WorldWideScience

Sample records for bioturbation

  1. An open source simulation model for soil and sediment bioturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffers, Katja; Teal, Lorna Rachel; Travis, Justin Mark John; Solan, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Bioturbation is one of the most widespread forms of ecological engineering and has significant implications for the structure and functioning of ecosystems, yet our understanding of the processes involved in biotic mixing remains incomplete. One reason is that, despite their value and utility, most mathematical models currently applied to bioturbation data tend to neglect aspects of the natural complexity of bioturbation in favour of mathematical simplicity. At the same time, the abstract nature of these approaches limits the application of such models to a limited range of users. Here, we contend that a movement towards process-based modelling can improve both the representation of the mechanistic basis of bioturbation and the intuitiveness of modelling approaches. In support of this initiative, we present an open source modelling framework that explicitly simulates particle displacement and a worked example to facilitate application and further development. The framework combines the advantages of rule-based lattice models with the application of parameterisable probability density functions to generate mixing on the lattice. Model parameters can be fitted by experimental data and describe particle displacement at the spatial and temporal scales at which bioturbation data is routinely collected. By using the same model structure across species, but generating species-specific parameters, a generic understanding of species-specific bioturbation behaviour can be achieved. An application to a case study and comparison with a commonly used model attest the predictive power of the approach.

  2. Bioturbation: a fresh look at Darwin's last idea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meysman, F.J.R.; Middelburg, J.J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2006-01-01

    Bioturbation refers to the biological reworking of soils and sediments, and its importance for soil processes and geomorphology was first realised by Charles Darwin, who devoted his last scientific book to the subject. Here, we review some new insights into the evolutionary and ecological role of bi

  3. Quantifying bioturbation and soil thickening over the late Quaternary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, M. T.; Pietsch, T.; Fox, J. F.

    2009-04-01

    We present geochemistry and biochemistry data to explore how bioturbation has operated in a residual sandstone-derived soil that thickened during the Holocene following aeolian deflation during the Last Glacial Maximum. Our site is located on a plateau cut into Triassic sandstones in humid Blue Mountains, SE Australia, where precipitation is ~1100 mm/a, and the mean annual maximum and minimum temperatures are 17°C and 5°C, respectively. Vegetation cover increase occurred ~13 ka, based on nearby palaeodune activity and pollen data from other highland sites. Our interpretation of terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclides (TCN) data suggests that ~30 cm of soil thickening has taken place since 13 ka, which includes 16 cm of bedrock lowering. Biofabrics preserve a short-term picture of biotically-displaced soil. In general, bioturbation decreases exponentially with increasing soil depth. The upper 21 cm of the profile is ~95% bioturbated; the middle 13 cm is 13 - 32% bioturbated; and the lowest 52 cm is 1 - 6% bioturbated. Tree roots penetrate weakness in the sandstone below this depth. Fallout radionuclides (7Be, 210Pb, and 137Cs) in the profile also suggest that vertical mixing in the upper 20 - 40 cm occurs over short—decadal—timescales. Optically stimulated luminescene (OSL) data records the time that quartz grains were last at the surface, and are used here to demonstrate vertical mixing of the profile over tens of thousands of years. OSL data indicates that some soil grains at all burial depths were once at the surface, consistent with modern process observations. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic values (delta 13C and delta 15N) of soil organic matter support the existence of soil organic matter turnover in the upper 30 cm of the soil column when regressed with log(SOC) and log(TN). Our carbon isotope data defy typical trends below ~30 cm for residual, undisturbed soils. We suggest this may reflect the absence of bioturbation during the LGM when the climate was cold

  4. Stabilization of the coupled oxygen and phosphorus cycles by the evolution of bioturbation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Richard; Dahl, Tais Wittchen; Dale, A. W.;

    2014-01-01

    between bioturbated and laminated sediments. Bioturbation also reduces steady-state marine phosphate levels, but this effect is offset by the decline in iron-adsorbed phosphate burial that results from a decrease in oxygen concentrations. The introduction of oxygen-sensitive bioturbation to dynamical...

  5. Bioturbation in different ecosystems at Forsmark and Oskarshamn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Tryggve; Lenoir, Lisette; Taylor, Astrid [Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research, Swedish University or Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) carries out extensive investigations on factors that can affect long-term storage of nuclear waste. Earthworms consume organic soil materials and when doing so they transport and mix mineral soil particles as well as litter and humus materials. Ants do not consume soil materials, but they collect and mix mineral soil particles and litter materials to construct their nests. This process of material displacement by earthworms and ants is called bioturbation and can be a mechanism for the redistribution (vertical and horizontal) of radionuclides within the soil profile. The aim of the present study was to determine the quantitative impact of earthworms and ants on bioturbation of soil in different ecosystems at Forsmark and Oskarshamn. Earthworms were sampled at four 20x20 cm{sup 2} sub-plots at each site and were determined, dried and weighed in the laboratory. Gut passage time and faeces production were determined in a laboratory experiment at constant temperature. Temperature dependence of earthworm growth was studied at 3, 6, 10 and 20 deg C, and it was assumed that defecation mirrored growth as regards temperature dependence. Ant species composition, ant nest density and nest volume were investigated in the field by using pitfall traps and a transect method to enumerate ant nests. Dry weights of ant nests were determined after weighing in the laboratory. Earthworm abundances and biomasses were high in moist/wet alder forests and deciduous woodlands and low in pine and pine/spruce forests at both Forsmark and Oskarshamn. In mesic spruce forests, high estimates of abundance/biomass of earthworms were found at Forsmark but low at Oskarshamn, whereas grazed pastures had high estimates at Oskarshamn and ungrazed abandoned fields had relatively low estimates at Forsmark. High pH at Forsmark and low pH at Oskarshamn as well as high groundwater tables at some of the Forsmark sites can explain the difference between

  6. Protracted development of bioturbation through the early Palaeozoic Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Lidya G.; Droser, Mary L.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Johnston, David T.

    2015-11-01

    Bioturbation, the physical and chemical mixing of sediment by burrowing animals, exerts an important control on the character of modern marine sediments and biogeochemical cycling. Here we show that the mixing of sediments on marine shelves remained limited until at least the late Silurian, 120 million years after the Precambrian-Cambrian transition. We present ichnological, stratigraphic and taphonomic data from a range of lower Phanerozoic siliciclastic successions spanning four palaeocontinents. The protracted development of the sediment mixed layer is also consistent with sulphur data and global sulphur model simulations. The slow increase in the intensity of bioturbation in the sediment record suggests that evolutionary advances in sediment colonization outpaced advances in sediment mixing. We conclude that ecosystem restructuring caused by the onset of significant infaunal mobile deposit feeding (`bulldozing’) occurred well after both the Cambrian Explosion and the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event.

  7. A model for microbial phosphorus cycling in bioturbated marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, Andrew W.; Boyle, R. A.; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    of benthic fauna. Results show that even shallow bioturbation at that time may have had a significant impact on P burial. Our model provides support for a recent study that proposed that faunal radiation in ocean sediments led to enhanced P burial and, possibly, a stabilization of atmospheric O2 levels....... The results also help to explain Corg:Porg ratios in the geological record and the persistence of Porg in ancient marine sediments. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd....

  8. Stabilization of the coupled oxygen and phosphorus cycles by the evolution of bioturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, R. A.; Dahl, T. W.; Dale, A. W.; Shields-Zhou, G. A.; Zhu, M.; Brasier, M. D.; Canfield, D. E.; Lenton, T. M.

    2014-09-01

    Animal burrowing and sediment-mixing (bioturbation) began during the run up to the Ediacaran/Cambrian boundary, initiating a transition between the stratified Precambrian and more well-mixed Phanerozoic sedimentary records, against the backdrop of a variable global oxygen reservoir probably smaller in size than present. Phosphorus is the long-term limiting nutrient for oxygen production via burial of organic carbon, and its retention (relative to carbon) within organic matter in marine sediments is enhanced by bioturbation. Here we explore the biogeochemical implications of a bioturbation-induced organic phosphorus sink in a simple model. We show that increased bioturbation robustly triggers a net decrease in the size of the global oxygen reservoir--the magnitude of which is contingent upon the prescribed difference in carbon to phosphorus ratios between bioturbated and laminated sediments. Bioturbation also reduces steady-state marine phosphate levels, but this effect is offset by the decline in iron-adsorbed phosphate burial that results from a decrease in oxygen concentrations. The introduction of oxygen-sensitive bioturbation to dynamical model runs is sufficient to trigger a negative feedback loop: the intensity of bioturbation is limited by the oxygen decrease it initially causes. The onset of this feedback is consistent with redox variations observed during the early Cambrian rise of bioturbation, leading us to suggest that bioturbation helped to regulate early oxygen and phosphorus cycles.

  9. RESPONSE OF GHOST SHRIMP (NEOTRYPAEA CALIFORNIENSIS) BIOTURBATION TO ORGANIC MATTER ENRICHMENT OF ESTUARINE INTERTIDAL SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populations of burrowing shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia p;ugettensis) are the dominant invertebrate fauna on Pacific estuarine tide flats, occupying >80% of intertidal area in some estuaries. Burrowing shrimp are renowned for their bioturbation of intertidal sedi...

  10. Water Velocity and Bioturbation Alter Sediment Resuspension and Biogeochemistry in an Experimental Freshwater Mesocosm System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, A.; Vanni, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Processes such as bioturbation and resuspension can affect organic matter decomposition by altering sediment redox conditions. Increased oxygen availability may, in turn, affect remineralization rates and larger scale processes such as benthic-pelagic coupling. However, relatively few studies have explicitly tested the simultaneous effects of bioturbation and water velocity on benthic biogeochemistry and sediment resuspension. Using a mesocosm system we conducted two experiments testing the effects of bioturbator identity on particulate and dissolved nutrient dynamics before and after a resuspension event (i.e. water velocity held constant at 0.12 m s-1 for 2 hr; Expt. 1) and rates of sediment resuspension with increasing water velocity (0.00 - 0.20 m s-1; Expt. 2). We manipulated bioturbator identity across four levels as sediments were undisturbed (control), manually punctured (2% of surface area), or disturbed by one of two fish species, either bluegill or catfish. For Expt. 1, the bioturbation treatments were applied for several days and measurements were made before and after the resuspension event. Initially, water column chlorophyll and total suspended sediment (TSS) concentrations were highest in the catfish treatments. Bioturbator identity did not affect the stoichiometry of TSS as strongly; C:N was unaffected by our treatments while N:P was lowest in the disturbed treatments. After the resuspension event, there was no difference in TSS concentrations or stoichiometric ratios across the bioturbation treatments. Dissolved nutrient flux rates were insensitive to the bioturbation treatments and were more strongly influenced by the resuspension event. For instance, sediment NO3- fluxes were negative (i.e. net flux into sediments) until after the resuspension event when they became positive. In Expt. 2, we gradually increased water velocity from 0.00 - 0.20 m s-1 and measured TSS concentrations only. TSS was initially highest in catfish treatments and lowest in

  11. [Effects of invertebrate bioturbation on vertical hydraulic conductivity of streambed for a river].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chao-Liang; Song, Jin-Xi; Yang, Xiao-Gang; Xue, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Streambed hydraulic conductivity is a key factor influencing water exchange between surface water and groundwater. However, the streambed invertebrate bioturbation has a great effect on the hydraulic conductivity. In order to determine the impact of invertebrate bioturbation on streambed hydraulic conductivity, the investigation of invertebrate bioturbation and in-situ test of vertical hydraulic conductivity of streambed are simultaneously conducted at five points along the main stream of the Weihe River. Firstly, correlation between the streambed vertical hydraulic conductivity and grain size distribution is analyzed. Secondly, type and density of the invertebrate and their correlation to hydraulic conductivity are determined. Finally, the effect of invertebrate bioturbation on the streambed hydraulic conductivity is illustrated. The results show that the vertical hydraulic conductivity and biological density of invertebrate are 18.479 m x d(-1) and 139 ind x m(-2), respectively for the Caotan site, where sediment composition with a large amount of sand and gravel particles. For Meixian site, the sediment constitutes a large amount of silt and clay particles, in which the vertical hydraulic conductivity and biological density of invertebrate are 2.807 m x d(-1) and 2 742 ind x m(-2) respectively. Besides, for the low permeability of four sites (Meixian, Xianyang, Lintong and Huaxian), grain size particles are similar while the vertical hydraulic conductivity and biological density of invertebrate are significantly different from one site to another. However, for each site, the vertical hydraulic conductivity closely related to biological density of invertebrate, the Pearson correlation coefficient is 0.987. It can be concluded that both grain size particles and invertebrate bioturbation influence sediment permeability. For example, higher values of streambed hydraulic conductivity from strong permeability site mainly due to the large amount of large-size particles

  12. Quantification of termite bioturbation in a savannah ecosystem: Application of OSL dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jeppe Ågård; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, Andrew;

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence dating is one of the most promising technique available for studying bioturbation on pedological timescales. In this study, we use multi-grain and single-grain quartz OSL to quantify termite bioturbation processes (Macrotermes natalensis) in a savannah ecosystem in Ghana. Termites...... is effectively bleached during the erosion process allowing us to quantify retrospectively, for the first time, the surface deposition rate, the inverse of the upwards transport rate. At this site, this is ~0.28 mm year-1 and began about 4.000 years ago. Downward mixing through subsurface galleries may replace...

  13. Bioturbation delays attenuation of DDT by clean sediment cap but promotes sequestration by thin-layered activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Diana; Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Werner, David; Luthy, Richard G

    2014-01-21

    The effects of bioturbation on the performance of attenuation by sediment deposition and activated carbon to reduce risks from DDT-contaminated sediment were assessed for DDT sediment-water flux, biouptake, and passive sampler (PE) uptake in microcosm experiments with a freshwater worm, Lumbriculus variegatus. A thin-layer of clean sediment (0.5 cm) did not reduce the DDT flux when bioturbation was present, while a thin (0.3 cm) AC cap was still capable of reducing the DDT flux by 94%. Bioturbation promoted AC sequestration by reducing the 28-day DDT biouptake (66%) and DDT uptake into PE (>99%) compared to controls. Bioturbation further promoted AC-sediment contact by mixing AC particles into underlying sediment layers, reducing PE uptake (55%) in sediment compared to the AC cap without bioturbation. To account for the observed effects from bioturbation, a mass transfer model together with a biodynamic model were developed to simulate DDT flux and biouptake, respectively, and models confirmed experimental results. Both experimental measurements and modeling predictions imply that thin-layer activated carbon placement on sediment is effective in reducing the risks from contaminated sediments in the presence of bioturbation, while natural attenuation process by clean sediment deposition may be delayed by bioturbation.

  14. Bioturbation in a declining oxygen environment, in situ observations from Wormcam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kersey Sturdivant

    Full Text Available Bioturbation, the displacement and mixing of sediment particles by fauna or flora, facilitates life supporting processes by increasing the quality of marine sediments. In the marine environment bioturbation is primarily mediated by infaunal organisms, which are susceptible to perturbations in their surrounding environment due to their sedentary life history traits. Of particular concern is hypoxia, dissolved oxygen (DO concentrations ≤2.8 mg l(-1, a prevalent and persistent problem that affects both pelagic and benthic fauna. A benthic observing system (Wormcam consisting of a buoy, telemetering electronics, sediment profile camera, and water quality datasonde was developed and deployed in the Rappahannock River, VA, USA, in an area known to experience seasonal hypoxia from early spring to late fall. Wormcam transmitted a time series of in situ images and water quality data, to a website via wireless internet modem, for 5 months spanning normoxic and hypoxic periods. Hypoxia was found to significantly reduce bioturbation through reductions in burrow lengths, burrow production, and burrowing depth. Although infaunal activity was greatly reduced during hypoxic and near anoxic conditions, some individuals remained active. Low concentrations of DO in the water column limited bioturbation by infaunal burrowers and likely reduced redox cycling between aerobic and anaerobic states. This study emphasizes the importance of in situ observations for understanding how components of an ecosystem respond to hypoxia.

  15. What is bioturbation? The need for a precise definition for fauna in aquatic sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Erik; Penha-Lopes, Gil; Delefosse, Matthieu

    2012-01-01

    referred to as particle reworking, while water movement (if considered) is re ferred to as bioirrigation in many cases. For consistency, we therefore propose that, for contemporary aquatic scientific disciplines, faunal bioturbation in aquatic environments includes all transport processes carried out...... by animals that directly or indirectly affect sediment matrices. These processes include both particle reworking and burrow ventilation. With this definition, bioturbation acts as an ‘umbrella’ term that covers all transport processes and their physical effects on the substratum. Particle reworking occurs...... through burrow construction and maintenance, as well as ingestion and defecation, and causes biomixing of the substratum. Organic matter and microorganisms are thus displaced vertically and laterally within the sediment matrix. Particle reworking animals can be categorized as biodiffusors, upward...

  16. Bioturbation in near-surface sediments from the COMRA Polymetallic Nodule Area:evidence from excess 210Pb measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Qunhui; ZHOU Huaiyang

    2004-01-01

    In order to evaluate bioturbation in sediments from the COMRA Polymetallic Nodule Area in the northeast tropical Pacific, excess 210Pb profiles in sediments cores collected with multiple corers during R/V DAYANGYIHAO Environmental Program Cruise in 1998 were measured by direct gamma assay using Ortec HPGe GWL series well-type coaxial low background intrinsic germanium detectors. A steady-state diffusion model of excess 210Pb profiles suggests that bioturbation mixing depths and biodiffusion coefficients are 16 cm and 2.75 cm2/a in East Zone, and 6 cm and 0.26 cm2/a in West Zone, respectively. Furthermore, the observations of macrofauna and measurements of total organic carbon (TOC) content in sediments suggest that bioturbation is directly controlled by species and abundance of benthic fauna, such as polychaete, and the bioturbation mixing depth and intensity are positively correlated with the organic matter content.

  17. Middle Ordovician Bioturbation Structures from Southeastern Margin of Ordos Basin and Their Environmentary Interpretation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Trace fossils were discovered in the Middle Ordovician Badou Member of Fengfeng Formation and the Member 1 of Jinsushan Formation in Mt. Jinsu of the Fuping region which lies at the southeastern margin of the Ordos basin. The rocks of the fore-mentioned parts contain a considerable amount of bioturbation structures, in which ichnogenus and ichnospecies can not be identified, and abundant stromatolites.The distributions and characteristics of the bioturbation structures are analyzed and summarized in this paper. The paleoenvironments of related formations and members were interpreted in the method of semiquantitative analysis of bioturbation structures with researches on stromatolites and sedimentology. It is suggested that Fuping zone, located in the southeastern margin of the Ordos basin, was a carbonate platform where stromatolite-developing tidal flat and low-energy subtidal open platform environments dominated. Also that this zone experienced three paleogeographic evolutions from tidal flat to low-energy subtidal open platform environments, that is, three larger-scale eustatisms occurred during the sedimentary period of Middle Ordovician Badou Member of Fengfeng Formation to the Member 1 of Jinsushan Formation.

  18. Upper Cretaceous bioturbated fine-to-medium sands: A problem for deep-water exploration in Campos Basin, Offshore Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carminatti, M.; Zimmermann, L.; Jahnert, R.; Pontes, C.

    1996-08-01

    The presence of bioturbation in oil-prone turbidite deposits has detained a better exploration of upper Cretaceous siliciclastic reservoirs in Campos Basin. Bioturbated sandstones have degraded their permo-porosity with impact in oil production. They occur associated to unbioturbated sandstones with similar seismic amplitude, becoming difficult to separate them in seismic mapping. A comprehensive study in order to reduce the exploratory risk must consider firstly the recognition of genetic facies association through cores, and secondly the calibration of sonic well-logs and seismic velocity sections with rock data. This study deals with sedimentary facies association. The range of main facies in such reservoirs includes: (1) medium-to-coarse siliciclastic sandstone with cross stratification; (2) fine-to-medium massive sandstone with thin traction carpets, bioturbated by opportunistic ichnofabrics and, (3) bioturbated, muddy, fine-to-medium, quartz-feldspatic and glauconitic sandstone over 60 in thick. The genetic facies associations suggest that the sandwich reservoirs were formed by high density turbidite currents deposited en masse or by thin traction carpets. The bioturbated sandstone was originated by reworking of bottom currents rich in nutrients and oxygen. Detritic and biogenic glauconite covered and/or filled bioturbations indicate a basinward movement of the bottom currents. The successive alternation of high-energy with low-energy ichnofabrics reflects cyclic variations in current velocities.

  19. On the origin of laminated-bioturbated chalk cycles in the Upper Maastrichtian, Danish Central Graben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ineson, J.R.; Buchardt, B.; Lassen, S.; Rasmussen, J.A.; Schovsbo, N.H.; Schioeler, P.; Sheldon, E.; Surlyk, F.

    2004-07-01

    Metre-scale laminated-bioturbated chalk cycles form a characteristic motif in the lower levels of the Upper Maastrichtian chalks in the Dan Field area, southern Danish Central Graben. They have most recently been interpreted in the literature to reflect cycles of relative oxygenation on the sea floor, the laminated half-cycles recording poorly oxygenated conditions. Sedimentological, isotopic, palynofacies and palaeoecological (nannofossils, dinoflagellates, foraminifers) analysis was undertaken of a close suite of samples across a composite cyclic interval to investigate the validity of this interpretation and the possible factors controlling periodic variation in bottom-water ventilation. The data from benthic organisms clearly demonstrate a hostile sea-floor environment and outline a cyclicity in bottom water conditions that parallels, yet is lightly out of phase with, the laminated-bioturbated cycles. Interestingly, the planktonic foraminiferal data suggest that during periods with the most hostile bottom water conditions, the upper water masses were relatively stable whereas slight amelioration at the sea floor coincided with stressed, changeable conditions in the surface waters. Data from palynofacies and dinoflagellate analysis indicate a low productivity, oligotrophic setting and no evidence of relative sea-level variation in phase with the cycles is observed. Similarly, the calcareous plankton show no indications of major productivity peaks related to the onset of lamination in the sediment; conversely, minor peaks in productivity indicators in the nannofossil dataset correlate with the transition from laminated to bioturbated chalk i.e. are the result, rather than the cause of oxygen deprivation at the sea floor. On the basis of these data, it is proposed that these short-term cycles were probably controlled by cyclic variations in mean wind stress resulting in the alternation of a weakly stratified shelf sea, in which local dysoxia developed in

  20. Effects of tubificid bioturbation on pore structures in sediment and the migration of sediment particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaorui; Hua, Xiuyi; Zheng, Fang; Dong, Deming; Liang, Dapeng; Guo, Zhiyong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the effects of tubificid bioturbation near the water-sediment interface on pore structures and the migration of sediment particles were evaluated using a series of simulations. In these experiments, the distribution and variation of the tubificid burrows and the macropores in the sediment were investigated by X-ray computed tomography (CT) and digital image collecting, without sampling or disturbing the sediment. The migration of the sediment particles was also determined using CT by adding BaSO4 microspheres to the sediment as a tracer. The effects of tubificid bioturbation on the distribution and migration of contaminants in the sediment were verified by adding Pb-containing sediment layers to the sediment. The results indicate that after the addition of the tubificids, both the burrows and the macropores in the sediments increased with time, and the rate of increase slowed gradually. With the increased worm density, the burrows and the pore structures also increased. The in-depth distribution of the burrows and macropores was determined by the settlement time of the worms: with the settlement time increasing from 3 to 19 days, the depth of the zone with the highest density of burrows and macropores increased from 0-30 to 30-50 mm and from 0-10 to 30-60 mm, respectively. The distribution of the burrows and macropores was closely related to the distribution of the tubificids. Thickening of the oxidized zones in the superficial sediments in the presence of tubificid bioturbation was also observed. The main action of tubificids on the sediment particles was the transport of particles from the inner sediment (especially in the range of 30-50 mm in depth) to the water-sediment interface. The migration of Pb in the contaminated sediment with tubificid bioturbation could be interpreted by the variation in the burrows and macropores and the migration of sediment particles. Both the formation and the variation in the burrows and macropores, as well as

  1. Contaminants, benthic communities, and bioturbation: potential for PAH mobilisation in Arctic sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalov, D.; Renaud, P.E.; Berge, J.; Voronkov, A.Y.; Cochrane, S.K.J. [Polar Environmental Center, Tromso (Norway)

    2010-07-01

    Marine benthic fauna and biological mixing were studied in relation to sediment organic enrichment and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bottom sediments of Svalbard. We investigated how organic enrichment may affect the fate and chemical composition of deposited contaminants by impacting biological reworking by faunal communities. Samples were collected near active coal mines at Barentsburg and at the mouth of Groenfjord. PAH sources in both areas were coal particles and pyrolytic compounds from coal-driven power stations. The results from a bioturbation experiment were consistent with the hypothesis that fauna enhance the vertical transport of PAHs within the sediment. Faunal community composition was similar at the two sites, with polychaete worms comprising 85% of the fauna. Abundances and taxon richness were eight and ten times higher in the organically enriched sediments near Barentsburg, and total PAH concentrations were up to three times higher in Barentsburg. Unlike expectations derived from models developed for temperate regions, organic enrichment in oligotrophic areas, such as this Arctic site, enhanced the biomass and bioturbation potential of benthic communities. Hence, new insights into the relationships among enrichment, benthic communities and the fate of contaminants must be considered in management and regulatory efforts in these areas.

  2. Soil Penetration by Earthworms and Plant Roots--Mechanical Energetics of Bioturbation of Compacted Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Siul; Or, Dani; Schymanski, Stanislaus J

    2015-01-01

    We quantify mechanical processes common to soil penetration by earthworms and growing plant roots, including the energetic requirements for soil plastic displacement. The basic mechanical model considers cavity expansion into a plastic wet soil involving wedging by root tips or earthworms via cone-like penetration followed by cavity expansion due to pressurized earthworm hydroskeleton or root radial growth. The mechanical stresses and resulting soil strains determine the mechanical energy required for bioturbation under different soil hydro-mechanical conditions for a realistic range of root/earthworm geometries. Modeling results suggest that higher soil water content and reduced clay content reduce the strain energy required for soil penetration. The critical earthworm or root pressure increases with increased diameter of root or earthworm, however, results are insensitive to the cone apex (shape of the tip). The invested mechanical energy per unit length increase with increasing earthworm and plant root diameters, whereas mechanical energy per unit of displaced soil volume decreases with larger diameters. The study provides a quantitative framework for estimating energy requirements for soil penetration work done by earthworms and plant roots, and delineates intrinsic and external mechanical limits for bioturbation processes. Estimated energy requirements for earthworm biopore networks are linked to consumption of soil organic matter and suggest that earthworm populations are likely to consume a significant fraction of ecosystem net primary production to sustain their subterranean activities.

  3. Effects of bioturbation on the fate of oil in coastal sandy sediments - An in situ experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Karen; Banta, Gary T.; Klinge, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Effects of bioturbation by the common lugworm Arenicola marina on the fate of oil hydrocarbons (alkanes and PAHs) were studied in situ during a simulated oil spill in a shallow coastal area of Roskilde fjord, Denmark. The fate of selected oil compounds was monitored during 120 d using GC–MS and b......Effects of bioturbation by the common lugworm Arenicola marina on the fate of oil hydrocarbons (alkanes and PAHs) were studied in situ during a simulated oil spill in a shallow coastal area of Roskilde fjord, Denmark. The fate of selected oil compounds was monitored during 120 d using GC...

  4. Bioturbation determines the response of benthic ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverock, B; Kitidis, V; Tait, K; Gilbert, J A; Osborn, A M; Widdicombe, S

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA), caused by the dissolution of increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in seawater, is projected to cause significant changes to marine ecology and biogeochemistry. Potential impacts on the microbially driven cycling of nitrogen are of particular concern. Specifically, under seawater pH levels approximating future OA scenarios, rates of ammonia oxidation (the rate-limiting first step of the nitrification pathway) have been shown to dramatically decrease in seawater, but not in underlying sediments. However, no prior study has considered the interactive effects of microbial ammonia oxidation and macrofaunal bioturbation activity, which can enhance nitrogen transformation rates. Using experimental mesocosms, we investigated the responses to OA of ammonia oxidizing microorganisms inhabiting surface sediments and sediments within burrow walls of the mud shrimp Upogebia deltaura. Seawater was acidified to one of four target pH values (pHT 7.90, 7.70, 7.35 and 6.80) in comparison with a control (pHT 8.10). At pHT 8.10, ammonia oxidation rates in burrow wall sediments were, on average, fivefold greater than in surface sediments. However, at all acidified pH values (pH ≤ 7.90), ammonia oxidation rates in burrow sediments were significantly inhibited (by 79-97%; p < 0.01), whereas rates in surface sediments were unaffected. Both bacterial and archaeal abundances increased significantly as pHT declined; by contrast, relative abundances of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidation (amoA) genes did not vary. This research suggests that OA could cause substantial reductions in total benthic ammonia oxidation rates in coastal bioturbated sediments, leading to corresponding changes in coupled nitrogen cycling between the benthic and pelagic realms.

  5. Biomantling and bioturbation by colonies of the Florida harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex badius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschinkel, Walter R

    2015-01-01

    In much of the world, soil-nesting ants are among the leading agents of biomantling and bioturbation, depositing excavated soil on the surface or in underground chambers. Colonies of the Florida harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex badius excavate a new nest once a year on average, depositing 0.1 to 12 L (3 L average) of soil on the surface. Repeated surveys of a population of about 400 colonies yielded the frequency of moves (approximately once per year), the distance moved (mean 4 m), and the direction moved (random). The area of the soil disc correlated well with the volume and maximum depth of the nest, as determined by excavation and mapping of chambers. The population-wide frequency distribution of disc areas thus yielded the frequency distribution of nest volumes and maximum depths. For each surveyed colony, the volume of soil excavated from six specified depth ranges and deposited on the surface was estimated. These parameters were used in a simulation to estimate the amount of soil mantled over time by the observed population of P. badius colonies. Spread evenly, P. badius mantling would create a soil layer averaging 0.43 cm thick in a millennium, with 10-15% of the soil deriving from depths greater than 1 m. Biomantling by P. badius is discussed in the context of the ant community of which it is a part, and in relation to literature reports of ant biomantling.

  6. Biomantling and bioturbation by colonies of the Florida harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex badius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R Tschinkel

    Full Text Available In much of the world, soil-nesting ants are among the leading agents of biomantling and bioturbation, depositing excavated soil on the surface or in underground chambers. Colonies of the Florida harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex badius excavate a new nest once a year on average, depositing 0.1 to 12 L (3 L average of soil on the surface. Repeated surveys of a population of about 400 colonies yielded the frequency of moves (approximately once per year, the distance moved (mean 4 m, and the direction moved (random. The area of the soil disc correlated well with the volume and maximum depth of the nest, as determined by excavation and mapping of chambers. The population-wide frequency distribution of disc areas thus yielded the frequency distribution of nest volumes and maximum depths. For each surveyed colony, the volume of soil excavated from six specified depth ranges and deposited on the surface was estimated. These parameters were used in a simulation to estimate the amount of soil mantled over time by the observed population of P. badius colonies. Spread evenly, P. badius mantling would create a soil layer averaging 0.43 cm thick in a millennium, with 10-15% of the soil deriving from depths greater than 1 m. Biomantling by P. badius is discussed in the context of the ant community of which it is a part, and in relation to literature reports of ant biomantling.

  7. A new method for measuring bioturbation rates in sandy tidal flat sediments based on luminescence dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anni T.; Murray, Andrew S.; Jain, Mayank

    2011-01-01

    The rates of post-depositional mixing by bioturbation have been investigated using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating in two sediment cores (BAL2 and BAL5), retrieved from a sandy tidal flat in the Danish part of the Wadden Sea. A high-resolution chronology, consisting of thirty-six OSL...... ages with ages ranging between 2 ± 4 and 410 ± 20 years, is presented. Slices of sediment (1–2 cm thick) have been dated at least every 5 cm, and from these data mixing depths of 20 cm and 22 cm (BAL5 and BAL2, respectively) are readily identified. Below the mixing zone there is a significant decrease....... The significant change in sedimentation rates at BAL5 may indicate an offset in OSL age of up to 620 years. This paper uses a simple conceptual model for vertical mixing in which all the sediment excreted at the surface by lugworms is assumed to be completely reset before being re-incorporated in the sediment...

  8. A new method for measuring bioturbation rates in sandy tidal flat sediments based on luminescence dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anni Tindahl; Murray, Andrew S.; jain, A

    2011-01-01

    The rates of post-depositional mixing by bioturbation have been investigated using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating in two sediment cores (BAL2 and BAL5), retrieved from a sandy tidal flat in the Danish part of the Wadden Sea. A high-resolution chronology, consisting of thirty-six OSL...... ages with ages ranging between 2 4 and 410 20 years, is presented. Slices of sediment (1e2 cm thick) have been dated at least every 5 cm, and from these data mixing depths of 20 cm and 22 cm (BAL5 and BAL2, respectively) are readily identified. Below the mixing zone there is a significant decrease....... The significant change in sedimentation rates at BAL5 may indicate an offset in OSL age of up to 620 years. This paper uses a simple conceptual model for vertical mixing in which all the sediment excreted at the surface by lugworms is assumed to be completely reset before being re-incorporated in the sediment...

  9. Biodiversity of benthic microbial communities in bioturbated coastal sediments is controlled by geochemical microniches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertics, Victoria J; Ziebis, Wiebke

    2009-11-01

    We used a combination of field and laboratory approaches to address how the bioturbation activity of two crustaceans, the ghost shrimp Neotrypaea californiensis and the fiddler crab Uca crenulata, affects the microbial diversity in the seabed of a coastal lagoon (Catalina Harbor, Santa Catalina Island, CA, USA). Detailed geochemical analyses, including oxygen microsensor measurements, were performed to characterize environmental parameters. We used a whole-assemblage fingerprinting approach (ARISA: amplified ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) to compare bacterial diversity along geochemical gradients and in relation to subsurface microniches. The two crustaceans have different burrowing behaviors. The ghost shrimp maintains complex, deep-reaching burrows and permanently lives subterranean, supplying its burrow with oxygen-rich water. In contrast, the fiddler crab constructs simpler, J-shaped burrows, which it does not inhabit permanently and does not actively ventilate. Our goal was to address how varying environmental parameters affect benthic microbial communities. An important question in benthic microbial ecology has been whether burrows support similar or unique communities compared with the sediment surface. Our results showed that sediment surface microbial communities are distinct from subsurface assemblages and that different burrow types support diverse bacterial taxa. Statistical comparisons by canonical correspondence analysis indicated that the availability of oxidants (oxygen, nitrate, ferric iron) play a key role in determining the presence and abundance of different taxa. When geochemical parameters were alike, microbial communities associated with burrows showed significant similarity to sediment surface communities. Our study provides implications on the community structure of microbial communities in marine sediments and the factors controlling their distribution.

  10. Effects of Lumbriculus variegatus (Annelida, Oligochaete) bioturbation on zinc sediment chemistry and toxicity to the epi-benthic invertebrate Chironomus tepperi (Diptera: Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Valentina; Pettigrove, Vincent J; Hoffmann, Ary A; Golding, Lisa A

    2016-09-01

    Classical laboratory-based single-species sediment bioassays do not account for modifications to toxicity from bioturbation by benthic organisms which may impact predictions of contaminated sediment risk to biota in the field. This study aims to determine the effects of bioturbation on the toxicity of zinc measured in a standard laboratory bioassay conducted with chironomid larvae (Chironomus tepperi). The epi-benthic chironomid larvae were exposed to two different levels of sediment contamination (1600 and 1980 mg/kg of dry weight zinc) in the presence or absence of annelid worms (Lumbriculus variegatus) which are known to be tolerant to metal and to have a large impact on sediment properties through bioturbation. Chironomids had 5-6x higher survival in the presence of L. variegatus which shows that bioturbation had a beneficial effect on the chironomid larvae. Chemical analyses showed that bioturbation induced a flux of zinc from the pore water into the water column, thereby reducing the bioavailability of zinc in pore water to the chironomid larvae. This also suggested that pore water was the major exposure path for the chironomids to metals in sediment. During the study, annelid worms (Oligochaetes) produced a thin layer of faecal pellets at the sediment surface, a process known to: (i) create additional adsorption sites for zinc, thus reducing its availability, (ii) increase the microbial abundance that in turn could represent an additional food source for opportunistic C. tepperi larvae, and (iii) modify the microbial community's structure and alter the biogeochemical processes it governs thus indirectly impact zinc toxicity. This study represents a contribution in recognising bioturbating organisms as "ecological engineers" as they directly and indirectly influence metal bioavailability and impact other sediment-inhabiting species. This is significant and should be considered in risk assessment of zinc levels (and other metals) in contaminated sediment

  11. Sediment nickel bioavailability and toxicity to estuarine crustaceans of contrasting bioturbative behaviors--an evaluation of the SEM-AVS paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, G Thomas; Schlekat, Christian E; Garman, Emily R; He, Lijian; Washburn, Katherine M; Stewart, Emily R; Ferry, John L

    2014-11-01

    Robust sediment quality criteria require chemistry and toxicity data predictive of concentrations where population/community response should occur under known geochemical conditions. Understanding kinetic and geochemical effects on toxicant bioavailability is key, and these are influenced by infaunal sediment bioturbation. This study used fine-scale sediment and porewater measurement of contrasting infaunal effects on carbon-normalized SEM-AVS to evaluate safe or potentially toxic nickel concentrations in a high-binding Spartina saltmarsh sediment (4%TOC; 35-45 μmol-S2-·g(-1)). Two crustaceans producing sharply contrasting bioturbation--the copepod Amphiascus tenuiremis and amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus--were cultured in oxic to anoxic sediments with SEM[Ni]-AVS, TOC, porewater [Ni], and porewater DOC measured weekly. From 180 to 750 μg-Ni·g(-1) sediment, amphipod bioturbation reduced [AVS] and enhanced porewater [Ni]. Significant amphipod uptake, mortality, and growth-depression occurred at the higher sediment [Ni] even when [SEM-AVS]/foc suggested acceptable risk. Less bioturbative copepods produced higher AVS and porewater DOC but exhibited net population growth despite porewater [Ni] 1.3-1.7× their aqueous [Ni] LOEC. Copepod aqueous tests with/without dissolved organic matter showed significant aqueous DOC protection, which suggests porewater DOC attenuates sediment Ni toxicity. The SEM[Ni]-AVS relationship was predictive of acceptable risk for copepods at the important population-growth level.

  12. On the quantification of soil bioturbation and soil relocation in a mountainous area in S Spain – testing the potential of single-grain OSL techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Román Sánchez, A.; Reimann, T.; Vanwalleghem, T.; Temme, A.J.A.M.; Giráldez, J.V.

    2015-01-01

    Soil formation depends on bedrock, climate, relief, vegetation and time. Bioturbation and colluvial soil re-location are important and significant processes that affect the mechanisms and rate of bedrock weathering. The estimation of the relative fraction of bedrock grains which has been mixed in th

  13. The effect of bioturbation in pelagic sediments: Lessons from radioactive tracers and planktonic foraminifera in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Zvi; Lazar, Boaz; Levi, Shani; Tsroya, Shimon; Pelled, Omer; Bookman, Revital; Erez, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    Studies of recent environmental perturbations often rely on data derived from marine sedimentary records. These records are known to imperfectly inscribe the true sequence of events, yet there is large uncertainty regarding the corrections that should be employed to accurately describe the sedimentary history. Here we show in recent records from the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, how events of the abrupt disappearance of the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides sacculifer, and episodic deposition of the artificial radionuclide 137Cs, are significantly altered in the sedimentary record compared to their known past timing. Instead of the abrupt disappearance of the foraminifera, we observe a prolonged decline beginning at core depth equivalent to ∼30 y prior to its actual disappearance and continuing for decades past the event. We further observe asymmetric smoothing of the radionuclide peak. Utilization of advection-diffusion-reaction models to reconstruct the original fluxes based on the known absolute timing of the events reveal that it is imperative to use a continuous function to describe bioturbation. Discretization of bioturbation into mixed and unmixed layers significantly shifts the location of the modeled event. When bioturbation is described as a continuously decreasing function of depth, the peak of a very short term event smears asymmetrically but remains in the right depth. When sudden events repeat while the first spike is still mixed with the upper sediment layer, bioturbation unifies adjacent peaks. The united peak appears at an intermediate depth that does not necessarily correlate with the timing of the individual events. In a third case, a long lasting sedimentary event affected by bioturbation, the resulting peak is rather weak compared to the actual event and appears deeper in the sediment column than expected based on the termination of the event. The model clearly shows that abrupt changes can only endure in the record if a thick sediment layer

  14. A model for microbial phosphorus cycling in bioturbated marine sediments: Significance for phosphorus burial in the early Paleozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Andrew W.; Boyle, Richard A.; Lenton, Timothy M.; Ingall, Ellery D.; Wallmann, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    A diagenetic model is used to simulate the diagenesis and burial of particulate organic carbon (Corg) and phosphorus (P) in marine sediments underlying anoxic versus oxic bottom waters. The latter are physically mixed by animals moving through the surface sediment (bioturbation) and ventilated by burrowing, tube-dwelling organisms (bioirrigation). The model is constrained using an empirical database including burial ratios of Corg with respect to organic P (Corg:Porg) and total reactive P (Corg:Preac), burial efficiencies of Corg and Porg, and inorganic carbon-to-phosphorus regeneration ratios. If Porg is preferentially mineralized relative to Corg during aerobic respiration, as many previous studies suggest, then the simulated Porg pool is found to be completely depleted. A modified model that incorporates the redox-dependent microbial synthesis of polyphosphates and Porg (termed the microbial P pump) allows preferential mineralization of the bulk Porg pool relative to Corg during both aerobic and anaerobic respiration and is consistent with the database. Results with this model show that P burial is strongly enhanced in sediments hosting fauna. Animals mix highly labile Porg away from the aerobic sediment layers where mineralization rates are highest, thereby mitigating diffusive PO43- fluxes to the bottom water. They also expand the redox niche where microbial P uptake occurs. The model was applied to a hypothetical shelf setting in the early Paleozoic; a time of the first radiation of benthic fauna. Results show that even shallow bioturbation at that time may have had a significant impact on P burial. Our model provides support for a recent study that proposed that faunal radiation in ocean sediments led to enhanced P burial and, possibly, a stabilization of atmospheric O2 levels. The results also help to explain Corg:Porg ratios in the geological record and the persistence of Porg in ancient marine sediments.

  15. Multiple sulfur isotope records at the end-Guadalupian (Permian) at Chaotian, China: Implications for a role of bioturbation in the Phanerozoic sulfur cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Masafumi; Ueno, Yuichiro; Matsu'ura, Fumihiro; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Isozaki, Yukio; Yao, Jianxin; Ji, Zhansheng; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2017-03-01

    A recent study on quadruple sulfur isotopes (32S, 33S, 34S, and 36S) of sedimentary pyrite suggested that the end-Guadalupian extinction was caused by shoaling of the sulfidic deep-water. This scenario is based on the assumption that sulfur isotopic compositions of pyrite from hosting sediments were controlled by benthos activities, thus by the redox conditions of the sedimentary environments. Nonetheless, the relationship between the sulfur isotope records and redox conditions, reconstructed from litho- and bio-facies, are poorly known. In order to examine the effect of bioturbation in sediments, quadruple sulfur isotopic compositions of sedimentary pyrite from the end-Guadalupian succession in Chaotian, South China, were analyzed. Black mudstones of deep-water facies immediately below the extinction horizon have consistently high Δ33S values of ca. +0.079‰, clearly suggesting a sulfate reduction in the anoxic water column. Our new data are consistent with the emergence of a sulfidic deep-water mass prior to the end-Guadalupian extinction; the upwelling of the toxic deep-water may have contributed to the extinction. In contrast, shallow-marine bioclastic limestones with burrows deposited under oxic conditions have negative Δ33S values. This anomalous isotopic signal indicates the mixing of two distinct types of pyrite; one generated during the sulfate reduction in an open system and the other in a closed system. We interpret that bioturbation supplied sulfate in the sediments and promoted sulfate reduction and in-situ sulfide precipitation within the sediments. The negative Δ33S values of oxic sediments in Chaotian are inconsistent with the previous model and demonstrate that the sedimentary sulfur cycle associated with bioturbation was more complicated than previously thought. Our study also implies that, more generally, the role of bioturbation in increasing seawater sulfate concentration in the Phanerozoic may have been overestimated in the previous

  16. Contribution of bioturbation by the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii to the recruitment of bloom-forming cyanobacteria from sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimasa YAMAMOTO

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of cyanobacterial blooms in a small eutrophic pond was monitored along with the potential effect of bioturbation by the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii discussed as well with respect to the recruitment of cyanobacteria from sediment. Cyanobacterial blooms were observed during the early spring and summer. The spring bloom was dominated by Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. Its population density reached the maximum level in late March, thereafter decreasing rapidly and becoming lower than the detection limit from May. When the water temperature exceeded 20 °C in late May, the population density of Microcystis spp. began to increase, and a bloom was formed from July to early August. Anabaena spp. also contributed to the formation of the summer bloom. The population densities of both Microcystis spp. and Anabaena spp. began to decline in mid August. Crayfish were sampled using baited traps from April to November. No sample was obtained in April, whereas crayfish were captured constantly from May to November. They were distributed widely throughout the pond from June, although a large number of crayfish were captured most effectively at a particular point in the pond. The first captures in late May were dominated by males. The sex ratio of the captures was almost 1:1 from June to September, and fell in favor of females from October. The sex ratio reached a minimum (0.2:1 in mid November, when an extremely large number of crayfish were captured at a distinctly warm point. Next, the potential ability of crayfish to promote the recruitment of cyanobacteria from the sediment was examined by performing an incubation experiment. The presence of crayfish in containers of the pond sediment increased the densities of cyanobacteria such as Microcystis spp. and Anabaena spp. However, population densities of cyanobacteria began to decline after the crayfish was removed. Overall, bioturbation by crayfish seemed to be somewhat important in the

  17. Image analysis techniques and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) for calculating bioturbation indices and characterizing biogenic sedimentary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Chris Ebey; Plotnick, Roy

    2008-11-01

    Aspects of texture and structure in a bed resulting from bioturbation can provide valuable information about the ecology and environment at the time of deposition. However, not only the degree of bioturbation, but the structure of the burrows is important for interpreting biogenic fabrics. Here, image analysis is applied to real and artificial images of biogenic sedimentary structures. Image segmentation was applied to images of Middle Ordovician biogenic sedimentary structures from Dixon, Illinois (Pecatonica Formation), isolating the biogenic sedimentary structures. A gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) is calculated from the segmented image and eight artificial images representing different levels of image noise. Texture measures were calculated from the GLCMs and compared with identify scale and directional structural differences between the images. Principal component analysis was used to statistically group the images. Artificial images were found to be distinguishable from the real images by GLCM texture measures, and the real images differed most significantly at the largest scales.

  18. Polychaete response to fresh food supply at organically enriched coastal sites: Repercussion on bioturbation potential and trophic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, N.; Pires-Vanin, A. M. S.; Salhi, M.; Bessonart, M.; Muniz, P.

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the vertical distribution, abundance, specific and functional structure of polychaete assemblages at four organically enriched sites. The effects of fresh organic matter input from the water column driving by upwelling were evaluated. Temperature and salinity values indicate the intrusion of South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) in spring, a nutrient-rich water mass. The dominance of the conveyor belt transport (CONV) in the station influenced by SACW, in the spring survey, is associated with fresh organic matter input as indicated by higher amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Conversely, the predominance of the diffusive mixing (DIFF) bioturbation category, in the sites without SACW influence is related to the preferential accumulation of more refractive food resources as indicated by higher concentrations of short chain saturated fatty acids. At the site influenced by SACW, the changes in polychaete assemblages were not all evident during proceeding upwelling conditions, but may persist at the end of the upwelling. Polychaetes in the study area seemed to be limited by the quality but not the quantity of food. The delay in polychaete response to fresh food supply may be related to the organic enrichment and the prevalence of refractory material in the sediments.

  19. Biodiversity differentials between the numerically-dominant macrobenthos of seagrass and adjacent unvegetated sediment in the absence of sandflat bioturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, R S K; Barnes, M K S

    2014-08-01

    Species composition, abundance and biodiversity of the South African estuarine invertebrate fauna are known to show marked differentials between seagrass beds and adjacent unvegetated sands in enclosed estuarine/marine bays. Such differentials were investigated at four disparate localities in a bay lacking the callianassid bioturbation of other local sites. Here there were no such marked or consistent differences: seagrass showing the lower, not higher, level in half of those. Overall, faunal abundance was lower in seagrass in the ratio of 0.64 : 1, whilst species density was higher but only by 1.13 to 1. Seagrass assemblages at a given locality were more similar to those of the adjacent bare sand than they were to seagrass assemblages at other localities, and likewise in respect of those in the bare sand. This suggests that marked differentials, where they occur, may result not from any supposed favourability of seagrass as a habitat but from the operation of processes within the unvegetated-sediment compartment of the system.

  20. Influence of benthic macro-invertebrate bioturbation on the biogeochemical behaviour of uranium within freshwater sediments; Influence de la bioturbation des macro-invertebres benthiques sur le comportement biogeochimique de l'uranium au sein des sediments d'eau douce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagauzere, S.

    2008-06-15

    In freshwater ecosystems, sediments act as an accumulation compartment for metallic pollutants as uranium. Secondary, there can also represent endogenous sources of contamination by resuspension (e.g. flood, bioturbation) or changes of metal speciation that acts upon their bioavailability. Indeed, metallic compounds can be transformed in more or less toxic or inert compounds through physico-chemical (e.g. pH, redox conditions, ionic force) and microbiological variations. These conditions are themselves under the effects of benthic macro-invertebrate activities via bioturbation processes. The main objective of this PhD was to determinate the influence of two benthic macro-invertebrate species (Chironomus riparius and Tubifex tubifex) on the distribution and the transfers of uranium within freshwater sediments. To reach this goal, laboratory experiments were performed in order to (i) assess the effects of uranium on benthic macro-invertebrates, more particularly on their bioturbation activity, (ii) determine the influence of these organisms on uranium behaviour through high resolution physico-chemical measurements (e.g. oxygen optodes, DET gel probes), and (iii) estimate the consequences of these interactions on pelagic organisms via genotoxicity measurements (micronuclei assay and molecular bio-markers analysis on Xenopus laevis). The results demonstrate that bioturbation intensity of macro-invertebrates can be affected in uranium-contaminated sediments, but the two species studied in this work show a relative tolerance. For high uranium concentrations (>100 times the geochemical background level), corresponding however to realistic concentrations in highly contaminated sites, T. tubifex worms are able to maintain a sufficient bioturbation activity that induces a high remobilization of uranium initially associated with sediments to the overlying water (factor 2 to 10). That represents therefore a potential risk for the remaining aquatic biocenose. However, by

  1. Elemental and mineralogical changes in soils due to bioturbation along an earthworm invasion chronosequence in Northern Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resner, Kathryn [Dept. of Soil, Water, and Climate, University of Minnesota, 439 Borlaug Hall, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, St. Paul, MN, 55108-6028 (United States); Yoo, Kyungsoo, E-mail: kyoo@umn.edu [Dept. of Soil, Water, and Climate, University of Minnesota, 439 Borlaug Hall, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, St. Paul, MN, 55108-6028 (United States); Hale, Cindy [University of Minnesota Duluth, The Natural Resources Research Institute, 5013 Miller Trunk Hwy. Duluth, MN 55811 (United States); Aufdenkampe, Anthony [Assistant Research Scientist - Isotope and Organic Geochemistry, Stroud Water Research Center, 970 Spencer Road, Avondale, PA 19311 (United States); Blum, Alex [US Geological Survey, 3215 Marine St., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Sebestyen, Stephen [Research Hydrologist, USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, Grand Rapids, MN 55744-3399 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Minnesota forested soils have evolved without the presence of earthworms since the last glacial retreat. When exotic earthworms arrive, enhanced soil bioturbation often results in dramatic morphological and chemical changes in soils with negative implications for the forests' sustainability. However, the impacts of earthworm invasion on geochemical processes in soils are not well understood. This study attempts to quantify the role of earthworm invasion in mineral chemical weathering and nutrient dynamics along an earthworm invasion chronosequence in a sugar maple forest in Northern Minnesota. Depth and rates of soil mixing can be tracked with atmospherically derived short lived radioisotopes {sup 210}Pb and {sup 137}Cs. Their radioactivities increase in the lower A horizon at the expense of the peak activities near the soil surface, which indicate that soil mixing rate and its depth reach have been enhanced by earthworms. Enhanced soil mixing by earthworms is consistent with the ways that the vertical profiles of elemental and mineralogical compositions were affected by earthworm invasion. Biologically cycled Ca and P have peak concentrations near the soil surface prior to earthworm invasion. However, these peak abundances significantly declined in the earthworm invaded soils presumably due to enhanced soil mixing. It is clear that enhanced soil mixing due to earthworms also profoundly altered the vertical distribution of most mineral species within A horizons. Though the mechanisms are not clear yet, earthworm invasion appears to have contributed to net losses of clay mineral species and opal from the A horizons. As much as earthworms vertically relocated minerals and elements, they also intensify the contacts between organic matter and cations as shown in the increased amount of Ca and Fe in organically complexed and in exchangeable pools. With future studies on soil mixing rates and elemental leaching, this study will quantitatively and mechanically

  2. Influence of bioturbation on the biogeochemistry of littoral sediments of an acidic post-mining pit lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagauzère, S.; Moreira, S.; Koschorreck, M.

    2011-02-01

    In the last decades, the mining exploitation of large areas in Lusatia (Eastern Germany) but also in other mining areas worldwide has led to the formation of hundreds of pit lakes. Pyrite oxidation in the surrounding dumps makes many such lakes extremely acidic (pH bioremediation strategies. Despite some studies reporting the presence of living organisms (mostly bacteria, algae, and macro-invertebrates) under such acidic conditions, and their trophic interactions, their potential impact on the ecosystem functioning was poorly investigated. The present study aimed to assess the influence of chironomid larvae on oxygen dynamics and iron cycle in the sediment of acidic pit lakes. In the Mining Lake 111, used as a study case since 1996, Chironomus crassimanus (Insecta, Diptera) is the dominant benthic macro-invertebrate species and occurs at relatively high abundances in shallow water. A 16-day laboratory experiment using microcosms combined with high resolution measurements (DET gel probes and O2 microsensors) was carried out. The burrowing activity of C. crassimanus larvae induced a 3-fold increase of the diffusive oxygen uptake by sediment, indicating a stimulation of the mineralization of organic matter in the upper layers of the sediment. The iron cycle was also impacted (e.g. lower rates of reduction and oxidation, increase of iron-oxidizing bacteria abundance, stimulation of mineral formation) but with no significant effect on the iron flux at the sediment-water interface, and thus on the water acidity budget. This work provides the first assessment of bioturbation in an acidic mining lake and shows that its influence on biogeochemistry cannot be neglected.

  3. Influence of bioturbation on the biogeochemistry of the sediment in the littoral zone of an acidic mine pit lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagauzère, S.; Moreira, S.; Koschorreck, M.

    2010-10-01

    In the last decades, the mining exploitation of large areas in Lusatia (South-eastern Germany) but also in other mining areas worldwide has led to the formation of hundreds of pit lakes. Pyrite oxidation in the surrounding dumps makes many such lakes extremely acidic (pH bioremediation strategies. Despite some studies reporting the presence of living organisms (mostly bacteria, algae, and macro-invertebrates) under such acidic conditions, and their trophic interactions, their potential impact on the ecosystem functioning was poorly investigated. The present study aimed to assess the influence of chironomid larvae on oxygen dynamics and iron cycle in the sediment of acidic pit lakes. In the Mining Lake 111, used as a study case since 1996, Chironomus crassimanus (Insecta, Diptera) is the dominant benthic macro-invertebrate species and occurs at relatively high abundances in shallow water. A 16-day laboratory experiment using microcosms combined with high resolution measurements (DET gel probes and O2 microsensors) was carried out. The burrowing activity of C. crassimanus larvae induced a 3-fold increase of the oxygen consumption by sediment, and stimulated the mineralization of organic matter in the upper layers of the sediment. The iron cycle was also impacted (e.g. lower rates of reduction and oxidation, increase of iron-oxidizing bacteria abundance, stimulation of mineral formation) but with no significant effect on the iron flux at the sediment-water interface, and thus on the water acidity budget. This work provides the first assessment of bioturbation in an acidic mining lake and shows that its influence on biogeochemistry cannot be neglected.

  4. Influence of bioturbation on the biogeochemistry of littoral sediments of an acidic post-mining pit lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lagauzère

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the mining exploitation of large areas in Lusatia (Eastern Germany but also in other mining areas worldwide has led to the formation of hundreds of pit lakes. Pyrite oxidation in the surrounding dumps makes many such lakes extremely acidic (pH < 3. The biogeochemical functioning of these lakes is mainly governed by cycling of iron. This represents a relevant ecological problem and intensive research has been conducted to understand the involved biogeochemical processes and develop bioremediation strategies. Despite some studies reporting the presence of living organisms (mostly bacteria, algae, and macro-invertebrates under such acidic conditions, and their trophic interactions, their potential impact on the ecosystem functioning was poorly investigated. The present study aimed to assess the influence of chironomid larvae on oxygen dynamics and iron cycle in the sediment of acidic pit lakes. In the Mining Lake 111, used as a study case since 1996, Chironomus crassimanus (Insecta, Diptera is the dominant benthic macro-invertebrate species and occurs at relatively high abundances in shallow water. A 16-day laboratory experiment using microcosms combined with high resolution measurements (DET gel probes and O2 microsensors was carried out. The burrowing activity of C. crassimanus larvae induced a 3-fold increase of the diffusive oxygen uptake by sediment, indicating a stimulation of the mineralization of organic matter in the upper layers of the sediment. The iron cycle was also impacted (e.g. lower rates of reduction and oxidation, increase of iron-oxidizing bacteria abundance, stimulation of mineral formation but with no significant effect on the iron flux at the sediment-water interface, and thus on the water acidity budget. This work provides the first assessment of bioturbation in an acidic mining lake and shows that its influence on biogeochemistry cannot be neglected.

  5. Influence of bioturbation on the biogeochemistry of the sediment in the littoral zone of an acidic mine pit lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lagauzère

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the mining exploitation of large areas in Lusatia (South-eastern Germany but also in other mining areas worldwide has led to the formation of hundreds of pit lakes. Pyrite oxidation in the surrounding dumps makes many such lakes extremely acidic (pH < 3. The biogeochemical functioning of these lakes is mainly governed by cycling of iron. This represents a relevant ecological problem and intensive research has been conducted to understand the involved biogeochemical processes and develop bioremediation strategies. Despite some studies reporting the presence of living organisms (mostly bacteria, algae, and macro-invertebrates under such acidic conditions, and their trophic interactions, their potential impact on the ecosystem functioning was poorly investigated. The present study aimed to assess the influence of chironomid larvae on oxygen dynamics and iron cycle in the sediment of acidic pit lakes. In the Mining Lake 111, used as a study case since 1996, Chironomus crassimanus (Insecta, Diptera is the dominant benthic macro-invertebrate species and occurs at relatively high abundances in shallow water. A 16-day laboratory experiment using microcosms combined with high resolution measurements (DET gel probes and O2 microsensors was carried out. The burrowing activity of C. crassimanus larvae induced a 3-fold increase of the oxygen consumption by sediment, and stimulated the mineralization of organic matter in the upper layers of the sediment. The iron cycle was also impacted (e.g. lower rates of reduction and oxidation, increase of iron-oxidizing bacteria abundance, stimulation of mineral formation but with no significant effect on the iron flux at the sediment-water interface, and thus on the water acidity budget. This work provides the first assessment of bioturbation in an acidic mining lake and shows that its influence on biogeochemistry cannot be neglected.

  6. Response of Paddy Soil Nutrients to Bioturbation of Misgurnus anguillicaudus%水田土壤养分对泥鳅扰动的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨立国; 孙刚; 潘希波; 房岩; 陈彬; 胡鹏宇

    2011-01-01

    [目的]研究水田土壤养分时泥鳅扰动的响应.[方法]通过野外定期取样,采用常规理化方法测定在养鱼水田和对照水田中土壤有机质、氮素、磷素、钾素的含量.[结果]养鱼水田土壤有机质含量、土壤速效氮含量、土壤速效磷含量在0.05水平显著高于对照水田.养鱼水田土壤全氮含量、土壤全磷含量、土壤全钾含量和土壤速效钾含量与对照水田间不存在差异.[结论]底栖鱼类泥鳅改善了水田土壤养分状况,尤其提高了土壤有机质、土壤速效氮和土壤速效磷的含量.%[ Objective ] The research aimed to explore the response of paddy soil nutrients to bioturbation of Misgurnus anguillicaudatus.[ Method]The sampling was conducted monthly in fields, and regular physical and chemical methods were used to determine the contents of soil organic matter, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium in rice-fish paddy field and control paddy field. [ Result ] The contents of soil organic matter, soil available nitrogen, and soil available phosphorus in rice-fish paddy field were significantly higher than those in control paddy field, while the contents of soil total nitrogen, soil total phosphorus, soil total potassium, and soil available potassium had no significant difference with those in control paddy field. [ Conclusion] The benthic fish Misgurnus anguillicaudatus improved the conditions of soil nutrients in paddy field, especially increased the contents of soil organic matter, soil available nitrogen, and soll available phosphorus.

  7. Use of total organic carbon, spectral gamma ray and bioturbation as tools in the identification of source rock; Carbono organico total, gamaespectrometria e bioturbacao como ferramentas na busca de possiveis horizontes geradores de hidrocarbonetos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Anderson S.; Pereira, Egberto [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Geologia. Dept. de Estratigrafia e Paleontologia

    2008-07-01

    This work presents the result obtained for the gamaespectrometric study of a borehole situated in north of Parana Basin, concerning sediments of the Ponta Grossa Formation. The Total Radioactivity data and the concentrations of Potassium (K), Uranium (U), Thorium (Th) have been compared to the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and to the degree of bioturbation intensity. The mentioned formation is composed of basal sandstones deposited in shoreface conditions, which pass to siltstones and black shales deposited in offshore conditions. Nine sedimentary facies were identified based on sedimentological characteristics and sedimentary structures. The bioturbation intensity indicates the modification degree of the initial arrangement of sedimentary beds by the action of organisms. High TOC values in the intervals in addition to the increase of the radioactivity values indicate anoxic conditions. These conditions are ideal for the organic matter concentration and preservation, reflecting favorable intervals to the hydrocarbons (HC) generation. Thus, with the integrated use of diverse tools it was possible to confirm that the Givetian-Frasnian interval of the Ponta Grossa Formation presents the best potential of HC generation of the section analyzed. (author)

  8. Effects of Bioturbation on Vertical Distribution of Sediment Particles by Two Macrobenthos Species%两种大型底栖动物生物扰动对沉积物颗粒垂直分布的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕洪斌; 王恕桥; 刘国山; 张秀梅

    2016-01-01

    Macrobenthos affect the physical, chemical and biological properties of the sediment-water interface. This bioturbation plays an important role in the biogeochemical processes of marine and lacustrine environments. Research has shown that bioturbation intensity depends on natural macrobenthos behavior, but is influenced by ex-ternal factors such as temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, macrobenthos density and food supply.In this stud-y,we investigated the effect of population density of a Polychaeta,Cirratulus chrysoderma, and size of a Bivalvia, Ruditapes philippinarum, on the vertical distribution of sediment particles.The two macrobenthos species were in-vestigated using polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubes(L28 cm, D10.5 cm) with 15 cm of sediment.Glass beads(0.4-0.5 mm) were placed on the surface of the sediment as the tracer before the organisms were placed in the appa-ratus.The experiment was conducted at a salinity of 30 g/kg, temperature of 20℃and each treatment was run in triplicate.Treatment groups included three densities of C.chrysoderma (255, 510, 1 020 ind/m2),three sizes of R.philippinarum[large: (32.64 ±0.08) mm, (7.34 ±0.45) g;medium: (25.30 ±0.11) mm, (3.54 ± 0.19) g;small:(20.34 ±0.06) mm, (1.63 ±0.13) g)] and a control.The vertical distribution of tracers and macrobenthos for each treatment was determined on day 7 and day 20 of the experiment.The two macrobenthos spe-cies displayed significantly different bioturbation intensities, primarily because they belong to different bioturbation functional groups.The quantity and depth of tracer beads distributed in the sediments changed with C chrysoderma density, R philippinarum size and bioturbation time.The transport rate of tracer beads increased with density of C chrysoderma on day 7, but was negatively correlated on day 20.The transport rate of tracer beads decreased with size of R philippinarum at both sampling time.The maximum depth and number of tracer particles transported in the sediment

  9. Cambrian substrate revolution :from matgrounds to bioturbated mixgrounds%寒武纪底质革命:从微生物席底到生物扰动混合底

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐永安; 王敏; 李妲; 代明月

    2012-01-01

    前寒武纪生态系以微生物的繁盛为特征,以叠层石和微生物成因沉积构造的大量发育为标志.后生动物及其遗迹化石出现在新元古代“雪球事件”之后,并与微生物席组成“埃迪卡拉花园”.新元古代的海底以发育完好的微生物席底和微弱的垂向生物扰动为特征,沉积物含水量低、沉积物.水界面平滑稳定;到寒武纪,由于垂向生物扰动的大量增加,微生物席底逐渐衰弱,“显生宙式”的海底沉积物含水量高、上下层沉积物易于混合和悬浮、沉积物一水界面模糊.自寒武纪开始,随着后生动物活动在浅海环境中不断地增多,遗迹化石习性类型趋于多样化和复杂化,微生物席底开始向较深的陆架乃至深海迁移并逐渐消亡.%Precambrian ecosystems are characterized by the flourish of microbiota and wide occurrence of stro- matolites and microbially induced sedimentary structures. Metazoans and their trace fossils, occurong after the Neoproterozoic "Snowball Earth" event, made up of "The Garden of Ediacara" with microbial mats. Late Neoproterozoic seafloor were characterized by well-developed microbial mats and poor development of vertical- ly-oriented bioturbation, thus it provied a fairly stable, relatively low water content sediment surface With a sharp water-sediment interface. Microbially-bound seafloor became increasingly scarce in shallow-marine set- tings of Cambrian, largely due to evolution of burrowing organisms with an increasing vertically-oriented com- ponent to their bioturbation. This " Phanerozoic-style" seafloor had a blurry water-sediment interface, greater water content, and lacked well-developed microbial mats. With the reworking increase of metazoans in Cam- brian shallow marine settings, the trace fossils tended to be more diverse and complex, and microbial mat- grounds retreated to deep sea and gradually disappeared.

  10. Oil spill effects on macrofaunal communities and bioturbation of pristine marine sediments (Caleta Valdés, Patagonia, Argentina): experimental evidence of low resistance capacities of benthic systems without history of pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Agustina; Gonzalez, Emilia; Franco, Marcos; Commendatore, Marta; Nievas, Marina; Militon, Cécile; Stora, Georges; Gilbert, Franck; Esteves, José Luis; Cuny, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    The Patagonian coast is characterized by the existence of pristine ecosystems which may be particularly sensitive to oil contamination. In this study, a simulated oil spill at acute and chronic input levels was carried out to assess the effects of contamination on the macrobenthic community structure and the bioturbation activity of sediments sampled in Caleta Valdés creek. Superficial sediments were either noncontaminated or contaminated by Escalante crude oil and incubated in the laboratory for 30 days. Oil contamination induced adverse effects on macrobenthic community at both concentrations with, for the highest concentration, a marked decrease of approximately 40 and 55 % of density and specific richness, respectively. Besides the disappearance of sensitive species, some other species like Oligochaeta sp. 1, Paranebalia sp., and Ostracoda sp. 2 species have a higher resistance to oil contamination. Sediment reworking activity was also affected by oil addition. At the highest level of contamination, nearly no activity was observed due to the high mortality of macroorganisms. The results strongly suggest that an oil spill in this protected marine area with no previous history of contamination would have a deep impact on the non-adapted macrobenthic community.

  11. Seeing the unseen-bioturbation in 4D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delefosse, Matthieu; Kristensen, Erik; Crunelle, Diane;

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spatial and temporal patterns of bioirrigation induced by benthic fauna ventilation is critical given its significance on benthic nutrient exchange and biogeochemistry in coastal ecosystems. The quantification of this process challenges marine scientists because faunal activities...... and behaviors are concealed in an opaque sediment matrix. Here, we use a hybrid medical imaging technique, positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) to provide a qualitative visual and fully quantitative description of bioirrigation in 4D (space and time). As a study case, we present images...

  12. Doomed pioneers: Gravity-flow deposition and bioturbation in marine oxygen-deficient environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föilmi, Karl B.; Grimm, Kurt A.

