidase inhibitor only, or both). Results Among the 660 subjects, 644 completed the 4-month study. At the end of the study, the median level of HbA1c decreased by 2.0% (from 9.1% to 7.0%) in the BHI 30 monotherapy group and also 2.0% (from 9.5% to 7.3%) in the BHI 30 plus OAD group. More patients achieved the HbA1c <7.0% target in the BHI 30 monotherapy group than in the BHI 30 plus OAD(s) group (47.9% vs. 35.3%, P=0.002). Compared with the expenses of the prior treatment strategy, the median daily cost decreased by 39.8% (4.5 yuan, Chinese RMB) at the end point in the BHI 30 monotherapy group but increased by 20.0% (2.2 yuan) in the BHI 30 plus OAD(s) group (P<0.0001). Moreover, patients in the BHI 30 plus OAD(s) group had fewer minor hypoglycemic episodes than in the BHI 30 monotherapy group (mean of 1.06 vs. 2.77 per patient per year, P<0.0001). Conclusions Short-term BHI 30 therapy can improve glycemic control in insulin-naive type 2 diabetes patients after failure of two or more OADs. With higher baseline glucose level, the BHI 30 plus OAD(s) group had lower pharmacoeconomic efficacy than the BHI 30 monotherapy group despite having fewer hypoglycemia events. PMID:22047050

  7. Comparison of thrice daily biphasic human insulin (30/70) versus basal detemir & bolus aspart in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus – A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundar, G.; Bhansali, Anil; Walia, Rama; Dutta, Pinaki; Upreti, Vimal

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Conventionally, biphasic human insulin (30/70, BHI) is used twice daily for the management of patients with diabetes. However, this regimen is suboptimal to control post-lunch and/or pre-dinner hyperglycaemia in some patients. This study was undertaken to compare the efficacy and safety of thrice-daily biphasic human insulin (30/70, BHI) versus basal detemir and bolus aspart (BB) in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: In this open labelled randomized pilot study, 50 patients with uncontrolled T2DM on twice-daily BHI and insulin sensitizers were randomized either to BHI thrice-daily or BB regimen. HbA1c, six point plasma glucose profile, increment in insulin dose, weight gain, hypoglycaemic episodes and cost were compared between the two treatment groups at the end of 12 wk. Results: Mean HbAlc (±SD) decreased from 9.0±0.9 per cent at randomization to 7.9±0.8 per cent in BHI (P<0.001) and from 9.4±1.3 to 8.2±1.0 per cent in BB regimen (P<0.001) after 12 wk of treatment. The mean (±SEM) weight gain in patients in the BHI regimen was 1.5±0.33 kg compared to 1.4±0.34 kg in the BB regimen. Insulin dose increment at 12 wk was significantly more in the BB regimen 0.46±0.32 U/kg/day compared to 0.15±0.21 U/kg/day in the BHI regimen (P<0.001). The incidence of major as well as minor hypoglycaemic episodes was not different in both the regimen. The BB regimen was more expensive than the BHI regimen (P<0.001). Interpretation & conclusions: The thrice daily biphasic human insulin regimen is non-inferior to the basal bolus insulin analogue regimen in terms efficacy and safety in patients with poorly controlled T2DM. However, these data require further substantiation in large long term prospective studies. PMID:22382187

  8. Switching from human insulin to biphasic insulin aspart 30 treatment gets more patients with type 2 diabetes to reach target glycosylated hemoglobin 《7%: the results from the China cohort of the PRESENT study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yan; GUO Xiao-hui

    2010-01-01

    Background The clinical importance of glycaemic control in patients with diabetes has been well established. This study aimed to explore twice-daily biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30) for insulin initiation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who had poor glycaemic control with human insulins (His). We use data from a Chinese cohort of the PRESENT study.Methods In the 3-month study, Chinese subjects with T2DM started insulin therapy with BIAsp 30 in routine care. Glycaemic control was measured by glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and posting plasma glucose (PPG). The safety assessment included hypoglycaemia and other adverse events.Results A total of 1989 subjects previously treated with His were switched to BIAsp 30 for 3-month treatment. Mean HbA1c, FPG and PPG were significantly improved after the therapy. The overall rate of hypoglycaemia decreased at the end of the trial except for the patients previously treated with long-acting insulin. Most of the events were minor and diurnal hypoglycaemia. Only one serious adverse drug reaction (SADR), a local hypersensitivity, was reported. The majority of the patients (296.7%) and physicians (≥84.7%) were either satisfied or very satisfied with the treatment using BIAsp 30 compared with previous HI therapy.Conclusion The BIAsp 30 treatment improved both glycaemic control and patients' satisfaction without increasing hypoglycaemia in T2DM subjects inadequately controlled by Hls.

  9. Bioavailability and variability of biphasic insulin mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeborg, Tue; Rasmussen, Christian Hove; Mosekilde, Erik;

    2012-01-01

    Absorption of subcutaneously administered insulin is associated with considerable variability. Some of this variability was quantitatively explained for both soluble insulin and insulin suspensions in a recent contribution to this journal (Søeborg et al., 2009). In the present article......, the absorption kinetics for mixtures of insulins is described. This requires that the bioavailability of the different insulins is considered. A short review of insulin bioavailability and a description of the subcutaneous depot thus precede the presentation of possible mechanisms associated with subcutaneous...... insulin degradation. Soluble insulins are assumed to be degraded enzymatically in the subcutaneous tissue. Suspended insulin crystals form condensed heaps that are assumed to be degraded from their surface by invading macrophages. It is demonstrated how the shape of the heaps affects the absorption...

  10. Subject‐driven titration of biphasic insulin aspart 30 twice daily is non‐inferior to investigator‐driven titration in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with premixed human insulin: A randomized, open‐label, parallel‐group, multicenter trial

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wenying; Zhu, Lvyun; Meng, Bangzhu; Yu LIU; Wang, Wenhui; Ye, Shandong; Sun, Li; Miao, Heng; Guo, Lian; Wang, Zhanjian; Lv, Xiaofeng; Li, Quanmin; Ji, Qiuhe; Zhao, Weigang; Yang, Gangyi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims/Introduction The present study was to compare the efficacy and safety of subject‐driven and investigator‐driven titration of biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30) twice daily (BID). Materials and Methods In this 20‐week, randomized, open‐label, two‐group parallel, multicenter trial, Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled by premixed/self‐mixed human insulin were randomized 1:1 to subject‐driven or investigator‐driven titration of BIAsp 30 BID, in combinati...

  11. Efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart and biphasic insulin lispro mix in patients with type 2 diabetes: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) represents an escalating burden worldwide, particularly in China and India. Compared with Caucasians, Asian people with diabetes have lower body mass index, increased visceral adiposity, and postprandial glucose (PPG)/insulin resistance. Since postprandial hyperglycemia contributes significantly to total glycemic burden and is associated with heightened cardiovascular risk, targeting PPG early in T2D is paramount. Premixed insulin regimens are widely used in Asia due to their convenience and effectiveness. Data from randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30) with biphasic insulin lispro mix (LM 25/50) and versus other insulin therapies or oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) in T2D demonstrated that BIAsp 30 and LM 25/50 were associated with similar or greater improvements in glycemic control versus comparator regimens, such as basal-bolus insulin, in insulin-naÏve, and prior insulin users. Studies directly comparing BIAsp 30 and LM 25 provided conflicting glycemic control results. Safety data generally showed increased hypoglycemia and weight gain with premixed insulins versus basal-bolus insulin or OADs. However, large observational trials documented improvements in glycated hemoglobin, PPG, and hypoglycemia with BIAsp 30 in multi-ethnic patient populations. In summary, this literature review demonstrates that premixed insulin regimens are an appropriate and effective treatment choice in T2D. PMID:27186543

  12. Efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart and biphasic insulin lispro mix in patients with type 2 diabetes: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D represents an escalating burden worldwide, particularly in China and India. Compared with Caucasians, Asian people with diabetes have lower body mass index, increased visceral adiposity, and postprandial glucose (PPG/insulin resistance. Since postprandial hyperglycemia contributes significantly to total glycemic burden and is associated with heightened cardiovascular risk, targeting PPG early in T2D is paramount. Premixed insulin regimens are widely used in Asia due to their convenience and effectiveness. Data from randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30 with biphasic insulin lispro mix (LM 25/50 and versus other insulin therapies or oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs in T2D demonstrated that BIAsp 30 and LM 25/50 were associated with similar or greater improvements in glycemic control versus comparator regimens, such as basal–bolus insulin, in insulin-naÏve, and prior insulin users. Studies directly comparing BIAsp 30 and LM 25 provided conflicting glycemic control results. Safety data generally showed increased hypoglycemia and weight gain with premixed insulins versus basal–bolus insulin or OADs. However, large observational trials documented improvements in glycated hemoglobin, PPG, and hypoglycemia with BIAsp 30 in multi-ethnic patient populations. In summary, this literature review demonstrates that premixed insulin regimens are an appropriate and effective treatment choice in T2D.

  13. Comparison of a soluble co-formulation of insulin degludec/insulin aspart vs biphasic insulin aspart 30 in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niskanen, Leo; Leiter, Lawrence A; Franek, Edward;

    2012-01-01

    Insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) is a soluble co-formulation of insulin degludec (70%) and insulin aspart (IAsp: 30%). Here, we compare the efficacy and safety of IDegAsp, an alternative IDegAsp formulation (AF: containing 45% IAsp), and biphasic IAsp 30 (BIAsp 30)....

  14. Autoantibodies against human insulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkin, T J; Nicholson, S.

    1984-01-01

    Sera from 680 non-diabetic subjects with suspected autoimmune disease were screened for 13 different antibodies. Of the 582 sera found to contain these antibodies, nine bound insulin in an IgG specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (micro ELISA). Four of the sera bound human, porcine, and bovine insulins and five bound exclusively human insulin. "Cold" human, porcine, and bovine insulins each displaced, in a dose dependent manner, the four sera which bound all three insulins, but only hum...

  15. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Kolkata cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Majumder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Kolkata, India. Results: A total of 576 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 417, insulin detemir (n = 70, insulin aspart (n = 55, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 19 and other insulin combinations (n = 15. At baseline, glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 8.3% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 8.6% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −1.3%, insulin users: −1.4%. SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events or episodes did not occur in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  16. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Hyderabad cohort of the A1chieve study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, R.; Mehrotra, Ravi; Sastry, N. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The A1chieve, a multicentric (28 countries), 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726) in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Hyderabad, India. Results: A total of 1249 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 893), insulin detemir (n = 158), insulin aspart (n = 124), basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 19) and other insulin combinations (n = 54). At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA1c: 9.0%) and insulin user (mean HbA1c: 9.5%) groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA1c (insulin naïve: −0.9%, insulin users: −1.1%). SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events or episodes did not occur in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia. PMID:24404501

  17. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Qatar cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hasan Daghash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Qatar. Results: A total of 91 patients were enrolled in the study. Two insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Study patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 88, insulin detemir (n = 2, and other insulin combinations (n = 1. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 10.9% and insulin users (mean HbA 1 c: 9.1% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, all the study groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −1.8%, insulin users: −1.3%. Major hypoglycaemia did not occur in the study patients. SADRs were reported in 1.4% of insulin users. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  18. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Rajasthan cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Rajasthan, India. Results: A total of 477 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 340, insulin detemir (n = 90, insulin aspart (n = 37, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 7 and other insulin combinations (n = 2. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 8.3% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 8.4% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −0.9%, insulin users: −1.2%. Major hypoglycaemic events decreased from 0.5 events/patient-year to 0.0 events/patient-year in insulin naïve group while no change from baseline (1.3 events/patients-year was observed for insulin users. SADRs were not reported in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  19. Biphasic modulation of insulin receptor substrate-1 during goitrogenesis

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    R. Grozovsky

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 is the main intracellular substrate for both insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I receptors and is critical for cell mitogenesis. Thyrotropin is able to induce thyroid cell proliferation through the cyclic AMP intracellular cascade; however, the presence of either insulin or IGF-I is required for the mitogenic effect of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH to occur. The aim of the present study was to determine whether thyroid IRS-1 content is modulated by TSH in vivo. Strikingly, hypothyroid goitrous rats, which have chronically high serum TSH levels (control, C = 2.31 ± 0.28; methimazole (MMI 21d = 51.02 ± 6.02 ng/mL, N = 12 rats, when treated with 0.03% MMI in drinking water for 21 days, showed significantly reduced thyroid IRS-1 mRNA content. Since goiter was already established in these animals by MMI for 21 days, we also evaluated IRS-1 expression during goitrogenesis. Animals treated with MMI for different periods of time showed a progressive increase in thyroid weight (C = 22.18 ± 1.21; MMI 5d = 32.83 ± 1.48; MMI 7d = 31.1 ± 3.25; MMI 10d = 33.8 ± 1.25; MMI 14d = 45.5 ± 2.56; MMI 18d = 53.0 ± 3.01; MMI 21d = 61.9 ± 3.92 mg, N = 9-15 animals per group and serum TSH levels (C = 1.57 ± 0.2; MMI 5d = 9.95 ± 0.74; MMI 7d = 10.38 ± 0.84; MMI 10d = 17.72 ± 1.47; MMI 14d = 25.65 ± 1.23; MMI 18d = 35.38 ± 3.69; MMI 21d = 31.3 ± 2.7 ng/mL, N = 9-15 animals per group. Thyroid IRS-1 mRNA expression increased progressively during goitrogenesis, being significantly higher by the 14th day of MMI treatment, and then started to decline, reaching the lowest values by the 21st day, when a significant reduction was detected. In the liver of these animals, however, a significant decrease of IRS-1 mRNA was detected after 14 days of MMI treatment, a mechanism probably involved in the insulin resistance that occurs in hypothyroidism. The increase in IRS-1 expression during goitrogenesis may represent an

  20. Human ultralente insulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Holman, R R; Steemson, J; Darling, P; Reeves, W G; Turner, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The greater solubility of human insulin and its possible faster action have led to doubts about whether a sufficiently long acting formulation could be produced to provide a basal supply for diabetics. In a double blind crossover study in 18 diabetics human ultralente insulin was as effective as beef ultralente insulin in controlling basal plasma glucose concentrations (median 5.7 mmol/l (103 mg/100 ml) with human and 6.3 mmol/l (114 mg/100 ml) with beef ultralente insulin respectively). Ther...

  1. P-glycoprotein regulating biphasic insulin secretion in rat pancreatic beta cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Yun-zhao; LI Dai-qing; SUN Fu-jun; LI Li; YU De-min

    2009-01-01

    Background A 65-kD mdr1(multi-drug resistance protein 1,P-glycoprotein)-like protein has been suggested to be the regulatory protein to the chloride channel protein 3(CIC-3)mediating insulin granules acidification and release in mouse pancreatic beta cells.But the protein has not been deeply investigated.In this study,we identified existence of the 65-kda protein in rat islets and preliminarily explored its biological functions.Methods Total RNAs of rat kidneys served as positive controls,and pancreas,islets and INS-1 cells were extracted for reverse-transcript PCR(RT-PCR),respectively.The cDNAs were run with specific primers selected from the mRNA of abcblb encoding P-glycoprotein.All PCR products were visualized in agarose gel electrophoresis and sequenced.Homogenates of rat islets and INS-1 cells were applied to SDS-PAGE.P-glycoprotein was detected by a specific monoclonal antibody,C219.Biphasic insulin release was measured in static incubations of rat islets with radioimmunology assay.Results Compared with positive control,expression of the P-glycoprotein mRNA segments were detected in the islets,INS-1 cells and pancreas.Sequence analysis confirmed that the PCR products were matched with mRNA of P-glycoprotein.A 65-kda protein was recognized by the antibody in the islets homogenate but not in that of INS-1 cells in Western-blotting.Instead,the homogenate of INS-1 cells contained a 160-kda protein recognized by the antibody.Insulin secretion of rat islets were stimulated by high glucose(16.7mmol/L),and showed biphasic curve during 60-minute incubation.After co-incubation with cyclosporine A(CsA),specific inhibitor to P-glycoprotein,the second phase of insulin secretion was reduced significantly while the first phase was not influenced.Conclusions The 65-kda protein expressed in rat islets is most likely a mini-P-glycoprotein.It may play a key role regulating biphasic insulin release.

  2. Insulin enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in healthy humans

    OpenAIRE

    Bouche, Clara; Lopez, Ximena; Fleischman, Amy; Cypess, Aaron M.; O'Shea, Sheila; Stefanovski, Darko; Bergman, Richard N.; Rogatsky, Eduard; Stein, Daniel T.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2010-01-01

    Islet β-cells express both insulin receptors and insulin-signaling proteins. Recent evidence from rodents in vivo and from islets isolated from rodents or humans suggests that the insulin signaling pathway is physiologically important for glucose sensing. We evaluated whether insulin regulates β-cell function in healthy humans in vivo. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was assessed in healthy humans following 4-h saline (low insulin/sham clamp) or isoglycemic-hyperinsulinemic (high insulin) c...

  3. Binding of insulin to rat pancreatic islets: comparison between pancreatic human insulin and biosynthetic human insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verspohl, E.J.; Ammon, H.P.

    Human pancreatic insulin, biosynthetic human insulin (BHI), and pork insulin were compared in terms of their binding characteristics to insulin receptors on rat pancreatic islets. There was no difference in binding or on biologic effect, i.e., ability to inhibit insulin secretion.

  4. Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Short Acting Humulin N NPH Human Insulin (Human Insulin Isophane Suspension) Intermediate Acting Novolin N NPH Human Insulin (Human Insulin Isophane Suspension) Intermediate Acting Lantus Insulin Glargine Long Acting ...

  5. Human insulin genome sequence map, biochemical structure of insulin for recombinant DNA insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Mungantiwar, Ashish A

    2003-08-01

    Insulin is a essential molecule for type I diabetes that is marketed by very few companies. It is the first molecule, which was made by recombinant technology; but the commercialization process is very difficult. Knowledge about biochemical structure of insulin and human insulin genome sequence map is pivotal to large scale manufacturing of recombinant DNA Insulin. This paper reviews human insulin genome sequence map, the amino acid sequence of porcine insulin, crystal structure of porcine insulin, insulin monomer, aggregation surfaces of insulin, conformational variation in the insulin monomer, insulin X-ray structures for recombinant DNA technology in the synthesis of human insulin in Escherichia coli. PMID:12769691

  6. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  7. Insulin allergy treated with human insulin (recombinant DNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leeuw, I; Delvigne, C; Bekaert, J

    1982-01-01

    Two insulin-dependent diabetic subjects treated with pork and beef insulin during a period of 6 mo developed severe local reactions. Both patients had an important allergic history (asthma, urticaria, drug reactions, rhinitis). Skin-testing revealed type I allergy to beef and pork insulin. Specific IgE-insulin binding was demonstrated with both insulins. After negative skin testing with NPH Lilly human insulin (recombinant DNA), treatment was started with this compound and remained successful during a period of 6-9 mo. In one patient a local reaction occurred when regular human insulin (recombinant DNA) was added to NPH in order to obtain better control. Skin testing with regular human insulin was positive, but not with NPH human insulin alone. The mechanism of this phenomenon remains unsolved. PMID:6765530

  8. Human insulin prepared by recombinant DNA techniques and native human insulin interact identically with insulin receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Keefer, L M; Piron, M A; DE MEYTS, P.

    1981-01-01

    Human insulin synthesized from A and B chains separately produced in Escherichia coli from cloned synthetic genes (prepared by the Eli Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN) was characterized by examining its interaction with human cultured lymphocytes, human circulating erythrocytes in vitro, and isolated rat fat cells. The binding behavior of the biosynthetic insulin with human cells was indistinguishable from that of native human or porcine insulins, with respect to affinity, assoc...

  9. A superactive insulin: [B10-aspartic acid]insulin(human).

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, G P; Burke, G. T.; Katsoyannis, P G

    1987-01-01

    The genetic basis for a case of familial hyperproinsulinemia has been elucidated recently. It involves a single point mutation in the proinsulin gene resulting in the substitution of aspartic acid for histidine-10 of the B chain of insulin. We have synthesized a human insulin analogue, [AspB10]insulin, corresponding to the mutant proinsulin and evaluated its biological activity. [AspB10]Insulin displayed a binding affinity to insulin receptors in rat liver plasma membranes that was 534 +/- 14...

  10. Insulin Human Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control pills); oral medications for diabetes such as pioglitazone (Actos, in Actoplus Met, in Duetact, in Oseni) or ... or lower legs sudden weight gain extreme drowsiness confusion dizziness Insulin inhalation may increase the risk that ...

  11. Initiating or Switching to Biphasic Insulin Aspart 30/70 Therapy in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. An Observational Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Leif; Almdal, Thomas; Eiken, Pia;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate tolerability and glycemic control over 26 weeks in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) who initiated insulin with, or switched to, biphasic insulin aspart 30/70 (BIAsp 30) in routine clinical care. METHODS: This was a non-randomized, non-interventional, open-label, obser......OBJECTIVE: To investigate tolerability and glycemic control over 26 weeks in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) who initiated insulin with, or switched to, biphasic insulin aspart 30/70 (BIAsp 30) in routine clinical care. METHODS: This was a non-randomized, non-interventional, open...... adverse drug reactions (SADR), glycemic parameters and hypoglycemic events were obtained from patients' notes, patients' diaries and recall, and transferred to case report forms by physicians at baseline (during 4 weeks prior to BIAsp 30 therapy) and after 12 and 26 weeks of treatment. RESULTS: 421...

  12. Improved safety and effectiveness of biphasic insulin aspart 30 in type 2 diabetic patients inadequately controlled on human insulin: Chinese subgroup analysis from an international, multicenter A1chieve observational study%人胰岛素血糖控制不佳患者改用双时相门冬胰岛素30的治疗结果——A1chieve国际多中心观察性研究中国亚组结果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭永德; 陈兵; 庄晓明; 李玉坤; 俞芳; 韩萍; 成志峰; 沈建国; 李蓬秋

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate clinical safety and effectiveness of biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30)in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) inadequately controlled on their previous human insulin regimens.Methods A1 chieve was a prospective,open-label,24-week observational study in patients with T2DM initiating insulin analogues therapy in routine clinical practice.In the present study,the data of patients who shifted previous treatment with human insulin to treatment with BIAsp 30 were summarized and analyzed.Eligible patients who had decided to start BIAsp 30 based on physicians' clinical judgments were enrolled into this study from 130 hospitals in China.The treatment regimen and dosing adjustment were decided at physician's discretion.Results A total of 1 588 Chinese patients with T2DM inadequately controlled on their previous human insulin regimens were treated with BIAsp 30 in this study,and 75.0% of these patients were treated with premixed human insulin before the study.The incidences of total,nocturnal,and major hypoglyceamia (events · patient-1 · year-1) were 6.54,1.84,0.43 at baseline and 2.36,0.45,0 at week 24(all P<0.01).HbA1cdecreased from (8.9 ± 2.3) % at baseline to (7.0 ± 1.1) % at week 24 (P<0.05).The percentage of patients achieving HbA1C <7.0 % increased from 17.8% at baseline to 54.8% by week 24.Fasting plasma glucose and postprandial 2 h plasma glucose levels were decreased by (-2.3 ± 3.3) and (-3.8 ± 4.4) mmol/L,respectively (both P <0.05).Conclusions Treatment with BIAsp 30 in Chinese patients with T2DM,who were inadequately controlled on previous human insulin regimens,is associated with marked improvement in glycaemic control without evidence of clinically significant safety or tolerability problems.%目的 观察人胰岛素改用双时相门冬胰岛素30治疗后的疗效和安全性.方法 A1chieve 是一项国际多中心、前瞻性、观察性、开放标签、非干预性、为期24周的胰

  13. Controlled and reversible induction of differentiation and activation of adult human hepatocytes by a biphasic culture technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcus K.H. Auth; Wolf-Otto Bechstein; Roman A. Blaheta; Kim A. Boost; Kerstin Leckel; Wolf-Dietrich Beecken; Tobias Engl; Dietger Jonas; Elsie Oppermann; Philip Hilgard; Bernd H. Markus

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Clinical application of human hepatocytes (HC) is hampered by the progressive loss of growth and differentiation in vitro. The object of the study was to evaluate the effect of a biphasic culture technique on expression and activation of growth factor receptors and differentiation of human adult HC.METHODS: Isolated HC were sequentially cultured in a hormone enriched differentiation medium (DM) containing nicotinamide, insulin, transferrin, selenium, and dexamethasone or activation medium (AM) containing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), andgranulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF). Expression, distribution and activation of the HC receptors (MET and EGFR) and the pattern of characteristic cytokeratin (CK) filaments were measured by fluorometry, confocal microscopy and Western blotting.RESULTS: In the biphasic culture system, HC underwent repeated cycles of activation (characterized by expression and activation of growth factor receptors) and re-differentiation (illustrated by distribution of typical filaments CK-18 but low or absent expression of CK-19). In AM increased expression of MET and EGFR was associated with receptor translocation into the cytoplasm and induction of atypical CK-19. In DM low expression of MET and EGFR was localized on the cell membrane and CK-19 was reduced. Receptor phosphorylation required embedding of HC in collagen type Ⅰ gel.CONCLUSION: Control and reversible modulation of growth factor receptor activation of mature human HC can be accomplishedin vitro, when defined signals from the extracellular matrix and sequential growth stimuli are provided. The biphasic technique helps overcome dedifferentiation, which occurs during continuous stimulation by means of growth factors.

  14. Cutaneous allergy to human (recombinant DNA) insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, L C; Metzger, B E; Patterson, R

    1984-03-16

    p6 report two cases of cutaneous allergy to human (recombinant DNA) insulin. Each patient had a history of systemic allergic reactions to porcine insulin and was at least as reactive to human as to porcine insulin by end-point cutaneous titration. Both patients' insulin allergy was managed with animal insulins and both have done well. Our experience with these two patients indicates that human insulin (rDNA) should not be expected to be efficacious in all patients with systemic allergy to insulin. PMID:6366262

  15. Human insulin: DNA technology's first drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The, M J

    1989-11-01

    The history, biologic activity, and immunogenicity of human insulin are described. Recombinant human insulin first entered clinical trials in humans in 1980. At that time, the A and B chains of the insulin molecule were produced separately and then combined by chemical techniques. Since 1986, a different recombinant process has been used. The human genetic coding for proinsulin is inserted into Escherichia coli cells, which are then grown by fermentation to produce proinsulin. The connecting peptide is cleaved enzymatically from proinsulin to produce human insulin. Studies indicate that there are no important differences between pork insulin and human insulin in terms of therapeutic efficacy and disposition after intravenous administration. Recombinant human insulin has a faster onset of action and lower immunogenicity than pork or beef insulin. Diabetic patients may have an improvement in glucose concentrations when their therapy is switched from animal-source insulin to human insulin. Such a change usually requires a dosage adjustment, which must be determined by a physician. Pharmacists are responsible for educating patients concerning all insulin products and for preventing patients from interchanging insulin products. The availability of human insulin as the first pharmaceutical product manufactured through recombinant DNA technology, however, has had little effect on the pharmacist's role in the care of such patients. The production of human insulin through recombinant DNA technology represents an important advance in the treatment of patients with diabetes. PMID:2690608

  16. Superactive insulin: [B10-aspartic acid]insulin(human)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genetic basis for a case of familial hyperproinsulinemia has been elucidated recently. It involves a single point mutation in the proinsulin gene resulting in the substitution of aspartic acid for histidine-10 of the B chain of insulin. The authors have synthesized a human insulin analogue, [Asp/sup B10/] insulin, corresponding to the mutant proinsulin and evaluated its biological activity. [Asp/sup B10/] Insulin displayed a binding affinity to insulin receptors in rat liver plasma membranes that was 534 +- 146% relative to the natural hormone. In lipogenesis assays, the synthetic analogue exhibited a potency that was 435 +- 144% relative to insulin, which is statistically not different from its binding affinity. Reversed-phase HPLC indicated that the synthetic analogue is more apolar than natural insulin. They suggest that the observed properties reflect changes in the conformation of the analogue relative to natural insulin, which results in a stronger interaction with the insulin receptor. Thus, a single substitution of an amino acid residue of human insulin has resulted in a superactive hormone

  17. Superactive insulin: (B10-aspartic acid)insulin(human)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, G.P.; Burke, G.T.; Katsoyannis, P.G.

    1987-09-01

    The genetic basis for a case of familial hyperproinsulinemia has been elucidated recently. It involves a single point mutation in the proinsulin gene resulting in the substitution of aspartic acid for histidine-10 of the B chain of insulin. The authors have synthesized a human insulin analogue, (Asp/sup B10/) insulin, corresponding to the mutant proinsulin and evaluated its biological activity. (Asp/sup B10/) Insulin displayed a binding affinity to insulin receptors in rat liver plasma membranes that was 534 +- 146% relative to the natural hormone. In lipogenesis assays, the synthetic analogue exhibited a potency that was 435 +- 144% relative to insulin, which is statistically not different from its binding affinity. Reversed-phase HPLC indicated that the synthetic analogue is more apolar than natural insulin. They suggest that the observed properties reflect changes in the conformation of the analogue relative to natural insulin, which results in a stronger interaction with the insulin receptor. Thus, a single substitution of an amino acid residue of human insulin has resulted in a superactive hormone.

  18. Effects of biphasic, basal-bolus or basal insulin analogue treatments on carotid intima-media thickness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby-Christensen, Louise; Vaag, Allan; Tarnow, Lise;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of 3 insulin analogue regimens on change in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes. DESIGN AND SETTING: Investigator-initiated, randomised, placebo-controlled trial with a 2×3 factorial design, conducted at 8 hospitals in Denmark....... PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: Participants with type 2 diabetes (glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c)≥7.5% (≥58 mmol/mol), body mass index >25 kg/m(2)) were, in addition to metformin versus placebo, randomised to 18 months open-label biphasic insulin aspart 1-3 times daily (n=137) versus insulin aspart 3 times daily...... adverse events were other prespecified outcomes. RESULTS: Carotid IMT change did not differ between groups (biphasic -0.009 mm (95% CI -0.022 to 0.004), aspart+detemir 0.000 mm (95% CI -0.013 to 0.013), detemir -0.012 mm (95% CI -0.025 to 0.000)). HbA1c was more reduced with biphasic (-1.0% (95% CI -1.2...

  19. A simulation study of the reaction of human heart to biphasic electrical shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seemann Gunnar

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article presents a study, which examines the effects of biphasic electrical shocks on human ventricular tissue. The effects of this type of shock are not yet fully understood. Animal experiments showed the superiority of biphasic shocks over monophasic ones in defibrillation. A mathematical computer simulation can increase the knowledge of human heart behavior. Methods The research presented in this article was done with different models representing a three-dimensional wedge of ventricular myocardium. The electrophysiology was described with Priebe-Beuckelmann model. The realistic fiber twist, which is specific to human myocardium was included. Planar electrodes were placed at the ends of the longest side of the virtual cardiac wedge, in a bath medium. They were sources of electrical shocks, which varied in magnitude from 0.1 to 5 V. In a second arrangement ring electrodes were placed directly on myocardium for getting a better view on secondary electrical sources. The electrical reaction of the tissue was generated with a bidomain model. Results The reaction of the tissue to the electrical shock was specific to the initial imposed characteristics. Depolarization appeared in the first 5 ms in different locations. A further study of the cardiac tissue behavior revealed, which features influence the response of the considered muscle. It was shown that the time needed by the tissue to be totally depolarized is much shorter when a biphasic shock is applied. Each simulation ended only after complete repolarization was achieved. This created the possibility of gathering information from all states corresponding to one cycle of the cardiac rhythm. Conclusions The differences between the reaction of the homogeneous tissue and a tissue, which contains cleavage planes, reveals important aspects of superiority of biphasic pulses. ...

  20. Rapamycin has a biphasic effect on insulin sensitivity in C2C12 myotubes due to sequential disruption of mTORC1 and mTORC2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan eYe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1, improves insulin sensitivity in acute studies in vitro and in vivo by disrupting a negative feedback loop mediated by S6 kinase. We find that rapamycin has a clear biphasic effect on insulin sensitivity in C2C12 myotubes, with enhanced responsiveness during the first hour that declines to almost complete insulin resistance by 24-48 hours. We and others have recently observed that chronic rapamycin treatment induces insulin resistance in rodents, at least in part due to disruption of mTORC2, an mTOR-containing complex that is not acutely sensitive to the drug. Chronic rapamycin treatment may also impair insulin action via the inhibition of mTORC1-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis and activity, which could result in a buildup of lipid intermediates that are known to trigger insulin resistance. We confirmed that rapamycin inhibits expression of PGC-1α, a key mitochondrial transcription factor, and acutely reduces respiration rate in myotubes. However, rapamycin did not stimulate phosphorylation of PKCθ, a central mediator of lipid-induced insulin resistance. Instead, we found dramatic disruption of mTORC2, which coincided with the onset of insulin resistance. Selective inhibition of mTORC1 or mTORC2 by shRNA-mediated knockdown of specific components (Raptor and Rictor, respectively confirmed that mitochondrial effects of rapamycin are mTORC1-dependent, whereas insulin resistance was recapitulated only by knockdown of mTORC2. Thus, mTORC2 disruption, rather than inhibition of mitochondria, causes insulin resistance in rapamycin-treated myotubes, and this system may serve as a useful model to understand the effects of rapamycin on mTOR signaling in vivo.

  1. CHEMICAL DERIVATION OF HUMAN INSULIN SUPERAGONISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The role of three highly conserved insulin residues TyrB26 was studied to better understand the relationship between insulin and receptor from rat adipose tissue plasma membranes. Insulin analogues with a single amino acid substitution or single N-methylation of the peptide bond in the position B26 were all shortened in the C-terminus of the B-chain by four amino acids. The effect of modifications was followed by the binding to the insulin receptor. From our results, we can deduce several conclusions: (1) the replacement of tyrosine in the position B26 by histidine, [N-MeHisB26]-des-tetrapeptide-(B27~B30)-insulin-B26-amide and [N-MeGluB26]-des-tetrapeptide- (B27~B30)-insulin-B26-amide, have no significant effect on the binding affinity and they show binding affinity 105%, 190% and 208%, respectively, of that of human insulin; (2) [AadB26] -des-tetrapeptide-(B27~B30)-insulin-B26-amide and [Phe(4-carboxyB26)]-des-tetrapeptide- (B27~B30)-insulin-B26-amide affect the potency highly positively in vitro studies; they show binding affinity 529 and 289 %, respectively, of that of human insulin.

  2. CHEMICAL DERIVATION OF HUMAN INSULIN SUPERAGONISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Baoquan; KANG Wei; YAN Junkai

    2007-01-01

    The role of three highly conserved insulin residues TyrB26 was studied to better understand the relationship between insulin and receptor from rat adipose tissue plasma membranes. Insulin analogues with a single amino acid substitution or single N-methylation of the peptide bond in the position B26 were all shortened in the C-terminus of the B-chain by four amino acids. The effect of modifications was followed by the binding to the insulin receptor. From our results, we can deduce several conclusions: (1) the replacement of tyrosine in the position B26 by histidine,[N-MeHisB26]-des-tetrapeptide-(B27~B30)-insulin-B26-amide and [N-MeGluB26]-des-tetrapeptide(B27~B30)-insulin-B26-amide, have no significant effect on the binding affinity and they show binding affinity 105%, 190% and 208%, respectively, of that of human insulin; (2) [AadB26]-des-tetrapeptide-(B27~B30)-insulin-B26-amide and [Phe(4-carboxyB26)]-des-tetrapeptide(B27~B30)-insulin-B26-amide affect the potency highly positively in vitro studies; they show binding affinity 529 and 289 %, respectively, of that of human insulin.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor block insulin binding and inhibit insulin action.

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, R A; Cassell, D J; Wong, K. Y.; Maddux, B A; Goldfine, I D

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies to the insulin receptor were prepared in BALB/c mice by immunization with IM-9 human lymphocytes, a cell type that has a large number of plasma membrane insulin receptors. The spleens of these mice were then removed, and their lymphocytes were fused to a mouse myeloma cell line, FO cells. After screening over 1,200 resulting hybrids, one stable hybrid was obtained that produced IgG1 antibodies directed towards the insulin receptor. This antibody blocked 125I-labeled insulin binding...

  4. Characteristics of human erythrocyte insulin binding sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    Insulin and human erythrocyte cell membrane interactions were studied with respect to binding and dissociation. The per cent of specific binding of 125I-labeled insulin to erythrocytes was directly proportional to the cell concentration. The optimum pH for binding was 8.1. The initial binding rate was directly proportional to, and the steady state insulin binding was reversely proportional to, the incubation temperature. The per cent of specific binding of 125I-labeled insulin was 12.10 +/- 1...

  5. Steroid biotransformations in biphasic systems with Yarrowia lipolytica expressing human liver cytochrome P450 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yarrowia lipolytica efficiently metabolizes and assimilates hydrophobic compounds such as n-alkanes and fatty acids. Efficient substrate uptake is enabled by naturally secreted emulsifiers and a modified cell surface hydrophobicity and protrusions formed by this yeast. We were examining the potential of recombinant Y. lipolytica as a biocatalyst for the oxidation of hardly soluble hydrophobic steroids. Furthermore, two-liquid biphasic culture systems were evaluated to increase substrate availability. While cells, together with water soluble nutrients, are maintained in the aqueous phase, substrates and most of the products are contained in a second water-immiscible organic solvent phase. Results For the first time we have co-expressed the human cytochromes P450 2D6 and 3A4 genes in Y. lipolytica together with human cytochrome P450 reductase (hCPR or Y. lipolytica cytochrome P450 reductase (YlCPR. These whole-cell biocatalysts were used for the conversion of poorly soluble steroids in biphasic systems. Employing a biphasic system with the organic solvent and Y. lipolytica carbon source ethyl oleate for the whole-cell bioconversion of progesterone, the initial specific hydroxylation rate in a 1.5 L stirred tank bioreactor was further increased 2-fold. Furthermore, the product formation was significantly prolonged as compared to the aqueous system. Co-expression of the human CPR gene led to a 4-10-fold higher specific activity, compared to the co-overexpression of the native Y. lipolytica CPR gene. Multicopy transformants showed a 50-70-fold increase of activity as compared to single copy strains. Conclusions Alkane-assimilating yeast Y. lipolytica, coupled with the described expression strategies, demonstrated its high potential for biotransformations of hydrophobic substrates in two-liquid biphasic systems. Especially organic solvents which can be efficiently taken up and/or metabolized by the cell might enable more

  6. Treatment satisfaction and quality of life with insulin glargine plus insulin lispro compared with NPH insulin plus unmodified human insulin in people with Type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwell , SG; Stephens, JW; Witthaus, E; Home, PD; Bradley, Clare

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE— The purpose of this study was to compare quality of life and treatment satisfaction using insulin glargine plus insulin lispro with that using NPH insulin plus unmodified human insulin in adults with type 1 diabetes managed with multiple injection regimens. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— As part of a 32-week, five-center, two-way crossover study in 56 individuals with type 1 diabetes randomized to evening insulin glargine plus mealtime insulin lispro or to NPH insulin (once or twi...

  7. Initiating therapy or switching to biphasic insulin aspart improves glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes: an Indian experience from the A1chieve study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A; Sharma, S K; Rajput, R; Unnikrishnan, A G

    2013-01-01

    Biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30) has been used in patients for almost a decade; There is a wealth of knowledge from clinical trials to document its efficacy and safety and suggest that BIAsp 30 is an option for initiation and intensification of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The A1chieve was a non-interventional study that explored the safety and effectiveness of initiating or switching to insulin analogues in routine clinical practice in more than 60,000 patients from 28 different countries. In this manuscript, we discuss the findings from the subgroup of the Indian cohort who were treated with BIAsp 30. In a cohort of 15287 who were on BIAsp 30, 12645 (83%) were insulin naive and 2642 (17%) had been on insulin therapy earlier. Glycaemic parameters were high at baseline. Mean (SD) HbA1c was 9.2% (1.3) in the these and was comparable in the insulin naive and insulin experienced groups. After 24 weeks of therapy with BIAsp 30, there were reductions in HbA1c in both the insulin naive group, [-1.8 (1.3)] and insulin experienced group [-1.6 (1.3)]. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) levels were also reduced significantly from baseline [-3.4 (2.7) and -4.8 (3.8) mmol/L, respectively, p < 0.05). Overall, hypoglycaemia decreased from 1.33 events/patient years at baseline to 0.19 events/patient years at 24 weeks. There was also an increase in quality of life score as evaluated by EQ-5D questionnaire. Initiating insulin therapy with or switching to BIAsp 30 in patients with poor glycaemic control leads to an improvement in glycaemic profile with no major hypoglycaemia or clinically significant weight gain. Therapy with BIAsp 30 also improves the quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  8. Defective insulin response of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase in insulin-resistant humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Kida, Y; Nyomba, B L; Bogardus, C; Mott, D M

    1991-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated glycogen synthase activity in human muscle correlates with insulin-mediated glucose disposal and is reduced in insulin-resistant subjects. Inhibition of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase) is considered as a possible mechanism of insulin action for glycogen synthase activation. In this study, we investigated the time course of insulin action on human muscle A-kinase activity during a 2-h insulin infusion in 13 insulin-sensitive (group S) and 7 insulin-resista...

  9. Effect of insulin on human erythrocyte metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin effects on the metabolism of human erythrocytes have been demonstrated. Under hypoxic conditions, glucose utilization was increased in insulin treated red cell suspensions at pH 7.32 and pH 7.66, but not at pH 7.48. A dose-response study at pH 7.31 revealed that glucose utilization was inhibited at lower insulin concentrations, i.e., 0.2 nM, whereas the simulatory effects were seen at relatively higher levels, i.e., 5.8-6.3 nM. Lactate production, and cellular content of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, fructose 1,6-biphosphate and triose 3-phosphate were unchanged in the presence of this hormone. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity was increased, but the amount of change was too small to account for the additional glucose used by the insulin-treated cells. Under ambient air conditions, insulin inhibited glucose utilization by dibutyryl-adenosine 3'-5'-cyclic monophosphate-treated red cells but lactate to production was unchanged. Insulin appeared to inhibit 32P incorporation into some, but not all, of the membrane proteins phosphorylated in intact cells incubated in the presence of dibutyryl-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. Insulin did not alter the rate or distribution of 32P incorporation into membrane proteins in the absence of this nucleotide. This studies suggest that the erythrocyte may be a useful model for future investigations into the molecular mechanism of insulin action

  10. Human insulin and porcine insulin in the treatment of diabetic children: comparison of metabolic control and insulin antibody production.

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, N P; Johnston, D I; Reeves, W G; Murphy, M A

    1983-01-01

    Semisynthetic human insulin and highly purified porcine insulin were compared in a double blind crossover study in 21 diabetic children. Glycosylated haemoglobin values at the end of four month treatment periods were higher after treatment with human insulin than after treatment with porcine insulin (mean 15.7% (SD 2.3%) v 14.2% (2.3%); p less than 0.01). Higher fasting blood glucose concentrations occurred during treatment with human insulin than with porcine insulin (mean 12.0 (SD 2.1) v 11...

  11. Influence of insulin antibodies on pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of recombinant human and highly purified beef insulins in insulin dependent diabetics.

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, R S; Cowan, P.; Di Mario, U.; Elton, R A; Clarke, B F; Duncan, L J

    1985-01-01

    Sixteen insulin dependent diabetics of long standing, with undetectable fasting plasma C peptide concentrations, and eight non-diabetic controls were each infused intravenously with biosynthetic human and highly purified beef insulin (1 mU/kg/min) while euglycaemia was maintained by a Biostator. No difference was observed between the two insulins in respect of insulin pharmacokinetics or biological action. The diabetics showed appreciable insulin resistance, manifested by a 40% reduction in t...

  12. Human insulin: study of safety and efficacy in man.

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, D R; Jones, M. K.; Hayes, T M; Heding, L G; Alberti, K G; Home, P. D.; Burrin, J M; Newcombe, R G

    1981-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of a new highly purified neutral soluble human insulin produced by conversion of porcine insulin was compared with a highly purified neutral soluble porcine insulin in six normal men. The insulins were administered by subcutaneous injection at a dose of 0.075 U/kg body weight. Somatostatin was infused during the experiment to suppress endogenous insulin secretin. No difference was found in the plasma glucose, insulin, or metabolite responses. Thus the potency, onset, a...

  13. Insulin is ubiquitous in extrapancreatic tissues of rats and humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenzweig, J L; Havrankova, J; Lesniak, M A; Brownstein, M; Roth, J

    1980-01-01

    Insulin has been detected, at levels higher than those in plasma, in a broad range of extrapancreatic tissues in both rats and humans. Rat liver insulin was shown to be indistinguishable from genuine insulin by radioimmunoassay, Sephadex chromatography, bioassay, and antibody neutralization. Liver insulin (like brain insulin) was unchanged in ob/ob mice, in rats treated with streptozotocin, or in fasted rats, despite marked alterations in pancreatic secretion of insulin and in liver content o...

  14. Molecular Characterisation of Long-Acting Insulin Analogues in Comparison with Human Insulin, IGF-1 and Insulin X10

    OpenAIRE

    Bo F Hansen; Glendorf, Tine; Hegelund, Anne C.; Lundby, Anders; Lützen, Anne; Slaaby, Rita; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard

    2012-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis There is controversy with respect to molecular characteristics of insulin analogues. We report a series of experiments forming a comprehensive characterisation of the long acting insulin analogues, glargine and detemir, in comparison with human insulin, IGF-1, and the super-mitogenic insulin, X10. Methods We measured binding of ligands to membrane-bound and solubilised receptors, receptor activation and mitogenicity in a number of cell types. Results Detemir and glargine each ...

  15. Human isophane or lente insulin? A double blind crossover trial in insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

    OpenAIRE

    Gibb, D M; Foot, A B; B. May; Parish, H.; Strang, S; Grant, D B; Dunger, D B

    1990-01-01

    Fifty two children with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus were randomised to receive human isophane or lente insulin preparations in combination with soluble insulin in a double blind trial. Patients were seen every two months, and crossed over after four months of treatment. Control assessed by glycated haemoglobin was significantly lower in children on human isophane insulin, but fasting blood glucose and fructosamine concentrations and the number of episodes of hypoglycaemia were similar...

  16. Recombinant DNA derived monomeric insulin analogue: comparison with soluble human insulin in normal subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Vora, J P; Owens, D R; Dolben, J; Atiea, J A; Dean, J. D.; Kang, S; Burch, A; Brange, J.

    1988-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the rate of absorption from subcutaneous tissue and the resulting hypoglycaemic effect of iodine-125 labelled soluble human insulin and a monomeric insulin analogue derived by recombinant DNA technology. DESIGN--Single blind randomised comparison of equimolar doses of 125I labelled soluble human insulin and insulin analogue. SETTING--Study in normal people at a diabetes research unit and a university department of medical physics. SUBJECTS--Seven healthy male volunteers ...

  17. Biphasic effects of minoxidil on the proliferation and differentiation of normal human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyera, N; Galey, I; Bernard, B A

    1997-01-01

    Minoxidil is the most used drug with proved effects in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA), but little is known about its pharmacological activity and target cells in hair follicles. As AGA is characterized by follicle atrophy, accelerated hair cycles and hair fiber thinning, we postulated that keratinocyte proliferation/differentiation is affected and we tested Minoxidil's effects on those parameters. Normal human keratinocytes (NHK) of follicular or epidermal origin were cultured in the presence of Minoxidil (0, 0.1, 1, 10, 100, 1,000 microM) during 5-8 days in various media (high-/low-calcium content, with or without serum). Proliferation was assessed by mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity (XTT), BrdU incorporation, lysosome numeration (neutral red incorporation) and total protein dosage. Drug-induced cytotoxicity was measured by lactate dehydrogenase release in culture supernatant, and pro-differentiating effects were evaluated by relative involucrin expression (ELISA dosage). On this basis, we showed that Minoxidil had biphasic effects on the proliferation and differentiation of NHK: Minoxidil stimulated NHK proliferation at micromolar doses, while antiproliferative, pro-differentiative and partially cytotoxic effects were observed with millimolar concentrations. We can hypothesize that Minoxidil hypertrichotic activity in vivo is possibly mediated by the maintenance of proliferative potential in follicular keratinocytes precociously committed to differentiation. PMID:9413895

  18. Electrochemically triggered release of human insulin from an insulin-impregnated reduced graphene oxide modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorescu, Florina; Rolland, Laure; Ramarao, Viswanatha; Abderrahmani, Amar; Mandler, Daniel; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2015-09-28

    An electrochemical insulin-delivery system based on reduced graphene oxide impregnated with insulin is described. Upon application of a potential pulse of -0.8 V for 30 min, up to 70 ± 4% of human insulin was released into a physiological medium while preserving its biological activity. PMID:26257079

  19. Insulin requirements in patients with diabetes and declining kidney function: differences between insulin analogues and human insulin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulozik, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In diabetic nephropathy the decline of renal function causes modifications of the insulin and carbohydrate metabolism resulting in changed insulin requirements. The aim of the present study was to identify potential differences in the requirements of human insulin and various insulin analogues in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and renal dysfunction. Methods: The insulin requirements of 346 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus under everyday life circumstances were assessed in an observational study. Simultaneously, laboratory parameters were measured and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the formula by Cockcroft–Gault. Medical history and concomitant medication were recorded. The insulin requirements of long- and short-acting insulin were tested for a relationship with the eGFR and laboratory parameters. Results: The dosage of long-acting human insulin did not show any relation to eGFR. In contrast, a strong positive relation between dosage and renal function was found for insulin glargine and insulin detemir. After classification according to renal function, the insulin dosage at eGFR less than 60 ml/min was 29.7% lower in glargine-treated and 27.3% lower in detemir-treated patients compared with eGFR greater than 90 ml/min. Considering the whole range of eGFR, short-acting human insulin did not show a relation with renal function. Only after classification according to renal function was a dose reduction found for human insulin at eGFR less than 60 ml/min. In contrast, requirements of insulin lispro were significantly related to eGFR over the whole range of eGFR. At eGFR less than 60 ml/min the insulin dosage was 32.6% lower than at eGFR greater than 90 ml/min. The requirements of insulin aspart did not show any association with the eGFR. Conclusions: Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus show different insulin requirements according to the renal function depending on the applied insulin. This finding is

  20. Insulin Analogs Versus Human Insulin in the Treatment of Patients With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Umpierrez, Guillermo E.; Jones, Sidney; Smiley, Dawn; Mulligan, Patrick; Keyler, Trevor; Temponi, Angel; Semakula, Crispin; Umpierrez, Denise; Peng, Limin; Cerón, Miguel; Robalino, Gonzalo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the safety and efficacy of insulin analogs and human insulins both during acute intravenous treatment and during the transition to subcutaneous insulin in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a controlled multicenter and open-label trial, we randomly assigned patients with DKA to receive intravenous treatment with regular or glulisine insulin until resolution of DKA. After resolution of ketoacidosis, patients treated with intravenous r...

  1. THE EFFECT OF CONTINUOUS SUBCUTANEOUS INSULIN INFUSION TREATMENT, INSULIN ANALOG, AND HUMAN INSULIN OF CHILDREN WITH DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Petkova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of  continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII to multiple daily insulin injection (MDI either with analogues or with human insulin, based on the achieved therapeutic results such as changes in glycated hemoglobin level (HbA1c in the various therapies. The study was performed with children with type-1 diabetes in Bulgaria. The objective of this study was to serve for the Bulgarian National Health Fund (NHIF.Methods: A combined retrospective and prospective study was performed at the Endocrinology diabetes and genetic diseases clinic.51 children with type-1 diabetes were observed for 7 months diveded into three group: Group 1- on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII; Group 2- on multiple daily insulin analogues injections (MDI and Group 3 – on human insulin (HI.Patient demographic data, age, sex, weight, duration of disease, HbA1c – values before the start of the study and after the end of the observation and type of treatment (CSII; MDI or HI were observed. Cost-effectiveness, sensitivity and statistical analyses are applied to studied long-term therapeutic results.Results: The three groups of observed children do not differ statistically in age and gender. Most of the participants in Group 1 and Group 2 have suffered from diabetes from 5,6 years. The duration of diabetes was lower in the group of human insulin. All studied children are treated. By all of them the results of the treatment improved, but in the Group 1 the improvement of HbA1c is the highest. The average improvement of HbA1c in the Group 1 after the CSII introduction is 1.85, while after the application of analogue insulin is 0,59 and 0,28 respectively in the Group 3 after the treatment on human insulin.The cost of insulin pump, consumables- infusion set and insulin reservoir, blood glucose monitoring system, strips, needles and insulin cost was calculated.The total cost ot the treatment of diabetes

  2. Metabolism of human insulin after subcutaneous administration: A possible means to uncover insulin misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Andreas; Brinkkötter, Paul; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2015-10-15

    The misuse of insulin for performance enhancement in sport or as toxic agent has frequently been reported in the past. In contrast to synthetic insulin analogues, the administration of recombinant human insulin is hardly recognized by mass spectrometry. The present study was designed to uncover the misuse of recombinant human insulin for doping control purposes as well as for forensic applications. It is hypothesized that an altered metabolite profile of circulating insulin prevails after subcutaneous administration due to exposure of insulin to epidermal proteases. In vitro experiments with skin tissue lysates (S9 fraction and microsomes), different biological fluids (urine, serum, plasma) and recombinant human insulin were performed and the deriving metabolites were characterized by liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Afterwards, authentic blood samples of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus and a control group of healthy humans were analysed. Therefore, a method using protein precipitation, ultrafiltration and antibody-coated magnetic beads for purification with subsequent separation by nano-scale liquid chromatography coupled a Q Exactive mass spectrometer was applied. Several metabolites of insulin with C-terminally truncated sequences of the B-chain (and A-chain in minor extent) were identified within this study. Here, the DesB30 human insulin represents the major metabolite in all experiments. This metabolite is frequently found in urine samples due to degradation processes and, thus, disqualifies this matrix for the intended purposes. In contrast, blood samples do commonly not contain DesB30 insulin, which was corroborated by data obtained from the control group. In post-administration blood samples, minute but distinct amounts (approx. 50 pg mL(-1)) of DesB30 insulin were found and suggest the use of this analyte as potential marker for subcutaneous human insulin administration, supporting the attempts to

  3. Generation and characterization of human insulin-releasing cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Joffé Elisa; Machado Marcel CC; Buchanan Cecilia; Terra Letícia F; Stigliano Iván; Krogh Karin; Peters Maria G; Labriola Leticia; Puricelli Lydia; Sogayar Mari C

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The in vitro culture of insulinomas provides an attractive tool to study cell proliferation and insulin synthesis and secretion. However, only a few human beta cell lines have been described, with long-term passage resulting in loss of insulin secretion. Therefore, we set out to establish and characterize human insulin-releasing cell lines. Results We generated ex-vivo primary cultures from two independent human insulinomas and from a human nesidioblastosis, all of which w...

  4. Cancer Incidence Among Those Initiating Insulin Therapy With Glargine Versus Human NPH Insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Stürmer, Til; Marquis, M. Alison; Zhou, Haibo; Meigs, James B; Lim, Soo; Blonde, Lawrence; MacDonald, Eileen; Wang, Ray; LaVange, Lisa M.; Pate, Virginia; Buse, John B.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To add to the evidence on comparative long-term effects of insulin analog glargine versus human NPH insulin on the risk for cancer. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We identified cohorts of initiators of glargine and human NPH without an insulin prescription during the prior 19 months among patients covered by the Inovalon Medical Outcomes Research for Effectiveness and Economics Registry (MORE2 Registry) between January 2003 and December 2010. Patients were required to have a second pre...

  5. Transgenic mice overexpressing human G972R IRS-1 show impaired insulin action and insulin secretion.

    OpenAIRE

    Hribal, Marta L.; Tornei, F; Pujol, A.; Menghini, R.; Barcaroli, D; Lauro, D; Amoruso, R; Lauro, R.; Bosch, F.; Sesti, G; Federici, M

    2008-01-01

    Molecular scanning of human insulin receptor substrate (Irs) genes revealed a single lrs1 prevalent variant, a glycine to arginine change at codon 972 (G972R); previous in vitro studies had demonstrated that the presence of this variant results in an impaired activation of the insulin signalling pathway, while human studies gave controversial results regarding its role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and related diseases. To address in vivo impact of this IRS-1 variant on whole body...

  6. Monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor that activate glucose transport but not insulin receptor kinase activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Forsayeth, J R; Caro, J F; Sinha, M K; Maddux, B A; Goldfine, I D

    1987-01-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the alpha subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited 125I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate ...

  7. Intracellular insulin in human tumors: examples and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Radulescu Razvan T

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Insulin is one of the major metabolic hormones regulating glucose homeostasis in the organism and a key growth factor for normal and neoplastic cells. Work conducted primarily over the past 3 decades has unravelled the presence of insulin in human breast cancer tissues and, more recently, in human non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). These findings have suggested that intracellular insulin is involved in the development of these highly prevalent human tumors. A potential mechanism...

  8. Insulin Augmentation of Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion Is Impaired in Insulin-Resistant Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Halperin, Florencia; Lopez, Ximena; Manning, Raquel; Kahn, C. Ronald; Kulkarni, Rohit Narayan; Goldfine, Allison Braunwald

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, the latter possibly caused by a defect in insulin signaling in β-cells. We hypothesized that insulin’s effect to potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) would be diminished in insulin-resistant persons. To evaluate the effect of insulin to modulate GSIS in insulin-resistant compared with insulin-sensitive subjects, 10 participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), 11 with T2D, a...

  9. Synthesis and Identification of FITC-Insulin Conjugates Produced Using Human Insulin and Insulin Analogues for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Dolly; Joan Taylor, M; Tomlins, Paul; Sahota, Tarsem S

    2016-03-01

    Human insulin was fluorescently labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and the conjugate species produced were identified using high performance liquid chromatography and electrospray mass spectroscopy. Mono-labelled FITC-insulin conjugate (A1 or B1) was successfully produced using human insulin at short reaction times (up to 5 h) however the product always contained some unlabelled native human insulin. As the reaction time was increased over 45 h, no unlabelled native human insulin was present and more di-labelled FITC-insulin conjugate (A1B1) was produced than mono-labelled conjugate with the appearance of tri-labelled conjugate (A1B1B29) after 20 h reaction time. The quantities switch from mono-labelled to di-labelled FITC-insulin conjugate between reaction times 9 and 20 h. In the presence of phenol or m-cresol, there appears to be a 10 % decrease in the amount of mono-labelled conjugate and an increase in di-labelled conjugate produced at lower reaction times. Clinically used insulin analogues present in commercially available preparations were successfully fluorescently labelled for future biomedical applications. PMID:26658795

  10. Human Insulin from Recombinant DNA Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Irving S.

    1983-02-01

    Human insulin produced by recombinant DNA technology is the first commercial health care product derived from this technology. Work on this product was initiated before there were federal guidelines for large-scale recombinant DNA work or commercial development of recombinant DNA products. The steps taken to facilitate acceptance of large-scale work and proof of the identity and safety of such a product are described. While basic studies in recombinant DNA technology will continue to have a profound impact on research in the life sciences, commercial applications may well be controlled by economic conditions and the availability of investment capital.

  11. Receptor binding of biosynthetic human insulin on isolated pig hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammeltoft, S.

    Biosynthetic human insulin (BHI) and pancreatic human insulin were compared with respect to receptor binding in a heterologous assay system: displacement of pork A14-/sup 125/I-monoiodoinsulin from receptors on pig hepatocytes. The concentrations of human insulin giving half-maximal displacement were identical for both preparations, i.e., 0.5 nM. Their relative potency was 1.01 +/- 0.14 (SD, N . 5), suggesting that biosynthetic and pancreatic human insulin exert the same biologic activity.

