WorldWideScience

Sample records for bioventing

  1. Bioventing reduces soil cleanup costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An offshoot technology from soil venting, bioventing offers a win-win solution for soils contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nonvolatile contaminants such as diesel and fuel oil. Using low air flowrates through permeable soils, bioventing injects sufficient oxygen to support naturally-occurring bacteria, which biodegraded the VOCs and other contaminants into benign byproducts. Waste gas can be directly discharged to atmosphere without further treatment. This results in no offgas treatment required. Bioventing is a cost-effective alternative to traditional soil-venting techniques. Soil venting uses air to volatilize organic-compound contamination from the vadose zone, the unsaturated soil layer above groundwater. Unfortunately, this simple-and-fast approach creates a waste offgas that requires further treatment before discharge, thus adding significantly to overall project costs. In contrast, bioventing uses low air flowrates, which require lower capital and operating costs. No offgas treatment further reduces equipment and operating costs and often eliminates air permitting. As in all treatment strategies, the process must meet the cleanup objectives. Bioventing is an alternative technique making inroads into refining and petrochemical soil-remediation applications

  2. Pressure dewatering: An extension of bioventing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past several years, bioventing has become one of the most widely applied and cost-effective means of remediating vadose-zone soils impacted with petroleum hydrocarbons. In the course of bioventing, air is injected into the subsurface under pressure. This application of pressure locally depresses the water table (i.e., pressure dewatering). Pressure dewatering and subsequent gravity drainage have a number of positive impacts that extend the overall utility of the bioventing technology. Water-table depression exposes a greater portion of the subsurface to the injected air. This then not only increases the pore volume open for air distribution, thereby increasing the radius of influence and zone of remediation, but also opens the smear zone to airflow, which allows for increased biodegradation of this significant secondary source. In the course of operating full-scale bioventing systems, improvement in groundwater quality has been observed at higher rates than could be attributed to vadose zone remediation alone. Data generated sin the course of monitoring these systems have shown that a factor responsible for this improvement is water-table depression as a result of pressure application and a concomitant increase of biological activity in the smear zone

  3. A case history comparing in situ bioventing versus ex situ bioventing of volatile fuel hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generally, the more efficient a bioremediation technology is at controlling oxygenation, mass transfer of the contaminant, etc., the higher the biodegradation or treatment rate of the system. Thus, ex situ bioremediation is expected to produce higher degradation rates compared to in situ bioremediation techniques due to a higher level of control over process parameters. However, a comparison between ex situ and in situ bioventing treatment rates of volatile fuel hydrocarbons in this case study indicates that the treatment rate of the ex situ bioventing system can be slower than the in situ bioventing system. Originally, ex situ bioventing of volatile fuel hydrocarbon contaminated soil was planned to remediate soils thought to be contaminated by a leaking underground gasoline storage tanks to 20 feet below ground surface. Once the impact of the contamination seemed to be deeper than the limits of the excavation equipment, in situ bioventing was initiated for the soils that remained in the subsurface. Presented within this paper is a case history of the project. The case history includes soil shredding to add nutrients prior to construction of the ex situ bioventing system, the impact of an oil field methane formation during the design and construction of the in situ bioventing system, the effects of gaseous ammonia injection into the subsurface, and operating conditions and treatment rates for both systems

  4. Bioventing PAH contamination at the Reilly Tar Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot-scale bioventing demonstration has been in progress since November 1992 to determine if bioventing is an effective remediation treatment for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The Reilly Tar and Chemical Corporation site in St. Louis Park, Minnesota, was selected for this demonstration. The location is the site of a former coal tar refinery and wood-preserving facility at which creosote in mineral oil served as the primary preservative. The goal of the project is to achieve 10% greater PAH removal over background degradation for each year of the 3-year study. Respiration measurements were made to estimate PAH biodegradation as a means of monitoring the progress of the technology. These measurements indicated that 13.4% and 17.3% degradation of the total PAH was possible during the first year and second year, respectively. Although not all of the respiration can be attributed conclusively to PAH metabolism, strong correlations were found between the PAH concentration and biodegradation rates

  5. Sustainable Horizontal Bioventing and Vertical Biosparging Implementation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, J.; Lin, J.; Ferris, S.

    2013-12-01

    A former natural gas processing site with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) impacts in both soil and groundwater was partially excavated to remove 2,400 cubic yards of impacted soil. However, due to active natural gas pipelines within the impacted footprint, excavation was discontinued and an area of impacted soil containing maximum concentrations of 5,000 mg/kg gasoline-range organics (GRO), 8,600 mg/kg diesel-range organics (DRO), and 130 mg/kg motor oil-range organics (ORO). Groundwater was impacted with concentrations up to 2,300 μg/L GRO and 4,200 μg/L DRO remained in place. Taking advantage of the open excavation, horizontal-screened piping was placed in the backfill to deliver air for bioventing, which resulted in successful remediation of soil in a physically inaccessible area. The combined use of excavation of the source area, bioventing of surrounding inaccessible soil, and biosparging of the groundwater and smear zone resulted in nearing a no-further-action status at the site. The sustainable bioventing system consisted of one 3-HP blower and eight horizontal air injection wells. Five dual-depth nested vapor monitoring points (VMPs) were installed at 5 feet and 10 feet below ground surface as part of the monitoring system for human health and system performance. The bioventing system operated for one year followed by a three-month rebound test. During the one-year operation, air flow was periodically adjusted to maximize removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the vent wells with elevated photo-ionization detector readings. After the bioventing successfully remediated the inaccessible impacted soil, the biosparging system incorporated the pre-existing bioventing unit with an upgraded 5-HP blower and three vertical biosparging wells to biodegrade dissolved phase impacts in the groundwater. The subsequent monitoring system includes the VMPs, the air injection wells, and four groundwater

  6. Investigations into the application of a combination of bioventing and biotrickling filter technologies for soil decontamination processes — A transition regime between bioventing and soil vapour extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, S.M.C.; Jorge, R.M. Ferreira; Castro, P. M. L.

    2009-01-01

    Bioventing has emerged as one of the most cost-effective in situ technologies available to address petroleum light-hydrocarbon spills, one of the mostcommonsources of soil pollution. However, themajor drawback associated with this technology is the extended treatment time often required. The present study aimed to illustrate how an intended air-injection bioventing technology can be transformed into a soil vapour extraction effort when the air flow rates are pushed to a stripping mode, ...

  7. Nutrient demand in bioventing of fuel oil pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of nutrient addition on bioventing of fuel oil pollution in an artificially polluted sandy soil has been studied at different experimental scales to assess the predictive value of laboratory treatability studies. The results of batch studies, laboratory column studies, and pilot-scale field tests (10 tons of soil) were compared. The qualitative response to nutrient addition was comparable in all experiments. Without nutrient addition, a minimal respiration rate was observed. With nutrient addition, respiration rates increased almost instantaneously. The highest rates were observed in the batch studies. The column study and pilot-scale field test indicated similar respiration rates, at approximately one sixth the respiration rates in the batch study. Respiration rates in the pilot-scale field study decreased during the winter season. Analysis of the residual oil composition in soil samples showed a relation between the degree of weathering, measured as the n-C17/pristane and n-C18/phytane ratio, and nutrient addition. Lower n-C17/pristane ratios were observed at higher total nitrogen content. After 1 year of bioventing with nutrient addition, a 66% reduction in TPH content was observed. Without nutrient addition, the residual oil still closely resembled the original fuel oil product, with only minor removal of the light-end compounds

  8. Application of bioventing at a fuel oil impacted site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misdelivery of approximately 8,700 gallons of fuel oil into an underground storage tank compliance monitoring well at a manufacturing facility in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of Virginia resulted in contamination of site soils and ground water. Attempts to remediate the site using conventional ground-water pump and treat technology succeeded in containing the fuel oil within the site boundaries, but did little to remove soil residual and dissolved phase hydrocarbon. Bioventing was considered as an option to address the residual hydrocarbon in the vadose zone. Results of a pilot test suggested that a viable indigenous population of heterotrophic organisms capable of utilizing hydrocarbon as a cell growth and energy source was present in the subsurface. Based on this conclusion and the data generated in the pilot test, a bioventing system was designed and installed at the site. At the conclusion of six months of operation, 6,097 kg of hydrocarbon were removed by in situ biodegradation, 30 kg by vacuum extraction, and 4 kg by separate recovery

  9. Investigations into the application of a combination of bioventing and biotrickling filter technologies for soil decontamination processes--a transition regime between bioventing and soil vapour extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, S M C; Ferreira Jorge, R M; Castro, P M L

    2009-10-30

    Bioventing has emerged as one of the most cost-effective in situ technologies available to address petroleum light-hydrocarbon spills, one of the most common sources of soil pollution. However, the major drawback associated with this technology is the extended treatment time often required. The present study aimed to illustrate how an intended air-injection bioventing technology can be transformed into a soil vapour extraction effort when the air flow rates are pushed to a stripping mode, thus leading to the treatment of the off-gas resulting from volatilisation. As such, a combination of an air-injection bioventing system and a biotrickling filter was applied for the treatment of contaminated soil, the latter aiming at the treatment of the emissions resulting from the bioventing process. With a moisture content of 10%, soil contaminated with toluene at two different concentrations, namely 2 and 14 mg g soil(-1), were treated successfully using an air-injection bioventing system at a constant air flow rate of ca. 0.13 dm(3) min(-1), which led to the removal of ca. 99% toluene, after a period of ca. 5 days of treatment. A biotrickling filter was simultaneously used to treat the outlet gas emissions, which presented average removal efficiencies of ca. 86%. The proposed combination of biotechnologies proved to be an efficient solution for the decontamination process, when an excessive air flow rate was applied, reducing both the soil contamination and the outlet gas emissions, whilst being able to reduce the treatment time required by bioventing only. PMID:19501963