    1990-11-01

    Isolated horizons of Thalassinoides and Gyrolithes burrows appear in exclusive association with gravity-flow deposits within sequences of nonbioturbated hernipelagic sedimentary rocks of the Miocene Monterey Formation of California and the Oligocene-Miocene San Gregorio Formation of Baja California. These burrowed levels are not associated with other ichnogenera such as Zoophycos and Chondrites. We infer a causal relation between gravity flow deposition and the presence of Thalassinoides and Gyrolithes and suggest that these gravity flows entrained thalassinidean crustacea. Upon deposition in oxygen-deficient environments, the surviving borrowers reworked substantial quantities of aminated, commonly organic-rich sediments in an environment from which they were previously excluded. The persistence of or the ecologically rapid return to oxygen-depleted conditions limited the survival time and ecological complexity of the transported infaunal dwellers and rendered them doomed pioneers. Ecological and physiological data support this hypothesis: thalassinidean crustacea have the capability to endure turbulent transport and survive up to 5-7 days of anoxia without being severely limited in their biological activities. The accurate recognition of doomed pioneer trace-fossil assemblages as ephemeral ecological phenomena in otherwise laminated successions may contribute to a better understanding and interpretation of paleo-oxygen levels and basin history.

  13. Testing the potential for improving quality of sediments impacted by mussel farms using bioturbating polychaete worms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Per; Carlsson, Marita S; Lindegarth, Mats;

    2015-01-01

    Biodeposits from farmed mussels severely influence the biogeochemistry of sediments by increasing the levels of organic matter (OM). Mitigation of such negative impacts is important for the development of sustainable aquaculture operations. As a step towards developing methods for remediation...... of coastal sediments affected by mussel farming, the effects of the polychaete, Hediste diversicolor was evaluated experimentally. In a series of field- and laboratory experiments we tested hypotheses about the effects of polychaetes on sediment oxygen consumption, nutrient fluxes and sulphide pools under...... of OM. The accumulation of pore water sulphides were reduced and fluxes of nutrients across the sediment-water interface increased. Additional calculations suggest that the effects of polychaetes were mainly indirect and driven by increased microbial activity due to the borrowing activity...

  14. Depth Profile of Bacterial Metabolism and PAH Biodegradation in Bioturbated and Unbioturbated Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Reactivity of Terriginous Organic Matter in this Study Phenolic Group Phenol suite (code) Remarks Vanillyl vanillin (Vl), acetovanillone (Vn), vanillic...is degraded in the sediment has been measured using a degradation index (Fig. 4). The ratio of acid to aldehyde for the vanillin family of lignin...is not statistically significant. The ratio of 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid to vanillin (DHBd/V) is Depth Profile of Bacterial Metabolism 5

  15. The Impact of Hypoxia on Bioturbation Rates in the Louisianna Continental Shelf, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    and below event layers, vertical, horizontal, and complex burrows. Preliminary radiochemistry results for the April 2009 cruise indicate shallow...sediment cores collected in April 2009, preliminary radiochemistry data indicates shallow depths of sediment mixing at all sites on a temporal scale of...preliminary radiochemistry data indicates shallow depths of sediment mixing at all sites on a temporal scale of ~1 year (Be-7), though sediments from

  16. Redistribution of fallout radionuclides in Enewetak Atoll lagoon sediments by callianassid bioturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtry, G M; Schneider, R C; Colin, P L; Buddemeier, R W; Suchanek, T H

    The lagoon sediments of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands contain a large selection of fallout radionuclides as a result of 43 nuclear weapon tests conducted there between 1948 and 1958. Studies of the burial of fallout radionuclides have been conducted on the islands and in several of the large craters, but studies of their vertical distribution have been limited to about the upper 20 cm of the lagoon sediments. We have found elevated fallout radionuclide concentrations buried more deeply in the lagoon sediments and evidence of burrowing into the sediment by several species of callianassid ghost shrimp (Crustacea: Thalassinidea) which has displaced highly radioactive sediment. The burrowing activities of callianassids, which are ubiquitous on the lagoon floor, facilitate radionuclide redistribution and complicate the fallout radionuclide inventory of the lagoon.

  17. Quantification of termite bioturbation in a savannah ecosystem: Application of OSL dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jeppe Ågård; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    transport soil from depth to the surface to construct termitaria. Over time, erosion levels these mounds and returns the sediment to the soil surface. These two processes of construction and erosion together represent an upward “conveyor belt” sediment transport process. We find that the sediment...

  18. The effects of bioturbation on nutrient fluxes in lakes subjected to lake restoration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Boll; Reitzel, Kasper; Andersen, Frede Østergaard;

    ) and cores from areas with and areas without an Al layer in Lake Nordborg with benthic macroinvertebrates in natural densities and "natural densities + 2800 Chironomus plumosus m-2" we are investigating the effects of benthic macroinvertebrates on nutrient fluxes and their influence on the effectiveness...

  19. Survival and bioturbation effects of common marine macrofauna in coastal soils newly flooded with seawater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valdemarsen, Thomas Bruun; Quintana, Cintia Organo; Thorsen, Sandra Walløe;

    of polychaetes on CO2 and nutrient fluxes for 4 weeks, and by the end quantified survival and bioirrigation activity. Results show that polychaetes stimulate benthic metabolism and nutrient release in flooded soil and therefore accelerate the transformation of soils into sediments. Furthermore it appears......Low-lying coastal soils are at risk of being permanently flooded due to global sea level rise, but how will these areas develop as habitat for marine species? We conducted an experiment to evaluate the habitat quality of flooded soils for common marine polychaetes (Marenzelleria viridis, Nereis...... diversicolor and Scoloplos armiger). Soil cores were collected at Gyldensteen Beach (Northern Fyn, Denmark), where a 200 ha area is designated for flooding as part of a nature restoration project. Soils cores were experimentally flooded for 1 month before adding polychaetes. We measured the effect...

  20. The impact of bioturbation by small mammals on heavy metal redistribution in an embanked floodplain of the river Rhine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, S.; Thonon, I.; Velde, G. van der; Leuven, R.S.E.W.; Zorn, M.; Eijsackers, H.; Smits, A.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Floodplains along large European rivers are diffusely polluted with heavy metals due to emissions in the past. Because of lowmobility of heavy metals in floodplain soils and improvements of water quality, these pollutants will remain in place, and can gradually become covered with less contaminated

  1. The impact of bioturbation by small mammals on heavy metal redistribution in an embanked floodplain of the River Rhine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, S.; Thonon, I.; Velde, G.D.; Leuven, R.; Zorn, M.; Eijsackers, H.J.P.; Smits, T.

    2006-01-01

    Floodplains along large European rivers are diffusely polluted with heavy metals due to emissions in the past. Because of low mobility of heavy metals in floodplain soils and improvements of water quality, these pollutants will remain in place, and can gradually become covered with less contaminated

  2. Rapid molecular assessment of the bioturbation extent in sandy soil horizons under pine using ester-bound lipids by on-line thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation-gas chromatography / mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierop, K.G.J.; Verstraten, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Each plant species has a unique chemical composition, and also within a given plant the various tissues differ from one another in their chemistry. These different compositions can be traced back after decay of the plant parts when they are transformed into soil organic matter (SOM). As a result, th

  3. The impact of sediment reworking by opportunistic chironomids on specialised mayflies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de E.M.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Koelmans, A.A.; Admiraal, W.

    2005-01-01

    1. Bioturbation, by definition, changes the structure and properties of sediments, thereby altering the environment of the bioturbator and other benthic species. In addition to the indirect effects of sediment reworking (e.g. changes in water quality), bioturbating species may also directly interfer

  4. Digital X-Radiography Scanning Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Generates digital X-radiographic images of sediment cores that portray density variations, sediment stratigraphy, bioturbation, and inclusions.DESCRIPTION:...

  5. Out of the dark - inverse modelling to make sense of luminescence properties of soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temme, A.J.A.M.; Langston, A.; Reimann, T.; Vanwalleghem, T.; Roman Sanchez, A.

    2015-01-01

    Novel single-grain luminescence measurements of quartz and feldspar grains offer exciting ways forward to characterize rates and mechanisms of soil bioturbation. However, to fulfil this potential, the attribution problem must be solved – we must know which bioturbation mechanisms can lead to the obs

  6. A documentation on burrows in hard substrates of ferromanganese crusts and associated soft sediments from the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.

    sediments on the sea floor also show numerous records of recent bioturbation activity. Thus presence of the ancient and modern burrows from tha same locality on the ocean floor indicates a prolonged bioturbation activity in this part of the CIB and this may...

  7. Complex effects of ecosystem engineer loss on benthic ecosystem response to detrital macroalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, F.; Gribsholt, B.; Gazeau, F.; Di Santo, V.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Ecosystem engineers change abiotic conditions, community assembly and ecosystem functioning. Consequently, their loss may modify thresholds of ecosystem response to disturbance and undermine ecosystem stability. This study investigates how loss of the bioturbating lugworm Arenicola marina modifies t

  8. Complex Effects of Ecosystem Engineer Loss on Benthic Ecosystem Response to Detrital Macroalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, F.; Gribsholt, B.; Gazeau, F.; Di Santo, V.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Ecosystem engineers change abiotic conditions, community assembly and ecosystem functioning. Consequently, their loss may modify thresholds of ecosystem response to disturbance and undermine ecosystem stability. This study investigates how loss of the bioturbating lugworm Arenicola marina modifies t

  9. Invertebrate footprints on detritus processing, bacterial community structure, and spatiotemporal redox profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunting, E.R.; Whatley, M.H.; van der Geest, H.G.; Mulder, C.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Breure, A.M.; Admiraal, W.

    2012-01-01

    Detritus processing is driven by a complex interplay between macroinvertebrate and microbial activities. Bioturbation/feeding activities of invertebrates in sediments are known to influence decomposition rates. However, direct effects of invertebrates on bacterial communities and detritus processing

  10. Potential effect of fiddler crabs on organic matter distribution: A combined laboratory and field experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natálio, Luís F.; Pardo, Juan C. F.; Machado, Glauco B. O.; Fortuna, Monique D.; Gallo, Deborah G.; Costa, Tânia M.

    2017-01-01

    Bioturbators play a key role in estuarine environments by modifying the availability of soil elements, which in turn may affect other organisms. Despite the importance of bioturbators, few studies have combined both field and laboratory experiments to explore the effects of bioturbators on estuarine soils. Herein, we assessed the bioturbation potential of fiddler crabs Leptuca leptodactyla and Leptuca uruguayensis in laboratory and field experiments, respectively. We evaluated whether the presence of fiddler crabs resulted in vertical transport of sediment, thereby altering organic matter (OM) distribution. Under laboratory conditions, the burrowing activity by L. leptodactyla increased the OM content in sediment surface. In the long-term field experiment with areas of inclusion and exclusion of L. uruguayensis, we did not observe influence of this fiddler crab in the vertical distribution of OM. Based on our results, we suggest that small fiddler crabs, such as the species used in these experiments, are potentially capable of alter their environment by transporting sediment and OM but such effects may be masked by environmental drivers and spatial heterogeneity under natural conditions. This phenomenon may be related to the small size of these species, which affects how much sediment is transported, along with the way OM interacts with biogeochemical and physical processes. Therefore, the net effect of these burrowing organisms is likely to be the result of a complex interaction with other environmental factors. In this sense, we highlight the importance of performing simultaneous field and laboratory experiments in order to better understanding the role of burrowing animals as bioturbators.

  11. Burgess shale-type biotas were not entirely burrowed away

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaines, Robert R.; Droser, Mary L.; Orr, Patrick J.;

    2012-01-01

    Burgess Shale-type biotas occur globally in the Cambrian record and offer unparalleled insight into the Cambrian explosion, the initial Phanerozoic radiation of the Metazoa. Deposits bearing exceptionally preserved soft-bodied fossils are unusually common in Cambrian strata; more than 40 are now......, however, suggest a more complex scenario. Ichnologic and microstratigraphic data from Burgess Shale-type deposits indicate that (1) bioturbation exerts a limiting effect on soft-bodied preservation; (2) the observed increase in the depth and extent or bioturbation following the Middle Cambrian would have...... restricted preservation of Burgess Shale type biotas in a number of settings; but (3) increasing depth and extent of bioturbation would not have affected preservation in many other settings, including the most richly fossiliferous portions of the Chengjiang (China) deposit and the Greater Phyllopod Bed...

  12. Microbially assisted recording of the Earth's magnetic field in sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangyu; Egli, Ramon; Gilder, Stuart A; Müller, Sebastian

    2016-02-11

    Sediments continuously record variations of the Earth's magnetic field and thus provide an important archive for studying the geodynamo. The recording process occurs as magnetic grains partially align with the geomagnetic field during and after sediment deposition, generating a depositional remanent magnetization (DRM) or post-DRM (PDRM). (P)DRM acquisition mechanisms have been investigated for over 50 years, yet many aspects remain unclear. A key issue concerns the controversial role of bioturbation, that is, the mechanical disturbance of sediment by benthic organisms, during PDRM acquisition. A recent theory on bioturbation-driven PDRM appears to solve many inconsistencies between laboratory experiments and palaeomagnetic records, yet it lacks experimental proof. Here we fill this gap by documenting the important role of bioturbation-induced rotational diffusion for (P)DRM acquisition, including the control exerted on the recorded inclination and intensity, as determined by the equilibrium between aligning and perturbing torques acting on magnetic particles.

  13. Extinction and ecosystem function in the marine benthos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solan, Martin; Cardinale, Bradley J; Downing, Amy L; Engelhardt, Katharina A M; Ruesink, Jennifer L; Srivastava, Diane S

    2004-11-12

    Rapid changes in biodiversity are occurring globally, yet the ecological impacts of diversity loss are poorly understood. Here we use data from marine invertebrate communities to parameterize models that predict how extinctions will affect sediment bioturbation, a process vital to the persistence of aquatic communities. We show that species extinction is generally expected to reduce bioturbation, but the magnitude of reduction depends on how the functional traits of individual species covary with their risk of extinction. As a result, the particular cause of extinction and the order in which species are lost ultimately govern the ecosystem-level consequences of biodiversity loss.

  14. Indirect effects of non-lethal predation on bivalve activity and sediment reworking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maire, O.; Merchant, J.N.; Bulling, M.; Teal, L.R.; Gremare, A.; Duchene, J.C.; Solan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Deposit-feeders are the dominant bioturbators of aquatic sediments, where they profoundly impact biogeochemical processes, but they are also vulnerable to both lethal and non-lethal predation by a large variety of predators. In this study, we performed a series of experiments to test the effects of

  15. Modeling 210Pb-derived mixing activity in ocean margin sediments: Diffusive versus nonlocal mixing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, K.E.R.; Herman, P.M.J.; Middelburg, J.J.; Heip, C.H.R.; De Stigter, H.; Van Weering, T.C.E.; Epping, E.; Helder, W.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of sediment mixing on activity versus depth profiles of the radionuclide (210)pb in the upper 20 cm of the sediments has been investigated along a depth transect (208 m- 4500 m, 17 stations) in the OMEX study area (Goban Spur, NE Atlantic Ocean). A hierarchical family of bioturbation/n

  16. Preliminary geotechnical properties of deepsea sediments from the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khadge, N.H.

    Pa) shear strength which increases with depth. Average undrained shear strength of siliceous sediments is 3.6kPa and average water content is 430%. Sediments have high porosity (88-93%) and imply compressible nature. Bioturbated layers show increase in water...

  17. Macrofaunal Impact on the Denitrifying Bacterial Community in Freshwater Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten; Stief, Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    actively expressed in the gut contents of C. plumosus. The remaining increase may be due to the creation of a (on the microscale) more structured habitat by larval activities like burrow construction, bioturbation, and water pumping, possibly combined with a general activation of microbes by enriching...

  18. Occurrence of benthic microbial nitrogen fixation coupled to sulfate reduction in the seasonally hypoxic Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertics, V. J.; Löscher, C. R.; Salonen, I.

    2013-01-01

    correlated with bottom water oxygen concentrations. Other variables that also appeared to play a role in rate determination were bioturbation, bubble irrigation and winter storm events. Molecular analysis demonstrated the presence of nifH sequences related to two known N2 fixing SRB, namely Desulfovibrio...

  19. Influence of Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae) and Tubifex tubifex (Annelida, Oligochaeta) on oxygen uptake by sediments. Consequences of uranium contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagauzere, S. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DEI/SECRE/LRE, Cadarache 186, BP 3, F-13115 Cedex, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: lagauzere@gmail.com; Pischedda, L.; Cuny, P. [Laboratoire de Microbiologie, Geochimie et Ecologie Marines, UMR 6117 CNRS/COM/Universite de la Mediterranee, Campus de Luminy, Case 901, F-13288 Cedex 09, Marseille (France); Gilbert, F. [EcoLab, Laboratoire d' Ecologie Fonctionnelle, UMR 5245 CNRS/INP/Universite Paul Sabatier, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, F-31055 Cedex 4, Toulouse (France); Stora, G. [Laboratoire de Microbiologie, Geochimie et Ecologie Marines, UMR 6117 CNRS/COM/Universite de la Mediterranee, Campus de Luminy, Case 901, F-13288 Cedex 09, Marseille (France); Bonzom, J.-M. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DEI/SECRE/LRE, Cadarache 186, BP 3, F-13115 Cedex, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2009-04-15

    The diffusive oxygen uptake (DOU) of sediments inhabited by Chironomus riparius and Tubifex tubifex was investigated using a planar oxygen optode device, and complemented by measurements of bioturbation activity. Additional experiments were performed within contaminated sediments to assess the impact of uranium on these processes. After 72 h, the two invertebrate species significantly increased the DOU of sediments (13-14%), and no temporal variation occurred afterwards. Within contaminated sediments, it was already 24% higher before the introduction of the organisms, suggesting that uranium modified the sediment biogeochemistry. Although the two species firstly reacted by avoidance of contaminated sediment, they finally colonized it. Their bioturbation activity was reduced but, for T. tubifex, it remained sufficient to induce a release of uranium to the water column and an increase of the DOU (53%). These results highlight the necessity of further investigations to take into account the interactions between bioturbation, microbial metabolism and pollutants. - This study highlights the ecological importance of bioturbation in metal-contaminated sediments.

  20. Effects of carbohydrate source for maintaining a high C:N ratio and fish driven re-suspension on pond ecology and production in periphyton-based freshwater prawn culture systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asaduzzaman, M.; Wahab, M.A.; Verdegem, M.C.J.; Adhikary, R.K.; Rahman, S.M.S.; Azim, M.E.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The present research investigated the effect of carbohydrate (CH) source for maintaining a high C:N ratio, and tilapia driven bioturbation on pond ecology, production and economical performances in C/N controlled periphyton-based (C/N-CP) freshwater prawn ponds. Two carbohydrate sources (high-cost t

  1. Evaluation of Sediment Contamination in Pearl Harbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    Mercenaria mercenaria) and adult shrimp (Penaeus vannamet) in a flow-through seawater system. Adult brine shrimp ( Artemia salina) and postlarval...activities of organisms modifies many pollutant substances. The bioaccumulation of contaminants by marine organisms such as oysters, clams, crabs, shrimp ...migration pathway. The burrowing activities (bioturbation) by bottom-dwelling organisms such as snapping shrimp , mantis shrimp , worms, and certain

  2. Effect of macrofauna, oxygen exchange and particle reworking on iron and manganese sediment gogeochemistry: a laboratory experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferro, I.; Van Nugteren, P.; Middelburg, J.J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2003-01-01

    The impact of bioturbation on iron and manganese cycling in rine sediments was studied in laboratory experiments in which faunal effects which combine in the field (particle mixing and oxygen exchange) were studied separately. Particle mixing and sediment aeration both enhance metal oxide reduction

  3. Contrasting macrobenthic activities differentially affect nematode density and diversity in a shallow subtidal marine sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braeckman, U.; van Colen, C.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Vincx, M.; Vanaverbeke, J.

    2011-01-01

    By bioturbating and bio-irrigating the sea floor, macrobenthic organisms transport organic matter and oxygen from the surface to deeper layers, thereby extending the habitat suitable for smaller infauna. Next to these engineering activities, competition, disturbance and predation may also affect the

  4. A novel approach to the assess biotic oxygen consumption in marine sediment communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Victor; Queiros, Ana; Widdicombe, Stephen; Stephens, Nick; Lessin, Gennadi; Krause, Stefan; Lewandowski, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    Bioturbation , the mixing of the sediment matrix by burrowing animals impacts sediment metabolism, including respiration through redistribution of particulate organics, changes in bacterial biota diversity and acitivity, as well as via burrowing fauna's own metabolism. Bioturbation, reflecting faunal activity, is also a proxy for the general sedimentary ecosystem health, and can be impacted by many of emerging marine environmental issues such as ocean acidification, warming and the occurrence of heat waves. Sedimentary oxygen consumption is often taken as a proxy for the activity of bioturbating fauna, but determining baselines can be difficult because of the confounding effects of other fauna and microbes present in sediments, as well as irnorganic processes that consume oxygen. Limitations therefore exist in current methodologies, and numerous confounding factors are hampering progress in this area. Here, we present novel method for the assessment of sediment respiration which is expected to be affected only by the biogenic oxygen consumption (namely aerobic respiration). As long as tracer reduction "immune" to inorganic oxygen consumption, so that measurements using this method can be used, alongside traditional methods, to decouple biological respiration from inorganic oxygen consumption reactions. The tracer is easily detectable, non-toxic and can be applied in systems with constant oxygen supply. The latter allow for incubation without the need to to work with unsealed experimental units, bringing procedural advantage over traditional methods. Consequently assessed bioturbating fauna is not exposed to hypoxia and additional stress. Here, we had applied system for the first time to investigate impacts of a common North-Atlantic bioturbator, the brittle star Amphiura filiformis, - on respiration of marine sediments. Two series of experiments were conducted with animals and sediment collected from Cawsand Bay, Plymouth, UK Preliminary results show that tracer

  5. Modelling potential impacts of bottom trawl fisheries on soft sediment biogeochemistry in the North Sea†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Ruth

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Bottom trawling causes physical disturbance to sediments particularly in shelf areas. The disturbance due to trawling is most significant in deeper areas with softer sediments where levels of natural disturbance due to wave and tidal action are low. In heavily fished areas, trawls may impact the same area of seabed more than four times per year. A single pass of a beam trawl, the heaviest gear routinely used in shelf sea fisheries, can kill 5–65% of the resident fauna and mix the top few cm of sediment. We expect that sediment community function, carbon mineralisation and biogeochemical fluxes will be strongly affected by trawling activity because the physical effects of trawling are equivalent to those of an extreme bioturbator, and yet, unlike bioturbating macrofauna, trawling does not directly contribute to community metabolism. We used an existing box-model of a generalised soft sediment system to examine the effects of trawling disturbance on carbon mineralisation and chemical concentrations. We contrasted the effects of a natural scenario, where bioturbation is a function of macrobenthos biomass, with an anthropogenic impact scenario where physical disturbance results from trawling rather than the action of bioturbating macrofauna. Simulation results suggest that the effects of low levels of trawling disturbance will be similar to those of natural bioturbators but that high levels of trawling disturbance prevent the modelled system from reaching equilibrium due to large carbon fluxes between oxic and anoxic carbon compartments. The presence of macrobenthos in the natural disturbance scenario allowed sediment chemical storage and fluxes to reach equilibrium. This is because the macrobenthos are important carbon consumers in the system whose presence reduces the magnitude of available carbon fluxes. In soft sediment systems, where the level physical disturbance due to waves and tides is low, model results suggest that intensive trawling

  6. Metal contaminant fluxes across the sediment water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frogner-Kockum, Paul; Göransson, Peter; Åslund, Henrik; Ländell, Märta; Stevens, Rodney; Tengberg, Anders; Göransson, Gunnel; Ohlsson, Yvonne

    2016-10-15

    To date, most estimates of contaminant fluxes across the sediment/water interface in risk assessments have been done using diffusive flux models. However, the reliability of these is limited as the overall flux from the sediment may have contributions caused by advection and bioturbation. We found through a comparison of modelled fluxes versus measured fluxes, that the methods Benthic Flux Chamber and surface leaching tests in a risk assessment context showed similar magnitude while calculated fluxes deviated at least by a factor of 100 from measured fluxes. This may be explained by the flux contribution in connection with bioturbation. The chamber-measured fluxes of copper were low compared to those of zinc and cobalt, but this is consistent with leaching tests that indicated copper to be more strongly bound. Risk assessments based on total concentrations may be misleading.

  7. Plutonium in the marine environment at Thule, NW-Greenland after a nuclear weapons accident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, H.; Eriksson, M.; Ilus, E.

    2001-01-01

    In January 1968, a B52 plane carrying 4 nuclear weapon!: crashed on the sea ice similar to 12 km from the Thule Air Base, in northwest Greenland. The benthic marine environment in the 180-230 m deep Bylot Sound was then contaminated with similar to1.4 TBq Pu-239,Pu-240 (similar to0.5 kg). The site...... was revisited in August 1997, 29 years after the accident. Water and brown algae data indicate that plutonium is not transported from the contaminated sediments into the surface waters in significant quantities. Sediment core data only indicate minor translocation of plutonium from the accident to the area...... into the contaminated layer. In addition to the classical bioturbation mixing the upper approximate to5 cm, the plutonium data indicate the existence of a deeper bioturbation gradually decreasing with depth. Transfer of plutonium to benthic biota is low leading to 1-2 orders of magnitude lower concentrations in biota...

  8. Modelling Soil Profiles in their Landscape Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Through models, explores the relationships between the interacting drivers of soil profile evolution. Soil hydrology drives the partition of precipitation between overland flow, shallow subsurface flow and deeper percolation/ lateral flow. Critical parts of this interchange occurs close to the surface, within the zone of strong bioturbation, where inorganic composition is determined by the balance between erosion and weathering rates expressed in the chemical depletion ratio. The intensity of organic matter cycling may also limit the final composition of weathering products. Erosion rates are partly driven by the geomorphic environment, through gradient and hydrology, but also constrained by the degree of soil weathering, through particle size and mineralogy. Weathering rates are determined by water movement below the bioturbation zone and ionic diffusion from parent material, which control the rate of decline with soil depth. These interactions are explored through simple equilibrium and evolutionary models for the soil profile that are applicable across a wide range of geological and climatic environments.

  9. Ecological implications of changes in polychaetes population in a shallow Danish estuary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delefosse, Matthieu

    in this thesis evaluates the effect of population change in size and distribution of 3 polychaete species in a shallow Danish estuary - Odense Fjord: the 2 ecologically important Arenicola marina and Nereis diversicolor and the non-native species Marenzelleria viridis. We focus on the effect of the dynamic......Burrowing polychaetes are typically the most numerous and active class among macrobenthic infauna in Danish estuaries. Their ecological role is well-recognized and has been often associated with their bioturbating activities. Construction and maintenance of galleries as well as ingestion...... and defecation displace sediment particles. Ventilation of their burrow irrigates the sediment. These activities transform the environment for other species: from microbes to plants (MS5). Given the important relations between bioturbating polychaetes and their ecosystem, any significant changes in population...

  10. Palaeoenvironment of Eocene prodelta in Spitsbergen recorded by the trace fossil Phycosiphon incertum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Rodríguez-Tovar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ichnological, sedimentological and geochemical analyses were conducted on the Eocene Frysjaodden Formation in order to interpret palaeoenvironment prodelta sediments in the Central Basin of Spitsbergen. Phycosiphon incertum is the exclusive ichnotaxon showing differences in size, distribution, abundance and density, and relation to laminated/bioturbated intervals. Large P. incertum mainly occur dispersed, isolated and randomly distributed throughout the weakly laminated/non-laminated intervals. Small P. incertum occur occasionally in patches of several burrows within laminated intervals or as densely packed burrows in thin horizons in laminated intervals or constituting fully bioturbated intervals that are several centimetres thick. Ichnological changes are mainly controlled by oxygenation, although the availability of benthic food cannot be discarded. Changes in oxygenation and rate of sedimentation can be correlated with the registered variations in the Bouma sequence of the distal turbiditic beds within prodeltal shelf sediments.

  11. Bacterial Production and Contamination Mineralization in Sediments of the Ala Wai Canal, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-29

    Apple, L.J. Hamdan, C.L. Osburn, and M.T. Montgomery. 2008. Evaluating PAH biodegradation relative to bacterial carbon demand in coastal...metabolism and PAH biodegradation in bioturbated and unbioturbated marine sediments. US Naval Research Laboratory, Formal Report, NRL/FR/6114—03...Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ( PAH ) mineralization was relatively low compared with other urbanized watersheds. Even with enhanced flow associated

  12. Eocene (Lutetian) Shark-Rich Coastal Paleoenvironments of the Southern North Sea Basin in Europe: Biodiversity of the Marine Fürstenau Formation Including Early White and Megatooth Sharks

    OpenAIRE

    C. G. Diedrich

    2012-01-01

    The Fürstenau Formation (Lutetian, Paleogene, Eocene) is based on type sections near Fürstenau in Germany (central Europe) and is built of 22 meter thick marine glauconitic and strongly bioturbated sands, clays, and a vertebrate-rich conglomerate bed. The conglomerate layer from the Early Lutetian transgression reworked Lower Cretaceous, and Paleogene marine sediments. It is dominated by pebbles from the locally mountains which must have been transported by an ancient river in a delta fan. Ma...

  13. Biological vs. physical mixing effects on benthic food web dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Braeckman

    Full Text Available Biological particle mixing (bioturbation and solute transfer (bio-irrigation contribute extensively to ecosystem functioning in sediments where physical mixing is low. Macrobenthos transports oxygen and organic matter deeper into the sediment, thereby likely providing favourable niches to lower trophic levels (i.e., smaller benthic animals such as meiofauna and bacteria and thus stimulating mineralisation. Whether this biological transport facilitates fresh organic matter assimilation by the metazoan lower part of the food web through niche establishment (i.e., ecosystem engineering or rather deprives them from food sources, is so far unclear. We investigated the effects of the ecosystem engineers Lanice conchilega (bio-irrigator and Abra alba (bioturbator compared to abiotic physical mixing events on survival and food uptake of nematodes after a simulated phytoplankton bloom. The (13C labelled diatom Skeletonema costatum was added to 4 treatments: (1 microcosms containing the bioturbator, (2 microcosms containing the bio-irrigator, (3 control microcosms and (4 microcosms with abiotic manual surface mixing. Nematode survival and subsurface peaks in nematode density profiles were most pronounced in the bio-irrigator treatment. However, nematode specific uptake (Δδ(13C of the added diatoms was highest in the physical mixing treatment, where macrobenthos was absent and the diatom (13C was homogenised. Overall, nematodes fed preferentially on bulk sedimentary organic material rather than the added diatoms. The total C budget (µg C m(-2, which included TO(13C remaining in the sediment, respiration, nematode and macrobenthic uptake, highlighted the limited assimilation by the metazoan benthos and the major role of bacterial respiration. In summary, bioturbation and especially bio-irrigation facilitated the lower trophic levels mainly over the long-term through niche establishment. Since the freshly added diatoms represented only a limited food

  14. The stratigraphy of cretaceous mudstones in the eastern Fuegian Andes: new data from body and trace fossils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo B. Olivero

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The stratigraphy of Cretaceous marine mudstones in the Fuegian Andes, roughly equivalent to Charles Darwin's clay-slate formation, remains a still unsolved problem. Previous records of Albian, Turonian-Coniacian, and Santonian-Campanian bivalves are combined with new findings of the Late Albian inoceramid Inoceramus anglicus Woods, and the Maastrichtian ammonites Diplomoceras sp., Anagaudryceras sp., Maorites densicostatus (Kilian and Reboul, Maorites sp., and Pachydiscus (Neodesmoceras sp. to further constrain the Cretaceous stratigraphy of the eastern Fuegian Andes. In addition, new records of distinctive trace fossils and ichnofabric are meaningful for stratigraphic division and delineation of paleoenvironmental settings in these Cretaceous mudstones. The Lower Cretaceous ichnoassemblage of Chondrites targioni (Brongniart and Zoophycos isp. is consistent with the inferred slope-volcaniclastic apron settings of the Yahgan Formation; Nereites missouriensis (Weller reflects distal basin plain depositional settings for the Beauvoir Formation. In the Upper Cretaceous, the "Estratos de Buen Suceso" record the earliest extensively bioturbated horizons, reflecting prolonged well-oxygenated bottom conditions. In the Bahía Thetis Formation, organic-rich, channel margin or distal basin slaty mudstones record the last occurrence of inoceramid bivalves in the Austral Basin; the generalized absence of trace fossils is consistent with dysoxic bottom conditions. The thoroughly bioturbated Policarpo Formation, records a marked change in paleoceanographic conditions. The strong contrast in the intensity of bioturbation between the Upper Campanian-Maastrichtian Bahía Thetis Formation, almost devoid of trace fossils, and the highly bioturbated Maastrichtian-Danian Policarpo Formation reflects a change from dysoxic-anoxic to well ventilated conditions, probably associated with a cooling trend of bottom waters in the austral deep oceans.

  15. The importance of biotic entrainment for base flow fluvial sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Stephen P.; Johnson, Matthew F.; Mathers, Kate; Reeds, Jake; Extence, Chris

    2016-05-01

    Sediment transport is regarded as an abiotic process driven by geophysical energy, but zoogeomorphological activity indicates that biological energy can also fuel sediment movements. It is therefore prudent to measure the contribution that biota make to sediment transport, but comparisons of abiotic and biotic sediment fluxes are rare. For a stream in the UK, the contribution of crayfish bioturbation to suspended sediment flux was compared with the amount of sediment moved by hydraulic forcing. During base flow periods, biotic fluxes can be isolated because nocturnal crayfish activity drives diel turbidity cycles, such that nighttime increases above daytime lows are attributable to sediment suspension by crayfish. On average, crayfish bioturbation contributed at least 32% (474 kg) to monthly base flow suspended sediment loads; this biotic surcharge added between 5.1 and 16.1 t (0.21 to 0.66 t km-2 yr-1) to the annual sediment yield. As anticipated, most sediment was moved by hydraulic forcing during floods and the biotic contribution from baseflow periods represented between 0.46 and 1.46% of the annual load. Crayfish activity is nonetheless an important impact during baseflow periods and the measured annual contribution may be a conservative estimate because of unusually prolonged flooding during the measurement period. In addition to direct sediment entrainment by bioturbation, crayfish burrowing supplies sediment to the channel for mobilization during floods so that the total biotic effect of crayfish is potentially greater than documented in this study. These results suggest that in rivers, during base flow periods, bioturbation can entrain significant quantities of fine sediment into suspension with implications for the aquatic ecosystem and base flow sediment fluxes. Energy from life rather than from elevation can make significant contributions to sediment fluxes.

  16. Radiocarbon dating of mangrove sediments to constrain Holocene relative sea-level change on Zanzibar in the southwest Indian Ocean.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Mangrove sedimentary deposits are sensitive to changes in sea level and can be used to reconstruct mid- to late Holocene sea-level fluctuations in intermediate and far-field locations, distant to the former polar ice sheets. However, they can be difficult to date using 14C because mangrove sediment can contain mixtures of carbon of different ages. The two main potential causes of error are younger mangrove roots penetrating down through the sediment column and bioturbation by burrowing animal...

  17. San Francisco Deep Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (SF-DODS) Monitoring Program. Physical, Chemical, and Benthic Community Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-29

    transferred to 80% ethyl alchohol soon after arrival in Woods Hole. 4.2 Laboratory Methods and Data Analysis This section describes the analysis methods...Bioturbation also affects sediment transport by changing the physical properties of sediments and their mechanical behavior (Rhoads and Boyer, 1982...this sample were there following colonization during the previous year, but also were responding to burial by on-going disposal. The mechanisms of

  18. Regulation biologique du meiobenthos d'un ecosysteme lagunaire par un alevinage experimental en soles (Solea vualgaris )

    OpenAIRE

    Castel, J.; Lasserre, P.

    1982-01-01

    The "fish reservoirs" of the Arcachon Basin (France) are artificial ponds created in lagoonal marshes. Opportunistic populations of microorganisms and of meiofauna increase the tendency to create dystrophic crisis. Fry stocking of soles (Solea vulgaris ) into the fish ponds have been made to estimate the influence of the predatory activity and bioturbation on the food web. For 10 soles/m super(2), the abundance of opportunistic populations of meiofauna decreases and this result indicates a mo...

  19. The Laminated Marca Shale: High-Frequency Climate Cycles From the Latest Cretaceous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A.; Kemp, A. E.; Weedon, G.; Barron, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    The Latest Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Marca Shale Member, California, displays a well-preserved record of alternating terrigenous and diatomaceous laminae couplets, remarkably similar in lithology to recent laminated sediments from the Gulf of California and Santa Barbara Basin. This similarity, together with the recognition of intra- and inter-annual variability in the diatom flora, implies an annual origin for these couplets. High-resolution backscattered electron imagery has identified two sublaminae types within the varved succession; near monospecific lamina of Chaetoceros-type resting spore and of large Azpeitiopsis morenoensis. The composition and occurrence of these laminae is similar to ENSO forced intra-annual variability of diatom flora along the modern Californian margin. Relative thickness variations in terrigenous and biogenic laminae (proxies for precipitation and productivity respectively) also exhibit similar characteristics to variability in Quaternary varves from the Santa Barbara Basin, shown to be imparted by ENSO forcing. In order to track changes in the levels of bottom water oxygenation within the basin, a bioturbation index was established. Periods when bioturbation was minimal (enhanced benthic anoxia) coincide with times of greatest diatomaceous export flux and also lowest flux of detrital material. Conversely, periods of enhanced bioturbation correspond with reduced diatomaceous export flux and an increased flux of detrital material, comparable with ENSO forced variations in diatomaceous and terrigenous export flux and associated benthic oxygenation levels in Pleistocene varves off the Californian margin. Power spectra obtained from time-series analysis of the bioturbation index and laminae thickness variations exhibit strong signals within the ENSO band. This research implies that high-frequency climate perturbations are inherent components of the climate system and that ENSO-type variability was not confined to the dynamic climate

  20. An unusual taphocoenosis of a sea urchin and a rectally inserted turriform gastropod from the lowermost Paleocene of Stevs klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milan, Jesper; Rasmussen, Bo Wilhelm; Vallon, Lothar H.

    2015-01-01

    A specimen of the common irregular echinoid Echinocorys sulcata (Goldfuss, 1826), recovered from the lowermost Paleocene Stevns Klint Formation, at Stevns Klint, Denmark, is of note in revealing a perfect external mold of the turriform gastropod Cerithiella fenestrata (Ravn, 1902) in the anal ope...... combination resulted from the activities of bioturbators which, by chance, pushed the empty gastropod shell into the anal opening of the test of the dead echinoid, although other, more colorful, explanations cannot be excluded....

  1. The influence of hypercapnia and the infaunal brittlestar Amphiura filiformis on sediment nutrient flux – will ocean acidification affect nutrient exchange?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Widdicombe

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide and the concomitant increased uptake of this by the oceans is resulting in hypercapnia-related reduction of ocean pH. Research focussed on the direct effects of these physicochemical changes on marine invertebrates has begun to improve our understanding of impacts at the level of individual physiologies. However, CO2-related impairment of organisms' contribution to ecological or ecosystem processes has barely been addressed. The burrowing ophiuroid Amphiura filiformis, which has a physiology that makes it susceptible to reduced pH, plays a key role in sediment nutrient cycling by mixing and irrigating the sediment, a process known as bioturbation. Here we investigate the role of A. filiformis in modifying nutrient flux rates across the sediment-water boundary and the impact of CO2- related acidification on this process. A 40 day exposure study was conducted under predicted pH scenarios from the years 2100 (pH 7.7 and 2300 (pH 7.3, plus an additional treatment of pH 6.8. This study demonstrated strong relationships between A. filiformis density and cycling of some nutrients; activity increases the sediment uptake of phosphate and the release of nitrite and nitrate. No relationship between A. filiformis density and the flux of ammonium or silicate were observed. Results also indicated that, within the timescale of this experiment, effects at the individual bioturbator level appear not to translate into reduced ecosystem influence. However, long term survival of key bioturbating species is far from assured and changes in both bioturbation and microbial processes could alter key biogeochemical processes in future, more acidic oceans.

  2. An Integrated Experimental and Modeling Approach to Predict Sediment Mixing from Benthic Burrowing Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Kevin R; Aubeneau, Antoine F; Xie, Minwei; Aquino, Tomás; Bolster, Diogo; Packman, Aaron I

    2016-09-20

    Bioturbation is the dominant mode of sediment transport in many aquatic environments and strongly influences both sediment biogeochemistry and contaminant fate. Available bioturbation models rely on highly simplified biodiffusion formulations that inadequately capture the behavior of many benthic organisms. We present a novel experimental and modeling approach that uses time-lapse imagery to directly relate burrow formation to resulting sediment mixing. We paired white-light imaging of burrow formation with fluorescence imaging of tracer particle redistribution by the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. We used the observed burrow formation statistics and organism density to parametrize a parsimonious model for sediment mixing based on fundamental random walk theory. Worms burrowed over a range of times and depths, resulting in homogenization of sediments near the sediment-water interface, rapid nonlocal transport of tracer particles to deep sediments, and large areas of unperturbed sediments. Our fundamental, parsimonious random walk model captures the central features of this highly heterogeneous sediment bioturbation, including evolution of the sediment-water interface coupled with rapid near-surface mixing and anomalous late-time mixing resulting from infrequent, deep burrowing events. This approach provides a general, transferable framework for explicitly linking sediment transport to governing biophysical processes.

  3. Downward migration of Chernobyl-derived radionuclides in soils in Poland and Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matisoff, Gerald, E-mail: gerald.matisoff@case.edu [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7216 (United States); Ketterer, Michael E. [Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ 86011-5698 (United States); Rosen, Klas [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Mietelski, Jerzy W. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Vitko, Lauren F. [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7216 (United States); Persson, Henning [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Lokas, Edyta [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: {yields} {sup 137}Cs and {sup 239,240}Pu move down into the soil profile. {yields} {sup 137}Cs is from Chernobyl fallout; {sup 239,240}Pu is from stratospheric fallout from the 1960s. {yields} Solute transport and bioturbation models describe some but not all of the radionuclide profiles. - Abstract: Vertical profiles of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 239,240}Pu were measured in soils collected from two sites in southern Sweden and three sites in southern Poland and were modeled using both a solute transport model and a bioturbation model to better understand their downward migration. A time series of measured {sup 137}Cs profiles indicates that {sup 137}Cs from Chernobyl was found at the soil surface in 1986 but it has migrated progressively downward into the soil 4.5-25.5 cm since. However, because of dispersion during the migration and mixing following Chernobyl deposition and the much higher activities of {sup 137}Cs from Chernobyl, stratospheric fallout of {sup 137}Cs from the 1960s cannot be identified as a second {sup 137}Cs activity maximum lower in the soil column at any of the sites. Conversely, the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio indicates that no Chernobyl-derived Pu is present in any of the cores with the exception of one sample in Sweden. This difference may be attributed to the nature of the release from Chernobyl. Cesium volatilized at the reactor temperature during the accident, and was released as a vapor whereas Pu was not volatile and was only released in the form of minute fuel particles that traveled regionally. Both the solute diffusion and the bioturbation models accurately simulate the downward migration of the radionuclides at some sites but poorly describe the distributions at other sites. The distribution coefficients required by the solute transport model are about 100 times lower than reported values from the literature indicating that even though the solute transport model can simulate the profile shapes, transport as a

  4. atz gene expressions during atrazine degradation in the soil drilosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monard, C; Martin-Laurent, F; Devers-Lamrani, M; Lima, O; Vandenkoornhuyse, P; Binet, F

    2010-02-01

    One of the various ecosystemic services sustained by soil is pollutant degradation mediated by adapted soil bacteria. The pathways of atrazine biodegradation have been elucidated but in situ expression of the genes involved in atrazine degradation has yet to be demonstrated in soil. Expression of the atzA and atzD genes involved in atrazine dechlorination and s-triazine ring cleavage, respectively, was investigated during in situ degradation of atrazine in the soil drilosphere and bulked samples from two agricultural soils that differed in their ability to mineralize atrazine. Interestingly, expression of the atzA gene, although present in both soils, was not detected. Atrazine mineralization was greatest in Epoisses soil, where a larger pool of atzD mRNA was consistently measured 7 days after atrazine treatment, compared with Vezin soil (146 vs. 49 mRNA per 10(6)16S rRNA, respectively). Expression of the atzD gene varied along the degradation time course and was profoundly modified in soil bioturbated by earthworms. The atzD mRNA pool was the highest in the soil drilosphere (casts and burrow-linings) and it was significantly different in burrow-linings compared with bulk soil (e.g. 363 vs. 146 mRNA per 10(6)16S rRNA, 7 days after atrazine treatment in Epoisses soil). Thus, consistent differences in atrazine mineralization were demonstrated between the soil drilosphere and bulk soil. However, the impact of bioturbation on atrazine mineralization depended on soil type. Mineralization was enhanced in casts, compared with bulk soil, from Epoisses soil but in burrow-linings from Vezin soil. This study is the first to report the effects of soil bioturbation by earthworms on s-triazine ring cleavage and its spatial variability in soil.

  5. Contrasting effects of ecosystem engineering by the cordgrass Spartina maritima and the sandprawn Callianassa kraussi in a marine-dominated lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, D.; Branch, G. M.; Dawson, J.; Henry, D.

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystem engineering by plants and animals significantly influences community structure and the physico-chemical characteristics of marine habitats. In this paper we document the contrasting effects of ecosystem engineering by the cordgrass Spartina maritima and the burrowing sandprawn Callianassa kraussi on physico-chemical characteristics, microflora, macrofaunal community structure and morphological attributes in the high shore intertidal sandflats of Langebaan Lagoon, a marine-dominated system on the west coast of South Africa. Comparisons were made at six sites in the lagoon within Spartina and Callianassa beds, and in a "bare zone" of sandflat between these two habitats that lacks both sandprawns and cordgrass. Sediments in Spartina habitats were consolidated by the root-shoot systems of the cordgrass, leading to low sediment penetrability, while sediments in beds of C. kraussi were more penetrable, primarily due to the destabilising effects of sandprawn bioturbation. Sediments in the "bare zone" had intermediate to low values of penetrability. Sediment organic content was lowest in bare zones and greatest in Spartina beds, while sediment chl- a levels were greatest on bare sand, but were progressively reduced in the Spartina and Callianassa beds. These differences among habitats induced by ecosystem engineering in turn affected the macrofauna. Community structure was different between all three habitats sampled, with species richness being surprisingly greater in Callianassa beds than either the bare zone or Spartina beds. In general, the binding of surface sediments by the root systems of Spartina favoured rigid-bodied, surface-dwelling and tube-building species, while the destabilising effect of bioturbation by C. kraussi favoured burrowing species. The contrasting effects of these ecosystem engineers suggest that they play important roles in increasing habitat heterogeneity. Importantly, the role of bioturbation by C. kraussi in enhancing macrofaunal

  6. The evolutionary ecology of biotic association in a megadiverse bivalve superfamily: sponsorship required for permanent residency in sediment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Marine lineage diversification is shaped by the interaction of biotic and abiotic factors but our understanding of their relative roles is underdeveloped. The megadiverse bivalve superfamily Galeommatoidea represents a promising study system to address this issue. It is composed of small-bodied clams that are either free-living or have commensal associations with invertebrate hosts. To test if the evolution of this lifestyle dichotomy is correlated with specific ecologies, we have performed a statistical analysis on the lifestyle and habitat preference of 121 species based on 90 source documents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Galeommatoidea has significant diversity in the two primary benthic habitats: hard- and soft-bottoms. Hard-bottom dwellers are overwhelmingly free-living, typically hidden within crevices of rocks/coral heads/encrusting epifauna. In contrast, species in soft-bottom habitats are almost exclusively infaunal commensals. These infaunal biotic associations may involve direct attachment to a host, or clustering around its tube/burrow, but all commensals locate within the oxygenated sediment envelope produced by the host's bioturbation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: the formation of commensal associations by Galeommatoidean clams is robustly correlated with an abiotic environmental setting: living in sediments (P < 0.001. Sediment-dwelling bivalves are exposed to intense predation pressure that drops markedly with depth of burial. Commensal galeommatoideans routinely attain depth refuges many times their body lengths, independent of siphonal investment, by virtue of their host's burrowing and bioturbation. In effect, they use their much larger hosts as giant auto-irrigating siphon substitutes. The evolution of biotic associations with infaunal bioturbating hosts may have been a prerequisite for the diversification of Galeommatoidea in sediments and has likely been a key factor in the success of this exceptionally diverse

  7. Characteristics of the Lithology, Fault-Related Rocks and Fault Zone Structures in TCDP Hole-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Rong Song

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP was to conduct an in-depth probe into a fault zone of recent major activity so as to gain a better understanding of and more insight into the physical, mechanical and chemical properties involved. By the end of 2004, with the completion of the drilling of Hole-A, cuttings from 0 to 431.34 m and cores from a 431.34- to 2003.26-m depth had been obtained. Stratigraphically, the Pliocene to Pleistocene Cholan Formation is found from the surface to a 1029-m depth and is predominantly composed of sandstone and sandstone-siltstone alternations with weak to intense bioturbation. The Pliocene Chinshui Formation is observed from a depth of 1029- to 1303-m and predominantly consists of siltstone with weak bioturbation. From 1303- to 1712-m down there is the late Miocene to early Pliocene Kueichulin Formation which is predominantly composed of massive sandstone with minor siltstone. Below 1712 m, the Formation again resembles the younger Cholan Formation with mollusca-rich, thick, layered shale and heavy bioturbated sandstone. Four types of fault-related rocks are identified in the cores. They are the fault breccia, gouges, foliated and non-foliated cataclasites and pseudotachylytes. At least six major fault zones are found in the cores: FZ1111, FZ1153, FZ1220, FZ1580, FZ1712, and FZ1812. Among these, FZ1111 most probably corresponds to the slip surface of the Chi-Chi earthquake, the Chelungpu fault, while FZ1712 very likely represents the Sanyi fault.

  8. Urban pollution of sediments: Impact on the physiology and burrowing activity of tubificid worms and consequences on biogeochemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigneret, M; Mermillod-Blondin, F; Volatier, L; Romestaing, C; Maire, E; Adrien, J; Guillard, L; Roussel, D; Hervant, F

    2016-10-15

    In urban areas, infiltration basins are designed to manage stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces and allow the settling of associated pollutants. The sedimentary layer deposited at the surface of these structures is highly organic and multicontaminated (mainly heavy metals and hydrocarbons). Only few aquatic species are able to maintain permanent populations in such an extreme environment, including the oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri. Nevertheless, the impact of urban pollutants on these organisms and the resulting influence on infiltration basin functioning remain poorly studied. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine how polluted sediments could impact the survival, the physiology and the bioturbation activity of L. hoffmeisteri and thereby modify biogeochemical processes occurring at the water-sediment interface. To this end, we conducted laboratory incubations of worms, in polluted sediments from infiltration basins or slightly polluted sediments from a stream. Analyses were performed to evaluate physiological state and burrowing activity (X-ray micro-tomography) of worms and their influences on biogeochemical processes (nutrient fluxes, CO2 and CH4 degassing rates) during 30-day long experiments. Our results showed that worms exhibited physiological responses to cope with high pollution levels, including a strong ability to withstand the oxidative stress linked to contamination with heavy metals. We also showed that the presence of urban pollutants significantly increased the burrowing activity of L. hoffmeisteri, demonstrating the sensitivity and the relevance of such a behavioural response as biomarker of sediment toxicity. In addition, we showed that X-ray micro-tomography was an adequate technique for accurate and non-invasive three-dimensional investigations of biogenic structures formed by bioturbators. The presence of worms induced stimulations of nutrient fluxes and organic matter recycling (between +100% and 200% of CO2 degassing rate

  9. The distribution of inorganic phosphorus in modern sediments of the Bay of Biscay; La distribution du phosphore inorganique dans les sediments modernes du golfe de Gasgogne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anschutz, P.; Hyacinthe, Ch.; Carbonel, P.; Jouanneau, J.M.; Jorissen, F. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Talence (France). Dept. de Geologie et d`Oceanographie, UMR CNRS 5805

    1999-06-01

    The phosphorus geochemistry on the bay of Biscay margin shows that modern sediments represent a source of phosphate for overlying seawater. However, particulate phosphorus leached with an ascorbate solution and 1 N HCl remains constant in the sedimentary column which suggests that inorganic particulate phosphorus is trapped in the sediment. This is due to bioturbation, which carries iron oxides with high adsorption capacities for phosphate deep into the sediment, and also, to the precipitation of authigenic phosphate minerals in the anaerobic zone of the sediment. (authors) 17 refs.

  10. Sedimentology and ichnology of the fluvial reach to inner estuary of the Ogeechee River estuary, Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchepetkina, Alina; Gingras, Murray K.; Pemberton, S. George

    2016-08-01

    Through the integration of sedimentological and ichnological observations, this paper explores the character of sediments deposited across the fluvio-tidal transition zone of the upper microtidal, mixed-energy, sand-dominated Ogeechee River estuary, Georgia, USA. A transect of tidally influenced to fluvial channel-bars and their facies variability is reported. Field and laboratory methods were employed, including observation of physical and biogenic sedimentary structures on the point-bar surfaces and in trenches, collection of grab samples, suction and box coring, grain size and total organic carbon analyses, optical microscopy, core logging, and daylight photography. The data presented in the paper can help in predicting facies changes across the fluvio-tidal transition of sand-dominated fluvio-tidal deposits in the rock record. The lower inner estuary is characterized by medium-fine and fine-medium sand with planar and trough cross-bedding, small-scale ripple lamination, tidal sedimentary structures (flaser and wavy bedding, herringbone cross-stratification), abundant organic debris, and mud rip-up clasts. Bioturbation of the intertidal point bars is low, but cryptobioturbation is locally observed. Upper inner estuary deposits comprise coarse-medium- and medium-coarse-grained sand, and are characterized by faint high-angle planar and trough cross-bedding. Organic debris, mud rip-up clasts, herringbone and current-ripple lamination are rarely observed. Bioturbation is absent to sparse. The fluvio-tidal transition is represented by very-coarse- to coarse-grained sand and granules. Physical sedimentary structures constitute massive, graded planar and trough cross-bedding with abundant plant detritus. Except for rare Siphonichnus- and Lockeia-like traces, bioturbation is absent. The fluvial setting is characterized by coarse-medium sand with unidirectional cross-bedding, current-ripple lamination, and rare organic-rich mud clasts. Bioturbation is absent. Inner

  11. Two episodic changes of trace fossils through the Permian-Triassic transition in the Meishan cores,Zhejiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Six ichnogenera,Chondrites,Palaeophycus,Planolites,Rhizocorallium,Skolithos,and Thalassinoides,were identified from the drilling cores near the Global Stratotype Section and Point(GSSP) of Permian-Triassic boundary at Meishan,Zhejiang Province.The ichnological indices,including abundance,bioturbation index,and disturbed depth of trace fossils,show two episodes of intense changes near the Permian-Triassic Boundary(PTB).Episode I occurred in Beds 25-27b when the ecologically complicate forms such as Chondrites,Skolithos,Rhizocorallium,and Thalassinoides disappeared hereafter,the bioturbation index reduced from 1-5 to 1-3,and the disturbed depth declined from 5-66 to 2-5 cm.Episode II took place at the base of Bed 33 with the disappearance of Palaeophycus and Planolites,and subsequent absence of trace fossils and bioturbation till the middle-upper part of Bed 41 when the disturbed structures reoccurred,but they are only tiny Planolites and the bioturbation index was never higher than 3 and the disturbed depth less than 4 mm.Episode I shows an intense change,corresponding to the main stage of the end-Permian mass extinction,whereas Episode II is relatively weak,corresponding to the epilogue of the mass extinction of trace makers in the Early Triassic.Subsequently,ichnofossils were dominated by surface tracks in simple ecological habit and structures.This phenomenon indicates that the Early Triassic benthonic fauna is changed from sessile benthic system to mobile benthic system after the end-Permian mass extinction.In other words,the evolution of the trace fossils across the Permian-Triassic transition had an episodic process similar to the body fossils.In addition,the change of ichnofabrics is well coincided with the negative excursion of carbon isotopes and the expansion of cyanobacteria.As the results of physical and biogenic processes,trace fossils provided unique materials for the study of the biotic and environmental events,as well as their coupling evolution

  12. Sediment reworking rates in deep sediments of the Mediterranean Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsanti, M., E-mail: mattia.barsanti@enea.it [ENEA, Marine Environment Research Centre, La Spezia (Italy); Delbono, I., E-mail: ivana.delbono@enea.it [ENEA, Marine Environment Research Centre, La Spezia (Italy); Schirone, A., E-mail: antonio.schirone@enea.it [ENEA, Marine Environment Research Centre, La Spezia (Italy); Langone, L., E-mail: leonardo.langone@bo.ismar.cnr.it [CNR, ISMAR Istituto di Scienze Marine, U.O.S. Bologna (Italy); Miserocchi, S., E-mail: stefano.miserocchi@bo.ismar.cnr.it [CNR, ISMAR Istituto di Scienze Marine, U.O.S. Bologna (Italy); Salvi, S., E-mail: stefano.salvi@enea.it [ENEA, Research Centre Brasimone, Camugnano (Italy); Delfanti, R., E-mail: roberta.delfanti@enea.it [ENEA, Marine Environment Research Centre, La Spezia (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    Different pelagic areas of the Mediterranean Sea have been investigated in order to quantify physical and biological mixing processes in deep sea sediments. Herein, results of eleven sediment cores sampled at different deep areas (> 2000 m) of the Western and Eastern Mediterranean Sea are presented. {sup 210}Pb{sub xs} and {sup 137}Cs vertical profiles, together with {sup 14}C dating, are used to identify the main processes characterising the different areas and, finally, controlling mixing depths (SML) and bioturbation coefficients (D{sub b}). Radionuclide vertical profiles and inventories indicate that bioturbation processes are the dominant processes responsible for sediment reworking in deep sea environments. Results show significant differences in sediment mixing depths and bioturbation coefficients among areas of the Mediterranean Sea characterised by different trophic regimes. In particular, in the Oran Rise area, where the Almeria-Oran Front induces frequent phytoplankton blooms, we calculate the highest values of sediment mixing layers (13 cm) and bioturbation coefficients (0.187 cm{sup 2} yr{sup -1}), and the highest values of {sup 210}Pb{sub xs} and {sup 137}Cs inventories. Intermediate values of SML and D{sub b} ({approx} 6 cm and {approx} 0.040 cm{sup 2} yr{sup -1}, respectively) characterise the mesothrophic Algero-Balearic basin, while in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea mixing parameters (SML of 3 cm and D{sub b} of 0.011 cm{sup 2} yr{sup -1}) are similar to those calculated for the oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean (SML of 2 cm and D{sub b} of {approx} 0.005 cm{sup 2} yr{sup -1}). - Research highlights: {yields} Physical and biological mixing processes in the Mediterranean Sea are investigated. {yields} Results of 11 sediment cores in deep areas of the Mediterranean Sea are shown. {yields} {sup 210}Pb{sub xs} and {sup 137}Cs vertical profiles are analysed. {yields} New data on {sup 210}Pb and {sup 137}Cs inventories of Mediterranean deep sediments are

  13. Phosphorus accumulation and spatial distribution in agricultural soils in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Gitte Holton; Kristensen, Kristian; Olesen, S E;

    2013-01-01

    Over the past century, phosphorus (P) has accumulated in Danish agricultural soils. We examined the soil P content and the degree of P saturation in acid oxalate (DPS) in 337 agricultural soil profiles and 32 soil profiles from deciduous forests sampled at 0–0.25, 0.25–0.50, 0.50–0.75 and 0.75–1....... discusses the potential importance of leaching, deep tillage, erosion and bioturbation for the observed accumulation of P in the subsoil....

  14. The influence of hypercapnia and macrofauna on sediment nutrient flux – will ocean acidification affect nutrient exchange?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Wood

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide and the concomitant increased uptake of this by the oceans is resulting in hypercapnia-related reduction of ocean pH. Research focussed on the direct effects of these physicochemical changes on marine invertebrates has begun to improve our understanding of impacts at the level of individual physiologies. However, CO2-related impairment of organisms' contribution to ecological or ecosystem processes has barely been addressed. The burrowing ophiuroid Amphiura filiformis, which has a physiology that makes it susceptible to reduced pH, plays a key role in sediment nutrient cycling by mixing and irrigating the sediment, a process known as bioturbation. Here we investigate the role of A. filiformis in modifying nutrient flux rates across the sediment-water boundary and the impact of CO2-related acidification on this process. A 40 day exposure study was conducted under predicted pH scenarios from the years 2100 (pH 7.7 and 2300 (pH 7.3, plus an additional treatment of pH 6.8. This study demonstrated strong relationships between A. filiformis density and cycling of some nutrients; A. filiformis activity increases the sediment uptake of phosphate and the release of nitrite and nitrate. No relationship between A. filiformis density and the flux of ammonium or silicate were observed. Results also indicated that, within the timescale of this experiment, effects at the individual bioturbator level appear not to translate into reduced ecosystem influence. Rather the effect of hypercapnia and lowered pH on bacteria and microphytobenthos may have been of greater significance in understanding the changes to nutrient fluxes seen here. However, long term survival of key bioturbating species is far from assured and changes in both bioturbation and microbial processes could alter key biogeochemical processes in future, more acidic oceans.

  15. Characteristics of deltaic deposits in the Cretaceous Pierre Shale, Trinidad Sandstone, and Vermejo Formation, Raton Basin, Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, R.M.; Tur, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed facies analyses of closely spaced measured surface sections in the Trinidad and adjacent areas of Colorado reflect deposition in the river-influenced delta. That this deltaic system was accompanied by abandonment of subdeltas is indicated by a destructional-deltaic facies of heavily bioturbated, carbonaceous sandstones, siltstones, and shales best recorded in the delta front deposits of the Trinidad Sandstone. Coal accumulation of the Vermejo deposits nevertheless remained primarily controlled by persistent organic sedimentation in interdistributary backswamps. These backswamps, which accumulated thick, lenticular coals, were formed during the normal constructional phase of the delta plain. -from Authors

  16. 塔里木盆地晚泥盆世东河塘组河口湾相遗迹化石%TRACE FOSSILS FROM ESTUARINE FACIES OF DONGHETANG FORMATION (UPPER DEVONIAN), TARIM BASIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐永安; 李凯琦

    2003-01-01

    epifaunal forms; 4)presence of an impoverished marine assemblage of ichnofauna rather than a mixed freshwater/marine assemblage, and diminished size relative to fully marine counterparts; 5)presence of elements of both the Skolithos and Cruziana ichnofacies.Based on the synthetic analysis on bioturbation index and ichnofabric constituent diagram, three ichnofabrics have been recognized from estuarine facies of Donghetang Formation (Upper Devonian) of Tarim Basin,western China, they are: Ophiomorpha ichnofabric, Skolithos ichnofabric and Palaeophycus ichnofabric.Ophiomorpha ichnofabric is characterized by the widely occurrence of Ophiomorpha as well as the absence of other trace fossils. The trace fossil Ophiomorpha ranges from simple, individual burrows to irregular three-dimensional burrow networks consisting of cylindrical tunnels and shafts that typically bifurcate at acute angles. The pelleted wall lining is unclear in the Donghetang Formation because of the strong diagenetic cementation in the burrows. The burrows are very obvious in core because they are commonly high-lighted by contrasting colors of the burrow fill and the surrounding matrix. The burrow fill is much lighter than the matrix and has different texture and fabric. The burrow fill, greyish white in color, consists of secondary ferroan calcite. The matrix, dark brown in color, is constituted by oil-soaked quartz sands. The bioturbation structures formed by Ophiomorpha tracemaker show a different bioturbated degree. They can be divided into 6 grades (bioturbation index), each grade of bioturbation (or BI)is clearly defined in terms of burrow density, amount of burrow overlap and preserved percent of the original sedimentary structures and represents different petrophysical properties. Bed by bed core analysis and statistics of bioturbation indices of Ophiomorpha ichnofabric indicate that the index 2 is common and amounts to 30% of the measured strata, other indices have low percent, absence of bioturbation

  17. Carbon mineralization and oxygen dynamics in sediments with deep oxygen penetration, Lake Superior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiying; Crowe, Sean Andrew; Miklesh, David;

    2012-01-01

    penetration is explained by low sedimentation rates (0.01–0.04 cm yr−1), high solubility of oxygen in freshwater, and a shallow (∼ 2 cm) bioturbation zone. In response mainly to oxygen variations in the bottom waters, the sediment oxygen penetration varied seasonally by as much as several centimeters......, suggesting that temporal variability in deeply oxygenated sediments may be greater than previously acknowledged. The oxygen uptake rates (4.4–7.7 mmol m−2 d−1, average 6.1 mmol m−2 d−1) and carbon mineralization efficiency (∼ 90% of deposited carbon) were similar to those in marine hemipelagic and pelagic...

  18. Habitat structure mediates biodiversity effects on ecosystem properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbold, J A; Bulling, M T; Solan, M

    2011-08-22

    Much of what we know about the role of biodiversity in mediating ecosystem processes and function stems from manipulative experiments, which have largely been performed in isolated, homogeneous environments that do not incorporate habitat structure or allow natural community dynamics to develop. Here, we use a range of habitat configurations in a model marine benthic system to investigate the effects of species composition, resource heterogeneity and patch connectivity on ecosystem properties at both the patch (bioturbation intensity) and multi-patch (nutrient concentration) scale. We show that allowing fauna to move and preferentially select patches alters local species composition and density distributions, which has negative effects on ecosystem processes (bioturbation intensity) at the patch scale, but overall positive effects on ecosystem functioning (nutrient concentration) at the multi-patch scale. Our findings provide important evidence that community dynamics alter in response to localized resource heterogeneity and that these small-scale variations in habitat structure influence species contributions to ecosystem properties at larger scales. We conclude that habitat complexity forms an important buffer against disturbance and that contemporary estimates of the level of biodiversity required for maintaining future multi-functional systems may need to be revised.

  19. Vertical migration of fine-grained sediments from interior to surface of seabed driven by seepage flows-`sub-bottom sediment pump action'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaotong; Jia, Yonggang; Wen, Mingzheng; Wang, Zhenhao; Zhang, Yaqi; Zhu, Chaoqi; Li, Bowen; Liu, Xiaolei

    2017-02-01

    A scientific hypothesis is proposed and preliminarily verified in this paper: under the driving of seepage flows, there might be a vertical migration of fine-grained soil particles from interior to surface of seabed, which is defined as `sub-bottom sediment pump action' in this paper. Field experiments were performed twice on the intertidal flat of the Yellow River delta to study this process via both trapping the pumped materials and recording the pore pressures in the substrate. Experimental results are quite interesting as we did observe yellow slurry which is mainly composed of fine-grained soil particles appearing on the seabed surface; seepage gradients were also detected in the intertidal flat, under the action of tides and small wind waves. Preliminary conclusions are that `sediment pump' occurs when seepage force exceeds a certain threshold: firstly, it is big enough to disconnect the soil particles from the soil skeleton; secondly, the degree of seabed fluidization or bioturbation is big enough to provide preferred paths for the detached materials to migrate upwards. Then they would be firstly pumped from interior to the surface of seabed and then easily re-suspended into overlying water column. Influential factors of `sediment pump' are determined as hydrodynamics (wave energy), degree of consolidation, index of bioturbation (permeability) and content of fine-grained materials (sedimentary age). This new perspective of `sediment pump' may provide some implications for the mechanism interpretation of several unclear geological phenomena in the Yellow River delta area.

  20. Early Triassic wrinkle structures on land: stressed environments and oases for life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Daoliang; Tong, Jinnan; Song, Haijun; Benton, Michael J.; Bottjer, David J.; Song, Huyue; Tian, Li

    2015-06-01

    Wrinkle structures in rocks younger than the Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) extinction have been reported repeatedly in marine strata, but rarely mentioned in rocks recording land. Here, three newly studied terrestrial P-Tr boundary rock succession in North China have yielded diverse wrinkle structures. All of these wrinkles are preserved in barely bioturbated shore-shallow lacustrine siliciclastic deposits of the Liujiagou Formation. Conversely, both the lacustrine siliciclastic deposits of the underlying Sunjiagou Formation and the overlying Heshanggou Formation show rich bioturbation, but no wrinkle structures or other microbial-related structures. The occurrence of terrestrial wrinkle structures in the studied sections reflects abnormal hydrochemical and physical environments, presumably associated with the extinction of terrestrial organisms. Only very rare trace fossils occurred in the aftermath of the P-Tr extinction, but most of them were preserved together with the microbial mats. This suggests that microbial mats acted as potential oases for the surviving aquatic animals, as a source of food and oxygen. The new finds suggests that extreme environmental stresses were prevalent both in the sea and on land through most of the Early Triassic.

  1. Performance assessment methodology as applied to the Greater Confinement Disposal site: Preliminary results of the third performance iteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baer, T.A. [GRAM Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy has contracted Sandia National Laboratories to conduct a performance assessment of the Greater Confinement Disposal facility, Nevada. The performance assessment is an iterative process in which transport models are used to prioritize site characterization data collection. Then the data are used to refine the conceptual and performance assessment models. The results of the first two performance assessment iterations indicate that the site is likely to comply with the performance standards under the existing hydrologic conditions. The third performance iteration expands the conceptual model of the existing transport system to include possible future events and incorporates these processes in the performance assessment models. The processes included in the third performance assessment are climate change, bioturbation, plant uptake, erosion, upward advection, human intrusion and subsidence. The work completed to date incorporates the effects of bioturbation, erosion and subsidence in the performance assessment model. Preliminary analyses indicate that the development of relatively deep-rooting plant species at the site, which could occur due to climate change, irrigated farming or subsidence, poses the greatest threat to the site`s performance.