  12. Receptor binding of biosynthetic human insulin on isolated pig hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biosynthetic human insulin (BHI) and pancreatic human insulin were compared with respect to receptor binding in a heterologous assay system: displacement of pork A14-125I-monoiodoinsulin from receptors on pig hepatocytes. The concentrations of human insulin giving half-maximal displacement were identical for both preparations, i.e., 0.5 nM. Their relative potency was 1.01 +/- 0.14 (SD, N . 5), suggesting that biosynthetic and pancreatic human insulin exert the same biologic activity

  13. Insulin Analogs Versus Human Insulin in the Treatment of Patients With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umpierrez, Guillermo E.; Jones, Sidney; Smiley, Dawn; Mulligan, Patrick; Keyler, Trevor; Temponi, Angel; Semakula, Crispin; Umpierrez, Denise; Peng, Limin; Cerón, Miguel; Robalino, Gonzalo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the safety and efficacy of insulin analogs and human insulins both during acute intravenous treatment and during the transition to subcutaneous insulin in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a controlled multicenter and open-label trial, we randomly assigned patients with DKA to receive intravenous treatment with regular or glulisine insulin until resolution of DKA. After resolution of ketoacidosis, patients treated with intravenous regular insulin were transitioned to subcutaneous NPH and regular insulin twice daily (n = 34). Patients treated with intravenous glulisine insulin were transitioned to subcutaneous glargine once daily and glulisine before meals (n = 34). RESULTS There were no differences in the mean duration of treatment or in the amount of insulin infusion until resolution of DKA between intravenous treatment with regular and glulisine insulin. After transition to subcutaneous insulin, there were no differences in mean daily blood glucose levels, but patients treated with NPH and regular insulin had a higher rate of hypoglycemia (blood glucose <70 mg/dl). Fourteen patients (41%) treated with NPH and regular insulin had 26 episodes of hypoglycemia and 5 patients (15%) in the glargine and glulisine group had 8 episodes of hypoglycemia (P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Regular and glulisine insulin are equally effective during the acute treatment of DKA. A transition to subcutaneous glargine and glulisine after resolution of DKA resulted in similar glycemic control but in a lower rate of hypoglycemia than with NPH and regular insulin. Thus, a basal bolus regimen with glargine and glulisine is safer and should be preferred over NPH and regular insulin after the resolution of DKA. PMID:19366972

  14. Insulin-like substance and insulin-degrading complex of hemolysate of human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lysate of human erythrocytes was fractionated on gel-filtration resins of different types and immunoreactive insulin, the insulinase activity and the effect of individual fractions on the insulinase activity was determined in the fractions obtained. It was established that the hemolysate contains a complex of insulin-metabolizing compounds, including an insulin-like substance, insulinase, and an inhibitor and activator of the insulinase activity. The insulin-like substance coincided with native insulin in site of elution from a column of Sephadex G-50 and its concentration in the lysate exceeded that of insulin in the blood plasma. Insulinase, which has a molecular weight of about 100,000, cleaved [125I] insulin to fragments soluble in trichloroacetic acid, but had no effect on hypophyseal proteins and glycoprotein hormones. The insulinase activity was inhibited by low temperatures, atropine, and a newly discovered intraerythrocytic proteinase inhibitor, which also inhibits the serine proteinases trypsin and chymotrypsin. A substance eluted from a column of Sephadex G-100 in the region of low-molecular-weight substances increased the insulinase activity. The elution curve of substances with proteinase-inhibiting and insulinase-activating activities indicates that there is more than one inhibitory and activating factor. The results of the studies suggest that the insulin-degrading complex in human erythrocytes acts as a regulator of the insulin level in the blood plasma. It is also possible that the insulin-like substance is produced in the cytosol of the erythrocytes

  15. Human Insulin Modulation of Escherichia coli Adherence and Chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Klosowska

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli exhibited increased hydrophobicity and mannose-resistant epithelial cell adherence after growth in the presence of human insulin (2 µU mLˉ1 or 200 µUmLˉ1 insulin, respectively with glucose (100 mg dLˉ1. Capsule production and hemagglutination were unaffected by insulin and glucose. Chemotactic attraction to glucose as compared to insulin or glucose alone was enhanced by the presence of insulin. Insulin alone (200 µU mLˉ1 was a chemorepellent and inhibited flagellar tethering to glass. These findings indicate that human insulin can modulate E. coli’s expression of factors associated with pathogenesis in a manner that is modifiable by the presence of glucose.

  16. Structural stability in the 4-zinc human insulin hexamer.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, G.D.; Swenson, D. C.; Dodson, E J; Dodson, G. G.; Reynolds, C D

    1984-01-01

    X-ray studies on human insulins prepared by semisynthetic and biosynthetic methods have recently been undertaken. Human insulin differs from porcine insulin only at the COOH terminus of the B-chain. The present study reports the crystal structure of 4-zinc human insulin, which is used clinically as a slow-acting preparation. The structure has been refined, using 1.85-A resolution data, to a residual of 0.173. The unit cell is rhombohedral, space group R3, with hexagonal cell constants a = 80....

  17. Insulin resistance is associated with reduced fasting and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthase phosphatase activity in human skeletal muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Kida, Y; Esposito-Del Puente, A; Bogardus, C; Mott, D M

    1990-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated glycogen synthase activity in human skeletal muscle correlates with insulin-mediated glucose disposal rate (M) and is reduced in insulin-resistant subjects. We have previously reported reduced insulin-stimulated glycogen synthase activity associated with reduced fasting glycogen synthase phosphatase activity in skeletal muscle of insulin-resistant Pima Indians. In this study we investigated the time course for insulin stimulation of glycogen synthase and synthase phosphatas...

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor that activate glucose transport but not insulin receptor kinase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsayeth, J.R.; Caro, J.F.; Sinha, M.K.; Maddux, B.A.; Goldfine, I.D.

    1987-05-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the ..cap alpha.. subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated /sup 125/I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited /sup 125/I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor-mediated phosphorylation of exogenous substrates. However, like insulin, two of the three antibodies stimulated glucose transport in isolated human adipocytes. One antibody, on a molar basis, was as potent as insulin. These studies indicate, therefore, that monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor can mimic a major function of insulin without activating receptor kinase activity. They also raise the possibility that certain actions of insulin such as stimulation of glucose transport may not require the activation of receptor kinase activity.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor that activate glucose transport but not insulin receptor kinase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the α subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited 125I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor-mediated phosphorylation of exogenous substrates. However, like insulin, two of the three antibodies stimulated glucose transport in isolated human adipocytes. One antibody, on a molar basis, was as potent as insulin. These studies indicate, therefore, that monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor can mimic a major function of insulin without activating receptor kinase activity. They also raise the possibility that certain actions of insulin such as stimulation of glucose transport may not require the activation of receptor kinase activity

  20. Intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation and segregation in a rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a human insulin receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, J.R.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1988-05-05

    The cellular processing of insulin and insulin receptors was studied using a rat fibroblast cell line that had been transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene, expressing approximately 500 times the normal number of native fibroblasts insulin receptors. These cells bind and internalize insulin normally. Biochemically assays based on the selective precipitation by polyethylene glycol of intact insulin-receptor complexes but not of free intracellular insulin were developed to study the time course of intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation. Fibroblasts were incubated with radiolabeled insulin at 4/sup 0/C, and internalization of insulin-receptor complexes was initiated by warming the cells to 37/sup 0/C. Within 2 min, 90% of the internalized radioactivity was composed of intact insulin-receptor complexes. The dissociation of insulin from internalized insulin-receptor complexes was markedly inhibited by monensin and chloroquine. Furthermore, chloroquine markedly increased the number of cross-linkable intracellular insulin-receptor complexes, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. These findings suggest that acidification of intracellular vesicles is responsible for insulin-receptor dissociation. Physical segregation of dissociated intracellular insulin from its receptor was monitored. The results are consistent with the view that segregation of insulin and receptor occurs 5-10 min after initiation of dissociation. These studies demonstrate the intracellular itinerary of insulin-receptor complexes, including internalization, dissociation of insulin from the internalized receptor within an acidified compartment, segregation of insulin from the receptor, and subsequent ligand degradation.

  1. Intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation and segregation in a rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a human insulin receptor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular processing of insulin and insulin receptors was studied using a rat fibroblast cell line that had been transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene, expressing approximately 500 times the normal number of native fibroblasts insulin receptors. These cells bind and internalize insulin normally. Biochemically assays based on the selective precipitation by polyethylene glycol of intact insulin-receptor complexes but not of free intracellular insulin were developed to study the time course of intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation. Fibroblasts were incubated with radiolabeled insulin at 40C, and internalization of insulin-receptor complexes was initiated by warming the cells to 370C. Within 2 min, 90% of the internalized radioactivity was composed of intact insulin-receptor complexes. The dissociation of insulin from internalized insulin-receptor complexes was markedly inhibited by monensin and chloroquine. Furthermore, chloroquine markedly increased the number of cross-linkable intracellular insulin-receptor complexes, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. These findings suggest that acidification of intracellular vesicles is responsible for insulin-receptor dissociation. Physical segregation of dissociated intracellular insulin from its receptor was monitored. The results are consistent with the view that segregation of insulin and receptor occurs 5-10 min after initiation of dissociation. These studies demonstrate the intracellular itinerary of insulin-receptor complexes, including internalization, dissociation of insulin from the internalized receptor within an acidified compartment, segregation of insulin from the receptor, and subsequent ligand degradation

  2. Intracellular insulin in human tumors: examples and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulescu Razvan T

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Insulin is one of the major metabolic hormones regulating glucose homeostasis in the organism and a key growth factor for normal and neoplastic cells. Work conducted primarily over the past 3 decades has unravelled the presence of insulin in human breast cancer tissues and, more recently, in human non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC. These findings have suggested that intracellular insulin is involved in the development of these highly prevalent human tumors. A potential mechanism for such involvement is insulin's binding and inactivation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB which in turn is likely controlled by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE. This model and its supporting data are collectively covered in this survey in order to provide further insight into insulin-driven oncogenesis and its reversal through future anticancer therapeutics.

  3. Oral Insulin: A Comparison With Subcutaneous Regular Human Insulin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Kapitza, Christoph; Zijlstra, Eric; Heinemann, Lutz; Castelli, M. Cristina; Riley, Gary; Heise, Tim

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of an oral insulin (OI) formulation compared with subcutaneously injected regular human insulin (RHI). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Ten male patients with type 2 diabetes (means ± SD; A1C 7.0 ± 1.1%; BMI 28.3 ± 2.7 kg/m2) received either 300 units of insulin combined with 400 mg of delivery agent orally or 15 units RHI subcutaneously under isoglycemic clamp conditions. RESULTS Maximum insulin concentration was greater an...

  4. Mechanisms of human insulin resistance and thiazolidinedione-mediated insulin sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, D. D.; Hsiao, G.; Hsiao, A.; Yu, J. G.; Courtney, C. H.; J.M. Ofrecio; Chapman, J; Subramaniam, S

    2009-01-01

    Cellular and tissue defects associated with insulin resistance are coincident with transcriptional abnormalities and are improved after insulin sensitization with thiazolidinedione (TZD) PPARγ ligands. We characterized 72 human subjects by relating their clinical phenotypes with functional pathway alterations. We transcriptionally profiled 364 biopsies harvested before and after hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies, at baseline and after 3-month TZD treatment. We have identified molecula...

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Biphasic Insulin Aspart 30/70 in Type 2 Diabetes Suboptimally Controlled on Oral Antidiabetic Therapy in Korea: A Multicenter, Open-Label, Single-Arm Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kee-Ho Song; Jung Min Kim; Jung-Hyun Noh; Yongsoo Park; Hyun-Shik Son; Kyong Wan Min; Kyung Soo Ko

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate change in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), side effects, and quality of life (QOL) after a 16-week treatment period with Biphasic insulin aspart 30/70 (BIasp30) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who had been suboptimally controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs). Methods The study consisted of a 4-week titration period when concurrent OAD(s) were replaced with BIasp30 and followed by a 12-week maintenance period. All pat...

  6. Insulin antibodies in patients with type 2 diabetic receiving recombinant human insulin injection: A report of 12 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaolei; Ma, Xiaowen; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Xiuli; Xu, Xuling; Gong, Hui; Chen, Fengling; Sun, Junjie

    2015-12-01

    We report 12 cases of patients with type 2 diabetic receiving recombinant human insulin injection, who had uncontrolled hyperglycemia or frequent episodes of hypoglycemia, high levels of serum insulin and positive insulin antibodies. The clinical characteristics and insulin antibodies pharmacokinetics parameters were analyzed. After administration of glucocorticoids, changing insulin formulations or discontinuing the insulin and switching to oral antidiabetic agents, the level of insulin antibodies decreased and the plasma glucose restored. Thus, we recommend to identify the presence of high insulin antibodies in patients with type 2 diabetes who experience unexplained high plasma glucose or frequent reoccurrence of hypoglycemia. PMID:26607016

  7. Human gut microbes impact host serum metabolome and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn;

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a forerunner state of ischaemic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we show how the human gut microbiome impacts the serum metabolome and associates with insulin resistance in 277 non-diabetic Danish individuals. The serum metabolome of insulin-resistant individ......Insulin resistance is a forerunner state of ischaemic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we show how the human gut microbiome impacts the serum metabolome and associates with insulin resistance in 277 non-diabetic Danish individuals. The serum metabolome of insulin......-resistant individuals is characterized by increased levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which correlate with a gut microbiome that has an enriched biosynthetic potential for BCAAs and is deprived of genes encoding bacterial inward transporters for these amino acids. Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus...

  8. THE EFFECT OF CONTINUOUS SUBCUTANEOUS INSULIN INFUSION TREATMENT, INSULIN ANALOG, AND HUMAN INSULIN OF CHILDREN WITH DIABETES

    OpenAIRE

    Elina Petkova; Valentina Petkova; Guenka Petrova; Maya Konstantinova

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of  continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) to multiple daily insulin injection (MDI) either with analogues or with human insulin, based on the achieved therapeutic results such as changes in glycated hemoglobin level (HbA1c) in the various therapies. The study was performed with children with type-1 diabetes in Bulgaria. The objective of this study was to serve for the Bulgarian National Health Fund (NHIF).Methods: A combine...

  9. Mechanisms of human insulin resistance and thiazolidinedione-mediated insulin sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, D. D.; Hsiao, G.; Hsiao, A.; Yu, J. G.; Courtney, C. H.; Ofrecio, J. M.; Chapman, J.; Subramaniam, S.

    2009-01-01

    Cellular and tissue defects associated with insulin resistance are coincident with transcriptional abnormalities and are improved after insulin sensitization with thiazolidinedione (TZD) PPARγ ligands. We characterized 72 human subjects by relating their clinical phenotypes with functional pathway alterations. We transcriptionally profiled 364 biopsies harvested before and after hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies, at baseline and after 3-month TZD treatment. We have identified molecular and functional characteristics of insulin resistant subjects and distinctions between TZD treatment responder and nonresponder subjects. Insulin resistant subjects exhibited alterations in skeletal muscle (e.g., glycolytic flux and intramuscular adipocytes) and adipose tissue (e.g., mitochondrial metabolism and inflammation) that improved relative to TZD-induced insulin sensitization. Pre-TZD treatment expression of MLXIP in muscle and HLA-DRB1 in adipose tissue from insulin resistant subjects was linearly predictive of post-TZD insulin sensitization. We have uniquely characterized coordinated cellular and tissue functional pathways that are characteristic of insulin resistance, TZD-induced insulin sensitization, and potential TZD responsiveness. PMID:19841271

  10. Localization and synthesis of an insulin-binding region on human insulin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven regions of the alpha subunit of human insulin receptor (HIR) were synthesized and examined for their ability to bind radioiodinated insulin. A peptide representing one of these regions (namely, residues alpha 655-670) exhibited a specific binding activity for insulin. In quantitative radiometric titrations, the binding curves of 125I-labeled insulin to adsorbents of peptide alpha 655-670 and of purified placental membrane were similar or superimposable. The binding of radioiodinated insulin to peptide or to membrane adsorbents was completely inhibited by unlabeled insulin, and the inhibition curves indicated that the peptide and the membrane on the adsorbents had similar affinities. Synthetic peptides that were shorter (peptide alpha 661-670) or longer (peptide alpha 651-670) than the region alpha 655-670 exhibited lower insulin-binding activity. It was concluded that an insulin-binding region in the HIR alpha subunit resides within residues alpha 655-670. The results do not rule out the possibility that other regions of the alpha subunit may also participate in binding of HIR to insulin, with the region described here forming a face within a larger binding site

  11. Localization and synthesis of an insulin-binding region on human insulin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, S.; Sakata, S.; Atassi, M.Z. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Seven regions of the alpha subunit of human insulin receptor (HIR) were synthesized and examined for their ability to bind radioiodinated insulin. A peptide representing one of these regions (namely, residues alpha 655-670) exhibited a specific binding activity for insulin. In quantitative radiometric titrations, the binding curves of {sup 125}I-labeled insulin to adsorbents of peptide alpha 655-670 and of purified placental membrane were similar or superimposable. The binding of radioiodinated insulin to peptide or to membrane adsorbents was completely inhibited by unlabeled insulin, and the inhibition curves indicated that the peptide and the membrane on the adsorbents had similar affinities. Synthetic peptides that were shorter (peptide alpha 661-670) or longer (peptide alpha 651-670) than the region alpha 655-670 exhibited lower insulin-binding activity. It was concluded that an insulin-binding region in the HIR alpha subunit resides within residues alpha 655-670. The results do not rule out the possibility that other regions of the alpha subunit may also participate in binding of HIR to insulin, with the region described here forming a face within a larger binding site.

  12. Insulin degradation by adipose tissue is increased in human obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Rafecas Jorba, Immaculada; Fernández López, José Antonio; Salinas, Isabel; X. Formiguera Sala; Remesar Betlloch, Xavier; Foz Sala, M. (Màrius); Alemany, Marià

    1995-01-01

    White adipose tissue samples from obese and lean patients were used for the estimation ofinsulin protease and insulin:glutathione transhydrogenase using 1251-labeled insulin. There was no activity detected in the absence of reduced glutathione, which indicates that insulin is cleaved in human adipose "tissue through reduction of the disulfide bridge between the chains. O bese patients showed higher transhydrogenase activity (per U tissue protein wt, per U tissue wt, and in the total adipose t...

  13. Molecular Basis of Catalytic Chamber-assisted Unfolding and Cleavage of Human Insulin by Human Insulin-degrading Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolopoulou, Marika; Guo, Qing; Malito, Enrico; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen; (UC); (UIC)

    2009-06-02

    Insulin is a hormone vital for glucose homeostasis, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays a key role in its clearance. IDE exhibits a remarkable specificity to degrade insulin without breaking the disulfide bonds that hold the insulin A and B chains together. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry to obtain high mass accuracy, and electron capture dissociation (ECD) to selectively break the disulfide bonds in gas phase fragmentation, we determined the cleavage sites and composition of human insulin fragments generated by human IDE. Our time-dependent analysis of IDE-digested insulin fragments reveals that IDE is highly processive in its initial cleavage at the middle of both the insulin A and B chains. This ensures that IDE effectively splits insulin into inactive N- and C-terminal halves without breaking the disulfide bonds. To understand the molecular basis of the recognition and unfolding of insulin by IDE, we determined a 2.6-A resolution insulin-bound IDE structure. Our structure reveals that IDE forms an enclosed catalytic chamber that completely engulfs and intimately interacts with a partially unfolded insulin molecule. This structure also highlights how the unique size, shape, charge distribution, and exosite of the IDE catalytic chamber contribute to its high affinity ( approximately 100 nm) for insulin. In addition, this structure shows how IDE utilizes the interaction of its exosite with the N terminus of the insulin A chain as well as other properties of the catalytic chamber to guide the unfolding of insulin and allowing for the processive cleavages.

  14. Acute pain induces insulin resistance in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, J.; Juhl, C.B.; Grøfte, Thorbjørn;

    2001-01-01

    Background: Painful trauma results in a disturbed metabolic state with impaired insulin sensitivity, which is related to the magnitude of the trauma. The authors explored whether pain per se influences hepatic and extrahepatic actions of insulin. Methods: Ten healthy male volunteers underwent two......, circulating concentrations of glucagon and growth hormone tended to increase during pain. Conclusions: Acute severe pain decreases insulin sensitivity, primarily by affecting nonoxidative glucose metabolism. It is conceivable that the counterregulatory hormonal response plays an important role. This may...

  15. Insulin and metabolic substrates during human sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Finney, Simon J

    2004-01-01

    Rusavy and colleagues recently endeavoured to dissect out the metabolic effects of insulin in patients with severe sepsis, in the setting of normoglycaemia. Twenty stable patients were studied 3–7 days after admission using a euglycaemic clamp at two supraphysiological insulin levels. Increased doses of exogenous insulin caused preferential use of glucose as a metabolic substrate, while total energy expenditure remained constant. Consequently, hyperinsulinaemia reduced tissue oxygen demand an...

  16. Postprandial Vascular Effects of VIAject Compared With Insulin Lispro and Regular Human Insulin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forst, Thomas; Pfützner, Andreas; Flacke, Frank; Krasner, Alan; Hohberg, Cloth; Tarakci, Eda; Pichotta, Philip; Forst, Senait; Steiner, Solomon

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent studies suggested an impact of prandial insulin delivery on postprandial regulation of tissue blood flow. This study compared the effect of VIAject with human regular insulin and insulin lispro on postprandial oxidative stress and endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fourteen patients (seven men; aged 61.5 ± 1.8 years; duration of diabetes 6.6 ± 4.6 years; A1C 7.2 ± 0.5% [mean ± SEM]) received a prandial injection of VIAject, human regular insulin, and insulin lispro. At baseline and after a standardized liquid meal test (Ensure Plus), the postprandial increases in asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and nitrotyrosine levels were investigated. In addition, the postprandial effects on microvascular blood flow, skin oxygenation, and vascular elasticity were measured. RESULTS Treatment with VIAject resulted in a significant reduction in the peak postprandial generation of ADMA compared with human insulin and insulin lispro (VIAject −27.3 ± 22.6, human insulin 97.7 ± 24.4, and insulin lispro 66.9 ± 33.9 nmol/l; P < 0.05, respectively). The postprandial increases in nitrotyrosine levels were significantly less after VIAject than after human regular insulin (VIAject −0.22 ± 0.17 vs. human insulin 0.25 ± 0.15 μg/ml; P < 0.05), whereas nitrotyrosine after insulin lispro was in between (insulin lispro 0.09 ± 0.07 μg/ml; NS). In parallel, earlier and more pronounced increases in microvascular blood flow and skin oxygenation were obtained after VIAject compared with those after human insulin or insulin lispro (P < 0.05, respectively). All insulin formulations resulted in comparable improvements in central arterial elasticity. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with VIAject reduced postprandial oxidative stress and improved endothelial function compared with human regular insulin or insulin lispro. PMID:19808913

  17. A divergent INS protein in Caenorhabditis elegans structurally resembles human insulin and activates the human insulin receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Qing-Xin; Nakagawa, Satoe H.; Wilken, Jill; Ramos, Rowena R.; Jia, Wenhua; Bass, Joseph; Weiss, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans contains a family of putative insulin-like genes proposed to regulate dauer arrest and senescence. These sequences often lack characteristic sequence features of human insulin essential for its folding, structure, and function. Here, we describe the structure and receptor-binding properties of INS-6, a single-chain polypeptide expressed in specific neurons. Despite multiple nonconservative changes in sequence, INS-6 recapitulates an insulin-like fold. Although lacking c...

  18. Human Y-79 retinoblastoma cells exhibit specific insulin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saviolakis, G.A.; Kyritsis, A.P.; Chader, G.J.

    1986-07-01

    The presence of insulin receptors was investigated in human Y-79 retinoblastoma cells grown in suspension culture. The binding of (/sup 125/I) insulin to these cells was time, temperature, and pH dependent, was competed for by insulin and proinsulin but not other peptides, and was inhibited by antibodies against the insulin receptor. The Scatchard plot of insulin competition data was curvilinear and was resolved into a high-affinity (KD approximately 0.5 X 10(-9) M)/low-capacity (approximately 3000 sites/cell) and a low-affinity (KD approximately 1 X 10(-7) M)/high-capacity (approximately 155,000 sites/cell) component. Negative cooperativity was not found, in agreement with other studies in rodent neural cells. However, in contrast to studies with rodent cells, insulin specifically down-regulated its receptor on human Y-79 cells after prolonged exposure. In conclusion, these data show for the first time the presence of specific insulin receptors in human Y-79 retinoblastoma cells. Because these cells were previously shown to have several characteristics typical of neural cells, we propose their use as a model to study the effects of insulin on neural and retinal tissues of human origin.

  19. Pancreatic expression of human insulin gene in transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Bucchini, D; Ripoche, M A; Stinnakre, M G; Desbois, P; Lorès, P; Monthioux, E; Absil, J; Lepesant, J A; Pictet, R; Jami, J

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of obtaining integration and expression of a native human gene in transgenic mice. An 11-kilobase (kb) human chromosomal DNA fragment including the insulin gene (1430 base pairs) was microinjected into fertilized mouse eggs. This fragment was present in the genomic DNA of several developing animals. One transgenic mouse and its progeny were analyzed for expression of the foreign gene. Synthesis and release of human insulin was revealed by detection of the ...

  20. Effect of exercise on insulin action in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Mikines, K J; Galbo, Henrik;

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 1 h of dynamic one-legged exercise on insulin action in human muscle was studied in 6 healthy young men. Four hours after one-legged knee extensions, a three-step sequential euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with arterial and bilateral femoral vein catheterization...... was performed. Increased insulin action on glucose uptake was found in the exercised compared with the rested thigh at mean plasma insulin concentrations of 23, 40, and 410 microU/ml. Furthermore, prior contractions directed glucose uptake toward glycogen synthesis and increased insulin effects on thigh O2...... consumption and at some insulin concentrations on potassium exchange. In contrast, no change in insulin effects on limb exchange of free fatty acids, glycerol, alanine or tyrosine were found after exercise. Glycogen concentration in rested vastus lateralis muscle did not increase measurably during the clamp...

  1. Differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues approved for therapeutic use- compilation of reports from the past 20 years

    OpenAIRE

    Werner Haim; Chantelau Ernst A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In order to provide comprehensive information on the differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues, published in vitro comparisons of human insulin and the rapid acting analogues insulin lispro (Humalog®), insulin aspart ( NovoRapid®), insulin glulisine (Apidra®), and the slow acting analogues insulin glargine (Lantus®), and insulin detemir (Levemir®) were gathered from the past 20 years (except for receptor binding studies). A total of 50 reports were retrie...

  2. Thermal dissociation and unfolding of insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huus, Kasper; Havelund, Svend; Olsen, Helle B;

    2005-01-01

    The thermal stability of human insulin was studied by differential scanning microcalorimetry and near-UV circular dichroism as a function of zinc/protein ratio, to elucidate the dissociation and unfolding processes of insulin in different association states. Zinc-free insulin, which is primarily...... dimeric at room temperature, unfolded at approximately 70 degrees C. The two monomeric insulin mutants Asp(B28) and Asp(B9),Glu(B27) unfolded at higher temperatures, but with enthalpies of unfolding that were approximately 30% smaller. Small amounts of zinc caused a biphasic thermal denaturation pattern...... of insulin. The biphasic denaturation is caused by a redistribution of zinc ions during the heating process and results in two distinct transitions with T(m)'s of approximately 70 and approximately 87 degrees C corresponding to monomer/dimer and hexamer, respectively. At high zinc concentrations (>or=5 Zn(2...

  3. Insulin-Induced Electrophysiology Changes in Human Pleura Are Mediated via Its Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    V. K. Kouritas; Ioannou, M.; Foroulis, C. N.; Desimonas, N.; K. Evaggelopoulos; Gourgoulianis, K. I.; Molyvdas, P A; Hatzoglou, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Insulin directly changes the sheep pleural electrophysiology. The aim of this study was to investigate whether insulin induces similar effects in human pleura, to clarify insulin receptor's involvement, and to demonstrate if glibenclamide (hypoglycemic agent) reverses this effect. Methods. Human parietal pleural specimens were mounted in Ussing chambers. Solutions containing insulin or glibenclamide and insulin with anti-insulin antibody, anti-insulin receptor antibody, and gl...

  4. Insulin Attenuates Beta-Amyloid-Associated Insulin/Akt/EAAT Signaling Perturbations in Human Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaojuan; Yang, Liling; Du, Heng; Sun, Qinjian; Wang, Xiang; Cong, Lin; Liu, Xiaohui; Yin, Ling; Li, Shan; Du, Yifeng

    2016-08-01

    The excitatory amino acid transporters 1 and 2 (EAAT1 and EAAT2), mostly located on astrocytes, are the main mediators for glutamate clearance in humans. Malfunctions of these transporters may lead to excessive glutamate accumulation and subsequent excitotoxicity to neurons, which has been implicated in many kinds of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Yet, the specific mechanism of the glutamate system dysregulation remains vague. To explore whether the insulin/protein kinase B (Akt)/EAAT signaling in human astrocytes could be disturbed by beta-amyloid protein (Aβ) and be protected by insulin, we incubated HA-1800 cells with varying concentrations of Aβ1-42 oligomers and insulin. Then the alterations of several key substrates in this signal transduction pathway were determined. Our results showed that expressions of insulin receptor, phospho-insulin receptor, phospho-protein kinase B, phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin, and EAAT1 and EAAT2 were decreased by the Aβ1-42 oligomers in a dose-dependent manner (p  0.05), and the mRNA levels of EAAT1 and EAAT2 were also unchanged (p > 0.05). Taken together, this study indicates that Aβ1-42 oligomers could cause disturbances in insulin/Akt/EAAT signaling in astrocytes, which might be responsible for AD onset and progression. Additionally, insulin can exert protective functions to the brain by modulating protein modifications or expressions. PMID:26358886

  5. Human Recombinant Insulin 1g - ug

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Proteins are the building blocks of our bodies and the living world around us. Within our bodies proteins make it possible for red blood cells to carry oxygen throughout the body. Others help transmit nerve impulses so we can hear, smell and feel the world around us. While others play a crucial role in preventing or causing disease. If the structure of a protein is known, then companies can develop new or improved drugs to fight the disease of which the protein is a part. To determine protein structure, researchers must grow near-perfect crystals of the protein. On Earth convection currents, sedimentation and other gravity-induced phenomena hamper crystal growth efforts. In microgravity researchers can grow near-perfect crystals in an environment free of these effects. Because of the enormous potential for new pharmaceutical products the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography--the NASA Commercial Space Center responsible for commercial protein crystal growth efforts has more than fifty major industry and academic partners. Research on crystals of human insulin could lead to improved treatments for diabetes.

  6. Biphasic insulin aspart 30 improved glycemic control in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes poorly controlled on oral glucose-lowering drugs: a subgroup analysis of the A1chieve study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Liming; Xing Xiaoyan; Lei Minxiang; Liu Jie; Shi Yongquan; Li Pengqiu; Qin Guijun

    2014-01-01

    Background The effectiveness and safety of initiating biphasic insulin aspart 30 in patients who were poorly controlled on oral glucose-lowering drugs were studied in randomized controlled trials,while results from clinical practice remain limited.This subgroup analysis was to provide such findings from a large-scale non-interventional study.Methods A1chieve was a multinational,prospective,open-label,non-interventional,24-week study in patients with type 2 diabetes initiating insulin analogues in 28 countries across Asia,Africa,Europe,and Latin America.After physician had taken the decision to use this insulin,any patient with type 2 diabetes who was not treated with or who had started the study insulin within 4 weeks before inclusion was eligible.Patients were treated with study insulin alone or in combination with oral glucose-lowering drugs.Data on adverse drug reactions,hypoglycemia and glycemic control were collected at baseline,week 12 and 24.This is a report of a Chinese subgroup analysis from the A1chieve study.Results Totally,4 100 patients constituted this subgroup.No serious adverse drug reactions were reported.Rates of total,major,nocturnal hypoglycemic events (events/patient per year) were 1.47,0.10,0.31 at baseline and 1.35,0.00,0.22 at week 24,respectively.Glycemic control was improved as measured by hemoglobin A1c (mean 9.3% to 7.0%,reduction -2.3%),fasting plasma glucose (mean 10.2 to 6.8 mmol/L,reduction-3.5 mmol/L) and postprandial plasma glucose (mean 14.4 to 8.8 mmol/L,reduction-5.6 mmol/L),all P <0.001.Change in mean body weight was +0.3 kg (P <0.001).Conclusion In this subgroup analysis of the A1chieve study,biphasic insulin aspart 30 improved glycemic control with low risk of hypoglycemia.

  7. Risk of severe hypoglycaemia in insulin treated diabetic patients transferred to human insulin: a case control study.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Egger; Smith, G.D.; Imhoof, H; Teuscher, A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine whether transfer from animal insulin to human insulin is associated with an increased risk of severe hypoglycaemia. DESIGN--Matched case-control study of insulin treated diabetic patients admitted to hospital because of hypoglycaemia during 1984-7, the period when human insulin was introduced into treatment. SETTING--Case admissions and control admissions were obtained from eight public hospitals within the Swiss canton of Berne and a second control group comprised membe...

  8. Effects of Dietary n-3 Fatty Acids on Hepatic and Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity in Insulin-Resistant Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Lalia, Antigoni Z; Johnson, Matthew L; Jensen, Michael D.; Hames, Kazanna C.; Port, John D.; Lanza, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), prevent insulin resistance and stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis in rodents, but the findings of translational studies in humans are thus far ambiguous. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of EPA and DHA on insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and muscle mitochondrial function in insulin-resistant, nondiabetic humans using a robust study design and gold-...

  9. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into insulin- secreting cells

    OpenAIRE

    S Mollamohammadi; Massumi, M.; H Jafary; Baharvand, H.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Type I diabetes mellitus is caused by autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells. A new potential method for curing the disease is transplantation of differentiated insulin- secreting cells from human embryonic stem cells. Methods: Human embryonic stem cell lines (Royan H1) were used to produce embryoid bodies. Differentiation carried out by growth factor-mediated selection of nestin positive cells. In final stage, these cells were expanded in the presence of bFGF, ...

  10. Generation and characterization of human insulin-releasing cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joffé Elisa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The in vitro culture of insulinomas provides an attractive tool to study cell proliferation and insulin synthesis and secretion. However, only a few human beta cell lines have been described, with long-term passage resulting in loss of insulin secretion. Therefore, we set out to establish and characterize human insulin-releasing cell lines. Results We generated ex-vivo primary cultures from two independent human insulinomas and from a human nesidioblastosis, all of which were cultured up to passage number 20. All cell lines secreted human insulin and C-peptide. These cell lines expressed neuroendocrine and islets markers, confirming the expression profile found in the biopsies. Although all beta cell lineages survived an anchorage independent culture, none of them were able to invade an extracellular matrix substrate. Conclusion We have established three human insulin-releasing cell lines which maintain antigenic characteristics and insulin secretion profiles of the original tumors. These cell lines represent valuable tools for the study of molecular events underlying beta cell function and dysfunction.

  11. Generation and characterization of human insulin-releasing cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labriola, Leticia; Peters, Maria G; Krogh, Karin; Stigliano, Iván; Terra, Letícia F; Buchanan, Cecilia; Machado, Marcel CC; Joffé, Elisa Bal de Kier; Puricelli, Lydia; Sogayar, Mari C

    2009-01-01

    Background The in vitro culture of insulinomas provides an attractive tool to study cell proliferation and insulin synthesis and secretion. However, only a few human beta cell lines have been described, with long-term passage resulting in loss of insulin secretion. Therefore, we set out to establish and characterize human insulin-releasing cell lines. Results We generated ex-vivo primary cultures from two independent human insulinomas and from a human nesidioblastosis, all of which were cultured up to passage number 20. All cell lines secreted human insulin and C-peptide. These cell lines expressed neuroendocrine and islets markers, confirming the expression profile found in the biopsies. Although all beta cell lineages survived an anchorage independent culture, none of them were able to invade an extracellular matrix substrate. Conclusion We have established three human insulin-releasing cell lines which maintain antigenic characteristics and insulin secretion profiles of the original tumors. These cell lines represent valuable tools for the study of molecular events underlying beta cell function and dysfunction. PMID:19545371

  12. Interacting with the Human Insulin Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidmose, Rune Thomas; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is an essential regulator of glucose homeostasis. In this issue of Structure, Croll et al. (2016) reports a significantly improved model of the Fab-complexed IR ectodomain refined against a dataset extending to 3.3 Å.......Insulin is an essential regulator of glucose homeostasis. In this issue of Structure, Croll et al. (2016) reports a significantly improved model of the Fab-complexed IR ectodomain refined against a dataset extending to 3.3 Å....

  13. Effects of exercise on insulin binding to human muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure was developed to measure insulin binding to human skeletal muscle obtained via the percutaneous muscle biopsy technique. With this method the effects of exercise on insulin binding were investigated. Subjects (n = 9) exercised for 60 min on a bicycle ergometer at intensities ranging from 20-86% maximum O2 consumption (VO2max). Blood samples were obtained before, during, and after exercise and analyzed for glucose and insulin. Muscle samples (250 mg) for the vastus lateralis were obtained 30 min before exercise, at the end of exercise, and 60 min after exercise. Two subjects rested during the experimental period. There was no linear relationship between exercise intensities and the changes in insulin binding to human muscle. At rest (n = 2) and at exercise intensities below 60% VO2max (n = 5) no change in insulin binding occurred (P greater than 0.05). However, when exercise occurred at greater than or equal to 69% VO2max (n = 4), a pronounced decrement in insulin binding (30-50%) was observed (P less than 0.05). This persisted for 60 min after exercise. These results indicate that insulin binding in human muscle is not altered by 60 min of exercise at less than or equal to 60% VO2max but that a marked decrement occurs when exercise is greater than or equal to 69% VO2max

  14. Insulin resistance in human subjects having impaired glucose regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine insulin resistance in human subjects having impaired glucose regulation (IGR) by Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). A total of 100 subjects with impaired glucose regulation were selected for evaluation of metabolic syndrome as per the criteria of National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP, ATP III), along with 47 healthy age and gender-matched controls. Physical examination to determine blood pressure and waist circumference was carried out and so was sampling for plasma glucose, serum triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol and insulin. Insulin resistance was calculated by the HOMA-IR. Finally, subjects with and without metabolic syndrome were compared with controls (n=47), using one-way ANOVA for studying insulin resistance between groups, with Tukey's post-hoc comparison. The frequency of finding metabolic syndrome in cases of IGR remained 47%. The insulin resistance demonstrated stepwise worsening from control population (mean=1.54, 95 % CI: 1.77 - 2.37) to subjects suffering from only IGR (mean=2.07, 95 % CI: 1.77- 2.37) to metabolic syndrome (mean=2.67, 95 %, CI: 2.34 - 3.00) (p < 0.001). Patients with impaired glucose regulation may have significant insulin resistance. It is, thus, recommended that a vigorous search be made to measure insulin resistance in all cases diagnosed to have impaired glucose regulation. (author)

  15. A secretory function of human insulin-producing cellsin vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Hua Hu; De-Quan Wu; Feng Gao; Guo-Dong Li; Lei Yao; Xin-Chen Zhang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells derived from human umbilical cord blood (UCB-MSCs) have good research and application prospects in the treatment of diabetes. We once induced UCB-MSCs to differentiate into insulin-producing cells (IPCs)in vitro, but we did not know the functions of these cellsin vivo. The aim of this study was to assess the functional effects of IPCs on insulin secretion and their role in the treatment of diabetesin vivo. METHODS: UCB-MSCs were induced to IPCs by an inducing protocol with extracellular matrix gel. BALB/C nude mice were made hyperglycemic by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. The diabetic mice were transplanted with 1×107 IPCs under the renal capsule or with phosphate-buffered saline as a control. After transplantation, the grafts were analyzed by immunocytochemistry for the expression of human insulin; the serum human insulin levels were measured; and blood glucose and body weight status were monitored. RESULTS: Immunolfuorescence showed that numerous IPCs under the kidney capsule were insulin-positive. On day 14 after transplantation, the serum human insulin level of the treatment group (n=9) averaged 0.44±0.12 mU/L, which was higher than that of the control group (n=9) that did not express insulin (t=10.842,P<0.05). The diabetic mice remained hyperglycemic and kept losing body weight after IPC transplantation, and there was no signiifcant difference in the control group. CONCLUSION: IPCs differentiated from UCB-MSCs generate human insulin in diabetic mice, but more research is needed to make further use of them to regulate hyperglycemia and body weightin vivo.

  16. Bovine and human insulin adsorption at lipid monolayers: a comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Sergio; Pandey, Ravindra; Rzeznicka, Izabela; Lu, Hao; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    Insulin is a widely used peptide in protein research and it is utilised as a model peptide to understand the mechanics of fibril formation, which is believed to be the cause of diseases such as Alzheimer and Creutzfeld-Jakob syndrome. Insulin has been used as a model system due to its biomedical relevance, small size and relatively simple tertiary structure. The adsorption of insu lin on a variety of surfaces has become the focus of numerous studies lately. These works have helped in elucidating the consequence of surface/protein hydrophilic/hydrophobic interaction in terms of protein refolding and aggregation. Unfortunately, such model surfaces differ significantly from physiological surfaces. Here we spectroscopically investigate the adsorption of insulin at lipid monolayers, to further our understanding of the interaction of insulin with biological surfaces. In particular we study the effect of minor mutations of insulin’s primary amino acid sequence on its interaction with 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DPPG) model lipid layers. We probe the structure of bovine and human insulin at the lipid/water interface using sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG). The SFG experiments are complemented with XPS analysis of Langmuir-Schaefer deposited lipid/insulin films. We find that bovine and human insulin, even though very similar in sequence, show a substantially different behavior when interacting with lipid films.

  17. Bovine and human insulin adsorption at lipid monolayers: a comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eMauri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Insulin is a widely used peptide in protein research and it is utilised as a model peptide to understand the mechanics of fibril formation, which is believed to be the cause of diseases such as Alzheimer and Creutzfeld-Jakob syndrome. Insulin has been used as a model system due to its biomedical relevance, small size and relatively simple tertiary structure. The adsorption of insu lin on a variety of surfaces has become the focus of numerous studies lately. These works have helped in elucidating the consequence of surface/protein hydrophilic/hydrophobic interaction in terms of protein refolding and aggregation. Unfortunately, such model surfaces differ significantly from physiological surfaces. Here we spectroscopically investigate the adsorption of insulin at lipid monolayers, to further our understanding of the interaction of insulin with biological surfaces.In particular we study the effect of minor mutations of insulin’s primary amino acid sequence on its interaction with 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DPPG model lipid layers. We probe the structure of bovine and human insulin at the lipid/water interface using sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG. The SFG experiments are complemented with XPS analysis of Langmuir-Schaefer deposited lipid/insulin films. We find that bovine and human insulin, even though very similar in sequence, show a substantially different behavior when interacting with lipid films.

  18. Molecular Characterisation of Long-Acting Insulin Analogues in Comparison with Human Insulin, IGF-1 and Insulin X10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Bo F.; Glendorf, Tine; Hegelund, Anne C.; Lundby, Anders; Lützen, Anne; Slaaby, Rita; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard

    2012-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis There is controversy with respect to molecular characteristics of insulin analogues. We report a series of experiments forming a comprehensive characterisation of the long acting insulin analogues, glargine and detemir, in comparison with human insulin, IGF-1, and the super-mitogenic insulin, X10. Methods We measured binding of ligands to membrane-bound and solubilised receptors, receptor activation and mitogenicity in a number of cell types. Results Detemir and glargine each displayed a balanced affinity for insulin receptor (IR) isoforms A and B. This was also true for X10, whereas IGF-1 had a higher affinity for IR-A than IR-B. X10 and glargine both exhibited a higher relative IGF-1R than IR binding affinity, whereas detemir displayed an IGF-1R:IR binding ratio of ≤1. Ligands with high relative IGF-1R affinity also had high affinity for IR/IGF-1R hybrid receptors. In general, the relative binding affinities of the analogues were reflected in their ability to phosphorylate the IR and IGF-1R. Detailed analysis revealed that X10, in contrast to the other ligands, seemed to evoke a preferential phosphorylation of juxtamembrane and kinase domain phosphorylation sites of the IR. Sustained phosphorylation was only observed from the IR after stimulation with X10, and after stimulation with IGF-1 from the IGF-1R. Both X10 and glargine showed an increased mitogenic potency compared to human insulin in cells expressing many IGF-1Rs, whereas only X10 showed increased mitogenicity in cells expressing many IRs. Conclusions Detailed analysis of receptor binding, activation and in vitro mitogenicity indicated no molecular safety concern with detemir. PMID:22590494

  19. Molecular characterisation of long-acting insulin analogues in comparison with human insulin, IGF-1 and insulin X10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo F Hansen

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: There is controversy with respect to molecular characteristics of insulin analogues. We report a series of experiments forming a comprehensive characterisation of the long acting insulin analogues, glargine and detemir, in comparison with human insulin, IGF-1, and the super-mitogenic insulin, X10. METHODS: We measured binding of ligands to membrane-bound and solubilised receptors, receptor activation and mitogenicity in a number of cell types. RESULTS: Detemir and glargine each displayed a balanced affinity for insulin receptor (IR isoforms A and B. This was also true for X10, whereas IGF-1 had a higher affinity for IR-A than IR-B. X10 and glargine both exhibited a higher relative IGF-1R than IR binding affinity, whereas detemir displayed an IGF-1R:IR binding ratio of ≤ 1. Ligands with high relative IGF-1R affinity also had high affinity for IR/IGF-1R hybrid receptors. In general, the relative binding affinities of the analogues were reflected in their ability to phosphorylate the IR and IGF-1R. Detailed analysis revealed that X10, in contrast to the other ligands, seemed to evoke a preferential phosphorylation of juxtamembrane and kinase domain phosphorylation sites of the IR. Sustained phosphorylation was only observed from the IR after stimulation with X10, and after stimulation with IGF-1 from the IGF-1R. Both X10 and glargine showed an increased mitogenic potency compared to human insulin in cells expressing many IGF-1Rs, whereas only X10 showed increased mitogenicity in cells expressing many IRs. CONCLUSIONS: Detailed analysis of receptor binding, activation and in vitro mitogenicity indicated no molecular safety concern with detemir.

  20. Internalization of /sup 125/I-insulin by IM-9 cultured human lymphocytes: a comparison between A14-monoiodo-pork and biosynthetic human insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpentier, J.L.; Halban, P.A.; Renold, A.E.; Orci, L.

    Human insulin synthesized from A- and B-chains separately produced in Escherichia coli from cloned genes was characterized by examining its interaction biochemically and morphologically with IM-9 cultured human lymphocytes. Biosynthetic human insulin (BHI) behaves similarly to pork insulin with respect both to its binding properties and to the rate and magnitude at which it is internalized by the cells.

  1. Internalization of 125I-insulin by IM-9 cultured human lymphocytes: a comparison between A14-monoiodo-pork and biosynthetic human insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human insulin synthesized from A- and B-chains separately produced in Escherichia coli from cloned genes was characterized by examining its interaction biochemically and morphologically with IM-9 cultured human lymphocytes. Biosynthetic human insulin (BHI) behaves similarly to pork insulin with respect both to its binding properties and to the rate and magnitude at which it is internalized by the cells

  2. Human primary myoblast cell cultures from non-diabetic insulin resistant subjects retain defects in insulin action.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, D B; Pratley, R; Ossowski, V

    1996-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a predictor of the development of noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in humans. It is unclear whether insulin resistance is a primary defect leading to NIDDM or the result of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. To determine if insulin resistance is the result of extrinsic factors such as hyperinsulinemia primary skeletal muscle cell cultures were established from muscle biopsies from Pima Indians with differing in vivo insulin sensitivities. These cell cultur...

  3. Human Insulin Does Not Increase Bladder Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Chin-Hsiao Tseng

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether human insulin can induce bladder cancer is rarely studied. METHODS: The reimbursement databases of all Taiwanese diabetic patients from 1996 to 2009 were retrieved from the National Health Insurance. An entry date was set at 1 January 2004 and a total of 785,234 patients with type 2 diabetes were followed up for bladder cancer incidence until the end of 2009. Users of pioglitazone were excluded and the period since the initiation of insulin glargine (marketed after the ent...

  4. Prevalence of lipodystrophy associated with human recombinant insulin

    OpenAIRE

    S. Akbarzadeh; Akha, O.; Z. Hajheydari; Z. Kashi

    2008-01-01

    AbstractBackground and Purpose: Lipodystrophy is potentially a clinical adverse effect, associated with insulin therapy and is believed that usage of human recombinant insulin’s is associated with decreasing prevalence of Lipodystrophy. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of insulin induced Lipodystrophy, among diabetic out-patients referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital, in Sari during 2007.Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional descriptive study, 220 diabetic pat...

  5. Calpain-10 and insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Norton, Luke

    2007-01-01

    Variation in the calpain-10 gene has been linked to a three-fold increased risk for type 2 diabetes in Pima Indian and some European populations. Furthermore, reduced skeletal muscle expression of calpain-10 is associated with reduced insulin mediated glucose disposal and carbohydrate oxidation. The skeletal muscle specific calpain-3 plays a key role in skeletal muscle integrity and has also been linked to insulin resistance in humans and rodents. The major aims of this thesis were to...

  6. Development of RP-HPLC for analysis of human insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan D; Gowda K; Mandal U; Ganesan.M; Bose A; Sarkar A; Pal T

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a simple and sensitive method for analysis of human insulin injection by using reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography technique. A reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography method with UV-detection at room temperature has been developed for the analysis of insulin from formulation. Hypersil BDS C-18 was used as stationary phase, and mobile phase consisted of 60 volume of 1 mmol sodium sulphate and 0.2% triethylami...

  7. Labile disulfide bonds in human placental insulin receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Finn, F. M.; Ridge, K D; HOFMANN, K

    1990-01-01

    The disulfide crosslinking pattern of human placental insulin receptor was investigated using selective reduction with tributylphosphine followed by alkylation with N-[3H]ethylmaleimide. Insulin receptor contains a single sulfhydryl group in each beta subunit whose alkylation with N-[3H]ethylmaleimide inhibits receptor autophosphorylation. Alkylation is partially inhibited by ATP or the nonhydrolyzable substrate analog adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate when the nucleotides are added...

  8. Characterisation of BHK-21 cells engineered to secrete human insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Gammell, Patrick; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Clynes, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Autoimmune destruction of β cells in the pancreas leads to type I, or insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), through the loss of endogenous insulin production capacity. This paper describes an attempt to generate ‘artificial’β cells using the fibroblast cell line BHK21. Stable transfectants expressing the human preproinsulin (PPI) gene were isolated and characterised. The resulting clone selected for further analysis (BHK-PPI-C16) was capable of secreting 0.12 pmol proinsulin/hr/105 cell...

  9. Protamine-containing insulins are strong risk factors, and human insulin analogues are possible risk factors for insulin autoantibody: case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kinoshita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin autoantibody is known to cause fluctuation of blood glucose. We examined whether medications for diabetes are risk factors for insulin autoantibody. Especially, we examined the associations between types of insulin and insulin autoantibody. We performed a case-control study. From April 2005 to March 2010, insulin autoantibody was measured 273 times in 217 patients in our hospital. Insulin autoantibody was positive (greater than 10% 53 times in 19 patients (case, and was negative 220 times in 198 patients (control. Oral hypoglycemic agents were not risk factors for insulin autoantibody; the odds ratio was 0.0. In contrast, insulin use was a significant risk factor for insulin autoantibody; the odds ratio (95% confidence interval was 56.3 (7.3-432.5. As for the types of insulin and insulin autoantibody, human insulins without protamine were not risk factors; the odds ratio was 0.0. For protamine-containing insulins, the odds ratio and adjusted odds ratio (adjusted by age, gender, and disease: type 1 diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and no diabetes were 35.3 (9.6-129.5 and 29.6 (7.6- 115.4, respectively. For Aspart-containing insulins, they were 6.2 (2.2-17.9 and 3.8 (1.2- 12.0, respectively. For Glargine, they were 3.2 (0.6-16.7 and 1.3 (0.2-8.3, respectively. To decrease the problem of insulin antibody, avoiding the use of protamine-containing insulins and avoiding the use of human insulin analogues might be preferable for the patients with diabetes.

  10. Interacting with the Human Insulin Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidmose, Rune T; Andersen, Gregers R

    2016-03-01

    Insulin is an essential regulator of glucose homeostasis. In this issue of Structure, Croll et al. (2016) reports a significantly improved model of the Fab-complexed IR ectodomain refined against a dataset extending to 3.3 Å. PMID:26933970

  11. Influence of PAMAM dendrimers on the human insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacka, Olga; Miłowska, Katarzyna; Ionov, Maksim; Bryszewska, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Dendrimers are specific class of polymeric macromolecules with wide spectrum of properties. One of the promising activities of dendrimers involves inhibition of protein fibril formation. Aggregation and fibrillation of insulin occurs in insulin-dependent diabetic patients after repeated administration, due to these processes being very easily triggered by the conditions of drug administration. The aim of this work was to study the influence of various generations PAMAM dendrimers on human insulin zeta potential, secondary structure and dithiotreitol (DTT)-induced aggregation. We observed the dependence between the number of positive charges on the surface of the PAMAM dendrimer and the values of zeta potential. Addition of dendrimers to insulin caused insignificant changes in the secondary structure. There was a small decrease in ellipticity, but it did not result in alterations in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum shape. Dendrimers neither induced protein aggregation nor inhibited the aggregation process induced by DTT, except for 0.01 µmol/l concentration.

  12. Prevalence of lipodystrophy associated with human recombinant insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Akbarzadeh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: Lipodystrophy is potentially a clinical adverse effect, associated with insulin therapy and is believed that usage of human recombinant insulin’s is associated with decreasing prevalence of Lipodystrophy. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of insulin induced Lipodystrophy, among diabetic out-patients referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital, in Sari during 2007.Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional descriptive study, 220 diabetic patients referred to the Diabetes Center at Imam Khomeini Hospital, in Sari, who under treatment by insulin at least three months prior to referral was evaluated.First, the demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients were recorded in a questionnaire; then all patients were examined clinically to evaluate lipodystrophy. In all subjects, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C was measured to assess the range of blood glucose level control. Recorded data were analyzed by statistical methods, such as descriptive T-test and X².Results: Of 220 diabetic patients studied, thirty-five (15.9% showed clinical evidences of insulin induced Lipodystrophy; 32 out of 35 cases of Lipodystrophic patients (14.5% had Lipohypertrophy, while 3 cases (1.4% had Lipoatrophy.The factors included Age, Sex, Education, BMI (Body mass index, type of Diabetes, The duration of insulin consumption and injection site had statistically significant effects on development of insulin induced Lipodystrophy (P<0.05.Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrated that despite using human recombinant insulin’s, the prevalence of insulin induced lipodystrophy, especially Lipohypertrophy, has remained high up to present. Therefore, regular examination of patients for this side effect is necessary, especially in subjects without good control of blood glucose level.Prevalence of lipodystrophy associated with human recombinant insulinZ. Kashi, M.D. + Z. Hajheydari, M.D.* O. Akha, M.D. * S

  13. Monomer-dimer model explains the results of radiation inactivation: binding characteristics of insulin receptor purified from human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of radiation inactivation has been used on highly purified human placental insulin receptor in order to determine the functional molecular size responsible for the insulin binding and to evaluate the affinity regulator hypothesis, which has been proposed to explain the increase in specific insulin binding to rat liver membranes observed at low radiation does. Three different types of inactivation curves were observed: (1) biphasic with an enhanced binding activity after exposure to low radiation doses, (2) nonlinear with no change in binding activity after exposure to low radiation doses, and (3) linear with a loss in the binding activity with increasing radiation exposures. A monomer-dimer model was the simplest model that best described the three types of radiation inactivation curves observed. The model predicts that an increase in insulin binding activity would result after exposure to low radiation doses when the initial dimer/monomer ratio is equal to or greater than 1 and a monomer is more active than a dimer. The monomer size of the binding activity was estimated to be 227,000 daltons by this model. To substantiate this model, the purified receptor was fractionated by Sepharose CL-6B chromatography. The insulin binding profile of this column indicated two peaks. These studies suggest that the affinity regulator does not exist as a separate structural protein but is due to the dimeric form of the receptor. The dimeric form (α2β2) possesses a much lower specific activity for insulin binding than does the monomeric αβ form (under the standard conditions), but the dimeric structure is necessary to observe the negative cooperative binding isotherm

  14. Insulin analogues versus human insulin in type 1 diabetes: direct and indirect meta-analyses of efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Cristina Conegero Sanches

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available All patients with Diabetes Mellitus (DM receive insulin therapy. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy, safety and tolerability of human insulin and insulin analogues. We performed a systematic review of the literature and a meta-analysis according to the Cochrane Collaboration methodology. In the absence of clinical studies comparing insulins, we performed a mixed treatment comparison to establish the differences between the active treatments. We included studies published from 1995 to 2010. HbA1c results, episodes of hypoglycemia and nocturnal hypoglycemia data were extracted and analyzed. Thirty-five randomized clinical trials were selected after examining the abstract and a full text review. These studies included 4,206 patients who received long-acting insulin analogues and 5,733 patients who received short-acting insulin analogues. Pooled data regarding efficacy indicated no significant differences in HbA1c values between glargine or detemir (once daily and NPH insulin. However, a twice-daily dose of detemir produced differences in HbA1c values that favored detemir (-0.14% [95% CI: -0.21 to -0.08]; p<0.0001; I²=0%. Direct and indirect comparisons are consistent and show that there were no significant differences between human insulin and insulin analogues in efficacy or safety. Our results indicate that long- and short-acting insulin analogues offer few clinical advantages over conventional human insulin.

  15. Successful desensitization with human insulin in a patient with an insulin allergy and hypersensitivity to protamine: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pföhler Claudia

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Insulin allergy may occur in patients treated with subcutaneous applications of insulin preparations. Besides additives in the insulin preparation such as protamine, cresol, and phenol, the insulin molecule itself may be the cause of the allergy. In the latter case, therapeutic options are rare. Case presentation A 68-year-old man with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus received different insulin preparations subcutaneously while on oral medication. Six to eight hours after each subcutaneous application, he developed pruritic plaques with a diameter of >15 cm at the injection sites that persisted for several days. Allergologic testing revealed positive reactions against every insulin preparation and against protamine. Investigation of serum samples demonstrated IgG antibodies against human and porcine insulin. We treated the patient with human insulin using an ultra-rush protocol beginning with 0.004 IU and a rapid augmentation in dose up to 5 IU. Therapy was accompanied by antihistamine therapy. Subsequent conversion to therapy with glargine insulin (6 IE twice daily was well-tolerated. Conclusion As reported in this case, desensitization with subcutaneously administered human insulin using an ultra-rush protocol in patients with an insulin allergy may present an easy form of therapy that is successful within a few days.

  16. Comparison of human versus porcine insulin in treatment of diabetes in children.

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, S A; Smith, M A; Cartwright, B.; Baum, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The blood glucose control obtained when using semi-synthetic monocomponent human insulin (insulin A) was compared with that using standard monocomponent porcine insulin (insulin B) in 14 children in a double blind crossover study. At the start of the study age, duration of diabetes, insulin dose, and daily carbohydrate intake were the same in both groups. After a one month run in period of standard treatment with porcine insulin the children were randomly divided into group 1 (three months of...

  17. Expression profiling of insulin action in human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Gaster, Michael; Oakeley, Edward J;

    2004-01-01

    ), 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 h, mRNA contents were analyzed in human myotubes for each time point using Affymetrix DNA chip technology. Insulin treatment induced an inflammatory and pro-angiogenic response in the myotubes, with expression of early response factors followed by inflammatory chemokines...... of diabetic skeletal muscle. We conclude, (i) that insulin induces a time-dependent inflammatory and pro-angiogenic transcriptional response in cultured human myotubes, (ii) that myotubes in vitro retain a gene expression pattern specific for type 2 diabetes and sharing five genes with that of type 2 diabetic...

  18. Influence of the dynamics of body weight on the risk factors of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes during the first year of insulin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Dzhavakhishvili

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate whether insulin treatment-induced weight gain had an adverse impact on cardiovascular risk factors in insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients during the first year after initiating insulin therapy when insulin analogues or human insulins are used. A total of 157 patients with newly insulinized type 2 diabetes were included in the study. The patients were divided in two groups. First group consisted of subjects (mean age 57 [45; 73], duration of diabetes of 10 years [4; 16] who had received long-acting basal (glargine, detemir, premixed (biphasic insulin aspart 30, Humalog Mix 25 or short-acting (aspart, lispro insulin analogues. Patients from second group (mean age 59 [46; 75], duration of diabetes of 10 years [5; 15] were treated with intermediate-acting basal (Protophane, Humulin NPH insulin, premixed (biphasic human insulin 30, Humulin M3 and regular (Actrapid, Humulin R human insulins. Our study has shown that insulin-induced weight gain may not adversely affect cardiovascular risk factors, particularly, lipid profile, in insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients during the first year after initiating insulin therapy. Use of insulin analogues for treatment of type 2 diabetes patients results in better glycaemic control, significant declines in blood lipid concentrations, less increase in waist circumference compared with human insulins during the first year after initiating insulin therapy.

