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Sample records for bipedal walking mechanism

  1. Evolution of central pattern generators for the control of a five-link planar bipedal walking mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Baydin, Atilim Gunes

    2008-01-01

    With the aim of producing a stable human-like bipedal gait, a five-link planar walking mechanism was coupled with a central pattern generator (CPG) network, consisting of units based on Matsuoka's half-center oscillator model. As a minimalistic approach to bipedal walking, this type of walking mechanism contains only four actuators (two in the hip joints and two in the knee joints), and is lacking feet and ankles. Firstly, the mechanism was designed and built as a physical simulation programmed from scratch, providing a platform for hand-tuned tests and the creation of a CPG controller by genetic algorithms (GA). The oscillatory characteristics of the CPG network together with its internal connection structure and the feedback pathways from the environment were subject to GA optimization. The approach proved successful and the results were then transferred to a hardware realization of the five-link walking mechanism, to test how well these perform under real-world dynamics. Results suggest that the biological...

  2. Modeling, simulation and optimization of bipedal walking

    CERN Document Server

    Berns, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    The model-based investigation of motions of anthropomorphic systems is an important interdisciplinary research topic involving specialists from many fields such as Robotics, Biomechanics, Physiology, Orthopedics, Psychology, Neurosciences, Sports, Computer Graphics and Applied Mathematics. This book presents a study of basic locomotion forms such as walking and running is of particular interest due to the high demand on dynamic coordination, actuator efficiency and balance control. Mathematical models and numerical simulation and optimization techniques are explained, in combination with experimental data, which can help to better understand the basic underlying mechanisms of these motions and to improve them. Example topics treated in this book are Modeling techniques for anthropomorphic bipedal walking systems Optimized walking motions for different objective functions Identification of objective functions from measurements Simulation and optimization approaches for humanoid robots Biologically inspired con...

  3. Theories of bipedal walking: an odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Christopher L

    2003-04-01

    In this paper six theories of bipedal walking, and the evidence in support of the theories, are reviewed. They include: evolution, minimising energy consumption, maturation in children, central pattern generators, linking control and effect, and robots on two legs. Specifically, the six theories posit that: (1) bipedalism is the fundamental evolutionary adaptation that sets hominids--and therefore humans--apart from other primates; (2) locomotion is the translation of the centre of gravity along a pathway requiring the least expenditure of energy; (3) when a young child takes its first few halting steps, his or her biomechanical strategy is to minimise the risk of falling; (4) a dedicated network of interneurons in the spinal cord generates the rhythm and cyclic pattern of electromyographic signals that give rise to bipedal gait; (5) bipedal locomotion is generated through global entrainment of the neural system on the one hand, and the musculoskeletal system plus environment on the other; and (6) powered dynamic gait in a bipedal robot can be realised only through a strategy which is based on stability and real-time feedback control. The published record suggests that each of the theories has some measure of support. However, it is important to note that there are other important theories of locomotion which have not been covered in this review. Despite such omissions, this odyssey has explored the wide spectrum of bipedal walking, from its origins through to the integration of the nervous, muscular and skeletal systems.

  4. Development of bipedal walking in humans and chimpanzees: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tasuku; Yaguramaki, Naoko

    2009-01-01

    Development of bipedal walking from the very early stage of walking was studied longitudinally in infant humans and chimpanzees. In contrast to adults, infants of neither species could walk steadily and rhythmically step by step. Short braking duration and small recovery of mechanical energy were demonstrated in infants of both species. The trunk was inclined forwards, the extension of lower limb joints was limited and the accelerating force was not strongly activated. Potential energy was not efficiently used in progression. Walking in adult chimpanzees still showed a forward-inclined trunk, short braking duration, small recovery of energy and large variance of parameters compared to the unique human adult bipedalism. The locomotor characteristics of presumed pre-bipedal ancestors are discussed.

  5. Theoretical analysis of the state of balance in bipedal walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmani, Flavio; Park, Edward J

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis based on classic mechanical principles of balance of forces in bipedal walking. Theories on the state of balance have been proposed in the area of humanoid robotics and although the laws of classical mechanics are equivalent to both humans and humanoid robots, the resulting motion obtained with these theories is unnatural when compared to normal human gait. Humanoid robots are commonly controlled using the zero moment point (ZMP) with the condition that the ZMP cannot exit the foot-support area. This condition is derived from a physical model in which the biped must always walk under dynamically balanced conditions, making the centre of pressure (CoP) and the ZMP always coincident. On the contrary, humans follow a different strategy characterized by a 'controlled fall' at the end of the swing phase. In this paper, we present a thorough theoretical analysis of the state of balance and show that the ZMP can exit the support area, and its location is representative of the imbalance state characterized by the separation between the ZMP and the CoP. Since humans exhibit this behavior, we also present proof-of-concept results of a single subject walking on an instrumented treadmill at different speeds (from slow 0.7 m/s to fast 2.0 m/s walking with increments of 0.1 m/s) with the motion recorded using an optical motion tracking system. In order to evaluate the experimental results of this model, the coefficient of determination (R2) is used to correlate the measured ground reaction forces and the resultant of inertial and gravitational forces (anteroposterior R² = 0.93, mediolateral R² = 0.89, and vertical R² = 0.86) indicating that there is a high correlation between the measurements. The results suggest that the subject exhibits a complete dynamically balanced gait during slow speeds while experiencing a controlled fall (end of swing phase) with faster speeds. This is quantified with the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD

  6. Using intelligent controller to enhance the walking stability of bipedal walking robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tsung-Che; Chang, Chia-Der

    2016-07-01

    This paper is to improve the stability issue of the bipedal walking robot. The study of robot's pivot joint constructs the driver system to control the implementation. First, a Proportion-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller is designed by which is used the concept of tuning parameter to achieve the stability of the system. Second, Fuzzy controller and tradition PID controller is used to maintain output. It improved original PID controller efficacy. Finally, Artificial Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) is utilized which is made the controller to achieve self-studying and modify the effect which is completed by the intelligent controller. It improved bipedal robot's stability control of realization. The result is verified that the walking stability of the bipedal walking robot in Matlab/Simulink. The intelligent controller has achieved the desired position of motor joint and the target stability performance.

  7. Three-dimensional kinematics of the pelvis and hind limbs in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and human bipedal walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Matthew C; Lee, Leng-Feng; Demes, Brigitte; Thompson, Nathan E; Larson, Susan G; Stern, Jack T; Umberger, Brian R

    2015-09-01

    The common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) is a facultative biped and our closest living relative. As such, the musculoskeletal anatomies of their pelvis and hind limbs have long provided a comparative context for studies of human and fossil hominin locomotion. Yet, how the chimpanzee pelvis and hind limb actually move during bipedal walking is still not well defined. Here, we describe the three-dimensional (3-D) kinematics of the pelvis, hip, knee and ankle during bipedal walking and compare those values to humans walking at the same dimensionless and dimensional velocities. The stride-to-stride and intraspecific variations in 3-D kinematics were calculated using the adjusted coefficient of multiple correlation. Our results indicate that humans walk with a more stable pelvis than chimpanzees, especially in tilt and rotation. Both species exhibit similar magnitudes of pelvis list, but with segment motion that is opposite in phasing. In the hind limb, chimpanzees walk with a more flexed and abducted limb posture, and substantially exceed humans in the magnitude of hip rotation during a stride. The average stride-to-stride variation in joint and segment motion was greater in chimpanzees than humans, while the intraspecific variation was similar on average. These results demonstrate substantial differences between human and chimpanzee bipedal walking, in both the sagittal and non-sagittal planes. These new 3-D kinematic data are fundamental to a comprehensive understanding of the mechanics, energetics and control of chimpanzee bipedalism.

  8. Analysis and Development of Walking Algorithm Kinematic Model for 5-Degree of Freedom Bipedal Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Wahyudi Setiono

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A design of walking diagram and the calculation of a bipedal robot have been developed. The bipedal robot was designed and constructed with several kinds of servo bracket for the legs, two feet and a hip. Each of the bipedal robot leg was 5-degrees of freedom, three pitches (hip joint, knee joint and ankle joint and two rolls (hip joint and ankle joint. The walking algorithm of this bipedal robot was based on the triangle formulation of cosine law to get the angle value at each joint. The hip height, height of the swinging leg and the step distance are derived based on linear equation. This paper discussed the kinematic model analysis and the development of the walking diagram of the bipedal robot. Kinematics equations were derived, the joint angles were simulated and coded into Arduino board to be executed to the robot.

  9. Modeling and analysis of passive dynamic bipedal walking with segmented feet and compliant joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Huang; Qi-Ning Wang; Yue Gao; Guang-Ming Xie

    2012-01-01

    Passive dynamic walking has been developed as a possible explanation for the efficiency of the human gait.This paper presents a passive dynamic walking model with segmented feet,which makes the bipedal walking gait more close to natural human-like gait.The proposed model extends the simplest walking model with the addition of flat feet and torsional spring based compliance on ankle joints and toe joints,to achieve stable walking on a slope driven by gravity.The push-off phase includes foot rotations around the toe joint and around the toe tip,which shows a great resemblance to human normal walking.This paper investigates the effects of the segmented foot structure on bipedal walking in simulations. The model achieves satisfactory walking results on even or uneven slopes.

  10. Modeling and analysis of passive dynamic bipedal walking with segmented feet and compliant joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Wang, Qi-Ning; Gao, Yue; Xie, Guang-Ming

    2012-10-01

    Passive dynamic walking has been developed as a possible explanation for the efficiency of the human gait. This paper presents a passive dynamic walking model with segmented feet, which makes the bipedal walking gait more close to natural human-like gait. The proposed model extends the simplest walking model with the addition of flat feet and torsional spring based compliance on ankle joints and toe joints, to achieve stable walking on a slope driven by gravity. The push-off phase includes foot rotations around the toe joint and around the toe tip, which shows a great resemblance to human normal walking. This paper investigates the effects of the segmented foot structure on bipedal walking in simulations. The model achieves satisfactory walking results on even or uneven slopes.

  11. Bipedal nanowalker by pure physical mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Juan; Hou, Ruizheng; Efremov, Artem; Liu, Ruchuan; van der Maarel, Johan RC; Wang, Zhisong

    2013-01-01

    Artificial nanowalkers are inspired by biomolecular counterparts from living cells, but remain far from comparable to the latter in design principles. The walkers reported to date mostly rely on chemical mechanisms to gain a direction; they all produce chemical wastes. Here we report a light-powered DNA bipedal walker based on a design principle derived from cellular walkers. The walker has two identical feet and the track has equal binding sites; yet the walker gains a direction by pure physical mechanisms that autonomously amplify an intra-site asymmetry into a ratchet effect. The nanowalker is free of any chemical waste. It has a distinct thermodynamic feature that it possesses the same equilibrium before and after operation, but generates a truly non-equilibrium distribution during operation. The demonstrated design principle exploits mechanical effects and is adaptable for use in other nanomachines.

  12. Study of Bipedal Robot Walking Motion in Low Gravity: Investigation and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiman Omer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Humanoid robots are expected to play a major role in the future of space and planetary exploration. Humanoid robot features could have many advantages, such as interacting with astronauts and the ability to perform human tasks. However, the challenge of developing such a robot is quite high due to many difficulties. One of the main difficulties is the difference in gravity. Most researchers in the field of bipedal locomotion have not paid much attention to the effect of gravity. Gravity is an important parameter in generating a bipedal locomotion trajectory. This research investigates the effect of gravity on bipedal walking motion. It focuses on low gravity, since most of the known planets and moons have lower gravity than earth. Further study is conducted on a full humanoid robot model walking subject to the moon’s gravity, and an approach for dealing with moon gravity is proposed in this paper.

  13. Simulation Studies of Bipedal Walking on the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Narukawa, Terumasa; Takahashi, Masaki; Hase, Kimitaka; Liu, Meigen; Mukai, Chiaki

    In order to walk upright on the Moon or Mars without falling, a specific walking strategy to account for altered gravitational conditions must be verified. We have therefore been studying changes in the kinematics of walking at different gravitational loads using a body weight suspension system. Our simulation consisted of three gravitational conditions: 1 g (Earth); 1/3 g (Mars); and 1/6 g (the Moon). Surface EMG recordings were taken from the leg muscles of subjects walking on a treadmill. Cadence, stance phase duration, and step length were calculated from the walking velocity and steps. Subsequent experiments revealed that muscle activity and the duration of the double support phase decreased as simulated gravity was reduced. These changes are apparently caused not only by the direct effects of unloading but also by kinematic adaptations to the same. It can be said that humans walk slowly with a shortened stride and elongated stance phase in order to adjust to low gravitational conditions. One major limitation of our study that may have affected walking stability was the fact that the suspension system was fixed to an immovable frame. We have begun further studies using a newer movable body weight suspension system to achieve more realistic simulations.

  14. Novel Control Algorithm for the Foot Placement of a Walking Bipedal Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanli Liu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel control algorithm for the foot placement of walking bipedal robots is proposed which can output the optimal step time and step location to obtain a desired walking gait from every feasible robot state. The step time and step location are determined by approximating the robot dynamics with the 3D linear inverted pendulum model and analytically solving the constraint equations. Intensive simulation studies are conducted to check the validity of the theoretical results. The results of this study show that the proposed control algorithm can get the system to a desired gait cycle from every feasible state within a finite number of steps.

  15. Dynamic Stability of Passive Bipedal Walking on Rough Terrain:A Preliminary Simulation Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parsa Nassiri Afshar; Lei Ren

    2012-01-01

    A simplified 2D passive dynamic model was simulated to walk down on a rough slope surface defined by deterministic profiles to investigate how the walking stability changes with increasing surface roughness.Our results show that the passive walker can walk on rough surfaces subject to surface roughness up to approximately 0.1% of its leg length.This indicates that bipedal walkers based on passive dynamics may possess some intrinsic stability to adapt to rough terrains although the maximum roughness they can tolerate is small.Orbital stability method was used to quantify the walking stability before the walker started to fall over.It was found that the average maximum Floquet multiplier increases with surface roughness in a non-linear form.Although the passive walker remained orbitally stable for all the simulation cases,the results suggest that the possibility of the bipedal model moving away from its limit cycle increases with the surface roughness if subjected to additional perturbations.The number of consecutive steps before falling was used to measure the walking stability after the passive walker started to fall over.The results show that the number of steps before falling decreases exponentially with the increase in surface roughness.When the roughness magnitude approached to 0.73% of the walker's leg length,it fell down to the ground as soon as it entered into the uneven terrain.It was also found that shifting the phase angle of the surface profile has apparent affect on the system stability.This is probably because point contact was used to simulate the heel strikes and the resulted variations in system states at heel strikes may have pronounced impact on the passive gaits,which have narrow basins of attraction.These results would provide insight into how the dynamic stability of passive bipedal walkers evolves with increasing surface roughness.

  16. Mechanisms for the acquisition of habitual bipedality: are there biomechanical reasons for the acquisition of upright bipedal posture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuschoft, Holger

    2004-05-01

    Morphology and biomechanics are linked by causal morphogenesis ('Wolff's law') and the interplay of mutations and selection (Darwin's 'survival of the fittest'). Thus shape-based selective pressures can be determined. In both cases we need to know which biomechanical factors lead to skeletal adaptation, and which ones exert selective pressures on body shape. Each bone must be able to sustain the greatest regularly occurring loads. Smaller loads are unlikely to lead to adaptation of morphology. The highest loads occur primarily in posture and locomotion, simply because of the effect of body weight (or its multiple). In the skull, however, it is biting and chewing that result in the greatest loads. Body shape adapted for an arboreal lifestyle also smooths the way towards bipedality. Hindlimb dominance, length of the limbs in relation to the axial skeleton, grasping hands and feet, mass distribution (especially of the limb segments), thoracic shape, rib curvatures, and the position of the centre of gravity are the adaptations to arboreality that also pre-adapt for bipedality. Five divergent locomotor/morphological types have evolved from this base: arm-swinging in gibbons, forelimb-dominated slow climbing in orangutans, quadrupedalism/climbing in the African apes, an unknown mix of climbing and bipedal walking in australopithecines, and the remarkably endurant bipedal walking of humans. All other apes are also facultative bipeds, but it is the biomechanical characteristics of bipedalism in orangutans, the most arboreal great ape, which is closest to that in humans. If not evolutionary accident, what selective factor can explain why two forms adopted bipedality? Most authors tend to connect bipedal locomotion with some aspect of progressively increasing distance between trees because of climatic changes. More precise factors, in accordance with biomechanical requirements, include stone-throwing, thermoregulation or wading in shallow water. Once bipedality has been

  17. Asymptotically Stable Walking of a Five-Link Underactuated 3D Bipedal Robot

    CERN Document Server

    Chevallereau, Christine; Shih, Ching-Long; 10.1109/TRO.2008.2010366

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents three feedback controllers that achieve an asymptotically stable, periodic, and fast walking gait for a 3D (spatial) bipedal robot consisting of a torso, two legs, and passive (unactuated) point feet. The contact between the robot and the walking surface is assumed to inhibit yaw rotation. The studied robot has 8 DOF in the single support phase and 6 actuators. The interest of studying robots with point feet is that the robot's natural dynamics must be explicitly taken into account to achieve balance while walking. We use an extension of the method of virtual constraints and hybrid zero dynamics, in order to simultaneously compute a periodic orbit and an autonomous feedback controller that realizes the orbit. This method allows the computations to be carried out on a 2-DOF subsystem of the 8-DOF robot model. The stability of the walking gait under closed-loop control is evaluated with the linearization of the restricted Poincar\\'e map of the hybrid zero dynamics. Three strategies are explo...

  18. Energetics of bipedal running. II. Limb design and running mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, T J; Chen, M S; Taylor, C R

    1998-10-01

    Compared with quadrupeds, bipedal runners of the same weight have longer legs, take longer steps and can presumably use slower, more economical muscle fibers. One might predict that bipedal running is less expensive, but it is not. We hypothesized that bipeds recruit a larger volume of muscle to support their weight, eliminating the potential economy of longer legs and slower steps. To test our hypothesis, we calculated the relative volume of muscle needed to support body weight over a stride in small dogs (Canis familiaris) and wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) of the same weight. First, we confirmed that turkeys and dogs use approximately the same amount of energy to run at the same speed, and found that turkeys take 1. 8-fold longer steps. Higher muscle forces and/or longer muscle fibers would require a greater volume of active muscle, since muscle volume is proportional to the product of force and fascicle length. We measured both mean fascicle length and mean mechanical advantage for limb extensor muscles. Turkeys generated approximately the same total muscle force to support their weight during running and used muscle fascicles that are on average 2.1 times as long as in dogs, thus requiring a 2.5-fold greater active muscle volume. The greater volume appears to offset the economy of slower rates of force generation, supporting our hypothesis and providing a simple explanation for why it costs the same to run on two and four legs.

  19. [A model of bipedal walking adaptable to an unpredictably dynamic environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Masafumi; Tomita, Nozomi; Makino, Yoshinari

    2010-11-01

    Modern science has been developed through concept of subject-object separation. That is, nature has been cordoned off from human beings and objectified. We have attempted to discover ideal world laws wherein we can consider nature as homogeneous. The real world, however, is by far more complicated than what natural sciences have so far been able to decipher. There are many problems that cannot be effectively addressed with the existing scientific technology. Because the real world is so unpredictable and dynamic, it is impossible to objectify it in advance and apply traditional methodology. This real world problem arises especially in information processing systems, that is, the recognition and the motion control systems coping with the real world. The current information systems can only handle explicit and complete information. Life is an intrinsic part of nature. To be both pliant and sturdy in a complex environment requires autonomy capable of creating the information needed to control the self. It forms the premise for the cognizance and control of life systems that exist in reality. To "live," a life system must independently forge a harmonious relationship with an unlimited environment. It requires that the life system be capable of creating the information necessary for self-control. It is this autonomy that clearly distinguishes the world of life systems from the physical world. Here, we will show an example of adaptive bipedal walking under an indefinite environment.

  20. Control strategy for energy-efficient bipedal walking with variable leg stiffness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L.C.; Stramigioli, S.; Carloni, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we propose a hybrid model for a bipedal walker with controlled variable leg stiffness, and a control strategy for stable gait control. The control reference is a passive gait of the limit-case bipedal spring-loaded inverted pendulum model with massless feet, ensuring that the gait is c

  1. Evaluating functional roles of phase resetting in generation of adaptive human bipedal walking with a physiologically based model of the spinal pattern generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Shinya; Ogihara, Naomichi; Funato, Tetsuro; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2010-05-01

    The central pattern generators (CPGs) in the spinal cord strongly contribute to locomotor behavior. To achieve adaptive locomotion, locomotor rhythm generated by the CPGs is suggested to be functionally modulated by phase resetting based on sensory afferent or perturbations. Although phase resetting has been investigated during fictive locomotion in cats, its functional roles in actual locomotion have not been clarified. Recently, simulation studies have been conducted to examine the roles of phase resetting during human bipedal walking, assuming that locomotion is generated based on prescribed kinematics and feedback control. However, such kinematically based modeling cannot be used to fully elucidate the mechanisms of adaptation. In this article we proposed a more physiologically based mathematical model of the neural system for locomotion and investigated the functional roles of phase resetting. We constructed a locomotor CPG model based on a two-layered hierarchical network model of the rhythm generator (RG) and pattern formation (PF) networks. The RG model produces rhythm information using phase oscillators and regulates it by phase resetting based on foot-contact information. The PF model creates feedforward command signals based on rhythm information, which consists of the combination of five rectangular pulses based on previous analyses of muscle synergy. Simulation results showed that our model establishes adaptive walking against perturbing forces and variations in the environment, with phase resetting playing important roles in increasing the robustness of responses, suggesting that this mechanism of regulation may contribute to the generation of adaptive human bipedal locomotion.

  2. Sensor data fusion for body state estimation in a bipedal robot and its feedback control application for stable walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Pei; Chen, Jing-Yi; Huang, Chun-Kai; Lu, Jau-Ching; Lin, Pei-Chun

    2015-02-27

    We report on a sensor data fusion algorithm via an extended Kalman filter for estimating the spatial motion of a bipedal robot. Through fusing the sensory information from joint encoders, a 6-axis inertial measurement unit and a 2-axis inclinometer, the robot's body state at a specific fixed position can be yielded. This position is also equal to the CoM when the robot is in the standing posture suggested by the detailed CAD model of the robot. In addition, this body state is further utilized to provide sensory information for feedback control on a bipedal robot with walking gait. The overall control strategy includes the proposed body state estimator as well as the damping controller, which regulates the body position state of the robot in real-time based on instant and historical position tracking errors. Moreover, a posture corrector for reducing unwanted torque during motion is addressed. The body state estimator and the feedback control structure are implemented in a child-size bipedal robot and the performance is experimentally evaluated.

  3. Sensor Data Fusion for Body State Estimation in a Bipedal Robot and Its Feedback Control Application for Stable Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Pei Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on a sensor data fusion algorithm via an extended Kalman filter for estimating the spatial motion of a bipedal robot. Through fusing the sensory information from joint encoders, a 6-axis inertial measurement unit and a 2-axis inclinometer, the robot’s body state at a specific fixed position can be yielded. This position is also equal to the CoM when the robot is in the standing posture suggested by the detailed CAD model of the robot. In addition, this body state is further utilized to provide sensory information for feedback control on a bipedal robot with walking gait. The overall control strategy includes the proposed body state estimator as well as the damping controller, which regulates the body position state of the robot in real-time based on instant and historical position tracking errors. Moreover, a posture corrector for reducing unwanted torque during motion is addressed. The body state estimator and the feedback control structure are implemented in a child-size bipedal robot and the performance is experimentally evaluated.

  4. Reactive and anticipatory control of posture and bipedal locomotion in a nonhuman primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Futoshi; Nakajima, Katsumi; Tachibana, Atsumichi; Takasu, Chijiko; Mori, Masahiro; Tsujimoto, Toru; Tsukada, Hideo; Mori, Shigemi

    2004-01-01

    Bipedal locomotion is a common daily activity. Despite its apparent simplicity, it is a complex set of movements that requires the integrated neural control of multiple body segments. We have recently shown that the juvenile Japanese monkey, M. fuscata, can be operant-trained to walk bipedally on moving treadmill. It can control the body axis and lower limb movements when confronted by a change in treadmill speed. M. fuscata can also walk bipedally on a slanted treadmill. Furthermore, it can learn to clear an obstacle attached to the treadmill's belt. When failing to clear the obstacle, the monkey stumbles but quickly corrects its posture and the associated movements of multiple motor segments to again resume smooth bipedal walking. These results give indication that in learning to walk bipedally, M. fuscata transforms relevant visual, vestibular, proprioceptive, and exteroceptive sensory inputs into commands that engage both anticipatory and reactive motor mechanisms. Both mechanisms are essential for meeting external demands imposed upon posture and locomotion.

  5. Towards efficient and robust control of bipedal walking : basic models of posture and rhythmic movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdaasdonk, Bart Willem

    2008-01-01

    Walking is a very important function of the human movement apparatus. The question how walking is controlled by the central nervous system is yet to be answered. A number of reasons lead us to believe that neural oscillators in the spinal cord, termed Central Pattern Generators (CPGs), have a major

  6. Exploiting Inherent Robustness and Natural Dynamics in the Control of Bipedal Walking Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    actuators to increase its performance. McGeer suggested using plantar flexion to enable a passive walker to walk on flat ground or uphill. Goswami, et...Potentiometers at the hips, knees, ankles, and boom measure joint angles and body pitch. Com- pression springs are used in the joint actuators to

  7. Estimate of the lower-limb-specific muscle parameters during bipedal walking for humans, apes and early hominids with the implications for the evolution of body proportion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Weijie

    2007-01-01

    Modern human has different body proportion from early hominids and great apes. Comparing with others, in general, modern human adults have relatively long lower limb and heavier body weight. Since the lower limbs provide support to the whole body and play an important role in walking, it is proposed that the ratio of the lower limb to the whole body for modern human could be beneficial to bipedal walking. This study tried to estimate the muscle parameters of the lower limb in walking for the subjects with various body proportions. Using a simplified musculoskeletal model, some muscle parameters of the lower limb, e.g. muscle force, stress, work and power, were estimated for modern human adult, child, AL 288-1 (the fossil specimens of Australopithecus afarensis, 3.18 million years old) and apes. The results show that with the body proportion modern human adult spends less muscle work and power in walking than other subjects. The results imply that using the cost of transport (i.e. the muscle work of the lower limb per unit of displacement) as the criteria, the early hominids, if their body proportions were structurally similar to AL 288-1, could evolve towards what modern human adult looks like, in order to save energy during bipedal walking.

  8. Mechatronic Wearable Exoskeletons for Bionic Bipedal Standing and Walking: A New Synthetic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onose, Gelu; Cârdei, Vladimir; Crăciunoiu, Ştefan T.; Avramescu, Valeriu; Opriş, Ioan; Lebedev, Mikhail A.; Constantinescu, Marian Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, interest has been growing to mechatronic and robotic technologies utilized in wearable powered exoskeletons that assist standing and walking. The available literature includes single-case reports, clinical studies conducted in small groups of subjects, and several recent systematic reviews. These publications have fulfilled promotional and marketing objectives but have not yet resulted in a fully optimized, practical wearable exoskeleton. Here we evaluate the progress and future directions in this field from a joint perspective of health professionals, manufacturers, and consumers. We describe the taxonomy of existing technologies and highlight the main improvements needed for the development and functional optimization of the practical exoskeletons. PMID:27746711

  9. Bipedal Walking Simulation System Using OpenGL for Humanoid Robot%基于OpenGL的仿人机器人步行仿真研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋薇; 章亚男; 见浪護; 刘勖

    2013-01-01

    Foot model is usually considered as one point or a circle in most bipedal walking simulations for decreasing the modeling difficulty. However, such simulations are less persuasive because the foot model is much different from the real human foot. The dynamic model of a bipedal humanoid robot composed by multi-links was set up by using a graphic presentation software "Open GL" under C++ Builder 6.0 environment. Several different walking styles were analyzed that may exist in a walking sequence including the style of foot rotating with toes-contacting, to make the walking of the robot more like human beings. Switching among those styles depended on different contact situations between the foot and the ground. Control strategy for bipedal walking simulation utilized position feedback and sinusoidal input, and stable walking with dynamic walking styles changing was obtained in the simulation.%已有的仿真建模中,为了减少复杂性,大多将人足模型简化为点或圆弧,这与实际情况相差较远.在C++Builder 6.0环境下利用“Open GL”图形库建立了3D仿人型机器人双足步行仿真系统,用多关节串联机构模拟足部,实现包括由前脚掌支撑、足部转动的多种步态方式,并分析步行中各种步态间的转换,根据机器人脚跟、脚尖与地面接触状态的变化动态切换不同的步态方式,符合人足步行的实际情况,增强了机器人步行的灵活性与拟人性.该系统的控制部分采用位置反馈与正弦驱动相结合的行走控制方法,通过对人足模型的多关节动力学建模,有效地实现了机器人的稳定步行仿真,并实现了步行过程中的实时步态调整.

  10. Walking loads analysis based on a new bipedal model and its parameters’effect%基于新型双足模型的步行荷载分析及其参数研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王益鹤; 杨娜

    2015-01-01

    It was previously shown that a bipedal model can be employed to simulate human periodic walking. Based on the model in ISO 5982 and a bipedal model,a new bipedal model was introduced.The dynamic equations of human walking were established by means of Lagrange equations.The mass,damping,stiffness matrices,and the force vector of the human walking system were defined from these equations.Walking characteristics and energy change were studied.The effects of leg stiffness,impact angle and walking speed on the reaction force of ground were analyzed.The results showed that the new bipedal model can be used to simulate human periodic walking cycles consisting of single and double support phases;the total energy of the model is constant,it includes gravitational potential energy,kinetic energy and elastic potential energy,they convertes each other in walking process;variations of leg stiffness,impact angle and walking speed have a greater effect on walking characteristics,but leg stiffness has a smaller effect on walking period and walking step length.%双足模型可模拟人的周期步行问题。基于 ISO 5982模型与双足模型,建立了新型双足步行模型。采用Lagrange 方程描述步行过程中的运动方程,确定了系统的质量矩阵、刚度矩阵、阻尼矩阵和荷载向量。研究了人体步行的力学特性及能量变化过程,分析了腿刚度、冲击角和步行速度等参数对地面反力的影响。结果表明:新型双足模型能够模拟包括双足和单足支撑阶段完整连续的步行过程;连续平稳步行中的总能量恒定,各能量随步行过程在重力势能、弹性势能和动能之间转化;腿刚度、冲击角和步行速度对步行特性有较大影响,但腿刚度对步行周期和步长的影响较小。

  11. Foot placement in robotic bipedal locomotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, T.

    2012-01-01

    Human walking is remarkably robust, versatile and energy-efficient: humans have the ability to handle large unexpected disturbances, perform a wide variety of gaits and consume little energy. A bipedal walking robot that performs well on all of these aspects has not yet been developed. Some robots a

  12. Mechanical design of walking machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, Keisuke; Hirose, Shigeo

    2007-01-15

    The performance of existing actuators, such as electric motors, is very limited, be it power-weight ratio or energy efficiency. In this paper, we discuss the method to design a practical walking machine under this severe constraint with focus on two concepts, the gravitationally decoupled actuation (GDA) and the coupled drive. The GDA decouples the driving system against the gravitational field to suppress generation of negative power and improve energy efficiency. On the other hand, the coupled drive couples the driving system to distribute the output power equally among actuators and maximize the utilization of installed actuator power. First, we depict the GDA and coupled drive in detail. Then, we present actual machines, TITAN-III and VIII, quadruped walking machines designed on the basis of the GDA, and NINJA-I and II, quadruped wall walking machines designed on the basis of the coupled drive. Finally, we discuss walking machines that travel on three-dimensional terrain (3D terrain), which includes the ground, walls and ceiling. Then, we demonstrate with computer simulation that we can selectively leverage GDA and coupled drive by walking posture control.

  13. Bipedal locomotion in granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, Mark; Zhang, Tingnan; Goldman, Daniel

    Bipedal walking, locomotion characterized by alternating swing and double support phase, is well studied on ground where feet do not penetrate the substrate. On granular media like sand however, intrusion and extrusion phases also occur. In these phases, relative motion of the two feet requires that one or both feet slip through the material, degrading performance. To study walking in these phases, we designed and studied a planarized bipedal robot (1.6 kg, 42 cm) that walked in a fluidized bed of poppy seeds. We also simulated the robot in a multibody software environment (Chrono) using granular resistive force theory (RFT) to calculate foot forces. In experiment and simulation, the robot experienced slip during the intrusion phase, with the experiment presenting additional slip due to motor control error during the double support phase. This exaggerated slip gave insight (through analysis of ground reaction forces in simulation) into how slip occurs when relative motion exists between the two feet in the granular media, where the foot with higher relative drag forces (from its instantaneous orientation, rotation, relative direction of motion, and depth) remains stationary. With this relationship, we generated walking gaits for the robot to walk with minimal slip.

  14. Bipedal Robot Locomotion on a Terrain with Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Tabrizizadeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a locomotion control system for bipedal robot is proposed to provide desirable walking on a terrain and skipping over a pitfall preventing the robot from falling in it. The proposed strategy is a combination of motion optimization based on particle swarm optimization algorithm and utilization of mode switching at the higher level controller. The model for bipedal robot is a compass gait model but the presented method is general and could be appropriately extended and generalized for other complicated models. Principles of minimalistic designs are also respected and simple central pattern generator and simple mechanical feedback control are used to produce and maintain desirable motion patterns of the robot.

  15. Underwater bipedal locomotion by octopuses in disguise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffard, Christine L; Boneka, Farnis; Full, Robert J

    2005-03-25

    Here we report bipedal movement with a hydrostatic skeleton. Two species of octopus walk on two alternating arms using a rolling gait and appear to use the remaining six arms for camouflage. Octopus marginatus resembles a coconut, and Octopus (Abdopus) aculeatus, a clump of floating algae. Using underwater video, we analyzed the kinematics of their strides. Each arm was on the sand for more than half of the stride, qualifying this behavior as a form of walking.

  16. Turning in a Bipedal Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jau-Ching Lu; Jing-Yi Chen; Pei-Chun Lin

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of turning behavior on a child-size bipedal robot that addresses two common scenarios:turning in place and simultaneous walking and turning.About turning in place,three strategies are investigated and compared,including body-first,leg-first,and body/leg-simultaneous.These three strategies are used for three actions,respectively:when walking follows turning immediately,when space behind the robot is very tight,and when a large turning angle is desired.Concerning simultaneous walking and turning,the linear inverted pendulum is used as the motion model in the single-leg support phase,and the polynomial-based trajectory is used as the motion model in the double-leg support phase and for smooth motion connectivity to motions in a priori and a posteriori single-leg support phases.Compared to the trajectory generation of ordinary walking,that of simultaneous walking and turning introduces only two extra parameters:one for determining new heading direction and the other for smoothing the Center of Mass (COM) trajectory.The trajectory design methodology is validated in both simulation and experimental environments,and successful robot behavior confirms the effectiveness of the strategy.

  17. Laetoli footprints preserve earliest direct evidence of human-like bipedal biomechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Raichlen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Debates over the evolution of hominin bipedalism, a defining human characteristic, revolve around whether early bipeds walked more like humans, with energetically efficient extended hind limbs, or more like apes with flexed hind limbs. The 3.6 million year old hominin footprints at Laetoli, Tanzania represent the earliest direct evidence of hominin bipedalism. Determining the kinematics of Laetoli hominins will allow us to understand whether selection acted to decrease energy costs of bipedalism by 3.6 Ma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an experimental design, we show that the Laetoli hominins walked with weight transfer most similar to the economical extended limb bipedalism of humans. Humans walked through a sand trackway using both extended limb bipedalism, and more flexed limb bipedalism. Footprint morphology from extended limb trials matches weight distribution patterns found in the Laetoli footprints. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide us with the earliest direct evidence of kinematically human-like bipedalism currently known, and show that extended limb bipedalism evolved long before the appearance of the genus Homo. Since extended-limb bipedalism is more energetically economical than ape-like bipedalism, energy expenditure was likely an important selection pressure on hominin bipeds by 3.6 Ma.

  18. Walk-Startup of a Two-Legged Walking Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babković, Kalman; Nagy, László; Krklješ, Damir; Borovac, Branislav

    There is a growing interest towards humanoid robots. One of their most important characteristic is the two-legged motion - walk. Starting and stopping of humanoid robots introduce substantial delays. In this paper, the goal is to explore the possibility of using a short unbalanced state of the biped robot to quickly gain speed and achieve the steady state velocity during a period shorter than half of the single support phase. The proposed method is verified by simulation. Maintainig a steady state, balanced gait is not considered in this paper.

  19. Design and Experimental Implementation of Bipedal robot

    OpenAIRE

    Sreejith C; Sreeshma K

    2012-01-01

    Biped robots have better mobility than conventional wheeled robots, but they tend to tip over easily. To be able to walk stably in various environments, such as on rough terrain, up and down slopes, or in regions containing obstacles, it is necessary for the robot to adapt to the ground conditions with a foot motion, and maintain its stability with a torso motion. In this paper, we first formulate the design and walking pattern for a bipedal robot and then a kicking robot has been developed f...

  20. The how and why of arm swing during human walking.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyns, P.; Bruijn, S.M.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2013-01-01

    Humans walk bipedally, and thus, it is unclear why they swing their arms. In this paper, we will review the mechanisms and functions of arm swinging in human gait. First, we discuss the potential advantages of having swinging arms. Second, we go into the detail on the debate whether arm swing is ari

  1. The strategic role of the tail in maintaining balance while carrying a load bipedally in wild capuchins (Sapajus libidinosus): a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, Luciana; Massa, Fabrizio; Simpson, Kathy; Fragaszy, Dorothy; Visalberghi, Elisabetta

    2016-04-01

    The ability to carry objects has been considered an important selective pressure favoring the evolution of bipedal locomotion in early hominins. Comparable behaviors by extant primates have been studied very little, as few primates habitually carry objects bipedally. However, wild bearded capuchins living at Fazenda Boa Vista spontaneously and habitually transport stone tools by walking bipedally, allowing us to examine the characteristics of bipedal locomotion during object transport by a generalized primate. In this pilot study, we investigated the mechanical aspects of position and velocity of the center of mass, trunk inclination, and forelimb postures, and the torque of the forces applied on each anatomical segment in wild bearded capuchin monkeys during the transport of objects, with particular attention to the tail and its role in balancing the body. Our results indicate that body mass strongly affects the posture of transport and that capuchins are able to carry heavy loads bipedally with a bent-hip-bent-knee posture, thanks to the "strategic" use of their extendable tail; in fact, without this anatomical structure, constituting only 5 % of their body mass, they would be unable to transport the loads that they habitually carry.

  2. Design and Experimental Implementation of Bipedal robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreejith C

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Biped robots have better mobility than conventional wheeled robots, but they tend to tip over easily. To be able to walk stably in various environments, such as on rough terrain, up and down slopes, or in regions containing obstacles, it is necessary for the robot to adapt to the ground conditions with a foot motion, and maintain its stability with a torso motion. In this paper, we first formulate the design and walking pattern for a bipedal robot and then a kicking robot has been developed for experimental verification. Finally, the correlation between the design and the walking patterns is described through simulation studies, and the effectiveness of the proposed methods is confirmed by simulation examples and experimental results.

  3. Planning energy-efficient bipedal locomotion on patterned terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Ali; Bhounsule, Pranav A.; Taha, Ahmad

    2016-05-01

    Energy-efficient bipedal walking is essential in realizing practical bipedal systems. However, current energy-efficient bipedal robots (e.g., passive-dynamics-inspired robots) are limited to walking at a single speed and step length. The objective of this work is to address this gap by developing a method of synthesizing energy-efficient bipedal locomotion on patterned terrain consisting of stepping stones using energy-efficient primitives. A model of Cornell Ranger (a passive-dynamics inspired robot) is utilized to illustrate our technique. First, an energy-optimal trajectory control problem for a single step is formulated and solved. The solution minimizes the Total Cost Of Transport (TCOT is defined as the energy used per unit weight per unit distance travelled) subject to various constraints such as actuator limits, foot scuffing, joint kinematic limits, ground reaction forces. The outcome of the optimization scheme is a table of TCOT values as a function of step length and step velocity. Next, we parameterize the terrain to identify the location of the stepping stones. Finally, the TCOT table is used in conjunction with the parameterized terrain to plan an energy-efficient stepping strategy.

  4. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the “push off” region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane. PMID:27766187

  5. Walking is not like reaching: evidence from periodic mechanical perturbations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooeun Ahn

    Full Text Available The control architecture underlying human reaching has been established, at least in broad outline. However, despite extensive research, the control architecture underlying human locomotion remains unclear. Some studies show evidence of high-level control focused on lower-limb trajectories; others suggest that nonlinear oscillators such as lower-level rhythmic central pattern generators (CPGs play a significant role. To resolve this ambiguity, we reasoned that if a nonlinear oscillator contributes to locomotor control, human walking should exhibit dynamic entrainment to periodic mechanical perturbation; entrainment is a distinctive behavior of nonlinear oscillators. Here we present the first behavioral evidence that nonlinear neuro-mechanical oscillators contribute to the production of human walking, albeit weakly. As unimpaired human subjects walked at constant speed, we applied periodic torque pulses to the ankle at periods different from their preferred cadence. The gait period of 18 out of 19 subjects entrained to this mechanical perturbation, converging to match that of the perturbation. Significantly, entrainment occurred only if the perturbation period was close to subjects' preferred walking cadence: it exhibited a narrow basin of entrainment. Further, regardless of the phase within the walking cycle at which perturbation was initiated, subjects' gait synchronized or phase-locked with the mechanical perturbation at a phase of gait where it assisted propulsion. These results were affected neither by auditory feedback nor by a distractor task. However, the convergence to phase-locking was slow. These characteristics indicate that nonlinear neuro-mechanical oscillators make at most a modest contribution to human walking. Our results suggest that human locomotor control is not organized as in reaching to meet a predominantly kinematic specification, but is hierarchically organized with a semi-autonomous peripheral oscillator operating under

  6. Humanoid Walking Robot: Modeling, Inverse Dynamics, and Gain Scheduling Control

    OpenAIRE

    Elvedin Kljuno; Williams, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents reference-model-based control design for a 10 degree-of-freedom bipedal walking robot, using nonlinear gain scheduling. The main goal is to show concentrated mass models can be used for prediction of the required joint torques for a bipedal walking robot. Relatively complicated architecture, high DOF, and balancing requirements make the control task of these robots difficult. Although linear control techniques can be used to control bipedal robots, nonlinear control is n...

  7. The cost of leg forces in bipedal locomotion: a simple optimization study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Rebula

    Full Text Available Simple optimization models show that bipedal locomotion may largely be governed by the mechanical work performed by the legs, minimization of which can automatically discover walking and running gaits. Work minimization can reproduce broad aspects of human ground reaction forces, such as a double-peaked profile for walking and a single peak for running, but the predicted peaks are unrealistically high and impulsive compared to the much smoother forces produced by humans. The smoothness might be explained better by a cost for the force rather than work produced by the legs, but it is unclear what features of force might be most relevant. We therefore tested a generalized force cost that can penalize force amplitude or its n-th time derivative, raised to the p-th power (or p-norm, across a variety of combinations for n and p. A simple model shows that this generalized force cost only produces smoother, human-like forces if it penalizes the rate rather than amplitude of force production, and only in combination with a work cost. Such a combined objective reproduces the characteristic profiles of human walking (R² = 0.96 and running (R² = 0.92, more so than minimization of either work or force amplitude alone (R² = -0.79 and R² = 0.22, respectively, for walking. Humans might find it preferable to avoid rapid force production, which may be mechanically and physiologically costly.

  8. The cost of leg forces in bipedal locomotion: a simple optimization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebula, John R; Kuo, Arthur D

    2015-01-01

    Simple optimization models show that bipedal locomotion may largely be governed by the mechanical work performed by the legs, minimization of which can automatically discover walking and running gaits. Work minimization can reproduce broad aspects of human ground reaction forces, such as a double-peaked profile for walking and a single peak for running, but the predicted peaks are unrealistically high and impulsive compared to the much smoother forces produced by humans. The smoothness might be explained better by a cost for the force rather than work produced by the legs, but it is unclear what features of force might be most relevant. We therefore tested a generalized force cost that can penalize force amplitude or its n-th time derivative, raised to the p-th power (or p-norm), across a variety of combinations for n and p. A simple model shows that this generalized force cost only produces smoother, human-like forces if it penalizes the rate rather than amplitude of force production, and only in combination with a work cost. Such a combined objective reproduces the characteristic profiles of human walking (R² = 0.96) and running (R² = 0.92), more so than minimization of either work or force amplitude alone (R² = -0.79 and R² = 0.22, respectively, for walking). Humans might find it preferable to avoid rapid force production, which may be mechanically and physiologically costly.

  9. From Walking to Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Juergen; Blum, Yvonne; Seyfarth, Andre

    The implementation of bipedal gaits in legged robots is still a challenge in state-of-the-art engineering. Human gaits could be realized by imitating human leg dynamics where a spring-like leg behavior is found as represented in the bipedal spring-mass model. In this study we explore the gap between walking and running by investigating periodic gait patterns. We found an almost continuous morphing of gait patterns between walking and running. The technical feasibility of this transition is, however, restricted by the duration of swing phase. In practice, this requires an abrupt gait transition between both gaits, while a change of speed is not necessary.

  10. Mechanical design and optimal control of humanoid robot (TPinokio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teck Chew Wee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical structure and the control of the locomotion of bipedal humanoid is an important and challenging domain of research in bipedal robots. Accurate models of the kinematics and dynamics of the robot are essential to achieve bipedal locomotion. Toe-foot walking produces a more natural and faster walking speed and it is even possible to perform stretch knee walking. This study presents the mechanical design of a toe-feet bipedal, TPinokio and the implementation of some optimal walking gait generation methods. The optimality in the gait trajectory is achieved by applying augmented model predictive control method and the pole-zero cancellation method, taken into consideration of a trade-off between walking speed and stability. The mechanism of the TPinokio robot is designed in modular form, so that its kinematics can be modelled accurately into a multiple point-mass system, its dynamics is modelled using the single and double mass inverted pendulum model and zero-moment-point concept. The effectiveness of the design and control technique is validated by simulation testing with the robot walking on flat surface and climbing stairs.

  11. Biologically Inspired Self-Stabilizing Control for Bipedal Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woosung Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent major advances in computational power and control algorithms, the stable and robust control of a bipedal robot is still a challenging issue due to the complexity and high nonlinearity of robot dynamics. To address the issue an efficient and powerful alternative based on a biologically inspired control framework employing neural oscillators is proposed and tested. In a numerical test the virtual force controller combined with the neural oscillator of a humanoid robot generated rhythmic control signals and stable bipedal locomotion when coupled with proper impedance components. The entrainment nature inherent to neural oscillators also achieved stable and robust walking even in the presence of unexpected disturbances, in that the centre of mass (COM was successfully kept in phase with the zero moment point (ZMP input trajectory. The efficiency of the proposed control scheme is discussed alongside simulation results.

  12. Bipedal tool use strengthens chimpanzee hand preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braccini, Stephanie; Lambeth, Susan; Schapiro, Steve;

    2010-01-01

    The degree to which non-human primate behavior is lateralized, at either individual or population levels, remains controversial. We investigated the relationship between hand preference and posture during tool use in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) during bipedal tool use. We experimentally induced...... tool use in a supported bipedal posture, an unsupported bipedal posture, and a seated posture. Neither bipedal tool use nor these supported conditions have been previously evaluated in apes. The hypotheses tested were 1) bipedal posture will increase the strength of hand preference, and 2) a bipedal...... stance, without the use of one hand for support, will elicit a right hand preference. Results supported the first, but not the second hypothesis: bipedalism induced the subjects to become more lateralized, but not in any particular direction. Instead, it appears that subtle pre-existing lateral biases...

  13. Instability-induced hierarchy in bipedal locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgane, Kunishige; Ueda, Kei-Ichi

    2008-05-01

    One of the important features of human locomotion is its instant adaptability to various unpredictable changes of physical and environmental conditions. This property is known as flexibility. Modeling the bipedal locomotion system, we show that initial-state coordination by a global variable which encodes the attractor basins of the system can yield flexibility. This model is based on the following hypotheses: (i) the walking velocity is a global variable, and (ii) the leg posture at the beginning of the stance phase is the initial state of the gait. Moreover, we confirm these hypotheses. We investigate the regions near the neutral states between walking and falling phases using numerical experiments and demonstrate that global variables can be defined as the dominant unstable directions of the system dynamics near the neutral states. We propose the concept of an “instability-induced hierarchy.” In this hierarchy, global variables govern other variables near neutral states; i.e., they become elements of a higher level.

  14. Mechanical Energy Recovery during Walking in Patients with Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipaola, Mariangela; Pavan, Esteban E.; Cattaneo, Andrea; Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Pezzoli, Gianni; Cavallari, Paolo; Frigo, Carlo A.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of mechanical energy recovery during gait have been thoroughly investigated in healthy subjects, but never described in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). The aim of this study was to investigate whether such mechanisms are preserved in PD patients despite an altered pattern of locomotion. We consecutively enrolled 23 PD patients (mean age 64±9 years) with bilateral symptoms (H&Y ≥II) if able to walk unassisted in medication-off condition (overnight suspension of all dopaminergic drugs). Ten healthy subjects (mean age 62±3 years) walked both at their ‘preferred’ and ‘slow’ speeds, to match the whole range of PD velocities. Kinematic data were recorded by means of an optoelectronic motion analyzer. For each stride we computed spatio-temporal parameters, time-course and range of motion (ROM) of hip, knee and ankle joint angles. We also measured kinetic (Wk), potential (Wp), total (WtotCM) energy variations and the energy recovery index (ER). Along with PD progression, we found a significant correlation of WtotCM and Wp with knee ROM and in particular with knee extension in terminal stance phase. Wk and ER were instead mainly related to gait velocity. In PD subjects, the reduction of knee ROM significantly diminished both Wp and WtotCM. Rehabilitation treatments should possibly integrate passive and active mobilization of knee to prevent a reduction of gait-related energetic components. PMID:27258183

  15. Mechanical Energy Recovery during Walking in Patients with Parkinson Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Dipaola

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of mechanical energy recovery during gait have been thoroughly investigated in healthy subjects, but never described in patients with Parkinson disease (PD. The aim of this study was to investigate whether such mechanisms are preserved in PD patients despite an altered pattern of locomotion. We consecutively enrolled 23 PD patients (mean age 64±9 years with bilateral symptoms (H&Y ≥II if able to walk unassisted in medication-off condition (overnight suspension of all dopaminergic drugs. Ten healthy subjects (mean age 62±3 years walked both at their 'preferred' and 'slow' speeds, to match the whole range of PD velocities. Kinematic data were recorded by means of an optoelectronic motion analyzer. For each stride we computed spatio-temporal parameters, time-course and range of motion (ROM of hip, knee and ankle joint angles. We also measured kinetic (Wk, potential (Wp, total (WtotCM energy variations and the energy recovery index (ER. Along with PD progression, we found a significant correlation of WtotCM and Wp with knee ROM and in particular with knee extension in terminal stance phase. Wk and ER were instead mainly related to gait velocity. In PD subjects, the reduction of knee ROM significantly diminished both Wp and WtotCM. Rehabilitation treatments should possibly integrate passive and active mobilization of knee to prevent a reduction of gait-related energetic components.

  16. From bone to plausible bipedal locomotion. Part II: Complete motion synthesis for bipedal primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Guillaume; Multon, Franck; Berillon, Gilles

    2009-05-29

    This paper addresses the problem of synthesizing plausible bipedal locomotion according to 3D anatomical reconstruction and general hypotheses on human motion control strategies. In a previous paper [Nicolas, G., Multon, F., Berillon, G., Marchal, F., 2007. From bone to plausible bipedal locomotion using inverse kinematics. Journal of Biomechanics 40 (5) 1048-1057], we have validated a method based on using inverse kinematics to obtain plausible lower-limb motions knowing the trajectory of the ankle. In this paper, we propose a more general approach that also involves computing a plausible trajectory of the ankles for a given skeleton. The inputs are the anatomical descriptions of the bipedal species, imposed footprints and a rest posture. This process is based on optimizing a reference ankle trajectory until a set of criteria is minimized. This optimization loop is based on the assumption that a plausible motion is supposed to have little internal mechanical work and should be as less jerky as possible. For each tested ankle trajectory, inverse kinematics is used to compute a lower-body motion that enables us to compute the resulting mechanical work and jerk. This method was tested on a set of modern humans (male and female, with various anthropometric properties). We show that the results obtained with this method are close to experimental data for most of the subjects. We also demonstrate that the method is not sensitive to the choice of the reference ankle trajectory; any ankle trajectory leads to very similar result. We finally apply the method to a skeleton of Pan paniscus (Bonobo), and compare the resulting motion to those described by zoologists.

  17. Mechanically induced ankle inversion during human walking and jumping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, P.H.J.A.; Grüneberg, C.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to study sudden ankle inversions during human walking and jumping is presented. Ankle inversions of 25 degrees were elicited using a box containing a trap door. During the gait task, subjects walked at a speed of 4 km/h. At a pre-programmed delay after left heel strike, an electromagnet

  18. Biped walking robot based on a 2-UPU+2-UU parallel mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhihuai; Yao, Yan'an; Kong, Xianwen

    2014-03-01

    Existing biped robots mainly fall into two categories: robots with left and right feet and robots with upper and lower feet. The load carrying capability of a biped robot is quite limited since the two feet of a walking robot supports the robot alternatively during walking. To improve the load carrying capability, a novel biped walking robot is proposed based on a 2-UPU+2-UU parallel mechanism. The biped walking robot is composed of two identical platforms(feet) and four limbs, including two UPU(universal-prismatic-universal serial chain) limbs and two UU limbs. To enhance its terrain adaptability like articulated vehicles, the two feet of the biped walking robot are designed as two vehicles in detail. The conditions that the geometric parameters of the feet must satisfy are discussed. The degrees-of-freedom of the mechanism is analyzed by using screw theory. Gait analysis, kinematic analysis and stability analysis of the mechanism are carried out to verify the structural design parameters. The simulation results validate the feasibility of walking on rugged terrain. Experiments with a physical prototype show that the novel biped walking robot can walk stably on smooth terrain. Due to its unique feet design and high stiffness, the biped walking robot may adapt to rugged terrain and is suitable for load-carrying.