  10. Evaluation of natural attenuation, bioventing, bioaugmentation and bioaugmentation-bioventing techniques, for the biodegradation of diesel in a sandy soil, through column experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was developed within an inter-institutional agreement between the Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, UPB-BBGA and the Colombian Petroleum Institute-ICP, in order to provide a solution to an environmental problem that occurs in areas where hydrocarbons are handled and where sandy soils have been found to be contaminated with diesel fuel with concentrations up to 6% at a maximum depth of 80 cm. For this study, the soil samples were artificially contaminated with diesel fuel in order to evaluate Natural Attenuation, Bioventing, Bioaugmentation and Bioaugmentation-Bioventing soil remediation techniques through the use of column experiments. The design parameters, column dimensions, inflow, diesel concentration, dissolved oxygen, bacterial growth, and monitoring was defined. Bioaugmentation was performed inoculating a bacterial consortium produced by the ICP. The experimental setup was assembled in triplicate and was monitored through a period of four months. The experimental results showed that Bioventing technique was the most effective, reaching up to 97% diesel removal from the contaminated soil; with the Bioaugmentation - Bioventing, diesel fuel removal percentage was 75%, and the Natural Attenuation and Bioaugmentation techniques resulted in diesel fuel removal percentages not greater than 48%. This study showed that the microbial consortium evaluated and provided by the Colombian Petroleum Institute proved to be not efficient for potentializing bioremediation processes of sandy soils contaminated with diesel fuel.

  11. D-area oil seepage basin bioventing optimization test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, C.J.; Radway, J.C.; Alman, D.; Hazen, T.C.

    1998-12-31

    The D Area Oil Seepage Basin (DOSB) was used from 1952 to 1975 for disposal of petroleum-based products (waste oils), general office and cafeteria waste, and apparently some solvents [trichloroethylene (TCE)/tetrachloroethylene (PCE)]. Numerous analytical results have indicated the presence of TCE and its degradation product vinyl chloride in groundwater in and around the unit, and of petroleum hydrocarbons in soils within the unit. The DOSB is slated for additional assessment and perhaps for environmental remediation. In situ bioremediation represents a technology of demonstrated effectiveness in the reclamation of sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents, and has been retained as an alternative for the cleanup of the DOSB. The Savannah River Site is therefore proposing to conduct a field treatability study designed to demonstrate and optimize the effectiveness of in situ microbiological biodegradative processes at the DOSB. The introduction of air and gaseous nutrients via two horizontal injection wells (bioventing) is expected to enhance biodegradation rates of petroleum components and stimulate microbial degradation of chlorinated solvents. The data gathered in this test will allow a determination of the biodegradation rates of contaminants of concern in the soil and groundwater, allow an evaluation of the feasibility of in situ bioremediation of soil and groundwater at the DOSB, and provide data necessary for the functional design criteria for the final remediation system.

  12. Bioventing of gasoline-contaminated soil: some questions to be answered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underground storage tank (UST) leakage is a big concern in the USA and Canada because gasoline-contaminated soil is a significant source of groundwater contamination. This threat is not confined to North America as locations like Sao Paulo (Brazil) have leakage rates similar to the North American average. The typical in-situ remediation technology used to remediate the contaminated soil is soil vapour extraction (SVE), but once tailing occurs, where the residual gasoline concentration still exceeds clean up levels, SVE becomes ineffective. Bioventing has emerged as one of the most cost-effective technologies currently available to address this tailing in the remediation of petroleum-contaminated sites. Bioventing is a source control treatment, which delivers air and nutrients through injection wells placed in contaminated areas, in order to stimulate the activity of the indigenous microorganisms. However, encouraging laboratory results have not always translated into similar outcomes when implemented in the field. A reason for this inconsistency is the scale-dependent phenomena that influence the bioventing process at the microscale, mesoscale, and macroscale. This paper intends to provide some insights about various research needs in order to improve the bioventing process, specifically related to predicting the time to reach site closure. (author)

  13. Installation of a bio-venting remediation system using directionally drilled horizontal wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The installation of a remediation system for off-site contamination was discussed. The site was contaminated with gasoline and diesel from an abandoned bulk fuel storage and distribution terminal located near a highway. The dissolved phase hydrocarbon plume extended beneath several houses down gradient of the site. Bioventing was considered to be the only remediation option to recover the liquid phase hydrocarbons beneath the highway in a way that would satisfy all the clean-up objectives and the design constraints. Bioventing is closely related to soil vapour extraction (SVE). The main difference is that in bioventing, the mechanism for removal of contaminants is bio-degradation by indigenous bacteria, whereas in SVE, contaminants are simply removed by volatilization. Bioventing systems enhance the activity of the indigenous bacteria by inducing air flow in the subsurface through the use of vapour injection or extraction wells. Two horizontal vapour extraction wells were installed with a directional drill. A soil pile was utilized as a bio-filter for the extracted hydrocarbon vapours and a backfilled trench was used to inject vapours recovered from the soil pile to the subsurface. The total mass of hydrocarbons degraded by this system in 230 days was estimated to be 1,000 kg. It was concluded that under appropriate conditions the in-situ treatment of contaminated soil using directionally drilled wells can be justified on both economic and technical grounds. 3 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  14. Bioventing at a heating oil spill site in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the application of a bioventing system used to treat soil and groundwater contaminated with diesel at a commercial property in Yellowknife. Contamination was caused by a broken pipe connected to an underground storage tank. A bioventing trial was proposed as the most economical method of remediating residual contamination following several years of product recovery. A background of earlier phased product recovery methods was provided. Sufficient heliotrophic bacteria was present in the groundwater for aerobic bioremediation of the petroleum hydrocarbon impacted soil and groundwater. Details of monitoring wells and recovery rates were presented, as well as installation procedures for the bioventing system, which included 3 air injection wells, 6 vadose zone observation wells and a blower fan with associated piping to blow air into the subsurface. The system operated for 12 days to establish subsurface conditions and evaluate effectiveness, and was subsequently used for various periods of duration from 2002 to 2004. Results for all periods of operation were provided. It was concluded that the system was effective in increasing subsurface oxygen concentrations to stimulate microbial bioremediation in the vadose zone soil. Estimated remediation time ranged from 3 to 5 years. The radius of influence of the system was in excess of 29 m. Changes in the water table meant that wells initially thought to be free of hydrocarbons became recontaminated. Further operations and monitoring of the bioventing system were recommended, including soil sampling to determine concentrations of hydrocarbons remaining at the site in comparison to other soil criteria. Monitoring costs were estimated at $10,000 per year. It was suggested that there was a potential for the application of this system in other northern contaminated areas. 3 figs

  15. Final technology report for D-Area oil seepage basin bioventing optimization test, environmental restoration support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radway, J.C.; Lombard, K.H.; Hazen, T.C.

    1997-01-24

    One method proposed for the cleanup of the D-Area Oil Seepage Basin was in situ bioremediation (bioventing), involving the introduction of air and gaseous nutrients to stimulate contaminant degradation by naturally occurring microorganisms. To test the feasibility of this approach, a bioventing system was installed at the site for use in optimization testing by the Environmental Biotechnology Section of the Savannah River Technology Center. During the interim action, two horizontal wells for a bioventing remediation system were installed eight feet below average basin grade. Nine piezometers were also installed. In September of 1996, a generator, regenerative blower, gas cylinder station, and associated piping and nutrient injection equipment were installed at the site and testing was begun. After baseline characterization of microbial activity and contaminant degradation at the site was completed, four injection campaigns were carried out. These consisted of (1) air alone, (2) air plus triethylphosphate (TEP), (3) air plus nitrous oxide, and (4) air plus methane. This report describes results of these tests, together with conclusions and recommendations for further remediation of the site. Natural biodegradation rates are high. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, and methane levels in soil gas indicate substantial levels of baseline microbial activity. Oxygen is used by indigenous microbes for biodegradation of organics via respiration and hence is depleted in the soil gas and water from areas with high contamination. Carbon dioxide is elevated in contaminated areas. High concentrations of methane, which is produced by microbes via fermentation once the oxygen has been depleted, are found at the most contaminated areas of this site. Groundwater measurements also indicated that substantial levels of natural contaminant biodegradation occurred prior to air injection.