  19. Analysis of Local Dynamics of Human Insulin and a Rapid-acting Insulin Analog by Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Shiori; Hashii, Noritaka; Hirose, Kenji; Kawasaki, Nana; Ahn, Joomi

    2013-01-01

    Human insulin, used by diabetics to regulate blood sugar, was first introduced as a recombinant therapeutic drug nearly 30 years ago. Human insulin and insulin lispro have identical primary structure, except for the transposition of two amino acids. Lispro is one of the rapid-acting insulin analogs, which has higher tendency to dissociate than human insulin. In this study, we present an analytical workflow to allow us to detect the difference in the oligomeric dynamics using Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX MS). The HDX analysis on Insulin and Lispro peptides was conducted to identify the location where different deuterium uptakes were observed between human insulin and lispro. The detected areas were illustrated in various formats to help understand their flexibility associated with rapid dissociation of insulin oligomers. Drug products, human insulin (Humulin R) and lispro (Humalog), were reduced and digested online by pepsin. Deuterium labeling, quenching, and injection to on-line pepsin digestion were prepared using a robotic sample manager. Labeling experiments in 0, 0.5, 5, 10, 60, and 180 min interval were duplicated for both samples. The peptic digests were separated on a UPLC system at 0 °C. Q-TOF MS was used to measure the deuterium incorporation of identified peptides. The amount of deuterium was determined by automated HDX data processing software, DynamX 2.0. We obtained 98% of sequence coverage for both human insulin and lispro. From peptide HDX determination, two regions were revealed distinctive different values in deuterium uptakes between human insulin and lispro; the N terminus of chain A, and a region adjacent to the C terminus of chain B. We attributed this localized behavior to the relation of hexamerization and dimerization, respectively. Furthermore, characteristic profiles that showed different deuteration margins between two insulins were determined, which was also consistent with their involvement in hexamer and dimer

  20. Chemical Synthesis of Human Insulin-Like Peptide-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fangzhou; Mayer, John P; Zaykov, Alexander N; Zhang, Fa; Liu, Fa; DiMarchi, Richard D

    2016-07-01

    Human insulin-like peptide-6 (INSL-6) belongs to the insulin superfamily and shares the distinctive disulfide bond configuration of human insulin. In this report we present the first chemical synthesis of INSL-6 utilizing fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl-based (Fmoc) solid-phase peptide chemistry and regioselective disulfide bond construction protocols. Due to the presence of an oxidation-sensitive tryptophan residue, two new orthogonal synthetic methodologies were developed. The first method involved the identification of an additive to suppress the oxidation of tryptophan during iodine-mediated S-acetamidomethyl (Acm) deprotection and the second utilized iodine-free, sulfoxide-directed disulfide bond formation. The methodologies presented here offer an efficient synthetic route to INSL-6 and will further improve synthetic access to other multiple-disulfide-containing peptides with oxidation-sensitive residues. PMID:27259101

  1. A synthetic route to human insulin using isoacyl peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fa; Luo, Ethan Y; Flora, David B; Mezo, Adam R

    2014-04-01

    The chemical synthesis of insulin has been a longstanding challenge, mainly because of the notorious hydrophobicity of the A chain and the complicated topology of this 51-mer peptide hormone consisting of two chains and three disulfide bonds. Reported herein is a new synthetic route utilizing the isoacyl peptide approach to address the hydrophobicity problems. The incorporation of isoacyl dipeptide segments into both A and B chains greatly improved their preparation and purification, and the RP-HPLC recovery of the chain ligation intermediates. The new route affords human insulin with a yield of 68 % based on the starting purified A chain and an overall yield of 24 % based on the substitution of the resin used for the preparation of A chain. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the most efficient route of human insulin chemical synthesis reported to date. PMID:24615765

  2. Enhanced Osteogenic and Vasculogenic Differentiation Potential of Human Adipose Stem Cells on Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Scaffolds in Fibrin Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    For bone tissue engineering synthetic biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) with a hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) ratio of 60/40 (BCP60/40) is successfully clinically applied, but the high percentage of HA may hamper efficient scaffold remodelling. Whether BCP with a lower HA/β-TCP ratio (BCP20/80) is more desirable is still unclear. Vascular development is needed before osteogenesis can occur. We aimed to test the osteogenic and/or vasculogenic differentiation potential as well as degradation of composites consisting of human adipose stem cells (ASCs) seeded on BCP60/40 or BCP20/80 incorporated in fibrin gels that trigger neovascularization for bone regeneration. ASC attachment to BCP60/40 and BCP20/80 within 30 min was similar (>93%). After 11 days of culture BCP20/80-based composites showed increased alkaline phosphatase activity and DMP1 gene expression, but not RUNX2 and osteonectin expression, compared to BCP60/40-based composites. BCP20/80-based composites also showed enhanced expression of the vasculogenic markers CD31 and VEGF189, but not VEGF165 and endothelin-1. Collagen-1 and collagen-3 expression was similar in both composites. Fibrin degradation was increased in BCP20/80-based composites at day 7. In conclusion, BCP20/80-based composites showed enhanced osteogenic and vasculogenic differentiation potential compared to BCP60/40-based composites in vitro, suggesting that BCP20/80-based composites might be more promising for in vivo bone augmentation than BCP60/40-based composites.

  3. Enhanced Osteogenic and Vasculogenic Differentiation Potential of Human Adipose Stem Cells on Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Scaffolds in Fibrin Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    For bone tissue engineering synthetic biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) with a hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) ratio of 60/40 (BCP60/40) is successfully clinically applied, but the high percentage of HA may hamper efficient scaffold remodelling. Whether BCP with a lower HA/β-TCP ratio (BCP20/80) is more desirable is still unclear. Vascular development is needed before osteogenesis can occur. We aimed to test the osteogenic and/or vasculogenic differentiation potential as well as degradation of composites consisting of human adipose stem cells (ASCs) seeded on BCP60/40 or BCP20/80 incorporated in fibrin gels that trigger neovascularization for bone regeneration. ASC attachment to BCP60/40 and BCP20/80 within 30 min was similar (>93%). After 11 days of culture BCP20/80-based composites showed increased alkaline phosphatase activity and DMP1 gene expression, but not RUNX2 and osteonectin expression, compared to BCP60/40-based composites. BCP20/80-based composites also showed enhanced expression of the vasculogenic markers CD31 and VEGF189, but not VEGF165 and endothelin-1. Collagen-1 and collagen-3 expression was similar in both composites. Fibrin degradation was increased in BCP20/80-based composites at day 7. In conclusion, BCP20/80-based composites showed enhanced osteogenic and vasculogenic differentiation potential compared to BCP60/40-based composites in vitro, suggesting that BCP20/80-based composites might be more promising for in vivo bone augmentation than BCP60/40-based composites. PMID:27547223

  4. Enhanced Osteogenic and Vasculogenic Differentiation Potential of Human Adipose Stem Cells on Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Scaffolds in Fibrin Gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esterik, Fransisca A S; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2016-01-01

    For bone tissue engineering synthetic biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) with a hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) ratio of 60/40 (BCP60/40) is successfully clinically applied, but the high percentage of HA may hamper efficient scaffold remodelling. Whether BCP with a lower HA/β-TCP ratio (BCP20/80) is more desirable is still unclear. Vascular development is needed before osteogenesis can occur. We aimed to test the osteogenic and/or vasculogenic differentiation potential as well as degradation of composites consisting of human adipose stem cells (ASCs) seeded on BCP60/40 or BCP20/80 incorporated in fibrin gels that trigger neovascularization for bone regeneration. ASC attachment to BCP60/40 and BCP20/80 within 30 min was similar (>93%). After 11 days of culture BCP20/80-based composites showed increased alkaline phosphatase activity and DMP1 gene expression, but not RUNX2 and osteonectin expression, compared to BCP60/40-based composites. BCP20/80-based composites also showed enhanced expression of the vasculogenic markers CD31 and VEGF189, but not VEGF165 and endothelin-1. Collagen-1 and collagen-3 expression was similar in both composites. Fibrin degradation was increased in BCP20/80-based composites at day 7. In conclusion, BCP20/80-based composites showed enhanced osteogenic and vasculogenic differentiation potential compared to BCP60/40-based composites in vitro, suggesting that BCP20/80-based composites might be more promising for in vivo bone augmentation than BCP60/40-based composites. PMID:27547223

  5. Ubiquitin is a Novel Substrate for Human Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Ralat, Luis A.; Kalas, Vasilios; Zheng, Zhongzhou; Goldman, Robert D.; Sosnick, Tobin R.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) can degrade insulin and amyloid-β (Aβ), peptides involved in diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. IDE selects its substrates based on size, charge, and flexibility. From these criteria, we predict that IDE can cleave and inactivate ubiquitin (Ub). Here, we show that IDE cleaves Ub in a biphasic manner, first, by rapidly removing the two C-terminal glycines (kcat = 2 sec-1) followed by a slow cleavage between residues 72-73 (kcat = 0.07 sec-1), thereby...

  6. Human insulin does not increase bladder cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Hsiao Tseng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whether human insulin can induce bladder cancer is rarely studied. METHODS: The reimbursement databases of all Taiwanese diabetic patients from 1996 to 2009 were retrieved from the National Health Insurance. An entry date was set at 1 January 2004 and a total of 785,234 patients with type 2 diabetes were followed up for bladder cancer incidence until the end of 2009. Users of pioglitazone were excluded and the period since the initiation of insulin glargine (marketed after the entry date in Taiwan was not included in the calculation of follow-up. Incidences for ever-users, never-users and subgroups of human insulin exposure (using tertile cutoffs of time since starting insulin, duration of therapy and cumulative dose were calculated and the hazard ratios were estimated by Cox regression. RESULTS: There were 87,940 ever-users and 697,294 never-users, with respective numbers of incident bladder cancer of 454 (0.52% and 3,330 (0.48%, and respective incidence of 120.49 and 94.74 per 100,000 person-years. The overall hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals indicated a significant association with insulin in the age-sex-adjusted models [1.238 (1.122-1.366], but not in the model adjusted for all covariates [1.063 (0.951-1.187]. There was also a significant trend for the hazard ratios for the different categories of the dose-response parameters in the age-sex-adjusted models, which became insignificant when all covariates were adjusted. CONCLUSIONS: This study relieves the concern of a bladder cancer risk associated with human insulin. Appropriate adjustment for confounders is important in the evaluation of cancer risk associated with a medication.

  7. Human Insulin Does Not Increase Bladder Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2014-01-01

    Background Whether human insulin can induce bladder cancer is rarely studied. Methods The reimbursement databases of all Taiwanese diabetic patients from 1996 to 2009 were retrieved from the National Health Insurance. An entry date was set at 1 January 2004 and a total of 785,234 patients with type 2 diabetes were followed up for bladder cancer incidence until the end of 2009. Users of pioglitazone were excluded and the period since the initiation of insulin glargine (marketed after the entry date in Taiwan) was not included in the calculation of follow-up. Incidences for ever-users, never-users and subgroups of human insulin exposure (using tertile cutoffs of time since starting insulin, duration of therapy and cumulative dose) were calculated and the hazard ratios were estimated by Cox regression. Results There were 87,940 ever-users and 697,294 never-users, with respective numbers of incident bladder cancer of 454 (0.52%) and 3,330 (0.48%), and respective incidence of 120.49 and 94.74 per 100,000 person-years. The overall hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) indicated a significant association with insulin in the age-sex-adjusted models [1.238 (1.122–1.366)], but not in the model adjusted for all covariates [1.063 (0.951–1.187)]. There was also a significant trend for the hazard ratios for the different categories of the dose-response parameters in the age-sex-adjusted models, which became insignificant when all covariates were adjusted. Conclusions This study relieves the concern of a bladder cancer risk associated with human insulin. Appropriate adjustment for confounders is important in the evaluation of cancer risk associated with a medication. PMID:24466131

  8. Type 1 Ig-E mediated allergy to human insulin, insulin analogues and beta-lactam antibiotics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Pedro; Barros, Luísa; Gonçalo, Margarida

    2012-01-01

    Insulin, a crucial therapeutic agent for diabetes mellitus, has been rarely associated with hypersensitivity events. We present a 69-year-old type-2 diabetic patient with urticariform lesions on the sites of subcutaneous injection of insulin. The patient denied any known allergies, except for an unspecific cutaneous reaction after intramuscular penicillin administration in childhood. Prick tests revealed positive reactions to all tested human insulins and insulin analogues. Serum IgE levels were above normal range and RAST tests were positive for human, bovine and porcine insulins, as well as beta-lactams. Type 1 IgE-mediated allergy to insulin analogues demands a prompt diagnosis and represents a significant therapeutic challenge in diabetic patients. PMID:23197216

  9. Effects of tacrolimus (FK506) on human insulin gene expression, insulin mRNA levels, and insulin secretion in HIT-T15 cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Redmon, J B; Olson, L K; Armstrong, M B; Greene, M J; Robertson, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    FK506 (tacrolimus) is an immunosuppressive drug which interrupts Ca2+-calmodulin-calcineurin signaling pathways in T lymphocytes, thereby blocking antigen activation of T cell early activation genes. Regulation of insulin gene expression in the beta cell may also involve Ca2+-signaling pathways and FK506 has been associated with insulin-requiring diabetes mellitus during clinical use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of FK506 on human insulin gene transcription, insul...

  10. Human insulin by tryptic transpeptidations of porcine insulin and biosynthetic precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markussen, J.

    1987-01-01

    The combination of enzymatic semisynthesis with recombinant DNA techniques opens up new ways to tailor biosynthetic precursors in order to achieve the desired product, human insulin. The many factors which influence the course of these enzymatic processes have been studied systematically. This book, illustrated by 77 tables and 37 figures, reports these studies in detail. The book also reviews the thermodynamics behind enzymatic peptide synthesis, where methods are still being evolved.

  11. Standardisation of radioimmunoassay for human insulin employing magnetizable cellulose particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a convenient and flexible solid phase radioimmunoassay for human insulin employing magnetizable cellulose particles. Anti-porcine insulin antibody was covalently linked to magnetizable cellulose particles to form a stable and economical solid phase immunosorbent system. The tracer was prepared by radioiodinating insulin with 125I using Chloramine-T oxidation method. The analytical sensitivity of assay observed was 5.5 μIU/mL. Intra-assay and inter-assay variations were found to be <12 % along with analytical recovery of 93-109 %. The developed assay can be used for the routine analysis of clinical samples. In addition, concentration of the solid phase magnetizable immunosorbent can be easily varied as per the specific requirement for research purposes. (author)

  12. Effects of Insulin Detemir and NPH Insulin on Body Weight and Appetite-Regulating Brain Regions in Human Type 1 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Golen, van, L.W.; Veltman, D.; IJzerman, R. G.; Deijen, J.B.; Heijboer, A.C.; Barkhof, F; Drent, M.L.; Diamant, M.

    2014-01-01

    Studies in rodents have demonstrated that insulin in the central nervous system induces satiety. In humans, these effects are less well established. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that causes less weight gain than other basal insulin formulations, including the current standard intermediate-long acting Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin. Due to its structural modifications, which render the molecule more lipophilic, it was proposed that insulin detemir enters the brain more r...

  13. Double blind clinical and laboratory study of hypoglycaemia with human and porcine insulin in diabetic patients reporting hypoglycaemia unawareness after transferring to human insulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Maran, A; Lomas, J.; Archibald, H; Macdonald, I A; Gale, E A; Amiel, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To compare awareness of hypoglycaemia and physiological responses to hypoglycaemia with human and porcine insulin in diabetic patients who reported loss of hypoglycaemia awareness after transferring to human insulin. DESIGN--Double blind randomised crossover study of clinical experience and physiological responses during slow fall hypoglycaemic clamping with porcine and human insulin. SETTING--Clinical investigation unit of teaching hospital recruiting from diabetes clinics of fiv...

  14. Secretory expression of α single-chain insulin precursor in yeast and its conversion into human insulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张友尚; 胡红明; 蔡若蓉; 冯佑民; 朱尚权; 贺潜斌; 唐月华; 徐明华; 许英镐; 张新堂; 刘滨; 梁镇和

    1996-01-01

    A synthetic single-chain porcine insulin precursor (PIP) gene and an α-mating factor leader sequence (αMFL) gene obtained by the PCR method are inserted between the promoter and 3’-terminating sequence of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH1 in plasmid pVT102-U to form plasmid pVT102-U/α MFL-PIP. The single-chain insulin precursor is expressed and secreted to the culture medium by Saccharomyces cererisiae transformed by pVT102-U/αMFL-PIP. The precursor is purified and converted into human insulin by tryptic transpeptidation. The purified human insulin is fully active and can be crystallized. The overall yield of human insulin is 25 mg per liter of culture medium.

  15. Bimodal effect on pancreatic β-cells of secretory products from normal or insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, Karim; Plomgaard, Peter; Berney, Thierry;

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance with a relative deficiency in insulin secretion. This study explored the potential communication between insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle and primary (human and rat) ß-cells....

  16. Bimodal effect on pancreatic β-cells of secretory products from normal or insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, Karim; Plomgaard, Peter; Berney, Thierry;

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance with a relative deficiency in insulin secretion. This study explored the potential communication between insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle and primary (human and rat) β-cells....

  17. Characterization of the growth of murine fibroblasts that express human insulin receptors. II. Interaction of insulin with other growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randazzo, P.A.; Jarett, L. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and insulin on DNA synthesis were studied in murine fibroblasts transfected with an expression vector containing human insulin receptor cDNA (NIH 3T3/HIR) and the parental NIH 3T3 cells. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, individual growth factors in serum-free medium stimulated DNA synthesis with the following relative efficacies: insulin greater than or equal to 10% fetal calf serum greater than PDGF greater than IGF-1 much greater than EGF. In comparison, the relative efficacies of these factors in stimulating DNA synthesis by NIH 3T3 cells were 10% fetal calf serum greater than PDGF greater than EGF much greater than IGF-1 = insulin. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, EGF was synergistic with 1-10 ng/ml insulin but not with 100 ng/ml insulin or more. Synergy of PDGF or IGF-1 with insulin was not detected. In the parental NIH 3T3 cells, insulin and IGF-1 were found to be synergistic with EGF (1 ng/ml), PDGF (100 ng/ml), and PDGF plus EGF. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, the lack of interaction of insulin with other growth factors was also observed when the percentage of cells synthesizing DNA was examined. Despite insulin's inducing only 60% of NIH 3T3/HIR cells to incorporate thymidine, addition of PDGF, EGF, or PDGF plus EGF had no further effect. In contrast, combinations of growth factors resulted in 95% of the parental NIH 3T3 cells synthesizing DNA. The independence of insulin-stimulated DNA synthesis from other mitogens in the NIH 3T3/HIR cells is atypical for progression factor-stimulated DNA synthesis and is thought to be partly the result of insulin receptor expression in an inappropriate context or quantity.

  18. Characterization of the growth of murine fibroblasts that express human insulin receptors. II. Interaction of insulin with other growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and insulin on DNA synthesis were studied in murine fibroblasts transfected with an expression vector containing human insulin receptor cDNA (NIH 3T3/HIR) and the parental NIH 3T3 cells. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, individual growth factors in serum-free medium stimulated DNA synthesis with the following relative efficacies: insulin greater than or equal to 10% fetal calf serum greater than PDGF greater than IGF-1 much greater than EGF. In comparison, the relative efficacies of these factors in stimulating DNA synthesis by NIH 3T3 cells were 10% fetal calf serum greater than PDGF greater than EGF much greater than IGF-1 = insulin. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, EGF was synergistic with 1-10 ng/ml insulin but not with 100 ng/ml insulin or more. Synergy of PDGF or IGF-1 with insulin was not detected. In the parental NIH 3T3 cells, insulin and IGF-1 were found to be synergistic with EGF (1 ng/ml), PDGF (100 ng/ml), and PDGF plus EGF. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, the lack of interaction of insulin with other growth factors was also observed when the percentage of cells synthesizing DNA was examined. Despite insulin's inducing only 60% of NIH 3T3/HIR cells to incorporate thymidine, addition of PDGF, EGF, or PDGF plus EGF had no further effect. In contrast, combinations of growth factors resulted in 95% of the parental NIH 3T3 cells synthesizing DNA. The independence of insulin-stimulated DNA synthesis from other mitogens in the NIH 3T3/HIR cells is atypical for progression factor-stimulated DNA synthesis and is thought to be partly the result of insulin receptor expression in an inappropriate context or quantity

  19. Reduction of Postprandial Glycemic Excursions in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes: A Novel Human Insulin Formulation versus a Rapid-Acting Insulin Analog and Regular Human Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Lutz; Hompesch, Marcus; Flacke, Frank; Simms, Patrick; Pohl, Rody; Albus, Kerstin; Pfützner, Andreas; Steiner, Solomon

    2011-01-01

    Background: Evaluation of postprandial glycemic excursions in patients with type 1 diabetes with three prandial insulins: VIAject™ (Linjeta™), an ultra-fast insulin (UFI); insulin lispro (LIS); and regular human insulin (RHI). Methods: After stabilization of preprandial glycemia, 18 patients received a subcutaneous injection with an individualized insulin dose prior to a meal. Results: Injection of UFI resulted in a more rapid insulin absorption than with either LIS or RHI (time to half-maximal insulin levels: 13.1 ± 5.2 vs 25.4 ± 7.6 and 38.4 ± 19.5 min; p = .001 vs LIS and p < .001 vs RHI, LIS vs. RHI p < .001). Maximal postprandial glycemia was lower with UFI (0–180 min; 157 ± 30 mg/dl; p = .002 vs RHI) and LIS (170 ± 42 mg/dl; p = .668 vs RHI) than after RHI (191 ± 46 mg/dl; RHI vs LIS p = .008). The difference between maximum and minimum glycemia was smaller with UFI (70 ± 17 mg/dl) than with either RHI (91 ± 33 mg/dl; p = .007 vs UFI) or LIS (89 ± 18 mg/dl; p = .011 vs UFI). Also, the area under the blood glucose profile was lower with UFI than with RHI (0–180 min; 21.8 ± 5.8 vs 28.4 ± 7.6 g·min/dl; p < .001). Conclusions: The rapid absorption of UFI results in a reduction of postprandial glycemic excursions. PMID:21722583

  20. Studies on the mechanism of insulin resistance in the liver from humans with noninsulin-dependent diabetes. Insulin action and binding in isolated hepatocytes, insulin receptor structure, and kinase activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Caro, J F; Ittoop, O; Pories, W J; Meelheim, D; Flickinger, E G; Thomas, F; Jenquin, M; Silverman, J F; Khazanie, P G; Sinha, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    We have developed a method to isolate insulin-responsive human hepatocytes from an intraoperative liver biopsy to study insulin action and resistance in man. Hepatocytes from obese patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes were resistant to maximal insulin concentration, and those from obese controls to submaximal insulin concentration in comparison to nonobese controls. Insulin binding per cell number was similar in all groups. However, insulin binding per surface area was decreased in the...

  1. Inflamed macrophage microvesicles induce insulin resistance in human adipocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yaqin; Shi, Li; Mei, Hongliang; Zhang, Jiexin; Zhu, Yunxia; Han, Xiao; Zhu, Dalong

    2015-01-01

    Background Cytokines secreted by adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) significantly alter adipocyte function, inducing inflammatory responses and decreasing insulin sensitivity. However, little relevant information is available regarding the role of microvesicles (MVs) derived from ATMs in macrophage-adipocyte crosstalk. Methods MVs were generated by stimulation of M1 or M2 phenotype THP-1 macrophages and incubated with human primary mature adipocytes and differentiated adipocytes. Subsequently,...

  2. Sildenafil Reduces Insulin-Resistance in Human Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Caterina Mammi; Donatella Pastore; Lombardo, Marco F; Francesca Ferrelli; Massimiliano Caprio; Claudia Consoli; Manfredi Tesauro; Lucia Gatta; Massimo Fini; Massimo Federici; Paolo Sbraccia; Giulia Donadel; Alfonso Bellia; Giuseppe M Rosano; Andrea Fabbri

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy of Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors to re-establish endothelial function is reduced in diabetic patients. Recent evidences suggest that therapy with PDE5 inhibitors, i.e. sildenafil, may increase the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) proteins in the heart and cardiomyocytes. In this study we analyzed the effect of sildenafil on endothelial cells in insulin resistance conditions in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cel...

  3. The influence of aprotinin on regional absorption of soluble human insulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, D R; Vora, J P; Birtwell, J; Luzio, S; Hayes, T M

    1988-01-01

    1. The absorption of 6U of soluble human insulin following subcutaneous injection into the anterior abdominal wall, thigh and into the thigh following admixture with aprotinin was assessed in normal subjects. The plasma immunoreactive insulin profiles were determined during a 6 h post injection period in subjects receiving concomitantly somatostatin to suppress endogenous insulin secretion. 2. Subcutaneous injection of human insulin into the anterior abdominal wall compared with the thigh led...

  4. Insulin and C-peptide in human brain neurons (insulin/C-peptide/brain peptides/immunohistochemistry/radioimmunoassay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regional distribution and cellular localization of insulin and C-peptide immunoreactivities were studied in human cadaver brains using the indirect immunofluorescence method, the peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique, and radioimmunoassay. Products of the immune reactions to both polypeptides were observed in most nerve cells in all areas of the brain examined. Immunostaining was mainly restricted to the cell soma and proximal dendrites. Radioimmunoassay revealed that human brain contains insulin and C-peptide in concentrations much higher than the blood, the highest being in the hypothalamus. These findings support the hypothesis that the 'brain insulin' is - at least in part - produced in the CNS. (author)

  5. Molecular Basis of Catalytic Chamber-assisted Unfolding and Cleavage of Human Insulin by Human Insulin-degrading Enzyme*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolopoulou, Marika; Guo, Qing; Malito, Enrico; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Insulin is a hormone vital for glucose homeostasis, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays a key role in its clearance. IDE exhibits a remarkable specificity to degrade insulin without breaking the disulfide bonds that hold the insulin A and B chains together. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry to obtain high mass accuracy, and electron capture dissociation (ECD) to selectively break the disulfide bonds in gas phase fragmentation, we determined the cleavage sites and composition of human insulin fragments generated by human IDE. Our time-dependent analysis of IDE-digested insulin fragments reveals that IDE is highly processive in its initial cleavage at the middle of both the insulin A and B chains. This ensures that IDE effectively splits insulin into inactive N- and C-terminal halves without breaking the disulfide bonds. To understand the molecular basis of the recognition and unfolding of insulin by IDE, we determined a 2.6-Å resolution insulin-bound IDE structure. Our structure reveals that IDE forms an enclosed catalytic chamber that completely engulfs and intimately interacts with a partially unfolded insulin molecule. This structure also highlights how the unique size, shape, charge distribution, and exosite of the IDE catalytic chamber contribute to its high affinity (∼100 nm) for insulin. In addition, this structure shows how IDE utilizes the interaction of its exosite with the N terminus of the insulin A chain as well as other properties of the catalytic chamber to guide the unfolding of insulin and allowing for the processive cleavages. PMID:19321446

  6. Differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues approved for therapeutic use- compilation of reports from the past 20 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Haim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to provide comprehensive information on the differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues, published in vitro comparisons of human insulin and the rapid acting analogues insulin lispro (Humalog®, insulin aspart ( NovoRapid®, insulin glulisine (Apidra®, and the slow acting analogues insulin glargine (Lantus®, and insulin detemir (Levemir® were gathered from the past 20 years (except for receptor binding studies. A total of 50 reports were retrieved, with great heterogeneity among study methodology. However, various differences in bioactivity compared to human insulin were obvious (e.g. differences in effects on metabolism, mitogenesis, apoptosis, intracellular signalling, thrombocyte function, protein degradation. Whether or not these differences have clinical bearings (and among which patient populations remains to be determined.

  7. Differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues approved for therapeutic use- compilation of reports from the past 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Haim; Chantelau, Ernst A

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide comprehensive information on the differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues, published in vitro comparisons of human insulin and the rapid acting analogues insulin lispro (Humalog®), insulin aspart ( NovoRapid®), insulin glulisine (Apidra®), and the slow acting analogues insulin glargine (Lantus®), and insulin detemir (Levemir®) were gathered from the past 20 years (except for receptor binding studies). A total of 50 reports were retrieved, with great heterogeneity among study methodology. However, various differences in bioactivity compared to human insulin were obvious (e.g. differences in effects on metabolism, mitogenesis, apoptosis, intracellular signalling, thrombocyte function, protein degradation). Whether or not these differences have clinical bearings (and among which patient populations) remains to be determined.

  8. Differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues approved for therapeutic use- compilation of reports from the past 20 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide comprehensive information on the differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues, published in vitro comparisons of human insulin and the rapid acting analogues insulin lispro (Humalog®), insulin aspart ( NovoRapid®), insulin glulisine (Apidra®), and the slow acting analogues insulin glargine (Lantus®), and insulin detemir (Levemir®) were gathered from the past 20 years (except for receptor binding studies). A total of 50 reports were retrieved, with great heterogeneity among study methodology. However, various differences in bioactivity compared to human insulin were obvious (e.g. differences in effects on metabolism, mitogenesis, apoptosis, intracellular signalling, thrombocyte function, protein degradation). Whether or not these differences have clinical bearings (and among which patient populations) remains to be determined. PMID:21714872

  9. Human Insulin Modulation of Escherichia coli Adherence and Chemotaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Karolina Klosowska; Plotkin, Balbina J.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli exhibited increased hydrophobicity and mannose-resistant epithelial cell adherence after growth in the presence of human insulin (2 µU mLˉ1 or 200 µUmLˉ1 insulin, respectively) with glucose (100 mg dLˉ1). Capsule production and hemagglutination were unaffected by insulin and glucose. Chemotactic attraction to glucose as compared to insulin or glucose alone was enhanced by the presence of insulin. Insulin alone (200 µU mLˉ1) was a chemorepellent and inhibit...

  10. Ingested human insulin inhibits the mosquito NF-¿B-dependent immune response to Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    We showed previously that ingested human insulin activates the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway in Anopheles stephensi and increases the susceptibility of these mosquitoes to Plasmodium falciparum. In other organisms insulin can alter immune responsiveness through regulation of NF-kB transcription fa...

  11. Labile disulfide bonds in human placental insulin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disulfide crosslinking pattern of human placental insulin receptor was investigated using selective reduction with tributylphosphine followed by alkylation with N-[3H]ethylmaleimide. Insulin receptor contains a single sulfhydryl group in each β subunit whose alkylation with N-[3H]ethylmaleimide inhibits receptor autophosphorylation. Alkylation is partially inhibited by ATP or the nonhydrolyzable substrate analog adenosine 5'-[β,γ-imido]triphosphate when the nucleotides are added as MN2+ complexes. Neither insulin nor 6 M guanidinium chloride renders additional sulfhydryl groups accessible to alkylation. When the receptor is reduced under drastic conditions with tributylphosphine in guanidinium chloride, 32 or the 37 sulfhydryl groups in the receptor's α subunit can be alkylated with N-[3H]ethylmaleimide. Surprisingly only three of the 10 cysteines in the β subunit become titratable under identical conditions. By using highly selective reducing conditions, the authors were able to determine quantitatively the maximum number of disulfide bridges that link the two αβ halves to form the tetrameric structures and those that couple the α to the β subunits. Liberation of two sulfhydryl groups in the α and one in the β subunit resulted in formation of αβ dimers. Free β subunit was formed when additional disulfide bond was reduced. Three models of the arrangement of the labile disulfide bonds, consistent with these findings, are proposed

  12. Heterogeneity of human plasma insulin: techniques for separating immunoreactive components and their determination by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When human plasma is filtered on Sephadex G-SO fine, insulin immunoreactivity is recovered in two peaks: 'big insulin', the higher molecular weight component and 'little insulin', the lower molecular component, having elution volumes that correspond to those of porcine proinsulin 125I and porcine insulin 125I respectively. The presence of another form of immunoreactive insulin 'big big insulin' was detected from an insuloma suspect and its elution pattern corresponding to serum albumin. The eluates correspondent to 'big' and 'little' insulin as well as 'big big' component were assayed by radioimmunoassay using crystalline human insulin as a standard, porcine insulin 125 tracer and anti insulin serum. The antibody, raised in guinea-pigs, was sensitive and potent being adequate for the assay. The reactivity of insulin and proinsulin was tested against the antibody. The relative proportions of several components of total immunoreactive insulin in plasma were studied in basal conditions in five normal subjects and in the patient JSC with pancreatic insulin-secreting tumor as well as after glucose stimuli in all tolbutamide in JSC. (author)

  13. Insulin signaling and glucose transport in insulin resistant human skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Håkan KR

    2005-01-01

    Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is a hallmark feature of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate downstream intermediates in the insulin signaling pathway in an attempt to characterize the molecular mechanism of skeletal muscle insulin resistance in Type 2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from healthy and Type 2 diabetic subjects before and after an in vivo hyperinsulinemic infusion. Insulin infusion increased the...

  14. Efficacy and Safety of Biphasic Insulin Aspart 30/70 in Type 2 Diabetes Suboptimally Controlled on Oral Antidiabetic Therapy in Korea: A Multicenter, Open-Label, Single-Arm Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee-Ho Song

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe purpose of this study was to evaluate change in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, side effects, and quality of life (QOL after a 16-week treatment period with Biphasic insulin aspart 30/70 (BIasp30 in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM who had been suboptimally controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs.MethodsThe study consisted of a 4-week titration period when concurrent OAD(s were replaced with BIasp30 and followed by a 12-week maintenance period. All patients completed the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire at the beginning and the end of the trial. Hypoglycemic episodes were recorded by the patient throughout the trial.ResultsSixty patients were included, of whom 55 patients (92% completed the full 16-week treatment period. Seven-point blood glucose was significantly improved as compared with the baseline, except for the postlunch blood glucose level. HbA1c at the end of period was significantly improved from 9.2% to 8.2% (P<0.001. Eleven percent (n=6 of patients achieved HbA1c values ≤6.5% and 22% (n=12 of patients achieved <7.0%. There were 3.4 episodes/patients-year of minor hypoglycemia and 0.05 episodes/patients-year of major hypoglycemia. QOL showed significant changes only in the acceptability of high blood glucose category (P=0.003.ConclusionTreatment with once or twice daily BIasp30 may be an option for the patients with T2DM suboptimally controlled with OADs in Korea. However, considering the low number of patients achieving the HbA1c target and the high postlunch blood glucose levels, additional management with another modality may be required for optimal control.

  15. Insulin Promotes Glycogen Storage and Cell Proliferation in Primary Human Astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Heni; Hennige, Anita M.; Andreas Peter; Dorothea Siegel-Axel; Anna-Maria Ordelheide; Norbert Krebs; Fausto Machicao; Andreas Fritsche; Hans-Ulrich Häring; Harald Staiger

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In the human brain, there are at least as many astrocytes as neurons. Astrocytes are known to modulate neuronal function in several ways. Thus, they may also contribute to cerebral insulin actions. Therefore, we examined whether primary human astrocytes are insulin-responsive and whether their metabolic functions are affected by the hormone. METHODS: Commercially available Normal Human Astrocytes were grown in the recommended medium. Major players in the insulin signaling pathwa...

  16. Metabolic rhythms in adolescents with diabetes during treatment with porcine or human insulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Hocking, M D; Crase, J; Rayner, P H; Nattrass, M

    1986-01-01

    Metabolic rhythms were studied over 24 hours in eight adolescent diabetic patients during treatment with porcine insulin and after transfer to human insulin. Despite an increase in dose with human insulin no significant changes were found in fasting blood glucose, 24h mean blood glucose, or glycosylated haemoglobin concentrations. Significantly higher 24h mean blood lactate concentrations and lower total ketone bodies and glycerol concentrations were observed during treatment with human insul...

  17. Fetal and perinatal outcomes in type 1 diabetes pregnancy: a randomized study comparing insulin aspart with human insulin in 322 subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hod, Moshe; Damm, Peter; Kaaja, Risto;

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was a comparison of insulin aspart (IAsp) with human insulin (HI) in basal-bolus therapy with neutral protamine Hagedorn for fetal and perinatal outcomes of type 1 diabetes in pregnancy.......The objective of the study was a comparison of insulin aspart (IAsp) with human insulin (HI) in basal-bolus therapy with neutral protamine Hagedorn for fetal and perinatal outcomes of type 1 diabetes in pregnancy....

  18. Ingested Human Insulin Inhibits the Mosquito NF-κB-Dependent Immune Response to Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corby-Harris, Vanessa; Green, Gabriel P.; Smithers, Hannah M.; Cheung, Kong W.; Riehle, Michael A.; Luckhart, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    We showed previously that ingested human insulin activates the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway in Anopheles stephensi and increases the susceptibility of these mosquitoes to Plasmodium falciparum. In other organisms, insulin can alter immune responsiveness through regulation of NF-κB transcription factors, critical elements for innate immunity that are also central to mosquito immunity. We show here that insulin signaling decreased expression of NF-κB-regulated immune genes in mosquito cells stimulated with either bacterial or malarial soluble products. Further, human insulin suppressed mosquito immunity through sustained phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation, since inhibition of this pathway led to decreased parasite development in the mosquito. Together, these data demonstrate that activation of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway by ingested human insulin can alter NF-κB-dependent immunity, and ultimately the susceptibility, of mosquitoes to P. falciparum. PMID:22473605

  19. Insulin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially as a result of taking non-human (animal or synthetic) insulin, these can interfere with insulin testing. In this case, a C-peptide may be performed as an alternative way to evaluate insulin production. Note also that ...

  20. Effects of insulin detemir and NPH insulin on body weight and appetite-regulating brain regions in human type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa W van Golen

    Full Text Available Studies in rodents have demonstrated that insulin in the central nervous system induces satiety. In humans, these effects are less well established. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that causes less weight gain than other basal insulin formulations, including the current standard intermediate-long acting Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH insulin. Due to its structural modifications, which render the molecule more lipophilic, it was proposed that insulin detemir enters the brain more readily than other insulins. The aim of this study was to investigate whether insulin detemir treatment differentially modifies brain activation in response to food stimuli as compared to NPH insulin. In addition, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF insulin levels were measured after both treatments. Brain responses to viewing food and non-food pictures were measured using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in 32 type 1 diabetic patients, after each of two 12-week treatment periods with insulin detemir and NPH insulin, respectively, both combined with prandial insulin aspart. CSF insulin levels were determined in a subgroup. Insulin detemir decreased body weight by 0.8 kg and NPH insulin increased weight by 0.5 kg (p = 0.02 for difference, while both treatments resulted in similar glycemic control. After treatment with insulin detemir, as compared to NPH insulin, brain activation was significantly lower in bilateral insula in response to visual food stimuli, compared to NPH (p = 0.02 for right and p = 0.05 for left insula. Also, CSF insulin levels were higher compared to those with NPH insulin treatment (p = 0.003. Our findings support the hypothesis that in type 1 diabetic patients, the weight sparing effect of insulin detemir may be mediated by its enhanced action on the central nervous system, resulting in blunted activation in bilateral insula, an appetite-regulating brain region, in response to food stimuli.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00626080.

  1. Comparison of the effects of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin on glucose and leucine kinetics in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Laager, R; Ninnis, R; Keller, U

    1993-01-01

    To compare the metabolic effects of elevated plasma concentrations of IGF-I and insulin, overnight-fasted normal subjects were studied twice, once receiving IGF-I and once insulin at doses that resulted in identical increases in glucose uptake during 8-h euglycemic clamping. Recombinant human IGF-I or insulin were infused in one group at high doses (30 micrograms/kg per h IGF-I or 0.23 nmol/kg per h insulin) and in another group at low doses (5 micrograms/kg per h IGF-I or 0.04 nmol/kg per h ...

  2. Lack of the architectural factor HMGA1 causes insulin resistance and diabetes in humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Daniela; Chiefari, Eusebio; Fedele, Monica; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Brunetti, Leonardo; Paonessa, Francesco; Manfioletti, Guidalberto; Barbetti, Fabrizio; Brunetti, Arturo; Croce, Carlo M; Fusco, Alfredo; Brunetti, Antonio

    2005-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a widespread disease, affecting millions of people globally. Although genetics and environmental factors seem to have a role, the cause of this metabolic disorder is largely unknown. Here we report a genetic flaw that markedly reduced the intracellular expression of the high mobility group A1 (HMGA1) protein, and adversely affected insulin receptor expression in cells and tissues from four subjects with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Restoration of HMGA1 protein expression in subjects' cells enhanced INSR gene transcription, and restored cell-surface insulin receptor protein expression and insulin-binding capacity. Loss of Hmga1 expression, induced in mice by disrupting the Hmga1 gene, considerably decreased insulin receptor expression in the major targets of insulin action, largely impaired insulin signaling and severely reduced insulin secretion, causing a phenotype characteristic of human type 2 diabetes. PMID:15924147

  3. Mecasermin (recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Arlan L

    2009-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) exercises its growth effects by stimulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) synthesis in the liver (endocrine IGF-I) and by inducing chondrocyte differentiation/replication and local production of IGF-I (paracrine/autocrine IGF-I). Injectable recombinant human (rh)IGF-I (mecasermin) has been available for nearly 20 years for treatment of the rare instances of GH insensitivity caused by GH receptor defects or GH-inhibiting antibodies. Full restoration of normal growth, as occurs with rhGH replacement of GH deficiency, is not seen, presumably because only the endocrine deficiency is addressed. RhIGF-I has also been effective as an insulin-sensitizing agent in severe insulin-resistant conditions. Although the insulin-sensitizing effect may benefit both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, there are no ongoing clinical trials because of concern about risk of retinopathy and other complications. Promotion of rhIGF-I for treatment of idiopathic short stature has been intensive, with neither data nor rationale suggesting that there might be a better response than has been documented with rhGH. Other applications that have either been considered or are undergoing clinical trial are based on the ubiquitous tissue-building properties of IGF-I and include chronic liver disease, cystic fibrosis, wound healing, AIDS muscle wasting, burns, osteoporosis, Crohn's disease, anorexia nervosa, Werner syndrome, X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, Alzheimer's disease, muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, hearing loss prevention, spinal cord injury, cardiovascular protection, and prevention of retinopathy of prematurity. The most frequent side effect is hypoglycemia, which is readily controlled by administration with meals. Other common adverse effects involve hyperplasia of lymphoid tissue, which may require tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy, accumulation of body fat, and coarsening of facies. The anti-apoptotic properties of IGF-I are implicated in cancer

  4. Preparation and In Vitro and In Vivo Performance of Magnesium Ion Substituted Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Spherical Microscaffolds as Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Microcarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hyun Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium ion substituted biphasic calcium phosphate (Mg-BCP bioceramic microscaffolds with spherical and porous morphology were successfully prepared using in situ coprecipitation and rotary spray drying atomization process for application of tissue engineering combined with human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAT-MSCs. After 4 weeks of immersion in Hanks’ balanced salt solution (HBSS, Mg-BCP micro-scaffolds showed the enhanced biodegradation and bioactivity due to the substituted Mg2+ ion present in the BCP structure. In this study, it was observed that hAT-MSCs have clearly attached on the surface of Mg-BCP micro-scaffolds. In addition, Mg-BCP micro-scaffolds exhibited the improved biocompatibility and osteoconductivity via in vitro and in vivo biological tests with hAT-MSCs. Therefore, these bioceramic micro-scaffolds had potential to be used as hAT-MSCs microcarriers for biomedical applications.

  5. mRNA related to insulin family in human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have previously reported that human term placenta contains mRNA displaying sequence homology to a rat preproinsulin I cDNA clone (p119). When placental poly(A+) RNA was analyzed for homology to p119 by RNA/DNA blot hybridization, prominent hybridization was observed which was found by densitometric analysis to be three-fold higher than control. To further characterize this insulin-like message, a cDNA library was generated (approx.7000 transformants) using normal term cesarean-sectioned tissue to prepare placental poly(A+) RNA templates. Five hundred transformants were initially screened by colony hybridization using a 32P-labeled rat preproinsulin I cDNA as probe. Of the ten initial positives obtained, three were found to be true positives based on Southern hybridization analyses of the recombinant plasmids. Using Taq I digested pBr322 as a size marker, the cDNAs were found to be approximately 300 bp in length. Preliminary DNA sequencing using the Sanger dideoxy chain termination method has revealed that one of these clones displays significant homology to the 5' region of human insulin-like growth factors I and II

  6. Insulin resistance alters islet morphology in nondiabetic humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezza, Teresa; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Sorice, Gian Pio;

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by poor glucose uptake in metabolic tissues and manifests when insulin secretion fails to cope with worsening insulin resistance. In addition to its effects on skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue metabolism, it is evident that insulin resistance also affects...... pancreatic β-cells. To directly examine the alterations that occur in islet morphology as part of an adaptive mechanism to insulin resistance, we evaluated pancreas samples obtained during pancreatoduodenectomy from nondiabetic subjects who were insulin-resistant or insulin-sensitive. We also compared...... insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and incretin levels between the two groups. We report an increased islet size and an elevated number of β- and α-cells that resulted in an altered β-cell-to-α-cell area in the insulin- resistant group. Our data in this series of studies suggest that neogenesis from...

  7. Insulin promotes glycogen storage and cell proliferation in primary human astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Heni

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In the human brain, there are at least as many astrocytes as neurons. Astrocytes are known to modulate neuronal function in several ways. Thus, they may also contribute to cerebral insulin actions. Therefore, we examined whether primary human astrocytes are insulin-responsive and whether their metabolic functions are affected by the hormone. METHODS: Commercially available Normal Human Astrocytes were grown in the recommended medium. Major players in the insulin signaling pathway were detected by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. Phosphorylation events were detected by phospho-specific antibodies. Glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis were assessed using radio-labeled glucose. Glycogen content was assessed by histochemistry. Lactate levels were measured enzymatically. Cell proliferation was assessed by WST-1 assay. RESULTS: We detected expression of key proteins for insulin signaling, such as insulin receptor β-subunit, insulin receptor substrat-1, Akt/protein kinase B and glycogen synthase kinase 3, in human astrocytes. Akt was phosphorylated and PI-3 kinase activity increased following insulin stimulation in a dose-dependent manner. Neither increased glucose uptake nor lactate secretion after insulin stimulation could be evidenced in this cell type. However, we found increased insulin-dependent glucose incorporation into glycogen. Furthermore, cell numbers increased dose-dependently upon insulin treatment. DISCUSSION: This study demonstrated that human astrocytes are insulin-responsive at the molecular level. We identified glycogen synthesis and cell proliferation as biological responses of insulin signaling in these brain cells. Hence, this cell type may contribute to the effects of insulin in the human brain.

  8. Differential roles of CIDEA and CIDEC in insulin-induced anti-apoptosis and lipid droplet formation in human adipocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Minoru; Nagasawa, Michiaki; Hara, Tomoko; Ide, Tomohiro; Murakami, Koji

    2010-01-01

    Both insulin and the cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector (CIDE) family play important roles in apoptosis and lipid droplet formation. However, regulation of the CIDE family by insulin and the contribution of the CIDE family to insulin actions remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether insulin regulates expression of the CIDE family and which subtypes contribute to insulin-induced anti-apoptosis and lipid droplet formation in human adipocytes. Insulin decreased CIDE...

  9. Inhaled human insulin (Exubera®): clinical profile and patient considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, Anthony H.; Bellary, Sri

    2007-01-01

    Inhaled human insulin (Exubera®) is a rapid-acting regular human insulin administered by oral inhalation before meals. It provides a non-invasive alternative to multiple subcutaneous injections for the treatment of hyperglycemia in adult patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Compared with subcutaneous rapid-acting insulin analogs, Exubera provides equivalent HbA1c control. As a monotherapy or in combination with oral agents, Exubera also provides greater glycemic control than oral agents ...

  10. Counter-regulatory hormone responses to spontaneous hypoglycaemia during treatment with insulin Aspart or human soluble insulin. A double-blinded randomised cross-over study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock-Jacobsen, Iben; Vind, B F; Korsholm, L;

    2011-01-01

    To compare insulin Aspart and human insulin with respect to glycaemic control, hypoglycaemic frequency and counter-regulatory responses to spontaneous hypoglycaemia. Methods: Glycaemic control, hypoglycaemic frequency, p-insulin concentrations, insulin dosages and patients’ satisfaction were...... examined in a randomized, double-blinded cross-over study for two periods of 8 weeks. Sixteen patients with type 1 diabetes were subjected to three daily injections of human soluble insulin or Aspart in addition to Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin twice daily. Each intervention period was followed...... by hospitalization where episodes of spontaneous hypoglycaemia and counter-regulatory hormone responses were evaluated from frequently obtained blood samples. Results: No difference between soluble insulin and insulin Aspart was found regarding HbA1c (7.0 0.2 vs. 7.0 0.2%, ns), hypoglycaemic...

  11. MEK1 and MEK2 differentially regulate human insulin-and insulin glargine-induced human bladder cancer T24 cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shan-ying; LIANG Ying; LIN Tian-xin; SU Fang; LIANG Wei-wen; Uwe Heemann; LI Yan

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased risk of bladder cancer has been reported in diabetic patients.This study was to investigate the roles of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1 and 2 in the regulation of human insulin-and insulin glargine-induced proliferation of human bladder cancer T24 cells.Methods In the absence or presence of a selective inhibitor for MEK1 (PD98059) or a specific siRNA for MEK2 (siMEK2),with or without addition of insulin or glargine,T24 cell proliferation was evaluated by cell counting kit (CCK)-8 assay.Protein expression of MEK2,phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt was analyzed by Western blotting.Results T24 cell proliferation was promoted by PD98059 at 5-20 μmol/L,inhibited by siMEK2 at 25-100 nmol/L.PD98059 and siMEK2 remarkably reduced phosphorylated ERK1/2.Insulin-and glargine-induced T24 cell proliferation was enhanced by PD98059,suppressed while not blocked by siMEK2.Insulin-and glargine-induced ERK1/2 activation was blocked by PD98059 or siMEK2 treatment,whereas activation of Akt was not affected.Conclusion MEK1 inhibits while MEK2 contributes to normal and human insulin-and insulin glargine-induced human bladder cancer T24 cell proliferation.

  12. Comparative studies on insulin binding human erythrocytes by immunoradiometric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood cells have been widely used to evaluate the status of the insulin receptor in man. The receptors exhibited competitive inhibition curves and nonlinear Scatchard plots similar to those reported for insulin target tissues, such as the hepatocyte and the adipocytes. This study demonstrated specific insulin binding by the erythrocytes (RBCs) of infants, children and adults. The total insulin bound by the RBCs from both children and adults gave a small difference over the physiologic range of insulin concentrations. blood RBCs of infants showed greater numbers of insulin receptors per cell and significant increase in the total amount of insulin binding than that in either children (ps for of infants, children and adults were similar to each other. It is clear that, the measurement of insulin binding by RBCs may be particularly useful in the study of infants and children with disorders of carbohydrate metabolism to elucidate the role, if any, of abnormal receptor function in their conditions

  13. Brain Insulin Resistance at the Crossroads of Metabolic and Cognitive Disorders in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Stephanie; Heni, Martin; Hallschmid, Manfred; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    Ever since the brain was identified as an insulin-sensitive organ, evidence has rapidly accumulated that insulin action in the brain produces multiple behavioral and metabolic effects, influencing eating behavior, peripheral metabolism, and cognition. Disturbances in brain insulin action can be observed in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), as well as in aging and dementia. Decreases in insulin sensitivity of central nervous pathways, i.e., brain insulin resistance, may therefore constitute a joint pathological feature of metabolic and cognitive dysfunctions. Modern neuroimaging methods have provided new means of probing brain insulin action, revealing the influence of insulin on both global and regional brain function. In this review, we highlight recent findings on brain insulin action in humans and its impact on metabolism and cognition. Furthermore, we elaborate on the most prominent factors associated with brain insulin resistance, i.e., obesity, T2D, genes, maternal metabolism, normal aging, inflammation, and dementia, and on their roles regarding causes and consequences of brain insulin resistance. We also describe the beneficial effects of enhanced brain insulin signaling on human eating behavior and cognition and discuss potential applications in the treatment of metabolic and cognitive disorders. PMID:27489306

  14. Effects of insulin on human β-adrenoceptors

    OpenAIRE

    Sager, G

    1990-01-01

    The effect of insulin on β-adrenoceptor stimulation and binding in mononuclear leucocytes from healthy subjects was studied. After 1 min exposure to insulin, the sensitivity and maximum response to (-)-isoprenaline and the number of β-adrenoceptors increased. After 35 min exposure to insulin, the sensitivity and maximal response to (-)-isoprenaline stimulation were lower than the pretreatment values. The β-adrenoceptor density was similar to the control value after 35 min exposure to insulin....

  15. Insulin action in human adipose tissue in acromegaly.

    OpenAIRE

    Bolinder, J.; Ostman, J; Werner, S.; Arner, P.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in acromegaly were investigated. Adipose tissue was obtained from nine patients with acromegaly who had in vivo insulin resistance and from 14 matched healthy control subjects. Receptor binding and the antilipolytic effect of insulin were determined in isolated fat cells. Insulin-induced glucose oxidation at a physiological hexose concentration was investigated in fat segments. In fat cells obtained from acromegaly patients after an overnight fast,...

  16. Development of RP-HPLC for analysis of human insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work is to develop a simple and sensitive method for analysis of human insulin injection by using reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography technique. A reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography method with UV-detection at room temperature has been developed for the analysis of insulin from formulation. Hypersil BDS C-18 was used as stationary phase, and mobile phase consisted of 60 volume of 1 mmol sodium sulphate and 0.2% triethylamine in water, pH 3.2 adjusted by phosphoric acid, and 40 volume of acetonitrile. The eluent was monitored with a UV detector set at 214 nm with a flow rate of 1 ml/min, and sample size of 20 µl were carried out at room temperature all over the study. The method produced linear response over the concentration range of 10-100 µg/ml, with a mean recovery of 97 ± 0.31% as well as average intra- and inter-day variations of 1.35 and 5.13% respectively. The limits of detection and quantitation of the method were 0.25 and 0.75 µg/ml respectively. Considering the analysis specifications, the system is suitable for direct analysis of routine formulations and stability studies.

  17. Transcriptional directionality of the human insulin-degrading enzyme promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lang; Wang, Pan; Ding, Qingyang; Wang, Zhao

    2013-10-01

    Unidirectional promoters dominate among mammalian genomes. However, the mechanism through which the transcriptional directionality of promoters is accomplished remains to be clarified. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a ubiquitously expressed zinc metalloprotease, whose promoter contains a CpG island. We previously showed that the basal promoter region of mouse IDE has bidirectional transcriptional activity, but an upstream promoter element blocks its antisense transcription. Therefore, we wonder whether the human IDE promoter contains an analogous element. Similarly, the basal promoter region of human IDE (-102 ~ +173 and -196 ~ +173 relative to the transcription start site) showed bidirectional transcriptional activity. However, the region from -348 to +173 could only be transcribed from the normal orientation, implying that an upstream promoter element between -348 and -196 blocks the antisense transcription of the human IDE promoter. Through promoter deletion and mutagenesis analysis, we mapped this element precisely and found that the upstream promoter element locates between -318 and -304. Furthermore, the transcription-blocking elements in the mouse and human IDE promoters inhibited the transcription of the SV40 promoter when put downstream of it. In conclusion, we identify an upstream promoter element which blocks the antisense transcription of the human IDE promoter. Our studies are helpful to clarify the transcriptional directionality of promoters.

  18. New method to differentiate human peripheral blood monocytes into insulin producing cells: Human hematosphere culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Jin; Yang, Ji Min; Choi, Jae-Il; Yun, Ji-Yeon; Jang, Jae Hee; Kim, Joonoh; Kim, Ju-Young; Oh, Il-Young; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2012-02-24

    Strategy to differentiate stem cells into insulin producing cells (IPCs) in vitro has been a promising one to get cell source of β-cell replacement therapy for diabetes. It has been suggested that islets and neurons share features and nestin-positive cells could differentiate into IPCs. We have recently developed a three-dimensional culture system using human peripheral blood cells named as blood-born hematosphere (BBHS). Here we showed that most of BBHS were composed of nestin-positive cells. Under the four-stage differentiation protocol for IPCs, we plated nestin-positive BBHS onto fibronectin-coated dish. These cells form islet-like clusters and most of them expressed insulin. Pancreatic specific genes were turned on, such as transcription factors (Pdx-1, Ngn3 and Nkx6.1), genes related to endocrine function (Glut-2 and PC2) or β cell function (Kir6.2, SUR1). Furthermore islet differentiation was confirmed by dithizone (DTZ) staining to detect zinc ion which binds insulin protein within the cells. Finally, IPCs derived from BBHS showed capability to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Taken together, our novel protocol successfully induced islet-like human insulin producing cells out of BBHS. This strategy of ex vivo expansion of IPCs using BBHS provides an autologous therapeutic cell source for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:22310720

  19. Human insulin dynamics in women: a physiologically based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael; Tura, Andrea; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Pacini, Giovanni; D'Argenio, David Z

    2016-02-01

    Currently available models of insulin dynamics are mostly based on the classical compartmental structure and, thus, their physiological utility is limited. In this work, we describe the development of a physiologically based model and its application to data from 154 patients who underwent an insulin-modified intravenous glucose tolerance test (IM-IVGTT). To determine the time profile of endogenous insulin delivery without using C-peptide data and to evaluate the transcapillary transport of insulin, the hepatosplanchnic, renal, and peripheral beds were incorporated into the circulatory model as separate subsystems. Physiologically reasonable population mean estimates were obtained for all estimated model parameters, including plasma volume, interstitial volume of the peripheral circulation (mainly skeletal muscle), uptake clearance into the interstitial space, hepatic and renal clearance, as well as total insulin delivery into plasma. The results indicate that, at a population level, the proposed physiologically based model provides a useful description of insulin disposition, which allows for the assessment of muscle insulin uptake.

  20. MCF-7 human mammary adenocarcinoma cells exhibit augmented responses to human insulin on a collagen IV surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Listov-Saabye, Nicolai; Jensen, Marianne Blirup; Kiehr, Benedicte;

    2009-01-01

    Human mammary cell lines are extensively used for preclinical safety assessment of insulin analogs. However, it is essentially unknown how mitogenic responses can be optimized in mammary cell-based systems. We developed an insulin mitogenicity assay in MCF-7 human mammary adenocarcinoma cells, un...

  1. Protein crystal growth in microgravity review of large scale temperature induction method: bovine insulin, human insulin and human alpha interferon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Marianna M.; Bishop, John Bradford; Nagabhushan, Tattanahalli L.; Reichert, Paul; Smith, G. David; DeLucas, Lawrence J.

    1996-10-01

    The protein crystal growth facility (PCF) is space-flight hardware that accommodates large scale protein crystal growth experiments using temperature change as the inductive step. Recent modifications include specialized instrumentation for monitoring crystal nucleation with laser light scattering. This paper reviews results from the PCF's first seven flights on the Space Shuttle, the last with laser light scattering instrumentation. The PCF's objective is twofold: (1) production of high quality protein crystals for X-ray analysis and subsequent structure based drug design and (2) preparation of a large quantity of relatively contaminant free crystals for use as time-release protein pharmaceuticals. The first three Shuttle flights with bovine insulin constituted the PCF's proof of concept, demonstrating that the space-grown crystals were larger and diffracted to higher resolution than their earth-grown counterparts. The later four PCF missions were used to grow recombinant human insulin crystals for X-ray analysis and to continue productions trials aimed at the development of a processing facility for crystalline recombinant alpha interferon.

  2. Ultra-Rapid Absorption of Recombinant Human Insulin Induced by Zinc Chelation and Surface Charge Masking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Roderike; Hauser, Robert; Li, Ming; De Souza, Errol; Feldstein, Robert; Seibert, Richard; Ozhan, Koray; Kashyap, Nandini; Steiner, Solomon

    2012-01-01

    Background In order to enhance the absorption of insulin following subcutaneous injection, excipients were selected to hasten the dissociation rate of insulin hexamers and reduce their tendency to reassociate postinjection. A novel formulation of recombinant human insulin containing citrate and disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) has been tested in clinic and has a very rapid onset of action in patients with diabetes. In order to understand the basis for the rapid insulin absorption, in vitro experiments using analytical ultracentrifugation, protein charge assessment, and light scattering have been performed with this novel human insulin formulation and compared with a commercially available insulin formulation [regular human insulin (RHI)]. Method Analytical ultracentrifugation and dynamic light scattering were used to infer the relative distributions of insulin monomers, dimers, and hexamers in the formulations. Electrical resistance of the insulin solutions characterized the overall net surface charge on the insulin complexes in solution. Results The results of these experiments demonstrate that the zinc chelating (disodium EDTA) and charge-masking (citrate) excipients used in the formulation changed the properties of RHI in solution, making it dissociate more rapidly into smaller, charge-masked monomer/dimer units, which are twice as rapidly absorbed following subcutaneous injection than RHI (Tmax 60 ± 43 versus 120 ± 70 min). Conclusions The combination of rapid dissociation of insulin hexamers upon dilution due to the zinc chelating effects of disodium EDTA followed by the inhibition of insulin monomer/dimer reassociation due to the charge-masking effects of citrate provides the basis for the ultra-rapid absorption of this novel insulin formulation. PMID:22920799

  3. Isolation of the human insulin-like growth factor genes: insulin-like growth factor II and insulin genes are contiguous.

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, G I; Gerhard, D S; Fong, N. M.; Sanchez-Pescador, R; Rall, L B

    1985-01-01

    Overlapping recombinant clones that encompass the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I and II genes have been isolated from a human genomic DNA library. Each gene is present once per haploid genome; the IGF-I gene spans greater than 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) and the IGF-II gene is at least 15 kbp. The exon-intron organization of these genes is similar, each having four exons, which is one more than the related insulin gene. Comparison of the restriction endonuclease cleavage maps of the IGF-II an...