  19. Automaticity of walking: functional significance, mechanisms, measurement and rehabilitation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Clark

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Automaticity is a hallmark feature of walking in adults who are healthy and well-functioning. In the context of walking, ‘automaticity’ refers to the ability of the nervous system to successfully control typical steady state walking with minimal use of attention-demanding executive control resources. Converging lines of evidence indicate that walking deficits and disorders are characterized in part by a shift in the locomotor control strategy from healthy automaticity to compensatory executive control. This is potentially detrimental to walking performance, as an executive control strategy is not optimized for locomotor control. Furthermore, it places excessive demands on a limited pool of executive reserves. The result is compromised ability to perform basic and complex walking tasks and heightened risk for adverse mobility outcomes including falls. Strategies for rehabilitation of automaticity are not well defined, which is due to both a lack of systematic research into the causes of impaired automaticity and to a lack of robust neurophysiological assessments by which to gauge automaticity. These gaps in knowledge are concerning given the serious functional implications of compromised automaticity. Therefore, the objective of this article is to advance the science of automaticity of walking by consolidating evidence and identifying gaps in knowledge regarding: a functional significance of automaticity; b neurophysiology of automaticity; c measurement of automaticity; d mechanistic factors that compromise automaticity; and e strategies for rehabilitation of automaticity.

  20. Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Human Walking Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azahari, Athirah; Siswanto, W. A.; Ngali, M. Z.; Salleh, S. Md.; Yusup, Eliza M.

    2017-01-01

    Behaviour such as gait or posture may affect a person with the physiological condition during daily activities. The characteristic of human gait cycle phase is one of the important parameter which used to described the human movement whether it is in normal gait or abnormal gait. This research investigates four types of crouch walking (upright, interpolated, crouched and severe) by simulation approach. The assessment are conducting by looking the parameters of hamstring muscle joint, knee joint and ankle joint. The analysis results show that based on gait analysis approach, the crouch walking have a weak pattern of walking and postures. Short hamstring and knee joint is the most influence factor contributing to the crouch walking due to excessive hip flexion that typically accompanies knee flexion.

  1. Predicting the metabolic energy costs of bipedalism using evolutionary robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, W I; Dennis, L A; Crompton, R H

    2003-04-01

    To understand the evolution of bipedalism among the hominoids in an ecological context we need to be able to estimate the energetic cost of locomotion in fossil forms. Ideally such an estimate would be based entirely on morphology since, except for the rare instances where footprints are preserved, this is the only primary source of evidence available. In this paper we use evolutionary robotics techniques (genetic algorithms, pattern generators and mechanical modeling) to produce a biomimetic simulation of bipedalism based on human body dimensions. The mechanical simulation is a seven-segment, two-dimensional model with motive force provided by tension generators representing the major muscle groups acting around the lower-limb joints. Metabolic energy costs are calculated from the muscle model, and bipedal gait is generated using a finite-state pattern generator whose parameters are produced using a genetic algorithm with locomotor economy (maximum distance for a fixed energy cost) as the fitness criterion. The model is validated by comparing the values it generates with those for modern humans. The result (maximum efficiency of 200 J m(-1)) is within 15% of the experimentally derived value, which is very encouraging and suggests that this is a useful analytic technique for investigating the locomotor behaviour of fossil forms. Initial work suggests that in the future this technique could be used to estimate other locomotor parameters such as top speed. In addition, the animations produced by this technique are qualitatively very convincing, which suggests that this may also be a useful technique for visualizing bipedal locomotion.

  2. The pendular mechanism does not determine the optimal speed of loaded walking on gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomeñuka, Natalia Andrea; Bona, Renata Luisa; da Rosa, Rodrigo Gomes; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    The pendular mechanism does not act as a primary mechanism in uphill walking due to the monotonic behavior of the mechanical energies of the center of mass. Nevertheless, recent evidence shows that there is an important minimization of energy expenditure by the pendular mechanism during walking on uphill gradients. In this study, we analyzed the optimum speed (OPT) of loaded human walking and the pendulum-like determining variables (Recovery R, Instantaneous pendular re-conversion Rint, and Congruity percentage %Cong). Ten young men walked on a treadmill at five different speeds and at three different treadmill incline gradients (0, +7 and +15%), with and without a load carried in their backpacks. We used indirect calorimetry and 3D motion analysis, and all of the data were analyzed by computational algorithms. Rint increased at higher speeds and decreased with increasing gradient. R and %Cong decreased with increasing gradient and increased with speed, independent of load. Thus, energy conversion by the pendular mechanism during walking on a 15% gradient is supported, and although this mechanism can explain the maintenance of OPT at low walking speeds, the pendular mechanism does not fully explain the energy minimization at higher speeds.

  3. Preferred gait and walk-run transition speeds in ostriches measured using GPS-IMU sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Monica A; Channon, Anthony J; Nolan, Grant S; Hall, Jade

    2016-10-15

    The ostrich (Struthio camelus) is widely appreciated as a fast and agile bipedal athlete, and is a useful comparative bipedal model for human locomotion. Here, we used GPS-IMU sensors to measure naturally selected gait dynamics of ostriches roaming freely over a wide range of speeds in an open field and developed a quantitative method for distinguishing walking and running using accelerometry. We compared freely selected gait-speed distributions with previous laboratory measures of gait dynamics and energetics. We also measured the walk-run and run-walk transition speeds and compared them with those reported for humans. We found that ostriches prefer to walk remarkably slowly, with a narrow walking speed distribution consistent with minimizing cost of transport (CoT) according to a rigid-legged walking model. The dimensionless speeds of the walk-run and run-walk transitions are slower than those observed in humans. Unlike humans, ostriches transition to a run well below the mechanical limit necessitating an aerial phase, as predicted by a compass-gait walking model. When running, ostriches use a broad speed distribution, consistent with previous observations that ostriches are relatively economical runners and have a flat curve for CoT against speed. In contrast, horses exhibit U-shaped curves for CoT against speed, with a narrow speed range within each gait for minimizing CoT. Overall, the gait dynamics of ostriches moving freely over natural terrain are consistent with previous lab-based measures of locomotion. Nonetheless, ostriches, like humans, exhibit a gait-transition hysteresis that is not explained by steady-state locomotor dynamics and energetics. Further study is required to understand the dynamics of gait transitions.

  4. A wrist-walker exhibiting no "Uner Tan Syndrome": a theory for possible mechanisms of human devolution toward the atavistic walking patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Uner

    2007-01-01

    transition from quadrupedality to bipedality. That is, the activity of the philogenetically youngest supraspinal centers for bipedal walking responsible for suppression of the older supraspinal centers for quadrupedal gait may be interrupted at the atavistic level due to genetic and/or environmental factors. Consequently, it is assumed that these individuals prefer their natural wrist-walking to move around more quickly and efficiently.

  5. The evolution of the human pelvis: changing adaptations to bipedalism, obstetrics and thermoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruss, Laura Tobias; Schmitt, Daniel

    2015-03-05

    The fossil record of the human pelvis reveals the selective priorities acting on hominin anatomy at different points in our evolutionary history, during which mechanical requirements for locomotion, childbirth and thermoregulation often conflicted. In our earliest upright ancestors, fundamental alterations of the pelvis compared with non-human primates facilitated bipedal walking. Further changes early in hominin evolution produced a platypelloid birth canal in a pelvis that was wide overall, with flaring ilia. This pelvic form was maintained over 3-4 Myr with only moderate changes in response to greater habitat diversity, changes in locomotor behaviour and increases in brain size. It was not until Homo sapiens evolved in Africa and the Middle East 200 000 years ago that the narrow anatomically modern pelvis with a more circular birth canal emerged. This major change appears to reflect selective pressures for further increases in neonatal brain size and for a narrow body shape associated with heat dissipation in warm environments. The advent of the modern birth canal, the shape and alignment of which require fetal rotation during birth, allowed the earliest members of our species to deal obstetrically with increases in encephalization while maintaining a narrow body to meet thermoregulatory demands and enhance locomotor performance.

  6. Reading from a Head-Fixed Display during Walking: Adverse Effects of Gaze Stabilization Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Borg

    Full Text Available Reading performance during standing and walking was assessed for information presented on earth-fixed and head-fixed displays by determining the minimal duration during which a numerical time stimulus needed to be presented for 50% correct naming answers. Reading from the earth-fixed display was comparable during standing and walking, with optimal performance being attained for visual character sizes in the range of 0.2° to 1°. Reading from the head-fixed display was impaired for small (0.2-0.3° and large (5° visual character sizes, especially during walking. Analysis of head and eye movements demonstrated that retinal slip was larger during walking than during standing, but remained within the functional acuity range when reading from the earth-fixed display. The detrimental effects on performance of reading from the head-fixed display during walking could be attributed to loss of acuity resulting from large retinal slip. Because walking activated the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex, the resulting compensatory eye movements acted to stabilize gaze on the information presented on the earth-fixed display but destabilized gaze from the information presented on the head-fixed display. We conclude that the gaze stabilization mechanisms that normally allow visual performance to be maintained during physical activity adversely affect reading performance when the information is presented on a display attached to the head.

  7. Modelling, stability and biomechanical implications of three DOF passive bipedal gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Máximo Alejandro Roa Garzón

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Passive dynamic walkers can achieve a steady gait down an inclined plane simply by the influence of gravity. This article presents the modelling of a 3 DOF passive bipedal walker, searching for a relationship between gait characteristics, the robot’s physical properties and the slope of the plane. The proposed adimensional dynamical model’s equations are also given, implementing and modelling the dynamics is described and the main results are presented. Limits on robotic parameters leading to establishing stable limit cycles are also analysed as perio-dic doubling bifurcations appear to be natural in passive gait. Interesting results arose when comparing natural passive walking with human bipedal locomotion.

  8. Decoding bipedal locomotion from the rat sensorimotor cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigosa, J.; Panarese, A.; Dominici, N.; Friedli, L.; van den Brand, R.; Carpaneto, J.; DiGiovanna, J.; Courtine, G.; Micera, S.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Decoding forelimb movements from the firing activity of cortical neurons has been interfaced with robotic and prosthetic systems to replace lost upper limb functions in humans. Despite the potential of this approach to improve locomotion and facilitate gait rehabilitation, decoding lower limb movement from the motor cortex has received comparatively little attention. Here, we performed experiments to identify the type and amount of information that can be decoded from neuronal ensemble activity in the hindlimb area of the rat motor cortex during bipedal locomotor tasks. Approach. Rats were trained to stand, step on a treadmill, walk overground and climb staircases in a bipedal posture. To impose this gait, the rats were secured in a robotic interface that provided support against the direction of gravity and in the mediolateral direction, but behaved transparently in the forward direction. After completion of training, rats were chronically implanted with a micro-wire array spanning the left hindlimb motor cortex to record single and multi-unit activity, and bipolar electrodes into 10 muscles of the right hindlimb to monitor electromyographic signals. Whole-body kinematics, muscle activity, and neural signals were simultaneously recorded during execution of the trained tasks over multiple days of testing. Hindlimb kinematics, muscle activity, gait phases, and locomotor tasks were decoded using offline classification algorithms. Main results. We found that the stance and swing phases of gait and the locomotor tasks were detected with accuracies as robust as 90% in all rats. Decoded hindlimb kinematics and muscle activity exhibited a larger variability across rats and tasks. Significance. Our study shows that the rodent motor cortex contains useful information for lower limb neuroprosthetic development. However, brain-machine interfaces estimating gait phases or locomotor behaviors, instead of continuous variables such as limb joint positions or speeds

  9. Numerical bifurcation analysis of the bipedal spring-mass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, Andreas; Kaiser, Dieter; Hermann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The spring-mass model and its numerous extensions are currently one of the best candidates for templates of human and animal locomotion. However, with increasing complexity, their applications can become very time-consuming. In this paper, we present an approach that is based on the calculation of bifurcations in the bipedal spring-mass model for walking. Since the bifurcations limit the region of stable walking, locomotion can be studied by computing the corresponding boundaries. Originally, the model was implemented as a hybrid dynamical system. Our new approach consists of the transformation of the series of initial value problems on different intervals into a single boundary value problem. Using this technique, discontinuities can be avoided and sophisticated numerical methods for studying parametrized nonlinear boundary value problems can be applied. Thus, appropriate extended systems are used to compute transcritical and period-doubling bifurcation points as well as turning points. We show that the resulting boundary value problems can be solved by the simple shooting method with sufficient accuracy, making the application of the more extensive multiple shooting superfluous. The proposed approach is fast, robust to numerical perturbations and allows determining complete manifolds of periodic solutions of the original problem.

  10. Level-Ground Walking for 3D Quasi-Passive Walker with Flat Feet - Lateral-plane Input using McKibben-Type Artificial Muscle -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, many bipedal robots have been proposed to realize the high energy efficiency walking. The passive dynamic walking does not require control input. Generally, a foot of passive dynamic walking robot is an arc foot. In this paper, it is intended to establish a control method and control mechanism to achieve energy efficient and stable gate. Therefore, we developed 3D quasi-passive walker with flat feet driven by an antagonistic pneumatic artificial muscle. An antagonistic mechanism is constituted by a pair of McKibben muscle. And an antagonistic pneumatic system is used as joint actuators of linkage mechanisms which control the torque, joint stiffness and position simultaneously. Finally, this report shows that the 3D quasi-passive walking in the level ground can realize by the swinging (simple input of the frontal direction, and the stride of the robot is proportional to lateral-plane input.

  11. Obesity does not increase external mechanical work per kilogram body mass during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Raymond C; McGowan, Craig P; Kram, Rodger

    2009-10-16

    Walking is the most common type of physical activity prescribed for the treatment of obesity. The net metabolic rate during level walking (W/kg) is approximately 10% greater in obese vs. normal weight adults. External mechanical work (W(ext)) is one of the primary determinants of the metabolic cost of walking, but the effects of obesity on W(ext) have not been clearly established. The purpose of this study was to compare W(ext) between obese and normal weight adults across a range of walking speeds. We hypothesized that W(ext) (J/step) would be greater in obese adults but W(ext) normalized to body mass would be similar in obese and normal weight adults. We collected right leg three-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRF) while twenty adults (10 obese, BMI=35.6 kg/m(2) and 10 normal weight, BMI=22.1 kg/m(2)) walked on a level, dual-belt force measuring treadmill at six speeds (0.50-1.75 m/s). We used the individual limb method (ILM) to calculate external work done on the center of mass. Absolute W(ext) (J/step) was greater in obese vs. normal weight adults at each walking speed, but relative W(ext) (J/step/kg) was similar between the groups. Step frequencies were not different. These results suggest that W(ext) is not responsible for the greater metabolic cost of walking (W/kg) in moderately obese adults.

  12. Mechanical energy assessment of adult with Down syndrome during walking with obstacle avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salami, Firooz; Vimercati, Sara Laura; Rigoldi, Chiara; Taebi, Amirtaha; Albertini, Giorgio; Galli, Manuela

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is analyzing the differences between plane walking and stepping over an obstacle for two groups of healthy people and people with Down syndrome and then, evaluating the movement efficiency between the groups by comprising of their mechanical energy exchanges. 39 adults including two groups of 21 people with Down syndrome (age: 21.6 ± 7 years) and 18 healthy people (age: 25.1 ± 2.4 years) participated in this research. The test has been done in two conditions, first in plane walking and second in walking with an obstacle (10% of the subject's height). The gait data were acquired using quantitative movement analysis, composed of an optoelectronic system (Elite2002, BTS) with eight infrared cameras. Mechanical energy exchanges are computed by dedicated software and finally the data including spatiotemporal parameters, mechanical energy parameters and energy recovery of gait cycle are analyzed by statistical software to find significant differences. Regards to spatiotemporal parameters velocity and step length are lower in people with Down syndrome. Mechanical energy parameters particularly energy recovery does not change from healthy people to people with Down syndrome. However, there are some differences in inter-group through plane walking to obstacle avoidance and it means people with Down syndrome probably use their residual abilities in the most efficient way to achieve the main goal of an efficient energy recovery.

  13. A stability-based mechanism for hysteresis in the walk-trot transition in quadruped locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Shinya; Katayama, Daiki; Fujiki, Soichiro; Tomita, Nozomi; Funato, Tetsuro; Yamashita, Tsuyoshi; Senda, Kei; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2013-04-01

    Quadrupeds vary their gaits in accordance with their locomotion speed. Such gait transitions exhibit hysteresis. However, the underlying mechanism for this hysteresis remains largely unclear. It has been suggested that gaits correspond to attractors in their dynamics and that gait transitions are non-equilibrium phase transitions that are accompanied by a loss in stability. In the present study, we used a robotic platform to investigate the dynamic stability of gaits and to clarify the hysteresis mechanism in the walk-trot transition of quadrupeds. Specifically, we used a quadruped robot as the body mechanical model and an oscillator network for the nervous system model to emulate dynamic locomotion of a quadruped. Experiments using this robot revealed that dynamic interactions among the robot mechanical system, the oscillator network, and the environment generate walk and trot gaits depending on the locomotion speed. In addition, a walk-trot transition that exhibited hysteresis was observed when the locomotion speed was changed. We evaluated the gait changes of the robot by measuring the locomotion of dogs. Furthermore, we investigated the stability structure during the gait transition of the robot by constructing a potential function from the return map of the relative phase of the legs and clarified the physical characteristics inherent to the gait transition in terms of the dynamics.

  14. Humanoid Walking Robot: Modeling, Inverse Dynamics, and Gain Scheduling Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvedin Kljuno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents reference-model-based control design for a 10 degree-of-freedom bipedal walking robot, using nonlinear gain scheduling. The main goal is to show concentrated mass models can be used for prediction of the required joint torques for a bipedal walking robot. Relatively complicated architecture, high DOF, and balancing requirements make the control task of these robots difficult. Although linear control techniques can be used to control bipedal robots, nonlinear control is necessary for better performance. The emphasis of this work is to show that the reference model can be a bipedal walking model with concentrated mass at the center of gravity, which removes the problems related to design of a pseudo-inverse system. Another significance of this approach is the reduced calculation requirements due to the simplified procedure of nominal joint torques calculation. Kinematic and dynamic analysis is discussed including results for joint torques and ground force necessary to implement a prescribed walking motion. This analysis is accompanied by a comparison with experimental data. An inverse plant and a tracking error linearization-based controller design approach is described. We propose a novel combination of a nonlinear gain scheduling with a concentrated mass model for the MIMO bipedal robot system.

  15. Individuals with multiple sclerosis redistribute positive mechanical work from the ankle to the hip during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Brenda L; Hoffman, Rashelle M; Kurz, Max J

    2016-09-01

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) typically walk slower, have reduced cadences and shorter step lengths. While these spatiotemporal gait alterations have been thought to be due to decreased power generation at the ankle, the distribution of mechanical work across the ankle, knee and hip joints during walking is not well understood. By quantifying the mechanical work at each joint, the compensatory mechanisms utilized by individuals with MS to maintain gait speed may be better understood. Fifteen subjects with MS (EDSS: 4.4±1.0) and fifteen healthy age-matched control subjects completed a three-dimensional gait analysis. The net mechanical work at the ankle, knee and hip joints was quantified for the stance phase of gait. Our results found that the less impaired leg of the subjects with MS generated a similar amount of mechanical work as the control group; however, the ankle joint produced less positive mechanical work, and the hip joint generated more positive mechanical work. Additionally, the less impaired leg of the subjects with MS and the leg of the control group generated more positive work than the more impaired leg of the subjects with MS. These outcomes suggest that individuals with MS may adopt a hip compensatory strategy with their less impaired leg during gait due to the limited amount of mechanical work generated at the ankle.

  16. Biomechanics of running indicates endothermy in bipedal dinosaurs.

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    Herman Pontzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the great unresolved controversies in paleobiology is whether extinct dinosaurs were endothermic, ectothermic, or some combination thereof, and when endothermy first evolved in the lineage leading to birds. Although it is well established that high, sustained growth rates and, presumably, high activity levels are ancestral for dinosaurs and pterosaurs (clade Ornithodira, other independent lines of evidence for high metabolic rates, locomotor costs, or endothermy are needed. For example, some studies have suggested that, because large dinosaurs may have been homeothermic due to their size alone and could have had heat loss problems, ectothermy would be a more plausible metabolic strategy for such animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe two new biomechanical approaches for reconstructing the metabolic rate of 14 extinct bipedal dinosauriforms during walking and running. These methods, well validated for extant animals, indicate that during walking and slow running the metabolic rate of at least the larger extinct dinosaurs exceeded the maximum aerobic capabilities of modern ectotherms, falling instead within the range of modern birds and mammals. Estimated metabolic rates for smaller dinosaurs are more ambiguous, but generally approach or exceed the ectotherm boundary. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results support the hypothesis that endothermy was widespread in at least larger non-avian dinosaurs. It was plausibly ancestral for all dinosauriforms (perhaps Ornithodira, but this is perhaps more strongly indicated by high growth rates than by locomotor costs. The polarity of the evolution of endothermy indicates that rapid growth, insulation, erect postures, and perhaps aerobic power predated advanced "avian" lung structure and high locomotor costs.

  17. Stability of an underactuated bipedal gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S; Sangwan, V; Taneja, A; Seth, B

    2007-01-01

    A self-excited biped walking mechanism consisting of two legs that are connected in series at the hip joint through a servomotor is studied as a cyclic system with collisions. A torque proportional to angle between the shank of the swinging leg and the vertical is seen to sustain a gait. Each leg has a thigh and a shank connected at a passive knee joint that has a knee stopper restricting hyperextension similar to the human knee. A mathematical model for the dynamics of the system including the impact equations is used to analyse the stability of the system through examination of phase plane plots. Attractor lines along which the system approaches stability have been identified. A leg length for optimal stability has been identified. The biological basis for the proposed system has been identified by comparison with human gait.

  18. FES-Assisted Walking with Spring Brake Orthosis: Simulation Studies

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    R. Jailani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simulation of bipedal locomotion to generate stimulation pulses for activating muscles for paraplegic walking with wheel walker using functional electrical stimulation (FES with spring brake orthosis (SBO. A new methodology for paraplegic gait, based on exploiting natural dynamics of human gait, is introduced. The work is a first effort towards restoring natural like swing phase in paraplegic gait through a new hybrid orthosis, referred to as spring brake orthosis (SBO. This mechanism simplifies the control task and results in smooth motion and more-natural like trajectory produced by the flexion reflex for gait in spinal cord injured subjects. SBO can eliminate reliance on the withdrawal reflex and foot-ground clearance without extra upper body effort. The stored energy in the spring of SBO is used to replace stimulation pulses in knee flexion and reduce total required torque for the paraplegic walking with wheel walker. The study is carried out with a model of humanoid with wheel walker using the Visual Nastran (Vn4D dynamic simulation software. Stimulated muscle model of quadriceps is developed for knee extension. Fuzzy logic control (FLC is developed in Matlab/Simulink to regulate the muscle stimulation pulse-width required to drive FES-assisted walking gait and the computed motion is visualised in graphic animation from Vn4D. The simulation results show that SBO can be successfully used with FES for paraplegic walking with wheel walker with all the advantages discussed over the current hybrid orthoses available.

  19. Effect of end-stage hip, knee, and ankle osteoarthritis on walking mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Daniel; Vap, Alexander; Queen, Robin M

    2015-09-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the presence of isolated ankle (A-OA; N=30), knee (K-OA; N=20), or hip (H-OA; N=30) osteoarthritis (OA) compared to asymptomatic controls (N=15) would lead to mechanical changes in the affected joint but also in all other lower limb joints and gait overall. Stride length, stance and swing times, as well as joint angles and moments at the hip, knee, and ankle were derived from 3-D kinematic and kinetic data collected from seven self-selected speed walking trial. Values were compared across groups using a 1×4 ANCOVA, covarying for walking speed. With walking speed controlled, the results indicated a reduction in hip and knee extension and ankle plantar flexion in accordance with the joint affected. In addition, OA in one joint had strong effects on other joints. In both H-OA and K-OA groups the hip never passed into extension, and A-OA subjects significantly changed hip kinematics to compensate for lack of plantar flexion. Finally, OA in any joint led to lower peak vertical forces as well as extension and plantar flexion moments compared to controls. The presence of end-stage OA at various lower extremity joints results in compensatory gait mechanics that cause movement alterations throughout the lower extremity. This work reinforces our understanding of the complex interaction of joints of the lower limb and the importance of focusing on the mechanics of the entire lower limb when considering gait disability and potential interventions in patients with isolated OA.

  20. Finite element analysis of sliding distance and contact mechanics of hip implant under dynamic walking conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yongchang; Jin, Zhongmin; Wang, Ling; Wang, Manyi

    2015-06-01

    An explicit finite element method was developed to predict the dynamic behavior of the contact mechanics for a hip implant under normal walking conditions. Two key parameters of mesh sensitivity and time steps were examined to balance the accuracy and computational cost. Both the maximum contact pressure and accumulated sliding distance showed good agreement with those in the previous studies using the implicit finite element analysis and analytical methods. Therefore, the explicit finite element method could be used to predict the contact pressure and accumulated sliding distance for an artificial hip joint simultaneously in dynamic manner.

  1. A Study on Bipedal and Mobile Robot Behavior Through Modeling and Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Nirmala Nirmala; Prianggada Indra Tanaya; Maralo Sinaga

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to study and analyze mobile robot behavior. In performing this, a framework is adopted and developed for mobile and bipedal robot. The robots are design, build, and run as proceed from the development of mechanical structure, electronics and control integration, and control software application. The behavior of those robots are difficult to be observed and analyzed qualitatively. To evaluate the design and behavior quality, modeling and simulation of robot structur...

  2. Walking at non-constant speeds: mechanical work, pendular transduction, and energy congruity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbinot, G

    2017-05-01

    Although almost half of all walking bouts in urban environments consist of less than 12 consecutive steps and several day-to-day gait activities contain transient gait responses, in most studies gait analysis is performed at steady-state. This study aimed to analyze external (Wext ) and internal mechanical work (Wint ), pendulum-like mechanics, and elastic energy usage during constant and non-constant speeds. The mechanical work, pendular transduction, and energy congruity (an estimate of storage and release of elastic energy) during walking were computed using two force platforms. We found that during accelerating gait (+NCS) energy recovery is maintained, besides extra W(+)ext , for decelerating gait (-NCS) poor energy recovery was counterbalanced by W(-)ext and C% predominance. We report an increase in elastic energy usage with speed (4-11%). Both W(-)ext and %C suggests that elastic energy usage is higher at faster speeds and related to -NCS (≈20% of elastic energy usage). This study was the first to show evidences of elastic energy usage during constant and non-constant speeds.

  3. Trajectory Generation and Stability Analysis for Reconfigurable Klann Mechanism Based Walking Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaichandar Kulandaidaasan Sheba

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Reconfigurable legged robots based on one degree of freedom are highly desired because they are effective on rough and irregular terrains and they provide mobility in such terrain with simple control schemes. It is necessary that reconfigurable legged robots should maintain stability during rest and motion, with a minimum number of legs while maintaining their full range of walking patterns resulting from different gait configuration. In this paper we present a method to generate input trajectory for reconfigurable quadruped robots based on Klann mechanism to properly synchronize movement. Six useful gait cycles based on this reconfigurable Klann mechanism for quadruped robots has been clearly shown here. The platform stability for these six useful gait cycles are validated through simulated results which clearly shows the capabilities of reconfigurable design.

  4. Effects of walking in deep venous thrombosis: a new integrated solid and fluid mechanics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Josep M; Fortuny, Gerard; Puigjaner, Dolors; Herrero, Joan; Marimon, Francesc; Garcia-Bennett, Josep

    2016-08-09

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common disease. Large thrombi in venous vessels cause bad blood circulation and pain; and when a blood clot detaches from a vein wall, it causes an embolism whose consequences range from mild to fatal. Walking is recommended to DVT patients as a therapeutical complement. In this study the mechanical effects of walking on a specific patient of DVT were simulated by means of an unprecedented integration of 3 elements: a real geometry, a biomechanical model of body tissues, and a computational fluid dynamics study. A set of computed tomography images of a patient's leg with a thrombus in the popliteal vein was employed to reconstruct a geometry model. Then a biomechanical model was used to compute the new deformed geometry of the vein as a function of the fiber stretch level of the semimembranosus muscle. Finally, a computational fluid dynamics study was performed to compute the blood flow and the wall shear stress (WSS) at the vein and thrombus walls. Calculations showed that either a lengthening or shortening of the semimembranosus muscle led to a decrease of WSS levels up to 10%. Notwithstanding, changes in blood viscosity properties or blood flow rate may easily have a greater impact in WSS.

  5. Introduction to Focus Issue: Bipedal Locomotion-From Robots to Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, John G.

    2009-06-01

    Running and walking, collectively referred to as bipedal locomotion, represent self-organized behaviors generated by a spatially distributed dynamical system operating under the constraint that a person must be able to move without falling down. The organizing principles involve both forces actively regulated by the nervous system and those generated passively by the biomechanical properties of the musculoskeletal system and the environment in which the movements occur. With the development of modern motion capture and electrophysiological techniques it has become possible to explore the dynamical interplay between the passive and active controllers of locomotion in a manner that directly compares observation to predictions made by relevant mathematical and computer models. Consequently, many of the techniques initially developed to study nonlinear dynamical systems, including stability analyses, phase resetting and entrainment properties of limit cycles, and fractal and multifractal analysis, have come to play major roles in guiding progress. This Focus Issue discusses bipedal locomotion from the point of view of dynamical systems theory with the goal of stimulating discussion between the dynamical systems, physics, biomechanics, and neuroscience communities.

  6. Kinesiology-Based Robot Foot Design for Human-Like Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SangJoo Kwon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Compared with the conventional flat foot, the flexible foot is advantageous in implementing human‐like walking and much reduces energy consumption. In this paper, from an anatomical and kinesiological point of view, a flexible foot with toes and heels is investigated for a bipedal robot and three critical design parameters for walking stability are drawn, which include stiffness of toes and heels, frontal toe position, and ankle joint position. In addition, a human‐like walking trajectory compatible with the flexible foot is proposed by mimicking a human walking pattern. First of all, the zero moment point (ZMP trajectory continuously moves forward without stopping, even in the single support phase. Secondly, the centre of mass (CoM trajectory includes vertical motion similar to that seen in human beings. Thirdly, the ankle trajectory follows the rotational motion of a human foot while being lifted from and landing on the ground. Through the simulation study, it is shown that the suggested design parameters can be applied as useful indices for the mechanical design of biped feet; interestingly, the vertical motion of the centre of mass tends to compensate for the transient response in the initial walking step.

  7. External Mechanical Work and Pendular Energy Transduction of Overground and Treadmill Walking in Adolescents with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, Marie; Degache, Francis; Currat, Gabriel; Pochon, Ludmila; Peyrot, Nicolas; Newman, Christopher J.; Malatesta, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Motor impairments affect functional abilities and gait in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Improving their walking is an essential objective of treatment, and the use of a treadmill for gait analysis and training could offer several advantages in adolescents with CP. However, there is a controversy regarding the similarity between treadmill and overground walking both for gait analysis and training in children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to compare the external mechanical work and pendular energy transduction of these two types of gait modalities at standard and preferred walking speeds in adolescents with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP) and typically developing (TD) adolescents matched on age, height and body mass. Methods: Spatiotemporal parameters, external mechanical work and pendular energy transduction of walking were computed using two inertial sensors equipped with a triaxial accelerometer and gyroscope and compared in 10 UCP (14.2 ± 1.7 year) and 10 TD (14.1 ± 1.9 year) adolescents during treadmill and overground walking at standard and preferred speeds. Results: The treadmill induced almost identical mechanical changes to overground walking in TD adolescents and those with UCP, with the exception of potential and kinetic vertical and lateral mechanical works, which are both significantly increased in the overground-treadmill transition only in UCP (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Adolescents with UCP have a reduced adaptive capacity in absorbing and decelerating the speed created by a treadmill (i.e., dynamic stability) compared to TD adolescents. This may have an important implication in rehabilitation programs that assess and train gait by using a treadmill in adolescents with UCP. PMID:27148062

  8. The biomechanical mechanism of how strength and power training improves walking speed in old adults remains unknown

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, C. M. I.; Granacher, U.; Vandervoort, A. A.; DeVita, P.; Hortobagyi, T.

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining and increasing walking speed in old age is clinically important because this activity of daily living predicts functional and clinical state. We reviewed evidence for the biomechanical mechanisms of how strength and power training increase gait speed in old adults. A systematic search yi

  9. Effect of carrying a weighted backpack on lung mechanics during treadmill walking in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominelli, Paolo B; Sheel, A William; Foster, Glen E

    2012-06-01

    Weighted backpacks are used extensively in recreational and occupational settings, yet their effects on lung mechanics during acute exercise is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different backpack weights on lung mechanics and breathing patterns during treadmill walking. Subjects (n = 7, age = 28 ± 6 years), completed two 2.5-min exercise stages for each backpack condition [no backpack (NP), an un-weighted backpack (NW) or a backpack weighing 15, 25 or 35 kg]. A maximal expiratory flow volume curve was generated for each backpack condition and an oesophageal balloon catheter was used to estimate pleural pressure. The 15, 25 and 35 kg backpacks caused a 3, 5 and 8% (P ventilation, end-expiratory lung volume decreased as backpack weight increased. As backpack weight increased, there was a concomitant decline in calculated maximal ventilation, a rise in minute ventilation, and a resultant greater utilization of maximal available ventilation. In conclusion, wearing a weighted backpack during an acute bout of exercise altered operational lung volumes; however, adaptive changes in breathing mechanics may have minimized changes in the required POB such that at an iso-ventilation, wearing a backpack weighing up to 35 kg does not increase the POB requirement.

  10. Metabolic Cost, Mechanical Work, and Efficiency during Normal Walking in Obese and Normal-Weight Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Chen, Peijie; Zhuang, Jie; Zhang, Yanxin; Walt, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the influence of childhood obesity on energetic cost during normal walking and to determine if obese children choose a walking strategy optimizing their gait pattern. Method: Sixteen obese children with no functional abnormalities were matched by age and gender with 16 normal-weight children. All…

  11. Gait-specific energetics contributes to economical walking and running in emus and ostriches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Rebecca R; Rubenson, Jonas; Coder, Lisa; Hoyt, Donald F; Propert, Matthew W G; Marsh, Richard L

    2011-07-07

    A widely held assumption is that metabolic rate (Ė(met)) during legged locomotion is linked to the mechanics of different gaits and this linkage helps explain the preferred speeds of animals in nature. However, despite several prominent exceptions, Ė(met) of walking and running vertebrates has been nearly uniformly characterized as increasing linearly with speed across all gaits. This description of locomotor energetics does not predict energetically optimal speeds for minimal cost of transport (E(cot)). We tested whether large bipedal ratite birds (emus and ostriches) have gait-specific energetics during walking and running similar to those found in humans. We found that during locomotion, emus showed a curvilinear relationship between Ė(met) and speed during walking, and both emus and ostriches demonstrated an abrupt change in the slope of Ė(met) versus speed at the gait transition with a linear increase during running. Similar to human locomotion, the minimum net E(cot) calculated after subtracting resting metabolism was lower in walking than in running in both species. However, the difference in net E(cot) between walking and running was less than is found in humans because of a greater change in the slope of Ė(met) versus speed at the gait transition, which lowers the cost of running for the avian bipeds. For emus, we also show that animals moving freely overground avoid a range of speeds surrounding the gait-transition speed within which the E(cot) is large. These data suggest that deviations from a linear relation of metabolic rate and speed and variations in transport costs with speed are more widespread than is often assumed, and provide new evidence that locomotor energetics influences the choice of speed in bipedal animals. The low cost of transport for walking is probably ecologically important for emus and ostriches because they spend the majority of their active day walking, and thus the energy used for locomotion is a large part of their daily

  12. Advanced age and the mechanics of uphill walking: a joint-level, inverse dynamic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Jason R; Kram, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    We sought to gain insight into age-related muscular limitations that may restrict the uphill walking ability of old adults. We hypothesized that: (1) old adults would exhibit smaller peak ankle joint kinetics and larger peak hip joint kinetics than young adults during both level and uphill walking and (2) these age-related differences in ankle and hip joint kinetics would be greatest during uphill vs. level walking. We quantified the sagittal plane ankle, knee, and hip joint kinetics of 10 old adults (mean ± SD, age: 72 ± 5 yrs) and 8 young adults (age: 27 ± 5 yrs) walking at 1.25 m/s on a dual-belt, force-measuring treadmill at four grades (0°, +3°, +6°, +9°). As hypothesized, old adults walked with smaller peak ankle joint kinetics (e.g., power generation: -18% at +9°) and larger peak hip joint kinetics (e.g., power generation: +119% at +9°) than young adults, most evident during the late stance phase of both level and uphill conditions. Old adults performed two to three times more single support positive work than young adults via muscles crossing the knee. In partial support of our second hypothesis, the age-related reduction in peak ankle joint moments was greater during uphill (-0.41 Nm/kg) vs. level (-0.30 Nm/kg) walking. However, old adults that exhibited reduced propulsive ankle function during level walking could perform 44% more trailing leg positive ankle joint work to walk uphill. Our findings indicate that maintaining ankle power generation and trailing leg propulsive function should be the primary focus of "prehabilitation" strategies for old adults to preserve their uphill walking ability.

  13. Analysis and simulation of fully ankle actuated planar bipedal robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, Michel; Oort, van Gijs; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of planar bipedal robots, based on passive dynamic walkers, which are actuated only by actuation of the ankle joints. An overview of the major design characteristics of such robots and their influence on the feasibility of a stable limit cycle is presented. It is s

  14. Theory Analysis and Experiment Research of the Leg Mechanism for the Human-Carrying Walking Chair Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingfeng Sang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the high carrying capacity of the human-carrying walking chair robot, in this paper, 2-UPS+UP parallel mechanism is selected as the leg mechanism; then kinematics, workspace, control, and experiment of the leg mechanism are researched in detail. Firstly, design of the whole mechanism is described and degrees of freedom of the leg mechanism are analyzed. Second, the forward position, inverse position, and velocity of leg mechanism are studied. Third, based on the kinematics analysis and the structural constraints, the reachable workspace of 2-UPS+UP parallel mechanism is solved, and then the optimal motion workspace is searched in the reachable workspace by choosing the condition number as the evaluation index. Fourth, according to the theory analysis of the parallel leg mechanism, its control system is designed and the compound position control strategy is studied. Finally, in optimal motion workspace, the compound position control strategy is verified by using circular track with the radius 100 mm; the experiment results show that the leg mechanism moves smoothly and does not tremble obviously. Theory analysis and experiment research of the single leg mechanism provide a theoretical foundation for the control of the quadruped human-carrying walking chair robot.

  15. Discrete-State-Based Vision Navigation Control Algorithm for One Bipedal Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunwen Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Navigation with the specific objective can be defined by specifying desired timed trajectory. The concept of desired direction field is proposed to deal with such navigation problem. To lay down a principled discussion of the accuracy and efficiency of navigation algorithms, strictly quantitative definitions of tracking error, actuator effect, and time efficiency are established. In this paper, one vision navigation control method based on desired direction field is proposed. This proposed method uses discrete image sequences to form discrete state space, which is especially suitable for bipedal walking robots with single camera walking on a free-barrier plane surface to track the specific objective without overshoot. The shortest path method (SPM is proposed to design such direction field with the highest time efficiency. However, one improved control method called canonical piecewise-linear function (PLF is proposed. In order to restrain the noise disturbance from the camera sensor, the band width control method is presented to significantly decrease the error influence. The robustness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm are illustrated through a number of computer simulations considering the error from camera sensor. Simulation results show that the robustness and efficiency can be balanced by choosing the proper controlling value of band width.

  16. Early, Prehospital Activation of the Walking Blood Bank Based on Mechanism of Injury Improves Time to Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Aaron K; Auten, Jonathan D; Zieber, Tara J; Lunceford, Nicole L

    2016-01-01

    Balanced component therapy (BCT) remains the mainstay in trauma resuscitation of the critically battle injured. In austere medical environments, access to packed red blood cells, apheresis platelets, and fresh frozen plasma is often limited. Transfusion of warm, fresh whole blood (FWB) has been used to augment limited access to full BCT in these settings. The main limitation of FWB is that it is not readily available for transfusion on casualty arrival. This small case series evaluates the impact early, mechanism-of-injury (MOI)-based, preactivation of the walking blood bank has on time to transfusion. We report an average time of 18 minutes to FWB transfusion from patient arrival. Early activation of the walking blood bank based on prehospital MOI may further reduce the time to FWB transfusion.

  17. Contributions of knee swing initiation and ankle plantar flexion to the walking mechanics of amputees using a powered prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Simon, Ann M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2014-01-01

    Recently developed powered prostheses are capable of producing near-physiological joint torque at the knee and/or ankle joints. Based on previous studies of biological joint impedance and the mechanics of able-bodied gait, an impedance-based controller has been developed for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that integrates knee swing initiation and powered plantar flexion in late stance with increasing ankle stiffness throughout stance. In this study, five prosthesis configuration conditions were tested to investigate the individual contributions of each sub-strategy to the overall walking mechanics of four unilateral transfemoral amputees as they completed a clinical 10-m walk test using a powered knee and ankle prosthesis. The baseline condition featured constant ankle stiffness and no swing initiation or powered plantar flexion. The four remaining conditions featured knee swing initiation alone (SI) or in combination with powered plantar flexion (SI+PF), increasing ankle stiffness (SI+IK), or both (SI+PF+IK). Self-selected walking speed did not significantly change between conditions, although subjects tended to walk the slowest in the baseline condition compared to conditions with swing initiation. The addition of powered plantar flexion resulted in significantly higher ankle power generation in late stance irrespective of ankle stiffness. The inclusion of swing initiation resulted in a significantly more flexed knee at toe off and a significantly higher average extensor knee torque following toe off. Identifying individual contributions of intrinsic control strategies to prosthesis biomechanics could help inform the refinement of impedance-based prosthesis controllers and simplify future designs of prostheses and lower-limb assistive devices alike.

  18. Systematic variation of prosthetic foot spring affects center-of-mass mechanics and metabolic cost during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelik, Karl E; Collins, Steven H; Adamczyk, Peter G; Segal, Ava D; Klute, Glenn K; Morgenroth, David C; Hahn, Michael E; Orendurff, Michael S; Czerniecki, Joseph M; Kuo, Arthur D

    2011-08-01

    Lower-limb amputees expend more energy to walk than non-amputees and have an elevated risk of secondary disabilities. Insufficient push-off by the prosthetic foot may be a contributing factor. We aimed to systematically study the effect of prosthetic foot mechanics on gait, to gain insight into fundamental prosthetic design principles. We varied a single parameter in isolation, the energy-storing spring in a prototype prosthetic foot, the controlled energy storage and return (CESR) foot, and observed the effect on gait. Subjects walked on the CESR foot with three different springs. We performed parallel studies on amputees and on non-amputees wearing prosthetic simulators. In both groups, spring characteristics similarly affected ankle and body center-of-mass (COM) mechanics and metabolic cost. Softer springs led to greater energy storage, energy return, and prosthetic limb COM push-off work. But metabolic energy expenditure was lowest with a spring of intermediate stiffness, suggesting biomechanical disadvantages to the softest spring despite its greater push-off. Disadvantages of the softest spring may include excessive heel displacements and COM collision losses. We also observed some differences in joint kinetics between amputees and non-amputees walking on the prototype foot. During prosthetic push-off, amputees exhibited reduced energy transfer from the prosthesis to the COM along with increased hip work, perhaps due to greater energy dissipation at the knee. Nevertheless, the results indicate that spring compliance can contribute to push-off, but with biomechanical trade-offs that limit the degree to which greater push-off might improve walking economy.

  19. [Walking abnormalities in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Masaya

    2010-11-01

    Walking is a spontaneous movement termed locomotion that is promoted by activation of antigravity muscles by serotonergic (5HT) neurons. Development of antigravity activity follows 3 developmental epochs of the sleep-wake (S-W) cycle and is modulated by particular 5HT neurons in each epoch. Activation of antigravity activities occurs in the first epoch (around the age of 3 to 4 months) as restriction of atonia in rapid eye movement (REM) stage and development of circadian S-W cycle. These activities strengthen in the second epoch, with modulation of day-time sleep and induction of crawling around the age of 8 months and induction of walking by 1 year. Around the age of 1 year 6 months, absence of guarded walking and interlimb cordination is observed along with modulation of day-time sleep to once in the afternoon. Bipedal walking in upright position occurs in the third epoch, with development of a biphasic S-W cycle by the age of 4-5 years. Patients with infantile autism (IA), Rett syndrome (RTT), or Tourette syndrome (TS) show failure in the development of the first, second, or third epoch, respectively. Patients with IA fail to develop interlimb coordination; those with RTT, crawling and walking; and those with TS, walking in upright posture. Basic pathophysiology underlying these condition is failure in restricting atonia in REM stage; this induces dysfunction of the pedunculopontine nucleus and consequently dys- or hypofunction of the dopamine (DA) neurons. DA hypofunction in the developing brain, associated with compensatory upward regulation of the DA receptors causes psychobehavioral disorders in infancy (IA), failure in synaptogenesis in the frontal cortex and functional development of the motor and associate cortexes in late infancy through the basal ganglia (RTT), and failure in functional development of the prefrontal cortex through the basal ganglia (TS). Further, locomotion failure in early childhood causes failure in development of functional

  20. A Study on Bipedal and Mobile Robot Behavior Through Modeling and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala Nirmala

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to study and analyze mobile robot behavior. In performing this, a framework is adopted and developed for mobile and bipedal robot. The robots are design, build, and run as proceed from the development of mechanical structure, electronics and control integration, and control software application. The behavior of those robots are difficult to be observed and analyzed qualitatively. To evaluate the design and behavior quality, modeling and simulation of robot structure and its task capability is performed. The stepwise procedure to robot behavior study is explained. Behavior cases study are experimented to bipedal robots, transporter robot and Autonomous Guided Vehicle (AGV developed at our institution. The experimentation are conducted on those robots by adjusting their dynamic properties and/or surrounding environment. Validation is performed by comparing the simulation result and the real robot execution. The simulation gives a more idealistic behavior execution rather than realistic one. Adjustments are performed to fine tuning simulation's parameters to provide a more realistic performance.

  1. FES-Assisted Walking with Spring Brake Orthosis: Simulation Studies

    OpenAIRE

    R. Jailani; Tokhi, M.O.; Gharooni, S. C.; B.S.K.K Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation of bipedal locomotion to generate stimulation pulses for activating muscles for paraplegic walking with wheel walker using functional electrical stimulation (FES) with spring brake orthosis (SBO). A new methodology for paraplegic gait, based on exploiting natural dynamics of human gait, is introduced. The work is a first effort towards restoring natural like swing phase in paraplegic gait through a new hybrid orthosis, referred to as spring brake orthosis (SBO...

  2. Mechanical work performed by individual limbs of transfemoral amputees during step-to-step transitions: Effect of walking velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Xavier; Villa, Coralie; Fodé, Pascale; Lavaste, Francois; Pillet, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    The greater metabolic demand during the gait of people with a transfemoral amputation limits their autonomy and walking velocity. Major modifications of the kinematic and kinetic patterns of transfemoral amputee gait quantified using gait analysis may explain their greater energy cost. Donelan et al. proposed a method called the individual limb method to explore the relationships between the gait biomechanics and metabolic cost. In the present study, we applied this method to quantify mechanical work performed by the affected and intact limbs of transfemoral amputees. We compared a cohort of six active unilateral transfemoral amputees to a control group of six asymptomatic subjects. Compared to the control group, we found that there was significantly less mechanical work produced by the affected leg and significantly more work performed by the unaffected leg during the step-to-step transition. We also found that this mechanical work increased with walking velocity; the increase was less pronounced for the affected leg and substantial for the unaffected leg. Finally, we observed that the lesser work produced by the affected leg was linked to the increase in the hip flexion moment during the late stance phase, which is necessary for initiating knee flexion in the affected leg. It is possible to quantify the mechanical work performed during gait by people with a transfemoral amputation, using the individual limb method and conventional gait laboratory equipment. The method provides information that is useful for prosthetic fitting and rehabilitation.

  3. Bionic crab walking mechanism and its kinematic characteristics analysis%仿螃蟹步行机构及其通过性试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建桥; 张广权; 王颖; 吴宝广; 黄晗; 薛龙

    2016-01-01

    仿生步行机构的研究对于复杂地形的行走机构开发具有十分重要的意义。为了设计出性能优越、结构简单的仿生步行机构,通过分析中华绒螯蟹的行走步态,提出了仿螃蟹步行机构的设计方案。由于螃蟹尾端的两只步足较少参与行走,为简化设计,将步行机构设计成6足式,腿部运动由六连杆机构实现。利用三维建模软件 CATIA 建立了步行机构整体模型,并在 ADAMS 中完成了运动学分析,得到步行机构足端运动轨迹,结果表明该步行机构能够完成预期的动作。根据设计加工出样机,在非常规地面上与轮式模型车进行通过性对比试验,结果表明仿螃蟹步行机构在农业生产所涉及的松软地面上具有较高的通过性能,在崎岖硬地面上波动比轮式模型车降低5%~75%。该步行机构还可作为试验平台,通过对其腿部杆件尺寸和足端触地方式的优化,为开展提高步行机构在不同地面通过性提供基础研究设备条件。%The research of bionic walking mechanism is of great significance for the development of walking mechanism on complex terrain. In order to design a bionic walking mechanism with superior performance and simple structure, by analyzing the walking gait of Eriocheir sinensis Milne-Edwards, the design scheme of the crab walking mechanism was proposed. Due to 2 feet at the end of the crab less involved in walking, in order to simplify the structure, the walking mechanism was designed to have 6 feet, and leg movement was achieved by the six-link mechanism. The whole model of the walking mechanism was established by the three-dimensional (3D) modeling software CATIA, and the kinematics analysis was finished in ADAMS. The results showed that the walking mechanism could complete the expected action. Based on the design, bionic walking mechanism prototype was produced, and walking test of bionic walking mechanism on the smooth hard

  4. Neural Computation Scheme of Compound Control: Tacit Learning for Bipedal Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Shingo; Kimura, Hidenori

    The growing need for controlling complex behaviors of versatile robots working in unpredictable environment has revealed the fundamental limitation of model-based control strategy that requires precise models of robots and environments before their operations. This difficulty is fundamental and has the same root with the well-known frame problem in artificial intelligence. It has been a central long standing issue in advanced robotics, as well as machine intelligence, to find a prospective clue to attack this fundamental difficulty. The general consensus shared by many leading researchers in the related field is that the body plays an important role in acquiring intelligence that can conquer unknowns. In particular, purposeful behaviors emerge during body-environment interactions with the help of an appropriately organized neural computational scheme that can exploit what the environment can afford. Along this line, we propose a new scheme of neural computation based on compound control which represents a typical feature of biological controls. This scheme is based on classical neuron models with local rules that can create macroscopic purposeful behaviors. This scheme is applied to a bipedal robot and generates the rhythm of walking without any model of robot dynamics and environments.

  5. The Design and Control of a Bipedal Robot with Sensory Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teck-Chew Wee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A stable walking motion requires effective gait balancing and robust posture correction algorithms. However, to develop and implement such intelligent motion algorithms remains a challenging task for researchers. Effective sensory feedback for stable posture control is essential for bipedal locomotion. In order to minimize the modelling errors and disturbances, this paper presents an effective sensory system and an alternative approach in generating a stable Centre-of-Mass (CoM trajectory by using an observer-based augmented model predictive control technique with sensory feedback. The proposed approach is used to apply an Augmented Model Predictive Control (AMPC algorithm with an on-line time shift and to look ahead to process future data to optimize a control signal by minimizing the cost function so that the system is able to track the desired Zero Moment Point (ZMP as closely as possible, and at the same time to limit the motion jerk. The robot’s feet are fitted with force sensors to measure the contact force’s location. An observer is also implemented into the system.

  6. Walking abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... safety reasons, especially on uneven ground. See a physical therapist for exercise therapy and walking retraining. For a ... the right position for standing and walking. A physical therapist can supply these and provide exercise therapy, if ...

  7. Steroid-associated hip joint collapse in bipedal emus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Zhen Zheng

    Full Text Available In this study we established a bipedal animal model of steroid-associated hip joint collapse in emus for testing potential treatment protocols to be developed for prevention of steroid-associated joint collapse in preclinical settings. Five adult male emus were treated with a steroid-associated osteonecrosis (SAON induction protocol using combination of pulsed lipopolysaccharide (LPS and methylprednisolone (MPS. Additional three emus were used as normal control. Post-induction, emu gait was observed, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed, and blood was collected for routine examination, including testing blood coagulation and lipid metabolism. Emus were sacrificed at week 24 post-induction, bilateral femora were collected for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT and histological analysis. Asymmetric limping gait and abnormal MRI signals were found in steroid-treated emus. SAON was found in all emus with a joint collapse incidence of 70%. The percentage of neutrophils (Neut % and parameters on lipid metabolism significantly increased after induction. Micro-CT revealed structure deterioration of subchondral trabecular bone. Histomorphometry showed larger fat cell fraction and size, thinning of subchondral plate and cartilage layer, smaller osteoblast perimeter percentage and less blood vessels distributed at collapsed region in SAON group as compared with the normal controls. Scanning electron microscope (SEM showed poor mineral matrix and more osteo-lacunae outline in the collapsed region in SAON group. The combination of pulsed LPS and MPS developed in the current study was safe and effective to induce SAON and deterioration of subchondral bone in bipedal emus with subsequent femoral head collapse, a typical clinical feature observed in patients under pulsed steroid treatment. In conclusion, bipedal emus could be used as an effective preclinical experimental model to evaluate potential treatment protocols to be developed for prevention of

  8. The evolution of bipedal running in lizards suggests a consequential origin may be exploited in later lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Christofer J

    2014-08-01

    The origin of bipedal locomotion in lizards is unclear. Modeling studies have suggested that bipedalism may be an exaptation, a byproduct of features originally designed to increase maneuverability, which were only later exploited. Measurement of the body center of mass (BCOM) in 124 species of lizards confirms a significant rearward shift among bipedal lineages. Further racetrack trials showed a significant acceleration threshold between bipedal and quadrupedal runs. These suggest good general support for a passive bipedal model, in which the combination of these features lead to passive lifting of the front of the body. However, variation in morphology could only account for 56% of the variation in acceleration thresholds, suggesting that dynamics have a significant influence on bipedalism. Deviation from the passive bipedal model was compared with node age, supporting an increase in the influence of dynamics over time. Together, these results show that bipedalism may have first arisen as a consequence of acceleration and a rearward shift in the BCOM, but subsequent linages have exploited this consequence to become bipedal more often, suggesting that bipedalism in lizards may convey some advantage. Exploitation of bipedalism was also associated with increased rates of phenotypic diversity, suggesting exploiting bipedalism may promote adaptive radiation.