  16. Final technology report for D-Area oil seepage basin bioventing optimization test, environmental restoration support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One method proposed for the cleanup of the D-Area Oil Seepage Basin was in situ bioremediation (bioventing), involving the introduction of air and gaseous nutrients to stimulate contaminant degradation by naturally occurring microorganisms. To test the feasibility of this approach, a bioventing system was installed at the site for use in optimization testing by the Environmental Biotechnology Section of the Savannah River Technology Center. During the interim action, two horizontal wells for a bioventing remediation system were installed eight feet below average basin grade. Nine piezometers were also installed. In September of 1996, a generator, regenerative blower, gas cylinder station, and associated piping and nutrient injection equipment were installed at the site and testing was begun. After baseline characterization of microbial activity and contaminant degradation at the site was completed, four injection campaigns were carried out. These consisted of (1) air alone, (2) air plus triethylphosphate (TEP), (3) air plus nitrous oxide, and (4) air plus methane. This report describes results of these tests, together with conclusions and recommendations for further remediation of the site. Natural biodegradation rates are high. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, and methane levels in soil gas indicate substantial levels of baseline microbial activity. Oxygen is used by indigenous microbes for biodegradation of organics via respiration and hence is depleted in the soil gas and water from areas with high contamination. Carbon dioxide is elevated in contaminated areas. High concentrations of methane, which is produced by microbes via fermentation once the oxygen has been depleted, are found at the most contaminated areas of this site. Groundwater measurements also indicated that substantial levels of natural contaminant biodegradation occurred prior to air injection

  17. Respiration testing for bioventing and biosparging remediation of petroleum contaminated soil and ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiration tests were performed to measure the effect of subsurface aeration on the biodegradation rates of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in vadose zone soils (bioventing) and ground water (biosparging). The aerobic biodegradation of petroleum contamination is typically limited by the absence of oxygen in the soil and ground water. Therefore, the goal of these bioremediation technologies is to increase the oxygen concentration in the subsurface and thereby enhance the natural aerobic biodegradation of the organic contamination. One case study for biosparging bioremediation testing is presented. At this site atmospheric air was injected into the ground water to increase the dissolved oxygen concentration in the ground water surrounding a well, and to aerate the smear zone above the ground water table. Aeration flow rates of 3 to 8 cfm (0.09 to 0.23 m3/min) were sufficient to increase the dissolved oxygen concentration. Petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation rates of 32 to 47 microg/l/hour were calculated based on measurements of dissolved oxygen concentration in ground water. The results of this test have demonstrated that biosparging enhances the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons, but the results as they apply to remediation are not known. Two case studies for bioventing respiration testing are presented

  18. Natural bioventing remediation from tidal wave action at a field site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A remediation research study has been implemented at a jet fuel spill site on an island airport. A buried pipeline fracture several years ago resulted in a fuel spill exceeding 160,000 gallons. The site hydrogeology is a fragmented coral matrix with fresh water overlying more dense salt water. Water table fluctuations of about two feet occur once every twelve hours from tidal action. The research approach being pursued is to recover free-phase floating petroleum liquid using vacuum-mediated subsurface skimming wells. The vacuum will create an active vadose zone aeration to enhance aerobic biodegradation processes and vaporization of fuel. Once the floating fuel is removed, a natural bioventing action caused by tidal oscillations will complete remediation of the spill site

  19. BIODEGRADATION OF DIESEL OIL IN SOIL AND ITS ENHANCEMENT BY APPLICATION OF BIOVENTING AND AMENDMENT WITH BREWERY WASTE EFFLUENTS AS BIOSTIMULATION-BIOAUGMENTATION AGENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Agarry

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate and evaluate the effects of natural bioattenuation, bioventing, and brewery waste effluents amendment as biostimulation-bioaugmentation agent on biodegradation of diesel oil in unsaturated soil. A microcosm system was constructed consisting of five plastic buckets containing 1 kg of soil, artificially contaminated or spiked with 10% w/w of diesel oil. Biodegradation was monitored over 28 days by determining the total petroleum hydrocarbon content of the soil and total hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. The results showed that combination of brewery waste effluents amendment and bioventing technique was the most effective, reaching up to 91.5% of diesel removal from contaminated soil; with the brewery waste effluents amendment (biostimulation-bioaugmentation, the percentage of diesel oil removal was 78.7%; with bioventing, diesel oil percentage degradation was 61.7% and the natural bioattenuation technique resulted in diesel oil removal percentage be not higher than 40%. Also, the total hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria (THDB count in all the treatments increased throughout the remediation period. The highest bacterial growth was observed for combined brewery waste effluents amendment with bioventing treatment strategy. A first-order kinetic model was fitted to the biodegradation data to evaluate the biodegradation rate and the corresponding half-life time was estimated. The model revealed that diesel oil contaminated-soil microcosms under combined brewery waste effluents amendment with bioventing treatment strategy had higher biodegradation rate constants, k as well as lower half-life times, t1/2 than other remediation systems. This study showed that the microbial consortium, organic solids, nitrogen and phosphorus present in the brewery waste effluents proved to be efficient as potential biostimulation-bioaugmentation agents for bioremediation processes of soils contaminated with diesel oil

  20. Vapor extraction, air sparging, and bioventing in combination form a technically and cost effective scenario to remediate petroleum hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the appropriate site conditions exist, air sparging, vapor extraction and bioventing can be combined to form a technically and cost effective scenario to remediate petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. A former Gulf Terminal in Upstate New York meets these conditions. The site geology consists of highly permeable sands and gravels with only trace amounts of silt. The groundwater table is approximately 15 feet below the ground surface which provides an ideal vadose zone. The site contaminants are petroleum fuel residuals primarily from the former storage and transfer of gasoline distillates. A series of pilot studies were conducted at the site in July, August, and September of 1994 to determine the validity of the proposed technologies. Based on the pilot study results, it was determined that the combined technologies of soil vapor extraction, air sparging, and bioventing could be used to effectively remediate the site. Using the pilot study data as the design basis, Parsons ES designed and installed a full-scale remediation system to address both the vadose and phreatic zone contaminants. The SVE portion of the system was placed into operation in April of 1995, and to date has removed over 12,000 pounds of petroleum hydrocarbons, including over 30 pounds of benzene. The overall costs for remediating the site including pilot studies, detailed design, system installation, and one year of operation are estimated at $5.60 per cubic yard for the estimated 35,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil at the site. The pilot study, full-scale operational results, and projected remediation costs are the focus of this paper

  1. BIODEGRADATION OF DIESEL OIL IN SOIL AND ITS ENHANCEMENT BY APPLICATION OF BIOVENTING AND AMENDMENT WITH BREWERY WASTE EFFLUENTS AS BIOSTIMULATION-BIOAUGMENTATION AGENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Agarry; Ganiyu K. Latinwo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate and evaluate the effects of natural bioattenuation, bioventing, and brewery waste effluents amendment as biostimulation-bioaugmentation agent on biodegradation of diesel oil in unsaturated soil. A microcosm system was constructed consisting of five plastic buckets containing 1 kg of soil, artificially contaminated or spiked with 10% w/w of diesel oil. Biodegradation was monitored over 28 days by determining the total petroleum hydrocarbon content of...

  2. Pilot-scale studies of soil vapor extraction and bioventing for remediation of a gasoline spill at Cameron Station, Alexandria, Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, W.; Joss, C.J.; Martino, L.E. [and others

    1994-07-01

    Approximately 10,000 gal of spilled gasoline and unknown amounts Of trichloroethylene and benzene were discovered at the US Army`s Cameron Station facility. Because the base is to be closed and turned over to the city of Alexandria in 1995, the Army sought the most rapid and cost-effective means of spill remediation. At the request of the Baltimore District of the US Army Corps of Engineers, Argonne conducted a pilot-scale study to determine the feasibility of vapor extraction and bioventing for resolving remediation problems and to critique a private firm`s vapor-extraction design. Argonne staff, working with academic and private-sector participants, designed and implemented a new systems approach to sampling, analysis and risk assessment. The US Geological Survey`s AIRFLOW model was adapted for the study to simulate the performance of possible remediation designs. A commercial vapor-extraction machine was used to remove nearly 500 gal of gasoline from Argonne-installed horizontal wells. By incorporating numerous design comments from the Argonne project team, field personnel improved the system`s performance. Argonne staff also determined that bioventing stimulated indigenous bacteria to bioremediate the gasoline spin. The Corps of Engineers will use Argonne`s pilot-study approach to evaluate remediation systems at field operation sites in several states.

  3. Demonstrating practical application of soil and groundwater clean-up and recovery technologies at natural gas processing facilities: Bioventing, air sparging and wetlands remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the project newsletter described the nature of bioventing, air sparging and wetland remediation. It reviewed their effectiveness in remediating hydrocarbon contaminated soil above the groundwater surface. Bioventing was described as an effective, low cost treatment in which air is pumped below ground to stimulate indigenous bacteria. The bacteria then use the oxygen to consume the hydrocarbons, converting them to CO2 and water. Air sparging involves the injection of air below the groundwater surface. As the air rises, hydrocarbons are stripped from the contaminated soil and water. The advantage of air sparging is that it cleans contaminated soil and water from below the groundwater surface. Hydrocarbon contamination of wetlands was described as fairly common. Conventional remediation methods of excavation, trenching, and bellholes to remove contamination often cause extreme harm to the ecosystem. Recent experimental evidence suggests that wetlands may be capable of attenuating contaminated water through natural processes. Four hydrocarbon contaminated wetlands in Alberta are currently under study. Results to date show that peat's high organic content promotes sorption and biodegradation and that some crude oil spills can been resolved by natural processes. It was suggested that assuming peat is present, a good clean-up approach may be to contain the contaminant source, monitor the lateral and vertical extent of contamination, and wait for natural processes to resolve the problem. 3 figs

  4. Evaluación de las técnicas de atenuación natural, bioventing, bioaumentación y bioaumentación- bioventing, para la biodegradación de diésel en un suelo arenoso, en experimentos en columna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica María Muskus Morales

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio fue desarrollado dentro del convenio de cooperación institucional realizado entre laUniversidad Pontifi cia Bolivariana, Seccional Bucaramanga y el Instituto Colombiano de Petróleos – ICP, con el fi nde dar solución a una problemática que se presenta en las zonas de manejo de hidrocarburos, donde se evidenciansuelos arenosos contaminados con diésel hasta concentraciones del 6% y a una profundidad máxima de 80 cm.Para el desarrollo metodológico se contaminó un suelo artifi cialmente con diésel para evaluar las técnicas deBioventing, Atenuación Natural, Bioaumentación y Bioventing-Bioaumentación, utilizando montajes en columnas.Se defi nieron los parámetros de diseño y seguimiento como dimensiones de las columnas, caudal de entrada,concentración de diésel, oxígeno disuelto y crecimiento bacteriano; para la bioaumentación se inoculó el suelocon un consorcio bacteriano producido por el ICP. Se realizaron los montajes experimentales por triplicado y secontroló el proceso durante cuatro meses. Los resultados obtenidos mostraron que en la técnica de Bioventingse obtuvieron porcentajes de remoción de diésel hasta del 97%. Con la técnica de Bioventing-Bioaumentación sealcanzaron porcentajes de remoción hasta del 75% y con las técnicas de Atenuación Natural y Bioaumentación,los porcentajes de remoción no superaron el 48%. El estudio mostró que el consorcio bacteriano utilizado yevaluado mediante las técnicas de Bioaumentación y Bioventing-Bioaumentación, no potencializó la efi cienciade los procesos de biorremediación del suelo arenoso contaminado con diésel.