  4. Generation-dependent effect of PAMAM dendrimers on human insulin fibrillation and thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacka, Olga; Milowska, Katarzyna; Belica-Pacha, Sylwia; Palecz, Bartlomiej; Šipošová, Katarina; Gazova, Zuzana; Bryszewska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the effect of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers of various generations on the thermal stability and fibrillation of human insulin. Thermostability of human insulin used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), which showed two phase-transitions for insulin at 60 and 82°C. After adding dendrimers at 0.6 μmol/l, the first peaks disappeared and the second peaks were higher. We posited that, in the presence of dendrimers, the dimers in the solution were transformed into hexamers. The effect of dendrimers on insulin fibrillation was monitored by measuring ThT fluorescence, and visualization of insulin fibrils by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effect of PAMAM dendrimers on insulin fibrillation was strongly dependent on the dendrimers generation and dendrimer:protein ratio. PMID:26598047

  5. Insulin binding properties of normal and transformed human epidermal cultured keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin binding to its receptors was studied in cultured normal and transformed (A431 line) human epidermal keratinocytes. The specific binding was a temperature-dependent, saturable process. Normal keratinocytes possess a mean value of about 80,000 receptors per cell. Fifteen hours exposure of the cells to insulin lowered their receptor number (about 65% loss in available sites); these reappeared when the hormone was removed from the culture medium. In the A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line, there is a net decrease in insulin binding (84% of the initial bound/free hormone ratio in comparison with normal cells) essentially related to a loss in receptor affinity for insulin. Thus, cultured human keratinocytes which express insulin receptors may be a useful tool in understanding skin pathology related to insulin disorders

  6. Development of a transgenic mouse model to study the immunogenicity of recombinant human insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torosantucci, Riccardo; Brinks, Vera; Kijanka, Grzegorz; Halim, Liem Andhyk; Sauerborn, Melody; Schellekens, Huub; Jiskoot, Wim

    2014-05-01

    Mouse models are commonly used to assess the immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins and to investigate the immunological processes leading to antidrug antibodies. The aim of this work was to develop a transgenic (TG) Balb/c mouse model for evaluating the immunogenicity of recombinant human insulin (insulin) formulations. Validation of the model was performed by measuring the antibody response against plain and particulate insulin in TG and nontransgenic (NTG) mice. Intraperitoneal administration of insulin (20 μg/dose, 12 doses over a period of 4 weeks) did not break the immune tolerance of the TG mice, whereas it did elicit antibodies in NTG mice. The immune tolerance of TG mice could be circumvented, albeit at low titers, by administering insulin covalently bound to 50-nm polystyrene nanoparticles. The TG mouse model was employed to compare the immunogenicity of oxidized aggregated insulin, oxidized nonaggregated insulin, and three commercially available formulations of insulin variants (i.e., Levemir®, Insulatard®, and Actrapid®). Oxidized insulin, aggregated or nonaggregated, was moderately immunogenic in TG mice (50% and 33% responders, respectively), whereas the immunogenicity of the commercial formulations was low. This model can be used to compare the immunogenicity of insulin formulations and to study immune mechanisms of antibody formation against insulin. PMID:24619587

  7. Short- and long-term glucocorticoid treatment enhances insulin signalling in human subcutaneous adipose tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Gathercole, LL; Morgan, SA; Bujalska, IJ; Stewart, PM; Tomlinson, JW

    2011-01-01

    Background: Endogenous or exogenous glucocorticoid (GC) excess (Cushing's syndrome) is characterized by increased adiposity and insulin resistance. Although GCs cause global insulin resistance in vivo, we have previously shown that GCs are able to augment insulin action in human adipose tissue, contrasting with their action in skeletal muscle. Cushing's syndrome develops following chronic GC exposure and, in addition, is a state of hyperinsulinemia. Objectives: We have therefore compared the ...

  8. Bioactives of Artemisia dracunculus L enhance cellular insulin signaling in primary human skeletal muscle culture

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhong Q.; RIBNICKY, DAVID; Zhang, Xian H.; Raskin, Ilya; Yu, Yongmei; Cefalu, William T.

    2008-01-01

    An alcoholic extract of Artemisia dracunculus L (PMI 5011) has been shown to decrease glucose and improve insulin levels in animal models, suggesting an ability to enhance insulin sensitivity. We sought to assess the cellular mechanism by which this botanical affects carbohydrate metabolism in primary human skeletal muscle culture. We measured basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, glycogen accumulation, phosphoinositide 3 (PI-3) kinase activity, and Akt phosphorylation in primary skele...

  9. Celastrol Protects against Antimycin A-Induced Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad Hafizi Abu Bakar; Kian-Kai Cheng; Mohamad Roji Sarmidi; Harisun Yaakob; Hasniza Zaman Huri

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are widely accepted as key hallmarks of obesity-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the functional roles of an anti-inflammatory compound, celastrol, in mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance induced by antimycin A (AMA) in human skeletal muscle cells. We found that celastrol treatment improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake activity of AMA-treated cells, apparently via PI3K/Akt pathwa...

  10. Defining human insulin-like growth factor I gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Aditi; Alzhanov, Damir; Rotwein, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) plays an essential role in controlling somatic growth and in regulating multiple physiological processes in humans and other species. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), a conserved, secreted 70-amino acid peptide, is a critical mediator of many of the biological effects of GH. Previous studies have demonstrated that GH rapidly and potently promotes IGF-I gene expression in rodents and in some other mammals through the transcription factor STAT5b, leading to accumulation of IGF-I mRNAs and production of IGF-I. Despite this progress, very little is known about how GH or other trophic factors control human IGF1 gene expression, in large part because of the absence of any cellular model systems that robustly express IGF-I. Here, we have addressed mechanisms of regulation of human IGF-I by GH after generating cells in which the IGF1 chromosomal locus has been incorporated into a mouse cell line. Using this model, we found that physiological levels of GH rapidly stimulate human IGF1 gene transcription and identify several potential transcriptional enhancers in chromatin that bind STAT5b in a GH-regulated way. Each of the putative enhancers also activates a human IGF1 gene promoter in reconstitution experiments in the presence of the GH receptor, STAT5b, and GH. Thus we have developed a novel experimental platform that now may be used to determine how human IGF1 gene expression is controlled under different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27406741

  11. Calcineurin inhibitors acutely improve insulin sensitivity without affecting insulin secretion in healthy human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øzbay, Aygen; Møller, Niels; Juhl, Claus;

    2012-01-01

    of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) ciclosporin (CsA) and tacrolimus (Tac) has improved the outcome of organ transplants, but complications such as new onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation (NODAT) cause impairment of survival rates. The relative contribution of each CNI to the pathogenesis and development.......047), whereas first phase and pulsatile insulin secretion were unaffected. Coinciding with the CNI induced improved insulin sensitivity, glucose oxidation rates increased, while insulin clearance rates decreased, only non-significantly. Tac singularly lowered hsCRP concentrations, otherwise no changes were...

  12. Development of a Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Human Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor and Insulin Receptor Isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Clare A; Rowzee, Anne M; Choe, Gina H; Saleh, Farrah L; Radford, Caitlin C; Taylor, Hugh S; Wood, Teresa L

    2016-04-01

    The biological activity of insulin and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) ligands, IGF-I and IGF-II, is based in part on the relative abundance and distribution of their target receptors: the insulin receptor (IR) splice variants A (IR-A) and B (IR-B) and IGF 1 receptor (IGF-1R). However, the relative quantity of all three receptors in human tissues has never been measured together on the same scale. Due to the high homology between insulin receptor (IR)-A and IR-B proteins and lack of antibodies that discern the two IR splice variants, their mRNA sequence is the most reliable means of distinguishing between the receptors. Hence, highly specific primers for IR-A, IR-B, and IGF-1R mRNA were designed to accurately detect all three receptors by quantitative RT-PCR and enable direct quantification of relative receptor expression levels. A standard concentration curve of cDNA from each receptor was performed. Assay specificity was tested using competition assays and postamplification analysis by gel electrophoresis and cloning. Forward and reverse primer concentrations were optimized to ensure equal efficiencies across primer pairs. This assay enables a specific molecular signature of IGF/insulin signaling receptors to be assayed in different tissues, cell types, or cancers. PMID:26862994

  13. Euglycemic Infusion of Insulin Detemir Compared With Human Insulin Appears to Increase Direct Current Brain Potential Response and Reduces Food Intake While Inducing Similar Systemic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallschmid, Manfred; Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Korn, Oliver; Mölle, Matthias; Rasch, Björn; Born, Jan; Schultes, Bernd; Kern, Werner

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In the treatment of diabetic patients, the long-acting insulin analog insulin detemir is less prone to induce weight gain than other insulin formulations. Assuming that because of its pharmacologic properties, detemir displays stronger central nervous anorexigenic efficacy than human insulin, we compared acute effects of human insulin and detemir on electroencephalography (EEG) measures and food intake. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Frontocortical EEG direct current (DC) potentials were recorded in 15 healthy men during two hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps that included an insulin bolus injection (human insulin, 17.75 mU/kg body wt; detemir, 90 mU/kg body wt) followed by a steady 90-min infusion (1.0 vs. 2.0 mU · kg−1 · min−1). A higher dosage was chosen for detemir to compensate for its delay in impact relative to human insulin and to elicit similar systemic effects. At 20 min after infusion, subjects were allowed to eat ad libitum from a test buffet. RESULTS Mean glucose infusions to maintain euglycemia (P > 0.93) and blood glucose concentrations (P > 0.34) did not differ between conditions. Detemir infusion induced a negative DC-potential shift, averaging −372.2 μV from 21 to 90 min that was not observed during human insulin infusion (146.5 μV, P = 0.02). Detemir, in comparison with human insulin, reduced subsequent food intake by 303 kcal (1,257 vs. 1,560, P < 0.04). CONCLUSIONS While inducing comparable peripheral effects, detemir exerts stronger acute effects on brain functions than human insulin and triggers a relative decrease in food consumption, suggesting an enhanced anorexigenic impact of detemir compared with human insulin on central nervous networks that control nutrient uptake. PMID:20068139

  14. Structure, Aggregation, and Activity of a Covalent Insulin Dimer Formed During Storage of Neutral Formulation of Human Insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Christian Fogt; Norrman, Mathias; Wahlund, Per-Olof; Benie, Andrew J; Petersen, Bent O; Jessen, Christian M; Pedersen, Thomas Å; Vestergaard, Kirsten; Steensgaard, Dorte B; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Naver, Helle; Hubálek, František; Poulsen, Christian; Otzen, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    A specific covalently linked dimeric species of insulin high molecular weight products (HMWPs), formed during prolonged incubation of a neutral pharmaceutical formulation of human insulin, were characterized in terms of tertiary structure, self-association, biological activity, and fibrillation properties. The dimer was formed by a covalent link between A21Asn and B29Lys. It was analyzed using static and dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering to evaluate its self-association behavior. The tertiary structure was obtained using nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. The biological activity of HMWP was determined using 2 in vitro assays, and its influence on fibrillation was investigated using Thioflavin T assays. The dimer's tertiary structure was nearly identical to that of the noncovalent insulin dimer, and it was able to form hexamers in the presence of zinc. The dimer exhibited reduced propensity for self-association in the absence of zinc but significantly postponed the onset of fibrillation in insulin formulations. Consistent with its dimeric state, the tested species of HMWP showed little to no biological activity in the used assays. This study is the first detailed characterization of a specific type of human insulin HMWP formed during storage of a marketed pharmaceutical formulation. These results indicate that this specific type of HMWP is unlikely to antagonize the physical stability of the formulation, as HMWP retained a tertiary structure similar to the noncovalent dimer and participated in hexamer assembly in the presence of zinc. In addition, increasing amounts of HMWP reduce the rate of insulin fibrillation. PMID:26921119

  15. Structure, Aggregation, and Activity of a Covalent Insulin Dimer Formed During Storage of Neutral Formulation of Human Insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Christian Fogt; Norrman, Mathias; Wahlund, Per-Olof; Benie, Andrew J; Petersen, Bent O; Jessen, Christian M; Pedersen, Thomas Å; Vestergaard, Kirsten; Steensgaard, Dorte B; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Naver, Helle; Hubálek, František; Poulsen, Christian; Otzen, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    A specific covalently linked dimeric species of insulin high molecular weight products (HMWPs), formed during prolonged incubation of a neutral pharmaceutical formulation of human insulin, were characterized in terms of tertiary structure, self-association, biological activity, and fibrillation properties. The dimer was formed by a covalent link between A21Asn and B29Lys. It was analyzed using static and dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering to evaluate its self-association behavior. The tertiary structure was obtained using nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. The biological activity of HMWP was determined using 2 in vitro assays, and its influence on fibrillation was investigated using Thioflavin T assays. The dimer's tertiary structure was nearly identical to that of the noncovalent insulin dimer, and it was able to form hexamers in the presence of zinc. The dimer exhibited reduced propensity for self-association in the absence of zinc but significantly postponed the onset of fibrillation in insulin formulations. Consistent with its dimeric state, the tested species of HMWP showed little to no biological activity in the used assays. This study is the first detailed characterization of a specific type of human insulin HMWP formed during storage of a marketed pharmaceutical formulation. These results indicate that this specific type of HMWP is unlikely to antagonize the physical stability of the formulation, as HMWP retained a tertiary structure similar to the noncovalent dimer and participated in hexamer assembly in the presence of zinc. In addition, increasing amounts of HMWP reduce the rate of insulin fibrillation.

  16. Rac1 signaling is required for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and is dysregulated in insulin-resistant murine and human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Lykke; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Kleinert, Maximilian;

    2013-01-01

    investigated. We hypothesized that Rac1 and its downstream target, p21-activated kinase (PAK), are regulators of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse and human skeletal muscle, and are dysregulated in insulin resistant states.Muscle specific inducible Rac1 knockout (KO) mice and pharmacological......The actin-cytoskeleton-regulating GTPase Rac1 is required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation in cultured muscle cells. However, involvement of Rac1 and its downstream signaling in glucose transport in insulin sensitive and insulin resistant mature skeletal muscle has not previously been...

  17. Protective role of Cys-178 against the inactivation and oligomerization of human insulin-degrading enzyme by oxidation and nitrosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralat, Luis A; Ren, Min; Schilling, Alexander B; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-12-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a 110-kDa metalloendopeptidase, hydrolyzes several physiologically relevant peptides, including insulin and amyloid-beta (Abeta). Human IDE has 13 cysteines and is inhibited by hydrogen peroxide and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), donors of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, respectively. Here, we report that the oxidative burst of BV-2 microglial cells leads to oxidation or nitrosylation of secreted IDE, leading to the reduced activity. Hydrogen peroxide and GSNO treatment of IDE reduces the V(max) for Abeta degradation, increases IDE oligomerization, and decreases IDE thermostability. Additionally, this inhibitory response of IDE is substrate-dependent, biphasic for Abeta degradation but monophasic for a shorter bradykinin-mimetic substrate. Our mutational analysis of IDE and peptide mass fingerprinting of GSNO-treated IDE using Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer reveal a surprising interplay of Cys-178 with Cys-110 and Cys-819 for catalytic activity and with Cys-789 and Cys-966 for oligomerization. Cys-110 is near the zinc-binding catalytic center and is normally buried. The oxidation and nitrosylation of Cys-819 allow Cys-110 to be oxidized or nitrosylated, leading to complete inactivation of IDE. Cys-789 is spatially adjacent to Cys-966, and their nitrosylation and oxidation together trigger the oligomerization and inhibition of IDE. Interestingly, the Cys-178 modification buffers the inhibition caused by Cys-819 modification and prevents the oxidation or nitrosylation of Cys-110. The Cys-178 modification can also prevent the oligomerization-mediated inhibition. Thus, IDE can be intricately regulated by reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. The structure of IDE reveals the molecular basis for the long distance interactions of these cysteines and how they regulate IDE function.

  18. Protective Role of Cys-178 against the Inactivation and Oligomerization of Human Insulin-degrading Enzyme by Oxidation and Nitrosylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralat, Luis A.; Ren, Min; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a 110-kDa metalloendopeptidase, hydrolyzes several physiologically relevant peptides, including insulin and amyloid-β (Aβ). Human IDE has 13 cysteines and is inhibited by hydrogen peroxide and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), donors of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, respectively. Here, we report that the oxidative burst of BV-2 microglial cells leads to oxidation or nitrosylation of secreted IDE, leading to the reduced activity. Hydrogen peroxide and GSNO treatment of IDE reduces the Vmax for Aβ degradation, increases IDE oligomerization, and decreases IDE thermostability. Additionally, this inhibitory response of IDE is substrate-dependent, biphasic for Aβ degradation but monophasic for a shorter bradykinin-mimetic substrate. Our mutational analysis of IDE and peptide mass fingerprinting of GSNO-treated IDE using Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer reveal a surprising interplay of Cys-178 with Cys-110 and Cys-819 for catalytic activity and with Cys-789 and Cys-966 for oligomerization. Cys-110 is near the zinc-binding catalytic center and is normally buried. The oxidation and nitrosylation of Cys-819 allow Cys-110 to be oxidized or nitrosylated, leading to complete inactivation of IDE. Cys-789 is spatially adjacent to Cys-966, and their nitrosylation and oxidation together trigger the oligomerization and inhibition of IDE. Interestingly, the Cys-178 modification buffers the inhibition caused by Cys-819 modification and prevents the oxidation or nitrosylation of Cys-110. The Cys-178 modification can also prevent the oligomerization-mediated inhibition. Thus, IDE can be intricately regulated by reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. The structure of IDE reveals the molecular basis for the long distance interactions of these cysteines and how they regulate IDE function. PMID:19808678

  19. Postreceptor insulin resistance contributes to human dyslipidemia and hepatic steatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Semple, Robert K.; Sleigh, Alison; Murgatroyd, Peter R; Adams, Claire A.; Bluck, Les; Jackson, Sarah; Vottero, Alessandra; Kanabar, Dipak; Charlton-Menys, Valentine; Durrington, Paul; Soos, Maria A.; Carpenter, T. Adrian; David J Lomas; Cochran, Elaine K.; Gorden, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic dyslipidemia is characterized by high circulating triglyceride (TG) and low HDL cholesterol levels and is frequently accompanied by hepatic steatosis. Increased hepatic lipogenesis contributes to both of these problems. Because insulin fails to suppress gluconeogenesis but continues to stimulate lipogenesis in both obese and lipodystrophic insulin-resistant mice, it has been proposed that a selective postreceptor defect in hepatic insulin action is central to the pathogenesis of fat...

  20. Cellular Effects of Insulin in Human THP-1 Monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Naderi, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Excess of insulin in the circulating blood relative to the level of glucose (Hyperinsulinemia) may be linked to systemic low-grade inflammation and some chronic disease such as the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The function of high levels of insulin in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), endothelial cells (ECs), and macrophages in relation to CVD has been investigated, but exact role of high insulin levels in monocytes, as an important cel...

  1. Endocytotic uptake, processing, and retroendocytosis of human biosynthetic proinsulin by rat fibroblasts transfected with the human insulin receptor gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, J R; Ullrich, A; Olefsky, J M

    1988-01-01

    The cellular itinerary and processing of insulin and proinsulin were studied to elucidate possible mechanisms for the observed in vivo differences in the biologic half-lives of these two hormones. A rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene was used. Due to gene amplification, the cells express large numbers of receptors and are ideal for studying a ligand, such as proinsulin, that has a low affinity for the insulin receptor. Competitive binding at 4 degre...

  2. Preparative isolation by high performance liquid chromatography of human insulin B chain produced in escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, N.; Antonio, S.; De Anda, R.; Gosset, G.; Bolivar, F. (Centro de Investigacion sobre Ingenieria Genetica y Biotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 510-3 Cuernavaca, Mor. 62271 (MX))

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple method developed for the analytical and preparative purification of human insulin B chain from recombinant origin. Three solvent systems: acetonitrile, isopropanol and methanol, were studied to determine their capacity to resolve the insulin B chain from a mixture of cyanogen bromide generated bacterial peptides. Using a {mu}Bondapak C18 column, it was possible to resolve the insulin B chain in all three systems. On a preparative scale, using a PrePak 500 C18 column with the isopropanol system, it was possible to purify insulin B chain and to obtain a 95% protein recovery.

  3. A novel point mutation in the human insulin gene giving rise to hyperproinsulinemia (proinsulin Kyoto).

    OpenAIRE

    Yano, H; Kitano, N; Morimoto, M.; Polonsky, K S; Imura, H; Seino, Y.

    1992-01-01

    We have identified a 65-yr-old nonobese Japanese man with diabetes mellitus, fasting hyperinsulinemia (150-300 pM), and a reduced fasting C-peptide/insulin molar ratio of 2.5-3.0. Fasting hyperinsulinemia was also found in his son and daughter. Analysis of insulin isolated from the serum of the proband and his son by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography revealed a minor peak coeluting with human insulin and a major peak of proinsulin-like materials. The insulin gene of the pat...

  4. The effect of exercise on the absorption of inhaled human insulin in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Astrid Heide; Kohler, Gerd; Korsatko, Stefan;

    2008-01-01

    overall absorption. Aims To investigate the effect of moderate exercise on the absorption of inhaled insulin. Methods A single-centre, randomized, open-label, three-period cross-over trial was carried out in 12 nonsmoking healthy subjects. A dose of 3.5 mg inhaled human insulin was administered via a...

  5. Structure, antihyperglycemic activity and cellular actions of a novel diglycated human insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Harte, F P; Boyd, A C; McKillop, A M;

    2000-01-01

    Human insulin was glycated under hyperglycemic reducing conditions and a novel diglycated form (M(r) 6135.1 Da) was purified by RP-HPLC. Endoproteinase Glu-C digestion combined with mass spectrometry and automated Edman degradation localized glycation to Gly(1) and Phe(1) of the insulin A- and B......-chains, respectively. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of diglycated insulin to mice alone or in combination with glucose (7 nmol/kg) resulted in a 43-61% and 11-34% reduction in glucose lowering activity, respectively, compared with native insulin. Consistent with these findings, diglycated insulin (10(-9) to 10......(-7) mol/liter) was 22-38% less effective (P insulin in stimulating glucose uptake, glucose oxidation and glycogen production in isolated mouse abdominal muscle....

  6. Common genetic variation in the human CTF1 locus, encoding cardiotrophin-1, determines insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Z Lutz

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Recently, cardiotrophin-1, a member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines was described to protect beta-cells from apoptosis, to improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance, and to prevent streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice. Here, we studied whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CTF1 locus, encoding cardiotrophin-1, influence insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in humans. METHODS: We genotyped 1,771 German subjects for three CTF1 tagging SNPs (rs1046276, rs1458201, and rs8046707. The subjects were metabolically characterized by an oral glucose tolerance test. Subgroups underwent magnetic resonance (MR imaging/spectroscopy and hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps. RESULTS: After appropriate adjustment, the minor allele of CTF1 SNP rs8046707 was significantly associated with decreased in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity. The other tested SNPs were not associated with OGTT-derived sensitivity parameters, nor did the three tested SNPs show any association with OGTT-derived parameters of insulin release. In the MR subgroup, SNP rs8046707 was nominally associated with lower visceral adipose tissue. Furthermore, the SNP rs1458201 showed a nominal association with increased VLDL levels. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, this study, even though preliminary and awaiting further confirmation by independent replication, provides first evidence that common genetic variation in CTF1 could contribute to insulin sensitivity in humans. Our SNP data indicate an insulin-desensitizing effect of cardiotrophin-1 and underline that cardiotrophin-1 represents an interesting target to influence insulin sensitivity.

  7. Oncogene activation induces metabolic transformation resulting in insulin-independence in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliccia Bollig-Fischer

    Full Text Available Normal breast epithelial cells require insulin and EGF for growth in serum-free media. We previously demonstrated that over expression of breast cancer oncogenes transforms MCF10A cells to an insulin-independent phenotype. Additionally, most breast cancer cell lines are insulin-independent for growth. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which oncogene over expression transforms MCF10A cells to an insulin-independent phenotype. Analysis of the effects of various concentrations of insulin and/or IGF-I on proliferation of MCF10A cells demonstrated that some of the effects of insulin were independent from those of IGF-I, suggesting that oncogene over expression drives a true insulin-independent proliferative phenotype. To test this hypothesis, we examined metabolic functions of insulin signaling in insulin-dependent and insulin-independent cells. HER2 over expression in MCF10A cells resulted in glucose uptake in the absence of insulin at a rate equal to insulin-induced glucose uptake in non-transduced cells. We found that a diverse set of oncogenes induced the same result. To gain insight into how HER2 oncogene signaling affected increased insulin-independent glucose uptake we compared HER2-regulated gene expression signatures in MCF10A and HER2 over expressing MCF10A cells by differential analysis of time series gene expression data from cells treated with a HER2 inhibitor. This analysis identified genes specifically regulated by the HER2 oncogene, including VAMP8 and PHGDH, which have known functions in glucose uptake and processing of glycolytic intermediates, respectively. Moreover, these genes specifically implicated in HER2 oncogene-driven transformation are commonly altered in human breast cancer cells. These results highlight the diversity of oncogene effects on cell regulatory pathways and the importance of oncogene-driven metabolic transformation in breast cancer.

  8. Quality control of insulin radioreceptor assay for human erythrocytes. Effect of ageing of mono-125I-Tyr-A14-insulin preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality control of insulin radioreceptor assay for human erythrocytes is based on the storage of erythrocyte preparations in Hepes buffer of pH 8.0, containing 10 g/l of albumin and 20 mmol/l of glucose. The change of erythrocytes into spherocytes and crenated cells reduces the apparent number of insulin receptors in a relatively constant way by less than 8% a week after 10 days of storage. At the same time the dissociation constants of the insulin-receptor complex increase rapidly. Thus the use of a preparation must be limited to controlling the determination of the insulin binding sites of erythrocytes, and not to the measurement of the affinities of the receptors. When mono-125I-Tyr-A14-insulin gets old, a slow decrease in the insulin binding sites can be measured, but the dissociation constants of the insulin receptor complex are not affected. (author)

  9. Plasma adiponectin concentration is associated with skeletal muscle insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation, and low plasma concentration precedes a decrease in whole-body insulin sensitivity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefan, Norbert; Vozarova, Barbora; Funahashi, Tohru;

    2002-01-01

    -induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR) and also increase whole-body insulin sensitivity. To further characterize the relationship between plasma adiponectin concentration and insulin sensitivity in humans, we examined 1) the cross-sectional association between plasma adiponectin......Adiponectin, the most abundant adipose-specific protein, has been found to be negatively associated with degree of adiposity and positively associated with insulin sensitivity in Pima Indians and other populations. Moreover, adiponectin administration to rodents has been shown to increase insulin...... concentration and skeletal muscle IR tyrosine phosphorylation and 2) the prospective effect of plasma adiponectin concentration at baseline on change in insulin sensitivity. Fasting plasma adiponectin concentration, body composition (hydrodensitometry or dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), insulin sensitivity...

  10. Pretreatment with insulin enhances anticancer functions of 5-fluorouracil in human esophageal and colonic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke ZOU; Ji-hang JU; Hong XIE

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of insulin on enhancing 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) anti-cancer functions and its mechanisms in the human esophageal cancer cell line (Eca 109) and human colonic cancer cell line (Ls-174-t). Methods: The effect of insulin/5-FU combination treatment on the growth of Eca 109 and Ls-174-t cells was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. After insulin treatment or insulin/5-FU treatment, cell cycle distri-bution of both cell lines was analyzed by flow cytometry. Western blot assay was used to assess the expression of caspase-3 and thymidylate synthase (TS).Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation assay, and termi-nal transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay (TUNEL). Moreover, the changes of 5-FU uptake after insulin pretreatment were detected by HPLC assay and Western blot analysis. Results: We found that insulin enhanced the inhibitory effect of 5-FU on cell proliferation when Eca 109 cells and Ls- 174-t cells were pretreated with insulin for the appropriate time. Insulin increased the cell number of the S phase and the uptake of 5-FU. Insulin/5-FU treatment enhanced apoptosis of tumor cells and upregulated the expression of cleaved caspase-3 compared with 5-FU treatment.Moreover, insulin/5-FU treatment induced the changes of free TS and the TS ternary complex level compared with 5-FU treatment in Eca 109 and Ls-174-t cells.Conclusion: These data suggest that insulin enhances anticancer functions of 5-FU when it is treated before 5-FU for the appropriate time in human esophageal and colonic cancer cell lines.

  11. Measurement of insulin in human sera using a new RIA kit. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive and versatile radioimmunoassay (RIA) for insulin was established using human insulin standard, a specific guinea pig anti-insulin antiserum and rabbit anti-guinea pig serum. Radioiodination was performed according to a modified chloramine T method. Tracer preparations were used for as long as 6 weeks after iodination. The standard curve ranges from 0.044 to 1.2 nmol/l. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was 3-5% and the inter-assay CV was 6-9% in the optimal range between 0.4 and 0.9 nmol/l. The average recovery of human insulin added to plasma or serum samples was 100.2 ± 2.0% (n = 38) and 100.1 ± 1.9% (n = 42), respectively. In addition to human insulin, procine, canine, rabbit and bovine insulin can also be determined but not rat or mouse insulin. The cross-reactivity of the antiserum with porcine proinsulin was found to be 40 % on the molar basis. The range of mean fasting plasma insulin concentrations in healthy subjects and under various pathological conditions were estimated. (author)

  12. Dopamine-Mediated Autocrine Inhibitory Circuit Regulating Human Insulin Secretion in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Norman; Maffei, Antonella; Freeby, Matthew; Burroughs, Steven; Freyberg, Zachary; Javitch, Jonathan; Leibel, Rudolph L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a negative feedback autocrine regulatory circuit for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in purified human islets in vitro. Using chronoamperometry and in vitro glucose-stimulated insulin secretion measurements, evidence is provided that dopamine (DA), which is loaded into insulin-containing secretory granules by vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 in human β-cells, is released in response to glucose stimulation. DA then acts as a negative regulator of insulin secretion via its action on D2R, which are also expressed on β-cells. We found that antagonism of receptors participating in islet DA signaling generally drive increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These in vitro observations may represent correlates of the in vivo metabolic changes associated with the use of atypical antipsychotics, such as increased adiposity. PMID:22915827

  13. Large-Scale Refolding and Enzyme Reaction of Human Preproinsulin for Production of Human Insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Bae; Son, Young-Jin

    2015-10-28

    Human insulin is composed of 21 amino acids of an A-chain and 30 amino acids of a B-chain. This is the protein hormone that has the role of blood sugar control. When the recombinant human proinsulin is expressed in Escherichia coli, a serious problem is the formation of an inclusion body. Therefore, the inclusion body must be denatured and refolded under chaotropic agents and suitable reductants. In this study, H27R-proinsulin was refolded from the denatured form with β-mercaptoethanol and urea. The refolding reaction was completed after 15 h at 15°C, whereas the reaction at 25°C was faster than that at 15°C. The refolding yield at 15°C was 17% higher than that at 25°C. The refolding reaction could be carried out at a high protein concentration (2 g/l) using direct refolding without sulfonation. The most economical and optimal refolding condition for human preproinsulin was 1.5 g/l protein, 10 mM glycine buffer containing 0.6 M urea, pH 10.6, and 0.3 mM β-mercaptoethanol at 15°C for 16 h. The maximum refolding yield was 74.8% at 15°C with 1.5 g/l protein. Moreover, the refolded preproinsulin could be converted into normal mature insulin with two enzymes. The average amount of human insulin was 138.2 g from 200 L of fermentation broth after enzyme reaction with H27R-proinsulin. The direct refolding process for H27R-proinsulin was successfully set up without sulfonation. The step yields for refolding and enzyme reaction were comparatively high. Therefore, our refolding process for production of recombinant insulin may be beneficial to the large-scale production of other biologically active proteins. PMID:26139616

  14. In nondiabetic, human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy, hepatic insulin extraction and posthepatic insulin clearance rate are decreased in proportion to insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte R;

    2005-01-01

    , human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with and without lipodystrophy. We studied 18 HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy (LIPO) on antiretroviral therapy and 25 HIV-infected patients without lipodystrophy (controls) of whom 18 were on antiretroviral therapy and 7 were not. Posthepatic...... > .1). Our data suggest that HEXi and MCRi are decreased in proportion to the degree of insulin resistance in nondiabetic HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy....

  15. Activation of transforming potential of the human insulin receptor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrovirus containing part of the human insulin receptor (hIR) gene was constructed by replacing ros sequences in the avian sarcoma virus UR2 with hIR cDNA sequences coding for 46 amino acids of the extracellular domain and the entire transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the β subunit of hIR. The resulting virus, named UIR, contains the hIR sequence fused to the 5' portion of the UR2 gag gene coding for p19. UIR is capable of transforming chicken embryo fibroblasts and promoting formation of colonies in soft agar; however, it does not form tumors in vivo. A variant that arose from the parental UIR is capable of efficiently inducing sarcomas in vivo. UIR-transformed cells exhibit higher rates of glucose uptake and growth than normal cells. The 4-kilobase UIR genome codes for a membrane-associated, glycosylated gag-hIR fusion protein of 75 kDa designated P75/sup gag-hir/. P75/sup gag-hir/ contains a protein tyrosine kinase activity that is capable of undergoing autophosphorylation and of phosphorylating foreign substrates in vitro; it is phosphorylated at both serine and tyrosine residues in vivo

  16. Activation of transforming potential of the human insulin receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L.H.; Lin, B.; Jong, S.M.J.; Dixon, D.; Ellis, L.; Roth, R.A.; Rutter, W.J.

    1987-08-01

    A retrovirus containing part of the human insulin receptor (hIR) gene was constructed by replacing ros sequences in the avian sarcoma virus UR2 with hIR cDNA sequences coding for 46 amino acids of the extracellular domain and the entire transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the ..beta.. subunit of hIR. The resulting virus, named UIR, contains the hIR sequence fused to the 5' portion of the UR2 gag gene coding for p19. UIR is capable of transforming chicken embryo fibroblasts and promoting formation of colonies in soft agar; however, it does not form tumors in vivo. A variant that arose from the parental UIR is capable of efficiently inducing sarcomas in vivo. UIR-transformed cells exhibit higher rates of glucose uptake and growth than normal cells. The 4-kilobase UIR genome codes for a membrane-associated, glycosylated gag-hIR fusion protein of 75 kDa designated P75/sup gag-hir/. P75/sup gag-hir/ contains a protein tyrosine kinase activity that is capable of undergoing autophosphorylation and of phosphorylating foreign substrates in vitro; it is phosphorylated at both serine and tyrosine residues in vivo

  17. Structure of human insulin monomer in water/acetonitrile solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocian, Wojciech; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Bednarek, Elzbieta [National Medicines Institute (Poland); Tarnowska, Anna; Kawecki, Robert [Institute of Organic Chemistry Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Kozerski, Lech [National Medicines Institute (Poland)], E-mail: lkoz@icho.edu.pl

    2008-01-15

    Here we present evidence that in water/acetonitrile solvent detailed structural and dynamic information can be obtained for important proteins that are naturally present as oligomers under native conditions. An NMR-derived human insulin monomer structure in H{sub 2}O/CD{sub 3}CN, 65/35 vol%, pH 3.6 is presented and compared with the available X-ray structure of a monomer that forms part of a hexamer (Acta Crystallogr. 2003 Sec. D59, 474) and with NMR structures in water and organic cosolvent. Detailed analysis using PFGSE NMR, temperature-dependent NMR, dilution experiments and CSI proves that the structure is monomeric in the concentration and temperature ranges 0.1-3 mM and 10-30 deg. C, respectively. The presence of long-range interstrand NOEs, as found in the crystal structure of the monomer, provides the evidence for conservation of the tertiary structure. Starting from structures calculated by the program CYANA, two different molecular dynamics simulated annealing refinement protocols were applied, either using the program AMBER in vacuum (AMBER{sub V}C), or including a generalized Born solvent model (AMBER{sub G}B)

  18. Structure of human insulin monomer in water/acetonitrile solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we present evidence that in water/acetonitrile solvent detailed structural and dynamic information can be obtained for important proteins that are naturally present as oligomers under native conditions. An NMR-derived human insulin monomer structure in H2O/CD3CN, 65/35 vol%, pH 3.6 is presented and compared with the available X-ray structure of a monomer that forms part of a hexamer (Acta Crystallogr. 2003 Sec. D59, 474) and with NMR structures in water and organic cosolvent. Detailed analysis using PFGSE NMR, temperature-dependent NMR, dilution experiments and CSI proves that the structure is monomeric in the concentration and temperature ranges 0.1-3 mM and 10-30 deg. C, respectively. The presence of long-range interstrand NOEs, as found in the crystal structure of the monomer, provides the evidence for conservation of the tertiary structure. Starting from structures calculated by the program CYANA, two different molecular dynamics simulated annealing refinement protocols were applied, either using the program AMBER in vacuum (AMBERVC), or including a generalized Born solvent model (AMBERGB)

  19. Adipose Cell Size and Regional Fat Deposition as Predictors of Metabolic Response to Overfeeding in Insulin-Resistant and Insulin-Sensitive Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Tracey; Craig, Colleen; Liu, Li-Fen; Perelman, Dalia; Allister, Candice; Spielman, Daniel; Cushman, Samuel W

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance, but significant variability exists between similarly obese individuals, pointing to qualitative characteristics of body fat as potential mediators. To test the hypothesis that obese, insulin-sensitive (IS) individuals possess adaptive adipose cell/tissue responses, we measured subcutaneous adipose cell size, insulin suppression of lipolysis, and regional fat responses to short-term overfeeding in BMI-matched overweight/obese individuals classified as IS or insulin resistant (IR). At baseline, IR subjects exhibited significantly greater visceral adipose tissue (VAT), intrahepatic lipid (IHL), plasma free fatty acids, adipose cell diameter, and percentage of small adipose cells. With weight gain (3.1 ± 1.4 kg), IR subjects demonstrated no significant change in adipose cell size, VAT, or insulin suppression of lipolysis and only 8% worsening of insulin-mediated glucose uptake (IMGU). Alternatively, IS subjects demonstrated significant adipose cell enlargement; decrease in the percentage of small adipose cells; increase in VAT, IHL, and lipolysis; 45% worsening of IMGU; and decreased expression of lipid metabolism genes. Smaller baseline adipose cell size and greater enlargement with weight gain predicted decline in IMGU, as did increase in IHL and VAT and decrease in insulin suppression of lipolysis. Weight gain in IS humans causes maladaptive changes in adipose cells, regional fat distribution, and insulin resistance. The correlation between development of insulin resistance and changes in adipose cell size, VAT, IHL, and insulin suppression of lipolysis highlight these factors as potential mediators between obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:26884438

  20. Characterization of the growth of murine fibroblasts that express human insulin receptors. I. The effect of insulin in the absence of other growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randazzo, P.A.; Morey, V.A.; Polishook, A.K.; Jarett, L. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The effect of insulin on the growth of murine fibroblasts transfected with an expression vector containing human insulin receptor cDNA (NIH 3T3/HIR) and the parental cells (NIH/3T3) was characterized. Insulin in the absence of other mitogens increased the rate of incorporation of thymidine into NIH 3T3/HIR cells with a half-maximal response occurring at an insulin concentration of 35 ng/ml and a maximal response that was equivalent to that elicited by 10% fetal calf serum. The thymidine incorporation rate was increased by 12 h, was maximal at approximately 16 h, and returned to basal rates at 24 h after the addition of insulin. Insulin induced a maximum of 65% of cells to incorporate thymidine. The increased DNA synthesis was accompanied by net growth. Addition of insulin to the NIH 3T3/HIR cells resulted in increased DNA content with a half-maximal response occurring at approximately 30 ng/ml insulin and a maximal response equivalent to that elicited by serum. An increase in cell number detected after the addition of insulin to the NIH 3T3/HIR suggests that the cells had progressed through mitosis. Insulin did not increase the rate of thymidine incorporation, DNA content, or number of the parental NIH 3T3 cells. These data show that insulin, in the absence of a second mitogen, is able to induce NIH 3T3/HIR fibroblasts to traverse the cell cycle.

  1. Characterization of the growth of murine fibroblasts that express human insulin receptors. I. The effect of insulin in the absence of other growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of insulin on the growth of murine fibroblasts transfected with an expression vector containing human insulin receptor cDNA (NIH 3T3/HIR) and the parental cells (NIH/3T3) was characterized. Insulin in the absence of other mitogens increased the rate of incorporation of thymidine into NIH 3T3/HIR cells with a half-maximal response occurring at an insulin concentration of 35 ng/ml and a maximal response that was equivalent to that elicited by 10% fetal calf serum. The thymidine incorporation rate was increased by 12 h, was maximal at approximately 16 h, and returned to basal rates at 24 h after the addition of insulin. Insulin induced a maximum of 65% of cells to incorporate thymidine. The increased DNA synthesis was accompanied by net growth. Addition of insulin to the NIH 3T3/HIR cells resulted in increased DNA content with a half-maximal response occurring at approximately 30 ng/ml insulin and a maximal response equivalent to that elicited by serum. An increase in cell number detected after the addition of insulin to the NIH 3T3/HIR suggests that the cells had progressed through mitosis. Insulin did not increase the rate of thymidine incorporation, DNA content, or number of the parental NIH 3T3 cells. These data show that insulin, in the absence of a second mitogen, is able to induce NIH 3T3/HIR fibroblasts to traverse the cell cycle

  2. Human insulin dynamics in women: a physiologically based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael; Tura, Andrea; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Pacini, Giovanni; D'Argenio, David Z

    2016-02-01

    Currently available models of insulin dynamics are mostly based on the classical compartmental structure and, thus, their physiological utility is limited. In this work, we describe the development of a physiologically based model and its application to data from 154 patients who underwent an insulin-modified intravenous glucose tolerance test (IM-IVGTT). To determine the time profile of endogenous insulin delivery without using C-peptide data and to evaluate the transcapillary transport of insulin, the hepatosplanchnic, renal, and peripheral beds were incorporated into the circulatory model as separate subsystems. Physiologically reasonable population mean estimates were obtained for all estimated model parameters, including plasma volume, interstitial volume of the peripheral circulation (mainly skeletal muscle), uptake clearance into the interstitial space, hepatic and renal clearance, as well as total insulin delivery into plasma. The results indicate that, at a population level, the proposed physiologically based model provides a useful description of insulin disposition, which allows for the assessment of muscle insulin uptake. PMID:26608654

  3. Polymorphisms of Exon 17 of Insulin-Receptor Gene in Pathogenesis of Human Disorders With Insulin Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU WANG; JIE MI; XIAO-YUAN ZHAO; JIAN-XIN WU; HONG CHENG; ZHI-KUN ZHANG; XIU-YUAN DING; DONG-QING HOU; HUILI

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between polymorphisms of insulin-receptor (INSR) gene and insulin resistance in a population-based study in China. Methods Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was used to the amplify Exon 17 of INSR gene and all amplified products were analyzed by direct sequencing. Results Six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found at the following loci: T to TC at the locus of 10699 (Tyr984), G to GC at the locus of 10731 (Glu994), Deletion G at the locus of 10798 (Asp1017), C to T/TC at the locus of 10923 (His1058), C to CA at the locus of 10954 (Leu1069), and T to TA at the locus of 10961 (Phe1071), which might not change the amino acid sequence. The data were in agreement with the test of Hardy-Weinberg balance (P>0.05). Among the 345 cases, all clinical indices were higher in males than in females except for HDL cholesterol (P0.05). After sex stratification in analysis,all allele frequencies on the six loci of SNPs of Exon 17 had different distributions between the insulin resistant group and the control group, but P>0.05. Conclusion SNPs of Exon 17 of INSR gene are unlikely to play a direct role in the pathogenesis of human disorders with insulin resistance.

  4. The study of biphsic insulin premixede aspart 30 versus human insulin 30 in controlling glycemia of sulphanylureas failed type 2 diabetes%双相门冬胰岛素和人预混胰岛素对磺脲类药物失效的2型糖尿病患者的疗效研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲建昌; 祝开思; 王丽莎; 王彤; 李丽

    2010-01-01

    目的 比较双相门冬胰岛素和人预混胰岛素对磺脲类降糖药物失效2型糖尿病患者的有效性、安全性.方法 86例口服磺脲类降糖药物后血糖控制不良糖尿病患者随机数字法表法分为双相门冬胰岛素组和人预混胰岛素组,各43例,进行为期26周的临床治疗观察.比较2组治疗前与治疗后13、26周,血糖和糖化血红蛋白下降程度,并对一般临床资料、患者的满意度、依从性进行分析比较.结果 2组患者治疗后13、26周7个时间点的血糖与同组治疗前比较血糖均显著下降(P<0.05),尤其是使用双相门冬胰岛素组餐后血糖下降更为明显.双相门冬胰岛素组治疗后13、26周糖化血红蛋白分别为(7.87±0.22)%、(6.19±0.36)%;治疗前(11.32±1.35)%.人预混胰岛素组治疗后13、26周糖化血红蛋白分别为(8.53±0.27)%、(7.12±0.15)%比治疗前(11.07±1.52)%低(均P<0.05),使用双相门冬胰岛素组低血糖发生率(为8%)较使用人预混胰岛素组低血糖发生率(27%)显著降低(P<0.05);患者的满意度和依从性双相门冬胰岛素组较人预混胰岛素组显著增高(P<0.01或P<0.05).结论 对口服磺脲类药物血糖控制不佳的糖尿病患者,尽早使用双相门冬胰岛素,能使血糖控制更好,糖化血红蛋白更早达标,且低血糖发生率低.%Objective To compare the efficiency and security between biphasic insulin 30(30% fast acting and 70% protamine crystallized insulin as part, BIAsp30) and premixed human insulin 30(30% regular insulin and 70% NPH insulin, BHI 30) in sulfonylureas failed type 2 diabetes. Methods Eighty-six cases of sulfonylureas failed type 2 diabetes were randomly divided into two groups. Glycemic and HbA1c after the treatment were com-pared. Results Totally 13 and 26 weeks after treatment, 7 time points of blood glucose were all significantly de-creased in two groups compared with baselines (P < 0.05). Postprandial blood glucose decreased more in biphasic

  5. Insulin in human milk and the use of hormones in infant formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Raanan; Shehadeh, Naim

    2013-01-01

    Human milk contains a substantial number of hormones and growth factors. Studies in animal models show that some of these peptides (e.g. insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1, IGF-1, epidermal growth factors) have an effect on the small intestine after orogastric administration. Recently, two efforts were made to incorporate growth factors into infant formulas. One of these efforts included the incorporation of IGF-1, and the second is an ongoing effort to evaluate the safety and efficacy of incorporating insulin into infant formulas. The rational and current evidence for adding insulin to infant formulas (presence in human milk, effects of orally administrated insulin on gut maturation, intestinal permeability, systemic effects and preliminary encouraging results of supplementing insulin to a preterm infant formula) is detailed in this review. If the addition of insulin to preterm infant formulas indeed results in better growth and accelerated intestinal maturation, future studies will need to address the supplementation of insulin in term infants and assess the efficacy of such supplementation in enhancing gut maturation and prevention of later noncommunicable diseases such as allergy, autoimmune diseases and obesity. PMID:24107496

  6. Insulin in human milk and the use of hormones in infant formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Raanan; Shehadeh, Naim

    2013-01-01

    Human milk contains a substantial number of hormones and growth factors. Studies in animal models show that some of these peptides (e.g. insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1, IGF-1, epidermal growth factors) have an effect on the small intestine after orogastric administration. Recently, two efforts were made to incorporate growth factors into infant formulas. One of these efforts included the incorporation of IGF-1, and the second is an ongoing effort to evaluate the safety and efficacy of incorporating insulin into infant formulas. The rational and current evidence for adding insulin to infant formulas (presence in human milk, effects of orally administrated insulin on gut maturation, intestinal permeability, systemic effects and preliminary encouraging results of supplementing insulin to a preterm infant formula) is detailed in this review. If the addition of insulin to preterm infant formulas indeed results in better growth and accelerated intestinal maturation, future studies will need to address the supplementation of insulin in term infants and assess the efficacy of such supplementation in enhancing gut maturation and prevention of later noncommunicable diseases such as allergy, autoimmune diseases and obesity.

  7. Insulin action in human thighs after one-legged immobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Kiens, Bente; Mizuno, M.;

    1989-01-01

    Insulin action was assessed in thighs of five healthy young males who had one knee immobilized for 7 days by a splint. The splint was not worn in bed. Subjects also used crutches to prevent weight bearing of the immobilized leg. Immobilization decreased the activity of citrate synthase and 3-OH......-acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase in the vastus lateralis muscle by 9 and 14%, respectively, and thigh volume by 5%. After 7 days of immobilization, a two-step euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp procedure combined with arterial and bilateral femoral venous catheterization was performed. Insulin action on glucose uptake and tyrosine...... release of the thighs at mean plasma insulin concentrations of 67 (clamp step I) and 447 microU/ml (clamp step II) was decreased by immobilization, whereas immobilization did not affect insulin action on thigh exchange of free fatty acids, glycerol, O2, or potassium. Before and during the clamp step I...

  8. Effect of insulin and glucose on adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocbuch, Katarzyna; Sakowicz-Burkiewicz, Monika; Grden, Marzena; Szutowicz, Andrzej; Pawelczyk, Tadeusz

    2009-01-01

    In diabetes several aspects of immunity are altered, including the immunomodulatory action of adenosine. Our study was undertaken to investigate the effect of different glucose and insulin concentrations on activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes line SKW 6.4. The activity of adenosine deaminase in the cytosolic fraction was very low and was not affected by different glucose concentration, but in the membrane fraction of cells cultured with 25 mM glucose it was decreased by about 35% comparing to the activity in cells maintained in 5 mM glucose, irrespective of insulin concentration. The activities of 5'-nucleotidase (5'-NT) and ecto-5'-NT in SKW 6.4 cells depended on insulin concentration, but not on glucose. Cells cultured with 10(-8) M insulin displayed an about 60% lower activity of cytosolic 5'-NT comparing to cells maintained at 10(-11) M insulin. The activity of ecto-5'-NT was decreased by about 70% in cells cultured with 10(-8) M insulin comparing to cells grown in 10(-11) M insulin. Neither insulin nor glucose had an effect on adenosine kinase (AK) activity in SKW 6.4 cells or in human B cells isolated from peripheral blood. The extracellular level of adenosine and inosine during accelerated catabolism of cellular ATP depended on glucose, but not on insulin concentration. Concluding, our study demonstrates that glucose and insulin differentially affect the activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes, but changes in those activities do not correlate with the adenosine level in cell media during accelerated ATP catabolism, implying that nucleoside transport is the primary factor determining the extracellular level of adenosine.

  9. Insulin Regulates the Unfolded Protein Response in Human Adipose Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Boden, Guenther; Cheung, Peter; Salehi, Sajad; Homko, Carol; Loveland-Jones, Catherine; Jayarajan, Senthil; Stein, T Peter; Williams, Kevin Jon; Liu, Ming-Lin; Barrero, Carlos A.; Merali, Salim

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is increased in obesity and is postulated to be a major contributor to many obesity-related pathologies. Little is known about what causes ER stress in obese people. Here, we show that insulin upregulated the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive reaction to ER stress, in vitro in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and in vivo, in subcutaneous (sc) adipose tissue of nondiabetic subjects, where it increased the UPR dose dependently over the entire physiologic insulin ra...

  10. A Case of Possible Hypersensitivity Reactions to Human Insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Adamescu Eduard; Tudose Adriana Mihaela; Dumitrescu Nicolae Viorel; Dobjanschi Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insulin therapy is commonly used in diabetic patients. It represents the only option for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and could be part of the treatment plan for the patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clinical appearance of hypersensitivity reactions to insulin vary significantly, depending on the immune mechanism involved. Many skin prick tests could be interpreted as positive reactions (either by using inappropriate concentrations or due to other mast cell degranul...

  11. A Case of Possible Hypersensitivity Reactions to Human Insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamescu Eduard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insulin therapy is commonly used in diabetic patients. It represents the only option for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and could be part of the treatment plan for the patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clinical appearance of hypersensitivity reactions to insulin vary significantly, depending on the immune mechanism involved. Many skin prick tests could be interpreted as positive reactions (either by using inappropriate concentrations or due to other mast cell degranulation causes.

  12. Radioimmunoassay procedure for human insulin based on magnetizable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin is a 51 amino acid hormone secreted in the pancreas by the islets of Langerhans. It is an anabolic polypeptide that regulates carbohydrate metabolism. We describe a user-friendly solid phase RIA for insulin based on antibody coupled magnetizable cellulose particles. The developed technique offers greater convenience by eliminating the need for precipitation and centrifugation to separate the antigen-antibody complex from free antigen with minimal errors

  13. Ontogenesis of somatomedin and insulin receptors in the human fetus.

    OpenAIRE

    Sara, V R; Hall, K.; Misaki, M; Fryklund, L.; Christensen, N.; Wetterberg, L

    1983-01-01

    This study examines the ontogenesis of somatomedin and insulin receptors in man. Particulate plasma membranes were prepared by ultracentrifugation from various tissues removed from fetuses after abortion and classified as less than 17, 17-25, and greater than 25 cm in length. The binding of iodinated insulinlike growth factors 1 (IGF-1) and 2 (IGF-2), somatomedin A (SMA), multiplication-stimulating activity (MSA), and insulin was examined at the different ages. In the liver, cross-reaction st...

  14. The human insulin gene is part of a large open chromatin domain specific for human islets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutskov, Vesco; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of how insulin (INS) gene expression is regulated will lead to better understanding of normal and abnormal pancreatic β cell function. We have mapped histone modifications over the INS region, coupled with an expression profile, in freshly isolated islets from multiple human donors. Unlike many other human genes, in which active modifications tend to be concentrated within 1 kb around the transcription start site, these marks are distributed over the entire coding region of INS as well. Moreover, a region of ≈80 kb around the INS gene, which contains the {tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)–(INS)–insulin-like growth factor 2 antisense (IGF2AS)–insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2)} gene cluster, unusually is marked by almost uniformly elevated levels of histone acetylation and H3K4 dimethylation, extending both downstream into IGF2 and upstream beyond the TH gene. This is accompanied by islet specific coordinate expression with INS of the neighboring TH and IGF2 genes. The presence of islet specific intergenic transcripts suggests their possible function in the maintenance of this unusual large open chromatin domain. PMID:19805079

  15. Crystallization of Enantiomerically Pure Proteins from Quasi-Racemic Mixtures: Structure Determination by X-Ray Diffraction of Isotope-Labeled Ester Insulin and Human Insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Dhayalan, Balamurugan; Avital-Shmilovici, Michal; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Kent, Stephen B H

    2016-03-01

    As a part of a program aimed towards the study of the dynamics of human insulin-protein dimer formation using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we used total chemical synthesis to prepare stable isotope labeled [(1-(13) C=(18) O)Phe(B24) )] human insulin, via [(1-(13) C=(18) O)Phe(B24) )] ester insulin as a key intermediate product that facilitates folding of the synthetic protein molecule (see preceding article). Here, we describe the crystal structure of the synthetic isotope-labeled ester insulin intermediate and the product synthetic human insulin. Additionally, we present our observations on hexamer formation with these two proteins in the absence of phenol derivatives and/or Zn metal ions. We also describe and discuss the fractional crystallization of quasi-racemic protein mixtures containing each of these two synthetic proteins. PMID:26707939

  16. Crystallization of Enantiomerically Pure Proteins from Quasi-Racemic Mixtures: Structure Determination by X-Ray Diffraction of Isotope-Labeled Ester Insulin and Human Insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Dhayalan, Balamurugan; Avital-Shmilovici, Michal; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Kent, Stephen B H

    2016-03-01

    As a part of a program aimed towards the study of the dynamics of human insulin-protein dimer formation using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we used total chemical synthesis to prepare stable isotope labeled [(1-(13) C=(18) O)Phe(B24) )] human insulin, via [(1-(13) C=(18) O)Phe(B24) )] ester insulin as a key intermediate product that facilitates folding of the synthetic protein molecule (see preceding article). Here, we describe the crystal structure of the synthetic isotope-labeled ester insulin intermediate and the product synthetic human insulin. Additionally, we present our observations on hexamer formation with these two proteins in the absence of phenol derivatives and/or Zn metal ions. We also describe and discuss the fractional crystallization of quasi-racemic protein mixtures containing each of these two synthetic proteins.

  17. Glucose responsive insulin production from human embryonic germ (EG) cell derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus subjects millions to a daily burden of disease management, life threatening hypoglycemia and long-term complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, heart disease, and stroke. Cell transplantation therapies providing a glucose-regulated supply of insulin have been implemented clinically, but are limited by safety, efficacy and supply considerations. Stem cells promise a plentiful and flexible source of cells for transplantation therapies. Here, we show that cells derived from human embryonic germ (EG) cells express markers of definitive endoderm, pancreatic and β-cell development, glucose sensing, and production of mature insulin. These cells integrate functions necessary for glucose responsive regulation of preproinsulin mRNA and expression of insulin C-peptide in vitro. Following transplantation into mice, cells become insulin and C-peptide immunoreactive and produce plasma C-peptide in response to glucose. These findings suggest that EG cell derivatives may eventually serve as a source of insulin producing cells for the treatment of diabetes

  18. Insulin stimulates synthesis and release of human chorionic gonadotropin by choriocarcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, S.G.; Braunstein, G.D. (Univ. of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that insulin regulates placental lactogen, progesterone, and estrogen production from human trophoblast cells. This study was performed to examine whether insulin also regulates the production of hCG by this type of cell. After 24-36 h of preincubation, JEG-3 and JAR cells (2-3 x 10(5) cells/ml.well) or human term trophoblast cells (1 x 10(6) cells/ml.well) were exposed to the test hormone in serum-free Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium for 24-96 h. Secretion of hCG from JEG-3 cells was stimulated by human insulin, human proinsulin, or porcine insulin in a dose-dependent manner, with lowest effective doses of 6.7, 96, and 53 mg/L, respectively. Time-course studies showed that hCG secretion peaked at 72-96 h with insulin exposure; in contrast, no decernable peak was seen without insulin in serum-free media. Exposure of JEG-3 cells for 24 h to 209 mg/liter insulin stimulated hCG synthesis, with 40 +/- 3% more immunoreactive intracellular hCG (P less than 0.05). Cells grown in the presence of insulin and (35S)methionine had 47 +/- 21% more labeled intracellular hCG and 56 +/- 13% more immunoprecipitable (35S)methionine-hCG secreted into the medium than the control cultures (P less than 0.05). During this time period, human placental lactogen release and total trichloroacetice acid-precipitable (35S)methionine protein were not increased. The insulin-induced stimulation of hCG synthesis was inhibited by cycloheximide. Additionally, insulin did not significantly affect total intracellular protein during 24-96 h of incubation. Insulin also increased hCG release from JAR cells, but not from human term trophoblast cells. A mouse monoclonal antibody to the IGF-I receptor inhibited the stimulation of insulin in JEG-3 cells.