  9. Leg mechanics contribute to establishing swing phase trajectories during memory-guided stepping movements in walking cats: a computational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keir Gordon Pearson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available When quadrupeds stop walking after stepping over a barrier with their forelegs, the memory of barrier height and location is retained for many minutes. This memory is subsequently used to guide hind leg movements over the barrier when walking is resumed. The upslope of the initial trajectory of hind leg paw movements is strongly dependent on the initial location of the paw relative to the barrier. In this study, we have attempted to determine whether mechanical factors contribute significantly in establishing the slope of the paw trajectories by creating a 4-link biomechanical model of a cat hind leg and driving this model with a variety of joint-torque profiles, including average torques for a range on initial paw positions relative to the barrier. Torque profiles for individual steps were determined by an inverse dynamic analysis of leg movements in three normal cats. Our study demonstrates that limb mechanics can contribute to establishing the dependency of trajectory slope on the initial position of the paw relative to the barrier. However, an additional contribution of neuronal motor commands was indicated by the fact that the simulated slopes of paw trajectories were significantly less that the observed slopes. A neuronal contribution to the modification of paw trajectories was also revealed by our observations that both the magnitudes of knee flexor muscle EMG bursts and the initial knee flexion torques depended on initial paw position. Previous studies have shown that a shift in paw position prior to stepping over a barrier changes the paw trajectory to be appropriate for the new paw position. Our data indicate that both mechanical and neuronal factors contribute to this updating process, and that any shift in leg position during the delay period modifies the working memory of barrier location.

  10. How Fast Can a Human Run? - Bipedal vs. Quadrupedal Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinugasa, Ryuta; Usami, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Usain Bolt holds the current world record in the 100-m run, with a running time of 9.58 s, and has been described as the best human sprinter in history. However, this raises questions concerning the maximum human running speed, such as "Can the world's fastest men become faster still?" The correct answer is likely "Yes." We plotted the historical world records for bipedal and quadrupedal 100-m sprint times according to competition year. These historical records were plotted using several curve-fitting procedures. We found that the projected speeds intersected in 2048, when for the first time, the winning quadrupedal 100-m sprint time could be lower, at 9.276 s, than the winning bipedal time of 9.383 s. Video analysis revealed that in quadrupedal running, humans employed a transverse gallop with a small angular excursion. These results suggest that in the future, the fastest human on the planet might be a quadrupedal runner at the 2048 Olympics. This may be achieved by shifting up to the rotary gallop and taking longer strides with wide sagittal trunk motion.

  11. Multiple phylogenetically distinct events shaped the evolution of limb skeletal morphologies associated with bipedalism in the jerboas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Talia Y; Organ, Chris L; Edwards, Scott V; Biewener, Andrew A; Tabin, Clifford J; Jenkins, Farish A; Cooper, Kimberly L

    2015-11-02

    Recent rapid advances in experimental biology have expanded the opportunity for interdisciplinary investigations of the evolution of form and function in non-traditional model species. However, historical divisions of philosophy and methodology between evolutionary/organismal biologists and developmental geneticists often preclude an effective merging of disciplines. In an effort to overcome these divisions, we take advantage of the extraordinary morphological diversity of the rodent superfamily Dipodoidea, including the bipedal jerboas, to experimentally study the developmental mechanisms and biomechanical performance of a remarkably divergent limb structure. Here, we place multiple limb character states in a locomotor and phylogenetic context. Whereas obligate bipedalism arose just once in the ancestor of extant jerboas, we find that digit loss, metatarsal fusion, between-limb proportions, and within-hindlimb proportions all evolved independently of one another. Digit loss occurred three times through at least two distinct developmental mechanisms, and elongation of the hindlimb relative to the forelimb is not simply due to growth mechanisms that change proportions within the hindlimb. Furthermore, we find strong evidence for punctuated evolution of allometric scaling of hindlimb elements during the radiation of Dipodoidea. Our work demonstrates the value of leveraging the evolutionary history of a clade to establish criteria for identifying the developmental genetic mechanisms of morphological diversification.

  12. Development and Feasibility Assessment of a Rotational Orthosis for Walking with Arm Swing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Juan; Xie, Qing; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Xie, Le

    2017-01-01

    Interlimb neural coupling might underlie human bipedal locomotion, which is reflected in the fact that people swing their arms synchronously with leg movement in normal gait. Therefore, arm swing should be included in gait training to provide coordinated interlimb performance. The present study aimed to develop a Rotational Orthosis for Walking with Arm Swing (ROWAS), and evaluate its feasibility from the perspectives of implementation, acceptability and responsiveness. We developed the mechanical structures of the ROWAS system in SolidWorks, and implemented the concept in a prototype. Normal gait data were used as the reference performance of the shoulder, hip, knee and ankle joints of the prototype. The ROWAS prototype was tested for function assessment and further evaluated using five able-bodied subjects for user feedback. The ROWAS prototype produced coordinated performance in the upper and lower limbs, with joint profiles similar to those occurring in normal gait. The subjects reported a stronger feeling of walking with arm swing than without. The ROWAS system was deemed feasible according to the formal assessment criteria.

  13. Patterns of Selection of Human Movements III: Energy Efficiency, Mechanical Advantage, and Walking Gait

    OpenAIRE

    Hagler, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Human movements are physical processes combining the classical mechanics of the human body moving in space and the biomechanics of the muscles generating the forces acting on the body under sophisticated sensory-motor control. One way to characterize movement performance is through measures of energy efficiency that relate the mechanical energy of the body and metabolic energy expended by the muscles. We expect the practical utility of such measures to be greater when human subjects execute m...

  14. Brownian motion or Lévy walk? Stepping towards an extended statistical mechanics for animal locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautestad, Arild O

    2012-09-07

    Animals moving under the influence of spatio-temporal scaling and long-term memory generate a kind of space-use pattern that has proved difficult to model within a coherent theoretical framework. An extended kind of statistical mechanics is needed, accounting for both the effects of spatial memory and scale-free space use, and put into a context of ecological conditions. Simulations illustrating the distinction between scale-specific and scale-free locomotion are presented. The results show how observational scale (time lag between relocations of an individual) may critically influence the interpretation of the underlying process. In this respect, a novel protocol is proposed as a method to distinguish between some main movement classes. For example, the 'power law in disguise' paradox-from a composite Brownian motion consisting of a superposition of independent movement processes at different scales-may be resolved by shifting the focus from pattern analysis at one particular temporal resolution towards a more process-oriented approach involving several scales of observation. A more explicit consideration of system complexity within a statistical mechanical framework, supplementing the more traditional mechanistic modelling approach, is advocated.

  15. 仿生双足水上行走机器人运动学分析及优化设计%Kinematics analysis and optimization design on a walking mechanism of bionic biped water-walking robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹凯; 徐林森; 沈惠平; 魏鲜明

    2013-01-01

    设计了仿生双足水上行走机器人行走机构,导出了两脚掌中心的运动轨迹方程、速度及加速度方程;以模拟蛇怪蜥蜴脚掌的运动轨迹为目标,选取给定脚掌拍击和扑打阶段的运动轨迹参数,进行给定轨迹的最优化设计,得到腿部机构的各个杆长参数.根据优化结果制作样机,并分析证明该仿生机构脚杆的运动能够满足蛇怪蜥蜴脚掌的运动轨迹要求.%A walking mechanism of bionic biped water-walking robot is designed; the equations of the location,velocity and acceleration is derived.To simulate the foot trajectory of basilisk lizard's,all the leg length parameters are achieved by optimizing the design of a given trajectory which is obtained by the set foot trajectory of impact and beat phase.The curve of angle between the feet of prototype and the horizontal is completed by the test of prototype and realized according to the optimized result.The simulation results show that the movement of this bionic walking mechanism can meet the basilisk lizards'foot trajectory.

  16. Walking Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your legs or feet Movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease Diseases such as arthritis or multiple sclerosis Vision or balance problems Treatment of walking problems depends on the cause. Physical therapy, surgery, or mobility aids may help.

  17. The Human Shoulder Suspension Apparatus: A Causal Explanation for Bilateral Asymmetry and a Fresh Look at the Evolution of Human Bipedality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Michelle L; Homberger, Dominique G

    2015-09-01

    The combination of large mastoid processes and clavicles is unique to humans, but the biomechanical and evolutionary significance of their special configuration is poorly understood. As part of the newly conceptualized shoulder suspension apparatus, the mastoid processes and clavicles are shaped by forces exerted by the musculo-fascial components of the cleidomastoid and clavotrapezius muscles as they suspend the shoulders from the head. Because both skeletal elements develop during infancy in tandem with the attainment of an upright posture, increased manual dexterity, and the capacity for walking, we hypothesized that the same forces would have shaped them as the shoulder suspension apparatus evolved in ancestral humans in tandem with an upright posture, increased manual dexterity, and bipedality with swinging arms. Because the shoulder suspension apparatus is subjected to asymmetrical forces from handedness, we predicted that its skeletal features would grow asymmetrically. We used this prediction to test our hypothesis in a natural experiment to correlate the size of the skeletal features with the forces exerted on them. We (1) measured biomechanically relevant bony features within the shoulder suspension apparatus in 101 male human specimens (62 of known handedness); and (2) modeled and analyzed the forces within the shoulder suspension apparatus from X-ray CT data. We identified eight right-handed characters and demonstrated the causal relationship between these right-handed characters and the magnitude and direction of forces acting on them. Our data suggest that the presence of the shoulder suspension apparatus in humans was a necessary precondition for human bipedality.

  18. Foot trajectory approximation using the pendulum model of walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Juan; Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Galen, Sujay; Conway, Bernard A; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    Generating a natural foot trajectory is an important objective in robotic systems for rehabilitation of walking. Human walking has pendular properties, so the pendulum model of walking has been used in bipedal robots which produce rhythmic gait patterns. Whether natural foot trajectories can be produced by the pendulum model needs to be addressed as a first step towards applying the pendulum concept in gait orthosis design. This study investigated circle approximation of the foot trajectories, with focus on the geometry of the pendulum model of walking. Three able-bodied subjects walked overground at various speeds, and foot trajectories relative to the hip were analysed. Four circle approximation approaches were developed, and best-fit circle algorithms were derived to fit the trajectories of the ankle, heel and toe. The study confirmed that the ankle and heel trajectories during stance and the toe trajectory in both the stance and the swing phases during walking at various speeds could be well modelled by a rigid pendulum. All the pendulum models were centred around the hip with pendular lengths approximately equal to the segment distances from the hip. This observation provides a new approach for using the pendulum model of walking in gait orthosis design.

  19. Towards bipedal behavior on a quadrupedal platform using optimal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, T. Turner; Vasilopoulos, Vasileios; De, Avik; Koditschek, Daniel E.

    2016-05-01

    This paper explores the applicability of a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) controller design to the problem of bipedal stance on the Minitaur [1] quadrupedal robot. Restricted to the sagittal plane, this behavior exposes a three degree of freedom (DOF) double inverted pendulum with extensible length that can be projected onto the familiar underactuated revolute-revolute "Acrobot" model by assuming a locked prismatic DOF, and a pinned toe. While previous work has documented the successful use of local LQR control to stabilize a physical Acrobot, simulations reveal that a design very similar to those discussed in the past literature cannot achieve an empirically viable controller for our physical plant. Experiments with a series of increasingly close physical facsimiles leading to the actual Minitaur platform itself corroborate and underscore the physical Minitaur platform corroborate and underscore the implications of the simulation study. We conclude that local LQR-based linearized controller designs are too fragile to stabilize the physical Minitaur platform around its vertically erect equilibrium and end with a brief assessment of a variety of more sophisticated nonlinear control approaches whose pursuit is now in progress.

  20. Mechanical energy oscillations of two brachiation gaits: measurement and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, J E; Chang, Y H

    2001-08-01

    How do arm-swinging apes locomote effectively over a variety of speeds? One way to reduce the metabolic energy cost of locomotion is to transfer energy between reversible mechanical modes. In terrestrial animals, at least two transfer mechanisms have been identified: 1) a pendulum-like mechanism for walking, with exchange between gravitational potential energy and translational kinetic energy, and 2) a spring-like mechanism for running, where the elastic strain energy of stretched muscle and tendon is largely returned to reaccelerate the animal. At slower speeds, a brachiator will always have at least one limb in contact with the support, similar to the overlap of foot contact in bipedal walking. At faster speeds, brachiators exhibit an aerial phase, similar to that seen in bipedal running. Are there two distinct brachiation gaits even though the animal appears to simply swing beneath its overhead support? If so, are different exchange mechanisms employed? Our kinetic analysis of brachiation in a white-handed gibbon (Hylobates lar) indicates that brachiation is indeed comprised of two mechanically distinct gaits. At slower speeds in "continuous contact" brachiation, the gibbon utilizes a simple pendulum-like transfer of mechanical energy within each stride. At faster speeds in "ricochetal" brachiation, translational and rotational kinetic energy are exchanged in a novel "whip-like" transfer. We propose that brachiators utilize the transfer between translational and rotational kinetic energy to control the dynamics of their swing. This maneuver may allow muscle action at the shoulder to control the transfer and adjust the ballistic portion of the step to meet the requirements for the next hand contact.

  1. Mechanical energetic contributions from individual muscles and elastic prosthetic feet during symmetric unilateral transtibial amputee walking: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmitrewicz, Robert J; Neptune, Richard R; Sasaki, Kotaro

    2007-01-01

    Energy storage and return (ESAR) foot-ankle prostheses have been developed in an effort to improve gait performance in lower-limb amputees. However, little is known about their effectiveness in providing the body segment mechanical energetics normally provided by the ankle muscles. The objective of this theoretical study was to use muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulations of unilateral transtibial amputee and non-amputee walking to identify the contributions of ESAR prostheses to trunk support, forward propulsion and leg swing initiation and how individual muscles must compensate in order to produce a normal, symmetric gait pattern. The simulation analysis revealed the ESAR prosthesis provided the necessary trunk support, but it could not provide the net trunk forward propulsion normally provided by the plantar flexors and leg swing initiation normally provided by the biarticular gastrocnemius. To compensate, the residual leg gluteus maximus and rectus femoris delivered increased energy to the trunk for forward propulsion in early stance and late stance into pre-swing, respectively, while the residual iliopsoas delivered increased energy to the leg in pre- and early swing to help initiate swing. In the intact leg, the soleus, gluteus maximus and rectus femoris delivered increased energy to the trunk for forward propulsion in the first half of stance, while the iliopsoas increased the leg energy it delivered in pre- and early swing. Thus, the energy stored and released by the ESAR prosthesis combined with these muscle compensations was able to produce a normal, symmetric gait pattern, although various neuromuscular and musculoskeletal constraints may make such a pattern non-optimal.

  2. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Simon, Ann M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2016-01-01

    Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions) and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed.

  3. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A Ingraham

    Full Text Available Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed.

  4. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ann M.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2016-01-01

    Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions) and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed. PMID:26807889

  5. Analysis on the Load Carrying Mechanism Integrated as Heterogeneous Co-operative Manipulator in a Walking Wheelchair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajay Vedaraj, I. S.; Jain, Ritika; Rao, B. V. A.

    2014-07-01

    used for climbing stairs with three leg design and anlaysis were also done on the mechanism integrated to the system. Kinematics of the legs are analysed separately and the legs are designed to carry a maximum of 175kgs, which is sustained by the center leg and shared by the dual wing legs equally during the walking phase. In the proposed design, screwjack mechanism is used as the central leg to share the load and thus the analysis on the load sharing capability of the whole system is analysed and concluded in terms of failure modes.

  6. Joint loads in marsupial ankles reflect habitual bipedalism versus quadrupedalism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian J Carlson

    Full Text Available Joint surfaces of limb bones are loaded in compression by reaction forces generated from body weight and musculotendon complexes bridging them. In general, joints of eutherian mammals have regions of high radiodensity subchondral bone that are better at resisting compressive forces than low radiodensity subchondral bone. Identifying similar form-function relationships between subchondral radiodensity distribution and joint load distribution within the marsupial postcranium, in addition to providing a richer understanding of marsupial functional morphology, can serve as a phylogenetic control in evaluating analogous relationships within eutherian mammals. Where commonalities are established across phylogenetic borders, unifying principles in mammalian physiology, morphology, and behavior can be identified. Here, we assess subchondral radiodensity patterns in distal tibiae of several marsupial taxa characterized by different habitual activities (e.g., locomotion. Computed tomography scanning, maximum intensity projection maps, and pixel counting were used to quantify radiodensity in 41 distal tibiae of bipedal (5 species, arboreal quadrupedal (4 species, and terrestrial quadrupedal (5 species marsupials. Bipeds (Macropus and Wallabia exhibit more expansive areas of high radiodensity in the distal tibia than arboreal (Dendrolagus, Phascolarctos, and Trichosurus or terrestrial quadrupeds (Sarcophilus, Thylacinus, Lasiorhinus, and Vombatus, which may reflect the former carrying body weight only through the hind limbs. Arboreal quadrupeds exhibit smallest areas of high radiodensity, though they differ non-significantly from terrestrial quadrupeds. This could indicate slightly more compliant gaits by arboreal quadrupeds compared to terrestrial quadrupeds. The observed radiodensity patterns in marsupial tibiae, though their statistical differences disappear when controlling for phylogeny, corroborate previously documented patterns in primates and

  7. When Human Walking is a Random Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, J. M.

    1998-03-01

    The complex, hierarchical locomotor system normally does a remarkable job of controlling an inherently unstable, multi-joint system. Nevertheless, the stride interval --- the duration of a gait cycle --- fluctuates from one stride to the next, even under stationary conditions. We used random walk analysis to study the dynamical properties of these fluctuations under normal conditions and how they change with disease and aging. Random walk analysis of the stride-to-stride fluctuations of healthy, young adult men surprisingly reveals a self-similar pattern: fluctuations at one time scale are statistically similar to those at multiple other time scales (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1995). To study the stability of this fractal property, we analyzed data obtained from healthy subjects who walked for 1 hour at their usual pace, as well as at slower and faster speeds. The stride interval fluctuations exhibited long-range correlations with power-law decay for up to a thousand strides at all three walking rates. In contrast, during metronomically-paced walking, these long-range correlations disappeared; variations in the stride interval were uncorrelated and non-fractal (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1996). To gain insight into the mechanism(s) responsible for this fractal property, we examined the effects of aging and neurological impairment. Using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), we computed α, a measure of the degree to which one stride interval is correlated with previous and subsequent intervals over different time scales. α was significantly lower in healthy elderly subjects compared to young adults (p < .003) and in subjects with Huntington's disease, a neuro-degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, compared to disease-free controls (p < 0.005) (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1997). α was also significantly related to degree of functional impairment in subjects with Huntington's disease (r=0.78). Recently, we have observed that just as

  8. Tractable Quantification of Metastability for Robust Bipedal Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Existence of Jordan normal form for any square matrix is fundamental to Linear Algebra . Consider a Jordan normal form of T̂ given by T̂ = V̂ Ĵ V̂ −1, (A...027836499000900206. [Meyer, 2000] Meyer, C. D. (2000). Matrix Analysis and Applied Linear Algebra . SIAM. [Miculescu and Karaman, 2014] Miculescu, D. and Karaman, S...human-like walking robots. The most elementary approach to balancing is ignoring the kinematics and dynamics of the system and modeling the robot as

  9. Experimental verification of a computational technique for determining ground reactions in human bipedal stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audu, Musa L; Kirsch, Robert F; Triolo, Ronald J

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) biomechanical model of human standing that enables us to study the mechanisms of posture and balance simultaneously in various directions in space. Since the two feet are on the ground, the system defines a kinematically closed-chain which has redundancy problems that cannot be resolved using the laws of mechanics alone. We have developed a computational (optimization) technique that avoids the problems with the closed-chain formulation thus giving users of such models the ability to make predictions of joint moments, and potentially, muscle activations using more sophisticated musculoskeletal models. This paper describes the experimental verification of the computational technique that is used to estimate the ground reaction vector acting on an unconstrained foot while the other foot is attached to the ground, thus allowing human bipedal standing to be analyzed as an open-chain system. The computational approach was verified in terms of its ability to predict lower extremity joint moments derived from inverse dynamic simulations performed on data acquired from four able-bodied volunteers standing in various postures on force platforms. Sensitivity analyses performed with model simulations indicated which ground reaction force (GRF) and center of pressure (COP) components were most critical for providing better estimates of the joint moments. Overall, the joint moments predicted by the optimization approach are strongly correlated with the joint moments computed using the experimentally measured GRF and COP (0.78 unity slope (experimental=computational results) for postures of the four subjects examined. These results indicate that this model-based technique can be relied upon to predict reasonable and consistent estimates of the joint moments using the predicted GRF and COP for most standing postures.

  10. Tail autotomy affects bipedalism but not sprint performance in a cursorial Mediterranean lizard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvides, Pantelis; Stavrou, Maria; Pafilis, Panayiotis; Sfenthourakis, Spyros

    2017-02-01

    Running is essential in all terrestrial animals mainly for finding food and mates and escaping from predators. Lizards employ running in all their everyday functions, among which defense stands out. Besides flight, tail autotomy is another very common antipredatory strategy within most lizard families. The impact of tail loss to sprint performance seems to be species dependent. In some lizard species, tail shedding reduces sprint speed, in other species, increases it, and, in a few species, speed is not affected at all. Here, we aimed to clarify the effect of tail autotomy on the sprint performance of a cursorial lizard with particular adaptations for running, such as bipedalism and spike-like protruding scales (fringes) on the toepads that allow high speed on sandy substrates. We hypothesized that individuals that performed bipedalism, and have more and larger fringes, would achieve higher sprint performance. We also anticipated that tail shedding would affect sprint speed (though we were not able to define in what way because of the unpredictable effects that tail loss has on different species). According to our results, individuals that ran bipedally were faster; limb length and fringe size had limited effects on sprint performance whereas tail autotomy affected quadrupedal running only in females. Nonetheless, tail loss significantly affected bipedalism: the ability for running on hindlimbs was completely lost in all adult individuals and in 72.3% of juveniles.

  11. The walking robot project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P.; Sagraniching, E.; Bennett, M.; Singh, R.

    1991-01-01

    A walking robot was designed, analyzed, and tested as an intelligent, mobile, and a terrain adaptive system. The robot's design was an application of existing technologies. The design of the six legs modified and combines well understood mechanisms and was optimized for performance, flexibility, and simplicity. The body design incorporated two tripods for walking stability and ease of turning. The electrical hardware design used modularity and distributed processing to drive the motors. The software design used feedback to coordinate the system and simple keystrokes to give commands. The walking machine can be easily adapted to hostile environments such as high radiation zones and alien terrain. The primary goal of the leg design was to create a leg capable of supporting a robot's body and electrical hardware while walking or performing desired tasks, namely those required for planetary exploration. The leg designers intent was to study the maximum amount of flexibility and maneuverability achievable by the simplest and lightest leg design. The main constraints for the leg design were leg kinematics, ease of assembly, degrees of freedom, number of motors, overall size, and weight.

  12. Research of Humanoid Robot Biped Walking Model%仿人机器人双足行走模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖乐; 张玉生; 殷晨波

    2011-01-01

    针对仿人机器人双足行走的稳定性问题,引入零力矩点理论,根据稳定行走必须满足地面反作用力位于稳定区域内这个条件,推导出仿人机器人在行走过程中单双腿支撑期的稳定区域面积和稳定裕量.建立2种不同形状的仿人机器人双足模型,在足底和地面间创建一系列接触力,并通过机械系统动力学自动分析软件得到行走过程中足底各个点的受力曲线并进行受力分析,得出合理的双足形状.%Aiming at the problem of walking stability in humanoid robot, this paper introduces Zero Moment Point(ZMP) theory, the reaction force of ground must be inside the support polygon to maintain dynamic balance. The area of stable region and stability margin in single support phase and double support phase are deduced. Humanoid robot biped walking model with two different shapes is established, and a series of contact is set between sole and ground. The contact forces ware got through Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical System(ADAMS) software after analyzing simulation and the forces of the sole during walking, it gets reasonable bipedal shape.

  13. Interlimb coordination during forward walking is largely preserved in backward walking in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyns, P.; Molenaers, G.; Desloovere, K.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Limb kinematics in backward walking (BW) are essentially those of forward walking (FW) in reverse. It has been argued that subcortical mechanisms could underlie both walking modes. METHODS: Therefore, we tested whether participants with supraspinal/cortical deficits (i.e. cerebral palsy)

  14. Hand before foot? Cortical somatotopy suggests manual dexterity is primitive and evolved independently of bipedalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Ueno, Kenichi; Ogawa, Akitoshi; Asamizuya, Takeshi; Suzuki, Chisato; Cheng, Kang; Tanaka, Michio; Taoka, Miki; Iwamura, Yoshiaki; Suwa, Gen; Iriki, Atsushi

    2013-11-19

    People have long speculated whether the evolution of bipedalism in early hominins triggered tool use (by freeing their hands) or whether the necessity of making and using tools encouraged the shift to upright gait. Either way, it is commonly thought that one led to the other. In this study, we sought to shed new light on the origins of manual dexterity and bipedalism by mapping the neural representations in the brain of the fingers and toes of living people and monkeys. Contrary to the 'hand-in-glove' notion outlined above, our results suggest that adaptations underlying tool use evolved independently of those required for human bipedality. In both humans and monkeys, we found that each finger was represented separately in the primary sensorimotor cortex just as they are physically separated in the hand. This reflects the ability to use each digit independently, as required for the complex manipulation involved in tool use. The neural mapping of the subjects' toes differed, however. In the monkeys, the somatotopic representation of the toes was fused, showing that the digits function predominantly as a unit in general grasping. Humans, by contrast, had an independent neurological representation of the big toe (hallux), suggesting association with bipedal locomotion. These observations suggest that the brain circuits for the hand had advanced beyond simple grasping, whereas our primate ancestors were still general arboreal quadrupeds. This early adaptation laid the foundation for the evolution of manual dexterity, which was preserved and enhanced in hominins. In hominins, a separate adaptation, involving the neural separation of the big toe, apparently occurred with bipedality. This accords with the known fossil evidence, including the recently reported hominin fossils which have been dated to 4.4 million years ago.

  15. Walking Robot Locomotion System Conception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatova D.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work is a brief analysis on the application and perspective of using the walking robots in different areas in practice. The most common characteristics of walking four legs robots are presented here. The specific features of the applied actuators in walking mechanisms are also shown in the article. The experience of Institute of Mechanics - BAS is illustrated in creation of Spiroid and Helicon1 gears and their assembly in actuation of studied robots. Loading on joints reductors of robot legs is modelled, when the geometrical and the walking parameters of the studied robot are preliminary defined. The obtained results are purposed for designing the control of the loading of reductor type Helicon in the legs of the robot, when it is experimentally tested.

  16. System overview and walking dynamics of a passive dynamic walking robot with flat feet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “passive dynamic walking robot” refers to the robot that can walk down a shallow slope stably without any actuation and control which shows a limit cycle during walking. By adding actuation at some joints, the passive dynamic walking robot can walk stably on level ground and exhibit more versatile gaits than fully passive robot, namely, the “limit cycle walker.” In this article, we present the mechanical structures and control system design for a passive dynamic walking robot with series elastic actuators at hip joint and ankle joints. We built a walking model that consisted of an upper body, knee joints, and flat feet and derived its walking dynamics that involve double stance phases in a walking cycle based on virtual power principle. The instant just before impact was chosen as the start of one step to reduce the number of independent state variables. A numerical simulation was implemented by using MATLAB, in which the proposed passive dynamic walking model could walk stably down a shallow slope, which proves that the derived walking dynamics are correct. A physical passive robot prototype was built finally, and the experiment results show that by only simple control scheme the passive dynamic robot could walk stably on level ground.

  17. 六足步行机器人腿部机构运动学分析%Kinematic analysis of leg mechanism of six-legged walking robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金柱; 金振林; 陈广广

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase the automation level of agricultural operations, broaden the application scope of agricultural robot, and improve the ability of adapting to the different working environment and flexible work, a novel three-degree-of-freedom leg mechanism used in the six-legged walking robot is introduced. This leg mechanism comprised a drive mechanism based on 2RUS+RU parallel manipulator and a traveling mechanism based on parallelogram mechanism. The motor of drive mechanism is fixed on body frame. This leg mechanism has not only the advantage of parallel mechanism, but also a good protectiveness. In this paper, kinematic analysis and simulation of leg mechanism of six-legged walking robot is accomplished. Firstly, based on the intrinsic relationbetween the angular velocity and the angular velocity of Euler angles of the dynamic platform, the relationship matrix between linear velocity and angular velocity of driving mechanism is established. Based on that, the entireJacbian matrix in the 3×3 form of the leg mechanism is deduced by using the relationship matrix derivative method, and the explicit Hessian matrix in the 3×3×3 form of the parallel drive mechanism and the leg walking mechanism is obtained, which also adopts the method of derivative matrix. Secondly, with the rationed rotation angle of the revolute joint ranging in [-45°, 45°], a distribution diagram of condition number of the integral Jacobian matrix is drawn. The condition number of integral Jacobian matrix is changed slowly and smaller in the central region of the workspace in this diagram, so that the mechanism flexibility is good in this area and can meet the requirements of the robot movement. Lastly, under the conditions that were step increment of 300 mm and crossing obstacle height of 200 mm, the trajectory planning of the foot end is accomplished and the track function of the foot end is presented based on the method of combined polynomial, which can make the robot stable and free

  18. Reflex control of robotic gait using human walking data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Macleod

    Full Text Available Control of human walking is not thoroughly understood, which has implications in developing suitable strategies for the retraining of a functional gait following neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury (SCI. Bipedal robots allow us to investigate simple elements of the complex nervous system to quantify their contribution to motor control. RunBot is a bipedal robot which operates through reflexes without using central pattern generators or trajectory planning algorithms. Ground contact information from the feet is used to activate motors in the legs, generating a gait cycle visually similar to that of humans. Rather than developing a more complicated biologically realistic neural system to control the robot's stepping, we have instead further simplified our model by measuring the correlation between heel contact and leg muscle activity (EMG in human subjects during walking and from this data created filter functions transferring the sensory data into motor actions. Adaptive filtering was used to identify the unknown transfer functions which translate the contact information into muscle activation signals. Our results show a causal relationship between ground contact information from the heel and EMG, which allows us to create a minimal, linear, analogue control system for controlling walking. The derived transfer functions were applied to RunBot II as a proof of concept. The gait cycle produced was stable and controlled, which is a positive indication that the transfer functions have potential for use in the control of assistive devices for the retraining of an efficient and effective gait with potential applications in SCI rehabilitation.

  19. Multi-muscle control during bipedal stance: an EMG-EMG analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Boonstra, Tjeerd W; Degani, Adriana M; Cardoso, Vinicius S; Magalhaes, Alessandra T; Mochizuki, Luis; Leonard, Charles T

    2014-01-01

    Posture and postural reactions to mechanical perturbations require the harmonic modulation of the activity of multiple muscles. This precision can become suboptimal in the presence of neuromuscular disorders and result in higher fall risk and associated levels of comorbidity. This study was designed to investigate neurophysiological principles related to the generation and distribution of inputs to skeletal muscles previously recognized as a synergistic group. Specifically, we investigated the current hypothesis that correlated neural inputs, as measured by intermuscular coherence, are the mechanism used by the central nervous system to coordinate the formation of postural muscle synergies. This hypothesis was investigated by analyzing the strength and distribution of correlated neural inputs to postural muscles during the execution of a quiet stance task. Nine participants, 4 females and 5 males, mean age 29.2 years old (±6.1 SD), performed the task of standing while holding a 5-kg barbell in front of their bodies at chest level. Subjects were asked to maintain a standing position for 10 s while the activity of three postural muscles was recorded by surface electrodes: soleus (SOL), biceps femoris (BF), and lumbar erector spinae (ERE). EMG-EMG coherence was estimated for three muscle pairs (SOL/BF, SOL/ERE, and BF/ERE). Our choice of studying these muscles was made based on the fact that they have been reported as components of a functional (synergistic) muscle group that emerges during the execution of bipedal stance. In addition, an isometric contraction can be easily induced in this muscle group by simply adding a weight to the body's anterior aspect. The experimental condition elicited a significant increase in muscle activation levels for all three muscles (p EMG-EMG coherence analysis revealed significant coherence within two distinct frequency bands, 0-5 and 5-20 Hz. Significant coherence within the later frequency band was also found to be significantly

  20. Robustness: a new SLIP model based criterion for gait transitions in bipedal locomotion

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez Salazar, Harold Roberto; Carbajal, Juan Pablo; Ivanenko, Yuri P.

    2014-01-01

    Bipedal locomotion is a phenomenon that still eludes a fundamental and concise mathematical understanding. Conceptual models that capture some relevant aspects of the process exist but their full explanatory power is not yet exhausted. In the current study, we introduce the robustness criterion which defines the conditions for stable locomotion when steps are taken with imprecise angle of attack. Intuitively, the necessity of a higher precision indicates the difficulty to continue moving with...

  1. Quantum walks public key cryptographic system

    OpenAIRE

    Vlachou, C; Rodrigues, J.; Mateus, P.; Paunković, N.; Souto, A.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum Cryptography is a rapidly developing field of research that benefits from the properties of Quantum Mechanics in performing cryptographic tasks. Quantum walks are a powerful model for quantum computation and very promising for quantum information processing. In this paper, we present a quantum public-key cryptographic system based on quantum walks. In particular, in the proposed protocol the public key is given by a quantum state generated by performing a quantum walk. We show that th...

  2. Walking, places and wellbeing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, Dick; Smajic, Ifeta

    2015-01-01

    While there is a substantial body of research on the health implications of walking, the physical, emotional and social outcomes of walking have received limited attention. This paper explores the wellbeing effects of walking and how the walking environment fosters or hinders such wellbeing effects.

  3. The Walk Poem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Ron

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the long history of writing poems about a walk, noting many titles. Notes four basic types of walk poems and includes one by American poet Bill Zavatksy, called "Class Walk With Notebooks After Storm." Offers numerous brief ideas for both the writing and the form of walk poems. (SR)

  4. Two families with quadrupedalism, mental retardation, no speech, and infantile hypotonia (Uner Tan Syndrome Type-II); a novel theory for the evolutionary emergence of human bipedalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Uner

    2014-01-01

    Two consanguineous families with Uner Tan Syndrome (UTS) were analyzed in relation to self-organizing processes in complex systems, and the evolutionary emergence of human bipedalism. The cases had the key symptoms of previously reported cases of UTS, such as quadrupedalism, mental retardation, and dysarthric or no speech, but the new cases also exhibited infantile hypotonia and are designated UTS Type-II. There were 10 siblings in Branch I and 12 siblings in Branch II. Of these, there were seven cases exhibiting habitual quadrupedal locomotion (QL): four deceased and three living. The infantile hypotonia in the surviving cases gradually disappeared over a period of years, so that they could sit by about 10 years, crawl on hands and knees by about 12 years. They began walking on all fours around 14 years, habitually using QL. Neurological examinations showed normal tonus in their arms and legs, no Babinski sign, brisk tendon reflexes especially in the legs, and mild tremor. The patients could not walk in a straight line, but (except in one case) could stand up and maintain upright posture with truncal ataxia. Cerebello-vermial hypoplasia and mild gyral simplification were noted in their MRIs. The results of the genetic analysis were inconclusive: no genetic code could be identified as the triggering factor for the syndrome in these families. Instead, the extremely low socio-economic status of the patients was thought to play a role in the emergence of UTS, possibly by epigenetically changing the brain structure and function, with a consequent selection of ancestral neural networks for QL during locomotor development. It was suggested that UTS may be regarded as one of the unpredictable outcomes of self-organization within a complex system. It was also noted that the prominent feature of this syndrome, the diagonal-sequence habitual QL, generated an interference between ipsilateral hands and feet, as in non-human primates. It was suggested that this may have been

  5. Comparative analysis between radiographic views for knee osteoarthrosis (bipedal AP versus monopedal AP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pires e Albuquerque

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A comparative analysis by applying the criteria of the original classification Ahlbäck in the anteroposterior (AP bipedal knee in extension and anteroposterior (AP monopodal knee in symptomatic knee arthrosis. With this analysis we intend to observe the agreement, any advantage or difference between the incidence and degree of joint involvement between the orthopedic surgeons and radiologists with the referring physician. METHODS: From January 2012 to March 2012, was a prospective study of 60 symptomatic arthrosis knees (60 patients, clinically selected group of outpatient knee and radiographic proposals submitted to the search. Of the 60 patients, 39 were female and 21 male, mean age 64 years (ranging from 50 to 84 years. Of the 60 knees studied, 37 corresponded to the right side and 23 on the left side. Statistical analysis was performed by Kappa statistics, which evaluates the interobserver agreement for qualitative data. RESULTS: According to the scale of Ahlbäck, there was a significant agreement (p < 0.0001 intra-observer in the classification of knee osteoarthritis among the five evaluators. There was a significant agreement (p < 0.0001 with inter-observer referring physician in the incidence of AP monopodal and AP bipedal for the four raters. CONCLUSION: The study found no difference between the incidence in the AP monopodal versus AP bipedal in osteoarthritis of the knee.

  6. Bipedal locomotion in Tropidurus torquatus (Wied, 1820 and Liolaemus lutzae Mertens, 1938

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Rocha-Barbosa

    Full Text Available Bipedalism has evolved on numerous occasions in phylogenetically diverse lizard families. In this paper we describe, for the first time, bipedal locomotion on South American lizards, the sand-dweller Liolaemus lutzae and the generalist Tropidurus torquatus. The lizards were videotaped running on a racetrack and the sequences were analyzed frame by frame. The body posture, as a whole, diverged a lot during bipedal locomotion between the two species, even though there was no difference regarding their sprint performance. The locomotor behavior of L. lutzae is, in general, more similar to the one observed on other sand-dweller lizards. Certain particularities are common, such as the digitigrade posture at footfall and throughout stance, trunk angles; and tail posture. In contrast, T. torquatus exhibited high trunk angles and dragged its tail, in a posture compared to basilisks. This body posture could be related to certain characteristics and obstacles of a microhabitat such as the one around lakes and streams (basilisks and the one with compact shrubby vegetation (T. torquatus.

  7. Optimal bipedal interactions with dynamic terrain: synthesis and analysis via nonlinear programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubicki, Christian; Goldman, Daniel; Ames, Aaron

    In terrestrial locomotion, gait dynamics and motor control behaviors are tuned to interact efficiently and stably with the dynamics of the terrain (i.e. terradynamics). This controlled interaction must be particularly thoughtful in bipeds, as their reduced contact points render them highly susceptible to falls. While bipedalism under rigid terrain assumptions is well-studied, insights for two-legged locomotion on soft terrain, such as sand and dirt, are comparatively sparse. We seek an understanding of how biological bipeds stably and economically negotiate granular media, with an eye toward imbuing those abilities in bipedal robots. We present a trajectory optimization method for controlled systems subject to granular intrusion. By formulating a large-scale nonlinear program (NLP) with reduced-order resistive force theory (RFT) models and jamming cone dynamics, the optimized motions are informed and shaped by the dynamics of the terrain. Using a variant of direct collocation methods, we can express all optimization objectives and constraints in closed-form, resulting in rapid solving by standard NLP solvers, such as IPOPT. We employ this tool to analyze emergent features of bipedal locomotion in granular media, with an eye toward robotic implementation.

  8. Effect of walking speed on the gait of king penguins: An accelerometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willener, Astrid S T; Handrich, Yves; Halsey, Lewis G; Strike, Siobhán

    2015-12-21

    Little is known about non-human bipedal gaits. This is probably due to the fact that most large animals are quadrupedal and that non-human bipedal animals are mostly birds, whose primary form of locomotion is flight. Very little research has been conducted on penguin pedestrian locomotion with the focus instead on their associated high energy expenditure. In animals, tri-axial accelerometers are frequently used to estimate physiological energy cost, as well as to define the behaviour pattern of a species, or the kinematics of swimming. In this study, we showed how an accelerometer-based technique could be used to determine the biomechanical characteristics of pedestrian locomotion. Eight king penguins, which represent the only family of birds to have an upright bipedal gait, were trained to walk on a treadmill. The trunk tri-axial accelerations were recorded while the bird was walking at four different speeds (1.0, 1.2, 1.4 and 1.6km/h), enabling the amplitude of dynamic body acceleration along the three axes (amplitude of DBAx, DBAy and DBAz), stride frequency, waddling and leaning amplitude, as well as the leaning angle to be defined. The magnitude of the measured variables showed a significant increase with increasing speed, apart from the backwards angle of lean, which decreased with increasing speed. The variability of the measured variables also showed a significant increase with speed apart from the DBAz amplitude, the waddling amplitude, and the leaning angle, where no significant effect of the walking speed was found. This paper is the first approach to describe 3D biomechanics with an accelerometer on wild animals, demonstrating the potential of this technique.

  9. A model-experiment comparison of system dynamics for human walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipfert, Susanne W; Günther, Michael; Renjewski, Daniel; Grimmer, Sten; Seyfarth, Andre

    2012-01-07

    The human musculo-skeletal system comprises high complexity which makes it difficult to identify underlying basic principles of bipedal locomotion. To tackle this challenge, a common approach is to strip away complexity and formulate a reductive model. With utter simplicity a bipedal spring-mass model gives good predictions of the human gait dynamics, however, it has not been fully investigated whether center of mass motion over time of walking and running is comparable between the model and the human body over a wide range of speed. To test the model's ability in this respect, we compare sagittal center of mass trajectories of model and human data for speeds ranging from 0.5 m/s to 4 m/s. For simulations, system parameters and initial conditions are extracted from experimental observations of 28 subjects. The leg parameters stiffness and length are extracted from functional fitting to the subjects' leg force-length curves. With small variations of the touch-down angle of the leg and the vertical position of the center of mass at apex, we find successful spring-mass simulations for moderate walking and medium running speeds. Predictions of the sagittal center of mass trajectories and ground reaction forces are good, but their amplitudes are overestimated, while contact time is underestimated. At faster walking speeds and slower running speeds we do not find successful model locomotion with the extent of allowed parameter variation. We conclude that the existing limitations may be improved by adding complexity to the model.

  10. Fire-Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  11. Research of 6-DOF Serial-Parallel Mechanism Platform for Stability Training of Legged-Walking Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Guo Wu; Wen-Qian Du

    2014-01-01

    The concept of legged-robot stability training with a training platform is proposed and a serial-parallel mechanism platform with 6 degrees of freedom is designed for this target. The designed platform is composed of 4-DOF parallel mechanism with spherical joints and prismatic pairs, and 2-DOF serial mechanism with prismatic pairs. With this design, the platform has advantages of low platform countertop, big workspace, high carrying capacity and high stiffness. On the basis of DOF analysis and computation of space mechanism, weight supporting auxiliary mechanism and raceways-balls supporting mechanism are designed, so as to improve the stiffness of designed large platform and payload capacity of servo motors. And then the whole structure design work of the platform is done. Meanwhile, this paper derives the analytical solutions of forward kinematics, inverse kinematics and inverse dynamics. The error analysis model of position and orientation is established. And then the simulation is done in ADAMS to ensure the correctness and feasibility of this design.

  12. Mechanical energy estimation during walking: validity and sensitivity in typical gait and in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Walle, P; Hallemans, A; Schwartz, M; Truijen, S; Gosselink, R; Desloovere, K

    2012-02-01

    Gait efficiency in children with cerebral palsy is usually quantified by metabolic energy expenditure. Mechanical energy estimations, however, can be a valuable supplement as they can be assessed during gait analysis and plotted over the gait cycle, thus revealing information on timing and sources of increases in energy expenditure. Unfortunately, little information on validity and sensitivity exists. Three mechanical estimation approaches: (1) centre of mass (CoM) approach, (2) sum of segmental energies (SSE) approach and (3) integrated joint power approach, were validated against oxygen consumption and each other. Sensitivity was assessed in typical gait and in children with diplegia. CoM approach underestimated total energy expenditure and showed poor sensitivity. SSE approach overestimated energy expenditure and showed acceptable sensitivity. Validity and sensitivity were best in the integrated joint power approach. This method is therefore preferred for mechanical energy estimation in children with diplegia. However, mechanical energy should supplement, not replace metabolic energy, as total energy expended is not captured in any mechanical approach.

  13. Kinematics Analysis and Parametric Design of a Walking Mechanism of Bionic Biped Water-Walking Robot%仿生双足水上行走机器人行走机构的运动学分析及参数化设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹凯; 徐林森; 沈惠平; 魏鲜明

    2013-01-01

    A walking mechanism of bionic biped water -walking robot is designed; educing the equations of the location, velocity, and acceleration of two feet mass sports center. To simulate the foot trajectory of basilisk lizard's, the foot rod and the horizontal plane angle curve is taken as the objective of parameter design, and the influences of the foot rod bar length change to the foot rid and the horizontal plane angle is analyzed through the software. The walking mechanism is parametric designed by analyzing the influential factors of sensitivity. Finally the parametric designed mechanism is simulated, and the simulation results show that the movement of this bionic walking mechanism can meet the basilisk lizards 'foot trajectory.%设计了仿生双足水上行走机器人行走机构,通过运动学分析导出了两脚掌质心的运动轨迹方程、速度及加速度方程;以模拟蛇怪蜥蜴脚掌的运动轨迹为目标,以脚杆与水平面的夹角曲线作为目标进行参数化设计,通过软件分析得到了各部分杆长变化对脚杆与水平面的夹角的影响,经过分析影响因素的敏感度,对机构进行参数化设计.最后对参数化设计的机构进行仿真分析,仿真结果表明,该仿生机构脚杆的运动能够满足蛇怪蜥蜴脚掌的运动轨迹.

  14. Two families with quadrupedalism, mental retardation, no speech, and infantile hypotonia (Uner Tan Syndrome Type-II; a novel theory for the evolutionary emergence of human bipedalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uner eTan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Two consanguineous families with Uner Tan Syndrome (UTS were analyzed in relation to self-organizing processes in complex systems, and the evolutionary emergence of human bipedalism. The cases had the key symptoms of previously reported cases of UTS, such as quadrupedalism, mental retardation, and dysarthric or no speech, but the new cases also exhibited infantile hypotonia and are designated UTS Type-II. There were 10 siblings in Branch I and 12 siblings in Branch II. Of these, there were seven cases exhibiting habitual quadrupedal locomotion (QL: four deceased and three living. The infantile hypotonia in the surviving cases gradually disappeared over a period of years, so that they could sit by about 10 years, crawl on hands and knees by about 12 years. They began walking on all fours around 14 years, habitually using QL. Neurological examinations showed normal tonus in their arms and legs, no Babinski sign, brisk tendon reflexes especially in the legs, and mild tremor. The patients could not walk in a straight line, but (except in one case could stand up and maintain upright posture with truncal ataxia. Cerebello-vermial hypoplasia and mild gyral simplification were noted in their MRIs. The results of the genetic analysis were inconclusive: no genetic code could be identified as the triggering factor for the syndrome in these families. Instead, the extremely low socio-economic status of the patients was thought to play a role in the emergence of UTS, possibly by epigenetically changing the brain structure and function, with a consequent selection of ancestral neural networks for QL during locomotor development. It was suggested that UTS may be regarded as one of the unpredictable outcomes of self-organization within a complex system. It was also noted that the prominent feature of this syndrome, the diagonal-sequence habitual QL, generated an interference between ipsilateral hands and feet, as in non-human primates. It was suggested that this

  15. On alternating quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseva, Jenia; Kovchegov, Yevgeniy

    2017-03-01

    We study an inhomogeneous quantum walk on a line that evolves according to alternating coins, each a rotation matrix. For the quantum walk with the coin alternating between clockwise and counterclockwise rotations by the same angle, we derive a closed form solution for the propagation of probabilities, and provide its asymptotic approximation via the method of stationary phase. Finally, we observe that for a x03c0;/4 angle, this alternating rotation walk will replicate the renown Hadamard walk.

  16. Feeding strategies as revealed by the section moduli of the humerus bones in bipedal theropod dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott; Richards, Zachary

    2015-03-01

    The section modulus of a bone is a measure of its ability to resist bending torques. Carnivorous dinosaurs presumably had strong arm bones to hold struggling prey during hunting. Some theropods are believed to have become herbivorous and such animals would not have needed such strong arms. In this work, the section moduli of the humerus bones of bipedal theropod dinosaurs (from Microvenator celer to Tyrannosaurus rex) are studied to determine the maximum bending loads their arms could withstand. The results show that bending strength is not of uniform importance to these magnificent animals. The predatory theropods had strong arms for use in hunting. In contrast, the herbivorous dinosaurs had weaker arms.

  17. Design Issues for Hexapod Walking Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Tedeschi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hexapod walking robots have attracted considerable attention for several decades. Many studies have been carried out in research centers, universities and industries. However, only in the recent past have efficient walking machines been conceived, designed and built with performances that can be suitable for practical applications. This paper gives an overview of the state of the art on hexapod walking robots by referring both to the early design solutions and the most recent achievements. Careful attention is given to the main design issues and constraints that influence the technical feasibility and operation performance. A design procedure is outlined in order to systematically design a hexapod walking robot. In particular, the proposed design procedure takes into account the main features, such as mechanical structure and leg configuration, actuating and driving systems, payload, motion conditions, and walking gait. A case study is described in order to show the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed design procedure.

  18. Walk modularity and community structure in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrle, David; Harkin, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Modularity maximization has been one of the most widely used approaches in the last decade for discovering community structure in networks of practical interest in biology, computing, social science, statistical mechanics, and more. Modularity is a quality function that measures the difference between the number of edges found within clusters minus the number of edges one would statistically expect to find based on random chance. We present a natural generalization of modularity based on the difference between the actual and expected number of walks within clusters, which we call walk-modularity. Walk-modularity can be expressed in matrix form, and community detection can be performed by finding leading eigenvectors of the walk-modularity matrix. We demonstrate community detection on both synthetic and real-world networks and find that walk-modularity maximization returns significantly improved results compared to traditional modularity maximization.

  19. Bipedality and hair loss in human evolution revisited: The impact of altitude and activity scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávid-Barrett, Tamás; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2016-05-01

    Bipedality evolved early in hominin evolution, and at some point was associated with hair loss over most of the body. One classic explanation (Wheeler 1984: J. Hum. Evol. 13, 91-98) was that these traits evolved to reduce heat overload when australopiths were foraging in more open tropical habitats where they were exposed to the direct effects of sunlight at midday. A recent critique of this model (Ruxton & Wilkinson 2011a: Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 20965-20969) argued that it ignored the endogenous costs of heat generated by locomotion, and concluded that only hair loss provided a significant reduction in heat load. We add two crucial corrections to this model (the altitude at which australopiths actually lived and activity scheduling) and show that when these are included there are substantial reductions in heat load for bipedal locomotion even for furred animals. In addition, we add one further consideration to the model: we extend the analysis across the full 24 h day, and show that fur loss could not have evolved until much later because of the thermoregulatory costs this would have incurred at the altitudes where australopiths actually lived. Fur loss is most likely associated with the exploitation of open habitats at much lower altitudes at a much later date by the genus Homo.

  20. A bipedal DNA motor that travels back and forth between two DNA origami tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liber, Miran; Tomov, Toma E; Tsukanov, Roman; Berger, Yaron; Nir, Eyal

    2015-02-04

    In this work, the successful operation of a dynamic DNA device constructed from two DNA origami building blocks is reported. The device includes a bipedal walker that strides back and forth between the two origami tiles. Two different DNA origami tiles are first prepared separately; they are then joined together in a controlled manner by a set of DNA strands to form a stable track in high yield as confirmed by single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). Second, a bipedal DNA motor, initially attached to one of the two origami units and operated by sequential interaction with "fuel" and "antifuel" DNA strands, moves from one origami tile to another and then back again. The operational yield, measured by SMF, was similar to that of a motor operating on a similar track embedded in a single origami tile, confirming that the transfer across the junction from one tile to the other does not result in dissociation that is any more than that of steps on a single tile. These results demonstrate that moving parts can reliably travel from one origami unit to another, and it demonstrates the feasibility of dynamic DNA molecular machines that are made of more than a single origami building block. This study is a step toward the development of motors that can stride over micrometer distances.

  1. Push recovery for the standing under-actuated bipedal robot using the hip strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao LI; Rong XIONG‡; Qiu-guo ZHU; Jun WU; Ya-liang WANG; Yi-ming HUANG

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a control algorithm for push recovery, which particularly focuses on the hip strategy when an external disturbance is applied on the body of a standing under-actuated biped. By analyzing a simplified dynamic model of a bipedal robot in the stance phase, it is found that horizontal stability can be maintained with a suitably controlled torque applied at the hip. However, errors in the angle or angular velocity of body posture may appear, due to the dynamic coupling of the transla-tional and rotational motions. To solve this problem, different hip strategies are discussed for two cases when (1) external dis-turbance is applied on the center of mass (CoM) and (2) external torque is acting around the CoM, and a universal hip strategy is derived for most disturbances. Moreover, three torque primitives for the hip, depending on the type of disturbance, are designed to achieve translational and rotational balance recovery simultaneously. Compared with closed-loop control, the advantage of the open-loop methods of torque primitives lies in rapid response and reasonable performance. Finally, simulation studies of the push recovery of a bipedal robot are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  2. How Fast Can a Human Run? − Bipedal vs. Quadrupedal Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinugasa, Ryuta; Usami, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Usain Bolt holds the current world record in the 100-m run, with a running time of 9.58 s, and has been described as the best human sprinter in history. However, this raises questions concerning the maximum human running speed, such as “Can the world’s fastest men become faster still?” The correct answer is likely “Yes.” We plotted the historical world records for bipedal and quadrupedal 100-m sprint times according to competition year. These historical records were plotted using several curve-fitting procedures. We found that the projected speeds intersected in 2048, when for the first time, the winning quadrupedal 100-m sprint time could be lower, at 9.276 s, than the winning bipedal time of 9.383 s. Video analysis revealed that in quadrupedal running, humans employed a transverse gallop with a small angular excursion. These results suggest that in the future, the fastest human on the planet might be a quadrupedal runner at the 2048 Olympics. This may be achieved by shifting up to the rotary gallop and taking longer strides with wide sagittal trunk motion. PMID:27446911

  3. A Passive Dynamic Walking Model Based on Knee-Bend Behaviour: Stability and Adaptability for Walking Down Steep Slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang An

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a passive dynamic walking model based on knee-bend behaviour, which is inspired by the way human beings walk. The length and mass parameters of human beings are used in the walking model. The knee-bend mechanism of the stance leg is designed in the phase between knee-strike and heel- strike. q* which is the angular difference of the stance leg between the two events, knee-strike and knee-bend, is adjusted in order to find a stable walking motion. The results show that the stable periodic walking motion on a slope of r <0.4 can be found by adjusting q*. Furthermore, with a particular q* in the range of 0.12walk down more steps before falling down on an arbitrary slope. The walking motion is more stable and adaptable than the conventional walking motion, especially for steep slopes.

  4. Water-walking devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, David L.; Prakash, Manu; Chan, Brian; Bush, John W. M.