  5. 生物通风过程中的甲苯运移及生物降解%Flow,transport and biodegradation of toluene during bioventing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隋红; 徐世民; 李鑫钢; 姜斌; 黄国强

    2004-01-01

    Bioventing is conducted on one-dimensional soil columns.A numerical model is developed for simulating the mass exchange,advective and dispersive transport and biodegradation of toluene.The model parameters are estimated independently through laboratory batch experiments,or from literature.Simulations are found to provide reasonable agreement with experimental data.Experimental results show that toluene removal due to biodegradation is more important at the later stage.The total cleanup time when NAPL(non-aqueous phase liquid)phase exists was twice more than that without NAPL.Sensitivity analysis of parameters suggests that model predictions are mainly dependent on mass transfer coefficient and microbial parameters,such as the half-saturation coefficient and maximum specific substrate utilization rate.

  6. Report on bioventing of petroleum contaminated soils at 108-3C: Active extraction and passive injection (barometric pumping) of a gaseous nutrient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bioventing system was constructed with horizontal extraction wells and vertical injection wells in an area which had previously been excavated and then backfilled. Initial in-situ respiration rates (air addition only) suggest that hydrocarbon degradation may be nutrient limited. The rate of TPH degradation was maximum (0.8-1.2 mg/kg/day) between 10-15 ft (bgs), but dropped to essentially zero 30 ft (bgs) within the contaminated zone (even though previous analysis at this depth indicated a TPH concentration of 3800 ppm). Analysis of the soil at 17 ft showed that NO3 and PO4 were below detection limits (0.5 ppm), indicating that nutrient limitation may be occurring. Nitrate levels were highest at 10 ft (bgs), correlating with the highest respiration rates. However, phosphate levels were at/or below detection levels throughout tile site (indicating possible PO4 limitation). Viable cells increased from 3 x 106 cfu/g at 3 ft (bgs) to 1 x 107 cfu/g at 10 ft (bgs) and remained relatively constant down to 17 ft. Cell numbers in the control area were significantly lower than in the contaminated zone (4.5 x 103). Gas phase nutrients (triethlyphosphate and nitrous oxide) will be injected to see if the hydrocarbon degradation rate can be increased

  7. In situ groundwater remediation using air sparging, vapor extraction and bioventing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 60 years of refining operations have resulted in petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of soil and groundwater at the 74-acre former Golden Eagle Refinery in Carson, California. Successful negotiations with the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)-Los Angeles Region, and the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) resulted in the use of a phased approach, separating the soil and groundwater remediation activities. Based on the findings of site assessments conducted to define and characterize the soil and groundwater contamination at the site, remediation of the soil was initiated first. By obtaining agency approval on the soil cleanup, the site could proceed with development during the groundwater remediation activities. Prior to groundwater remediation, an air sparging pilot test was performed at the site on a highly heterogeneous site consisting of mostly low permeability soils in southern California. This paper how the pilot test was performed, the test results and the accuracy of the results when scaled up to the full operating system

  8. Evaluación de las técnicas de atenuación natural, bioventing, bioaumentación y bioaumentación- bioventing, para la biodegradación de diésel en un suelo arenoso, en experimentos en columna

    OpenAIRE

    Angélica María Muskus Morales; Claudia Santoyo Muñoz; Luijesmarth Silvia Plata Quintero

    2013-01-01

    El presente estudio fue desarrollado dentro del convenio de cooperación institucional realizado entre laUniversidad Pontifi cia Bolivariana, Seccional Bucaramanga y el Instituto Colombiano de Petróleos – ICP, con el fi nde dar solución a una problemática que se presenta en las zonas de manejo de hidrocarburos, donde se evidenciansuelos arenosos contaminados con diésel hasta concentraciones del 6% y a una profundidad máxima de 80 cm.Para el desarrollo metodológico se contaminó un suelo artifi ...

  9. Subsurface remedial technology research and demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A subsurface remediation technique using bioventing technology for removal of groundwater and soil contaminants near the Gulf Strachan sour gas plant in Alberta, is discussed. This report describes the bioventing activities at the gas plant from May 1995 to April 1996. Bioventing is a technology which enhances aerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons in the subsurface, by providing oxygen to the bacteria present in the contaminated soil through either air extraction or air injection. Since May 1995 the bioventing program included the continuation of air injection bioventing and respiration testing at selected wells to monitor biodegradation rates and hydrocarbon vapour concentrations. Periodic monitoring of hydrocarbon concentrations at all wells was also conducted. Potential groundwater impact was determined through soil sampling and leachate testing. Results showed that over a two year period, the hydrocarbon vapour concentrations in the soil zone dropped significantly. Approximately 4,000 kg of hydrocarbons were removed from the subsurface between August 1993 and December 1995. Bioventing was not inhibited by winter operation. The cost of bioventing was shown to be economical, costing about $10/m3 of treated soil, or $25/kg of hydrocarbon removed. 7 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs., 5 appendices

  10. Soil and Sediment remediation, mechanisms, technologies and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lens, P.N.L.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Malina, G.; Tabak, H.H.

    2005-01-01

    Technologies for the treatment of soils and sediments in-situ (landfarming, bioscreens, bioventing, nutrient injection, phytoremediation) and ex-situ (landfarming, bio-heap treatment, soil suspension reactor) will be discussed. The microbiological, process technological and socio-economical aspects

  11. In situ and on-site subsoil and aquifer restoration at a retail gasoline station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of venting to remove petroleum vapors and volatile petroleum products from the vadose zone is presented in this paper. In addition to the possibility of enhancing the evaporation of volatile organics, venting can also be used to enhance convective air transport in soil to stimulate the oxygen-dependent petroleum biodegradation in the vadose zone. The possibilities for bioventing were indicated by lysimeter studies on a microbially mediated gas-oil mixture (gas-oil) removal from sand. In the absence of bioventing, an almost 100 percent removal was achieved in a period of 8 years. A feasibility study subsequently carried out confirmed the possibilities for the enhancement of biodegradation by bioventing. a large-scale field experiment was started in 1984 to validate the feasibility study. The next step is to develop this methodology further in a real spill situation. After careful consideration and screening, the contaminated area surrounding a retail gasoline station was selected as a test case to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of the approach

  12. Biological Remediation of Soil: An Overview of Global Market and Available Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay; Kuhad, Ramesh C.; Ward, Owen P.

    Due to a wide range of industrial and agricultural activities, a high number of chemical contaminants is released into the environment, causing a significant concern regarding potential toxicity, carcinogenicity, and potential for bioaccumulation in living systems of various chemicals in soil. Although microbial activity in soil accounts for most of the degradation of organic contaminants, chemical and physical mechanisms can also provide significant transformation pathways for these compounds. The specific remediation processes that have been applied to clean up contaminated sites include natural attenuation, landfarming, biopiling or composting, contained slurry bioreactor, bioventing, soil vapor extraction, thermal desorption, incineration, soil washing and land filling (USEPA 2004).

  13. The use of integrated sanitation procedures for decontamination of the geological environment by oil pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For groundwater and soil remediation in a habitat of refining plant Slovnaft in vicinity of Vojany and in former plant Slovnaft Benatech Zilina was suggested and realized a remediation technology. This technology combine some technological methods with relative conditioned effects. Realized technology take advantage of bioventing, biosparging, pumping of ground water with biodegradation and in Vojany also stripping (for elimination of oil compounds in air was realized bio-filter). Operation results demonstrated that preventing - remediation system realized on both habitats it's possible to state, that developed groundwater and soil remediation technology was satisfactory and effective. (author)

  14. Biological treatment of waste gas containing volatile hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biological system to treat volatile hydrocarbon-contaminated gases generated during in situ bioventing and air sparging of subsurfaces contaminated with gasoline was field-tested. The system consisted of an air/water separator, a trickling filter, and a biofilter in series. During the field test, extensive monitoring was carried out to evaluate system performance, including the measurement of physical, chemical, biochemical, and microbiological parameters. Degradation and mineralization of volatile hydrocarbons such as benzene and toluene were demonstrated by gene probing and mineralization assays. Data collected showed an average removal of 90% of the BTX (benzene, toluene, and xylenes) and 72% for total hydrocarbons

  15. In situ remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayner, J.; Snape, I.; Ferguson, S.; Harvey, P.; Raymond, T. [Australian Government Antarctic Div., Kingston, Tasmania (Australia). Environmental Protection and Change; Mumford, K.; Stevens, G. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, Victoria (Australia). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Walworth, J. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The results of 2 bioremediation experiments conducted in Antarctica were presented. The aim of the study was to improve in situ remediation techniques in cold, remote locations using tracer tests and intensive monitoring. Sampling techniques were used to assess the effectiveness of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) at Casey Station, Antarctica. A micro-bioventing trial was conducted at Macquarie Island. The PRB was installed to prevent off-site migration of hydrocarbons and to promote the biodegradation of organic compounds. The PRB was comprised of 5 cage pallets containing 5 different treatments of granulated materials separated by 2 mm galvanized steel plates. Treatments consisted of controlled release nutrients at the front of the barrier, hydrocarbon and nutrient sorption in the middle, and excess nutrient sorption at the effluent end. Materials included zeolite, Max bac, granulated activated carbon, and sand. Water from a catchment was directed into the barriers from 2 subsurface drains. Residence times and proportion of flow were measured with a salt tracer test by analyzing the breakthrough curves at locations throughout the PRC. Tracer tests were used to assess bypass or short-circuiting of flow. The micro bioventing test at Macquarie Island was installed to provide maximum oxygenation of a shallow, water-saturated subsurface to promote the biodegradation of a 20-year old fuel spill. The effectiveness of the biovents was monitored with in-situ oxygen sensors. Water samples were collected before and after aeration. Respiration rates were estimated by stopping the aeration process and compared with laboratory studies to determine nutrient, oxygen, and moisture status. Results for the PRB tests showed that hydraulic conductivity was different in all 5 treatments. Estimates from the slopes of each residence time curve ranged from 2000 m/d to 4000 m/d. Tracer mass distribution curves ranged from 30 per cent to 15 per cent. Results of the micro bioventing study