  19. Insulin stimulates synthesis and release of human chorionic gonadotropin by choriocarcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies have shown that insulin regulates placental lactogen, progesterone, and estrogen production from human trophoblast cells. This study was performed to examine whether insulin also regulates the production of hCG by this type of cell. After 24-36 h of preincubation, JEG-3 and JAR cells (2-3 x 10(5) cells/ml.well) or human term trophoblast cells (1 x 10(6) cells/ml.well) were exposed to the test hormone in serum-free Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium for 24-96 h. Secretion of hCG from JEG-3 cells was stimulated by human insulin, human proinsulin, or porcine insulin in a dose-dependent manner, with lowest effective doses of 6.7, 96, and 53 mg/L, respectively. Time-course studies showed that hCG secretion peaked at 72-96 h with insulin exposure; in contrast, no decernable peak was seen without insulin in serum-free media. Exposure of JEG-3 cells for 24 h to 209 mg/liter insulin stimulated hCG synthesis, with 40 +/- 3% more immunoreactive intracellular hCG (P less than 0.05). Cells grown in the presence of insulin and [35S]methionine had 47 +/- 21% more labeled intracellular hCG and 56 +/- 13% more immunoprecipitable [35S]methionine-hCG secreted into the medium than the control cultures (P less than 0.05). During this time period, human placental lactogen release and total trichloroacetice acid-precipitable [35S]methionine protein were not increased. The insulin-induced stimulation of hCG synthesis was inhibited by cycloheximide. Additionally, insulin did not significantly affect total intracellular protein during 24-96 h of incubation. Insulin also increased hCG release from JAR cells, but not from human term trophoblast cells. A mouse monoclonal antibody to the IGF-I receptor inhibited the stimulation of insulin in JEG-3 cells

  20. Root and shoot parts of strawberry: factories for production of functional human pro-insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavizi, Ashkan; Javaran, Mokhtar Jalali; Moieni, Ahmad; Mohammadi-Dehcheshmeh, Manijeh; Mohebodini, Mehdi; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes, a disease caused by excessive blood sugar, is caused by the lack of insulin. For commercial production, insulin is made in bacteria or yeast by protein recombinant technology. The focus of this research is evaluating another resource and producing of recombinant insulin protein in as strawberry as this plant has high potential in production of pharmaceutical proteins. Strawberry is a suitable bioreactor for production of recombinant proteins especially edible vaccines. In this research, human pro-insulin gene was cloned in pCAMBIA1304 vector under CaMV35S promoter and NOS terminator. Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404, AGL1, EHA105, EHA101, C58, C58 (pGV2260) and C58 (pGV3101) strains were used for transformation of pro-insulin gene into strawberry cv. Camarosa, Selva, Sarian Hybrid, Pajaro, Paros, Gaviota, Alpine. Additionally, Agrobacterium rhizogenes K599, R1000, A4 and MSU440 strains were utilized for gene transformation into hairy roots. PCR analysis indicated the presence of transformed human pro-insulin gene in the strawberry and hairy roots. Also, its transcription was confirmed using RT-PCR. Furthermore, the analysis of plants, fruits and hairy roots at the level of proteins using dot blot, ELISA, SDS-PAGE and ECL tests re-confirmed the expression of this protein in the transgenic plants as well as hairy roots. Protein purification of human pro-insulin from transgenic tissues was performed using affinity chromatography. Finally, the bioassay of recombinant pro-insulin was performed. The analysis of second generations of transgenic plants (T1) at DNA and protein levels was also performed as a complementary experiment. This study opens a new avenue in molecular farming of human pro-insulin through its mass production in roots and shoots of strawberry. PMID:25403333

  1. An update on the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: focus on insulin detemir, a long-acting human insulin analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raslova, Katarina

    2010-01-01

    Basal insulin analogs are used to minimize unpredictable processes of NPH insulin. Modification of the human insulin molecule results in a slower distribution to peripheral target tissues, a longer duration of action with stable concentrations and thus a lower rate of hypoglycemia. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that provides effective therapeutic options for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. For glycemic control, no significant differences were found in HbA1c levels compared with NPH and insulin glargine. It is comparable with insulin glargine in significantly reducing rates of all types of hypoglycemia. Clinical studies have demonstrated that detemir is responsible for significantly lower within-subject variability and no or less weight gain than NPH insulin and glargine. Recent pharmacodynamic studies have shown that detemir can be used once daily in many patients with diabetes. Together with patient-friendly injection devices and dose adjustments, it provides a treatment option with the potential to lower the key barriers of adherence to insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes. Recent guidelines for treatment of type 2 diabetes suggest starting intensive therapy of hyperglycemia at an early stage of diabetes and recommend therapeutic options that provide the possibility of reaching HbA1c goals individually, with a low risk of hypoglycemia or other adverse effects of treatment. The properties of insulin detemir match these requirements. PMID:20539842

  2. Fetal and perinatal outcomes in type 1 diabetes pregnancy : a randomized study comparing insulin aspart with human insulin in 322 subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hod, Moshe; Damm, Peter; Kaaja, Risto; Visser, Gerard H. A.; Dunne, Fidelma; Demidova, Irina; Hansen, Anne-Sofie Pade; Mersebach, Henriette

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was a comparison of insulin aspart (IAsp) with human insulin (HI) in basal-bolus therapy with neutral protamine Hagedorn for fetal and perinatal outcomes of type 1 diabetes in pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN: This was a randomized, parallel, open-label, controlled, mult

  3. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a more potent regulator of gene expression than insulin in primary human myoblasts and myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palsgaard, J.; Brown, A.E.; Jensen, M.;

    2009-01-01

    regulation was investigated in primary human skeletal muscle cells before and after differentiation. Cell cultures were treated with 100 nM insulin, IGF-I or nothing for 4h, and gene expression was subsequently determined using the Affymetrix microarray platform. Insulin and IGF-I receptor levels were......Conventionally, insulin is believed to induce a metabolic response, and IGF-I a mitogenic/differentiation response in vivo. However, several studies indicate that the roles of insulin and IGF-I may not be that easy to separate. In this study, insulin and IGF-I specificity in terms of gene......-I receptors as determined by radioligand binding assays. In the myotubes, we did not identify any ligand specificity in terms of functional categories. The major difference between the two ligands was their respective potencies in gene regulation, which was higher for IGF-I than for insulin. This was true for...

  4. Human pituitary and placental hormones control human insulin-like growth factor II secretion in human granulosa cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Ramasharma, K; Li, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    Human granulosa cells cultured with calf serum actively proliferated for 18-20 generation and secreted progesterone into the medium; progesterone levels appeared to decline with increase in generation number. Cells cultured under serum-free conditions secreted significant amounts of progesterone and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The progesterone secretion was enhanced by the addition of human follitropin, lutropin, and chorionic gonadotropin but not by growth hormone. These cells, w...

  5. The Effects of Anti-insulin Antibodies and Cross-reactivity with Human Recombinant Insulin Analogues in the E170 Insulin Immunometric Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Serim; Yun, Yeo Min; Hur, Mina; Moon, Hee Won; Kim, Jin Q

    2011-01-01

    Background Insulin assays are affected by varying degrees of interference from anti-insulin antibodies (IAs) and by cross-reactivity with recombinant insulin analogues. We evaluated the usefulness of the E170 insulin assay by assessing IA effects and cross-reactivity with 2 analogues. Methods Sera were obtained from 59 type 2 diabetes patients receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and 18 healthy controls. Insulin levels were determined using an E170 analyzer. To investigate the e...

  6. Reduced DPP4 activity improves insulin signaling in primary human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrborn, Diana; Brückner, Julia; Sell, Henrike; Eckel, Jürgen

    2016-03-11

    DPP4 is a ubiquitously expressed cell surface protease which is also released to the circulation as soluble DPP4 (sDPP4). Recently, we identified DPP4 as a novel adipokine oversecreted in obesity and thus potentially linking obesity to the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, sDPP4 impairs insulin signaling in an autocrine and paracrine fashion in different cell types. However, it is still unknown which functional role DPP4 might play in adipocytes. Therefore, primary human adipocytes were treated with a specific DPP4 siRNA. Adipocyte differentiation was not affected by DPP4 silencing. Interestingly, DPP4 reduction improved insulin responsiveness of adipocytes at the level of insulin receptor, proteinkinase B (Akt) and Akt substrate of 160 kDa. To investigate whether the observed effects could be attributed to the enzymatic activity of DPP4, human adipocytes were treated with the DPP4 inhibitors sitagliptin and saxagliptin. Our data show that insulin-stimulated activation of Akt is augmented by DPP4 inhibitor treatment. Based on our previous observation that sDPP4 induces insulin resistance in adipocytes, and that adipose DPP4 levels are higher in obese insulin-resistant patients, we now suggest that the abundance of DPP4 might be a regulator of adipocyte insulin signaling.

  7. Insulin and leptin enhance human sperm motility, acrosome reaction and nitric oxide production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fanuel Lampiao; Stefan S. du Plessis

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the in vitro effects of insulin and leptin on human sperm motility, viability, acrosome reaction and nitric oxide (NO) production. Methods: Washed human spermatozoa from normozoospermic donors were treated with insulin (10 μIU) and leptin (10 nmol). Insulin and leptin effects were blocked by inhibition of their intracellular effector, phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), by wortmannin (10 μmol) 30 min prior to insulin and leptin being given. Computer-assisted semen analysis was used to assess motility after 1, 2 and 3 h of incubation. Viability was assessed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting using propidium iodide as a fluorescent probe. Acrosome-reacted cells were observed under a fluorescent microscope using fluorescein-isothiocyanate-Pisum sativum agglutinin as a probe. NO was measured after treating the sperm with 4,5-diaminofluorescein-2/diacetate (DAF-2/DA) and analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Results: Insulin and leptin significantly increased total motility, progressive motility and acrosome reaction, as well as NO production. Conclusion: This study showed the in vitro beneficial effects of insulin and leptin on human sperm function. These hormones could play a role in enhancing the fertilization capacity of human spermatozoa.

  8. optimization of insulin radioreceptor assay in human erythrocytes in normal and some disease status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is concerned with the evaluation of a new optimized technique for the principle of chloramine-T method used for insulin iodination by 125I-radioisotope with some modifications. The modified procedure can be carried out under normal condition of room temperature, employed longer reaction times and omitted the addition of inorganic reducing salts, maintaining efficient iodination and avoiding denaturations to obtain labels of exceedingly high specific activity on a small quantities of insulin for in vitro usage in the investigation of human erythrocytes 125 I-insulin binding capacity in normal and some disease status

  9. Human muscle fiber type-specific insulin signaling: Impact of obesity and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Peter Hjorth; Pedersen, Andreas J T; Birk, Jesper Bratz;

    2015-01-01

    /or metabolic enzymes. Pools of type I and II fibers were prepared from biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscles from lean, obese and type 2 diabetic subjects before and after a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Type I fibers compared to type II fibers have higher protein levels of the insulin receptor, GLUT4......-responses to insulin adjusted for protein level were not different between fiber types. Independently of fiber type, insulin signaling was similar (TBC1D1, GS and PDH-E1α) or decreased (Akt and TBC1D4) in muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes compared to lean and obese subjects. We conclude that human type I...

  10. Elevated insulin receptor content in human breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Papa, V.; Pezzino, V; Costantino, A.; Belfiore, A.; D. Giuffrida; Frittitta, L; Vannelli, G.B.; Brand, R.; Goldfine, I D; Vigneri, R

    1990-01-01

    The growth of breast cancer cells is under the regulation of hormones, growth factors, and their receptors. In the present study, we have employed a new, sensitive, and specific radioimmunoassay for the direct measurement of insulin receptors in surgical specimens of breast cancers. In 159 specimens the insulin receptor content was 6.15 +/- 3.69 ng/0.1 mg protein. This value was more than sixfold higher than the mean value found in both 27 normal breast tissues obtained at total mastectomy (0...

  11. Prolonged Fasting Identifies Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Dysfunction as Consequence Rather Than Cause of Human Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeks, Joris; van Herpen, Noud A.; Mensink, Marco; Moonen-Kornips, Esther; van Beurden, Denis; Hesselink, Matthijs K.C.; Schrauwen, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, but it is debated whether this is a primary factor in the pathogenesis of the disease. To test the concept that mitochondrial dysfunction is secondary to the development of insulin resistance, we employed the unique model of prolonged fasting in humans. Prolonged fasting is a physiologic condition in which muscular insulin resistance develops in the presence of increased free fatty acid (FFA) levels, increased fat oxidation and low glucose and insulin levels. It is therefore anticipated that skeletal muscle mitochondrial function is maintained to accommodate increased fat oxidation unless factors secondary to insulin resistance exert negative effects on mitochondrial function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS While in a respiration chamber, twelve healthy males were subjected to a 60 h fast and a 60 h normal fed condition in a randomized crossover design. Afterward, insulin sensitivity was assessed using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and mitochondrial function was quantified ex vivo in permeabilized muscle fibers using high-resolution respirometry. RESULTS Indeed, FFA levels were increased approximately ninefold after 60 h of fasting in healthy male subjects, leading to elevated intramuscular lipid levels and decreased muscular insulin sensitivity. Despite an increase in whole-body fat oxidation, we observed an overall reduction in both coupled state 3 respiration and maximally uncoupled respiration in permeabilized skeletal muscle fibers, which could not be explained by changes in mitochondrial density. CONCLUSIONS These findings confirm that the insulin-resistant state has secondary negative effects on mitochondrial function. Given the low insulin and glucose levels after prolonged fasting, hyperglycemia and insulin action per se can be excluded as underlying mechanisms, pointing toward elevated plasma FFA and/or intramuscular fat accumulation as possible

  12. Serum Autotaxin/ENPP2 Correlates with Insulin Resistance in Older Humans with Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, Valerie L.; Trybula, Joy S.; Wills, Rachel C.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Dubé, John J.; Kienesberger, Petra C; Kershaw, Erin E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Autotaxin (ATX) is an adipocyte-derived lysophospholipase D that generates the lipid signaling molecule lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). The ATX/LPA pathway in adipose tissue has recently been implicated in obesity and insulin resistance in animal models, but the role of circulating ATX in humans remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between serum ATX and insulin resistance. Methods In this retrospective study, older (60–75 years), non-diabetic ...

  13. Surface redistribution of 125I-insulin in cultured human lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    The cultured human lymphocyte (IM-9) binds 125I-insulin by a receptor- mediated process; the receptor, in turn, is regulated by the ligand. In the present study we have examined quantitatively the morphologic events involved in 125I-insulin interaction with the surface of the lymphocyte. At 2 min of incubation of 15 degrees or 37 degrees C, the ligand localizes preferentially at the villous surface of the cell, whereas with longer periods of incubation, the ligand distributes indistinguishabl...

  14. Insulin Stimulates Interleukin-6 Expression and Release in LS14 Human Adipocytes through Multiple Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    LaPensee, Christopher R.; Hugo, Eric R.; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2008-01-01

    IL-6 is an important cytokine that regulates both immune and metabolic functions. Within adipose tissue, preadipocytes produce significant amounts of IL-6, but little is known about the factors or mechanisms that regulate IL-6 production in these cells. Using LS14, a newly developed human adipocyte cell line, our objective was to determine the mechanisms by which insulin stimulates IL-6 production and release in preadipocytes. Insulin increased IL-6 gene expression and secretion in a time- an...

  15. Serological analysis of human IgG and IgE anti-insulin antibodies by solid-phase radioimmunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single solid-phase assay system which is useful for quantitative measurement of both IgG and IgE anti-insulin antibodies in human serum has been developed. Insulin-specific immunoglobulins are absorbed from human serum by excess quantities of insulin-agarose. After washes to remove unbound immunoglobulins, radioiodinated Staph A or rabbit anti-human IgE is added to detect bound IgG or IgE anbitodies, respectively

  16. An update on the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: focus on insulin detemir, a long-acting human insulin analog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Raslova

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Katarina RaslovaMetabolic Center Ltd and Slovak Medical University, Bratislava, Slovak RepublicAbstract: Basal insulin analogs are used to minimize unpredictable processes of NPH insulin. Modification of the human insulin molecule results in a slower distribution to peripheral target tissues, a longer duration of action with stable concentrations and thus a lower rate of hypoglycemia. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that provides effective therapeutic options for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. For glycemic control, no significant differences were found in HbA1c levels compared with NPH and insulin glargine. It is comparable with insulin glargine in significantly reducing rates of all types of hypoglycemia. Clinical studies have demonstrated that detemir is responsible for significantly lower within-subject variability and no or less weight gain than NPH insulin and glargine. Recent pharmacodynamic studies have shown that detemir can be used once daily in many patients with diabetes. Together with patient-friendly injection devices and dose adjustments, it provides a treatment option with the potential to lower the key barriers of adherence to insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes. Recent guidelines for treatment of type 2 diabetes suggest starting intensive therapy of hyperglycemia at an early stage of diabetes and recommend therapeutic options that provide the possibility of reaching HbA1c goals individually, with a low risk of hypoglycemia or other adverse effects of treatment. The properties of insulin detemir match these requirements.Keywords: insulin analog, insulin detemir, diabetes mellitus, hypoglycemia, within-subject variability

  17. Celastrol Protects against Antimycin A-Induced Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Hafizi Abu Bakar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are widely accepted as key hallmarks of obesity-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the functional roles of an anti-inflammatory compound, celastrol, in mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance induced by antimycin A (AMA in human skeletal muscle cells. We found that celastrol treatment improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake activity of AMA-treated cells, apparently via PI3K/Akt pathways, with significant enhancement of mitochondrial activities. Furthermore, celastrol prevented increased levels of cellular oxidative damage where the production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines in cultures cells was greatly reduced. Celastrol significantly increased protein phosphorylation of insulin signaling cascades with amplified expression of AMPK protein and attenuated NF-κB and PKC θ activation in human skeletal muscle treated with AMA. The improvement of insulin signaling pathways by celastrol was also accompanied by augmented GLUT4 protein expression. Taken together, these results suggest that celastrol may be advocated for use as a potential therapeutic molecule to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction-induced insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle cells.

  18. Newer insulin analogues and inhaled insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Girish C; Manikandan S; Jayanthi M

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disease with high prevalence worldwide. Exogenous insulin is used in the management of this condition. The development of human insulin has provided tighter control of glycaemia in diabetic patients. Insulin analogues like insulin lispro and aspart were developed to closely match its profile with physiological secretion. The newer additions to this armamentarium are insulin glulisine, insulin detemir and albulin.Insulin glulisine is a short acting analogue with a rapid...

  19. Transplanted human pancreatic islets after long-term insulin independence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Y D; Gupta, Shashank; Morel, P;

    2013-01-01

    independence. Islets were pooled from two donors with respectively one and five HLA mismatches. Insulin-positive islets were found throughout the right and left liver, and absent in the pancreas. Two- and three-dimensional analysis showed that islets lost their initial rounded and compact morphology, had...

  20. Differential interaction of Apolipoprotein-E isoforms with insulin receptors modulates brain insulin signaling in mutant human amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Elizabeth S; Chen, Christopher; Cole, Gregory M; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2015-09-08

    It is unclear how human apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although Aβ levels can lead to insulin signaling impairment, these experiments were done in the absence of human ApoE. To examine ApoE role, we crossed the human ApoE-targeted replacement mice with mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) mice. In 26 week old mice with lower Aβ levels, the expression and phosphorylation of insulin signaling proteins remained comparable among APP, ApoE3xAPP and ApoE4xAPP mouse brains. When the mice aged to 78 weeks, these proteins were markedly reduced in APP and ApoE4xAPP mouse brains. While Aβ can bind to insulin receptor, how ApoE isoforms modulate this interaction remains unknown. Here, we showed that ApoE3 had greater association with insulin receptor as compared to ApoE4, regardless of Aβ42 concentration. In contrast, ApoE4 bound more Aβ42 with increasing peptide levels. Using primary hippocampal neurons, we showed that ApoE3 and ApoE4 neurons are equally sensitive to physiological levels of insulin. However, in the presence of Aβ42, insulin failed to elicit a downstream response only in ApoE4 hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our data show that ApoE genotypes can modulate this Aβ-mediated insulin signaling impairment.

  1. Glucagon-to-insulin ratio is pivotal for splanchnic regulation of FGF-21 in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Schiøler; Clemmesen, Jens Otto; Secher, Niels Henry;

    2015-01-01

    that the splanchnic circulation secretes FGF-21 at rest and that it is rapidly enhanced during exercise. In contrast, the leg does not contribute to the systemic levels of FGF-21. To unravel the mechanisms underlying the regulation of exercise-induced hepatic release of FGF-21, we manipulated circulating glucagon......-to-venous differences over the liver and the leg during exercise, we evaluated the organ-specific secretion of FGF-21 in humans. By four different infusion models manipulating circulating glucagon and insulin, we addressed the interaction of these hormones on FGF-21 secretion in humans. RESULTS: We demonstrate...... and insulin. These studies demonstrated that in humans glucagon stimulates splanchnic FGF-21 secretion whereas insulin has an inhibitory effect. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our data reveal that 1) in humans, the splanchnic bed contributes to the systemic FGF-21 levels during rest and exercise; 2) under normo...

  2. Long-term effect of insulin on glucose transport and insulin binding in cultured adipocytes from normal and obese humans with and without non-insulin-dependent diabetes.

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, M K; Taylor, L G; Pories, W J; Flickinger, E G; Meelheim, D; Atkinson, S.; Sehgal, N S; Caro, J F

    1987-01-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that in vitro exposure of insulin-resistant adipocytes with insulin results in improved insulin action. A primary culture system of adipocytes from obese subjects with or without non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and nonobese control subjects has been developed. The adipocytes when cultured in serum-free medium do not lose their original characteristics in regard to insulin binding and glucose transport. The adipocytes from three groups were incubat...

  3. Expression of human insulin gene wrapped with chitosan nanoparticles in NIH3T3 cells and diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li NIU; Yan-cheng XU; Hai-ying XIE; Zhe DAI; Hui-qin TANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To study the expression of human insulin gene wrapped with chitosan nanoparticles in NIH3T3 cells and diabetic rats. Methods: pCMV.Ins, an expression plasmid of the human insulin gene, was constructed. In total, 100 μg pCMV.Ins wrapped with chitosan nanoparticles (chitosan-pCMV.Ins) was transfected to NIH3T3 cells and diabetes rats through lavage and coloclysis, respectively. The transfected cells were grown in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, containing G418, for 72 h after transfection. The clones were selected and continued to grow in G418 medium for 24 d. The expression of human insulin was detected by immunohistochemistry. Human insulin in the culture medium of transfected cells was measured. Fasting blood glucose and plasma human insulin of diabetic rats were measured for 5 d after transfection. RT-PCR and Western blotting were performed to confirm the expression of the human insulin gene in diabetic rats. Results: Approximately 10% of NIH3T3 cells transfected by chitosan-pCMV.Ins expressed human insulin. Human insulin in the culture medium of NIH3T3 cells transfected by chitosan-pCMV.Ins significantly increased compared with that of the control group (P<0.01). Fasting blood glucose levels of the lavage group and the coloclysis group decreased significantly in 5 d (P<0.01) in comparison, while plasma insulin levels were much higher (P<0.01). The human insulin gene mRNA and human insulin were only detected in the lavage and the coloclysis groups. Conclusion: The human insulin gene can be transfected and expressed successfully by chitosan-pCMV.Ins in NIH3T3 cells and diabetes rats, which indicates that chitosan is a promising, non-viral vector for gene expression.

  4. Linkage disequilibrium in the human insulin/insulin-like growth factor II region of human chromosome II.

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, N J; Bell, G I; Xiang, K S

    1988-01-01

    Caucasian (N = 128) and Chinese (N = 84) subjects were typed for RFLPs in the insulin (INS)/insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2) region of chromosome 11. Both the analysis of extended haplotypes and the pairwise measures of linkage disequilibrium among the RFLPs indicate that there is extensive linkage disequilibrium in the INS/IGF2 region. The disequilibrium extends across the hypervariable region (HVR) located just 5' to the INS gene and encompasses a region of at least 40 kbp. Previous stu...

  5. Tissue-specific methylation of human insulin gene and PCR assay for monitoring beta cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed I Husseiny

    Full Text Available The onset of metabolic dysregulation in type 1 diabetes (T1D occurs after autoimmune destruction of the majority of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. We previously demonstrated that the DNA encoding the insulin gene is uniquely unmethylated in these cells and then developed a methylation-specific PCR (MSP assay to identify circulating beta cell DNA in streptozotocin-treated mice prior to the rise in blood glucose. The current study extends to autoimmune non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and humans, showing in NOD mice that beta cell death occurs six weeks before the rise in blood sugar and coincides with the onset of islet infiltration by immune cells, demonstrating the utility of MSP for monitoring T1D. We previously reported unique patterns of methylation of the human insulin gene, and now extend this to other human tissues. The methylation patterns of the human insulin promoter, intron 1, exon 2, and intron 2 were determined in several normal human tissues. Similar to our previous report, the human insulin promoter was unmethylated in beta cells, but methylated in all other tissues tested. In contrast, intron 1, exon 2 and intron 2 did not exhibit any tissue-specific DNA methylation pattern. Subsequently, a human MSP assay was developed based on the methylation pattern of the insulin promoter and human islet DNA was successfully detected in circulation of T1D patients after islet transplantation therapy. Signal levels of normal controls and pre-transplant samples were shown to be similar, but increased dramatically after islet transplantation. In plasma the signal declines with time but in whole blood remains elevated for at least two weeks, indicating that association of beta cell DNA with blood cells prolongs the signal. This assay provides an effective method to monitor beta cell destruction in early T1D and in islet transplantation therapy.

  6. Tissue-Specific Methylation of Human Insulin Gene and PCR Assay for Monitoring Beta Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husseiny, Mohamed I.; Kaye, Alexander; Zebadua, Emily; Kandeel, Fouad; Ferreri, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metabolic dysregulation in type 1 diabetes (T1D) occurs after autoimmune destruction of the majority of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. We previously demonstrated that the DNA encoding the insulin gene is uniquely unmethylated in these cells and then developed a methylation-specific PCR (MSP) assay to identify circulating beta cell DNA in streptozotocin-treated mice prior to the rise in blood glucose. The current study extends to autoimmune non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and humans, showing in NOD mice that beta cell death occurs six weeks before the rise in blood sugar and coincides with the onset of islet infiltration by immune cells, demonstrating the utility of MSP for monitoring T1D. We previously reported unique patterns of methylation of the human insulin gene, and now extend this to other human tissues. The methylation patterns of the human insulin promoter, intron 1, exon 2, and intron 2 were determined in several normal human tissues. Similar to our previous report, the human insulin promoter was unmethylated in beta cells, but methylated in all other tissues tested. In contrast, intron 1, exon 2 and intron 2 did not exhibit any tissue-specific DNA methylation pattern. Subsequently, a human MSP assay was developed based on the methylation pattern of the insulin promoter and human islet DNA was successfully detected in circulation of T1D patients after islet transplantation therapy. Signal levels of normal controls and pre-transplant samples were shown to be similar, but increased dramatically after islet transplantation. In plasma the signal declines with time but in whole blood remains elevated for at least two weeks, indicating that association of beta cell DNA with blood cells prolongs the signal. This assay provides an effective method to monitor beta cell destruction in early T1D and in islet transplantation therapy. PMID:24722187

  7. Successful desensitization with human insulin in a patient with an insulin allergy and hypersensitivity to protamine: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Pföhler Claudia; Müller Cornelia SL; Hasselmann Dirk O; Tilgen Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Insulin allergy may occur in patients treated with subcutaneous applications of insulin preparations. Besides additives in the insulin preparation such as protamine, cresol, and phenol, the insulin molecule itself may be the cause of the allergy. In the latter case, therapeutic options are rare. Case presentation A 68-year-old man with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus received different insulin preparations subcutaneously while on oral medication. Six to eight ...

  8. Regulation of recombinant human insulin-induced maturational events in Clarias batrachus (L.) oocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajra, Sudip; Das, Debabrata; Ghosh, Pritha; Pal, Soumojit; Nath, Poulomi; Maitra, Sudipta

    2016-04-01

    Regulation of insulin-mediated resumption of meiotic maturation in catfish oocytes was investigated. Insulin stimulation of post-vitellogenic oocytes promotes the synthesis of cyclin B, histone H1 kinase activation and a germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) response in a dose-dependent and duration-dependent manner. The PI3K inhibitor wortmannin abrogates recombinant human (rh)-insulin action on histone H1 kinase activation and meiotic G2-M1 transition in denuded and follicle-enclosed oocytes in vitro. While the translational inhibitor cycloheximide attenuates rh-insulin action, priming with transcriptional blocker actinomycin D prevents insulin-stimulated maturational response appreciably, albeit in low amounts. Compared with rh-insulin, human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) stimulation of follicle-enclosed oocytes in vitro triggers a sharp increase in 17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17α,20β-DHP) secreted in the incubation medium at 12 h. Interestingly, the insulin, but not the hCG-induced, maturational response shows less susceptibility to steroidogenesis inhibitors, trilostane or dl-aminoglutethimide. In addition, priming with phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) or cell-permeable dbcAMP or adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin reverses the action of insulin on meiotic G2-M1 transition. Conversely, the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, SQ 22536, or PKA inhibitor H89 promotes the resumption of meiosis alone and further potentiates the GVBD response in the presence of rh-insulin. Furthermore, insulin-mediated meiotic maturation involves the down-regulation of endogenous protein kinase A (PKA) activity in a manner sensitive to PI3K activation, suggesting potential involvement of a cross-talk between cAMP/PKA and insulin-mediated signalling cascade in catfish oocytes in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that rh-insulin regulation of the maturational response in C. batrachus oocytes involves down-regulation of PKA, synthesis of cyclin

  9. The human insulin-like growth factor II gene contains two development-specific promoters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagter-Holthuizen, P. de; Jansen, M.; Schaik, F.M.A.; Kammen, R. van der; Oosterwijk, C.; Brande, J.L. van den; Sussenbach, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGF) play an important role in fetal and postnatal development. Recently, the nucleotide sequences of the cDNAs encoding IGF-I and IGF-II and part of the human IGF genes were reported. In this communication we describe two distinct IGF-II cDNAs isolated from a human

  10. Human growth hormone binding and stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in cloned rat insulinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils

    1985-01-01

    Binding of 125I labelled human growth hormone to cloned insulin producing RIN-5AH cells is described. Binding was specific for somatotropic hormones since both human and rat growth hormone could compete for binding sites, whereas much higher concentrations of lactogenic hormones were needed to in...

  11. Monoclonal antibodies directed to human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouse hybridomas secreting antibodies to human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I) were produced by fusion of spleen cells of hyperimmunised mice with FO mouse-myeloma cells. Eight clones producing antibodies against human IGF I have been isolated, two of which have been characterised. One was used in a radioimmunoassay, the other for immunopurification of IGF. (Auth.)

  12. Rates and tissue sites of non-insulin- and insulin-mediated glucose uptake in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo glucose uptake can occur via two mechanisms, namely, insulin-mediated glucose uptake (IMGU) and non-insulin-mediated glucose uptake (NIMGU). Although the principal tissue sites for IMGU are skeletal muscle, the tissue sites for NIMGU at a given serum glucose concentration are not known. To examine this issue, rates of whole body glucose uptake (Rd) were measured at basal and during glucose clamp studies performed at euglycemia (approximately 90 mg/dl) and hyperglycemia (approximately 220 mg/dl) in six lean healthy men. Studies were performed during hyperinsulinemia (approximately 70 microU/ml) and during somatostatin-induced insulinopenia to measure IMGU and NIMGU, respectively. During each study, leg glucose balance (arteriovenous catheter technique) was also measured. With this approach, rates of whole body skeletal muscle IMGU and NIMGU can be estimated, and the difference between overall Rd and skeletal muscle glucose uptake represents non-skeletal muscle Rd. The results indicate that approximately 20% of basal Rd is into skeletal muscle. During insulinopenia approximately 86% of body NIMGU occurs in non-skeletal muscle tissues at euglycemia. When hyperglycemia was created, whole body NIMGU increased from 128 +/- 6 to 213 +/- 18 mg/min (P less than 0.01); NIMGU into non-skeletal muscle tissues was 134 +/- 11 and 111 +/- 6 mg/min at hyperglycemia and euglycemia, respectively, P = NS. Therefore, virtually all the hyperglycemia induced increment in NIMGU occurred in skeletal muscle. During hyperinsulinemia, IMGU in skeletal muscle represented 75 and 95% of body Rd, at euglycemia and hyperglycemia, respectively

  13. A Study on the Insulin Receptor of the Cultured Human Fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluated the usefulness of cultured human fibroblast for insulin receptor assay, the authors cultured fibroblast from biopsied normal adult female eyelid skin and assayed the insulin receptor with radioreceptor assay method. From the data obtained, percent of labeled insulin bound, numbers of insulin binding sites, affinity constants(Ka) and affinity of the empty sites(Ke) were calculated. The results were as follow; 1) The percent radioactivity bound of cultured fibroblast reached plateau at 4 hours 15 .deg. C incubation. 2) The scatchard plot of insulin binding to cultured human fibroblast was curvilinear and the affinity to receptor was decreased with increased receptor occupancy. 3) The numbers of high affinity, low affinity and total insulin receptor of cultured fibroblasts were 852, 24,800 and 25,652 sites per cell. 4) High and low affinity constants of cultured fibroblasts were 3.4 X 1010M-1, and l.08 X 108M-1, and the affinity of empty site was 5.0 X 108M-1.

  14. [Outcome of non-pharmacologic treatment in a gestational diabetic woman with high insulin resistance HOMA-IR index and allergy to human insulin. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokup, Alina; Swiatkowski, Maciej; Tyloch, Malgorzata; Szymanski, Wiesław

    2005-05-01

    Gestational diabetes is a syndrome of significant pathophysiological and clinical heterogeneity. This type of diabetes mellitus can be treated with diet, exercise and insulin in cases of unsatisfactory results of nonpharmacologic treatment. It has been reported the case of a 28-year -old female with gestational diabetes treated with high doses of insulin (128 U/per day) on four injections regimens. During the therapy allergic type III reactions to human insulin preparations (Ultratard HM, Actrapid HM Humulin U, Humulin R, Humalog) has been occurred at the injection site. The insulin was omitted. We applied diet modification and 15-30 minutes walking before meals till the afternoon with god metabolic control. High insulin resistance index HOMA-IR, type 2 diabetes history in both parents god metabolic control of nonpharmacologic treatment, and impaired glucose tolerance after post-partum may suggest, the early stage of diabetes type 2 in presented case. PMID:16145861

  15. The effect of feeding frequency on insulin and ghrelin responses in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Chambers, Edward S; Jeukendrup, Asker E;

    2008-01-01

    Recent work shows that increased meal frequency reduces ghrelin responses in sheep. Human research suggests there is an interaction between insulin and ghrelin. The effect of meal frequency on this interaction is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effect of feeding frequency on insulin...... trials (P>0.05), although the hormonal response patterns to the two meal feeding regimens were different. An inverse relationship was found between serum insulin and plasma ghrelin during the FAST andLOFREQ(MEAL) trials (P0.05). This study provides further evidence that the postprandial fall in ghrelin...... might be due, at least partially, to the rise in insulin and that high-frequency feeding may disrupt this relationship....

  16. Tolerance induced by physiological levels of secreted proteins in transgenic mice expressing human insulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteley, P J; Lake, J P; Selden, R F; Kapp, J A

    1989-01-01

    We have used transgenic mice to study immune tolerance to autologous, non-MHC encoded proteins that are expressed at physiological levels in the circulation. The transgenic mice used in these studies express the human preproinsulin gene and synthesize human proinsulin. Human and mouse insulin are secreted from the pancreatic islets of transgenic mice in response to normal physiological stimuli, such as glucose. Our data demonstrate that the transgenic mice have acquired tolerance to human ins...

  17. Eccentric exercise decreases maximal insulin action in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asp, Svend; Daugaard, J R; Kristiansen, S;

    1996-01-01

    subjects participated in two euglycaemic clamps, performed in random order. One clamp was preceded 2 days earlier by one-legged eccentric exercise (post-eccentric exercise clamp (PEC)) and one was without the prior exercise (control clamp (CC)). 2. During PEC the maximal insulin-stimulated glucose uptake...... for all three clamp steps used (P maximal activity of glycogen synthase was identical in the two thighs for all clamp steps. 3. The glucose infusion rate (GIR......) necessary to maintain euglycaemia during maximal insulin stimulation was lower during PEC compared with CC (15.7%, 81.3 +/- 3.2 vs. 96.4 +/- 8.8 mumol kg-1 min-1, P maximal...

  18. Global Haplotype Diversity in the Human Insulin Gene Region

    OpenAIRE

    Stead, John D.H.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Jeffreys, Alec J.

    2003-01-01

    The insulin minisatellite (INS VNTR) has been intensively analyzed due to its associations with diseases including diabetes. We have previously used patterns of variant repeat distribution in the minisatellite to demonstrate that genetic diversity is unusually great in Africans compared to non-Africans. Here we analyzed variation at 56 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) flanking the minisatellite in individuals from six populations, and we show that over 40% of the total genetic var...

  19. Persistent circulating human insulin in sheep transplanted in utero with human mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersek, Adel; Pixley, John S.; Goodrich, A. Daisy; Porada, Christopher D.; Almeida-Porada, Graca; Thain, David S.; Zanjani, Esmail D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine if mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) derived from human fetal pancreatic tissue (pMSC) would engraft and differentiate in sheep pancreas following transplantation in utero. Methods A three-step culture system was established for generating human fetal pMSC. Sheep fetuses were transplanted during the fetal transplant receptivity period with human pMSC and evaluated for in situ and functional engraftment in their pancreas, liver and bone marrow. Results Isolation and expansion of adherent cells from the human fetal pancreas yielded a cell population with morphologic and phenotypic characteristics similar to MSC derived from bone marrow. This putative stem cell population could undergo multilineage differentiation in vitro. Three to 27 months after fetal transplantation, the pancreatic engraftment frequency (chimeric index) was 79% while functional engraftment was noted in 50% of transplanted sheep. Hepatic and marrow engraftment and expression was noted as well. Conclusion We have established a procedure for isolation of human fetal pMSC that display characteristics similar to bone marrow derived MSC. In vivo results suggest the pMSC engraft, differentiate and secrete human insulin from the sheep pancreas. PMID:20170708

  20. Effect of insulin catheter wear-time on subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow and insulin absorption in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Trine Schnedler; Kaastrup, Peter; Stallknecht, Bente

    2009-01-01

    blood flow (ATBF) and absorption of the rapid-acting insulin analog insulin aspart over a period of 4 days. METHODS: Teflon insulin catheters (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) were inserted into the abdominal SAT of 10 healthy men without diabetes (mean +/- SEM age, 23.0 +/- 1.1 years; body mass index, 22...... +/- 3 min on day 0 to 45 +/- 4 min on day 4 (P = 0.019). Neither peak plasma concentration nor area under the curve of insulin aspart changed significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Insertion of a Teflon insulin catheter into the SAT results in increased ATBF and faster absorption of insulin aspart in a period of 4...

  1. Synchronization in G0/G1 enhances the mitogenic response of cells overexpressing the human insulin receptor A isoform to insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelander, Gitte-Mai; Hansen, Bo Falck; Jensen, Pia; Krabbe, Jonas S.; Jensen, Marianne B.; Hegelund, Anne Charlotte; Svendsen, Jette E.; Oleksiewicz, Martin B.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluating mitogenic signaling specifically through the human insulin receptor (IR) is relevant for the preclinical safety assessment of developmental insulin analogs. It is known that overexpression of IR sensitizes cells to the mitogenic effects of insulin, but it is essentially unknown how mitogenic responses can be optimized to allow practical use of such recombinant cell lines for preclinical safety testing. We constitutively overexpressed the short isoform of the human insulin receptor (hIR-A, exon 11-negative) in L6 rat skeletal myoblasts. Because the mitogenic effect of growth factors such as insulin is expected to act in G0/G1, promoting S-phase entry, we developed a combined topoinhibition + serum deprivation strategy to explore the effect of G0/G1 synchronization as an independent parameter in the context of serum deprivation, the latter being routinely used to reduce background in mitogenicity assays. G0/G1 synchronization significantly improved the mitogenic responses of L6-hIR cells to insulin, measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation. Comparison with the parental L6 cells using phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase, phospho-AKT, as well as 3H-thymidine incorporation end points supported that the majority of the mitogenic effect of insulin in L6-hIR cells was mediated by the overexpressed hIR-A. Using the optimized L6-hIR assay, we found that the X-10 insulin analog was more mitogenic than native human insulin, supporting that X-10 exhibits increased mitogenic signaling through the hIR-A. In summary, this study provides the first demonstration that serum deprivation may not be sufficient, and G0/G1 synchronization may be required to obtain optimal responsiveness of hIR-overexpressing cell lines for preclinical safety testing. PMID:19898946

  2. Validation of methods for measurement of insulin secretion in humans in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, L L; Christiansen, E; Vølund, A;

    2000-01-01

    of these mathematical techniques for quantification of insulin secretion have been tested in dogs, but not in humans. In the present studies, we examined the validity of both methods to recover the known infusion rates of insulin and C-peptide mimicking ISR during an oral glucose tolerance test. ISR from both......, and a close agreement was found for the results of an oral glucose tolerance test. We also studied whether C-peptide kinetics are influenced by somatostatin infusion. The decay curves after bolus injection of exogenous biosynthetic human C-peptide, the kinetic parameters, and the metabolic clearance rate were...

  3. Study of the insulin-like peptide 3 in human platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Borg, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    The insulin-like 3 peptide is autocrine/paracrine insulin-related hormone with a size of approximately 6kDa [1]. It mediates through a leucine richG-coupled receptor named LGR8. INSL3 is mainly expressed in human Leydig cells and is directly responsible for migration of the testis during the pre-natal period in maledevelopment. [2] INSL3 mRNA has recently been verified in human platelets whereas no mRNA has been detected for LGR8 (by Sanofi-Aventis GmbH in Frankfurt,Germany), indicating that ...

  4. Generation of Insulin-Producing Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Park, Si-Nae; Suh, Hwal

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of current experiment is the generation of insulin-producing human mesenchymal stem cells as therapeutic source for the cure of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is generally caused by insulin deficiency accompanied by the destruction of islet β-cells. In various trials for the treatment of type 1 diabetes, cell-based gene therapy using stem cells is considered as one of the most useful candidate for the treatment. In this experiment, human mesenchymal stem cells were transduced wi...

  5. Tissue-specific expression of transfected human insulin genes in pluripotent clonal rat insulinoma lines induced during passage in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, O.D.; Andersen, L.C.; Michelsen, B.; Owerbach, D.; Larsson, L.I.; Lernmark, A.; Steiner, D.F. (Hagedorn Research Laboratory, Gentofte (Denmark))

    1988-09-01

    The pluripotent rat islet tumor cell line MSL-G2 expresses primarily glucagon or cholecystokinin and not insulin in vitro but changes phenotype completely after prolonged in vivo cultivation to yield small-sized hypoglycemic tumors composed almost entirely of insulin-producing beta cells. When a genomic DNA fragment containing the coding and upstream regulatory regions of the human insulin gene was stably transfected into MSL-G2 cells no measurable amounts of insulin or insulin mRNA were detected in vitro. However, successive transplantation of two transfected clones resulted in hypoglycemic tumors that efficiently coexpressed human and rat insulin as determined by human C-peptide-specific immunoreagents. These results demonstrate that cis-acting tissue-specific insulin gene enhancer elements are conserved between rat and human insulin genes. The authors propose that the in vivo differentiation of MSL-G2 cells and transfected subclones into insulin-producing cells reflects processes of natural beta-cell ontogeny leading to insulin gene expression.

  6. Tissue-specific expression of transfected human insulin genes in pluripotent clonal rat insulinoma lines induced during passage in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pluripotent rat islet tumor cell line MSL-G2 expresses primarily glucagon or cholecystokinin and not insulin in vitro but changes phenotype completely after prolonged in vivo cultivation to yield small-sized hypoglycemic tumors composed almost entirely of insulin-producing beta cells. When a genomic DNA fragment containing the coding and upstream regulatory regions of the human insulin gene was stably transfected into MSL-G2 cells no measurable amounts of insulin or insulin mRNA were detected in vitro. However, successive transplantation of two transfected clones resulted in hypoglycemic tumors that efficiently coexpressed human and rat insulin as determined by human C-peptide-specific immunoreagents. These results demonstrate that cis-acting tissue-specific insulin gene enhancer elements are conserved between rat and human insulin genes. The authors propose that the in vivo differentiation of MSL-G2 cells and transfected subclones into insulin-producing cells reflects processes of natural beta-cell ontogeny leading to insulin gene expression

  7. Reversal of diabetes with insulin-producing cells derived in vitro from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Alireza; Bruin, Jennifer E; Arora, Payal; Rubin, Allison; Batushansky, Irina; Asadi, Ali; O'Dwyer, Shannon; Quiskamp, Nina; Mojibian, Majid; Albrecht, Tobias; Yang, Yu Hsuan Carol; Johnson, James D; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2014-11-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic progenitors or insulin-secreting cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has been proposed as a therapy for diabetes. We describe a seven-stage protocol that efficiently converts hESCs into insulin-producing cells. Stage (S) 7 cells expressed key markers of mature pancreatic beta cells, including MAFA, and displayed glucose-stimulated insulin secretion similar to that of human islets during static incubations in vitro. Additional characterization using single-cell imaging and dynamic glucose stimulation assays revealed similarities but also notable differences between S7 insulin-secreting cells and primary human beta cells. Nevertheless, S7 cells rapidly reversed diabetes in mice within 40 days, roughly four times faster than pancreatic progenitors. Therefore, although S7 cells are not fully equivalent to mature beta cells, their capacity for glucose-responsive insulin secretion and rapid reversal of diabetes in vivo makes them a promising alternative to pancreatic progenitor cells or cadaveric islets for the treatment of diabetes.

  8. Regulation of lipogenesis by glucocorticoids and insulin in human adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura L Gathercole

    Full Text Available Patients with glucocorticoid (GC excess, Cushing's syndrome, develop a classic phenotype characterized by central obesity and insulin resistance. GCs are known to increase the release of fatty acids from adipose, by stimulating lipolysis, however, the impact of GCs on the processes that regulate lipid accumulation has not been explored. Intracellular levels of active GC are dependent upon the activity of 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1 and we have hypothesized that 11β-HSD1 activity can regulate lipid homeostasis in human adipose tissue (Chub-S7 cell line and primary cultures of human subcutaneous (sc and omental (om adipocytes. Across adipocyte differentiation, lipogenesis increased whilst β-oxidation decreased. GC treatment decreased lipogenesis but did not alter rates of β-oxidation in Chub-S7 cells, whilst insulin increased lipogenesis in all adipocyte cell models. Low dose Dexamethasone pre-treatment (5 nM of Chub-S7 cells augmented the ability of insulin to stimulate lipogenesis and there was no evidence of adipose tissue insulin resistance in primary sc cells. Both cortisol and cortisone decreased lipogenesis; selective 11β-HSD1 inhibition completely abolished cortisone-mediated repression of lipogenesis. GCs have potent actions upon lipid homeostasis and these effects are dependent upon interactions with insulin. These in vitro data suggest that manipulation of GC availability through selective 11β-HSD1 inhibition modifies lipid homeostasis in human adipocytes.

  9. A Role for SPARC in the Moderation of Human Insulin Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Lorna W.; McCulloch, Laura J.; Holley, Janet E.; Rawling, Thomas J.; Welters, Hannah J.; Kos, Katarina

    2013-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis We have previously shown the implication of the multifunctional protein SPARC (Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine)/osteonectin in insulin resistance but potential effects on beta-cell function have not been assessed. We therefore aimed to characterise the effect of SPARC on beta-cell function and features of diabetes. Methods We measured SPARC expression by qRT-PCR in human primary pancreatic islets, adipose tissue, liver and muscle. We then examined the relation of SPARC with glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in primary human islets and the effect of SPARC overexpression on GSIS in beta cell lines. Results SPARC was expressed at measurable levels in human islets, adipose tissue, liver and skeletal muscle, and demonstrated reduced expression in primary islets from subjects with diabetes compared with controls (p< = 0.05). SPARC levels were positively correlated with GSIS in islets from control donors (p< = 0.01). Overexpression of SPARC in cultured beta-cells resulted in a 2.4-fold increase in insulin secretion in high glucose conditions (p< = 0.01). Conclusions Our data suggest that levels of SPARC are reduced in islets from donors with diabetes and that it has a role in insulin secretion, an effect which appears independent of SPARC’s modulation of obesity-induced insulin resistance in adipose tissue. PMID:23840838

  10. A role for SPARC in the moderation of human insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorna W Harries

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We have previously shown the implication of the multifunctional protein SPARC (Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine/osteonectin in insulin resistance but potential effects on beta-cell function have not been assessed. We therefore aimed to characterise the effect of SPARC on beta-cell function and features of diabetes. METHODS: We measured SPARC expression by qRT-PCR in human primary pancreatic islets, adipose tissue, liver and muscle. We then examined the relation of SPARC with glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS in primary human islets and the effect of SPARC overexpression on GSIS in beta cell lines. RESULTS: SPARC was expressed at measurable levels in human islets, adipose tissue, liver and skeletal muscle, and demonstrated reduced expression in primary islets from subjects with diabetes compared with controls (p< = 0.05. SPARC levels were positively correlated with GSIS in islets from control donors (p< = 0.01. Overexpression of SPARC in cultured beta-cells resulted in a 2.4-fold increase in insulin secretion in high glucose conditions (p< = 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that levels of SPARC are reduced in islets from donors with diabetes and that it has a role in insulin secretion, an effect which appears independent of SPARC's modulation of obesity-induced insulin resistance in adipose tissue.

  11. Effect of insulin on human skeletal muscle protein synthesis is modulated by insulin-induced changes in muscle blood flow and amino acid availability

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Satoshi; Rasmussen, Blake B.; Cadenas, Jerson G.; Grady, James J.; Volpi, Elena

    2006-01-01

    Insulin promotes muscle anabolism, but it is still unclear whether it stimulates muscle protein synthesis in humans. We hypothesized that insulin can increase muscle protein synthesis only if it increases muscle amino acid availability. We measured muscle protein and amino acid metabolism using stable-isotope methodologies in 19 young healthy subjects at baseline and during insulin infusion in one leg at low (LD, 0.05), intermediate (ID, 0.15), or high (HD, 0.30 mU·min−1·100 ml−1) doses. Insu...

  12. A novel rapid - acting oral inhalation human insulin for diabetes mellitus: Afrezza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra S. Beedimani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Afrezza is rapid-acting oral inhalation insulin that is administered at the beginning of each meal. The U.S Food and Drug Administration has approved Afrezza (insulin human inhalation powder, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin to improve glycemic control in adults and #8805;18 years of age with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM or T2DM. Afrezza must be used in combination with long-acting insulin in patients with T1DM. Afrezza may be used with either oral anti-diabetic drugs or basal insulin in patients with T2DM. Afrezza should be administered via oral inhalation using Afrezza inhaler. Dosage adjustment is needed when switching from injection insulin to oral inhalation Afrezza. It is contraindicated in individuals with chronic lung disease and smokers because of the risk of the acute bronchospasm. Before initiating, Afrezza, a complete medical history, physical examination and spirometry (forced expiratory volume 1 sec results is required in all individuals to identify the potential lung disease. Common adverse reactions in individuals treated with Afrezza include hypoglycemia, cough, throat pain or irritation, headache, and diarrhea. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(5.000: 1040-1042

  13. Acute and chronic effects of glyceryl trinitrate therapy on insulin and glucose regulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrzkiewicz, Sean; Parker, John D

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the effect of acute and sustained transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) therapy on insulin and glucose regulation. Totally, 12 males (18-30 years) underwent a glucose tolerance test at baseline (visit 1), 90 minutes after acute transdermal GTN 0.6 mg/h (visit 2), following 7 days of continuous GTN (visit 3), and 2 to 3 days after stopping GTN (visit 4). At each visit, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured before and 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after a 75-g oral glucose load. Indices of glucose metabolism that were examined included the insulin sensitivity index, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and the insulinogenic index. The acute administration of GTN had no effect on glucose and insulin responses (visit 2). However, after 7 days of GTN exposure (visit 3) there was an increase in the mean glucose concentration measured after the oral glucose load. On visit 1, the mean glucose concentration (± standard deviation) following the 75 g oral glucose challenge was 5.7 ± 0.5 µmol/L. On visit 3, after 7 days of transdermal GTN therapy, the mean glucose concentration after the oral glucose was significantly higher; 6.2 ± 0.5 µmol/L (P GTN therapy modifies glucose metabolism causing evidence of increased insulin resistance during sustained therapy in normal humans.

  14. Human Insulin Resistance Is Associated With Increased Plasma Levels of 12α-Hydroxylated Bile Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Astiarraga, Brenno; Camastra, Stefania; Accili, Domenico; Ferrannini, Ele

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) exert pleiotropic metabolic effects, and physicochemical properties of different BAs affect their function. In rodents, insulin regulates BA composition, in part by regulating the BA 12α-hydroxylase CYP8B1. However, it is unclear whether a similar effect occurs in humans. To address this question, we examined the relationship between clamp-measured insulin sensitivity and plasma BA composition in a cohort of 200 healthy subjects and 35 type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients. In healthy subjects, insulin resistance (IR) was associated with increased 12α-hydroxylated BAs (cholic acid, deoxycholic acid, and their conjugated forms). Furthermore, ratios of 12α-hydroxylated/non–12α-hydroxylated BAs were associated with key features of IR, including higher insulin, proinsulin, glucose, glucagon, and triglyceride (TG) levels and lower HDL cholesterol. In T2D patients, BAs were nearly twofold elevated, and more hydrophobic, compared with healthy subjects, although we did not observe disproportionate increases in 12α-hydroxylated BAs. In multivariate analysis of the whole dataset, controlling for sex, age, BMI, and glucose tolerance status, higher 12α-hydroxy/non–12α-hydroxy BA ratios were associated with lower insulin sensitivity and higher plasma TGs. These findings suggest a role for 12α-hydroxylated BAs in metabolic abnormalities in the natural history of T2D and raise the possibility of developing insulin-sensitizing therapeutics based on manipulations of BA composition. PMID:23884887

  15. Synthesis of the human insulin gene: protein expression, scaling up and bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwan, El-Rashdy M; Matar, Saleh M; El-Aziz, Gamal Abd; Serour, Ehab A

    2008-01-01

    Optimized Synthetic human insulin gene was preferred to easy of cloning, plasmid stability, and protein expression away from the native sequence and its rare codons. Two steps to obtain the insulin, so we assembled the gene of 293 bp using a battery of overlapped synthetic oligos, then cloned into pET101directional TOPO expression vector downstream to the T7 promoter. The proinsulin products were produced as inclusion bodies in E. coli at a level of 10%. The batch cultivation of the strain yielded 6 g/L, while the high cell density of fed-batch cultivation yielded 46 g/L. The proinsulin purification yielded 110 mg/gram cell weight, and 1.3 mg/gram of a bioactive insulin. The native insulin was generated by enzymatic conversion of chemically processed proinsulin. The produced insulin was matched with that of a commercial aqueous version at a level of enzyme immunoassys, SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, and bioactivity. The present results showed that the produced insulin has a comparable biochemical and potency similar to that of commercial one. PMID:18080908

  16. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of insulin in agar and porcine models of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiszthuber, Helga; Bhatnagar, Sunali; Gyöngy, Miklós; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-assisted transdermal insulin delivery offers a less painful and less invasive alternative to subcutaneous insulin injections. However, ultrasound-based drug delivery, otherwise known as sonophoresis, is a highly variable phenomenon, in part dependent on cavitation. The aim of the current work is to investigate the role of cavitation in transdermal insulin delivery. Fluorescently stained, soluble Actrapid insulin was placed on the surface of human skin-mimicking materials subjected to 265 kHz, 10% duty cycle focused ultrasound. A confocally and coaxially aligned 5 MHz broadband ultrasound transducer was used to detect cavitation. Two different skin models were used. The first model, 3% agar hydrogel, was insonated with a range of pressures (0.25-1.40 MPa peak rarefactional focal pressure—PRFP), with and without cavitation nuclei embedded within the agar at a concentration of 0.05% w/v. The second, porcine skin was insonated at 1.00 and 1.40 MPa PRFP. In both models, fluorescence measurements were used to determine penetration depth and concentration of delivered insulin. Results show that in agar gel, both insulin penetration depth and concentration only increased significantly in the presence of inertial cavitation, with up to a 40% enhancement. In porcine skin the amount of fluorescent insulin was higher in the epidermis of those samples that were exposed to ultrasound compared to the control samples, but there was no significant increase in penetration distance. The results underline the importance of instigating and monitoring inertial cavitation during transdermal insulin delivery.

  17. Effect of starvation on human muscle protein metabolism and its response to insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the effect of fasting on muscle protein turnover in the basal state and in response to insulin, we measured forearm amino acid kinetics, using [3H]phenylalanine (Phe) and [14C]leucine (Leu) infused systemically, in eight healthy subjects after 12 (postabsorptive) and 60 h of fasting. After a 150-min basal period, forearm local insulin concentration was selectively raised by approximately 25 muU/ml for 150 min by intra-arterial insulin infusion (0.02 mU.kg-1. min-1). The 60-h fast increased urine nitrogen loss and whole body Leu flux and oxidation (by 50-75%, all P less than 0.02). Post-absorptively, forearm muscle exhibited a net release of Phe and Leu, which increased two- to threefold after the 60-h fast (P less than 0.05); this effect was mediated exclusively by accelerated local rates of amino acid appearance (Ra), with no reduction in rates of disposal (Rd). Local hyperinsulinemia in the postabsorptive condition caused a twofold increase in forearm glucose uptake (P less than 0.01) and completely suppressed the net forearm output of Phe and Leu (P less than 0.02). After the 60-h fast, forearm glucose disposal was depressed basally and showed no response to insulin; in contrast, insulin totally abolished the accelerated net forearm release of Phe and Leu. The action of insulin to reverse the augmented net release of Phe and Leu was mediated exclusively by approximately 40% suppression of Ra (P less than 0.02) rather than a stimulation of Rd. We conclude that in short-term fasted humans (1) muscle amino acid output accelerates due to increased proteolysis rather than reduced protein synthesis, and (2) despite its catabolic state and a marked impairment in insulin-mediated glucose disposal, muscle remains sensitive to insulin's antiproteolytic action

  18. Human islet preparations distributed for research exhibit a variety of insulin-secretory profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Kayton, Nora S.; Poffenberger, Gregory; Henske, Joseph; Dai, Chunhua; Thompson, Courtney; Aramandla, Radhika; Shostak, Alena; Nicholson, Wendell; Brissova, Marcela; Bush, William S.; Powers, Alvin C.

    2015-01-01

    Human islet research is providing new insights into human islet biology and diabetes, using islets isolated at multiple US centers from donors with varying characteristics. This creates challenges for understanding, interpreting, and integrating research findings from the many laboratories that use these islets. In what is, to our knowledge, the first standardized assessment of human islet preparations from multiple isolation centers, we measured insulin secretion from 202 preparations isolat...

  19. Insulin increases phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xiaolu; Bak, Steffen; Pedersen, Andreas James Thestrup;

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that multiple proteins involved in key regulatory processes in mitochondria are phosphorylated in mammalian tissues. Insulin regulates glucose metabolism by phosphorylation-dependent signaling and has been shown to stimulate ATP synthesis in human skeletal muscle. Here...... the majority of novel sites. Phosphorylation sites detected more often or exclusively in insulin-stimulated samples include multiple sites in mitochondrial proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and fatty acid metabolism, as well as several components of the newly defined......, we investigated the effect of insulin on the phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo. Using a combination of TiO2 phosphopeptide-enrichment, HILIC fractionation, and LC−MS/MS, we compared the phosphoproteomes of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscle samples...

  20. The human insulin receptor substrate-1 gene (IRS1) is localized on 2q36

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Masaki; Matsufuji, Senya; Hayashi, Shin-ichi; Furusaka, Akihiro; Tanaka, Teruji (Jikei Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)); Inazawa, J.; Nakamura, Yusuke (Cancer Institute, Tokyo (Japan)); Ariyama, Takeshi (Kyoto Prefactural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)); Wands, J.R. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-03-01

    The chromosomal localization of some of the genes participating in the insulin signaling pathway is known. The insulin and insulin receptor genes have been mapped to chromosomes 11 and 19, respectively. To identify the chromosomal localization of the human IRS1 gene, the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique was employed with Genomic Clone B-10. A total of 50 metaphase cells exhibiting either single or double spots of hybridization signals were examined. Among them, 32 showed the specific signals on 2q36. Therefore, the authors assigned the human IRS1 gene to 2q36. The genes for homeobox sequence (HOX4), fibronectin 1, alkaline phosphatase (intestinal), transition protein 1, villin 1, collagen (type IV), Waardenburg syndrome (type 1), alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, and glucagon have been localized in the vicinity of the IRS1 gene.

  1. Redifferentiation of insulin-secreting cells after in vitro expansion of adult human pancreatic islet tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular replacement therapy holds promise for the treatment of diabetes mellitus but donor tissue is severely limited. Therefore, we investigated whether insulin-secreting cells could be differentiated in vitro from a monolayer of cells expanded from human donor pancreatic islets. We describe a three-step culture protocol that allows for the efficient generation of insulin-producing cell clusters from in vitro expanded, hormone-negative cells. These clusters express insulin at levels of up to 34% that of average freshly isolated human islets and secrete C-peptide upon membrane depolarization. They also contain cells expressing the other major islet hormones (glucagon, somatostatin, and pancreatic polypeptide). The source of the newly differentiated endocrine cells could either be indigenous stem/progenitor cells or the proliferation-associated dedifferentiation and subsequent redifferentiation of mature endocrine cells. The in vitro generated cell clusters may be efficacious in providing islet-like tissue for transplantation into diabetic recipients

  2. Ubiquitin is a Novel Substrate for Human Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralat, Luis A.; Kalas, Vasilios; Zheng, Zhongzhou; Goldman, Robert D.; Sosnick, Tobin R.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) can degrade insulin and amyloid-β (Aβ), peptides involved in diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. IDE selects its substrates based on size, charge, and flexibility. From these criteria, we predict that IDE can cleave and inactivate ubiquitin (Ub). Here, we show that IDE cleaves Ub in a biphasic manner, first, by rapidly removing the two C-terminal glycines (kcat = 2 sec-1) followed by a slow cleavage between residues 72-73 (kcat = 0.07 sec-1), thereby producing the inactive Ub1-74 and Ub1-72. IDE is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic protein, where monomeric Ub is also present. Thus, Ub degradation by IDE should be regulated. IDE is known to bind the cytoplasmic intermediate filament protein nestin with high affinity. We found that nestin potently inhibits the cleavage of Ub by IDE. In addition, Ub1-72 has a markedly increased affinity for IDE (∼90 fold). Thus, the association of IDE with cellular regulators and product inhibition by Ub1-72 can prevent inadvertent proteolysis of cellular Ub by IDE. Ub is a highly stable protein. However, IDE instead prefers to degrade peptides with high intrinsic flexibility. Indeed, we demonstrate that IDE is exquisitely sensitive to Ub stability. Mutations that only mildly destabilize Ub (ΔΔG ‹ 0.6 kcal/mol) render IDE hypersensitive to Ub with rate enhancements greater than 12-fold. The Ub-bound IDE structure and IDE mutants reveal that interaction of the exosite with the N-terminus of Ub guides the unfolding of Ub, allowing its sequential cleavages. Together, our studies link the control of Ub clearance with IDE. PMID:21185309

  3. Response of Chick B Islets to Insulin Secretagogues is Comparable to those of Human Islet Equivalents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawna Chandravanshi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Context The B islets isolated from 3-5 day old chick respond well to glucose challenge in a similar fashion to those isolated from mouse pancreas. Objective To compare insulin secretory response of chick B islets with that of human Islet Equivalents (hIEqs generated from stem cells. Methods Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells (UC-MSCs were differentiated into hIEqs employing three step sequential serum free protocols. Results Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated Insulin, C peptide and Glut 2 positivity of both these islets. Static insulin stimulation of these islets in response to glucose, metformin and Gama Amino Butyric Acid (GABA resulted in increased insulin secretion as compared to basal glucose stimulation. Our results demonstrate that insulin secretory response of Chick B islets to Metformin and GABA is comparable to those of hIEqs. Moreover, both chick and hIEqs could be successfully cryopreserved and revived in a commercially available cryomix - Cryostore 5, indicating resemblance in their behaviour at sub-zero temperatures. Inference Present study advocates Chick islets as an alternative source for diabetes research and islet banking.