    We report recent efforts in the design and construction of water-walking machines inspired by insects and spiders. The fundamental physical constraints on the size, proportion and dynamics of natural water-walkers are enumerated and used as design criteria for analogous mechanical devices. We report devices capable of rowing along the surface, leaping off the surface and climbing menisci by deforming the free surface. The most critical design constraint is that the devices be lightweight and non-wetting. Microscale manufacturing techniques and new man-made materials such as hydrophobic coatings and thermally actuated wires are implemented. Using highspeed cinematography and flow visualization, we compare the functionality and dynamics of our devices with those of their natural counterparts.

  5. Control of a Step Walking Combined to Arms Swinging for a Three Dimensional Humanoid Prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Aloulou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Present researches focus to make humanoid robots more and more autonomous so they can assist human in daily works like taking care of children, aged or disabled persons. In such social activities, the contemporary humanoid robots are expected to have human like morphology and gait. Studies on bipedal locomotion for humanoid robots are then part of the hottest topics in the field of robotic researches. Knowing the benefits of arm swinging for human gait, we propose in this study a new prototype of female humanoid robot morphology having the capabilities to swing arms during step walking. Approach: A new humanoid robot prototype had been introduced based on a human morphology corresponding to a woman whose weight is 70 kg and height is 1,73 m and using realistic gait parameters of a women. The female humanoid robot prototype was composed of fifteen links associated to twenty-six degrees of freedom. Winter statistical model had been applied to determine all physical parameters corresponding to each link. Modeling the proposed humanoid robot implies first to establish the kinematic model basically founded on Euler’s transformation matrix and then to set the dynamic model computed using the Newton-Euler method. To show how the arms played an important role in bipedal gait, we had chosen to consider the whole body as two independent robotic systems: the upper body and the lower body. Results: Both three dimensional kinematic and dynamic models of the humanoid robot had been developed. The three dimensional humanoid robot was controlled via a feedback linearization control during the single support, impact and double support phases. The simulation results showed the arm swing during the step of walking. Conclusion: The humanoid robot proposed has a human like morphology and ensures the function of a step walking with arm swinging. The applied control laws have ensured to the robot desired performances during a step walking.

  6. Treadmill walking is not equivalent to overground walking for the study of walking smoothness and rhythmicity in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row Lazzarini, Brandi S; Kataras, Theodore J

    2016-05-01

    Treadmills are appealing for gait studies, but some gait mechanics are disrupted during treadmill walking. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of speed and treadmill walking on walking smoothness and rhythmicity of 40 men and women between the ages of 70-96 years. Gait smoothness was examined during overground (OG) and treadmill (TM) walking by calculating the harmonic ratio from linear accelerations measured at the level of the lumbar spine. Rhythmicity was quantified as the stride time standard deviation. TM walking was performed at two speeds: a speed matching the natural OG walk speed (TM-OG), and a preferred TM speed (PTM). A dual-task OG condition (OG-DT) was evaluated to determine if TM walking posed a similar cognitive challenge. Statistical analysis included a one-way Analysis of Variance with Bonferroni corrected post hoc comparisons and the Wilcoxon signed rank test for non-normally distributed variables. Average PTM speed was slower than OG. Compared to OG, those who could reach the TM-OG speed (74.3% of sample) exhibited improved ML smoothness and rhythmicity, and the slower PTM caused worsened vertical and AP smoothness, but did not affect rhythmicity. PTM disrupted smoothness and rhythmicity differently than the OG-DT condition, likely due to reduced speed. The use of treadmills for gait smoothness and rhythmicity studies in older adults is problematic; some participants will not achieve OG speed during TM walking, walking at the TM-OG speed artificially improves rhythmicity and ML smoothness, and walking at the slower PTM speed worsens vertical and AP gait smoothness.

  7. Development of energy and time parameters in the walking of healthy human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tasuku; Yaguramaki, Naoko; Fujita, Masaki; Ogiue-Ikeda, Mari; Nishizawa, Satoshi; Ueda, Yutaka

    2005-11-01

    Sixteen infants were analyzed longitudinally from the onset of independent walking to 3 years of age using time parameters, speed and energy recovery. Considerable variation and irregularities were observed in many parameters of infant walking, especially until 13 months of age when infants had difficulty in walking steadily step by step. Infant walking until 3 years of age was characterized by a small braking duration, caused mainly by the forward inclination of the trunk, a large relative stance phase duration, which maintained static balance, short stride length, due to the small range of the lower limb joint angle, and a small recovery of external energy. These characteristics were also predominantly evident until 13 months of age. The small recovery characteristic of infants was caused by flexed lower limb joints, pronounced irregularities in energy output, and in younger infants, slow speed. The maximum recovery up until 2 years of age, though smaller than in adults, appeared at about 0.45 dimensionless speed, which is about the same speed that adults in particular naturally and at which their maximum recovery appeared. The forward inclination of the trunk and the lower limb joint angle, influenced the development of many characteristics of bipedal walking.

  8. Rhythm Pattern of Sole through Electrification of the Human Body When Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, Kiyoaki; Wada, Takayuki; Tohyama, Shigeki

    The rhythm of automatic cyclic movements such as walking is known to be generated by a rhythm generator called CPG in the spinal cord. The measurement of rhythm characteristics in walking is considered to be important for analyzing human bipedal walking and adaptive walking on irregular terrain. In particular, the soles that contact the terrain surface perform flexible movements similar to the movement of the fins of a lungfish, which is considered to be the predecessor of land animals. The sole movements are believed to be a basic movement acquired during prehistoric times. The detailed rhythm pattern of sole motion is considered to be important. We developed a method for measuring electrification without installing device on a subject's body and footwear for stabilizing the electrification of the human body. We measured the rhythm pattern of 20 subjects including 4 infants when walking by using this system and the corresponding equipment. Therefore, we confirmed the commonality of the correlative rhythm patterns of 20 subjects. Further, with regard to an individual subject, the reproducibility of a rhythm pattern with strong correlation coefficient > 0.93 ± 0.5 (mean ± SD) concerning rhythms of trials that are differently conducted on adult subjects could be confirmed.

  9. Quantum walk public-key cryptographic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachou, C.; Rodrigues, J.; Mateus, P.; Paunković, N.; Souto, A.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum Cryptography is a rapidly developing field of research that benefits from the properties of Quantum Mechanics in performing cryptographic tasks. Quantum walks are a powerful model for quantum computation and very promising for quantum information processing. In this paper, we present a quantum public-key cryptographic system based on quantum walks. In particular, in the proposed protocol the public-key is given by a quantum state generated by performing a quantum walk. We show that the protocol is secure and analyze the complexity of public key generation and encryption/decryption procedures.

  10. Virtually Abelian quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro D'Ariano, Giacomo; Erba, Marco; Perinotti, Paolo; Tosini, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    We study discrete-time quantum walks on Cayley graphs of non-Abelian groups, focusing on the easiest case of virtually Abelian groups. We present a technique to reduce the quantum walk to an equivalent one on an Abelian group with coin system having larger dimension. This method allows one to extend the notion of wave-vector to the virtually Abelian case and study analytically the walk dynamics. We apply the technique in the case of two quantum walks on virtually Abelian groups with planar Cayley graphs, finding the exact solution in terms of dispersion relation.

  11. Walks on Weighted Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU An-Cai; XU Xin-Jian; WU Zhi-Xi; WANG Ying-Hai

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of random walks on weighted networks. Assuming that the edge weight and the node strength are used as local information by a random walker. Two kinds of walks, weight-dependent walk and strength-dependent walk, are studied. Exact expressions for stationary distribution and average return time are derived and confirmed by computer simulations. The distribution of average return time and the mean-square that a weight-dependent walker can arrive at a new territory more easily than a strength-dependent one.

  12. Prediction of walking possibility in crawling children in poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, S S; Tandon, H

    1999-01-01

    Crawling is one of the most common modes of ambulating in children with severe paralysis and deformities in poliomyelitis. Restoring upright posture and bipedal gait, although desirable, has its own limitations due to various factors. Fifty-three children below the age of 12 years (29 boys and 24 girls) crawling due to post-poliomyelitis residual paralysis were assessed for the genesis of crawling as a mode of ambulating. The patterns of crawling were classified according to Cross's classification. Paralyzed muscles and deformities in definite combinations were found responsible for each type of crawling. Trunk muscles, gluteus maximus, quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae were identified as muscles crucial for walking in order of priority. At least antigravity power in these muscles was necessary for an upright posture and walking with support. Various combinations of treatment modalities were used to correct the deformities before fitting an orthosis and instituting gait training. Thirty-four children became outdoor walkers, 14 indoor walkers, and five remained nonwalkers. The most favorable patterns of crawling for restoration of upright posture were true quadruped progression (30 cases) and infant-like crawl (14 cases). Average follow-up was 17 months (range, 6 months to 5 years).

  13. Emergence of bipedal locomotion through entrainment among the neuro-musculo-skeletal system and the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taga, Gentaro

    1994-08-01

    A principle of locomotor control in an unpredictably changing environment is presented on the basis of neurophysiology and biomechanics from the perspective of nonlinear dynamics theory. Locomotor movements emerge as a limit cycle generated through global entrainment among the neuro-musculo-skeletal system and the environment. A computer simulation of a specific model of bipedal locomotion shows its ability to adapt to a changing environment in real-time. The stability of the limit cycle is maintained despite the presence of time delays in transporting and processing information between the neural rhythm generator and the musculo-skeletal system. With considerable time delays, however, the locomotor pattern becomes chaotic, which is compared with a gait of patients with neural deficits. A general framework for motor control is discussed toward the control of movements in an unpredictable environment.

  14. Intra-task variability of trunk coordination during a rate-controlled bipedal dance jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jo Armour; Siemienski, Adam; Popovich, John M; Kulig, Kornelia

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated trunk coordination during rate-controlled bipedal vertical dance jumps. The aims of the study were to investigate the pattern of coordination and the magnitude of coordination variability within jump phases and relative to phase-defining events during the jump. Lumbar and thoracic kinematics were collected from seven dancers during a series of jumps at 95 beats per minute. The vector coding technique was used to quantify the pattern and variability of trunk coordination. Coordination was predominantly anti-phase during propulsion and landing. Mean coordination variability peaked just before the landing phase and at the transition from landing to propulsion phases, and was lowest during the propulsion phase just before toe-off. The results indicate that peaks in variability could be explained by task and phase-specific biomechanical demands.

  15. The influence of initial bipedal stance width on the clinical measurement of unipedal balance time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, James K.; Tang, Chi; Nwagwu, Chijioke; Nnodim, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of varying initial bipedal stance width (ISW) on the clinical measurement of unipedal balance time (UBT). Design Observational, cross sectional study. Setting Academic physiatric outpatient facility. Subjects Thirty-one clinic subjects with neuromuscular and/or musculoskeletal conditions known to influence mobility, and 30 similarly-aged healthy subjects. Methods Demographic and clinical information were recorded. UBT was determined under three distinct conditions by varying bipedal inter-malleolar distance: 1) ISW of 0.3 body height; 2) ISW of 0.05 body height; and 3) ISW of 0 body height. The last was accomplished by subjects assuming unipedal balance while using the hands on a horizontal surface for stabilization. Subjects lifted the contralateral foot (or hands in the case of 0 body height condition) in response to a cadenced command to minimize variation in rate of weight transfer Main Outcome Measurements UBT under each of the three ISW conditions. Results Mean UBT increased with decreasing ISW, and the differences were significant when comparing each ISW with the next smaller. Healthy subjects demonstrated greater UBT than clinic subjects at each ISW, but the magnitude of these group differences were similar across ISW condition. A UBT > 10 seconds in the 0.3 body height ISW was the best discriminator between clinic and healthy subjects. Conclusions Because UBT varies with ISW, standardization of ISW is necessary for accurate within subject, and between subject, comparisons in UBT. Healthy subjects were best differentiated from clinic subjects by UBT > 10 sec in the 0.3 body height ISW condition. PMID:20430326

  16. More Adults Are Walking

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-31

    This podcast is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.  Created: 7/31/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/7/2012.

  17. The Dead Walk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Phillips

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Monsters have always enjoyed a significant presence in the human imagination, and religion was instrumental in replacing the physical horror they engendered with that of a moral threat. Zombies, however, are amoral – their motivation purely instinctive and arbitrary, yet they are, perhaps, the most loathed of all contemporary monsters. One explanation for this lies in the theory of the uncanny valley, proposed by robotics engineer Masahiro Mori. According to the theory, we reserve our greatest fears for those things which seem most human, yet are not – such as dead bodies. Such a reaction is most likely a survival mechanism to protect us from danger and disease – a mechanism even more essential when the dead rise up and walk. From their beginnings zombies have reflected western societies’ greatest fears – be they of revolutionary Haitians, women, or communists. In recent years the rise in the popularity of the zombie in films, books and television series reflects our fears for the planet, the economy, and of death itself

  18. Energy expenditure during walking in amputees after disarticulation of the hip. A microprocessor-controlled swing-phase control knee versus a mechanical-controlled stance-phase control knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, T; Sawamura, S; Shiba, R; Oyabu, H; Nagakura, Y; Nakagawa, A

    2005-01-01

    We have compared the energy expenditure during walking in three patients, aged between 51 and 55 years, with unilateral disarticulation of the hip when using the mechanical-controlled stance-phase control knee (Otto Bock 3R15) and the microprocessor-controlled pneumatic swing-phase control knee (Intelligent Prosthesis, IP). All had an endoskeletal hip disarticulation prosthesis with an Otto Bock 7E7 hip and a single-axis foot. The energy expenditure was measured when walking at speeds of 30, 50, and 70 m/min. Two patients showed a decreased uptake of oxygen (energy expenditure per unit time, ml/kg/min) of between 10.3% and 39.6% when using the IP compared with the Otto Bock 3R15 at the same speeds. One did not show any significant difference in the uptake of oxygen at 30 m/min, but at 50 and 70 m/min, a decrease in uptake of between 10.5% and 11.6% was found when using the IP. The use of the IP decreased the energy expenditure of walking in these patients.

  19. Biomechanical analysis of rollator walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Larsen, Peter K; Pedersen, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects.......The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects....

  20. Bipedal gait experiment for functional electrical stimulation%服务于功能性电刺激的双足步态实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王颖; 张定国

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Functional electrical stimulation (FES) uses electrical pulse of low level to stimulate the peripheral nerve of muscles in order to restore the motor functions, and it has already achieved clinical success in area of paraplegic walking. However, the patterns of FES are inflexible, unstable and hard to operate for the end-users at present.OBJECTIVE: To study the synergistic action of the muscles involved in walking movements for simplifying the design of FES control patterns based on gait analysis and to make the subjects perform expected involuntary walking movements using FES.METHODS: According to the characteristics of bipedal walking, a method of gait research was proposed based on measurement and analysis of joint angle and electromyography signal. It served for FES system design, which generated the desired stimulation patterns for muscle groups of lower limbs, and realized the corresponding collaborative activation of the muscle groups.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Satisfactory involuntary walking of a healthy subject without self-control was realized using the FES method proposed. The results from the experiment had verified the feasibility of FES in lower limb rehabilitation. It sheds light on more complex FES control methods, and provides experimental support for clinical study on paralyzed patients in future.%背景:功能性电刺激利用低频弱电流脉冲刺激失去神经控制的肌肉已经在截瘫行走的临床应用中取得了小范围成功,但现有的电刺激模式存在不灵活、不易操作、且稳定性不高的缺点.目的:基于步态分析方法,研究涉及到步行动作的各肌肉群的协同动作关系,将肌肉电刺激模式简化为无需患者操作的规律性控制策略,并验证该策略在功能性电刺激实验中的有效性.方法:针对双足步行的特点,提出一种基于关节角变化趋势及肌电信号强度变化的步态研究方法,旨在服务于功能性电刺激的设计,为下肢肌肉

  1. Levy random walks on multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Quantong; Zheng, Zhiming; Moreno, Yamir

    2016-01-01

    Random walks constitute a fundamental mechanism for many dynamics taking place on complex networks. Besides, as a more realistic description of our society, multiplex networks have been receiving a growing interest, as well as the dynamical processes that occur on top of them. Here, inspired by one specific model of random walks that seems to be ubiquitous across many scientific fields, the Levy flight, we study a new navigation strategy on top of multiplex networks. Capitalizing on spectral graph and stochastic matrix theories, we derive analytical expressions for the mean first passage time and the average time to reach a node on these networks. Moreover, we also explore the efficiency of Levy random walks, which we found to be very different as compared to the single layer scenario, accounting for the structure and dynamics inherent to the multiplex network. Finally, by comparing with some other important random walk processes defined on multiplex networks, we find that in some region of the parameters, a ...

  2. Effect of expertise in shooting and Taekwondo on bipedal and unipedal postural control isolated or concurrent with a reaction-time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahban, Hossein; Aryan, Najmolhoda; Mazaheri, Masood; Norasteh, Ali Asghar; Sanjari, Mohammad Ali

    2013-06-01

    It was hypothesized that training in 'static balance' or 'dynamic balance' sports has differential effects on postural control and its attention demands during quiet standing. In order to test this hypothesis, two groups of female athletes practicing shooting, as a 'static balance' sport, and Taekwondo, as a 'dynamic balance' sport, and a control group of non-physically active females voluntarily participated in this study. Postural control was assessed during bipedal and unipedal stance with and without performing a Go/No-go reaction time task. Visual and/or support surface conditions were manipulated in bipedal and unipedal stances in order to modify postural difficulty. Mixed model analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of dual tasking on postural and cognitive performance. Similar pattern of results were found in bipedal and unipedal stances, with Taekwondo practitioners displaying larger sway, shooters displaying lower sway and non-athletes displaying sway characteristics intermediate to Taekwondo and shooting athletes. Larger effect was found in bipedal stance. Single to dual-task comparison of postural control showed no significant effect of mental task on sway velocity in shooters, indicating less cognitive effort invested in balance control during bipedal stance. We suggest that expertise in shooting has a more pronounced effect on decreased sway in static balance conditions. Furthermore, shooters invest less attention in postures that are more specific to their training, i.e. bipedal stance.

  3. Crossover from random walk to self-avoiding walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Jens

    1988-11-01

    A one-dimensional n-step random walk on openZ1 which must not visit a vertex more than k times is studied via Monte Carlo methods. The dependences of the mean-square end-to-end distance of the walk and of the fraction of trapped walks on λ=(k-1)/n will be given for the range from λ=0 (self-avoiding walk) to λ=1 (unrestricted random walk). From the results it is conjectured that in the limit n-->∞ the walk obeys simple random walk statistics with respect to its static properties for all λ>0.

  4. Integrated photonic quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Lebugle, Maxime; Guzman-Silva, Diego; Perez-Leija, Armando; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 20 years quantum walks (QWs) have gained increasing interest in the field of quantum information science and processing. In contrast to classical walkers, quantum objects exhibit intrinsic properties like non-locality and non-classical many-particle correlations, which renders QWs a versatile tool for quantum simulation and computation as well as for a deeper understanding of genuine quantum mechanics. Since they are highly controllable and hardly interact with their environment, photons seem to be ideally suited quantum walkers. In order to study and exploit photonic QWs, lattice structures that allow low loss coherent evolution of quantum states are demanded. Such requirements are perfectly met by integrated optical waveguide devices that additionally allow a substantial miniaturization of experimental settings. Moreover, by utilizing the femtosecond direct laser writing technique three-dimensional waveguide structures are capable of analyzing QWs also on higher dimensional geometries. In this context, advances and findings of photonic QWs are discussed in this review. Various concepts and experimental results are presented covering, such as different quantum transport regimes, the Boson sampling problem, and the discrete fractional quantum Fourier transform.

  5. Walking Shoes: Features and Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a pair of walking shoes: Wear the same socks you'll wear when walking, or take the socks with you to the store. Shop for shoes ... fits snugly in each shoe and doesn't slip as you walk. All walking shoes eventually show ...

  6. Walking - Sensing - Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Meinhardt, Nina Dam; Browning, David

    Building on ethnographic research and social theory in the field of ‘mobilities’, this workshop paper suggests that field work based on simply walking with people entails a form of embodied participation that informs technological interventions by creating a space within which to address a wider ...... set of experiential or ‘felt’ qualities of living with mobile technologies. Moving from reflections on the value of walking with people, the paper outlines some affordances of a smartphone application built to capture place experiences through walking.......Building on ethnographic research and social theory in the field of ‘mobilities’, this workshop paper suggests that field work based on simply walking with people entails a form of embodied participation that informs technological interventions by creating a space within which to address a wider...

  7. Toe Walking in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may simply monitor your child's gait during regular office visits. If a physical problem is contributing to toe walking, treatment options may include: Physical therapy. Gentle stretching of the leg and foot muscles may improve ...

  8. The Act of Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Maria Quvang Harck; Olesen, Mette; Helmer, Pernille Falborg

    2014-01-01

    individuals in Denmark conduct and experience walking, and the ‘rationalities’ (Giddens 1984) that lie behind their choice of mobility. It provides insight into how different lifestyles perceive and act walking in their everyday life. Kaufmann (2002) describes how the individual mobility is influenced......’ of mobility (Jensen 2013:111) such as the urban environment, and the infrastructures. Walking has indeed also a ‘software dimension’ as an embodied performance that trigger the human senses (Jensen 2013) and which is closely related to the habitus and identity of the individual (Halprin 1963). The individual...... by individual strategies, values, perceptions and habits, and how appropriation of mobility is constructed through the internalization of standards and values. The act of walking could thus be understood as the result of dynamic internal negotiation of individual, everyday mobility strategies (Lassen 2005...

  9. Contribution of each leg to the control of unperturbed bipedal stance in lower limb amputees: new insights using entropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Hlavackova

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to assess the relative contribution of each leg to unperturbed bipedal posture in lower limb amputees. To achieve this goal, eight unilateral traumatic trans-femoral amputees (TFA were asked to stand as still as possible on a plantar pressure data acquisition system with their eyes closed. Four dependent variables were computed to describe the subject's postural behavior: (1 body weight distribution, (2 amplitude, (3 velocity and (4 regularity of centre of foot pressure (CoP trajectories under the amputated (A leg and the non-amputated (NA leg. Results showed a larger body weight distribution applied to the NA leg than to the A leg and a more regular CoP profiles (lower sample entropy values with greater amplitude and velocity under the NA leg than under the A leg. Taken together, these findings suggest that the NA leg and the A leg do not equally contribute to the control of unperturbed bipedal posture in TFA. The observation that TFA do actively control unperturbed bipedal posture with their NA leg could be viewed as an adaptive process to the loss of the lower leg afferents and efferents because of the unilateral lower-limb amputation. From a methodological point of view, these results demonstrate the suitability of computing bilateral CoP trajectories regularity for the assessment of lateralized postural control under pathological conditions.

  10. Does getting a dog increase recreational walking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knuiman Matthew W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examines changes in socio-demographic, environmental and intrapersonal factors associated with dog acquisition in non-dog owners at baseline to 12-months follow-up and the effect of dog acquisition on minutes per week of recreational walking. Methods RESIDE study participants completed self-administered questionnaires (baseline and 12-months follow-up measuring physical activity, dog ownership, dog walking behavior as well as environmental, intrapersonal and socio-demographic factors. Analysis was restricted to 'Continuing non-owners' (i.e., non-owners at both baseline and follow-up; n = 681 and 'New dog owners' (i.e., non-owners who acquired a dog by follow-up; n = 92. Results Overall, 12% of baseline non-owners had acquired a dog at follow-up. Dog acquisition was associated with working and having children at home. Those who changed from single to couple marital status were also more likely to acquire a dog. The increase in minutes of walking for recreation within the neighborhood from baseline to follow-up was 48 minutes/week for new dog owners compared with 12 minutes/week for continuing non-owners (p p p > 0.05 after further adjustment for change in baseline to follow-up variables. Increase in intention to walk was the main factor contributing to attenuation of the effect of dog acquisition on recreational walking. Conclusion This study used a large representative sample of non-owners to examine the relationship between dog acquisition and recreational walking and provides evidence to suggest that dog acquisition leads to an increase in walking. The most likely mechanism through which dog acquisition facilitates increased physical activity is through behavioral intention via the dog's positive effect on owner's cognitive beliefs about walking, and through the provision of motivation and social support for walking. The results suggest that behavioral intention mediates the relationship between dog acquisition

  11. Quantum Walks for Computer Scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Venegas-Andraca, Salvador

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computation, one of the latest joint ventures between physics and the theory of computation, is a scientific field whose main goals include the development of hardware and algorithms based on the quantum mechanical properties of those physical systems used to implement such algorithms. Solving difficult tasks (for example, the Satisfiability Problem and other NP-complete problems) requires the development of sophisticated algorithms, many of which employ stochastic processes as their mathematical basis. Discrete random walks are a popular choice among those stochastic processes. Inspir

  12. Unitary equivalence of quantum walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Sandeep K., E-mail: sandeep.goyal@ucalgary.ca [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, 4000 Durban (South Africa); Konrad, Thomas [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, 4000 Durban (South Africa); National Institute for Theoretical Physics (NITheP), KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa); Diósi, Lajos [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O.B. 49 (Hungary)

    2015-01-23

    Highlights: • We have found unitary equivalent classes in coined quantum walks. • A single parameter family of coin operators is sufficient to realize all simple one-dimensional quantum walks. • Electric quantum walks are unitarily equivalent to time dependent quantum walks. - Abstract: A simple coined quantum walk in one dimension can be characterized by a SU(2) operator with three parameters which represents the coin toss. However, different such coin toss operators lead to equivalent dynamics of the quantum walker. In this manuscript we present the unitary equivalence classes of quantum walks and show that all the nonequivalent quantum walks can be distinguished by a single parameter. Moreover, we argue that the electric quantum walks are equivalent to quantum walks with time dependent coin toss operator.

  13. 基于多连杆的机器人步行机构运动特性分析%Analysis of the Kinetic Characterristics of the Walking Mechanism Based on the Multi-links for the Novel Mobile Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鹏辉

    2012-01-01

    In the studying and designing process for the robotic walking system, theoretical analysis and simulation on the kinematic characteristics of the walking mechanism of the robot are done. From our experiments,the path curve of the drop-foot point is obtained. The walking mechanism is formed with multi-links. It has a total of six groups of the same structure . The whole mechanism uses one motor. The drop-foot point does cyclical movement through the mechanism transmission , to make the robot go forward , backward , and move through obstacles in a certain range. The general requirements of the path curve of the drop-foot point is met in this mechanism: The robot moves in the first half period , keeping the drop-foot as high as possible above the ground , with some horizontal displacement; In the second half period the drop-foot point returns to the initial position , and its path curve is kept as parallel as possible with the ground.%在研究设计机器人步行系统过程中,对所设计机器人步行机构的运动特性进行了理论分析和仿真实验,得出了步行机构落足点的运动轨迹曲线.步行机构为多连杆机构,共6组,每组结构相同.该机构采用1台电机,通过机构传动,来实现落足点周期性的运动,从而实现机器人的前进、后退以及一定范围内的越障.该步行机构满足落足点运动轨迹的一般要求:前半个周期实现迈步动作,落足点尽可能的高于地面,并有一定的水平位移;后半个周期使落足点回到初始位置,并保证其轨迹尽可能的与地面平行.

  14. Bouncing and walking droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molacek, Jan; Bush, John

    2012-11-01

    Motivated by the hydrodynamic quantum analogue system of Yves Couder, we examine the dynamics of silicone oil drops bouncing on a vertically vibrating liquid bath. We report regime diagrams indicating the dependence of the vertical drop motion on the system parameters. A logarithmic spring model for the interface is developed, and provides new rationale for the regime diagrams. We further examine the spatio-temporal evolution of the standing waves created on the bath surface by repeated drop impacts. Measurement of the tangential coefficient of restitution of drops bouncing on a quiescent bath enables us to accurately determine all the major forces acting on the drop during flight and impact. By combining the horizontal and vertical dynamics, we thus develop a model for the walking drops that enables us to rationalize both the extent of the walking regime and the walking speeds. The model predictions compare favorably with experimental data in the parameter range explored.

  15. Biomechanical conditions of walking

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Y F; Luo, L P; Li, Z Y; Han, S Y; Lv, C S; Zhang, B

    2015-01-01

    The development of rehabilitation training program for lower limb injury does not usually include gait pattern design. This paper introduced a gait pattern design by using equations (conditions of walking). Following the requirements of reducing force to the injured side to avoid further injury, we developed a lower limb gait pattern to shorten the stride length so as to reduce walking speed, to delay the stance phase of the uninjured side and to reduce step length of the uninjured side. This gait pattern was then verified by the practice of a rehabilitation training of an Achilles tendon rupture patient, whose two-year rehabilitation training (with 24 tests) has proven that this pattern worked as intended. This indicates that rehabilitation training program for lower limb injury can rest on biomechanical conditions of walking based on experimental evidence.

  16. Ways of Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eslambolchilar, Parisa; Bødker, Mads; Chamberlain, Alan

    2016-01-01

    It seems logical to argue that mobile computing technologies are intended for use "on-the-go." However, on closer inspection, the use of mobile technologies pose a number of challenges for users who are mobile, particularly moving around on foot. In engaging with such mobile technologies...... and their envisaged development, we argue that interaction designers must increasingly consider a multitude of perspectives that relate to walking in order to frame design problems appropriately. In this paper, we consider a number of perspectives on walking, and we discuss how these may inspire the design of mobile...... technologies. Drawing on insights from non-representational theory, we develop a partial vocabulary with which to engage with qualities of pedestrian mobility, and we outline how taking more mindful approaches to walking may enrich and inform the design space of handheld technologies....

  17. Walking With Meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer McDuff

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is beneficial for people with dementia, but little research explores subjective experiences of physical activity in this population. Interpretive description guided the analysis of 26 interviews conducted with 12 people with dementia. Three themes described the subjective meaning of everyday physical activity: Participants were attracted to activity because it improved physical well-being, provided social connections, gave opportunity to be in nature, and provided structure and focus; participants experienced impediments to activity because of physical discomfort, environmental factors, lack of enthusiasm, and memory loss; and participants made adjustments by choosing walking over other activities and by being active with others. Results show that physical activity remains important for people with dementia, although they encounter barriers. They may prefer walking with others as a form of activity. Findings could influence how nurses conceptualize wandering and suggest that walking programs could be well received by people with dementia.

  18. Walking for data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Browning, David; Meinhardt, Nina Dam

    We suggest that ‘walking’ in ethnographic work sensitizes researchers to a particular means of making sense of place. Following a brief conceptual exposition, we present our research tool iMaCam) that supports capturing and representing activities such as walking.......We suggest that ‘walking’ in ethnographic work sensitizes researchers to a particular means of making sense of place. Following a brief conceptual exposition, we present our research tool iMaCam) that supports capturing and representing activities such as walking....

  19. Aperiodic Quantum Random Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, P; Mosseri, R; Ribeiro, Pedro; Milman, Perola; Mosseri, Remy

    2004-01-01

    We generalize the quantum random walk protocol for a particle in a one-dimensional chain, by using several types of biased quantum coins, arranged in aperiodic sequences, in a manner that leads to a rich variety of possible wave function evolutions. Quasiperiodic sequences, following the Fibonacci prescription, are of particular interest, leading to a sub-ballistic wavefunction spreading. In contrast, random sequences leads to diffusive spreading, similar to the classical random walk behaviour. We also describe how to experimentally implement these aperiodic sequences.

  20. Walking Robots Dynamic Control Systems on an Uneven Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNTEANU, M. S.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents ZPM dynamic control of walking robots, developing an open architecture real time control multiprocessor system, in view of obtaining new capabilities for walking robots. The complexity of the movement mechanism of a walking robot was taken into account, being a repetitive tilting process with numerous instable movements and which can lead to its turnover on an uneven terrain. The control system architecture for the dynamic robot walking is presented in correlation with the control strategy which contains three main real time control loops: balance robot control using sensorial feedback, walking diagram control with periodic changes depending on the sensorial information during each walk cycle, predictable movement control based on a quick decision from the previous experimental data. The results obtained through simulation and experiments show an increase in mobility, stability in real conditions and obtaining of high performances related to the possibility of moving walking robots on terrains with a configuration as close as possible to real situations, respectively developing new technological capabilities of the walking robot control systems for slope movement and walking by overtaking or going around obstacles.

  1. Shared muscle synergies in human walking and cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Filipe O; Torricelli, Diego; Moreno, Juan C; Taylor, Julian; Gomez-Soriano, Julio; Bravo-Esteban, Elisabeth; Piazza, Stefano; Santos, Cristina; Pons, José L

    2014-10-15

    The motor system may rely on a modular organization (muscle synergies activated in time) to execute different tasks. We investigated the common control features of walking and cycling in healthy humans from the perspective of muscle synergies. Three hypotheses were tested: 1) muscle synergies extracted from walking trials are similar to those extracted during cycling; 2) muscle synergies extracted from one of these motor tasks can be used to mathematically reconstruct the electromyographic (EMG) patterns of the other task; 3) muscle synergies of cycling can result from merging synergies of walking. A secondary objective was to identify the speed (and cadence) at which higher similarities emerged. EMG activity from eight muscles of the dominant leg was recorded in eight healthy subjects during walking and cycling at four matched cadences. A factorization technique [nonnegative matrix factorization (NNMF)] was applied to extract individual muscle synergy vectors and the respective activation coefficients behind the global muscular activity of each condition. Results corroborated hypotheses 2 and 3, showing that 1) four synergies from walking and cycling can successfully explain most of the EMG variability of cycling and walking, respectively, and 2) two of four synergies from walking appear to merge together to reconstruct one individual synergy of cycling, with best reconstruction values found for higher speeds. Direct comparison of the muscle synergy vectors of walking and the muscle synergy vectors of cycling (hypothesis 1) produced moderated values of similarity. This study provides supporting evidence for the hypothesis that cycling and walking share common neuromuscular mechanisms.

  2. Bicycling and walking are associated with different cortical oscillatory dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena eStorzer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Although bicycling and walking involve similar complex coordinated movements, surprisingly Parkinson’s patients with freezing of gait typically remain able to bicycle despite severe difficulties walking. This observation suggests functional differences in the motor networks subserving bicycling and walking. However, a direct comparison of brain activity related to bicycling and walking has never been performed, neither in healthy participants nor in patients. Such a comparison could potentially help elucidating the cortical involvement in motor control and the mechanisms through which bicycling ability may be preserved in patients with freezing of gait. The aim of this study was to contrast the cortical oscillatory dynamics involved in bicycling and walking in healthy participants.To this end, EEG and EMG data of 14 healthy participants were analyzed, who cycled on a stationary bicycle at a slow cadence of 40 revolutions per minute (rpm and walked at 40 strides per minute (spm, respectively.Relative to walking, bicycling was associated with a stronger power decrease in the high beta band (23-35 Hz during movement initiation and execution, followed by a stronger beta power increase after movement termination. Walking, on the other hand, was characterized by a stronger and persisting alpha power (8-12 Hz decrease. Both bicycling and walking exhibited movement cycle-dependent power modulation in the 24-40 Hz range that was correlated with EMG activity. This modulation was significantly stronger in walking.The present findings reveal differential cortical oscillatory dynamics in motor control for two types of complex coordinated motor behavior, i.e., bicycling and walking. Bicycling was associated with a stronger sustained cortical activation as indicated by the stronger high beta power decrease during movement execution and less cortical motor control within the movement cycle. We speculate this to be due to the more continuous nature of

  3. k-Walk-Regular Digraphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen LIU; Jing LIN

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,we define a class of strongly connected digraph,called the k-walk-regular digraph,study some properties of it,provide its some algebraic characterization and point out that the O-walk-regular digraph is the same as the walk-regular digraph discussed BY Liu and Lin in 2010 and the D-walk-regular digraph is identical with the weakly distance-regular digraph defined by Comellas et al in 2004.

  4. Snakes and perturbed random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, Gopal

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study some properties of random walks perturbed at extrema, which are generalizations of the walks considered e.g., in Davis (1999). This process can also be viewed as a version of {\\em excited random walk}, studied recently by many authors. We obtain a few properties related to the range of the process with infinite memory. We also prove the Strong law, Central Limit Theorem, and the criterion for the recurrence of the perturbed walk with finite memory.

  5. Walking and Sensing Mobile Lives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Meinhardt, Nina Dam

    In this position paper, we discuss how mindful walking with people allow us to explore sensory aspects of mobile lives that are typically absent from research. We present an app that aids researchers collect impressions from a walk.......In this position paper, we discuss how mindful walking with people allow us to explore sensory aspects of mobile lives that are typically absent from research. We present an app that aids researchers collect impressions from a walk....

  6. Walking Advisement: Program Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byram Hills School District, Armonk, NY.

    The Walking Advisement program at Crittenden Middle School in Armonk, New York was started during the 1984-1985 school year. It was based on the work of Alfred Arth, a middle school specialist at the University of Wyoming. Essentially, the program attempts to expand the guidance function of the school by bringing faculty and students together to…

  7. Deterministic Walks with Choice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeler, Katy E.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Cooper, Joshua N.; Hunter, Meagan N.; Barr, Peter S.

    2014-01-10

    This paper studies deterministic movement over toroidal grids, integrating local information, bounded memory and choice at individual nodes. The research is motivated by recent work on deterministic random walks, and applications in multi-agent systems. Several results regarding passing tokens through toroidal grids are discussed, as well as some open questions.

  8. Walking along water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    2014-01-01

    Steep slopes, white peaks and deep valleys make up the Andes. As phenomenologists of landscape have told us, different people have different landscapes. By moving across the terrain, walking along, we might get a sense of how this has been carved out by the movement of wind and water, tectonics...

  9. Dynamic walking with Dribbel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dertien, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the design and construction of Dribbel, a passivity-based walking robot. Dribbel has been designed and built at the Control Engineering group of the University of Twente. This paper focuses on the practical side: the design approach, construction, electronics, and software desig

  10. Walking. Sensing. Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses three meditations to contemplate walking, sensing and participation as three ways with which we can extend the notion of ‘experiential computing’ proposed by Yoo (2010). By using the form of meditations, loosely associated concepts that are part introspective and part ‘causative’, i...

  11. Autonomous exoskeleton reduces metabolic cost of walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Rouse, Elliott J; Herr, Hugh M

    2014-01-01

    We developed an autonomous powered leg exoskeleton capable of providing large amounts of positive mechanical power to the wearer during powered plantarflexion phase of walking. The autonomous exoskeleton consisted of a winch actuator fasted to the shin which pulled on fiberglass struts attached to a boot. The fiberglass struts formed a rigid extension of the foot when the proximal end of the strut was pulled in forward by the winch actuator. This lightweight, geometric transmission allowed the electric winch actuator to efficiently produce biological levels of power at the ankle joint. The exoskeleton was powered and controlled by lithium polymer batteries and motor controller worn around the waist. Preliminary testing on two subjects walking at 1.4 m/s resulted in the exoskeleton reducing the metabolic cost of walking by 6-11% as compared to not wearing the device. The exoskeleton provided a peak mechanical power of over 180 W at each ankle (mean standard ± deviation) and an average positive mechanical power of 27 ± 1 W total to both ankles, while electrically using 75-89 W of electricity. The batteries (800 g) used in this experiment are estimated to be capable of providing this level of assistance for up to 7 km of walking.

  12. Quantum walks on Cayley graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Acevedo, O [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 2 Avenue Adolphe Chauvin 95302 Cergy Pontoise Cedex (France); Institut fuer Mathematik und Informatik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn Str.15a, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Gobron, T [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 2 Avenue Adolphe Chauvin 95302 Cergy Pontoise Cedex (France)

    2006-01-20

    We address the problem of the construction of quantum walks on Cayley graphs. Our main motivation is the relationship between quantum algorithms and quantum walks. In particular, we discuss the choice of the dimension of the local Hilbert space and consider various classes of graphs on which the structure of quantum walks may differ. We completely characterize quantum walks on free groups and present partial results on more general cases. Some examples are given including a family of quantum walks on the hypercube involving a Clifford algebra.

  13. Fractional random walk lattice dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Michelitsch, Thomas; Riascos, Alejandro Perez; Nowakowski, Andrzeij; Nicolleau, Franck

    2016-01-01

    We analyze time-discrete and continuous `fractional' random walks on undirected regular networks with special focus on cubic periodic lattices in $n=1,2,3,..$ dimensions.The fractional random walk dynamics is governed by a master equation involving {\\it fractional powers of Laplacian matrices $L^{\\frac{\\alpha}{2}}$}where $\\alpha=2$ recovers the normal walk.First we demonstrate thatthe interval $0\\textless{}\\alpha\\leq 2$ is admissible for the fractional random walk. We derive analytical expressions for fractional transition matrix and closely related the average return probabilities. We further obtain thefundamental matrix $Z^{(\\alpha)}$, and the mean relaxation time (Kemeny constant) for the fractional random walk.The representation for the fundamental matrix $Z^{(\\alpha)}$ relates fractional random walks with normal random walks.We show that the fractional transition matrix elements exihibit for large cubic $n$-dimensional lattices a power law decay of an $n$-dimensional infinite spaceRiesz fractional deriva...

  14. Covering walks in graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Fujie, Futaba

    2014-01-01

    Covering Walks  in Graphs is aimed at researchers and graduate students in the graph theory community and provides a comprehensive treatment on measures of two well studied graphical properties, namely Hamiltonicity and traversability in graphs. This text looks into the famous Kӧnigsberg Bridge Problem, the Chinese Postman Problem, the Icosian Game and the Traveling Salesman Problem as well as well-known mathematicians who were involved in these problems. The concepts of different spanning walks with examples and present classical results on Hamiltonian numbers and upper Hamiltonian numbers of graphs are described; in some cases, the authors provide proofs of these results to illustrate the beauty and complexity of this area of research. Two new concepts of traceable numbers of graphs and traceable numbers of vertices of a graph which were inspired by and closely related to Hamiltonian numbers are introduced. Results are illustrated on these two concepts and the relationship between traceable concepts and...

  15. On extracting design principles from biology: II. Case study-the effect of knee direction on bipedal robot running efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberland, M; Kim, S

    2015-02-02

    Comparing the leg of an ostrich to that of a human suggests an important question to legged robot designers: should a robot's leg joint bend in the direction of running ('forwards') or opposite ('backwards')? Biological studies cannot answer this question for engineers due to significant differences between the biological and engineering domains. Instead, we investigated the inherent effect of joint bending direction on bipedal robot running efficiency by comparing energetically optimal gaits of a wide variety of robot designs sampled at random from a design space. We found that the great majority of robot designs have several locally optimal gaits with the knee bending backwards that are more efficient than the most efficient gait with the knee bending forwards. The most efficient backwards gaits do not exhibit lower touchdown losses than the most efficient forward gaits; rather, the improved efficiency of backwards gaits stems from lower torque and reduced motion at the hip. The reduced hip use of backwards gaits is enabled by the ability of the backwards knee, acting alone, to (1) propel the robot upwards and forwards simultaneously and (2) lift and protract the foot simultaneously. In the absence of other information, designers interested in building efficient bipedal robots with two-segment legs driven by electric motors should design the knee to bend backwards rather than forwards. Compared to common practices for choosing robot knee direction, application of this principle would have a strong tendency to improve robot efficiency and save design resources.

  16. Arm raising in humans under loaded vs. unloaded and bipedal vs. unipedal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernazza-Martin, S; Martin, N; Cincera, M; Pedotti, A; Massion, J

    1999-10-30

    The aim of the present experiment was to study the central organization of equilibrium control during arm raising in the frontal plane. Nine adult subjects (five seniors and four young adults) were asked to raise their right arm to a horizontal position in the frontal plane in two support conditions (bipedal vs. unipedal) and two load conditions (unloaded vs. a 3.5-kg load added on the moving hand). No instructions were given concerning the movement speed. The movements were performed at about half the maximum speed achievable under reaction time conditions. The final lateral center of mass (CM) position 1 s after the movement offset, and the time course of the CM shift during the movement were studied in the four experimental conditions, using a CM compensation index. The electromyographic (EMG) pattern of the main muscles involved in the movement performance and in the postural control were studied in three out of nine subjects during movements performed at two velocities (at the preferred speed and as fast as possible). The results indicate that (1) the CM shift remains minimized in the frontal plane during the time course of the arm movement and during the final stabilization of the arm regardless of the stance and load conditions; (2) the time course of the CM compensation index remains stable during the first 400 ms after the movement onset, decreasing late in the movement and increasing again at the end of the stabilization stage. A modelisation suggests that the time course is the result of the interaction of two controls: a first one, putative feedforward, starting early and decreasing with time and a second one, putative feedback, starting late in the movement and increasing with time; (3) both early and late index values are influenced by the support and load conditions, the highest index values being observed during unipedal stance and load conditions; (4) activation of quadratus lomborum (QL) contralateral to the raising arm is time locked with the

  17. Minimal Walking Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal

    2007-01-01

    I report on our construction and analysis of the effective low energy Lagrangian for the Minimal Walking Technicolor (MWT) model. The parameters of the effective Lagrangian are constrained by imposing modified Weinberg sum rules and by imposing a value for the S parameter estimated from the under...... the underlying Technicolor theory. The constrained effective Lagrangian allows for an inverted vector vs. axial-vector mass spectrum in a large part of the parameter space....

  18. Nordic Walking Classes

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2015-01-01

    Four classes of one hour each are held on Tuesdays. RDV barracks parking at Entrance A, 10 minutes before class time. Spring Course 2015: 05.05/12.05/19.05/26.05 Prices 40 CHF per session + 10 CHF club membership 5 CHF/hour pole rental Check out our schedule and enroll at: https://espace.cern.ch/club-fitness/Lists/Nordic%20Walking/NewForm.aspx? Hope to see you among us! fitness.club@cern.ch

  19. Comparative Anatomy of the Hind Limb Vessels of the Bearded Capuchins (Sapajus libidinosus with Apes, Baboons, and Cebus capucinus: With Comments on the Vessels' Role in Bipedalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roqueline A. G. M. F. Aversi-Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capuchin monkeys are known to exhibit sporadic bipedalism while performing specific tasks, such as cracking nuts. The bipedal posture and locomotion cause an increase in the metabolic cost and therefore increased blood supply to lower limbs is necessary. Here, we present a detailed anatomical description of the capuchin arteries and veins of the pelvic limb of Sapajus libidinosus in comparison with other primates. The arterial pattern of the bearded capuchin hind limb is more similar to other quadrupedal Cebus species. Similarities were also found to the pattern observed in the quadruped Papio, which is probably due to a comparable pelvis and the presence of the tail. Sapajus' traits show fewer similarities when compared to great apes and modern humans. Moreover, the bearded capuchin showed unique patterns for the femoral and the short saphenous veins. Although this species switches easily from quadrupedal to bipedal postures, our results indicate that the bearded capuchin has no specific or differential features that support extended bipedal posture and locomotion. Thus, the explanation for the behavioral differences found among capuchin genera probably includes other aspects of their physiology.

  20. A formative evaluation of a family-based walking intervention-Furness Families Walk4Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bull Fiona

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family unit may be an important mechanism for increasing physical activity levels, yet little is known about what types of family-based interventions are effective. This study involved a formative evaluation of a 12 week intervention to encourage walking as a family based activity. The intervention consisted of several key elements including led walks and tailored resources, as well as remote support provided via the telephone. The project aimed to explore factors associated with successful delivery of the programme and to identify areas of improvement for future implementation. Methods A total of nine interviews were undertaken with programme staff who were involved in either the set up or delivery of the intervention. In addition, four interviews and two focus groups were undertaken with participants to explore their experiences of the programme. The analysis involved both deductive and inductive reasoning. Results In total, 114 people participated in the programme, which included 36 adults, 10 adolescents and 68 children (≤ 10 years of age. Adult participants reported several barriers to walking including concerns over their children's behaviour and their ability to maintain 'control' of their children. Walking in a group with other families gave parents confidence to go out walking with their children and provided a valuable opportunity for social interaction for parents and children alike. The most successful walks incorporated specific destinations and an activity to undertake upon reaching the destination. Incorporating other activities along the way also helped to keep the children engaged. Conclusions The results of this study have highlighted the important contribution that formative research can make in informing and refining a programme to increase appropriateness and effectiveness. The study has helped to highlight the key characteristics associated with delivering a successful walking intervention to young

  1. Quantum walks on Cayley graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Acevedo, O L

    2006-01-01

    We address the problem of the construction of quantum walks on Cayley graphs. Our main motivation is the relationship between quantum algorithms and quantum walks. Thus we consider quantum walks on a general basis and try to classify them as a preliminary step in the construction of new algorithms that could be devised in this way. In particular, we discuss the choice of the dimension of the local Hilbert space, and consider various classes of graphs on which the structure of quantum walks may differ. We characterize completely the quantum walks on free groups and present partial results on more general cases. Examples are given among which a family of quantum walks on the hypercube involving a Clifford Algebra.

  2. Quantum walks on general graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Kendon, V

    2003-01-01

    A scheme for a discrete time quantum walk on a general graph of N vertices with undirected edges is given, and compared with the continuous time quantum walk on a general graph introduced by Farhi and Gutmann [PRA 58 915 (1998)]. Both walks are contrasted with the examples of quantum walks in the literature treating graphs of fixed, small (< log N) degree. This illustrates the way in which extra information about the graph allows more efficient algorithms to be designed. To obtain a quantum speed up over classical for comparable resources it is necessary to code the position space of the quantum walk into a qubit register (or equivalent). The role of the oracle is also discussed and an efficient gate sequence is presented for implementing a discrete quantum walk given one copy of a quantum state encoding the adjacency matrix of the graph.

  3. A Fractional Diffusion Equation for an n-Dimensional Correlated Levy Walk

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor-King, J P; Fedotov, S; Van Gorder, R A

    2016-01-01

    Levy walks define a fundamental concept in random walk theory which allows one to model diffusive spreading that is faster than Brownian motion. They have many applications across different disciplines. However, so far the derivation of a diffusion equation for an n-dimensional correlated Levy walk remained elusive. Starting from a fractional Klein-Kramers equation here we use a moment method combined with a Cattaneo approximation to derive a fractional diffusion equation for superdiffusive short range auto-correlated Levy walks in the large time limit, and solve it. Our derivation discloses different dynamical mechanisms leading to correlated Levy walk diffusion in terms of quantities that can be measured experimentally.

  4. Evaluating functional roles of phase resetting in generation of adaptive human bipedal walking with a physiologically based model of the spinal pattern generator.

    OpenAIRE

    Aoi, Shinya; Ogihara, Naomichi; Funato, Tetsuro; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    The central pattern generators (CPGs) in the spinal cord strongly contribute to locomotor behavior. To achieve adaptive locomotion, locomotor rhythm generated by the CPGs is suggested to be functionally modulated by phase resetting based on sensory afferent or perturbations. Although phase resetting has been investigated during fictive locomotion in cats, its functional roles in actual locomotion have not been clarified. Recently, simulation studies have been conducted to examine the roles of...

  5. Pseudo-Hermitian continuous-time quantum walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimi, S; Sorouri, A, E-mail: shsalimi@uok.ac.i, E-mail: a.sorouri@uok.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, PO Box 66177-15175, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-07-09

    In this paper we present a model exhibiting a new type of continuous-time quantum walk (as a quantum-mechanical transport process) on networks, which is described by a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian possessing a real spectrum. We call it pseudo-Hermitian continuous-time quantum walk. We introduce a method to obtain the probability distribution of walk on any vertex and then study a specific system. We observe that the probability distribution on certain vertices increases compared to that of the Hermitian case. This formalism makes the transport process faster and can be useful for search algorithms.

  6. Physical implementation of quantum walks

    CERN Document Server

    Manouchehri, Kia

    2013-01-01

    Given the extensive application of random walks in virtually every science related discipline, we may be at the threshold of yet another problem solving paradigm with the advent of quantum walks. Over the past decade, quantum walks have been explored for their non-intuitive dynamics, which may hold the key to radically new quantum algorithms. This growing interest has been paralleled by a flurry of research into how one can implement quantum walks in laboratories. This book presents numerous proposals as well as actual experiments for such a physical realization, underpinned by a wide range of

  7. Persistence of random walk records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2014-06-01

    We study records generated by Brownian particles in one dimension. Specifically, we investigate an ordinary random walk and define the record as the maximal position of the walk. We compare the record of an individual random walk with the mean record, obtained as an average over infinitely many realizations. We term the walk ‘superior’ if the record is always above average, and conversely, the walk is said to be ‘inferior’ if the record is always below average. We find that the fraction of superior walks, S, decays algebraically with time, S ˜ t-β, in the limit t → ∞, and that the persistence exponent is nontrivial, β = 0.382 258…. The fraction of inferior walks, I, also decays as a power law, I ˜ t-α, but the persistence exponent is smaller, α = 0.241 608…. Both exponents are roots of transcendental equations involving the parabolic cylinder function. To obtain these theoretical results, we analyze the joint density of superior walks with a given record and position, while for inferior walks it suffices to study the density as a function of position.

  8. Quantum Walks on the Hypercube

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Cristopher; Moore, Cristopher; Russell, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that one-dimensional quantum walks can mix more quickly than classical random walks, suggesting that quantum Monte Carlo algorithms can outperform their classical counterparts. We study two quantum walks on the n-dimensional hypercube, one in discrete time and one in continuous time. In both cases we show that the quantum walk mixes in (\\pi/4)n steps, faster than the O(n log n) steps required by the classical walk. In the continuous-time case, the probability distribution is {\\em exactly} uniform at this time. More importantly, these walks expose several subtleties in the definition of mixing time for quantum walks. Even though the continuous-time walk has an O(n) instantaneous mixing time at which it is precisely uniform, it never approaches the uniform distribution when the stopping time is chosen randomly as in [AharonovAKV2001]. Our analysis treats interference between terms of different phase more carefully than is necessary for the walk on the cycle; previous general bounds p...

  9. A mathematical nature walk

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, John A

    2009-01-01

    How heavy is that cloud? Why can you see farther in rain than in fog? Why are the droplets on that spider web spaced apart so evenly? If you have ever asked questions like these while outdoors, and wondered how you might figure out the answers, this is a book for you. An entertaining and informative collection of fascinating puzzles from the natural world around us, A Mathematical Nature Walk will delight anyone who loves nature or math or both. John Adam presents ninety-six questions about many common natural phenomena--and a few uncommon ones--and then shows how to answer them using mostly b

  10. Collisions of Random Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Barlow, Martin T; Sousi, Perla

    2010-01-01

    A recurrent graph $G$ has the infinite collision property if two independent random walks on $G$, started at the same point, collide infinitely often a.s. We give a simple criterion in terms of Green functions for a graph to have this property, and use it to prove that a critical Galton-Watson tree with finite variance conditioned to survive, the incipient infinite cluster in $\\Z^d$ with $d \\ge 19$ and the uniform spanning tree in $\\Z^2$ all have the infinite collision property. For power-law combs and spherically symmetric trees, we determine precisely the phase boundary for the infinite collision property.