  2. Ichnological record of the Frasnian-Famennian boundary interval: two examples from the Holy Cross Mts (Central Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachacz, Michał; Uchman, Alfred; Rodríguez-Tovar, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    The Frasnian-Famennian (Late Devonian) boundary interval within the carbonate-siliciclastic series in the Kowala and Płucki sections (Holy Cross Mts, Central Poland) has been analysed to evaluate the influence of the Kellwasser event on the macrobenthic tracemaker community. The Upper Kellwasser event has a lithologically variable record, as horizons of flints (Kowala) and as a bed of bituminous, black, cephalopod limestone (Płucki). Both sections show mostly laminated, unbioturbated beds of marlstones or shales just above the Frasnian-Famennian boundary, which point to events of anoxia on the sea floor. However, the first anoxic horizon occurs below the Frasnian-Famennian boundary. The trace fossils and bioturbational structures are uncommon and poorly diversified. Trichichnus and Multina are the only frequent trace fossils in some beds. Moreover, one horizon above the Frasnian-Famennian boundary contains numerous Multina and a single ? Planolites. Such poorly diversified trace fossil assemblage suggests an unfavourable environment for most of burrowing organisms and fluctuations in oxygenation from anoxic, to dysoxic conditions. The occurrence of the trace fossils and bioturbational structures as spotted and mottled ichnofabrics from the 1.3 m above the Frasnian-Famennian boundary is interpreted as an improvement in bottom water oxygen conditions after the Upper Kellwasser event.

  3. Base of brackish-water mud as key regional stratigraphic marker of mid-Holocene marine flooding of the Baltic Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtasalo, Joonas J.; Endler, Michael; Moros, Matthias; Jokinen, Sami A.; Hämäläinen, Jyrki; Kotilainen, Aarno T.

    2016-12-01

    Many modern epicontinental seas were dry land before their marine flooding by the mid-Holocene glacioeustatic sea-level rise, whereas the Baltic Sea Basin was covered by a huge postglacial lake. This change from a postglacial lake to the present-day semi-enclosed brackish-water sea is studied here in sediment cores and acoustic profiles from the Baltic Sea major sub-basins, based on novel datasets combined with information extracted from earlier publications. In shallow areas (50m water depth), where it may be locally less clearly expressed due to reworking and bioturbation. Both in the shallow and deep areas, the brackish-water mud is strongly enriched in organic matter compared to underlying sediments. Bioturbation type changes at the flooding surface in response to the increased sedimentary organic content, but no firm-ground ichnofacies were developed because of low erosion. It is concluded that the base of the brackish-water mud is a robust allostratigraphic bounding surface that is identifiable by the lithologic examination of cores over the Baltic Sea. The surface is a distinct reflector in seismic-acoustic profiles, which facilitates mapping and basin-wide stratigraphic subdivision. Detailed geochronologic studies are required to confirm if sediments immediately overlying the erosional flooding surface in shallow areas are younger than the basal part of the brackish-water mud in deep areas that is predicted to be time-equivalent to the erosion.

  4. Temporal Distribution of Diagnostic Biofabrics in the Lower and Middle Ordovician in North China:Clues to the Geobiology of the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jianbo; ZHAN Renbin

    2009-01-01

    The temporal distribution of the diagnostic biofabrics In the Lower and Middle Ordovician in North China distinctly illustrates that the sedimentary systems on the paleoplate have been changed markedly as consequences of the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE).The pre-GOBE sedimentary systems deposited in Tremadoc display widespread microbialite and flat-pebble conglomerates,and a less extent of bioturbation.Through the transitional period of early Floian,the sedimentary systems in the rest of the Early and Mid-Ordovician change to GOBE type and are characterized by intensive bioturbation and vanishing flat-pebble conIglomerates and subtidal microbial sediments.The irreversible changes in sedimentary systems in North China are Iinked to the GOBE,which conduced the increase in infaunal tiering,the expansion of infaunal ecospace,and the appearance of new burrowers related to the development of the Paleozoic Evolutionary Fauna during the Ordovician biodiversification.Thus,changes in sedimentary systems during the pivotal period of the GOBE were consequences of a steep diversification of benthic faunas rather than the GOBE's environmental background.

  5. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: The Jurassic of Skåne, southern Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivhed, Ulf

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available In Sweden, Jurassic strata are restricted to Skåne and adjacent offshore areas. Jurassic sedimentary rocks predominantly comprise sandy to muddy siliciclastics, with subordinate coal beds andfew carbonate-rich beds. During Mesozoic times, block-faulting took place in the Sorgenfrei–Tornquist Zone, a tectonic zone which transects Skåne in a NW–SE direction. The Jurassic depositionalenvironments in Skåne were thus strongly influenced by uplift and downfaulting, and to some extent by volcanism. Consequently, the sedimentary record reveals evidence of numerous transgressions, regressions and breaks in sedimentation. Relative sea-level changes played a significant role in controlling the facies distribution, as deposition mainly took place in coastal plain to shallow shelf environments.The alluvial deposits in Skåne include floodplain palaeosols, autochthonous coals, overbank sandstones, and stream channel pebbly sandstones. Restricted marine strata comprise intertidalheteroliths with mixed freshwater and marine trace fossil assemblages, and intertidal delta distributary channel sandstones. Shallow marine sediments encompass subtidal and shoreface sandstoneswith herringbone structures, and bioturbated mudstones with tempestite sandstones. Offshore deposits typically comprise extensively bioturbated muddy sandstones.Floral remains, palaeopedology, clay mineralogy and arenite maturity indicate a warm and humid climate in Skåne throughout the Jurassic, possibly with slightly increasing aridity towards the end of the period. Most Jurassic strata in Skåne have been subjected to mild burial diagenesis, and the petroleum generative window has rarely been reached.

  6. Sedimentary and petrofacies analyses of the Amasiri Sandstone, southern Benue Trough, Nigeria: Implications for depositional environment and tectonic provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, A. U.; Igwe, E. O.; Nwajide, C. S.

    2016-11-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the depositional environment, provenance and tectonic setting for the Turonian Amasiri Sandstone, southern Benue Trough, Nigeria, using lithofacies analysis and re-appraisal of petrography of the sandstones. Local stratigraphy and field relationships show a thick succession of shales alternating with elongate/parallel sandstone ridges extending eastwards from Akpoha to Amasiri through Itigidi and Ugep to Apiapum areas. Lithofacies analysis reveals 9 lithofacies suggestive of storm (mass flow) and tidal shelf processes. These include dark grey to black laminated shale/silty mudstones, bioturbated mudstones, coquinoid limestones, very fine-grained bioturbated sandstones with shell hash/debris in places and limestone rip-up clasts, massive and chaotic sandy conglomerate with rip - up clasts, fine to medium-grained, parallel laminated sandstone, hummocky cross-stratified, massive, medium to coarse-grained sandstones, medium to very coarse-grained, planar cross-bedded sandstone, with clay-draped foresets and Ophiomorpha burrows, and coarse-grained trough cross-bedded sandstone. Petrofacies analysis identifies the sandstones as feldspathic and arkosic arenites. Ternary plot of framework mineralogy indicates derivation from an uplifted continental block related to the nearby Oban Massif and Cameroon Basement Complex.

  7. Mangrove Crab Ucides cordatus Removal Does Not Affect Sediment Parameters and Stipule Production in a One Year Experiment in Northern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mangrove crabs influence ecosystem processes through bioturbation and/or litter feeding. In Brazilian mangroves, the abundant and commercially important crab Ucides cordatus is the main faunal modifier of microtopography establishing up to 2 m deep burrows. They process more than 70% of the leaf litter and propagule production, thus promoting microbial degradation of detritus and benefiting microbe-feeding fiddler crabs. The accelerated nutrient turn-over and increased sediment oxygenation mediated by U. cordatus may enhance mangrove tree growth. Such positive feed-back loop was tested in North Brazil through a one year crab removal experiment simulating increased harvesting rates in a mature Rhizophora mangle forest. Investigated response parameters were sediment salinity, organic matter content, CO2 efflux rates of the surface sediment, and reduction potential. We also determined stipule fall of the mangrove tree R. mangle as a proxy for tree growth. Three treatments were applied to twelve experimental plots (13 m × 13 m each): crab removal, disturbance control and control. Within one year, the number of U. cordatus burrows inside the four removal plots decreased on average to 52% of the initial number. Despite this distinct reduction in burrow density of this large bioturbator, none of the measured parameters differed between treatments. Instead, most parameters were clearly influenced by seasonal changes in precipitation. Hence, in the studied R. mangle forest, abiotic factors seem to be more important drivers of ecosystem processes than factors mediated by U. cordatus, at least within the studied timespan of one year. PMID:27907093

  8. The Hamburg Oceanic Carbon Cycle Circulation Model. Version 1. Version 'HAMOCC2s' for long time integrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinze, C.; Maier-Reimer, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    The Hamburg Ocean Carbon Cycle Circulation Model (HAMOCC, configuration HAMOCC2s) predicts the atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressure (as induced by oceanic processes), production rates of biogenic particulate matter, and geochemical tracer distributions in the water column as well as the bioturbated sediment. Besides the carbon cycle this model version includes also the marine silicon cycle (silicic acid in the water column and the sediment pore waters, biological opal production, opal flux through the water column and opal sediment pore water interaction). The model is based on the grid and geometry of the LSG ocean general circulation model (see the corresponding manual, LSG=Large Scale Geostrophic) and uses a velocity field provided by the LSG-model in 'frozen' state. In contrast to the earlier version of the model (see Report No. 5), the present version includes a multi-layer sediment model of the bioturbated sediment zone, allowing for variable tracer inventories within the complete model system. (orig.)

  9. Iridium profiles and delivery across the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmeray-Senlet, Selen; Miller, Kenneth G.; Sherrell, Robert M.; Senlet, Turgay; Vellekoop, Johan; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2017-01-01

    We examined iridium (Ir) anomalies at the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary in siliciclastic shallow marine cores of the New Jersey Coastal Plain, USA, that were deposited at an intermediate distance (∼2500 km) from the Chicxulub, Mexico crater. Although closely spaced and generally biostratigraphically complete, the cores show heterogeneity in terms of preservation of the ejecta layers, maximum concentration of Ir measured (∼0.1-2.4 ppb), and total thickness of the Ir-enriched interval (11-119 cm). We analyzed the shape of the Ir profiles with a Lagrangian particle-tracking model of sediment mixing. Fits between the mixing model and measured Ir profiles, as well as visible burrows in the cores, show that the shape of the Ir profiles was determined primarily by sediment mixing via bioturbation. In contrast, Tighe Park 1 and Bass River cores show post-depositional remobilization of Ir by geochemical processes. There is a strong inverse relationship between the maximum concentration of Ir measured and the thickness of the sediments over which Ir is spread. We show that the depth-integrated Ir inventory is similar in the majority of the cores, indicating that the total Ir delivery at time of the K/Pg event was spatially homogeneous over this region. Though delivered through a near-instantaneous source, stratospheric dispersal, and settling, our study shows that non-uniform Ir profiles develop due to changes in the regional delivery and post-depositional modification by bioturbation and geochemical processes.

  10. Modelling benthic biophysical drivers of ecosystem structure and biogeochemical response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Nicholas; Bruggeman, Jorn; Lessin, Gennadi; Allen, Icarus

    2016-04-01

    The fate of carbon deposited at the sea floor is ultimately decided by biophysical drivers that control the efficiency of remineralisation and timescale of carbon burial in sediments. Specifically, these drivers include bioturbation through ingestion and movement, burrow-flushing and sediment reworking, which enhance vertical particulate transport and solute diffusion. Unfortunately, these processes are rarely satisfactorily resolved in models. To address this, a benthic model that explicitly describes the vertical position of biology (e.g., habitats) and biogeochemical processes is presented that includes biological functionality and biogeochemical response capturing changes in ecosystem structure, benthic-pelagic fluxes and biodiversity on inter-annual timescales. This is demonstrated by the model's ability to reproduce temporal variability in benthic infauna, vertical pore water nutrients and pelagic-benthic solute fluxes compared to in-situ data. A key advance is the replacement of bulk parameterisation of bioturbation by explicit description of the bio-physical processes responsible. This permits direct comparison with observations and determination of key parameters in experiments. Crucially, the model resolves the two-way interaction between sediment biogeochemistry and ecology, allowing exploration of the benthic response to changing environmental conditions, the importance of infaunal functional traits in shaping benthic ecological structure and the feedback the resulting bio-physical processes exert on pore water nutrient profiles. The model is actively being used to understand shelf sea carbon cycling, the response of the benthos to climatic change, food provision and other societal benefits.

  11. Back barrier facies of a microtidal coastline, Upper Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamola, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Protected lagoonal environments situated landward or prograding barriers, are characterized by low energy deposits which include flood tidal deltas, flood-dominated channel-fill sandstones, swamps (coal), and lagoon-fill siltstones. Flood tidal deltas consists of landward-dipping beds of sandstone which interfinger vertically and laterally with rooted and/or bioturbated lagoonal siltstones. Locally, individual beds of the flood tidal delta may be rooted or burrowed, which indicates discontinuous deposition of sediment into a lagoon. Channel-fill sandstones characterized by landward-oriented paleocurrent directions are interpreted to represent tidally influenced channels in a flood-dominated, microtidal setting. The majority of the lagoon-fill sediments are bioturbated, rooted, or burrowed siltstone, with brackish water bivalves Crossostrea, Brachidontes, Corbula and Anomia. Trace fossils Thalassinoides, Planolites, Palaeophycus, and Pelecypodichnus are common. Ophiomorpha-burrowed, medium grain size sandstone with abraded oyster shells is the only evidence of higher energy (storm-related) lagoonal deposition. Swamps are represented by low sulfur, low ash coal seams, with tree stumps, tree roots, and dinosaur tracks. Swamp environments prograded over sediment-filled lagoons, and are interpreted as the final stage of back barrier deposition.

  12. Viability of microcomputed tomography to study tropical marine worm galleries in humid muddy sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennafirme, Simone F., E-mail: sipennafirme@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biologia Marinha; Machado, Alessandra S.; Lima, Inaya; Suzuki, Katia N.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: machado@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: norisuzuki6@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Bioturbation is an ecological process driven by organisms, which transports nutrients and gases from air/water to sediment through their galleries, by the time they feed, burrow and/or construct galleries. This exchange is vital to the maintenance of micro and macrobenthic organisms, mainly in muddy flat environments. Species with distinct galleries could create levels of bioturbation, affecting the benthic interactions. In this sense, it is fundamental developing a non-destructive method that permits identifying/quantifying the properties of these galleries. The recent advances in micro-computed tomography are allowing the high resolution 3D images generation. However, once muddy sediments are rich in organic matter and interstitial water, these would lead to motion artifacts which could, in turn, decrease the accuracy of galleries identification/quantification. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol which combines laboratory experiments and microtomography analysis in order to generate accurate 3D images of the small marine worm's galleries within humid muddy sediments. The sediment was collected at both muddy flats of Surui's and Itaipu lagoon's mangroves (RJ-Brazil), sieved (0.5mm mesh) and introduced with one individual of the marine worm Laeonereis acuta (Nereididae, Polychaeta) in each acrylic corer holders (4.4cm of internal diameter). High energy microtomography scanner was used to obtain 3D images and the setup calibration was 130 kV and 61 mA. Each acquisition image time was among 4h and 6h. Several procedures of drying remained water inside the cores were performed aiming obtaining images without movement artifacts due to circulating water, and this issue was one of the main studied parameter. In order to investigate possible chemical effects, 2ml of formalin (35%) with menthol were added to the surface of the cores. The results show that although the drying time was appropriated, the chemicals created bubbles

  13. ASPEK PROSES DIAGENESIS TERHADAP SIFAT FISIK BATUPASIR FORMASI KEREK, DAERAH KALIPUTIH DAN SEKITARNYA, KECAMATAN SINGOROJO, KABUPATEN KENDAL, JAWA TENGAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanny Hertanto Vahyu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The sedimentary rock is formed and associated with the diagenesis processes, as all the physical, chemical, andbiological changes in the characteristics of a sediment accumulation from the time the grains are deposited untilthey are metamorphosed. This process is profoundly influence the characteristic of sedimentary rock, including thetexture, internal structure, mineral composition, cementation type, and pore space. Hence, it is important to knowor learn the stage of sandstone diagenesis, especially in the Kerek Formation to mark the correlation betweendiagenesis and physical properties of sandstone.The purpose of this research is to identify the stage of diagenetic processes, diagenetic environment, the type ofcementation, and the relationship between diagenetic stage and physical properties of sandstone. The methods usedin this research are survey method and data analysis method. The survey method includes the making of crosssectionalmeasured stratigraphy and data analysis method includes petrographic and scanning electron microscopy(SEM.The sedimentary structures found in the carbonate sandstones are burrows, convolute ripple lamination, gradedbedding, parallel lamination, cross lamination, current ripple lamination; which are features of turbidity deposition(Bouma sequence. Based on the petrography analysis results for sample P 01 and P 02 showed compaction,cementation, dissolution, and bioturbation, with a porosity value of 1 %. Sample P 03 showed compaction,cementation, dissolution, and bioturbation, with a porosity value of 7 %. Sample P 04 showed compaction,cementation, and dissolution, with a porosity value of 1 %. Sample P 06 showed compaction, cementation,dissolution and replacement, with a porosity value of 5 %. Sample P 07 showed compaction, and cementation, witha porosity value of 30 %. The Lithology type in the research area was Calcarenite with dominant shell fragment,the lithology names are Packed biomicrite (Folks, 1959; in

  14. The role of benthic macrofauna on nitrogen cycling in eutrophic lake sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, J.M.

    1998-12-01

    This thesis concerns the role of sediment-living macrobenthos in the cycling of nitrogen species and nitrogen transformation in eutrophic freshwater sediments. In my thesis I have, employing {sup 15}N-isotope techniques in laboratory experiments, shown the importance of infaunal chironomid larvae and oligochaetes on denitrification in eutrophic lake sediments. Investigated benthic organisms not only expand the sediment surface with their permanent or non-permanent burrow constructions, they also transport water through the burrows continuously. This behaviour of intermittent water-pumping activity, provides the burrows with oxygen, and in addition, mediates the supply of nitrate to denitrifying zones. The highly dynamic oxygen climate within and narrow oxic zones around burrows, due to their radial geometry, provides a very short diffusion path for nitrate into surrounding anoxic zones. In my studies rates of denitrification were enhanced c. 3 to 6-fold by the influence of chironomids (Chironomus plumosus) and c. 2-fold by the influence of oligochaetes at comparable biomass. The difference in degree of stimulation is explained by species-specific habitat exploitation which could also be observed between different tube-dwelling species of chironomids. Besides chironomid biomass, the degree of enhancement of denitrification by chironomids was dependent on nitrate concentration in the overlying water, and water temperature. Nitrification was also seen to be stimulated by the infaunal macrobenthos but to a lesser degree than denitrification. It is suggested that bioturbated eutrophic sediment, under predominantly oxic bottom water conditions may act more pronouncedly as a sink for inorganic nitrogen relative to non-bioturbated sediment, and that bioturbated sediment above all, may be an important factor contributing to lowered transport of nitrogen to the coast. In order to sustain high nitrogen removal capacity in wetlands, ponds and lakes, it is further suggested

  15. Biogeomorphically driven salt pan formation in Sarcocornia-dominated salt-marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escapa, Mauricio; Perillo, Gerardo M. E.; Iribarne, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Salt-marshes are under increasing threat, particularly from sea-level rise and increased wave action associated with climate change. The development and stability of these valuable habitats largely depend on complex interactions between biotic and abiotic processes operating at different scales. Also, interactions between biotic and abiotic processes drive internal morphological change in salt-marshes. In this paper we used a biogeomorphological approach to assess the impact of biological activities and interactions on salt pan formation in Sarcocornia-dominated salt marshes. Salt pans represent a key physiographic feature of salt-marshes and recent studies hypothesized that biogeomorphic processes could be related to salt pan formation in SW Atlantic salt-marshes. The glasswort Sarcocornia perennis is one of the dominant plants in the salt-marshes of the Bahía Blanca Estuary (Argentina) where they form patches up to 8 m in diameter. These salt-marshes are also inhabited in great densities by the burrowing crab Neohelice (Chasmagnathus) granulata whose bioturbation rates are among the highest reported for salt-marshes worldwide. A set of biological interactions between N. granulata and S. perennis appears to be responsible for salt pan development in these areas which has not been described elsewhere. The main objective of this work was to determine the ecological interactions occurring between plants and crabs that lead to salt pan formation by using field-based sampling and manipulative experiments. Our results showed that S. perennis facilitated crab colonization of the salt-marsh by buffering otherwise stressful physical conditions (e.g., temperature, desiccation). Crabs preferred to construct burrows underneath plants and, once they reach high densities (up to 40 burrows m- 2), the sediment reworking caused plant die-off in the central area of patches. At this state, the patches lose elevation and become depressed due to the continuous bioturbation by crabs

  16. Modeling the vertical soil organic matter profile using 210Pbex measurements and Bayesian inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kruijt

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In view of its potential significance for soil organic matter (SOM cycling, the vertical SOM distribution in the profile should be considered in models. To mechanistically predict the SOM profile, three additional processes should be represented compared to bulk SOM models: (vertically distributed rhizodeposition, mixing due to bioturbation, and movement with the liquid phase as dissolved organic matter. However, the convolution of these processes complicates parameter estimation based on the vertical SOM distribution alone. Measurements of the atmospherically produced isotope 210Pbex may provide the additional information needed to constrain the processes. Since 210Pbex enters the soil at the surface and bind strongly to organic matter it is an effective tracer for SOM transport. In order to study the importance of root input, bioturbation, and liquid phase transport for SOM profile formation we performed Bayesian parameter estimation of the previously developed mechanistic SOM profile model SOMPROF. 13 parameters, related to decomposition and transport of organic matter, were estimated for the soils of two temperate forests with strongly contrasting SOM profiles: Loobos (the Netherlands and Hainich (Germany. Measurements of organic carbon stocks and concentrations, decomposition rates, and 210Pbex profiles were used in the optimization. For both sites, 3 optimizations were performed in which stepwise 210Pbex data and prior knowledge were added. The optimizations yielded posterior distributions with several cases (modes which were characterized by the dominant organic matter (OM pool: non-leachable slow OM, leachable slow OM, or root litter. For Loobos, the addition of 210Pbex data to the optimization clearly indicated which case was most likely. For Hainich, there is more uncertainty, but the most likely case produced by the optimization agrees well with other measurements. For both sites the most likely case of the final optimization was one

  17. Mussel farming as a nutrient reduction measure in the Baltic Sea: consideration of nutrient biogeochemical cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadmark, J; Conley, D J

    2011-07-01

    Nutrient loads from the land to the sea must be reduced to combat coastal eutrophication. It has been suggested that further mitigation efforts are needed in the brackish Baltic Sea to decrease nutrients, especially in eutrophic coastal areas. Mussel farming is a potential measure to remove nutrients directly from the sea. Mussels consume phytoplankton containing nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P); when the mussels are harvested these nutrients are removed from the aquatic system. However, sedimentation of organic material in faeces and pseudo-faeces below a mussel farm consumes oxygen and can lead to hypoxic or even anoxic sediments causing an increased sediment release of ammonium and phosphate. Moreover, N losses from denitrification can be reduced due to low oxygen and reduced numbers of bioturbating organisms. To reveal if mussel farming is a cost-effective mitigation measure in the Baltic Sea the potential for enhanced sediment nutrient release must be assessed.

  18. TransparC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Vesterdal, Lars; Magnussen, Andreas;

    soil horizons and the fraction of the organic horizon that is translocated to spodic material in a B-horizon is to be chosen from a range of values. Four cases were selected in that reflect common forested soil types in Denmark. In the four selected cases turnover rates (k, year-1) were adjusted......, and iterated turnover rates in horizontal fixed depth soil sections to 1 meter depth. The intended use is mainly for outlier detection in resampling studies and teaching soil C dynamics. The simulation utilized repeated measurements of soil C (SINKS 2007-12) and will be validated with new data collected during......, bioturbation by macrofauna (earthworms) and podzolisation were included, allowing transfer of SOC between the forest floor and mineral soil layers. The forest soil carbon simulator incorporates all types of new and old organic matter into one pool. It is organized in six horizontal soil layers and runs for 40...

  19. Assessment of benthic disturbance associated with stingray foraging for ghost shrimp by aerial survey over an intertidal sandflat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Seiji; Tamaki, Akio

    2014-08-01

    One notable type of bioturbation in marine soft sediments involves the excavation of large pits and displacement of sediment associated with predator foraging for infaunal benthos. Batoids are among the most powerful excavators, yet their impact on sediment has been poorly studied. For expansive tidal flats, only relatively small proportions of the habitat can be sampled due to physical and logistical constraints. The knowledge of the dynamics of these habitats, including the spatial and temporal distribution of ray bioturbation, thus remains limited. We combined the use of aerial photogrammetry and in situ benthic sampling to quantify stingray feeding pits in Tomioka Bay, Amakusa, Japan. Specifically, we mapped newly-formed pits over an 11-ha section of an intertidal sandflat over two consecutive daytime low tides. Pit size and distribution patterns were assumed to scale with fish size and reflect size-specific feeding behaviors, respectively. In situ benthic surveys were conducted for sandflat-surface elevation and prey density (callianassid shrimp). The volume versus area relationship was established as a logistic function for pits of varying sizes by photographing and refilling them with sediment. This relationship was applied to the area of every pit detected by air to estimate volume, in which special attention was paid to ray ontogenetic change in space utilization patterns. In total, 18,103 new pits were formed per day, with a mean individual area of 1060 cm2. The pits were divided into six groups (G1 to G6 in increasing areas), with abundances of G1, G2+G3, and G4-G6 being medium, high, and low, respectively. Statistical analyses using generalized linear models revealed a marked preference for the higher prey-density areas in G1 and the restriction of feeding grounds of G4-G6 to the lower shore, with G2+G3 being generalists for prey density and sandflat elevation. The lower degrees of overall bioturbation by G1 and G4-G6 were spatially structured for the

  20. Mineralization of organic carbon on and in the sediment of Lake Grevelingen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeboom, H. J.; De Klerk, H. A. J.; Sandee, A. J. J.

    Within the framework of a research project on the carbon cycle in saline Lake Grevelingen a study of the mineralization on and in the sediment was made. The oxygen uptake by the sediment was measured using the bell jar method at 6 sampling stations. Applying a C over O 2 conversion factor of 0.29, it was calculated that 330 g·m -2 is mineralized in the sediment of the lake annually. By means of biomass estimates of the macroflora and fauna inside the bell jars and regression analysis, the contribution of these organisms to the carbon mineralization rate was calculated to be 70 and 95 g·m -2·a -1, respectively. The effect of oxygen gradients and apparent diffusion coefficients upon the oxygen uptake rate was studied with microelectrodes. This indicated that bioturbation is a major factor influencing the oxygen uptake rate. A good correlation between this rate and temperature was found.

  1. Denudation rates determined from the accumulation of in situ-produced 10Be in the luquillo experimental forest, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Erik Thorson; Stallard, Robert F.; Larsen, Matthew C.; Raisbeck, Grant M.; Yiou, Francoise

    1995-01-01

    We present a simple method for estimation of long-term mean denudation rates using in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be in fluvial sediments. Procedures are discussed to account for the effects of soil bioturbation, mass wasting and attenuation of cosmic rays by biomass and by local topography. Our analyses of 10Be in quartz from bedrock outcrops, soils, mass-wasting sites and riverine sediment from the Icacos River basin in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, are used to characterize denudation for major landform elements in that basin. The 10Be concentration of a discharge-weighted average of size classes of river sediment corresponds to a long-term average denudation of ≈ 43 m Ma −1, consistent with mass balance results. 

  2. Tidal dunes versus tidal bars: The sedimentological and architectural characteristics of compound dunes in a tidal seaway, the lower Baronia Sandstone (Lower Eocene), Ager Basin, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olariu, Cornel; Steel, Ronald J.; Dalrymple, Robert W.; Gingras, Murray K.

    2012-11-01

    The Lower Eocene Baronia Formation in the Ager Basin is interpreted as a series of stacked compound dunes confined within a tectonically generated embayment or tidal seaway. This differs from the previous interpretation of lower Baronia sand bodies as tidal bars in the front of a delta. The key architectural building block of the succession, the deposit of a single compound dune, forms a 1-3 m-thick, upward coarsening succession that begins with highly bioturbated, muddy, very fine to fine grained sandstone that contains an open-marine Cruziana ichnofacies. This is overlain gradationally by ripple-laminated sandstone that is commonly bioturbated and contains mud drapes. The succession is capped by fine- to coarse-grained sandstones that contain both planar and trough cross-strata with unidirectional or bi-directional paleocurrent directions and occasional thin mud drapes on the foresets. The base of a compound dune is gradational where it migrated over muddy sandstone deposited between adjacent dunes, but is sharp and erosional where it migrated over the stoss side of a previous compound dune. The cross strata that formed by simple superimposed dunes dip in the same direction as the inclined master bedding planes within the compound dune, forming a forward-accretion architecture. This configuration is the fundamental reason why these sandbodies are interpreted as compound tidal dunes rather than as tidal bars, which, in contrast, generate lateral-accretion architecture. In the Baronia, fields of compound dunes generated tabular sandbodies 100s to 1000s of meters in extent parallel to the paleocurrent direction and up to 6 m thick that alternate vertically with highly bioturbated muddy sandstones (up to 10 m thick) that represent the low-energy fringes of the dune fields or periods of high sea level when current speeds decreased. Each cross-stratified sandstone sheet (compound-dune complexes) contains overlapping lenticular "shingles" formed by individual compound

  3. The stratigraphy of cretaceous mudstones in the eastern Fuegian Andes: new data from body and trace fossils Estratigrafía de las fangolitas del Cretácico en los Andes Fueguinos orientales: Nuevos datos de cuerpos y trazas fósiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo B. Olivero

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The stratigraphy of Cretaceous marine mudstones in the Fuegian Andes, roughly equivalent to Charles Darwin's clay-slate formation, remains a still unsolved problem. Previous records of Albian, Turonian-Coniacian, and Santonian-Campanian bivalves are combined with new findings of the Late Albian inoceramid Inoceramus anglicus Woods, and the Maastrichtian ammonites Diplomoceras sp., Anagaudryceras sp., Maorites densicostatus (Kilian and Reboul, Maorites sp., and Pachydiscus (Neodesmoceras sp. to further constrain the Cretaceous stratigraphy of the eastern Fuegian Andes. In addition, new records of distinctive trace fossils and ichnofabric are meaningful for stratigraphic division and delineation of paleoenvironmental settings in these Cretaceous mudstones. The Lower Cretaceous ichnoassemblage of Chondrites targioni (Brongniart and Zoophycos isp. is consistent with the inferred slope-volcaniclastic apron settings of the Yahgan Formation; Nereites missouriensis (Weller reflects distal basin plain depositional settings for the Beauvoir Formation. In the Upper Cretaceous, the "Estratos de Buen Suceso" record the earliest extensively bioturbated horizons, reflecting prolonged well-oxygenated bottom conditions. In the Bahía Thetis Formation, organic-rich, channel margin or distal basin slaty mudstones record the last occurrence of inoceramid bivalves in the Austral Basin; the generalized absence of trace fossils is consistent with dysoxic bottom conditions. The thoroughly bioturbated Policarpo Formation, records a marked change in paleoceanographic conditions. The strong contrast in the intensity of bioturbation between the Upper Campanian-Maastrichtian Bahía Thetis Formation, almost devoid of trace fossils, and the highly bioturbated Maastrichtian-Danian Policarpo Formation reflects a change from dysoxic-anoxic to well ventilated conditions, probably associated with a cooling trend of bottom waters in the austral deep oceans.En los Andes Fueguinos la

  4. Bioaccumulation of 51Cr, 63Ni and 14C in Baltic Sea benthos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumblad, L; Bradshaw, C; Gilek, M

    2005-03-01

    The Baltic Sea is a species-poor, semi-enclosed, brackish sea, whose sediments contain a wide range of contaminants, including sediment-associated metals and radionuclides. In this study, we have examined and compared bioaccumulation kinetics and assimilation efficiencies of sediment-associated (51)Cr, (63)Ni and (14)C in three key benthic invertebrates (the deposit-feeding Monoporeia affinis, the facultative deposit-feeding Macoma baltica, and the omnivorous Halicryptus spinulosus). Our results demonstrate that (i) all radionuclides were accumulated, (ii) the different radionuclides were accumulated to various extents, (iii) small changes in organic carbon concentration can influence the accumulation, and (iv) the degree of accumulation differed only slightly between species. These processes, together with sediment resuspension and bioturbation, may remobilise trace metals from the sediment to the water and to higher trophic levels, and therefore should be taken into account in exposure models and ERAs.

  5. Multiple S-isotopic evidence for episodic shoaling of anoxic water during Late Permian mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanan; Farquhar, James; Zhang, Hua; Masterson, Andrew; Zhang, Tonggang; Wing, Boswell A

    2011-02-22

    Global fossil data show that profound biodiversity loss preceded the final catastrophe that killed nearly 90% marine species on a global scale at the end of the Permian. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain this extinction and yet still remain greatly debated. Here, we report analyses of all four sulphur isotopes ((32)S, (33)S, (34)S and (36)S) for pyrites in sedimentary rocks from the Meishan section in South China. We observe a sulphur isotope signal (negative δ(34)S with negative Δ(33)S) that may have resulted from limitation of sulphate supply, which may be linked to a near shutdown of bioturbation during shoaling of anoxic water. These results indicate that episodic shoaling of anoxic water may have contributed to the profound biodiversity crisis before the final catastrophe. Our data suggest a prolonged deterioration of oceanic environments during the Late Permian mass extinction.

  6. Reservoir characterization of the Bakken formation; or why is Parshall special?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau, Anne [Triangle Petroleum Corp. (Canada); Sterling, Robert [Cirque Resources LP (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The Middle Bakken, an Upper Devonian formation, has been a productive reservoir in recent years. It is formed of several distinct lithofacies representing various mineralogical assemblages and sedimentary mechanisms. Each lithofacies has unique petrophysical parameters. One striking example of this variability can be seen at Parshall Field, which has three main lithofacies, two of which are reservoir facies. The Upper Middle Bakken, which has the highest porosity, is made of algal laminated dolomite mudstones. The heavily bioturbated Lower Middle Bakken is formed of limestone and dolomite. The defining character of the third lithofacies is crinoidal limestone shoals highly cemented with calcite. The reservoir quality of these facies and their distribution, along with the thermal maturity barrier, are the main considerations for setting up the field. The way to correctly assess amount of oil in the Middle Bakken consists of calibrating electric logs to core data.

  7. Correlation of basinal carbonate cycles to nearshore parasequences in the late Cretaceous Greenhorn seaway, Western Interior USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, W.P.; Gustason, E.R.; Sageman, B.B.

    1994-01-01

    In the central basin in Colorado and Kansas, these sedimentary cycles are represented by limestone-shale and marlstone-shale couplets ~0.5-1.0m in thickness. More calcareous parts of these couplets may be correlated westward into condensed, fossiliferous concretion and shell beds in proximal offshore lithofacies of Arizona and Utah. These concretion and shell beds are physically traceable farther landward (westward) into bioturbated, fossil-rich, transgressive lag deposits that bound 10-20m thick coarsening-upward progradational strand-plain deposits (parasequences) in southwestern Utah. We consider Milankovitch-style orbital forcing of climate and tectonically induced fluctuations in rates of foredeep basin subsidence as possible forcing mechanisms for these basinwide events. -from Authors

  8. Sequential development of platform to off-platform facies of the great American carbonate bank in the central Appalachians: chapter 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezinski, David K.; Taylor, John F.; Repetski, John E.

    2012-01-01

    In the central Appalachians, carbonate deposition of the great American carbonate bank began during the Early Cambrian with the creation of initial ramp facies of the Vintage Formation and lower members of the Tomstown Formation. Vertical stacking of bioturbated subtidal ramp deposits (Bolivar Heights Member) and dolomitized microbial boundtsone (Fort Duncan Member) preceded the initiation of platform sedimentation and creation of sand shoal facies (Benevola Member) that was followed by the development of peritidal cyclicity (Daragan Member). Initiation of peritidal deposition coincided with the development of a rimmed platform that would persist throughout much of the Cambrian and Early Odrovician. At the end of deposition of the Waynesboro Formation, the platform became subaerially exposed because of the Hawke Bay regression, bringing the Sauk I supersequence to and end. In the Conestoga Valley of eastern Pennsylvania, Early Cambrian ramp deposition was succeeded by deposition of platform-margin and periplatfrom facies of the Kinzers Formation.

  9. Environmental Fate of Synthetic Drilling fluids from Offshore Drilling Operations - An Experimental Study of an Olefin-, Ether- and Ester-Based Mud System on Cuttings Deposited in Benthic Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaanning, M.T.

    1996-03-01

    In offshore drilling operations, much of the mineral oil previously used in mud systems has been replaced by synthetic drilling fluid. The chemicals enter the North Sea environment attached to bore hole cuttings deposited on the seabed near the discharge sites. After deposition, erosion may occur by biodegradation, bioturbation, resuspension and release to the water mass of dissolved chemicals or metabolites. In the investigation described in this report aliquots of control sediment and three types of cuttings were deposited in duplicate benthic chambers. During an experimental period of 161 days, the loss of drilling fluids from the sediments as well as the change of the ratio between drilling fluid and barium was measured. The mineralization of drilling carbon fluid to CO{sub 2} and water was calculated from oxygen consumption measurements and effects on sediment pH and redox potentials were determined at various time intervals. 10 refs., 13 figs., 25 tabs.

  10. Effects of the invasive polychaete, Marenzelleria viridis, on the fate of sediment associated pollutants – a microcosm study with 14C-labelled pyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banta, Gary Thomas; Hedman, Jenny Elisabet

    on the fate of deeply buried sediment-associated pollutants in the historically polluted Baltic Sea. We report here the results of an experimental microcosm study examining the fate of 14C radiolabelled pyrene (a 4-ring PAH) in sediment microcosms with and without Marenzelleria viridis. We also investigated...... the impact of depositing labile organic matter (seston) on the sediment surface. Worms clearly enhanced the release of pyrene and degradation metabolites from the sediment to the overlying water in all cases, mostly due to the initial flushing of sediments during burrow establishment. Surprisingly......, there was no clear effect of worms on the mineralization of pyrene to CO2, where a complicated interaction between bioturbation and the presence of labile organic matter was observed. Furthermore, the ultimate fate of the increased release of sediment-associated pyrene and its metabolites to the water is unknown....

  11. Radiochronology of lake sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erten, H.N. [Bilkent Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-01-01

    Sediment cores from Lakes Zurich, Constance, from the Sea of Marmara and from southern Turkey, northern Cyprus and eastern Spain were dated using natural {sup 210}Pb, fallout {sup 137}Cs and cosmic-ray produced {sup 7}Be radionuclides. Constant activity regions in the uppermost sections of sediments from Lake Zurich and the Sea of Marmara were attributed to post-depositional mobility of {sup 210}Pb in the former case and to bioturbation in the latter. A serious discrepancy exists between the {sup 210}Pb dating of Sea of Marmara sediments and those obtained by organic carbon based methods. The elements Zn, Cu, P and Pb were enriched in the upper sections of the sediment cores corresponding to the last 200 years. The increased metallurgical activities as a result of reforms in the Ottoman Army during the 18th century could be the most likely cause. (Author).

  12. Dynamic modeling of environmental risk associated with drilling discharges to marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgut, İsmail; Rye, Henrik; Reed, Mark; Smit, Mathijs G D; Ditlevsen, May Kristin

    2015-10-15

    Drilling discharges are complex mixtures of base-fluids, chemicals and particulates, and may, after discharge to the marine environment, result in adverse effects on benthic communities. A numerical model was developed to estimate the fate of drilling discharges in the marine environment, and associated environmental risks. Environmental risk from deposited drilling waste in marine sediments is generally caused by four types of stressors: oxygen depletion, toxicity, burial and change of grain size. In order to properly model these stressors, natural burial, biodegradation and bioturbation processes were also included. Diagenetic equations provide the basis for quantifying environmental risk. These equations are solved numerically by an implicit-central differencing scheme. The sediment model described here is, together with a fate and risk model focusing on the water column, implemented in the DREAM and OSCAR models, both available within the Marine Environmental Modeling Workbench (MEMW) at SINTEF in Trondheim, Norway.

  13. Consequences of a simulated rapid ocean acidification event for benthic ecosystem processes and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Fiona; Widdicombe, Stephen; McNeill, C Louise; Solan, Martin

    2013-08-30

    Whilst the biological consequences of long-term, gradual changes in acidity associated with the oceanic uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are increasingly studied, the potential effects of rapid acidification associated with a failure of sub-seabed carbon storage infrastructure have received less attention. This study investigates the effects of severe short-term (8days) exposure to acidified seawater on infaunal mediation of ecosystem processes (bioirrigation and sediment particle redistribution) and functioning (nutrient concentrations). Following acidification, individuals of Amphiura filiformis exhibited emergent behaviour typical of a stress response, which resulted in altered bioturbation, but limited changes in nutrient cycling. Under acidified conditions, A. filiformis moved to shallower depths within the sediment and the variability in occupancy depth reduced considerably. This study indicated that rapid acidification events may not be lethal to benthic invertebrates, but may result in behavioural changes that could have longer-term implications for species survival, ecosystem structure and functioning.

  14. Implications of excess 210Pb and 137Cs in sediment cores from Mikawa Bay, Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xueqiang; MATSUMOTO Eiji

    2009-01-01

    Four sediment cores were collected from Mikawa Bay, Japan, and excess 210Pb and 137Cs were measured by gamma spectrometry. Sedimentation rates for the four cores were determined by 210Pb method. The sedimentation rate range is 0.10--0.70 g/(cm2·year). The bio-mixing depth for each core is less than 7.0 cm, and was determined by the excess 210Pb profiles as well. Therefore, the bioturbation is slight. The 210Pb-derived dates coincide with the results from 137Cs geochronology. Acceleration in sedimentation rate due to environmental alteration has been found in cores A2.5 and 05AS8, representing two depocenters due to their topography. Evidence of the Tokai Flood in 2000 was found in core 05AS8 according to the profiles of both radioisotopes and trace metals.

  15. Periodic anoxic shelf in the Early-Middle Ordovician transition: ichnosedimentologic evidence from west-central Utah, USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Ichnosedimentologic evidence of periodic anoxic shelf in the Early-Middle Ordovician transition includes lower ichnodiversity, shallower bioturbation and burrowing depth (<4 cm ), rare domichnia, tiny Chondrites occupying shallower or shallowest tiering, widely distributed nodules of limonite pseudomorphs after pyrite, occurrence of trace fossils being closely associated with the storm event layers, and stratigraphic successions with orbital cyclostratigraphic architecture. It is suggested that lower atmospheric oxygen level during the Early Paleozoic, the Ordovician radiation, dramatic transgression and warmer temperatures would result in the periodic anoxia in the Early-Middle Ordovician transition. This episode began at the later Early Ordovician and lasted about 3.4 Ma on the basis of orbital cyclostratigraphy.

  16. Groundwater ferricretes from the Silurian of Ireland and Permian of the Spanish Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, V. P.; Sloan, R. J.; Valero Garcés, B.; Garvie, L. A. J.

    1992-04-01

    Haematite nodule horizons occur in alluvial-lacustrine deposits from the Mill Cove Formation (Silurian) of Dingle, Ireland and the Unidad Roja Superior (Permian) of the Spanish Pyrenees. These horizons, generally less than 1 m thick, are not associated with palaeosol profiles but are hosted by laminated or structureless, bioturbated mudstones to sandstones. The sequences contain weakly developed calcrete profiles. The haematite nodules are interpreted as having formed around fluctuating water-tables and are analogous to present-day groundwater ferricretes (laterites or plinthites). Fe 2+, mobilised during periods of reducing groundwaters, was segregated into ferric oxide nodules during falls in the water-table or during influxes of oxygenated meteoric waters. The prevailing climate during deposition of both sequences was probably semi-arid and the presence of ferricrete-like horizons is not evidence of humid climates. The horizons represent early "diagenetic" effects, not related to prevailing soil moisture regime.

  17. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael eBeman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation-reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation are active and actively coupled to one another—yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly understood. We report pore water geochemical (O2, NH4+, NO3- profiles, quantitative profiles of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and ammonia oxidation rate measurements, from bioturbated marine sediments of Catalina Island, California. Across triplicate sediment cores collected offshore at Bird Rock and within Catalina Harbor, oxygen penetration (0.24-0.5 cm depth and the abundance of amoA genes (up to 9.30 x 107 genes g-1 varied with depth and between cores. Bacterial amoA genes were consistently present at depths of up to 10 cm, and archaeal amoA was readily detected in Bird Rock cores, and Catalina Harbor cores from 2008, but not 2007. Although detection of DNA is not necessarily indicative of active growth and metabolism, ammonia oxidation rate measurements made in 2008 (using isotope tracer demonstrated the production of oxidized nitrogen at depths where amoA was present. Rates varied with depth and between cores, but indicate that active ammonia oxidation occurs at up to 10 cm depth in bioturbated Catalina Harbor sediments, where it may be carried out by either or both ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria.

  18. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J M; Bertics, Victoria J; Braunschweiler, Thomas; Wilson, Jesse M

    2012-01-01

    Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation-reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation) are active and actively coupled to one another - yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly understood. We report pore water geochemical (O(2), [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]) profiles, quantitative profiles of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and ammonia oxidation rate measurements, from bioturbated marine sediments of Catalina Island, California. Across triplicate sediment cores collected offshore at Bird Rock (BR) and within Catalina Harbor (CH), oxygen penetration (0.24-0.5 cm depth) and the abundance of amoA genes (up to 9.30 × 10(7) genes g(-) (1)) varied with depth and between cores. Bacterial amoA genes were consistently present at depths of up to 10 cm, and archaeal amoA was readily detected in BR cores, and CH cores from 2008, but not 2007. Although detection of DNA is not necessarily indicative of active growth and metabolism, ammonia oxidation rate measurements made in 2008 (using isotope tracer) demonstrated the production of oxidized nitrogen at depths where amoA was present. Rates varied with depth and between cores, but indicate that active ammonia oxidation occurs at up to 10 cm depth in bioturbated CH sediments, where it may be carried out by either or both ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

  19. Sedimentary facies of the central part of radial tidal sand ridge system of the eastern China coast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong YIN; Xinqin ZOU; Dakui ZHU; Jiaxiang HUANG

    2008-01-01

    A unique radial tidal sand ridge system (RTSRS) has developed under a complex tidal current field on the eastern China coast between the Yangtze River delta to the south and the abandoned Yellow River (Huanghe) delta to the north. The present study examines the sedimentary evolution of a ridge-channel pair in the central RTSRS. Three cores, with two on the ridges and one in the channel, were drilled to reveal the late Pleistocene-Holocene deposits of the system. Five sedimentary facies were distinguished, i.e. ridge-shallow subtidal facies, ridge-deep subtidal facies, near-surface channel bottom facies, middle tidal flat facies and low tidal flat facies. The ridge-shallow subtidal facies consists of sandy strata with ripple cross bed-dings, horizontal lamina, and massive beddings. Bioturbation seldom occurs. The ridge-deep subtidal facies is primarily characterized by sandy and muddy interlayers with common flaser and lenticular bedding structures. Bioturbation appears abundantly. Massive and graded sediment sequences of storm origin are pre-sent as characterized by rich shell fragments. The near-surface channel bottom facies consists of loose, soft, clayey silt deposits with deformed sedimentary layers. This facies occurs in the deeper part of the active chan-nels. The middle tidal flat and lower tidal flat facies composed of silt-clay couplets prevailed primarily in the tidal flats. Incomplete sedimentary successions show that coastal plain deposits dominate in the study area during 12-13 ka B.P. The sandy ridge and channel facies became dominant during 4 6 ka B.P. when the sea level receded temporarily. Tidal ridge and channel in the study area became active during the last four decades. Sediment reworking due to typhoon and sandy ridge migration plays a key role in shaping the present radial ridge system.

  20. The effect of macrofaunal disturbance on Cerastoderma edule post-larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Timothy Andrew; Jenkins, Stuart Rees; Richardson, Christopher Allan; Hiddink, Jan Geert

    2016-06-01

    Populations of the Common European cockle (Cerastoderma edule) often have highly patchy distributions and variable recruitment success. One of the proposed reasons is that high densities of filter feeders and/or bioturbators are thought to reduce the success of larval settlement and post-settlement survival, but the direct causal processes driving these observations are not clearly identified and validated. Through combined field and laboratory experiments, we test the hypothesis that macrofauna cause decreases in post-larval density through feeding and movement activities. The effect of excluding the bioturbating lugworm Arenicola marina and filter-feeding adult cockles on post-larval cockle densities was estimated in separate field experiments at two locations from the time of initial larval settlement in May 2012 to late summer August 2012. Lugworm exclusion led to a significant increase in cockle post-larval densities whereas the opposite was true for adult cockles, where exclusion led to a reduction in C. edule post-larval density. Although clear effects were observed in the field, experiments conducted in the laboratory failed to detect changes in mortality or byssus drifting of post-larvae as a consequence of macrofaunal activity. This study demonstrates that the presence of macrofauna can have both positive and negative effects on post-settlement density of C. edule post-larvae. Thus the density, distribution and identity of macrofauna have significant effects on the density and spatial distribution of C. edule post-larvae during the post-settlement period. These observations have implications for conservation and fishery management of this species.

  1. Possible trace fossils of putative termite origin in the Lower Jurassic (Karoo Supergroup of South Africa and Lesotho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Catuneanu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex structures in the sandstones of the Lower Jurassic aeolian Clarens Formation (Karoo Supergroup are found at numerous localities throughout southern Africa, and can be assigned to five distinct architectural groups: (1 up to 3.3-m high, free-standing, slab-shaped forms of bioturbated sandstones with elliptical bases, orientated buttresses and an interconnecting large burrow system; (2 up to 1.2-m high, free-standing, irregular forms of bioturbated sandstones with 2-cm to 4-cm thick, massive walls, empty chambers and vertical shafts; (3 about 0.15-m to 0.25-m high, mainly bulbous, multiple forms with thin walls (larger than 2 cm, hollow chambers with internal pillars and bridges; (4 about 0.15-m to 0.2-m (maximum 1-m high, free-standing forms of aggregated solitary spheres associated with massive horizontal, orientated capsules or tubes, and meniscate tubes; and (5 about 5 cmin diameter, ovoid forms with weak internal shelving in a close-fitting cavity. Based on size, wall thickness, orientation and the presence of internal chambers, these complex structures are tentatively interpreted as ichnofossils of an Early Jurassic social organism; the different architectures are reflective of the different behaviours of more than one species, the history of structural change in architectural forms (ontogenetic series or an architectural adaptation to local palaeoclimatic variability. While exact modern equivalents are unknown, some of these ichnofossils are comparable to nests (or parts of nests constructed by extant termites, and thus these Jurassic structures are very tentatively interpreted here as having been made by a soil-dwelling social organism, probably of termite origin. This southern African discovery, along with reported Triassic and Jurassic termite ichnofossils from North America, supports previous hypotheses that sociality in insects, particularity in termites, likely evolved prior to the Pangea breakup in the Early Mesozoic.

  2. Linking hydropedology and ecosystem services: differential controls of surface field saturated hydraulic conductivity in a volcanic setting in central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gómez-Tagle

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the variation of field saturated soil hydraulic conductivity (Kfs as key control variable and descriptor of infiltration was examined by means of a constant head single ring infiltrometer. The study took place in five coverage types and land uses in a volcanic setting in central Mexico. The tested hypothesis was that there exist a positive relationship between plant cover and surface Kfs for the study area. The examined coverage types included; Second growth pine-oak forest, pasture land, fallow land, gully and Cupresus afforestation. Results indicate that Kfs did not depend exclusively of plant cover; it was related to surface horizontal expression of the unburied soil horizons and linked to land use history. Therefore the Kfs measured at a certain location did not depend exclusively of the actual land use, it was also influenced by soil bioturbation linked to plant succession patterns and land use management practices history. The hypothesis accounts partially the variation between sites. Kfs under dense plant cover at the Cupresus afforestation was statistically equal to that measured at the fallow land or the gully sites, while second growth pine-oak forest Kfs figures were over an order of magnitude higher than the rest of the coverage types. The results suggest the relevance of unburied soil horizons in the soil hydrologic response when present at the surface. Under these conditions loosing surface soil horizons due to erosion, not only fertility is lost, but environmental services generation potential. A conceptual model within the hydropedological approach is proposed. It explains the possible controls of Kfs, for this volcanic setting. Land use history driven erosion plays a decisive role in subsurface horizon presence at the surface and soil matrix characteristic determination, while plant succession patterns seem to be strongly linked to soil bioturbation and

  3. Investigation into the Origin and Character of Surficial Sedimentary Deposits at the Midshore Regional Solid Waste Facility near Easton, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, Joseph P.; Newell, Wayne L.; DeJong, Benjamin D.

    2009-01-01

    A temporary exposure at the Midshore Regional Solid Waste Facility near Easton, MD, provided an opportunity to document the characteristics of the complex assemblage of surficial facies in that area. This unusually large cross section allowed interpretation of the changing processes that shaped the landscape in response to climate change through the late Pleistocene. Eight stratigraphic units were recognized: (1) gray, fossiliferous, muddy silt of the marine Miocene Choptank Formation; (2) coarse, crossbedded conglomerate of the late Miocene to Pliocene fluvial Pensauken Formation; (3) bioturbated muddy conglomerate interpreted as deposits of small colluvial fans; (4) pebbly, quartzose sand overlying a planar erosional surface reflecting a marine transgression; (5) irregular pods and lenses of sand and gravel deformed into bowl-shaped folds and faulted, which are interpreted as wind deposits over a semipermanent snow cover (niveo-aeolian deposits); (6) crossbedded sand and conglomerate with abundant mud partings indicating tidal influences on sinuous stream channels; (7) heavily bioturbated silt and sand with abundant root casts and flattened vesicles interpreted as aeolian loess deposits in marshy fens; and (8) pebbly sand and mud with scattered boulders and cobbles that reflect modern infill of the excavation by the operators. Soils formed on units 3, 4, and 7. Superimposed on units 4, 5, and 7 is evidence of deep freezing and permafrost development and subsequent thermokarst development after thawing, which includes large, complexly filled wedge-shaped cracks, deformed bedding and faults, fluid-injection structures, and spherical blobs of sand and mud. Each of the stratigraphic units has irregular distributions and lateral changes. The results of this study provide a unique insight into the geometry of surficial deposits that will help facilitate mapping of units, interpretation of cored intervals, and understanding of ground-penetrating radar profiles. The

  4. Conditional Responses of Benthic Communities to Interference from an Intertidal Bivalve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Van Colen

    Full Text Available Habitat-modifying organisms that impact other organisms and local functioning are important in determining ecosystem resilience. However, it is often unclear how the outcome of interactions performed by key species varies depending on the spatial and temporal disturbance context which makes the prediction of disturbance-driven regime shifts difficult. We investigated the strength and generality of effects of the filter feeding cockle Cerastoderma edule on its ambient intertidal benthic physical and biological environment. By comparing the magnitude of the effect of experimental cockle removal between a non-cohesive and a sheltered cohesive sediment in two different periods of the year, we show that the outcome of cockle interference effects relates to differences in physical disturbance, and to temporal changes in suspended sediment load and ontogenetic changes in organism traits. Interference effects were only present in the cohesive sediments, though the effects varied seasonally. Cockle presence decreased only the density of surface-dwelling species suggesting that interference effects were particularly mediated by bioturbation of the surface sediments. Furthermore, density reductions in the presence of cockles were most pronounced during the season when larvae and juveniles were present, suggesting that these life history stages are most vulnerable to interference competition. We further illustrate that cockles may enhance benthic microalgal biomass, most likely through the reduction of surface-dwelling grazing species, especially in periods with high sediment load and supposedly also high bioturbation rates. Our results emphasize that the physical disturbance of the sediment may obliterate biotic interactions, and that temporal changes in environmental stressors, such as suspended sediments, may affect the outcome of key species interference effects at the local scale. Consequently, natural processes and anthropogenic activities that change

  5. Interbasinal marker intervals——A case study from the Jurassic basins of Kachchh and Jaisalmer, western India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANDEY; Dhirendra; Kumar; FüRSICH; Franz; Theodor

    2009-01-01

    The Kachchh Basin and the Jaisalmer Basin are two neighboring Mesozoic sedimentary basins at the western margin of the Indian craton. The Jurassic succession of the Kachchh Basin is more complete and more fossiliferous than that of the Jaisalmer Basin. Consequently, intrabasinal correlation of the sedimentary units has been possible in the Kachchh Basin, but not in the Jaisalmer Basin. However, some marker beds existing in the Kachchh Basin can be recognized also in the Jaisalmer Basin. Ammonite evidence shows that they are time-equivalent. The following four units form marker intervals in both basins: (1) the pebbly rudstone unit with Isastrea bernardiana and Leptosphinctes of the Kaladongar Formation (Kachchh Basin) and the Isastrea bernardiana-bearing rudstone of the Jaisalmer Formation (Jaisalmer Basin) both represent transgressive systems tract deposits dated as Late Bajocian; (2) bioturbated micrites with anomalodesmatan bivalves within the Goradongar Yellow Flagstone Member (Kachchh Basin) and bioturbated units in the Fort Member (Jaisalmer Basin) represent maximum flooding zone deposits of the Middle to Late Bathonian; (3) trough-crossbedded, sandy packto grainstones of the Raimalro Limestone Member (Kachchh Basin) and the basal limestone-sandstone unit of the Kuldhar section of the Jaisalmer Formation (Jaisalmer Basin) correspond to Late Bathonain transgressive systems tract deposits; and (4) ferruginous ooid-bearing carbonates with hardgrounds of the Dhosa Oolite member (Kachchh Basin) and the middle part of the Jajiya Member (Jaisalmer Basin) are Oxfordian transgressive systems tract deposits. The fact that in both basins similar biofacies prevailed during certain time intervals demonstrates a common control of their depositional history. As the two basins represent different tectonic settings, the most likely controlling factors were the relative sea-level changes produced by eustatic processes, a common subsidence history of the northwestern margin of

  6. Base of brackish-water mud as key regional stratigraphic marker of mid-Holocene marine flooding of the Baltic Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtasalo, Joonas J.; Endler, Michael; Moros, Matthias; Jokinen, Sami A.; Hämäläinen, Jyrki; Kotilainen, Aarno T.

    2016-08-01

    Many modern epicontinental seas were dry land before their marine flooding by the mid-Holocene glacioeustatic sea-level rise, whereas the Baltic Sea Basin was covered by a huge postglacial lake. This change from a postglacial lake to the present-day semi-enclosed brackish-water sea is studied here in sediment cores and acoustic profiles from the Baltic Sea major sub-basins, based on novel datasets combined with information extracted from earlier publications. In shallow areas (water depth), the base of the brackish-water mud is erosional and covered by a patchy, thin, transgressive silt-sand sheet resulting from decreased sediment supply, winnowing and the redistribution of material from local coarse-grained deposits during transgression. This erosional marine flooding surface becomes sharp and possibly erosional in deep areas (>50m water depth), where it may be locally less clearly expressed due to reworking and bioturbation. Both in the shallow and deep areas, the brackish-water mud is strongly enriched in organic matter compared to underlying sediments. Bioturbation type changes at the flooding surface in response to the increased sedimentary organic content, but no firm-ground ichnofacies were developed because of low erosion. It is concluded that the base of the brackish-water mud is a robust allostratigraphic bounding surface that is identifiable by the lithologic examination of cores over the Baltic Sea. The surface is a distinct reflector in seismic-acoustic profiles, which facilitates mapping and basin-wide stratigraphic subdivision. Detailed geochronologic studies are required to confirm if sediments immediately overlying the erosional flooding surface in shallow areas are younger than the basal part of the brackish-water mud in deep areas that is predicted to be time-equivalent to the erosion.

  7. Studies on the regional feature of organic carbon in sediments off the Huanghe River Estuary waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Huamao; LIU Zhigang; SONG Jinming; L(U) Xiaoxia; LI Xuegang; LINing; ZHAN Tianrong

    2004-01-01

    Organic carbon (OC) in definitely small area sediments(according to marine dimension)offthe Huanghe River Estuary is investigated in order to evaluate the feature of regional difference of physical and chemical properties in marginal sea sediments. The distributions of OC in sediments with natural grain size and the relationship with the pH,Eh,Es and Fe3+/Fe2+ are discussed. In addition, OC decomposition rates in surfacial/subsurfacial sediments are estimated. OC concentrations range from 0.26% to 1.8%(wt)in the study area. Significant differences in OC content and in horizontal distribution as well as various trends in surfacial/subsurfacial sediments exhibit the feature of regional difference remarkably in marginal sea sediments. The complicated distribution of OC in surface sediments is due to the influence of bacterial activity and abundance, bioturbation of benthos and physical disturbance. The OC decomposition rate constant in surfacial/subsurfacial sediments ranges from 0.009 7 to 0.076 a-1 and the relatively high values may be mainly related to bacteria that are mainly responsible for OC mineralization;meio-and macrofauna affect OC degradation both directly, through feeding on it, and indirectly through bioturbation and at the same time coarse sediments are also disadvantageous to OC preservation. In almost all the middle and bottom sediments the contents of Ocdecrease with the increase of deposition depth, which indicates that mineralization of OC in the middle and bottom sediments has occurred via processes like SO2-4 reduction and Fe-oxide reduction.

  8. Depositional environment, ichnological features and oxygenation of Permian to earliest Triassic marine sediments in central Spitsbergen, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Uchman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Late Early Permian–lowermost Triassic carbonate, siliceous (spiculites and clastic marine sediments in the Marmierfjellet area (Isfjorden, central Spitsbergen contain a relatively diverse and abundant trace fossil assemblage providing important information about the depositional processes. The Vøringen Member (Late Artinskian–Kungurian of the Kapp Starostin Formation (Late Artinskian–? Changhsingian contains trace fossils (Nereites, Phycosiphon, Zoophycos and Arenicolites—common in tempestites typical of the proximal–archetypal Cruziana ichnofacies, which indicates lower shoreface. Nereites, Phycosiphon and Zoophycos, accompanied by other rare trace fossils, characterize the Svenskegga and Hovtinden members of the Kapp Starostin Formation. They are interpreted as the distal Cruziana ichnofacies, possibly transitional to the Zoophycos ichnofacies typical of the lower offshore zone. However, the sporadic occurrences of Arenicolites and Macaronichnus can point to episodic shallowing to upper offshore–lower shoreface. The lowest part of the Triassic Vikinghøgda Formation (Induan–Olenekian contains a very low-diverse ichnoassemblage composed of a few simple and branched forms ascribed to the impoverished Cruziana ichnofacies (lower to upper offshore environment, which is attributed to the early recovery stage after the Permian–Triassic extinction. The trace fossils and loss of primary sedimentary structures caused by intense bioturbation throughout most of the section point to generally oxygenated pore waters on the sea floor. However, some horizons, especially laminated black shales, display reduced or no bioturbational activity. These horizons also show high V/(V+Ni ratios, which indicate oxygen-depleted sediments with periods of anoxic conditions. A remarkable black shale unit deposited under anoxic and sulphidic conditions occurs at the Permian–Triassic transition.

  9. Marine geological study of the continental shelf around Heugsan island, SE Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chi Won; Jin, Jae Hwa; Shin, Won Cheol; Kim, Won Sik; Kim, Jung Ki; Kim, Sang Woo; Lee, Ho Yong; Chang, Cheong Hae; Kim, Sung Woo; Lee, Yoon Oh; Park, Young Soo; Bahng, Hyo Ky [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    This annual report is a result of marine geological and geophysical surveys conducted in 1995 to obtain a variety of data available for mapping Korean continental shelf geology. The study area is situated off city of Mokpo, comprising a rectangle enclosed by lines connecting between 34 degree 30`N and 35 degree 00`N, and between 125 degree 00`E and 126 degree 00`E. Geophysical surveys included water-depth sounding, sea floor side scanning, 3.5 khz sub-bottom profiling, air gun seismic reflection profiling and measurement of total magnetic intensity. During geological terms, 102 grab samples were collected from a grid of 4 miles x 4 miles spaced on the sea floor, and 31 sediment cores were raised from the proper sites determined by preliminary interpretation of geophysical data. The survey vessel, R/V Tamhae, was positioned by a GPS system (Loran-GPS 10X; Trimble Navigation Co.). The sea floor is largely covered with seven distinct types of surface and near-surface sediments; (1) massive sand, (2) homogeneous clay, (3) laminated silt, (4) bioturbated muddy sand, (5) massive silt, (6) bioturbated gravelly muddy sand, and (7) shell aggregate. Based on synthetic interpretation of high-resolution (3.5 khz) seismic data and correlated sedimentary facies, the shallow substratum comprises low-stand, transgressive and high-stand systems tracts (LST, TST and HST, respectively) formed during the last glacio-eutectics regression and transgression. Air gun seismic profiles show that pre-Pleistocene sediments comprise 4 sequences designated as B, C, D, and E, respectively. (author). 63 refs.

  10. Spatial distribution of southern brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus subtilis on the Amazon continental shelf: a fishery, marine geology and GIS integrated approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah E. G. Martins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The spatial distribution of the southern brown shrimp Farfantepenaeus subtilis (Pérez-Farfante, 1967 was studied based on industrial fishing fleet activities and is associated with geological and oceanographic characteristics of the benthonic environments on the Amazon continental shelf. Using a geographical information system (GIS this paper sought to calculate the relative abundance of brown shrimp based on catch per unit effort (CPUE and compare it with bathymetry, type of sedimentary structure, sedimentation rate and bottom salinity. As a result, we have concluded that the relative abundance (in terms of CPUE is not uniformly distributed in space. Spatial analysis indicates that commercial trawling efforts were made in the (foreset region of the subaqueous Amazon delta at depths of 40 to 60 m. In this region, prawn are responsible for the bioturbation of the sediments and the creation of a sedimentary structure called mottled mud. In the foreset region, sedimentation rates progressively increased up to 10 cm.yr-1; re-suspension was reduced and bottom salinity was high (~ 36. It appears that all of these factors define a stable muddy area with intense bioturbation. This notable biological activity is to be explained by the occurrence of a high F. subtilis abundance that appears to originate in a microbial loop. We concluded that by combining fishery information with environmental data from a GIS, it was possible to identify abundance distribution patterns for southern brown shrimp and other economically important fishery resources and to understand how they change on a large spatial-scale.

  11. Paleoecology of the Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence in eastern Kentucky with an atlas of some common fossils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron, L.S.; Ettensohn, F.R.

    1981-04-01

    The Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence of eastern North America is a distinctive stratigraphic interval generally characterized by low clastic influx, high organic production in the water column, anaerobic bottom conditions, and the relative absence of fossil evidence for biologic activity. The laminated black shales which constitute most of the black-shale sequence are broken by two major sequences of interbedded greenish-gray, clayey shales which contain bioturbation and pyritized micromorph invertebrates. The black shales contain abundant evidence of life from upper parts of the water column such as fish fossils, conodonts, algae and other phytoplankton; however, there is a lack of evidence of benthic life. The rare brachiopods, crinoids, and molluscs that occur in the black shales were probably epiplanktic. A significant physical distinction between the environment in which the black sediments were deposited and that in which the greenish-gray sediments were deposited was the level of dissolved oxygen. The laminated black shales point to anaerobic conditions and the bioturbated greenish-gray shales suggest dysaerobic to marginally aerobic-dysaerobic conditions. A paleoenvironmental model in which quasi-estuarine circulation compliments and enhances the effect of a stratified water column can account for both depletion of dissolved oxygen in the bottom environments and the absence of oxygen replenishment during black-shale deposition. Periods of abundant clastic influx from fluvial environments to the east probably account for the abundance of clays in the greenish-gray shale as well as the small amounts of oxygen necessary to support the depauparate, opportunistic, benthic faunas found there. These pulses of greenish-gray clastics were short-lived and eventually were replaced by anaerobic conditions and low rates of clastic sedimentation which characterized most of black-shale deposition.