  4. Effect of 5'-flanking sequence deletions on expression of the human insulin gene in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromont-Racine, M; Bucchini, D; Madsen, O;

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the human insulin gene was examined in transgenic mouse lines carrying the gene with various lengths of DNA sequences 5' to the transcription start site (+1). Expression of the transgene was demonstrated by 1) the presence of human C-peptide in urine, 2) the presence of specific tra...... of the transgene was observed in cell types other than beta-islet cells.......Expression of the human insulin gene was examined in transgenic mouse lines carrying the gene with various lengths of DNA sequences 5' to the transcription start site (+1). Expression of the transgene was demonstrated by 1) the presence of human C-peptide in urine, 2) the presence of specific......, and -168 allowed correct initiation of the transcripts and cell specificity of expression, while quantitative expression gradually decreased. Deletion to -58 completely abolished the expression of the gene. The amount of human product that in mice harboring the longest fragment contributes up to 50...

  5. Expression of a functional human insulin receptor from a cloned cDNA in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Ebina, Y; Edery, M; Ellis, L; Standring, D; Beaudoin, J; Roth, R A; Rutter, W J

    1985-01-01

    We have placed human insulin receptor cDNA into a vector under the control of the simian virus 40 (SV40) early promoter and tested its function by transient expression in microinjected Xenopus oocytes and by expression in stably transformed CHO cells. The precursor and the alpha and beta subunits of the receptor were detected by immunoprecipitation from extracts of these cells. The human insulin receptor expressed in CHO cells specifically binds 125I-labeled insulin but not insulin-like growt...

  6. Alternate Phosphorylation/O-GlcNAc Modification on Human Insulin IRSs: A Road towards Impaired Insulin Signaling in Alzheimer and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangir, Zainab; Ahmad, Waqar; Shabbiri, Khadija

    2014-01-01

    Impaired insulin signaling has been thought of as important step in both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) regulate functions and interaction of insulin with insulin receptors substrates (IRSs) and activate insulin signaling downstream pathways via autophosphorylation on several tyrosine (TYR) residues on IRSs. Two important insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 are widely expressed in human, and alternative phosphorylation on their serine (Ser) and threonine (Thr) residues has been known to block the Tyr phosphorylation of IRSs, thus inhibiting insulin signaling and promoting insulin resistance. Like phosphorylation, O-glycosylation modification is important PTM and inhibits phosphorylation on same or neighboring Ser/Thr residues, often called Yin Yang sites. Both IRS-1 and IRS-2 have been shown to be O-glycosylated; however exact sites are not determined yet. In this study, by using neuronal network based prediction methods, we found more than 50 Ser/Thr residues that have potential to be O-glycosylated and may act as possible sites as well. Moreover, alternative phosphorylation and O-glycosylation on IRS-1 Ser-312, 984, 1037, and 1101 may act as possible therapeutic targets to minimize the risk of AD and T2DM. PMID:25580119

  7. Alternate Phosphorylation/O-GlcNAc Modification on Human Insulin IRSs: A Road towards Impaired Insulin Signaling in Alzheimer and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired insulin signaling has been thought of as important step in both Alzheimer’s disease (AD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Posttranslational modifications (PTMs regulate functions and interaction of insulin with insulin receptors substrates (IRSs and activate insulin signaling downstream pathways via autophosphorylation on several tyrosine (TYR residues on IRSs. Two important insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 are widely expressed in human, and alternative phosphorylation on their serine (Ser and threonine (Thr residues has been known to block the Tyr phosphorylation of IRSs, thus inhibiting insulin signaling and promoting insulin resistance. Like phosphorylation, O-glycosylation modification is important PTM and inhibits phosphorylation on same or neighboring Ser/Thr residues, often called Yin Yang sites. Both IRS-1 and IRS-2 have been shown to be O-glycosylated; however exact sites are not determined yet. In this study, by using neuronal network based prediction methods, we found more than 50 Ser/Thr residues that have potential to be O-glycosylated and may act as possible sites as well. Moreover, alternative phosphorylation and O-glycosylation on IRS-1 Ser-312, 984, 1037, and 1101 may act as possible therapeutic targets to minimize the risk of AD and T2DM.

  8. The accumulations of HIF-1α and HIF-2α by JNK and ERK are involved in biphasic effects induced by different levels of arsenite in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuan; Li, Yuan [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Li, Huiqiao [Qujing Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Qujing 655000, Yunnan (China); Pang, Ying; Zhao, Yue; Jiang, Rongrong; Shen, Lu [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Jianwei; Wang, Xinru [The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Liu, Qizhan, E-mail: drqzliu@hotmail.com [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-01-15

    The biphasic effects of arsenite, in which low levels of arsenite induce cell proliferation and high levels of arsenite induce DNA damage and apoptosis, apparently contribute to arsenite-induced carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of different levels of arsenite on cell proliferation, DNA damage and apoptosis as well as on signal transduction pathways in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. Our results show that a low level of arsenite activates extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), which probably mediate arsenite-inhibited degradation of ubiquitinated hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) in HBE cells. ERK inhibition blocks cell proliferation induced by a low level of arsenite, in part via HIF-2α. In contrast, a high level of arsenite activates c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), which provoke a response to suppress ubiquitinated HIF-1α degradation. Down-regulation of HIF-1α by inhibiting JNK, however, increases the DNA damage but decreases the apoptosis induced by a high level of arsenite. Thus, data in the present study suggest that the accumulations of HIF-1α and HIF-2α by JNK and ERK are involved in different levels of arsenite-induced biphasic effects, with low levels of arsenite inducing cell proliferation and high levels of arsenite inducing DNA damage and apoptosis in HBE cells. -- Highlights: ► Biphasic effects induced by different concentrations of arsenite. ► Different regulation of ERK or JNK signal pathway by arsenite. ► Different regulation of HIF1α or HIF 2α by arsenite.

  9. Human pituitary and placental hormones control human insulin-like growth factor II secretion in human granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasharma, K.; Li, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    Human granulosa cells cultured with calf serum actively proliferated for 18-20 generations and secreted progesterone into the medium; progesterone levels appeared to decline with increase in generation number. Cells cultured under serum-free conditions secreted significant amounts of progesterone and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The progesterone secretion was enhanced by the addition of human follitropin, lutropin, and chorionic gonadotropin but not by growth hormone. These cells, when challenged to varying concentrations of human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, human prolactin, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin, secreted IGF-II into the medium as measured by specific IGF-II RIA. Among these human hormones, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin were most effective in inducing IGF-II secretion from these cells. When synthetic lutropin-releasing hormone and ..cap alpha..-inhibin-92 were tested, only lutropin-releasing hormone was effective in releasing IGF-II. The results described suggest that cultured human granulosa cells can proliferate and actively secrete progesterone and IGF-II into the medium. IGF-II production in human granulosa cells was influenced by a multi-hormonal complex including human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, and prolactin.

  10. Human pituitary and placental hormones control human insulin-like growth factor II secretion in human granulosa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human granulosa cells cultured with calf serum actively proliferated for 18-20 generations and secreted progesterone into the medium; progesterone levels appeared to decline with increase in generation number. Cells cultured under serum-free conditions secreted significant amounts of progesterone and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The progesterone secretion was enhanced by the addition of human follitropin, lutropin, and chorionic gonadotropin but not by growth hormone. These cells, when challenged to varying concentrations of human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, human prolactin, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin, secreted IGF-II into the medium as measured by specific IGF-II RIA. Among these human hormones, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin were most effective in inducing IGF-II secretion from these cells. When synthetic lutropin-releasing hormone and α-inhibin-92 were tested, only lutropin-releasing hormone was effective in releasing IGF-II. The results described suggest that cultured human granulosa cells can proliferate and actively secrete progesterone and IGF-II into the medium. IGF-II production in human granulosa cells was influenced by a multi-hormonal complex including human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, and prolactin

  11. A sensitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay for the bioanalysis of carboxyl-terminal B-chain analogues of human insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y; Smith, W C; Bowsher, R R

    2001-08-01

    Quantification of analogues of human insulin in biological matrices is complicated by differences in their immunoreactivity and the presence of both the analogue and endogenous concentrations of insulin in test samples. To facilitate pharmacokinetic comparisons of carboxyl-terminal B-chain analogues of human insulin, we undertook development of a sensitive ELISA. The ELISA detection method was optimized systematically to permit routine analysis of 10-microl serum samples. Accordingly, a noncompetitive 'sandwich' chemiluminescent ELISA was validated for the quantification of carboxyl-terminal B-chain insulin analogues in human serum over a concentration range from 5 to 3125 pM. The mean bias (RE%) within the validated range varied from -10.3 to 4.3%, with an intermediate precision (inter-assay CV%) from 4.2 to 11.5%. The two-sided 90% expectation tolerance interval for total measurement error was within +/-25% of the nominal concentration for all levels of validation samples. Insulin lispro, human insulin, proinsulin, despentapeptide insulin (DPI) and porcine insulin displayed comparable crossreactivity in the ELISA. Potential utility of the new assay for insulin bioanalysis in nonhuman species was investigated by assessing the pharmacokinetic profile of DPI in rats following administration of a single subcutaneous dose. The sensitive chemiluminescent detection method is simple to perform and should be readily adaptable for ELISAs of other therapeutic proteins.

  12. Biphasic Polyurethane/Polylactide Sponges Doped with Nano-Hydroxyapatite (nHAp Combined with Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marycz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage and bone tissue injuries are common targets in regenerative medicine. The degeneration of cartilage tissue results in tissue loss with a limited ability to regenerate. However, the application of mesenchymal stem cells in the course of such condition makes it possible to manage this disorder by improving the structure of the remaining tissue and even stimulating its regeneration. Nevertheless, in the case of significant tissue loss, standard local injection of cell suspensions is insufficient, due to the low engraftment of transplanted cells. Introduction of mesenchymal stem cells on the surface of a compatible biomaterial can be a promising tool for inducing the regeneration by both retaining the cells at the desired site and filling the tissue gap. In order to obtain such a cell-biomaterial hybrid, we developed complex, biphasic polymer blend biomaterials composed of various polyurethane (PU-to-polylactide (PLA ratios, and doped with different concentrations of nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp. We have determined the optimal blend composition and nano-hydroxyapatite concentration for adipose mesenchymal stem cells cultured on the biomaterial. We applied biological in vitro techniques, including cell viability assay, determination of oxidative stress factors level, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potentials as well as cell proteomic analysis. We have shown that the optimal composition of biphasic scaffold was 20:80 of PU:PLA with 20% of nHAp for osteogenic differentiation, and 80:20 of PU:PLA with 10% of nHAp for chondrogenic differentiation, which suggest the optimal composition of final biphasic implant for regenerative medicine applications.

  13. Oral insulin (human, murine, or porcine) does not prevent diabetes in the non-obese diabetic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Minh N; Gibson, Claire; Rydén, Anna K E; Perdue, Nikole; Boursalian, Tamar E; Pagni, Philippe P; Coppieters, Ken; Skonberg, Christian; Porsgaard, Trine; von Herrath, Matthias; Vela, Jose Luis

    2016-03-01

    Studies have shown oral insulin prevents type 1 diabetes (T1D) in mouse models, however human trials were inconclusive. We tested the ability of different insulins to prevent T1D in non-obese diabetic mice. Mice received oral insulin or PBS twice weekly and disease was monitored. Contrary to previous studies, no insulin tested showed significant ability to prevent T1D, nor did testing of linked suppression in a delayed type hypersensitivity model have reproducible effect. To investigate delivery of antigen within the GI tract, blue dye was fed to mice. Dye traveled 5-8 cm from stomach to small intestine within 10s, suggesting orally administered antigen may not get digested in the stomach in mice. Insulin incubated with jejunum extracts was instantly digested. Thus, in humans large doses of insulin may be required to achieve tolerance as antigen may be more vulnerable to digestion in the stomach even before reaching the small intestine.

  14. Gene therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus in rats by gastrointestinal administration of chitosan nanoparticles containing human insulin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression of human insulin gene in gastrointestinal tracts of diabetic rats. METHODS: pCHV.Ins, an expression plasmid of the human insulin gene, wrapped with chitosan nanoparticles, was transfected to the diabetic rats through lavage and coloclysis, respectively. Fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were measured for 7 d. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis and Western blot analysis were performed to confirm the expression of human insulin gene. RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the fasting blood glucose levels in the lavage and coloclysis groups were decreased significantly in 4 d (5.63 ± 0.48 mmol/L and 5.07 ± 0.37 mmol/L vs 22.12± 1.31 mmol/L, respectively, P < 0.01), while the plasma insulin levels were much higher (32.26±1.81 μIU/mL and 32.79 ± 1.84 μIU/mL vs 14.23 ± 1.38 μIU/mL, respectively, P<0.01). The human insulin gene mRNA and human insulin were only detected in the lavage and coloclysis groups. CONCLUSION: Human insulin gene wrapped with chitosan nanoparticles can be successfully transfected to rats through gastrointestinal tract, indicating that chitosan is a promising non-viral vector.

  15. Regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle: effects of exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel; Madsen, Agnete Louise Bjerregaard; Kleinert, Maximilian;

    2016-01-01

    Studies in rodent muscle suggest that autophagy is regulated by acute exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation. However, little is known about the regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle. Here we investigate the autophagic response to acute one-legged exercise, one...... increase the capacity for formation of autophagosomes in muscle. Moreover, AMPK activation during exercise may not be sufficient to regulate autophagy in muscle, while mTORC1 signalling via ULK1 likely mediates the autophagy-inhibiting effect of insulin. This article is protected by copyright. All rights...

  16. Risk of cancer in patients on insulin glargine and other insulin analogues in comparison with those on human insulin: Results from a large population-based follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiter, Rikje; Visser, Loes; Coebergh, Jan Willem; Herk-Sukel, Myrthe; Haak, H.R.; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, P.H.; Straus, Sabine; Herings, Ron; Stricker, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Several publications suggest an association between certain types of insulin and cancer, but with conflicting results. We investigated whether insulin glargine (A21Gly,B31Arg,B32Arg human insulin) is associated with an increased risk of cancer in a large population-based cohort study. Methods Data for this study were obtained from dispensing records from community pharmacies individually linked to hospital discharge records from 2.5 million individuals in the Netherlands. In a...

  17. Safety and Efficacy of Modern Insulin Analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Hye Jin Yoo; Keun Yong Park; Kang Seo Park; Kyu Jeung Ahn; Kyung Wan Min; Jeong Hyun Park; Sang Ah Chang; Bong Soo Cha; Dong-Jun Kim; Yong Seong Kim; Tae Keun Oh; Suk Chon; Il Seong Nam-Goong; Mi Jin Kim; Hye-Soon Kim

    2013-01-01

    Background A1chieve® was a noninterventional study evaluating the clinical safety and efficacy of biphasic insulin aspart 30, insulin detemir, and insulin aspart. Methods Korean type 2 diabetes patients who have not been treated with the study insulin or have started it within 4 weeks before enrollment were eligible for the study. The patient selection and the choice of regimen were at the discretion of the physician. The safety and efficacy information was collected from the subjects at base...

  18. An insulin based model to explain changes and interactions in human breath-holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangmann, Rosita

    2015-06-01

    Until now oxygen was thought to be the leading factor of hypoxic conditions. Whereas now it appears that insulin is the key regulator of hypoxic conditions. Insulin seems to regulate the redox state of the organism and to determine the breakpoint of human breath-holding. This new hypoxia-insulin hypotheses might have major clinical relevance. Besides the clinical relevance, this hypothesis could explain, for the first time, why the training of the diaphragm, among other factors, results in an increase in breath-holding performance. Elite freedivers/apnea divers are able to reach static breath-holding times to over 6 min. Untrained persons exhibit an unpleasant feeling after more or less a minute. Breath-holding is stopped at the breakpoint. The partial oxygen pressure as well as the carbon dioxide pressure failed to directly influence the breakpoint in earlier studies. The factors that contribute to the breakpoint are still under debate. Under hypoxic conditions the organism needs more glucose, because it changes from the oxygen consuming pentose phosphate (36 ATP/glucose molecule) to the anaerobic glycolytic pathway (2ATP/glucose molecule). Hence insulin, as it promotes the absorption of glucose, is set in the center of interest regarding hypoxic conditions. This paper provides an insulin based model that could explain the changes and interactions in human breath-holding. The correlation between hypoxia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their influence on the sympathetic nerve system and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) is dealt with. It reviews as well the direct interrelation of HIF-1α and insulin. The depression of insulin secretion through the vagus nerve activation via inspiration is discussed. Furthermore the paper describes the action of insulin on the carotid bodies and the diaphragm and therefore a possible role in respiration pattern. Freedivers that go over the breakpoint of breath-holding could exhibit seizures and thus the effect of

  19. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor 1: A nuclear magnetic resonance and restrained molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, R.M.; Harvey, T.S.; Campbell, I.D. (Univ. of Oxford (England))

    1991-06-04

    The solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor 1 has been investigated with a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance and restrained molecular dynamics methods. The results show that the solution structure is similar to that of insulin, but minor differences exist. The regions homologous to insulin are well-defined, while the remainder of the molecular exhibits greater disorder. The resultant structures have been used to visualize the sites for interaction with a number of physiologically important protein.

  20. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor 1: A nuclear magnetic resonance and restrained molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor 1 has been investigated with a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance and restrained molecular dynamics methods. The results show that the solution structure is similar to that of insulin, but minor differences exist. The regions homologous to insulin are well-defined, while the remainder of the molecular exhibits greater disorder. The resultant structures have been used to visualize the sites for interaction with a number of physiologically important protein

  1. Human insulin polymorphism upon ligand binding and pH variation: the case of 4-ethylresorcinol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fili

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the effects of the organic ligand 4-ethylresorcinol on the crystal structure of human insulin using powder X-ray crystallography. For this purpose, systematic crystallization experiments have been conducted in the presence of the organic ligand and zinc ions within the pH range 4.50–8.20, while observing crystallization behaviour around the isoelectric point of insulin. High-throughput crystal screening was performed using a laboratory X-ray diffraction system. The most representative samples were selected for synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements, which took place at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF and the Swiss Light Source (SLS. Four different crystalline polymorphs have been identified. Among these, two new phases with monoclinic symmetry have been found, which are targets for the future development of microcrystalline insulin drugs.

  2. Effect of phorbol and glucose on insulin secretion from the human fetal pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuch, B E; Williams, P F; Handelsman, D; Dunlop, M; Grigoriou, S; Turtle, J R

    1987-04-01

    It has been reported previously that 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate is capable of stimulating the release of insulin from adult and neonatal pancreatic tissue. The data from this study show that this agent at a concentration of 1.3 uM, in the presence of 2.8 mM glucose, was unable to cause significant secretion of insulin from cultured human fetal pancreatic explants. By contrast 20 mM glucose was able to cause a small but significant immediate increase in secretion of insulin, but was unable to maintain this response beyond ten minutes. When the two agents were combined, a synergistic effect was seen throughout the entire 50 minute period of stimulation. The reason for this synergism is unclear since, whilst both secretagogues were able to cause a rise in the levels of diacylglycerol, together no extra effect was observed.

  3. Human insulin polymorphism upon ligand binding and pH variation: the case of 4-ethylresorcinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fili, S; Valmas, A; Norrman, M; Schluckebier, G; Beckers, D; Degen, T; Wright, J; Fitch, A; Gozzo, F; Giannopoulou, A E; Karavassili, F; Margiolaki, I

    2015-09-01

    This study focuses on the effects of the organic ligand 4-ethylresorcinol on the crystal structure of human insulin using powder X-ray crystallography. For this purpose, systematic crystallization experiments have been conducted in the presence of the organic ligand and zinc ions within the pH range 4.50-8.20, while observing crystallization behaviour around the isoelectric point of insulin. High-throughput crystal screening was performed using a laboratory X-ray diffraction system. The most representative samples were selected for synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements, which took place at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the Swiss Light Source (SLS). Four different crystalline polymorphs have been identified. Among these, two new phases with monoclinic symmetry have been found, which are targets for the future development of microcrystalline insulin drugs. PMID:26306195

  4. Human insulin/IGF-1 and familial longevity at middle age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozing, Maarten P.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; Frölich, Marijke; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Beekman, Marian; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Blauw, Gerard-Jan; Slagboom, P. Eline; van Heemst, Diana; Group, on behalf of the Leiden Longevity Study (LLS)

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that compared to controls, long-lived familial nonagenarians (mean age: 93.4 years) from the Leiden Longevity Study displayed a lower mortality rate, and their middle-aged offspring displayed a lower prevalence of cardio-metabolic diseases, including diabetes mellitus. The evolutionarily conserved insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway has been implicated in longevity in model organisms, but its relevance for human longevity has generated much controversy. Here, we show that compared to their partners, the offspring of familial nonagenarians displayed similar non-fasted serum levels of IGF-1, IGFBP3 and insulin but lower non-fasted serum levels of glucose, indicating that familial longevity is associated with differences in insulin sensitivity. PMID:20157552

  5. Effect of training on insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake and lipolysis in human adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, Bente; Larsen, J J; Mikines, K J;

    2000-01-01

    Training increases insulin sensitivity of both whole body and muscle in humans. To investigate whether training also increases insulin sensitivity of adipose tissue, we performed a three-step hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp in eight endurance-trained (T) and eight sedentary (S) young men...... [insulin infusion rates: 10,000 (step I), 20,000 (step II), and 150,000 (step III) microU x min(-1) x m(-2)]. Glucose and glycerol concentrations were measured in arterial blood and also by microdialysis in interstitial fluid in periumbilical, subcutaneous adipose tissue and in quadriceps femoris muscle...... (glucose only). Adipose tissue blood flow was measured by (133)Xe washout. In the basal state, adipose tissue blood flow tended to be higher in T compared with S subjects, and in both groups blood flow was constant during the clamp. The change from basal in arterial-interstitial glucose concentration...

  6. The human insulin gene linked polymorphic region exhibits an altered DNA structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond-Kosack, M.C.U.; Docherty, K.; Kilpatrick, M.W. (Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom)); Dobrinski, B.; Lurz, R. (Max-Planck-Inst., Berlin (West Germany))

    1992-01-25

    Regulation of transcription of the human insulin gene appears to involve a series of DNA sequences in the 5{prime} region. Hypersensitivity to DNA structural probes has previously been demonstrated in regulatory regions of cloned genomic DNA fragments, and been correlated with gene activity. To investigate the structure of the DNA in the human insulin gene, bromoacetaldehyde and S1 nuclease were reacted with a supercoiled plasmid containing a 5kb genomic insulin fragment. Both probes revealed the human insulin gene linked polymorphic region (ILPR), a region ({minus}363) upstream of the transcriptional start site which contains multiple repeats of a 14-15mer oligonucleotide with the consensus sequence ACAGGGGT(G/C)(T/C)GGGG, as the major hypersensitive site. Fine mapping and electron microscopic analysis both show a very different behavior of the two DNA strands in the region of the ILPR and suggest the G-rich strand may be adopting a highly structured conformation with the complementary strand remaining largely single stranded.

  7. Alterations of Mitochondrial Function and Insulin Sensitivity in Human Obesity and Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koliaki, Chrysi; Roden, Michael

    2016-07-17

    Mitochondrial function refers to a broad spectrum of features such as resting mitochondrial activity, (sub)maximal oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), and mitochondrial dynamics, turnover, and plasticity. The interaction between mitochondria and insulin sensitivity is bidirectional and varies depending on tissue, experimental model, methodological approach, and features of mitochondrial function tested. In human skeletal muscle, mitochondrial abnormalities may be inherited (e.g., lower mitochondrial content) or acquired (e.g., impaired OXPHOS capacity and plasticity). Abnormalities ultimately lead to lower mitochondrial functionality due to or resulting in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Similar mechanisms can also operate in adipose tissue and heart muscle. In contrast, mitochondrial oxidative capacity is transiently upregulated in the liver of obese insulin-resistant humans with or without fatty liver, giving rise to oxidative stress and declines in advanced fatty liver disease. These data suggest a highly tissue-specific interaction between insulin sensitivity and oxidative metabolism during the course of metabolic diseases in humans. PMID:27146012

  8. RFX6 Regulates Insulin Secretion by Modulating Ca2+ Homeostasis in Human β Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikash Chandra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Development and function of pancreatic β cells involve the regulated activity of specific transcription factors. RFX6 is a transcription factor essential for mouse β cell differentiation that is mutated in monogenic forms of neonatal diabetes. However, the expression and functional roles of RFX6 in human β cells, especially in pathophysiological conditions, are poorly explored. We demonstrate the presence of RFX6 in adult human pancreatic endocrine cells. Using the recently developed human β cell line EndoC-βH2, we show that RFX6 regulates insulin gene transcription, insulin content, and secretion. Knockdown of RFX6 causes downregulation of Ca2+-channel genes resulting in the reduction in L-type Ca2+-channel activity that leads to suppression of depolarization-evoked insulin exocytosis. We also describe a previously unreported homozygous missense RFX6 mutation (p.V506G that is associated with neonatal diabetes, which lacks the capacity to activate the insulin promoter and to increase Ca2+-channel expression. Our data therefore provide insights for understanding certain forms of neonatal diabetes.

  9. Differentiation of human labia minora dermis-derived fibroblasts into insulin-producing cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bona; Yoon, Byung Sun; Moon, Jai-Hee; Kim, Jonggun; Jun, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Jung Han; Kim, Jun Sung; Baik, Cheong Soon; Kim, Aeree; Whang, Kwang Youn; You, Seungkwon

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that human skin fibroblasts may represent a novel source of therapeutic stem cells. In this study, we report a 3-stage method to induce the differentiation of skin fibroblasts into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). In stage 1, we establish the isolation, expansion and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from human labia minora dermis-derived fibroblasts (hLMDFs) (stage 1: MSC expansion). hLMDFs express the typical mesenchymal stem cell marker proteins and ca...

  10. Derivation of Insulin-Producing Beta-Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schiesser, Jacqueline V.; Micallef, Suzanne J.; Hawes, Susan; Elefanty, Andrew G.; Stanley, Edouard G.

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have been advanced as a source of insulin-producing cells that could potentially replace cadaveric-derived islets in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. To this end, protocols have been developed that promote the formation of pancreatic progenitors and endocrine cells from human pluripotent stem cells, encompassing both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. In this review, we examine these methods and place them in the context of the developmental a...

  11. Brown Adipose Tissue Improves Whole-Body Glucose Homeostasis and Insulin Sensitivity in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Chondronikola, Maria; Volpi, Elena; Børsheim, Elisabet; Porter, Craig; Annamalai, Palam; Enerbäck, Sven; Lidell, Martin E.; Saraf, Manish K.; Sebastien M Labbe; Hurren, Nicholas M; Yfanti, Christina; Chao, Tony; Andersen, Clark R.; Cesani, Fernando; Hawkins, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has attracted scientific interest as an antidiabetic tissue owing to its ability to dissipate energy as heat. Despite a plethora of data concerning the role of BAT in glucose metabolism in rodents, the role of BAT (if any) in glucose metabolism in humans remains unclear. To investigate whether BAT activation alters whole-body glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in humans, we studied seven BAT-positive (BAT+) men and five BAT-negative (BAT−) men under thermon...

  12. Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Humans: Regulation of Adiposity and Insulin Sensitivity1,2

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, J. Mark; McIntosh, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers, a group of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid [18:2(n-6)], have been studied extensively due to their ability to modulate cancer, atherosclerosis, obesity, immune function and diabetes in a variety of experimental models. The purpose of this review was to examine CLA’s isomer-specific regulation of adiposity and insulin sensitivity in humans and in cultures of human adipocytes. It has been clearly demonstrated that specific CLA isomers or...

  13. Automated approach to radioimmunoassays of somatotropin (human growth hormone) and insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adaptation of human somatotropin and insulin assays to the automated Centria radioimmunoassay system [Clin. Chem. 21, 1305 (1975)] is reported. For the somatotropin assay, reaction conditions include a borate/bovine serum albumin buffer (pH 8.4) and a 20-h incubation at 40C. Assay results for clinical samples compared favorably (correlation coefficient = 0.930) with values obtained from a reference laboratory. The means determined for 92 patients' samples were 4.3 μg/liter (reference laboratory) and 5.1 μg/liter (Centria). Intra- and inter-run precision ranged from 3.2 to 15.9%. For the insulin assay, a phosphate/bovine serum albumin buffer (pH 7.4) is used, with a 20-h incubation at 40C. Previously analyzed insulin samples from a reference laboratory were determined by the Centria analyzer with excellent correlation (r = 0.965). Means for patients' samples were 43.0 milli (USP) units of insulin per liter (reference laboratory) and 47.5 milliunits of insulin per liter (Centria). In both assays an anionicexchange gel is used in the separation step. The criterion of parallelism, an indication of the validity of a radioimmunoassay, was satisfied in both assays. The Centria radioimmunoassay system offers the advantage of automating all the critical steps of these radioimmunoassays

  14. Posttranslational regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 in normal and transformed human fibroblasts. Insulin-like growth factor dependence and biological studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Conover, C A; Kiefer, M C; Zapf, J

    1993-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 (IGFBP-4) is a 24-26-kD protein expressed by a variety of cell types in vivo and in vitro. Treatment of normal adult human fibroblasts with 10 nM insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) for 24 h resulted in an 85% decrease in endogenous IGFBP-4, as assessed by Western ligand blot analysis of the conditioned medium. Incubation of human fibroblast-conditioned medium (HFCM) with IGF-II under cell-free conditions led to a similar loss of IGFBP-4. This p...

  15. Effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 on the responses to and recognition of hypoglycemia in humans. A comparison with insulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, D.; Tamborlane, W V; Rife, F; Sherwin, R S

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-1 (rhIGF-1) lowers blood glucose in humans but its effect on counterregulatory responses has not been established. We therefore compared infusions of rhIGF-1 (0.7 micrograms/kg per min) and insulin (0.8 mU/kg.min) for 120 min in 10 healthy volunteers (glucose allowed to fall freely). With both, glucose fell rapidly because of stimulation of glucose uptake and suppression of hepatic glucose production. Despite similar plasma glucose nadirs (2.6 +/- ...

  16. The Effects of Insulin Resistance on Individual Tissues: An Application of a Mathematical Model of Metabolism in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Taliesin; Wattis, Jonathan A D; King, John R; MacDonald, Ian A; Mazzatti, Dawn J

    2016-06-01

    Whilst the human body expends energy constantly, the human diet consists of a mix of carbohydrates and fats delivered in a discontinuous manner. To deal with this sporadic supply of energy, there are transport, storage and utilisation mechanisms, for both carbohydrates and fats, around all tissues of the body. Insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes and obesity are characterised by reduced efficiency of these mechanisms. Exactly how these insulin-resistant states develop, for example whether there is an order in which tissues become insulin resistant, is an active area of research with the hope of gaining a better overall understanding of insulin resistance. In this paper, we use a previously derived system of 12 first-order coupled differential equations that describe the transport between, and storage in, different tissues of the human body. We briefly revisit the derivation of the model before parametrising the model to account for insulin resistance. We then solve the model numerically, separately simulating each individual tissue as insulin resistant, and discuss and compare these results, drawing three main conclusions. The implications of these results are in accordance with biological intuition. First, insulin resistance in a tissue creates a knock-on effect on the other tissues in the body, whereby they attempt to compensate for the reduced efficiency of the insulin-resistant tissue. Second, insulin resistance causes a fatty liver, and the insulin resistance of tissues other than the liver can cause fat to accumulate in the liver. Finally, although insulin resistance in individual tissues can cause slightly reduced skeletal muscle metabolic flexibility, it is when the whole body is insulin resistant that the biggest effect on skeletal muscle flexibility is seen. PMID:27306890

  17. Human obesity and insulin resistance: lessons from experiments of nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The past decade or so has seen the adipocyte catapulted from a position of relative obscurity onto the centre stage of biomedical science. Having long been viewed largely as a passive storage depot for energy in times of plenty and a fuel reservoir called upon in times of need, the discovery that the adipocyte is an active participant in the control mechanisms for both energy balance and intermediary metabolism represents one of the most stunning paradigm shifts in modern mammalian biology. The normal control of energy homeostasis is now known to be highly dependent on the adipocyte-secreted hormone, leptin. Defects in the leptin signalling pathway, both inherited and acquired, are now known to contribute to the important clinical problem of obesity. Dysfunction of adipocytes, in both obesity and lipodystrophies, is now considered to be critically involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. The range of metabolites, steroids and bioactive peptides now known to be actively produced by adipocytes and influencing organs as diverse as brain, muscle, liver and pancreatic islet has increased dramatically. Our understanding of how these are co-ordinated to regulate normal metabolism and are dysregulated in metabolic disease is still in its infancy. However what is clear is that the adipocyte, until recently the 'Cinderella Cell' of metabolism, has rapidly become the 'Belle of the Ball'. PMID:18269171

  18. Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells can secrete insulin in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujeni, Zahra Niki; Aleyasin, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells, leading to decreased insulin production. Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into insulin-producing cells offers novel ways of diabetes treatment. MSCs can be isolated from the human umbilical cord tissue and differentiate into insulin-secreting cells. Human umbilical cord-derived stem cells (hUDSCs) were obtained after birth, selected by plastic adhesion, and characterized by flow cytometric analysis. hUDSCs were transduced with nonintegrated lentivirus harboring PDX1 (nonintegrated LV-PDX1) and was cultured in differentiation medium in 21 days. Pancreatic duodenum homeobox protein-1 (PDX1) is a transcription factor in pancreatic development. Significant expressions of PDX1, neurogenin3 (Ngn3), glucagon, glucose transporter2 (Glut2), and somatostatin were detected by quantitative RT-PCR (P treatment of diabetic rats and could decrease the blood glucose level from 400 mg/dL to a normal level in 4 days. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that hUDSCs are able to differentiate into insulin-producing cells by transduction with nonintegrated LV-PDX1. These hUDSCs(PDX1+) have the potential to be used as a viable resource in cell-based gene therapy of type 1 diabetes.

  19. Acute and chronic effects of glyceryl trinitrate therapy on insulin and glucose regulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrzkiewicz, Sean; Parker, John D

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the effect of acute and sustained transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) therapy on insulin and glucose regulation. Totally, 12 males (18-30 years) underwent a glucose tolerance test at baseline (visit 1), 90 minutes after acute transdermal GTN 0.6 mg/h (visit 2), following 7 days of continuous GTN (visit 3), and 2 to 3 days after stopping GTN (visit 4). At each visit, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured before and 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after a 75-g oral glucose load. Indices of glucose metabolism that were examined included the insulin sensitivity index, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and the insulinogenic index. The acute administration of GTN had no effect on glucose and insulin responses (visit 2). However, after 7 days of GTN exposure (visit 3) there was an increase in the mean glucose concentration measured after the oral glucose load. On visit 1, the mean glucose concentration (± standard deviation) following the 75 g oral glucose challenge was 5.7 ± 0.5 µmol/L. On visit 3, after 7 days of transdermal GTN therapy, the mean glucose concentration after the oral glucose was significantly higher; 6.2 ± 0.5 µmol/L (P versus 6.9 (6.8) on visit 3 (P < .015). Other indices of glucose metabolism did not change. These observations document that GTN therapy modifies glucose metabolism causing evidence of increased insulin resistance during sustained therapy in normal humans. PMID:23230283

  20. Comparative 2D NMR studies of human insulin and des-pentapeptide insulin: Sequential resonance assignment and implications for protein dynamics and receptor recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Qingxin (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Weiss, M.A. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States))

    1991-06-04

    The solution structure and dynamics of human insulin are ivestigated by 2D {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy in reference to a previously analyzed analogue, des-pentapeptide (B26-B30) insulin. This spectroscopic comparison is of interest since (i) the structure of the C-terminal region of the B-chain has not been determined in the monomeric state and (ii) the role of this region in binding to the insulin receptor has been the subject of long-standing speculation. The present NMR studies are conducted in the presence of an organic cosolvent (20% acetic acid), under which conditions both proteins are monomeric and stably folded. Complete sequential assignment of human insulin is obtained and leads to the following conclusions. (1) The secondary structure of the insulin monomer (three {alpha}-helices and B-chain {beta}-turn) is similar to that observed in the 2-Zn crustal state. (2) The folding of DPI is essentially the same as the corresponding portion of intact insulin, in accord with the similarities between their respective crystal structues. (3) residues B24-B28 adopt an extended configuration in the monomer and pack against the hydrophobic core as in crystallographic dimers; residues B29 and B30 are largely disordered. (4) The insulin fold is shown to provide a model for collective motions in a protein with implications for the mechanism of protein-protein recognition. To their knowledge, this paper describes the first detailed analysis of a protein NMR spectrum under conditions of extensive conformational broadening.

  1. Comparative 2D NMR studies of human insulin and des-pentapeptide insulin: Sequential resonance assignment and implications for protein dynamics and receptor recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solution structure and dynamics of human insulin are ivestigated by 2D 1H NMR spectroscopy in reference to a previously analyzed analogue, des-pentapeptide (B26-B30) insulin. This spectroscopic comparison is of interest since (i) the structure of the C-terminal region of the B-chain has not been determined in the monomeric state and (ii) the role of this region in binding to the insulin receptor has been the subject of long-standing speculation. The present NMR studies are conducted in the presence of an organic cosolvent (20% acetic acid), under which conditions both proteins are monomeric and stably folded. Complete sequential assignment of human insulin is obtained and leads to the following conclusions. (1) The secondary structure of the insulin monomer (three α-helices and B-chain β-turn) is similar to that observed in the 2-Zn crustal state. (2) The folding of DPI is essentially the same as the corresponding portion of intact insulin, in accord with the similarities between their respective crystal structues. (3) residues B24-B28 adopt an extended configuration in the monomer and pack against the hydrophobic core as in crystallographic dimers; residues B29 and B30 are largely disordered. (4) The insulin fold is shown to provide a model for collective motions in a protein with implications for the mechanism of protein-protein recognition. To their knowledge, this paper describes the first detailed analysis of a protein NMR spectrum under conditions of extensive conformational broadening

  2. B islet cells of pancreas are the site of expression of the human insulin gene in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucchini, D.; Desbois, P.; Pictet, R.; Jami, J. (Univ. Paris 7 (France)); Madsen, O. (Hagedorn Research Lab., Gentofte (Denmark))

    1989-02-01

    Transgenic mouse lines carrying the human insulin gene were previously shown to express it in pancreas but not in other tissues. The present study reports evidence that the expression of the transgene is restricted to a single category of cells. Immunofluorescence staining of frozen pancreas sections showed that the human C-peptide was present in pancreatic islets only, and more precisely in the B cells of the islets. Human insulin transcripts were initiated correctly in mouse pancreas at the same site as in human pancreas. Three different transgenic lines with different insertion sites and various copy numbers of the human insulin transgene had the same high levels of the transgene transcripts corresponding to a well-balanced contribution in insulin gene expression.

  3. Influence of obesity and insulin sensitivity on insulin signaling genes in human omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, R; Cui, W; Simard, S; Cianflone, K

    2008-02-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are independent risk factors for metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Adipose tissue samples from nonobese (NO), insulin-sensitive obese (ISO), and insulin-resistant obese (IRO) subjects from subcutaneous (SC) and omental (OM) adipose tissue (n = 28) were analyzed by microarray and confirmed by real-time PCR. Insulin signaling gene expression changes were greater in OM than in SC tissue and were related to insulin resistance rather than to obesity; few genes correlated with body mass index. Insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) increased in the IRO versus pooled insulin-sensitive (NO+ISO) subjects. In glucose transport, PI3Kalpha and PDK2 decreased in IRO subjects, whereas PI3Kgamma, Akt2, GLUT4, and GLUT1 increased. IRS-1 regulators Jnk and IKK increased in IRO (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001 respectively). In protein synthesis, most genes examined were downregulated in IRO subjects, including mTor, Rheb, and 4EBP and eIF members (all P < 0.05). In proliferation, SHC, SOS, and Raf1 (P < 0.05) were increased, whereas Ras and MEK1/2 kinase 1 (P < 0.05) were decreased, in IRO subjects. Finally, in differentiation, PPARgamma, CEBPalpha, and CEBPbeta decreased, whereas PPARdelta, CEBPgamma, and CEBPepsilon increased, in IRO subjects (P < 0.05). Together, microarray and real-time PCR data demonstrate that insulin resistance rather than obesity is associated with altered gene expression of insulin signaling genes, especially in OM adipose tissue. PMID:17986714

  4. Structural analogs of human insulin-like growth factor I with reduced affinity for serum binding proteins and the type 2 insulin-like growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four structural analogs of human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) have been prepared by site-directed mutagenesis of a synthetic IGF-I gene and subsequent expression and purification of the mutant protein from the conditioned media of transformed yeast. [Phe-1, Val1, Asn2, Gln3, His4, Ser8, His9, Glu12, Tyr15, Leu16]IGF-I (B-chain mutant), in which the first 16 amino acids of hIGF-I were replaced with the first 17 amino acids of the B-chain of insulin, has >1000-, 100-, and 2-fold reduced potency for human serum binding proteins, the rat liver type 2 IGF receptor, and the human placental type 1 IGF receptor, respectively. The B-chain mutant also has 4-fold increased affinity for the human placental insulin receptor. [Gln3, Ala4] IGF-I has 4-fold reduced affinity for human serum binding proteins, but is equipotent to hIGF-I at the types 1 and 2 IGF and insulin receptors. [Tyr15, Leu16] IGH-I has 4-fold reduced affinity for human serum binding proteins and 10-fold increased affinity for the insulin receptor. The peptide in which these four-point mutations are combined, [Gln3, Ala4, Tyr15,Leu16]IGF-I, has 600-fold reduced affinity for the serum binding proteins. All four of these mutants stimulate DNA synthesis in the rat vascular smooth muscle cell line A10 with potencies reflecting their potency at the type 1 IGF receptor. These studies identify some of the domains of hIGF-I which are responsible for maintaining high affinity binding with the serum binding protein and the type 2 IGF receptor. In addition, These peptides will be useful in defining the role of the type 2 IGF receptor and serum binding proteins in the physiological actions of hIGF-I

  5. Beta-cell dysfunction and low insulin clearance in insulin-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Vølund, Aage;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To obtain a better understanding of the physiological aspects of glucose homeostasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy, we evaluated separately beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity after an oral glucose load. DESIGN: Beta-cell function...

  6. Remodeling lipid metabolism and improving insulin responsiveness in human primary myotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren M Sparks

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Disturbances in lipid metabolism are strongly associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D. We hypothesized that activation of cAMP/PKA and calcium signaling pathways in cultured human myotubes would provide further insight into regulation of lipid storage, lipolysis, lipid oxidation and insulin responsiveness. METHODS: Human myoblasts were isolated from vastus lateralis, purified, cultured and differentiated into myotubes. All cells were incubated with palmitate during differentiation. Treatment cells were pulsed 1 hour each day with forskolin and ionomycin (PFI during the final 3 days of differentiation to activate the cAMP/PKA and calcium signaling pathways. Control cells were not pulsed (control. Mitochondrial content, (14C lipid oxidation and storage were measured, as well as lipolysis and insulin-stimulated glycogen storage. Myotubes were stained for lipids and gene expression measured. RESULTS: PFI increased oxidation of oleate and palmitate to CO(2 (p<0.001, isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis (p = 0.01, triacylglycerol (TAG storage (p<0.05 and mitochondrial DNA copy number (p = 0.01 and related enzyme activities. Candidate gene and microarray analysis revealed increased expression of genes involved in lipolysis, TAG synthesis and mitochondrial biogenesis. PFI increased the organization of lipid droplets along the myofibrillar apparatus. These changes in lipid metabolism were associated with an increase in insulin-mediated glycogen storage (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Activation of cAMP/PKA and calcium signaling pathways in myotubes induces a remodeling of lipid droplets and functional changes in lipid metabolism. These results provide a novel pharmacological approach to promote lipid metabolism and improve insulin responsiveness in myotubes, which may be of therapeutic importance for obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  7. Validation of methods for measurement of insulin secretion in humans in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, L L; Christiansen, E; Vølund, A;

    2000-01-01

    of these mathematical techniques for quantification of insulin secretion have been tested in dogs, but not in humans. In the present studies, we examined the validity of both methods to recover the known infusion rates of insulin and C-peptide mimicking ISR during an oral glucose tolerance test. ISR from both......). These results indicate that both approaches provide accurate assessment of prehepatic ISRs in type 2 diabetic patients and control subjects. A simplified version of the deconvolution method based on standard kinetic parameters for C-peptide (Van Cauter et al.) was compared with the 2-day deconvolution method......, and a close agreement was found for the results of an oral glucose tolerance test. We also studied whether C-peptide kinetics are influenced by somatostatin infusion. The decay curves after bolus injection of exogenous biosynthetic human C-peptide, the kinetic parameters, and the metabolic clearance rate were...

  8. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin

  9. Structure based discovery of small molecules to regulate the activity of human insulin degrading enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Çakir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is an allosteric Zn(+2 metalloprotease involved in the degradation of many peptides including amyloid-β, and insulin that play key roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, respectively. Therefore, the use of therapeutic agents that regulate the activity of IDE would be a viable approach towards generating pharmaceutical treatments for these diseases. Crystal structure of IDE revealed that N-terminal has an exosite which is ∼30 Å away from the catalytic region and serves as a regulation site by orientation of the substrates of IDE to the catalytic site. It is possible to find small molecules that bind to the exosite of IDE and enhance its proteolytic activity towards different substrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we applied structure based drug design method combined with experimental methods to discover four novel molecules that enhance the activity of human IDE. The novel compounds, designated as D3, D4, D6, and D10 enhanced IDE mediated proteolysis of substrate V, insulin and amyloid-β, while enhanced degradation profiles were obtained towards substrate V and insulin in the presence of D10 only. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This paper describes the first examples of a computer-aided discovery of IDE regulators, showing that in vitro and in vivo activation of this important enzyme with small molecules is possible.

  10. Structure Based Discovery of Small Molecules to Regulate the Activity of Human Insulin Degrading Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Bilal; Dağliyan, Onur; Dağyildiz, Ezgi; Bariş, İbrahim; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil; Kizilel, Seda; Türkay, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Background Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is an allosteric Zn+2 metalloprotease involved in the degradation of many peptides including amyloid-β, and insulin that play key roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), respectively. Therefore, the use of therapeutic agents that regulate the activity of IDE would be a viable approach towards generating pharmaceutical treatments for these diseases. Crystal structure of IDE revealed that N-terminal has an exosite which is ∼30 Å away from the catalytic region and serves as a regulation site by orientation of the substrates of IDE to the catalytic site. It is possible to find small molecules that bind to the exosite of IDE and enhance its proteolytic activity towards different substrates. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we applied structure based drug design method combined with experimental methods to discover four novel molecules that enhance the activity of human IDE. The novel compounds, designated as D3, D4, D6, and D10 enhanced IDE mediated proteolysis of substrate V, insulin and amyloid-β, while enhanced degradation profiles were obtained towards substrate V and insulin in the presence of D10 only. Conclusion/Significance This paper describes the first examples of a computer-aided discovery of IDE regulators, showing that in vitro and in vivo activation of this important enzyme with small molecules is possible. PMID:22355395

  11. The study of chemiluminescence immunoassay for determination of human serum true insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop a highly sensitive CLIA to detect human serum true insulin, two specific monoclonal antibodies having different and distinct epitopes on insulin molecule were used in this study: one was coated on microtiter plate as the solid phase antibody and the other was labeled with alkaline phosphatase. Adamantine derivate was used as the substrate. The results showed that the sensitivity was 0.06 μIU/mL, and the linear calibrator was in the range of 1.0-150 μIU/mL. The CV of intra-and interbatches were 5.0% and 7.8%, respectively, and the mean recovery rate was 94.4%. According to measurement results of 200 samples (100 men and 100 women) the determination range was 0.52%-11.23 μIU/mL for males, 0.75-10.66 μIU/mL for females, and the mean value was 3.86, 3.62 μIU/mL. There was no obvious difference between men and women. Chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) is a simple and convenient, and can reflect truly the level of serum insulin. CLIA of insulin has application value in diagnosis and pathological research of diabetes mellitus. (authors)

  12. Human insulin/IGF-1 and familial longevity at middle age

    OpenAIRE

    Rozing, Maarten P.; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Frölich, Marijke; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Beekman, Marian; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Simon P Mooijaart; Blauw, Gerard-Jan; Slagboom, P Eline; van Heemst, Diana; Group, on behalf of the Leiden Longevity Study (LLS)

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that compared to controls, long-lived familial nonagenarians (mean age: 93.4 years) from the Leiden Longevity Study displayed a lower mortality rate, and their middle-aged offspring displayed a lower prevalence of cardio-metabolic diseases, including diabetes mellitus. The evolutionarily conserved insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway has been implicated in longevity in model organisms, but its relevance for human longevity has generated much controversy. Here, we show...

  13. High Insulin and Leptin Increase Resistin and Inflammatory Cytokine Production from Human Mononuclear Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tsiotra, Panayoula C.; Eleni Boutati; George Dimitriadis; Raptis, Sotirios A.

    2013-01-01

    Resistin and the proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β , produced by adipocytes, and macrophages, are considered to be important modulators of chronic inflammation contributing to the development of obesity and atherosclerosis. Human monocyte-enriched mononuclear cells, from ten healthy individuals, were exposed to high concentrations of insulin, leptin, and glucose (alone or in combination) for 24 hours in vitro. Resistin, TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β production was exami...

  14. Insulin stimulation regulates AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylation sites in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middelbeek, R J W; Chambers, M A; Tantiwong, P;

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are typically insulin resistant, exhibiting impaired skeletal muscle glucose uptake. Animal and cell culture experiments have shown that site-specific phosphorylation of the Rab-GTPase-activating proteins AS160 and TBC1D1 is critical for GLUT4 tr...... translocation facilitating glucose uptake, but their regulation in human skeletal muscle is not well understood....

  15. The road to the first, fully active and more stable human insulin variant with an additional disulfide bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther, Tine N; Kjeldsen, Thomas B; Jensen, Knud J; Hubálek, František

    2015-11-01

    Insulin, a small peptide hormone, is crucial in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis. The stability and activity of the protein is directed by an intricate system involving disulfide bonds to stabilize the active monomeric species and by their non-covalent oligomerization. All known insulin variants in vertebrates consist of two peptide chains and have six cysteine residues, which form three disulfide bonds, two of them link the two chains and a third is an intra-chain bond in the A-chain. This classical insulin fold appears to have been conserved over half a billion years of evolution. We addressed the question whether a human insulin variant with four disulfide bonds could exist and be fully functional. In this review, we give an overview of the road to engineering four-disulfide bonded insulin analogs. During our journey, we discovered several active four disulfide bonded insulin analogs with markedly improved stability and gained insights into the instability of analogs with seven cysteine residues, importance of dimerization for stability, insulin fibril formation process, and the conformation of insulin binding to its receptor. Our results also open the way for new strategies in the development of insulin biopharmaceuticals. PMID:26382042

  16. Meta-analysis of insulin aspart versus regular human insulin used in a basal–bolus regimen for the treatment of diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Simon; Bode, Bruce; Kozlovski, Plamen; Svendsen, Anne Louise

    2013-01-01

    Background: The objective of the current study was to compare the efficacy of two different insulin formulations, insulin aspart (IAsp) and regular human insulin (RHI), for prandial insulin coverage with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin as basal insulin using a meta-analysis approach. The primary endpoint was change in A1c over time. Secondary endpoints included incidence of hypoglycemia and postprandial glycemic control. Methods Clinical trials (Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes) complying with Good Clinical Practice, and with individual patient data, were included in the meta-analysis. Trials were randomized, consisting of (at least) two treatment arms and had a minimum duration of 12 weeks. Estimates were calculated using fixed-effects and random-effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed for each analysis. The effect of baseline parameters on A1c was analyzed in extended simultaneous models. Results The mean difference in A1c was 0.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] [−0.15; −0.04], P < 0.001) in favor of IAsp. Higher accumulated dose of IAsp, higher age and increased rates of hypoglycemia were associated with improved A1c outcome. Fasting plasma glucose was not significantly different between regimens. Postprandial glucose was significantly lower after treatment with IAsp compared with RHI, but the analysis did present a significant level of heterogeneity (P < 0.001). The overall rate of hypoglycemia was the same with both regimens, but nocturnal hypoglycemia was significantly lower with IAsp. Conclusions A basal–bolus regimen with IAsp as bolus insulin provided minimal, but statistically significant, improvement in overall glycemic control with a lower rate of nocturnal hypoglycemic episodes, compared with a corresponding regimen with bolus RHI. PMID:23586846

  17. Differentiation of insulin-producing cells from human neural progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Hori

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Success in islet-transplantation-based therapies for type 1 diabetes, coupled with a worldwide shortage of transplant-ready islets, has motivated efforts to develop renewable sources of islet-replacement tissue. Islets and neurons share features, including common developmental programs, and in some species brain neurons are the principal source of systemic insulin. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here we show that brain-derived human neural progenitor cells, exposed to a series of signals that regulate in vivo pancreatic islet development, form clusters of glucose-responsive insulin-producing cells (IPCs. During in vitro differentiation of neural progenitor cells with this novel method, genes encoding essential known in vivo regulators of pancreatic islet development were expressed. Following transplantation into immunocompromised mice, IPCs released insulin C-peptide upon glucose challenge, remained differentiated, and did not form detectable tumors. CONCLUSION: Production of IPCs solely through extracellular factor modulation in the absence of genetic manipulations may promote strategies to derive transplantable islet-replacement tissues from human neural progenitor cells and other types of multipotent human stem cells.

  18. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line

    OpenAIRE

    Binhai Ren; Chang Tao; Margaret Anne Swan; Nichole Joachim; Rosetta Martiniello-Wilks; Nassif, Najah T; O’Brien, Bronwyn A; Simpson, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected an...

  19. Human blood-brain barrier insulin-like growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and IGF-2, may be important regulatory molecules in the CNS. Possible origins of IGFs in brain include either de novo synthesis or transport of circulating IGFs from blood into brain via receptor mediated transcytosis mechanisms at the brain capillary endothelial wall, ie, the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the present studies, isolated human brain capillaries are used as an in vitro model system of the human BBB and the characteristics of IGF-1 or IGF-2 binding to this preparation were assessed. The total binding of IGF-2 at 37 degrees C exceeded 130% per mg protein and was threefold greater than the total binding for IGF-1. However, at 37 degrees C nonsaturable binding equaled total binding, suggesting that endocytosis is rate limiting at physiologic temperatures. Binding studies performed at 4 degrees C slowed endocytosis to a greater extent than membrane binding, and specific binding of either IGF-1 or IGF-2 was detectable. Scatchard plots for either peptide were linear and the molar dissociation constant of IGF-1 and IGF-2 binding was 2.1 +/- 0.4 and 1.1 +/- 0.1 nmol/L, respectively. Superphysiologic concentrations of porcine insulin inhibited the binding of both IGF-1 (ED50 = 2 micrograms/mL) and IGF-2 (ED50 = 0.5 microgram/mL). Affinity cross linking of 125I-IGF-1, 125I-IGF-2, and 125I-insulin to isolated human brain capillaries was performed using disuccinimidylsuberate (DSS). These studies revealed a 141 kd binding site for both IGF-1 and IGF-2, and a 133 kd binding site for insulin

  20. Insulin-producing cells generated from dedifferentiated human pancreatic beta cells expanded in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger A Russ

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expansion of beta cells from the limited number of adult human islet donors is an attractive prospect for increasing cell availability for cell therapy of diabetes. However, attempts at expanding human islet cells in tissue culture result in loss of beta-cell phenotype. Using a lineage-tracing approach we provided evidence for massive proliferation of beta-cell-derived (BCD cells within these cultures. Expansion involves dedifferentiation resembling epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Epigenetic analyses indicate that key beta-cell genes maintain open chromatin structure in expanded BCD cells, although they are not transcribed. Here we investigated whether BCD cells can be redifferentiated into beta-like cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Redifferentiation conditions were screened by following activation of an insulin-DsRed2 reporter gene. Redifferentiated cells were characterized for gene expression, insulin content and secretion assays, and presence of secretory vesicles by electron microscopy. BCD cells were induced to redifferentiate by a combination of soluble factors. The redifferentiated cells expressed beta-cell genes, stored insulin in typical secretory vesicles, and released it in response to glucose. The redifferentiation process involved mesenchymal-epithelial transition, as judged by changes in gene expression. Moreover, inhibition of the EMT effector SLUG (SNAI2 using shRNA resulted in stimulation of redifferentiation. Lineage-traced cells also gave rise at a low rate to cells expressing other islet hormones, suggesting transition of BCD cells through an islet progenitor-like stage during redifferentiation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate for the first time that expanded dedifferentiated beta cells can be induced to redifferentiate in culture. The findings suggest that ex-vivo expansion of adult human islet cells is a promising approach for generation of insulin-producing cells for

  1. Cancer incidence and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with human insulin: a cohort study in Shanghai.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjuan Gu

    Full Text Available AIM: The aim was to investigate the association between human insulin and cancer incidence and mortality in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We recruited 8,774 insulin-naïve diabetes patients from the Shanghai Diabetes Registry (SDR. The follow-up rate was 85.4%. All subjects were divided into the insulin use cohort (n = 3,639 and the non-insulin use cohort (n = 5,135. The primary outcome was the first diagnosis of any cancer. The secondary outcome was all-cause mortality. Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relative risk (RR of cancer and mortality. RESULTS: We observed 98 cancer events in the insulin use cohort and 170 in the non-insulin use cohort. Cancer incidence rates were 78.6 and 74.3 per 10,000 patients per year in the insulin users and the non-insulin users, respectively. No significant difference in cancer risk was observed between the two cohorts (adjusted RR = 1.20, 95% CI 0.89-1.62, P = 0.228. Regarding site-specific cancers, only the risk of liver cancer was significantly higher in the insulin users compared to that in the non-insulin users (adjusted RR = 2.84, 95% CI 1.12-7.17, P = 0.028. The risks of overall mortality (adjusted RR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.47-2.43, P<0.0001 and death from cancer (adjusted RR = 2.16, 95% CI 1.39-3.35, P = 0.001 were all significantly higher in the insulin users than in the non-insulin users. CONCLUSION: There was no excess risk of overall cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with human insulin. However, a significantly higher risk of liver cancer was found in these patients. Moreover, insulin users showed higher risks of overall and cancer mortality. Considering that individuals treated with insulin were more likely to be advanced diabetic patients, caution should be used in interpreting these results.

  2. Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Treated with Human Insulin: A Cohort Study in Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ying; Hou, Xuhong; Mo, Yifei; Yu, Weihui; Zhang, Lei; Hu, Cheng; Nan, Hairong; Chen, Lei; Li, Jie; Liu, Yuxiang; Huang, Zhezhou; Han, Ming; Bao, Yuqian; Zhong, Weijian; Jia, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim was to investigate the association between human insulin and cancer incidence and mortality in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods We recruited 8,774 insulin-naïve diabetes patients from the Shanghai Diabetes Registry (SDR). The follow-up rate was 85.4%. All subjects were divided into the insulin use cohort (n = 3,639) and the non-insulin use cohort (n = 5,135). The primary outcome was the first diagnosis of any cancer. The secondary outcome was all-cause mortality. Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of cancer and mortality. Results We observed 98 cancer events in the insulin use cohort and 170 in the non-insulin use cohort. Cancer incidence rates were 78.6 and 74.3 per 10,000 patients per year in the insulin users and the non-insulin users, respectively. No significant difference in cancer risk was observed between the two cohorts (adjusted RR = 1.20, 95% CI 0.89–1.62, P = 0.228). Regarding site-specific cancers, only the risk of liver cancer was significantly higher in the insulin users compared to that in the non-insulin users (adjusted RR = 2.84, 95% CI 1.12–7.17, P = 0.028). The risks of overall mortality (adjusted RR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.47–2.43, P<0.0001) and death from cancer (adjusted RR = 2.16, 95% CI 1.39–3.35, P = 0.001) were all significantly higher in the insulin users than in the non-insulin users. Conclusion There was no excess risk of overall cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with human insulin. However, a significantly higher risk of liver cancer was found in these patients. Moreover, insulin users showed higher risks of overall and cancer mortality. Considering that individuals treated with insulin were more likely to be advanced diabetic patients, caution should be used in interpreting these results. PMID:23308218

  3. Insulin degludec for diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Over the last few years there has been a steady increase in the number of prescriptions dispensed in primary care for intermediate and long-acting insulin analogues and a reduction in prescriptions for biphasic isophane insulin. For example, in England, the volume of intermediate and long-acting insulin analogues in general practice has risen from approximately 650,000 prescriptions per quarter in 2007 to over 850,000 per quarter in 2012.(1) ▾Insulin degludec (Tresiba, Novo Nordisk) is a new long acting basal insulin analogue for the management of diabetes mellitus in adults.(2) Two strengths of insulin degludec (100 units/mL and 200 units/mL) were launched in the UK in February 2013. Here we discuss evidence for the effectiveness and safety of insulin degludec. PMID:23842634

  4. Molecular Basis of Catalytic Chamber-assisted Unfolding and Cleavage of Human Insulin by Human Insulin-degrading Enzyme*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Manolopoulou, Marika; Guo, Qing; Malito, Enrico; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Insulin is a hormone vital for glucose homeostasis, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays a key role in its clearance. IDE exhibits a remarkable specificity to degrade insulin without breaking the disulfide bonds that hold the insulin A and B chains together. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry to obtain high mass accuracy, and electron capture dissociation (ECD) to selectively break the disulfide bonds in gas phase fragmentatio...