  11. Cookie branching random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Bartsch, Christian; Kochler, Thomas; Müller, Sebastian; Popov, Serguei

    2011-01-01

    We consider a branching random walk on $\\Z$, where the particles behave differently in visited and unvisited sites. Informally, each site on the positive half-line contains initially a cookie. On the first visit of a site its cookie is removed and particles at positions with a cookie reproduce and move differently from particles on sites without cookies. Therefore, the movement and the reproduction of the particles depend on the previous behaviour of the population of particles. We study the question if the process is recurrent or transient, i.e., whether infinitely many particles visit the origin or not.

  12. Interindividual differences in H reflex modulation during normal walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Alkjaer, T

    2002-01-01

    of afferent input to the spinal cord, by EMG activity and by walking mechanics. Increasing H reflex excitability during the swing phase appears to protect the subject against unexpected perturbations around heel strike by a facilitated stretch reflex in the triceps surae muscle. Alternatively, in subjects......Based on previous studies, at least two different types of soleus Hoffmann (H) reflex modulation were likely to be found during normal human walking. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to identify different patterns of modulation of the soleus H reflex and to examine whether...... or not subjects with different H reflex modulation would exhibit different walking mechanics and different EMG activity. Fifteen subjects walked across two force platforms at 4.5 km/h (+/-10%) while the movements were recorded on video. The soleus H reflex and EMG activity were recorded separately during...

  13. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C → U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics. PMID:26465508

  14. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  15. Random-walk enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Goodman, Myron F

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C→U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  16. Intersegmental coordination of walking movements in stick insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwar, Björn Ch; Göritz, Marie L; Schmidt, Joachim

    2005-03-01

    Locomotion requires the coordination of movements across body segments, which in walking animals is expressed as gaits. We studied the underlying neural mechanisms of this coordination in a semi-intact walking preparation of the stick insect Carausius morosus. During walking of a single front leg on a treadmill, leg motoneuron (MN) activity tonically increased and became rhythmically modulated in the ipsilateral deafferented and deefferented mesothoracic (middle leg) ganglion. The pattern of modulation was correlated with the front leg cycle and specific for a given MN pool, although it was not consistent with functional leg movements for all MN pools. In an isolated preparation of a pair of ganglia, where one ganglion was made rhythmically active by application of pilocarpine, we found no evidence for coupling between segmental central pattern generators (CPGs) that could account for the modulation of MN activity observed in the semi-intact walking preparation. However, a third preparation provided evidence that signals from the front leg's femoral chordotonal organ (fCO) influenced activity of ipsilateral MNs in the adjacent mesothoracic ganglion. These intersegmental signals could be partially responsible for the observed MN activity modulation during front leg walking. While afferent signals from a single walking front leg modulate the activity of MNs in the adjacent segment, additional afferent signals, local or from contralateral or posterior legs, might be necessary to produce the functional motor pattern observed in freely walking animals.

  17. Intrinsic Lévy behaviour in organisms – searching for a mechanism: Comment on “Liberating Lévy walk research from the shackles of optimal foraging” by A.M. Reynolds

    OpenAIRE

    Sims, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The seminal papers by Viswanathan and colleagues in the late 1990s [1] and [2] proposed not only that scale-free, superdiffusive Lévy walks can describe the free-ranging movement patterns observed in animals such as the albatross [1], but that the Lévy walk was optimal for searching for sparsely and randomly distributed resource targets [2]. This distinct advantage, now shown to be present over a much broader set of conditions than originally theorised [3], implied that the Lévy walk is a sea...

  18. A Novel Algorithm of Quantum Random Walk in Server Traffic Control and Task Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yumin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A quantum random walk optimization model and algorithm in network cluster server traffic control and task scheduling is proposed. In order to solve the problem of server load balancing, we research and discuss the distribution theory of energy field in quantum mechanics and apply it to data clustering. We introduce the method of random walk and illuminate what the quantum random walk is. Here, we mainly research the standard model of one-dimensional quantum random walk. For the data clustering problem of high dimensional space, we can decompose one m-dimensional quantum random walk into m one-dimensional quantum random walk. In the end of the paper, we compare the quantum random walk optimization method with GA (genetic algorithm, ACO (ant colony optimization, and SAA (simulated annealing algorithm. In the same time, we prove its validity and rationality by the experiment of analog and simulation.

  19. Quantum walks and search algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Portugal, Renato

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses an interesting area of quantum computation called quantum walks, which play an important role in building quantum algorithms, in particular search algorithms. Quantum walks are the quantum analogue of classical random walks. It is known that quantum computers have great power for searching unsorted databases. This power extends to many kinds of searches, particularly to the problem of finding a specific location in a spatial layout, which can be modeled by a graph. The goal is to find a specific node knowing that the particle uses the edges to jump from one node to the next. This book is self-contained with main topics that include: Grover's algorithm, describing its geometrical interpretation and evolution by means of the spectral decomposition of the evolution operater Analytical solutions of quantum walks on important graphs like line, cycles, two-dimensional lattices, and hypercubes using Fourier transforms Quantum walks on generic graphs, describing methods to calculate the limiting d...

  20. Walking around to grasp interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Jantzen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    with the sound installations. The aim was to gain an understanding of the role of the in-teraction, if interaction makes a difference for the understanding of the sound art. 30 walking interviews were carried out at ZKM, Karlsruhe with a total of 57 museum guests, individuals or groups. During the walk......The paper presents experiences from a study using walk-alongs to provide insight into museum visitors’ experience with interactive features of sound art installations. The overall goal of the study was to learn about the participants’ opinions and feelings about the possibility of interaction...... knowledge of spa-tial conditions, e.g. noise, crowds, darkness provided a profound and shared un-derstanding of e.g. the visitors’ engagement in and dislike of the installations. Another finding concerns group walking that, compared to walking with a sin-gle person, generated a diversified discussion...

  1. Human treadmill walking needs attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Olivier

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to assess the attentional requirements of steady state treadmill walking in human subjects using a dual task paradigm. The extent of decrement of a secondary (cognitive RT task provides a measure of the attentional resources required to maintain performance of the primary (locomotor task. Varying the level of difficulty of the reaction time (RT task is used to verify the priority of allocation of attentional resources. Methods 11 healthy adult subjects were required to walk while simultaneously performing a RT task. Participants were instructed to bite a pressure transducer placed in the mouth as quickly as possible in response to an unpredictable electrical stimulation applied on the back of the neck. Each subject was tested under five different experimental conditions: simple RT task alone and while walking, recognition RT task alone and while walking, walking alone. A foot switch system composed of a pressure sensitive sensor was placed under the heel and forefoot of each foot to determine the gait cycle duration. Results Gait cycle duration was unchanged (p > 0.05 by the addition of the RT task. Regardless of the level of difficulty of the RT task, the RTs were longer during treadmill walking than in sitting conditions (p 0.05 was found between the attentional demand of the walking task and the decrement of performance found in the RT task under varying levels of difficulty. This finding suggests that the healthy subjects prioritized the control of walking at the expense of cognitive performance. Conclusion We conclude that treadmill walking in young adults is not a purely automatic task. The methodology and outcome measures used in this study provide an assessment of the attentional resources required by walking on the treadmill at a steady state.

  2. Design of a walking robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, William; Dowling, Kevin

    1994-01-01

    Carnegie Mellon University's Autonomous Planetary Exploration Program (APEX) is currently building the Daedalus robot; a system capable of performing extended autonomous planetary exploration missions. Extended autonomy is an important capability because the continued exploration of the Moon, Mars and other solid bodies within the solar system will probably be carried out by autonomous robotic systems. There are a number of reasons for this - the most important of which are the high cost of placing a man in space, the high risk associated with human exploration and communication delays that make teleoperation infeasible. The Daedalus robot represents an evolutionary approach to robot mechanism design and software system architecture. Daedalus incorporates key features from a number of predecessor systems. Using previously proven technologies, the Apex project endeavors to encompass all of the capabilities necessary for robust planetary exploration. The Ambler, a six-legged walking machine was developed by CMU for demonstration of technologies required for planetary exploration. In its five years of life, the Ambler project brought major breakthroughs in various areas of robotic technology. Significant progress was made in: mechanism and control, by introducing a novel gait pattern (circulating gait) and use of orthogonal legs; perception, by developing sophisticated algorithms for map building; and planning, by developing and implementing the Task Control Architecture to coordinate tasks and control complex system functions. The APEX project is the successor of the Ambler project.

  3. Walking indoors, walking outdoors: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo eDalla Volta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An observation/execution matching system for walking has not been assessed yet. The present fMRI study was aimed at assessing whether, as for object-directed actions, an observation/execution matching system is active for walking and whether the spatial context of walking (open or narrow space recruits different neural correlates. Two experimental conditions were employed. In the execution condition, while being scanned, participants performed walking on a rolling cylinder located just outside the scanner. The same action was performed also while observing a video presenting either an open space (a country field or a narrow space (a corridor. In the observation condition, participants observed a video presenting an individual walking on the same cylinder on which the actual action was executed, the open space video and the narrow space video, respectively. Results showed common bilateral activations in the dorsal premotor/supplementary motor areas and in the posterior parietal lobe for both execution and observation of walking, thus supporting a matching system for this action. Moreover, specific sectors of the occipital-temporal cortex and the middle temporal gyrus were consistently active when processing a narrow space versus an open one, thus suggesting their involvement in the visuo-motor transformation required when walking in a narrow space. We forward that the present findings may have implications for rehabilitation of gait and sport training.

  4. walk around Irkutsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It is noteworthy that this country develops through two types of events: either through a jubilee or through a catastrophe.It seems that Irkutsk Airport will be built only after the next crash. At least the interest to this problem returns regularly after sad events, and this occurs almost half a century (a jubilee, too! – the Council of Ministers decided to relocate the Airport away from the city as long ago as 1962. The Airport does not relate to the topic of this issue, but an attentive reader understands that it is our Carthage, and that the Airport should be relocated. The Romans coped with it faster and more effectively.Back to Irkutsk’s jubilee, we should say that we will do without blare of trumpets. We will just make an unpretentious walk around the city in its summer 350. Each our route covers new (some of them have been completed by the jubilee and old buildings, some of them real monuments. All these buildings are integrated into public spaces of different quality and age.We will also touch on the problems, for old houses, especially the wooden ones often provoke a greedy developer to demolish or to burn them down. Thus a primitive thrift estimates an output of additional square meters. Not to mention how attractive it is to seize public spaces without demolition or without reallocation of the dwellers. Or, rather, the one who is to preserve, to cherish and to improve such houses for the good of the citizens never speaks about this sensitive issue. So we have to do it.Walking is a no-hurry genre, unlike the preparation for the celebration. Walking around the city you like is a pleasant and cognitive process. It will acquaint the architects with the works of their predecessors and colleagues. We hope that such a walk may be interesting for Irkutsk citizens and visitors, too. Isn’t it interesting to learn “at first hand” the intimate details of the restoration of the Trubetskoys’ estate

  5. Walking for art's sake

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

      The man who compared himself to a proton ! On 20 May, Gianni Motti went down into the LHC tunnel and walked around the 27 kilometres of the underground ring at an average, unaccelerated pace of 5 kph. This was an artistic rather than an athletic performance, aimed at drawing a parallel between the fantastic speed of the beams produced by the future accelerator and the leisurely stroll of a human. The artist, who hails from Lombardy, was accompanied by cameraman Ivo Zanetti, who filmed the event from start to finish, and physicist Jean-Pierre Merlo. The first part of the film can be seen at the Villa Bernasconi, 8 route du Grand-Lancy, Grand Lancy, until 26 June.

  6. Walking for art's sake

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    The man who compared himself to a proton ! On 20 May, Gianni Motti went down into the LHC tunnel and walked around the 27 kilometres of the underground ring at an average, unaccelerated pace of 5 kph. This was an artistic rather than an athletic performance, aimed at drawing a parallel between the fantastic speed of the beams produced by the future accelerator and the leisurely stroll of a human. The artist, who hails from Lombardy, was accompanied by cameraman Ivo Zanetti, who filmed the event from start to finish, and physicist Jean-Pierre Merlo. The first part of the film can be seen at the Villa Bernasconi, 8 route du Grand-Lancy, Grand Lancy, until 26 June.

  7. Intrinsic Lévy behaviour in organisms - searching for a mechanism. Comment on "Liberating Lévy walk research from the shackles of optimal foraging" by A.M. Reynolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, David W.

    2015-09-01

    The seminal papers by Viswanathan and colleagues in the late 1990s [1,2] proposed not only that scale-free, superdiffusive Lévy walks can describe the free-ranging movement patterns observed in animals such as the albatross [1], but that the Lévy walk was optimal for searching for sparsely and randomly distributed resource targets [2]. This distinct advantage, now shown to be present over a much broader set of conditions than originally theorised [3], implied that the Lévy walk is a search strategy that should be found very widely in organisms [4]. In the years since there have been several influential empirical studies showing that Lévy walks can indeed be detected in the movement patterns of a very broad range of taxa, from jellyfish, insects, fish, reptiles, seabirds, humans [5-10], and even in the fossilised trails of extinct invertebrates [11]. The broad optimality and apparent deep evolutionary origin of movement (search) patterns that are well approximated by Lévy walks led to the development of the Lévy flight foraging (LFF) hypothesis [12], which states that "since Lévy flights and walks can optimize search efficiencies, therefore natural selection should have led to adaptations for Lévy flight foraging".

  8. Research advances in control methods of wearable walking assist robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia ZHANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As the proportion of the elderly in China increases, the need for robotic assist walking is growing. The assisted-as-needed (AAN property of a wearable walking assist robot matches a user’s biological need and improves the flexibility, appetency and friendliness of a mechanical system. To realize AAN walking and aiming at realizing master/slave flexible assist, a new hybrid control method consisting of hip joint control based on central pattern generators and knee joint impedance structured control is proposed. The adaptation of a robot's master/slave motion mode to a user's physical function, the continuous switching method for knee joint impedance structured control and its stability, and the AAN effect of the Hybrid control theory are studied, which provides a new thought for the development of wearable walking assist robots.

  9. Visual control of walking velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Matthieu; Morice, Antoine H P; Bootsma, Reinoud J; Montagne, Gilles

    2011-06-01

    Even if optical correlates of self-motion velocity have already been identified, their contribution to the control of displacement velocity remains to be established. In this study, we used a virtual reality set-up coupled to a treadmill to test the role of both Global Optic Flow Rate (GOFR) and Edge Rate (ER) in the regulation of walking velocity. Participants were required to walk at a constant velocity, corresponding to their preferred walking velocity, while eye height and texture density were manipulated. This manipulation perturbed the natural relationship between the actual walking velocity and its optical specification by GOFR and ER, respectively. Results revealed that both these sources of information are indeed used by participants to control walking speed, as demonstrated by a slowing down of actual walking velocity when the optical specification of velocity by either GOFR or ER gives rise to an overestimation of actual velocity, and vice versa. Gait analyses showed that these walking velocity adjustments result from simultaneous adaptations in both step length and step duration. The role of visual information in the control of self-motion velocity is discussed in relation with other factors.

  10. Bouchaud walks with variable drift

    CERN Document Server

    Parra, Manuel Cabezas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study a sequence of Bouchaud trap models on $\\mathbb{Z}$ with drift. We analyze the possible scaling limits for a sequence of walks, where we make the drift decay to 0 as we rescale the walks. Depending on the speed of the decay of the drift we obtain three different scaling limits. If the drift decays slowly as we rescale the walks we obtain the inverse of an \\alpha$-stable subordinator as scaling limit. If the drift decays quickly as we rescale the walks, we obtain the F.I.N. diffusion as scaling limit. There is a critical speed of decay separating these two main regimes, where a new process appears as scaling limit. This critical speed is related to the index $\\alpha$ of the inhomogeneity of the environment.

  11. Quantum Snake Walk on Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Rosmanis, Ansis

    2010-01-01

    I introduce a new type of continuous-time quantum walk on graphs called the quantum snake walk, the basis states of which are fixed-length paths (snakes) in the underlying graph. First I analyze the quantum snake walk on the line, and I show that, even though most states stay localized throughout the evolution, there are specific states which most likely move on the line as wave packets with momentum inversely proportional to the length of the snake. Next I discuss how an algorithm based on the quantum snake walk might be able to solve an extended version of the glued trees problem which asks to find a path connecting both roots of the glued trees graph. No efficient quantum algorithm solving this problem is known yet.

  12. Localization of reinforced random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrès, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    We describe and analyze how reinforced random walks can eventually localize, i.e. only visit finitely many sites. After introducing vertex and edge self-interacting walks on a discrete graph in a general setting, and stating the main results and conjectures so far on the topic, we present martingale techniques that provide an alternative proof of the a.s. localization of vertex-reinforced random walks (VRRWs) on the integers on finitely many sites and, with positive probability, on five consecutive sites, initially proved by Pemantle and Volkov (1999). Next we introduce the continuous time-lines representation (sometimes called Rubin construction) and its martingale counterpart, and explain how it has been used to prove localization of some reinforced walks on one attracting edge. Then we show how a modified version of this construction enables one to propose a new short proof of the a.s. localization of VRRWs on five sites on Z.

  13. Big power from walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illenberger, Patrin K.; Madawala, Udaya K.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric Elastomer Generators (DEG) offer an opportunity to capture the energy otherwise wasted from human motion. By integrating a DEG into the heel of standard footwear, it is possible to harness this energy to power portable devices. DEGs require substantial auxiliary systems which are commonly large, heavy and inefficient. A unique challenge for these low power generators is the combination of high voltage and low current. A void exists in the semiconductor market for devices that can meet these requirements. Until these become available, existing devices must be used in an innovative way to produce an effective DEG system. Existing systems such as the Bi-Directional Flyback (BDFB) and Self Priming Circuit (SPC) are an excellent example of this. The BDFB allows full charging and discharging of the DEG, improving power gained. The SPC allows fully passive voltage boosting, removing the priming source and simplifying the electronics. This paper outlines the drawbacks and benefits of active and passive electronic solutions for maximizing power from walking.

  14. Quantum Walk with Jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Lavička, H; Kiss, T; Lutz, E; Jex, I

    2011-01-01

    We analyze a special class of 1-D quantum walks (QWs) realized using optical multi-ports. We assume non-perfect multi-ports showing errors in the connectivity, i.e. with a small probability the multi- ports can connect not to their nearest neighbor but to another multi-port at a fixed distance - we call this a jump. We study two cases of QW with jumps where multiple displacements can emerge at one timestep. The first case assumes time-correlated jumps (static disorder). In the second case, we choose the positions of jumps randomly in time (dynamic disorder). The probability distributions of position of the QW walker in both instances differ significantly: dynamic disorder leads to a Gaussian-like distribution, while for static disorder we find two distinct behaviors depending on the parity of jump size. In the case of even-sized jumps, the distribution exhibits a three-peak profile around the position of the initial excitation, whereas the probability distribution in the odd case follows a Laplace-like discre...

  15. 深立井凿井迈步吊盘结构受力模拟试验研究%Study on Mechanical Properties of a Self-walking Sinking Platform for Ultra-deep Shaft Sinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王博; 刘志强; 李幸福; 梁智; 范浩

    2015-01-01

    A new hydraulic self‐walking sinking platform (HWSP) has recently been developed for ul‐tra‐deep shaft construction. It is imperative to carry out study on the mechanical properties of the HWSP before getting into practical application. In this paper ,series of physical model tests with a geo‐metric ratio of 1∶10 were conducted to clarify the mechanical performance of the new sinking platform under tw o w orking conditions:fixed load condition and moving load condition. T he results show that , under various working conditions ,the HWSP has a good structural reliability.In the moving case con‐ditions ,move up or down for the upper layer or the walking layer are the worst case respective‐ly. Errors of the sinking platform manufacture and the reserved grooves construction may cause an im‐balance bearing among the hanging corbels. The corbel which suffers more unbalanced loads will be the first place to be destroyed under long‐term load that affect the security and reliability of the HWSP.Based on the model test data ,it has a reliable assurance for the hanging security of the HWSP model w hen positional tolerance among each corbels or grooves is less than 50 mm.%针对在实验室构建的几何缩比1∶10的深立井凿井迈步吊盘模型,进行了不同凿井施工工况下的迈步吊盘结构受力物理模拟试验。试验结果表明:迈步吊盘结构各测点的应力值均不超过材料允许应力,迈步吊盘结构受力合理;在移动工况下,当上层盘或迈步盘牛腿单独支撑吊盘时,相应盘面的梁构件受力明显增大,此种为相应盘面的不利工况;凿井迈步吊盘利用牛腿支撑,结构制造误差或井壁梁窝不平顺易导致各支撑牛腿受力不均匀,试验条件下允许井壁梁窝最大位置偏差不大于50 m m时,迈步吊盘牛腿可有效支撑吊盘,在实际凿井施工中应严格控制井壁梁窝的预留精度。

  16. The advantages of a rolling foot in human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Peter G; Collins, Steven H; Kuo, Arthur D

    2006-10-01

    The plantigrade human foot rolls over the ground during each walking step, roughly analogous to a wheel. The center of pressure progresses on the ground like a wheel of radius 0.3 L (leg length). We examined the effect of varying foot curvature on the mechanics and energetics of walking. We controlled curvature by attaching rigid arc shapes of various radii to the bottoms of rigid boots restricting ankle motion. We measured mechanical work performed on the center of mass (COM), and net metabolic rate, in human subjects (N=10) walking with seven arc radii from 0.02-0.40 m. Simple models of dynamic walking predict that redirection of COM velocity requires step-to-step transition work, decreasing quadratically with arc radius. Metabolic cost would be expected to change in proportion to mechanical work. We measured the average rate of negative work performed on the COM, and found that it followed the trend well (r2=0.95), with 2.37 times as much work for small radii as for large. Net metabolic rate (subtracting quiet standing) also decreased with increasing arc radius to a minimum at 0.3 L, with a slight increase thereafter. Maximum net metabolic rate was 6.25 W kg(-1) (for small-radius arc feet), about 59% greater than the minimum rate of 3.93 W kg(-1), which in turn was about 45% greater than the rate in normal walking. Metabolic rate was fit reasonably well (r2=0.86) by a quadratic curve, but exceeded that expected from COM work for extreme arc sizes. Other factors appear to increase metabolic cost for walking on very small and very large arc feet. These factors may include effort expended to stabilize the joints (especially the knee) or to maintain balance. Rolling feet with curvature 0.3 L appear energetically advantageous for plantigrade walking, partially due to decreased work for step-to-step transitions.

  17. Comparison of forward walking and backward walking in stroke hemiplegia patients focusing on the paretic side

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Misato; Takami, Akiyoshi; Oda, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the features of backward walking in stroke patients with hemiplegia by focusing on the joint movements and moments of the paretic side, walking speed, stride length, and cadence. [Subjects and Methods] Nine stroke patients performed forward walking and backward walking along a 5-m walkway. Walking speed and stride length were self-selected. Movements were measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system and a force plate. One walking cycle of the paretic side was analyzed. [Results] Walking speed, stride length, and cadence were significantly lower in backward walking than in forward walking. Peak hip extension was significantly lower in backward walking and peak hip flexion moment, knee extension moment, and ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion moments were lower in backward walking. [Conclusion] Unlike forward walking, backward walking requires conscious hip joint extension. Conscious extension of the hip joint is hard for stroke patients with hemiplegia. Therefore, the range of hip joint movement declined in backward walking, and walking speed and stride length also declined. The peak ankle plantar flexion moment was significantly lower in backward walking than in forward walking, and it was hard to generate propulsion power in backward walking. These difficulties also affected the walking speed. PMID:28265136

  18. 基于动力学特性水声传感网随机游走容错机制%Fault-tolerance mechanism of random walk for underwater acoustic sensor networks based on dynamic behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘方鑫; 何明; 刘光云; 康凯

    2015-01-01

    The energy of sensors is limited and the performance of Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks(UASNs) descends by complex marine environment. These factors restrict promoting of application of UASNs into monitoring the marine environment and developing the marine resources. In order to solve the problems of the imbalance of data trans-mission load and low fault-tolerance of UASNs, the characterization of dynamic behaviors of data transmission of UASNs has been quantitatively curved. Some reasons of sensor nodes failure in complex marine environment have been analyzed. The evolution model of network based on cluster structure is established. A fault-tolerance mechanism of random walk is proposed. It would improve the fault-tolerance and extend the life cycle of UASNs. The simulation results verify the ratio-nality and validity of the model. The research results show that the mechanism can reveal the general characterization of dynamic behaviors and the law of the UASNs.%水下传感器节点能量有限、复杂海洋环境影响网络性能下降等因素,制约了水声传感器网络在海洋资源开发、海洋监测等方面的应用推广.为解决水声传感器网络的数据传输负载不均衡、容错能力低等问题,刻画水声传感器网络传播动力学特性,分析复杂海洋环境中传感器节点失效原因,建立了簇结构网络演化模型,提出了一种随机游走容错机制,以提高水声传感器网络容错性和延长其生命周期.仿真实验验证了该模型的合理性和有效性,实验结果表明该机制能揭示水下传感器网络中存在的普遍动力学特性和规律.

  19. Bionic ankle–foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh M.; Grabowski, Alena M.

    2012-01-01

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75–1.75 m s−1 and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation. PMID:21752817

  20. Bionic ankle-foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh M; Grabowski, Alena M

    2012-02-07

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75-1.75 m s(-1) and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation.

  1. Displacement of the pelvis during human walking : experimental data and model predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, W; Hof, AL

    1997-01-01

    Displacements of the pelvis during treadmill walking were studied in dependence of walking speed, stride frequency and stride length. Displacement curves per stride cycle were described by means of harmonic analysis. Simple mechanical, or geometrical models of the body's center of mass (COM) traject

  2. Prosthetic knee stability during the push-off phase of walking - experimental findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Bart F.J.M.; Hendriks, Paul J.H.; Grootenboer, Henk J.

    1996-01-01

    Most of the energy needed for ambulation is generated during the double support phase of walking. Knee flexion during push-off is crucial to maintain the walking velocity. Since users of an above-knee prosthesis have to stabilize the knee with the hip muscles, and regular knee mechanisms are not sta

  3. Single and Dual Task Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie de Bruin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the viability and efficacy of integrating cadence-matched, salient music into a walking intervention for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. Twenty-two people with PD were randomised to a control (CTRL, n=11 or experimental (MUSIC, n=11 group. MUSIC subjects walked with an individualised music playlist three times a week for the intervention period. Playlists were designed to meet subject's musical preferences. In addition, the tempo of the music closely matched (±10–15 bpm the subject's preferred cadence. CTRL subjects continued with their regular activities during the intervention. The effects of training accompanied by “walking songs” were evaluated using objective measures of gait score. The MUSIC group improved gait velocity, stride time, cadence, and motor symptom severity following the intervention. This is the first study to demonstrate that music listening can be safely implemented amongst PD patients during home exercise.

  4. Self-interacting random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Peres, Yuval; Sousi, Perla

    2012-01-01

    Let $\\mu_1,... \\mu_k$ be $d$-dimensional probability measures in $\\R^d$ with mean 0. At each step we choose one of the measures based on the history of the process and take a step according to that measure. We give conditions for transience of such processes and also construct examples of recurrent processes of this type. In particular, in dimension 3 we give the complete picture: every walk generated by two measures is transient and there exists a recurrent walk generated by three measures.

  5. Pedagogies of the Walking Dead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Peters

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the trope of the zombie and the recent upsurge in popular culture surrounding the figure of the zombie described as the “walking dead”. We investigate this trope and figure as a means of analyzing the “pedagogy of the walking dead” with particular attention to the crisis of education in the era of neoliberal capitalism. In particular we examine the professionalization and responsibilization of teachers in the new regulative environment and ask whether there is any room left for the project of critical education.

  6. Limited transfer of newly acquired movement patterns across walking and running in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Ogawa

    Full Text Available The two major modes of locomotion in humans, walking and running, may be regarded as a function of different speed (walking as slower and running as faster. Recent results using motor learning tasks in humans, as well as more direct evidence from animal models, advocate for independence in the neural control mechanisms underlying different locomotion tasks. In the current study, we investigated the possible independence of the neural mechanisms underlying human walking and running. Subjects were tested on a split-belt treadmill and adapted to walking or running on an asymmetrically driven treadmill surface. Despite the acquisition of asymmetrical movement patterns in the respective modes, the emergence of asymmetrical movement patterns in the subsequent trials was evident only within the same modes (walking after learning to walk and running after learning to run and only partial in the opposite modes (walking after learning to run and running after learning to walk (thus transferred only limitedly across the modes. Further, the storage of the acquired movement pattern in each mode was maintained independently of the opposite mode. Combined, these results provide indirect evidence for independence in the neural control mechanisms underlying the two locomotive modes.

  7. Human-like Three-dimensional Walking with Natural Dynamic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Natural dynamics can be exploited in the control of biped walking robots: the swing leg can swing passively, the compliant ankle can naturally transfer the center of pressure along the foot and help in toe off.These mechanisms simplify control and result in motion that is smooth and natural looking.Imitated human being's behavior, we presented a control strategy for HIT-III biped robot, in which active and passive motions were combined.The experiment result shows that robot walked at a faster speed (approximately 0.25m/s) than previous and had a natural and smooth looking gait.

  8. Dynamics of longitudinal arch support in relation to walking speed: contribution of the plantar aponeurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggi, Paolo; Pataky, Todd; Günther, Michael; Savage, Russell; Crompton, Robin

    2010-09-01

    The plantar aponeurosis (PA), in spanning the whole length of the plantar aspect of the foot, is clearly identified as one of the key structures that is likely to affect compliance and stability of the longitudinal arch. A recent study performed in our laboratory showed that tension/elongation in the PA can be predicted from the kinematics of the segments to which the PA is attached. In the present investigation, stereophotogrammetry and inverse kinematics were employed to shed light on the mechanics of the longitudinal arch and its main passive stabilizer, the PA, in relation to walking speed. When compared with a neutral unloaded position, the medial longitudinal arch underwent greater collapse during the weight-acceptance phase of stance at higher walking speed (0.1 degrees +/-1.9 degrees in slow walking; 0.9 degrees +/-2.6 degrees in fast walking; P = 0.0368). During late stance the arch was higher (3.4 degrees +/-3.1 degrees in slow walking; 2.8 degrees +/-2.7 degrees in fast walking; P = 0.0227) and the metatarsophalangeal joints more dorsiflexed (e.g. at the first metatarsophalangeal joint, 52 degrees +/-5 degrees in slow walking; 64 degrees +/-4 degrees in fast walking; P plantar aspect of the foot when walking at faster speeds.

  9. Brisk Walk May Help Sidestep Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_162978.html Brisk Walk May Help Sidestep Heart Disease In just 10 weeks, cholesterol, blood pressure and ... at moderate intensity may lower the risk of heart disease, a small study suggests. "We know walking is ...

  10. Minnesota Walk-In Access Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Minnesota Walk-In Access site (WIA) GIS data represents areas of private land that have been made open to the public for the purpose of walk-in (foot travel)...

  11. Robotic gait analysis of bipedal treadmill stepping by spinal contused rats: characterization of intrinsic recovery and comparison with BBB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessler, Jeff A; De Leon, Ray D; Sharp, Kelli; Kwak, Eugene; Minakata, Koyiro; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2006-06-01

    There is a critical need to develop objective, quantitative techniques to assess motor function after spinal cord injury. Here, we assess the ability of a recently developed robotic device (the "rat stepper") to characterize locomotor impairment following contusion injury in rats. In particular, we analyzed how the kinematic features of hindlimb movement during bipedal, weight-supported treadmill stepping change following contusion, and whether these changes correlate with the recovery of open field locomotion. Female, Sprague-Dawley rats (n=29, 8 weeks of age) received mid thoracic contusion injuries of differing severities (11 mild, nine moderate, nine severe, and four sham). In a first experiment, 16 of the animals were evaluated weekly for 12 weeks using the robotic stepping device. In a second experiment, 17 of the animals were evaluated every other day for 4 weeks. The contused animals recovered open field locomotion based on the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan Scale (BBB) analysis, with most of the recovery occurring by 4 weeks post-injury. Analysis of 14 robotic measures of stepping revealed that several measures improved significantly during the same 4 weeks: swing velocity, step height, step length, hindlimb coordination, and the ability to support body weight. These measures were also significantly correlated with the BBB score. The number of steps taken during testing was not directly related to intrinsic recovery or correlated to the BBB score. These results suggest that it is the quality of weight-supported steps, rather than the quantity, that best reflects locomotor recovery after contusion injury, and that the quality of these steps is determined by the integrity of extensor, flexor, and bilateral coordination pathways. Thus, by measuring only a few weight-supported steps with motion capture, a sensitive, valid measure of locomotor recovery following contusion injury can be obtained across a broad range of impairment levels.

  12. Going round the bend: Persistent personal biases in walked angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetzschke, Simon; Ernst, Marc O; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Boeddeker, Norbert

    2016-03-23

    For navigation through our environment, we can rely on information from various modalities, such as vision and audition. This information enables us for example to estimate our position relative to the starting position, or to integrate velocity and acceleration signals from the vestibular organ and proprioception to estimate the displacement due to self-motion. To better understand the mechanisms that underlie human navigation we analysed the performance of participants in an angle-walking task in the absence of visual and auditory signals. To this end, we guided them along paths of different lengths and asked them to turn by an angle of ±90°. We found significant biases in turn angles, i.e. systematic deviations from the correct angle and that these were characteristic for individual participants. Varying path length, however, had little effect on turn accuracy and precision. To check whether this idiosyncrasy was persistent over time and present in another type of walking task, we performed a second experiment several weeks later. Here, the same participants were guided to walk angles with varying amplitude. We then asked them to judge whether they had walked an angle larger or smaller than 90° in a two-alternative forced-choice paradigm. The personal bias was highly correlated between the two experiments even though they were conducted weeks apart. The presence of a persistent bias in walked angles in the absence of external directional cues indicates a possible error component for navigation, which is surprisingly time stable and idiosyncratic.

  13. A generalized model via random walks for information filtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhuo-Ming, E-mail: zhuomingren@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 3, CH-1700, Fribourg (Switzerland); Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, ChongQing, 400714 (China); Kong, Yixiu [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 3, CH-1700, Fribourg (Switzerland); Shang, Ming-Sheng, E-mail: msshang@cigit.ac.cn [Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, ChongQing, 400714 (China); Zhang, Yi-Cheng [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 3, CH-1700, Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2016-08-06

    There could exist a simple general mechanism lurking beneath collaborative filtering and interdisciplinary physics approaches which have been successfully applied to online E-commerce platforms. Motivated by this idea, we propose a generalized model employing the dynamics of the random walk in the bipartite networks. Taking into account the degree information, the proposed generalized model could deduce the collaborative filtering, interdisciplinary physics approaches and even the enormous expansion of them. Furthermore, we analyze the generalized model with single and hybrid of degree information on the process of random walk in bipartite networks, and propose a possible strategy by using the hybrid degree information for different popular objects to toward promising precision of the recommendation. - Highlights: • We propose a generalized recommendation model employing the random walk dynamics. • The proposed model with single and hybrid of degree information is analyzed. • A strategy with the hybrid degree information improves precision of recommendation.

  14. Einstein's random walk and thermal diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Thermal diffusion has been studied for over 150 years. Despite of the long history and the increasing importance of the phenomenon, the physics of thermal diffusion remains poorly understood. In this paper Ludwig's thermal diffusion is explained using Einstein's random walk. The only new structure added is the spatial heterogeneity of the random walk to reflect the temperature gradient of thermal diffusion. Hence, the walk length and the walk speed are location dependent functions in this pap...

  15. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; O'Brien, Jeremy; Wang, Jingbo; Matthews, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise quantum walks have shown much potential as a frame- work for developing new quantum algorithms. In this paper, we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs ef...

  16. Walking Tips for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most ppular form of exercise among older adults and it's a great choice. What can walking do for you? strengthen muscles help prevent weight gain lower risks of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and osteoporosis improve balance lower the likelihood of falling If ...

  17. Walking pattern classification and walking distance estimation algorithms using gait phase information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeen-Shing; Lin, Che-Wei; Yang, Ya-Ting C; Ho, Yu-Jen

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a walking pattern classification and a walking distance estimation algorithm using gait phase information. A gait phase information retrieval algorithm was developed to analyze the duration of the phases in a gait cycle (i.e., stance, push-off, swing, and heel-strike phases). Based on the gait phase information, a decision tree based on the relations between gait phases was constructed for classifying three different walking patterns (level walking, walking upstairs, and walking downstairs). Gait phase information was also used for developing a walking distance estimation algorithm. The walking distance estimation algorithm consists of the processes of step count and step length estimation. The proposed walking pattern classification and walking distance estimation algorithm have been validated by a series of experiments. The accuracy of the proposed walking pattern classification was 98.87%, 95.45%, and 95.00% for level walking, walking upstairs, and walking downstairs, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed walking distance estimation algorithm was 96.42% over a walking distance.

  18. Developmental Continuity? Crawling, Cruising, and Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Karen E.; Berger, Sarah E.; Leo, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    This research examined developmental continuity between "cruising" (moving sideways holding onto furniture for support) and walking. Because cruising and walking involve locomotion in an upright posture, researchers have assumed that cruising is functionally related to walking. Study 1 showed that most infants crawl and cruise concurrently prior…

  19. Claimed walking distance of lower limb amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, JHB; Bosmans, JC; Van der Schans, CP; Dijkstra, PU

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Walking ability in general and specifically for lower limb amputees is of major importance for social mobility and ADL independence. Walking determines prosthesis prescription. The aim of this study was to mathematically analyse factors influencing claimed walking distance of lower limb amp

  20. Interindividual differences in H reflex modulation during normal walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Alkjaer, Tine; Aagaard, Per; Magnusson, S Peter

    2002-01-01

    Based on previous studies, at least two different types of soleus Hoffmann (H) reflex modulation were likely to be found during normal human walking. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to identify different patterns of modulation of the soleus H reflex and to examine whether or not subjects with different H reflex modulation would exhibit different walking mechanics and different EMG activity. Fifteen subjects walked across two force platforms at 4.5 km/h (+/-10%) while the movements were recorded on video. The soleus H reflex and EMG activity were recorded separately during treadmill walking at 4.5 km/h. Using a two-dimensional analysis joint angles, angular velocities, accelerations, linear velocities and accelerations were calculated, and net joint moments about the ankle, knee and hip joint were computed by inverse dynamics from the video and force plate data. Six subjects (group S) showed a suppressed H reflex during the swing phase, and 9 subjects (group LS) showed increasing reflex excitability during the swing phase. The plantar flexor dominated moment about the ankle joint was greater for group LS. In contrast, the extensor dominated moment about the knee joint was greater for the S group. The hip joint moment was similar for the groups. The EMG activity in the vastus lateralis and anterior tibial muscles was greater prior to heel strike for the S group. These data indicate that human walking exhibits at least two different motor patterns as evaluated by gating of afferent input to the spinal cord, by EMG activity and by walking mechanics. Increasing H reflex excitability during the swing phase appears to protect the subject against unexpected perturbations around heel strike by a facilitated stretch reflex in the triceps surae muscle. Alternatively, in subjects with a suppressed H reflex in the swing phase the knee joint extensors seem to form the primary protection around heel strike.

  1. Using the Functional Reach Test for Probing the Static Stability of Bipedal Standing in Humanoid Robots Based on the Passive Motion Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo Zenzeri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to analyze the static stability of a computational architecture, based on the Passive Motion Paradigm, for coordinating the redundant degrees of freedom of a humanoid robot during whole-body reaching movements in bipedal standing. The analysis is based on a simulation study that implements the Functional Reach Test, originally developed for assessing the danger of falling in elderly people. The study is carried out in the YARP environment that allows realistic simulations with the iCub humanoid robot.

  2. Stability and Control of Constrained Three-Dimensional Robotic Systems with Application to Bipedal Postural Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallel, Hichem

    Three classes of postural adjustments are investigated with the view of a better understanding of the control mechanisms involved in human movement. The control mechanisms and responses of human or computer models to deliberately induced disturbances in postural adjustments are the focus of this dissertation. The classes of postural adjustments are automatic adjustments, (i.e. adjustments not involving voluntary deliberate movement), adjustments involving imposition of constraints for the purpose of maintaining support forces, and adjustments involving violation and imposition of constraints for the purpose of maintaining balance, (i.e. taking one or more steps). For each class, based on the physiological attributes of the control mechanisms in human movements, control strategies are developed to synthesize the desired postural response. The control strategies involve position and velocity feedback control, on line relegation control, and pre-stored trajectory control. Stability analysis for constrained and unconstrained maneuvers is carried out based on Lyapunov stability theorems. The analysis is based on multi-segment biped robots. Depending on the class of postural adjustments, different biped models are developed. An eight-segment three dimensional biped model is formulated for the study of automatic adjustments and adjustments for balance. For the study of adjustments for support, a four segment lateral biped model is considered. Muscle synergies in automatic adjustments are analyzed based on a three link six muscle system. The muscle synergies considered involve minimal muscle number and muscle co-activation. The role of active and passive feedback in these automatic adjustments is investigated based on the specified stiffness and damping of the segments. The effectiveness of the control strategies and the role of muscle synergies in automatic adjustments are demonstrated by a number of digital computer simulations.

  3. Active quantum walks: a framework for quantum walks with adiabatic quantum evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Song, Fangmin; Li, Xiangdong

    2016-05-01

    We study a new methodology for quantum walk based algorithms. Different from the passive quantum walk, in which a walker is guided by a quantum walk procedure, the new framework that we developed allows the walker to move by an adiabatic procedure of quantum evolution, as an active way. The use of this active quantum walk is helpful to develop new quantum walk based searching and optimization algorithms.

  4. Biased random walks on multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Battiston, Federico; Latora, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Biased random walks on complex networks are a particular type of walks whose motion is biased on properties of the destination node, such as its degree. In recent years they have been exploited to design efficient strategies to explore a network, for instance by constructing maximally mixing trajectories or by sampling homogeneously the nodes. In multiplex networks, the nodes are related through different types of links (layers or communication channels), and the presence of connections at different layers multiplies the number of possible paths in the graph. In this work we introduce biased random walks on multiplex networks and provide analytical solutions for their long-term properties such as the stationary distribution and the entropy rate. We focus on degree-biased walks and distinguish between two subclasses of random walks: extensive biased walks consider the properties of each node separately at each layer, intensive biased walks deal instead with intrinsically multiplex variables. We study the effec...

  5. Anthropomorphic Design of the Human-Like Walking Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Hsun Chiang; Fan-Ren Chang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we present a new concept of the mechanical design of a humanoid robot.The goal is to build a humanoid robot utilizing a new structure which is more suitable for human-like walking with the characteristics of the knee stretch,heel-contact,and toe-off.Inspired by human skeleton,we made an anthropomorphic pelvis for the humanoid robot.In comparison with conventional humanoid robots,with such the anthropomorphic pelvis,our robot is capable of adjusting the center of gravity of the upper body by the motion of pelvic tilt,thus reducing the required torque at the ankle joint and the velocity variations in human-like walking.With more precise analysis of the foot mechanism,the fixed-length inverted pendulum can be used to describe the dynamics of biped walking,thus preventing redundant works and power consumption in length variable inverted pendulum system.As the result of the new structure we propose,a humanoid robot is able to walk with human-like gait.

  6. Quantum walk on a cylinder

    CERN Document Server

    Bru, Luis A; Di Molfetta, Giuseppe; Pérez, Armando; Roldán, Eugenio; Silva, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We consider the 2D alternate quantum walk on a cylinder. We concentrate on the study of the motion along the open dimension, in the spirit of looking at the closed coordinate as a small or "hidden" extra dimension. If one starts from localized initial conditions on the lattice, the dynamics of the quantum walk that is obtained after tracing out the small dimension shows the contribution of several components, which can be understood from the study of the dispersion relations for this problem. In fact, these components originate from the contribution of the possible values of the quasi-momentum in the closed dimension. In the continuous space-time limit, the different components manifest as a set of Dirac equations, with each quasi-momentum providing the value of the corresponding mass. We briefly discuss the possible link of these ideas to the simulation of high energy physical theories that include extra dimensions.

  7. Random walk near the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1988-07-01

    The random walk of a particle on a three-dimensional semi-infinite lattice is considered. In order to study the effect of the surface on the random walk, it is assumed that the velocity of the particle depends on the distance to the surface. Moreover it is assumed that at any point the particle may be absorbed with a certain probability. The probability of the return of the particle to the starting point and the average time of eventual return are calculated. The dependence of these quantities on the distance to the surface, the probability of absorption and the properties of the surface is discussed. The method of generating functions is used.

  8. Groups, graphs and random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Salvatori, Maura; Sava-Huss, Ecaterina

    2017-01-01

    An accessible and panoramic account of the theory of random walks on groups and graphs, stressing the strong connections of the theory with other branches of mathematics, including geometric and combinatorial group theory, potential analysis, and theoretical computer science. This volume brings together original surveys and research-expository papers from renowned and leading experts, many of whom spoke at the workshop 'Groups, Graphs and Random Walks' celebrating the sixtieth birthday of Wolfgang Woess in Cortona, Italy. Topics include: growth and amenability of groups; Schrödinger operators and symbolic dynamics; ergodic theorems; Thompson's group F; Poisson boundaries; probability theory on buildings and groups of Lie type; structure trees for edge cuts in networks; and mathematical crystallography. In what is currently a fast-growing area of mathematics, this book provides an up-to-date and valuable reference for both researchers and graduate students, from which future research activities will undoubted...

  9. City Walks and Tactile Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina Diaconu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to develop categories of the pedestrian’s tactile and kinaesthetic experience of the city. The beginning emphasizes the haptic qualities of surfaces and textures, which can be “palpated” visually or experienced by walking. Also the lived city is three-dimensional; its corporeal depth is discussed here in relation to the invisible sewers, protuberant profiles, and the formal diversity of roofscapes. A central role is ascribed in the present analysis to the formal similarities between the representation of the city by walking through it and the representation of the tactile form of objects. Additional aspects of the “tactile” experience of the city in a broad sense concern the feeling of their rhythms and the exposure to weather conditions. Finally, several aspects of contingency converge in the visible age of architectural works, which record traces of individual and collective histories.

  10. The six determinants of gait and the inverted pendulum analogy: A dynamic walking perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Arthur D

    2007-08-01

    We examine two prevailing, yet surprisingly contradictory, theories of human walking. The six determinants of gait are kinematic features of gait proposed to minimize the energetic cost of locomotion by reducing the vertical displacement of the body center of mass (COM). The inverted pendulum analogy proposes that it is beneficial for the stance leg to behave like a pendulum, prescribing a more circular arc, rather than a horizontal path, for the COM. Recent literature presents evidence against the six determinants theory, and a simple mathematical analysis shows that a flattened COM trajectory in fact increases muscle work and force requirements. A similar analysis shows that the inverted pendulum fares better, but paradoxically predicts no work or force requirements. The paradox may be resolved through the dynamic walking approach, which refers to periodic gaits produced almost entirely by the dynamics of the limbs alone. Demonstrations include passive dynamic walking machines that descend a gentle slope, and active dynamic walking robots that walk on level ground. Dynamic walking takes advantage of the inverted pendulum mechanism, but requires mechanical work to transition from one pendular stance leg to the next. We show how the step-to-step transition is an unavoidable energetic consequence of the inverted pendulum gait, and gives rise to predictions that are experimentally testable on humans and machines. The dynamic walking approach provides a new perspective, focusing on mechanical work rather than the kinematics or forces of gait. It is helpful for explaining human gait features in a constructive rather than interpretive manner.

  11. Segment lengths influence hill walking strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Riley C; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2014-08-22

    Segment lengths are known to influence walking kinematics and muscle activity patterns. During level walking at the same speed, taller individuals take longer, slower strides than shorter individuals. Based on this, we sought to determine if segment lengths also influenced hill walking strategies. We hypothesized that individuals with longer segments would display more joint flexion going uphill and more extension going downhill as well as greater lateral gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis activity in both directions. Twenty young adults of varying heights (below 155 cm to above 188 cm) walked at 1.25 m/s on a level treadmill as well as 6° and 12° up and downhill slopes while we collected kinematic and muscle activity data. Subsequently, we ran linear regressions for each of the variables with height, leg, thigh, and shank length. Despite our population having twice the anthropometric variability, the level and hill walking patterns matched closely with previous studies. While there were significant differences between level and hill walking, there were few hill walking variables that were correlated with segment length. In support of our hypothesis, taller individuals had greater knee and ankle flexion during uphill walking. However, the majority of the correlations were between tibialis anterior and lateral gastrocnemius activities and shank length. Contrary to our hypothesis, relative step length and muscle activity decreased with segment length, specifically shank length. In summary, it appears that individuals with shorter segments require greater propulsion and toe clearance during uphill walking as well as greater braking and stability during downhill walking.

  12. Use of formative research and social network theory to develop a group walking intervention: Sumter County on the Move!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forthofer, Melinda; Burroughs-Girardi, Ericka; Stoisor-Olsson, Liliana; Wilcox, Sara; Sharpe, Patricia A; Pekuri, Linda M

    2016-10-01

    Although social support is a frequently cited enabler of physical activity, few studies have examined how to harness social support in interventions. This paper describes community-based formative research to design a walking program for mobilizing naturally occurring social networks to support increases in walking behavior. Focus group methods were used to engage community members in discussions about desired walking program features. The research was conducted with underserved communities in Sumter County, South Carolina. The majority of focus group participants were women (76%) and African American (92%). Several important themes emerged from the focus group results regarding attitudes toward walking, facilitators of and barriers to walking, ideal walking program characteristics, and strategies for encouraging community members to walk. Most noteably, the role of existing social networks as a supportive influence on physical activity was a recurring theme in our formative research and a gap in the existing evidence base. The resulting walking program focused on strategies for mobilizing, supporting and reinforcing existing social networks as mechanisms for increasing walking. Our approach to linking theory, empirical evidence and community-based formative research for the development of a walking intervention offers an example for practitioners developing intervention strategies for a wide range of behaviors.

  13. The effect of walking speed on gait kinematics and kinetics after endoprosthetic knee replacement following bone tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Yusuke; Tatematsu, Noriatsu; Nagai, Koutatsu; Nakayama, Tomitaka; Nakamata, Takeharu; Okamoto, Takeshi; Toguchida, Junya; Ichihashi, Noriaki; Matsuda, Shuichi; Tsuboyama, Tadao

    2014-09-01

    Gait function is one of the most important components of functional outcome evaluation in patients with a tumor around the knee. In addition to walking at a preferred speed, the patients might be sometimes required to walk fast in daily life (e.g., schooling and working) because the major types of bone tumors often occur in adolescence and young adults. Therefore, recovering the ability to walk fast would increase the quality of life of these patients. To clarify which parts of the lower limb are exerted while walking fast, we investigated the kinematic and kinetic changes during fast walking in patients who underwent endoprosthetic knee replacement after bone tumor resection. Laboratory-based gait analysis was performed on eight patients who had undergone endoprosthetic knee replacement following resection of a tumor around the knee. Patients walked at a preferred and faster speed, and the gait parameters were compared between the two walking speeds for each leg. To increase walking speed, patients tended to rely on the bilateral hip, ankle, and contralateral knee to generate additional power. Kinetic analysis showed that involved-side vertical body support was not significantly increased during late stance to increase walking speed, which was associated with a small increase in ankle plantarflexion moment and concentric power. These results suggest to patients after knee reconstruction how to effectively increase their walking speed or redistribute the mechanical load on the muscles and joints to prevent excessive stress on the lower limbs.

  14. Differences in walking pattern during 6-min walk test between patients with COPD and healthy subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneke Annegarn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, detailed analyses of walking patterns using accelerometers during the 6-min walk test (6MWT have not been performed in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Therefore, it remains unclear whether and to what extent COPD patients have an altered walking pattern during the 6MWT compared to healthy elderly subjects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 79 COPD patients and 24 healthy elderly subjects performed the 6MWT wearing an accelerometer attached to the trunk. The accelerometer features (walking intensity, cadence, and walking variability and subject characteristics were assessed and compared between groups. Moreover, associations were sought with 6-min walk distance (6MWD using multiple ordinary least squares (OLS regression models. COPD patients walked with a significantly lower walking intensity, lower cadence and increased walking variability compared to healthy subjects. Walking intensity and height were the only two significant determinants of 6MWD in healthy subjects, explaining 85% of the variance in 6MWD. In COPD patients also age, cadence, walking variability measures and their interactions were included were significant determinants of 6MWD (total variance in 6MWD explained: 88%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: COPD patients have an altered walking pattern during 6MWT compared to healthy subjects. These differences in walking pattern partially explain the lower 6MWD in patients with COPD.

  15. A direct comparison of local dynamic stability during unperturbed standing and walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Gu; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2006-06-01

    Standing and walking are very different tasks. It might be reasonable, therefore, to assume that the mechanisms used to maintain the stability of standing and walking should be quite different. However, many studies have shown that postural stability measures can generally predict risk of falls, even though most falls occur during locomotor tasks and not during postural tasks. This suggests that there is at least some commonality among the mechanisms governing the control of both standing and walking. The present study was conducted to determine whether the postural stability either is or is not directly related to locomotor stability. Twenty healthy adults, age 18-73 years, walked on a motorized treadmill at their preferred walking speed for three trials of 5 min. They also stood on a force plate for three trials of 5 min. Both tasks were performed without imposing any additional external perturbations. The motion of each subject's trunk segment was recorded and described using a multi-dimensional state space defined in the same manner for both tasks. Local dynamic stability was quantified from the mean divergence over time of locally perturbed trajectories in state space, which was parameterized as a double exponential process. Divergence parameters were compared to determine the relationship between local dynamic stability during standing and walking. Standing and walking exhibited local dynamic stability properties that were significantly different (P0.1). Divergence parameters were also compared to traditional center of pressure (COP) measures obtained from standing trials. COP measures were significantly correlated to local divergence parameters for standing, but not to those for walking. This study provides direct evidence that the mechanisms governing standing and walking stability are significantly different.

  16. Recycling energy to restore impaired ankle function during human walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven H Collins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Humans normally dissipate significant energy during walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy. The replacement of lost energy is necessary for steady gait, in which mechanical energy is constant on average, external dissipation is negligible, and no net work is performed over a stride. However, dissipation and replacement by muscles might not be necessary if energy were instead captured and reused by an assistive device. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a microprocessor-controlled artificial foot that captures some of the energy that is normally dissipated by the leg and "recycles" it as positive ankle work. In tests on subjects walking with an artificially-impaired ankle, a conventional prosthesis reduced ankle push-off work and increased net metabolic energy expenditure by 23% compared to normal walking. Energy recycling restored ankle push-off to normal and reduced the net metabolic energy penalty to 14%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that reduced ankle push-off contributes to the increased metabolic energy expenditure accompanying ankle impairments, and demonstrate that energy recycling can be used to reduce such cost.