  12. A structurally controlled fan-delta complex at the southern margin of the peninsular range forearc basin complex (Baja California)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, W.R.; Busby-Spera, C. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (USA))

    1990-05-01

    A confined trunk fan delta and its structurally controlled tributary fan deltas are extremely well exposed along the southern margin of the Rosario embayment. This fan-delta complex consists of nonmarine to deep marine deposits almost continuously exposed for over 20 km in the down-paleoslope direction. Facies and stratal patterns in the fan-delta complex were controlled by local faulting, climatic variation, and eustasy, resulting in relative sea level fluctuations. Basin bathymetry and drainage patterns were controlled by a series of half-grabens that formed along north-south-trending faults that lay along the northern margin of an east-west-trending depression. Breccias were initially shed into the north-south-trending half-grabens; axial drainage systems were later established within the grabens, making up the tributary fan deltas. These tributary fan deltas fed a voluminous trunk fan delta confined to the east-west-trending depression. The trunk and tributary fan delta deposits show two major progradational to retrogradational cycles that record relative sea level fluctuations. Progradation in the shallow-marine environment is represented by conglomerate channels cut into ripple-laminated or bioturbated siltstone and HCS sandstones, overlain by conglomerate mouth bar deposits interstratified with nearshore sandstone deposits. Retrogradation in the shallow marine environment is recorded by either a vertical clastic facies transition or a clastic-carbonate facies transition. The clastic facies transition consists of nearshore sandstone deposits overlain by offshore bioturbated siltstones. The clastic-carbonate facies transition consists of the development of red algal patch reefs and rhodoliths on top of fan-delta conglomeratic lobes, mudstone and sandstone bank channel margins, or paleobasement highs. The clastic-carbonate facies transition reflects low sediment supply controlled by climatic conditions.

  13. Small ecosystem engineers as important regulators of lake's sediment respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Victor; Lewandowski, Joerg; Krause, Stefan; Romeijn, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Although shallow lakes are covering only about 1.5% of the land surface of the Earth, they are responsible for sequestration of carbon amounts similar or even larger than those sequestered in all marine sediments. One of the most important drivers of the carbon sequestration in lakes is sediment respiration. Especially in shallow lakes, bioturbation, i.e. the biogenic reworking of the sediment matrix and the transport of fluids within the sediment, severely impacts on sediment respiration. Widespread freshwater bioturbators such as chironomid larvae (Diptera, Chironomidae) are building tubes in the sediment and actively pump water through their burrows (ventilation). In the present work we study how different organism densities and temperatures (5-30°C) impact on respiration rates. In a microcosm experiment the bioreactive resazurin/resorufin smart tracer system was applied for quantifying the impacts of different densities of Chironomidae (Diptera) larvae (0, 1000, 2000 larvae/m2) on sediment respiration. Tracer transformation rates (and sediment respiration) were correlated with larval densities with highest transformation rates occurring in microcosms with highest larval densities. Respiration differences between defaunated sediment and sediment with 1000 and 2000 larvae per m2 was insignificant at 5 °C, and was progressively increasing with rising temperatures. At 30 °C respiration rates of sediment with 2000 larvae per m2 was 4.8 times higher than those of defaunated sediment. We interpret this as an effect of temperature on larval metabolic and locomotory activity. Furthermore, bacterial communities are benefiting from the combination of the high water temperatures and bioirrigation as bacterial community are able to maintain high metabolic rates due to oxygen supplied by bioirrigation. In the context of global climate change that means that chironomid ecosystem engineering activity will have a profound and increasing impact on lake sediment respiration

  14. Kinetic quantification of vertical solid matter transfers in soils by a multi-tracers approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagercikova, Mariannaa; Cornu, Sophiea; Bourl`es, Didierb; Evrard, Olivierc; Alainb, V.'eron; Hatt'e, Christinec; Ayrault, Sophiec; Jérômea, Balesdent

    2015-04-01

    We will present a novel multi-tracers method - combining different isotopic systems (137 Cs, 210 Pb (xs), meteoric 10 Be, 206/207 Pb, δ13 C, 14 C) with numerical modeling based on a non-linear diffusion-convection equation with depth dependent parameters - to quantify vertical transfer of solid matter in Luvisols, namely clay translocation and bioturbation. Our results show that as much as 91 ± 9 % and 80 ± 9 % of 137Cs and 10Be, respectively, are associated with the clay size fraction (0-2 µm) and provide therefore relevant tracers to investigate vertical transfer of solid matter in soils with pH > 5 and low organic carbon contents. Lead partitioning between different solid phases is more complex. Considering two spatial distributions of isotopes (macropores or soil matrix) depending on the contribution of a fraction inherited from the loess parent material to the soil concentration, we built up a multi-tracers modeling approach that simulates the experimental data with the common set of transfer parameters and allows us to quantify the relative contributions of vertical solid matter transfers to present-day 0-2 µm vertical distributions. Clay translocation is responsible for 9 to 66 % of clay accumulation in the Bt-horizon. The diffusion coefficients quantifying the rate of soil mixing by bioturbation yields values that are significantly higher than those estimated in previous ecological studies. Modeling the kinetics of solid matter transfer at various spatial and temporal scales should become a reference method in modern pedogenic and critical zone studies.

  15. TAPHONOMIC TOOLS TO EVALUATE SEDIMENTATION RATES AND STRATIGRAPHIC COMPLETENESS IN ROSSO AMMONITICO FACIES (EPIOCEANIC TETHYAN JURASSIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JESÚS E. CARACUEL

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available A combined multidisciplinary approach has been applied to calculate minimum values of the stratigraphic completeness and, secondarily, sedimentation rates in 9.2 m thick Rosso Ammonitico facies from central Apennines (Italy and 11 m thick deposits of the same facies in Southern Spain. Middle - Upper Toarcian expanded sedimentation in Valdorbia section (Umbria-Marche Apennines and extremely condensed Oxfordian-Tithonian sedimentation at Puerto Escaño section (External Subbetic have been investigated using combined taphonomic, ichnologic and sedimentologic data and analyses. At Valdorbia, infaunal tiering is largely preserved and 27 horizons of infaunal-tiering truncation and casting reveal strong erosional activity forced by tempestite/turbidite events. Therefore, microstratigraphic gaps could be evaluated without biostratigraphic control. In this expanded section, 13 horizons of firm- and hardgrounds have been recorded showing simple or gradational tiering. Conversely, in the condensed Puerto Escaño section, taphonomic analysis reveals 25 horizons of bioclasts truncation (mainly in ammonites, and 56 horizons of firm-hardgrounds intensively bioturbated. In Valdorbia rather than in Puerto Escaño section, the evaluation of flattening in burrows and spherical bioclasts reveal a measurable mechanical compaction and dissolution. In addition, Rosso Ammonitico at Valdorbia section favoured the calculation of decompaction coefficients (nd for each lithology easier than in Puerto Escaño section. In condensed and essentially hiatal Rosso Ammonitico, mottled deposits due to intense bioturbation dominate and tiering cannot be recognizable. This fact is accentuated by usual overprinting of elementary depositional events, which in turn hampered the accurate calculation of missing deposits. Therefore, in condensed Rosso Ammonitico the latter was only available in terms of minimal missing-record trough the analysis of truncated bioclasts. 

  16. Salmon as biogeomorphic agents in gravel-bed rivers (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Spawning salmon have been known to affect streambed texture, influence sediment transport, and play an important geomorphological role in streams by digging nests or redds. We examined the impact of salmon and floods on channel morphology, bed material dispersion and yield, bed surface texture and stability, fine sediment dynamics and nutrient retention of small gravel bed streams in British Columbia, Canada. Channel morphology and dynamics of a large number of streams in British Columbia are partially or wholly affected by fish bioturbation. The scale of the impact is controlled by the salmon species, population density, and channel size and characteristics. Sediment transport measurements show that salmon play a significant role in erosion and deposition within the channel by promoting vertical and longitudinal mixing of the substrate, as well as by changing the relative mobility of the gravel on the bed. The action of salmon bioturbation promotes distinctive bedforms and packing of sediment grains. In streams with dense populations of sockeye or chum salmon the whole surface of spawning reaches may be modified, as bars are excavated and pools are filled. For chinook salmon the organization of spawning bedforms ranges from scattered mounds or ‘gravel pile-ups’ to well-ordered dunes. Such dunes extend for hundreds of meters to kilometres along the river bed. They exhibit amplitudes of more than one metre and wavelengths of 10 to 15 m. Our conclusion that mass-spawning fish can dominate sediment transport in mountain drainage basins has fundamental implications for understanding channel morphology, aquatic ecosystem dynamics, stream responses to environmental change, and river restoration programs.

  17. Early diagenesis of recently deposited organic matter: A 9-yr time-series study of a flood deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesi, T.; Langone, L.; Goñi, M. A.; Wheatcroft, R. A.; Miserocchi, S.; Bertotti, L.

    2012-04-01

    In Fall 2000, the Po River (Italy) experienced a 100-yr return period flood that resulted in a 1-25 cm-thick deposit in the adjacent prodelta (10-25 m water depth). In the following years, numerous post-depositional perturbations occurred including bioturbation, reworking by waves with heights exceeding 5 m, as well as periods of extremely high and low sediment supply. Cores collected in the central prodelta after the Fall 2000 flood and over the following 9 yr, allowed characterization of the event-strata in their initial state and documentation of their subsequent evolution. Sedimentological characteristics were investigated using X-radiographs and sediment texture analyses, whereas the composition of sedimentary organic matter (OM) was studied via bulk and biomarker analyses, including organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), carbon stable isotope composition (δ13C), lignin phenols, cutin-products, p-hydroxy benzenes, benzoic acids, dicarboxylic acids, and fatty acids. The 9-yr time-series analysis indicated that roughly the lower half of the original event bed was preserved in the sediment record. Conversely, the upper half of the deposit experienced significant alterations including bioturbation, addition of new material, as well as coarsening. Comparison of the recently deposited material with 9-yr old preserved strata represented a unique natural laboratory to investigate the diagenesis of sedimentary OM in a non-steady system. Bulk data indicated that OC and TN were degraded at similar rates (loss ∼17%) whereas biomarkers exhibited a broad spectrum of reactivities (loss from ∼6% to ∼60%) indicating selective preservation during early diagenesis. Given the relevance of episodic sedimentation in several margins, this study has demonstrated the utility of event-response and time-series sampling of the seabed for understanding the early diagenesis in non-steady conditions.

  18. Mineralogical and geochemical influences on sediment color of Amazon wetlands analyzed by visible spectrophotometry Influências mineralógicas e geoquímicas na cor dos sedimentos das zonas úmidas da Amazônia analisada através da espectrofotometria no visível

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tasso Felix Guimarães

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on sedimentological and geochemical data, this work relates spectrophotometric measurements with sediment composition and its application in palaeoecological studies of Amazon wetlands. The CIELAB values are directly related to mineralogical and chemical composition, mostly involving quartz, iron oxyhydroxides and sulfides (e.g. pyrite, and total organic carbon. Total organic carbon contents between 0.4-1%, 1-2%, 3-5% and 15-40% were related to L* (lightness data of 27, 26-15, 7-10 and 7 or less, respectively. The CIELAB values of a deposit in Marabá, Pará, were proportional to variations in quartz and total organic carbon contents, but changes in zones of similar color, mainly in the +a* (red and +b* (yellow values of deposits in Calçoene, Amapá and Soure, Pará, indicate a close relationship between total organic carbon content and iron oxyhydroxides and sulfides. Furthermore, the Q7/4 diagram (ratio between the % re?ectance value at 700 nm to that at 400 nm, coupled with L* indicated iron-rich sediments in the bioturbated mud facies of the Amapá deposit, bioturbated mud and bioturbated sand facies of Soure deposit, and cross-laminated sand and massive sand facies of the Marabá core. Also, organic-rich sediments were found in the bioturbated mud facies of the Amapá deposit, lenticular heterolithic and bioturbated mud facies of the Soure deposit, and laminated mud and peat facies of the Marabá deposit. At the Marabá site, the data suggest an autochthonous influence with peat formation. The coastal wetland sites at Marajó and Amapá represent the development of a typical tidal flat setting with sulfide and iron oxyhydroxides formation during alternated flooding and drying.Com base em dados sedimentológicos e geoquímicos, este trabalho relaciona medições espectrofotométricas com a composição do sedimento, e sua aplicação em estudos paleoecológicos das áreas alagáveis da Amazônia. Os dados CIELAB estão diretamente

  19. The geoarchaeology of urban wastes: from refuses to activities and towns organisation (France, 6th c. BC - 10th c. aD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borderie, Q.; Cammas, C.; Petit, C.

    2012-04-01

    In an urban context, geoarchaeological study of man-environment interaction is often neglected, although recent studies of urbic anthrosols and human induced processes show that it can provide a great amount of data. The sedimentary matrix of the archaeological layers, especially its organic and heavy metal contents (phosphore, organic carbon, lead…) and the pedo-sedimentary processes (such as bioturbation, percolation, decay of organic matter…), are evidence of ancient lifestyle and waste disposal habits. This data are even more useful when archaeological evidence is rare or inefficient, such as in the early medieval Dark Earth. This paper is based on several geoarchaeological studies undertaken since the 1990 in French towns ranging from the Iron Age to the early Middle Ages (Paris, Beauvais, Bayeux, Noyon, Macon, Metz, Lattara…), mainly from rescue excavations. Multi-scale, 3D and fine scale analyses of archaeological stratigraphy are combined with micromorphological studies of undisturbed samples and grain size as well as geochemical analysis of bulk samples (CaCO3, C/N, Fe, Pb, Zn, Cu…). Spatial sampling reveals complex pattern of activities in finely stratified and well defined architectural context like Lattara (Iron Age). Organic refuses were found mainly in specific urban spaces like courtyards or squares and animal housing areas could be delineate. In more undifferentiated stratigraphy (early medieval Dark Earth), bioturbation is one of the main formation process and seems to have obliterated others. Thus, we analysed the 3D pattern of macro-artefacts on field, combined with micromorphology, geochemical and semi quantitative counting of micro-artefacts on thin sections. It allowed us to characterise Dark Earth by the type of activity refuses, in relation with the pedo-sedimentary context and the uses of the areas. It also allowed us to assess the characters induced by in situ activities and those due to the local background. Moreover, in Metz

  20. Irrigation in dose assessments models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Barkefors, Catarina [Studsvik RadWaste AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    dominating contribution to resulting concentrations of radionuclides in vegetation due to irrigation. Finally a proposal is given how to model irrigation in future assessments by using an expression taking into account the leaf area index (LAI) and a specific storage capacity. In addition differentiation of retention on vegetation surfaces for various elements is proposed due to information in the literature. It has been stated that cations are retained more effectively than anions. Most radioecological models describe migration of radionuclides in soils by an expression including advection and bioturbation as main processes. A sensitivity and uncertainty analysis was performed for the expression used in SR 97 and SAFE to describe this. The results show, as expected, that for immobile radionuclides bioturbation causes a higher transport than advection, while for mobile radionuclides bioturbation is negligible. Irrigation is important from an exposure point of view. The importance varies due to element and consumption rates. Interception on vegetation surfaces and subsequent retention give the highest contamination for elements with low bioavailability.

  1. Presentation, calibration and validation of the low-order, DCESS Earth System Model (Version 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Pepke Pedersen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A new, low-order Earth System Model is described, calibrated and tested against Earth system data. The model features modules for the atmosphere, ocean, ocean sediment, land biosphere and lithosphere and has been designed to simulate global change on time scales of years to millions of years. The atmosphere module considers radiation balance, meridional transport of heat and water vapor between low-mid latitude and high latitude zones, heat and gas exchange with the ocean and sea ice and snow cover. Gases considered are carbon dioxide and methane for all three carbon isotopes, nitrous oxide and oxygen. The ocean module has 100 m vertical resolution, carbonate chemistry and prescribed circulation and mixing. Ocean biogeochemical tracers are phosphate, dissolved oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon for all three carbon isotopes and alkalinity. Biogenic production of particulate organic matter in the ocean surface layer depends on phosphate availability but with lower efficiency in the high latitude zone, as determined by model fit to ocean data. The calcite to organic carbon rain ratio depends on surface layer temperature. The semi-analytical, ocean sediment module considers calcium carbonate dissolution and oxic and anoxic organic matter remineralisation. The sediment is composed of calcite, non-calcite mineral and reactive organic matter. Sediment porosity profiles are related to sediment composition and a bioturbated layer of 0.1 m thickness is assumed. A sediment segment is ascribed to each ocean layer and segment area stems from observed ocean depth distributions. Sediment burial is calculated from sedimentation velocities at the base of the bioturbated layer. Bioturbation rates and oxic and anoxic remineralisation rates depend on organic carbon rain rates and dissolved oxygen concentrations. The land biosphere module considers leaves, wood, litter and soil. Net primary production depends on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and

  2. Presentation, calibration and validation of the low-order, DCESS Earth System Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. P. Pedersen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A new, low-order Earth system model is described, calibrated and tested against Earth system data. The model features modules for the atmosphere, ocean, ocean sediment, land biosphere and lithosphere and has been designed to simulate global change on time scales of years to millions of years. The atmosphere module considers radiation balance, meridional transport of heat and water vapor between low-mid latitude and high latitude zones, heat and gas exchange with the ocean and sea ice and snow cover. Gases considered are carbon dioxide and methane for all three carbon isotopes, nitrous oxide and oxygen. The ocean module has 100 m vertical resolution, carbonate chemistry and prescribed circulation and mixing. Ocean biogeochemical tracers are phosphate, dissolved oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon for all three carbon isotopes and alkalinity. Biogenic production of particulate organic matter in the ocean surface layer depends on phosphate availability but with lower efficiency in the high latitude zone, as determined by model fit to ocean data. The calcite to organic carbon rain ratio depends on surface layer temperature. The semi-analytical, ocean sediment module considers calcium carbonate dissolution and oxic and anoxic organic matter remineralisation. The sediment is composed of calcite, non-calcite mineral and reactive organic matter. Sediment porosity profiles are related to sediment composition and a bioturbated layer of 0.1 m thickness is assumed. A sediment segment is ascribed to each ocean layer and segment area stems from observed ocean depth distributions. Sediment burial is calculated from sedimentation velocities at the base of the bioturbated layer. Bioturbation rates and oxic and anoxic remineralisation rates depend on organic carbon rain rates and dissolved oxygen concentrations. The land biosphere module considers leaves, wood, litter and soil. Net primary production depends on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and

  3. Rapid shoreline erosion induced by human impacts in a tropical muddy coast context, an example from western French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunier, Guillaume; Anthony, Edward; Gardel, Antoine

    2015-04-01

    The Guyanas coast (French Guiana, Surinam and Guiana) is the longest muddy coast in the world (1500 km). It is under the influence of mud banks in transit from the Amazon delta in Brazil to the Orinoco delta in Venezuela. This westward mud bank migration induces a strong geomorphic control on the shoreline which can be summarized in terms of "bank" (shoreline advance and wave energy dissipation) and "inter-bank" phases (erosion of shoreline by waves). Our study site, rice polders close to Mana city (western French Guiana), is a fine example of the exacerbation, by human activities, of the erosional dynamics on this muddy coast during an "inter-bank" phase. The polders cover 50,000 ha, in 200 x 600 m compartments flanked by earth dikes and canals. They were built in the muddy Holocene coastal plain in the 1980s and are rapidly eroding. Waves (mean significant height = 1.5 m height) comprise Atlantic swell and local trade wind-waves, and the tidal context is semi-diurnal and meso-tidal. We determined historical shoreline evolution from satellite (Landsat & SPOT) and orthophotography images, and conducted four field campaigns between October 2013 and October 2014, comprising topographic (RTK-DGPS) and hydrodynamic (pressure sensors) measurements. The results show intense erosion of 150 m/year affecting the polders since 2001, and lesser retreat (30 to 100 m/year) of the adjacent sectors colonized by mangrove forests. The erosive shoreface shows the same structure in each polder compartment: a chenier beach which freely retreats backwards under the influence of wave overwash. The chenier retreat rate is 100 m/year and it appears to be more intense (net retreat of 45 m) during the high wave-energy season (December to March), which generates more overwashing. In front of the chenier, we observed a large (50 m) inter-tidal mud bed showing different levels of induration and bioturbation by mangrove roots. The mud shorefaces exhibit an erosion rate of 100 m/year on average

  4. The Bakken - An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarg, J.

    2011-12-31

    An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar

  5. Marine geological and geophysical study of the continental shelf off southern part of Cheju Island, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chi Won; Kim, Seung Woo; Jang, Jung Hae; Kim, Won Sik; Sin, Won Chul; Min, Gun Hong; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Ho Young; Jin, Jae Hwa; Kim, Sung Pil; Kim, Jung Ki; Park, Hong Soo; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Suk Whan [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    This report is a preliminary result of marine geological and geophysical surveys conducted by KIGAM in 1996 obtain data available for mapping Korean continental shelves. The survey area is located off Seoguipo city of Cheju Island, which is the largest volcanic island in Korea. Total of 1,050 line-km of geophysical survey includes echo sounding, side scan sonar survey, 3.5 KHz subbottom profiling, air gun seismic and magnetic surveys. 75 grab samples were collected from grid positions of 4 x 4 miles spacing by using a Smith McIntyre sampler for textural analysis of surface sediments, and 27 sediment cores were raised from the sites determined by interpretation of geophysical data. The survey vessel, R/V Tamhae, was positioned by GPS system. Isobaths shallower than 90 m are parallel to coastline and the sea floor deepens rapidly from coast to the water depth of more than 100 m deep. The sea floor exceeding 90 m in water depth is comparatively smooth. A moat-like topographic low up to ca. 160 m deep occurs between Gapa and Mara Islands, where the tidal currents in the upper layer is stronger than 3.4 knots. The sea floor is largely covered with thin (<20 cm) shell fragment aggregates including lithic pebbles. The content of CaCO{sub 3} in coarse fraction of the surface sediments ranges from 30 % to 100 %, and is relatively higher values in nearshore. According to textural parameters and sedimentary structures, the shallow substratum can be divided into 10 sedimentary facies; 1) massive sandy mud (MSm), 2) laminated sandy mud (MSl), 3) massive muddy sand (SMm), 4) bioturbated muddy sand (SMb), 5) faintly laminated muddy sand (SMf), 6) fining-upward muddy sand (SMfu), 7) massive sand (Sm), 8) fining-upward gravelly sand (GSfu), and 9) disorganized gravelly sand (GSd). The near-surface sediments of the survey area has deposited largely under low energy conditions interrupted by high energy events. Laminated sandy mud (MSl) and bioturbated muddy sand (SMb) reflect the

  6. Late Miocene fossils from shallow marine sediments in Brunei Darussalam: systematics, palaeoenvironment and ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslim, Amajida; Briguglio, Antonino; Kocsis, László; Ćorić, Stjepan; Razak, Hazirah

    2016-04-01

    The geology of Brunei Darussalam is fascinating but difficult to approach: rainforests and heavy precipitation tend to erode and smoothen the landscape limiting rocks exposure, whereas abundant constructions sites and active quarries allow the creation of short time available outcrop, which have to be immediately sampled. The stratigraphy of Brunei Darussalam comprises mainly Neogene sediments deposited in a wave to tide dominated shallow marine environment in a pure siliciclastic system. Thick and heavily bioturbated sandstone layers alternate to claystone beds which occasionally yield an extraordinary abundance and diversity of fossils. The sandstones, when not bioturbated, are commonly characterized by a large variety of sedimentary structures (e.g., ripple marks, planar laminations and cross beddings). In this study, we investigate the sediments and the fossil assemblages to record the palaeoenvironmental evolution of the shallow marine environment during the late Miocene, in terms of sea level change, chemostratigraphy and sedimentation rate. The study area is one of the best in terms of accessibility, extension, abundance and preservation of fossils; it is located in the region -'Bukit Ambug' (Ambug Hill), Tutong District. The fossils fauna collected encompasses mollusks, decapods, otoliths, shark and ray teeth, amber, foraminifera and coccolithophorids. In this investigation, sediment samples were taken along a section which measures 62.5 meters. A thick clay layer of 9 meters was sampled each 30 cm to investigate microfossils occurrences. Each sample was treated in peroxide and then sieved trough 63 μm, 150μm, 250μm, 450μm, 600μm, 1mm and 2mm sieves. Results point on the changes in biodiversity of foraminifera along the different horizons collected reflecting sea level changes and sediment production. The most abundant taxa identified are Pseoudorotalia schroeteriana, Ampistegina lessonii, Elphidium advenum, Quinqueloculina sp., Bolivina sp

  7. Salt Marsh Sediment Mixing Following Petroleum Hydrocarbon Exposure from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, R. S.; Yeager, K. M.; Brunner, C. A.; Wade, T. L.; Briggs, K. B.; Schindler, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Tidal marshes support valuable ecosystems, but their coastal locations make them susceptible to oil spills. Oil spilled in the ocean is easily transported via tidal and wind-driven currents to the shore and incorporated into sediments. The primary goal of this research was to determine how deeply oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill has penetrated sediments along the Gulf Coast, and whether oil has quantifiably affected benthic ecosystems at these sites. Sediment cores were taken from three marsh environments at sites classified as unoiled, lightly oiled, and heavily oiled based on data from NOAA's Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA). These classifications have been verified by measurements of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ([TPAH] without perylene). Bioturbators, such as polychaetes and oligochaetes, constantly rework sediments as they burrow into them. In this way, bioturbators can play a role in the fate of organic contaminants, either by allowing for natural remediation of contaminants via enhanced microbial degradation, or by mixing oil from the surface deeper into the sediment column. The constant fallout radionuclide 7Be was measured to determine short-term sediment mixing depths. However, there was a conspicuous absence of 7Be at most sites. This could be due to sediment composition constraints on 7Be sorption (coarse-grained sediment, high organic matter contents), or rapid erosion of the marsh surface. Instead, minimum mixing depths were derived from 234Thxs profiles. Thorium-234 is a lithogenic isotope that has widely been used to trace particle mixing on short time scales near that of its mean life (36 days). Penetration depths of 234Thxs ranged between 0.25 and 4.5 cm. Sediment accumulation rates will be determined using 210Pb, with verification from an independent tracer, 137Cs, in selected cores. Preliminary results from 210Pb profiles reveal thorough, long-term (decadal) sediment mixing to at least 40 cm at all sites

  8. Spilled oil and infaunal activity - Modification of burrowing behavior and redistribution of oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, H.E.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rapp, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    A series of experiments in Willapa Bay, Washington, indicates the degree to which the presence of spilled oil modifies the burrowing behavior of infauna and the extent to which the animals redistribute oil into intertidal sediment. Small amounts of North Slope crude oil introduced at low tide directly into burrow openings (mostly made by the crustacean Callianassa) resulted in a limited and temporary reduction in the number of burrow openings. In contrast, a layer of oil-saturated sand 1 cm thick buried about 5 cm below the sediment surface sharply reduced the number of burrow openings. After a year, the few new burrows penetrated only the margins of the experimental plot, and bioturbation below the buried oil-saturated sand layer declined dramatically. The experiments suggest that small amounts of oil temporarily stranded by tides in themselves have no long-range effect on burrowing behavior. The fauna, however, are capable of introducing measurable amounts of oil into the subsurface, where it is retained long after the rest of the stranded oil had washed away. A buried layer of oil-saturated sand greatly reduces infaunal activity; the oil presents an effective barrier that can persist for years. The oil incorporated into the sediment from burrow openings showed evidence of degradation after 7 months. In contrast the layer of buried oil remained essentially undergraded after a period of two years, even though oil in lower concentrations above the layer was degraded after a period of one year. This variation in degree of degradation of the buried oil, as well as the heterogeneity of oil distribution wherever the oil has been incorporated from the surface, emphasises the importance of careful sampling in any attempt to locate or monitor the presence of spilled oil in the substrate.In a series of experiments in Willapa Bay, Washington, small amounts of North Slope crude oil introduced at low tide directly into burrow openings resulted in a limited and temporary

  9. An experimental approach for archeological soil micromorphology: building a model for site taphonomy in coastal shell middens of the Beagle Channel (Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbo, Andrea; Suarez Villagran, Ximena; Madella, Marco; Vila, Asumpcio; Estevez, Jordi

    2010-05-01

    component of the Tunel VII archaeological site, combusted in a muffle furnace at temperatures from 200 to 800° C. The original archaeological samples from Tunel VII included resin-consolidat columns taken from vaious profiles within the shell midden site. The thin sections analysed here were taken from a profile dug through a passageway that crosses the shell dumping area. The experimental reference collection showed the intense bioturbation of both exposed and buried surfaces, despite the low temperatures that characterize the area, commonly associated to inhibition of biological activity. The same intense bioturbation was observed in the shell midden, were a form of anthrosol develops during abandonment periods of the site. The experimental samples of Mytilus edulis served as reference for identification of burning temperatures reached by the anthropic fires and were useful aids to identify reworked burnt layers as accretion material for the shell midden.

  10. Non-destructive X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) Analysis of Sediment Variance in Marine Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oti, E.; Polyak, L. V.; Dipre, G.; Sawyer, D.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    Benthic activity within marine sediments can alter the physical properties of the sediment as well as indicate nutrient flux and ocean temperatures. We examine burrowing features in sediment cores from the western Arctic Ocean collected during the 2005 Healy-Oden TransArctic Expedition (HOTRAX) and from the Gulf of Mexico Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 308. While traditional methods for studying bioturbation require physical dissection of the cores, we assess burrowing using an X-ray computed tomography (XCT) scanner. XCT noninvasively images the sediment cores in three dimensions and produces density sensitive images suitable for quantitative analysis. XCT units are recorded as Hounsfield Units (HU), where -999 is air, 0 is water, and 4000-5000 would be a higher density mineral, such as pyrite. We rely on the fundamental assumption that sediments are deposited horizontally, and we analyze the variance over each flat-lying slice. The variance describes the spread of pixel values over a slice. When sediments are reworked, drawing higher and lower density matrix into a layer, the variance increases. Examples of this can be seen in two slices in core 19H-3A from Site U1324 of IODP Expedition 308. The first slice, located 165.6 meters below sea floor consists of relatively undisturbed sediment. Because of this, the majority of the sediment values fall between 1406 and 1497 HU, thus giving the slice a comparatively small variance of 819.7. The second slice, located 166.1 meters below sea floor, features a lower density sediment matrix disturbed by burrow tubes and the inclusion of a high density mineral. As a result, the Hounsfield Units have a larger variance of 1,197.5, which is a result of sediment matrix values that range from 1220 to 1260 HU, the high-density mineral value of 1920 HU and the burrow tubes that range from 1300 to 1410 HU. Analyzing this variance allows us to observe changes in the sediment matrix and more specifically capture

  11. Sedimentology and ichnology of two Lower Triassic sections in South China: Implications for the biotic recovery following the end-Permian mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mao; George, Annette D.; Chen, Zhong-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Biotic recovery following the end-Permian mass extinction was investigated using trace fossil and facies analysis of two Lower-Middle Triassic sections in South China. The Susong section (Lower Yangtze Sedimentary Province) comprises a range of carbonate and mudstone facies that record overall shallowing from offshore to intertidal settings. The Tianshengqiao section (Upper Yangtze Sedimentary Province) consists of mixed carbonate and siliciclastic facies deposited in shallow marine to offshore settings. Griesbachian to Dienerian ichnological records in both sections are characterized by low ichnodiversity, low ichnofabric indices (1-2) and low bedding plane bioturbation indices (1-2). Higher ichnofabric indices (3 and 4), corresponding to a dense population of diminutive ichnotaxon, in the Tianshengqiao section suggest opportunistic infaunal biotic activity during the earliest Triassic. Ichnological data from the Susong section show an increase in ichnodiversity during the late Smithian with 11 ichnogenera identified and increased ichnofabric indices of 4-5 and bedding plane bioturbation indices of 3-5. Although complex traces such as Rhizocorallium are present in Spathian-aged strata in this section, low ichnodiversity and ichnofabric indices and diminutive Planolites suggest a decline in recovery. In the Tianshengqiao section, ichnofabric indices are moderate to high (3-5) although only six ichnogenera are present and Planolites burrows are consistently small in Smithian and Spathian strata. Complex traces, such as large Rhizocorallium and Thalassinoides, and large Planolites, did not appear until the Anisian. Ichnological results from both sections record the response of organisms to unfavourable environmental conditions although the Susong section shows earlier recovery during the Smithian prior to latest Smithian-Spathian decline. This decline may have resulted from a resurgence of euxinic to anoxic marine environment in various regions of South China

  12. Mangroves, Coral, and the Search for a Paleotsunami Deposit Along the Andaman Coast of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, B.; Jankaew, K.; Kirby, M.

    2007-05-01

    Finding a preserved paleotsunami deposit along Thailand's Andaman coast has proven to be a major challenge. The coastline is tectonically stable precluding the preservation of tsunami deposits due to sudden sea level changes. Much of the coast is fringed by wide beach plains that have been thoroughly disturbed during a long history of placer tin mining. In the rare undisturbed areas, distinguishing potential paleotsunami sand layers from interlayered beach deposits is frustratingly difficult. In the central part of Phangnga Province, several large areas of mangrove-fringed coastal lagoons formed during Holocene sea level rise. The fine sand, mud and peat that accumulated in these quiet lagoons provide a suitably contrasting host for coarser tsunami deposits. The December 2004 tsunami entered these tidal channels destroying swaths of mangroves up to 200 m wide. Satellite images showing the patterns of destroyed mangroves suggest that the energy of the tsunami varied greatly along the lagoons' shores. Sampling in shallow trenches along transects across these swaths suggests that the sand layer marking this tsunami is thickest where the mangroves are destroyed, and thins rapidly landward into the standing mangroves. Intense bioturbation within the mangroves is already mixing the sand with the underlying peat and mud. Thus, deposition of any paleotsunami sand layer would be as discontinuous lenses along the paleoshoreline, and mixing with the enclosing sediment may mask it. Perhaps the best opportunity for discovering a paleotsunami deposit is to locate an unusually coarse deposit that could endure bioturbation. We found one such deposit in the Thap Lamu lagoon where the 2004 tsunami deposited a litter of angular coral-gravel blanketing an unusually large zone of destroyed mangroves. Cores collected along two transects across this zone penetrated a similar layer of coral gravel at 1-2 m depth. This coral-gravel layer thins landward, and cross cuts a facies boundary

  13. Be2D: A model to understand the distribution of meteoric 10Be in soilscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides have revolutionised our understanding of earth surface process rates. They have become one of the standard tools to quantify soil production by weathering, soil redistribution and erosion. Especially Beryllium-10 has gained much attention due to its long half-live and propensity to be relatively conservative in the landscape. The latter makes 10Be an excellent tool to assess denudation rates over the last 1000 to 100 × 103 years, bridging the anthropogenic and geological time scale. Nevertheless, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in soil systems makes translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates difficult. Here we present a coupled soil hillslope model, Be2D, that is applied to synthetic and real topography to address the following three research questions. (i) What is the influence of vertical meteoric Be10 mobility, caused by chemical mobility, clay translocation and bioturbation, on its lateral redistribution over the soilscape, (ii) How does vertical mobility influence erosion rates and soil residence times inferred from meteoric 10Be inventories and (iii) To what extent can a tracer with a half-life of 1.36 Myr be used to distinguish between natural and human-disturbed soil redistribution rates? The model architecture of Be2D is designed to answer these research questions. Be2D is a dynamic model including physical processes such as soil formation, physical weathering, clay migration, bioturbation, creep, overland flow and tillage erosion. Pathways of meteoric 10Be mobility are simulated using a two step approach which is updated each timestep. First, advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be is simulated within the soil profile and second, lateral redistribution because of lateral soil fluxes is calculated. The performance and functionality of the model is demonstrated through a number of synthetic and real model runs using existing datasets of meteoric 10Be from case-studies in southeastern US. Brute

  14. Assessing SfM-Photogrammetry potential at micro-scale on a rapidly evolving mud-bank: case study on a mesocosm study within pioneer mangroves in French Guiana (South America)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Jules; Brunier, Guillaume; Michaud, Emma; Anthony, Edward; Dussouillez, Philippe; Morvan, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    Mud banks are the loci of rich bio-geo-chemical processes occuring rapidly at infra-tide frequency. Their surface topography is commonly affected by many of these processes, including bioturbation, water drainage or dessication. Quantifying surface morphology and changes on a mud bank at the micro-scale is a challenging task due to a number of issues. First, the water-saturated nature of the soil makes it difficult to measure High Resolution Topography (HRT) with classical methods. Second, setting up an instrumented experiment without disrupting the signal being studied is hardly achieved at micro-scale. Finally, the highly mobile nature of this environment enhancing strong spatio-temporal heterogeneity is hard to capture. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) and SfM (Surface from Motion)-Photogrammetry are two techniques that enable mapping of micro-scale features, but the first technique is not suitable because of the poor quality of the backscattered laser signal on wet surfaces and the need to set up several measuring stations on a complex, unstable substrate. Thus, we set up an experiment to assess the feasibility and the accuracy of SfM in such a context. We took the opportunity of the installation of a pontoon dedicated to the study of bio-geochemical processes within benthic mesocosms installed on a mud bank inhabited by pioneer mangroves trees to develop an adapted photogrammetry protocol based on a full-frame remotely triggered camera sensor mounted on a pole. The incident light on the surface was also controlled with a light-diffusing device. We obtained sub-millimetric resolution 3D-topography and visible imagery. Surveys were carried out every 2 hours at low tide to detect surface changes due to water content variation as well as bioturbation mainly caused by crabs digging galleries and feeding on sediment surface. Both the qualitative and quantitative results seem very promising and lead us to expect new insights into heterogeneous surface processes on a

  15. Occurrence of benthic microbial nitrogen fixation coupled to sulfate reduction in the seasonally hypoxic Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. J. Bertics

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide occurrence of marine hypoxic regions, benthic nitrogen (N cycling within these areas is poorly understood and it is generally assumed that these areas represent zones of intense fixed N loss from the marine system. Sulfate reduction can be an important process for organic matter degradation in sediments beneath hypoxic waters and many sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB have the genetic potential to fix molecular N (N2. Therefore, SRB may supply fixed N to these systems, countering some of the N lost via microbial processes, such as denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation. The objective of this study was to evaluate if N2 fixation, possibly by SRB, plays a role in N cycling within the seasonally hypoxic sediments from the Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea. Monthly samplings were performed over the course of one year to measure nitrogenase activity (NA and sulfate reduction rates, to determine the seasonal variations in bioturbation (bioirrigation activity and important benthic geochemical profiles, such as sulfur and N compounds, and to monitor changes in water column temperature and oxygen concentrations. Additionally, at several time points, the active N-fixing community was examined via molecular tools. Integrated rates of N2 fixation (approximated from NA and sulfate reduction showed a similar seasonality pattern, with highest rates occurring in August (approx. 22 and 880 nmol cm−3 d−1 of N and SO42−, respectively and October (approx. 22 and 1300 nmol cm−3 d−1 of N and SO42− respectively, and lowest rates occurring in February (approx. 8 and 32 nmol cm−3 d−1 of N and SO42−, respectively. These rate changes were positively correlated with bottom water temperatures and previous reported plankton bloom activities, and negatively correlated with bottom water oxygen concentrations. Other variables that also appeared to play a role in rate determination were bioturbation, bubble irrigation and winter storm

  16. Char BC amendments for soil and sediment amelioration: BC quantification and field pilot trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, G.; Braendli, R. C.; Eek, E.; Henriksen, T.; Hartnik, T.; Breedveld, G. D.

    2008-12-01

    sediment by bioturbation), chemical monitoring (porewater concentrations, diffusive transport to water and air) and biological monitoring (biodiversity, bioaccumulation). The first results indicate that i) bioturbation mixes BC into the top 5 cm of the sediments, ii) 6 months after BC amendment, PAH leaching from soils is reduced by a factor of 2, iii) Hg leaching from sediments is reduced, iv) diffusive transport from sediment to water is reduced, and v) sediment biodiversity remains unaffected by the placement of a thin BC layer.

  17. Planktic foraminiferal shell thinning in the Arabian Sea due to anthropogenic ocean acidification?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. de Moel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available About one third of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 released into the atmosphere in the past two centuries has been taken up by the ocean. As CO2 invades the surface ocean, carbonate ion concentrations and pH are lowered. Laboratory studies indicate that this reduces the calcification rates of marine calcifying organisms, including planktic foraminifera. Such a reduction in calcification resulting from anthropogenic CO2 emissions has not been observed, or quantified in the field yet. Here we present the findings of a study in the Western Arabian Sea that uses shells of the surface water dwelling planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber in order to test the hypothesis that anthropogenically induced acidification has reduced shell calcification of this species. We found that light, thin-walled shells from the surface sediment are younger (based on 14C and δ13C measurements than the heavier, thicker-walled shells. Shells in the upper, bioturbated, sediment layer were significantly lighter compared to shells found below this layer. These observations are consistent with a scenario where anthropogenically induced ocean acidification reduced the rate at which foraminifera calcify, resulting in lighter shells. On the other hand, we show that seasonal upwelling in the area also influences their calcification and the stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O signatures recorded by the foraminifera shells. Plankton tow and sediment trap data show that lighter shells were produced during upwelling and heavier ones during non-upwelling periods. Seasonality alone, however, cannot explain the 14C results, or the increase in shell weight below the bioturbated sediment layer. We therefore must conclude that probably both the processes of acidification and seasonal upwelling are responsible for the presence of light shells in the top of the sediment and the age

  18. Textural and Mineralogical Characteristics of Microbial Fossils in Modern and Ancient Iron (oxyhydr)oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; McPherson, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation contains extensive alkaline saline lacustrine deposits rich in diagenetic iron (oxyhydr)oxides that are well exposed on the Colorado Plateau of the southwestern USA. These early diagenetic iron (oxyhydr)oxide minerals are associated with preserved diatoms and other algal forms, identified via scanning electron microscope (SEM) in thin sections of representative samples. The minerals are also associated with macroscopic bioturbation features (e.g., charophytes, burrows and fossilized dinosaur bones). Algal forms with cellular elaboration are identified by HF dissolution of bioturbation structures and examination with SEM. Collectively, these features suggest biomediated textures are preserved in early diagenetic iron (oxyhydr)oxides, and can persist for tens of millions of years. Modern microbially precipitated iron (oxyhydr)oxides and ~100ka tufa terraces from a cold spring system along Ten Mile Graben in southern Utah, USA are compared with the Morrison examples to identify modern microbial fossils and document any differences and preservation changes during diagenesis over geologic time. Two distinct suites of elements (1. C, Fe, As and 2. C, S, Se) are associated with microbial fossils in both the modern and ancient tufas, as well as the ancient Morrison specimens. The occurrence of these distinctive trace element configurations in the iron (oxyhydr)oxide minerals suggest the suites could be potential markers for biosignatures. The presence of ferrihydrite in ~100ka fossil microbial mats suggests this thermodynamically unstable mineral may also be used as a biomarker. Diagnostic trace element suites and unusual mineral phases warrant further study for their potential as biomarkers. These terrestrial iron (oxyhydr)oxide examples will: 1) document specific biomediated textures and what their origins might be (related to different processes or species), 2) show how they might persist or respond to

  19. Modeling the vertical soil organic matter profile using Bayesian parameter estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Braakhekke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The vertical distribution of soil organic matter (SOM in the profile may constitute a significant factor for soil carbon cycling. However, the formation of the SOM profile is currently poorly understood due to equifinality, caused by the entanglement of several processes: input from roots, mixing due to bioturbation, and organic matter leaching. In this study we quantified the contribution of these three processes using Bayesian parameter estimation for the mechanistic SOM profile model SOMPROF. Based on organic carbon measurements, 13 parameters related to decomposition and transport of organic matter were estimated for two temperature forest soils: an Arenosol with a mor humus form (Loobos, The Netherlands, and a Cambisol with mull type humus (Hainich, Germany. Furthermore, the use of the radioisotope 210Pbex as tracer for vertical SOM transport was studied.

    For Loobos the calibration results demonstrate the importance of liquid phase transport for shaping the vertical SOM profile, while the effects of bioturbation are generally negligible. These results are in good agreement with expectations given in situ conditions. For Hainich the calibration offered three distinct explanations for the observations (three modes in the posterior distribution. With the addition of 210Pbex data and prior knowledge, as well as additional information about in situ conditions, we were able to identify the most likely explanation, which identified root litter input as the dominant process for the SOM profile. For both sites the organic matter appears to comprise mainly adsorbed but potentially leachable material, pointing to the importance of organo-mineral interactions. Furthermore, organic matter in the mineral soil appears to be mainly derived from root litter, supporting previous studies that highlighted the importance of root input for soil carbon sequestration. The 210

  20. Geomorphological implications of engineering bed sediments by lotic animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statzner, Bernhard

    2012-07-01

    Recent developments in zoogeomorphology in combination with the increasing interest of ecologists in ecosystem engineering by organisms initiated considerable research on the impact of running water (i.e., lotic) animals (and other organisms) on fluvial bed sediments and the transport of solids. This research provided multiple evidence from field and laboratory observations and experiments that many species among mammals, amphibians, fish, insects, crustaceans, mollusks, and worms engineer bed sediments of running waters with diverse mechanistic "tools", thereby perturbing or consolidating the sediments in many types of running waters across continents, seasons, habitat types, particle sizes, and discharge levels (baseflow vs. flood). Furthermore, many animals modify the bed-sediment engineering by plants (algae, larger macrophytes, riparian vegetation). Modeling effects of bioturbating lotic animals across species and relatively simple environmental conditions (in mesocosms) provided highly significant results (P-range: abundance in combination with physical variables, such as baseflow shear stress or gravel size, explained between ~ 70 and ~ 90% of the variability in sediment responses such as the overall baseflow sediment transport and, as a result of the baseflow sediment-surface engineering by the animals, the flood-induced gravel or sand transport. Confronting these seemingly encouraging experimental results with real world conditions, however, illustrates considerable problems to unravel the complexity of biotic and physical factors that vary temporally and interfere/interact non-linearly in a patchy pattern in small parts of real river beds, where baseflow bed-sediment engineering by lotic animals prevents or fosters mass erosion during subsequent floods. Despite these complications, these problems must be solved, as bioturbators such as crayfish and bioconsolidators such as silk-spinning caddisflies may locally modify (i) rates of transport of fluvial

  1. Tidal effects on the shoreface: Towards a conceptual framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtgard, Shahin E.; MacEachern, James A.; Frey, Shannon E.; Gingras, Murray K.

    2012-11-01

    Tidal processes can have a significant impact on the sedimentological and ichnological character of wave-dominated shoreface deposits. As the influence of tides increases, the resulting shoreface successions begin to depart markedly from those postulated by the conventional, wave-dominated shoreface model, which was built upon essentially non-tidal shoreline settings. In shoreface settings subject to stronger tidal flux, tides can be manifest either directly or indirectly. Direct tidal effects refer to those characteristics imparted by tidal energy (e.g., tidal currents) per se, and are best expressed in offshore and lower shoreface positions. Key evidence of direct tidal control includes uniform sediment calibres from the upper shoreface to the offshore, and little or no mud preserved in the lower shoreface. Additionally, sands in the lower shoreface and offshore tend to be intensely bioturbated. Where primary stratification is preserved, it largely comprises current-generated structures. Such shoreface deposits are referred to herein as "tide-influenced shorefaces", and are expected in settings with low storm-wave input coupled with strong tidal currents (e.g., straits). Indirect tidal influences are manifest by the lateral translation of wave zones across the shoreface profile owing to changes in water depth during the tidal cycle. This is best developed in macrotidal to megatidal settings. Indirect tidal influences are more pronounced in the upper and lower shoreface, and are recorded through the interbedding of sedimentary structures produced by shoaling waves, breakers and surf, swash-backwash, and surface runoff. The boundaries between shoreface subenvironments are correspondingly poorly defined. The foreshore in settings of elevated tidal range is also generally much thicker (typically 4 to 5 m). Bioturbation tends to be patchy in distribution across the shoreface, and dominated by vertical structures. Such systems are defined as "tidally modulated

  2. The structure of soft-bottom benthic communities in the vicinity of the Texas Flower Garden Banks, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingst, Josephine Y.; Rhoads, Donald C.

    1985-05-01

    Biological and sedimentological samples were obtained in June 1980 from box cores taken in 100-200 m of water on sandy-mud sediments near the East and West Flower Garden Bank reefs, on the Texas-Louisiana Continental Shelf. The objective was to obtain baseline information about sedimentary parameters and organisms adjacent to the FGB environments in order to allow inferences to be made about potential effects of physical disturbance of the seafloor on the resident benthos. Most infaunal organisms are found in the upper 3-5 cm of the bottom. Permanent meiofauna dominate in both numbers and biomass. X-radiographs of sediment fabrics show all stations to be reworked by head-down deposit-feeders or errant bioturbators. Taxa responsible for this bioturbation were not quantitatively sampled. Macrofaunal densities range from 3000 to 25000 m -2 and total meiofauna from 221 to 892 × (10 cm) -2. Nematodes dominate followed in equal abundance by foraminiferans, polychaetes, and copepods. Seventy-five percent of the total sediment ATP in the top 3 cm is contributed by meiofauna. These benthic assemblages are hypothesized to represent a mixture of pioneering and high-order successional stages. Bacterial abundances are positively correlated with organic content and inversely correlated with macro- and meiofaunal densities. This inverse relationship may reflect consumer cropping intensities. Both microbial ATP and bacterial biomass are lower than reported for the Georgia Bight Shelf, Cape Blanc, West African Shelf, western coast of Norway, and Long Island Sound. Bacterial counts are lower than those recorded for the East China Sea and the Amazon River shelf. Moderate to low standing stocks of benthos, dominated by meiofaunal-sized taxa, further suggest that this area of the Gulf of Mexico is a relatively oligotrophic system for infaunal benthic consumers. Higher order successional stages are, in general, adversely affected to a greater extent than pioneering stages by physical

  3. Depositional controls on coal distribution and quality in the Eocene Brunner Coal Measures, Buller Coalfield, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, R.M.; Sykes, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Buller Coalfield on the West Coast of the South Island, New Zealand, contains the Eocene Brunner Coal Measures. The coal measures unconformably overlie Paleozoic-Cretaceous basement rocks and are conformably overlain by, and laterally interfinger with, the Eocene marine Kaiata Formation. This study examines the lithofacies frameworks of the coal measures in order to interpret their depositional environments. The lower part of the coal measures is dominated by conglomeratic lithofacies that rest on a basal erosional surface and thicken in paleovalleys incised into an undulating peneplain surface. These lithofacies are overlain by sandstone, mudstone and organic-rich lithofacies of the upper part of the coal measures. The main coal seam of the organic-rich lithofacies is thick (10-20 m), extensive, locally split, and locally absent. This seam and associated coal seams in the Buller Coalfield are of low- to high-volatile bituminous rank (vitrinite reflectance between 0.65% and 1.75%). The main seam contains a variable percentage of ash and sulphur. These values are related to the thickening and areal distribution of the seam, which in turn, were controlled by the nature of clastic deposition and peat-forming mire systems, marine transgression and local tidal incursion. The conglomeratic lithofacies represent deposits of trunk and tributary braided streams that rapidly aggraded incised paleovalleys during sea-level stillstands. The main seam represents a deposit of raised mires that initially developed as topogenous mires on abandoned margins of inactive braidbelts. Peat accumulated in mires as a response to a rise in the water table, probably initially due to gradual sea-level rise and climate, and the resulting raised topography served as protection from floods. The upper part of the coal measures consists of sandstone lithofacies of flu vial origin and bioturbated sandstone, mudstone and organic-rich lithofacies, which represent deposits of paralic (deltaic

  4. Extending the High-Resolution Global Climate Record in Santa Barbara Basin: Developing a More Continuous Composite Section from Overlapping Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, R. J.; Kennett, J. P.; Hill, T. M.; Pak, D.; Schimmelmann, A.; Cannariato, K. G.; Nicholson, C.; Sorlien, C. C.; Hopkins, S. E.; Team, S.

    2005-12-01

    More than thirty ~2 to 5m-long piston cores were recovered from an eroded, breached anticline on the Mid-Channel Trend of the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB). Precision placement of cores enabled us to build several composite stratigraphic sections of overlapping cores. This was accomplished by continuous shipboard evaluation and feedback between pre-existing and concurrently acquired high-resolution seismic data and immediate sedimentologic core analysis to determine subsequent core locations. Overlap was confirmed by correlated stratigraphic patterns of alternating laminated vs. massive intervals, gray flood layers, spectrophotometric and MST density/porosity data. These cores were acquired to provide a semi-continuous, composite paleoceanographic record of the Quaternary SBB and the California Margin that extends beyond the fertile ODP Site 893 core, to possibly as old as 450 to 600 ka, an age previously unreachable by conventional methods. Most cores were mantled by glauconitic sand or a thin carbonate hardground encrusted with sessile organisms, including solitary corals. Underlying the condensed Holocene sand or hardground deposits are alternating layers of Pleistocene laminated and massive/bioturbated sediment with minor sand and sandy clay layers. The style, continuity, and variability of laminated fabric and the nature of bedding contacts are similar to that observed at ODP Site 893 where glacial episodes were associated with oxygenated, bioturbated sediment and interglacial and interstadial sediment were associated with dysoxic, laminated sediment. Laminated sediment comprises 38% of the hemipelagic deposits which is nearly identical with the ratio of laminated to massive sediment over the past 160 ky at Site 893. By extrapolation, despite accumulating in a mobile, deforming, active margin basin, the earlier Pleistocene deposits seem to record similar behavior to the last 160 ky recorded at ODP Site 893. In some intervals, gray layers are thicker and more

  5. User guide for luminescence sampling in archaeological and geological contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michelle S.; Gray, Harrison J.; Johnson, Jack A.; Rittenour, Tammy M.; Feathers, James K.; Mahan, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence dating provides a direct age estimate of the time of last exposure of quartz or feldspar minerals to light or heat and has been successfully applied to deposits, rock surfaces, and fired materials in a number of archaeological and geological settings. Sampling strategies are diverse and can be customized depending on local circumstances, although all sediment samples need to include a light-safe sample and material for dose-rate determination. The accuracy and precision of luminescence dating results are directly related to the type and quality of the material sampled and sample collection methods in the field. Selection of target material for dating should include considerations of adequacy of resetting of the luminescence signal (optical and thermal bleaching), the ability to characterize the radioactive environment surrounding the sample (dose rate), and the lack of evidence for post-depositional mixing (bioturbation in soils and sediment). Sample strategies for collection of samples from sedimentary settings and fired materials are discussed. This paper should be used as a guide for luminescence sampling and is meant to provide essential background information on how to properly collect samples and on the types of materials suitable for luminescence dating.

  6. High resolution shallow geologic characterization of a late Pleistocene eolian environment using ground penetrating radar and optically stimulated luminescence techniques: North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallinson, D.; Mahan, S.; Moore, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Geophysical surveys, sedimentology, and optically-stimulated luminescence age analyses were used to assess the geologic development of a coastal system near Swansboro, NC. This area is a significant Woodland Period Native American habitation and is designated the "Broad Reach" archaeological site. 2-d and 3-d subsurface geophysical surveys were performed using a ground penetrating radar system to define the stratigraphic framework and depositional facies. Sediment samples were collected and analyzed for grain-size to determine depositional environments. Samples were acquired and analyzed using optically stimulated luminescence techniques to derive the depositional age of the various features. The data support a low eolian to shallow subtidal coastal depositional setting for this area. Li-DAR data reveal ridge and swale topography, most likely related to beach ridges, and eolian features including low-relief, low-angle transverse and parabolic dunes, blowouts, and a low-relief eolian sand sheet. Geophysical data reveal dominantly seaward dipping units, and low-angle mounded features. Sedimentological data reveal mostly moderately-well to well-sorted fine-grained symmetrical to coarse skewed sands, suggesting initial aqueous transport and deposition, followed by eolian reworking and bioturbation. OSL data indicate initial coastal deposition prior to ca. 45,000 yBP, followed by eolian reworking and low dune stabilization at ca. 13,000 to 11,500 yBP, and again at ca. 10,000 yBP (during, and slightly after the Younger Dryas chronozone).

  7. Recognizing magnetostratigraphy in overprinted and altered marine sediments: Challenges and solutions from IODP Site U1437

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, Robert J.; Kars, Myriam

    2016-08-01

    Core disturbance, drilling overprints, postdepositional acquisition of remanence, authigenic growth of magnetic iron sulfides, and alteration all contribute challenges to recognizing the primary magnetostratigraphy in marine sediments. We address these issues in a sequence of tuffaceous muds and volcaniclastics at International Ocean Discovery Program Site U1437 and produce the longest continuous magnetic polarity stratigraphy in the history of scientific ocean drilling. Remanence measurements were filtered to remove intervals affected by fluidization, plastic sediment disturbance, and core biscuiting. Drilling overprints are concentrated in the disturbed annulus surrounding intact core material. Bioturbation was limited to a vertical extent of at most 15 cm. Changes in sediment color, stiffness, and magnetic hysteresis all suggest that remanence was locked in within a few meters of the sediment-water interface. We did not observe any systematic offset between magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic datums. Authigenic growth of greigite, in response to both initial sulfate reduction in the upper 50 m of the sediment column and to deeper resupply of sulfate, has led to magnetic overprinting. Anomalous polarity artefacts, extending drilling and postdrilling overprints and increased the resistance of these overprints to removal by conventional demagnetization. We recovered the magnetostratigraphic record from many samples with resistant overprints through low-temperature demagnetization through the Verwey transition.

  8. BURROW ARCHITECTURE OF RED GHOST CRAB OCYPODE MACROCERA (H. MILNE-EDWARDS, 1852 : A CASE STUDY IN INDIAN SUNDARBANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Kumar Dubey

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A study on burrow architecture and burrow morphology of the red ghost crab (Ocypode macrocera was carried out at the southern proximity of the Sagar island (21°37.973' N, to E 88° 04.195', western sector of Indian Sundarbans that faces the regular tidal influences of Bay of Bengal. Ocypode macrocera constructs burrows that are highly species specific and used by single individual. Four types of burrow patterns were observed like ‘I’, ‘J’ ‘U’ and ‘semi-U’ type with different sizes as revealed by POP casting. Important physic-chemical parameters like air temperature, temperature and salinity of the water were significantly varied (P < 0.05 throughout seasons in the Ocypode zone. Burrow sand column temperature were also significantly varied from ambient air temperature thus exhibiting preference for cooler subterranean residential compartment. The digging behaviour of Ocypodes enhances oxygenation in the ground soil and facilitates decomposition of organic materials, nutrient recycling, entrapping the sediments and mangrove seedlings and helps the process of bioturbation. As per the preliminary observations it was suggested that burrow shape is directly related to tidal action and metabolic activities of the crab are strongly correlated with burrow microenvironment. They are adapted to the different sediment conditions, tidal fluctuations, varying salinity gradients, air and water temperatures and other environmental fluctuations.

  9. Influence of biological activity on sorption by using {sup 65}Zn and {sup 109}Cd into mangrove sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sondermann, Melissa N.; Barros, Joanna F.; Suzuki, Katia N.; Bellido, Alfredo V.B., E-mail: melissa.sonder@gmail.com, E-mail: joanna_barros2@hotmail.com, E-mail: ksuzuki@id.uff.br, E-mail: alfredobellido@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica. Pos-Graduacao em Geoquimica Ambiental; Bellido, Luis F., E-mail: lbellido@cnen.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Evaluation of the chemical behavior of zinc and cadmium as well as the influence of biological activity in the sorption kinetics under microcosm experiments by mangrove sediments collected in Sepetiba Bay - Rio de Janeiro was carried out. The mentioned area was well contaminated due to the leaching from the tailing pile by the abandoned zinc processing company Inga Mercantil. Radiotracer {sup 65}Zn and {sup 109}Cd were used to follow their exchange across water-sediment interfaces up to 48 hours experiments in six mangrove sediment cores. To determine the benthic activity index (BAI) the cores were treated with formaldehyde (biocide) and it was found that the presence of the radiotracers in the deeper layers of sediment without formaldehyde treatment showed clearly the influence of benthic activity retention (benthic faunal and microbial effects), since the same pattern was not found in the treated sediment. The activity values obtained for {sup 65}Zn and {sup 109}Cd in the untreated sediment with formaldehyde on the first centimeter were 53.79±0.28 % and 67.34±0.16 % respectively, whereas for the treated ones, were 98.72 ± 0.29 % and 98.31 ± 0.24 % respectively. Thus, it was demonstrated that the use of formaldehyde, as biological activity inhibitor, ceases the bioturbation process and allowed the accumulation along the sediment. (author)

  10. Temporal changes of a macrobenthic assemblage in harsh lagoon sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Como, Serena; Magni, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    An opportunistic macrobenthic assemblage was studied from 2001 to 2003 in a central area of the Cabras lagoon (western Sardinia, Italy), known to be affected by environmental disturbances (i.e. organic over-enrichment of sediments, and episodic events of hypoxia/anoxia and sulphide development). We identified recurrent seasonal changes in this macrobenthic assemblage, with a general impoverishment in summer and a recovery in winter/spring. The nereids Neanthes succinea and Hediste diversicolor were found to replace the spionid Polydora ciliata as the most dominant species in the summer for 3 consecutive years. Occasional, unsynchronized appearances of small-sized deposit feeders, such as Tubificidae, Capitella cf. capitata, chironomid larvae and Hydrobia spp., were observed in winter/spring. We suggest that these changes are driven by the interplay of environmental conditions (worse in summer) with numerous biotic factors. This includes different tolerance levels of taxa to low oxygen concentrations and sulphides, variability in larval supply and post-larval transport, as well as competition for space and food between and within different functional groups, and facilitation through animal bioturbation and sediment reoxidation. A conceptual model is proposed to demonstrate how environmental conditions and biotic interactions may control the benthic assemblage in such a harsh lagoon environment.

  11. Organic geochemical study of sequences overlying coal seams; example from the Mansfield Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian), Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalerz, Maria; Stankiewicz, A.B.; Salmon, G.; Kvale, E.P.; Millard, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Roof successions above two coal seams from the Mansfield Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian) in the Indiana portion of the Illinois Basin have been studied with regard to sedimentary structures, organic petrology and organic geochemistry. The succession above the Blue Creek Member of the Mansfield Formation is typical of the lithologies covering low-sulphur coals ( 2.%). The transgressive-regressive packages above both seams reflect the periodic inundation of coastal mires by tidal flats and creeks as inferred from bioturbation and sedimentary structures such as tidal rhythmites and clay-draped ripple bedforms. Geochemistry and petrology of organic facies above the Blue Creek coal suggest that tidal flats formed inland in fresh-water environments. These overlying fresh water sediments prevented saline waters from invading the peat, contributing to low-sulphur content in the coal. Above the unnamed coal, trace fossils and geochemical and petrological characteristics of organic facies suggest more unrestricted seaward depositional environment. The absence of saline or typically marine biomarkers above this coal is interpreted as evidence of very short periods of marine transgression, as there was not enough time for establishment of the precursor organisms for marine biomarkers. However, sufficient time passed to raise SO42- concentration in pore waters, resulting in the formation of authigenic pyrite and sulphur incorporation into organic matter.

  12. Resource utilisation by deep-sea megabenthos in the Canadian High Arctic (Baffin Bay and Parry Channel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Solveig; Witte, Ursula; Harrison, Ailish M.; Makela, Anni; Kazanidis, Georgios; Archambault, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing climate change in the Arctic is causing drastic alteration of the Arctic marine ecosystem functioning, such as shifts in patterns of primary production, and modifying the present tight pelagic-benthic coupling. Subsequently benthic communities, which rely upon organic matter produced in the top layers of the Ocean, will also be affected by these changes. The benthic megafaunal communities play a significant role in ecological processes and ecosystem functioning (i.e. organic matter recycling, bioturbation, food source for the higher trophic levels…). Yet, information is scarce regarding the main food sources for dominant benthic organisms, and therefore the impact of the ongoing changes is difficult to assess. The goal of this study is to investigate the preferential feeding of different carbon sources by megabenthic organisms in the Canadian High Arctic and to identify environmental drivers which explain the observed trends. In summer 2013, benthic megafauna was collected at 9 stations spread along latitudinal (58 to 81°N) and longitudinal (62 to 114°W) transects in the Baffin Bay and Parry Channel, respectively. Carbon and nitrogen bulk stable isotope analyses (δ13C and δ15N) were performed on several species divided into groups according to their feeding type. This study highlights distinct trends in δ13C values of benthic organisms suggesting the importance of both phytoplankton and ice algae as carbon sources for megafauna in the Canadian High Arctic. The importance of physical and biological parameters as drivers of food web structure will be furthermore discussed.

  13. Active eukaryotes in microbialites from Highborne Cay, Bahamas, and Hamelin Pool (Shark Bay), Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgcomb, Virginia P; Bernhard, Joan M; Summons, Roger E; Orsi, William; Beaudoin, David; Visscher, Pieter T

    2014-02-01

    Microbialites are organosedimentary structures that are formed through the interaction of benthic microbial communities and sediments and include mineral precipitation. These lithifying microbial mat structures include stromatolites and thrombolites. Exuma Sound in the Bahamas, and Hamelin Pool in Shark Bay, Western Australia, are two locations where significant stands of modern microbialites exist. Although prokaryotic diversity in these structures is reasonably well documented, little is known about the eukaryotic component of these communities and their potential to influence sedimentary fabrics through grazing, binding and burrowing activities. Accordingly, comparisons of eukaryotic communities in modern stromatolitic and thrombolitic mats can potentially provide insight into the coexistence of both laminated and clotted mat structures in close proximity to one another. Here we examine this possibility by comparing eukaryotic diversity based on Sanger and high-throughput pyrosequencing of small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) genes. Analyses were based on total RNA extracts as template to minimize input from inactive or deceased organisms. Results identified diverse eukaryotic communities particularly stramenopiles, Alveolata, Metazoa, Amoebozoa and Rhizaria within different mat types at both locations, as well as abundant and diverse signatures of eukaryotes with eukaryotic diversity, particularly in hypersaline Hamelin Pool. There was evidence of vertical structuring of protist populations and foraminiferal diversity was highest in bioturbated/clotted thrombolite mats of Highborne Cay.

  14. Influence of macrofaunal assemblages and environmental heterogeneity on microphytobenthic production in experimental systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Kirstie E; Bulling, Mark T; Solan, Martin; Hernandez-Milian, Gema; Raffaelli, David G; White, Piran C L; Paterson, David M

    2007-10-22

    Despite the complexity of natural systems, heterogeneity caused by the fragmentation of habitats has seldom been considered when investigating ecosystem processes. Empirical approaches that have included the influence of heterogeneity tend to be biased towards terrestrial habitats; yet marine systems offer opportunities by virtue of their relative ease of manipulation, rapid response times and the well-understood effects of macrofauna on sediment processes. Here, the influence of heterogeneity on microphytobenthic production in synthetic estuarine assemblages is examined. Heterogeneity was created by enriching patches of sediment with detrital algae (Enteromorpha intestinalis) to provide a source of allochthonous organic matter. A gradient of species density for four numerically dominant intertidal macrofauna (Hediste diversicolor, Hydrobia ulvae, Corophium volutator, Macoma balthica) was constructed, and microphytobenthic biomass at the sediment surface was measured. Statistical analysis using generalized least squares regression indicated that heterogeneity within our system was a significant driving factor that interacted with macrofaunal density and species identity. Microphytobenthic biomass was highest in enriched patches, suggesting that nutrients were obtained locally from the sediment-water interface and not from the water column. Our findings demonstrate that organic enrichment can cause the development of heterogeneity which influences infaunal bioturbation and consequent nutrient generation, a driver of microphytobenthic production.

  15. Biologic origin of iron nodules in a marine terrace chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, M.S.; Vivit, D.; Schulz, C.; Fitzpatrick, J.; White, A.

    2010-01-01

    The distribution, chemistry, and morphology of Fe nodules were studied in a marine terrace soil chronosequence northwest of Santa Cruz, California. The Fe nodules are found at depths soil mineral grains cemented by Fe oxides. The nodules varied in size from 0.5 to 25 mm in diameter. Nodules did not occur in the underlying regolith. The Fe-oxide mineralogy of the nodules was typically goethite; however, a subset of nodules consisted of maghemite. There was a slight transformation to hematite with time. The abundance of soil Fe nodules increased with terrace age on the five terraces studied (aged 65,000-226,000 yr). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed Fe-oxide-containing fungal hyphae throughout the nodules, including organic structures incorporating fine-grained Fe oxides. The fine-grained nature of the Fe oxides was substantiated by M??ssbauer spectroscopy. Our microscopic observations led to the hypothesis that the nodules in the Santa Cruz terrace soils are precipitated by fungi, perhaps as a strategy to sequester primary mineral grains for nutrient extraction. The fungal structures are fixed by the seasonal wetting and dry cycles and rounded through bioturbation. The organic structures are compacted by the degradation of fungal C with time. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  16. Enchytraeus crypticus as model species in soil ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Ferreira, Marta P; Roelofs, Dick; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Verweij, Rudo A; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Amorim, Mónica J B

    2012-06-01

    Enchytraeids are ecologically relevant soil organisms, due to their activity in decomposition and bioturbation in many soil types worldwide. The enchytraeid reproduction test (ERT) guidelines ISO 16387 and OECD 220 are exclusive to the genus Enchytraeus and recommend using the species E. albidus with a 6-week test period. The suggested alternative, E. crypticus has a shorter generation time which may enable the ERT to be twice as fast. To confirm the suitability of a 3-week test period for E. crypticus, the toxicity of five chemicals, with distinct properties and modes of action, was assessed in LUFA 2.2 soil. In all controls the validity criteria were met, as survival of E. crypticus was above 92% and more than 772 juveniles were produced. The good performance supports its appropriateness as model species. Reproduction was more sensitive than survival, with only cadmium and 3,5-dichloroaniline causing significant lethal effects in the tested concentration ranges. The effect concentration causing 50% reduction in the number of juveniles (EC50) was 35 mg kg(-1) for cadmium, ecotoxicology, with advantages such as good control performance and speed, leading to a reliable and faster ERT.