  5. Protein crystal growth in microgravity review of large scale temperature induction method: Bovine insulin, human insulin and human α-interferon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Protein Crystal Growth Facility (PCF) is space-flight hardware that accommodates large scale protein crystal growth experiments using temperature change as the inductive step. Recent modifications include specialized instrumentation for monitoring crystal nucleation with laser light scattering. This paper reviews results from its first seven flights on the Space Shuttle, the last with laser light scattering instrumentation in place. The PCF's objective is twofold: (1) the production of high quality protein crystals for x-ray analysis and subsequent structure-based drug design and (2) preparation of a large quantity of relatively contaminant free crystals for use as time-release protein pharmaceuticals. The first three Shuttle flights with bovine insulin constituted the PCF's proof of concept, demonstrating that the space-grown crystals were larger and diffracted to higher resolution than their earth-grown counterparts. The later four PCF missions were used to grow recombinant human insulin crystals for x-ray analysis and continue productions trials aimed at the development of a processing facility for crystalline recombinant a-interferon

  6. Protein crystal growth in microgravity review of large scale temperature induction method: Bovine insulin, human insulin and human α-interferon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Marianna M.; Bishop, John Bradford; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Nagabhushan, Tattanhalli L.; Reichert, Paul; Smith, G. David

    1997-01-01

    The Protein Crystal Growth Facility (PCF) is space-flight hardware that accommodates large scale protein crystal growth experiments using temperature change as the inductive step. Recent modifications include specialized instrumentation for monitoring crystal nucleation with laser light scattering. This paper reviews results from its first seven flights on the Space Shuttle, the last with laser light scattering instrumentation in place. The PCF's objective is twofold: (1) the production of high quality protein crystals for x-ray analysis and subsequent structure-based drug design and (2) preparation of a large quantity of relatively contaminant free crystals for use as time-release protein pharmaceuticals. The first three Shuttle flights with bovine insulin constituted the PCF's proof of concept, demonstrating that the space-grown crystals were larger and diffracted to higher resolution than their earth-grown counterparts. The later four PCF missions were used to grow recombinant human insulin crystals for x-ray analysis and continue productions trials aimed at the development of a processing facility for crystalline recombinant a-interferon.

  7. Insulin glargine overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Sari Dogan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin glargine is a long acting novel recombinant human insulin analogue indicated to improve glycemic control, in adults and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The time course of action of insulins including insulin glargine may vary between individuals and/or within the same individual. Insulin glargine is given as a 24-h dosing regimen and has no documented half-life or peak effect. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin, including insulin glargine. As with all insulins, the timing of hypoglycemia may differ among various insulin formulations. We present a case of a 76-year-old male insulin-dependent diabetic patient with refractory hypoglycemia secondary to an intentional overdose of insulin glargine. We would like to highlight the necessity of prolonging IV glucose infusion, for a much longer period than expected from pharmacokinetic properties of these insulin analogues after intentional massive overdose.

  8. Purification of human insulin-like growth factors I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGFs) are the designations for two polypeptides of approximately 7.5 kDa isolated from human serum. Two methods of purification of IGF are described which employ modern peptide separation techniques. Isolation of IGF from human serum or a plasma fraction involve both a gel filtration at low pH as an early step. Final purification is carried out in an HPLC system. Radioimmunoassays are used to monitor IGF at various stages of purification

  9. Purification of human insulin-like growth factors I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumstein, P.P.; Humbel, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGFs) are the designations for two polypeptides of approximately 7.5 kDa isolated from human serum. Two methods of purification of IGF are described which employ modern peptide separation techniques. Isolation of IGF from human serum or a plasma fraction involve both a gel filtration at low pH as an early step. Final purification is carried out in an HPLC system. Radioimmunoassays are used to monitor IGF at various stages of purification.

  10. High Insulin and Leptin Increase Resistin and Inflammatory Cytokine Production from Human Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panayoula C. Tsiotra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistin and the proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β, produced by adipocytes, and macrophages, are considered to be important modulators of chronic inflammation contributing to the development of obesity and atherosclerosis. Human monocyte-enriched mononuclear cells, from ten healthy individuals, were exposed to high concentrations of insulin, leptin, and glucose (alone or in combination for 24 hours in vitro. Resistin, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production was examined and compared to that in untreated cells. High insulin and leptin concentrations significantly upregulated resistin and the cytokines. The subsequent addition of high glucose significantly upregulated resistin and TNF-α mRNA and protein secretion, while it did not have any effect on IL-6 or IL-1β production. By comparison, exposure to dexamethasone reduced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production, while at this time point it increased resistin protein secretion. These data suggest that the expression of resistin, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β from human mononuclear cells, might be enhanced by the hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia and possibly by the hyperglycemia in metabolic diseases as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and atherosclerosis. Therefore, the above increased production may contribute to detrimental effects of their increased adipocyte-derived circulating levels on systemic inflammation, insulin sensitivity, and endothelial function of these patients.

  11. PKCδ regulates hepatic insulin sensitivity and hepatosteatosis in mice and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bezy, Olivier; Tran, Thien T; Pihlajamäki, Jussi;

    2011-01-01

    C57BL/6J and 129S6/Sv (B6 and 129) mice differ dramatically in their susceptibility to developing diabetes in response to diet- or genetically induced insulin resistance. A major locus contributing to this difference has been mapped to a region on mouse chromosome 14 that contains the gene encodi...... of PKCδ between strains of mice and in obese humans play an important role in the genetic risk of hepatic insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and hepatosteatosis; and thus PKCδ may be a potential target in the treatment of metabolic syndrome.......C57BL/6J and 129S6/Sv (B6 and 129) mice differ dramatically in their susceptibility to developing diabetes in response to diet- or genetically induced insulin resistance. A major locus contributing to this difference has been mapped to a region on mouse chromosome 14 that contains the gene encoding...... PKCδ. Here, we found that PKCδ expression in liver was 2-fold higher in B6 versus 129 mice from birth and was further increased in B6 but not 129 mice in response to a high-fat diet. PRKCD gene expression was also elevated in obese humans and was positively correlated with fasting glucose...

  12. X-ray investigation of gene-engineered human insulin crystallized from a solution containing polysialic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Chuprov-Netochin, R. N.; Samigina, V. R.; Bezuglov, V. V.; Miroshnikov, K. A.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    Attempts to crystallize the noncovalent complex of recombinant human insulin with polysialic acid were carried out under normal and microgravity conditions. Both crystal types belonged to the same space group, I213, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 77.365 Å, α = β = γ = 90.00°. The reported space group and unit-cell parameters are almost identical to those of cubic insulin reported in the PDB. The results of X-ray studies confirmed that the crystals obtained were cubic insulin crystals and that they contained no polysialic acid or its fragments. Electron-density maps were calculated using X-ray diffraction sets from earth-grown and microgravity-grown crystals and the three-dimensional structure of the insulin molecule was determined and refined. The conformation and secondary-structural elements of the insulin molecule in different crystal forms were compared. PMID:20208155

  13. Insulin resistance and the mitochondrial link. Lessons from cultured human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael

    2007-01-01

    lipid uptake. The metabolic phenotype during respiratory uncoupling resembled the above picture, except for an increase in glucose and palmitate oxidation. Antimycin A and oligomycin treatment induced insulin resistance at the level of glucose and palmitate uptake in all three study groups while......In order to better understand the impact of reduced mitochondrial function for the development of insulin resistance and cellular metabolism, human myotubes were established from lean, obese, and T2D subjects and exposed to mitochondrial inhibitors, either affecting the electron transport chain...... (Antimycin A), the ATP synthase (oligomycin) or respiratory uncoupling (2,4-dinitrophenol). Direct inhibition of the electron transport chain or the ATP synthase was followed by increased glucose uptake and lactate production, reduced glycogen synthesis, reduced lipid and glucose oxidation and unchanged...

  14. Complete sequence-specific 1H NMR assignments for human insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solvent conditions where human insulin could be studied by high-resolution NMR were determined. Both low pH and addition of acetonitrile were required to overcome the protein's self-association and to obtain useful spectra. Two hundred eighty-six 1H resonances were located and assigned to specific sites on the protein by using two-dimensional NMR methods. The presence and position of numerous dNN sequential NOE's indicate that the insulin conformation seen in crystallographic studies is largely retained under these solution conditions. Slowly exchanging protons were observed for seven backbone amide protons and were assigned to positions A15 and A16 and to positions B15-B19. These amides all occur within helical regions of the protein

  15. Sensitive detection of human insulin using a designed combined pore approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Chang; Noonan, Owen; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Qian, Kun; Xu, Chun; Zhang, Jun; Nouwens, Amanda; Yu, Chengzhong

    2014-06-25

    A unique combined pore approach to the sensitive detection of human insulin is developed. Through a systematic study to understand the impact of pore size and surface chemistry of nanoporous materials on their enrichment and purification performance, the advantages of selected porous materials are integrated to enhance detection sensitivity in a unified two-step process. In the first purification step, a rationally designed large pore material (ca. 100 nm in diameter) is chosen to repel the interferences from nontarget molecules. In the second enrichment step, a hydrophobically modified mesoporous material with a pore size of 5 nm is selected to enrich insulin molecules. A low detection limit of 0.05 ng mL(-1) in artificial urine is achieved by this advanced approach, similar to most antibody-based analysis protocols. This designer approach is efficient and low cost, and thus has great potential in the sensitive detection of biomolecules in complex biological systems. PMID:24599559

  16. Complete sequence-specific sup 1 H NMR assignments for human insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, A.D.; Justice, R.M. Jr. (Eli Lilly and Co., Indianapolis, IN (USA))

    1990-03-27

    Solvent conditions where human insulin could be studied by high-resolution NMR were determined. Both low pH and addition of acetonitrile were required to overcome the protein's self-association and to obtain useful spectra. Two hundred eighty-six {sup 1}H resonances were located and assigned to specific sites on the protein by using two-dimensional NMR methods. The presence and position of numerous d{sub NN} sequential NOE's indicate that the insulin conformation seen in crystallographic studies is largely retained under these solution conditions. Slowly exchanging protons were observed for seven backbone amide protons and were assigned to positions A15 and A16 and to positions B15-B19. These amides all occur within helical regions of the protein.

  17. Reactivation of the insulin-like growth factor-Ⅱ signaling pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Breuhahn; Peter Schirmacher

    2008-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-signaling axis is frequently observed in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Especially the over-expression of the fetal growth factor IGF-Ⅱ, IGF-Ⅰ receptor (IGF-IR), and cytoplasmic downstream effectors such as insulin-receptor substrates (IRS) contribute to proliferation, anti-apoptosis, and invasive behavior. This review focuses on the relevant alterations in this signaling pathway and independent in vivo models that support the central role IGF-Ⅱ signaling during HCC development and progression. Since this pathway has become the center of interest as a target for potential anti-cancer therapy in many types of malignancies, various experimental strategies have been developed, including neutralizing antibodies and selective receptor ki-nase inhibitors, with respect to the specific and efficient reduction of oncogenic IGF-Ⅱ/IGF-IR-signaling.

  18. Human amnion epithelial cells can be induced to differentiate into functional insulin-producing cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanan Hou; Qin Huang; Tianjin Liu; Lihe Guo

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation has demonstrated that long-term insulin independence may be achieved in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus type 1. However, limited availability of islet tissue means that new sources of insulinproducing cells that are responsive to glucose are required. Here, we show that human amnion epithelial cells (HAEC) can be induced to differentiate into functional insulinproducing cells in vitro. After induction of differentiation, HAEC expressed multiple pancreatic --cell genes, including insulin, pancreas duodenum homeobox-1, paired box gene 6,NK2 transcription factor-related locus 2, Islet 1, glucokinase,and glucose transporter-2, and released C-peptide in a glucose-regulated manner in response to other extracellular stimulations. The transplantation of induced HAEC into streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57 mice reversed hyperglycemia, restored body weight, and maintained euglycemia for 30 d. These findings indicated that HAEC may be a new source for cell replacement therapy in type 1 diabetes.

  19. Determination of human insulin and its analogues in human blood using liquid chromatography coupled to ion mobility mass spectrometry (LC-IM-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Andreas; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative determination of insulin from human blood samples is an emerging topic in doping controls as well as in other related disciplines (e.g. forensics). Beside the therapeutic use, insulin represents a prohibited, performance enhancing substance in sports drug testing. In both cases accurate, sensitive, specific, and unambiguous determination of the target peptide is of the utmost importance. The challenges concerning identifying insulins in blood by liquid chromatography coupled to ion mobility mass spectrometry (LC-IM-MS) are detecting the basal concentrations of approximately 0.2 ng/mL and covering the hyperinsulinaemic clamps at > 3 ng/mL simultaneously using up to 200 μL of plasma or serum. This is achieved by immunoaffinity purification of the insulins with magnetic beads and subsequent separation by micro-scale liquid chromatography coupled to ion mobility / high resolution mass spectrometry. The method includes human insulin as well as the synthetic or animal analogues insulin aspart, glulisine, glargine, detemir, lispro, bovine, and porcine insulin. The method validation shows reliable results considering specificity, limit of detection (0.2 ng/mL except for detemir: 0.8 ng/mL), limit of quantification (0.5 ng/mL for human insulin), precision (CV  0.99), recovery, accuracy (>90%), robustness (plasma/serum), and ion suppression. For quantification of human insulin a labelled internal standard ([[(2) H10 ]-Leu(B6,B11,B15,B17) ] - human Insulin) is introduced. By means of the additional ion mobility separation of the different analogues, the chromatographic run time is shortened to 8 min without losing specificity. As proof-of-concept, the procedure was successfully applied to different blood specimens from diabetic patients receiving recombinant synthetic analogues. PMID:25219675

  20. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Binhai; Tao, Chang; Swan, Margaret Anne; Joachim, Nichole; Martiniello-Wilks, Rosetta; Nassif, Najah T; O'Brien, Bronwyn A; Simpson, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected and expanded into cell lines: H4IIEins (insulin gene alone), H4IIE/ND (NeuroD1 gene alone), and H4IIEins/ND (insulin and NeuroD1 genes). The H4IIEins cells did not store insulin; however, H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells stored 65.5 ± 5.6 and 1475.4 ± 171.8 pmol/insulin/5 × 10⁶ cells, respectively. Additionally, several β cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones were expressed in both H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells. Electron microscopy revealed insulin storage vesicles in the H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cell lines. Regulated secretion of insulin to glucose (0-20 mmol/L) was seen in the H4IIEins/ND cell line. The H4IIEins/ND cells were transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, resulting in normalization of blood glucose. This data shows that the expression of NeuroD1 and insulin in liver cells may be a useful strategy for inducing islet neogenesis and reversing diabetes. PMID:27070593

  1. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binhai Ren

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected and expanded into cell lines: H4IIEins (insulin gene alone, H4IIE/ND (NeuroD1 gene alone, and H4IIEins/ND (insulin and NeuroD1 genes. The H4IIEins cells did not store insulin; however, H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells stored 65.5 ± 5.6 and 1475.4 ± 171.8 pmol/insulin/5 × 106 cells, respectively. Additionally, several β cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones were expressed in both H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells. Electron microscopy revealed insulin storage vesicles in the H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cell lines. Regulated secretion of insulin to glucose (0–20 mmol/L was seen in the H4IIEins/ND cell line. The H4IIEins/ND cells were transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, resulting in normalization of blood glucose. This data shows that the expression of NeuroD1 and insulin in liver cells may be a useful strategy for inducing islet neogenesis and reversing diabetes.

  2. X-ray investigation of gene-engineered human insulin crystallized from a solution containing polysialic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystals of insulin have been grown from a solution containing insulin and polysialic acid and the three-dimensional structure of insulin in these crystals has been solved at 1.6 Å resolution. Attempts to crystallize the noncovalent complex of recombinant human insulin with polysialic acid were carried out under normal and microgravity conditions. Both crystal types belonged to the same space group, I213, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 77.365 Å, α = β = γ = 90.00°. The reported space group and unit-cell parameters are almost identical to those of cubic insulin reported in the PDB. The results of X-ray studies confirmed that the crystals obtained were cubic insulin crystals and that they contained no polysialic acid or its fragments. Electron-density maps were calculated using X-ray diffraction sets from earth-grown and microgravity-grown crystals and the three-dimensional structure of the insulin molecule was determined and refined. The conformation and secondary-structural elements of the insulin molecule in different crystal forms were compared

  3. In vivo activation of ROCK1 by insulin is impaired in skeletal muscle of humans with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Kwang-Hoon; Choi, Kang-Duk; Lee, Dae-Ho; Jung, Yoonshin; Henry, Robert R; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Kim, Young-Bum

    2011-03-01

    To determine whether serine/threonine ROCK1 is activated by insulin in vivo in humans and whether impaired activation of ROCK1 could play a role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, we measured the activity of ROCK1 and the protein content of the Rho family in vastus lateralis muscle of lean, obese nondiabetic, and obese type 2 diabetic subjects. Biopsies were taken after an overnight fast and after a 3-h hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Insulin-stimulated GDR was reduced 38% in obese nondiabetic subjects compared with lean, 62% in obese diabetic subjects compared with lean, and 39% in obese diabetic compared with obese nondiabetic subjects (all comparisons P lean or obese subjects. Basal activity of ROCK1 was similar in all groups. Insulin increased ROCK1 activity 2.1-fold in lean and 1.7-fold in obese nondiabetic subjects in muscle. However, ROCK1 activity did not increase in response to insulin in muscle of obese type 2 diabetic subjects without change in ROCK1 protein levels. Importantly, insulin-stimulated ROCK1 activity was positively correlated with insulin-mediated GDR in lean subjects (P accounting for defective ROCK1 activity. Thus, these data suggest that ROCK1 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of resistance to insulin action on glucose disposal in muscle of obese type 2 diabetic subjects.

  4. Understanding the structural differences between spherical and rod-shaped human insulin nanoparticles produced by supercritical fluids precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonju; Seo, Yongil; Chae, Boknam; Pyo, Dongjin; Chung, Hoeil; Hwang, Hyonseok; Jung, Young Mee

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the thermal denaturation mechanism and secondary structures of two types of human insulin nanoparticles produced by a process of solution-enhanced dispersion by supercritical fluids using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol (EtOH) solutions of insulin are investigated using spectroscopic approaches and molecular dynamics calculations. First, the temperature-dependent IR spectra of spherical and rod-shaped insulin nanoparticles prepared from DMSO and EtOH solution, respectively, are analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and 2D correlation spectroscopy to obtain a deeper understanding of the molecular structures and thermal behavior of the two insulin particle shapes. All-atom molecular dynamics (AAMD) calculations are performed to investigate the influence of the solvent molecules on the production of the insulin nanoparticles and to elucidate the geometric differences between the two types of nanoparticles. The results of the PCA, the 2D correlation spectroscopic analysis, and the AAMD calculations clearly reveal that the thermal denaturation mechanisms and the degrees of hydrogen bonding in the spherical and rod-shaped insulin nanoparticles are different. The polarity of the solvent might not alter the structure or function of the insulin produced, but the solvent polarity does influence the synthesis of different shapes of insulin nanoparticles.

  5. Production of human insulin in an E. coli system with Met-Lys-human proinsulin as the expressed precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin-Qiu Chen; Hong-Tao Zhang; Mei-Hao Hu; Jian-Guo Tang [Peking Univ., Beijing (China)

    1995-10-01

    The construction of a gene encoding Lys-human proinsulin, its direct expression in E.coli, and the simple purification procedure are described here. The temperature inducible promotor was employed for induction in a very short time. The expression level could reach 20-30%. After a simple downstream processing and only one step of Sephadex G50 purification, 150 mg recombinant Lys-human proinsulin with a purity of up to 90% could be obtained easily from 1 L of high density fermentation medium. The obtained product is in the form of Met-Lys-human proinsulin because of the failure of the bacterial host to remove the initiator methionine residue. The Lys-human proinsulin could be changed into human insulin by tryspin and carboxypeptidase B treatment in later steps. After separation with DEAE Sephadex A25, human insulin with expected amino acid composition and full native biological activity could be obtained with a yield of 50 mg/L fermentation medium. 20 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 protease, and growth hormone-binding protein in lipodystrophic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte Rønde;

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV-lipodystrophy....... These parameters were measured in overnight fasting serum samples from 16 Caucasian males with HIV-lipodystrophy (LIPO) and 15 Caucasian HIV-infected males without lipodystrophy (NONLIPO) matched for age, weight, duration of HIV infection, and antiretroviral therapy. In LIPO, abdominal fat mass and insulin...... of bioactive IGF-I in HIV-lipodystrophy....

  7. Unraveling the Symmetry Ambiguity in a Hexamer: Calculation of the R6 Human Insulin Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donoghue, Sean I.; Chang, Xiaoqing; Abseher, Roger;

    2000-01-01

    ambiguous distance restraints, insulin hexamer, principal component analysis, solution structure, symmetric oligomers......ambiguous distance restraints, insulin hexamer, principal component analysis, solution structure, symmetric oligomers...

  8. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells derived from Wharton's jelly differentiate into insulin-producing cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-wu; LIN Li-min; HE Hong-yan; YOU Fang; LI Wei-zhong; HUANG Tian-hua; MA Gui-xia; MA Lian

    2011-01-01

    Background Islet transplantation is an effective way of reversing type Ⅰ diabetes. However, islet transplantation is hampered by issues such as immune rejection and shortage of donor islets. Mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into insulin-producing cells. However, the potential of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (huMSCs) to become insulin-producing cells remains undetermined.Methods We isolated and induced cultured huMSCs under islet cell culture conditions. The response of huMSCs were monitored under an inverted phase contrast microscope. Immunocytochemical and immunofluorescence staining methods were used to measure insulin and glucagon protein levels. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to detect gene expression of human insulin and PDX-1. Dithizone-staining was employed to determine the zinc contents in huMSCs. Insulin secretion was also evaluated through radioimmunoassay.Results HuMSCs induced by nicotinamide and β-mercaptoethanol or by neurogenic differentiation 1 gene (NeuroD1)transfection gradually changed morphology from typically elongated fibroblast-shaped cells to round cells. They had a tendency to form clusters. Immunocytochemical studies showed positive expression of human insulin and glucagon in these cells in response to induction. RT-PCR experiments found that huMSCs expressed insulin and PDX-1 genes following induction and dithizone stained the cytoplasm of huMSCs a brownish red color after induction. Insulin secretion in induced huMSCs was significantly elevated compared with the control group (t=6.183, P<0.05).Conclusions HuMSCs are able to differentiate into insulin-producing cells in vitro. The potential use of huMSCs in βcell replacement therapy of diabetes needs to be studied further.

  9. Acute systemic insulin intolerance does not alter the response of the Akt/GSK-3 pathway to environmental hypoxia in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Hulst, Gommaar; Sylow, Lykke; Hespel, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate how acute environmental hypoxia regulates blood glucose and downstream intramuscular insulin signaling after a meal in healthy humans. METHODS: Fifteen subjects were exposed for 4 h to normoxia (NOR) or to normobaric hypoxia (HYP, FiO2 = 0.11) in a randomized order 40 min ...... insulin intolerance developed independently of defects in conventional insulin signaling in skeletal muscle....

  10. [Differentiation of human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells into insulin-secreting cells induced by regenerating pancreatic extract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanmei; Wang, Dianliang; Zeng, Hongyan; Wang, Lieming; Sun, Jinwei; Zhang, Zhen; Dong, Shasha

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the natural biological inducer, rat regenerating pancreatic extract (RPE), was used to induce human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) into insulin-secreting cells. We excised 60% of rat pancreas in order to stimulate pancreatic regeneration. RPE was extracted and used to induce hAMSCs at a final concentration of 20 microg/mL. The experiment methods used were as follows: morphological-identification, dithizone staining, immumofluorescence analysis, reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and insulin secretion stimulated by high glucose. The results show that the cell morphology of passge3 hAMSCs changed significantly after the induction of RPE, resulting in cluster shape after induction for 15 days. Dithizone staining showed that there were scarlet cell masses in RPE-treated culture. Immumofluorescence analysis indicated that induced cells were insulin-positive expression. RT-PCR showed the positive expression of human islet-related genes Pdx1 and insulin in the induced cells. The result of insulin secretion stimulated by high glucose indicated that insulin increasingly secreted and then kept stable with prolongation of high glucose stimulation. In conclusion, hAMSCs had the potential to differentiate into insulin-secreting cells induced by RPE in vitro. PMID:22667123

  11. Phenothiazine Neuroleptics Signal to the Human Insulin Promoter as Revealed by a Novel High-Throughput Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    KISELYUK, ALICE; FARBER-KATZ, SUZETTE; COHEN, TOM; LEE, SEUNG-HEE; GERON, IFAT; AZIMI, BEHRAD; HEYNEN-GENEL, SUSANNE; SINGER, ODED; PRICE, JEFFREY; MERCOLA, MARK; ITKIN-ANSARI, PAMELA; LEVINE, FRED

    2012-01-01

    A number of diabetogenic stimuli interact to influence insulin promoter activity, making it an attractive target for both mechanistic studies and therapeutic interventions. High-throughput screening (HTS) for insulin promoter modulators has the potential to reveal novel inputs into the control of that central element of the pancreatic β-cell. A cell line from human islets in which the expression of insulin and other β-cell-restricted genes are modulated by an inducible form of the bHLH transcription factor E47 was developed. This cell line, T6PNE, was adapted for HTS by transduction with a vector expressing green fluorescent protein under the control of the human insulin promoter. The resulting cell line was screened against a library of known drugs for those that increase insulin promoter activity. Members of the phenothiazine class of neuroleptics increased insulin gene expression upon short-term exposure. Chronic treatment, however, resulted in suppression of insulin promoter activity, consistent with the effect of phenothiazines observed clinically to induce diabetes in chronically treated patients. In addition to providing insights into previously unrecognized targets and mechanisms of action of phenothiazines, the novel cell line described here provides a broadly applicable platform for mining new molecular drug targets and central regulators of β-cell differentiated function. PMID:20547533

  12. c-Jun represses the human insulin promoter activity that depends on multiple cAMP response elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, Nobuya; Seino, Yutaka; Imura, Hiroo (Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Maekawa, Toshio; Sudo, Tatsuhiko; Ishii, Shunsuke (Inst. of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Tsukuba (Japan))

    1992-02-01

    Glucose is known to increase the cAMP concentration in pancreatic {beta} cells. To determine the mechanism by which cAMP augments insulin gene expression, the authors first identified the cAMP response elements (CREs) of human insulin gene. In DNase I footprint analysis, the bacterially synthesized CRE-binding protein, CRE-BP1, protected four sites: two sites in the region upstream from the insulin core promoter, one site in the first exon, and one site in the first intron. To examine the roles of those four sites, they constructed a series of DNA plasmids in which the wild-type and mutant insulin promoters were linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Studies of the transcriptional activity of these plasmids after transfection into hamster insulinoma (HIT) cells showed that these four sites contributed additively to the cAMP inducibility of the insulin promoter. Surprisingly, the c-jun protooncogene product (c-Jun) repressed the cAMP-induced activity of the insulin promoter in a cotransfection assay with the c-Jun expression plasmic. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the level of c-jun mRNA was dramatically increased by glucose deprivation in HIT cells. These results suggest that glucose deprivation in HIT cells. These results suggest that glucose may regulate expression of the human insulin gene through multiple CREs and c-Jun.

  13. A prospective randomised cross-over study of the effect of insulin analogues and human insulin on the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes and recurrent hypoglycaemia (the HypoAna trial): study rationale and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe hypoglycaemia still represents a significant problem in insulin-treated diabetes. Most patients do not experience severe hypoglycaemia often. However, 20% of patients with type 1 diabetes experience recurrent severe hypoglycaemia corresponding to at least two episodes per year. The effect of insulin analogues on glycaemic control has been documented in large trials, while their effect on the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia is less clear, especially in patients with recurrent severe hypoglycaemia. The HypoAna Trial is designed to investigate whether short-acting and long-acting insulin analogues in comparison with human insulin are superior in reducing the occurrence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes in patients with recurrent hypoglycaemia. This paper reports the study design of the HypoAna Trial. Methods/design The study is a Danish two-year investigator-initiated, prospective, randomised, open, blinded endpoint (PROBE), multicentre, cross-over trial investigating the effect of insulin analogues versus human insulin on the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia in subjects with type 1 diabetes. Patients are randomised to treatment with basal-bolus therapy with insulin detemir / insulin aspart or human NPH insulin / human regular insulin in random order. The major inclusion criterion is history of two or more episodes of severe hypoglycaemia in the preceding year. Discussion In contrast to almost all other studies in this field the HypoAna Trial includes only patients with major problems with hypoglycaemia. The HypoAna Trial will elucidate whether basal-bolus regimen with short-acting and long-acting insulin analogues in comparison with human insulin are superior in reducing occurrence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes in hypoglycaemia prone patients with type 1 diabetes. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00346996. PMID:22727048

  14. A prospective randomised cross-over study of the effect of insulin analogues and human insulin on the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes and recurrent hypoglycaemia (the HypoAna trial: study rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Peter

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe hypoglycaemia still represents a significant problem in insulin-treated diabetes. Most patients do not experience severe hypoglycaemia often. However, 20% of patients with type 1 diabetes experience recurrent severe hypoglycaemia corresponding to at least two episodes per year. The effect of insulin analogues on glycaemic control has been documented in large trials, while their effect on the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia is less clear, especially in patients with recurrent severe hypoglycaemia. The HypoAna Trial is designed to investigate whether short-acting and long-acting insulin analogues in comparison with human insulin are superior in reducing the occurrence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes in patients with recurrent hypoglycaemia. This paper reports the study design of the HypoAna Trial. Methods/design The study is a Danish two-year investigator-initiated, prospective, randomised, open, blinded endpoint (PROBE, multicentre, cross-over trial investigating the effect of insulin analogues versus human insulin on the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia in subjects with type 1 diabetes. Patients are randomised to treatment with basal-bolus therapy with insulin detemir / insulin aspart or human NPH insulin / human regular insulin in random order. The major inclusion criterion is history of two or more episodes of severe hypoglycaemia in the preceding year. Discussion In contrast to almost all other studies in this field the HypoAna Trial includes only patients with major problems with hypoglycaemia. The HypoAna Trial will elucidate whether basal-bolus regimen with short-acting and long-acting insulin analogues in comparison with human insulin are superior in reducing occurrence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes in hypoglycaemia prone patients with type 1 diabetes. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00346996.

  15. Four RFLPs of the human insulin receptor gene: PstI, KpnI, RsaI (2 RFLPs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, N.J.; Spielman, R.S.; Taub, R. (Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia (USA)); Kahn, C.R.; Muller-Wieland, D.; Kriauciunas, K.M. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1989-01-25

    Fragments were isolated from subclones containing the human insulin receptor cDNA. Probe 1 was a 677 bp XhoI/EcoRI fragment from the {alpha}-subunit region of the insulin receptor cDNA corresponding to nucleotides 334 to 1,011, the putative ligand binding domain. Probe 2 was a 1,599 bp PstI fragment from the {beta}-subunit region of the insulin receptor cDNA corresponding to nucleotides 2,746 to 4,345, encoding the tyrosine kinase domain.

  16. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor II; recognition sites for receptors and binding proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Terasawa, H; Kohda, D.; Hatanaka, H; Nagata, K.; Higashihashi, N; Fujiwara, H.; Sakano, K; Inagaki, F.

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human insulin-like growth factor II was determined at high resolution in aqueous solution by NMR and simulated annealing based calculations. The structure is quite similar to those of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I, which consists of an alpha-helix followed by a turn and a strand in the B-region and two antiparallel alpha-helices in the A-region. However, the regions of Ala1-Glu6, Pro31-Arg40 and Thr62-Glu67 are not well-defined for lack of distanc...

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits insulin's stimulating effect on glucose uptake and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask-Madsen, Christian; Domínguez, Helena; Ihlemann, Nikolaj;

    2003-01-01

    -stimulated endothelial function in humans. METHODS AND RESULTS: Healthy, lean male volunteers were studied. On each study day, 3 acetylcholine (ACh) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP) dose-response studies were performed by infusion into the brachial artery. Before and during the last 2 dose-response studies, insulin and...... smaller (P<0.001); TNF-alpha had no effect on the SNP response without insulin infusion. Thus, TNF-alpha inhibition of the combined response to insulin and ACh was likely mediated through inhibition of NO production. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the concept that TNF-alpha could play a role in the...... development of insulin resistance in humans, both in muscle and in vascular tissue....

  18. Evidence for increased recombination near the human insulin gene: implication for disease association studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarti, A.; Elbein, S.C.; Permutt, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    Haplotypes for four new restriction site polymorphisms (detected by Rsa I, Taq I, HincII, and Sac I) and a previously identified DNA length polymorphism (5'FP), all at the insulin locus, have been studied in US Blacks, African Blacks, Caucasians, and Pima Indians. Black populations are polymorphic for all five markers, whereas the other groups are polymorphic for Rsa I, Taq I, and 5'FP only. The data suggest that approx. = 1 in 550 base pairs is variant in this region. The polymorphisms, even though located within 20 kilobases, display low levels of nonrandom association. Population genetic analysis suggests that recombination within this 20-kilobase segment occurs 24 times more frequently than expected if crossing-over occurred uniformly throughout the human genome. These findings suggest that population association between DNA polymorphisms and disease susceptibility genes near the insulin gene or structural mutations in the insulin gene will be weak. Thus, population studies would probably require large sample sizes to detect association. However, the low levels of nonrandom association increase the information content of the locus for linkage studies, which is the best alternative for discovering disease susceptibility genes.

  19. Insulin stimulates translocation of human GLUT4 to the membrane in fat bodies of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Crivat

    Full Text Available The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model system for studies of genes controlling development and disease. However, its applicability to physiological systems is less clear because of metabolic differences between insects and mammals. Insulin signaling has been studied in mammals because of relevance to diabetes and other diseases but there are many parallels between mammalian and insect pathways. For example, deletion of Drosophila Insulin-Like Peptides resulted in 'diabetic' flies with elevated circulating sugar levels. Whether this situation reflects failure of sugar uptake into peripheral tissues as seen in mammals is unclear and depends upon whether flies harbor the machinery to mount mammalian-like insulin-dependent sugar uptake responses. Here we asked whether Drosophila fat cells are competent to respond to insulin with mammalian-like regulated trafficking of sugar transporters. Transgenic Drosophila expressing human glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4, the sugar transporter expressed primarily in insulin-responsive tissues, were generated. After expression in fat bodies, GLUT4 intracellular trafficking and localization were monitored by confocal and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM. We found that fat body cells responded to insulin with increased GLUT4 trafficking and translocation to the plasma membrane. While the amplitude of these responses was relatively weak in animals reared on a standard diet, it was greatly enhanced in animals reared on sugar-restricted diets, suggesting that flies fed standard diets are insulin resistant. Our findings demonstrate that flies are competent to mobilize translocation of sugar transporters to the cell surface in response to insulin. They suggest that Drosophila fat cells are primed for a response to insulin and that these pathways are down-regulated when animals are exposed to constant, high levels of sugar. Finally, these studies are the first to use TIRFM to

  20. Insulin and GH signaling in human skeletal muscle in vivo following exogenous GH exposure: impact of an oral glucose load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Krusenstjerna-Hafstrøm

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: GH induces acute insulin resistance in skeletal muscle in vivo, which in rodent models has been attributed to crosstalk between GH and insulin signaling pathways. Our objective was to characterize time course changes in signaling pathways for GH and insulin in human skeletal muscle in vivo following GH exposure in the presence and absence of an oral glucose load. METHODS: Eight young men were studied in a single-blinded randomized crossover design on 3 occasions: 1 after an intravenous GH bolus 2 after an intravenous GH bolus plus an oral glucose load (OGTT, and 3 after intravenous saline plus OGTT. Muscle biopsies were taken at t = 0, 30, 60, and 120. Blood was sampled at frequent intervals for assessment of GH, insulin, glucose, and free fatty acids (FFA. RESULTS: GH increased AUC(glucose after an OGTT (p<0.05 without significant changes in serum insulin levels. GH induced phosphorylation of STAT5 independently of the OGTT. Conversely, the OGTT induced acute phosphorylation of the insulin signaling proteins Akt (ser(473 and thr(308, and AS160.The combination of OGTT and GH suppressed Akt activation, whereas the downstream expression of AS160 was amplified by GH. WE CONCLUDED THE FOLLOWING: 1 A physiological GH bolus activates STAT5 signaling pathways in skeletal muscle irrespective of ambient glucose and insulin levels 2 Insulin resistance induced by GH occurs without a distinct suppression of insulin signaling proteins 3 The accentuation of the glucose-stimulated activation of AS 160 by GH does however indicate a potential crosstalk between insulin and GH. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00477997.

  1. SIRT3 Deficiency Induces Endothelial Insulin Resistance and Blunts Endothelial-Dependent Vasorelaxation in Mice and Human with Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Yang; Julei Zhang; Wenjuan Xing; Xing Zhang; Jie Xu; Haifeng Zhang; Li Chen; Xiaona Ning; Gang Ji; Jia Li; Qingchuan Zhao; Feng Gao

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the critical role of Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) in the development of many metabolic diseases, but the contribution of SIRT3 to vascular homeostasis remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of SIRT3 in endothelial insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction in obesity. We found an impaired insulin-induced mesenteric vasorelaxation and concomitant reduced vascular SIRT3 expression in morbid obese human subjects compared with the non-obese sub...

  2. Topographic abnormalities of proinsulin to insulin conversion in functioning human insulinomas. Comparison of immunoelectron microscopic and clinical data.

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, J; Komminoth, P; Heitz, P. U.

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that the major defect in human insulinomas is a decreased hormone storage capacity resulting in uncontrolled release of proinsulin and insulin. By immunoelectron microscopy with monoclonal antibodies we studied the subcellular distribution of proinsulin and insulin in benign and malignant functioning insulinomas of different histology and compared the findings with various clinical and pathohistological parameters. We found that, in contrast to normal B cells, the proinsu...

  3. Reevaluation of Fatty Acid Receptor 1 as a Drug Target for the Stimulation of Insulin Secretion in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Robert; Kaiser, Gabriele; Gerst, Felicia; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Due-Hansen, Maria E.; Grundmann, Manuel; Machicao, Fausto; Peter, Andreas; Kostenis, Evi; Ulven, Trond; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Ullrich, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The role of free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1/GPR40) in glucose homeostasis is still incompletely understood. Small receptor agonists stimulating insulin secretion are undergoing investigation for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Surprisingly, genome-wide association studies did not discover diabetes risk variants in FFAR1. We reevaluated the role of FFAR1 in insulin secretion using a specific agonist, FFAR1-knockout mice and human islets. Nondiabetic individuals were metabolically phenotype...

  4. Differential effects of prednisone and growth hormone on fuel metabolism and insulin antagonism in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horber, F.F.; Marsh, H.M.; Haymond, M.W. (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) and prednisone cause insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. However, it is unknown whether hGH and prednisone antagonize insulin action on protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism by a common or independent mechanism. Therefore, protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism was assessed simultaneously in four groups of eight subjects each after 7 days of placebo, recombinant DNA hGH (rhGH; 0.1 mg.kg-1.day-1), prednisone (0.8 mg.kg-1.day-1), or rhGH and prednisone administration after an 18-h fast and during gut infusion of glucose and amino acids (fed state). Fasting plasma glucose concentrations were similar during placebo and rhGH but elevated (P less than 0.001) during combined treatment, whereas plasma insulin concentrations were higher (237 +/- 57 pmol/ml, P less than 0.001) during combined than during placebo, rhGH, or prednisone treatment (34, 52, and 91 pM, respectively). In the fed state, plasma glucose concentrations were elevated only during combined treatment (11.3 +/- 2.1 mM, P less than 0.001). Plasma insulin concentrations were elevated during therapy with prednisone alone and rhGH alone (667 +/- 72 and 564 +/- 65 pmol/ml, respectively, P less than 0.001) compared with placebo (226 +/- 44 pmol/ml) but lower than with the combined rhGH and prednisone treatment (1249 +/- 54 pmol/ml, P less than 0.01). Protein oxidation {sup 14}C leucine increased (P less than 0.001) with prednisone therapy, decreased (P less than 0.001) with rhGH treatment, and was normal during the combined treatment.

  5. Differential effects of prednisone and growth hormone on fuel metabolism and insulin antagonism in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human growth hormone (hGH) and prednisone cause insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. However, it is unknown whether hGH and prednisone antagonize insulin action on protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism by a common or independent mechanism. Therefore, protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism was assessed simultaneously in four groups of eight subjects each after 7 days of placebo, recombinant DNA hGH (rhGH; 0.1 mg.kg-1.day-1), prednisone (0.8 mg.kg-1.day-1), or rhGH and prednisone administration after an 18-h fast and during gut infusion of glucose and amino acids (fed state). Fasting plasma glucose concentrations were similar during placebo and rhGH but elevated (P less than 0.001) during combined treatment, whereas plasma insulin concentrations were higher (237 +/- 57 pmol/ml, P less than 0.001) during combined than during placebo, rhGH, or prednisone treatment (34, 52, and 91 pM, respectively). In the fed state, plasma glucose concentrations were elevated only during combined treatment (11.3 +/- 2.1 mM, P less than 0.001). Plasma insulin concentrations were elevated during therapy with prednisone alone and rhGH alone (667 +/- 72 and 564 +/- 65 pmol/ml, respectively, P less than 0.001) compared with placebo (226 +/- 44 pmol/ml) but lower than with the combined rhGH and prednisone treatment (1249 +/- 54 pmol/ml, P less than 0.01). Protein oxidation 14C leucine increased (P less than 0.001) with prednisone therapy, decreased (P less than 0.001) with rhGH treatment, and was normal during the combined treatment

  6. Highly efficient differentiation of human ES cells and iPS cells into mature pancreatic insulin-producing cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donghui Zhang; Wei Jiang; Meng Liu; Xin Sui; Xiaolei Yin; Song Chen; Yan Shi; Hongkui Deng

    2009-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent a potentially unlimited source of functional pancreatic endocrine lineage cells. Here we report a highly efficient approach to induce human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to differentiate into mature insulin-producing cells in a chemical-defined culture system. The differentiated human ES cells obtained by this approach comprised nearly 25% insulin-positive cells as assayed by flow cytometry analysis, which released insulin/C-peptide in response to glucose stimuli in a manner comparable to that of adult human islets. Most of these insulin-producing cells co-expressed mature β cell-specific markers such as NKX6-1 and PDX1, indicating a similar gene expression pattern to adult islet β cells in vivo. In this study, we also demonstrated that EGF facilitates the expansion of PDX1-positive pancreatic progenitors. Moreover, our protocol also succeeded in efficiently inducing human iPS cells to differentiate into insulin-producing cells. Therefore, this work not only provides a new model to study the mechanism of human pancreatic specialization and maturation in vitro, but also enhances the possibility of utilizing patient-specific iPS cells for the treatment of diabetes.

  7. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates the insulin-induced activation of the nitric oxide synthase in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Ingrid; Schulz, Christian; Fichtlscherer, Birgit; Kemp, Bruce E; Fisslthaler, Beate; Busse, Rudi

    2003-11-01

    Little is known about the signaling cascades that eventually regulate the activity of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in platelets. Here, we investigated the effects of insulin on the phosphorylation and activation of eNOS in washed human platelets and in endothelial cells. Insulin activated the protein kinase Akt in cultured endothelial cells and increased the phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser(1177) but failed to increase endothelial cyclic GMP levels or to elicit the relaxation of endothelium-intact porcine coronary arteries. In platelets, insulin also elicited the activation of Akt as well as the phosphorylation of eNOS and initiated NO production which was associated with increased cyclic GMP levels and the inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation. The insulin-induced inhibition of aggregation was accompanied by a decreased Ca(2+) response to thrombin and was also prevented by N(omega) nitro-L-arginine. In platelets, but not in endothelial cells, insulin induced the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic stress-sensing kinase which was sensitive to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) inhibitor wortmannin and the AMPK inhibitor iodotubercidin. Moreover, the insulin-mediated inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation was prevented by iodotubercidin. Insulin-independent activation of the AMPK using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside, increased platelet eNOS phosphorylation, increased cyclic GMP levels and attenuated platelet aggregation. These results highlight the differences in the signal transduction cascade activated by insulin in endothelial cells and platelets, and demonstrate that insulin stimulates the formation of NO in human platelets, in the absence of an increase in Ca(2+), by acti-vating PI3-K and AMPK which phosphorylates eNOS on Ser(1177).

  8. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and thiazolidinedione oral antidiabetic drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinner, S; Krätzner, R; Baun, D; Dickel, C; Blume, R; Oetjen, E

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is essential for glucose homeostasis. PPARγ ligands reducing insulin levels in vivo are used as drugs to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Genes regulated by PPARγ have been found in several tissues including insulin-producing pancreatic islet β-cells. However, the role of PPARγ at the insulin gene was unknown. Therefore, the effect of PPARγ and PPARγ ligands like rosiglitazone on insulin gene transcription was investigated. Experimental approach: Reporter gene assays were used in the β-cell line HIT and in primary mature pancreatic islets of transgenic mice. Mapping studies and internal mutations were carried out to locate PPARγ-responsive promoter regions. Key results: Rosiglitazone caused a PPARγ-dependent inhibition of insulin gene transcription in a β-cell line. This inhibition was concentration-dependent and had an EC50 similar to that for the activation of a reporter gene under the control of multimerized PPAR binding sites. Also in normal primary pancreatic islets of transgenic mice, known to express high levels of PPARγ, rosiglitazone inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin gene transcription. Transactivation and mapping experiments suggest that, in contrast to the rat glucagon gene, the inhibition of the human insulin gene promoter by PPARγ/rosiglitazone does not depend on promoter-bound Pax6 and is attributable to the proximal insulin gene promoter region around the transcription start site from −56 to +18. Conclusions and implications: The human insulin gene represents a novel PPARγ target that may contribute to the action of thiazolidinediones in type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:19338578

  9. Characterization of the Human Insulin-induced Gene 2 (INSIG2) Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alvarez, Ana; Soledad Alvarez, María; Cucarella, Carme; Casado, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-induced gene 2 (INSIG2) and its homolog INSIG1 encode closely related endoplasmic reticulum proteins that regulate the proteolytic activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins, transcription factors that activate the synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids in animal cells. Several studies have been carried out to identify INSIG2 genetic variants associated with metabolic diseases. However, few data have been published regarding the regulation of INSIG2 gene expression. Two Insig2 transcripts have been described in rodents through the use of different promoters that produce different noncoding first exons that splice into a common second exon. Herein we report the cloning and characterization of the human INSIG2 promoter and the detection of an INSIG2-specific transcript homologous to the Insig2b mouse variant in human liver. Deletion analyses on 3 kb of 5′-flanking DNA of the human INSIG2 gene revealed the functional importance of a 350-bp region upstream of the transcription start site. Mutated analyses, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, and RNA interference analyses unveiled the significance of an Ets-consensus motif in the proximal region and the interaction of the Ets family member SAP1a (serum response factor (SRF) accessory protein-1a) with this region of the human INSIG2 promoter. Moreover, our findings suggest that insulin activated the human INSIG2 promoter in a process mediated by phosphorylated SAP1a. Overall, these results map the functional elements in the human INSIG2 promoter sequence and suggest an unexpected regulation of INSIG2 gene expression in human liver. PMID:20145255

  10. Measurement of insulin in human sera using a new RIA kit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the micro-scale modification of a newly developed RIA kit for insulin, methods for the determination of free and total insulin in serum of insulin-treated diabetics were established. Precipitation with polyethylene glycol 6000 or acid alcohol extraction of sera was carried out to remove or to dissociate antibody-bound insulin. Both assays permit precise and accurate measurement of serum insulin fractions. In 50 diabetic sera with tracer insulin binding of 0 - 97 %, free (after equilibration of the sera at 37 0C) and total insulin levels as well as insulin antibody binding parameters were determined. There was a good correlation of free to total insulin levels with maximally 10-fold higher values of total insulin. Both free and total insulin were found to be correlated with the ability of the serum to bind insulin. In detail, binding affinities (i.e. the reciprocal of equilibrium dissociation constants) and binding site concentrations were evaluated which were shown to be positively correlated with free and total insulin levels as well. From these data it was concluded that insulin antibodies in the serum may accumulate therapeutic insulin and function as a depot for delivering insulin in insulinopenic episodes. (author)

  11. Etiske Aspekter Inden For Brugen Af Humane Embryoniske Stamceller til Insulin Fremstillende Forskning

    OpenAIRE

    Kyhnauv, Ida Johanne; Køneke, Casper; Frost, Jeanne Birgit; Berendtsen, Nicolai Tubæk; Knudsen, Peter Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the ethical challenges regarding differentiation and creation of insulin producing cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We include the development, advantages and disadvantages of using hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We outline the ethical aspects concerning the use of hESC in research, based on our case as well as ethical and biological theories on the making of hESCs and iPSCs. We likewise include legislation and articles, where ethnical di...

  12. Biosynthetic 20-kilodalton methionyl-human growth hormone has diabetogenic and insulin-like activities.

    OpenAIRE

    Kostyo, J L; Cameron, C M; Olson, K.C.; Jones, A J; Pai, R C

    1985-01-01

    The anterior pituitary gland produces a 20-kilodalton (kDa) variant of human growth hormone (hGH) that differs from the predominant 22-kDa form of hGH in that amino acid residues 32-46 are deleted. Previous work has suggested that the 20-kDa variant possesses the full growth-promoting and lactogenic activities of 22-kDa hGH but lacks its intrinsic diabetogenic and insulin-like activities. In the present study, recombinant DNA techniques were used to prepare biosynthetic 20-kDa hGH, and some o...

  13. Synthesis of [3H-TyrB26]-human insulin by enzymic semisynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure is described for tritium labelling of human insulin in position TyrB26 by means of trypsin catalyzed condensation of DiBoc-DOI with [Nε-Boc, 3H-TyrB26]-IOP, subsequent deprotection and purification by HPLC. The tritium labelling of the octapeptide was accomplished by dehalotritiation of the corresponding DitB26-octapeptide which was obtained both by iodination of Nε-Boc-IOP and by total synthesis. (author). 2 figs., 1 tab., 17 refs

  14. Structure Based Discovery of Small Molecules to Regulate the Activity of Human Insulin Degrading Enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Bilal Çakir; Onur Dağliyan; Ezgi Dağyildiz; İbrahim Bariş; Ibrahim Halil Kavakli; Seda Kizilel; Metin Türkay

    2012-01-01

    Structure Based Discovery of Small Molecules to Regulate the Activity of Human Insulin Degrading Enzyme Bilal C¸ akir1, Onur Dag˘ liyan1, Ezgi Dag˘ yildiz1, I˙brahim Baris¸1, Ibrahim Halil Kavakli1,2*, Seda Kizilel1*, Metin Tu¨ rkay3* 1 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Koc¸ University, Sariyer, Istanbul, Turkey, 2 Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Koc¸ University, Sariyer, Istanbul, Turkey, 3 Department of Industrial Engineering, Koc¸ University...

  15. Structural analogs of human insulin-like growth factor I with reduced affinity for serum binding proteins and the type 2 insulin-like growth factor receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayne, M.L.; Applebaum, J.; Chicchi, G.G.; Hayes, N.S.; Green, B.G.; Cascieri, M.A.

    1988-05-05

    Four structural analogs of human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) have been prepared by site-directed mutagenesis of a synthetic IGF-I gene and subsequent expression and purification of the mutant protein from the conditioned media of transformed yeast. (Phe/sup -1/, Val/sup 1/, Asn/sup 2/, Gln/sup 3/, His/sup 4/, Ser/sup 8/, His/sup 9/, Glu/sup 12/, Tyr/sup 15/, Leu/sup 16/)IGF-I (B-chain mutant), in which the first 16 amino acids of hIGF-I were replaced with the first 17 amino acids of the B-chain of insulin, has >1000-, 100-, and 2-fold reduced potency for human serum binding proteins, the rat liver type 2 IGF receptor, and the human placental type 1 IGF receptor, respectively. The B-chain mutant also has 4-fold increased affinity for the human placental insulin receptor. (Gln/sup 3/, Ala/sup 4/) IGF-I has 4-fold reduced affinity for human serum binding proteins, but is equipotent to hIGF-I at the types 1 and 2 IGF and insulin receptors. (Tyr/sup 15/, Leu/sup 16/) IGH-I has 4-fold reduced affinity for human serum binding proteins and 10-fold increased affinity for the insulin receptor. The peptide in which these four-point mutations are combined, (Gln/sup 3/, Ala/sup 4/, Tyr/sup 15/,Leu/sup 16/)IGF-I, has 600-fold reduced affinity for the serum binding proteins. All four of these mutants stimulate DNA synthesis in the rat vascular smooth muscle cell line A10 with potencies reflecting their potency at the type 1 IGF receptor. These studies identify some of the domains of hIGF-I which are responsible for maintaining high affinity binding with the serum binding protein and the type 2 IGF receptor. In addition, These peptides will be useful in defining the role of the type 2 IGF receptor and serum binding proteins in the physiological actions of hIGF-I.

  16. Human Liver Cells Expressing Albumin and Mesenchymal Characteristics Give Rise to Insulin-Producing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irit Meivar-Levy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the pancreatic lineage in the liver has been suggested as a potential autologous cell replacement therapy for diabetic patients. Transcription factors-induced liver-to-pancreas reprogramming has been demonstrated in numerous species both in vivo and in vitro. However, human-derived liver cells capable of acquiring the alternate pancreatic repertoire have never been characterized. It is yet unknown whether hepatic-like stem cells or rather adult liver cells give rise to insulin-producing cells. Using an in vitro experimental system, we demonstrate that proliferating adherent human liver cells acquire mesenchymal-like characteristics and a considerable level of cellular plasticity. However, using a lineage-tracing approach, we demonstrate that insulin-producing cells are primarily generated in cells enriched for adult hepatic markers that coexpress both albumin and mesenchymal markers. Taken together, our data suggest that adult human hepatic tissue retains a substantial level of developmental plasticity, which could be exploited in regenerative medicine approaches.

  17. Expression, content, and localization of insulin-like growth factor I in human achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jens L; Heinemeier, Katja M; Langberg, Henning;

    2006-01-01

    by immunoflourometric assay, real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry used to localize and determine expression of IGF-I and IGFBP-4 in 6 postmortem human Achilles tendons. Tendon tissue concentrations of IGF-I were found to be 0.53 +/- 0.10 ng/g. Furthermore, we demonstrated that IGF-I and IGFBP-4 are localized around......In animals insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) stimulates collagen production by fibroblasts and is expressed in tendons together with its binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4). However, the presence of IGF-I and IGFBP-4 in human tendon tissue is not described. Tissue IGF-I content was examined...... the tendon fibroblasts and that mRNA for IGF-I and IGFBP-4 can be determined in human tendon tissue. The present study adds support for the roles of IGF-I and IGFBP-4 in the regulation of tendon adaptive responses to mechanical loading....

  18. High-level expression of human insulin receptor cDNA in mouse NIH 3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop a simple, efficient system for the high-level expression of human insulin receptors in eukaryotic cells, a full-length human kidney insulin receptor cDNA was inserted into a bovine papilloma virus vector under the control of the mouse metallothionein promoter. After transfection of mouse NIH 3T3 cells with this construct, seven cell lines expressing insulin receptors were isolated; two cell lines had more than 106 receptors per cell. The cell line with the highest 125I-insulin binding (NIH 3T3 HIR3.5) had 6 x 106 receptors with a K/sub d/ of 10-9 M. This level was not dependent on exposure to metals but could be increased further to 2 x 107 receptors per cell by addition of sodium butyrate to the culture medium. The α and β subunits had apparent molecular weights of 147,000 and 105,000, respectively (compared to 135,000 and 95,000 in IM-9 human lymphocytes), values identical to those of the α and β subunits of the insulin receptors of nontransformed NIH 3T3 cells. This size difference was due to altered carbohydrate composition, as N-glycanase digestion reduced the apparent receptor subunit size of the transfected cells and IM-9 lymphocytes to identical values. The alteration in N-linked oligosaccharide composition could not be ascribed to differences in the kinetics of posttranslational processing of the insulin receptors, which was comparable to that of other cells studied. The basal rate of glycogen synthesis in the cells overexpressing insulin receptors was increased 4- to 5-fold compared with controls. Low levels of added insulin (0.1 nM) caused a 50% increase in the rate of glycogen synthesis

  19. High-level expression of human insulin receptor cDNA in mouse NIH 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, J.; Okamoto, A.K.; Thys, R.; Bell, G.I.; Steiner, D.F.; Hofmann, C.A.

    1987-08-01

    In order to develop a simple, efficient system for the high-level expression of human insulin receptors in eukaryotic cells, a full-length human kidney insulin receptor cDNA was inserted into a bovine papilloma virus vector under the control of the mouse metallothionein promoter. After transfection of mouse NIH 3T3 cells with this construct, seven cell lines expressing insulin receptors were isolated; two cell lines had more than 10/sup 6/ receptors per cell. The cell line with the highest /sup 125/I-insulin binding (NIH 3T3 HIR3.5) had 6 x 10/sup 6/ receptors with a K/sub d/ of 10/sup -9/ M. This level was not dependent on exposure to metals but could be increased further to 2 x 10/sup 7/ receptors per cell by addition of sodium butyrate to the culture medium. The ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits had apparent molecular weights of 147,000 and 105,000, respectively (compared to 135,000 and 95,000 in IM-9 human lymphocytes), values identical to those of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of the insulin receptors of nontransformed NIH 3T3 cells. This size difference was due to altered carbohydrate composition, as N-glycanase digestion reduced the apparent receptor subunit size of the transfected cells and IM-9 lymphocytes to identical values. The alteration in N-linked oligosaccharide composition could not be ascribed to differences in the kinetics of posttranslational processing of the insulin receptors, which was comparable to that of other cells studied. The basal rate of glycogen synthesis in the cells overexpressing insulin receptors was increased 4- to 5-fold compared with controls. Low levels of added insulin (0.1 nM) caused a 50% increase in the rate of glycogen synthesis

  20. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2014-09-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5'- and 3'-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:24726898

  1. Pseudoislet formation enhances gene expression, insulin secretion and cytoprotective mechanisms of clonal human insulin-secreting 1.1B4 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alastair D; Vasu, Srividya; McClenaghan, Neville H; Flatt, Peter R

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the effects of cell communication on human beta cell function and resistance to cytotoxicity using the novel human insulin-secreting cell line 1.1B4 configured as monolayers and pseudoislets. Incubation with the incretin gut hormones GLP-1 and GIP caused dose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion from 1.1B4 cell monolayers and pseudoislets. The secretory responses were 1.5-2.7-fold greater than monolayers. Cell viability (MTT), DNA damage (comet assay) and apoptosis (acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining) were investigated following 2-h exposure of 1.1B4 monolayers and pseudoislets to ninhydrin, H2O2, streptozotocin, glucose, palmitate or cocktails of proinflammatory cytokines. All agents tested decreased viability and increased DNA damage and apoptosis in both 1.1B4 monolayers and pseudoislets. However, pseudoislets exhibited significantly greater resistance to cytotoxicity (1.5-2.7-fold increases in LD50) and lower levels of DNA damage (1.3-3.4-fold differences in percentage tail DNA and olive tail moment) and apoptosis (1.3-1.5-fold difference) compared to monolayers. Measurement of gene expression by reverse-transcription, real-time PCR showed that genes involved with insulin secretion (INS, PDX1, PCSK1, PCSK2, GLP1R and GIPR), cell-cell communication (GJD2, GJA1 and CDH1) and antioxidant defence (SOD1, SOD2, GPX1 and CAT) were significantly upregulated in pseudoislets compared to monolayers, whilst the expression of proapoptotic genes (NOS2, MAPK8, MAPK10 and NFKB1) showed no significant differences. In summary, these data indicate cell-communication associated with three-dimensional islet architecture is important both for effective insulin secretion and for protection of human beta cells against cytotoxicity. PMID:25559846

  2. Insulin Resistance in Human iPS Cells Reduces Mitochondrial Size and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Burkart, Alison M.; Tan, Kelly; Warren, Laura; Iovino, Salvatore; Hughes, Katelyn J.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance, a critical component of type 2 diabetes (T2D), precedes and predicts T2D onset. T2D is also associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. To define the cause-effect relationship between insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction, we compared mitochondrial metabolism in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from 5 healthy individuals and 4 patients with genetic insulin resistance due to insulin receptor mutations. Insulin-resistant iPSC had increased mitochondrial number...