  16. In situ bioremediation of oil pollution in the unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leakage of an underground storage tank at the Trandum Army Base caused a 20.000 liter spill of fuel oil. Several options for remediation have been evaluated. In situ bioremediation was chosen as the most cost effective and realistic method and was evaluated in detail. Preliminary laboratory studies showed that a large number of hydrocarbon degrading micro-organism are present and that good degradation rates can be obtained with the addition of a nitrogen and phosphorus source. Since July 1991 a full scale bioventing installation has been in operation. The preliminary monitoring results give an indication of biological activity. 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Performance and cost evaluation of bioremediation techniques for fuel spills. Book chapter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soils and ground water beneath the US Coast Guard Air Station at Traverse City, MI, have been contaminated with separate spills of aviation gasoline and JP-4 jet fuel. Contamination from both plumes has affected a shallow water table aquifer consisting of a medium grained sand. This site has been the location of a cooperative effort between the US Coast Guard and US EPA to extensively characterize the site to determine three dimensional extent of contamination, local hydrogeology, geochemistry of the solids and water, and nature of microbial activity. Evaluation concerning feasibility and cost of three innovative bioremediation techniques has also been completed at the Air Station. One evaluation demonstrated the use of hydrogen peroxide as the electron acceptor to enhance aerobic biodegradation in a portion of the aviation gasoline area. Nitrate was used as the electron acceptor for a portion of the JP-4 jet fuel contamination. Bioventing of a second portion of the aviation gasoline contamination was the third innovative technique evaluated. Each treatment reduced benzene levels to less than 5 micrograms/l, with 25% to 60% reduction in total fuel levels. For these evaluations, bioventing had the lowest capital and operating costs, followed by nitrate addition and finally hydrogen peroxide

  18. In-situ biodegradation of ethanolamine in low permeability soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A research program to investigate whether ethanolamine is susceptible to biodegradation is described. The project was undertaken at a former Edmonton area gas plant site to demonstrate in-situ site remediation techniques. A horizontal well was drilled at a depth of four metres below ground surface and hydraulically fractured to increase permeability of the glacial till soils. A sand propant was used to prevent the subsequent closure of the water-based slurry used in fracturing the soil, with phosphoric acid added to provide a source of phospate to stimulate bacterial growth. A network of monitoring wells was installed along the horizontal wells to monitor bacterial respiration. Field test results showed oxygen depletion and carbon dioxide production. Bioventing was restricted as a result of unexpectedly high water levels, but in a subsequent dewatering bioventing program the ethanolamine levels in groundwater extracted from the monitoring wells showed an overall decline in concentration. There were no changes in ammonia levels. Since ammonia is a breakdown product of amines its increase in the groundwater would have provided positive proof of biodegradation. However, the fact that there was no change, is not taken as an indication of the total absence of biodegradation. Rather, it is suspected that the concentration of the ammonia in the groundwater is at a level that it exerts a a toxic influence on the soil bacteria, thus preventing additional degradation. 14 refs., 4 tabs.7 figs

  19. Bioremediation at a petroleum refinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a summary of three projects at the Mobil Refinery in Torrance, California where bioremediation technologies were successfully employed for the remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The three projects represent variations of implementation of bioremediation, both in-situ and ex-situ. Soil from all of the projects was considered non-hazardous designated waste under the California Code of Regulations, Title 23, section 2522. The projects were permitted and cleanup requirements were defined with the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board. In all of the projects, different methods were used for supplying water, oxygen, and nutrients to the hydrocarbon degrading bacteria to stimulate growth. The Stormwater Retention Basin Project utilized in-situ mechanical mixing of soils to supply solid nutrients and oxygen, and a self-propelled irrigation system to supply water. The Tank Farm Lake project used an in-situ active bioventing technology to introduce oxygen, moisture, and vapor phase nutrients. The Tank 1340X247 project was an ex-situ bioventing remediation project using a drip irrigation system to supply water and dissolved nutrients, and a vapor extraction system to provide oxygen

  20. Risk-based approach for bioremediation of fuel hydrocarbons at a major airport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a risk-based approach for bioremediation of fuel-hydrocarbon-contaminated soil and ground water at a major airport in Colorado. In situ bioremediation pilot testing, natural attenuation modeling, and full-scale remedial action planning and implementation for soil and ground water contamination has conducted at four airport fuel farms. The sources of fuel contamination were leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) or pipelines transporting Jet A fuel and aviation gasoline. Continuing sources of contamination were present in several small cells of free-phase product and in fuel residuals trapped within the capillary fringe at depths 15 to 20 feet below ground surface. Bioventing pilot tests were conducted to assess the feasibility of using this technology to remediate contaminated soils. The pilot tests included measurement of initial soil gas chemistry at the site, determination of subsurface permeability, and in situ respiration tests to determine fuel biodegradation rates. A product recovery test was also conducted. ES designed and installed four full-scale bioventing systems to remediate the long-term sources of continuing fuel contamination. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were detected in ground water at concentrations slightly above regulatory guidelines

  1. Immunological techniques as tools to characterize the subsurface microbial community at a trichloroethylene contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliermans, C.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Franck, M.M.; McKinzey, P.C.; Hazen, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Effective in situ bioremediation strategies require an understanding of the effects pollutants and remediation techniques have on subsurface microbial communities. Therefore, detailed characterization of a site's microbial communities is important. Subsurface sediment borings and water samples were collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated site, before and after horizontal well in situ air stripping and bioventing, as well as during methane injection for stimulation of methane-utilizing microorganisms. Subsamples were processed for heterotrophic plate counts, acridine orange direct counts (AODC), community diversity, direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) enumeration for several nitrogen-transforming bacteria, and Biolog [reg sign] evaluation of enzyme activity in collected water samples. Plate counts were higher in near-surface depths than in the vadose zone sediment samples. During the in situ air stripping and bioventing, counts increased at or near the saturated zone, remained elevated throughout the aquifer, but did not change significantly after the air stripping. Sporadic increases in plate counts at different depths as well as increased diversity appeared to be linked to differing lithologies. AODCs were orders of magnitude higher than plate counts and remained relatively constant with depth except for slight increases near the surface depths and the capillary fringe. Nitrogen-transforming bacteria, as measured by serospecific DFA, were greatly affected both by the in situ air stripping and the methane injection. Biolog[reg sign] activity appeared to increase with subsurface stimulation both by air and methane. The complexity of subsurface systems makes the use of selective monitoring tools imperative.

  2. Immunological techniques as tools to characterize the subsurface microbial community at a trichloroethylene contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliermans, C.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Franck, M.M.; McKinzey, P.C.; Hazen, T.C.

    1992-12-31

    Effective in situ bioremediation strategies require an understanding of the effects pollutants and remediation techniques have on subsurface microbial communities. Therefore, detailed characterization of a site`s microbial communities is important. Subsurface sediment borings and water samples were collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated site, before and after horizontal well in situ air stripping and bioventing, as well as during methane injection for stimulation of methane-utilizing microorganisms. Subsamples were processed for heterotrophic plate counts, acridine orange direct counts (AODC), community diversity, direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) enumeration for several nitrogen-transforming bacteria, and Biolog {reg_sign} evaluation of enzyme activity in collected water samples. Plate counts were higher in near-surface depths than in the vadose zone sediment samples. During the in situ air stripping and bioventing, counts increased at or near the saturated zone, remained elevated throughout the aquifer, but did not change significantly after the air stripping. Sporadic increases in plate counts at different depths as well as increased diversity appeared to be linked to differing lithologies. AODCs were orders of magnitude higher than plate counts and remained relatively constant with depth except for slight increases near the surface depths and the capillary fringe. Nitrogen-transforming bacteria, as measured by serospecific DFA, were greatly affected both by the in situ air stripping and the methane injection. Biolog{reg_sign} activity appeared to increase with subsurface stimulation both by air and methane. The complexity of subsurface systems makes the use of selective monitoring tools imperative.

  3. Estimation of rates of aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation by simulation of gas transport in the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahvis, M.A.; Baehr, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the unsaturated zone provides a geochemical signature of aerobic hydrocarbon degradation at petroleum product spill sites. The fluxes of these gases are proportional to the rate of aerobic biodegradation and are quantified by calibrating a mathematical transport model to the oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data. Reaction stoichiometry is assumed to convert the gas fluxes to a corresponding rate of hydrocarbon degradation. The method is applied at a gasoline spill site in Galloway Township, New Jersey, to determine the rate of aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons associated with passive and bioventing remediation field experiments. At the site, microbial degradation of hydrocarbons near the water table limits the migration of hydrocarbon solutes in groundwater and prevents hydrocarbon volatilization into the unsaturated zone. In the passive remediation experiment a site-wide degradation rate estimate of 34,400 g yr-1 (11.7 gal. yr-1) of hydrocarbon was obtained by model calibration to carbon dioxide gas concentration data collected in December 1989. In the bioventing experiment, degradation rate estimates of 46.0 and 47.9 g m-2 yr-1 (1.45 x 10-3 and 1.51 x 10-3 gal. ft.-2 yr-1) of hydrocarbon were obtained by model calibration to oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data, respectively. Method application was successful in quantifying the significance of a naturally occurring process that can effectively contribute to plume stabilization.