  17. Seasonality and depth distribution of the abundance and activity of ammonia oxidizing microorganisms in marine coastal sediments (North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Antonia Lipsewers

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial processes such as nitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox are important for nitrogen cycling in marine sediments. Seasonal variations of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers (AOA and AOB and anammox bacteria, as well as the environmental factors affecting these groups, are not well studied. We have examined the seasonal and depth distribution of the abundance and potential activity of these microbial groups in coastal marine sediments of the southern North Sea. This was achieved by quantifying specific intact polar lipids (IPLs as well as the abundance and gene expression of their 16S rRNA gene, the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA gene of AOA and AOB, and the hydrazine synthase (hzsA gene of anammox bacteria. AOA, AOB and anammox bacteria were detected and transcriptionally active down to 12 cm sediment depth. In all seasons, the abundance of AOA was higher compared to the AOB abundance suggesting that AOA play a more dominant role in aerobic ammonia oxidation in these sediments. Anammox bacteria were abundant and active even in oxygenated and bioturbated parts of the sediment. The abundance of AOA and AOB was relatively stable with depth and over the seasonal cycle, while anammox bacteria abundance and transcriptional activity were highest in August. North Sea sediments thus seem to provide a common, stable, ecological niche for AOA, AOB and anammox bacteria.

  18. Linking functional group richness and ecosystem functions of dung beetles: an experimental quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milotić, Tanja; Quidé, Stijn; Van Loo, Thomas; Hoffmann, Maurice

    2017-01-01

    Dung beetles form an insect group that fulfils important functions in terrestrial ecosystems throughout the world. These include nutrient cycling through dung removal, soil bioturbation, plant growth, secondary seed dispersal and parasite control. We conducted field experiments at two sites in the northern hemisphere temperate region in which dung removal and secondary seed dispersal were assessed. Dung beetles were classified in three functional groups, depending on their size and dung manipulation method: dwellers, large and small tunnelers. Other soil inhabiting fauna were included as a fourth functional group. Dung removal and seed dispersal by each individual functional group and combinations thereof were estimated in exclusion experiments using different dung types. Dwellers were the most diverse and abundant group, but tunnelers were dominant in terms of biomass. All dung beetle functional groups had a clear preference for fresh dung. The ecosystem services in dung removal and secondary seed dispersal provided by dung beetles were significant and differed between functional groups. Although in absolute numbers more dwellers were found, large tunnelers were disproportionally important for dung burial and seed removal. In the absence of dung beetles, other soil inhabiting fauna, such as earthworms, partly took over the dung decomposing role of dung beetles while most dung was processed when all native functional groups were present. Our results, therefore, emphasize the need to conserve functionally complete dung ecosystems to maintain full ecosystem functioning.

  19. Geological characteristics of the peat deposits in Costa Rica (preliminary study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, S.; Cohen, A.D.; Raymond, R.; Alvarado, A.; Malavassi, L.

    1986-04-01

    Wide areas containing peat deposits have been found in Costa Rica. Three of them were selected for the preliminary evaluation. In the Talamanca range peat occurs as a thin blanket deposit about 1 m thick in an area of about 150 km/sup 2/. It is very decomposed (about 28% fibers), with high ash content, (21%) and extensively bioturbated. It has the lowest water content (84%), pH, fixed carbon (23%) and sulphur (0.2%) of all the sampled sites, However, it has the highest bulk density (0.22 g/cm/sup 3/) and volatile components (55%). Its calorific value averages 7700 Btu/lb, dry. In Medio Queso de Upala, several peat horizons are interbedded with alluvium layers within a 70 km/sup 2/ flood plain. They have the highest calorific values (8000 Btu/lb, dry), fixed carbon (30%) and ash content (22%). Their fiber content is low (27%), and the bulk density 0.20 g/cm/sup 3/. In El Silencio, near Siquirres, the thickness of the main layer exceeds 3.5 m, averaging 19% of ash, 53% of fibers, 5.8 pH, 0.6% of sulphur, 0.13 g/cm/sup 3/ bulk density, and 7500 Btu/lb, dry. (5 refs.)

  20. Facies development and paleoenvironment of the Hajajah Limestone Member, Aruma Formation, central Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S.; Ismail, Abdelmoneim; Youssef, Mohamed; Nour, Hamdy

    2016-12-01

    The Campanian Hajajah Limestone Member of the Aruma Formation was formed during two regressive episodes. Each of them formed of three depositional facies, from base to top: 1) intra-shelf basin facies, made up of fossiliferous green shale and mudstone with ostracods and badly preserved foraminifers. 2) fore-reef facies, consists of hard, massive, marly coralline limestone. The upper part is rich with low divers, badly to moderate preserved, solitary and colonial corals, and, 3) back reef and near-shore facies, consists of fossiliferous sandy dolomitized, bioturbated limestone with abundant reworked corals, bivalves, gastropods, and aggregate grains. On the basis of field observations, micro-and macrofossils and microfacies analysis, the Hajajah Limestone Member was deposited in distal marine settings below storm wave base in a low-energy environment changed upward to fore-reef framework in an open marine environment with moderate to high energy conditions and terminated with shallow marine facies with accumulation of skeletal grains by storms during regression.

  1. Helium and thorium isotope constraints on African dust transport to the Bahamas over recent millennia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Christopher T.; McGee, David; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Boyle, Edward A.; Maloof, Adam C.

    2017-01-01

    Despite its potential linkages with North Atlantic climate, the variability in Saharan dust transport to the western North Atlantic over the past two millennia has not been well-characterized. A factor of 4 increase in dust production in sub-Saharan Africa has been attributed to the onset of Sahelian agriculture 200 yr ago. The regional extent of this anthropogenic dust increase, however, remains uncertain. Additionally, while millennial-scale cold periods of the last deglaciation have been associated with strong increases in North African dust emissions, few adequate records exist to observe dustiness during the Little Ice Age, a century-scale cooling of the North Atlantic (AD 1400-1800). In this study, we develop a new technique for the paired use of 230Th-normalized 232Th fluxes and 3He-normalized 4He fluxes in Bahamian tidal flat sediments. After justifying the fact that 230Th and 3He have had relatively constant sources to tidal flat and banktop waters, and accounting for the smoothing effect of bioturbation, a factor of 4 change in far-field dust transport to the western North Atlantic between the pre-industrial and modern era is not supported by our dust proxies over the past 2000 yr. Furthermore, we speculate why the response of western North Atlantic dust deposition associated with the Little Ice Age climate anomalies may have been modest compared to prior climatic events of the early Holocene or the last deglaciation.

  2. Patterns of short-term sedimentation in a freshwater created marsh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, Sarah K; Mitsch, William J

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated different sedimentation measurement techniques and examined patterns of short-term sedimentation in two 1-ha replicate created freshwater marshes in central Ohio, USA. Short-term (one-year) sediment accumulation above feldspar, clay, glitter, and sand artificial marker horizons was compared at different water depths and distances from wetland inflow. A sediment budget was also constructed from turbidity and suspended sediment data for comparison with marker horizons. Glitter and sand marker horizons were the most successful for measuring sediment accumulation (81-100% marker recovery), while clay markers were completely unsuccessful. The sedimentation rate for both wetlands averaged 4.9 cm yr(-1) (36 kg m(-2) yr(-1)), and ranged from 1.82 to 9.23 cm yr(-1) (12.4 to 69.7 kg m(-2) yr(-1)). Sedimentation rates in deep, open water areas were significantly higher than in shallow, vegetated areas for both wetlands (t test, p wetlands, suggesting that bioturbation and turbulence may cause significant resuspension or that high hydrologic loads may distribute sediments throughout the basins. A sediment budget estimated sediment retention of approximately 740 g m(-2) yr(-1) per wetland (43% removal rate), yet gross sediment accumulation was 36,000 g m(-2) yr(-1) measured by marker horizons. These results suggest that erosive forces may have influenced sedimentation, but also may indicate problems with the sediment budget calculation methodology.

  3. Calibration and Performance of the Stirred Flux Chamber from the Benthic Lander Elinor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    GLUD, RN; GUNDERSEN, JK; REVSBECH, NP;

    1995-01-01

    Flow velocities and O-2 microgradients were measured by use of minithermistors and O-2 microelectrodes inside a laboratory model of the chamber from the benthic lander, Elinor. The sensors were introduced from below through small holes in the chamber bottom and penetrated up through the sediment.......%. Radial pressure gradients in the stirred chamber were 1-3 Pa. Such pressure gradients may induce advective pore water transport in permeable sediments and increase the flushing of animal burrows in bioturbated sediments.......Flow velocities and O-2 microgradients were measured by use of minithermistors and O-2 microelectrodes inside a laboratory model of the chamber from the benthic lander, Elinor. The sensors were introduced from below through small holes in the chamber bottom and penetrated up through the sediment....... Flow velocities and the diffusive boundary layer (DBL) could thereby be studied with a minimum of disturbance. In the central part of the chamber covering 9% of the area, the DBL was thicker and the flow rates significantly lower than in the rest of the hydrodynamically uniform chamber. Average flow...

  4. Nitrogen turnover in drying sediments of an Amazon floodplain lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschorreck, Matthias

    2005-05-01

    In the Amazon floodplain large areas are subject to annual cycles of drying and rewetting. The turnover of nitrogen in the periodically drying sediments is an important regulator of floodplain fertility. In the present study the transition of a lake sediment from flooded to dry conditions was studied with respect to microbial nitrogen turnover. Soil nitrogen pools, as well as the activity and abundance of denitrifying and nitrifying bacteria, were investigated during one dry season. During the first weeks after drying, most of the inorganic nitrogen vanished from the sediment. The process was inhibited by a nitrification inhibitor, showing that coupled nitrification-denitrification was responsible for the nitrogen loss. Assimilation by plants or microbes, as well as leaching, were not important mechanisms of nitrogen loss. During a period of only 10 days, 59% of the total denitrification and 94% of the total N2O emission during the dry period occurred. Cell numbers of denitrifiers were not correlated with activities. Denitrification was not correlated with other sediment variables but was regulated by the patchy distribution of reduced and oxidized zones in the uppermost centimeters of the sediment. This heterogeneity was probably introduced by the bioturbation of small insects, which was restricted to a rather short time period shortly after drying.

  5. Iron limitation in the Western Interior Seaway during the Late Cretaceous OAE 3 and its role in phosphorus recycling and enhanced organic matter preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessin, Allyson; Sheldon, Nathan D.; Hendy, Ingrid; Chappaz, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    The sedimentary record of the Coniacian-Santonian Oceanic Anoxic Event 3 (OAE 3) in the North American Western Interior Seaway is characterized by a prolonged period of enhanced organic carbon (OC) burial. This study investigates the role of Fe in enhancing organic matter preservation and maintaining elevated primary productivity to sustain black shale deposition within the Coniacian-Santonian-aged Niobrara Formation in the USGS #1 Portland core. Iron speciation results indicate the development of a reactive Fe limitation coeval with reduced bioturbation and increased organic matter preservation, suggesting that decreased sulfide buffering by reactive Fe may have promoted enhanced organic matter preservation at the onset of OAE 3. An Fe limitation would also provide a feedback mechanism to sustain elevated primary productivity through enhanced phosphorus recycling. Additionally our results demonstrate inconsistencies between Fe-based and trace metal redox reconstructions. Iron indices from the Portland core indicate a single stepwise change, whereas the trace metal redox proxies indicate fluctuating redox conditions during and after OAE 3. Using Fe speciation to reconstruct past redox conditions may be complicated by a number of factors, including Fe sequestration in diagenetic carbonate phases and efficient sedimentary pyrite formation in a system with limited Fe supply and high levels of export production.

  6. Accumulation in mussels of PAH mobilized from contaminated seabed; Akkumulering i blaaskjell av PAH mobilisert fra forurenset sjoebunn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakke, T.; Konieczny, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    In Norway there are several smelters, some older ones, which have caused contamination of sediments and marine organisms with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). There are significant amounts of PAH in the bottom sediments of many fjords which have been used as recipients for the waste water from the plants, especially close to the factories. This report discusses how intake of PAH in mussels was investigated as part of an experiment to map the release of PAH from contaminated seabed. Shell populations were placed downstream ``undisturbed sections`` of the bottoms of three Norwegian fjords in experiments with flowing water. The concentrations of PAH in the shells correlated positively with concentrations in the water and in the test sediments, and with the total amount of material suspended at the outlet. The PAH level increased gradually during the first three months and then leveled out during the next three. The Saudafjord had the most biologically available PAH and the fastest leveling out of the concentration, which may be due to a greater TOC (total organic carbon) in its sediments. The shells accumulated carcinogenic PAH selectively compared to the water, but not compared to the sediments. Increased bioturbation and long exposure gave an other PAH composition in the shells than in the water they were exposed to. 27 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Hypoxia causes preservation of labile organic matter and changes seafloor microbial community composition (Black Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Gerdhard L.; Lichtschlag, Anna; Ramette, Alban; Pantoja, Silvio; Rossel, Pamela E.; Schubert, Carsten J.; Struck, Ulrich; Boetius, Antje

    2017-01-01

    Bottom-water oxygen supply is a key factor governing the biogeochemistry and community composition of marine sediments. Whether it also determines carbon burial rates remains controversial. We investigated the effect of varying oxygen concentrations (170 to 0 μM O2) on microbial remineralization of organic matter in seafloor sediments and on community diversity of the northwestern Crimean shelf break. This study shows that 50% more organic matter is preserved in surface sediments exposed to hypoxia compared to oxic bottom waters. Hypoxic conditions inhibit bioturbation and decreased remineralization rates even within short periods of a few days. These conditions led to the accumulation of threefold more phytodetritus pigments within 40 years compared to the oxic zone. Bacterial community structure also differed between oxic, hypoxic, and anoxic zones. Functional groups relevant in the degradation of particulate organic matter, such as Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria, changed with decreasing oxygenation, and the microbial community of the hypoxic zone took longer to degrade similar amounts of deposited reactive matter. We conclude that hypoxic bottom-water conditions—even on short time scales—substantially increase the preservation potential of organic matter because of the negative effects on benthic fauna and particle mixing and by favoring anaerobic processes, including sulfurization of matter. PMID:28246637

  8. Charles Darwin's Observations on the Behaviour of Earthworms and the Evolutionary History of a Giant Endemic Species from Germany, Lumbricus badensis (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Kutschera

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The British naturalist Charles Darwin (1809–1882 began and ended his almost 45-year-long career with observations, experiments, and theories related to earthworms. About six months before his death, Darwin published his book on The Formation of Vegetable Mould, through the Actions of Worms, With Observations on their Habits (1881. Here we describe the origin, content, and impact of Darwin's last publication on earthworms (subclass Oligochaeta, family Lumbricidae and the role of these annelids as global “ecosystem reworkers” (concept of bioturbation. In addition, we summarize our current knowledge on the reproductive behaviour of the common European species Lumbricus terrestris. In the second part of our account we describe the biology and evolution of the giant endemic species L. badensis from south western Germany with reference to the principle of niche construction. Biogeographic studies have shown that the last common ancestor of L. badensis, and the much smaller sister-taxon, the Atlantic-Mediterranean L. friendi, lived less than 10 000 years ago. Allopatric speciation occurred via geographically isolated founder populations that were separated by the river Rhine so that today two earthworm species exist in different areas.

  9. Manganese, Iron, and Sulfur Cycling in a Coastal Marine Sediment, Aarhus Bay, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    THAMDRUP, B.; FOSSING, H.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    -scale measurements showed that it extended to the upper 0-2.5 mm during summer, when the zones of Mn and Fe reduction were compressed towards the surface. Most of the H2S produced precipitated as iron sulfides and S0 by reaction with Fe. Both Fe(III) and a nonsulfur-bound authigenic Fe(II) pool reacted efficiently...... with H2S. The authigenic Fe(II) pool was present at one hundredfold higher concentration than dissolved Fe2+. Only 15% of the precipitated sulfide was buried permanently. Most of the reoxidation of reduced S occurred within 1 cm of the sediment-water interface and was supported by upward bioturbation....... All of the estimated Mn reduction could be coupled to the reoxidation of reduced S and Fe. Partial oxidation of H2S, forming S0 and pyrite, accounted for 63% of the estimated Fe reduction. The remaining Fe reduction was coupled to complete oxidation of reduced S or to C mineralization. The settling...

  10. Mediterranean climate variability during the Holocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S.L. CASFORD

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a study on four high sedimentation-rate marine cores with suppressed bioturbation effects, recovered along the northern margin of the eastern Mediterranean. We demonstrate that this region, central to the development of modern civilisation, was substantially affected throughout the Holocene by a distinct cycle of cooling events on the order of 2o C. In the best-preserved cases the onset of these events appears particularly abrupt, within less than a century. The cooling events typically lasted several centuries, and there are compelling indications that they were associated with increased aridity in the Levantine/NE African sector (Rossignol-Strick, 1995; 1998; Alley et al., 1997; Hassan, 1986; 1996; 1997a,b; McKim Malville et al., 1998. Several of these episodes appear coincident with cultural reorganisations, with indigenous developments (eg. cattle domestication, new technologies and population migrations and fusion of peoples and ideas (Hassan, 1986; 1996; 1997a,b; McKim Malville, 1998. We infer that climatic events of a likely high-latitude origin (O’Brien et al., 1995; Bond et al., 1997; Mayewski et al., 1997; Alley et al., 1997 caused cooling and aridity in and around the eastern Mediterranean via a direct atmospheric link, and therefore played an important role in the development of modern civilisation.

  11. Actual development of the chenier coast of suriname (South America)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustinus, Pieter G. E. F.

    1980-04-01

    The Holocene coastal plain of Suriname is a chenier plain. Its actual sedimentological development has been studied during three field-work periods (1966, 1967/1968, 1972). Clay is the predominant sediment in this low- to medium-energy environment. It accumulates in extensive shoreface-attached mudflats (sometimes considered as giant mudwaves), which migrate continuously to the west due to deposition of slingmud at their west side and simultaneous erosion of the east side. In between the mudflats cheniers may develop. Thin-section analysis of the clay deposits revealed that they are built up of an alternation of thick clayey laminae and thin laminae of silt and fine sand. The clayey laminae chiefly show a unistrial plasmic fabric. Disturbaces in the upper zone are caused by bioturbation. Two types of cheniers can be distinguished. One type contains fine sand which has been winnowed out of the pelite deposits. Since this sand is brought from the shelf the chenier formation begins at approximately mean low-water level. Longshore bars are formed and these are driven shoreward by wave action. The other type is built up of medium to coarse sand supplied by a local river. It is transported westward by beachdrift in a narrow zone around the mean high-water line. These cheniers develop therefore at or just above the mean high-tide level. The sedimentary structures of both types of cheniers have many characteristics in common. However, each type also has its own distinct features.

  12. Developing a Luminescence Chronology for Fan-terrace Sediments, Los Cabos, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, E. J.; Brown, N. D.; Antinao, J.; Huenupi, E. C.; Baker, S. E.; McDonald, E.

    2012-12-01

    Extensive depositional units forming large terrace units within alluvial fans close to the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico, record sedimentation under a very different climatic regime from the present. Dating these sediments presents significant challenges; they contain very sparse organic material suitable for radiocarbon dating; their upper surfaces are heavily bioturbated, in some places eroded and in other locations show signs of continued deposition even after incision and base level fall, rendering them difficult to date using TCN (terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide) methods. Locations that have experienced significant regional tectonic influences associated with rapid erosion (e.g. Transverse Ranges, California, Southern Alps, New Zealand, Himalaya and Tibet) are typically not well-suited for quartz OSL (optically stimulated luminescence) application owing to low signal sensitivity. For this reason, our efforts to develop a chronology for the sandy sediments that characterize these contexts have focussed on IRSL dating of K-feldspar, using newly developed post-infrared IRSL (infra-red stimulated luminescence) approaches. We explore the relative advantages of different techniques, and methods to assess both the degree of incomplete zeroing and signal fading. In particular, we explore how novel single grain IRSL measurements of K-feldspar can be applied to these and similar high energy deposits on timescales ranging from the last 100,000 years to a few decades. Based on our chronology coupled with detailed sedimentological and soil stratigraphy investigations, we are able to exploit these deposits as valuable archives of past environmental and climatic change.

  13. Anatomy of a phylloid algal buildup, Raytown Limestone, Iola Formation, Pennsylvanian, Southeast Kansas, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, William C.; Carozzi, Albert V.

    1986-05-01

    Quantitative petrography and temporal-spatial relationships of microfacies were used to interpret the depositional history of Iola carbonates. The Paola Limestone, consisting of four microfacies, was deposited on a carbonate ramp and appears to record the maximum transgression within the Iola cycle of deposition. The overlying Raytown Limestone was composed of nineteen microfacies arranged in three vertically successive depositional models of similar general configuration. These models revealed an initial bioclastic bar evolving upward into a complex bioaccumulated-bioconstructed phylloid algal buildup. The latter was replaced landward by a siliciclastic distal deltaic environment and graded basinward into upper ramp and lower ramp carbonates. Locally, restricted circulation caused the development of hypersaline conditions. The shallowing-upward depositional evolution of the phylloid algal buildup consisted of four distinct stages: bioclastic (hydrodynamic buildup), bioaccumulation, bioconstruction, and bioclastic (destruction in storm-dominated conditions and intermittent emergence). Diagenesis of Iola microfacies was complex and included: marine phreatic 1 (bioturbation, syneresis, micritization, micrite lithification, and hardground genesis; freshwater vadose—phreatic undersaturated 1 (dissolution of evaporites, moldic dissolution, collapse brecciation, and vadose silt infiltration); marine phreatic 2 (isopachous rim and botryoidal cementation); freshwater phreatic saturated 2 (sparite cementation, and extensive neomorphism); deep burial (anhydritization, dolomitization, stylolitization, and silicification); and late uplift (fracturation and cementation). Most of the diagenesis was microfacies specific.

  14. Rooting Characteristics of Vegetation Near Areas 3 and 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site--Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. J. Hansen

    2003-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy emplaced high-specific-activity low-level radioactive wastes and limited quantities of classified transuranic wastes in Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes from 1984 to 1989. The boreholes are located at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in southern Nevada. The boreholes were backfilled with native alluvium soil. The surface of these boreholes and trenches is expected to be colonized by native vegetation in the future. Considering the long-term performance of the disposal facilities, bioturbation (the disruption of buried wastes by biota) is considered a primary release mechanism for radionuclides disposed in GCD boreholes as well as trenches at both Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs. This report provides information about rooting characteristics of vegetation near Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs. Data from this report are being used to resolve uncertainties involving parameterization of performance assessment models used to characterize the biotic mixing of soils and radionuclide transport processes by biota. The objectives of this study were to: (1) survey the prior ecological literature on the NTS and identify pertinent information about the vegetation, (2) conduct limited field studies to describe the current vegetation in the vicinity of Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs so as to correlate findings with more extensive vegetation data collected at Yucca Mountain and the NTS, ( 3 ) review prior performance assessment documents and evaluate model assumptions based on current ecological information, and (4) identify data deficiencies and make recommendations for correcting such deficiencies.

  15. Manganese, iron and phosphorus cycling in an estuarine mudflat, Loire, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault de Chanvalon, A.; Mouret, A.; Knoery, J.; Geslin, E.; Péron, O.; Metzger, E.

    2016-12-01

    The sampling of surface sediment from two sites of a mudflat of the Loire Estuary during four contrasting seasons has led to new information about geochemical cycling under transient diagenesis fuelled by flood deposition. Based on stocks of reactive iron-oxides and manganese-oxides (ascorbate-extracted) and pore water concentrations, the progressive evolution of flood deposits is described. Three major steps are observed: at first, there is no manganese, iron and phosphorus release into pore water within the flood-deposited layer. Then, during a period of approximately 1 month, Mn oxides are consumed while the dissolved Mn concentration increases. Simultaneously, the Fe oxide-rich layer from flood deposition prevents (or at least limits) phosphorus release into pore water as shown by the increasing P/Fe ratio of the ascorbate extractions. During spring and summer, Fe oxides are reductively dissolved until complete depletion results. This period also corresponds to the saturation of Fe oxides by phosphorus and probably maximum P release to the water column. The site located closer to the shore showed higher density of benthic faunas leading to more intense bioirrigation. The importance of bioturbation on the year scale for biogeochemical processes is discussed according to both bioirrigation and biomixing processes.

  16. Regional and long-term patterns of lead concentrations in fluvial, marine and terrestrial systems and humans in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagner, C. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrophysik

    2000-07-01

    Lead contamination of abiotic and biotic systems has been studied closely since the early 1970s, when lead was firstly perceived as an environmental problem. Lead emission reduction policies were implemented throughout Europe during that time. Nonetheless, analyses of lead loads in aquatic systems, such as the river Elbe, showed no decline over time in either suspended matter or surface sediments. Regional differences in lead concentrations of fluvial systems were found, due to tidal influence, runoff and local emissions. Lead contamination of sediments from the North Sea was highest in estuaries. Concentrations in sediment cores were quite stable down to the depth of background values, due to bioturbation, flow, waves and meandering channels. Terrestrial soils in Europe were highly polluted in industrial and ore mining areas and large cities. No decline in lead concentrations was evident in foraminifers, bladder wrack or fish. It was found that contamination in sediments, mammals and fish was higher in coastal zones than in the open sea. In contrast to in aquatic organisms, positive impacts of lead reduction regulations were detected in terrestrial plants, which adsorbed or took up lead mainly through atmospheric lead deposition. European lead concentrations in plants decreased coincidently with lead emissions. That trend could also be identified in the blood lead levels of the human population in Europe: since 1979 they have declined in every group of the population. Mainly influenced by age, sex and the living environment, overall, the lead loads of humans had never been high enough to cause health danger. (orig.)

  17. Interactions between sediment chemistry and frenulate pogonophores (Annelida) in the north-east Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, P. R.; Southward, A. J.; Southward, E. C.; Lamont, P.; Harvey, R.

    2008-08-01

    The small frenulate pogonophores (Annelida: Pogonophora a.k.a. Siboglinidae) typically inhabit muddy sediments on the continental slope, although a few species occur near hydrothermal vents and cold seeps. We present data on the distribution and habitat characteristics of several species on the European continental shelf and slope from 48°N to 75°N and show how the animals interact with the chemistry of the sediments. The environments inhabited include: shallow (30 m), organic-rich, fjord sediments; slope sediments (1000-2200 m) and methane seeps at 330 m depth. All the species studied obtain nutrition from endosymbiotic bacteria. They take up reduced sulphur species, or in one case, methane, through the posterior parts of their tubes buried in the anoxic sediment. We conclude that most species undertake sulphide 'mining', a mechanism previously demonstrated in the bivalves Lucinoma borealis and Thyasira sarsi. These pogonophores participate in the sulphur cycle and effectively lower the sulphide content of the sediments. Our results show that the abundance of frenulate pogonophores increases with increasing sedimentation and with decreasing abundance of other benthos, particularly bioturbating organisms. The maximum sustainable carrying capacity of non-seep sediments for frenulate pogonophores is limited by the rate of sulphate reduction.

  18. First Ediacaran Fauna Occurrence in Northeastern Brazil (Jaibaras Basin, ?Ediacaran-Cambrian: Preliminary Results and Regional Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCISCO R.G. BARROSO

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the first known occurrence of the Ediacaran fauna in northeastern Brazil (at Pacujá Municipality, northwestern state of Ceará and presents preliminary interpretations of its significance. Regional correlation indicates that the fossils originated in the Jaibaras Basin and that they may represent a new geological system. The depositional environment can be attributed to a fluviomarine system. Nine Ediacaran species can be identified, including members of pandemic groups (e.g., Charniodiscus arboreus Glaessner, 1959; ?Charniodiscus concentricus Ford, 1958; Cyclomedusa davidi Sprigg, 1947; Ediacaria flindersi Sprigg, 1947; and Medusinites asteroides Sprigg, 1949 and endemic groups (e.g., Kimberella quadrata Glaessner & Wade, 1966; Palaeophragmodictya reticulata Gehling & Rigby, 1996; Parvancorina minchami Glaessner, 1958; and Pectinifrons abyssalis Bamforth, Narbonne, Anderson, 2008. Three ichnogenera are also present: Arenicolites Salter, 1857; Palaeophycus Hall, 1987; and Planolites Nicholson, 1873. The relative age of the deposits is between ?Ediacaran and Cambrian, and the fauna resembles the White Sea Assemblage. The bioturbation presents typical unbranched Ediacaran ichnogenera with little depth in the substrate. This previously unknown occurrence of the Ediacaran fauna reinforces the importance of the state of Ceará to Brazilian and global palaeontology.

  19. The Anthropocene: a conspicuous stratigraphical signal of anthropogenic changes in production and consumption across the biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark; Zalasiewicz, Jan; Waters, Colin N.; Edgeworth, Matt; Bennett, Carys; Barnosky, Anthony D.; Ellis, Erle C.; Ellis, Michael A.; Cearreta, Alejandro; Haff, Peter K.; Ivar do Sul, Juliana A.; Leinfelder, Reinhold; McNeill, John R.; Odada, Eric; Oreskes, Naomi; Revkin, Andrew; Richter, Daniel deB; Steffen, Will; Summerhayes, Colin; Syvitski, James P.; Vidas, Davor; Wagreich, Michael; Wing, Scott L.; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Zhisheng, An

    2016-03-01

    Biospheric relationships between production and consumption of biomass have been resilient to changes in the Earth system over billions of years. This relationship has increased in its complexity, from localized ecosystems predicated on anaerobic microbial production and consumption to a global biosphere founded on primary production from oxygenic photoautotrophs, through the evolution of Eukarya, metazoans, and the complexly networked ecosystems of microbes, animals, fungi, and plants that characterize the Phanerozoic Eon (the last ˜541 million years of Earth history). At present, one species, Homo sapiens, is refashioning this relationship between consumption and production in the biosphere with unknown consequences. This has left a distinctive stratigraphy of the production and consumption of biomass, of natural resources, and of produced goods. This can be traced through stone tool technologies and geochemical signals, later unfolding into a diachronous signal of technofossils and human bioturbation across the planet, leading to stratigraphically almost isochronous signals developing by the mid-20th century. These latter signals may provide an invaluable resource for informing and constraining a formal Anthropocene chronostratigraphy, but are perhaps yet more important as tracers of a biosphere state that is characterized by a geologically unprecedented pattern of global energy flow that is now pervasively influenced and mediated by humans, and which is necessary for maintaining the complexity of modern human societies.

  20. Modeling Channelization in Coastal Wetlands with Ecological Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Z. J.; Mahadevan, A.; Pennings, S.; FitzGerald, D.

    2014-12-01

    In coastal wetlands in Georgia and South Carolina, dendritic channel networks are actively incising headward at the rate of nearly 2 m/yr. The future geomorphic evolution of these marshes remains in question as rates of relative sea-level rise increase. Our objective is to understand the mechanisms that lead to the evolution of these channel networks through field observations and modeling. We model the geomorphological evolution of tidal creeks by viewing the wetland as a permeable medium. The porosity of the medium affects its hydraulic conductivity, which in turn is altered by erosion. Our multiphase model spontaneously generates channelization and branching networks through flow and erosion. In our field studies, we find that crabs play an active role in grazing vegetation and in the bioturbation of sediments. These effects are incorporated in our model based on field and laboratory observations of crab behavior and its effects on the marsh. We find the erosional patterns and channelization are significantly altered by the faunal feedback. Crabs enhance the growth of channels, inducing the headward erosion of creeks where flow-induced stresses are weakest. They are instrumental in generating high rates of creek extension, which channelize the marsh more effectively in response to sea-level rise. This indicates that the evolution of coastal wetlands is responding to interactions between physics and ecology and highlights the importance of the faunal contribution to these feedbacks.

  1. Southern North Sea Basin in Europe: Biodiversity of the Marine Fürstenau Formation Including Early White and Megatooth Sharks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Diedrich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fürstenau Formation (Lutetian, Paleogene, Eocene is based on type sections near Fürstenau in Germany (central Europe and is built of 22 meter thick marine glauconitic and strongly bioturbated sands, clays, and a vertebrate-rich conglomerate bed. The conglomerate layer from the Early Lutetian transgression reworked Lower Cretaceous, and Paleogene marine sediments. It is dominated by pebbles from the locally mountains which must have been transported by an ancient river in a delta fan. Marine reworked Lower Cretaceous and Paleogen pebbles/fossils, were derived from the underlying deposits of northern Germany (= southern pre North Sea basin. The benthic macrofauna is cold upwelling water influenced and non-tropical, and medium divers. The vertebrate fish fauna is extremely rich in shark teeth, with about 5,000 teeth per cubic meter of gravel. The most dominant forms are teeth from sand shark ancestors Striatolamia macrota, followed by white shark ancestors Carcharodon auriculatus. Even teeth from the magatooth shark ancestor Carcharocles sokolovi are present in a moderately diverse and condensed Paleogene fish fauna that also includes rays, chimaeras, and more then 80 different bony fish. Fragmentary turtle remains are present, and few terrestrial vertebrates and even marine mammals with phocids, sirenians and possibly whales.

  2. Hyperspectral imaging of the microscale distribution and dynamics of microphytobenthos in intertidal sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Chennu, Arjun

    2013-10-03

    We describe a novel, field-deployable hyperspectral imaging system, called Hypersub, that allows noninvasive in situ mapping of the microphytobenthos (MPB) biomass distribution with a high spatial (sub-millimeter) and temporal (minutes) resolution over areas of 1 × 1 m. The biomass is derived from a log-transformed and near-infrared corrected reflectance hyperspectral index, which exhibits a linear relationship (R2 > 0.97) with the chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration in the euphotic zone of the sediment and depends on the sediment grain size. Deployments of the system revealed that due to factors such as sediment topography, bioturbation, and grazing, the distribution of MPB in intertidal sediments is remarkably heterogeneous, with Chl a concentrations varying laterally by up to 400% of the average value over a distance of 1 cm. Furthermore, due to tidal cycling and diel light variability, MPB concentrations in the top 1 mm of sediments are very dynamic, changing by 40–80% over a few hours due to vertical migration. We argue that the high-resolution hyperspectral imaging method overcomes the inadequate resolution of traditional methods based on sedimentary Chl a extraction, and thus helps improve our understanding of the processes that control benthic primary production in coastal sediments.

  3. Microfacies Analysis of Upper Eocene Shallow-water Carbonates from the Rodnei Mountains (N Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Sahy

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A Priabonian carbonate ramp developed in the NW Rodnei Mountains as a part of a Paleogene sedimentary cover which overlies the metamorphic basement of the Eastern Carpathians. Two sections were sampled at different locations along the carbonate ramp. The deposits accumulated in a shallow environment, in which relative sea level change is seen as the main controlling factor of facies distribution. A shoreface → middle ramp → inner ramp transition was recorded in both sections. Associations of large benthic foraminifers and high siliciclastic input are the dominant features in the northern part of the ramp, while in the south corals and coralline algae thrived in an environment characterized by low hydrodynamic energy and clastic input. A 4-5 m thick intercalation identified in the middle ramp deposits of both studied sections shows a temporary change in fossil assemblages, with foraminifers almost completely replaced by red algae and rhodoliths, and extensive bioturbation caused by ostracods and gastropods. Towards the top of the carbonate deposits, large bivalve colonies and an increase in clastic input indicate a relative sea-level fall, which ultimately led to the cessation of carbonate sedimentation and the deposition of black shales on a basin-wide scale during the Lower Oligocene.

  4. The ecology of open-bay bottoms of Texas: A community profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, N.E.

    1987-05-01

    Open-bay bottoms represent one of the most extensive habitats in any estuarine system, especially in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico estuaries of Texas. Seven major estuarine systems are found here (Sabine Lake, Galveston Bay, Matagorda Bay, San Antonio Bay, Copano-Aransas Bays, Corpus Christi Bay, and the Laguna Madre), along with three minor riverine estuaries (Brazos, San Bernard, and Rio Grande) which long ago filled. These bays are typically broad and shallow with average depths of 1.2 to 2.4 m and a total surface area of 624,000 ha. Salt marshes and seagrass beds are small. The structure and function of the benthic communities in these Texas estuaries are examined by reviewing and integrating data from a number of past and ongoing studies. While studies in these systems have not been as numerous as in other estuaries, the patterns of structure and function are beginning to emerge. The key functions of the benthic system are production of biomass as food resources for higher trophic levels; bioturbation, which enhances nutrient regeneration; and nutrient regeneration itself. Benthic nutrient regeneration in the shallow waters of Texas estuaries may play a key role in regulating primary production in the estuaries. Managers of these estuaries must consider the open-bay bottom systems as a critical part of the overall function of these estuaries.

  5. Ancient charcoal as a natural archive for paleofire regime and vegetation change in the Mayumbe, Democratic Republic of the Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubau, Wannes; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Kitin, Peter; Mees, Florias; Baert, Geert; Verschuren, Dirk; Nsenga, Laurent; Van Acker, Joris; Beeckman, Hans

    2013-09-01

    Charcoal was sampled in four soil profiles at the Mayumbe forest boundary (DRC). Five fire events were recorded and 44 charcoal types were identified. One stratified profile yielded charcoal assemblages around 530 cal yr BP and > 43.5 cal ka BP in age. The oldest assemblage precedes the period of recorded anthropogenic burning, illustrating occasional long-term absence of fire but also natural wildfire occurrences within tropical rainforest. No other charcoal assemblages older than 2500 cal yr BP were recorded, perhaps due to bioturbation and colluvial reworking. The recorded paleofires were possibly associated with short-lived climate anomalies. Progressively dry climatic conditions since ca. 4000 cal yr BP onward did not promote paleofire occurrence until increasing seasonality affected vegetation at the end of the third millennium BP, as illustrated by a fire occurring in mature rainforest that persisted until around 2050 cal yr BP. During a drought episode coinciding with the 'Medieval Climate Anomaly', mature rainforest was locally replaced by woodland savanna. Charcoal remains from pioneer forest indicate that fire hampered forest regeneration after climatic drought episodes. The presence of pottery shards and oil-palm endocarps associated with two relatively recent paleofires suggests that the effects of climate variability were amplified by human activities.

  6. El Niño-Southern oscillation variability from the late cretaceous marca shale of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Andrew; Kemp, Alan E.S.; Weedon, Graham P.; Barron, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the possible behavior of El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) with global warming have provoked interest in records of ENSO from past “greenhouse” climate states. The latest Cretaceous laminated Marca Shale of California permits a seasonal-scale reconstruction of water column flux events and hence interannual paleoclimate variability. The annual flux cycle resembles that of the modern Gulf of California with diatoms characteristic of spring upwelling blooms followed by silt and clay, and is consistent with the existence of a paleo–North American Monsoon that brought input of terrigenous sediment during summer storms and precipitation runoff. Variation is also indicated in the extent of water column oxygenation by differences in lamina preservation. Time series analysis of interannual variability in terrigenous sediment and diatom flux and in the degree of bioturbation indicates strong periodicities in the quasi-biennial (2.1–2.8 yr) and low-frequency (4.1–6.3 yr) bands both characteristic of ENSO forcing, as well as decadal frequencies. This evidence for robust Late Cretaceous ENSO variability does not support the theory of a “permanent El Niño,” in the sense of a continual El Niño–like state, in periods of warmer climate.

  7. Thermal sensitivity of the crab Neosarmatium africanum in tropical and temperate mangroves on the east coast of Africa

    KAUST Repository

    Fusi, Marco

    2017-03-09

    Mangrove forests are amongst the tropical marine ecosystems most severely affected by rapid environmental change, and the activities of key associated macrobenthic species contribute to their ecological resilience. Along the east coast of Africa, the amphibious sesarmid crab Neosarmatium africanum (=meinerti) plays a pivotal role in mangrove ecosystem functioning through carbon cycling and sediment bioturbation. In the face of rapid climate change, identifying the sensitivity and vulnerability to global warming of this species is of increasing importance. Based on a latitudinal comparison, we measured the thermal sensitivity of a tropical and a temperate population of N. africanum, testing specimens at the centre and southern limit of its distribution, respectively. We measured metabolic oxygen consumption and haemolymph dissolved oxygen content during air and water breathing within a temperature range that matched the natural environmental conditions. The results indicate different thermal sensitivities in the physiological responses of N. africanum from tropical and temperate populations, especially during air breathing. The differences observed in the thermal physiology between the two populations suggest that the effect of global warming on this important mangrove species may be different under different climate regimes.

  8. Ichnological record of palaeoenvironment from the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary interval at El Kef, Tunisia: The first study of old and new sections at the stratotype area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Tovar, F. J.; Uchman, A.; M'Hamdi, A.; Riahi, S.; Ismail-Lattrache, K. B.

    2016-08-01

    Trace fossil analysis of the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary interval at El Kef (Tunisia) has provided new information on the response of the macrobenthic tracemaker community to the K/Pg boundary event. Ichnological data from the Global Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary were completed with those from a new, well-exposed section nearby. The trace fossil assemblage consists of dominant Trichichnus, frequent Chondrites, and rare Thalassinoides and Zoophycos in the uppermost Maastrichtian, and only Trichichnus in the lowest Danian, the diversity being comparatively lower than in other K/Pg boundary sections worldwide. Bioturbational structures are observed continuously across the K/Pg boundary interval, without primary lamination; this discards anoxic conditions. However, the upward-decreasing diversity in the sections may be related to a transition from a moderately dysoxic or slightly dysoxic macrobenthic habitat in the sediment during the latest Maastrichtian to a strong or very strong dysoxia during early Danian. Comparison with micropaleontological data reveals a minor influence of the K/Pg boundary event on the macrobenthic tracemaker community, while the change in oxygenation of pore waters at the El Kef sections can be attributed to local or regional phenomenon, marked by increasing clay content in the Danian sediments.

  9. Consequences of biodiversity loss diverge from expectation due to post-extinction compensatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Matthias S.; Garcia, Clement; Bolam, Stefan G.; Parker, Ruth; Godbold, Jasmin A.; Solan, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Consensus has been reached that global biodiversity loss impairs ecosystem functioning and the sustainability of services beneficial to humanity. However, the ecosystem consequences of extinction in natural communities are moderated by compensatory species dynamics, yet these processes are rarely accounted for in impact assessments and seldom considered in conservation programmes. Here, we use marine invertebrate communities to parameterise numerical models of sediment bioturbation – a key mediator of biogeochemical cycling – to determine whether post-extinction compensatory mechanisms alter biodiversity-ecosystem function relations following non-random extinctions. We find that compensatory dynamics lead to trajectories of sediment mixing that diverge from those without compensation, and that the form, magnitude and variance of each probabilistic distribution is highly influenced by the type of compensation and the functional composition of surviving species. Our findings indicate that the generalized biodiversity-function relation curve, as derived from multiple empirical investigations of random species loss, is unlikely to yield representative predictions for ecosystem properties in natural systems because the influence of post-extinction community dynamics are under-represented. Recognition of this problem is fundamental to management and conservation efforts, and will be necessary to ensure future plans and adaptation strategies minimize the adverse impacts of the biodiversity crisis.

  10. Phylogenetic and functional diversity of nitrogen cycling microbes in coastal sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The coastal zone contains diverse habitats which are usually characterized by strong environmental gradients (e.g. salinity, nutrients and pollutants. This makes the coastal zone an ideal experimental laboratory for describing microbial diversity and testing hypotheses on community structure, function and control. Coastal sediment is of significance in nutrient regeneration and transformation involving different assemblages of microbes in the nitrogen cycle. This review focuses on 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic diversity and the key enzyme encoding gene-based (e.g. nifH, amoA, narG, nirS, nirK, nosZ, nrfA, hzo and hzs functional diversity of nitrogen fixing, ammonia oxidizing and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (Anammox bacteria as well as bacteria and fungi involved in denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA. Characteristics of community composition and diversity of nitrogen cycling microbes in different habitats (e.g. estuarine, intertidal flats, seagrass or seaweed beds, mangroves, salt marsh, coral reefs, and shallow seas, and their spatiotemporal patterns under benthic pollution or bioturbation are reviewed. Future directions for a better understanding diversity of nitrogen cycling microbes are suggested, such as culture methods and technologies, and single-cell sequencing, etc.

  11. Detection of sedimentary structural elements using formation micro imager technique, a case study from South Mansoura-1 well, Nile Delta, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Wahed, Ahmed G.; Anan, Tarek I.

    2016-12-01

    A detailed structure and sedimentology interpretation was performed for the South Mansoura-1 well. The Formation Micro Imager (FMI) is recorded and interpreted over the interval 9100-8009 ft. This interval belongs to Sidi Salem and Qawasim Formations. Based on azimuth trend of manually picked dips (bed boundaries), the interval can be divided into 4 structural dip zones (Zone 1 (9100-8800 ft), variable azimuth direction with the major trends mainly to SW&NE; Zone 2 (8800-8570 ft), bedding dip azimuth is mainly to the NW; Zone 3 (8570-8250 ft), bedding dip azimuth is mainly to the NE; and Zone 4 (8250-8009 ft), bedding dip azimuth is mainly to the NW). Lamination identified over the interval shows a dominant dip azimuth trend toward North North-West direction. The interbedded shale units are highly laminated and show little evidence of bioturbation. Sand exhibits abundant cross bedding showing a dominant dip azimuth trends toward NNE and NE and more locally to the E. Sixteen truncations identified over the interval show variable azimuth trend with the major trend mainly to the North North-West.

  12. Detection of sedimentary structural elements using formation micro imager technique, a case study from South Mansoura-1 well, Nile Delta, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed G. Abd El-Wahed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A detailed structure and sedimentology interpretation was performed for the South Mansoura-1 well. The Formation Micro Imager (FMI is recorded and interpreted over the interval 9100–8009 ft. This interval belongs to Sidi Salem and Qawasim Formations. Based on azimuth trend of manually picked dips (bed boundaries, the interval can be divided into 4 structural dip zones (Zone 1 (9100–8800 ft, variable azimuth direction with the major trends mainly to SW&NE; Zone 2 (8800–8570 ft, bedding dip azimuth is mainly to the NW; Zone 3 (8570–8250 ft, bedding dip azimuth is mainly to the NE; and Zone 4 (8250–8009 ft, bedding dip azimuth is mainly to the NW. Lamination identified over the interval shows a dominant dip azimuth trend toward North North-West direction. The interbedded shale units are highly laminated and show little evidence of bioturbation. Sand exhibits abundant cross bedding showing a dominant dip azimuth trends toward NNE and NE and more locally to the E. Sixteen truncations identified over the interval show variable azimuth trend with the major trend mainly to the North North-West.

  13. Frequency of injury and the ecology of regeneration in marine benthic invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sara M

    2010-10-01

    Many marine invertebrates are able to regenerate lost tissue following injury, but regeneration can come at a cost to individuals in terms of reproduction, behavior and physiological condition, and can have effects that reach beyond the individual to impact populations, communities, and ecosystems. For example, removal and subsequent regeneration of clams' siphons, polychaetes' segments, and brittlestars' arms can represent significant energetic input to higher trophic levels. In marine soft-sediment habitats, injury changes infaunal bioturbation rates and thus secondarily influences sediment-mediated competition, adult-larval interactions, and recruitment success. The importance of injury and regeneration as factors affecting the ecology of marine invertebrate communities depends on the frequency of injury, as well as on individual capacity for, and speed of, regeneration. A key question to answer is: "How frequently are marine benthic invertebrates injured?" Here, I review the sources and the frequencies of injury in a variety of marine invertebrates from different benthic habitats, discuss challenges, and approaches for accurately determining injury rates in the field, consider evidence for species-specific, temporal and geographic variation in injury rates, and present examples of indirect effects of injury on marine invertebrates to illustrate how injury and regeneration can modify larger-scale ecological patterns and processes.

  14. The fate of terrestrial organic matter in two Scottish sea lochs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, P. S.; Reeves, A. D.; Harvey, S. M.; Overnell, J.; Miller, A. E. J.

    2008-02-01

    Sea lochs are zones of rapid organic matter (OM) turnover. Most of this OM is of allochthonous origin, being introduced into the lochs via freshwater input. In this study the behaviour of terrestrially derived OM was elucidated using a combination of parameters which indicate OM diagenesis in the near surface sediments from two Scottish sea lochs, Loch Creran and Loch Etive. Alkaline CuO oxidation was used to determine lignin phenols which serve as biomarkers for terrestrial OM in sediments. Stable carbon isotope, total carbon and nitrogen and total OM (including the labile and refractory fractions) compositions were also determined. Lignin materials in the lochs were generally highly degraded and undergo little degradation further seaward. The vanillic acid to vanillin ratio, (Ad/Al)v in the lochs ranged from 0.52 to 2.69. However, there was a fraction of relatively fresh, land-derived OM, still undergoing degradation adding to the carbon cycling in the lochs, as indicated by the Rp values (ratio of refractory to total OM) and OC/N ratios in the surface sediments. The hydrological and hydrodynamic regimes in Loch Creran result in several phenomena such as the transportation of terrestrial debris via hydrodynamic sorting processes and the promotion of surface sediment diagenesis by bioturbation. Frequent water renewal results in better water circulation and oxygenation which facilitate OM decomposition. In Loch Etive the less frequent renewal gives rise to a more constant OM diagenesis along the loch.

  15. Monsoon triggered formation of Quaternary alluvial megafans in the interior of Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechschmidt, Ingo; Matter, Albert; Preusser, Frank; Rieke-Zapp, Dirk

    2009-09-01

    A vast bajada consisting of coalescing low-gradient (veneer of weakly cemented Quaternary gravels. A combination of remote sensing, lithological analyses and luminescence dating is used to interpret the complex aggradation history of the Quaternary alluvial fans from the interior of Oman in the context of independent regional climate records. From satellite imagery and clast analysis four fans can be discerned in the study area. While two early periods of fan formation are tentatively correlated to the Miocene-Pliocene and the Early Pleistocene, luminescence dating allows the distinction of five phases of fan aggradation during the Middle-Late Pleistocene. These phases are correlated with pluvial periods from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11 through 3, when southern Arabia was affected by monsoonal precipitation. It is concluded that the aggradation of the alluvial fans was triggered by the interplay of increased sediment production during arid periods and high rainfall with enhanced erosion of hillslopes and transport rates during strong monsoon phases. However, the lack of fine-grained sediments, bioturbation and organic material implies that although the Quaternary fans are sourced by monsoonal rains they formed in a semi-arid environment. Thus, it appears that, in contrast to the Oman Mountains, the interior was not directly affected by monsoonal precipitation.

  16. The biomechanics of burrowing and boring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgan, Kelly M

    2015-01-15

    Burrowers and borers are ecosystem engineers that alter their physical environments through bioturbation, bioirrigation and bioerosion. The mechanisms of moving through solid substrata by burrowing or boring depend on the mechanical properties of the medium and the size and morphology of the organism. For burrowing animals, mud differs mechanically from sand; in mud, sediment grains are suspended in an organic matrix that fails by fracture. Macrofauna extend burrows through this elastic mud by fracture. Sand is granular and non-cohesive, enabling grains to more easily move relative to each other, and macrofaunal burrowers use fluidization or plastic rearrangement of grains. In both sand and mud, peristaltic movements apply normal forces and reduce shear. Excavation and localized grain compaction are mechanisms that plastically deform sediments and are effective in both mud and sand, with bulk excavation being used by larger organisms and localized compaction by smaller organisms. Mechanical boring of hard substrata is an extreme form of excavation in which no compaction of burrow walls occurs and grains are abraded with rigid, hard structures. Chemical boring involves secretion to dissolve or soften generally carbonate substrata. Despite substantial differences in the mechanics of the media, similar burrowing behaviors are effective in mud and sand.

  17. Characterization and origin of the `3-Dedos` marker bed (Santonian) of the Campos Basin; Caracterizacao e origem do marco 3-Dedos (Santoniano) da Bacia de Campos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caddah, Luiz F.G.; Hanashiro, Mauro [E and P BC, Macae, RJ (Brazil); Alves, Daisy B.; Mizusaki, Ana M.P. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1994-04-01

    The 3-Dedos Marker bed, which appears in the Santonian pelitic section of the Ubatuba Formation in the SE of the Campos Basin, is characterized in electrical well-logs by three peaks of low resistivity and very high porosity. Each peak corresponds to a 1 to 2 m thick bed of greenish gray, high hygroscopy, homogeneous and nonbioturbated clay stone. These beds are separated by 5 to 10 m of intensely bioturbated shales and siltstones representing the usual marine sedimentation. Contrasting with these polymineralic pelitic rocks, the clay stones are almost exclusively composed of homogeneous, highly expandable and disordered dioctahedral illite/smectite mixed-layers. The high free water content of these minerals is responsible for the low resistivity values that were determined. The anomalous porosity corresponds to microporosity created by the random distribution of the minute crystals. The mode of occurrence of the clay stones suggests their origin from the deposition of trachytic volcanic ashes that are deeply altered. For these reasons, based on compositional and genetic criteria as well, such clay stones can be classified as bentonite. The `3-Dedos` Marker bed was originated by successive brief events and represents an ideal horizon for chrono stratigraphic correlation. It was possible to trace this marker over an extensive area of the Campos Basin that covers, up to the present, the Marimba and Pirauna oil fields, the area of the RJS-116 wildcat well, and part of the Enchova, Pampo and Bonito oil fields. (author). 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Organic matter quality and supply to deep-water coral/mound systems of the NW European Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriakoulakis, K.; Freiwald, A.; Fisher, E.; Wolff, G. A.

    2007-02-01

    Comparison of five deep-water coral (DWC)/mound ecosystems along the European Continental Margin shows that suspended particulate organic matter (sPOM), a potential food source, is lipid rich and of high quality. However, there are differences between the sites. The Darwin and Pelagia Mounds (N. Rockall Trough and N. Porcupine Bank, respectively) have higher proportions of labile particulate lipids (including high proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids) in the benthic boundary layer than Logachev, Hovland and Belgica Mounds (Rockall Bank, S. Porcupine Bank and Porcupine Seabight, respectively). The high quality sPOM could be transported downslope from the euphotic zone. There is some evidence for inter-annual variability at some sites (e.g. Hovland and Logachev Mounds) as large differences in suspended lipid and particulate organic carbon concentrations were observed over the sampling period. Elevated total organic carbon contents of sediments at mound sites, relative to control sites in some cases (particularly Darwin Mounds), probably reflect local hydrodynamic control and the trapping of sPOM by the DWC. Fresh POM can be relatively rapidly transferred to significant depth (up to 8 cm) through bioturbation that is evident at all sites. There is no clear evidence of present day hydrocarbon seepage at any of the sites.

  19. A conceptual framework for shear flow-induced erosion of soft cohesive sediment beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterwerp, J. C.; van Kesteren, W. G. M.; van Prooijen, B.; Jacobs, W.

    2012-10-01

    This paper proposes a conceptual framework for erosion of cohesive sediment beds. We focus on cohesive beds, distinguishing between floc erosion, surface erosion, and mass erosion. By (our) definition, surface erosion is a drained soil mechanical process, whereas mass erosion occurs under undrained conditions. The eroding shear stress is modeled through a probability density function. This yields a continuous description of floc erosion and surface erosion as a function of mean bed shear stress. Furthermore, we assume a distribution for the bed strength. The mean values of the bed strength are derived from soil mechanical theory, assuming that the surface erosion rate is limited by the swelling rate from the undrained shear strength in the bed to its drained value at its surface. The rate of erosion then relates to the undrained shear strength of the soil, and its consolidation (swelling) coefficient. The critical shear stress for erosion is slightly larger than the true cohesion of the bed, i.e., the drained strength, and follows a power law relation with the plasticity index. The conceptual framework proposed herein has been validated against a limited number of experimental data, and has a series of advantages above other methods of direct measuring erodibility, as it is inexpensive and can be used to attain space-covering information on the sediment bed. Moreover, the use of bulk soil mechanical parameters accounts implicitly for the effects of organic material, though the role of, e.g., macrophytobenthos mats and/or bioturbation is difficult to capture a priori.

  20. Ecosystem engineering effects on species diversity across ecosystems: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Gustavo Q; Gonçalves-Souza, Thiago; Vieira, Camila; Koricheva, Julia

    2015-08-01

    Ecosystem engineering is increasingly recognized as a relevant ecological driver of diversity and community composition. Although engineering impacts on the biota can vary from negative to positive, and from trivial to enormous, patterns and causes of variation in the magnitude of engineering effects across ecosystems and engineer types remain largely unknown. To elucidate the above patterns, we conducted a meta-analysis of 122 studies which explored effects of animal ecosystem engineers on species richness of other organisms in the community. The analysis revealed that the overall effect of ecosystem engineers on diversity is positive and corresponds to a 25% increase in species richness, indicating that ecosystem engineering is a facilitative process globally. Engineering effects were stronger in the tropics than at higher latitudes, likely because new or modified habitats provided by engineers in the tropics may help minimize competition and predation pressures on resident species. Within aquatic environments, engineering impacts were stronger in marine ecosystems (rocky shores) than in streams. In terrestrial ecosystems, engineers displayed stronger positive effects in arid environments (e.g. deserts). Ecosystem engineers that create new habitats or microhabitats had stronger effects than those that modify habitats or cause bioturbation. Invertebrate engineers and those with lower engineering persistence (1 year. Invertebrate species richness was particularly responsive to engineering impacts. This study is the first attempt to build an integrative framework of engineering effects on species diversity; it highlights the importance of considering latitude, habitat, engineering functional group, taxon and persistence of their effects in future theoretical and empirical studies.

  1. What They Work at is not What They eat: Incongruence of Strong Interactions and Assimilation in Shrimps and Baetid Mayflies in a Brazilian Coastal Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, T.; de Souza, M. L.; Brito, E. F.; Krsulovic, F. M.; Silveira, R. M.; Ometto, J. B.

    2005-05-01

    Exclusion experiments showed that atyid shrimps (Potimirim glabra) and baetid mayflies (Cloeodes sp., Americabaetis sp.) removed benthic material from hard substrate at different sites in the forested stream Rio Andorinha, Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro. Their effects were greater on organic material not associated with algae than on algae. Macrobrachium olfersi shrimp had a negative effect on the mayflies, causing a trophic cascade with the benthic material. Gut analysis of the atyid and baetids showed that they ingested large amounts of detritus, as expected. Macrobrachium contained mainly detritus, some algae and some insect parts. Stable isotope analysis of the gut contents confirmed these compositions, but the tissue of the shrimps and mayflies was of carbon derived from algae (as testified by enriched δ 13C corresponding to microalgae from the periphyton). Baetids appeared to be algal herbivores and both Potimirim and Macrobrachium appeared (from their δ 15N signatures) to be secondary consumers. We note that what the animals remove (both by bioturbation and ingestion) and what they assimilate are very different. We speculate that the baetids and atyid are "gardeners" and remove material to promote the growth of algal turf.

  2. Anatomy of a shoreface sand ridge revisited using foraminifera: False Cape Shoals, Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M.M.; McBride, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Certain details regarding the origin and evolution of shelf sand ridges remain elusive. Knowledge of their internal stratigraphy and microfossil distribution is necessary to define the origin and to determine the processes that modify sand ridges. Fourteen vibracores from False Cape Shoal A, a well-developed shoreface-attached sand ridge on the Virginia/North Carolina inner continental shelf, were examined to document the internal stratigraphy and benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as to reconstruct the depositional environments recorded in down-core sediments. Seven sedimentary and foraminiferal facies correspond to the following stratigraphic units: fossiliferous silt, barren sand, clay to sandy clay, laminated and bioturbated sand, poorly sorted massive sand, fine clean sand, and poorly sorted clay to gravel. The units represent a Pleistocene estuary and shoreface, a Holocene estuary, ebb tidal delta, modern shelf, modern shoreface, and swale fill, respectively. The succession of depositional environments reflects a Pleistocene sea-level highstand and subsequent regression followed by the Holocene transgression in which barrier island/spit systems formed along the Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf ???5.2 ka and migrated landward and an ebb tidal delta that was deposited, reworked, and covered by shelf sand.

  3. Anatomy of a shoreface sand ridge revisted using foraminifera: False Cape Shoals, Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Marci M.; McBride, Randolph A.

    2008-01-01

    Certain details regarding the origin and evolution of shelf sand ridges remain elusive. Knowledge of their internal stratigraphy and microfossil distribution is necessary to define the origin and to determine the processes that modify sand ridges. Fourteen vibracores from False Cape Shoal A, a well-developed shoreface-attached sand ridge on the Virginia/North Carolina inner continental shelf, were examined to document the internal stratigraphy and benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as to reconstruct the depositional environments recorded in down-core sediments. Seven sedimentary and foraminiferal facies correspond to the following stratigraphic units: fossiliferous silt, barren sand, clay to sandy clay, laminated and bioturbated sand, poorly sorted massive sand, fine clean sand, and poorly sorted clay to gravel. The units represent a Pleistocene estuary and shoreface, a Holocene estuary, ebb tidal delta, modern shelf, modern shoreface, and swale fill, respectively. The succession of depositional environments reflects a Pleistocene sea-level highstand and subsequent regression followed by the Holocene transgression in which barrier island/spit systems formed along the Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf not, vert, ~5.2 ka and migrated landward and an ebb tidal delta that was deposited, reworked, and covered by shelf sand.

  4. Archaeological horizons and fluvial processes at the Lower Paleolithic open-air site of Revadim (Israel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Ofer; Malinsky-Buller, Ariel; Shahack-Gross, Ruth; Ackermann, Oren; Ayalon, Avner; Bar-Matthews, Miryam; Goldsmith, Yonaton; Inbar, Moshe; Rabinovich, Rivka; Hovers, Erella

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we present new data pertaining to the paleo-landscape characteristics at the Acheulian site of Revadim, on the southern coastal plain of Israel. Sedimentological, isotopic, granulometric and micromorphological studies showed that the archaeological remains accumulated in an active fluvial environment where channel action, overbank flooding and episodic inundation occurred. Measurements of total organic matter and its carbon isotopic composition indicate that the hominin activity at the site started at a period of relatively drier conditions, which coincided with erosion of the preceding soil sequence. This process led to the formation of a gently-undulating topography, as reconstructed by a GIS model. Later deposition documents relatively wetter conditions, as indicated by carbon isotopic composition. Formation processes identified at the site include fluvial processes, inundation episodes that resulted in anaerobic conditions and formation of oxide nodules, as well as small-scale bioturbation and later infiltration of carbonate-rich solutions that resulted in the formation of calcite nodules and crusts. The combination of micro-habitats created favorable conditions that repeatedly drew hominins to the area, as seen by a series of super-imposed archaeological horizons. This study shows that site-specific paleo-landscape reconstructions should play an important role in understanding regional variation among hominin occupations and in extrapolating long-term behavioral patterns during the Middle Pleistocene.

  5. Impacts of leaves, roots, and earthworms on soil organic matter composition and distribution in sycamore maple stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, N.; Mueller, K. E.; Mueller, C. W.; Oleksyn, J.; Hale, C.; Freeman, K. H.; Eissenstat, D.

    2009-12-01

    The relative contributions of leaf and root material to soil organic matter (SOM) are poorly understood despite the importance of constraining SOM sources to conceptual and numeric models of SOM dynamics. Selective ingestion and bioturbation of litter and soil by earthworms can alter the fate and spatial distribution of OM in soils, including stabilization pathways of leaf and root litter. However, studies on the contributions of leaves, roots, and earthworms to SOM dynamics are rare. In 3 stands of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) with minimal O horizon development and high earthworm activity, we sampled surface litter (> 2 mm) from the Oi horizon, fine roots (cutin was low relative to plant litter, confirming the often-observed selective preservation of aliphatic over aromatic biomolecules. The ratio of lignin to cutin/suberin acids in earthworm casts was also low; based on the minimal extent of decomposition in casts evident by lignin acid to aldehyde ratios, we attribute this to selective ingestion by L. terrestris of leaf litter rich in aliphatic biomolecules at the expense of woody debris and petioles rich in lignin, rather than selective preservation.

  6. Biogeochemistry of pyrite and iron sulfide oxidation in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schippers, A.; Jørgensen, BB

    2002-01-01

    Pyrite (FeS2) and iron monosulfide (FeS) play a central role in the sulfur and iron cycles of marine sediments, They may be buried in the sediment or oxidized by O-2 after transport by bioturbation to the sediment surface. FeS2 and FeS may also be oxidized within the anoxic sediment in which NO3......-, Fe(III) oxides, or MnO2 are available as potential electron acceptors. In chemical experiments, FeS2 and FeS were oxidized by MnO2 but not with NO3- or amorphous Fe(III) oxide (Schippers and Jørgensen, 2001). Here we also show that in experiments with anoxic sediment slurries, a dissolution of tracer......-marked (FeS2)-Fe-55 occurred with MnO2 but not with NO3- or amorphous Fe(III) oxide as electron acceptor. To study a thermodynamically possible anaerobic microbial FeS, and FeS oxidation with NO3- or amorphous Fe(III) oxide as electron acceptor, more than 300 assays were inoculated with material from several...

  7. Function of Hexagenia (Mayfly) Burrows: Fluid Model Suggests Bacterial Gardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynham, B.; Furbish, D.; Miller, M.; White, D.

    2006-12-01

    Lake and stream bottoms experience an array of physical, chemical, and biological processes that create spatial variations both in the fluid column and in the sediment that provide a physical template for distinct niches. Burrowing insects are major ecological engineers of communities where they structure large areas of the benthic habitat through bioturbation and other activities including respiration, feeding, and defecation. The burrowing mayfly Hexagenia, when present in high densities, has a large impact on food-web dynamics and provides essential ecosystem services within the fluid column and benthic substrate, including sediment mixing, nutrient cycling, and ultimately, energy flow through the freshwater food web. It has long been recognized that particular benthic species are important in linking detrital energy resources to higher trophic levels and for determining how organic matter is processed in freshwater ecosystems; however, the unique contributions made by individual benthic species is largely absent from the literature. Here we present a model that describes the structure and function of a Hexagenia burrow. If testing supports this hypothesis, the model suggests that when high food concentration is available to Hexagenia, there exists a favorable tube length for harvesting bacteria that grow on the burrow walls. The burrow microhabitat created by Hexagenia serves as a case-study in understanding the influence of benthic burrowers on both energy flow through freshwater food webs and nutrient cycling.

  8. Stratigraphy and palaeoceanography of upper Masstrichtian chalks, southern Danish Central Graben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ineson, J.R.; Buchardt, B.; Lassen, Susanne; Rasmussen, Jan A.; Schioeler, P.; Schovsbo, N.H.; Sheldon, E.; Surlyk, F. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2006-07-01

    Upper Maastrichtian chalks form important hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Danish sector of the North Sea and have been intensively studied, yet their lithological uniformity can frustrate attempts to develop a high-resolution stratigraphic subdivision and a genetic understanding of the factors controlling production and sedimentation of the pelagic carbonate ooze. Recent research into these topics, by means of a multidisciplinary study involving quantitative/semiquantitative palynology, micropalaeontology (nannofossils, foraminifers) and isotope geochemistry, integrated with detailed sedimentology. Two key wells were selected, the M-1OX well from the Dan Field and the E-5X well from the Tyra SE Field, based on the extensive core coverage in these wells and on their position in the southern part of the Danish Central Graben where evidence of large-scale resedimentation (and consequent stratigraphic complexity) is uncommon within the Maastrichtian section. This study concentrated on a number of palaeoceanographic signals that can be derived from the sedimentary record. Planktonic organisms, both phytoplankton (e.g. coccolithophores, some dinoflagellates) and zooplankton (e.g. foraminifers) provide a record of conditions in the upper watermasses, largely within the photic zone, while bottom conditions are indicated by epifaunal/infaunal organisms (e.g. benthic foraminifers) and bioturbation, and by the sedimentological evidence of depositional processes at the sea floor. (LN)

  9. Consequences of biodiversity loss diverge from expectation due to post-extinction compensatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Matthias S.; Garcia, Clement; Bolam, Stefan G.; Parker, Ruth; Godbold, Jasmin A.; Solan, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Consensus has been reached that global biodiversity loss impairs ecosystem functioning and the sustainability of services beneficial to humanity. However, the ecosystem consequences of extinction in natural communities are moderated by compensatory species dynamics, yet these processes are rarely accounted for in impact assessments and seldom considered in conservation programmes. Here, we use marine invertebrate communities to parameterise numerical models of sediment bioturbation – a key mediator of biogeochemical cycling – to determine whether post-extinction compensatory mechanisms alter biodiversity-ecosystem function relations following non-random extinctions. We find that compensatory dynamics lead to trajectories of sediment mixing that diverge from those without compensation, and that the form, magnitude and variance of each probabilistic distribution is highly influenced by the type of compensation and the functional composition of surviving species. Our findings indicate that the generalized biodiversity-function relation curve, as derived from multiple empirical investigations of random species loss, is unlikely to yield representative predictions for ecosystem properties in natural systems because the influence of post-extinction community dynamics are under-represented. Recognition of this problem is fundamental to management and conservation efforts, and will be necessary to ensure future plans and adaptation strategies minimize the adverse impacts of the biodiversity crisis. PMID:28255165

  10. Paleoclimatical significance of the paleosol levels occurring in the Miocene-Pleistocene stratigraphy of the Manonga-Wembere Valley inCentral Tanzania

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PeterD.Kafumu

    2004-01-01

    Micromorphological characteristics of four paleosol levels of the Manonga - Wembere deposits in Central Tanzania indicate periods of wetter climate in the Pliocene than at present. The stratigraphy of the studied section shows a series of lacustrine calcareous clay sediments alternating with gravel, sand and silt. The sediments are believed to have been deposited in the Manonga - Wembere paleolake environment. Paleosols intercalate these sediments and were formed when stable landscapes developed on former lake beds during regression periods. Micromorphological features of the paleosols indicate strong clay illuviation of red to yellow typic clay coating and some Fe-Mn hydoxide hypocoatings in voids and channels. The groundmass consists of either an accumulation of bioturbated yellow to red clay coating fragments or an argillic red to yellow groundmass of clay mass. Such an illuviation and its associated groundmass is comparable to intense clay illuviation fronts that are found in present-day calcareous sediments of warm and wet climates. The paleosol levels therefore represent wetter climatic conditions than today in the area during the Lower Pliocene.