  17. Quantum random walks - an introductory overview

    CERN Document Server

    Kempe, J

    2003-01-01

    This article aims to provide an introductory survey on quantum random walks. Starting from a physical effect to illustrate the main ideas we will introduce quantum random walks, review some of their properties and outline their striking differences to classical walks. We will touch upon both physical effects and computer science applications, introducing some of the main concepts and language of present day quantum information science in this context. We will mention recent developments in this new area and outline some open questions.

  18. Walking in Place Through Virtual Worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Immersive virtual reality (IVR) is seemingly on the verge of entering the homes of consumers. Enabling users to walk through virtual worlds in a limited physical space presents a challenge. With an outset in a taxonomy of virtual travel techniques, we argue that Walking-in-Place (WIP) techniques ....... Finally, we summarize work we have performed in order to produce more natural WIP locomotion and present unexplored topics which need to be address if WIP techniques are to provide perceptually natural walking experiences....

  19. Random Walk Smooth Transition Autoregressive Models

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This paper extends the family of smooth transition autoregressive (STAR) models by proposing a specification in which the autoregressive parameters follow random walks. The random walks in the parameters can capture structural change within a regime switching framework, but in contrast to the time varying STAR (TV-STAR) speciifcation recently introduced by Lundbergh et al (2003), structural change in our random walk STAR (RW-STAR) setting follows a stochastic process rather than a determinist...

  20. Implementation of a Three-Dimensional Pedometer Automatic Accumulating Walking or Jogging Motions in Arbitrary Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Shing Sheu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a method for using a three-axis accelerometer and a single-chip microcontrol unit to implement a three-dimensional (3D pedometer that can automatically identify walking and running motions. The proposed design can calculate the number of walking and running steps down to small numbers of steps and can be easily worn, thus remedying defects of generic mechanical and 3D pedometers. The user’s motion state is calculated using a walk/run mode switching algorithm.

  1. Gaitography applied to prosthetic walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Cutti, Andrea G; Summa, Aurora; Monari, Davide; Veronesi, Davide; van Ooijen, Mariëlle W; Beek, Peter J

    2014-11-01

    During walking on an instrumented treadmill with an embedded force platform or grid of pressure sensors, center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories exhibit a characteristic butterfly-like shape, reflecting the medio-lateral and anterior-posterior weight shifts associated with alternating steps. We define "gaitography" as the analysis of such COP trajectories during walking (the "gaitograms"). It is currently unknown, however, if gaitography can be employed to characterize pathological gait, such as lateralized gait impairments. We therefore registered gaitograms for a heterogeneous sample of persons with a trans-femoral and trans-tibial amputation during treadmill walking at a self-selected comfortable speed. We found that gaitograms directly visualize between-person differences in prosthetic gait in terms of step width and the relative duration of prosthetic and non-prosthetic single-support stance phases. We further demonstrated that one should not only focus on the gaitogram's shape but also on the time evolution along that shape, given that the COP evolves much slower in the single-support phase than in the double-support phase. Finally, commonly used temporal and spatial prosthetic gait characteristics were derived, revealing both individual and systematic differences in prosthetic and non-prosthetic step lengths, step times, swing times, and double-support durations. Because gaitograms can be rapidly collected in an unobtrusive and markerless manner over multiple gait cycles without constraining foot placement, clinical application of gaitography seems both expedient and appealing. Studies examining the repeatability of gaitograms and evaluating gaitography-based gait characteristics against a gold standard with known validity and reliability are required before gaitography can be clinically applied.

  2. Motor modules in robot-aided walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizzi Leonardo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is hypothesized that locomotion is achieved by means of rhythm generating networks (central pattern generators and muscle activation generating networks. This modular organization can be partly identified from the analysis of the muscular activity by means of factorization algorithms. The activity of rhythm generating networks is described by activation signals whilst the muscle intervention generating network is represented by motor modules (muscle synergies. In this study, we extend the analysis of modular organization of walking to the case of robot-aided locomotion, at varying speed and body weight support level. Methods Non Negative Matrix Factorization was applied on surface electromyographic signals of 8 lower limb muscles of healthy subjects walking in gait robotic trainer at different walking velocities (1 to 3km/h and levels of body weight support (0 to 30%. Results The muscular activity of volunteers could be described by low dimensionality (4 modules, as for overground walking. Moreover, the activation signals during robot-aided walking were bursts of activation timed at specific phases of the gait cycle, underlying an impulsive controller, as also observed in overground walking. This modular organization was consistent across the investigated speeds, body weight support level, and subjects. Conclusions These results indicate that walking in a Lokomat robotic trainer is achieved by similar motor modules and activation signals as overground walking and thus supports the use of robotic training for re-establishing natural walking patterns.

  3. Quantum walk with one variable absorbing boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feiran; Zhang, Pei; Wang, Yunlong; Liu, Ruifeng; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2017-01-01

    Quantum walks constitute a promising ingredient in the research on quantum algorithms; consequently, exploring different types of quantum walks is of great significance for quantum information and quantum computation. In this study, we investigate the progress of quantum walks with a variable absorbing boundary and provide an analytical solution for the escape probability (the probability of a walker that is not absorbed by the boundary). We simulate the behavior of escape probability under different conditions, including the reflection coefficient, boundary location, and initial state. Moreover, it is also meaningful to extend our research to the situation of continuous-time and high-dimensional quantum walks.

  4. Excited random walks: results, methods, open problems

    CERN Document Server

    Kosygina, Elena

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of self-interacting random walks in deterministic or random environments, known as excited random walks or cookie walks, on the d-dimensional integer lattice. The main purpose of this paper is two-fold: to give a survey of known results and some of the methods and to present several new results. The latter include functional limit theorems for transient one-dimensional excited random walks in bounded i.i.d. cookie environments as well as some zero-one laws. Several open problems are stated.

  5. Effect of Body Composition on Walking Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciejczyk Marcin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the study was to evaluate walking economy and physiological responses at two walking speeds in males with similar absolute body mass but different body composition. Methods. The study involved 22 young men with similar absolute body mass, BMI, aerobic performance, calf and thigh circumference. The participants differed in body composition: body fat (HBF group and lean body mass (HLBM group. In the graded test, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max and maximal heart rate were measured. Walking economy was evaluated during two walks performed at two different speeds (4.8 and 6.0 km ‧ h-1. Results. The VO2max was similar in both groups, as were the physiological responses during slow walking. The absolute oxygen uptake or oxygen uptake relative to body mass did not significantly differentiate the studied groups. The only indicator significantly differentiating the two groups was oxygen uptake relative to LBM. Conclusions. Body composition does not significantly affect walking economy at low speed, while during brisk walking, the economy is better in the HLBM vs. HBF group, provided that walking economy is presented as oxygen uptake relative to LBM. For this reason, we recommend this manner of oxygen uptake normalization in the evaluation of walking economy.

  6. Effects of walking velocity on vertical head and body movements during locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasaki, E.; Moore, S. T.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    1999-01-01

    Trunk and head movements were characterized over a wide range of walking speeds to determine the relationship between stride length, stepping frequency, vertical head translation, pitch rotation of the head, and pitch trunk rotation as a function of gait velocity. Subjects (26-44 years old) walked on a linear treadmill at velocities of 0.6-2.2 m/s. The head and trunk were modeled as rigid bodies, and rotation and translation were determined using a video-based motion analysis system. At walking speeds up to 1.2 m/s there was little head pitch movement in space, and the head pitch relative to the trunk was compensatory for trunk pitch. As walking velocity increased, trunk pitch remained approximately invariant, but a significant head translation developed. This head translation induced compensatory head pitch in space, which tended to point the head at a fixed point in front of the subject that remained approximately invariant with regard to walking speed. The predominant frequency of head translation and rotation was restricted to a narrow range from 1.4 Hz at 0.6 m/s to 2.5 Hz at 2.2 m/s. Within the range of 0.8-1.8 m/s, subjects tended to increase their stride length rather than step frequency to walk faster, maintaining the predominant frequency of head movement at close to 2.0 Hz. At walking speeds above 1.2 m/s, head pitch in space was highly coherent with, and compensatory for, vertical head translation. In the range 1.2-1.8 m/s, the power spectrum of vertical head translation was the most highly tuned, and the relationship between walking speed and head and trunk movements was the most linear. We define this as an optimal range of walking velocity with regard to head-trunk coordination. The coordination of head and trunk movement was less coherent at walking velocities below 1.2 m/s and above 1.8 m/s. These results suggest that two mechanisms are utilized to maintain a stable head fixation distance over the optimal range of walking velocities. The relative

  7. Walk the line: station context, corridor type and bus rapid transit walk access in Jinan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yang; Mehndiratta, Shomik; Zegras, P. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines BRT station walk access patterns in rapidly urbanizing China and the relationship between bus rapid transit (BRT) station context and corridor type and the distance people will walk to access the system (i.e., catchment area). We hypothesize that certain contextual built environment features and station and right-of-way configurations will increase the walk-access catchment area; that is, that urban design influences users’ willingness to walk to BRT. We base our analysis ...

  8. Analysis of Neuromuscular Mechanics of Lower Extremities Based on Self-Balance Recovery During Walking%步态自主平衡行为的下肢神经肌肉力学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏海龙; 张大卫; 李佳

    2013-01-01

    针对步态过程滑移后的自主平衡恢复行为,建立了基于神经肌肉力学理论的下肢行走多杆动力学模型。利用该模型对步态滑移现象发生后的自主平衡恢复过程进行了定性分析,给出了步态自主平衡恢复行为中的主控参数,并对自主平衡恢复过程中下肢肌群的功效进行了讨论,计算了自主平衡恢复行为中的下肢肌群主控参数。两组不同受试者的滑后自主平衡恢复实验结果表明,该步态模型可用于分析滑跌后的自主平衡行为特征。%Aiming at the self-balancing recovery of post-slip during adults’ walking,a multi-rod dynamic lower ex-tremity gait model was proposed that could make a qualitative analysis of self-balance recovery of post-slip during walking. Using this model,the main and independent parameters and the leading muscle actions of lower extremity were discussed. The experimental results of self-balance during post-slip about two different groups show that the model is able to be used to analyze the muscle actions about self-balance during post-slip.

  9. Some simple bijections involving lattice walks and ballot sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Van Leeuwen, Marc A A

    2010-01-01

    In this note we observe that a bijection related to Littelmann's root operators (for type $A_1$) transparently explains the well known enumeration by length of walks on $\\N$ (left factors of Dyck paths), as well as some other enumerative coincidences. We indicate a relation with bijective solutions of Bertrand's ballot problem: those can be mechanically transformed into bijective proofs of the mentioned enumeration formula.

  10. IMU-based ambulatory walking speed estimation in constrained treadmill and overground walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuozhi; Li, Qingguo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of a walking speed estimation system based on using an inertial measurement unit (IMU), a combination of accelerometers and gyroscopes. The walking speed estimation algorithm segments the walking sequence into individual stride cycles (two steps) based on the inverted pendulum-like behaviour of the stance leg during walking and it integrates the angular velocity and linear accelerations of the shank to determine the displacement of each stride. The evaluation was performed in both treadmill and overground walking experiments with various constraints on walking speed, step length and step frequency to provide a relatively comprehensive assessment of the system. Promising results were obtained in providing accurate and consistent walking speed/step length estimation in different walking conditions. An overall percentage root mean squared error (%RMSE) of 4.2 and 4.0% was achieved in treadmill and overground walking experiments, respectively. With an increasing interest in understanding human walking biomechanics, the IMU-based ambulatory system could provide a useful walking speed/step length measurement/control tool for constrained walking studies.

  11. Walking performance: correlation between energy cost of walking and walking participation. new statistical approach concerning outcome measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Franceschini

    Full Text Available Walking ability, though important for quality of life and participation in social and economic activities, can be adversely affected by neurological disorders, such as Spinal Cord Injury, Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis or Traumatic Brain Injury. The aim of this study is to evaluate if the energy cost of walking (CW, in a mixed group of chronic patients with neurological diseases almost 6 months after discharge from rehabilitation wards, can predict the walking performance and any walking restriction on community activities, as indicated by Walking Handicap Scale categories (WHS. One hundred and seven subjects were included in the study, 31 suffering from Stroke, 26 from Spinal Cord Injury and 50 from Multiple Sclerosis. The multivariable binary logistical regression analysis has produced a statistical model with good characteristics of fit and good predictability. This model generated a cut-off value of.40, which enabled us to classify correctly the cases with a percentage of 85.0%. Our research reveal that, in our subjects, CW is the only predictor of the walking performance of in the community, to be compared with the score of WHS. We have been also identifying a cut-off value of CW cost, which makes a distinction between those who can walk in the community and those who cannot do it. In particular, these values could be used to predict the ability to walk in the community when discharged from the rehabilitation units, and to adjust the rehabilitative treatment to improve the performance.

  12. Spatial search by quantum walk

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, A M; Childs, Andrew M.; Goldstone, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Grover's quantum search algorithm provides a way to speed up combinatorial search, but is not directly applicable to searching a physical database. Nevertheless, Aaronson and Ambainis showed that a database of N items laid out in d spatial dimensions can be searched in time of order sqrt(N) for d>2, and in time of order sqrt(N) poly(log N) for d=2. We consider an alternative search algorithm based on a continuous time quantum walk on a graph. The case of the complete graph gives the continuous time search algorithm of Farhi and Gutmann, and other previously known results can be used to show that sqrt(N) speedup can also be achieved on the hypercube. We show that full sqrt(N) speedup can be achieved on a d-dimensional periodic lattice for d>4. In d=4, the quantum walk search algorithm takes time of order sqrt(N) poly(log N), and in d<4, the algorithm provides no speedup.

  13. WALK-ASSISTING BALANCE SYSTEM OF THE EXOSKELETON ROBOT FOR DISABLED PEOPLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Yuehong; Zhou Chunlin; Song Jiaren; Chen Shiyi; Han Tianpu; Zhou Chen

    2004-01-01

    A novel methodology for a walk-assisting balance system of the exoskeleton robot for disabled people is presented.The experiment on the walk-assisting balance system is implemented using a mini-type ropewalker robot.The mechanism of the ropewalker robot is designed,its dynamic model is built,and its control system based on PWM is developed.The emulations in Matlab and the results of experiments prove that this methodology is effective.

  14. Lumbosacral lordosis in fetal spine: genetic or mechanic parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choufani, Elie; Jouve, Jean-Luc; Pomero, Vincent; Adalian, Pascal; Chaumoitre, Kathia; Panuel, Michel

    2009-09-01

    Many believe that the fetus spine had only one curvature from cranial to caudal which is a global kyphosis and that the lumbosacral lordosis appears with the erect posture. They agree that the sacrum of Homo sapiens is not positioned posteriorly at birth and that it is during the first few years that the sacrum, in humans, moves dorsally in relation with the progressive acquisition of erect posture and the ontogeny of bipedal locomotion. Nevertheless, there is no biometric study assessing these parameters in vivo in utero during the fetal life. Cross-sectional biometric study of the lumbosacral junction of the spine in in utero fetuses was to document the presence of a lumbosacral lordosis in the fetal population in utero long before standing and walking and its change during growth. Forty-five MRIs (magnetic resonance imaging) of fetuses aged of 23-40 weeks of gestation were analyzed. The measurements were performed on computerized MRI DICOM images using a professional software to calculate the curvature and radius of the lumbosacral junction. The presence or absence of visual lumbosacral lordosis was noted for each case. Correlation tests were performed in order to disclose a correlation between the gestational age and the curvature calculated. A test was considered significant for P < 0.01. There were 14 males, 17 females and 14 undetermined. All the curves (100%) showed mathematically the presence of a lordosis in the lumbosacral region. The visual lumbosacral lordosis was present in 60% of cases. The measurement of the lumbosacral curvature varies between -0.133 and -0.033 mm(-1) and a mean of -0.054 mm(-1) with a corresponding radius ranging from -7 to -303 mm with a mean of -18.7 mm. The statistical analysis showed no correlation between the gestational age and the lumbosacral curvature (R (2) = 0.11). The hypothesis of increased lumbosacral lordosis with gestational age is rejected. It is difficult to accurately determine the role played separately by

  15. Walking on high heels changes muscle activity and the dynamics of human walking significantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Nørreslet, Andreas;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the distribution of net joint moments in the lower extremities during walking on high-heeled shoes compared with barefooted walking at identical speed. Fourteen female subjects walked at 4 km/h across three force platforms while they were filmed by five...... digital video cameras operating at 50 frames/second. Both barefooted walking and walking on high-heeled shoes (heel height: 9 cm) were recorded. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. EMG was recorded from eight leg muscles. The knee extensor moment peak in the first half of the stance...

  16. Lower limb joint kinetics in walking: the role of industry recommended footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Geoffrey S; Franz, Jason R; Dicharry, Jay; Della Croce, Ugo; Kerrigan, D Casey

    2011-03-01

    The effects of current athletic footwear on lower extremity biomechanics are unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the changes, if any, that occur in peak lower extremity net joint moments while walking in industry recommended athletic footwear. Sixty-eight healthy young adults underwent kinetic evaluation of lower extremity extrinsic joint moments while walking barefoot and while walking in current standard athletic footwear matched to the foot mechanics of each subject while controlling for speed. A secondary analysis was performed comparing peak knee joint extrinsic moments during barefoot walking to those while walking in three different standard footwear types: stability, motion control, and cushion. 3-D motion capture data were collected in synchrony with ground reaction force data collected from an instrumented treadmill. The shod condition was associated with a 9.7% increase in the first peak knee varus moment, and increases in the hip flexion and extension moments. These increases may be largely related to a 6.5% increase in stride length with shoes associated with increases in the ground reaction forces in all three axes. The changes from barefoot walking observed in the peak knee joint moments were similar when subjects walked in all three footwear types. It is unclear to what extent these increased joint moments may be clinically relevant, or potentially adverse. Nonetheless, these differences should be considered in the recommendation as well as the design of footwear in the future.

  17. Realisation of an energy efficient walking robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dertien, Edwin; Oort, van Gijs; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    In this video the walking robot ‘Dribbel’ is presented, which has been built at the Control Engineering group of the University of Twente, the Netherlands. This robot has been designed with a focus on minimal energy consumption, using a passive dynamic approach. It is a so-called four-legged 2D walk

  18. Walking (Gait), Balance, and Coordination Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Seeking Services: Questions to Ask d Employment Disclosure Decisions Career Options Accommodations d Resources for Specific Populations Pediatric ... MS Navigator Program Patient Resources Contact Us d Careers in MS ... MS Symptoms Walking (Gait) Difficulties Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Walking (Gait) ...

  19. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-04-01

    Voluntary limb modifications must be integrated with basic walking patterns during visually guided walking. In this study we tested whether voluntary gait modifications can become more automatic with practice. We challenged walking control by presenting visual stepping targets that instructed subjects to modify step length from one trial to the next. Our sequence learning paradigm is derived from the serial reaction-time (SRT) task that has been used in upper limb studies. Both random and ordered sequences of step lengths were used to measure sequence-specific and sequence-nonspecific learning during walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 yr,n= 20) could learn a specific sequence of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 yr,n= 8) had lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning were the same compared with those of older children (11-16 yr,n= 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited at faster walking speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that spatial sequence learning can be integrated with a highly automatic task such as walking. These findings suggest that adults and children use implicit knowledge about the sequence to plan and execute leg movement during visually guided walking.

  20. Quantum random walks and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Karthik H

    2014-01-01

    How realistic is it to adopt a quantum random walk model to account for decisions involving two choices? Here, we discuss the neural plausibility and the effect of initial state and boundary thresholds on such a model and contrast it with various features of the classical random walk model of decision making.

  1. Nordic walking improves mobility in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkeren, FJ van; Reijmers, R.S.; Kleinveld, M.J.; Minten, A.; Bruggen, J.P.; Bloem, B.R.

    2008-01-01

    Nordic walking may improve mobility in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we examined whether the beneficial effects persist after the training period. We included 19 PD patients [14 men; mean age 67.0 years (range 58-76); Hoehn and Yahr stage range 1-3] who received a 6-week Nordic walking exercise pr

  2. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Wang, Jingbo B; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-05-05

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  3. Getting mobile with a walking-help

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    Ethnomethodology has been one of the few fields were mundane experiences and social ordering such as walking have been a focus of interest (e.g. Ryave and Schenkein 1974). In the present paper we want to discuss how this mundane practice sometimes needs to be achieved through the help of technology...... people with acquired brain injury were introduced to a new walking help that should enable them to walk (better). Our multimodal interaction analysis (Goodwin 2000) of the data will show how the practice of walking with this specific technology is dependent on the interplay of the material affordances...... of the technology (e.g. Gaver 1996), the bodily affordances (e.g. Sheller 2011) of the user and, furthermore, the scaffolding by an accompanying helper. The paper will discuss how movement as an enabled experience can be analysed as an entanglement of these three aspects. To do that, the situations of walk...

  4. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-05-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  5. Two- and 6-minute walk tests assess walking capability equally in neuromuscular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Linda Kahr; Knak, Kirsten Lykke; Witting, Nanna;

    2016-01-01

    to participate on 2 test days, each consisting of 1 2MWT and 1 6MWT separated by a minimum 30-minute period of rest. The order of the walk tests was randomly assigned via sealed envelopes. A group of 38 healthy controls completed 1 6MWT. RESULTS: The mean walking distance for the 2MWT was 142.8 meters......OBJECTIVE: This methodologic study investigates if the 2-minute walk test (2MWT) can be a valid alternative to the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) to describe walking capability in patients with neuromuscular diseases. METHODS: Patients (n = 115) with different neuromuscular diseases were invited...... and for the 6MWT 405.3 meters. The distance walked in the 2MWT was highly correlated to the distance walked in the 6MWT (r = 0.99, p minute in the 6MWT, both among patients and healthy controls, which was not evident in the 2MWT...

  6. The limits of agency in walking humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannape, O A; Schwabe, L; Tadi, T; Blanke, O

    2010-05-01

    An important principle of human ethics is that individuals are not responsible for actions performed when unconscious. Recent research found that the generation of an action and the building of a conscious experience of that action (agency) are distinct processes and crucial mechanisms for self-consciousness. Yet, previous agency studies have focussed on actions of a finger or hand. Here, we investigate how agents consciously monitor actions of the entire body in space during locomotion. This was motivated by previous work revealing that (1) a fundamental aspect of self-consciousness concerns a single and coherent representation of the entire spatially situated body and (2) clinical instances of human behaviour without consciousness occur in rare neurological conditions such as sleepwalking or epileptic nocturnal wandering. Merging techniques from virtual reality, full-body tracking, and cognitive science of conscious action monitoring, we report experimental data about consciousness during locomotion in healthy participants. We find that agents consciously monitor the location of their entire body and its locomotion only with low precision and report that while precision remains low it can be systematically modulated in several experimental conditions. This shows that conscious action monitoring in locomoting agents can be studied in a fine-grained manner. We argue that the study of the mechanisms of agency for a person's full body may help to refine our scientific criteria of self-hood and discuss sleepwalking and related conditions as alterations in neural systems encoding motor awareness in walking humans.

  7. Walking droplets in confined geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoux, Boris; Mathieu, Olivier; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2014-11-01

    When gently placing a droplet onto a vertically vibrated bath, coalescence may be avoided: the drop bounces permanently. Upon increasing forcing acceleration, a drop interacts with the wave it generates, and becomes a ``walker'' with a well defined velocity. In this work, we investigate the confinement of a walker in a mono-dimensional geometry. The system consists of linear submarine channels used as waveguides for a walker. By studying the dynamics of walkers in those channels, we discover some 1D-2D transition. We also propose a model based on an analogy with ``Quantum Wires.'' Finally, we consider the situation of a walker in a circular submarine channel, and examine the behavior of several walking droplets in this system. We show the quantization of the drop distances, and correlate it to their bouncing modes.

  8. Snell's law and walking droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, John; Pucci, Giuseppe; Aubin, Benjamin; Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Faria, Luiz

    2016-11-01

    Droplets walking on the surface of a vibrating bath have been shown to exhibit a number of quantum-like features. We here present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of such droplets crossing a linear step corresponding to a reduction in bath depth. When the step is sufficiently large, the walker reflects off the step; otherwise, it is refracted as it crosses the step. Particular attention is given to an examination of the regime in which the droplet obeys a form of Snell's Law, a behavior captured in accompanying simulations. Attempts to provide theoretical rationale for the dependence of the effective refractive index on the system parameters are described. Supported by NSF through CMMI-1333242.

  9. Random walks on reductive groups

    CERN Document Server

    Benoist, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The classical theory of Random Walks describes the asymptotic behavior of sums of independent identically distributed random real variables. This book explains the generalization of this theory to products of independent identically distributed random matrices with real coefficients. Under the assumption that the action of the matrices is semisimple – or, equivalently, that the Zariski closure of the group generated by these matrices is reductive - and under suitable moment assumptions, it is shown that the norm of the products of such random matrices satisfies a number of classical probabilistic laws. This book includes necessary background on the theory of reductive algebraic groups, probability theory and operator theory, thereby providing a modern introduction to the topic.

  10. Symbolic walk in regular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermann, Leonardo; Carlo, Gabriel G.

    2015-01-01

    We find that a symbolic walk (SW)—performed by a walker with memory given by a Bernoulli shift—is able to distinguish between the random or chaotic topology of a given network. We show this result by means of studying the undirected baker network, which is defined by following the Ulam approach for the baker transformation in order to introduce the effect of deterministic chaos into its structure. The chaotic topology is revealed through the central role played by the nodes associated with the positions corresponding to the shortest periodic orbits of the generating map. They are the overwhelmingly most visited nodes in the limit cycles at which the SW asymptotically arrives. Our findings contribute to linking deterministic chaotic dynamics with the properties of networks constructed using the Ulam approach.

  11. Blindman-Walking Optimization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunming Li

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimization methods are all implemented with the hypothesis of unknowing the mathematic express of objective objection. Using the human analogy innovative method, the one-dimension blind-walking optimal method is proposed in this paper. The theory and the algorithm of this method includes halving, doubling, reversing probing step and verifying the applicability condition. Double-step is available to make current point moving to the extremum point. Half-step is available to accelerate convergence. In order to improve the optimization, the applicability condition decides whether update current point or not. The operation process, algorithmic flow chart and characteristic analysis of the method were given. Two optimization problems with unimodal or multimodal objective function were solved by the proposed method respectively. The simulation result shows that the proposed method is better than the ordinary method. The proposed method has the merit of rapid convergence, little calculation capacity, wide applicable range, etc. Taking the method as innovative kernel, the random research method, feasible direction method and complex shape method were improved. Taking the innovative content of this paper as innovative kernel, a monograph was published. The other innovations of the monograph are listed, such as applied algorithm of Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT qualifications on judging the restriction extremum point, the design step of computing software, the complementarity and derivation of Powell criterion, the method of keeping the complex shape not to deduce dimension and the analysis of gradual optimization characteristic, the reinforced wall of inner point punish function method, the analysis of problem with constrained monstrosity extremum point, the improvement of Newton method and the validation of optimization idea of blind walking repeatedly, the explanation of later-day optimization method, the conformity of seeking algorithm needing the

  12. Statistical Modeling of Robotic Random Walks on Different Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Austin; Kinnaman, Laura

    Issues of public safety, especially with crowd dynamics and pedestrian movement, have been modeled by physicists using methods from statistical mechanics over the last few years. Complex decision making of humans moving on different terrains can be modeled using random walks (RW) and correlated random walks (CRW). The effect of different terrains, such as a constant increasing slope, on RW and CRW was explored. LEGO robots were programmed to make RW and CRW with uniform step sizes. Level ground tests demonstrated that the robots had the expected step size distribution and correlation angles (for CRW). The mean square displacement was calculated for each RW and CRW on different terrains and matched expected trends. The step size distribution was determined to change based on the terrain; theoretical predictions for the step size distribution were made for various simple terrains. It's Dr. Laura Kinnaman, not sure where to put the Prefix.

  13. Biasing the random walk of a molecular motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astumian, R Dean [Department of Physics, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469-5709 (United States)

    2005-11-30

    Biomolecular motors are often described in mechanical terms, with analogy to cars, turbines, judo throws, levers, etc. It is important to remember however that because of their small size, and because of the aqueous environment in which molecular motors move, viscous drag and thermal noise dominate the inertial forces that drive macroscopic machines. The sequence of motions-conformational changes-by which a motor protein moves can best be described as a random walk, with transitions from one state to another occurring by thermal activation over energy barriers. In this paper I will address the question of how this random walk is biased by a non-equilibrium chemical reaction (ATP hydrolysis) so that the motor molecule moves preferentially (with almost unit certainty) in one direction, even when an external force is applied to drive it in the opposite direction. I will also discuss how these 'soft matter' motors can achieve thermodynamic efficiencies of nearly 100%.

  14. A generalized model via random walks for information filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhuo-Ming; Kong, Yixiu; Shang, Ming-Sheng; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2016-08-01

    There could exist a simple general mechanism lurking beneath collaborative filtering and interdisciplinary physics approaches which have been successfully applied to online E-commerce platforms. Motivated by this idea, we propose a generalized model employing the dynamics of the random walk in the bipartite networks. Taking into account the degree information, the proposed generalized model could deduce the collaborative filtering, interdisciplinary physics approaches and even the enormous expansion of them. Furthermore, we analyze the generalized model with single and hybrid of degree information on the process of random walk in bipartite networks, and propose a possible strategy by using the hybrid degree information for different popular objects to toward promising precision of the recommendation.

  15. Sensor-based hip control with hybrid neuroprosthesis for walking in paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Curtis S; Kobetic, Rudi; Bulea, Thomas C; Audu, Musa L; Schnellenberger, John R; Pinault, Gilles; Triolo, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test whether a hybrid neuroprosthesis (HNP) with an exoskeletal variable-constraint hip mechanism (VCHM) combined with a functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) controller can maintain upright posture with less upper-limb support and improve gait speed as compared with walking with either an isocentric reciprocating gait orthosis (IRGO) or FNS only. The results show that walking with the HNP significantly reduced forward lean in FNS-only walking and the maximum upper-limb forces by 42% and 19% as compared with the IRGO and FNS-only gait, respectively. Walking speed increased significantly with VCHM as compared with 1:1 reciprocal coupling and by 15% when using the sensor-based FNS controller as compared with HNP with fixed baseline stimulation without the controller active.

  16. Universal adaptive self-stabilizing traversal scheme: random walk and reloading wave

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Thibault; Sohier, Devan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate random walk based token circulation in dynamic environments subject to failures. We describe hypotheses on the dynamic environment that allow random walks to meet the important property that the token visits any node infinitely often. The randomness of this scheme allows it to work on any topology, and require no adaptation after a topological change, which is a desirable property for applications to dynamic systems. For random walks to be a traversal scheme and to answer the concurrence problem, one needs to guarantee that exactly one token circulates in the system. In the presence of transient failures, configurations with multiple tokens or with no token can occur. The meeting property of random walks solves the cases with multiple tokens. The reloading wave mechanism we propose, together with timeouts, allows to detect and solve cases with no token. This traversal scheme is self-stabilizing, and universal, meaning that it needs no assumption on the system topology. We describ...

  17. Sensor-based hip control with hybrid neuroprosthesis for walking in paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis S. To, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to test whether a hybrid neuroprosthesis (HNP with an exoskeletal variable-­constraint hip mechanism (VCHM combined with a functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS controller can maintain upright posture with less upper-limb support and improve gait speed as compared with walking with either an isocentric reciprocating gait orthosis (IRGO or FNS only. The results show that walking with the HNP significantly reduced forward lean in FNS-only walking and the maximum upper-limb forces by 42% and 19% as compared with the IRGO and FNS-only gait, respectively. Walking speed increased significantly with VCHM as compared with 1:1 reciprocal coupling and by 15% when using the sensor-based FNS controller as compared with HNP with fixed baseline stimulation without the controller active.

  18. A review on the coordinative structure of human walking and the application of principal component analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinguang Wang; Nicholas O'Dwyer; Mark Halaki

    2013-01-01

    Walking is a complex task which includes hundreds of muscles, bones and joints working together to deliver smooth movements. With the complexity, walking has been widely investigated in order to identify the pattern of multi-segment movement and reveal the control mechanism. The degree of freedom and dimensional properties provide a view of the coordinative structure during walking, which has been extensively studied by using dimension reduction technique. In this paper, the studies related to the coordinative structure, dimensions detection and pattern reorganization during walking have been reviewed. Principal component analysis, as a popular technique, is widely used in the processing of human movement data. Both the principle and the outcomes of principal component analysis were introduced in this paper. This technique has been reported to successfully reduce the redundancy within the original data, identify the physical meaning represented by the extracted principal components and discriminate the different patterns. The coordinative structure during walking assessed by this technique could provide further information of the body control mechanism and correlate walking pattern with injury.

  19. The Walking Renaissance: A Longitudinal Analysis of Walking Travel in the Greater Los Angeles Area, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Joh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Promoting walking travel is considered important for reducing automobile use and improving public health. Recent U.S. transportation policy has incentivized investments in alternative, more sustainable transportation modes such as walking, bicycling and transit in auto-oriented cities such as Los Angeles. Although many past studies have analyzed changes in walking travel across the U.S., there is little clarity on the drivers of change. We address this gap by conducting a longitudinal analysis of walking travel in the greater Los Angeles area from 2001 to 2009. We use travel diary and household data from regional and national surveys to analyze changes in walking trip shares and rates across our study area. Results show that walking has significantly increased across most of Los Angeles, and that increases in walking trips generally correspond with increases in population, employment, and transit service densities. Estimates from fixed-effects regression analysis generally suggest a positive association between population density and walking, and that higher increases in transit stop density are correlated with increased walking trips to and from transit stops. These findings illustrate how regional planning efforts to pursue a coordinated land use-transit planning strategy can help promote walking in auto-oriented or vehicle adopting cities.

  20. Effects of a Flexibility and Relaxation Programme, Walking, and Nordic Walking on Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Reuter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD progress despite optimized medical treatment. The present study investigated the effects of a flexibility and relaxation programme, walking, and Nordic walking (NW on walking speed, stride length, stride length variability, Parkinson-specific disability (UPDRS, and health-related quality of life (PDQ 39. 90 PD patients were randomly allocated to the 3 treatment groups. Patients participated in a 6-month study with 3 exercise sessions per week, each lasting 70 min. Assessment after completion of the training showed that pain was reduced in all groups, and balance and health-related quality of life were improved. Furthermore, walking, and Nordic walking improved stride length, gait variability, maximal walking speed, exercise capacity at submaximal level, and PD disease-specific disability on the UPDRS in addition. Nordic walking was superior to the flexibility and relaxation programme and walking in improving postural stability, stride length, gait pattern and gait variability. No significant injuries occurred during the training. All patients of the Nordic walking group continued Nordic walking after completing the study.

  1. Community walking training program improves walking function and social participation in chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, MinKyu; Cho, KiHun; Lee, WanHee

    2014-01-01

    Stroke patients live with balance and walking dysfunction. Walking is the most important factor for independent community activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a community walking training program (CWTP) within the real environment on walking function and social participation in chronic stroke patients. Twenty-two stroke patients (13 male, 50.45 years old, post stroke duration 231.64 days) were randomly assigned to either the CWTP group or the control group. All subjects participated in the same standard rehabilitation program consisting of physical and occupational therapy for 60 min per day, five times a week, for four weeks. In addition, the CWTP group participated in CWTP for 30 min per day, five times a week, for four weeks. Walking function was assessed using the 10-m walk test (measurement for 10-meter walking speed), 6-min walk assessment (measurement of gait length for 6-minutes), and community gait assessment. Social participation was assessed using a social participation domain of stroke impact scale. In walking function, greater improvement was observed in the CWTP group compared with the control group (P participation improved more in the CWTP group compared with the control group (P participation in chronic stroke patients. Therefore, we suggest that CWTP within the real environment may be an effective method for improving walking function and social participation of chronic stroke patients when added to standard rehabilitation.

  2. Walking dreams in congenital and acquired paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurat, Marie-Thérèse; Agbakou, Maité; Attigui, Patricia; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2011-12-01

    To test if dreams contain remote or never-experienced motor skills, we collected during 6 weeks dream reports from 15 paraplegics and 15 healthy subjects. In 9/10 subjects with spinal cord injury and in 5/5 with congenital paraplegia, voluntary leg movements were reported during dream, including feelings of walking (46%), running (8.6%), dancing (8%), standing up (6.3%), bicycling (6.3%), and practicing sports (skiing, playing basketball, swimming). Paraplegia patients experienced walking dreams (38.2%) just as often as controls (28.7%). There was no correlation between the frequency of walking dreams and the duration of paraplegia. In contrast, patients were rarely paraplegic in dreams. Subjects who had never walked or stopped walking 4-64 years prior to this study still experience walking in their dreams, suggesting that a cerebral walking program, either genetic or more probably developed via mirror neurons (activated when observing others performing an action) is reactivated during sleep.

  3. The work of walking: a calorimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, P; Saris, W H; Schoffelen, P F; Van Ingen Schenau, G J; Ten Hoor, F

    1988-08-01

    Experiments were designed to test the traditional assumption that during level walking all of the energy from oxidation of fuel appears as heat and no work is done. Work is force expressed through distance, or energy transferred from a man to the environment, but not as heat. While wearing a suit calorimeter in a respiration chamber, five women and five men walked for 70 to 90 min on a level treadmill at 2.5, 4.6, and 6.7 km.h-1 and pedalled a cycle ergometer for 70 to 90 min against 53 and 92 W loads. They also walked with a weighted backpack and against a horizontal load. During cycling, energy from fuel matched heat loss plus the power measured by the ergometer. During walking, however, energy from fuel exceeded that which appeared as heat, meaning that work was done. The power increased with walking speed; values were 14, 29, and 63 W, which represented 11, 12, and 13% of the incremental cost of fuel above the resting level. Vertical and horizontal loads increased the fuel cost and heat loss of walking but did not alter the power output. This work energy did not re-appear as thermal energy during 18 h of recovery. The most likely explanation of the work done is in the inter-action between the foot and the ground, such as compressing the heel of the shoe and bending the sole. We conclude that work is done in level walking.

  4. Elements of random walk and diffusion processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ibe, Oliver C

    2013-01-01

    Presents an important and unique introduction to random walk theory Random walk is a stochastic process that has proven to be a useful model in understanding discrete-state discrete-time processes across a wide spectrum of scientific disciplines. Elements of Random Walk and Diffusion Processes provides an interdisciplinary approach by including numerous practical examples and exercises with real-world applications in operations research, economics, engineering, and physics. Featuring an introduction to powerful and general techniques that are used in the application of physical and dynamic

  5. Scaling of random walk betweenness in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, O

    2016-01-01

    The betweenness centrality of graphs using random walk paths instead of geodesics is studied. A scaling collapse with no adjustable parameters is obtained as the graph size $N$ is varied; the scaling curve depends on the graph model. A normalized random betweenness, that counts each walk passing through a node only once, is also defined. It is argued to be more useful and seen to have simpler scaling behavior. In particular, the probability for a random walk on a preferential attachment graph to pass through the root node is found to tend to unity as $N\\rightarrow\\infty.$

  6. Limit cycle walking on a regularized ground

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Henry O

    2012-01-01

    The singular nature of contact problems, such as walking, makes them difficult to analyze mathematically. In this paper we will "regularize" the contact problem of walking by approximating the ground with a smooth repulsive potential energy and a smooth dissipative friction force. Using this model we are able to prove the existence of a limit cycle for a periodically perturbed system which consists of three masses connected by springs. In particular, this limit cycle exists in a symmetry reduced phase. In the unreduced phase space, the motion of the masses resembles walking.

  7. Exponential algorithmic speedup by quantum walk

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, A M; Deotto, E; Farhi, E; Gutmann, S; Spielman, D A; Childs, Andrew M.; Cleve, Richard; Deotto, Enrico; Farhi, Edward; Gutmann, Sam; Spielman, Daniel A.

    2002-01-01

    We construct an oracular problem that can be solved exponentially faster on a quantum computer than on a classical computer. The quantum algorithm is based on a continuous time quantum walk, and thus employs a different technique from previous quantum algorithms based on quantum Fourier transforms. We show how to implement the quantum walk efficiently in our oracular setting. We then show how this quantum walk can be used to solve our problem by rapidly traversing a graph. Finally, we prove that no classical algorithm can solve this problem with high probability in subexponential time.

  8. A feasibility study on the design and walking operation of a biped locomotor via dynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingfeng; Ceccarelli, Marco; Carbone, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    A feasibility study on the mechanical design and walking operation of a Cassino biped locomotor is presented in this paper. The biped locomotor consists of two identical 3 degrees-of-freedom tripod leg mechanisms with a parallel manipulator architecture. Planning of the biped walking gait is performed by coordinating the motions of the two leg mechanisms and waist. A threedimensional model is elaborated in SolidWorks® environment in order to characterize a feasible mechanical design. Dynamic simulation is carried out in MSC.ADAMS® environment with the aims of characterizing and evaluating the dynamic walking performance of the proposed design. Simulation results show that the proposed biped locomotor with proper input motions of linear actuators performs practical and feasible walking on flat surfaces with limited actuation and reaction forces between its feet and the ground. A preliminary prototype of the biped locomotor is built for the purpose of evaluating the operation performance of the biped walking gait of the proposed locomotor.

  9. Quantum-walk transport properties on graphene structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougroura, Hamza; Aissaoui, Habib; Chancellor, Nicholas; Kendon, Viv

    2016-12-01

    We present numerical studies of quantum walks on C60 and related graphene structures to investigate their transport properties. Also known as a honeycomb lattice, the lattice formed by carbon atoms in the graphene phase can be rolled up to form nanotubes of various dimensions. Graphene nanotubes have many important applications, some of which rely on their unusual electrical conductivity and related properties. Quantum walks on graphs provide an abstract setting in which to study such transport properties independent of the other chemical and physical properties of a physical substance. They can thus be used to further the understanding of mechanisms behind such properties. We find that nanotube structures are significantly more efficient in transporting a quantum walk than cycles of equivalent size, provided the symmetry of the structure is respected in how they are used. We find faster transport on zigzag nanotubes compared to armchair nanotubes, which is unexpected given that for the actual materials the armchair nanotube is metallic, while the zigzag is semiconducting.

  10. Effect on Blood Pressure of Daily Lemon Ingestion and Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoji Kato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent studies suggest that the daily intake of lemon (Citrus limon has a good effect on health, but this has not been confirmed in humans. In our previous studies, it was observed that people who are conscious of their health performed more lemon intake and exercise. An analysis that took this into account was required. Methodology. For 101 middle-aged women in an island area in Hiroshima, Japan, a record of lemon ingestion efforts and the number of steps walked was carried out for five months. The change rates (Δ% of the physical measurements, blood test, blood pressure, and pulse wave measured value during the observation period were calculated, and correlations with lemon intake and the number of steps walked were considered. As a result, it was suggested that daily lemon intake and walking are effective for high blood pressure because both showed significant negative correlation to systolic blood pressure Δ%. Conclusions. As a result of multiple linear regression analysis, it was possible that lemon ingestion is involved more greatly with the blood citric acid concentration Δ% and the number of steps with blood pressure Δ%, and it was surmised that the number of steps and lemon ingestion are related to blood pressure improvement by different action mechanisms.

  11. Variability and stability analysis of walking of transfemoral amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamoth, Claudine C.; Ainsworth, Erik; Polomski, Wojtek; Houdijk, Han

    2010-01-01

    Variability and stability of walking of eight transfemoral amputees and eight healthy controls was studied under four conditions walking inside on a smooth terrain walking while performing a dual-task and walking outside on (ir)regular surfaces Trunk accelerations were recorded with a tri-axial acce

  12. Symmetricity of Distribution for One-Dimensional Hadamard Walk

    CERN Document Server

    Konno, N; Soshi, T; Konno, Norio; Namiki, Takao; Soshi, Takahiro

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we study a one-dimensional quantum random walk with the Hadamard transformation which is often called the Hadamard walk. We construct the Hadamard walk using a transition matrix on probability amplitude and give some results on symmetricity of probability distributions for the Hadamard walk.

  13. Urban Walking and the Pedagogies of the Street

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairner, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Drawing upon the extensive literature on urban walking and also on almost 60 years' experience of walking the streets, this article argues that there is a pressing need to re-assert the educational value of going for a walk. After a brief discussion of the social significance of the "flaneur," the historic pioneer of urban walking, the article…

  14. Sensitivity Study of Stochastic Walking Load Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars; Frier, Christian

    2010-01-01

    On flexible structures such as footbridges and long-span floors, walking loads may generate excessive structural vibrations and serviceability problems. The problem is increasing because of the growing tendency to employ long spans in structural design. In many design codes, the vibration...... serviceability limit state is assessed using a walking load model in which the walking parameters are modelled deterministically. However, the walking parameters are stochastic (for instance the weight of the pedestrian is not likely to be the same for every footbridge crossing), and a natural way forward...... investigates whether statistical distributions of bridge response are sensitive to some of the decisions made by the engineer doing the analyses. For the paper a selected part of potential influences are examined and footbridge responses are extracted using Monte-Carlo simulations and focus is on estimating...

  15. Simple expressions for the long walk distance

    CERN Document Server

    Chebotarev, Pavel; Balaji, R

    2011-01-01

    The walk distances in graphs are defined as the result of appropriate transformations of the $\\sum_{k=0}^\\infty(tA)^k$ proximity measures, where $A$ is the weighted adjacency matrix of a connected weighted graph and $t$ is a sufficiently small positive parameter. The walk distances are graph-geodetic, moreover, they converge to the shortest path distance and to the so-called long walk distance as the parameter $t$ approaches its limiting values. In this paper, simple expressions for the long walk distance are obtained. They involve the generalized inverse, minors, and inverses of submatrices of the symmetric irreducible singular M-matrix ${\\cal L}=\\rho I-A,$ where $\\rho$ is the Perron root of $A.$

  16. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    at faster walking speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that spatial sequence learning can be integrated with a highly automatic task like walking. These findings suggest that adults and children use implicit knowledge about the sequence to plan and execute leg movement during...... walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 years, N = 20) could learn a specific sequence...... of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 years, N = 8) have lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning was the same compared to older children (11-16 years, N = 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited...

  17. Community walking in people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Robyn M; Morris, Meg E; Woollacott, Marjorie H; Brauer, Sandra G

    2012-01-01

    People with Parkinson's disease often have walking difficulty, and this is likely to be exacerbated while walking in places in the community, where people are likely to face greater and more varied challenges. This study aims to understand the facilitators and the barriers to walking in the community perceived by people with Parkinson's disease. This qualitative study involved 5 focus groups (n = 34) of people with Parkinson's disease and their partners residing in metropolitan and rural regions in Queensland, Australia. Results found that people with PD reported to use internal personal strategies as facilitators to community walking, but identified primarily external factors, particularly the environmental factors as barriers. The adoption of strategies or the use of facilitators allows people with Parkinson's disease to cope so that participants often did not report disability.

  18. Holographic walking from tachyon DBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutasov, David [EFI and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Av., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Lin, Jennifer, E-mail: jenlin@uchicago.edu [EFI and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Av., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Parnachev, Andrei [Institute Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Leiden University, PO Box 9506, Leiden 2300RA (Netherlands)

    2012-10-11

    We use holography to study conformal phase transitions, which are believed to be realized in four dimensional QCD and play an important role in walking technicolor models of electroweak symmetry breaking. At strong coupling they can be modeled by the non-linear dynamics of a tachyonic scalar field with mass close to the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound in anti-de Sitter spacetime. Taking the action for this field to have a tachyon-Dirac-Born-Infeld form gives rise to models that resemble hard and soft wall AdS/QCD, with a dynamically generated wall. For hard wall models, the highly excited spectrum has the KK form m{sub n}{approx}n; in the soft wall case we exhibit potentials with m{sub n}{approx}n{sup {alpha}}, 0<{alpha} Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 1/2. We investigate the finite temperature phase structure and find first or second order symmetry restoration transitions, depending on the behavior of the potential near the origin of field space.

  19. 基于随机游走模型的质量信息传递的焓变机制研究%Research on Enthalpy Change Mechanism of Quality Information Transmission Based on Random Walk Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史丽萍; 唐书林; 刘强; 苑婧婷

    2012-01-01

    Considering the different perception ability for quality information by different customers, the paper argued "enthalpy" in physics, defined the fluctuation of customs' perception value caused by quality information as enthalpy change of quality information transmission, and that enthalpy change of quality information was the key indicator of describing quality evolution. The paper adopted random walk model to establish enthalpy change model of quality different times, further discovered the time and space of enthalpy change. Research results indicated that enthalpy change of quality information transmission obeyed Gaussian distribution, whose convergence was proportional to perception ability of quality information by customer. Positive enthalpy change could increase customer' s perception value, which would purchase desire; negative enthalpy change would cause "enthalpy black hole" of customer' s perception value, which would betoken the occurrence of quality crisis. Comparing the enthalpy and price of different times Could identify the development stage and affecting region of quality crisis, which would provide distinguishing basis for enterprise decision.%从顾客对质量信息的感知能力差异出发,本文认为质量信息的传递会导致顾客感知价值呈现波动性,因此引入物理学中"焓"的概念,将因质量信息引起顾客感知价值的波动定义为"质量信息传递的焓变",认为质量信息的焓变是描述质量演变的关键性指标.本文利用随机游走理论建立了质量信息传递的焓变模型来描述同一时间不同顾客、同一顾客不同时间的焓,发现焓变的时间和空间.研究结果表明质量信息传递的焓变服从高斯分布,其收敛性跟顾客对质量信息的感知能力成正比.正焓变会增加顾客感知价值,提升购买欲望;负焓变会使顾客感知价值出现"焓黑洞",预示着质量危机的发生.对比不同时刻的焓和价格可以识别出质量危机

  20. Walking on high heels changes muscle activity and the dynamics of human walking significantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Svendsen, Morten B; Nørreslet, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    digital video cameras operating at 50 frames/second. Both barefooted walking and walking on high-heeled shoes (heel height: 9 cm) were recorded. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. EMG was recorded from eight leg muscles. The knee extensor moment peak in the first half of the stance...... joint abductor moment. Several EMG parameters increased significantly when walking on high-heels. The results indicate a large increase in bone-on-bone forces in the knee joint directly caused by the increased knee joint extensor moment during high-heeled walking, which may explain the observed higher...

  1. DNA sequencing technology, walking with modular primers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulanovsky, L.

    1996-12-31

    The success of the Human Genome Project depends on the development of adequate technology for rapid and inexpensive DNA sequencing, which will also benefit biomedical research in general. The authors are working on DNA technologies that eliminate primer synthesis, the main bottleneck in sequencing by primer walking. They have developed modular primers that are assembled from three 5-mer, 6-mer or 7-mer modules selected from a presynthesized library of as few as 1,000 oligonucleotides ({double_bond}4, {double_bond}5, {double_bond}7). The three modules anneal contiguously at the selected template site and prime there uniquely, even though each is not unique for the most part when used alone. This technique is expected to speed up primer walking 30 to 50 fold, and reduce the sequencing cost by a factor of 5 to 15. Time and expensive will be saved on primer synthesis itself and even more so due to closed-loop automation of primer walking, made possible by the instant availability of primers. Apart from saving time and cost, closed-loop automation would also minimize the errors and complications associated with human intervention between the walks. The author has also developed two additional approaches to primer-library based sequencing. One involves a branched structure of modular primers which has a distinctly different mechanism of achieving priming specificity. The other introduces the concept of ``Differential Extension with Nucleotide Subsets`` as an approach increasing priming specificity, priming strength and allowing cycle sequencing. These approaches are expected to be more robust than the original version of the modular primer technique.

  2. Momentum Dynamics of One Dimensional Quantum Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Fuss, I; Sherman, P J; Naguleswaran, S; Fuss, Ian; White, langord B.; Sherman, Peter J.; Naguleswaran, Sanjeev

    2006-01-01

    We derive the momentum space dynamic equations and state functions for one dimensional quantum walks by using linear systems and Lie group theory. The momentum space provides an analytic capability similar to that contributed by the z transform in discrete systems theory. The state functions at each time step are expressed as a simple sum of three Chebyshev polynomials. The functions provide an analytic expression for the development of the walks with time.

  3. Effect of Body Composition on Walking Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Maciejczyk Marcin; Wiecek Magdalena; Szymura Jadwiga; Szygula Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of the study was to evaluate walking economy and physiological responses at two walking speeds in males with similar absolute body mass but different body composition. Methods. The study involved 22 young men with similar absolute body mass, BMI, aerobic performance, calf and thigh circumference. The participants differed in body composition: body fat (HBF group) and lean body mass (HLBM group). In the graded test, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and maximal heart rate were me...

  4. On a directionally reinforced random walk

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Arka; Roitershtein, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We consider a generalized version of a directionally reinforced random walk, which was originally introduced by Mauldin, Monticino, and von Weizs\\"{a}cker in \\cite{drw}. Our main result is a stable limit theorem for the position of the random walk in higher dimensions. This extends a result of Horv\\'{a}th and Shao \\cite{limits} that was previously obtained in dimension one only (however, in a more stringent functional form).

  5. Balancing of the anthropomorphous robot walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaev, V. M.; Nikitina, D. V.; Fadeev, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Anthropomorphic robots are designed a human environment operates: buildings and structures, cabs and etc. The movement of these robots is carried out by walking which provides high throughput to overcome natural and manmade obstacles. The article presents some algorithm results for dynamic walking on the anthropomorphic robot AR601 example. The work is performed according to the Russian Government Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University.

  6. Go Naked: Diapers Affect Infant Walking

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Whitney G.; Lingeman, Jesse M.; Adolph, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    In light of cross-cultural and experimental research highlighting effects of childrearing practices on infant motor skill, we asked whether wearing diapers, a seemingly innocuous childrearing practice, affects infant walking. Diapers introduce bulk between the legs, potentially exacerbating infants’ poor balance and wide stance. We show that walking is adversely affected by old-fashioned cloth diapers, and that even modern disposable diapers—habitually worn by most infants in the sample—incur...

  7. Feedback control system for walking in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, J S; Phillips, C A; Heaton, H H

    1984-01-01

    A computer control stimulation system is described which has been successfully tested by allowing a paraplegic subject to stand and walk through closed loop control. This system is a Z80 microprocessor system with eight channels of analog to digital and 16 channels of digital to analog control. Programming is written in CPM and works quite successfully for maintaining lower body postural control in paraplegics. Further expansion of this system would enable a feedback control system for multidirectional walking in man.

  8. The Snail Takes a Walk with Me

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宜鸣; 乐伟国

    2008-01-01

    @@ 一、故事内容 I'm a snake. Today God gives me a job-I should take a walk with the snail. The snail moves too slowly. I have to scare him. He looks at me, full of shame. I am very angry. I pull him, and even kick.The snail cries, so he stops walking. I feel quite helpless.