  4. Biological Treatment of Petroleum in Radiologically Contaminated Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERRY, CHRISTOPHER

    2005-11-14

    This chapter describes ex situ bioremediation of the petroleum portion of radiologically co-contaminated soils using microorganisms isolated from a waste site and innovative bioreactor technology. Microorganisms first isolated and screened in the laboratory for bioremediation of petroleum were eventually used to treat soils in a bioreactor. The bioreactor treated soils contaminated with over 20,000 mg/kg total petroleum hydrocarbon and reduced the levels to less than 100 mg/kg in 22 months. After treatment, the soils were permanently disposed as low-level radiological waste. The petroleum and radiologically contaminated soil (PRCS) bioreactor operated using bioventing to control the supply of oxygen (air) to the soil being treated. The system treated 3.67 tons of PCRS amended with weathered compost, ammonium nitrate, fertilizer, and water. In addition, a consortium of microbes (patent pending) isolated at the Savannah River National Laboratory from a petroleum-contaminated site was added to the PRCS system. During operation, degradation of petroleum waste was accounted for through monitoring of carbon dioxide levels in the system effluent. The project demonstrated that co-contaminated soils could be successfully treated through bioventing and bioaugmentation to remove petroleum contamination to levels below 100 mg/kg while protecting workers and the environment from radiological contamination.

  5. Toluene Removal from Sandy Soils via In Situ Technologies with an Emphasis on Factors Influencing Soil Vapor Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Amin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of bioventing (BV and soil vapor extraction (SVE appears to be an effective combination method for soil decontamination. This paper serves two main purposes: it evaluates the effects of soil water content (SWC and air flow rate on SVE and it investigates the transition regime between BV and SVE for toluene removal from sandy soils. 96 hours after air injection, more than 97% removal efficiency was achieved in all five experiments (carried out for SVE including 5, 10, and 15% for SWC and 250 and 500 mL/min for air flow rate on SVE. The highest removal efficiency (>99.5% of toluene was obtained by the combination of BV and SVE (AIBV: Air Injection Bioventing after 96 h of air injection at a constant flow rate of 250 mL/min. It was found that AIBV has the highest efficiency for toluene removal from sandy soils and can remediate the vadose zone effectively to meet the soil guideline values for protection of groundwater.

  6. Synergistic application of four remedial techniques at an industrial site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The soil and ground water at a General Motors plant site were contaminated with petroleum products from leaking underground storage tanks. Based on the initial assessment, the site was complex from the standpoint of geology, hydrology, and contaminant. After a thorough study of remedial alternatives, a synergistic remedial approach was adopted including pump and treat, product removal, vapor extraction, and bioventing. The system was designed and implemented at the site through 22 dual-extraction wells. Over a 21-month period, 4400 gallons of gasoline and oil were removed from the system, including 59% by vapor extraction, 28% by bioventing, and 13% by pump and treat. Synergism between the various remedial methods was demonstrated clearly. Ground water pump and treat lowered the water table, allowing air to flow for vapor extraction. The vacuum applied for vapor extraction increased the ground water removal rate and the efficiency of pump and treat. The vapor extraction system also added oxygen to the soil to stimulate aerobic biodegradation

  7. Use of environmental isotopes in organic contaminants research in groundwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents two case studies that explore the use of environmental isotopes (13Cl, 37Cl) in organic contaminants research in groundwater systems. Carbon-13 data on soil CO2 were collected at a gas plant site where the degradation of organic contaminants by bioventing is being investigated. The isotope study was done to contribute to the evaluation of biodegradation of organic contaminants, especially under field conditions where results obtained by standard techniques are not conclusive. The results show enriched δ13C values on soil CO2, in comparison with the natural gas condensate source, a by-product of gas plants. Degradation of the condensate in a controlled laboratory microcosm did not show any significant isotopic fractionation during degradation. These results suggest that preferential degradation of enriched 13C hydrocarbons is occurring during bioventing. This hypothesis is being tested under field and laboratory conditions. The isotope research on chlorinated solvents aims to evaluate the use of 37Cl and 13C as tracers to provide information about sources and transformation of chlorinated solvents in groundwater systems. Chlorine-37 and 13C data in chlorinated solvents, perchlorethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,1,1, trichloroethane (TCA), supplied by different manufacturers range from -3.5 to +6.0 per mille for δ37Cl and from -37.2 to -23.3 per mille for δ13C. These results indicated that these compounds have a different and distinct isotopic composition, which results from the individual manufacturing practices. These results show the potential of 37Cl and 13Cl as tracers to provide information to identify source areas of chlorinated solvent plumes in groundwater. (author). 25 refs, 3 figs

  8. Bioremediation of Petroleum and Radiological Contaminated Soils at the Savannah River Site: Laboratory to Field Scale Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRIGMON, ROBINL.

    2004-06-07

    In the process of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations limited amounts of waste are generated containing petroleum, and radiological contaminated soils. Currently, this combination of radiological and petroleum contaminated waste does not have an immediate disposal route and is being stored in low activity vaults. SRS developed and implemented a successful plan for clean up of the petroleum portion of the soils in situ using simple, inexpensive, bioreactor technology. Treatment in a bioreactor removes the petroleum contamination from the soil without spreading radiological contamination to the environment. This bioreactor uses the bioventing process and bioaugmentation or the addition of the select hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. Oxygen is usually the initial rate-limiting factor in the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Using the bioventing process allowed control of the supply of nutrients and moisture based on petroleum contamination concentrations and soil type. The results of this work have proven to be a safe and cost-effective means of cleaning up low level radiological and petroleum-contaminated soil. Many of the other elements of the bioreactor design were developed or enhanced during the demonstration of a ''biopile'' to treat the soils beneath a Polish oil refinery's waste disposal lagoons. Aerobic microorganisms were isolated from the aged refinery's acidic sludge contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Twelve hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were isolated from the sludge. The predominant PAH degraders were tentatively identified as Achromobacter, Pseudomonas Burkholderia, and Sphingomonas spp. Several Ralstonia spp were also isolated that produce biosurfactants. Biosurfactants can enhance bioremediation by increasing the bioavailability of hydrophobic contaminants including hydrocarbons. The results indicated that the diversity of acid-tolerant PAH-degrading microorganisms in acidic oil wastes may

  9. Design and analysis of a SVE system in a shallow water table application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins Southeastern Power, Inc. (CSPI) operates a diesel engine repair facility in Hialeah Gardens, FL. Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. (Parsons ES) was retained to design a treatment system to remediate soil and hydrocarbons beneath the CSPI service building. Soil vapor extraction (SVE) followed by bioventing was selected as the most appropriate and cost effective approach. These activities were completed as part of CSPI's overall environmental program, which includes cleanup of any contamination that is encountered at their facilities and continual implementation of new measures to prevent future contamination from occurring. This paper presents a complete case history outlining the unique technical challenges associated with the CSPI site conditions. The methods utilized during completion and analysis of the pilot test are discussed and a description of how the pilot data was utilized for completion of the full-scale design is included. The paper presents the empirical analysis method which was developed during this design and shows how it can be applied to other SVE remediation applications

  10. Surfactant-aided recovery/in situ bioremediation for oil-contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioremediation has been the most commonly used method way for in situ cleaning of soils contaminated with low-volatility petroleum products such as diesel oil. However, whatever the process (bioventing, bioleaching, etc.), it is a time-consuming technique that may be efficiency limited by both accessibility and too high concentrations of contaminants. A currently developed process aims at quickly recovering part of the residual oil in the vadose and capillary zones by surfactant flushing, then activating in situ biodegradation of the remaining oil in the presence of the same or other surfactants. The process has been tested in laboratory columns and in an experimental pool, located at the Institut Franco-Allemand de Recherche sur l'Environnement (IFARE) in Strasbourg, France. Laboratory column studies were carried out to fit physico-chemical and hydraulic parameters of the process to the field conditions. The possibility of recovering more than 80% of the oil in the flushing step was shown. For the biodegradation step, forced aeration as a mode of oxygen supply, coupled with nutrient injection aided by surfactants, was tested

  11. Remediation of DNAPLs in Low Permeability Soils. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dense, non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) compounds like trichloroethene (TCE) and perchloroethene (PCE) are prevalent at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), other government, and industrial sites. Their widespread presence in low permeability media (LPM) poses severe challenges for assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective remediation technologies. Most remedial methods that involve fluid flow perform poorly in LPM. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of remediation methods such as vapor extraction, free-product recovery, soil flushing, steam stripping, bioremediation, bioventing, and air sparging in LPM by enhancing formation permeability through the creation of fractures filled with high-permeability materials, such as sand. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of other remediation methods such as oxidation, reductive dechlorination, and bioaugmentation by enhancing delivery of reactive agents to the subsurface. Hydraulic fractures are typically created using a 2-in. steel casing and a drive point pushed into the subsurface by a pneumatic hammer. Hydraulic fracturing has been widely used for more than 50 years to stimulate the yield of wells recovering oil from rock at great depth and has recently been shown to stimulate the yield of wells recovering contaminated liquids and vapors from LPM at shallow depths. Hydraulic fracturing is an enabling technology for improving the performance of some remedial methods and is a key element in the implementation of other methods. This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance data