  11. Freshwater seepages and ephemeral macroalgae proliferation in an intertidal bay: I Effect on benthic community structure and food web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouisse, Vincent; Riera, Pascal; Migné, Aline; Leroux, Cédric; Davoult, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater seepages and ephemeral Enteromorpha spp. proliferation create heterogeneity at small spatial scale in intertidal sediment. Macrobenthic community diversity was compared between these two disturbances and their respective control points throughout the year 2007 at the Roscoff Aber Bay (Western English Channel, France). In March and September 2007, trophic community pathways of characteristic species were additionally studied using stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen. The low salinity recorded at the freshwater seepage induced the exclusion of the main bioturbator and the presence of omnivores which modified the community composition by biotic pressure. Moreover, food web analyses clearly highlighted a separation at small spatial scale between the two trophic pathways of the impacted area and its control. On the contrary, little differences were observed owning to the ephemeral Enteromorpha spp. proliferation. This suggested a progressive and diffusive disturbance which was applied from the algal mat to the nearby area. However, seasonal changes were observed. First, the algal expansion phase increased the macrofauna diversity and foraminifers' abundance (meiofauna) and then acted as a physical barrier decreasing sediment and water column exchanges and decreasing the fauna diversity. This study highlights the need to take into account small spatial heterogeneity to avoid misinterpretations in intertidal ecology studies.

  12. Taphonomy of a thick Terebratula bioherm from the Pliocene of southeastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Diego A.

    2015-04-01

    Brachiopods were extremely abundant during the Paleozoic era but underwent a dramatic loss of biodiversity at the Permo-Triassic boundary. The comparison of brachiopod and bivalve diversity through geological time shows that the latter were the most successful counterpart at best recovering from mass extinction events. Nonetheless, there are cases where Post-Paleozoic brachiopods stand out as the dominant marine benthos in particular environments, forming paucispecific brachiopod-dominated bioherms. This note describes an example of shallow-water brachiopod bioherm dominated by the terebratulid Terebratula calabra. The shell bed is found in mixed siliciclastic-temperate carbonate deposits of late Early Pliocene age nearby Águilas (southeastern Spain). This unique brachiopod concentration may be helpful to understand the particular success of large-sized brachiopods like Terebratula in Cenozoic environments typically dominated by bivalves. The bioherm attains 1.5 meters in thickness and crops out along a band up to 140 meters wide. The lithology consists of bioturbated fine-grained sands containing poorly sorted bioclasts, mostly fragments of Terebratula. This shell bed also records a diverse fauna, including five brachiopod genera, pectinids (4 genera), oysters (3 genera), in addition to rare gastropods, echinoids, bryozoans, etc. The density and sorting of bioclasts is laterally variable, and the biofabrics range from loosely dispersed to densely-packed, including examples of concave-up vertical stacking and nesting of shells. Most of the fragments of Terebratula preserve the posterior part of the shell only. These fragments generally display corrasion (rounded fractured margins, rounded to completely missing symphytium), bioerosion (prevailing the ichnogenera Entobia, Gnathichnus and Podichnus) and encrustation (mainly by bryozoans, Ancistrocrania, and Pododesmus). The good preservation of Pododesmus contrasts with that of most fragments of Terebratula, although

  13. Review on the Wrinkle Structure%皱饰构造研究进展综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭荣涛; 郭丽娜; 霍荣

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the research course analysis and the latest investigation on wrinkle structure, four dominating origin models are outlined. The core issue is what kind of role played by microbial mat and physical process, and the influence of mat-builder, light penetration, hydrodynamic energy conditions, substrate, and bioturbation in the formation of wrinkle structure. The comprehensive research on wrinkle structure and modern microbial mat show that the distribution of wrinkle structure and microbial mat is consistent to a great extent. So the paleoenvironment of wrinkle structure is outlined through the study on modern microbial mat environment. Wrinkle structure generally develops in intertidal flat and offshore transition, and does not associated with massive bioturbation in Phanerozoic. Wrinkle structure is most common microbial induced sedimentary structure preserved within the siliciclastic rock record. Thus understanding the genetic origin and paleoenvironment distribution of wrinkle structure promote the development of the microbial mat sedimentology in clastic rocks.%在综述皱饰构造成因研究历程和国内外最新研究成果的基础上,总结评述了 4种有代表性的皱饰构造形成模式,其核心问题是在皱饰构造的形成过程中微生物席和物理作用的参与方式,以及受造席者、透光性、水动力条件、基底类型和生物扰动五大因素的影响程度.在对皱饰构造和现代微生物席对比研究的基础上,发现皱饰构造与微生物席的分布在很大程度上具有一致性,所以通过对现代微生物席的生长发育环境进行综合研究,推测了有利于皱饰构造发育的古环境.皱饰构造一般发育于潮间坪和滨外过渡带,并且在显生宙一般与生物扰动作用具有不相容性.皱饰构造是发育最普遍、受关注最广泛的保存在硅质碎屑岩中的微生物诱导形成的原生沉积构造,所以理清皱饰构造的成因模式及古地理

  14. Cyanobacteria/Foraminifera Association from Anoxic/Dysoxic Beds of the Agua Nueva Formation (Upper Cretaceous - Cenomanian/Turonian) at Xilitla, San Luis Potosi, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Piñón, A.; Maurrasse, F. J.; Rojas-León, A.; Duque-Botero, F.

    2008-05-01

    The Agua Nueva Formation in the vicinity of Xilitla, State of San Luis Potosí, Central Mexico, consists of interbedded brown shale (Grayish orange 10YR 7/4 to Moderate yellowish brown 10YR 5/4) and dark-gray fossiliferous limestone (Bluish gray 5B 6/1 to Dark bluish gray 5B 4/1), varying between 10 and 20 cm in thickness. The sequence also includes 2 to 4 cm- thick intermittent bentonite layers (Moderate greenish yellow 10Y 7/4, to dark greenish yellow 10Y 6/6 and Light olive 10Y 5/4). At the field scale, shaly intervals show no apparent internal structures, whereas most limestone beds show primary lamination at the millimeter scale (1-2 mm), and intermittent layers of black chert of about 5 cm thick. Pyrite is present as disseminated crystals and as 2 cm-thick layers. Bioturbation or macrobenthic organisms other than inoceramids do not occur in the Agua Nueva Formation at Xilitla. Unusual macrofossils are present only in limestone strata, and consist of well- preserved diverse genera of fishes such as sharks, Ptychodus sp. and teleosteans, Rhynchodercetis sp., Tselfatia sp., Goulmimichthys sp., and scales of Ichtyodectiformes, as well as ammonites and inoceramids (Blanco et al., 2006). The presence of Inoceramus (Mytyloides) labiatus (Maldonado-Koederll, 1956) indicates an Early Turonian age for the sequence. Total carbonate content (CaCO3 = TIC) varies between 62 and 94% in the Limestone beds, which yield Total Organic Carbon (TOC) from 0.4% to 2.5%; the shale intervals contain TIC values consistently lower than 33% and TOC lower than 0.8% Microscopically the limestone beds vary from mudstone to packstone composed essentially of coccoid cyanobacteria similar to coeval deposits in northeastern Mexico, Coahuila State, at Parras de La Fuente (Duque- Botero 2006). Similarly, the microspheroids are spherical to sub-spherical, and occur as isolated elements or aggregates forming series of chains of parallel-packed light lamina 1-2 mm thick. Filamentous cyanobacteria

  15. The recent marine sedimentary record of Baranof Island, Southeast Alaska - implications for paleoclimate reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, J. A.; Finney, B. P.; Jaeger, J. M.; Stoner, J. S.; Norris, R. D.; Hangsterfer, A.

    2011-12-01

    Modern and paleoclimate studies suggest a correlation between Pacific decadal climate variability and marine ecosystem productivity, but are generally limited by either short periods of observation or low temporal resolution. Long, annually resolved paleoclimate time-series data are thus critical for assessing this correlation and understanding the full range of Pacific climate variability and its impacts. Baranof Island is located in the Alexander Archipelago of Southeast Alaska, and contains many temperate ice-free fjords with shallow sills that enhance organic matter preservation by restricting oxygenation of bottom waters. Multicore samples EW0408-32MC and 43MC were recovered from two fjords on Baranof Island, and analyzed to determine how recent sedimentation patterns relate to the instrument record as a first step towards reconstructing high-latitude Pacific climate at annual timescales. A combination of radiometric 137Cs and excess 210Pb geochronometry, 3D computerized tomography (CT), and high-resolution Avaatech scanning XRF geochemical analyses were used to investigate this relationship. Scanning XRF data were collected every 2 mm on core 32MC, while 43MC was measured at 0.2 mm intervals. Core 32MC is composed of a diffusely laminated to bioturbated clay with a maximum apparent steady-state sedimentation rate of ~5±1 mm/yr, while core 43MC is a strongly laminated diatom ooze with a maximum apparent sedimentation rate of ~6±0.5 mm/yr. Using conservative estimates of accumulation to assess basal ages of the cores yields approximately ~AD 1930 for 32MC, and ~AD 1900 for 43MC. Scanning XRF centered natural log-ratio transformed [clr] element intensities indicate 32MC is controlled by a balance between detrital (Al, Si, K, Ti, Fe, and Ca) and biogenic components (S and Br), and isolated peaks in clr Ca data correspond with CT-visible shell debris. Core 43MC is more complex, with both XRF and CT scans indicating four distinct lithologies: (i) millimeter

  16. Integrating models to simulate emergent behaviour: effects of organic matter on soil hydraulics in the ICZ-1D soil-vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valstar, Johan; Rowe, Ed; Konstantina, Moirogiorgou; Giannakis, Giorgos; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    Soil develops as a result of interacting processes, many of which have been described in more or less detailed models. A key challenge in developing predictive models of soil function is to integrate processes that operate across a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Many soil functions could be classified as "emergent", since they result from the interaction of subsystems. For example, soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics are commonly considered in relation to carbon storage, but can have profound effects on soil hydraulic properties that are conventionally considered to be static. Carbon fixed by plants enters the soil as litterfall, root turnover or via mycorrhizae. Plants need water and nutrients to grow, and an expanding root system provides access to a larger volume of soil for uptake of water and nutrients. Roots also provide organic exudates, such as oxalate, which increase nutrient availability. Carbon inputs are transformed at various rates into soil biota, CO2, and more persistent forms of organic matter. The SOM is partly taken up into soil aggregates of variable sizes, which slows down degradation. Water availability is an important factor as both plant growth and SOM degradation can be limited by shortage of water. Water flow is the main driver for transport of nutrients and other solutes. The flow of water in turn is influenced by the presence of SOM as this influences soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity. Towards the top of the unsaturated zone, bioturbation by the soil fauna transports both solid material and solutes. Weathering rates of minerals determine the availability of many nutrients and are in turn dependent on parameters such as pH, water content, CO2 pressure and oxalate concentration. Chemical reactions between solutes, dissolution and precipitation, and exchange on adsorption sites further influence solute concentrations. Within the FP7 SoilTrEC project, we developed a model that incorporates all of these processes, to

  17. Occurrence of benthic microbial nitrogen fixation coupled to sulfate reduction in the seasonally hypoxic Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. J. Bertics

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide occurrence of marine hypoxic regions, benthic nitrogen (N cycling within these areas is poorly understood and it is generally assumed that these areas represent zones of intense fixed N loss from the marine system. Sulfate reduction can be an important process for organic matter degradation in sediments beneath hypoxic waters and many sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB have the genetic potential to fix molecular N (N2. Therefore, SRB may supply fixed N to these systems, countering some of the N lost via microbial processes such as denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation. The objective of this study was to evaluate if N2-fixation, possibly by SRB, plays a role in N cycling within the seasonally hypoxic sediments from Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea. Monthly samplings were performed over the course of one year to measure N2-fixation and sulfate reduction rates, to determine the seasonal variations in bioturbation (bioirrigation activity and important benthic geochemical profiles, such as sulfur and N compounds, and to monitor changes in water column temperature and oxygen concentrations. Additionally, at several time points, rates of benthic denitrification were also measured and the active N-fixing community was examined via molecular tools. Integrated rates of N2-fixation and sulfate reduction showed a similar seasonality pattern, with highest rates occurring in August (approx. 22 and 880 nmol cm−3 d−1 of N and SO42−, respectively and October (approx. 22 and 1300 nmol cm−3 d−1 of N and SO42−, respectively, and lowest rates occurring in February (approx. 8 and 32 nmol cm−3 d−1 of N and SO42−, respectively. These rate changes were positively correlated with bottom water temperatures and previous reported plankton bloom activities

  18. Testing hillslope transport models in the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, N.; Kirby, E.

    2012-12-01

    Since the recognition that hillslope gradients adjust to balance downslope fluxes with production of regolith, workers have sought to understand the quantitative relationship between mass fluxes and hillslope topography. For much of the last century, it has been hypothesized that the downslope flux of regolith is linearly proportional to the local hillslope gradient, while the rate of surface lowering is linearly proportional to hillslope curvature. The development of new isotopic methods and the increasing availability of high resolution topographic data sets allows for testing of these simple transport models in a variety of landscapes. With the application of these tools, workers have learned that the simple linear transport rules do not always adequately describe the behavior of hillslopes. Our study presents a preliminary test of simple geomorphic models, using a combination of meteoric 10Be derived regolith erosion and flux rates and high resolution topographic data, collected using airborne laser swath mapping. Our field area, the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHO), located only 75 km due south of the Laurentide ice margin in central Pennsylvania, serves as a compelling staging ground for investigating process control on erosion, as local mechanisms for sediment transport have transitioned from freeze-thaw processes to bioturbation. Local hillslope gradients and ridgetop curvature values were extracted from a 1 m resolution digital elevation model for use in flux calculations and model testing. Meteoric 10Be concentrations in regolith along two hillslopes in SSHO were used to measure downslope flux rates, and revealed a systematic increase in flux rates from ~ 5 cm2/y near the ridge tops to ~ 30 cm2/y near the toe slopes. Comparing our measured flux rates with simple geomorphic transport rules suggests a surprising result - at SSHO, fluxes of regolith are not linearly correlated with topographic gradient. However, if we incorporate the

  19. Lower Aptian Sequence at Madoz (SE Spain) in Relation to Cretaceous Anoxic Event-1a (OAE- 1a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaona-Narvaez, T.; Maurrasse, F. J.; Lamolda, M. A.

    2008-05-01

    levels of fossiliferous marls (bioclasts 50%), framboidal pyrite (1-2.5%), and organic matter (5-7 %). Benthic foraminifers and bioturbation are totally absent within this interval, but there are occasional algal fragments, and very rare ostracods. In contrast to the adjacent levels, the absence of benthic foraminifers lack of bioturbation, and increased OM suggest that the black shale level clearly implies development of anoxic to dysoxic conditions within that interval. Based on the presence of D. desahyesi in subunit 1 its relationship to OAE- 1a remains ambiguous, and its occurrence may be related to a possible regional event due to the complexity of the paleogeography of that region during its tectonic development in the Early Cretaceous. Duvernois, Ch., Floquet, M., Humbel, B. 1972. La Sierra d'Aralar (Pyrénées basques Espagnoles): stratigraphie, structure. Thèse de Doctorat de Troisième cycle, Université de Dijon, 240 pp. Cherchi, A., Schroeder, R. 1998. Aptian and Albian large foraminifera at Madoz. 24° Coloquio Europeo de Micropaleontología. Libro Guía. Lamolda, M.A. Ed. 71-73p.

  20. Sensitivity of mineral dissolution rates to physical weathering : A modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opolot, Emmanuel; Finke, Peter

    2015-04-01

    There is continued interest on accurate estimation of natural weathering rates owing to their importance in soil formation, nutrient cycling, estimation of acidification in soils, rivers and lakes, and in understanding the role of silicate weathering in carbon sequestration. At the same time a challenge does exist to reconcile discrepancies between laboratory-determined weathering rates and natural weathering rates. Studies have consistently reported laboratory rates to be in orders of magnitude faster than the natural weathering rates (White, 2009). These discrepancies have mainly been attributed to (i) changes in fluid composition (ii) changes in primary mineral surfaces (reactive sites) and (iii) the formation of secondary phases; that could slow natural weathering rates. It is indeed difficult to measure the interactive effect of the intrinsic factors (e.g. mineral composition, surface area) and extrinsic factors (e.g. solution composition, climate, bioturbation) occurring at the natural setting, in the laboratory experiments. A modeling approach could be useful in this case. A number of geochemical models (e.g. PHREEQC, EQ3/EQ6) already exist and are capable of estimating mineral dissolution / precipitation rates as a function of time and mineral mass. However most of these approaches assume a constant surface area in a given volume of water (White, 2009). This assumption may become invalid especially at long time scales. One of the widely used weathering models is the PROFILE model (Sverdrup and Warfvinge, 1993). The PROFILE model takes into account the mineral composition, solution composition and surface area in determining dissolution / precipitation rates. However there is less coupling with other processes (e.g. physical weathering, clay migration, bioturbation) which could directly or indirectly influence dissolution / precipitation rates. We propose in this study a coupling between chemical weathering mechanism (defined as a function of reactive area

  1. The truth is out there: measured, calculated and modelled benthic fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomova, Svetlana; Protsenko, Elizaveta

    2016-04-01

    In a modern Earth science there is a great importance of understanding the processes, forming the benthic fluxes as one of element sources or sinks to or from the water body, which affects the elements balance in the water system. There are several ways to assess benthic fluxes and here we try to compare the results obtained by chamber experiments, calculated from porewater distributions and simulated with model. Benthic fluxes of dissolved elements (oxygen, nitrogen species, phosphate, silicate, alkalinity, iron and manganese species) were studied in the Baltic and Black Seas from 2000 to 2005. Fluxes were measured in situ using chamber incubations (Jch) and at the same time sediment cores were collected to assess the porewater distribution at different depths to calculate diffusive fluxes (Jpw). Model study was carried out with benthic-pelagic biogeochemical model BROM (O-N-P-Si-C-S-Mn-Fe redox model). It was applied to simulate biogeochemical structure of the water column and upper sediment and to assess the vertical fluxes (Jmd). By the behaviour at the water-sediment interface all studied elements can be divided into three groups: (1) elements which benthic fluxes are determined by the concentrations gradient only (Si, Mn), (2) elements which fluxes depend on redox conditions in the bottom water (Fe, PO4, NH4), and (3) elements which fluxes are strongly connected with organic matter fate (O2, Alk, NH4). For the first group it was found that measured fluxes are always higher than calculated diffusive fluxes (1.5bioturbation, bioirrigation and advection should be taken into account. For the second group measured fluxes can be both much lower (practically absent) and much higher than calculated diffusive fluxes (0.01

  2. Carbon and oxygen isotopic variation in Upper Maastrichtian chalk, Danish Central Graben. M-10X (Dan Field), E-5X (Tyra SE Field)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schovsbo, N.H.; Buchardt, B.

    2004-07-01

    The chemostratigraphic potential of the carbon isotopic variation in Upper Maastrichtian chalk has been evaluated based on 143 bulk chalk samples from the M-10X and E-5X wells. The wells are situated 30 km apart and are located in the Dan and Tyra SE oil and gas fields, respectively. Samples were taken each metre to record the stratigraphic variation. In addition, an interval in the M-10X well was sampled on a decimetre scale to resolve the link between {delta}{sup 13}C- and {delta}{sup 18}0-isotopic variation and lithology. Across three laminated to bioturbated chalk cycles, the m-scale variation in {delta}{sup 13}C is 0.1 %o. In the middle cycle, more negative {delta}{sup 13}C values were measured in the laminated chalk compared to bioturbated chalk. These more negative {delta}{sup 13}C values are interpreted to reflect early diagenetic cement characterised by light {delta}{sup 13}C values that formed as a response to a semiclosed pore-water environment. No consistent trend was observed in the other cycles. The laminated interval is here weakly developed and possibly reflects a depositional environment characterised by a more open pore-water system that did not allow a diagenetic component to form. The m-scale variation in {delta}{sup 18}0 values amounts to 0.5 %o and shows no apparent relationship to lithology. A chemostratigraphic correlation between the wells is presented. The correlation is consistent with the established biostratigraphy based on nannofossils, pelagic foraminifers and dinoflagellates. The chemostratigraphy was established based on the m-scale variation in {delta}{sup 13}C values and consists of seven units; the chemostratigraphy thus allows a high degree of stratigraphical resolution in the uppermost Maastrichtian interval. Moreover, the combined chemo- and biostratigraphic framework confirms the stratigraphic significance of the logbased porosity markers that form the basis of the cyclostratigraphic correlation system proposed. The recorded

  3. The filter feeder Dreissena polymorpha affects nutrient, silicon, and metal(loid) mobilization from freshwater sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Jörg; Planer-Friedrich, Britta

    2017-05-01

    Organic sediments in aquatic ecosystems are well known sinks for nutrients, silicon, and metal(loid)s. Organic matter-consuming organisms like invertebrate shredders, grazers, and bioturbators significantly affect element fixation or remobilization by changing redox conditions or binding properties of organic sediments. Little is known about the effect of filter feeders, like the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha, an invasive organism in North American and European freshwater ecosystems. A laboratory batch experiment exposing D. polymorpha (∼1200 organisms per m(2)) to organic sediment from a site contaminated with arsenic, copper, lead, and uranium revealed a significant uptake and accumulation of arsenic, copper, iron, and especially uranium both into the soft body tissues and the seashell. This is in line with previous observations of metal(loid) accumulation from biomonitoring studies. Regarding its environmental impact, D. polymorpha significantly contributed to mobilization of silicon, iron, phosphorus, arsenic, and copper and to immobilization of uranium (p < 0.001), probably driven by redox conditions, microbial activity within the gut system, or active control of element homeostasis. No net mobilization or immobilization was observed for zinc and lead, because of their low mobility at the prevailing pH of 7.5-8.5. The present results suggest that D. polymorpha can both ameliorate (nutrient mobilization, immobilization of toxicants mobile under oxic conditions) or aggravate negative effects (mobilization of toxicants mobile under reducing conditions) in ecosystems. Relating the results of the present study to observed population densities in natural freshwater ecosystems suggests a significant influence of D. polymorpha on element cycling and needs to be considered in future studies.

  4. Structured heterogeneity in a marine terrace chronosequence: Upland mottling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Marjorie S.; Stonestrom, David A.; Lawrence, Corey R.; Bullen, Thomas D.; Fitzpatrick, John; Kyker-Snowman, Emily; Manning, Jane; Mnich, Meagan

    2016-01-01

    Soil mottles generally are interpreted as a product of reducing conditions during periods of water saturation. The upland soils of the Santa Cruz, CA, marine terrace chronosequence display an evolving sequence of reticulate mottling from the youngest soil (65 ka) without mottles to the oldest soil (225 ka) with well-developed mottles. The mottles consist of an interconnected network of clay and C-enriched regions (gray, 2.5Y 6/1) bordered by leached parent material (white, 2.5Y 8/1) within a diminishing matrix of oxidized parent material (orange, 7.5YR 5/8). The mottles develop in soils that formed from relatively uniform nearshore sediments and occur below the depth of soil bioturbation. To explore how a presumably wetland feature occurs in an unsaturated upland soil, physical and chemical characteristics of mottle separates (orange, gray, and white) were compared through the deep time represented by the soil chronosequence. Mineralogical, isotopic, and surface-area differences among mottle separates indicate that rhizogenic centimeter-scale mass transfer acting across millennia is an integral part of weathering, pedogenesis, and C and nutrient transfer. Elemental analysis, electron microscopy, and Fe-isotope systematics indicate that mottle development is driven by deep roots together with their fungal and microbial symbionts. Taken together, these data suggest that deep soil horizons on old stable landforms can develop reticulate mottling as the long-term imprint of rhizospheric processes. The processes of rhizogenic mottle formation appear to regulate pedogenesis, nutrients, and C sequestration at depth in unsaturated zones.

  5. Morphology of submarine canyon system and geotechnical properties of surficial sediments across the Peru-Chile forearc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergersen, D.D.; Coulbourn, W.T.; Moberly, R.

    1989-03-01

    During August 1987, a SeaMARC II side-scan and sampling survey was conducted across the Peru-Chile forearc from 17/degrees/30'S to 19/degrees/30'S. Side-scan images reveal a complex submarine canyon system. Incised canyons meander across the Arequipa basin; their sinuosity results from erosion and cutbank slumping of the basin sediments. Lenticular packets of strata visible in reprocessed digital single-channel seismic profiles are interpreted to be buried channels. Tributary canyons coalesce into a single canyon at the structural high that deviates from its north-south course to a northeast-southwest course as a result of stream piracy. A dendritic drainage basin forming on the midslope may be the rejuvenation of an abandoned channel. Sediment properties were measured on 42 free-fall cores and 7 piston cores recovered both in and around the submarine canyon. Olive-gray (5Y 3/2) hemipelagic mud is the predominant sediment across the forearc. Most cores exhibit a small degree of bioturbation and thin laminae of sand; the number of sand laminae increases as the distance away from the canyon decreases. Shear strengths, averaged over a 1-m core length, decrease slightly with water depth. Carbonate content in all samples from this area is negligible with the exception of one piston core recovered from the upper reaches of the canyon, the bottom of which is composed of gravel- and sand-size shell fragments. Bulk mineralogy, determined from semiquantitative analysis of x-ray diffraction patterns, shows a decrease in relative feldspar percent and an increase in total clay content with increasing water depth. Preliminary analysis of core tops shows a mean grain size in the medium to very fine silt class, with increasing grain size toward the canyon. Smear slide counts generally show a surprisingly low abundance of volcanic glass and biogenic material, particularly diatoms.

  6. Impact of bottom trawling on deep-sea sediment properties along the flanks of a submarine canyon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo Martín

    Full Text Available The offshore displacement of commercial bottom trawling has raised concerns about the impact of this destructive fishing practice on the deep seafloor, which is in general characterized by lower resilience than shallow water regions. This study focuses on the flanks of La Fonera (or Palamós submarine canyon in the Northwestern Mediterranean, where an intensive bottom trawl fishery has been active during several decades in the 400-800 m depth range. To explore the degree of alteration of surface sediments (0-50 cm depth caused by this industrial activity, fishing grounds and control (untrawled sites were sampled along the canyon flanks with an interface multicorer. Sediment cores were analyzed to obtain vertical profiles of sediment grain-size, dry bulk density, organic carbon content and concentration of the radionuclide 210Pb. At control sites, surface sediments presented sedimentological characteristics typical of slope depositional systems, including a topmost unit of unconsolidated and bioturbated material overlying sediments progressively compacted with depth, with consistently high 210Pb inventories and exponential decaying profiles of 210Pb concentrations. Sediment accumulation rates at these untrawled sites ranged from 0.3 to 1.0 cm y-1. Sediment properties at most trawled sites departed from control sites and the sampled cores were characterized by denser sediments with lower 210Pb surface concentrations and inventories that indicate widespread erosion of recent sediments caused by trawling gears. Other alterations of the physical sediment properties, including thorough mixing or grain-size sorting, as well as organic carbon impoverishment, were also visible at trawled sites. This work contributes to the growing realization of the capacity of bottom trawling to alter the physical properties of surface sediments and affect the seafloor integrity over large spatial scales of the deep-sea.

  7. Relationship between bacterial diversity and function under biotic control: the soil pesticide degraders as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monard, Cécile; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe; Le Bot, Barbara; Binet, Françoise

    2011-06-01

    In soil, the way biotic parameters impact the relationship between bacterial diversity and function is still unknown. To understand these interactions better, we used RNA-based stable-isotope probing to study the diversity of active atrazine-degrading bacteria in relation to atrazine degradation and to explore the impact of earthworm-soil engineering with respect to this relationship. Bulk soil, burrow linings and earthworm casts were incubated with (13)C-atrazine. The pollutant degradation was quantified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for 8 days, whereas active atrazine degraders were identified at 2 and 8 days by sequencing the 16S ribosomal RNA in the (13)C-RNA fractions from the three soil microsites. An original diversity of atrazine degraders was found. Earthworm soil engineering greatly modified the taxonomic composition of atrazine degraders with dominance of α-, β- and γ-proteobacteria in burrow linings and of Actinobacteria in casts. Earthworm soil bioturbation increased the γ-diversity of atrazine degraders over the soil microsites generated. Atrazine degradation was enhanced in burrow linings in which primary atrazine degraders, closely related to Pelomonas aquatica, were detected only 2 days after atrazine addition. Atrazine degradation efficiency was not linearly related to the species richness of degraders but likely relied on keystone species. By enhancing soil heterogeneity, earthworms sustained high phylogenetic bacterial diversity and exerted a biotic control on the bacterial diversity-function relationships. Our findings call for future investigations to assess the ecological significance of biotic controls on the relationships between diversity and function on ecosystem properties and services (for example, soil detoxification) at larger scales.

  8. Documenting the Distribution and Sedimentology of the Penultimate Tsunami Along a Cross Island Transect on Koh Phra Thong Island, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, M. E.; Rhodes, B. P.; Leeper, R. J.; Choowong, M.

    2013-12-01

    Thailand's Koh Phra Thong Island is characterized by ridge-swale topography. Unlike the ridges, swales often hold water during the wet season, which allows for the deposition and preservation of sediment. As a result, swales are potential archives for past tsunami deposits. Seven different swale sites along a 1.9 km transect on the northern half of the island were trenched to investigate the occurrence and distribution of paleo-tsunami deposits. Duplicate overlapping slab cores were taken from the trench walls. Cores from sites F111, F511, F611, and F811 were analyzed at 1 cm contiguous intervals for magnetic susceptibility, percent organic matter, percent total carbonate, and grain size. Each site contained at least one distinct penultimate tsunami (PT) unit. Although the quality of preservation of the PT sediment unit diminishes with distance from the modern shoreline, presumably caused by differential bioturbation, grain size distributions and organic matter content clearly demarcate each PT unit. Notably, the distribution of sand sizes throughout the PT is not the same landward. More distal sites (F611 and F811) are dominated by very fine to fine sands; whereas, the mid island site (F511) is sand and coarse sand dominated. Microscopic charcoal was picked under a binocular scope to bracket the PT unit. A maximum age of 620 cy BP was obtained for the most distal site (F811). Ages spanning 740 - 900 cy BP provide a maximum age for the PT unit at F511. Ages for the PT unit from near the present day shoreline are similar (550 - 770 cy BP: Jankaew et al., 2008) using radiocarbon methods. OSL dates from the PT unit sands show an age 380×50 years before AD 1950 (Prendergast et al., 2012). From these various ages, the PT unit was deposited no earlier than 900 cy BP but likely no later than 380×50 years before AD 1950.

  9. Variations in glacial and interglacial marine conditions over the last two glacial cycles off northern Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwemark, Ludvig; Chao, Weng-Si; Gyllencreutz, Richard; Hanebuth, Till J. J.; Chiu, Pin-Yao; Yang, Tien-Nan; Su, Chih-Chieh; Chuang, Chih-Kai; León Dominguez, Dora Carolina; Jakobsson, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Five sediment cores from the Lomonosov Ridge and the Morris Jesup Rise north of Greenland show the history of sea-ice coverage and primary productivity over the last two glacial cycles. Variations in Manganese content, benthic and planktonic foraminifera, bioturbation, and trace fossil diversity are interpreted to reflect differences in sea-ice cover and sediment depositional conditions between the identified interglacials. Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 1 and MIS 2 are represented by thin (ice conditions north of Greenland while MIS 5 appears to have been considerably warmer with more open water, higher primary productivity, and higher sedimentation rates. Strengthened flow of Atlantic water along the northern continental shelf of Greenland rather than development of local polynyas is here suggested as a likely cause for the relatively warmer marine conditions during MIS 5 compared to MIS 1. The cores also suggest distinct differences between the glacial intervals MIS 2 and MIS 6. While MIS 6 is distinguished by a relatively thick sediment unit poor in foraminifera and with low Mn values, MIS 2 is practically missing. We speculate that this could be the effect from a paleocrystic sea-ice cover north of Greenland during MIS 2 that prevented sediment delivery from sea ice and icebergs. In contrast, the thick sequence deposited during MIS 6 indicates a longer glacial period with dynamic intervals characterized by huge drifting icebergs delivering ice rafted debris (IRD). A drastic shift from thinner sedimentary cycles where interglacial sediment parameters indicate more severe sea-ice conditions gave way to larger amplitude cycles with more open water indicators was observed around the boundary between MIS 7/8. This shift is in agreement with a sedimentary regime shift previously identified in the Eurasian Basin and may be an indicator for the growth of larger ice sheets on the Eurasian landmass during the penultimate glacial period.

  10. Effects of ghost shrimp on zinc and cadmium in sediments from Tampa Bay, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerks, P.L.; Felder, D.L.; Strasser, K.; Swarzenski, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effects that ghost shrimp have on the distribution of metals in sediment. We measured levels of HNO3-extractable zinc and cadmium in surface sediment, in ghost shrimp burrow walls and in sediment ejected by the ghost shrimp from their burrows, at five sandy intertidal sites in Tampa Bay. Ghost shrimp densities and their rate of sediment ejection were also quantified, as were sediment organic content and silt + clay content. Densities of ghost shrimp (Sergio trilobata and Lepidophthalmus louisianensis) averaged 33/m2 at our sites, and they ejected sediment at an average rate of 28 g/burrow/day. Levels of both Zn and Cd were significantly higher in burrow walls than in surface sediments. Sediment ejected by the shrimp from their burrows had elevated levels of Zn (relative to surface sediments) at one of the sites. Sediment organic content and silt + clay content were higher in burrow-wall sediments than in ejected sediment, which in turn tended to have values above those of surface sediments. Differences in levels of HNO3-extractable Zn and Cd among sediment types may be a consequence of these sediments differing in other physiochemical characteristics, though the differences in metal levels remained statistically significant for some sites after correcting for differences in organic content and silt + clay content. We conclude that the presence of ghost shrimp burrows contributes to spatial heterogeneity of sedimentary metal levels, while the ghost shrimp bioturbation results in a significant flux of metals to the sediment surface and is expected to decrease heterogeneity of metal levels in sedimentary depth profiles.

  11. Community Structure and Activity of a Highly Dynamic and Nutrient-Limited Hypersaline Microbial Mat in Um Alhool Sabkha, Qatar

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Thani, Roda

    2014-03-21

    The Um Alhool area in Qatar is a dynamic evaporative ecosystem that receives seawater from below as it is surrounded by sand dunes. We investigated the chemical composition, the microbial activity and biodiversity of the four main layers (L1–L4) in the photosynthetic mats. Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration and distribution (measured by HPLC and hyperspectral imaging, respectively), the phycocyanin distribution (scanned with hyperspectral imaging), oxygenic photosynthesis (determined by microsensor), and the abundance of photosynthetic microorganisms (from 16S and 18S rRNA sequencing) decreased with depth in the euphotic layer (L1). Incident irradiance exponentially attenuated in the same zone reaching 1% at 1.7-mm depth. Proteobacteria dominated all layers of the mat (24%–42% of the identified bacteria). Anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (dominated by Chloroflexus) were most abundant in the third red layer of the mat (L3), evidenced by the spectral signature of Bacteriochlorophyll as well as by sequencing. The deep, black layer (L4) was dominated by sulfate reducing bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, which were responsible for high sulfate reduction rates (measured using 35S tracer). Members of Halobacteria were the dominant Archaea in all layers of the mat (92%–97%), whereas Nematodes were the main Eukaryotes (up to 87%). Primary productivity rates of Um Alhool mat were similar to those of other hypersaline microbial mats. However, sulfate reduction rates were relatively low, indicating that oxygenic respiration contributes more to organic material degradation than sulfate reduction, because of bioturbation. Although Um Alhool hypersaline mat is a nutrient-limited ecosystem, it is interestingly dynamic and phylogenetically highly diverse. All its components work in a highly efficient and synchronized way to compensate for the lack of nutrient supply provided during regular inundation periods.

  12. Design and construction of the backfilled pit cover system at Whistle Mine, Canada : a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayres, B.K.; O' Kane, M. [O' Kane Consultants Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Lanteigne, L. [Inco Ltd., Sudbury, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the design and construction of an engineered cover system developed during the decommissioning of Inco's Whistle Mine in Sudbury, Ontario. The process involved the relocation of 6.4 million tonnes of acid-generating waste rock to the open pit from 2 adjacent stockpiles. The cover system, which works as a barrier to minimize the entry of atmospheric oxygen and water to the underlying material, was developed for backfilling the pit to reduce acid-rock drainage. The effectiveness of a range of cover systems was determined through geochemical modelling. Field trials were also conducted at the site to monitor the performance of the cover system and to estimate full-scale construction costs. A calibrated model of covered waste rock was developed using the VADOSE/W two-dimensional soil-atmosphere model and field data. Net percolation and oxygen infiltration through various cover system alternatives were predicted for site-specific climate conditions. The runoff management and final landform for the pit cover system was determined through erosion and landform evolution numerical modelling. The long-term performance of the pit cover system is affected by physical process such as erosion, slope instability, wet-dry cycles, freeze-thaw cycles, consolidation, extreme climate events and brush fires. Efforts were made to minimize the chemical processes that affect liner performance such as osmotic consolidation, dispersion, dissolution, acidic hydrolysis, mineralogical consolidation, sorption, salinization and oxidation. It was noted that the performance of the liner is also influenced by biological processes such as root penetration, burrowing animals, bioturbation, human intervention, bacteriological clogging and the establishment of vegetation. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  13. Geomagnetic Secular Variation in Texas over the Last 17,000 Years: High-Intensity Geomagnetic Field 'Spike' Observed at ca. 3000 cal BP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, M. D.; Feinberg, J. M.; Waters, M. R.; Stafford, T. W., Jr.; Forman, S. L.; Lundelius, E. L.

    2015-12-01

    By observing the fluctuations in direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field through time, we increase our understanding of the fluid motions in the Earth's outer core that sustain the geomagnetic field, the geodynamo. Recent archaeomagnetic studies in the Near East have proposed extremely rapid increases - 'spikes' - in geomagnetic field intensity ca. 3000 years ago that have proved problematic for our current understanding of core-flow. However, until now, these geomagnetic spikes had not been observed outside of the Near East, where they have been found in metallurgical slag and mud brick walls. We present a new fully-oriented, geomagnetic secular variation and relative palaeointensity (RPI) record for the last 17,000 years from Hall's Cave, Texas. Sediment washed into the cave has formed a continuous stratigraphic sequence that is at least 3.5 m thick. Within the stable, cool climate of the cave, pedogenic and bioturbation processes are almost non-existent, thereby limiting post-depositional physical and geochemical alteration of the magnetic record. The sub-aerial and subterranean setting of the sedimentary sequence in Hall's Cave enabled us to collect oriented palaeomagnetic cubes from an excavated section through the sequence. The palaeomagnetic samples yielded high-quality vectors. An age model for the sequence, determined using 57 AMS 14C-dates on individual bones from microvertebrate, was combined with the palaeomagnetic data to construct a secular variation record. The record is in broad agreement with predictions by Holocene field models for the site's location. However, at ca. 3000 years ago, the RPI data indicate an almost four-fold increase in geomagnetic field intensity lasting several hundred years and contemporaneous with the more short-lived, decadal-scale spikes reported from the Near East. Evidence for this extreme intensity event outside of the Near East has major implications for our current understanding of core-dynamics.

  14. Paired charcoal and tree-ring records of high-frequency Holocene fire from two New Mexico bog sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C.D.; Anderson, R. Scott; Jass, R.B.; Toney, J.L.; Baisan, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    Two primary methods for reconstructing paleofire occurrence include dendrochronological dating of fire scars and stand ages from live or dead trees (extending back centuries into the past) and sedimentary records of charcoal particles from lakes and bogs, providing perspectives on fire history that can extend back for many thousands of years. Studies using both proxies have become more common in regions where lakes are present and fire frequencies are low, but are rare where high-frequency surface fires dominate and sedimentary deposits are primarily bogs and wetlands. Here we investigate sedimentary and fire-scar records of fire in two small watersheds in northern New Mexico, in settings recently characterised by relatively high-frequency fire where bogs and wetlands (Chihuahuen??os Bog and Alamo Bog) are more common than lakes. Our research demonstrates that: (1) essential features of the sedimentary charcoal record can be reproduced between multiple cores within a bog deposit; (2) evidence from both fire-scarred trees and charcoal deposits documents an anomalous lack of fire since ???1900, compared with the remainder of the Holocene; (3) sedimentary charcoal records probably underestimate the recurrence of fire events at these high-frequency fire sites; and (4) the sedimentary records from these bogs are complicated by factors such as burning and oxidation of these organic deposits, diversity of vegetation patterns within watersheds, and potential bioturbation by ungulates. We consider a suite of particular challenges in developing and interpreting fire histories from bog and wetland settings in the Southwest. The identification of these issues and constraints with interpretation of sedimentary charcoal fire records does not diminish their essential utility in assessing millennial-scale patterns of fire activity in this dry part of North America. ?? IAWF 2008.

  15. Sedimentation Pulse in the NE Gulf of Mexico following the 2010 DWH Blowout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregg R Brooks

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH oil discharge at the seafloor as recorded in bottom sediments of the DeSoto Canyon region in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Through a close coupling of sedimentological, geochemical, and biological approaches, multiple independent lines of evidence from 11 sites sampled in November/December 2010 revealed that the upper ~1 cm depth interval is distinct from underlying sediments and results indicate that particles originated at the sea surface. Consistent dissimilarities in grain size over the surficial ~1 cm of sediments correspond to excess (234Th depths, which indicates a lack of vertical mixing (bioturbation, suggesting the entire layer was deposited within a 4-5 month period. Further, a time series from four deep-sea sites sampled up to three additional times over the following two years revealed that excess (234Th depths, accumulation rates, and (234Th inventories decreased rapidly, within a few to several months after initial coring. The interpretation of a rapid sedimentation pulse is corroborated by stratification in solid phase Mn, which is linked to diagenesis and redox change, and the dramatic decrease in benthic formanifera density that was recorded in surficial sediments. Results are consistent with a brief depositional pulse that was also reported in previous studies of sediments, and marine snow formation in surface waters closer to the wellhead during the summer and fall of 2010. Although sediment input from the Mississippi River and advective transport may influence sedimentation on the seafloor in the DeSoto Canyon region, we conclude based on multidisciplinary evidence that the sedimentation pulse in late 2010 is the product of marine snow formation and is likely linked to the DWH discharge.

  16. Historical Reconstruction of Organic Carbon Inputs to Sediments in the Colville River Delta, Alaska: The Application of Biomarker Proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Bianchi, T. S.; Allison, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic permafrost represents about 50% of the total belowground global carbon pool, and thus the fate of this pool, as it thaws in the wake of global warming, warrants close attention. Large-river delta-front estuaries (LDEs) have been shown to be important recorders of natural and human-induced changes in watersheds, as they are critical zones for the exchange of organic carbon between the continents and the ocean. The Colville River is the largest North American Arctic River with a continuous permafrost watershed. Simpson's Lagoon, an eastward distal component of the Colville River Delta is an excellent location for historical reconstruction work since it is an area well protected from intense ice grounding and has minimal bioturbation. Sediment cores were collected from the mouth of the river and the lagoon in August of 2010, and analyzed for bulk organic carbon and nitrogen proxies, biomarkers (including lignin phenols, fatty acids), and compound-specific 13C isotope analysis (CSIA) of fatty acids. Downcore sediment data from CSIA of short-chain fatty acids (C14-C18) to the delta over the past ca. 50 years were found to be more depleted and had a wider isotopic range (-17.0~-33.2‰) than long-chain fatty acids (C22-C30, -30.3~-36.8‰). This possibly reflects alterations of inputs of freshwater flow to the delta which could have resulted in isotopic changes that caused corresponding changes in marine versus freshwater phytoplankton inputs. Downcore short-chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid profiles reflected differences in the abundance of bacteria and post-depositional decay of algal inputs across different regions of the delta. Ongoing analyses will also focus on compound-specific radiocarbon analyses (CSRA) of fatty acids and lignin phenols to better understand the changes of organic inputs from terrestrially-derived organic-rich horizons in surface soils vs. old deep permafrost-derived organic horizons.

  17. Application of paleoDNA for identification of paleotsunami deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczucinski, W.; Pawlowska, J.; Lejzerowicz, F.; Nishimura, Y.; Kokocinski, M.; Majewski, W.; Nakamura, Y.; Pawlowski, J.

    2015-12-01

    The identification of sedimentary records of paleotsunamis is the key to tsunami hazard assessment. However, it is often challenging to distinguish the tsunami deposits due to their variability, influence of local context, variable sediment sources, as well as postdepositional alterations. Among the most commonly used approaches to identify paleotsunami is the study of microfossils (e.g. foraminifera, diatoms). They are most commonly used to show marine origin of sediments. The common problem with microfossils in coastal settings (eg. marshes, peat bogs) is that they may not be preserved. For instance, it was found during studies on post-depositional changes of 2004 tsunami deposits and in paleotsunami deposits in Thailand that the tests composed of calcium carbonate as well as from silica have been largely dissolved with time. The rapid progress in paleogenetic studies suggests that analyses of DNA preserved in marine sediments may be a new research direction. A recent successful application of the method to the deep sea and fjord sediments, greater than 30,000 years old proved that it is possible to extract DNA and identify it from sediments that are affected by oxygenated waters and bioturbating organisms. Here we apply the paleogenetic studies for a series of paleotsunami deposits from Urahoro, eastern Hokkaido Island, Japan dated to be from several hundreds of years to more than 2000 years old based on tephrochronology. The sandy tsunami deposits intercalated by muddy peat contained rare diatoms of various origin but foraminifera and radiolaria tests were missing. Nevertheless, we were able to retrieve short fragments of the foraminiferal DNA from marine species using high-throughput sequencing technology. Our study provides first evidence that eukaryotic DNA can be preserved in tsunami deposits in coastal marsh environment for as long as 2000 years even in absence of any micropaleontological evidence. Thus paleoDNA analyses may provide a new useful tool to

  18. From divots to swales: Hillslope sediment transport across divers length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbish, David Jon; Haff, Peter K.

    2010-09-01

    In soil-mantled steeplands, soil motions associated with creep, ravel, rain splash, soil slips, tree throw, and rodent activity are patchy and intermittent and involve widely varying travel distances. To describe the collective effect of these motions, we formulate a nonlocal expression for the soil flux. This probabilistic formulation involves upslope and downslope convolutions of land surface geometry to characterize motions in both directions, notably accommodating the bidirectional dispersal of material on gentle slopes as well as mostly downslope dispersal on steeper slopes, and it distinguishes between the mobilization of soil material and the effect of surface slope in giving a downslope bias to the dispersal of mobilized material. The formulation separates dispersal associated with intermittent surface motions from the slower bulk behavior associated with small-scale bioturbation and similar dilational processes operating mostly within the soil column. With a uniform rate of mobilization of soil material, the nearly parabolic form of a hillslope profile at steady state resembles a diffusive behavior. With a slope-dependent rate of mobilization, the steady state hillslope profile takes on a nonparabolic form where land surface elevation varies with downslope distance x as xa with a ˜ 3/2, consistent with field observations and where the flux increases nonlinearly with increasing slope. The convolution description of the soil flux, when substituted into a suitable expression of conservation, yields a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation and can be mapped to discrete particle models of hillslope behavior and descriptions of soil-grain transport by rain splash as a stochastic advection-dispersion process.

  19. Modelling intertidal sediment transport for nutrient change and climate change scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Rose; Widdows, John

    2003-10-01

    A model of intertidal sediment transport, including effects of bioturbation and biostabilisation, was applied to two transects on the east coast of England: Leverton (within the Wash) and Skeffling (in the Humber Estuary). The physical and biological parameters were chosen to represent four 1-year scenarios: a baseline year (1995), the same year but with estuarine nitrate inputs reduced by 50% and by 16%, and a year with climate change effects estimated for 2050. The changes in nitrate supply can potentially change microphytobenthos numbers within the surface sediment, which will then affect erodibility. The model results show a range of behaviour determined by bathymetry, external forcing and biotic state. When intertidal sediment transport is dominated by external sediment supply, the model produces highest deposition at the most offshore point, and there is greatest deposition in the winter and spring, when offshore sediment concentrations are highest. When intertidal processes dominate intertidal sediment transport, there is a peak of deposition at the high-shore level and erosion at mid-tide levels. The greatest deposition now occurs in winter and summer, when low chlorophyll levels mean that the sediment is most erodible. The Skeffling transect was dominated by intertidal processes for the baseline scenario and with a 16% reduction in nitrate. Under the climate change (warm winter) scenario, the Skeffling transect was dominated by external sediment supply. The scenario with 50% reduction in nitrate gave intermediate behaviour at Skeffling (intertidally driven during the winter and summer, and governed by offshore sediment supply during spring and autumn). The Leverton transect was dominated by offshore sediment supply for all the scenarios.

  20. Factors controlling mud accumulation in the Heuksan mud belt off southwestern Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tae Soo; Ha, Hun Jun; Chun, Seung Soo

    2015-12-01

    The Heuksan mud belt (hereafter HMB) is 20~50 km wide, ~200 km long, and ~50 m thick, having accumulated in the course of the Holocene transgression on the tide-dominated epicontinental shelf southwest of Korea. The internal architecture of the HMB is characterized by offshore prograding clinoforms. Of particular interest are the depositional processes responsible for this anomalously thick mud accumulation within a relatively short period of time. Tidal currents are important in the dispersal of mud in the HMB, although these alone cannot explain such an enormous mud deposit. In order to understand the formative processes of the HMB, a detailed sedimentary facies analysis, including high-resolution grain-size measurements, has been conducted on more than 30 short cores and three long drill cores recovered from the mud belt. Five major mud facies were identified. Of these, mud sequences showing a thickening-thinning trend of alternating silt and clay laminae suggestive of a tidal origin occur dominantly at inner to mid shelf locations. By contrast, internally structureless muds with sharp bases and no bioturbation, which are interpreted of representing fluid-mud deposits, are widespread at mid to outer shelf locations. Wave-generated mud ripples and storm beds on the inner shelf suggest that storm waves in winter resuspend previously deposited mud to form near-bed fluid-mud suspensions with resulting gravity-driven mud transport across the low-gradient outer shelf. This previously not recognized process is probably a major factor controlling depositional processes on the giant mud belt, enabling rapid accumulation and offshore progradation even during transgression, i.e., at times of sea-level rise.

  1. Incorporation of microplastics from litter into burrows of Lumbricus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza; Gertsen, Hennie; Gooren, Harm; Peters, Piet; Salánki, Tamás; van der Ploeg, Martine; Besseling, Ellen; Koelmans, Albert A; Geissen, Violette

    2017-01-01

    Pollution caused by plastic debris is an urgent environmental problem. Here, we assessed the effects of microplastics in the soil surface litter on the formation and characterization of burrows built by the anecic earthworm Lumbricus terrestris in soil and quantified the amount of microplastics that was transported and deposited in L. terrestris burrows. Worms were exposed to soil surface litter treatments containing microplastics (Low Density Polyethylene) for 2 weeks at concentrations of 0%, 7%, 28%, 45% and 60%. The latter representing environmentally realistic concentrations found in hot spot soil locations. There were significantly more burrows found when soil was exposed to the surface treatment composed of 7% microplastics than in all other treatments. The highest amount of organic matter in the walls of the burrows was observed after using the treatments containing 28 and 45% microplastics. The highest microplastic bioturbation efficiency ratio (total microplastics (mg) in burrow walls/initial total surface litter microplastics (mg)) was found using the concentration of 7% microplastics, where L. terrestris introduced 73.5% of the surface microplastics into the burrow walls. The highest burrow wall microplastic content per unit weight of soil (11.8 ± 4.8 g kg-(1)) was found using a concentration of 60% microplastics. L. terrestris was responsible for size-selective downward transport when exposed to concentrations of 7, 28 and 45% microplastics in the surface litter, as the fraction ≤50 μm microplastics in burrow walls increased by 65% compared to this fraction in the original surface litter plastic. We conclude that the high biogenic incorporation rate of the small-fraction microplastics from surface litter into burrow walls causes a risk of leaching through preferential flow into groundwater bodies. Furthermore, this leaching may have implications for the subsequent availability of microplastics to terrestrial organisms or for the transport

  2. Sea-Floor geology and character of Eastern Rhode Island Sound West of Gay Head, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Irwin, B.J.; Schaer, J.D.; Forrest, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 102 square kilometers of sea floor in eastern Rhode Island Sound west of Gay Head, Massachusetts. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H11922, these acoustic data and the sea-floor stations subsequently occupied to verify them (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities (for example, windfarms and fisheries) along the Massachusetts inner continental shelf. Most of the sea floor in the study area has an undulating to faintly rippled appearance and is composed of bioturbated muddy sand, reflecting processes associated with sediment sorting and reworking. Shallower areas are composed of rippled sand and, where small fields of megaripples are present, indicate sedimentary environments characterized by processes associated with coarse bedload transport. Boulders and gravel were found on the floors of scour depressions and on top of an isolated bathymetric high where erosion has removed the Holocene marine sediments and exposed the underlying relict lag deposits of Pleistocene drift. The numerous scour depressions, which formed during storm-driven events, result in the juxtaposition of sea-floor areas with contrasting sedimentary environments and distinct gravel, sand, and muddy sand textures. This textural heterogeneity in turn creates a complex patchwork of habitats. Our observations of local variations in community structure suggest that this small-scale textural heterogeneity adds dramatically to the sound-wide benthic biological diversity.

  3. Nitrate reduction functional genes and nitrate reduction potentials persist in deeper estuarine sediments. Why?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokratis Papaspyrou

    Full Text Available Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the

  4. Nitrate Reduction Functional Genes and Nitrate Reduction Potentials Persist in Deeper Estuarine Sediments. Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Smith, Cindy J.; Dong, Liang F.; Whitby, Corinne; Dumbrell, Alex J.; Nedwell, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the sediment column. This

  5. From Magnetotactic Bacteria to Sediment Magnetizations: new insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, R.; Mao, X.; Zhao, X.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent one of the most intriguing examples of iron biomineralization and magnetic navigation in nature. MTB synthesize magnetic nanocrystals, called magnetosomes, which act as an incorporated compass for navigation purposes (magnetotaxis). MTB are ubiquitous organisms living in chemically stratified freshwater and marine environments, where they contribute significantly to the Fe cycle. Magnetosomes accumulate as fossil MTB remains in sediment (magnetofossils). The recent development of magnetic measurement protocols enabling to detect small magnetosome concentrations among complex iron mineral mixtures led to the discovery that magnetofossil preservation over geological times is not uncommon. Therefore, magnetofossils can play an important role in sedimentary records of the Earth's magnetic field, as well as conveying selective information about past environmental conditions (e.g. redox conditions and nutrient concentration). Paleomagnetic and environmental applications require us to understand the processes that control MTB occurrence, magnetofossil formation and preservation, and the final alignment with the Earth's magnetic field. Our current knowledge relies mostly on experiments performed with cultured MTB in aqueous solutions, under physical and chemical conditions that do not necessarily reproduce those encountered in sediment. These experiments have been pivotal for understanding magnetosome growth and the fundaments of magnetotaxis. On the other hand, recent investigations of living MTB populations in sediment with specially developed observation techniques led to unexpected findings, with important implications for magnetotaxis models, MTB ecology, and, indirectly, for modeling the acquisition of natural magnetizations in bioturbated sediments. Ludwig, P. et al. (2013), Global Planet. Change 110, 321-339. Mao, X. et al. (2014), Geochem. Geophys. Geosys. 15, doi:10.1002/2013GC005034. Mao, X. et al. (2014). PLoS ONE 9, doi

  6. Solid partitioning and solid-liquid distribution of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in marine anoxic sediments: roads of Cherbourg at the northwestern France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connan, O. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie de Cherbourg-Octeville, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire (IRSN), Service d' Etudes et du Comportement des Radionucleides dans l' Environnement (SECRE), rue Max Pol Fouchet, 50130 Cherbourg-Octeville (France)], E-mail: olivier.connan@irsn.fr; Boust, D. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie de Cherbourg-Octeville, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire (IRSN), Service d' Etudes et du Comportement des Radionucleides dans l' Environnement (SECRE), rue Max Pol Fouchet, 50130 Cherbourg-Octeville (France); Billon, G. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Marine, Universite des sciences et technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Solier, L.; Rozet, M.; Bouderbala, S. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie de Cherbourg-Octeville, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire (IRSN), Service d' Etudes et du Comportement des Radionucleides dans l' Environnement (SECRE), rue Max Pol Fouchet, 50130 Cherbourg-Octeville (France)

    2009-10-15

    A sequential extraction protocol has been used to determine the solid-phase partition of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in anoxic marine sediment from the roads of Cherbourg (France) in the central English Channel. Measurements were also obtained in pore waters, in which {sup 210}Po activities range between 1 and 20 mBq L{sup -1} and {sup 210}Pb activities between 2.4 and 3.8 mBq L{sup -1}, with highest activities in the topmost layer. These activities are higher than in seawater, suggesting that sediment act as a source of both {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb for overlying water. The {sup 210}Po profile in the pore waters is apparently correlated with those obtained for Fe, Mn and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, suggesting an influence of early diagenetic processes on the {sup 210}Po solid-liquid distribution. In the sediment, {sup 210}Po is predominantly bound to organic matter or chromium reducible sulphides, and residuals (clay minerals and refractory oxides). Our results indicate that {sup 210}Po is not significantly bound to AVS, i.e. acid volatile sulphides: bioturbation could play a role by the early redistribution of {sup 210}Po bound to acid volatile sulphides in the sediment. {sup 210}Po, {sup 210}Pb and Pb exhibit differences in terms of distribution, probably due to a different mode of penetration in the sediment. This work provides information on solid and liquid distribution of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in marine sediment. These data are very scarce in the litterature.

  7. Sedimentological and Stratigraphic Controls on Natural Fracture Distribution in Wajid Group, SW Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaafi, Mohammed; Hariri, Mustafa; Abdullatif, Osman; Makkawi, Mohammed; Korvin, Gabor

    2016-04-01

    The Cambro-Permian Wajid Group, SW Saudi Arabia, is the main groundwater aquifer in Wadi Al-Dawasir and Najran areas. In addition, it has a reservoir potentiality for oil and natural gas in Rub' Al-Khali Basin. Wajid Group divided into four formations, ascending Dibsiyah, Sanamah, Khussyayan and Juwayl. They are mainly sandstone and exposed in an area extend from Wadi Al-Dawasir southward to Najran city and deposited within fluvial, shallow marine and glacial environments. This study aims to investigate the sedimentological and stratigraphic controls on the distribution of natural fractures within Wajid Group outcrops. A scanline sampling method was used to study the natural fracture network within Wajid Group outcrops, where the natural fractures were measured and characterized in 12 locations. Four regional natural fracture sets were observed with mean strikes of 050o, 075o, 345o, and 320o. Seven lithofacies characterized the Wajid Group at these locations and include fine-grained sandstone, coarse to pebbly sandstone, cross-bedded sandstone, massive sandstone, bioturbated sandstone, conglomerate sandstone, and conglomerate lithofacies. We found that the fine-grained and small scale cross-bedded sandstones lithofacies are characterized by high fracture intensity. In contrast, the coarse-grained sandstone and conglomerate lithofacies have low fracture intensity. Therefore, the relative fracture intensity and spacing of natural fractures within Wajid Group in the subsurface can be predicted by using the lithofacies and their depositional environments. In terms of stratigraphy, we found that the bed thickness and the stratigraphic architecture are the main controls on fractures intensity. The outcomes of this study can help to understand and predict the natural fracture distribution within the subsurface fractured sandstone hosting groundwater and hydrocarbon in Wajid and Rub' Al-Khali Basins. Hence, the finding of this study might help to explore and develop the

  8. Sedimentation rates in the Wanggang salt marshes, Jiangsu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGAijun; GAOShu; JIAJianjun; PANShaoming

    2005-01-01

    Coastal salt-marshes represent an important coastal wetland system. The total area of coastal wetlands exceeds 5000 km2 in Jiangsu Province, China, but it is decreasing rapidly in response to the intense reclamation activities and coastal erosion along a part of the coastline. Hence, two types of plants, Spartina angelica and Spartina alterniflora, were introduced successively into the Jiangsu coastal areas, in order to protect the coastline from erosion and to increase the accumulation rate. Pb-210 and Cs-137 analyses were carried out for sediment samples from the salt-marshes of Wanggang to determine the sedimentation rate, on the basis of an evaluation of the background activity values and the factors affecting the enrichment of Pb-210. Analysis of a typical sediment column of the tidal flat shows that there is weak absorption of Pb-210 in the silt-dominated sediment. Because of the influences of factors such as storm events, bioturbation, material sources and analytical error, some abnormal data points appear in the Pb-210 record. After ignoring these data the calculated sedimentation rate was 3.3 cm yr-1 on average. Based upon analysis of the Cs-137 dating, the rate since 1963 was 3.1 cm yr-1 on average, similar to the data by Pb-210 dating and the previous studies. The dating results show that there were three stages of sedimentation, with the most rapid accretion being taking place after Spartina angelica was introduced into the area. The study also shows that at the stage of Spartina alterniflora growth, the accretion rate was higher than on the flat surface with the same elevation without the cover of this plant.

  9. Distribution of gamma-emitting radionuclides in surface subtidal sediments near the Sellafield plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.G.; Roberts, P.D.; Miller, J.M.

    1988-08-01

    Detailed distributions of total gamma activity, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 106/Ru and /sup 95/Zr + /sup 95/Nb in surface seabed sediments near the Sellafield plant are presented. The results are derived from a towed seabed gamma-ray spectrometer survey in September, 1982. All the distributions are similar, with contours of equal activity parallel to the coast defining a 'ridge' of higher activity which is displaced northwards relative to the outfall. Nuclide concentrations decrease with increasing distance from Sellafield; rates of decrease being in the order Zr + Nb > Ru > Cs. This can be related to the levels of the nuclides discharged, their sorption characteristics and their half lives. The pattern of seabed activity seems to have been fairly stable over the period 1978-85, but there is evidence of a small northward shift. Concentrations of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 106/Ru in 1985 were considerably lower than in 1978 or 1982. This is explicable in terms of the fall in discharge levels allied, in the case of Ru, to its short half life and, for Cs, the desorption observed in laboratory experiments. Nuclide ratios in sediment samples yield apparent transit times for the transport of nuclides in the survey area of 1.7-3.7 years. These times are generally greater than those obtained from sediments in the more distant Solway Firth and Ravenglass Estuary. It is suggested that they reflect fairly intense bioturbation causing mixing of relatively recent effluent with that from earlier discharges. This is supported by structures observed in X-radiographs of box cores, an abundant burrowing benthos and by interpretations of nuclide profiles and radiocarbon dating of sediment cores by other workers. A lag effect, of up to two years across the survey area, appears to be superimposed on that due to mixing.

  10. Effects of temporal fluctuation in population processes of intertidal Lanice conchilega (Pallas, 1766) aggregations on its ecosystem engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Renata M. S.; Vanaverbeke, Jan; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; Guarini, Jean-Marc; Vincx, Magda; Van Colen, Carl

    2017-03-01

    Ecosystem engineers contribute to ecosystem functioning by regulating key environmental attributes, such as habitat availability and sediment biogeochemistry. While autogenic engineers can increase habitat complexity passively and provide physical protection to other species, allogenic engineers can regulate sediment oxygenation and biogeochemistry through bioturbation and/or bioirrigation. Their effects rely on the physical attributes of the engineer and/or its biogenic constructs, such as abundance and/or size. The present study focused on tube aggregations of a sessile, tube-building polychaete that engineers marine sediments, Lanice conchilega. Its tube aggregations modulate water flow by dissipating energy, influencing sedimentary processes and increasing particle retention. These effects can be influenced by temporal fluctuations in population demographic processes. Presently, we investigated the relationship between population processes and ecosystem engineering through an in-situ survey (1.5 years) of L. conchilega aggregations at the sandy beach of Boulogne-sur-Mer (France). We (1) evaluated temporal patterns in population structure, and (2) investigated how these are related to the ecosystem engineering of L. conchilega on marine sediments. During our survey, we assessed tube density, demographic structure, and sediment properties (surficial chl-a, EPS, TOM, median and mode grain size, sorting, and mud and water content) on a monthly basis for 12 intertidal aggregations. We found that the population was mainly composed by short-lived (6-10 months), small-medium individuals. Mass mortality severely reduced population density during winter. However the population persisted, likely due to recruits from other populations, which are associated to short- and long-term population dynamics. Two periods of recruitment were identified: spring/summer and autumn. Population density was highest during the spring recruitment and significantly affected several

  11. Tectono-climatic signals in linear, confined, point-sourced, deep-marine siliciclastic systems as analog for submarine-canyon fills, Eocene, Spanish Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, K.

    2008-12-01

    The linear, confined geometry, and point-sourced nature, of the deep-marine siliciclastic systems in the Eocene Ainsa-Jaca basin, Spanish Pyrenees, provides a useful ancient spatial-temporal comparison and partial analog for the architecture and controls on the sedimentary infill of large submarine canyons / multiple canyons at continental margins with active tectonics, including salt and shale diapirism. The cumulative ~4 km of stratigraphy contains 8 sandy systems with a total of ~25 discrete channelized sandbodies that accumulated over ~10 Myr in water depths of ~400 to 800 m, that were controlled by the ~400-kyr Milkankovitch frequency with modes, at ~100 kyr and ~41 kyr (possibly stacked ~23-kyr) influencing bottom- water conditions, causing periodic stratification in the water column across a submarine sill within the western part of the more proximal depositional systems. Local tectonics defined and controlled the position and stacking patterns of the 8 sandy systems and their constituent channelized sandbodies, in a process of "seesaw tectonics" by: (i) Westward lateral offset-stacking of channelized sandbodies due to growth of the eastern side of the basin, and (ii) Eastward (orogenwards) "back-stepping" of the depositional axis of each sandy system, due to phases of relative uplift of the opposing lateral margin. Thus, the first-order control on accommodation for deep-marine sedimentation was tectonic, with the pacing of the supply of coarse siliciclastics being driven by global climatic processes, particularly Milankovitch-type frequencies. The dominance of eccentricity and obliquity is similar to results from the continental lacustrine, Eocene Green River Formation. The age model for the Ainsa basin yields an average sediment accumulation rate of ~40 cm kyr-1, that is consistent with that inferred from the spectral analysis on bioturbation intensity for fine-grained sedimentation (~30 cm kyr-1). This paper compares and contrasts depositional patterns

  12. Brachyuran crab community structure and associated sediment reworking activities in pioneer and young mangroves of French Guiana, South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbroich, Adélaïde; Michaud, Emma; Stieglitz, Thomas; Fromard, François; Gardel, Antoine; Tavares, Marcos; Thouzeau, Gérard

    2016-12-01

    This study in French Guiana evaluates the changes of crab assemblages and their bioturbation activities between mangrove early stages (pioneer and young mangrove) and within stages by taking their spatial heterogeneity (tidal channels, flat areas, pools) into account. The results show differences in crab assemblage structure between and within the early stages of mangrove in relation to microhabitat and sediment characteristics. The sediment reworking rates are a function of the biomass or density of particular species (Ucides cordatus, Uca cumulanta) and burrower functional groups. Crab species or functional interactions mediate changes in sediment reworking rates suggesting the need to consider entire benthic communities rather than single species. This study suggests that the role of the microhabitat in determining the biologically-induced sediment reworking rates depends on the age of the mangrove. Feeding activity results in a sediment turnover of 11.7 ± 9.7 gdw m-2 day-1 and 6.8 ± 3.0 gdw m-2 day-1 in the pioneer and young mangroves, respectively. Burrow maintenance excavates 40.5 ± 7.4 gdw m-2 day-1 and 251.3 ± 419.7 gdw m-2 day-1 in the pioneer and young mangroves, respectively. Upscaling to the studied area (Sinnamary estuary: 6 km2), shows that 500 tons.day-1 and 20 tons.day-1 of sediments could be excavated and pelletized, respectively, during the spring tides of the dry season. Thus, biological sediment reworking would greatly contribute to the sedimentary dynamics of the Guianese mangroves under Amazonian influence.