  9. Walking Out of the Family Towards Rights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    WALKING in any city or ruralarea in China today, one will seewomen with confidence andpride, with their own work and lives.There is not much difference between theurban and rural women in dress. Theirfaces portray contentment and happiness.These are significant changes which havebeen brought about by women walking outof the family over the past near 50 years,and getting involved in society, alteringtheir dependence on men and making thempeople of dignity. The government knew clearly that to

  10. A Walk in the Semantic Park

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Johannsen, Jacob; Zerny, Ian

    2011-01-01

    To celebrate the 20th anniversary of PEPM, we are inviting you to a walk in the semantic park and to inter-derive reduction-based and reduction-free negational normalization functions.......To celebrate the 20th anniversary of PEPM, we are inviting you to a walk in the semantic park and to inter-derive reduction-based and reduction-free negational normalization functions....

  11. More Adults Are Walking PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-31

    This 60 second PSA is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.  Created: 7/31/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/7/2012.

  12. Factors associated with daily walking of dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Westgarth, Carri; Christian, Hayley E; Christley, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity is beneficial to the health of both people and animals. The role of regular exercise undertaken together, such as dog walking, is a public health interest of mutual benefit. Exploration of barriers and incentives to regular dog walking by owners is now required so that effective interventions to promote it can be designed. This study explored a well-characterised cross-sectional dataset of 276 dogs and owners from Cheshire, UK, for evidence of factors asso...

  13. Design with the feet: walking methods and participatory design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Bertelsen, Pernille; Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of walking methods and their relation to participatory design (PD). The paper includes a study of walking methods found in the literature and an empirical study of transect walks in a PD project. From this analysis, we identify central attributes of, and challenges...... to, PD walks. Walking with people in the context of design is a natural activity for the participatory designer, who acknowledges the importance of immersion and relationships in design. However, the various intentions of walking approaches indicate an underacknowledged awareness of walking methods....... With this study, we take a step towards a methodological framework for "design with the feet" in PD....

  14. Coined quantum walks on percolation graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Godfrey; Knott, Paul; Bailey, Joe; Kendon, Viv, E-mail: V.Kendon@leeds.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Quantum walks, both discrete (coined) and continuous time, form the basis of several quantum algorithms and have been used to model processes such as transport in spin chains and quantum chemistry. The enhanced spreading and mixing properties of quantum walks compared with their classical counterparts have been well studied on regular structures and also shown to be sensitive to defects and imperfections in the lattice. As a simple example of a disordered system, we consider percolation lattices, in which edges or sites are randomly missing, interrupting the progress of the quantum walk. We use numerical simulation to study the properties of coined quantum walks on these percolation lattices in one and two dimensions. In one dimension (the line), we introduce a simple notion of quantum tunnelling and determine how this affects the properties of the quantum walk as it spreads. On two-dimensional percolation lattices, we show how the spreading rate varies from linear in the number of steps down to zero as the percolation probability decreases towards the critical point. This provides an example of fractional scaling in quantum-walk dynamics.

  15. Levy Walks Suboptimal under Predation Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato S Abe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A key challenge in movement ecology is to understand how animals move in nature. Previous studies have predicted that animals should perform a special class of random walks, called Lévy walk, to obtain more targets. However, some empirical studies did not support this hypothesis, and the relationship between search strategy and ecological factors is still unclear. We focused on ecological factors, such as predation risk, and analyzed whether Lévy walk may not be favored. It was remarkable that the ecological factors often altered an optimal search strategy from Lévy walk to Brownian walk, depending on the speed of the predator's movement, density of predators, etc. This occurred because higher target encounter rates simultaneously led searchers to higher predation risks. Our findings indicate that animals may not perform Lévy walks often, and we suggest that it is crucial to consider the ecological context for evaluating the search strategy performed by animals in the field.

  16. Calcaneal loading during walking and running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, V. L.; Beaupre, G. S.; Whalen, R. T.; Carter, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study of the foot uses experimentally measured kinematic and kinetic data with a numerical model to evaluate in vivo calcaneal stresses during walking and running. METHODS: External ground reaction forces (GRF) and kinematic data were measured during walking and running using cineradiography and force plate measurements. A contact-coupled finite element model of the foot was developed to assess the forces acting on the calcaneus during gait. RESULTS: We found that the calculated force-time profiles of the joint contact, ligament, and Achilles tendon forces varied with the time-history curve of the moment about the ankle joint. The model predicted peak talocalcaneal and calcaneocuboid joint loads of 5.4 and 4.2 body weights (BW) during walking and 11.1 and 7.9 BW during running. The maximum predicted Achilles tendon forces were 3.9 and 7.7 BW for walking and running. CONCLUSIONS: Large magnitude forces and calcaneal stresses are generated late in the stance phase, with maximum loads occurring at approximately 70% of the stance phase during walking and at approximately 60% of the stance phase during running, for the gait velocities analyzed. The trajectories of the principal stresses, during both walking and running, corresponded to each other and qualitatively to the calcaneal trabecular architecture.

  17. Winding angles of long lattice walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2016-07-01

    We study the winding angles of random and self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on square and cubic lattices with number of steps N ranging up to 107. We show that the mean square winding angle of random walks converges to the theoretical form when N → ∞. For self-avoiding walks on the square lattice, we show that the ratio /2 converges slowly to the Gaussian value 3. For self-avoiding walks on the cubic lattice, we find that the ratio /2 exhibits non-monotonic dependence on N and reaches a maximum of 3.73(1) for N ≈ 104. We show that to a good approximation, the square winding angle of a self-avoiding walk on the cubic lattice can be obtained from the summation of the square change in the winding angles of lnN independent segments of the walk, where the ith segment contains 2i steps. We find that the square winding angle of the ith segment increases approximately as i0.5, which leads to an increase of the total square winding angle proportional to (lnN)1.5.

  18. Exploring scalar quantum walks on Cayley graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Acevedo, O L; Roland, J; Acevedo, Olga Lopez; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2006-01-01

    A quantum walk, \\emph{i.e.}, the quantum evolution of a particle on a graph, is termed \\emph{scalar} if the internal space of the moving particle (often called the coin) has a dimension one. Here, we study the existence of scalar quantum walks on Cayley graphs, which are built from the generators of a group. After deriving a necessary condition on these generators for the existence of a scalar quantum walk, we present a general method to express the evolution operator of the walk, assuming homogeneity of the evolution. We use this necessary condition and the subsequent constructive method to investigate the existence of scalar quantum walks on Cayley graphs of various groups presented with two or three generators. In this restricted framework, we classify all groups -- in terms of relations between their generators -- that admit scalar quantum walks, and we also derive the form of the most general evolution operator. Finally, we point out some interesting special cases, and extend our study to a few examples ...

  19. Walking in postpoliomyelitis syndrome: The relationships between time-scored tests, walking in daily life and perceived mobility problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L.D. Horemans (Herwin); J.B.J. Bussmann (Hans); A. Beelen (Anita); H.J. Stam (Henk); F. Nollet (Frans)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare walking test results with walking in daily life, and to investigate the relationships between walking tests, walking activity in daily life, and perceived mobility problems in patients with post-poliomyelitis syndrome. Subjects: Twenty-four ambulant patients with po

  20. Angular momentum in human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh; Popovic, Marko

    2008-02-01

    Angular momentum is a conserved physical quantity for isolated systems where no external moments act about a body's center of mass (CM). However, in the case of legged locomotion, where the body interacts with the environment (ground reaction forces), there is no a priori reason for this relationship to hold. A key hypothesis in this paper is that angular momentum is highly regulated throughout the walking cycle about all three spatial directions [|Lt| approximately 0], and therefore horizontal ground reaction forces and the center of pressure trajectory can be explained predominantly through an analysis that assumes zero net moment about the body's CM. Using a 16-segment human model and gait data for 10 study participants, we found that calculated zero-moment forces closely match experimental values (Rx2=0.91; Ry2=0.90). Additionally, the centroidal moment pivot (point where a line parallel to the ground reaction force, passing through the CM, intersects the ground) never leaves the ground support base, highlighting how closely the body regulates angular momentum. Principal component analysis was used to examine segmental contributions to whole-body angular momentum. We found that whole-body angular momentum is small, despite substantial segmental momenta, indicating large segment-to-segment cancellations ( approximately 95% medio-lateral, approximately 70% anterior-posterior and approximately 80% vertical). Specifically, we show that adjacent leg-segment momenta are balanced in the medio-lateral direction (left foot momentum cancels right foot momentum, etc.). Further, pelvis and abdomen momenta are balanced by leg, chest and head momenta in the anterior-posterior direction, and leg momentum is balanced by upper-body momentum in the vertical direction. Finally, we discuss the determinants of gait in the context of these segment-to-segment cancellations of angular momentum.

  1. A General Random Walk Model of Molecular Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xian-Ju; AI Bao-Quan; LIU Guo-Tao; LIU Liang-Gang

    2003-01-01

    A general random walk model framework is presented which can be used to statistically describe the internaldynamics and external mechanical movement of molecular motors along filament track. The motion of molecular motorin a periodic potential and a constant force is considered. We show that the molecular motor's movement becomesslower with the potential barrier increasing, but if the forceis increased, the molecular motor's movement becomesfaster. The relation between the effective rate constant and the potential barrier's height, and that between the effectiverate constant and the value of the force are discussed. Our results are consistent with the experiments and relevanttheoretical consideration, and can be used to explain some physiological phenomena.

  2. Speed and entropy of an interacting continuous time quantum walk

    CERN Document Server

    De Falco, D; Falco, Diego de; Tamascelli, Dario

    2006-01-01

    We present some dynamic and entropic considerations about the evolution of a continuous time quantum walk implementing the clock of an autonomous machine. On a simple model, we study in quite explicit terms the Lindblad evolution of the clocked subsystem, relating the evolution of its entropy to the spreading of the wave packet of the clock. We explore possible ways of reducing the generation of entropy in the clocked subsystem, as it amounts to a deficit in the probability of finding the target state of the computation. We are thus lead to examine the benefits of abandoning some classical prejudice about how a clocking mechanism should operate.

  3. Kinematic evaluation of virtual walking trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirio, Gabriel; Olivier, Anne-Hélène; Marchal, Maud; Pettré, Julien

    2013-04-01

    Virtual walking, a fundamental task in Virtual Reality (VR), is greatly influenced by the locomotion interface being used, by the specificities of input and output devices, and by the way the virtual environment is represented. No matter how virtual walking is controlled, the generation of realistic virtual trajectories is absolutely required for some applications, especially those dedicated to the study of walking behaviors in VR, navigation through virtual places for architecture, rehabilitation and training. Previous studies focused on evaluating the realism of locomotion trajectories have mostly considered the result of the locomotion task (efficiency, accuracy) and its subjective perception (presence, cybersickness). Few focused on the locomotion trajectory itself, but in situation of geometrically constrained task. In this paper, we study the realism of unconstrained trajectories produced during virtual walking by addressing the following question: did the user reach his destination by virtually walking along a trajectory he would have followed in similar real conditions? To this end, we propose a comprehensive evaluation framework consisting on a set of trajectographical criteria and a locomotion model to generate reference trajectories. We consider a simple locomotion task where users walk between two oriented points in space. The travel path is analyzed both geometrically and temporally in comparison to simulated reference trajectories. In addition, we demonstrate the framework over a user study which considered an initial set of common and frequent virtual walking conditions, namely different input devices, output display devices, control laws, and visualization modalities. The study provides insight into the relative contributions of each condition to the overall realism of the resulting virtual trajectories.

  4. Assessing walking behaviors of selected subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Masurier, Guy C; Bauman, Adrian E; Corbin, Charles B; Konopack, James F; Umstattd, Renee M; VAN Emmerik, Richard E A

    2008-07-01

    Recent innovations in physical activity (PA) assessment have made it possible to assess the walking behaviors of a wide variety of populations. Objective measurement methods (e.g., pedometers, accelerometers) have been widely used to assess walking and other prevalent types of PA. Questionnaires suitable for international populations (e.g., the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire) and measurement techniques for the assessment of gait patterns in disabled populations allow for the study of walking and its health benefits among many populations. Results of studies using the aforementioned techniques indicate that children are more active than adolescents and adolescents are more active than adults. Males, particularly young males, are typically more active than females. The benefits associated with regular participation in PA for youth and walking for older adults have been well documented, although improvements in the assessments of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial parameters must be made if we are to fully understand the benefits of walking for people of all ages. Most youth meet appropriate age-related PA activity recommendations, but adults, particularly older adults and adults with disabilities, are less likely to meet PA levels necessary for the accrual of health benefits. International studies indicate variation in walking by culture. It is clear, however, that walking is a prevalent form of PA across countries and a movement form that has great potential in global PA promotion. Continued development of measurement techniques that allow for the study of individualized gait patterns will help us add to the already rich body of knowledge on chronically disabled populations and allow for individual prescriptions for these populations.

  5. Energy efficient walking with central pattern generators: from passive dynamic walking to biologically inspired control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdaasdonk, B.W.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2009-01-01

    Like human walking, passive dynamic walking—i.e. walking down a slope with no actuation except gravity—is energy efficient by exploiting the natural dynamics. In the animal world, neural oscillators termed central pattern generators (CPGs) provide the basic rhythm for muscular activity in locomotion

  6. The associated random walk and martingales in random walks with stationary increments

    CERN Document Server

    Grey, D R

    2010-01-01

    We extend the notion of the associated random walk and the Wald martingale in random walks where the increments are independent and identically distributed to the more general case of stationary ergodic increments. Examples are given where the increments are Markovian or Gaussian, and an application in queueing is considered.

  7. Does walking strategy in older people change as a function of walking distance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Najafi, Bijan; Helbostad, Jorunn L.; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Aminian, Kamiar

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates whether the spatio-temporal parameters of gait in the elderly vary as a function of walking distance. The gait pattern of older subjects (n = 27) over both short (SWD <10 m) and long (LWD > 20 in) walking was evaluated using an ambulatory device consisting of body-worn sensor

  8. Activating and relaxing music entrains the speed of beat synchronized walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Leman

    Full Text Available Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musical stimuli all having a tempo of 130 beats per minute and a meter of 4 beats. The walking speed was measured as the walked distance during a time interval of 30 seconds. The results reveal that some music is 'activating' in the sense that it increases the speed, and some music is 'relaxing' in the sense that it decreases the speed, compared to the spontaneous walked speed in response to metronome stimuli. Participants are consistent in their observation of qualitative differences between the relaxing and activating musical stimuli. Using regression analysis, it was possible to set up a predictive model using only four sonic features that explain 60% of the variance. The sonic features capture variation in loudness and pitch patterns at periods of three, four and six beats, suggesting that expressive patterns in music are responsible for the effect. The mechanism may be attributed to an attentional shift, a subliminal audio-motor entrainment mechanism, or an arousal effect, but further study is needed to figure this out. Overall, the study supports the hypothesis that recurrent patterns of fluctuation affecting the binary meter strength of the music may entrain the vigor of the movement. The study opens up new perspectives for understanding the relationship between entrainment and expressiveness, with the possibility to develop applications that can be used in domains such as sports and physical rehabilitation.

  9. Neuromechanical Control for Hexapedal Robot Walking on Challenging Surfaces and Surface Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Xiaofeng; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2014-01-01

    agonist–antagonist muscle mechanisms (VAAMs). The controller allows for variable compliant leg motions of a hexapod robot, thereby leading to energy-efficient walking on different surfaces. Without any passive mechanisms or torque and position feedback at each joint, the variable compliant leg motions......The neuromechanical control principles of animal locomotion provide good insights for the development of bio-inspired legged robots for walking on challenging surfaces. Based on such principles, we developed a neuromechanical controller consisting of a modular neural network (MNN) and of virtual...... are achieved by only changing the stiffness parameters of the VAAMs. In addition, six surfaces can be also classified by observing the motor signals generated by the controller. The performance of the controller is tested on a physical hexapod robot. Experimental results show that it can effectively walk...

  10. Psychometric performance of a generic walking scale (Walk-12G) in multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladh, Stina; Nilsson, Maria H; Hariz, Gun-Marie; Westergren, Albert; Hobart, Jeremy; Hagell, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Walking difficulties are common in neurological and other disorders, as well as among the elderly. There is a need for reliable and valid instruments for measuring walking difficulties in everyday life since existing gait tests are clinician rated and focus on situation specific capacity. The Walk-12G was adapted from the 12-item multiple sclerosis walking scale as a generic patient-reported rating scale for walking difficulties in everyday life. The aim of this study is to examine the psychometric properties of the Walk-12G in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and Parkinson's disease (PD). The Walk-12G was translated into Swedish and evaluated qualitatively among 25 people with and without various neurological and other conditions. Postal survey (MS, n = 199; PD, n = 189) and clinical (PD, n = 36) data were used to test its psychometric properties. Respondents considered the Walk-12G relevant and easy to use. Mean completion time was 3.5 min. Data completeness was good (0.6). Coefficient alpha and test-retest reliabilities were >0.9, and standard errors of measurement were 2.3-2.8. Construct validity was supported by correlations in accordance with a priori expectations. Results are similar to those with previous Walk-12G versions, indicating that scale adaptation was successful. Data suggest that the Walk-12G meets rating scale criteria for clinical trials, making it a valuable complement to available gait tests. Further studies involving other samples and application of modern psychometric methods are warranted to examine the scale in more detail.

  11. Modality-specific communication enabling gait synchronization during over-ground side-by-side walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivotofsky, Ari Z; Gruendlinger, Leor; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2012-10-01

    An attentive observer will notice that unintentional synchronization of gait between two walkers on the street seems to occur frequently. Nonetheless, the rate of occurrence and motor-sensory mechanisms underlying this phase-locking of gait have only recently begun to be investigated. Previous studies have either been qualitative or carried out under non-natural conditions, e.g., treadmill walking. The present study quantitatively examined the potential sensory mechanisms that contribute to the gait synchronization that occurs when two people walk side by side along a straight, over-ground, pathway. Fourteen pairs of subjects walked 70 m under five conditions that manipulated the available sensory feedback. The modalities studied were visual, auditory, and tactile. Movement was quantified using a trunk-mounted tri-axial accelerometer. A gait synchronization index (GSI) was calculated to quantify the phase synchronization of the gait rhythms. Overall, 36% of the walks exhibited synchrony. Tactile and auditory feedback showed the greatest ability to synchronize, while visual feedback was the least effective. The results show that gait synchronization during natural walking is common, quantifiable, and has modality-specific properties.

  12. Dynamic Locomotion of a Biomorphic Quadruped ‘Tekken’ Robot Using Various Gaits: Walk, Trot, Free-Gait and Bound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fukuoka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous quadruped walking and running robots have been developed to date. Each robot walks by means of a crawl, walk, trot or pace gait, or runs by means of a bound and/or gallop gait. However, it is very difficult to design a single robot that can both walk and run because of problems related to mechanisms and control. In response to this, we adapted a biological control method for legged locomotion in order to develop a dog-like quadruped robot we have named ‘Tekken’. Tekken has a control system that incorporates central pattern generators, reflexes and responses as well as a mechanism that makes the most of the control system. Tekken, which is equipped with a single mechanism, an unchangeable control method, and modifiable parameters, is capable of achieving walking and trotting on flat terrain, can walk using a free gait on irregular terrain, and is capable of running on flat terrain using a bounding gait. In this paper, we describe the mechanism, the control method and the experimental results of our new development.

  13. Vection in depth during treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, April; Palmisano, Stephen; Apthorp, Deborah; Allison, Robert S

    2013-01-01

    Vection has typically been induced in stationary observers (ie conditions providing visual-only information about self-motion). Two recent studies have examined vection during active treadmill walking--one reported that treadmill walking in the same direction as the visually simulated self-motion impaired vection (Onimaru et al, 2010 Journal of Vision 10(7):860), the other reported that it enhanced vection (Seno et al, 2011 Perception 40 747-750; Seno et al, 2011 Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics 73 1467-1476). Our study expands on these earlier investigations of vection during observer active movement. In experiment 1 we presented radially expanding optic flow and compared the vection produced in stationary observers with that produced during walking forward on a treadmill at a 'matched' speed. Experiment 2 compared the vection induced by forward treadmill walking while viewing expanding or contracting optic flow with that induced by viewing playbacks of these same displays while stationary. In both experiments subjects' tracked head movements were either incorporated into the self-motion displays (as simulated viewpoint jitter) or simply ignored. We found that treadmill walking always reduced vection (compared with stationary viewing conditions) and that simulated viewpoint jitter always increased vection (compared with constant velocity displays). These findings suggest that while consistent visual-vestibular information about self-acceleration increases vection, biomechanical self-motion information reduces this experience (irrespective of whether it is consistent or not with the visual input).

  14. Scaling Argument of Anisotropic Random Walk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bing-Zhen; JIN Guo-Jun; WANG Fei-Feng

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we analytically discuss the scaling properties of the average square end-to-end distance for anisotropic random walk in D-dimensional space ( D ≥ 2), and the returning probability Pn(ro) for the walker into a certain neighborhood of the origin. We will not only give the calculating formula for and Pn (ro), but also point out that if there is a symmetric axis for the distribution of the probability density of a single step displacement, we always obtain ~ n, where ⊥ refers to the projections of the displacement perpendicular to each symmetric axes of the walk; in D-dimensional space with D symmetric axes perpendicular to each other, we always have ~ n and the random walk will be like a purely random motion; if the number of inter-perpendicular symmetric axis is smaller than the dimensions of the space, we must have ~ n2 for very large n and the walk will be like a ballistic motion. It is worth while to point out that unlike the isotropic random walk in one and two dimensions, which is certain to return into the neighborhood of the origin, generally there is only a nonzero probability for the anisotropic random walker in two dimensions to return to the neighborhood.

  15. Coined quantum walks on percolation graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, Godfrey; Bailey, Joe; Kendon, Viv

    2010-01-01

    Quantum walks, both discrete (coined) and continuous time, form the basis of several quantum algorithms and have been used to model processes such as transport in spin chains and quantum chemistry. The enhanced spreading and mixing properties of quantum walks compared with their classical counterparts have been well-studied on regular structures and also shown to be sensitive to defects and imperfections in the lattice. As a simple example of a disordered system, we consider percolation lattices, in which edges or sites are randomly missing, interrupting the progress of the quantum walk. We use numerical simulation to study the properties of coined quantum walks on these percolation lattices in one and two dimensions. In one dimension (the line) we introduce a simple notion of quantum tunneling and determine how this affects the properties of the quantum walk as it spreads. On two-dimensional percolation lattices, we show how the spreading rate varies from linear to square root in the number of steps, as the ...

  16. Myoelectric walking mode classification for transtibial amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jason D; Beazer, Mahyo Seyedali; Hahn, Michael E

    2013-10-01

    Myoelectric control algorithms have the potential to detect an amputee's motion intent and allow the prosthetic to adapt to changes in walking mode. The development of a myoelectric walking mode classifier for transtibial amputees is outlined. Myoelectric signals from four muscles (tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius (MG), vastus lateralis, and biceps femoris) were recorded for five nonamputee subjects and five transtibial amputees over a variety of walking modes: level ground at three speeds, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent. These signals were decomposed into relevant features (mean absolute value, variance, wavelength, number of slope sign changes, number of zero crossings) over three subwindows from the gait cycle and used to test the ability of classification algorithms for transtibial amputees using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and support vector machine (SVM) classifiers. Detection of all seven walking modes had an accuracy of 97.9% for the amputee group and 94.7% for the nonamputee group. Misclassifications occurred most frequently between different walking speeds due to the similar nature of the gait pattern. Stair ascent/descent had the best classification accuracy with 99.8% for the amputee group and 100.0% for the nonamputee group. Stability of the developed classifier was explored using an electrode shift disturbance for each muscle. Shifting the electrode placement of the MG had the most pronounced effect on the classification accuracy for both samples. No increase in classification accuracy was observed when using SVM compared to LDA for the current dataset.

  17. Fast Scramblers, Democratic Walks and Information Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Magan, Javier M

    2015-01-01

    We study a family of weighted random walks on complete graphs. These `democratic walks' turn out to be explicitly solvable, and we find the hierarchy window for which the characteristic time scale saturates the so-called fast scrambling conjecture. We show that these democratic walks describe well the properties of information spreading in systems in which every degree of freedom interacts with every other degree of freedom, such as Matrix or infinite range models. The argument is based on the analysis of suitably defined `Information fields' ($\\mathcal{I}$), which are shown to evolve stochastically towards stationarity due to unitarity of the microscopic model. The model implies that in democratic systems, stabilization of one subsystem is equivalent to global scrambling. We use these results to study scrambling of infalling perturbations in black hole backgrounds, and argue that the near horizon running coupling constants are connected to entanglement evolution of single particle perturbations in democratic...

  18. Photonics walking up a human hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hao; Parmeggiani, Camilla; Martella, Daniele; Wasylczyk, Piotr; Burresi, Matteo; Wiersma, Diederik S.

    2016-03-01

    While animals have access to sugars as energy source, this option is generally not available to artificial machines and robots. Energy delivery is thus the bottleneck for creating independent robots and machines, especially on micro- and nano- meter length scales. We have found a way to produce polymeric nano-structures with local control over the molecular alignment, which allowed us to solve the above issue. By using a combination of polymers, of which part is optically sensitive, we can create complex functional structures with nanometer accuracy, responsive to light. In particular, this allowed us to realize a structure that can move autonomously over surfaces (it can "walk") using the environmental light as its energy source. The robot is only 60 μm in total length, thereby smaller than any known terrestrial walking species, and it is capable of random, directional walking and rotating on different dry surfaces.

  19. Humanoid robot Lola: design and walking control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Thomas; Lohmeier, Sebastian; Ulbrich, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present the humanoid robot LOLA, its mechatronic hardware design, simulation and real-time walking control. The goal of the LOLA-project is to build a machine capable of stable, autonomous, fast and human-like walking. LOLA is characterized by a redundant kinematic configuration with 7-DoF legs, an extremely lightweight design, joint actuators with brushless motors and an electronics architecture using decentralized joint control. Special emphasis was put on an improved mass distribution of the legs to achieve good dynamic performance. Trajectory generation and control aim at faster, more flexible and robust walking. Center of mass trajectories are calculated in real-time from footstep locations using quadratic programming and spline collocation methods. Stabilizing control uses hybrid position/force control in task space with an inner joint position control loop. Inertial stabilization is achieved by modifying the contact force trajectories.

  20. Gaussian Networks Generated by Random Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Javarone, Marco Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We propose a random walks based model to generate complex networks. Many authors studied and developed different methods and tools to analyze complex networks by random walk processes. Just to cite a few, random walks have been adopted to perform community detection, exploration tasks and to study temporal networks. Moreover, they have been used also to generate scale-free networks. In this work, we define a random walker that plays the role of "edges-generator". In particular, the random walker generates new connections and uses these ones to visit each node of a network. As result, the proposed model allows to achieve networks provided with a Gaussian degree distribution, and moreover, some features as the clustering coefficient and the assortativity show a critical behavior. Finally, we performed numerical simulations to study the behavior and the properties of the cited model.

  1. Quantum walk search through potential barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas G.

    2016-12-01

    An ideal quantum walk transitions from one vertex to another with perfect fidelity, but in physical systems, the particle may be hindered by potential energy barriers. Then the particle has some amplitude of tunneling through the barriers, and some amplitude of staying put. We investigate the algorithmic consequence of such barriers for the quantum walk formulation of Grover’s algorithm. We prove that the failure amplitude must scale as O(1/\\sqrt{N}) for search to retain its quantum O(\\sqrt{N}) runtime; otherwise, it searches in classical O(N) time. Thus searching larger ‘databases’ requires increasingly reliable hop operations or error correction. This condition holds for both discrete- and continuous-time quantum walks.

  2. Dynamic Stability of Superior vs. Inferior Body Segments in Individuals with Transtibial Amputation Walking in Destabilizing Environments✰

    OpenAIRE

    Beurskens, Rainer; Wilken, Jason M.; Dingwell, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    Interestingly, young and highly active people with lower limb amputation appear to maintain a similar trunk and upper body stability during walking as able bodied individuals. Understanding the mechanisms underlying how this stability is achieved after lower leg amputation is important to improve training regimens for improving walking function in these patients. This study quantified how superior (i.e., head, trunk, and pelvis) and inferior (i.e., thigh, shank, and feet) segments of the body...

  3. 竞走运动员运动性贫血的发生机制探析%Analysis on the emerging mechanism of the sports anemia of walking athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄利军

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the history, definitions, and the standers of evaluations of sports anemia as well as the emerging mechanism of the sports anemia in order to make the athletes' sport mark and the competition quality higher.%文章从运动性贫血的历史研究、定义以及判断标准,分析竞走运动员运动性贫血的发生机制,以提高运动员运动成绩和竞赛质量,以期为教练员提供理论依据.

  4. Stride Counting in Human Walking and Walking Distance Estimation Using Insole Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Phuc Huu; Lee, Jinwook; Kwon, Ae-Ran; Jeong, Gu-Min

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method of estimating walking distance based on a precise counting of walking strides using insole sensors. We use an inertial triaxial accelerometer and eight pressure sensors installed in the insole of a shoe to record walkers’ movement data. The data is then transmitted to a smartphone to filter out noise and determine stance and swing phases. Based on phase information, we count the number of strides traveled and estimate the movement distance. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, we created two walking databases on seven healthy participants and tested the proposed method. The first database, which is called the short distance database, consists of collected data from all seven healthy subjects walking on a 16 m distance. The second one, named the long distance database, is constructed from walking data of three healthy subjects who have participated in the short database for an 89 m distance. The experimental results show that the proposed method performs walking distance estimation accurately with the mean error rates of 4.8% and 3.1% for the short and long distance databases, respectively. Moreover, the maximum difference of the swing phase determination with respect to time is 0.08 s and 0.06 s for starting and stopping points of swing phases, respectively. Therefore, the stride counting method provides a highly precise result when subjects walk. PMID:27271634

  5. Stride Counting in Human Walking and Walking Distance Estimation Using Insole Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Huu Truong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel method of estimating walking distance based on a precise counting of walking strides using insole sensors. We use an inertial triaxial accelerometer and eight pressure sensors installed in the insole of a shoe to record walkers’ movement data. The data is then transmitted to a smartphone to filter out noise and determine stance and swing phases. Based on phase information, we count the number of strides traveled and estimate the movement distance. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, we created two walking databases on seven healthy participants and tested the proposed method. The first database, which is called the short distance database, consists of collected data from all seven healthy subjects walking on a 16 m distance. The second one, named the long distance database, is constructed from walking data of three healthy subjects who have participated in the short database for an 89 m distance. The experimental results show that the proposed method performs walking distance estimation accurately with the mean error rates of 4.8% and 3.1% for the short and long distance databases, respectively. Moreover, the maximum difference of the swing phase determination with respect to time is 0.08 s and 0.06 s for starting and stopping points of swing phases, respectively. Therefore, the stride counting method provides a highly precise result when subjects walk.

  6. Movement Behavior of High-Heeled Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjær, Tine; Raffalt, Peter Christian; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar

    2012-01-01

    The human locomotor system is flexible and enables humans to move without falling even under less than optimal conditions. Walking with high-heeled shoes constitutes an unstable condition and here we ask how the nervous system controls the ankle joint in this situation? We investigated the movement...... behavior of high-heeled and barefooted walking in eleven female subjects. The movement variability was quantified by calculation of approximate entropy (ApEn) in the ankle joint angle and the standard deviation (SD) of the stride time intervals. Electromyography (EMG) of the soleus (SO) and tibialis...

  7. Random walk term weighting for information retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanco, R.; Lioma, Christina

    2007-01-01

    We present a way of estimating term weights for Information Retrieval (IR), using term co-occurrence as a measure of dependency between terms.We use the random walk graph-based ranking algorithm on a graph that encodes terms and co-occurrence dependencies in text, from which we derive term weights...... that represent a quantification of how a term contributes to its context. Evaluation on two TREC collections and 350 topics shows that the random walk-based term weights perform at least comparably to the traditional tf-idf term weighting, while they outperform it when the distance between co-occurring terms...

  8. On d-Walk Regular Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada, Ernesto; de la Pena, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    Let G be a graph with set of vertices 1,...,n and adjacency matrix A of size nxn. Let d(i,j)=d, we say that f_d:N->N is a d-function on G if for every pair of vertices i,j and k>=d, we have a_ij^(k)=f_d(k). If this function f_d exists on G we say that G is d-walk regular. We prove that G is d-walk regular if and only if for every pair of vertices i,j at distance

  9. Nordic walking and chronic low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Hartvigsen, Jan; Puggaard, Lis;

    2006-01-01

    Low Back Pain is a major public health problem all over the western world. Active approaches including exercise in the treatment of low back pain results in better outcomes for patients, but it is not known exactly which types of back exercises are most beneficial or whether general physical....... Until now no studies have been performed to investigate whether Nordic Walking has beneficial effects in relation to low back pain. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether supervised Nordic Walking can reduce pain and improve function in a population of chronic low back pain patients...

  10. Human leg model predicts ankle muscle-tendon morphology, state, roles and energetics in walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavitra Krishnaswamy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A common feature in biological neuromuscular systems is the redundancy in joint actuation. Understanding how these redundancies are resolved in typical joint movements has been a long-standing problem in biomechanics, neuroscience and prosthetics. Many empirical studies have uncovered neural, mechanical and energetic aspects of how humans resolve these degrees of freedom to actuate leg joints for common tasks like walking. However, a unifying theoretical framework that explains the many independent empirical observations and predicts individual muscle and tendon contributions to joint actuation is yet to be established. Here we develop a computational framework to address how the ankle joint actuation problem is resolved by the neuromuscular system in walking. Our framework is founded upon the proposal that a consideration of both neural control and leg muscle-tendon morphology is critical to obtain predictive, mechanistic insight into individual muscle and tendon contributions to joint actuation. We examine kinetic, kinematic and electromyographic data from healthy walking subjects to find that human leg muscle-tendon morphology and neural activations enable a metabolically optimal realization of biological ankle mechanics in walking. This optimal realization (a corresponds to independent empirical observations of operation and performance of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, (b gives rise to an efficient load-sharing amongst ankle muscle-tendon units and (c causes soleus and gastrocnemius muscle fibers to take on distinct mechanical roles of force generation and power production at the end of stance phase in walking. The framework outlined here suggests that the dynamical interplay between leg structure and neural control may be key to the high walking economy of humans, and has implications as a means to obtain insight into empirically inaccessible features of individual muscle and tendons in biomechanical tasks.

  11. Human Leg Model Predicts Ankle Muscle-Tendon Morphology, State, Roles and Energetics in Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Pavitra; Brown, Emery N.; Herr, Hugh M.

    2011-01-01

    A common feature in biological neuromuscular systems is the redundancy in joint actuation. Understanding how these redundancies are resolved in typical joint movements has been a long-standing problem in biomechanics, neuroscience and prosthetics. Many empirical studies have uncovered neural, mechanical and energetic aspects of how humans resolve these degrees of freedom to actuate leg joints for common tasks like walking. However, a unifying theoretical framework that explains the many independent empirical observations and predicts individual muscle and tendon contributions to joint actuation is yet to be established. Here we develop a computational framework to address how the ankle joint actuation problem is resolved by the neuromuscular system in walking. Our framework is founded upon the proposal that a consideration of both neural control and leg muscle-tendon morphology is critical to obtain predictive, mechanistic insight into individual muscle and tendon contributions to joint actuation. We examine kinetic, kinematic and electromyographic data from healthy walking subjects to find that human leg muscle-tendon morphology and neural activations enable a metabolically optimal realization of biological ankle mechanics in walking. This optimal realization (a) corresponds to independent empirical observations of operation and performance of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, (b) gives rise to an efficient load-sharing amongst ankle muscle-tendon units and (c) causes soleus and gastrocnemius muscle fibers to take on distinct mechanical roles of force generation and power production at the end of stance phase in walking. The framework outlined here suggests that the dynamical interplay between leg structure and neural control may be key to the high walking economy of humans, and has implications as a means to obtain insight into empirically inaccessible features of individual muscle and tendons in biomechanical tasks. PMID:21445231

  12. Environmental factors influencing older adults’ walking for transportation: a study using walk-along interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Cauwenberg Jelle

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current knowledge on the relationship between the physical environment and walking for transportation among older adults (≥ 65 years is limited. Qualitative research can provide valuable information and inform further research. However, qualitative studies are scarce and fail to include neighborhood outings necessary to study participants’ experiences and perceptions while interacting with and interpreting the local social and physical environment. The current study sought to uncover the perceived environmental influences on Flemish older adults’ walking for transportation. To get detailed and context-sensitive environmental information, it used walk-along interviews. Methods Purposeful convenience sampling was used to recruit 57 older adults residing in urban or semi-urban areas. Walk-along interviews to and from a destination (e.g. a shop located within a 15 minutes’ walk from the participants’ home were conducted. Content analysis was performed using NVivo 9 software (QSR International. An inductive approach was used to derive categories and subcategories from the data. Results Data were categorized in the following categories and subcategories: access to facilities (shops & services, public transit, connectivity, walking facilities (sidewalk quality, crossings, legibility, benches, traffic safety (busy traffic, behavior of other road users, familiarity, safety from crime (physical factors, other persons, social contacts, aesthetics (buildings, natural elements, noise & smell, openness, decay and weather. Conclusions The findings indicate that to promote walking for transportation a neighborhood should provide good access to shops and services, well-maintained walking facilities, aesthetically appealing places, streets with little traffic and places for social interaction. In addition, the neighborhood environment should evoke feelings of familiarity and safety from crime. Future quantitative studies should

  13. Does perceptual-motor calibration generalize across two different forms of locomotion? Investigations of walking and wheelchairs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R Kunz

    Full Text Available The relationship between biomechanical action and perception of self-motion during walking is typically consistent and well-learned but also adaptable. This perceptual-motor coupling can be recalibrated by creating a mismatch between the visual information for self-motion and walking speed. Perceptual-motor recalibration of locomotion has been demonstrated through effects on subsequent walking without vision, showing that learned perceptual-motor coupling influences a dynamic representation of one's spatial position during walking. Our present studies test whether recalibration of wheelchair locomotion, a novel form of locomotion for typically walking individuals, similarly influences subsequent wheelchair locomotion. Furthermore, we test whether adaptation to the pairing of visual information for self-motion during one form of locomotion transfers to a different locomotion modality. We find strong effects of perceptual-motor recalibration for matched locomotion modalities--walking/walking and wheeling/wheeling. Transfer across incongruent locomotion modalities showed weak recalibration effects. The results have implications both for theories of perceptual-motor calibration mechanisms and their effects on spatial orientation, as well as for practical applications in training and rehabilitation.

  14. Mobility-Related Fatigue, Walking Speed, and Muscle Strength in Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F.; Rantanen, Taina

    2012-01-01

    among men (b = −.04, p older adults......Background. Fatigue is an important early marker of functional decline among older people, but the mechanisms underlying this association are not fully understood. The purpose of the present study was to examine the association between mobility-related fatigue and walking speed and to test...

  15. Dynamic stability during level walking and obstacle crossing in persons with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, N.H.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.; Weerdesteyn, V.G.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with FSHD suffer from progressive skeletal muscle weakness, which is associated with an elevated fall risk. To obtain insight into fall mechanisms in this patient group, we aimed to assess dynamic stability during level walking and obstacle crossing in patients at different disease stages.

  16. Invertebrate neurobiology: sensory processing in reverse for backward walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zill, Sasha N

    2007-06-19

    Humans and many other animals can readily walk forward or backward. In insects, the nervous system changes the effects of sense organs that signal forces on a leg when the direction of walking is reversed.

  17. Effects of visual focus and gait speed on walking balance in the frontal plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodworth, Adam; Perrone, Kathryn; Pillsbury, Mark; Yargeau, Michelle

    2015-08-01

    We investigated how head position and gait speed influenced frontal plane balance responses to external perturbations during gait. Thirteen healthy participants walked on a treadmill at three different gait speeds. Visual conditions included either focus downward on lower extremities and walking surface only or focus forward on a stationary scene with horizontal and vertical lines. The treadmill was positioned on a platform that was stationary (non-perturbed) or moving in a pattern that appeared random to the subjects (perturbed). In non-perturbed walking, medial-lateral upper body motion was very similar between visual conditions. However, in perturbed walking, there was significantly less body motion when focus was on the stationary visual scene, suggesting visual feedback of stationary vertical and horizontal cues are particularly important when balance is challenged. Sensitivity of body motion to perturbations was significantly decreased by increasing gait speed, suggesting that faster walking was less sensitive to frontal plane perturbations. Finally, our use of external perturbations supported the idea that certain differences in balance control mechanisms can only be detected in more challenging situations, which is an important consideration for approaches to investigating sensory contribution to balance during gait.

  18. A comparison of multi-segment foot kinematics during level overground and treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulchin, Kirsten; Orendurff, Michael; Karol, Lori

    2010-01-01

    Previous work comparing treadmill and overground walking has focused on lower extremity motion and kinetics, with few identified differences. However, a comparison of multi-segment foot kinematics between these conditions has not been previously reported. Sagittal ankle motion using a single rigid body foot model and three-dimensional hindfoot and forefoot kinematics were compared during barefoot, level, overground walking at a self-selected speed and treadmill walking at a similar speed for 20 healthy adults. Slight differences were seen in ankle plantarflexion and hindfoot plantarflexion during first rocker, as well as peak forefoot eversion and abduction, however all changes were less than 3 degrees , and most were within the day-to-day repeatability. These results indicate that foot mechanics as determined using a multi-segment foot model were similar between overground and treadmill walking at similar speeds in healthy adults. Treadmill protocols may provide a controlled method to analyze a patient's ability to adapt to walking at different speeds and surface slopes, which are encountered often during ambulation of daily living.

  19. Dynamic stability during level walking and obstacle crossing in persons with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijken, N H M; van Engelen, B G M; Geurts, A C H; Weerdesteyn, V

    2015-09-01

    Patients with FSHD suffer from progressive skeletal muscle weakness, which is associated with an elevated fall risk. To obtain insight into fall mechanisms in this patient group, we aimed to assess dynamic stability during level walking and obstacle crossing in patients at different disease stages. Ten patients with at least some lower extremity weakness were included, of whom six were classified as moderately affected and four as mildly affected. Ten healthy controls were also included. Level walking at comfortable speed was assessed, as well as crossing a 10 cm high wooden obstacle. We assessed forward and lateral dynamic stability, as well as spatiotemporal and kinematics variables. During level walking, the moderately affected group demonstrated a lower walking speed, which was accompanied by longer step times and smaller step lengths, yet dynamic stability was unaffected. When crossing the obstacle, however, the moderately affected patients demonstrated reduced forward stability margins during the trailing step, which was accompanied by an increased toe clearance and greater trunk and hip flexion. This suggests that during level walking, the patients effectively utilized compensatory strategies for maintaining dynamic stability, but that the moderately affected group lacked the capacity to fully compensate for the greater stability demands imposed by obstacle crossing, rendering them unable to maintain optimal stability levels. The present results highlight the difficulties that FSHD patients experience in performing this common activity of daily living and may help explain their propensity to fall in the forward direction.

  20. Femoral condyle curvature is correlated with knee walking kinematics in ungulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, Adam D

    2015-12-01

    The knee has been the focus of many studies linking mammalian postcranial form with locomotor behaviors and animal ecology. A more difficult task has been linking joint morphology with joint kinematics during locomotor tasks. Joint curvature represents one opportunity to link postcranial morphology with walking kinematics because joint curvature develops in response to mechanical loading. As an initial examination of mammalian knee joint curvature, the curvature of the medial femoral condyle was measured on femora representing 11 ungulate species. The position of a region of low curvature was measured using a metric termed the "angle to low curvature". This low-curvature region is important because it provides the greatest contact area between femoral and tibial condyles. Kinematic knee angles during walking were derived from the literature and kinematic knee angles across the gait cycle were correlated with angle to low curvature values. The highest correlation between kinematic knee angle and the angle to low curvature metric occurred at 20% of the walking gait cycle. This early portion of the walking gait cycle is associated with a peak in the vertical ground reaction force for some mammals. The chondral modeling theory predicts that frequent and heavy loading of particular regions of a joint surface during ontogeny will result in these regions being flatter than the surrounding joint surface. The locations of flatter regions of the femoral condyles of ungulates, and their association with knee angles used during the early stance phase of walking provides support for the chondral modeling theory.

  1. Relationships between the perceived neighborhood social environment and walking for transportation among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cauwenberg, Jelle; De Donder, Liesbeth; Clarys, Peter; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Buffel, Tine; De Witte, Nico; Dury, Sarah; Verté, Dominique; Deforche, Benedicte

    2014-03-01

    Ecological models state that physical activity (PA) behaviors can be explained by the interplay between individuals and their surrounding physical and social environment. However, the majority of research on PA-environment relationships has focused upon the physical environment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship between the perceived social environment and older adults' walking for transportation, while adjusting for individual and perceived physical environmental factors. Questionnaires were used to collect data on walking for transportation, individual, perceived physical and social environmental factors in 50,986 Flemish older adults (≥65 years) in the period of 2004-2010. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were applied to examine the relationships between perceived social environmental factors and the odds of daily walking for transportation. The final models showed significant positive relationships for frequency of contacts with neighbors, neighbors' social support, too many immigrants residing in the neighborhood, neighborhood involvement, participation, and volunteering. These results emphasize the need for including social environmental factors in future studies examining correlates of older adults' physical activity. Current findings suggest that projects stimulating interpersonal relationships, place attachment, and formal community engagement might promote walking for transportation among older adults. Future research should try to further disentangle the complex (inter)relationships and causal mechanisms between older individuals, their environments, and their walking for transportation behavior.

  2. Reference Trajectory Generation for 3-Dimensional Walking of a Humanoid Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Humanoid walking planning is a complicated task because of the high number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) and the variable mechanical structure during walking. In this paper, a planning method for 3-dimensional (3-D) walking movements was developed based on a model of a typical humanoid robot with 12 DOFs on the lower body. The planning process includes trajectory generation for the hip, ankle, and knee joints in the Cartesian space. The balance of the robot was ensured by adjusting the hip motion. The angles for each DOF were obtained from 3-D kinematics calculation. The calculation gave reference trajectories of all the DOFs on the humanoid robot which were used to control the real robot. The simulation results show that the method is effective.

  3. The complexity of human walking: a knee osteoarthritis study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Kotti

    Full Text Available This study proposes a framework for deconstructing complex walking patterns to create a simple principal component space before checking whether the projection to this space is suitable for identifying changes from the normality. We focus on knee osteoarthritis, the most common knee joint disease and the second leading cause of disability. Knee osteoarthritis affects over 250 million people worldwide. The motivation for projecting the highly dimensional movements to a lower dimensional and simpler space is our belief that motor behaviour can be understood by identifying a simplicity via projection to a low principal component space, which may reflect upon the underlying mechanism. To study this, we recruited 180 subjects, 47 of which reported that they had knee osteoarthritis. They were asked to walk several times along a walkway equipped with two force plates that capture their ground reaction forces along 3 axes, namely vertical, anterior-posterior, and medio-lateral, at 1000 Hz. Data when the subject does not clearly strike the force plate were excluded, leaving 1-3 gait cycles per subject. To examine the complexity of human walking, we applied dimensionality reduction via Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis. The first principal component explains 34% of the variance in the data, whereas over 80% of the variance is explained by 8 principal components or more. This proves the complexity of the underlying structure of the ground reaction forces. To examine if our musculoskeletal system generates movements that are distinguishable between normal and pathological subjects in a low dimensional principal component space, we applied a Bayes classifier. For the tested cross-validated, subject-independent experimental protocol, the classification accuracy equals 82.62%. Also, a novel complexity measure is proposed, which can be used as an objective index to facilitate clinical decision making. This measure proves that knee osteoarthritis

  4. The complexity of human walking: a knee osteoarthritis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotti, Margarita; Duffell, Lynsey D; Faisal, Aldo A; McGregor, Alison H

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes a framework for deconstructing complex walking patterns to create a simple principal component space before checking whether the projection to this space is suitable for identifying changes from the normality. We focus on knee osteoarthritis, the most common knee joint disease and the second leading cause of disability. Knee osteoarthritis affects over 250 million people worldwide. The motivation for projecting the highly dimensional movements to a lower dimensional and simpler space is our belief that motor behaviour can be understood by identifying a simplicity via projection to a low principal component space, which may reflect upon the underlying mechanism. To study this, we recruited 180 subjects, 47 of which reported that they had knee osteoarthritis. They were asked to walk several times along a walkway equipped with two force plates that capture their ground reaction forces along 3 axes, namely vertical, anterior-posterior, and medio-lateral, at 1000 Hz. Data when the subject does not clearly strike the force plate were excluded, leaving 1-3 gait cycles per subject. To examine the complexity of human walking, we applied dimensionality reduction via Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis. The first principal component explains 34% of the variance in the data, whereas over 80% of the variance is explained by 8 principal components or more. This proves the complexity of the underlying structure of the ground reaction forces. To examine if our musculoskeletal system generates movements that are distinguishable between normal and pathological subjects in a low dimensional principal component space, we applied a Bayes classifier. For the tested cross-validated, subject-independent experimental protocol, the classification accuracy equals 82.62%. Also, a novel complexity measure is proposed, which can be used as an objective index to facilitate clinical decision making. This measure proves that knee osteoarthritis subjects exhibit more

  5. Iterated random walks with shape prior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pujadas, Esmeralda Ruiz; Kjer, Hans Martin; Piella, Gemma;

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new framework for image segmentation using random walks where a distance shape prior is combined with a region term. The shape prior is weighted by a confidence map to reduce the influence of the prior in high gradient areas and the region term is computed with k-means to estimate th...

  6. The Quantum Walk of F. Riesz

    CERN Document Server

    Grunbaum, F A

    2011-01-01

    We exhibit a way to associate a quantum walk (QW) on the non-negative integers to any probability measure on the unit circle. This forces us to consider one step transitions that are not traditionally allowed. We illustrate this in the case of a very interesting measure, originally proposed by F. Riesz for a different purpose.

  7. The variability problem of normal human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjær, Tine

    2012-01-01

    Previous investigations have suggested considerable inter-individual variability in the time course pattern of net joint moments during normal human walking, although the limited sample sizes precluded statistical analyses. The purpose of the present study was to obtain joint moment patterns from...

  8. Second annual Dog Walk Against Cancer scheduled

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    The second annual "Dog Walk Against Cancer" will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 9, on the grounds of the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg. The event is open to the public and will be held in conjunction with the college's annual "Open House."

  9. Influence of moving visual surroundings on walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mert, A.; Hak, L.; Bles, W.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Balance is negatively influenced by optokinetic stimuli. Fall research with these stimuli has been done with standing subjects. Less is known of the influence these stimuli have on risk of falling while walking. The objective of this study was to qualitatively investigate the influence

  10. Exploring Space and Place with Walking Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Phil; Bunce, Griff; Evans, James; Gibbs, Hannah; Hein, Jane Ricketts

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the use of walking interviews as a research method. In spite of a wave of interest in methods which take interviewing out of the "safe," stationary environment, there has been limited work critically examining the techniques for undertaking such work. Curiously for a method which takes an explicitly spatial approach, few…

  11. Mesonic spectroscopy of Minimal Walking Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the structure and the novel emerging features of the mesonic non-singlet spectrum of the Minimal Walking Technicolor (MWT) theory. Precision measurements in the nonsinglet pseudoscalar and vector channels are compared to the expectations for an IR-conformal field theory and a QCD...

  12. Random Walk Method for Potential Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Raju, I. S.

    2002-01-01

    A local Random Walk Method (RWM) for potential problems governed by Lapalace's and Paragon's equations is developed for two- and three-dimensional problems. The RWM is implemented and demonstrated in a multiprocessor parallel environment on a Beowulf cluster of computers. A speed gain of 16 is achieved as the number of processors is increased from 1 to 23.

  13. Go Naked: Diapers Affect Infant Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Whitney G.; Lingeman, Jesse M.; Adolph, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    In light of cross-cultural and experimental research highlighting effects of childrearing practices on infant motor skill, we asked whether wearing diapers, a seemingly innocuous childrearing practice, affects infant walking. Diapers introduce bulk between the legs, potentially exacerbating infants' poor balance and wide stance. We show that…

  14. Osteogenesis imperfecta in childhood : Prognosis for walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbert, RHH; Uiterwaal, CSPM; Gulmans, VAM; Pruijs, H; Helders, PJM

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: We studied the predicted value of disease-related characteristics for the ability of children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) to walk. Study design: The severity of OI was classified according to Sillence. The parents were asked to report the age at which the child achieved motor miles

  15. Random walk centrality for temporal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha, Luis Enrique Correa

    2014-01-01

    Nodes can be ranked according to their relative importance within the network. Ranking algorithms based on random walks are particularly useful because they connect topological and diffusive properties of the network. Previous methods based on random walks, as for example the PageRank, have focused on static structures. However, several realistic networks are indeed dynamic, meaning that their structure changes in time. In this paper, we propose a centrality measure for temporal networks based on random walks which we call TempoRank. While in a static network, the stationary density of the random walk is proportional to the degree or the strength of a node, we find that in temporal networks, the stationary density is proportional to the in-strength of the so-called effective network. The stationary density also depends on the sojourn probability q which regulates the tendency of the walker to stay in the node. We apply our method to human interaction networks and show that although it is important for a node ...

  16. Exact Random Walk Distributions using Noncommutative Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bellissard, J; Barelli, A; Claro, F; Bellissard, Jean; Camacho, Carlos J; Barelli, Armelle; Claro, Francisco

    1997-01-01

    Using the results obtained by the non commutative geometry techniques applied to the Harper equation, we derive the areas distribution of random walks of length $ N $ on a two-dimensional square lattice for large $ N $, taking into account finite size contributions.

  17. Assessment of a Solar System Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.; Murrell, Steven R.; Kirchner, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The idea of sending students and the general public on a walk through a scale model of the solar system in an attempt to instill an appreciation of the relative scales of the sizes of the objects compared to the immense distances between them is certainly not new. A good number of such models exist, including one on the National Mall in…

  18. Infrared dynamics of Minimal Walking Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino;

    2010-01-01

    We study the gauge sector of Minimal Walking Technicolor, which is an SU(2) gauge theory with nf=2 flavors of Wilson fermions in the adjoint representation. Numerical simulations are performed on lattices Nt x Ns^3, with Ns ranging from 8 to 16 and Nt=2Ns, at fixed \\beta=2.25, and varying the fer...

  19. Quantifiying the stability of walking using accelerometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarsing, Jan H.; Mayagoitia, Ruth E.; Veltink, Peter H.