  12. Enhancing in situ bioremediation with pneumatic fracturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major technical obstacle affecting the application of in situ bioremediation is the effective distribution of nutrients to the subsurface media. Pneumatic fracturing can increase the permeability of subsurface formations through the injection of high pressure air to create horizontal fracture planes, thus enhancing macro-scale mass-transfer processes. Pneumatic fracturing technology was demonstrated at two field sites at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Tests were performed to increase the permeability for more effective bioventing, and evaluated the potential to increase permeability and recovery of free product in low permeability soils consisting of fine grain silts, clays, and sedimentary rock. Pneumatic fracturing significantly improved formation permeability by enhancing secondary permeability and by promoting removal of excess soil moisture from the unsaturated zone. Postfracture airflows were 500% to 1,700% higher than prefracture airflows for specific fractured intervals in the formation. This corresponds to an average prefracturing permeability of 0.017 Darcy, increasing to an average of 0.32 Darcy after fracturing. Pneumatic fracturing also increased free-product recovery rates of number 2 fuel from an average of 587 L (155 gal) per month before fracturing to 1,647 L (435 gal) per month after fracturing

  13. Toxicity of vapor phase petroleum contaminants to microbial degrader communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroleum products constitute the largest quantity of synthetic organic chemical products produced in the US. They are comprised of mostly hydrocarbon constituents from many different chemical classes including alkenes, cycloalkanes, aromatic compounds, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Many petroleum constituents are classified as volatile organic compounds or VOCs. Petroleum products also constitute a major portion of environmental pollution. One emerging technology, with promise for applications to VOCs in subsurface soil environments, is bioventing coupled with soil vapor extraction. These technologies involve volatilization of contaminants into the soil gas phase by injection and withdrawal of air. This air movement causes enhancement of the aerobic microbial degradation of the mobilized vapors by the indigenous populations. This study investigated the effects of exposure of mixed, subsurface microbial communities to vapor phase petroleum constituents or vapors of petroleum mixtures. Soil slurries were prepared and plated onto mineral salts agar plates and exposed to vapor phase contaminants at equilibrium with pure product. Representative n-alkane, branched alkane, cycloalkane, and aromatic compounds were tested as well as petroleum product mixtures. Vapor exposure altered the numbers and morphologies of the colonies enumerated when compared to controls. However, even at high, equilibrium vapor concentrations, microbial degrader populations were not completely inhibited

  14. Bioslurping pilot test in a silty low-permeability soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency of bioslurping as a remedial technology for hydrocarbon contaminated sites was discussed. Bioslurping combines the two remedial technologies of bioventing and vacuum-enhanced free-product recovery. Bioslurping does not require a cone of depression in the groundwater table around a well to draw the light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) contaminant to the well. LNAPLs are recovered by applying a low to medium vacuum on the recovery wells. The rate of LNAPL recovery is higher with bioslurping than with a dual-pump system. A 26-day bioslurping pilot study was conducted at a decommissioned Montreal gas station contaminated by gasoline. The site was on soil composed mainly of silt. The depth of hydrocarbons measured was 1.17 m. Bioslurping was capable of removing about 50 kg/day per well of hydrocarbons from this site. The bulk of the product extracted was in the form of vapors. The cost associated with the treatment of air emissions could be reduced by partial reinjection within the radius of influence of the slurping wells. The indigenous microbial population was able to biodegrade the hydrocarbons. About eight per cent of the total mass of hydrocarbons was eliminated by biodegradation. 13 refs., 5 tabs., 11 figs

  15. Bioremediation of oil-contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balba, T. [Conestoga-Rovers and Associates, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    One of the most prevalent contaminants in subsurface soil and groundwater are petroleum hydrocarbons. This paper presented bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons as one of the most promising treatment technologies. Petroleum hydrocarbons are categorized into four simple fractions: saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes. Bioremediation refers to the treatment process whereby contaminants are metabolized into less toxic or nontoxic compounds by naturally occurring organisms. The various strategies include: use of constitutive enzymes, enzyme induction, co-metabolism, transfer of plasmids coding for certain metabolic pathways, and production of biosurfactants to enhance bioavailability of hydrophobic compounds. Three case studies were presented: (1) bioremediation of heavy oils in soil at a locomotive maintenance yard in California, involving a multi-step laboratory treatability study followed by a field demonstration achieving up to 94 per cent removal of TPH in less than 16 weeks, (2) bioremediation of light oils in soil at an oil refinery in Germany where a dual process was applied (excavation and in-situ treatment), achieving an 84 per cent reduction within 24 weeks, and (3) bioremediation of oil-contaminated desert soil in Kuwait which involved landfarming, composting piles, and bioventing soil piles, achieving an 80 per cent reduction within 12 months. 7 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  16. Design and implementation of a highly integrated and automated in situ bioremediation system for petroleum hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, J.C.; Rosenwinkel, P. [Resource Control Corp., Rancocas, NJ (United States); Norris, R.D. [Eckenfelder, Inc., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The proposed sale of an industrial property required that an environmental investigation be conducted as part of the property transfer agreement. The investigation revealed petroleum hydrocarbon compounds (PHCs) in the subsurface. Light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) varsol (a gasoline like solvent), gasoline, and fuel oil were found across a three (3) acre area and were present as liquid phase PHCs, as dissolved phase PHCs, and as adsorbed phase PHCs in both saturated and unsaturated soils. Fuel oil was largely present in the unsaturated soils. Fuel oil was largely present in the unsaturated soils. Varsol represented the majority of the PHCs present. The presence of liquid phase PHCs suggested that any remedial action incorporate free phase recovery. The volatility of varsol and gasoline and the biodegradability of the PHCs present in the subsurface suggested that bioremediation, air sparging, and soil vapor extraction/bioventing were appropriate technologies for incorporation in a remedy. The imminent conversion of the impacted area to a retail facility required that any long term remedy be unobtrusive and require minimum activity across much of the impacted area. In the following sections the site investigation, selection and testing of remedial technologies, and design and implementation of an integrated and automated remedial system is discussed.

  17. In-situ treatment of hydrocarbons contamination through enhanced bio-remediation and two phase extraction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aglietto, I.; Brunero Bronzin, M. [Studio Aglietto s.r.l., Torino (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    It happens frequently to find industrial site affected by contamination of subsoil and groundwater with consequent presence of free phase product floating on the water table. The remediation technologies in this case shall be properly selected and coordinated in a way that the interactions between each activities will help to decontaminate the site. The case study deals with an industrial site located near Turin, in Italy, of about 50 hectares of extension where has been found an area of about 4000 square meters with contamination of subsoil and groundwater. The compounds with higher concentrations are petroleum hydrocarbons found both in soil and in groundwater. Another big problem is represented by the presence of a layer of free product floating on the water table with a maximum measured thickness of 70 cm; this situation can be considered in fact one of the major difficulty in management of selected remediation technologies because the complete recover of the free phase is a priority for any kind of remediation system to apply subsequently. The present work is based upon the selection and implementation of a multiple treatment for definitive remediation of subsoil and groundwater. Free product recovery has been faced with a two-phase extraction technology, then for the remediation of subsoil we implemented a bio-venting system to improve biodegradation processes and finally for groundwater treatment we apply an enhanced in situ bio-remediation injecting oxygen release compounds directly into the aquifer. To reach these choices we have to pass through a complex activity of investigation of the site made up of more than 40 sampling point, 8 monitoring wells, about 140 analysis on subsoil samples and 10 on groundwater samples and one well used for an aquifer test. The preliminary design of the remediation system was therefore based on an extensive site characterization that included geological and geochemical, microbiological and hydrological data, together with

  18. Soils bio-remediation; Bioremediation des sols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, T.M. [Universite Claude Bernard, 69 - Lyon-1 (France)

    2001-06-01

    The biological treatment of soils (in-situ or excavated) consists in the use of micro-organisms for the transformation of noxious compounds into non-noxious ones. Bacteria are the main micro-organisms used but fungi can play a role in some ex-situ processes. The bio-remediation of the soil and aquifer requires the use of various processes like diffusion and advection, sorption and desorption, and biodegradation. The degradation of the pollutants is efficient only if a sufficient amount of micro-organisms is in close-contact with the pollutants. The efficiency, fastness and cost are important factors to take into consideration in such remedial actions. Thus, a good mastery of soils sciences and processes engineering is needed. This article presents the concepts and processes used in biological remediation of soils: 1 - concept of processes engineering (heterogenous environments, processes characteristics, in-situ or on-site reactors); 2 - concept of biological treatments (micro-organisms, biodegradation, microbial ecology, bio-stimulation, bio-augmentation); 3 - biological treatment process (bio-venting, bio-spargeing, bio-slurping, in-situ aerobic bio-process, bio-hillock, phyto-remediation, metals extraction). (J.S.)