  13. Spatial variability of benthic-pelagic coupling in an estuary ecosystem: consequences for microphytobenthos resuspension phenomenon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ubertini

    resuspension effect in summer than in spring, in turn suggesting an important role of macrofauna bioturbation and filter feeding (Cerastoderma edule.

  14. Determinants of soil organic carbon pools in oak stands in northeastern Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckman, Viktor J.; Hochbichler, Eduard; Yan, Shuai; Glatzel, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    Recently deciduous forests in northeastern Austria received increased attention as potential sources of biomass for energetic utilisation. There are still substantial deficits in the knowledge on carbon pools, -sequestration and -dynamics at these forest sites. The aim of our study was therefore to identify the main determinants which control soil organic carbon (SOC) pools in differently managed Quercus petraea dominated stands. We used the chronosequence approach to test the influence of stand age and management on the SOC pool. Soil samples were systematically collected from 14 plots by means of a 70mm hand auger to a depth of max. 60cm and separated into five geometric horizons. Narrow O-layers and signs of active bioturbation on most sites suggest rapid carbon mineralisation. Carbon pools of the aboveground biomass, the O horizon as well as fine and coarse roots and decay were determined. Soils in our study are cambisols derived from fossil alluvial deposits and loess and calcic chernozems derived from loess. Total soil carbon was determined by means of dry combustion and subtraction of soil inorganic carbon (SIC, by means of the Scheibler-method) if present. Mean SOC contents ranged from 5.3 kg.m-2 to10.4 kg.m-2 in the entire study area. The highest contents were found in calcic chernozem sites (7.2-10.4 kg.m-2) followed by loamy cambisol (6.1-6.8 kg.m-2) and sandy cambisol sites (5.3-6.9 kg.m-2). Among three chronosequence sets, we found strong positive correlations with total nitrogen (Pearson correlation coefficients of +0.91 to +0.93, pcoppice with standards vs. high forest system) in deciduous forests in the northeastern lowlands of Austria has no decisive influence on soil carbon pools.

  15. Extended power-law scaling of heavy-tailed random fields or processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guadagnini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the scaling behaviors of two log permeability data sets showing heavy-tailed frequency distributions in three and two spatial dimensions, respectively. One set consists of 1-m scale pneumatic packer test data from six vertical and inclined boreholes spanning a decameters scale block of unsaturated fractured tuffs near Superior, Arizona, the other of pneumatic minipermeameter data measured at a spacing of 15 cm along two horizontal transects on a 21 m long outcrop of lower-shoreface bioturbated sandstone near Escalante, Utah. Order q sample structure functions of each data set scale as a power ξ (q of separation scale or lag, s, over limited ranges of s. A procedure known as Extended Self-Similarity (ESS extends this range to all lags and yields a nonlinear (concave functional relationship between ξ (q and q. Whereas the literature tends to associate extended and nonlinear power-law scaling with multifractals or fractional Laplace motions, we have shown elsewhere that (a ESS of data having a normal frequency distribution is theoretically consistent with (Gaussian truncated (additive, self-affine, monofractal fractional Brownian motion (tfBm, the latter being unique in predicting a breakdown in power-law scaling at small and large lags, and (b nonlinear power-law scaling of data having either normal or heavy-tailed frequency distributions is consistent with samples from sub-Gaussian random fields or processes subordinated to tfBm, stemming from lack of ergodicity which causes sample moments to scale differently than do their ensemble counterparts. Here we (i demonstrate that the above two data sets are consistent with sub-Gaussian random fields subordinated to tfBm and (ii provide maximum likelihood estimates of parameters characterizing the corresponding Lévy stable subordinators and tfBm functions.

  16. {sup 210}Pb dating of sediments from the central and northern Adriatic Sea: deposition and preservation of sedimentary organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T. F., LLNL

    1998-04-01

    Lead-210 ({sup 21O}Pb) and organic C depth distribution profiles in sediments from the northern and central Adriatic Sea were measured as part of the EEC funded project on Eutrophic Limits of the Northern Adriatic (ELNA). {sup 210}Pb derived mass-accumulation rates decrease southward from between 0.15 and 0.2 g cm{sup -2}y{sup -1} close to the Po River outflow (> 24 m, water depth) to less than 0.04 g cm{sup -2}y{sup -1} in the Jabuka Pit (246 m, water depth) in the central Adriatic Sea. The mass- accumulation rates obtained in the Jabuka Pit correspond to mean sedimentation rates of about 0.03 cm y{sup -1} (ref. porosity = 0.5) and fall between 5 to 20 times lower than rates found for north Adriatic shelf cores. Estimated sedimentation rates are considered as upper limits because of the possible effects of bioturbation and physical disturbance on the {sup 21O}Pb sedimentary record but are consistent with data from previous work. Rates of sediment accumulation and carbon burial appear to be strongly influenced by the transport of fluvial materials from land and transport of fine-grained particles. First-order estimates of organic C burial rates into surface sediment ranged from 1 to 0.028 mMol cm{sup -2}y{sup -1} between the Po delta and the Jabuka Pit regions, respectively. We estimate that a maximum of 50% of organic C preserved in surface sediment may be derived from biological production in the overlying water column.

  17. Mississippian clastic-to-carbonate transition in the northeastern Brooks Range, Alaska: Depositional cycles of the Endicott and Lisburne Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepain, D.L.; Crowden, R.K.; Watts, K.F. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The Ellesmerian sequence in northeastern Alaska consists of a thick succession of Mississippian to Lower Cretaceous platform carbonate and terrigenous clastic rocks. At the base of the Ellesmerian sequence, clastic rocks of the Endicott Group are the lower part of a major transgressive sequence that passes gradationally upward into carbonates of the Lisburne Group. In the Endicott Group, the basal Kekiktuk Conglomerate was deposited in fluvial and marginal marine environments. A broad suite of tidally influenced, shallow-marine environments are recorded in the overlying Kayak Shale. The transition into carbonate platform rocks of the Lisburne Group is recorded in a series of depositional cycles developed within the upper half of the Kayak Shale. In the lower beds of the transition, the depositional cycles are multiple upward-thickening and upward-coarsening successions composed of (1) organic-rich siltstone containing flaser-bedded and lenticular-bedded fine-grained sandstone, (2) fine-grained, ripple-laminated quartzarenite, and (3) an intensely bioturbated horizon of medium- to coarse-grained quartzarenite that contains scattered brachiopods, bryozoa, and crinoids. Each cycle is terminated by a sharp transgressive surface that consists of a thin shale drape. Near the top of the Kayak Shale, the coarse-grained horizons become increasingly replaced by wackestone, grainstone, and coralline boundstone. Despite the lithologic change, the vertical upward-thickening and upward-coarsening cycles continue in the basal limestone of the Lisburne Group. Repeated upward-shallowing episodes, followed by coastal onlap, are likely mechanisms for this cyclicity and suggests a genetic relation between both the clastic and carbonate depositional cycles.

  18. Oxygen, carbon, and nutrient exchanges at the sediment-water interface in the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea, southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vittor, Cinzia; Relitti, Federica; Kralj, Martina; Covelli, Stefano; Emili, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    In the shallow environment, the nutrient and carbon exchanges at the sediment-water interface contribute significantly to determine the trophic status of the whole water column. The intensity of the allochthonous input in a coastal environment subjected to strong anthropogenic pressures determines an increase in the benthic oxygen demand leading to depressed oxygen levels in the bottom waters. Anoxic conditions resulting from organic enrichment can enhance the exchange of nutrients between sediments and the overlying water. In the present study, carbon and nutrient fluxes at the sediment-water interface were measured at two experimental sites, one highly and one moderately contaminated, as reference point. In situ benthic flux measurements of dissolved species (O2, DIC, DOC, N-NO3 (-), N-NO2 (-), N-NH4 (+), P-PO4 (3-), Si-Si(OH)4, H2S) were conducted using benthic chambers. Furthermore, undisturbed sediment cores were collected for analyses of total and organic C, total N, and biopolymeric carbon (carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids) as well as of dissolved species in porewaters and supernatant in order to calculate the diffusive fluxes. The sediments were characterized by suboxic to anoxic conditions with redox values more negative in the highly contaminated site, which was also characterized by higher biopolymeric carbon content (most of all lipids), lower C/N ratios and generally higher diffusive fluxes, which could result in a higher release of contaminants. A great difference was observed between diffusive and in situ benthic fluxes suggesting the enhancing of fluxes by bioturbation and the occurrence of biogeochemically important processes at the sediment-water interface. The multi-contamination of both inorganic and organic pollutants, in the sediments of the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (declared SIN in 1998), potentially transferable to the water column and to the aquatic trophic chain, is of serious concern for its ecological relevance, also considering the

  19. Consequences of increasing hypoxic disturbance on benthic communities and ecosystem functioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Villnäs

    Full Text Available Disturbance-mediated species loss has prompted research considering how ecosystem functions are changed when biota is impaired. However, there is still limited empirical evidence from natural environments evaluating the direct and indirect (i.e. via biota effects of disturbance on ecosystem functioning. Oxygen deficiency is a widespread threat to coastal and estuarine communities. While the negative impacts of hypoxia on benthic communities are well known, few studies have assessed in situ how benthic communities subjected to different degrees of hypoxic stress alter their contribution to ecosystem functioning. We studied changes in sediment ecosystem function (i.e. oxygen and nutrient fluxes across the sediment water-interface by artificially inducing hypoxia of different durations (0, 3, 7 and 48 days in a subtidal sandy habitat. Benthic chamber incubations were used for measuring responses in sediment oxygen and nutrient fluxes. Changes in benthic species richness, structure and traits were quantified, while stress-induced behavioral changes were documented by observing bivalve reburial rates. The initial change in faunal behavior was followed by non-linear degradation in benthic parameters (abundance, biomass, bioturbation potential, gradually impairing the structural and functional composition of the benthic community. In terms of ecosystem function, the increasing duration of hypoxia altered sediment oxygen consumption and enhanced sediment effluxes of NH(4(+ and dissolved Si. Although effluxes of PO(4(3- were not altered significantly, changes were observed in sediment PO(4(3- sorption capability. The duration of hypoxia (i.e. number of days of stress explained a minor part of the changes in ecosystem function. Instead, the benthic community and disturbance-driven changes within the benthos explained a larger proportion of the variability in sediment oxygen- and nutrient fluxes. Our results emphasize that the level of stress to the

  20. Mercury contaminated sediment sites—An evaluation of remedial options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Chattopadhyay, Sandip, E-mail: Sandip.Chattopadhyay@tetratech.com [Tetra Tech, Inc., 250 West Court Street, Suite 200W, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally-occurring element that is ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Though efforts have been made in recent years to decrease Hg emissions, historically-emitted Hg can be retained in the sediments of aquatic bodies where they may be slowly converted to methylmercury (MeHg). Consequently, Hg in historically-contaminated sediments can result in high levels of significant exposure for aquatic species, wildlife and human populations consuming fish. Even if source control of contaminated wastewater is achievable, it may take a very long time, perhaps decades, for Hg-contaminated aquatic systems to reach relatively safe Hg levels in both water and surface sediment naturally. It may take even longer if Hg is present at higher concentration levels in deep sediment. Hg contaminated sediment results from previous releases or ongoing contributions from sources that are difficult to identify. Due to human activities or physical, chemical, or biological processes (e.g. hydrodynamic flows, bioturbation, molecular diffusion, and chemical transformation), the buried Hg can be remobilized into the overlying water. Hg speciation in the water column and sediments critically affect the reactivity (i.e. conversion of inorganic Hg(II) to MeHg), transport, and its exposure to living organisms. Also, geochemical conditions affect the activity of methylating bacteria and its availability for methylation. This review paper discusses remedial considerations (e.g. key chemical factors in fate and transport of Hg, source characterization and control, environmental management procedures, remediation options, modeling tools) and includes practical case studies for cleaning up Hg-contaminated sediment sites. -- Highlights: ► Managing mercury-contaminated sediment sites are challenging to remediate. ► Remediation technologies are making a difference in managing these sites. ► Partitioning plays a dominant role in the distribution of mercury species. ► Mathematical

  1. 江苏王港盐沼的现代沉积速率%Sedimentation rates in the Wanggang salt marshes, Jiangsu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王爱军; 高抒; 贾建军

    2005-01-01

    Coastal salt-marshes represent an important coastal wetland system. The total area of coastal wetlands exceeds 5000 km2 in Jiangsu Province, China, but it is decreasing rapidly in response to the intense reclamation activities and coastal erosion along a part of the coastline. Hence, two types of plants, Spartina angelica and Spartina alterniflora, were introduced successively into the Jiangsu coastal areas, in order to protect the coastline from erosion and to increase the accumulation rate. Pb-210 and Cs-137 analyses were carried out for sediment samples from the salt-marshes of Wanggang to determine the sedimentation rate, on the basis of an evaluation of the background activity values and the factors affecting the enrichment of Pb-210. Analysis of a typical sediment column of the tidal flat shows that there is weak absorption of Pb-210 in the silt-dominated sediment. Because of the influences of factors such as storm events, bioturbation, material sources and analytical error, some abnormal data points appear in the Pb-210 record. After ignoring these data the calculated sedimentation rate was 3.3 cm yr-1 on average. Based upon analysis of the Cs-137 dating, the rate since 1963 was 3.1 cm yr-1 on average, similar to the data by Pb-210 dating and the previous studies. The dating results show that there were three stages of sedimentation, with the most rapid accretion being taking place after Spartina angelica was introduced into the area. The study also shows that at the stage of Spartina alterniflora growth, the accretion rate was higher than on the flat surface with the same elevation without the cover of this plant.

  2. Geomorphic controls on biological soil crust distribution: A conceptual model from the Mojave Desert (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda J.; Buck, Brenda J.; Soukup, Deborah A.; Merkler, Douglas J.

    2013-08-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are bio-sedimentary features that play critical geomorphic and ecological roles in arid environments. Extensive mapping, surface characterization, GIS overlays, and statistical analyses explored relationships among BSCs, geomorphology, and soil characteristics in a portion of the Mojave Desert (USA). These results were used to develop a conceptual model that explains the spatial distribution of BSCs. In this model, geologic and geomorphic processes control the ratio of fine sand to rocks, which constrains the development of three surface cover types and biogeomorphic feedbacks across intermontane basins. (1) Cyanobacteria crusts grow where abundant fine sand and negligible rocks form saltating sand sheets. Cyanobacteria facilitate moderate sand sheet activity that reduces growth potential of mosses and lichens. (2) Extensive tall moss-lichen pinnacled crusts are favored on early to late Holocene surfaces composed of mixed rock and fine sand. Moss-lichen crusts induce a dust capture feedback mechanism that promotes further crust propagation and forms biologically-mediated vesicular (Av) horizons. The presence of thick biogenic vesicular horizons supports the interpretation that BSCs are long-lived surface features. (3) Low to moderate density moss-lichen crusts grow on early Holocene and older geomorphic surfaces that display high rock cover and negligible surficial fine sand. Desert pavement processes and abiotic vesicular horizon formation dominate these surfaces and minimize bioturbation potential. The biogeomorphic interactions that sustain these three surface cover trajectories support unique biological communities and soil conditions, thereby sustaining ecological stability. The proposed conceptual model helps predict BSC distribution within intermontane basins to identify biologically sensitive areas, set reference conditions for ecological restoration, and potentially enhance arid landscape models, as scientists address impacts

  3. Trace fossil evidence for late Permian shallow water condition in Guryul ravine, Kashmir, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcha, Suraj; Horacek, Micha; Krystyn, Leopold; Pandey, Shivani

    2015-04-01

    The present study is focused on the Late Permian (Changhsingian) succession, present in the Guryul ravine, Kashmir Basin. The basin has a complete Cambro-Triassic sequence and thus contains a unique position in the geology of Himalaya. The Guryul Ravine Permian mainly comprises of mixed siliciclastic-carbonate sediments deposited in a shallow-shelf or ramp setting. The present assemblage of Ichnofossils is the first significant report of trace fossils in the Guryul ravine since early reports in the 1970s. The Ichnofossils reported from this section include: Diplichnites, Dimorphichnus, Monomorphichnus, Planolites, Skolithos along with burrow, scratch marks and annelid worm traces?. The ichnofossils are mainly preserved in medium grain sandstone-mudstone facies. The Ichnofossils are widely distributed throughout the section and are mostly belonging to arthropods and annelid origin, showing behavioral activity, mainly dwelling and feeding, and evidence the dominant presence of deposit feeders. The vertical to slightly inclined biogenic structures are commonly recognized from semi-consolidated substrate which are characteristic features of the near shore/foreshore marine environment, with moderate to high energy conditions. The topmost layer of silty shale contains trace fossils like Skolithos and poorly preserved burrows. The burrow material filled is same as that of host rock. The studied Zewan C and D sequence represents the early to late part of the Changhsingian stage, from 40 to 5 m below the top of Zewan D member with bioturbation still evident in some limestone layers till 2 metres above. No trace fossils could be recognized in the topmost 3 m beds of Zewan D due to their gliding related amalgamated structure. The widespread distribution of traces and their in situ nature will be useful for interpretation of the paleoecological and paleoenvironmental conditions during the late Permian in the Guryul ravine of Kashmir.

  4. THE PERMIAN -TRIASSIC BOUNDARY, DEAD SEA, JORDAN: TRANSITIONAL ALLUVIAL TO MARINE DEPOSITIONAL SEQUENCES AND BIOSTRATIGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHN H. POWELL

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Permian to Triassic transition in Jordan is characterised by a sequence boundary underlain by red-bed, alluvial lithofacies deposited in a humid-tropical climate by low-sinuosity rivers, and overlain by shallow marine siliciclastics with thin carbonates. The low-gradient alluvial floodplain was repeatedly subjected to the development of ferralitic and pisolitic paleosols on the interfluves. In contrast, dysaerobic environments in the fluvial channels and abandoned lakes resulted in the preservation of a prolific flora of macro-plants and palynomorphs that indicate a probable range from Mid- to Late Permian age, though the abundant presence of the distinctive pollen Pretricolpipollenites bharadwajii  indicates the youngest part of that range.  Above the sequence boundary, reddened shallow-marine beds characterised by ripple cross-laminated, siltstones/sandstone with desiccation cracks and sparse surface burrows mark the initial Triassic marine transgression in the region (Arabian Plate Tr 10. These are followed by two thin limestone (packstone beds with shallow scours and bivalve shell lags, that have yielded a low diversity assemblage of conodonts (e.g. Hadrodontina aequabilis and foraminifera (“Cornuspira” mahajeri that are interpreted as euryhaline  taxa characterising the early Induan (Early Triassic. Thus the absence of body fossils and vertical infaunal burrows in the lowest marine beds may reflect low-diversity ecosystems following the Permian-Triassic extinction event, or be a result of stressed shallow marine environments. A gradational upward increase in grey, green and yellow siltstones beds accompanied by a concomitant increase in bioturbation (and infaunal vertical burrows and thin-shelled bivalves about 15 m above the boundary indicates colonisation of the substrate under more normal shallow marine conditions perhaps indicating recovery phase following the extinction event.

  5. Microbes and mass extinctions: paleoenvironmental distribution of microbialites during times of biotic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, S A; Bottjer, D J

    2012-01-01

    Widespread development of microbialites characterizes the substrate and ecological response during the aftermath of two of the 'big five' mass extinctions of the Phanerozoic. This study reviews the microbial response recorded by macroscopic microbial structures to these events to examine how extinction mechanism may be linked to the style of microbialite development. Two main styles of response are recognized: (i) the expansion of microbialites into environments not previously occupied during the pre-extinction interval and (ii) increases in microbialite abundance and attainment of ecological dominance within environments occupied prior to the extinction. The Late Devonian biotic crisis contributed toward the decimation of platform margin reef taxa and was followed by increases in microbialite abundance in Famennian and earliest Carboniferous platform interior, margin, and slope settings. The end-Permian event records the suppression of infaunal activity and an elimination of metazoan-dominated reefs. The aftermath of this mass extinction is characterized by the expansion of microbialites into new environments including offshore and nearshore ramp, platform interior, and slope settings. The mass extinctions at the end of the Triassic and Cretaceous have not yet been associated with a macroscopic microbial response, although one has been suggested for the end-Ordovician event. The case for microbialites behaving as 'disaster forms' in the aftermath of mass extinctions accurately describes the response following the Late Devonian and end-Permian events, and this may be because each is marked by the reduction of reef communities in addition to a suppression of bioturbation related to the development of shallow-water anoxia.

  6. Marine coastal sediments microbial hydrocarbon degradation processes: contribution of experimental ecology in the omics'era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Duran, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Coastal marine sediments, where important biological processes take place, supply essential ecosystem services. By their location, such ecosystems are particularly exposed to human activities as evidenced by the recent Deepwater Horizon disaster. This catastrophe revealed the importance to better understand the microbial processes involved on hydrocarbon degradation in marine sediments raising strong interests of the scientific community. During the last decade, several studies have shown the key role played by microorganisms in determining the fate of hydrocarbons in oil-polluted sediments but only few have taken into consideration the whole sediment's complexity. Marine coastal sediment ecosystems are characterized by remarkable heterogeneity, owning high biodiversity and are subjected to fluctuations in environmental conditions, especially to important oxygen oscillations due to tides. Thus, for understanding the fate of hydrocarbons in such environments, it is crucial to study microbial activities, taking into account sediment characteristics, physical-chemical factors (electron acceptors, temperature), nutrients, co-metabolites availability as well as sediment's reworking due to bioturbation activities. Key information could be collected from in situ studies, which provide an overview of microbial processes, but it is difficult to integrate all parameters involved. Microcosm experiments allow to dissect in-depth some mechanisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation but exclude environmental complexity. To overcome these lacks, strategies have been developed, by creating experiments as close as possible to environmental conditions, for studying natural microbial communities subjected to oil pollution. We present here a review of these approaches, their results and limitation, as well as the promising future of applying "omics" approaches to characterize in-depth microbial communities and metabolic networks involved in hydrocarbon degradation. In addition, we

  7. Marine coastal sediments microbial hydrocarbon degradation processes: contribution of experimental ecology in the omics’era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana eCravo-Laureau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal marine sediments, where important biological processes take place, supply essential ecosystem services. By their location, such ecosystems are particularly exposed to human activities as evidenced by the recent Deepwater Horizon disaster. This catastrophe revealed the importance to better understand the microbial processes involved on hydrocarbon degradation in marine sediments raising strong interests of the scientific community. During the last decade, several studies have shown the key role played by microorganisms in determining the fate of hydrocarbons in oil-polluted sediments but only few have taken into consideration the whole sediment’s complexity. Marine coastal sediment ecosystems are characterized by remarkable heterogeneity, owning high biodiversity and are subjected to fluctuations in environmental conditions, especially to important oxygen oscillations due to tides. Thus, for understanding the fate of hydrocarbons in such environments, it is crucial to study microbial activities, taking into account sediment characteristics, physical-chemical factors (electron acceptors, temperature, nutrients, co-metabolites availability as well as sediment’s reworking due to bioturbation activities. Key information could be collected from in situ studies, which provide an overview of microbial processes, but it is difficult to integrate all parameters involved. Microcosm experiments allow to dissect in-depth some mechanisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation but exclude environmental complexity. To overcome these lacks, strategies have been developed, by creating experiments as close as possible to environmental conditions, for studying natural microbial communities subjected to oil pollution. We present here a review of these approaches, their results and limitation, as well as the promising future of applying ‘omics’ approaches to characterize in-depth microbial communities and metabolic networks involved in hydrocarbon

  8. The benthic marine assemblages of the estuarine and shallow marine Upper Burdigalian deposits of the Korneuburg Basin in Lower Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengst, Babette; Zuschin, Martin; Harzhauser, Mathias; Mandic, Oleg; Roetzel, Reinhard

    2010-05-01

    In the course of highway constructions (Wiener Außenring-Schnellstraße (S1)) a detailed sedimentological transect of 1.8 km length was logged in deposits of the Central Paratethys near the village of Stetten, N of Korneuburg in Lower Austria. A total of 324 sediment- and 118 molluscan samples was studied. The siliciclastic succession consists of pelitic and sandy sediments and sandstones and is rich in fossils. The fossil remains consist of sponges, corals, serpulids, molluscs, balanids, echinoderms, fish and micromammals. Quantitatively the molluscs dominate and have been studied in detail. 139 species were determined from more than 11,000 shells. Two gastropod species, Agapilia pachii und Granulolabium bicinctum make up more than 53% of the assemblage. Another 11 species (Nassarius edlaueri, Bittium spina, Loripes dujardini, Hydrobia spp., Paphia subcarinata, Cyllenina ternodosa, Turritella gradata, Corbula gibba, Cerastoderma praeplicata, Striarca lactea, Sandbergeria perpusilla) each contributes more than 1% to the total molluscan composition, but all other 126 species are quantitatively unimportant. A conspicuous alternation between intertidal and shallow subtidal mollusc associations is evident. The intertidal is dominated by the superabundant Agapilia pachii and Granulolabium plicatum, whereas the heavily bioturbated fully marine subtidal is characterized by a more diverse assemblage including Turritella gradata, Nassarius edlaueri, Anadara diluvii and various venerids. Additionally, layers with large fragments of Crassostrea and thin coal deposits with Terebralia bidentata are quite abundant in the section. Washed in land snails (e.g., Planorbidae) and river snails (Melanopsidae) occur occasionally. This faunal composition, along with its typical alternation points to a vivid dynamic within this Lower Miocene, subtropical ecosystem in the paleo-estuary of the southern Korneuburg basin.

  9. Tectonic Setting and Characteristics of Natural Fractures in Mesaverde and Dakota Reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LORENZ, JOHN C.; COOPER, SCOTT P.

    2001-01-01

    A set of vertical extension fractures, striking N-S to NNE-SSW but with local variations, is present in both the outcrop and subsurface in both Mesaverde and Dakota sandstones. Additional sets of conjugate shear fractures have been recognized in outcrops of Dakota strata and may be present in the subsurface. However, the deformation bands prevalent locally in outcrops in parts of the basin as yet have no documented subsurface equivalent. The immature Mesaverde sandstones typically contain relatively long, irregular extension fractures, whereas the quartzitic Dakota sandstones contain short, sub-parallel, closely spaced, extension fractures, and locally conjugate shear planes as well. Outcrops typically display secondary cross fractures which are rare in the subsurface, although oblique fractures associated with local structures such as the Hogback monocline may be present in similar subsurface structures. Spacings of the bed-normal extension fractures are approximately equal to or less than the thicknesses of the beds in which they formed, in both outcrop and subsurface. Fracture intensities increase in association with faults, where there is a gradation from intense fracturing into fault breccia. Bioturbation and minimal cementation locally inhibited fracture development in both formations, and the vertical limits of fracture growth are typically at bedding/lithology contrasts. Fracture mineralizations have been largely dissolved or replaced in outcrops, but local examples of preserved mineralization show that the quartz and calcite common to subsurface fractures were originally present in outcrop fractures. North-south trending compressive stresses created by southward indentation of the San Juan dome area (where Precambrian rocks are exposed at an elevation of 14,000 ft) and northward indentation of the Zuni uplift, controlled Laramide-age fracturing. Contemporaneous right-lateral transpressive wrench motion due to northeastward translation of the basin was both

  10. The origin of terrestrial pisoliths and pisolitic iron ore deposits: Raindrops and sheetwash in a semi-arid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascelles, Desmond F.

    2016-07-01

    Ooliths evidently form by chemical precipitation in limnic, paralic, fluvial and marine environments, pisoliths, however, appear to be restricted to terrestrial environments. Typically composed of iron, aluminium and manganese sesquioxides with minor admixtures of quartz and kaolinite, they are widely distributed in tropical to subtropical regions overlying deeply weathered soil profiles. Although iron-, aluminium- and manganese-rich end members are important sources of these metals, their genesis is still enigmatic; their formation has never been observed or produced experimentally and current models for their origin are little more than guesses. A new model is presented based on a unique personal observation in which pisoliths are formed by the action of charged raindrops during thunderstorms impacting on dry deeply weathered powdery soils. The pisoliths are transported across pediments by sheetwash, accumulating as thick deposits in the valley floors. Pisolites are characteristically unfossiliferous and typically clearly pedogenic. The absence of fine depositional layering, fossil seeds, leaves and pollen in pisolites is explained by bioturbation and the action of soil organisms during extended pedogenesis while the major coarse bedding features derive from erosional and depositional events in the evolution of the pediment. Pisolitic iron ores (aka channel iron deposits, CID) are a special case of transported pisolitic ferricrust that form an important resource of medium grade iron ore (57-60 wt% Fe) in the Pilbara Region of Western Australia. Apart from minor deposits in the northern Yilgarn Province of Western Australia, they have not been found elsewhere. They differ from normal transported ferricrust and terrestrial pisolites not only in the exceptionally high iron and low alumina and silica content but also in containing abundant fossilised wood particles.

  11. Relative sea-level changes during the Holocene in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Towhida; Suzuki, S.; Sato, Hiroshi; Monsur, M. H.; Saha, S. K.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a reconstruction of the Holocene paleo-environment in the central part of Bangladesh in relation to relative sea-level changes 200 km north of the present coastline. Lithofacies characteristics, mangal peat, diatoms and paleophysiographical evidence were considered to reconstruct the past position and C-14 ages were used to determine the time of formation of the relative sea level during the Holocene. With standard reference datum, the required m.s.l. at the surface of five sections was calculated. The relative sea-level (RSL) curve suggests that Bangladesh experienced two mid-Holocene RSL transgressions punctuated by regressions. The curve shows an RSL highstand at approximately 7500 cal BP, although the height of this highstand could not be determined because the transgressive phase was observed in a bioturbated sand flat facies. The curve shows a regression of approximately 6500 cal BP, and the RSL was considerably lower, perhaps 1-2 m, than the present m.s.l. The abundant marine diatoms and mangrove pollens indicate the highest RSL transgression in Bangladesh at approximately 6000 cal BP, being at least 4.5 to 5 m higher than the modern m.s.l. After this phase, the relative sea level started to fall, and consequently, a freshwater peat developed at approximately 5980-5700 cal BP. The abundant mangrove pollens in the salt-marsh succession shows the regression at approximately 5500 cal BP, when it was 1-2 m higher than the modern sea level. The curve indicates that at approximately 5000 cal BP and onwards, the RSL started to fall towards its present position, and the present shoreline of Bangladesh was established at approximately 1500 cal BP and has not noticeably migrated inland since.

  12. Depositional environment and organic geochemistry of the Upper Permian Ravenfjeld Formation source rock in East Greenland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, F.G.; Piasecki, S.; Stemmerik, L. (Geologoical Survey of Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Telnaes, N. (Norsk Hydro Research Center, Bergen (Norway))

    1993-09-01

    The Upper Permian Ravnefjeld Formation in East Greenland is composed of shales that laterally pass into carbonate buildups and platforms of the Wegener Halvo Formation. The Ravnefjeld Formation is subdivided into five units that can be traced throughout the Upper Permian depositional basin. Two of the units are laminated and organic rich and were deposited under anoxic conditions. They are considered good to excellent source rocks for liquid hydrocarbons with initial average TOC (total organic carbon) values between 4 and 5% and HI (hydrogen index) between 300 and 400. The cumulative source rocks are separated and enclosed by three units of bioturbated siltstone with a TOC of less than 0.5% and an HI of less than 100. These siltstones were deposited under relatively oxic conditions. The organic geochemistry of the source rocks is typical for marine source rocks with some features normally associated with carbonate/evaporite environments [low Pr/Ph (pristane/phytane), low CPI (carbon preference index), distribution of tricyclic and pentacyclic terpanes]. The establishment of anoxic conditions and subsequent source rock deposition was controlled by eustatic sea level changes. The subenvironment (paleogeographic setting, influx of carbonate material, water depth, salinity) has some influence on a number of bulk parameters [TOC-HI relations, TOC-TS (total sulfur) relations] and, in particular, biomarker parameters such as Pr/Ph and terpane ratios. All the basal shales or shales in the vicinity of carbonate buildups of platforms are characterized by low Pr/Ph, high C[sub 23] tricyclic terpanes, and high C[sub 35] and C[sub 33] hopanes. 52 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Errors in generating time-series and in dating events at late quaternary millenial (radiocarbon) time-scales: Examples from Baffin Bay, NW Labrador Sea, and East Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, John T.; Barber, Donald C.; Jennings, Anne E.

    A crucial question to understand the climate system at millennial time-scales is whether we can detect leads and lags. We examine errors on downcore age data sets resulting from the application of two depth/radiocarbon age models: 1) interpolation between dates, versus 2) ordinary least squares (OLS) regression. In areas affected by changes in sediment accumulation rates, interpolation between dates on facies boundaries would seem most appropriate, whereas in areas of constant sedimentation OLS regression would seem appropriate. We estimated the ages of 50 and 21 data points respectively, from cores HU87033-009 and HU93030-007 (both with rates of sediment accumulation ca. 30-40 cm/ky) using the two age models. Both cores show intervals of increased sediment accumulation associated with iceberg rafting events possibly coeval with H-1, -2 and -3(?). The two age models produced average age differences of 0.88 ky in HU87033-009 and 0.48 ky in HU93030-007. Monte Carlo simulation experiments indicated that the interpolation method consistently resulted in the larger errors. We then examine the age distribution for the basal ages of two detrital carbonate (DC) "events" in Baffin Bay and the NW Labrador Sea, including H-1, and show that errors on dating the onset of these events are considerable (˜± 300 yrs). We conclude that, when dealing with the generation of millennial time-series and correlation of abrupt events, more attention needs to be given to appropriate age/depth models and attendant errors. This analysis does not take into account the calibration of the radiocarbon time-scale nor bioturbation, both of which can introduce additional errors.

  14. Evolving Phytoplankton Stoichiometry Fueled Diversification of the Marine Biosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Quigg

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The availability of nutrients and the quantity and quality of food at the base of food webs have largely been ignored in discussions of the Phanerozoic record of biodiversity. We examine the role of nutrient availability and phytoplankton stoichiometry (the relative proportions of inorganic nutrients to carbon in the diversification of the marine biosphere. Nutrient availability and phytoplankton stoichiometry played a critical role in the initial diversification of the marine biosphere during the Neoproterozoic. Initial biosphere expansion during this time resulted in the massive sequestration of nutrients into biomass which, along with the geologically slow input of nutrients from land, set the stage for severe nutrient limitation and relatively constant marine biodiversity during the rest of the Paleozoic. Given the slow nutrient inputs from land and low recycling rates, the growth of early-to-middle Paleozoic metazoans remained limited by their having to expend energy to first “burn off” (respire excess carbon in food before the associated nutrients could be utilized for growth and reproduction; the relative equilibrium in marine biodiversity during the Paleozoic therefore appears to be real. Limited nutrient availability and the consequent nutrient imbalance may have delayed the appearance of more advanced carnivores until the Permo-Carboniferous, when widespread orogeny, falling sea level, the spread of forests, greater weathering rates, enhanced ocean circulation, oxygenation, and upwelling all combined to increase nutrient availability. During the Meso-Cenozoic, rising oxygen levels, the continued nutrient input from land, and, especially, increasing rates of bioturbation, enhanced nutrient availability, increasing the nutrient content of phytoplankton that fueled the diversification of the Modern Fauna.

  15. The magnitude, timing and abruptness of changes in North African dust deposition over the last 20,000 yr

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, D.; deMenocal, P. B.; Winckler, G.; Stuut, J. B. W.; Bradtmiller, L. I.

    2013-06-01

    Reconstructions of eolian dust accumulation in northwest African margin sediments provide important continuous records of past changes in atmospheric circulation and aridity in the region. Existing records indicate dramatic changes in North African dust emissions over the last 20 ka, but the limited spatial extent of these records and the lack of high-resolution flux data do not allow us to determine whether changes in dust deposition occurred with similar timing, magnitude and abruptness throughout northwest Africa. Here we present new records from a meridional transect of cores stretching from 31°N to 19°N along the northwest African margin. By combining grain size endmember modeling with 230Th-normalized fluxes for the first time, we are able to document spatial and temporal changes in dust deposition under the North African dust plume throughout the last 20 ka. Our results provide quantitative estimates of the magnitude of dust flux changes associated with Heinrich Stadial 1, the Younger Dryas, and the African Humid Period (AHP; ˜11.7-5 ka), offering robust targets for model-based estimates of the climatic and biogeochemical impacts of past changes in North African dust emissions. Our data suggest that dust fluxes between 8 and 6 ka were a factor of ˜5 lower than average fluxes during the last 2 ka. Using a simple model to estimate the effects of bioturbation on dust input signals, we find that our data are consistent with abrupt, synchronous changes in dust fluxes in all cores at the beginning and end of the AHP. The mean ages of these transitions are 11.8±0.2 ka (1σ) and 4.9±0.2 ka, respectively.

  16. Infaunal community responses to a gradient of trawling disturbance and a long-term Fishery Exclusion Zone in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, M. Cristina; Kaiser, Michel J.; Porporato, Erika M. D.; Lambert, Gwladys I.; Rinelli, Paola; Spanò, Nunziacarla

    2014-03-01

    Historically the majority of Mediterranean trawl fisheries occur on the continental shelf with a smaller proportion focused on the shelf slope and deep sea areas. Understanding how trawl fisheries affect the wider ecosystem is an important component of the ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management. In this context the current study examined the impact of the otter trawl fishery on the infaunal communities found on the continental shelf and upper slope off the coast of Sicily and Calabria, Italy. A total of thirty six sites were sampled across a gradient of fishing intensity and from within a large bay from which trawling has been excluded for 22 years. Fishing intensities were ascertained post-hoc from vessel monitoring system data. Seabed characteristics of the sites studied were uniform across the continental shelf and slope areas that were studied, such that the only factor that varied was fishing intensity. The density index (DI) and total number of species (S) were significantly higher in the fishery closure area compared with other continental shelf sites. In particular, bioturbating decapod fauna occurred only within the fishery closure area. Fished sites were dominated primarily by burrowing deposit feeding worms, small bivalves and scavenging biota. In contrast, the response to fishing on the upper slope was less clear. This observation was treated with caution as the power to detect fishing effects was lower for the upper slope sites as a result of possible illegal fishing that had compromised two of the four replicate sites within the closed area. While the present study was able to quantify the effect of the demersal trawl fleet on the benthic infauna of the continental shelf, the effects of trawling on the upper shelf slope remain unclear and warrant further study.

  17. Interplay between physical movements of soils and mineral grains and chemical weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, K.

    2007-12-01

    Most soil biogeochemistry studies treat the soils and their inorganic and organic constituents as physically immobile. Those soil materials, however, are in perpetual motion due to the conversion of bedrock to soils, colluvial transport, and vertical mixing by various biophysical perturbations of the soils. Subsequently, a soil is continuously replaced by the materials from the neighboring soils and the underlying parent material, while its individual horizons are gradually mixed with the materials in the neighboring horizons. The movements of bulk soil materials are ultimately driven by moving individual mineral grains. While rarely appreciated, these physical movements of soil's mineral components operate in the presence of strong vertical and topographic gradients of the rates of mineral dissolution and leaching. The result is that the physical movement of soil constituents affects chemical weathering. The fluxes of soil materials (via physical movements and solute fluxes) in and out of a soil system defined by a researcher determine the time length that the materials reside in the system. The residence time, together with the system-specific rates of chemical weathering, determine the degree of weathering of the materials within the system. This presentation provides a new mathematical framework to consistently quantify the residence times of minerals, individual soil horizons, soil profiles, and an entire soil within a watershed boundary. Soil age, which is equivalent of the time length since the cessation of erosion or deposition on level grounds, becomes a special case of the residence time. The model is combined with empirical data to quantitatively illustrate the impacts that the physical motion of soil constituents have on the rates of chemical weathering. The data are drawn from ongoing field and laboratory studies focusing on the impact of river incision, colluvial flux, bioturbation, and agricultural tillage on the vertical and lateral variation of

  18. Eutrophication in the northern Adriatic Sea: Pore water and sediment studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, D.E.; Berelson, W.M. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)); Giordani, P.; Langone, L.; Frignani, M.; Ravaioli, M. (Inst. di Geologia Marina, CNR, Bologna (Italy))

    1990-01-09

    The northern Adriatic Sea has been plagued by problems of eutrophication. This area is relatively shallow (maximum depth = 60m), becoming stratified during the summer months which inhibits oxygen transport to bottom waters. Anthropogenic nutrient loading in rivers entering the northern Adriatic (Po River being the largest) has increased nutrient input to this system and stimulated algal growth. Cores were collected for studies of pore water and solid phase chemistry at 6 stations in this region. [sup 210]Pb was used to constrain sediment accumulation rates and a range of 0-0.5 cm/yr was determined at different stations. Excess [sup 234]Th was only found in the upper 1-2 cm, suggesting that bioturbation is largely restricted to shallow depths. Pore water profiles show evidence of irrigation, and mean diffusive fluxes for oxygen, silica phosphate and ammonia are generally 20-90% of the fluxes obtained from benthic chamber measurements. This is consistent with previous work in this area in which studies of radon fluxes indicated that irrigation plays an important role in sediment-water exchange. Pore water profiles in the northern portion of the study area (near the Po River Delta) were markedly different than profiles in the south; sediments in the north are substantially more acidic and have high concentrations of dissolved iron and phosphate. From the alkalinity vs. TCO[sub 2] relationship in sediment pore waters it appears that differences in reactions involving the reduction of iron oxides and the exchange of magnesium for iron in clays are responsible for this regional difference in pore water properties. Sediments close to the Po apparently undergo more iron-magnesium exchange, while more distal sediments are limited in their ability to do so. Other pore water observations are limited in their ability to do so. Other pore water observations and trends regarding the shape of the silica profiles (which show shallow maxima) will be discussed.

  19. Towards an improved modeling of chemical weathering in the SoilGen soil evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opolot, Emmanuel; Finke, Peter

    2014-05-01

    As the need for soil information particularly in the fields of agriculture, land evaluation, hydrology, biogeochemistry and climate change keeps increasing, models for soil evolution are increasingly becoming valuable tools to provide such soil information. Although still limited, such models are progressively being developed. The SoilGen model is one of such models with capabilities to provide soil information such as soil texture, pH, base saturation, organic carbon, CEC, etc over multi-millennia time scale. SoilGen is a mechanistic water flow driven pedogenetic model describing soil forming processes such as carbon cycling, clay migration, decalcification, bioturbation, physical weathering and chemical weathering. The model has been calibrated and confronted with field measurements in a number of case studies, giving plausible results. Discrepancies between measured and simulated soil properties as concluded from case studies have been mainly attributed to (i) the simple chemical weathering system (ii) poor estimates of initial data inputs such as bulk density and element fluxes, and (iii) incorrect values of variables that describe boundary conditions such as precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. This study focuses on extending the chemical weathering system, such that it can deal with a more heterogeneous composition of primary minerals and includes more elements such as Fe and Si. We propose and discuss here an extended description of chemical weathering in the model that is based on more primary minerals, taking into account the role of the specific area of these minerals, and the effect of physical weathering on these specific areas over time. In the initial stage, the proposed chemical weathering mechanism is also implemented in PHREEQC (a widely applied geochemical code with capabilities to simulate equilibrium reactions involving water and minerals, surface complexes and ion exchangers, etc.) to facilitate comparison with the model results

  20. Origin of carbonate concretions from mud mounds in the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberian Peninsula); Origen de las concreciones carbonatadas de los monticulos de fango en el Golfo de Cadiz (SO Peninsula Iberica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rejas, M.; Taberner, C.; Pueyo, J. J.; Giralt, S.; Mata, M. P.; Gibert, J. M. de; Diaz del Rio, V.

    2015-07-01

    The Gulf of Cadiz displays a number of structures that are associated with fluid circulation (mud volcanoes, mud mounds and pockmarks).This area has been used as natural laboratory for the sedimentological, bio- logical and biogeochemical studies of these environments. Analysis of the associated authigenic carbonates has been widely used as a proxy to yield insights into the circulation and chemical composition of these flu- ids. A study of carbonate concretions from the Iberico, Cornide and Arcos mud mounds in the Diasom Field was undertaken to better understand the origin and type of fluids from which these concretions precipitated. The concretions display varying morphologies, some of which correspond to bioturbation traces. X-ray dif- fractions revealed that these carbonate concretions are mainly composed of dolomite, Fe-rich dolomite, high magnesium calcite (HMC) and ankerite. The δ{sup 1}3 C values of carbonate minerals ranged between -48.3 and-10.9 V-PDB, which suggests that the main processes involved in their genesis are organic matter oxidation, bac- terial sulphate-reduction (BSR) and anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM). The origin of the methane is main- ly thermogenic, and only few concretions yielded δ{sup 1}3C values lower than -40 V-PDB, suggesting oxidation of microbial methane. Fluids involved in the carbonate precipitation are interpreted as being related to gas hydrate destabilisation (δ{sup 18}O fluid-V-SMOW values higher than +2%) and, to a lesser extent, modified seawater enriched in {sup 18}O due to rock-water interaction. Nevertheless, the highest δ{sup 1}8O fluid-V-SMOW values suggest that the influence of other deep-seated fluids due to clay-mineral dehydration cannot be ruled out. (Author)

  1. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L. [BDM Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  2. Depositional Settings of the basal López de Bertodano Formation, Maastrichtian, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.B. Olivero

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In Snow Hill and Seymour islands the lower Maastrichtian, basal part of the L ópez de Bertodano Formation, rests on a high relief, erosive surface elaborated in the underlying Snow Hill Island Formation. Mudstone-dominated beds with inclined heterolithic stratification dominate the basal strata of the López de Bertodano Formation. They consist of rhythmical alternations of friable sandy- and clayeymudstone couplets, with ripple cross lamination, mud drapes, and flaser bedding. They are characterized by a marked lenticular geometry, reflecting the filling of tide-influenced channels of various scales and paleogeographic positions within a tide-dominated embayment or estuary. Major, sand-rich channel fills, up to 50-m thick, bounded by erosive surfaces probably represent inlets, located on a more central position in the estuary. Minor channel fills, 1- to 3-m thick, associated with offlapping packages with inclined heterolithic stratification probably represent the lateral accretion of point bars adjacent to migrating tidal channels in the upper estuary. Both types of channel fills bear relatively abundant marine fauna, are intensively bioturbated, and are interpreted as a network of subtidal channels. In southwestern Snow Hill Island, the minor offlapping packages have scarce marine fossils and bear aligned depressions interpreted as poor preserved dinosaur footprints. They represent the lateral accretion of point bars adjacent to intertidal creeks, probably located on the fringes of a mud-dominated estuary or embayment. The basal unconformity was produced by subaerial erosion; hence the inferred estuarine settings are consistent with the beginning of a new transgressive sedimentary cycle.

  3. Community structure and activity of a highly dynamic and nutrient-limited hypersaline microbial mat in Um Alhool Sabkha, Qatar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roda Al-Thani

    Full Text Available The Um Alhool area in Qatar is a dynamic evaporative ecosystem that receives seawater from below as it is surrounded by sand dunes. We investigated the chemical composition, the microbial activity and biodiversity of the four main layers (L1-L4 in the photosynthetic mats. Chlorophyll a (Chl a concentration and distribution (measured by HPLC and hyperspectral imaging, respectively, the phycocyanin distribution (scanned with hyperspectral imaging, oxygenic photosynthesis (determined by microsensor, and the abundance of photosynthetic microorganisms (from 16S and 18S rRNA sequencing decreased with depth in the euphotic layer (L1. Incident irradiance exponentially attenuated in the same zone reaching 1% at 1.7-mm depth. Proteobacteria dominated all layers of the mat (24%-42% of the identified bacteria. Anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (dominated by Chloroflexus were most abundant in the third red layer of the mat (L3, evidenced by the spectral signature of Bacteriochlorophyll as well as by sequencing. The deep, black layer (L4 was dominated by sulfate reducing bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, which were responsible for high sulfate reduction rates (measured using 35S tracer. Members of Halobacteria were the dominant Archaea in all layers of the mat (92%-97%, whereas Nematodes were the main Eukaryotes (up to 87%. Primary productivity rates of Um Alhool mat were similar to those of other hypersaline microbial mats. However, sulfate reduction rates were relatively low, indicating that oxygenic respiration contributes more to organic material degradation than sulfate reduction, because of bioturbation. Although Um Alhool hypersaline mat is a nutrient-limited ecosystem, it is interestingly dynamic and phylogenetically highly diverse. All its components work in a highly efficient and synchronized way to compensate for the lack of nutrient supply provided during regular inundation periods.

  4. Coupled Environmental Processes in the Mojave Desert and Implications for ET Covers as Stable Landforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Shafer; M. Y oung; S. Zitzer; E. McDonald; T. Caldwell

    2006-01-18

    Monolayer evapotranspiration (ET) covers are the baseline method for closure of disposal sites for low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed LLW, and transuranic (TRU) waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The regulatory timeline is typically 1,000 years for LLW and 10,000 years for TRU waste. Covers for such waste have different technical considerations than those with shorter timelines because they are subject to environmental change for longer periods of time, and because the environmental processes are often coupled. To evaluate these changes, four analog sites (approximately 30, 1,000 to 2,000, 7,000 to 12,500, and 125,000 years in age) on the NTS were analyzed to address the early post-institutional control period (the youngest site), the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of LLW, and the 10,000-year period for TRU waste. Tests included soil texture, structure, and morphology; surface soil infiltration and hydraulic conductivity; vegetation and faunal surveys; and literature reviews. Separate measurements were made in plant undercanopy and intercanopy areas. The results showed a progressive increase in silt and clay content of surface soils with age. Changes in soil texture and structure led to a fivefold decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity in intercanopy areas, but no change in undercanopies, which were subject to bioturbation. These changes may have been responsible for the reduction in total plant cover, most dramatically in intercanopy areas, primarily because more precipitation either runs off the site or is held nearer to the surface where plant roots are less common. The results suggest that covers may evolve over longer timeframes to stable landforms that minimize the need for active maintenance.

  5. Process regime variability across growth faults in the Paleogene Lower Wilcox Guadalupe Delta, South Texas Gulf Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olariu, Mariana I.; Ambrose, William A.

    2016-07-01

    The Wilcox Group in Texas is a 3000 m thick unit of clastic sediments deposited along the Gulf of Mexico coast during early Paleogene. This study integrates core facies analysis with subsurface well-log correlation to document the sedimentology and stratigraphy of the Lower Wilcox Guadalupe Delta. Core descriptions indicate a transition from wave- and tidally-influenced to wave-dominated deposition. Upward-coarsening facies successions contain current ripples, organic matter, low trace fossil abundance and low diversity, which suggest deposition in a fluvial prodelta to delta front environment. Heterolithic stratification with lenticular, wavy and flaser bedding indicate tidal influence. Pervasively bioturbated sandy mudstones and muddy sandstones with Cruziana ichnofacies and structureless sandstones with Ophiomorpha record deposition in wave-influenced deltas. Tidal channels truncate delta front deposits and display gradational upward-fining facies successions with basal lags and sandy tabular cross-beds passing into heterolithic tidal flats and biologically homogenized mudstones. Growth faults within the lower Wilcox control expanded thickness of sedimentary units (up to 4 times) on the downdip sides of faults. Increased local accommodation due to fault subsidence favors a stronger wave regime on the outer shelf due to unrestricted fetch and water depth. As the shoreline advances during deltaic progradation, successively more sediment is deposited in the downthrown depocenters and reworked along shore by wave processes, resulting in a thick sedimentary unit characterized by repeated stacking of shoreface sequences. Thick and laterally continuous clean sandstone successions in the downthrown compartments represent attractive hydrocarbon reservoirs. As a consequence of the wave dominance and increased accommodation, thick (tens of meters) sandstone-bodies with increased homogeneity and vertical permeability within the stacked shoreface successions are created.

  6. Soil fauna: key to new carbon models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filser, Juliane; Faber, Jack H.; Tiunov, Alexei V.; Brussaard, Lijbert; Frouz, Jan; De Deyn, Gerlinde; Uvarov, Alexei V.; Berg, Matty P.; Lavelle, Patrick; Loreau, Michel; Wall, Diana H.; Querner, Pascal; Eijsackers, Herman; José Jiménez, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is key to maintaining soil fertility, mitigating climate change, combatting land degradation, and conserving above- and below-ground biodiversity and associated soil processes and ecosystem services. In order to derive management options for maintaining these essential services provided by soils, policy makers depend on robust, predictive models identifying key drivers of SOM dynamics. Existing SOM models and suggested guidelines for future SOM modelling are defined mostly in terms of plant residue quality and input and microbial decomposition, overlooking the significant regulation provided by soil fauna. The fauna controls almost any aspect of organic matter turnover, foremost by regulating the activity and functional composition of soil microorganisms and their physical-chemical connectivity with soil organic matter. We demonstrate a very strong impact of soil animals on carbon turnover, increasing or decreasing it by several dozen percent, sometimes even turning C sinks into C sources or vice versa. This is demonstrated not only for earthworms and other larger invertebrates but also for smaller fauna such as Collembola. We suggest that inclusion of soil animal activities (plant residue consumption and bioturbation altering the formation, depth, hydraulic properties and physical heterogeneity of soils) can fundamentally affect the predictive outcome of SOM models. Understanding direct and indirect impacts of soil fauna on nutrient availability, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and plant growth is key to the understanding of SOM dynamics in the context of global carbon cycling models. We argue that explicit consideration of soil fauna is essential to make realistic modelling predictions on SOM dynamics and to detect expected non-linear responses of SOM dynamics to global change. We present a decision framework, to be further developed through the activities of KEYSOM, a European COST Action, for when mechanistic SOM models

  7. Early Eocene volcanic ashes on Greifswalder Oie and their depositional environment, with an overview of coeval ash-bearing deposits in northern Germany and Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obst, Karsten; Ansorge, Jörg; Matting, Sabine; Hüneke, Heiko

    2015-11-01

    Unconsolidated bentonites and carbonate-cemented volcanic ashes occur in northern Germany within the clay sequence of the Lamstedt and Schlieven Formations documented by several wells. Ash-bearing carbonate concretions (so-called cementstones) are also known from glacially transported rafts and erratic boulders on the Baltic Sea island Greifswalder Oie, representing the easternmost exposures of early Eocene sediments in the North Sea Basin. The ashes can be correlated with water-lain ashes of the Danish Fur and Ølst Formations (mo-clay) generated during the opening of the North Atlantic Ocean about 55 Ma ago. Two types of cementstones can be distinguished on the basis of the mineralogical composition, sedimentary features and fossil content. Greifswalder Oie type I contains a black, up to 12-cm-thick ash deposit that follows above two distinct thin grey ash layers. The major ash unit has a rather homogeneous lower part; only a very weak normal grading and faint lamination are discernible. In the upper part, however, intercalations with light mudstone, in part intensively bioturbated, together with parallel and cross-lamination suggest reworking of the ash in a shallow marine environment. Major and trace element compositions are used to correlate type I ashes with those of the Danish-positive series which represent rather uniform ferrobasalts of the Danish stage 4, probably related to the emergence of proto-Iceland. In contrast, type II ash comprises a single, normally graded, about 5-cm-thick layer of water-lain air-fall tuff, which is embedded in fine-grained sandstone to muddy siltstone. Type II ash is characterised by very high TiO2 but low MgO contents. Exceptional REE patterns with a pronounced positive Eu anomaly suggest intense leaching of the glass that hampers exact correlation with pyroclastic deposits within the North Atlantic Igneous Province.

  8. Architecture and development of the alluvial sediments of the Upper Jurassic Tordillo Formation in the Cañada Ancha Valley, northern Neuquén Basin, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gómez, José; Martín-Chivelet, Javier; Palma, Ricardo M.

    2009-07-01

    The Upper Jurassic Tordillo Formation at Cañada Ancha area, northern Neuquén Basin, Argentina, comprises a multi-stage suit of predominantly alluvial sediments that is heterolithic in nature. In that suit, several lithofacies, architectural elements, and bounding surfaces of different order have been identified and their lateral and vertical distribution characterized. This analysis allowed the differentiation of 3 main units (lower, middle and upper), 20 subunits (C-1 to C-20), and the characterization of their alluvial styles. The lower unit (which comprises subunits C-1 to C-4) is mainly formed by fine- to medium-grained sandstones, which become medium- to coarse-grained towards the top. These sandstones characterize settings ranging from floodplains with isolated, unconfined flows, to more complex, vertically stacked, multi-storey sheet sandstones of braided fluvial systems. The middle unit (C-5 to C-10) is dominated by pale brown-grey fine-to coarse-grained sands and medium size subangular to angular conglomerates, which reflect amalgamated complexes of sandstone sheets and downstream accretion macroforms. Remarkably, this alluvial sedimentation was episodically punctuated by volcaniclastic flows. The upper unit (C-11 to C-20) consists of finer sediments, mainly pink to white fine-to medium grained sandstones and red to green siltstones. Towards the top, bioturbation becomes important, and also the presence of volcanosedimentary flows is noticeable. Fluvial settings include braided sheet sandstones with waning flood deposits evolving to isolated high-sinuosity fluvial systems, with flash flood deposits. At the top of this unit, facies may suggest marine influence. Vertical changes in the fluvial style result from both climatic and tectonic controls. A semiarid to arid climate and the active tectonism linked to the eastward migration of the Andean volcanic arc determined major bounding surfaces, fluvial style evolution and the presence of the volcano

  9. Characteristics and origin of Earth-mounds on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tullis, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Earth-mounds are common features on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The mounds are typically round or oval in plan view, <0.5 m in height, and from 8 to 14 m in diameter. They are found on flat and sloped surfaces, and appear less frequently in lowland areas. The mounds have formed on deposits of multiple sedimentary environments. Those studied included alluvial gravel terraces along the Big Lost River (late Pleistocene/early Holocene age), alluvial fan segments on the flanks of the Lost River Range (Bull Lake and Pinedale age equivalents), and loess/slopewash sediments overlying basalt flows. Backhoe trenches were dug to allow characterization of stratigraphy and soil development. Each mound has features unique to the depositional and pedogenic history of the site; however, there are common elements to all mounds that are linked to the history of mound formation. Each mound has a {open_quotes}floor{close_quotes} of a sediment or basement rock of significantly different hydraulic conductivity than the overlying sediment. These paleosurfaces are overlain by finer-grained sediments, typically loess or flood-overbank deposits. Mounds formed in environments where a sufficient thickness of fine-grained sediment held pore water in a system open to the migration to a freezing front. Heaving of the sediment occurred by the growth of ice lenses. Mound formation occurred at the end of the Late Pleistocene or early in the Holocene, and was followed by pedogenesis. Soils in the mounds were subsequently altered by bioturbation, buried by eolian deposition, and eroded by slopewash runoff. These secondary processes played a significant role in maintaining or increasing the mound/intermound relief.

  10. Acid-base physiology response to ocean acidification of two ecologically and economically important holothuroids from contrasting habitats, Holothuria scabra and Holothuria parva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, Marie; Eeckhaut, Igor; Dehairs, Frank; Dubois, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    Sea cucumbers are dominant invertebrates in several ecosystems such as coral reefs, seagrass meadows and mangroves. As bioturbators, they have an important ecological role in making available calcium carbonate and nutrients to the rest of the community. However, due to their commercial value, they face overexploitation in the natural environment. On top of that, occurring ocean acidification could impact these organisms, considered sensitive as echinoderms are osmoconformers, high-magnesium calcite producers and have a low metabolism. As a first investigation of the impact of ocean acidification on sea cucumbers, we tested the impact of short-term (6 to 12 days) exposure to ocean acidification (seawater pH 7.7 and 7.4) on two sea cucumbers collected in SW Madagascar, Holothuria scabra, a high commercial value species living in the seagrass meadows, and H. parva, inhabiting the mangroves. The former lives in a habitat with moderate fluctuations of seawater chemistry (driven by day-night differences) while the second lives in a highly variable intertidal environment. In both species, pH of the coelomic fluid was significantly negatively affected by reduced seawater pH, with a pronounced extracellular acidosis in individuals maintained at pH 7.7 and 7.4. This acidosis was due to an increased dissolved inorganic carbon content and pCO2 of the coelomic fluid, indicating a limited diffusion of the CO2 towards the external medium. However, respiration and ammonium excretion rates were not affected. No evidence of accumulation of bicarbonate was observed to buffer the coelomic fluid pH. If this acidosis stays uncompensated for when facing long-term exposure, other processes could be affected in both species, eventually leading to impacts on their ecological role.

  11. Towards an Accurate and Precise Chronology for the Colonization of Australia: The Example of Riwi, Kimberley, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balme, Jane; O’Connor, Sue; Whitau, Rose

    2016-01-01

    An extensive series of 44 radiocarbon (14C) and 37 optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages have been obtained from the site of Riwi, south central Kimberley (NW Australia). As one of the earliest known Pleistocene sites in Australia, with archaeologically sterile sediment beneath deposits containing occupation, the chronology of the site is important in renewed debates surrounding the colonization of Sahul. Charcoal is preserved throughout the sequence and within multiple discrete hearth features. Prior to 14C dating, charcoal has been pretreated with both acid-base-acid (ABA) and acid base oxidation-stepped combustion (ABOx-SC) methods at multiple laboratories. Ages are consistent between laboratories and also between the two pretreatment methods, suggesting that contamination is easily removed from charcoal at Riwi and the Pleistocene ages are likely to be accurate. Whilst some charcoal samples recovered from outside hearth features are identified as outliers within a Bayesian model, all ages on charcoal within hearth features are consistent with stratigraphy. OSL dating has been undertaken using single quartz grains from the sandy matrix. The majority of samples show De distributions that are well-bleached but that also include evidence for mixing as a result of post-depositional bioturbation of the sediment. The results of the two techniques are compared and evaluated within a Bayesian model. Consistency between the two methods is good, and we demonstrate human occupation at this site from 46.4–44.6 cal kBP (95.4% probability range). Importantly, the lowest archaeological horizon at Riwi is underlain by sterile sediments which have been dated by OSL making it possible to demonstrate the absence of human occupation for between 0.9–5.2 ka (68.2% probability range) prior to occupation. PMID:27655174

  12. Spatial partitioning between species of the phytoplankton-feeding guild on an estuarine intertidal sand flat and its implication on habitat carrying capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Akio; Nakaoka, Ayumi; Maekawa, Hideki; Yamada, Fumihiko

    2008-07-01

    The fishery yield of Manila clams, Ruditapes philippinarum, increased considerably in the 1970s but has decreased rapidly since the middle 1980s on extensive intertidal sand flats in Ariake Sound (Kyushu, Japan). A survey conducted in 2004 on a 3.4-km 2 sand flat located in the central part of the Sound (Shirakawa sand flat) revealed four dominant species: two thalassinidean shrimps ( Upogebia major and Nihonotrypaea japonica), which are deep-reaching burrow dwellers with strong bioturbation activities, and two bivalves ( Mactra veneriformis and R. philippinarum). All four species belong to a phytoplankton (diatom)-feeding guild. In the late 1970s, the Manila clam population prevailed in high densities over the entire sand flat, whereas its distribution was restricted to the lowest quarter of the shore in 2004. In contrast, the population sizes and zones of occurrence of the other phytoplankton feeders have expanded in the absence of R. philippinarum, perhaps an indication of competitive release. After establishment, effects of the thalassinidean shrimps on sediment stability appear to have further reduced clam abundances. Across the sand flat in 2004, wet weight population biomass estimates for N. japonica, U. major, M. veneriformis, and R. philippinarum (whole body for shrimps and soft tissue for bivalves) were 304, 111, 378, and 234 tonnes, respectively. Based on Manila clam fishery yield records from Shirakawa, the carrying capacity of the Shirakawa sand flat in the late 1970s was estimated to be two times greater than the sum value for the whole phytoplankton-feeding guild in 2004. It is hypothesized that (1) the amount of phytoplankton determines the carrying capacity for the benthic community on the Shirakawa sand flat, with both phytoplankton and benthic biomass at maxima in the late 1970s, and (2) the subsequent increases in competition for space have caused further declines in the Manila clam population biomass to approximately one-eighth of its past

  13. Development of topographic asymmetry: Insights from dated cinder cones in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Luke A.; Pelletier, Jon D.; Roering, Joshua J.

    2014-08-01

    Topographic asymmetry, that is, differences in the morphology of landscapes as a function of slope aspect, can be used to infer ecohydrogeomorphic feedback relationships. In this study, we document the dependence of topographic gradients and drainage densities on slope aspect and time/age in four Quaternary cinder cone fields in Arizona, Oregon, and California. Cinder cones are particularly useful as natural experiments in geomorphic evolution because they begin their evolution at a known time in the past (many have been radiometrically dated) and because they often have simple, well-constrained initial morphologies. North-facing portions of cinder cones have steeper topographic gradients and higher mean vegetation cover (i.e., Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, or NDVI, values) under current climatic conditions compared with corresponding south-facing portions of cones within each volcanic field. Drainage density is also higher on north-facing portions of cones in three of the four volcanic fields. These differences in topography were not present initially but developed progressively over time, indicating that the asymmetry is a result of post-eruption geomorphic processes. To test alternative hypotheses for the slope-aspect control of topography, we developed a numerical model for cinder cone evolution and a methodology for estimating local paleovegetation cover as a function of elevation, slope aspect, and time within the Quaternary. The numerical model results demonstrate that rates of colluvial transport were higher on south-facing hillslopes in at least three of the four cinder cones fields. Our paleovegetation analysis suggests that in the two Arizona volcanic fields we studied, higher rates of colluvial transport on south-facing hillslopes were the result of greater time-averaged vegetation cover and hence higher rates of sediment transport by floral bioturbation. Our results illustrate the profound impact that relatively small variations in solar

  14. Deep marine facies in the Upper Volgian - Ryazanian of the northern Danish Central Gragen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ineson, J.R.; Rasmussen, E.S.

    1998-10-01

    In the Gertrud Graben, a sub-basin of the Danish Central Graben, the uppermost Farsund Formation (Upper Volgian - Ryazanian) is characterized by organic-rich mudstones interbedded locally with turbidite sandstones. The core presented here, from the Jeppe-1 well (5603/28-3), records the processes active on the western flank of the Graben, adjacent to a Late Jurassic structural high, the Gert Ridge. In this setting, `classical` turbidites are largely restricted to thin sand-mud couplets, deposited by sediment-starved, dilute turbidity currents, possibly representing overbank deposits from an axial turbidite system in the Gertrud Graben. Sand-rich facies typically have a mud matrix and contain mudstone clasts and large contorted rafts of interbedded sandtone and mudstone; these deposits mainly record sliding and bebris flow, but intrusive sediment boidies may also be represented. The facies spectrum is completed by organic-rich, non-bioturbated hemipelagic mudstones which form an important component of the the `hot shales` which cap the cored section although remaining subordinate to mudstone turbidites. Upper Jurassic mudrocks are generally accepted to be the most important hydrocarbon source rocks in the central and northern North Sea. Of particular importance are the `hot shales` that occur in the upper levels of the succession and show abnormally high (`hot`) levels of gamma radioactivity, corresponding to a high content of organic carbon. In certain settings, these rich source rocks interfinger with, or overlie, sand-rich reservoir facies that are commonly of deep-water aspect. The aim here is to present an example of this facies association from the Jeppe-1 well (5603/28-3) in the Danish sector of the Central Graben. (au) 8 fig., 16 refs.

  15. Effects of organic matter addition on methylmercury formation in capped and uncapped marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndungu, Kuria; Schaanning, Morten; Braaten, Hans Fredrik Veiteberg

    2016-10-15

    In situ subaqueous capping (ISC) of contaminated marine sediments is frequently proposed as a feasible and effective mitigation option. However, though effective in isolating mercury species migration into overlying water, capping can also alter the location and extent of biogeochemical zones and potentially enhance methylmercury (MeHg) formation in Hg-contaminated marine sediments. We carried out a boxcosm study to investigate whether the addition of organic carbon (OC) to Hg-contaminated marine sediments beneath an in situ cap would initiate and/or enhance MeHg formation of the inorganic Hg present. The study was motivated by ongoing efforts to remediate ca. 30,000 m(2) of Hg-contaminated seabed sediments from a Hg spill from the U864 WWII submarine wreck. By the time of sinking, the submarine is assumed to have been holding a cargo of ca. 65 tons of liquid Hg. Natural organic matter and petroleum hydrocarbons from fuels and lubricants in the wreck are potential sources of organic carbon that could potentially fuel MeHg formation beneath a future cap. The results of our study clearly demonstrated that introduction of algae OC to Hg-contaminated sediments, triggered high rates of MeHg production as long a there was sufficient OC. Thus, MeHg production was limited by the amount of organic carbon available. The study results also confirmed that, within the six-month duration of the study and in the absence of bioturbating fauna, a 3-cm sediment clay cap could effectively reduce fluxes of Hg species to the overlying water and isolate the Hg-contaminated sediments from direct surficial deposition of organic matter that could potentially fuel methylation.