    1996-01-01

    A dynamic analysis method is sought to measure the relative stability of walking, using a triaxial accelerometer. A performance parameter that can be calculated from the data from the accelerometer is defined; it should give a measure of the stability of the subject. It is based on the balancing for

  20. Establishing the Range of Perceptually Natural Visual Walking Speeds for Virtual Walking-In-Place Locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    from 1.0 to 3.0. Thus, the slowest speed was equal to an estimate of the subjects normal walking speed, while the highest speed was three times greater. The perceived naturalness of the visual speed was assessed using self-reports. The first study compared four different types of movement, namely...... to virtual motion. This paper describes two within-subjects studies performed with the intention of establishing the range of perceptually natural walking speeds for WIP locomotion. In both studies, subjects performed a series of virtual walks while exposed to visual gains (optic flow multipliers) ranging......, no leg movement, walking on a treadmill, and two forms of gestural input for WIP locomotion. The results suggest that WIP locomotion is accompanied by a perceptual distortion of the speed of optic flow. The second study was performed using a 4×2 factorial design and compared four different display field...

  1. Searching via walking: How to find a marked clique of a complete graph using quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillery, Mark; Reitzner, Daniel; Bužek, Vladimír

    2010-06-01

    We show how a quantum walk can be used to find a marked edge or a marked complete subgraph of a complete graph. We employ a version of a quantum walk, the scattering walk, which lends itself to experimental implementation. The edges are marked by adding elements to them that impart a specific phase shift to the particle as it enters or leaves the edge. If the complete graph has N vertices and the subgraph has K vertices, the particle becomes localized on the subgraph in O(N/K) steps. This leads to a quantum search that is quadratically faster than a corresponding classical search. We show how to implement the quantum walk using a quantum circuit and a quantum oracle, which allows us to specify the resources needed for a quantitative comparison of the efficiency of classical and quantum searches—the number of oracle calls.

  2. Speed dependence of averaged EMG profiles in walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL; Elzinga, H; Grimmius, W; Halbertsma, JPK

    2002-01-01

    Electromyogram (EMG) profiles strongly depend on walking speed and, in pathological gait, patients do not usually walk at normal speeds. EMG data was collected from 14 muscles in two groups of healthy young subjects who walked at five different speeds ranging from 0.75 to 1.75 ms(-1). We found that

  3. Modeling Framework and Software Tools for Walking Robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duindam, Vincent; Stramigioli, Stefano; Groen, Frank

    2005-01-01

    In research on passive dynamic walking, the aim is to study and design robots that walk naturally, i.e., with little or no control effort. McGeer [1] and others (e.g. [2, 3]) have shown that, indeed, robots can walk down a shallow slope with no actuation, only powered by gravity. In this work, we de

  4. The Walking Classroom: Active Learning Is Just Steps Away!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kelly Mancini

    2016-01-01

    Walking is a viable and valuable form of exercise for young children that has both physical and mental health benefits. There is much evidence showing that school-age children are not getting the recommended 60 minutes of daily exercise. A school-wide walking program can be a great way to encourage walking in and out of school, can be aligned with…

  5. Accumulating Brisk Walking for Fitness, Cardiovascular Risk, and Psychological Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Marie; Nevill, Alan; Neville, Charlotte; Biddle, Stuart; Hardman, Adrianne

    2002-01-01

    Compared the effects of different patterns of regular brisk walking on fitness, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and psychological well-being in previously sedentary adults. Data on adults who completed either short-bout or long-bout walking programs found that three short bouts of brisk walking accumulated throughout the day were as effective…

  6. Evaluation of the Phase-Dependent Rhythm Control of Human Walking Using Phase Response Curves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Funato

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Humans and animals control their walking rhythms to maintain motion in a variable environment. The neural mechanism for controlling rhythm has been investigated in many studies using mechanical and electrical stimulation. However, quantitative evaluation of rhythm variation in response to perturbation at various timings has rarely been investigated. Such a characteristic of rhythm is described by the phase response curve (PRC. Dynamical simulations of human skeletal models with changing walking rhythms (phase reset described a relation between the effective phase reset on stability and PRC, and phase reset around touch-down was shown to improve stability. A PRC of human walking was estimated by pulling the swing leg, but such perturbations hardly influenced the stance leg, so the relation between the PRC and walking events was difficult to discuss. This research thus examines human response to variations in floor velocity. Such perturbation yields another problem, in that the swing leg is indirectly (and weakly perturbed, so the precision of PRC decreases. To solve this problem, this research adopts the weighted spike-triggered average (WSTA method. In the WSTA method, a sequential pulsed perturbation is used for stimulation. This is in contrast with the conventional impulse method, which applies an intermittent impulsive perturbation. The WSTA method can be used to analyze responses to a large number of perturbations for each sequence. In the experiment, perturbations are applied to walking subjects by rapidly accelerating and decelerating a treadmill belt, and measured data are analyzed by the WSTA and impulse methods. The PRC obtained by the WSTA method had clear and stable waveforms with a higher temporal resolution than those obtained by the impulse method. By investigation of the rhythm transition for each phase of walking using the obtained PRC, a rhythm change that extends the touch-down and mid-single support phases is found to occur.

  7. Evaluation of the Phase-Dependent Rhythm Control of Human Walking Using Phase Response Curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funato, Tetsuro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Aoi, Shinya; Imai, Takashi; Aoyagi, Toshio; Tomita, Nozomi; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Humans and animals control their walking rhythms to maintain motion in a variable environment. The neural mechanism for controlling rhythm has been investigated in many studies using mechanical and electrical stimulation. However, quantitative evaluation of rhythm variation in response to perturbation at various timings has rarely been investigated. Such a characteristic of rhythm is described by the phase response curve (PRC). Dynamical simulations of human skeletal models with changing walking rhythms (phase reset) described a relation between the effective phase reset on stability and PRC, and phase reset around touch-down was shown to improve stability. A PRC of human walking was estimated by pulling the swing leg, but such perturbations hardly influenced the stance leg, so the relation between the PRC and walking events was difficult to discuss. This research thus examines human response to variations in floor velocity. Such perturbation yields another problem, in that the swing leg is indirectly (and weakly) perturbed, so the precision of PRC decreases. To solve this problem, this research adopts the weighted spike-triggered average (WSTA) method. In the WSTA method, a sequential pulsed perturbation is used for stimulation. This is in contrast with the conventional impulse method, which applies an intermittent impulsive perturbation. The WSTA method can be used to analyze responses to a large number of perturbations for each sequence. In the experiment, perturbations are applied to walking subjects by rapidly accelerating and decelerating a treadmill belt, and measured data are analyzed by the WSTA and impulse methods. The PRC obtained by the WSTA method had clear and stable waveforms with a higher temporal resolution than those obtained by the impulse method. By investigation of the rhythm transition for each phase of walking using the obtained PRC, a rhythm change that extends the touch-down and mid-single support phases is found to occur.

  8. Exploring Muscle Activation during Nordic Walking: A Comparison between Conventional and Uphill Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Barbara; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre; Zoppirolli, Chiara; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Bacchi, Elisabetta; Figard-Fabre, Hélène; Schena, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Nordic Walking (NW) owes much of its popularity to the benefits of greater energy expenditure and upper body engagement than found in conventional walking (W). Muscle activation during NW is still understudied, however. The aim of the present study was to assess differences in muscle activation and physiological responses between NW and W in level and uphill walking conditions. Nine expert Nordic Walkers (mean age 36.8±11.9 years; BMI 24.2±1.8 kg/m2) performed 5-minute treadmill trials of W and NW at 4 km/h on inclines of 0% and 15%. The electromyographic activity of seven upper body and five leg muscles and oxygen consumption (VO2) were recorded and pole force during NW was measured. VO2 during NW was 22.3% higher at 0% and only 6.9% higher at 15% than during W, while upper body muscle activation was 2- to 15-fold higher under both conditions. Lower body muscle activation was similarly increased during NW and W in the uphill condition, whereas the increase in erector spinae muscle activity was lower during NW than W. The lack of a significant increase in pole force during uphill walking may explain the lower extra energy expenditure of NW, indicating less upper body muscle activation to lift the body against gravity. NW seemed to reduce lower back muscle contraction in the uphill condition, suggesting that walking with poles may reduce effort to control trunk oscillations and could contribute to work production during NW. Although the difference in extra energy expenditure between NW and W was smaller in the uphill walking condition, the increased upper body muscle involvement during exercising with NW may confer additional benefit compared to conventional walking also on uphill terrains. Furthermore, people with low back pain may gain benefit from pole use when walking uphill. PMID:26418339

  9. How might we increase physical activity through dog walking?: A comprehensive review of dog walking correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Westgarth, Carri; Christley, Robert M; Christian, Hayley E

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour are major threats to population health. A considerable proportion of people own dogs, and there is good evidence that dog ownership is associated with higher levels of physical activity. However not all owners walk their dogs regularly. This paper comprehensively reviews the evidence for correlates of dog walking so that effective interventions may be designed to increase the physical activity of dog owners. Methods Published findings fro...

  10. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartog, J P Den

    1961-01-01

    First published over 40 years ago, this work has achieved the status of a classic among introductory texts on mechanics. Den Hartog is known for his lively, discursive and often witty presentations of all the fundamental material of both statics and dynamics (and considerable more advanced material) in new, original ways that provide students with insights into mechanical relationships that other books do not always succeed in conveying. On the other hand, the work is so replete with engineering applications and actual design problems that it is as valuable as a reference to the practicing e

  11. Comparison of elliptical training, stationary cycling, treadmill walking and overground walking. Electromyographic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Laura A; Stanley, Christopher J; Norman, Tracy L; Park, Hyung S; Damiano, Diane L

    2011-02-01

    The most common functional motor goal of lower extremity rehabilitation is to improve walking ability. For reasons of feasibility, safety or intensity, devices are frequently used to facilitate or augment gait training. The objective of this study was to compare the muscle activity patterns of the rectus femoris and semitendinosus muscles during four conditions: overground walking, treadmill walking, stationary cycling, and elliptical training. Ten healthy adults (six male, four female; mean age 22.7±2.9 years, range 20-29) participated and surface electromyographic data were recorded. Linear envelope curves were generated and time normalized from 0 to 100% cycle. The mean plus three standard deviations from a static trial was used as the threshold for muscle activity. Repeated measures analysis of variance procedures were used to detect differences between conditions. Elliptical training demonstrated greater rectus femoris activity and greater rectus femoris/semitendinosus coactivation than all other conditions. Consistent with previous work, treadmill walking demonstrated greater rectus femoris activity than overground walking. Minimal differences in semitendinosus activation were observed between conditions, limited to lower peak activity during cycling compared to treadmill walking. These results provide normative values for rectus femoris and semitendinosus activation for different locomotor training methods and may assist in selecting the most appropriate training device for specific patients. Clinicians and researchers should also consider the kinematic and kinetic differences between tasks, which cannot necessarily be inferred from muscle activation patterns.

  12. A comparison of at-home walking and 10-meter walking test parameters of individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Katsuhito; Hori, Hideaki; Muramatsu, Ken

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the difference in gait parameters of at-home walking and the 10-meter walking test results of individuals with hemiparesis. [Subjects] A total of 14 hemiparetic stroke recovery patients participated in this study. Inclusion criteria were: living at home, the ability to walk independently, and demonstrated low extremity on recovery stages III-V on the Brunnstrom Approach. The average age of the subjects was 66 years. [Methods] We used video surveillance and the inked footprint technique to record usual walking speed and maximum speed patterns both in subjects' homes and during the 10-meter walking test. From these methods, walking speed, stride length, and step rate were calculated. [Results] While both usual and maximum walking speeds of the 10-meter walking test correlated with stride length and step rate, at-home walking speeds only significantly correlated with stride length. [Conclusion] Walking patterns of the 10-meter walking test are quantifiably distinct from those demonstrated in patients' homes, and this difference is mainly characterized by stride length. In order to enhance in-home walking ability, exercises that improve length of stride rather than step rate should be recommended.

  13. Random walk search in unstructured P2P

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Zhaoqing; You Jinyuan; Rao Ruonan; Li Minglu

    2006-01-01

    Unstructured P2P has power-law link distribution, and the random walk in power-law networks is analyzed. The analysis results show that the probability that a random walker walks through the high degree nodes is high in the power-law network, and the information on the high degree nodes can be easily found through random walk. Random walk spread and random walk search method (RWSS) is proposed based on the analysis result. Simulation results show that RWSS achieves high success rates at low cost and is robust to high degree node failure.

  14. Concave Majorants of Random Walks and Related Poisson Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, Josh

    2010-01-01

    We offer a unified approach to the theory of concave majorants of random walks by providing a path transformation for a walk of finite length that leaves the law of the walk unchanged whilst providing complete information about the concave majorant. This leads to a description of a walk of random geometric length as a Poisson point process of excursions away from its concave majorant, which is then used to find a complete description of the concave majorant for a walk of infinite length. In the case where subsets of increments may have the same arithmetic mean, we investigate three nested compositions that naturally arise from our construction of the concave majorant.

  15. Distributed recurrent neural forward models with synaptic adaptation and CPG-based control for complex behaviors of walking robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Goldschmidt, Dennis; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like stick insects, cockroaches or ants, demonstrate a fascinating range of locomotive abilities and complex behaviors. The locomotive behaviors can consist of a variety of walking patterns along with adaptation that allow the animals to deal with changes in environmental conditions, like uneven terrains, gaps, obstacles etc. Biological study has revealed that such complex behaviors are a result of a combination of biomechanics and neural mechanism thus representing the true nature of embodied interactions. While the biomechanics helps maintain flexibility and sustain a variety of movements, the neural mechanisms generate movements while making appropriate predictions crucial for achieving adaptation. Such predictions or planning ahead can be achieved by way of internal models that are grounded in the overall behavior of the animal. Inspired by these findings, we present here, an artificial bio-inspired walking system which effectively combines biomechanics (in terms of the body and leg structures) with the underlying neural mechanisms. The neural mechanisms consist of (1) central pattern generator based control for generating basic rhythmic patterns and coordinated movements, (2) distributed (at each leg) recurrent neural network based adaptive forward models with efference copies as internal models for sensory predictions and instantaneous state estimations, and (3) searching and elevation control for adapting the movement of an individual leg to deal with different environmental conditions. Using simulations we show that this bio-inspired approach with adaptive internal models allows the walking robot to perform complex locomotive behaviors as observed in insects, including walking on undulated terrains, crossing large gaps, leg damage adaptations, as well as climbing over high obstacles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the newly developed recurrent network based approach to online forward models outperforms the adaptive neuron forward models

  16. Random walks and cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; Wheatley, D N

    2000-11-01

    For many years, it has been believed that diffusion is the principle motive force for distributing molecules within the cell. Yet, our current information about the cell makes this improbable. Furthermore, the argument that limitations responsible for the relative constancy of cell size--which seldom varies by more than a factor of 2, whereas organisms can vary in mass by up to 10(24)--are based on the limits of diffusion is questionable. This essay seeks to develop an alternative explanation based on transport of molecules along structural elements in the cytoplasm and nucleus. This mechanism can better account for cell size constancy, in light of modern biological knowledge of the complex microstructure of the cell, than simple diffusion.

  17. Cardiovascular Responses Associated with Daily Walking in Subacute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay K. Prajapati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of regaining independent ambulation after stroke, the amount of daily walking completed during in-patient rehabilitation is low. The purpose of this study is to determine if (1 walking-related heart rate responses reached the minimum intensity necessary for therapeutic aerobic exercise (40%–60% heart rate reserve or (2 heart rate responses during bouts of walking revealed excessive workload that may limit walking (>80% heart rate reserve. Eight individuals with subacute stroke attending in-patient rehabilitation were recruited. Participants wore heart rate monitors and accelerometers during a typical rehabilitation day. Walking-related changes in heart rate and walking bout duration were determined. Patients did not meet the minimum cumulative requirements of walking intensity (>40% heart rate reserve and duration (>10 minutes continuously necessary for cardiorespiratory benefit. Only one patient exceeded 80% heart rate reserve. The absence of significant increases in heart rate associated with walking reveals that patients chose to walk at speeds well below a level that has meaningful cardiorespiratory health benefits. Additionally, cardiorespiratory workload is unlikely to limit participation in walking. Measurement of heart rate and walking during in-patient rehabilitation may be a useful approach to encourage patients to increase the overall physical activity and to help facilitate recovery.

  18. Distracted walking: Examining the extent to pedestrian safety problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Mwakalonge

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrians, much like drivers, have always been engaged in multi-tasking like using hand-held devices, listening to music, snacking, or reading while walking. The effects are similar to those experienced by distracted drivers. However, distracted walking has not received similar policies and effective interventions as distracted driving to improve pedestrian safety. This study reviewed the state-of-practice on policies, campaigns, available data, identified research needs, and opportunities pertaining to distracted walking. A comprehensive review of literature revealed that some of the agencies/organizations disseminate useful information about certain distracting activities that pedestrians should avoid while walking to improve their safety. Various walking safety rules/tips have been given, such as not wearing headphones or talking on a cell phone while crossing a street, keeping the volume down, hanging up the phone while walking, being aware of traffic, and avoiding distractions like walking with texting. The majority of the past observational-based and experimental-based studies reviewed in this study on distracted walking is in agreement that there is a positive correlation between distraction and unsafe walking behavior. However, limitations of the existing crash data suggest that distracted walking may not be a severe threat to the public health. Current pedestrian crash data provide insufficient information for researchers to examine the extent to which distracted walking causes and/or contributes to actual pedestrian safety problems.

  19. Pseudo Memory Effects, Majorization and Entropy in Quantum Random Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Bracken, A J; Tsohantjis, I; Bracken, Anthony J.; Ellinas, Demosthenes; Tsohantjis, Ioannis

    2004-01-01

    A quantum random walk on the integers exhibits pseudo memory effects, in that its probability distribution after N steps is determined by reshuffling the first N distributions that arise in a classical random walk with the same initial distribution. In a classical walk, entropy increase can be regarded as a consequence of the majorization ordering of successive distributions. The Lorenz curves of successive distributions for a symmetric quantum walk reveal no majorization ordering in general. Nevertheless, entropy can increase, and computer experiments show that it does so on average. Varying the stages at which the quantum coin system is traced out leads to new quantum walks, including a symmetric walk for which majorization ordering is valid but the spreading rate exceeds that of the usual symmetric quantum walk.

  20. Comparison of elliptical training, stationary cycling, treadmill walking and overground walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Diane L; Norman, Tracy; Stanley, Christopher J; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2011-06-01

    The extent to which therapeutic, exercise or robotic devices can maximize gait function is a major unresolved issue in neurorehabilitation. Several factors may influence gait outcomes such as similarity of the task to overground walking, degree of coordination within and across limbs, and cycle-to-cycle variability in each device. Our objective was to compare lower extremity kinematics, coordination and variability during four locomotor tasks: overground walking, treadmill walking, elliptical training and stationary cycling in 10 non-disabled adults (6 male; mean age 22.7±2.9 yrs, range 20-29). All first performed four overground walking trials at self-selected speed with mean temporal-spatial data used to pace the other conditions. Joint positions, excursions, and the Gait Deviation Index (GDI) were compared across conditions to evaluate kinematic similarity. Time-series data were correlated within and across limbs to evaluate intralimb and interlimb coordination, respectively. Variability in cadence was quantified to assess how constrained the locomotor rhythm was compared to overground walking. Treadmill walking most closely resembled overground with GDI values nearly overlapping, reinforcing its appropriateness for gait training. Cycling showed the largest GDI difference from overground, with elliptical closer but still a significant distance from all three. Cycling showed greater hip reciprocation Cycling and elliptical showed stronger intralimb synergism at the hip and knee than the other two. Based on kinematics, results suggest that elliptical training may have greater transfer to overground walking than cycling and cycling may be more useful for enhancing reciprocal coordination. Further evaluation of these devices in neurological gait disorders is needed.

  1. Compensatory strategies during walking in response to excessive muscle co-contraction at the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruoli; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2014-03-01

    Excessive co-contraction causes inefficient or abnormal movement in several neuromuscular pathologies. How synergistic muscles spanning the ankle, knee and hip adapt to co-contraction of ankle muscles is not well understood. This study aimed to identify the compensation strategies required to retain normal walking with excessive antagonistic ankle muscle co-contraction. Muscle-actuated simulations of normal walking were performed to quantify compensatory mechanisms of ankle and knee muscles during stance in the presence of normal, medium and high levels of co-contraction of antagonistic pairs gastrocnemius+tibialis anterior and soleus+tibialis anterior. The study showed that if co-contraction increases, the synergistic ankle muscles can compensate; with gastrocmemius+tibialis anterior co-contraction, the soleus will increase its contribution to ankle plantarflexion acceleration. At the knee, however, almost all muscles spanning the knee and hip are involved in compensation. We also found that ankle and knee muscles alone can provide sufficient compensation at the ankle joint, but hip muscles must be involved to generate sufficient knee moment. Our findings imply that subjects with a rather high level of dorsiflexor+plantarflexor co-contraction can still perform normal walking. This also suggests that capacity of other lower limb muscles to compensate is important to retain normal walking in co-contracted persons. The compensatory mechanisms can be useful in clinical interpretation of motion analyses, when secondary muscle co-contraction or other deficits may present simultaneously in subjects with motion disorders.

  2. Random Walk Picture of Basketball Scoring

    CERN Document Server

    Gabel, Alan

    2011-01-01

    We present evidence, based on play-by-play data from all 6087 games from the 2006/07--2009/10 seasons of the National Basketball Association (NBA), that basketball scoring is well described by a weakly-biased continuous-time random walk. The time between successive scoring events follows an exponential distribution, with little memory between different scoring intervals. Using this random-walk picture that is augmented by features idiosyncratic to basketball, we account for a wide variety of statistical properties of scoring, such as the distribution of the score difference between opponents and the fraction of game time that one team is in the lead. By further including the heterogeneity of team strengths, we build a computational model that accounts for essentially all statistical features of game scoring data and season win/loss records of each team.

  3. Random walk centrality in interconnected multilayer networks

    CERN Document Server

    Solé-Ribalta, Albert; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Real-world complex systems exhibit multiple levels of relationships. In many cases they require to be modeled as interconnected multilayer networks, characterizing interactions of several types simultaneously. It is of crucial importance in many fields, from economics to biology and from urban planning to social sciences, to identify the most (or the less) influential nodes in a network using centrality measures. However, defining the centrality of actors in interconnected complex networks is not trivial. In this paper, we rely on the tensorial formalism recently proposed to characterize and investigate this kind of complex topologies, and extend two well known random walk centrality measures, the random walk betweenness and closeness centrality, to interconnected multilayer networks. For each of the measures we provide analytical expressions that completely agree with numerically results.

  4. Exploring Space and Place With Walking Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Jones

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the use of walking interviews as a research method. In spite of a wave of interest in methods which take interviewing out of the “safe,” stationary environment, there has been limited work critically examining the techniques for undertaking such work. Curiously for a method which takes an explicitly spatial approach, few projects have attempted to rigorously connect what participants say with where they say it. The article reviews three case studies where the authors have used different techniques, including GPS, for locating the interview in space. The article concludes by arguing that researchers considering using walking interviews need to think carefully about what kinds of data they wish to generate when deciding which approach to adopt.

  5. The Walking Egg non-profit organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, N

    2011-01-01

    The Walking Egg non-profit organisation (npo) was founded in 2010 by scientists and an artist to realise the Arusha Project which strives to implement accessible infertility programmes in resource-poor countries. Right from the start The Walking Egg has opted for a multidisciplinary and global approach towards the problem of infertility and in cooperation with the Special Task Force (STF) on "Developing countries and infertility" of the European Society of Human reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) and the WHO, it gathers medical, social and economical scientists and experts along with artists to discuss and work together towards its goal. The project aims to raise awareness -surrounding childlessness in resource-poor countries and to make infertility care in all its aspects, including assisted reproductive technologies, available and accessible for a much larger part of the population.

  6. Random walks, random fields, and disordered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Černý, Jiří; Kotecký, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the mathematics that lies at the intersection of probability theory, statistical physics, combinatorics and computer science, this volume collects together lecture notes on recent developments in the area. The common ground of these subjects is perhaps best described by the three terms in the title: Random Walks, Random Fields and Disordered Systems. The specific topics covered include a study of Branching Brownian Motion from the perspective of disordered (spin-glass) systems, a detailed analysis of weakly self-avoiding random walks in four spatial dimensions via methods of field theory and the renormalization group, a study of phase transitions in disordered discrete structures using a rigorous version of the cavity method, a survey of recent work on interacting polymers in the ballisticity regime and, finally, a treatise on two-dimensional loop-soup models and their connection to conformally invariant systems and the Gaussian Free Field. The notes are aimed at early graduate students with a mod...

  7. Uphill walking with a simple exoskeleton: plantarflexion assistance leads to proximal adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2015-01-01

    While level walking with a pneumatic ankle-foot exoskeleton is studied extensively, less is known on uphill walking. The goals of this study were to get a better understanding of the biomechanical adaptations and the influence of actuation timing on metabolic cost during uphill walking with a plantarflexion assisting exoskeleton. Seven female subjects walked on a treadmill with 15% inclination at 1.36 ms(-1) in five conditions (4 min): one condition with an unpowered exoskeleton and four with a powered exoskeleton with onset of pneumatic muscle actuation at 19, 26, 34 and 41% of stride. During uphill walking the metabolic cost was more than 10% lower for all powered conditions compared to the unpowered condition. When actuation onset was in between 26 and 34% of the stride, metabolic cost was suggested to be minimal. While it was expected that exoskeleton assistance would reduce muscular activity of the plantarflexors during push-off, subjects used the additional power to raise the body centre of mass in the beginning of each step to a higher point compared to unpowered walking. This reduced the muscular activity in the m. vastus lateralis and the m. biceps femoris as less effort was necessary to reach the highest body centre of mass position in the single support phase. In conclusion, subjects can use plantarflexion assistance during the push-off to reduce muscular activity in more proximal joints in order to minimize energy cost during uphill locomotion. Kinetic data seem necessary to fully understand this mechanism, which highlights the complexity of human-exoskeleton interaction.

  8. Adaptive, fast walking in a biped robot under neuronal control and learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poramate Manoonpong

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Human walking is a dynamic, partly self-stabilizing process relying on the interaction of the biomechanical design with its neuronal control. The coordination of this process is a very difficult problem, and it has been suggested that it involves a hierarchy of levels, where the lower ones, e.g., interactions between muscles and the spinal cord, are largely autonomous, and where higher level control (e.g., cortical arises only pointwise, as needed. This requires an architecture of several nested, sensori-motor loops where the walking process provides feedback signals to the walker's sensory systems, which can be used to coordinate its movements. To complicate the situation, at a maximal walking speed of more than four leg-lengths per second, the cycle period available to coordinate all these loops is rather short. In this study we present a planar biped robot, which uses the design principle of nested loops to combine the self-stabilizing properties of its biomechanical design with several levels of neuronal control. Specifically, we show how to adapt control by including online learning mechanisms based on simulated synaptic plasticity. This robot can walk with a high speed (>3.0 leg length/s, self-adapting to minor disturbances, and reacting in a robust way to abruptly induced gait changes. At the same time, it can learn walking on different terrains, requiring only few learning experiences. This study shows that the tight coupling of physical with neuronal control, guided by sensory feedback from the walking pattern itself, combined with synaptic learning may be a way forward to better understand and solve coordination problems in other complex motor tasks.

  9. Soleus H-reflex gain in humans walking and running under simulated reduced gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, D. P.; Aagaard, P.; Simonsen, E. B.; Farley, C. T.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Hoffmann (H-) reflex is an electrical analogue of the monosynaptic stretch reflex, elicited by bypassing the muscle spindle and directly stimulating the afferent nerve. Studying H-reflex modulation provides insight into how the nervous system centrally modulates stretch reflex responses.A common measure of H-reflex gain is the slope of the relationship between H-reflex amplitude and EMG amplitude. To examine soleus H-reflex gain across a range of EMG levels during human locomotion, we used simulated reduced gravity to reduce muscle activity. We hypothesised that H-reflex gain would be independent of gravity level.We recorded EMG from eight subjects walking (1.25 m s-1) and running (3.0 m s-1) at four gravity levels (1.0, 0.75, 0.5 and 0.25 G (Earth gravity)). We normalised the stimulus M-wave and resulting H-reflex to the maximal M-wave amplitude (Mmax) elicited throughout the stride to correct for movement of stimulus and recording electrodes relative to nerve and muscle fibres. Peak soleus EMG amplitude decreased by 30% for walking and for running over the fourfold change in gravity. As hypothesised, slopes of linear regressions fitted to H-reflex versus EMG data were independent of gravity for walking and running (ANOVA, P > 0.8). The slopes were also independent of gait (P > 0.6), contrary to previous studies. Walking had a greater y-intercept (19.9% Mmax) than running (-2.5% Mmax; P EMG, walking H-reflex amplitudes were higher than running H-reflex amplitudes by a constant amount. We conclude that the nervous system adjusts H-reflex threshold but not H-reflex gain between walking and running. These findings provide insight into potential neural mechanisms responsible for spinal modulation of the stretch reflex during human locomotion.

  10. The role of the neck and trunk in facilitating head stability during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Justin; Barrett, Rod; Morrison, Steven

    2006-07-01

    An apparent goal of the human postural system is to maintain head stability during walking. Although much is known about sensory-motor stabilising mechanisms associated with the head and neck, less is known about how the postural system attenuates motion between the trunk and neck segments in order to regulate head motion. Therefore the purpose of this study was to determine the role that the neck and the trunk play in stabilising the head at a range of walking speeds. Eight healthy male subjects (age: 23+/-4 years) performed self-selected slow, preferred, and fast walking speed trials along a 30 m walkway. Four custom-designed wireless triaxial accelerometers were attached to the head, upper trunk, lower trunk, and shank of each subject to measure vertical (VT), anterior-posterior (AP), and mediolateral (ML) accelerations. Acceleration data were examined in each direction using RMS, power spectral, harmonic, and regularity measures. Signal regularity was increased from the lower to upper trunk for all walking speeds and directions with the exception of the slow speed in the AP direction. Evidence from analysis of power spectral and amplitude characteristics of acceleration signals was suggestive that accelerations are also attenuated from the lower to upper trunk by dynamics of the intervening trunk segment. Differences in selected power spectral and amplitude characteristics between the accelerations of the upper trunk and head due to the intervening neck segment were only detected in the AP direction at preferred and fast walking speeds. Overall the findings of the present study suggest that the trunk segment plays a critical role in regulating gait-related oscillations in all directions. Only accelerations in the direction of travel at preferred and fast speeds required additional control from the neck segment in order to enhance head stability during walking.

  11. Influences on Neighborhood Walking in Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Nancy Ambrose; Clarke, Philippa J.; Ronis, David L.; Cherry, Carol Loveland; Nyquist, Linda; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional survey study was to examine the influence of self-efficacy, outcome expectations and environment on neighborhood walking in older adults with (n=163, mean age=78.7, SD=7.96 years) and without (n=163, mean age=73.6, SD=7.93 years) mobility limitations (controlling for demographic characteristics). Measures included: Neighborhood Physical Activity Questionnaire, Multidimensional Outcome Expectations for Exercise Scale, Neighborhood Environment Walkability Sca...

  12. Discriminative Parameter Estimation for Random Walks Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Baudin, Pierre-Yves; Goodman, Danny; Kumar, Puneet; Azzabou, Noura; Carlier, Pierre G.; Paragios, Nikos; Pawan Kumar, M.

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The Random Walks (RW) algorithm is one of the most e - cient and easy-to-use probabilistic segmentation methods. By combining contrast terms with prior terms, it provides accurate segmentations of medical images in a fully automated manner. However, one of the main drawbacks of using the RW algorithm is that its parameters have to be hand-tuned. we propose a novel discriminative learning framework that estimates the parameters using a training dataset. The main challen...

  13. A Short Walk along the Gravimeters Path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iginio Marson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of gravity measurements begun in 1604 with Galileo Galilei experiments on the acceleration due to the gravity force of the earth, g, along inclined planes. In his memory, the most used unit to measure g is the gal (10−2 m/s2. The paper takes the interested reader through a walk along some of the most important achievements in gravity measurements and gives some perspectives for future developments in terrestrial gravity.

  14. Cavity QED-based quantum walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    di, Tiegang; Hillery, Mark; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2004-09-01

    We discuss a possible experimental scheme for the implementation of a quantum walk. The scheme is based on the passage of an atom inside a high- Q cavity. The chirality is characterized by the atomic states and the displacement is characterized by the photon number inside the cavity. The quantum steps are described by appropriate interactions with a sequence of classical and quantized cavity fields.

  15. Piano crossing - walking on a keyboard

    OpenAIRE

    Bojan Kverh; Matevz Lipanje; Borut Batagelj; Franc Solina

    2015-01-01

    Piano Crossing is an interactive art installation which turns a pedestrian crossing marked with white stripes into a piano keyboard so that pedestrians can generate music by walking over it. Matching tones are generated when a pedestrian is over a particular stripe or key. A digital camera is directed at the crossing from above. A special computer vision application was developed that maps the stripes of the pedestrian crossing to piano keys and which detects over which key is the center of g...

  16. Mesonic spectroscopy of Minimal Walking Technicolor

    CERN Document Server

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Patella, Agostino; Pica, Claudio; Rago, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the structure and the novel emerging features of the mesonic non-singlet spectrum of the Minimal Walking Technicolor (MWT) theory. Precision measurements in the nonsinglet pseudoscalar and vector channels are compared to the expectations for an IR-conformal field theory and a QCD-like theory. Our results favor a scenario in which MWT is (almost) conformal in the infrared, while spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking seems less plausible.

  17. Dynamic random walks theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Guillotin-Plantard, Nadine

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this book is to report on the progress realized in probability theory in the field of dynamic random walks and to present applications in computer science, mathematical physics and finance. Each chapter contains didactical material as well as more advanced technical sections. Few appendices will help refreshing memories (if necessary!).· New probabilistic model, new results in probability theory· Original applications in computer science· Applications in mathematical physics· Applications in finance

  18. WalkThrough Example Procedures for MAMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, Christy E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gaschen, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bloch, Jeffrey Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-15

    This documentation is a growing set of walk through examples of analyses using the MAMA V2.0 software. It does not cover all the features or possibilities with the MAMA software, but will address using many of the basic analysis tools to quantify particle size and shape in an image. This document will continue to evolve as additional procedures and examples are added. The starting assumption is that the MAMA software has been successfully installed.

  19. Submaximal Exercise Testing Treadmill and Floor Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    Association, 65(Suppl 1): 18-25, 1969. 35. Traugh, G. H., Corcoran, P. J., and Reyes , R. L., "Energy Expenditure of Ambulation in Patients with Above Knee...subjects were measured over three walking velocities. 1 No comments were offered on the subjects attire during the testa or the experimental conditions...Testing," Journal of the South Carolina Medical Association, 65(Suppl 1): 18- ,- _19-69.7 .. i 35. Traugh, G. H., Corcoran, P. J., and Reyes , R. L

  20. A Random Walk Picture of Basketball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Alan; Redner, Sidney

    2012-02-01

    We analyze NBA basketball play-by-play data and found that scoring is well described by a weakly-biased, anti-persistent, continuous-time random walk. The time between successive scoring events follows an exponential distribution, with little memory between events. We account for a wide variety of statistical properties of scoring, such as the distribution of the score difference between opponents and the fraction of game time that one team is in the lead.

  1. Gait analysis in chronic heart failure: The calf as a locus of impaired walking capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizzolo, Fausto A; Maiorana, Andrew J; Naylor, Louise H; Dembo, Lawrence; Lloyd, David G; Green, Daniel J; Rubenson, Jonas

    2014-11-28

    Reduced walking capacity, a hallmark of chronic heart failure (CHF), is strongly correlated with hospitalization and morbidity. The aim of this work was to perform a detailed biomechanical gait analysis to better identify mechanisms underlying reduced walking capacity in CHF. Inverse dynamic analyses were conducted in CHF patients and age- and exercise level-matched control subjects on an instrumented treadmill at self-selected treadmill walking speeds and at speeds representing +20% and -20% of the subjects' preferred speed. Surprisingly, no difference in preferred speed was observed between groups, possibly explained by an optimization of the mechanical cost of transport in both groups (the mechanical cost to travel a given distance; J/kg/m). The majority of limb kinematics and kinetics were also similar between groups, with the exception of greater ankle dorsiflexion angles during stance in CHF. Nevertheless, over two times greater ankle plantarflexion work during stance and per distance traveled is required for a given triceps surae muscle volume in CHF patients. This, together with a greater reliance on the ankle compared to the hip to power walking in CHF patients, especially at faster speeds, may contribute to the earlier onset of fatigue in CHF patients. This observation also helps explain the high correlation between triceps surae muscle volume and exercise capacity that has previously been reported in CHF. Considering the key role played by the plantarflexors in powering walking and their association with exercise capacity, our findings strongly suggest that exercise-based rehabilitation in CHF should not omit the ankle muscle group.

  2. Knee rotationplasty: motion of the body centre of mass during walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Viviana; Okita, Yusuke; Manfrini, Marco; Tesio, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Knee rotationplasty (KRP) is a type of surgery in which the rotated ankle serves as a new knee after being removed for bone tumor. Although this limb salvage surgery is rarely indicated in properly selected patients, it may offer functional advantages over transfemoral amputation, and more durable results compared with a prosthesis. The walking mechanics of adult patients after KRP is believed to be close to that of below-knee amputees. In this study, we evaluated steady-state walking of KRP patients from the viewpoint of the overall muscle power needed to keep the body centre of mass in motion. Three adult patients after KRP, all athletes, were evaluated. Ground reactions during walking were recorded during six subsequent strides on a force treadmill. The positive mechanical work and power sustaining the motion of the centre of mass and the recovery of muscle energy due to the pendulum-like mechanism of walking were computed and compared with those obtained in previous studies from above-knee, below-knee amputees and healthy individuals. In KRP patients, walking was sustained by a muscle power output which was 1.4–3.6 times lower during the step performed on the rotated limb than on the subsequent step. The recovery of muscle energy was slightly lower (0.9) or higher (1.3–1.4 times) on the affected side. In two out of the three KRP patients, our findings were more similar to those from above-knee amputees than to those from below-knee amputees. After KRP, the rotated limb does not necessarily provide the same power provided by below-knee amputation. This may have a relevance for the paralympic classification of KRP athletes. PMID:27685013

  3. 'It was not just a walking experience': reflections on the role of care in dog-walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeling, Chris; Rock, Melanie

    2013-09-01

    Research into physical activity and human health has recently begun to attend to dog-walking. This study extends the literature on dog-walking as a health behaviour by conceptualizing dog-walking as a caring practice. It centres on qualitative interviews with 11 Canadian dog-owners. All participants resided in urban neighbourhoods identified through previous quantitative research as conducive to dog-walking. Canine characteristics, including breed and age, were found to influence people's physical activity. The health of the dog and its position in the life-course influenced patterns of dog-walking. Frequency, duration and spatial patterns of dog-walking all depended on relationships and people's capacity to tap into resources. In foregrounding networks of care, inclusive of pets and public spaces, a relational conceptualization of dog-walking as a practice of caring helps to make sense of heterogeneity in patterns of physical activity among dog-owners.

  4. Quantum simulation of a quantum stochastic walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govia, Luke C. G.; Taketani, Bruno G.; Schuhmacher, Peter K.; Wilhelm, Frank K.

    2017-03-01

    The study of quantum walks has been shown to have a wide range of applications in areas such as artificial intelligence, the study of biological processes, and quantum transport. The quantum stochastic walk (QSW), which allows for incoherent movement of the walker, and therefore, directionality, is a generalization on the fully coherent quantum walk. While a QSW can always be described in Lindblad formalism, this does not mean that it can be microscopically derived in the standard weak-coupling limit under the Born–Markov approximation. This restricts the class of QSWs that can be experimentally realized in a simple manner. To circumvent this restriction, we introduce a technique to simulate open system evolution on a fully coherent quantum computer, using a quantum trajectories style approach. We apply this technique to a broad class of QSWs, and show that they can be simulated with minimal experimental resources. Our work opens the path towards the experimental realization of QSWs on large graphs with existing quantum technologies.

  5. Deterministic Random Walks on Regular Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, Joshua; Friedrich, Tobias; Spencer, Joel; 10.1002/rsa.20314

    2010-01-01

    Jim Propp's rotor router model is a deterministic analogue of a random walk on a graph. Instead of distributing chips randomly, each vertex serves its neighbors in a fixed order. Cooper and Spencer (Comb. Probab. Comput. (2006)) show a remarkable similarity of both models. If an (almost) arbitrary population of chips is placed on the vertices of a grid $\\Z^d$ and does a simultaneous walk in the Propp model, then at all times and on each vertex, the number of chips on this vertex deviates from the expected number the random walk would have gotten there by at most a constant. This constant is independent of the starting configuration and the order in which each vertex serves its neighbors. This result raises the question if all graphs do have this property. With quite some effort, we are now able to answer this question negatively. For the graph being an infinite $k$-ary tree ($k \\ge 3$), we show that for any deviation $D$ there is an initial configuration of chips such that after running the Propp model for a ...

  6. Modulation of Head Movement Control During Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Verstraete, Mary C.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Paloski, William H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the coordination of the head relative to the trunk within a gait cycle during gaze fixation. Nine normal subjects walked on a motorized treadmill driven at 1.79 m/sec (20 s trials) while fixing their gaze on a centrally located earth-fixed target positioned at a distance of 2m from their eyes. The relative motion of the head and the net torque acting on it relative to the trunk during the gait cycle were used as measures of coordination. It was found that the net torque applied to the head counteracts the destabilizing forces acting on the upper body during locomotion. The average net torque impulse was significantly different (p less than 0.05) between the heel strike and swing phases and were found to be symmetrical between the right and left leg events of the gait cycle. However, the average net displacement of the head relative to the trunk was maintained uniform (p greater than 0.05) throughout the gait cycle. Thus, the coordination of the motion of the head relative to the trunk during walking is dynamically modulated depending on the behavioral events occurring in the gait cycle. This modulation may serve to aid stabilization of the head by counteracting the force variations acting on the upper body that may aid in the visual fixing of targets during walking.

  7. Stationary states in quantum walk search

    Science.gov (United States)

    PrÅ«sis, Krišjānis; Vihrovs, Jevgěnijs; Wong, Thomas G.

    2016-09-01

    When classically searching a database, having additional correct answers makes the search easier. For a discrete-time quantum walk searching a graph for a marked vertex, however, additional marked vertices can make the search harder by causing the system to approximately begin in a stationary state, so the system fails to evolve. In this paper, we completely characterize the stationary states, or 1-eigenvectors, of the quantum walk search operator for general graphs and configurations of marked vertices by decomposing their amplitudes into uniform and flip states. This infinitely expands the number of known stationary states and gives an optimization procedure to find the stationary state closest to the initial uniform state of the walk. We further prove theorems on the existence of stationary states, with them conditionally existing if the marked vertices form a bipartite connected component and always existing if nonbipartite. These results utilize the standard oracle in Grover's algorithm, but we show that a different type of oracle prevents stationary states from interfering with the search algorithm.

  8. Computational Models to Synthesize Human Walking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Ren; David Howard; Laurence Kenney

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis of human walking is of great interest in biomechanics and biomimetic engineering due to its predictive capabilities and potential applications in clinical biomechanics, rehabilitation engineering and biomimetic robotics. In this paper,the various methods that have been used to synthesize humanwalking are reviewed from an engineering viewpoint. This involves a wide spectrum of approaches, from simple passive walking theories to large-scale computational models integrating the nervous, muscular and skeletal systems. These methods are roughly categorized under four headings: models inspired by the concept of a CPG (Central Pattern Generator), methods based on the principles of control engineering, predictive gait simulation using optimisation, and models inspired by passive walking theory. The shortcomings and advantages of these methods are examined, and future directions are discussed in the context of providing insights into the neural control objectives driving gait and improving the stability of the predicted gaits. Future advancements are likely to be motivated by improved understanding of neural control strategies and the subtle complexities of the musculoskeletal system during human locomotion. It is only a matter of time before predictive gait models become a practical and valuable tool in clinical diagnosis, rehabilitation engineering and robotics.

  9. Visual evoked responses during standing and walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Gramann

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Human cognition has been shaped both by our body structure and by its complex interactionswith its environment. Our cognition is thus inextricably linked to our own and others’ motorbehavior. To model brain activity associated with natural cognition, we propose recording theconcurrent brain dynamics and body movements of human subjects performing normal actions.Here we tested the feasibility of such a mobile brain/body (MoBI imaging approach byrecording high-density electroencephalographic (EEG activity and body movements of subjectsstanding or walking on a treadmill while performing a visual oddball response task. Independentcomponent analysis (ICA of the EEG data revealed visual event-related potentials (ERPs thatduring standing, slow walking, and fast walking did not differ across movement conditions,demonstrating the viability of recording brain activity accompanying cognitive processes duringwhole body movement. Non-invasive and relatively low-cost MoBI studies of normal, motivatedactions might improve understanding of interactions between brain and body dynamics leadingto more complete biological models of cognition.

  10. "Feeling younger, walking faster": subjective age and walking speed in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Yannick; Sutin, Angelina R; Terracciano, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Walking speed is a key vital sign in older people. Given the implications of slower gait speed, a large literature has identified health-related, behavioral, cognitive, and biological factors that moderate age-related decline in mobility. The present study aims to contribute to existing knowledge by examining whether subjective age, how old or young individuals experience themselves to be relative to their chronological age, contributes to walking speed. Participants were drawn from the 2008 and 2012 waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS, N = 2970) and the 2011 and 2013 waves of the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS, N = 5423). In both the HRS and the NHATS, linear regression analysis revealed that a younger subjective age was associated with faster walking speed at baseline and with less decline over time, controlling for age, sex, education, and race. These associations were partly accounted for by depressive symptoms, disease burden, physical activity, cognition, body mass index, and smoking. Additional analysis revealed that feeling younger than one's age was associated with a reduced risk of walking slower than the frailty-related threshold of 0.6 m/s at follow-up in the HRS. The present study provides novel and consistent evidence across two large prospective studies for an association between the subjective experience of age and walking speed of older adults. Subjective age may help identify individuals at risk for mobility limitations in old age and may be a target for interventions designed to mitigate functional decline.

  11. How muscle fiber lengths and velocities affect muscle force generation as humans walk and run at different speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Edith M; Hamner, Samuel R; Seth, Ajay; Millard, Matthew; Delp, Scott L

    2013-06-01

    The lengths and velocities of muscle fibers have a dramatic effect on muscle force generation. It is unknown, however, whether the lengths and velocities of lower limb muscle fibers substantially affect the ability of muscles to generate force during walking and running. We examined this issue by developing simulations of muscle-tendon dynamics to calculate the lengths and velocities of muscle fibers from electromyographic recordings of 11 lower limb muscles and kinematic measurements of the hip, knee and ankle made as five subjects walked at speeds of 1.0-1.75 m s(-1) and ran at speeds of 2.0-5.0 m s(-1). We analyzed the simulated fiber lengths, fiber velocities and forces to evaluate the influence of force-length and force-velocity properties on force generation at different walking and running speeds. The simulations revealed that force generation ability (i.e. the force generated per unit of activation) of eight of the 11 muscles was significantly affected by walking or running speed. Soleus force generation ability decreased with increasing walking speed, but the transition from walking to running increased the force generation ability by reducing fiber velocities. Our results demonstrate the influence of soleus muscle architecture on the walk-to-run transition and the effects of muscle-tendon compliance on the plantarflexors' ability to generate ankle moment and power. The study presents data that permit lower limb muscles to be studied in unprecedented detail by relating muscle fiber dynamics and force generation to the mechanical demands of walking and running.

  12. Scattering theory of walking droplets in the presence of obstacles

    CERN Document Server

    Dubertrand, Rémy; Schlagheck, Peter; Vandewalle, Nicolas; Bastin, Thierry; Martin, John

    2016-01-01

    We aim to describe a droplet bouncing on a vibrating bath. Due to Faraday instability a surface wave is created at each bounce and serves as a pilot wave of the droplet. This leads to so called walking droplets or walkers. Since the seminal experiment by {\\it Couder et al} [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 97}, 154101 (2006)] there have been many attempts to accurately reproduce the experimental results. Here we present a simple and highly versatile model inspired from quantum mechanics. We propose to describe the trajectories of a walker using a Green function approach. The Green function is related to Helmholtz equation with Neumann boundary conditions on the obstacle(s) and outgoing conditions at infinity. For a single slit geometry our model is exactly solvable and reproduces some general features observed experimentally. It stands for a promising candidate to account for the presence of any boundaries in the walkers'dynamics.

  13. A wearable walking monitoring system for gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Tsai, An-Chih; Chang, Cha-Wei; Ho, Ka-Hou; Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Ta-Te

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, both hardware and software design to develop a wearable walking monitoring system for gait analysis are presented. For hardware, the mechanism proposed is adaptive to different individuals to wear, and the portability of the design makes it easy to perform outdoor experiments. Four force sensors and two angle displacement sensors were used to measure plantar force distribution and the angles of hip and knee joints. For software design, a novel algorithm was developed to detect different gait phases and the four gait periods during the stance phase. Furthermore, the center of ground contact force was calculated based on the relationships of the force sensors. The results were compared with the VICON motion capture system and a force plate for validation. Experiments showed the behavior of the joint angles are similar to VICON system, and the average error in foot strike time is less than 90 ms.

  14. A General Random Walk Model of Molecular Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXian-Ju; AIBao-Quan; LIUGuo-Tao; LIULiang-Gang

    2003-01-01

    A general random walk model framework is presented which can be used to statistically describe the internal dynamics and external mechanical movement of molecular motors along filament track. The motion of molecular motor in a periodic potential and a constant force is considered. We show that the molecular motor's movement becomes slower with the potential barrier increasing, but if the force is increased, the molecular motor''s movement becomes faster. The relation between the effective rate constant and the potential battler's height, and that between the effective rate constant and the value of the force are discussed. Our results are consistent with the experiments and relevant theoretical consideration, and can be used to explain some physiological phenomena.

  15. Properties of pedestrians walking in line: Stepping behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Jelić, Asja; Lemercier, Samuel; Pettré, Julien

    2012-01-01

    In human crowds, interactions among individuals give rise to a variety of self-organized collective motions that help the group to effectively solve the problem of coordination. However, it is still not known how exactly are the humans adjusting their behavior locally, nor what are the direct consequences on the emergent organization. One of the underlying mechanisms of adjusting individual motions is the stepping dynamics. In this paper, we present first quantitative analysis on the stepping behavior in a one-dimensional pedestrian flow studied under controlled laboratory conditions. We find that the step length is proportional to the velocity of the pedestrian, and is directly related to the space available in front of him, while the variations of the step duration are much weaker. Furthermore, we study the phenomena of synchronization --walking in lock-steps-- and show its dependence on the flow densities. We show that the synchronization of steps is particularly important at high densities, which has dire...

  16. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chester, W

    1979-01-01

    When I began to write this book, I originally had in mind the needs of university students in their first year. May aim was to keep the mathematics simple. No advanced techniques are used and there are no complicated applications. The emphasis is on an understanding of the basic ideas and problems which require expertise but do not contribute to this understanding are not discussed. How­ ever, the presentation is more sophisticated than might be considered appropri­ ate for someone with no previous knowledge of the subject so that, although it is developed from the beginning, some previous acquaintance with the elements of the subject would be an advantage. In addition, some familiarity with element­ ary calculus is assumed but not with the elementary theory of differential equations, although knowledge of the latter would again be an advantage. It is my opinion that mechanics is best introduced through the motion of a particle, with rigid body problems left until the subject is more fully developed. Howev...

  17. Astronaut Scott Carpenter tests balance mechanism performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-01

    Astronaut M. Scott Carpenter's balance mechanism performance is tested by his walking on a narrow board in his bare feet. He is performing this test at the School of Aviation Medicine, Pensicola, Florida (04570); Carpenter walks a straight line by putting one foot directly in front of the other to test his balance (04571).

  18. Walking for Well-Being: Are Group Walks in Certain Types of Natural Environments Better for Well-Being than Group Walks in Urban Environments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Warber

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of walking in natural environments for well-being are increasingly understood. However, less well known are the impacts different types of natural environments have on psychological and emotional well-being. This cross-sectional study investigated whether group walks in specific types of natural environments were associated with greater psychological and emotional well-being compared to group walks in urban environments. Individuals who frequently attended a walking group once a week or more (n = 708 were surveyed on mental well-being (Warwick Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale, depression (Major Depressive Inventory, perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale and emotional well-being (Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. Compared to group walks in urban environments, group walks in farmland were significantly associated with less perceived stress and negative affect, and greater mental well-being. Group walks in green corridors were significantly associated with less perceived stress and negative affect. There were no significant differences between the effect of any environment types on depression or positive affect. Outdoor walking group programs could be endorsed through “green prescriptions” to improve psychological and emotional well-being, as well as physical activity.

  19. Locking mechanism for orthopedic braces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, J. I.; Epps, C. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An orthopedic brace locking mechanism is described which under standing or walking conditions cannot be unlocked, however under sitting conditions the mechanism can be simply unlocked so as to permit bending of the patient's knee. Other features of the device include: (1) the mechanism is rendered operable, and inoperable, dependent upon the relative inclination of the brace with respect to the ground; (2) the mechanism is automatically locked under standing or walking conditions and is manually unlocked under sitting conditions; and (3) the mechanism is light in weight and is relatively small in size.

  20. Optimal speeds for walking and running, and walking on a moving walkway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Manoj

    2009-06-01

    Many aspects of steady human locomotion are thought to be constrained by a tendency to minimize the expenditure of metabolic cost. This paper has three parts related to the theme of energetic optimality: (1) a brief review of energetic optimality in legged locomotion, (2) an examination of the notion of optimal locomotion speed, and (3) an analysis of walking on moving walkways, such as those found in some airports. First, I describe two possible connotations of the term "optimal locomotion speed:" that which minimizes the total metabolic cost per unit distance and that which minimizes the net cost per unit distance (total minus resting cost). Minimizing the total cost per distance gives the maximum range speed and is a much better predictor of the speeds at which people and horses prefer to walk naturally. Minimizing the net cost per distance is equivalent to minimizing the total daily energy intake given an idealized modern lifestyle that requires one to walk a given distance every day—but it is not a good predictor of animals' walking speeds. Next, I critique the notion that there is no energy-optimal speed for running, making use of some recent experiments and a review of past literature. Finally, I consider the problem of predicting the speeds at which people walk on moving walkways—such as those found in some airports. I present two substantially different theories to make predictions. The first theory, minimizing total energy per distance, predicts that for a range of low walkway speeds, the optimal absolute speed of travel will be greater—but the speed relative to the walkway smaller—than the optimal walking speed on stationary ground. At higher walkway speeds, this theory predicts that the person will stand still. The second theory is based on the assumption that the human optimally reconciles the sensory conflict between the forward speed that the eye sees and the walking speed that the legs feel and tries to equate the best estimate of the