  19. In-situ treatment of hydrocarbons contamination through enhanced bio-remediation and two phase extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It happens frequently to find industrial site affected by contamination of subsoil and groundwater with consequent presence of free phase product floating on the water table. The remediation technologies in this case shall be properly selected and coordinated in a way that the interactions between each activities will help to decontaminate the site. The case study deals with an industrial site located near Turin, in Italy, of about 50 hectares of extension where has been found an area of about 4000 square meters with contamination of subsoil and groundwater. The compounds with higher concentrations are petroleum hydrocarbons found both in soil and in groundwater. Another big problem is represented by the presence of a layer of free product floating on the water table with a maximum measured thickness of 70 cm; this situation can be considered in fact one of the major difficulty in management of selected remediation technologies because the complete recover of the free phase is a priority for any kind of remediation system to apply subsequently. The present work is based upon the selection and implementation of a multiple treatment for definitive remediation of subsoil and groundwater. Free product recovery has been faced with a two-phase extraction technology, then for the remediation of subsoil we implemented a bio-venting system to improve biodegradation processes and finally for groundwater treatment we apply an enhanced in situ bio-remediation injecting oxygen release compounds directly into the aquifer. To reach these choices we have to pass through a complex activity of investigation of the site made up of more than 40 sampling point, 8 monitoring wells, about 140 analysis on subsoil samples and 10 on groundwater samples and one well used for an aquifer test. The preliminary design of the remediation system was therefore based on an extensive site characterization that included geological and geochemical, microbiological and hydrological data, together with

  20. Assessment of Canadian Regulations and Remediation Methods for Diesel Oil Contaminated Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Rushton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Diesel fuel released into the environment can contaminate ground water, degrade potable water supplies and cause the collapse of fisheries. They are toxic to both animals and humans and can affect the liver, lungs, kidneys, and nervous system leading to cancer as well as immunological and reproductive effects. The objectives of this study were to review current Canadian regulations pertaining to diesel fuel and to evaluate the current remediation methods using five criteria: efficiency, applicability, cost, time and cleanliness. PAHs are deemed toxic under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act but no standards have been set for PAHs in diesel. The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME has developed Canada-Wide Standards for Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Soil (CWS PHCS while the Atlantic PIRI has implemented a Risk Based Corrective Action (RBCA for the Atlantic region. The remediation methods included soil washing, landfilling, incineration, thermal desorption, radio frequency heating, chemical addition, landfarming, biopiling, composting, bioventing, liquid delivery and bioreactors. The bioreactors studied included: static bed, continuous mix, horizontal drum, fungal compost, slurry-phase, DITS, biofilters and packed bed bioreactors. The results showed that the biological methods were more effective than nonbiological ones and the bioreactors scored the highest among the biological methods. Eight criteria were then used for the evaluation of bioreactors: efficiency, time, cost, maintenance, simplicity, release of VOCs to the atmosphere, containment of contaminants and control of operating parameters The results showed that the continuous mix bioreactor was the most effective system.

  1. Contaminated soil remediation and quality assurance; Pilaantuneen maan kunnostaminen ja laadunvarmistus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkkila, J.; Mroueh, U.M.; Leino-Forsman, H.

    2004-07-01

    The aim of contaminated soil remediation quality assurance is to carry out remediation activities according to plans. Besides the design work the appropriate implementation of the quality assurance covers source data and investigation methods as well as the requirements for documentation. Contaminated soil characterization and the selection of the most suitable remediation method is made with the help of various sampling and analysis methods. There are different kinds of requirements to the sampling plan depending on the type of remediation project. Quality assurance is taken into account in sampling, in sample handling and analysis as well as in the reporting of results. The most common unsaturated zone remediation methods used in Finland are introduced in this guide. These methods include excavation (as part of remediation), encapsulating, stabilization, thermal desorption, soil washing, composting, soil vapor extraction and bioventing. The methods are introduced on a general level with emphasis on their technical implementation and feasibility as well as on the eventual material requirements. Harmful environmental impacts of the methods must be identified and prevented. In order to monitor the remediation process, various chemical and physical quality assurance measurements are performed. Additionally the work safety issues related to remediation methods must be taken into account and proper documentation must be prepared. (orig.)

  2. Integrated technologies for expedited soil and groundwater remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fast-track and economic approach was necessary to meet the needs of a property transfer agreement and to minimize impact to future usage of a site in the Los Angeles Basin. Woodward-Clyde responded by implementing site investigation, remedial action plan preparation for soil and groundwater, and selection and installation of remedial alternatives in an aggressive schedule of overlapped tasks. Assessment of soil and groundwater was conducted at the site, followed by design and construction of remediation systems. This phase of activity was completed within 2 years. Soil and groundwater were found to be impacted by chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons. A vapor extraction system (2,000 scfm capacity) was installed for soil remediation, and an innovative air sparging system was installed for cost effective groundwater cleanup. A bioventing system was also applied in selected areas. The vapor extraction wellfield consists of 26 extraction and monitoring well points, with multiple screened casings. The air sparging wellfield consists of 32 sparging wells with a designed maximum flow of 400 scfm. The systems began operation in 1993, and have resulted in the estimated removal of approximately 30,000 pounds of contaminants, or about 90% of the estimated mass in place. The combined vapor extraction/air sparging system is expected to reduce the time for on-site groundwater remediation from 1/3 to 1/6 the time when compared to the conventional pump and treat method for groundwater remediation

  3. Evaluation of bioremediation systems utilizing stable carbon isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon, whether in an organic or inorganic form, is composed primarily of two stable isotopes, carbon-12 and carbon-13. The ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-13 is approximately 99:1. The stable carbon isotope ratios of most natural carbon materials of biological interest range from approximately 0 to -110 per mil (per-thousand) versus the PDB standard. Utilizing stable carbon isotope analysis, it is often possible to determine the source(s) of the liberated carbon dioxide, thereby confirming successful mineralization of the targeted carbon compound(s) and, if the carbon dioxide results from multiple carbon compounds, in what ratio the carbon compounds are mineralized. Basic stable isotope 'theory' recommended sampling procedures and analysis protocols are reviewed. A case study involving fuel oil presented on the application of stable carbon isotope analysis for the monitoring and evaluation of in situ bioremediation. At the site, where a field bioventing study was being conducted, multiple potential sources of carbon dioxide production existed. Additional potential applications of stable carbon isotope analysis for bioremediation evaluation and monitoring are discussed

  4. Application Evaluation of Air-Sparging and Aerobic Bioremediation in PAM(Physical Aquifer Model) with Advanced and Integrated Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, U.; Ko, J.; Park, S.; Kim, Y.; Kwon, S.; Ha, J.; Lim, J.; Han, K.

    2010-12-01

    It is generally difficult for a single process to remediate contaminated soil and groundwater contaminated with various organic compounds such as total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX), chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) because those contaminants show different chemical properties in two phases (e.g. soil and groundwater). Therefore, it is necessary to design an in-situ remediation system which can remove various contaminants simultaneously. For the purpose, we constructed integrated well module which can apply several remediation process such as air sparging, soil vapor extraction, and bioventing. The advanced integrated module consisted of three main parts such as head, body, and end cap. First of all, head part has three 3.6-cm-diameter stainless lines and can simultaneously inject air or extract NAPL, respectively. Secondly, body part has two 10-cm-height screen intervals with 100-mesh stainless inserts for unsaturated and smear zone. Lastly, we constructed three different sizes of end caps for injection and extraction from a saturated zone. We assumed that the integrated module can play bioremediation, air sparging, cometabolic sparging, chemical oxidation. In this study, we examined application of air sparing and aerobic bioremediation of toluene in Physical Aquifer Model (PAM) with an integrated well module. During air sparging experiments, toluene concentration decreased by injection of air. In addition, we accomplished bioremediation experiment to evaluate removal of toluene by indigenous microbes in PAM with continuous air injection. From the two experiments result, we confirmed that air sparging and aerobic bioremediation processes can be simultaneously carried out by an intergrated well module.

  5. Innovative technology demonstrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental Management Operations (EMO) is conducting an Innovative Technology Demonstration Program for Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB). Several innovative technologies are being demonstrated to address specific problems associated with remediating two contaminated test sites at the base. Cone penetrometer testing (CPT) is a form of testing that can rapidly characterize a site. This technology was selected to evaluate its applicability in the tight clay soils and consolidated sandstone sediments found at TAFB. Directionally drilled horizontal wells was selected as a method that may be effective in accessing contamination beneath Building 3001 without disrupting the mission of the building, and in enhancing the extraction of contamination both in ground water and in soil. A soil gas extraction (SGE) demonstration, also known as soil vapor extraction, will evaluate the effectiveness of SGE in remediating fuels and TCE contamination contained in the tight clay soil formations surrounding the abandoned underground fuel storage vault located at the SW Tanks Site. In situ sensors have recently received much acclaim as a technology that can be effective in remediating hazardous waste sites. Sensors can be useful for determining real-time, in situ contaminant concentrations during the remediation process for performance monitoring and in providing feedback for controlling the remediation process. Following the SGE demonstration, the SGE system and SW Tanks test site will be modified to demonstrate bioremediation as an effective means of degrading the remaining contaminants in situ. The bioremediation demonstration will evaluate a bioventing process in which the naturally occurring consortium of soil bacteria will be stimulated to aerobically degrade soil contaminants, including fuel and TCE, in situ

  6. Soil Contamination and Remediation Strategies. Current research and future challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzelli, G.

    2012-04-01

    Soil contamination: the heritage of industrial development Contamination is only a part of a whole set of soil degradation processes, but it is one of paramount importance since soil pollution greatly influences the quality of water, food and human health. Soil contamination has been identified as an important issue for action in the European strategy for soil protection, it has been estimated that 3.5 million of sites are potentially contaminated in Europe. Contaminated soils have been essentially discovered in industrial sites landfills and energy production plants, but accumulation of heavy metals and organic compounds can be found also in agricultural land . Remediation strategies. from incineration to bioremediation The assessment of soil contamination is followed by remedial action. The remediation of contaminated soils started using consolidates technologies (incineration inertization etc.) previously employed in waste treatment,. This has contributed to consider a contaminated soil as an hazardous waste. This rough approximation was unfortunately transferred in many legislations and on this basis soil knowledge have been used only marginally in the clean up procedures. For many years soil quality has been identified by a value of concentration of a contaminant and excavation and landfill disposal of soil has been largely used. In the last years the knowledge of remediation technology has rapidly grown, at present many treatment processes appear to be really feasible at field scale, and soil remediation is now based on risk assessment procedures. Innovative technologies, largely dependent on soil properties, such as in situ chemical oxidation, electroremediation, bioventing, soil vapor extraction etc. have been successfully applied. Hazardous organic compounds are commonly treated by biological technologies, biorememdiation and phytoremediation, being the last partially applied also for metals. Technologies selection is no longer exclusively based on