  3. Allergy reactions to insulin: effects of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and insulin analogues.

    OpenAIRE

    RADERMECKER, Régis; Scheen, André

    2007-01-01

    The purification of animal insulin preparations and the use of human recombinant insulin have markedly reduced the incidence but not completely suppressed the occurrence of insulin allergy manifestations. Advances in technologies concerning the mode of delivery of insulin, i.e. continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), and the use of insulin analogues, resulting from the alteration in the amino acid sequence of the native insulin molecule, may influence the immunogenicity and antigenic...

  4. Monoclonal antibodies directed to human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I). Use for radioimmunoassay and immunopurification of IGF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laubli, U.K. (Zurich Univ. (Switzerland). Biochemisches Inst.); Baier, W.; Celio, M.R. (Zurich Univ. (Switzerland). Anatomisches Inst.); Binz, H.; Humbel, R.E. (Zurich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Immunologie und Virologie)

    1982-11-22

    Mouse hybridomas secreting antibodies to human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I) were produced by fusion of spleen cells of hyperimmunised mice with FO mouse-myeloma cells. Eight clones producing antibodies against human IGF I have been isolated, two of which have been characterised. One was used in a radioimmunoassay, the other for immunopurification of IGF.

  5. Interactions of short-acting, intermediate-acting and pre-mixed human insulins with free radicals--Comparative EPR examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczyk, Paweł; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Ramos, Paweł; Mencner, Łukasz; Olczyk, Krystyna; Pilawa, Barbara

    2015-07-25

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to examine insulins interactions with free radicals. Human recombinant DNA insulins of three groups were studied: short-acting insulin (Insuman Rapid); intermediate-acting insulins (Humulin N, Insuman Basal), and pre-mixed insulins (Humulin M3, Gensulin M50, Gensulin M40, Gensulin M30). The aim of an X-band (9.3GHz) study was comparative analysis of antioxidative properties of the three groups of human insulins. DPPH was used as a stable free radical model. Amplitudes of EPR lines of DPPH as the paramagnetic free radical reference, and DPPH interacting with the individual tested insulins were compared. For all the examined insulins kinetics of their interactions with free radicals up to 60 min were obtained. The strongest interactions with free radicals were observed for the short-acting insulin - Insuman Rapid. The lowest interactions with free radicals were characteristic for intermediate-acting insulin - Insuman Basal. The pre-mixed insulins i.e. Humulin M3 and Gensulin M50 revealed the fastest interactions with free radicals. The short acting, intermediate acting and premixed insulins have been found to be effective agents in reducing free radical formation in vitro and should be further considered as potential useful tools in attenuation of oxidative stress in diabetic patients. PMID:25975232

  6. Interactions of short-acting, intermediate-acting and pre-mixed human insulins with free radicals--Comparative EPR examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczyk, Paweł; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Ramos, Paweł; Mencner, Łukasz; Olczyk, Krystyna; Pilawa, Barbara

    2015-07-25

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to examine insulins interactions with free radicals. Human recombinant DNA insulins of three groups were studied: short-acting insulin (Insuman Rapid); intermediate-acting insulins (Humulin N, Insuman Basal), and pre-mixed insulins (Humulin M3, Gensulin M50, Gensulin M40, Gensulin M30). The aim of an X-band (9.3GHz) study was comparative analysis of antioxidative properties of the three groups of human insulins. DPPH was used as a stable free radical model. Amplitudes of EPR lines of DPPH as the paramagnetic free radical reference, and DPPH interacting with the individual tested insulins were compared. For all the examined insulins kinetics of their interactions with free radicals up to 60 min were obtained. The strongest interactions with free radicals were observed for the short-acting insulin - Insuman Rapid. The lowest interactions with free radicals were characteristic for intermediate-acting insulin - Insuman Basal. The pre-mixed insulins i.e. Humulin M3 and Gensulin M50 revealed the fastest interactions with free radicals. The short acting, intermediate acting and premixed insulins have been found to be effective agents in reducing free radical formation in vitro and should be further considered as potential useful tools in attenuation of oxidative stress in diabetic patients.

  7. Reduced insulin exocytosis in human pancreatic β-cells with gene variants linked to type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosengren, Anders H; Braun, Matthias; Mahdi, Taman;

    2012-01-01

    , and structure. Variants near TCF7L2 and ADRA2A were associated with reduced glucose-induced insulin secretion, whereas susceptibility variants near ADRA2A, KCNJ11, KCNQ1, and TCF7L2 were associated with reduced depolarization-evoked insulin exocytosis. KCNQ1, ADRA2A, KCNJ11, HHEX/IDE, and SLC2A2 variants......The majority of genetic risk variants for type 2 diabetes (T2D) affect insulin secretion, but the mechanisms through which they influence pancreatic islet function remain largely unknown. We functionally characterized human islets to determine secretory, biophysical, and ultrastructural features...... in relation to genetic risk profiles in diabetic and nondiabetic donors. Islets from donors with T2D exhibited impaired insulin secretion, which was more pronounced in lean than obese diabetic donors. We assessed the impact of 14 disease susceptibility variants on measures of glucose sensing, exocytosis...

  8. Reversal of hyperglycemia in mice by using human expandable insulin-producing cells differentiated from fetal liver progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalzman, Michal; Gupta, Sanjeev; Giri, Ranjit K.; Berkovich, Irina; Sappal, Baljit S.; Karnieli, Ohad; Zern, Mark A.; Fleischer, Norman; Efrat, Shimon

    2003-06-01

    Beta-cell replacement is considered to be the most promising approach for treatment of type 1 diabetes. Its application on a large scale is hindered by a shortage of cells for transplantation. Activation of insulin expression, storage, and regulated secretion in stem/progenitor cells offers novel ways to overcome this shortage. We explored whether fetal human progenitor liver cells (FH) could be induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells after expression of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) gene, which is a key regulator of pancreatic development and insulin expression in beta cells. FH cells possess a considerable replication capacity, and this was further extended by introduction of the gene for the catalytic subunit of human telomerase. Immortalized FH cells expressing Pdx1 activated multiple beta-cell genes, produced and stored considerable amounts of insulin, and released insulin in a regulated manner in response to glucose. When transplanted into hyperglycemic immunodeficient mice, the cells restored and maintained euglycemia for prolonged periods. Quantitation of human C-peptide in the mouse serum confirmed that the glycemia was normalized by the transplanted human cells. This approach offers the potential of a novel source of cells for transplantation into patients with type 1 diabetes.

  9. Generation of Monocyte-Derived Insulin-Producing Cells from Non-Human Primates According to an Optimized Protocol for the Generation ofPCMO-Derived Insulin-Producing Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Jessica; Harder, Ole; Faendrich, Fred; Schulze, Maren

    2014-01-01

    Ob­jec­ti­ve: The vision of potential autologous cell therapy for the cure of diabetes encourages ongoing research. According to a previously published protocol for the generation of insulin-producing cells from human monocytes, we analyzed whether the addition of growth factors could increase insulin production. This protocol was then transferred to a non-human primate model by using either blood- or spleen-derived monocytes. Methods: Human monocytes were treated to dedifferentiate into prog...

  10. Human placental growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor I and -II, and insulin requirements during pregnancy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Jens; Lauszus, Finn; Flyvbjerg, Allan;

    2003-01-01

    Human placental GH (hPGH) replaces pituitary GH during pregnancy. hPGH is correlated to serum IGF-I in normal pregnancies and in pregnancies complicated by fetoplacental disorders. In gestational diabetes and type 2 diabetes no correlation between hPGH and IGF-I has been found. The relationship...... between hPGH and IGF-I in type 1 diabetes mellitus has not been investigated thoroughly. Furthermore, hPGH may be involved in the development of insulin resistance during pregnancy. In this prospective, longitudinal study, 51 type 1 diabetic subjects were followed with repeated blood sampling during...... pregnancy (median, 14 blood samples/subject; range, 8-26). Maternal concentrations of serum hPGH, IGF-I, and IGF-II were measured and compared with insulin requirements and birth characteristics. hPGH was detected from as early as 6 wk gestation. In all subjects, a rise in serum hPGH was observed during...

  11. Human leukocyte antigen class II susceptibility conferring alleles among non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequency of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II susceptibility conferring alleles among type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients, in comparison with healthy controls. Cross-sectional comparative study. Patients with non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus meeting World Health Organization criteria were studied. These were compared with age and gender matched healthy control subjects. For each subject (patients as well as controls), DNA was extracted from ethylene diamine tetra-acetate sample and HLA class II DRB1 typing was carried out at allele group level (DRB1*01-DRB1*16) by sequence specific primers. Human leukocyte antigen DRB1 type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results were recorded. Frequencies were determined as number of an allele divided by total number of alleles per group; p-value was computed using Pearson's chi-square test. Among the 100 patients, there were 63 males and 37 females with 68 controls. A total of 13 different HLA DRB1 alleles were detected, with DRB1*15 being the commonest in both the groups. The allele DRB1*13 had statistically significant higher frequency in patient group as compared to controls (p 0.005). HLA DRB1*13 was found with a significantly increased frequency in non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus. (author)

  12. Characterization of lipid metabolism in insulin-sensitive adipocytes differentiated from immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a great demand for cell models to study human adipocyte function. Here we describe the adipogenic differentiation of a telomerase-immortalized human mesenchymal stem cell line (hMSC-Tert) that maintains numerous features of terminally differentiated adipocytes even after prolonged withdrawal of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist rosiglitazone. Differentiated hMSC-Tert developed the characteristic monolocular phenotype of mature adipocytes. The expression of adipocyte specific markers was highly increased during differentiation. Most importantly, the presence of the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone was not required for the stable expression of lipoprotein lipase, adipocyte fatty acid binding protein and perilipin on mRNA and protein levels. Adiponectin expression was post-transcriptionally down-regulated in the absence of rosiglitazone. Insulin sensitivity as measured by insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein was also independent of rosiglitazone. In addition to commonly used adipogenic markers, we investigated further PPARγ-stimulated proteins with a role in lipid metabolism. We observed an increase of lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR, LRP1) and apolipoprotein E expression during differentiation. Despite this increased expression, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of lipoproteins was decreased in differentiated adipocytes, suggesting that these proteins may have an additional function in adipose tissue beyond lipoprotein uptake

  13. Lifelong Physical Activity Prevents Aging-Associated Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Myotubes via Increased Glucose Transporter Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tipwadee Bunprajun

    Full Text Available Both aging and physical inactivity are associated with increased development of insulin resistance whereas physical activity has been shown to promote increased insulin sensitivity. Here we investigated the effects of physical activity level on aging-associated insulin resistance in myotubes derived from human skeletal muscle satellite cells. Satellite cells were obtained from young (22 yrs normally active or middle-aged (56.6 yrs individuals who were either lifelong sedentary or lifelong active. Both middle-aged sedentary and middle-aged active myotubes had increased p21 and myosin heavy chain protein expression. Interestingly MHCIIa was increased only in myotubes from middle-aged active individuals. Middle-aged sedentary cells had intact insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation however, the same cell showed ablated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. On the other hand, middle-aged active cells retained both insulin-stimulated increases in glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. Middle-aged active cells also had significantly higher mRNA expression of GLUT1 and GLUT4 compared to middle-aged sedentary cells, and significantly higher GLUT4 protein. It is likely that physical activity induces a number of stable adaptations, including increased GLUT4 expression that are retained in cells ex vivo and protect, or delay the onset of middle-aged-associated insulin resistance. Additionally, a sedentary lifestyle has an impact on the metabolism of human myotubes during aging and may contribute to aging-associated insulin resistance through impaired GLUT4 localization.

  14. From the Cover: Cell-replacement therapy for diabetes: Generating functional insulin-producing tissue from adult human liver cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Tamar; Shternhall, Keren; Meivar-Levy, Irit; Blumenfeld, Tamar; Cohen, Hamutal; Skutelsky, Ehud; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Barshack, Iris; Goldberg, Iris; Pri-Chen, Sarah; Ben-Dor, Lya; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Karasik, Avraham; Shimon, Ilan; Mor, Eytan; Ferber, Sarah

    2005-05-01

    Shortage in tissue availability from cadaver donors and the need for life-long immunosuppression severely restrict the large-scale application of cell-replacement therapy for diabetic patients. This study suggests the potential use of adult human liver as alternate tissue for autologous beta-cell-replacement therapy. By using pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (PDX-1) and soluble factors, we induced a comprehensive developmental shift of adult human liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. PDX-1-treated human liver cells express insulin, store it in defined granules, and secrete the hormone in a glucose-regulated manner. When transplanted under the renal capsule of diabetic, immunodeficient mice, the cells ameliorated hyperglycemia for prolonged periods of time. Inducing developmental redirection of adult liver offers the potential of a cell-replacement therapy for diabetics by allowing the patient to be the donor of his own insulin-producing tissue. pancreas | transdifferentiation

  15. Whole and fractionated yellow pea flours reduce fasting insulin and insulin resistance in hypercholesterolaemic and overweight human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinangeli, Christopher P F; Jones, Peter J H

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare whole pea flour (WPF) to fractionated pea flour (FPF; hulls only) for their ability to reduce risk factors associated with CVD and diabetes in overweight hypercholesterolaemic individuals. Using a cross-over design, twenty-three hypercholesterolaemic overweight men and women received two-treatment muffins/d containing WPF, FPF or white wheat flour (WF) for 28 d, followed by 28 d washout periods. Daily doses of WPF and FPF complied with the United States Department of Agriculture's recommended level of intake of half a cup of pulses/d (approximately 50 g/d). Dietary energy requirements were calculated for each study subject, and volunteers were only permitted to eat food supplied by the study personnel. Fasting insulin, body composition, urinary enterolactone levels, postprandial glucose response, as well as fasting lipid and glucose concentrations, were assessed at the beginning and at the end of each treatment. Insulin concentrations for WPF (37·8 (SEM 3·4) pmol/ml, P = 0·021) and FPF (40·5 (SEM 3·4) pmol/ml, P = 0·037) were lower compared with WF (50·7 (SEM 3·4) pmol/ml). Insulin homeostasis modelling assessment showed that consumption of WPF and FPF decreased (P yellow pea flours at doses equivalent to half a cup of yellow peas/d reduced IR, while WPF reduced android adiposity in women. PMID:20807459

  16. A highly potent insulin: des-(B26-B30)-[AspB10,TyrB25-NH2]insulin(human).

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, G P; Burke, G. T.; Katsoyannis, P G

    1989-01-01

    An insulin analogue that embodies two distinct structural modifications, each of which independently increases insulin activity, has been synthesized and evaluated for biological activity. The analogue, des-(B26-B30)-[AspB10,TyrB25-NH2]insulin is the most potent insulin analogue yet described; it displays an 11- to 13-fold higher activity than natural insulin. The findings are discussed with regard to the receptor-binding domains of insulin.

  17. Two insulin-like growth factor I messenger RNAs are expressed in human liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through use of a synthetic radiolabelled oligonucleotide probe, human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) cDNA clones were isolated from a liver library. Two types of cDNAs were defined by restriction enzyme analysis and DNA sequencing. Both encode IGF-I precursors of either 195 or 153 amino acids. The two predicted protein precursors are identical from their amino terminus to a lysine residue 16 codons beyond the IGF-I sequence, and then they diverge. Both cDNAs predict additional unique carboxyl-terminal extension peptides. Since there is only one IGF-I gene in the human genome, the finding of two different cDNAs suggests that alternative RNA processing plays a role in IGF-I gene expression. The functions of the different extension peptides remain to be elucidates

  18. Effect of insulin on human skeletal muscle mitochondrial ATP production, protein synthesis, and mRNA transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Craig S.; Short, Kevin R.; Bigelow, Maureen L.; Schimke, Jill M.; Sreekumaran Nair, K.

    2003-06-01

    Mitochondria are the primary site of skeletal muscle fuel metabolism and ATP production. Although insulin is a major regulator of fuel metabolism, its effect on mitochondrial ATP production is not known. Here we report increases in vastus lateralis muscle mitochondrial ATP production capacity (32-42%) in healthy humans (P oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle along with synthesis of gene transcripts and mitochondrial protein in human subjects. Skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients has a reduced capacity to increase ATP production with high insulin levels. cytochrome c oxidase | NADH dehydrogenase subunit IV | amino acids | citrate synthase

  19. Threonine 1336 of the human insulin receptor is a major target for phosphorylation by protein kinase C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of tumor-promoting phorbol diesters to inhibit both insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity and its intracellular signaling correlates with the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor β subunit on serine and threonine residues. In the present studies, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts transfected with a human insulin receptor cDNA and expressing greater than one million of these receptors per cell were labeled with [32P]phosphate and treated with or without 100 nM 4β-phorbol 12β-myristate 13α-acetate (PMA). Phosphorylated insulin receptors were immunoprecipitated and digested with trypsin. Alternatively, insulin receptors affinity purified from human term placenta were phosphorylated by protein kinase C prior to trypsin digestion of the 32P-labeled β subunit. Analysis of the tryptic phosphopeptides from both the in vivo and in vitro labeled receptors by reversed-phase HPLC and two-dimensional thin-layer separation revealed that PMA and protein kinase C enhanced the phosphorylation of a peptide with identical chromatographic properties. Comparison of these data with the known, deduced receptor sequence suggested that the receptor-derived tryptic phosphopeptide might be Ile-Leu-Thr(P)-Leu-Pro-Arg. The phosphorylation site corresponds to threonine 1336 in the human insulin receptor β subunit. This threonine, which resides in a receptor domain also containing tyrosine phosphorylation sites, is located eight amino acids from the carboxyl terminus of the β subunit and may play a role in the protein kinase C induced inhibition of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity

  20. Threonine 1336 of the human insulin receptor is a major target for phosphorylation by protein kinase C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, R.E.; Cao, Lin; Perregaux, D.; Czech, M.P. (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester (USA))

    1990-02-20

    The ability of tumor-promoting phorbol diesters to inhibit both insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity and its intracellular signaling correlates with the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor {beta} subunit on serine and threonine residues. In the present studies, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts transfected with a human insulin receptor cDNA and expressing greater than one million of these receptors per cell were labeled with ({sup 32}P)phosphate and treated with or without 100 nM 4{beta}-phorbol 12{beta}-myristate 13{alpha}-acetate (PMA). Phosphorylated insulin receptors were immunoprecipitated and digested with trypsin. Alternatively, insulin receptors affinity purified from human term placenta were phosphorylated by protein kinase C prior to trypsin digestion of the {sup 32}P-labeled {beta} subunit. Analysis of the tryptic phosphopeptides from both the in vivo and in vitro labeled receptors by reversed-phase HPLC and two-dimensional thin-layer separation revealed that PMA and protein kinase C enhanced the phosphorylation of a peptide with identical chromatographic properties. Comparison of these data with the known, deduced receptor sequence suggested that the receptor-derived tryptic phosphopeptide might be Ile-Leu-Thr(P)-Leu-Pro-Arg. The phosphorylation site corresponds to threonine 1336 in the human insulin receptor {beta} subunit. This threonine, which resides in a receptor domain also containing tyrosine phosphorylation sites, is located eight amino acids from the carboxyl terminus of the {beta} subunit and may play a role in the protein kinase C induced inhibition of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity.

  1. An Obesity Risk SNP (rs17782313 near the MC4R Gene Is Associated with Cerebrocortical Insulin Resistance in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Tschritter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R by insulin sensitive neurons is a central mechanism in body weight regulation, and genetic variants in the MC4R gene (e.g., rs17782313 are associated with obesity. By using magnetoencephalography, we addressed whether rs17782313 affects the cerebrocortical insulin response. We measured the cerebrocortical insulin response by using magnetoencephalography in a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (versus placebo in 51 nondiabetic humans (26 f/25 m, age 35±3 years, BMI 28±1kg/m2. The C-allele of rs17782313 was minor allele (frequency 23%, and the genotype distribution (TT 30, TC 19, CC 2 was in Hardy-Weinberg-Equilibrium. Insulin-stimulated cerebrocortical theta activity was decreased in the presence of the C-allele (TT 33±16 fT; TC/CC −27±20 fT; P=.023, and this effect remained significant after adjusting for BMI and peripheral insulin sensitivity (P=.047. Cerebrocortical theta activity was impaired in carriers of the obesity risk allele. Therefore, cerebral insulin resistance may contribute to the obesity effect of rs17782313.

  2. [Relationship between PTEN mutations and protein kinase B phosphorylation caused by insulin or recombinant human epidermal growth factor stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hailan; Hu, Xianfu; Lin, Jianhua

    2016-08-01

    Objective To study the effect of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) mutations on protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation of CNE-1 nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line. Methods CNE-1 cells were cultured in RPMI1640 medium containing 100 mL/L fetal calf serum, and then transfected with wild-type PTEN (wtPTEN), mutant PTEN C124S and mutant PTEN G129E plasmid separately. After overnight serum starvation, the cells were stimulated with 0.15 IU/mL insulin or 0.3 μg/mL recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF). At last, Akt phosphorylation was evaluated by Western blotting. Results Insulin or rhEGF stimulation led to Akt activation in CNE-1 cells. The wtPTEN inhibited insulin- or rhEGF-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt. PTEN C124S mutant activated insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt, but not rhEGF-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt. PTEN G129E mutant inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt. Conclusion The wtPTEN inhibited insulin- or rhEGF-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt, while PTEN C124S and G129E mutants failed to activate the phosphorylation of Akt consistently. This suggested PTEN mutations might not be correlated with activated Akt. PMID:27412938

  3. Reevaluation of fatty acid receptor 1 as a drug target for the stimulation of insulin secretion in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert; Kaiser, Gabriele; Gerst, Felicia; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Due-Hansen, Maria E; Grundmann, Manuel; Machicao, Fausto; Peter, Andreas; Kostenis, Evi; Ulven, Trond; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Ullrich, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    The role of free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1/GPR40) in glucose homeostasis is still incompletely understood. Small receptor agonists stimulating insulin secretion are undergoing investigation for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Surprisingly, genome-wide association studies did not discover diabetes risk variants in FFAR1. We reevaluated the role of FFAR1 in insulin secretion using a specific agonist, FFAR1-knockout mice and human islets. Nondiabetic individuals were metabolically phenotyped and genotyped. In vitro experiments indicated that palmitate and a specific FFAR1 agonist, TUG-469, stimulate glucose-induced insulin secretion through FFAR1. The proapoptotic effect of chronic exposure of β-cells to palmitate was independent of FFAR1. TUG-469 was protective, whereas inhibition of FFAR1 promoted apoptosis. In accordance with the proapoptotic effect of palmitate, in vivo cross-sectional observations demonstrated a negative association between fasting free fatty acids (NEFAs) and insulin secretion. Because NEFAs stimulate secretion through FFAR1, we examined the interaction of genetic variation in FFAR1 with NEFA and insulin secretion. The inverse association of NEFA and secretion was modulated by rs1573611 and became steeper for carriers of the minor allele. In conclusion, FFAR1 agonists support β-cell function, but variation in FFAR1 influences NEFA effects on insulin secretion and therefore could affect therapeutic efficacy of FFAR1 agonists. PMID:23378609

  4. Enhanced bioavailability of subcutaneously injected insulin coadministered with collagen in rats and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was undertaken to develop an agent that stabilizes insulin injected subcutaneously. 125I-Porcine insulin with 0.2 U/kg unlabeled porcine insulin was subcutaneously injected with or without collagen in the rat under the depilated skin of the back. At various times, the radioactivity in subcutaneous tissue was assayed for insulin and its metabolites by gel filtration. The degradation and absorption rate constants of insulin at the subcutaneous injection site were estimated according to a one-compartment model. The degradation rate constant of insulin in the presence of collagen at the injection site was less than half of the control rate. The inhibition was confirmed by increases in the immunoreactive insulin plasma levels and the hypoglycemic effect in rats and healthy volunteers. We postulate that collagen prevents insulin from being degraded by inhibiting proteolytic enzymes, mainly collagenase-like peptidase, in subcutaneous tissue

  5. Application of simple fed-batch technique to high-level secretory production of insulin precursor using Pichia pastoris with subsequent purification and conversion to human insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The prevalence of diabetes is predicted to rise significantly in the coming decades. A recent analysis projects that by the year 2030 there will be ~366 million diabetics around the world, leading to an increased demand for inexpensive insulin to make this life-saving drug also affordable for resource poor countries. Results A synthetic insulin precursor (IP)-encoding gene, codon-optimized for expression in P. pastoris, was cloned in frame with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor secretory signal and integrated into the genome of P. pastoris strain X-33. The strain was grown to high-cell density in a batch procedure using a defined medium with low salt and high glycerol concentrations. Following batch growth, production of IP was carried out at methanol concentrations of 2 g L-1, which were kept constant throughout the remaining production phase. This robust feeding strategy led to the secretion of ~3 gram IP per liter of culture broth (corresponding to almost 4 gram IP per liter of cell-free culture supernatant). Using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) as a novel approach for IP purification, 95% of the secreted product was recovered with a purity of 96% from the clarified culture supernatant. Finally, the purified IP was trypsin digested, transpeptidated, deprotected and further purified leading to ~1.5 g of 99% pure recombinant human insulin per liter of culture broth. Conclusions A simple two-phase cultivation process composed of a glycerol batch and a constant methanol fed-batch phase recently developed for the intracellular production of the Hepatitis B surface antigen was adapted to secretory IP production. Compared to the highest previously reported value, this approach resulted in an ~2 fold enhancement of IP production using Pichia based expression systems, thus significantly increasing the efficiency of insulin manufacture. PMID:20462406

  6. Application of simple fed-batch technique to high-level secretory production of insulin precursor using Pichia pastoris with subsequent purification and conversion to human insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chugh Dipti

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of diabetes is predicted to rise significantly in the coming decades. A recent analysis projects that by the year 2030 there will be ~366 million diabetics around the world, leading to an increased demand for inexpensive insulin to make this life-saving drug also affordable for resource poor countries. Results A synthetic insulin precursor (IP-encoding gene, codon-optimized for expression in P. pastoris, was cloned in frame with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor secretory signal and integrated into the genome of P. pastoris strain X-33. The strain was grown to high-cell density in a batch procedure using a defined medium with low salt and high glycerol concentrations. Following batch growth, production of IP was carried out at methanol concentrations of 2 g L-1, which were kept constant throughout the remaining production phase. This robust feeding strategy led to the secretion of ~3 gram IP per liter of culture broth (corresponding to almost 4 gram IP per liter of cell-free culture supernatant. Using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC as a novel approach for IP purification, 95% of the secreted product was recovered with a purity of 96% from the clarified culture supernatant. Finally, the purified IP was trypsin digested, transpeptidated, deprotected and further purified leading to ~1.5 g of 99% pure recombinant human insulin per liter of culture broth. Conclusions A simple two-phase cultivation process composed of a glycerol batch and a constant methanol fed-batch phase recently developed for the intracellular production of the Hepatitis B surface antigen was adapted to secretory IP production. Compared to the highest previously reported value, this approach resulted in an ~2 fold enhancement of IP production using Pichia based expression systems, thus significantly increasing the efficiency of insulin manufacture.

  7. Stimulation tests of human growth hormone secretion by insulin, lysine vasopressin, pyrogen and glucagon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogawa,Norio

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available Firstly, comparisons have been made of the secretion of human growth hormone (HGH that was induced by insulin, lysine vasopressin and pyrogen injections in order to study whether these substances can be utilized as a rapid test of HGH secretion. In insulin test, a fall of the fasting blood glucose level by 28.6% or more seemed to be sufficient to provoke adequate HGH elevation, and 9.4 ng/ml or higher HGH increment was recognized as being normal, because lysine vasopressin and pyrogen produce varying degrees of side-effects and are less specific and unpredictable in the release of HGH. Secondly, the pharmacologic effects and mechanism of action of exogenous glucagon upon the HGH secretion were studied. In normal subjects after one mg sc glucagon, there was a mean peak blood glucose level of 142. 4±3.l mg/lOO ml at 30 min, HGH levels reached a mean peak level of 22. 6±4. 8 ng/ml at 150 min, and no false negative response was noted. In patients with hypopituitarism, there was no positive response in plasma HGH levels after the sc glucagon. The present study revealed that the rise and subsequent fall of blood glucose are not the sole mechanism responsible for the effct of glucagon on HGH secretion, and that the HGH secretion in response to the sc glucagon was not triggered by cathecholamine via the stimulation of the adrenal medulla.

  8. The human insulin receptor mRNA contains a functional internal ribosome entry segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggs, Keith A.; Cobbold, Laura C.; Ridley, Simon H.; Coldwell, Mark; Bottley, Andrew; Bushell, Martin; Willis, Anne E.; Siddle, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA translation is an important mechanism determining the level of expression of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Translation is most commonly initiated by cap-dependent scanning, but many eukaryotic mRNAs contain internal ribosome entry segments (IRESs), providing an alternative means of initiation capable of independent regulation. Here, we show by using dicistronic luciferase reporter vectors that the 5′-UTR of the mRNA encoding human insulin receptor (hIR) contains a functional IRES. RNAi-mediated knockdown showed that the protein PTB was required for maximum IRES activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that PTB1, PTB2 and nPTB, but not unr or PTB4, bound to hIR mRNA, and deletion mapping implicated a CCU motif 448 nt upstream of the initiator AUG in PTB binding. The IR-IRES was functional in a number of cell lines, and most active in cells of neuronal origin, as assessed by luciferase reporter assays. The IRES was more active in confluent than sub-confluent cells, but activity did not change during differentiation of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts to adipocytes. IRES activity was stimulated by insulin in sub-confluent cells. The IRES may function to maintain expression of IR protein in tissues such as the brain where mRNA translation by cap-dependent scanning is less effective. PMID:19654240

  9. 持续皮下胰岛素输注在人胰岛素过敏患者脱敏治疗中的应用%Application of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in desensitization for allergy to recombinant human insulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李乃适; 赵维纲; 阳洪波; 李文慧; 邹晓玲; 潘慧; 王良录; 向红丁

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the values of continuous subcutaneous insulin/rapid insulin analoguc infusion in desensitization for allergy to recombinant human insulin. Methods Two patients allergic to recombinant human insulin received desensitization therapy by continuous subcutaneous insulin lispro infusion. The diluted insulin lispro solution was pumped with initial basal rate of O. O1 U/h, and the basal rate and insulin lispro concentration increased gradually until the insulin dosage for clinical treatment was reached. After that, continuous subcutaneous insulin lispro infusion was replaced by regimen of insulin lispro subcutaneous injection plus oral hypoglycemic agents. Results Local wheals were not observed in both two patients during continuous subcutaneous insulin lispro infusion or during bolus subcutaneous injection of insulin lispro after desensitization. Conclusion The desensitization therapy by continuous subcutaneous insulin/rapid insulin analogue infusion can be applied for allergy to recombinant human insulin.%目的 评价持续皮下胰岛素输注法在人胰岛素过敏患者脱敏治疗中的应用价值.方法 对2例人胰岛素过敏患者采用赖脯胰岛素持续皮下泵入治疗,以0.01 U/h稀释赖脯胰岛素溶液为起始基础率,逐步增加输注速率和浓度直至临床所需剂量,在此基础上调整治疗方案为3餐前皮下注射赖脯胰岛素联合口服药物治疗.结果 2例患者在持续皮下赖脯胰岛素输注治疗的起始及加量过程中均未出现皮肤瘙痒症状,注射局部亦无风团出现;改用餐前皮下赖脯胰岛素注射联合口服药治疗后亦无上述症状出现.结论 持续皮下输注胰岛素或速效胰岛素类似物可用于人胰岛素过敏患者的脱敏治疗.

  10. Human skeletal muscle ceramide content is not a major factor in muscle insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbro, M; Baranowski, M; Skov-Jensen, C;

    2008-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In skeletal muscle, ceramides may be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance through an attenuation of insulin signalling. This study investigated total skeletal muscle ceramide fatty acid content in participants exhibiting a wide range of insulin sensitivities. METHODS...

  11. Human ketone body production and utilization studied using tracer techniques: Regulation by free fatty acids, insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketone body concentrations fluctuate markedly during physiological and pathological conditions. Tracer techniques have been developed in recent years to study production, utilization, and the metabolic clearance rate of ketone bodies. This review describes data on the roles of insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones in the regulation of ketone body kinetics. The data indicate that insulin lowers ketone body concentrations by three independent mechanisms: first, it inhibits lipolysis, and thus lowers free fatty acid availability for ketogenesis; second, it restrains ketone body production within the liver; third, it enhances peripheral ketone body utilization. To assess these effects in humans in vivo, experimental models were developed to study insulin effects with controlled concentrations of free fatty acids, insulin, glucagon, and ketone bodies. Presently available data also support an important role of catecholamines in increasing ketone body concentrations. Evidence was presented that norepinephrine increases ketogenesis not only by stimulating lipolysis, and thus releasing free fatty acids, but also by increasing intrahepatic ketogenesis. Thyroid hormone availability was associated with lipolysis and ketogenesis. Ketone body concentrations after an overnight fast were only modestly elevated in hyperthyroidism resulting from increased peripheral ketone body clearance. There was a significant correlation between serum triiodothyronine levels and the ketone body metabolic clearance rate. Thus, ketone body homeostasis in human subjects resulted from the interaction of hormones such as insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones regulating lipolysis, intrahepatic ketogenesis, and peripheral ketone body utilization. 58 references

  12. High-affinity insulin binding to an atypical insulin-like growth factor-I receptor in human breast cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Milazzo, G.; Yip, C. C.; Maddux, B A; Vigneri, R; Goldfine, I D

    1992-01-01

    We studied the nature of insulin receptor binding in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In both intact cells and solubilized receptor preparations, high-affinity insulin binding was seen. However, unlabeled insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) was five-fold more potent in inhibiting 125I-insulin binding than insulin itself. With monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor, 30% of 125I-insulin binding was inhibited. In contrast when alpha-IR3, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes typical IGF-I rece...

  13. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 delays replicative senescence of human fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micutkova, Lucia; Diener, Thomas; Li, Chen;

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence can be induced by a variety of mechanisms, and recent data suggest a key role for cytokine networks to maintain the senescent state. Here, we have used a proteomic LC-MS/MS approach to identify new extracellular regulators of senescence in human fibroblasts. We identified 26...... extracellular proteins with significantly different abundance in conditioned media from young and senescent fibroblasts. Among these was insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 (IGFBP-6), which was chosen for further analysis. When IGFBP-6 gene expression was downregulated, cell proliferation was inhibited...... and apoptotic cell death was increased. Furthermore, downregulation of IGFBP-6 led to premature entry into cellular senescence. Since IGFBP-6 overexpression increased cellular lifespan, the data suggest that IGFBP-6, in contrast to other IGF binding proteins, is a negative regulator of cellular...

  14. Crystal structure of human insulin-regulated aminopeptidase with specificity for cyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Stefan J; Ascher, David B; Hancock, Nancy C; Holien, Jessica K; Michell, Belinda J; Chai, Siew Yeen; Morton, Craig J; Parker, Michael W

    2015-02-01

    Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP or oxytocinase) is a membrane-bound zinc-metallopeptidase that cleaves neuroactive peptides in the brain and produces memory enhancing effects when inhibited. We have determined the crystal structure of human IRAP revealing a closed, four domain arrangement with a large, mostly buried cavity abutting the active site. The structure reveals that the GAMEN exopeptidase loop adopts a very different conformation from other aminopeptidases, thus explaining IRAP's unique specificity for cyclic peptides such as oxytocin and vasopressin. Computational docking of a series of IRAP-specific cognitive enhancers into the crystal structure provides a molecular basis for their structure-activity relationships and demonstrates that the structure will be a powerful tool in the development of new classes of cognitive enhancers for treating a variety of memory disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25408552

  15. Direct radioimmunoassay of proinsulin and insulin in human plasma by the chromatographic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific method for direct radioimmunoassay of IRP and IRI separately in human plasma has been described. The method is used for extraction of total insulin and separation of IRP from IRI by paper chromatography to be assayed separately. The separation of the two components is identified and confirmed by column chromatography, paper chromatography and ultraviolet spectral analysis in comparison with the standard compounds. 134 plasma samples of different cases were investigated for the determination of IRI, IRP and IRT. Out of these 39 were normals, 16 normal obes, 21 juvinil diabetes, 18 overt adult diabetes, 10 recent adult diabetes, 12 hypothyroidism and 18 bilharzial hepatosplenomegaly. They were used to evaluate the test levels in comparison with blood sugar concentration. (author)

  16. Preparation of Tyr-C-peptide from genetically altered human insulin presursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huaiyu Sun; Jianguo Tang; Meihao Hu [Peking Univ., Beijing (China)

    1995-12-01

    C-peptide radiommunoassay (C-peptide RIA) is widely used in determination of pancreatic B-cell secretion activity. {sup 125}I labeled Tyr-C-peptide is indispensable in C-peptide RIA kit. Herein we discuss a way of obtaining recombinant Tyr-C-peptide. Arg32Tyr human proinsulin mutant (R32Y-proinsulin) gene was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Purified R32Y-proinsulin was converted to insulin and Tyr-C-peptide by trypsin and carboxypeptidase B codigestion. Tyr-C-peptide was isolated through reverse-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) and identified by C-peptide RIA and amino acid analysis. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Crystal structure of human insulin-regulated aminopeptidase with specificity for cyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Stefan J; Ascher, David B; Hancock, Nancy C; Holien, Jessica K; Michell, Belinda J; Chai, Siew Yeen; Morton, Craig J; Parker, Michael W

    2015-02-01

    Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP or oxytocinase) is a membrane-bound zinc-metallopeptidase that cleaves neuroactive peptides in the brain and produces memory enhancing effects when inhibited. We have determined the crystal structure of human IRAP revealing a closed, four domain arrangement with a large, mostly buried cavity abutting the active site. The structure reveals that the GAMEN exopeptidase loop adopts a very different conformation from other aminopeptidases, thus explaining IRAP's unique specificity for cyclic peptides such as oxytocin and vasopressin. Computational docking of a series of IRAP-specific cognitive enhancers into the crystal structure provides a molecular basis for their structure-activity relationships and demonstrates that the structure will be a powerful tool in the development of new classes of cognitive enhancers for treating a variety of memory disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor I enhances collagen synthesis in engineered human tendon tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herchenhan, Andreas; Bayer, Monika L.; Eliasson, Pernilla;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Isolated human tendon cells form 3D tendon constructs that demonstrate collagen fibrillogenesis and feature structural similarities to tendon when cultured under tensile load. The exact role of circulating growth factors for collagen formation in tendon is sparsely examined. We...... investigated the influence of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on tendon construct formation in 3D cell culture. DESIGN: Tendon constructs were grown in 0.5 or 10% FBS with or without IGF-I (250 mg/ml) supplementation. Collagen content (fluorometric), mRNA levels (PCR) and fibril diameter (transmission...... of fibril diameter (day 14), collagen content (at days 21 and 28) and mRNA expression for collagen, tenomodulin and scleraxis. CONCLUSION: IGF-I supplementation promotes early onset of tensile load induced collagen formation and tendon structural arrangement, whereas the FBS concentration routinely used...

  19. Adsorption of human insulin on single-crystal gold surfaces investigated by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy and electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welinder, Anna Christina; Zhang, Jingdong; Steensgaard, D.B.;

    2010-01-01

    We have explored the adsorption of zinc-free human insulin on the three low-index single-crystalline Au(111)-, Au(100)- and Au(110)-surfaces in aqueous buffer (KH2PO4, pH 5) by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunnelling microscopy (in situ STM) at single-molecule resolution and linear s...

  20. epi-Fluorescence imaging at the air-water interface of fibrillization of bovine serum albumin and human insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, Kristen; Sacks, Stuart; Li, Shanghao; Leblanc, Roger M

    2014-08-18

    Protein fibrillization is associated with many devastating neurodegenerative diseases. This process has been studied using spectroscopic and microscopic methods. In this study, epi-fluorescence at the air-water interface was developed as an innovative technique for observing fibrillization of bovine serum albumin and human insulin. PMID:24976597

  1. Long-term tolerability of inhaled human insulin (Exubera) in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnett, A H; Lange, P; Dreyer, M;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Inhaled human insulin (Exubera; EXU) has shown encouraging tolerability in short-term trials. We evaluated the safety profile of EXU after long-term exposure. DESIGN: In two, open-label, 2-year studies patients poorly controlled on a sulphonylurea were randomised to adjunctive EXU or...

  2. Lipodystrophy in human immunodeficiency virus patients impairs insulin action and induces defects in beta-cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ulrik B;

    2003-01-01

    The pathophysiology of insulin resistance in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) is not fully clarified. We investigated 18 men with HALS and 18 HIV-positive males without lipodystrophy (control subjects). Duration and modality of antiretroviral therapy were...

  3. Human Skeletal Muscle Disuse Atrophy: Effects on Muscle Protein Synthesis, Breakdown, and Insulin Resistance-A Qualitative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudrappa, Supreeth S; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Greenhaff, Paul L; Smith, Kenneth; Idris, Iskandar; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The ever increasing burden of an aging population and pandemic of metabolic syndrome worldwide demands further understanding of the modifiable risk factors in reducing disability and morbidity associated with these conditions. Disuse skeletal muscle atrophy (sometimes referred to as "simple" atrophy) and insulin resistance are "non-pathological" events resulting from sedentary behavior and periods of enforced immobilization e.g., due to fractures or elective orthopedic surgery. Yet, the processes and drivers regulating disuse atrophy and insulin resistance and the associated molecular events remain unclear-especially in humans. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of relationships between muscle protein turnover, insulin resistance and muscle atrophy during disuse, principally in humans. Immobilization lowers fasted state muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and induces fed-state "anabolic resistance." While a lack of dynamic measurements of muscle protein breakdown (MPB) precludes defining a definitive role for MPB in disuse atrophy, some proteolytic "marker" studies (e.g., MPB genes) suggest a potential early elevation. Immobilization also induces muscle insulin resistance (IR). Moreover, the trajectory of muscle atrophy appears to be accelerated in persistent IR states (e.g., Type II diabetes), suggesting IR may contribute to muscle disuse atrophy under these conditions. Nonetheless, the role of differences in insulin sensitivity across distinct muscle groups and its effects on rates of atrophy remains unclear. Multifaceted time-course studies into the collective role of insulin resistance and muscle protein turnover in the setting of disuse muscle atrophy, in humans, are needed to facilitate the development of appropriate countermeasures and efficacious rehabilitation protocols. PMID:27610086

  4. Human Skeletal Muscle Disuse Atrophy: Effects on Muscle Protein Synthesis, Breakdown, and Insulin Resistance—A Qualitative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudrappa, Supreeth S.; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Greenhaff, Paul L.; Smith, Kenneth; Idris, Iskandar; Atherton, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    The ever increasing burden of an aging population and pandemic of metabolic syndrome worldwide demands further understanding of the modifiable risk factors in reducing disability and morbidity associated with these conditions. Disuse skeletal muscle atrophy (sometimes referred to as “simple” atrophy) and insulin resistance are “non-pathological” events resulting from sedentary behavior and periods of enforced immobilization e.g., due to fractures or elective orthopedic surgery. Yet, the processes and drivers regulating disuse atrophy and insulin resistance and the associated molecular events remain unclear—especially in humans. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of relationships between muscle protein turnover, insulin resistance and muscle atrophy during disuse, principally in humans. Immobilization lowers fasted state muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and induces fed-state “anabolic resistance.” While a lack of dynamic measurements of muscle protein breakdown (MPB) precludes defining a definitive role for MPB in disuse atrophy, some proteolytic “marker” studies (e.g., MPB genes) suggest a potential early elevation. Immobilization also induces muscle insulin resistance (IR). Moreover, the trajectory of muscle atrophy appears to be accelerated in persistent IR states (e.g., Type II diabetes), suggesting IR may contribute to muscle disuse atrophy under these conditions. Nonetheless, the role of differences in insulin sensitivity across distinct muscle groups and its effects on rates of atrophy remains unclear. Multifaceted time-course studies into the collective role of insulin resistance and muscle protein turnover in the setting of disuse muscle atrophy, in humans, are needed to facilitate the development of appropriate countermeasures and efficacious rehabilitation protocols.

  5. Reduced malonyl-CoA content in recovery from exercise correlates with improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig, Christian; Roepstorff, Carsten; Brandt, Nina;

    2009-01-01

    to be compromised, although to a minor extent, by the Fat diet. Collectively, this study indicates that reduced muscle MCoA content in recovery from exercise may be part of the adaptive response leading to improved insulin action on glucose uptake after exercise in human muscle.......This study evaluated whether improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in recovery from acute exercise coincides with reduced malonyl-CoA (MCoA) content in human muscle. Furthermore, we investigated whether a high-fat diet [65 energy-% (Fat)] would alter the content of MCoA and insulin action...... uptake. Four days of Fat diet resulted in an increased content of intramyocellular triacylglycerol (Pbody insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. However, at the muscular level proximal insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake appeared...

  6. Functional Evaluation of the Reusable JuniorSTAR® Half-Unit Insulin Pen

    OpenAIRE

    Klonoff, David; Nayberg, Irina; Rabbone, Ivana; Domenger, Catherine; Stauder, Udo; Oualali, Hamid; Danne, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background: The functional performance of the JuniorSTAR® (Sanofi, Paris, France) half-unit insulin pen was evaluated through a series of specific objective tests to assess the dose accuracy, pen weight, injection force, and dialing torque. Method: Pens (n = 60) were tested under standard atmospheric conditions with 3 different types of insulins manufactured by Sanofi (insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, and biphasic insulin isophane). The dose accuracy was tested according to the ISO 11608-...

  7. Insulin receptor isoform A and insulin-like growth factor II as additional treatment targets in human osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avnet, Sofia; Sciacca, Laura; Salerno, Manuela; Gancitano, Giovanni; Cassarino, Maria Francesca; Longhi, Alessandra; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Carboni, Joan M; Gottardis, Marco; Giunti, Armando; Pollak, Michael; Vigneri, Riccardo; Baldini, Nicola

    2009-03-15

    Despite the frequent presence of an insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGFIR)-mediated autocrine loop in osteosarcoma (OS), interfering with this target was only moderately effective in preclinical studies. Here, we considered other members of the IGF system that might be involved in the molecular pathology of OS. We found that, among 45 patients with OS, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 serum levels were significantly lower, and IGF-II serum levels significantly higher, than healthy controls. Increased IGF-II values were associated with a decreased disease-free survival. After tumor removal, both IGF-I and IGF-II levels returned to normal values. In 23 of 45 patients, we obtained tissue specimens and found that all expressed high mRNA level of IGF-II and >IGF-I. Also, isoform A of the insulin receptor (IR-A) was expressed at high level in addition to IGFIR and IR-A/IGFIR hybrids receptors (HR(A)). These receptors were also expressed in OS cell lines, and simultaneous impairment of IGFIR, IR, and Hybrid-Rs by monoclonal antibodies, siRNA, or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor BMS-536924, which blocks both IGFIR and IR, was more effective than selective anti-IGFIR strategies. Also, anti-IGF-II-siRNA treatment in low-serum conditions significantly inhibited MG-63 OS cells that have an autocrine circuit for IGF-II. In summary, IGF-II rather than IGF-I is the predominant growth factor produced by OS cells, and three different receptors (IR-A, HR(A), and IGFIR) act complementarily for an IGF-II-mediated constitutive autocrine loop, in addition to the previously shown IGFIR/IGF-I circuit. Cotargeting IGFIR and IR-A is more effective than targeting IGF-IR alone in inhibiting OS growth. PMID:19258511

  8. Effect of insulin on human skeletal muscle mitochondrial ATP production, protein synthesis, and mRNA transcripts

    OpenAIRE

    Stump, Craig S.; Short, Kevin R.; Bigelow, Maureen L.; Schimke, Jill M.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondria are the primary site of skeletal muscle fuel metabolism and ATP production. Although insulin is a major regulator of fuel metabolism, its effect on mitochondrial ATP production is not known. Here we report increases in vastus lateralis muscle mitochondrial ATP production capacity (32–42%) in healthy humans (P < 0.01) i.v. infused with insulin (1.5 milliunits/kg of fat-free mass per min) while clamping glucose, amino acids, glucagon, and growth hormone. Increased ATP product...

  9. Insulin-like growth factors decrease oxygen-regulated erythropoietin production by human hepatoma cells (Hep G2)

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, H; Baier, W.; Ratcliffe, P.; Eckardt, K.; Zapf, J.; Kurtz, Armin; Bauer, C

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and insulin on erythropoietin (EPO) production by human hepatoma cells (Hep G2). Compared with normoxia (20% O2), EPO production by Hep G2 cells during a 72-h incubation was stimulated fivefold by exposure to low oxygen tension (1% O2) and nearly threefold by exposure to cobalt chloride (100 microM). IGF-I caused a concentration-dependent attenuation of EPO formation under normoxic conditions and inhibited (maximally 50%) EPO produ...

  10. Lipodystrophy in human immunodeficiency virus patients impairs insulin action and induces defects in beta-cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ulrik B;

    2003-01-01

    The pathophysiology of insulin resistance in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) is not fully clarified. We investigated 18 men with HALS and 18 HIV-positive males without lipodystrophy (control subjects). Duration and modality of antiretroviral therapy wer...... =.006), whereas levels of basal and insulin-stimulated oxidative glucose metabolism (OGM) (2.4 v 2.3, P =.55, and 3.3 v 4.0, P =.064, respectively) were not significantly different between groups. Despite comparable total fat masses, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans showed...

  11. Palmitate-induced inflammatory pathways in human adipose microvascular endothelial cells promote monocyte adhesion and impair insulin transcytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Nicolas J; Azizi, Paymon M; Li, Yujin E; Liu, Jun; Wang, Changsen; Chan, Kenny L; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Bazinet, Richard P; Heit, Bryan; Bilan, Philip J; Lee, Warren L; Klip, Amira

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is associated with inflammation and immune cell recruitment to adipose tissue, muscle and intima of atherosclerotic blood vessels. Obesity and hyperlipidemia are also associated with tissue insulin resistance and can compromise insulin delivery to muscle. The muscle/fat microvascular endothelium mediates insulin delivery and facilitates monocyte transmigration, yet its contribution to the consequences of hyperlipidemia is poorly understood. Using primary endothelial cells from human adipose tissue microvasculature (HAMEC), we investigated the effects of physiological levels of fatty acids on endothelial inflammation and function. Expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules was measured by RT-qPCR. Signaling pathways were evaluated by pharmacological manipulation and immunoblotting. Surface expression of adhesion molecules was determined by immunohistochemistry. THP1 monocyte interaction with HAMEC was measured by cell adhesion and migration across transwells. Insulin transcytosis was measured by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Palmitate, but not palmitoleate, elevated the expression of IL-6, IL-8, TLR2 (Toll-like receptor 2), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). HAMEC had markedly low fatty acid uptake and oxidation, and CD36 inhibition did not reverse the palmitate-induced expression of adhesion molecules, suggesting that inflammation did not arise from palmitate uptake/metabolism. Instead, inhibition of TLR4 to NF-κB signaling blunted palmitate-induced ICAM-1 expression. Importantly, palmitate-induced surface expression of ICAM-1 promoted monocyte binding and transmigration. Conversely, palmitate reduced insulin transcytosis, an effect reversed by TLR4 inhibition. In summary, palmitate activates inflammatory pathways in primary microvascular endothelial cells, impairing insulin transport and increasing monocyte transmigration. This behavior may contribute in vivo to reduced tissue insulin action and enhanced tissue

  12. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-μmol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 μmol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  13. Biphasic calcium phosphate in periapical surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Suneelkumar, Chinni; Datta, Krithika; Manali R Srinivasan; Kumar, Sampath T

    2008-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics like hydroxyapatite and β -tricalcium phosphate (β -TCP) possess mineral composition that closely resembles that of the bone. They can be good bone substitutes due to their excellent biocompatibility. Biphasic calcium phosphate is a bone substitute which is a mixture of hydroxyapatite and β -tricalcium phosphate in fixed ratios. Studies have demonstrated the osteoconductive potential of this composition. This paper highlights the clinical use of biphasic calcium pho...

  14. Engineering of a Novel Simplified Human Insulin-Like Peptide 5 Agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Nitin A; Hughes, Richard A; Rosengren, K Johan; Kocan, Martina; Ang, Sheng Yu; Tailhades, Julien; Separovic, Frances; Summers, Roger J; Grosse, Johannes; Wade, John D; Bathgate, Ross A D; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter

    2016-03-10

    Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) has recently been discovered as only the second orexigenic gut hormone after ghrelin. As we have previously reported, INSL5 is extremely difficult to assemble and oxidize into its two-chain three-disulfide structure. The focus of this study was to generate structure-activity relationships (SARs) of INSL5 and use it to develop a potent and simpler INSL5 mimetic with RXFP4 agonist activity. A series of human and mouse INSL5 (hINSL5/mINSL5) analogues were designed and chemically synthesized, resulting in a chimeric INSL5 analogue exhibiting more than 10-fold higher potency (0.35 nM) at human RXFP4 compared with native hINSL5 (4.57 nM). The SAR study also identified a key residue (K(A15)) in the A-chain of mINSL5 that contributes to improved RXFP4 affinity and potency of mINSL5 compared with hINSL5. This knowledge ultimately led us to engineer a minimized hINSL5 mimetic agonist that retains native hINSL5-like RXFP4 affinity and potency at human RXFP4. This minimized analogue was synthesized in 17.5-fold higher yield and in less time compared with hINSL5. PMID:26824523

  15. Engineering of a Novel Simplified Human Insulin-Like Peptide 5 Agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Nitin A; Hughes, Richard A; Rosengren, K Johan; Kocan, Martina; Ang, Sheng Yu; Tailhades, Julien; Separovic, Frances; Summers, Roger J; Grosse, Johannes; Wade, John D; Bathgate, Ross A D; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter

    2016-03-10

    Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) has recently been discovered as only the second orexigenic gut hormone after ghrelin. As we have previously reported, INSL5 is extremely difficult to assemble and oxidize into its two-chain three-disulfide structure. The focus of this study was to generate structure-activity relationships (SARs) of INSL5 and use it to develop a potent and simpler INSL5 mimetic with RXFP4 agonist activity. A series of human and mouse INSL5 (hINSL5/mINSL5) analogues were designed and chemically synthesized, resulting in a chimeric INSL5 analogue exhibiting more than 10-fold higher potency (0.35 nM) at human RXFP4 compared with native hINSL5 (4.57 nM). The SAR study also identified a key residue (K(A15)) in the A-chain of mINSL5 that contributes to improved RXFP4 affinity and potency of mINSL5 compared with hINSL5. This knowledge ultimately led us to engineer a minimized hINSL5 mimetic agonist that retains native hINSL5-like RXFP4 affinity and potency at human RXFP4. This minimized analogue was synthesized in 17.5-fold higher yield and in less time compared with hINSL5.

  16. Lifelong Physical Activity Prevents Aging-Associated Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Myotubes via Increased Glucose Transporter Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunprajun, Tipwadee; Henriksen, Tora Ida; Scheele, Camilla;

    2013-01-01

    derived from human skeletal muscle satellite cells. Satellite cells were obtained from young (22 yrs) normally active or middle-aged (56.6 yrs) individuals who were either lifelong sedentary or lifelong active. Both middle-aged sedentary and middle-aged active myotubes had increased p21 and myosin heavy...... chain protein expression. Interestingly MHCIIa was increased only in myotubes from middle-aged active individuals. Middle-aged sedentary cells had intact insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation however, the same cell showed ablated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma...... membrane. On the other hand, middle-aged active cells retained both insulin-stimulated increases in glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. Middle-aged active cells also had significantly higher mRNA expression of GLUT1 and GLUT4 compared to middle-aged sedentary cells...

  17. Protein kinase C is differentially regulated by thrombin, insulin, and epidermal growth factor in human mammary tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, M.L.; Tellez-Inon, M.T. (Instituto de Ingenieria Genetica y Biologia Molecular, Buenos Aires (Argentina)); Medrano, E.E.; Cafferatta, E.G.A. (Instituto de Investigaciones Bioquimicas Fundacion Campomar, Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    1988-03-01

    The exposure of serum-deprived mammary tumor cells MCF-7 and T-47D to insulin, thrombin, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) resulted in dramatic modifications in the activity and in the translocation capacity of protein kinase C from cytosol to membrane fractions. Insulin induces a 600% activation of the enzyme after 5 h of exposure to the hormone in MCF-7 cells; thrombin either activates (200% in MCF-7) or down-regulates (in T-47D), and EGF exerts only a moderate effect. Thus, the growth factors studied modulate differentially the protein kinase C activity in human mammary tumor cells. The physiological significance of the results obtained are discussed in terms of the growth response elicited by insulin, thrombin, and EGF.

  18. Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenberg, Eduardo Ekman; Alexandre, João Felipe Morel; Filev, Renato; Cravo, Andre Mascioli; Sato, João Ricardo; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Yonamine, Maurício; Waguespack, Marian; Lomnicka, Izabela; Barker, Steven A; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Ritual use of ayahuasca, an amazonian Amerindian medicine turned sacrament in syncretic religions in Brazil, is rapidly growing around the world. Because of this internationalization, a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action of the brew and the neural correlates of the modified states of consciousness it induces is important. Employing a combination of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings and quantification of ayahuasca's compounds and their metabolites in the systemic circulation we found ayahuasca to induce a biphasic effect in the brain. This effect was composed of reduced power in the alpha band (8-13 Hz) after 50 minutes from ingestion of the brew and increased slow- and fast-gamma power (30-50 and 50-100 Hz, respectively) between 75 and 125 minutes. Alpha power reductions were mostly located at left parieto-occipital cortex, slow-gamma power increase was observed at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal and right frontal cortices while fast-gamma increases were significant at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal, right frontal and right parieto-occipital cortices. These effects were significantly associated with circulating levels of ayahuasca's chemical compounds, mostly N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine and some of their metabolites. An interpretation based on a cognitive and emotional framework relevant to the ritual use of ayahuasca, as well as it's potential therapeutic effects is offered. PMID:26421727

  19. Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ekman Schenberg

    Full Text Available Ritual use of ayahuasca, an amazonian Amerindian medicine turned sacrament in syncretic religions in Brazil, is rapidly growing around the world. Because of this internationalization, a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action of the brew and the neural correlates of the modified states of consciousness it induces is important. Employing a combination of electroencephalogram (EEG recordings and quantification of ayahuasca's compounds and their metabolites in the systemic circulation we found ayahuasca to induce a biphasic effect in the brain. This effect was composed of reduced power in the alpha band (8-13 Hz after 50 minutes from ingestion of the brew and increased slow- and fast-gamma power (30-50 and 50-100 Hz, respectively between 75 and 125 minutes. Alpha power reductions were mostly located at left parieto-occipital cortex, slow-gamma power increase was observed at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal and right frontal cortices while fast-gamma increases were significant at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal, right frontal and right parieto-occipital cortices. These effects were significantly associated with circulating levels of ayahuasca's chemical compounds, mostly N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT, harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine and some of their metabolites. An interpretation based on a cognitive and emotional framework relevant to the ritual use of ayahuasca, as well as it's potential therapeutic effects is offered.

  20. Characterization of polyhormonal insulin-producing cells derived in vitro from human embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Bruin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs were used as a model system of human pancreas development to study characteristics of the polyhormonal cells that arise during fetal pancreas development. HESCs were differentiated into fetal-like pancreatic cells in vitro using a 33-day, 7-stage protocol. Cultures were ~90–95% PDX1-positive by day (d 11 and 70–75% NKX6.1-positive by d17. Polyhormonal cells were scattered at d17, but developed into islet-like clusters that expressed key transcription factors by d33. Human C-peptide and glucagon secretion were first detected at d17 and increased thereafter in parallel with INS and GCG transcript levels. HESC-derived cells were responsive to KCl and arginine, but not glucose in perifusion studies. Compared to adult human islets, hESC-derived cells expressed ~10-fold higher levels of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 mRNA, but similar levels of glucokinase (GCK. In situ hybridization confirmed the presence of GLUT1 transcript within endocrine cells. However, GLUT1 protein was excluded from this population and was instead observed predominantly in non-endocrine cells, whereas GCK was co-expressed in insulin-positive cells. In rubidium efflux assays, hESC-derived cells displayed mild potassium channel activity, but no responsiveness to glucose, metabolic inhibitors or glibenclamide. Western blotting experiments revealed that the higher molecular weight SUR1 band was absent in hESC-derived cells, suggesting a lack of functional KATP channels at the cell surface. In addition, KATP channel subunit transcript levels were not at a 1:1 ratio, as would be expected (SUR1 levels were ~5-fold lower than KIR6.2. Various ratios of SUR1:KIR6.2 plasmids were transfected into COSM6 cells and rubidium efflux was found to be particularly sensitive to a reduction in SUR1. These data suggest that an impaired ratio of SUR1:KIR6.2 may contribute to the observed KATP channel defects in hESC-derived islet endocrine cells, and along with