  16. Free atmospheric CO2 enrichment increased above ground biomass but did not affect symbiotic N2-fixation and soil carbon dynamics in a mixed deciduous stand in Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Smith

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Through increases in net primary production (NPP, elevated CO2 is hypothesized to increase the amount of plant litter entering the soil. The fate of this extra carbon on the forest floor or in mineral soil is currently not clear. Moreover, increased rates of NPP can be maintained only if forests can escape nitrogen limitation. In a Free atmospheric CO2 Enrichment (FACE experiment near Bangor, Wales, 4 ambient and 4 elevated [CO2] plots were planted with patches of Betula pendula, Alnus glutinosa and Fagus sylvatica on a former arable field. After 4 years, biomass averaged for the 3 species was 5497 (se 270 g m−2 in ambient and 6450 (se 130 g m−2 in elevated [CO2] plots, a significant increase of 17% (P = 0.018. During that time, only a shallow L forest floor litter layer had formed due to intensive bioturbation. Total soil C and N contents increased irrespective of treatment and species as a result of afforestation. We could not detect an additional C sink in the soil, nor were soil C stabilization processes affected by elevated [CO2]. We observed a decrease of leaf N content in Betula and Alnus under elevated [CO2], while the soil C/N ratio decreased regardless of CO2 treatment. The ratio of N taken up from the soil and by N2-fixation in Alnus was not affected by elevated [CO2]. We infer that increased nitrogen use efficiency is the mechanism by which increased NPP is sustained under elevated [CO2] at this site.

  17. Surface sedimentation and sediment property of 2014~2015 years on the Dongho open-coast intertidal flat, Gochang coast of southwestern Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryang, Woo Hun; Kang, Na Yeong; Kang, Sol Ip

    2016-04-01

    The Dongho intertidal flat, located on the southwestern coast of Korea, is macro-tide, open-coast, linear shoreline, and sand substrates. In the Dongho intertidal flat, this study has focused on characteristics of surface sedimentation and sediment properties during 2014~2015 years. Can cores (30×17×5 cm3) were sampled at 4 sites with 150 m interval from shoreline to lower intertidal area during the 6 seasons from spring (June) in 2014 to summer (Aug.) in 2015. The 24 can cores of the intertidal flat were analyzed for sediment texture, porosity, wet density, grain density, and shear strength at 2, 10, and 25 cm parts from the top. Sediment type is mostly sand (S) facies of the Folk scheme, and mean grain size and skewness of the sediments are 0.93~2.70 ϕ and -0.50~0.41, respectively. Sediment properties show porosity of 9~32%, wet density of 1.88~2.45 g/cm3, grain density of 2.62~3.09 g/cm3, and shear strength of 8~64 kPa. The cancore peels represent planar and inclined stratification and bioturbated faintly stratification with some shell fragments. The stratification weaken from the shoreline to the lower intertidal site. This is indicative of waning influences of sea wave in the Dongho intertidal flat. Keywords: macro-tide, open-coast, can core, intertidal flat, Gochang coast Acknowledgements: This study was supported by the research grant from the Korean Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries (PJT200538). This presentation is an interim result of the coastal research program in the study area.

  18. Fidelity of life and death molluscan assemblages from carbonate tidal flats in the Persian (Arabian) Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Diego A.; Albano, Paolo G.; Harzhauser, Mathias; Piller, Werner E.; Zuschin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Live-dead (LD) studies aim to help understand how faithfully fossil assemblages can be used to quantitatively infer the structure of the original living communities that generated them. To this purpose, LD comparisons have been conducted in different terrestrial and aquatic environments to assess how environment-specific differences in quality and intensity of taphonomic factors affect LD fidelity. In sub-tropical and tropical settings, most LD studies have focused on hard substrates or seagrass bottoms. Here we present results on molluscan assemblages from soft carbonate sediments in tidal flats of the Persian (Arabian) Gulf (Indo-West Pacific biogeographic province). We analyzed a total of 7193 mollusks collected from six sites comprising time-averaged death assemblages (DAs) and snapshot living assemblages (LAs). All analyses were performed at site and at habitat scales after correcting for sample-size differences. We found a good match in proportional abundance and a notable mismatch in species composition. In fact, species richness in DAs is 6 times larger than in LAs at site scale, and 4 times at habitat scale. Additionally, we found a good fidelity of evenness, and rank abundance of feeding guilds. Other studies have shown that molluscan DAs from subtidal carbonate environments can display lower time-averaging than those from siliciclastic environments due to high rates of shell loss to bioerosion and dissolution. For our case study of tidal flat carbonate settings, we interpret that despite temporal autocorrelation (good fidelity of proportional abundance), substantial differences in species richness and composition can be explained by early cementation, lateral mixing, intense bioturbation and moderate sedimentation rates. Our results suggest that tidal flat carbonate environments can potentially lead to a wider window of time-averaging in comparison with subtidal carbonate settings.

  19. Biological Dimensions of Crack Morphology in Dryland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, K. F.; Spiegel, M.; Caylor, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    Macropores and cracks have an integral role in soil hydrology, and the physicochemical factors that induce them have been the subject of much laboratory research. How these processes translate to field soils, however, is often obfuscated by the biological elements present that complicate its formation and dynamics. In this study, we investigated the biological influence of herbivores and vegetation on 3D crack morphology in a dryland swelling soil (black cotton/vertisol). Fieldwork was conducted at and near the Kenya Long-Term Exclosure Experiment (KLEE) plots in Mpala, central Kenya, where three different soil regions were identified: highly vegetated areas, animal trails, and termite mounds. Crack networks were physically characterized by pouring liquid resin into the soil and excavating them when dry, after which they were imaged and quantified using medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cracking intensity of each cast was corrected via soil moisture and bulk density measurements at 5 cm intervals over 30 cm. 3D characterization of the soil system shows that mechanical compaction is a major influence in the formation of extensive and deep cracks in animal trails, with megaherbivores (e.g. elephants) inducing the most extreme cracks. Bioturbation is seen as a major influence in the formation of shallower cracks in termite mounds, as termites loosen and aerate the soil and reduce the soil's cohesive properties. Highly vegetated soils show a large degree of variability: small, disconnected soil patches induced by vegetative cover and a larger root network results in smaller and shallower cracks, but full vegetative cover induces deep and irregular cracks, possibly due to diverted rainfall. Our results highlight the intricate connections between the biology and physics that dictate soil processes in a complex soil system at the field scale.

  20. An alternative model for CaCO3 over-shooting during the PETM: Biological carbonate compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yiming; Boudreau, Bernard P.; Dickens, Gerald R.; Sluijs, Appy; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2016-11-01

    Decreased CaCO3 content of deep-sea sediments argues for rapid and massive acidification of the oceans during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ∼56 Ma BP). In the course of the subsequent recovery from this acidification, sediment CaCO3 content came to exceed pre-PETM levels, known as over-shooting. Past studies have largely attributed the latter to increased alkalinity input to the oceans via enhanced weathering, but this ignores potentially important biological factors. We successfully reproduce the CaCO3 records from Walvis Ridge in the Atlantic Ocean, including over-shooting, using a biogeochemical box model. Replication of the CaCO3 records required: 1) introduction of a maximum of ∼6500 GtC of CO2 directly into deep-ocean waters or ∼8000 GtC into the atmosphere, 2) limited deep-water exchange between the Indo-Atlantic and Pacific oceans, 3) the disappearance of sediment bioturbation during a portion of the PETM, and 4) most central to this study, a ∼50% reduction in net CaCO3 production, during acidification. In our simulations, over-shooting is an emergent property, generated at constant alkalinity input (no weathering feedback) as a consequence of attenuated CaCO3 productivity. This occurs because lower net CaCO3 production from surface waters allows alkalinity to build-up in the deep oceans (alkalinization), thus promoting deep-water super-saturation. Restoration of CaCO3 productivity later in the PETM, particularly in the Indo-Atlantic Ocean, leads to greater accumulation of CaCO3, ergo over-shooting, which returns the ocean to pre-PETM conditions over a time scale greater than 200 ka.

  1. A Numerical Model to Assess Soil Fluxes from Meteoric 10Be Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, B.; Govers, G.; Vanacker, V.; Vanderborght, J.; Smolders, E.; Baken, S.

    2015-12-01

    Meteoric 10Be may be mobile in the soil system. The latter hampers a direct translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into spatial variations in erosion and deposition rates. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model that allows us to simulate the behaviour of meteoric 10Be in the soil system. The Be2D model is then used to analyse the potential impact of human-accelerated soil fluxes on meteoric 10Be inventories. The model consists of two parts. A first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be within the soil profile including particle migration, chemical leaching and bioturbation, whereas a second component describes lateral soil (and meteoric 10Be) fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering and lateral soil fluxes from creep, water and tillage erosion. Model simulations show that meteoric 10Be inventories can indeed be related to erosion and deposition, across a wide range of geomorphological and pedological settings. However, quantification of the effects of vertical mobility is essential for a correct interpretation of the observed spatial patterns in 10Be data. Moreover, our simulations suggest that meteoric 10Be can be used as a tracer to unravel human impact on soil fluxes when soils have a high retention capacity for meteoric meteoric 10Be. Application of the Be2D model to existing data sets shows that model parameters can reliably be constrained, resulting in a good agreement between simulated and observed meteoric 10Be concentrations and inventories. This confirms the suitability of the Be2D model as a robust tool to underpin quantitative interpretations of spatial variability in meteoric 10Be data for eroding landscapes.

  2. Improvement of Carbon Dioxide Sweep Efficiency by Utilization of Microbial Permeability Profile Modification to Reduce the Amount of Oil Bypassed During Carbon Dioxide Flood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Darrel [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Brown, Lewis [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Lynch, F. Leo [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Kirkland, Brenda L. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Collins, Krystal M. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Funderburk, William K. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2010-12-31

    The objective of this project was to couple microbial permeability profile modification (MPPM), with carbon dioxide flooding to improve oil recovery from the Upper Cretaceous Little Creek Oil Field situated in Lincoln and Pike counties, MS. This study determined that MPPM technology, which improves production by utilizing environmentally friendly nutrient solutions to simulate the growth of the indigenous microflora in the most permeable zones of the reservoir thus diverting production to less permeable, previously unswept zones, increased oil production without interfering with the carbon dioxide flooding operation. Laboratory tests determined that no microorganisms were produced in formation waters, but were present in cores. Perhaps the single most significant contribution of this study is the demonstration that microorganisms are active at a formation temperature of 115°C (239°F) by using a specially designed culturing device. Laboratory tests were employed to simulate the MPPM process by demonstrating that microorganisms could be activated with the resulting production of oil in coreflood tests performed in the presence of carbon dioxide at 66°C (the highest temperature that could be employed in the coreflood facility). Geological assessment determined significant heterogeneity in the Eutaw Formation, and documented relatively thin, variably-lithified, well-laminated sandstone interbedded with heavily-bioturbated, clay-rich sandstone and shale. Live core samples of the Upper Cretaceous Eutaw Formation from the Heidelberg Field, MS were quantitatively assessed using SEM, and showed that during MPPM permeability modification occurs ubiquitously within pore and throat spaces of 10-20 μm diameter. Testing of the MPPM procedure in the Little Creek Field showed a significant increase in production occurred in two of the five production test wells; furthermore, the decline curve in each of the production wells became noticeably less steep. This project greatly

  3. A 210Pb sediment budget and granulometric record of sediment fluxes in a subarctic deltaic system: The Great Whale River, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülse, Peter; Bentley, Samuel J.

    2012-08-01

    To elucidate how modern river discharge conditions of the Great Whale River (GWR) are represented in the marine sedimentary record, eight box and gravity cores were examined in terms of 210Pb and 137Cs radiochemistry, granulometry and physical sedimentary structures. These data were analyzed to provide insights into sedimentary processes and patterns at the study site. Sediment accumulation in the study area appears to be a relatively steady process over time-scales of 50-100 yr, allowing biological activity to overprint the primary depositional fabric. Subtle differences between 137Cs and 210Pb sediment accumulation rates (SARs) suggest an offshore shift in the locus of fine sediment deposition during the past ˜150 yr, which may be a result of ongoing climatic warming leading to decreasing sea-ice coverage and a more energetic marine environment. Under present day conditions 23% (40,000 t/yr) of the discharged sediment appear to accumulate in a 25 km2 area off the river mouth. The remaining 77% (136,000 t/yr) are either deposited further offshore, possibly along the northeastern shore as a result of Hudson Bay's counterclockwise circulation, or dispersed into the Hudson Bay system. Grain diameter frequency analyses suggest that environmental processes controlling sediment transport and deposition vary over decadal time scales. Although, we cannot define an exact cause for this pattern, these shifts may be related to variations in river discharge, wave climate, possibly due to windier conditions or less sea-ice dampening, bioturbation or a combination of all. This suggests that also longer term river discharge signals are preserved in the marine sedimentary record offshore the Great Whale River. In summary, no major change in sediment discharge over the past ˜150 yr was observed. However, the offshore shift in the locus of sediment deposition suggests, that a warming climate will lead to more energetic marine conditions, less sea-ice coverage, and an increased

  4. Deciphering site formation processes through soil micromorphology at Contrebandiers Cave, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldeias, Vera; Goldberg, Paul; Dibble, Harold L; El-Hajraoui, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Contrebandiers Cave preserves a Late Pleistocene sequence containing Middle Stone Age (MSA) so-called Maghrebian Mousterian and Aterian occupations, spanning from ∼126 to 95 ka (thousands of years ago), followed by spatially restricted Iberomaurusian industries. Micromorphological analyses, complemented by instrumental mineralogical identification and fabric orientation, allowed for the reconstruction of the main site formation processes at the site. Initial deposition is characterized by local reworking of marine shelly sands dating to Marine Isotopic Stage 5e (MIS5e). The subsequent stratification reveals sedimentary dynamics predominantly associated with gravity-driven inputs and contributions from weathering of the encasing bedrock, at the same time that anthropogenic sediments were being accumulated. The allochthonous components reflect soil degradation and vegetation changes around the cave during the last interglacial. Human occupations seems to be somewhat ephemeral in nature, with some stratigraphic units apparently lacking archaeological components, while in others the human-associated deposits (e.g., burned bones, charcoal, and ashes) can be substantial. Ephemeral breaks in sedimentation and/or erosion followed by stabilization are mainly discernible microscopically by the presence of phosphatic-rich laminae interpreted as short-lived surfaces, peaks of increased humidity and colonization by plants. More substantial erosion affects the uppermost Aterian layers, presumably due to localized reconfigurations of the cave's roof. The subsequent Iberomaurusian deposits are not in their primary position and are associated with well-sorted silts of aeolian origin. While the effects of chemical diagenesis are limited throughout the whole stratigraphic sequence, physical bioturbation (e.g., by wasps, rodents, and earthworms) is more pervasive and leads to localized movement of the original sedimentary particles.

  5. Overlapping Ballistic Ejecta Fields: Separating Distinct Blasts at Kings Bowl, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, C.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Hughes, S. S.; Sears, D. W. G.; Heldmann, J. L.; Lim, D. S. S.; Haberle, C. W.; Sears, H.; Elphic, R. C.; Kobayashi, L.; Garry, W. B.; Neish, C.; Karunatillake, S.; Button, N.; Purcell, S.; Mallonee, H.; Ostler, B.

    2015-12-01

    Kings Bowl is a ~2200ka pit crater created by a phreatic blast along a volcanic fissure in the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), Idaho. The main crater measures approximately 80m in length, 30m in width, and 30m in depth, with smaller pits located nearby on the Great Rift fissure, and has been targeted by the FINESSE team as a possible analogue for Cyane Fossae, Mars. The phreatic eruption is believed to have occurred due to the interaction of groundwater with lava draining back into the fissure following a lava lake high stand, erupting already solidified basalt from this and previous ERSP lava flows. The contemporaneous draw back of the lava with the explosions may conceal some smaller possible blast pits as more lava drained into the newly formed pits. Ballistic ejecta from the blasts occur on both sides of the fissure. To the east, the ballistic blocks are mantled by fine tephra mixed with eolian dust, the result of a westerly wind during the explosions. We use differential GPS to map the distribution of ballistic blocks on the west side of the fissure, recording position, percent vesiculation, and the length of 3 mutually perpendicular axes for each block >20cm along multiple transects parallel to the fissure. From the several hundred blocks recorded, we have been able to separate the ballistic field into several distinct blast deposits on the basis of size distributions and block concentration. The smaller pits identified from the ballistic fields correspond broadly to the northern and southern limits of the tephra/dust field east of the fissure. Soil formation and bioturbation of the tephra by sagebrush have obliterated any tephrostratigraphy that could have been linked to individual blasts. The ballistic block patterns at Kings Bowl may be used to identify distinct ejecta groups in high-resolution imagery of Mars or other planetary bodies.

  6. Burial of Authigenic Carbonate in Reducing Sediments of the Cenomanian/Turonian Western Interior Seaway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, M. M.; Zeng, Z.; Wehner, M.; Xu, G.; Maulana, I.; Conte, R.; Laya, J. C.; Miller, B.; Pope, M. C.; Mattson, A.; Osborn, B.; Gillespie, D.; Albert, P.; Bartlett, R.; Berry, H.; Colmenares, E.; Herman, M. D.; Knott, P.; Koerth, J. N.; Levitt, E.; Palachek, R.; Patrolia, M.; Phillips, D.; Shalia, A. K.; Tran, C.; Wilcoxson, R.; Wood, E.; Wood, V.; Worley, D.; Zapalac, R.

    2014-12-01

    Early diagenetic carbonate cements (authigenic carbonate) have been hypothesized to form significant sinks for carbon during intervals of widespread oceanic anoxia. We examined rocks of the Eagle Ford Group in core (McMullen County, south Texas) and outcrop (Lozier Canyon and Antonio Creek, Terrell County, west Texas) to determine controls on authigenic carbonate formation. Rocks in both locations were deposited in shallow platform settings above storm wave base, with western samples showing evidence of greater current activity and occasional bioturbation under oxic conditions, particularly during the Turonian. Rocks from the south Texas core were deposited under almost uniformly anoxic conditions. In outcrop, carbonate-rich lithologies occur as distinct beds interbedded with organic-rich shale, and as nodules or partially compacted nodular beds. Microscopically, carbonate occurs as foraminifer tests, inoceramid fragments, coarse void filling cements, disseminated silt-sized grains, and lenticular masses, with cements comprising 5-80% of rocks by volume. Foraminifer cavity fill defines a paragenetic sequence of early calcite followed by ±kaolinite, pyrite, and late calcite. This sequence is consistent with diagenesis under metal reducing to sulfate reducing conditions, occasionally in the presence of volcanic ash. Cements thus formed under a variety of pore fluid conditions likely controlled by anaerobic microbial metabolisms partially constrained by the redox state of the overlying water column. Bulk carbonate carbon isotopic compositions record three negative excursions of up to 5‰ indicating early diagenetic incorporation of oxidized organic matter. Associated diagenetic Ba-rich celestine, SrSO4, together with hydraulic lags of detrital celestine, indicate pervasive early dissolution of high-Sr carbonates in or around the sulfate reducing zone of the sediment column. Co-occurrence of negative isotopic excursions, celestine deposits, multiple ash beds, and

  7. Earthworm effects on native grassland root system dynamics under natural and increased rainfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Arnone

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Earthworms (EWs can modify soil structure and nutrient availability, and hence alter conditions for plant growth through their burrowing and casting activities. However, few studies have specifically quantified EW effects by experimentally manipulating EW densities (EWDs. In an earlier field study in native grassland ecosystems exposed to ambient and experimentally elevated rainfall (+280 mm year-1, projected under some climate change scenarios, we found no effects of EWDs (37, 114, 169 EW m-2 and corresponding EW activity on aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP, even though soil nutrient availability likely increased with increasing EWDs. The lack of effects of EWDs on ANPP suggested that EWs may have adversely affected root systems in that study in some way. The objective of the present study was to quantify responses of root length density (RLD, using data collected from the same grassland plots during the earlier study. RLDs were highest in plots with low EWDs and decreased in plots with higher EWDs. Elevated rainfall primarily increased RLDs in the low EWD treatment (by almost +40%. Reductions in RLDs resulting from increased EWDs did not affect ANPP. Our results indicate that elevating EWDs above ambient levels may limit root growth through large increases in soil bioturbation, but concurrent increases in cast production and nutrient availability may compensate for the suppression of root nutrient absorbing surface area leaving ANPP unchanged, but with shifts in growth (biomass allocation toward shoots. Similarly, reductions in EWDs appeared to promote higher RLDs that increased soil nutrient foraging in soil with lower amounts of nutrients because of reduced casting activity. Amplified responses observed when rainfall during the growing season was increased suggest that EWDs may mainly affect RLDs and above- vs. belowground growth (biomass allocation under climate changes that include more frequent wetter-than-average growing

  8. Ecohydrological Interfaces as Dynamic Hotspots of Biogeochemical Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Stefan; Lewandowski, Joerg; Hannah, David; McDonald, Karlie; Folegot, Silvia; Baranov, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Ecohydrological interfaces, represent the boundaries between water-dependent ecosystems that can alter substantially the fluxes of energy and matter. There is still a critical gap of understanding the organisational principles of the drivers and controls of spatially and temporally variable ecohydrological interface functions. This knowledge gap limits our capacity to efficiently quantify, predict and manage the services provided by complex ecosystems. Many ecohydrological interfaces are characterized by step changes in microbial metabolic activity, steep redox gradients and often even thermodynamic phase shifts, for instance at the interfaces between atmosphere and water or soil matrix and macro-pores interfaces. This paper integrates investigations from point scale laboratory microcosm experiments with reach and subcatchment scale tracer experiments and numerical modeling studies to elaborate similarities in the drivers and controls that constitute the enhanced biogeochemical activity of different types of ecohydrologica interfaces across a range of spatial and temporal scales. We therefore combine smart metabolic activity tracers to quantify the impact of bioturbating benthic fauna onto ecosystem respiration and oxygen consumption and investigate at larger scale, how microbial metabolic activity and carbon turnover at the water-sediment interface are controlled by sediment physical and chemical properties as well as water temperatures. Numerical modeling confirmed that experimentally identified hotspots of streambed biogeochemical cycling were controlled by patterns of physical properties such as hydraulic conductivities or bioavailability of organic matter, impacting on residence time distributions and hence reaction times. In contrast to previous research, our investigations thus confirmed that small-scale variability of physical and chemical interface properties had a major impact on biogeochemical processing at the investigated ecohydrological interfaces

  9. Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by marine biota: application to the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives i Batlle, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic model D-DAT was developed to study the dynamics of radionuclide uptake and turnover in biota and sediments in the immediate aftermath of the Fukushima accident. This dynamics is determined by the interplay between the residence time of radionuclides in seawater/sediments and the biological half-lives of elimination by the biota. The model calculates time-variable activity concentration of (131)I, (134)Cs, (137)Cs and (90)Sr in seabed sediment, fish, crustaceans, molluscs and macroalgae from surrounding activity concentrations in seawater, with which to derive internal and external dose rates. A central element of the model is the inclusion of dynamic transfer of radionuclides to/from sediments by factorising the depletion of radionuclides adsorbed onto suspended particulates, molecular diffusion, pore water mixing and bioturbation, represented by a simple set of differential equations coupled with the biological uptake/turnover processes. In this way, the model is capable of reproducing activity concentration in sediment more realistically. The model was used to assess the radiological impact of the Fukushima accident on marine biota in the acute phase of the accident. Sediment and biota activity concentrations are within the wide range of actual monitoring data. Activity concentrations in marine biota are thus shown to be better calculated by a dynamic model than with the simpler equilibrium approach based on concentration factors, which tends to overestimate for the acute accident period. Modelled dose rates from external exposure from sediment are also significantly below equilibrium predictions. The model calculations confirm previous studies showing that radioactivity levels in marine biota have been generally below the levels necessary to cause a measurable effect on populations. The model was used in mass-balance mode to calculate total integrated releases of 103, 30 and 3 PBq for (131)I, (137)Cs and (90)Sr, reasonably in line with previous

  10. Spatial variability and the fate of cesium in coastal sediments near Fukushima, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Black

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the amount of cesium incorporated into marine sediments as a result of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP accident has proven challenging due to the limited multi-core sampling from within the 30 km zone around the facility, the inherent spatial heterogeneities in ocean sediments, and the potential for inventory fluctuations due to physical, biological, and chemical processes. Using 210Pb, 234Th, 137Cs, and 134Cs profiles from 20 sediment cores, coastal sediment inventories were reevaluated. A minimum 137Cs sediment inventory of 100 ± 50 TBq was found for an area of 55 000 km2 using cores from this study and a total of 130 ± 60 TBq using an additional 181 samples. These inventories represent less than 1% of the estimated 15–30 PBq of cesium released during the FDNPP disaster and constitute ~ 90% of the total coastal inventory of 137Cs remaining in 2012. The time needed for surface sediment activities (0 to 3 cm at the 20 locations to reduce by 50% via bioturbation was estimated to range from 0.4 to 26 years, indicating a much greater persistence of cesium in the sediments relative to coastal water activities. However, due to the observed variability in mixing rates, grain size, and inventories, additional cores are needed to further improve estimates and capture the full extent of cesium penetration into the shallow coastal sediments, which was deeper than 14 cm for all cores retrieved from water depths less than 150 m.

  11. Abrupt release of terrigenous organic carbon to the Laptev Sea at termination of the Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesi, T.; Muschitiello, F.; Smittenberg, R.; Jakobsson, M.; Vonk, J.; Hill, P.; Dudarev, O.; Semiletov, I. P.; Kirchner, N.; Noormets, R.; Andersson, A.; Gustafsson, O.

    2015-12-01

    Based on analysis of a piston core collected in 2014 from the Lena River paleo delta, now Laptev Sea, we show that rapid and massive organic carbon (OC) deposition took place into the marine system at the termination of the Younger Dryas when the Arctic region experienced a large and extremely fast climate change. The highly laminated strata with absence of bioturbation further confirm the rapid event-driven emplacement of this deposit which was largely dominated by terrigenous OC as indicated by depleted δ13C values and high concentrations of terrestrial fossil biomarkers (lignin phenols and cutin-derived products). Moreover, the hydrogen isotopic composition (δ2H) of HMW n-alkanes indicates that this terrestrially-derived translocated OC was produced in the watershed during a relatively cold period. The OC appears to be a few thousand years old at time of deposition (ca. 4-5000 radiocarbon years; reservoir age corrected), consistent with the radiocarbon age of pre-aged OC currently supplied by the Lena river. Altogether our results indicate that fast climate warming exerts first-order control on large-scale carbon redistribution. Because the Younger Dryas-Preboreal transition occurred within a few decades, we infer that the abrupt and large release of terrigenous OC was essentially driven by rapid changes in the permafrost stability (i.e., thermal collapse/thawing) and increase in precipitation over the Siberian watershed. Interestingly, only surface and sub-surface carbon pools (i.e., active layer) were remobilized while deep and old sources (radiocarbon dead) did not seem to have substantially contributed to the total land-to-ocean flux during the Younger Dryas-Preboreal transition.

  12. Outcrop and core integrative ichnofabric analysis of Miocene sediments from Lepe, Huelva (SW Spain): Improving depositional and paleoenvironmental interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Tovar, Francisco J.; Dorador, Javier; Mayoral, Eduardo; Santos, Ana

    2017-03-01

    Ichnofabric analysis was conducted in Miocene sediments from Lepe (Huelva, SW Spain) based on integrative outcrop and core research, to improve interpretations of depositional and paleoenvironmental conditions, with special attention to sequence stratigraphy. Seven intervals were differentiated in outcrops based on stratigraphic and ichnological features, consisting of two ichnofabrics: Ophiomorpha-Thalassinoides-Spongeliomorpha ichnofabric characterizes intervals 1, 2, 6, 7 and 8, while Palaeophycus-Planolites-Phycosiphon ichnofabric characterizes intervals 3, 4 and 5. Fourteen ichnofabrics were differentiated in the core, mainly in view of lithological features, including ferruginous material, grain size, mottled background, ichnotaxa, and Bioturbation Index. A comparison between outcrop and core ichnofabrics through the upper 13.5 m, corresponding to the uppermost Tortonian-lowermost Messinian interval, revealed certain similarities as well as some differences. A continuous and relatively slow siliciclastic deposition with punctual variations in the sedimentation rate can be interpreted that, associated with favorable paleoenvironmental parameters such as aerobic conditions and nutrient availability, evidence that a well-developed and diverse macroinvertebrate trace maker community existed at that time. Softgrounds are dominant, but occasionally loosegrounds and even firmgrounds could develop. The ichnofabric distribution shows long-range patterns in outcrop and core, and short-range patterns exclusively in core. Long-range patterns reflect the last phases of a transgressive system tract, with a "maximum flooding zone" at the end, and then a highstand normal regression. High-frequency, short-range, repetitive patterns in ichnofabrics from core, mainly between ichnofabrics 6/8 to 9 from lower to upper part of the pattern, can be linked to "local flooding surfaces", subdividing the "maximum flooding zone" into parasequences. Our results reveals the usefulness of

  13. Modeling the gopher-meadow eco-geomorphic system on montane hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchell, E. W.; Doak, D. F.; Anderson, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    On montane hillslopes of Colorado's Front Range, the transport of soil by gophers can dominate the modern geomorphic system in meadows. Qualitative observations reveal that gophers prefer to forage in meadows over forests, that seedling roots are consumed by gophers, and that trees commonly occupy the rocky crests of hills overlooking open meadow hillslopes. This motivates a numerical model of gopher-mediated transport of soil and the long-term evolution of the coupled ecological-geomorphic system through quantitative observations from a manipulative experiment on meadow-centered plots in the Boulder Creek CZO in the Colorado Front Range montane forest. The ecological and geomorphic processes in the coupled system we wish to model must include: seedling establishment and damage, gopher tunneling geometries and resulting mound generation, mound material transport driven by rain and hail and by ungulate trampling, vegetative lock-down of mound material, and resulting changes in the soil depth and rockiness of the landscape. We must therefore have algorithms to capture the feedback mechanisms between gopher activity and the growth and potential death of trees, the casting of seeds and their likelihood of germination, and the spatial distribution of plants. The ecological component interacts with the soils/critical zone layer through feedbacks that include the dependence of gopher activity on root density, depth, and size, undergrowth availability, and the dependence of the rate of change of soil thickness on gradients in gopher-mediated transport. Results of a preliminary cellular automaton model which captures the essence of these geomorphic-ecological feedbacks can readily address the role of gophers in limiting the encroachment of trees into meadow patches. The bioturbation of the meadows, and the downslope transport of soil within them, is much more efficient than that in the forest, which sees little to no gopher activity. These geomorphic transport hotspots will

  14. Environmental changes of the last 30,000 years in the gas hydrate area of Joetsu Basin, eastern margin of Japan Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, A.F.M.; Sugai, T. [Tokyo Univ., Kashiwanoha Campus, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Natural Environmental Studies; Takeuchi, E.; Nagasaka, A.; Hiruta, A.; Ishizaki, O.; Matsumoto, R. [Tokyo Univ., Hongo Campus, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Science

    2008-07-01

    The Japan Sea is a semi-isolated marginal sea with an average depth of 1350 metres and a maximum water depth of approximately 3700 metres in the northern basin. This paper presented a study that inferred the age and the nature of the environmental events of the last 30 thousand years using geochemical and sedimentary records from piston cores collected on the gas hydrates bearing-sediments of Joetsu Basin, eastern margin of Japan Sea, south of Sado Islands. Interbedded dark gray thinly laminates and dark brown to gray bioturbated units are common throughout the quaternary sediments of the Japan Sea. They have been explained in terms of glacio-eustatic sea-level change. Active methane venting and gas hydrates have also been recognized, which are widely distributed just beneath the sea floor in the Joetsu Basin, in the eastern margin of the Japan Sea. In order to identify the nature of the organic matter present in the study area and to make a correlation with samples collected in the Pacific Ocean, the study utilized total organic carbon contents and carbon isotopic composition of the gas hydrates bearing-sediments. Using X-ray diffraction analysis, these data were used to apply sequence stratigraphy concepts to locate the holocene/pleistocene boundary and to identify key stratigraphic surfaces, and also to recognize methane flux variations and sulfate-methane interfaces. The paper discussed total organic carbon in the Holocene/Pleistocene boundaries; nature of the organic matter and terrestrial versus marine phytoplankton production; and terrigenous material input. Sulfate oxidation of methane was also discussed. It was concluded that the correlation between the Japan Sea and Pacific Ocean was possible using piston cores. 13 refs., 13 figs.

  15. Effect of earthworms on the community structure of active methanotrophic bacteria in a landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héry, Marina; Singer, Andrew C; Kumaresan, Deepak; Bodrossy, Levente; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Prosser, Jim I; Thompson, Ian P; Murrell, J Colin

    2008-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, landfills are the primary anthropogenic source of methane emissions. Methanotrophic bacteria present in landfill biocovers can significantly reduce methane emissions via their capacity to oxidize up to 100% of the methane produced. Several biotic and abiotic parameters regulate methane oxidation in soil, such as oxygen, moisture, methane concentration and temperature. Earthworm-mediated bioturbation has been linked to an increase in methanotrophy in a landfill biocover soil (AC Singer et al., unpublished), but the mechanism of this trophic interaction remains unclear. The aims of this study were to determine the composition of the active methanotroph community and to investigate the interactions between earthworms and bacteria in this landfill biocover soil where the methane oxidation activity was significantly increased by the earthworms. Soil microcosms were incubated with 13C-CH4 and with or without earthworms. DNA and RNA were extracted to characterize the soil bacterial communities, with a particular emphasis on methanotroph populations, using phylogenetic (16S ribosomal RNA) and functional methane monooxygenase (pmoA and mmoX) gene probes, coupled with denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis, clone libraries and pmoA microarray analyses. Stable isotope probing (SIP) using 13C-CH4 substrate allowed us to link microbial function with identity of bacteria via selective recovery of 'heavy' 13C-labelled DNA or RNA and to assess the effect of earthworms on the active methanotroph populations. Both types I and II methanotrophs actively oxidized methane in the landfill soil studied. Results suggested that the earthworm-mediated increase in methane oxidation rate in the landfill soil was more likely to be due to the stimulation of bacterial growth or activity than to substantial shifts in the methanotroph community structure. A Bacteroidetes-related bacterium was identified only in the active bacterial community of earthworm-incubated soil but

  16. Dynamics of bacterial community structure on intertidal sandflat inhabited by the ghost shrimp Nihonotrypaea harmandi (Decapoda: Axiidea: Callianassidae) in Tomioka Bay, Amakusa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Minoru; Urakawa, Tatsuyuki; Tamaki, Akio

    2016-02-01

    Callianassid (ghost) shrimp has been claimed as an ecosystem engineer, as it is one of the most powerful bioturbating macrobenthos in intertidal sandflats. However, our knowledge about the relationship between areal distribution of bottom-dwelling ghost shrimps and dynamics of sediment microbial community structure remains obscured. We used automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) to reveal the bacterial community dynamics in the sediment of intertidal sandflat of Tomioka Bay, Kyushu, Japan, which is predominantly inhabited by a burrow-dwelling callianassid shrimp Nihonotrypaea harmandi. We found that the bacterial community structures of high and middle shrimp population areas were significantly differentiated from those of low population area (ANOSIM, R=0.10-0.18, p0.1). These results illustrated the potential importance of shrimp population density as a key factor in shaping the bacterial community structure and interpreting their dynamics in the sandflat. Furthermore, greater similarity between burrow and non-burrow communities was found in samples taken in autumn through winter than in those in summer (one-way ANOVA, pshrimp in permeable sandflat would strongly homogenize sediment particles, enhance solute transport surrounding the burrow and ambient subsurface substrate, and therefore reduce spatial differentiation of the bacterial community structure between the two sites. A comparison between present and previous studies of axiidean (former taxonomic group name, thalassinidean) ghost shrimps provides us with a comprehensive understanding of the shrimps' impacts on bacterial community dynamics, highlighting the importance of sediment permeability, a characteristic determined by the type of sediment, as a key controlling factor to shape spatial heterogeneity of bacterial community structure around burrow.

  17. Organic carbon burial in fjords: Terrestrial versus marine inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xingqian; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Savage, Candida; Smith, Richard W.

    2016-10-01

    Fjords have been identified as sites of enhanced organic carbon (OC) burial and may play an important role in regulating climate change on glacial-interglacial timescales. Understanding sediment processes and sources of sedimentary OC are necessary to better constrain OC burial in fjords. In this study, we use Fiordland, New Zealand, as a case study and present data on surface sediments, sediment down-cores and terrestrial end-members to examine dynamics of sediments and the sources of OC in fjord sediments. Sediment cores showed evidence of multiple particle sources, frequent bioturbation and mass-wasting events. A multi-proxy approach (stable isotopes, lignin-phenols and fatty acids) allowed for separation of marine, soil and vascular plant OC in surface sediments. The relationship between mass accumulation rate (MAR) and OC contents in fjord surface sediments suggested that mineral dilution is important in controlling OC content on a global scale, but is less important for specific regions (e.g., New Zealand). The inconsistency of OC budgets calculated by using MAR weighted %OC and OC accumulation rates (AR; 6 vs 21-31 Tg OC yr-1) suggested that sediment flux in fjords was likely underestimated. By using end-member models, we propose that 55% to 62% of total OC buried in fjords is terrestrially derived, and accounts for 17 ± 12% of the OCterr buried in all marine sediments. The strong correlation between MAR and OC AR indicated that OC flux will likely decrease in fjords in the future with global warming due to decrease in sediment flux caused by glacier denudation.

  18. A depositional model for organic-rich Duvernay Formation mudstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Levi J.; McMillan, Julia M.; Harris, Nicholas B.

    2017-01-01

    The Upper Devonian Duvernay Formation of western Canada is an organic-rich shale formation now targeted as a hydrocarbon reservoir. We present a detailed sedimentological analysis of the Duvernay Formation in order to better understand organic-rich mudstone depositional processes and conditions and to characterize the vertical and lateral heterogeneity of mudstone lithofacies that affect petrophysical and geomechanical rock properties. Organic-rich mudstone facies of the Duvernay Formation were deposited in a dynamic depositional environment by a variety of sediment transport mechanisms, including suspension settling, turbidity currents, and bottom water currents in variably oxygenated bottom waters. Suspension settling dominated in distal relatively deep areas of the basin, but evidence for weak turbidity currents and bottom water currents was observed in the form of graded beds and thin grain-supported siltstone laminae. Organic enrichment primarily occurred in distal areas as a result of bottom water anoxia and low depositional rates of inorganic sediment. In deep water locations near platform margins, alternating silty-sandy contourite beds and organic-rich mudstone beds are present, the former interpreted to have been deposited and reworked by bottom water currents flowing parallel to slope. In shallower, more oxygenated settings, mudstone lithologies vary from calcareous to argillaceous. These sediments were deposited from suspension settling, turbidity currents, and bottom water currents, although primary sedimentary structures are often obscured by extensive bioturbation. Locally, organic enrichment in dysoxic rather than anoxic bottom waters was driven by a slightly increased sedimentation rate and possibly also by aggregation of sedimentary particles in the water column due to interaction between organic matter and clay minerals. Large variations observed in sediment composition, from siliceous to calcareous to argillaceous, reflect multiple biogenic

  19. Turbidites as indicators of paleotopography, Upper Miocene Lake Pannon, Western Mecsek Mountains (Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sztanó Orsolya

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The floor of Lake Pannon covering the Pannonian Basin in the Late Miocene had considerable relief, including both deep sub-basins, like the Drava Basin, and basement highs, like the Mecsek Mts, in close proximity. The several km thick lacustrine succession in the Drava Basin includes profundal marls, basin-center turbidites, overlain by shales of basin-margin slopes, coarsening-upward deltaic successions and alluvial deposits. Along the margin of the Mecsek Mts locally derived shoreface sands and deltaic deposits from further away have been mapped so far on the surface. Recent field studies at the transition between the two areas revealed a succession that does not fit into either of these environments. A series of sandstone a few meters thick occurs above laminated to bioturbated clayey siltstone. The sandstone show normal grading, plane lamination, flat erosional surfaces, soft-sediment deformations (load and water-escape structures and sharp-based beds with small reverse faults and folds. These indicate rapid deposition from turbidity currents and their deformation as slumps on an inclined surface. These beds are far too thick and may reveal much larger volumes of mass wasting than is expected on the 20–30 m high delta slopes; however, regional seismic lines also exclude outcropping of deep-basin turbidites. We suggest that slopes with transitional size (less than 100 m high may have developed on the flank of the Mecsek as a consequence of lake-level rise. Although these slopes were smaller than the usually several hundred meter high clinoforms in the deep basins, they could still provide large enough inertia for gravity flows. This interpretation is supported by the occurrence of sublittoral mollusc assemblages in the vicinity, indicating several tens of meters of water depth. Fossils suggest that sedimentation in this area started about 8 Ma ago.

  20. Radiocarbon evidence for a possible abyssal front near 3.1 km in the glacial equatorial Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keigwin, L. D.; Lehman, S. J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the radiocarbon ventilation age in deep equatorial Pacific sediment cores using the difference in conventional 14C age between coexisting benthic and planktonic foraminifera, and integrate those results with similar data from around the North Pacific Ocean in a reconstruction for the last glaciation (15 to 25 conventional 14C ka). Most new data from both the Equatorial Pacific and the Emperor Seamounts in the northwestern Pacific come from maxima in abundance of benthic taxa because this strategy reduces the effect of bioturbation. Although there remains considerable scatter in the ventilation age estimates, on average, ventilation ages in the Equatorial Pacific were significantly greater below 3.2 km (∼ 3080 ± 1125 yrs, n = 15) than in the depth interval 1.9 to 3.0 km (∼ 1610 ± 250 yrs, n = 12). When compared to the average modern seawater Δ14C profile for the North Pacific, the Equatorial Pacific glacial data suggest an abyssal front located somewhere between 3.0 and 3.2 km modern water depth. Above that depth, the data may indicate slightly better ventilation than today, and below that depth, glacial Equatorial Pacific data appear to be as old as last glacial maximum (LGM) deep water ages reported for the deep southern Atlantic. This suggests that a glacial reservoir of aged waters extended throughout the circumpolar Southern Ocean and into the Equatorial Pacific. Renewed ventilation of such a large volume of aged (and, by corollary, carbon-rich) water would help to account for the rise in atmospheric pCO2 and the fall in Δ14C as the glaciation drew to a close.

  1. Generic reactive transport codes as flexible tools to integrate soil organic matter degradation models with water, transport and geochemistry in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Diederik; Gérard, Fréderic; Mayer, Uli; Simunek, Jirka; Leterme, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    and inorganic carbon in the aqueous and gaseous phases, as well as different decomposition functions with first-order, linear dependence or nonlinear dependence on a biomass pool. In addition, we show how processes such as local bioturbation (bio-diffusion) can be included implicitly through a Fickian formulation of transport of soil organic matter. Coupling soil organic matter models with generic and flexible reactive transport codes offers a valuable tool to enhance insights into coupled physico-chemical processes at different scales within the scope of C-biogeochemical cycles, possibly linked with other chemical elements such as plant nutrients and pollutants.

  2. Connections between transport in events and transport at landscape-structuring timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, C. J.; Lohse, K. A.; Troch, P. A.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-12-01

    the population of runoff events and processes that generate them. The results suggest that over the long term, slope-dependent transport processes (such as rainsplash, bioturbation and trampling) seem to play an important role in these steeper hillslopes in inverting the flow of resources. Over many storm and inter-storm periods, soil organic matter is transported downslope in plumes extending at least two canopy radii downslope from below woody-shrub canopies into the inter-space. This pattern was particularly evident where microtopography and soil properties create micro-sites protected from fluvial transport. While many of the patterns observed are similar to those from more stable geomorphic surfaces, the results suggest that long-term downslope transport processes in sloping terrain can disrupt the autogenic processes that reinforce the redistribution of resources under shrubs. This result has important implications for our understanding of the relationship between ecosystem function and landscape-scale transport in these environments.

  3. Transfer and mobility of trace metallic elements in the sedimentary column of continental hydro-systems; Transferts et mobilite des elements traces metalliques dans la colonne sedimentaire des hydrosystemes continentaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devallois, V.

    2009-02-15

    In freshwater systems, trace metal pollutants are transferred into water and sedimentary columns under dissolved forms and/or fixed onto solid particles. Accumulated in the sedimentary areas, these latter ones can constitute important stocks of materials and associated pollutants and may impair water quality when environmental changes lead to increase their mobility. The mobility of the stocks of pollutants is mainly depending on the erosion, on the interstitial diffusion of the mobile phases (dissolved and colloidal) and on the bioturbation. In this context, this study involves the analysis of the mobility by interstitial diffusion. This topic consists in studying trace metal fractionation between their mobile (dissolved and colloidal) and non mobile (fixed onto the particles) forms. This point is governed by sorption/desorption processes at the particle surfaces. These processes are regulated by physico-chemical parameters (pH, redox potential, ionic strength...) and are influenced by biogeochemical reactions resulting from the oxidation of the organic matter by the microbial activity. These reactions generate vertical profiles of nutrients and metal concentrations along the sedimentary column. To understand these processes, this work is based on a mixed approach that combines in situ, analysis and modelling. In situ experimental part consists in sampling natural sediments cores collected at 4 different sites (1 site in Durance and 3 sites on the Rhone). These samples are analyzed according to an analytical protocol that provides the vertical distribution of physicochemical parameters (pH, redox potential, size distribution, porosity), nutrients and solid - liquid forms of trace metals (cobalt, copper, nickel, lead, zinc). The analysis and interpretation of these experimental results are based on a model that was developed during this study and that includes: 1) model of interstitial diffusion (Boudreau, 1997), 2) biogeochemical model (Wang and Van Cappellen

  4. Making a black shale shine: the interaction of hydrothermal fluids and diagenetic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Sarah; Magnall, Joe; Reynolds, Merilie

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal fluids are important agents of mass and thermal transfer in the upper crust. This is exemplified by shale-hosted massive sulphide deposits (SHMS), which are anomalous accumulations of Zn and Pb sulphides (± barite) in sedimentary basins created by hydrothermal fluids. These deposits occur in passive margin settings and, typically, there is no direct evidence of magmatic input. Recent studies of Paleozoic deposits in the North American Cordillera (MacMillan Pass and Red Dog Districts) have shown that the deposits are formed in a sub-seafloor setting, where the potential for thermal and chemical gradients is high. Mineralization is characterized by the replacement and displacement of unconsolidated, partially lithified and lithified biosiliceous mudstones (± carbonates), and commonly the sulphide mineralization post-dates, and replaces, bedded barite units in the sediments. The Red Dog District (Alaska, USA) contain some of the largest Zn-Pb deposits ever discovered. The host-rocks are dominantly carbonaceous mudstones, with carbonate units and some radiolarites. The ore forms massive sulphide bodies that replace pyritized mudstones, barite and carbonate units. Lithological and textural relationships provide evidence that much of the ore formed in bioturbated, biosiliceous zones that may have had high primary porosity and/or permeability. Sediment permeability may have been further modified by aging of the silica rich sediments and the dissolution/replacement of carbonate and barite beds. At the Tom and Jason deposits (MacMillan Pass, Yukon) the fault-controlled hydrothermal upflow zone is uniquely preserved as an unequivocal vent complex. Here, the metal bearing fluids are hot (300°C), low salinity (6 wt% NaCl equiv.) and acidic (pH Red Dog deposits, reduced sulphur was generated during open system diagenesis and euxinic conditions were not present at the time of mineralization. Furthermore, the formation of diagenetic barite provided an important

  5. High-resolution topography using SfM-photogrammetry from UAV for coastal mudflat geomorphic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Jules; Brunier, Guillaume; Michaud, Emma; Anthony, Edward; Morvan, Sylvain; Dussouillez, Philippe; Gardel, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    The coast between the Amazon and the Orinoco river mouths comprises mud banks formed from the large muddy discharge of the Amazon and migrating westward under the influence of waves and currents. These banks are highly dynamic and strongly affected by complex hydro-bio-geochemical interactions that are also important in mangrove colonization of bare mudflats in the upper intertidal zone of these banks. The surface topography of these mud banks is further affected by physical and biological processes such as tidal channel incision and bioturbation. Surveying the morphology of these mudflats over large areas and at a high-resolution without perturbing their surface is a real challenge that cannot be accomplished using classical survey methods such as RTK-GPS or Total Stations. To overcome this hurdle, we conducted a SfM(Surface from Motion)-photogrammetry experiment over 1 ha of a large intertidal mudflat colonized by pioneer mangroves at the mouth of the Sinnamary estuary in French Guiana. We developed a topographic data acquisition system based on sub-vertical aerial photography from a UAV flying at low altitude (15 m), in order to produce images at 3 mm resolution. A light DJI F550 drone was used, with an automatic flight programming using GPS navigation and a flight plan designed on photogrammetric criteria. The payload was a lightweight (250 grams) Ricoh GR camera with an APS-C sensor of 16.2 Megapixel and including an intervalometer triggering function. The drone had a flight autonomy of 12 minutes thus covering entirely the surrounding mudflat platform. The landing procedure was conducted manually in order for the drone to land safely on a very narrow artificial ground base set up for our experiment. 3D-models and derived products were generated using Agisoft Photoscan Professionnal software. We produced a gridded Digital Surface Model (DSM) and an orthophoto in visible bands at 1 cm and 5mm pixel resolution respectively. The vertical accuracy of the DSM based

  6. Decoupling of the Carbon Cycle during Ocean Anoxic Event-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldrett, J.; Bergman, S. C.; Minisini, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Cenomanian to Turonian Boundary transition (95-93 Ma) represents one of the most profound global perturbations in the carbon cycle of the last 140 million years. This interval is characterized by widespread deposition of organic-rich fine-grained sediment marked by a globally recognised positive carbon isotope excursion (CIE) reflecting the widespread removal of 12C-enriched organic matter in marine sediments under global anoxic conditions. However, the exact timing and trigger of this inferred global phenomenon, termed Oceanic Anoxic Event-2 is still debated, with recent studies showing diachroneity between the deposition of the organic-rich sediment and the CIE, and conflicting interpretations on detailed redox analyses in several of these inferred anoxic settings. Here we present the first evidence for widespread and persistent oxygenation during OAE-2 based primarily on the distribution of redox-sensitive trace metals preserved in sediments from the Eagle Ford Formation, Western Interior Seaway of North America. We generated a δ13C curve which indicates an earlier initiation of the CIE in Texas compared to the Global Stratotype and Point Section at Pueblo, Colorado. Our data also indicate anoxic-euxinic conditions in the mid-late Cenomanian, but improved bottom-water oxygenation prior to and during the CIE, corroborated by increased bioturbation, abundance of benthic foraminifera and reduced total organic carbon values. Trace metal enrichments support large volumes of mafic volcanism possibly from the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (LIP), which occur during peak bottom-water oxygenation and a plateau in δ13Corg values and does not immediately precede the Cenomanian-Turonian CIE, as previously stated. This suggests that the emplacement of a LIP was not the primary trigger of the OAE-2 event. It is also unlikely that bottom-water oxygenation was promoted by the introduction of volcanogenic Fe inhibiting sulfate reduction, as the depletion in redox

  7. Chronostratigraphical investigations on Pleistocene fluvioglacial terraces of NW-Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhorst, B.

    2009-04-01

    Investigations on paleopedology and Quaternary stratigraphy were carried out in the area of fluvioglacial terraces of the rivers Inn and Traun/Enns. Research projects have been financed by the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the ICSU Grant Programme. Detailed studies were carried out on paleosols and loess sequences of different ages. The investigations of the research group were focused on loess/paleosol sequences located on top of Riss terraces (OIS 6 and older) as well as in areas with Mindel and Günz terraces. Loess records of the last glacial/interglacial cycle can be well observed in the study areas. Generally, the Eemian soil (O/S 5e) is developed as a reddish Bt-horizon in fluvioglacial gravels. U/Th-datings of calcites in the fluvioglacial sediments are indicating that soil formation took place in the catchment area about 113.000 ± 4.400 ka (Terhorst et al., 2002). The interglacial paleosol was truncated and a redeposited colluvial layer was deposited on top of the Bt-horizons containing charcaol with characteristic relicts of coniferous trees. After this land surface destabilisation phase, sedimentation of loess became the predominant process. Pedogenesis in form of a brown paleosol occurred, which partly has been redeposited. The pedocomplex is characterized by intense bioturbation of steppe animals. OSL-datings show that this part of the sequence belong to the Middle Würmian stage. The pedocomplex is overlain by a Cambisol corresponding to the youngest Middle Würmian interstadial. The paleosol is covered by thick loess deposits of the Upper Pleniglacial. Well-developed Tundragleysols subdivide the loess deposits. The uppermost soil corresponds to the Holocene Luvisol that includes hydromorphic properties. Older fluvioglacial terraces of Mindel and Günz age (in the classical stratigraphy) show a completely different structure of the covering layers (c.f. Kohl, 1999). In this case, several thick interglacial paleosols are embedded within records

  8. Off shore wind farms change the benthic pelagic coupling in the Belgian Part of the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaverbeke, Jan; Coates, Delphine; Braeckman, Ulrike; Soetaert, Karline; Moens, Tom

    2016-04-01

    sediment matrix, will lead to a change in the biogeochemical properties of the sediment: highly reactive permeable sediments, poor in organic matter will shift towards sediment where organic matter will accumulate. Degradation of organic matter will then no longer be governed by physical processes, but mediated by biological processes (bioturbation, bio-irrigation).

  9. Evaluating Multi-Proxy Records of Paleocyclones in Florida Coastal Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, M. R.; Jaeger, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    this include: (1) the vegetation separating the ponds from the beach may prevent much of the overwash from reaching the ponds and (2) bioturbation within the ponds would cause a mixing of the sediments that would destroy storm-produced bedding.

  10. The use of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 137}Cs in environmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijnis, H. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Environmental Radiochemistry Group, Environment Division

    1999-11-01

    The use of natural radioactivity in environmental studies has proven a very powerful tool to determine the dynamics of both natural and antrophogenic processes in our environment. The use of {sup 14}C in archaeology and past climate studies has led to many scientific discoveries (the shroud of Turin and Utze {sup t}he ice-man from Austria are two examples). The use of the {sup 238}U-decay series is of at least equal value to studies in archaeology and of past climates. Some of the Isotopes studied supplement {sup 14}C (which is limited to 40,000 years) data and allow dating of samples formed up to 500,000 years ago (see McCullough, this book of abstracts, pages 19-23), others can be utilised to date very young sediments, which can`t be dated by {sup 14}C.The so-called {sup 210}Pb dating method has been used over the past 3 decades to date recent sediment. The method uses the disequilibrium in the {sup 238}U decay chain, caused by the escape of the intermediate daughter {sup 222}Rn, a noble gas, from the earth`s crust. In the atmosphere the {sup 222}Rn decays via short-lived daughter isotopes to {sup 210}Pb. This {sup 210}Pb with a very convenient half-life of 22,3 years decays to stable {sup 206}Pb. By measuring the surface activity of a sediment core and subsequent samples at regular intervals, a chronology for the sediment core can be established (relative to the surface). In addition to {sup 210}Pb dating one could analyse the samples for {sup l37}Cs to establish an independent chronology based on a pulse of radioactive Caesium. The pulse of {sup 137}Cs originates from the atmospheric atomic-bomb test of the early sixties. The maximum of Caesium activity found in a core should correspond to the height of the tests (approximately 1963 in the Northern hemisphere). A combination of the two dating methods often leads to more reliable results in the chronology. Another use of {sup 137}Cs is to test if the sediment has been subject to bio-turbation or other mixing. In

  11. Imaging Reservoir Quality: Seismic Signatures of Geologic Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Department of Geophysics

    2008-06-30

    Lithofacies successions from diverse depositional environments show distinctive patterns in various rock-physics planes (velocity-porosity, velocity-density and porosity-clay). Four clear examples of decameter-scale lithofacies sequences are documented in this study: (1) Micocene fluvial deposits show an inverted-V pattern indicative of dispersed fabric, (2) a fining-upward sequence of mud-rich deep deposits shows a linear trend associated with laminated sand-clay mixtures, (3) sand-rich deposits show a pattern resulting from the scarcity of mixed lithofacies, and (4) a coarsening-upward sequence shows evidence of both dispersed and horizontally laminated mixed lithofacies, with predominating dispersed mixtures generated by bioturbation. It was observed that carbonate-cemented sandstones are extremely heterogeneous in the project deep-water study area. Those from the base of incisions are usually associated with lower shaliness, lower porosity and higher P-impedance, while from the top of flooding surfaces exhibit higher shaliness, higher porosity and lower P-impedance. One rock physics model that captures the observed impedance-porosity trend is the 'stiff-sand model'. For this model, the high-porosity end-member is unconsolidated sand whose initial porosity is a function of sorting and shaliness, while the low-porosity end-member is solid mineral. These two end points are joined with a Hashin-Shtrikman equation. A systematic variation of quartz:clay ratio from proximal to distal locations was observed in the study area even within a single facies. The quartz:clay ratio changes from [0.5:0.5] to [1:0] along the direction of flow, based on the trends of P-impedance vs. porosity as predicted by the rock model for uncemented sands. The results are in agreement with spill-and-fill sequence stratigraphic model in mini-basin setting. In addition, porosity at the distal location ({approx}25 % to 35%) is higher than the porosity at the proximal location ({approx

  12. Complex variations during a caldera-forming Plinian eruption, including precursor deposits, thick pumice fallout, co-ignimbrite breccias and climactic lag breccias: The 184 ka Lower Pumice 1 eruption sequence, Santorini, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, J. M.; Cas, R. A. F.; Druitt, T. H.; Folkes, C. B.

    2016-09-01

    The 184 ka Lower Pumice 1 eruption sequence records a complex history of eruption behaviours denoted by two significant eruptive phases: (1) a minor precursor (LP1-Pc) and (2) a major Plinian phase (LP1-A, B, C). The precursor phase produced 13 small-volume pyroclastic fallout, surge and flow deposits, which record the transition from a dominantly magmatic to a phreatomagmatic eruptive style, and exhibit a normal (dacite to andesitic-dacite) to reverse (andesitic-dacite to dacite) compositional zonation of juvenile pyroclasts in the stratigraphy. Incipient bioturbation and variability in unit thickness and lithology reflect multiple time breaks and highlight the episodic nature of volcanism prior to the main Plinian eruption phase. The Plinian magmatic eruption phase is defined by three major stratigraphic divisions, including a basal pumice fallout deposit (LP1-A), an overlying valley-confined ignimbrite (LP1-B) and a compositionally zoned (rhyodacite to basaltic andesite) lithic-rich lag breccia (LP1-C), which caps the sequence. This sequence records the initial development of a buoyant convective eruption column and the transition to eruption column and catastrophic late-stage caldera collapse events. Similarities in pyroclast properties (i.e., chemistry, density), between the Plinian fallout (LP1-A) and pyroclastic flow (LP1-B) deposits, indicate that changes in magma properties exerted no influence on the dynamics and temporal evolution of the LP1 eruption. Conversely, lithic breccias at the base of the LP1-B ignimbrite suggest that the transition from a buoyant convective column to column collapse was facilitated by mechanical erosion of the conduit system and/or the initiation of caldera collapse, leading to vent widening, an increase in magma discharge rate and the increased incorporation of lithics into the eruption column, causing mass overload. Lithic-rich lag breccia deposits (LP1-C), which cap the eruption sequence, record incremental, high

  13. The distribution of depleted uranium contamination in Colonie, NY, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, N.S., E-mail: nsl3@alumni.leicester.ac.uk [Department of Geology, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chenery, S.R.N. [British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Parrish, R.R. [Department of Geology, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-20

    Uranium oxide particles were dispersed into the environment from a factory in Colonie (NY, USA) by prevailing winds during the 1960s and '70s. Uranium concentrations and isotope ratios from bulk soil samples have been accurately measured using inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) without the need for analyte separation chemistry. The natural range of uranium concentrations in the Colonie soils has been estimated as 0.7-2.1 {mu}g g{sup -1}, with a weighted geometric mean of 1.05 {mu}g g{sup -1}; the contaminated soil samples comprise uranium up to 500 {+-} 40 {mu}g g{sup -1}. A plot of {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U against {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U isotope ratios describes a mixing line between natural uranium and depleted uranium (DU) in bulk soil samples; scatter from this line can be accounted for by heterogeneity in the DU particulate. The end-member of DU compositions aggregated in these bulk samples comprises (2.05 {+-} 0.06) x 10{sup -3235}U/{sup 238}U, (3.2 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup -5236}U/{sup 238}U, and (7.1 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6234}U/{sup 238}U. The analytical method is sensitive to as little as 50 ng g{sup -1} DU mixed with the natural uranium occurring in these soils. The contamination footprint has been mapped northward from site, and at least one third of the uranium in a soil sample from the surface 5 cm, collected 5.1 km NNW of the site, is DU. The distribution of contamination within the surface soil horizon follows a trend of exponential decrease with depth, which can be approximated by a simple diffusion model. Bioturbation by earthworms can account for dispersal of contaminant from the soil surface, in the form of primary uranium oxide particulates, and uranyl species that are adsorbed to organic matter. Considering this distribution, the total mass of uranium contamination emitted from the factory is estimated to be c. 4.8 tonnes.

  14. Reaction hotspots at micro- and macroscales: Challenges in early diagenetic modeling (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meile, C. D.

    2010-12-01

    . This bottom-up approach is contrasted by the quantification of organic matter decomposition from a wide range of measurements. Data obtained in the field include direct rate measurements of select processes, concentration and flux measurements, and isotopic composition of bulk organic matter as well as specific molecules. Mathematical interpretation of these various signatures help to then constrain the breakdown of organic matter under a wider range of environmental conditions. A third and equally critical feature of porous media is the role of spatio-temporal patchiness in the distribution of reaction zones and the oscillatory nature of metabolic processes. Examples include the presence of hotspots in marsh settings associated with tidal flooding, soil horizons or bioturbated settings exhibiting redox oscillations, and aggregate structures with reducing microenvironments caused by transport limitations or because they contain elevated levels of electron donors. Due to the need for and the challenge associated with parameterization of complex semi-mechanistic models of biogeochemical reactions, the linkage between experimental and modeling efforts will be emphasized.

  15. Soil and vegetation carbon stocks in Brazilian Western Amazonia: relationships and ecological implications for natural landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, C E G R; do Amaral, E F; de Mendonça, B A F; Oliveira, H; Lani, J L; Costa, L M; Fernandes Filho, E I

    2008-05-01

    The relationships between soils attributes, soil carbon stocks and vegetation carbon stocks are poorly know in Amazonia, even at regional scale. In this paper, we used the large and reliable soil database from Western Amazonia obtained from the RADAMBRASIL project and recent estimates of vegetation biomass to investigate some environmental relationships, quantifying C stocks of intact ecosystem in Western Amazonia. The results allowed separating the western Amazonia into 6 sectors, called pedo-zones: Roraima, Rio Negro Basin, Tertiary Plateaux of the Amazon, Javari-Juruá-Purus lowland, Acre Basin and Rondonia uplands. The highest C stock for the whole soil is observed in the Acre and in the Rio Negro sectors. In the former, this is due to the high nutrient status and high clay activity, whereas in the latter, it is attributed to a downward carbon movement attributed to widespread podzolization and arenization, forming spodic horizons. The youthful nature of shallow soils of the Javari-Juruá-Purus lowlands, associated with high Al, results in a high phytomass C/soil C ratio. A similar trend was observed for the shallow soils from the Roraima and Rondonia highlands. A consistent east-west decline in biomass carbon in the Rio Negro Basin sector is associated with increasing rainfall and higher sand amounts. It is related to lesser C protection and greater C loss of sandy soils, subjected to active chemical leaching and widespread podzolization. Also, these soils possess lower cation exchangeable capacity and lower water retention capacity. Zones where deeply weathered Latosols dominate have a overall pattern of high C sequestration, and greater than the shallower soils from the upper Amazon, west of Madeira and Negro rivers. This was attributed to deeper incorporation of carbon in these clayey and highly pedo-bioturbated soils. The results highlight the urgent need for refining soil data at an appropriate scale for C stocks calculations purposes in Amazonia. There

  16. Radioecological assessment of marine environment: complexity, sensitivity and uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iosjpe, Mikhail [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, P.O. Box 55, N-1332 Oesteraas (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    A compartment modelling approach is widely used to evaluate the consequences after the release of radionuclides into the marine environment, by taking into account: (i) dispersion of radionuclides in water and sediment phases, (ii) bioaccumulation of radionuclides in biota and (iii) dose assessments for marine organisms and human populations. The NRPA box model includes site-specific information for the compartments, advection of radioactivity between compartments, sedimentation, diffusion of radioactivity through pore water in sediment, resuspension, mixing due to bioturbation, particle mixing, a burial process for radionuclides in deep sediment layers and radioactive decay. The contamination of biota is calculated from the known radionuclide concentrations in filtered seawater in the different water regions. Doses to man are calculated on the basis of seafood consumption, in accordance with available data for seafood catches and assumptions about human diet in the respective areas. Dose to biota is calculated on the basis of radionuclide concentrations in marine organisms, water and sediment, using dose conversion factors. This modelling approach requires the use of a large set of parameters (up to several thousand), some of which have high uncertainties linked to them. This work consists of two parts: A radioecological assessment as described above, and a sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, which was applied to two release scenarios: (i) a potential accident with a nuclear submarine and (ii) unit uniform atmospheric deposition to selected marine areas. The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is based on the calculation of local and global sensitivity indexes, and then compare this approach to the Monte-Carlo Methods. The simulations clearly demonstrate the complexities encountered when using the compartment modelling approach. It is shown that the results can strongly depend on the time being analyzed. For example, the change of a given parameter may either

  17. Changes in the redox state of sediments following the 2010 BP blowout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, D. W.; Brooks, G.; Hollander, D. J.; Larson, R. A.; Morford, J. L.; Romero, I.; Hammaker, S.; Hogan, A.; Roeder, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    We have collected multi-core sediment cores from over 40 sites along the NE Gulf of Mexico continental slope following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We present the geochemical results from four select sites collected on August 2010, December 2010, February 2011, September 2011, and August 2012. Cores were extruded at 2 mm intervals, and sediments were analyzed for TOC, 13C, carbonate, short-lived radioisotopes (Pb-210, Cs-137, Be-7, Th-234) and grain size. Cores reveal a well-defined, internally stratified dark brown layer in the top 1-6 cm, with finer grain size than underlying sediments. Samples were digested at high temperature and pressure in concentrated nitric acid to dissolve both the oil and authigenic fractions, but not the detrital component. Samples were subsequently analyzed by ICP-MS. Although the Macondo crude oil is slightly enriched in Ni, V, and Co, with concentrations of 2.8, 0.9, and 0.08ppm, respectively, no significant enrichment of these metals is observed in Gulf of Mexico sediments. Sediment mass accumulation rates following the event range from 0.6 - 20 g/cm2/yr, which are one to two orders of magnitude higher than pre-spill rates. Organic and inorganic carbon deposition rates from the 2010 and February 2011 cores are also elevated one to two orders of magnitude. 13C signatures of this recent deposited material are slightly depleted relative to pre-oil event material. Large sedimentation rates, depleted 13C values and lack of bioturbation on the surface of the deep sediments studied supports the hypothesis of a large sea-snow-like blizzard event during the oil-spill in 2010. Bacterially mediated oxidation of organic matter is reflected in a well-established sequence of oxidation-reduction reactions. We exploit redox sensitive trace elements including Mn, Fe, Re, U, Mo, and V to infer changes in the redox state of sediments following this large pulse of organic matter to the seafloor.

  18. Análisis sedimentológico de los materiales lacustres (formacion de Gorafe-Huelago del sector central de la depresión de Guadix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Aguilar, J. M.

    1988-04-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentological and petrological analysis of the Gorafe-Huélago formation (pliocene permits to distinguish some different facies types which characterize the following subenvironments of lacustrine carbonate sedimentation: lutitic plain (silts, carbonatic silts and sands, swamps (coaly marls, carbonatic marshy rim (root-bioturbated limestones, nodulzar lemistones, paleosols, calcareous crusts and nodular marls and lacustrine zone (algal limestones, fossiliferous limestones, marly limestones and marls. The distribution of this facies was strongly controlled by the tectonics (Negratin accident, which delimited a southern sunken block, predominantly with terrigenous facies (lutitic plain and swamps and a northern uplifted block in which there is a greater development of carbonatic lacustrine sediments. Finally, these facies are organized in retractive, expansive or expansive-retractive sequences which mark the sedimentological evolution of the formation.El análisis sedimentológico y petrológico de los materiales carbonatados de la formación de Gorafe-Huélago (Plioceno, ha permitido diferenciar diversas facies que caracterizan varios subambientes de sedimentación carbonatada dentro de un sistema deposicional tluvio-lacustre: llanura lutítica (limos, limos carbonatados y arenas, zonas de encharcamiento palustre (margas carbonosas, orla palustre carbonatada (calizas bioturbadas por raíces, calizas nodulosas y paleosuelos, costras calcáreas y margas nodulosas y zona lacustre (calizas algales laminadas y oncolíticas, calizas fosilíferas, calizas margosas y margas. La evolución y distribución de las facies están controladas por el accidente tectónico del Negratin, fundamentalmente transcurrente y que atraviesa la zona de estudio con una dirección NE-SW. En el bloque levantado (sector N tiene lugar una sedimentación carbonatada lacustre, mientras que en el bloque hundido (sector S la sedimentación es fundamentalmente terrígena. Los

  19. Tithonian-Early Valanginian evolution of deposition along the proto-Caribbean margin of North America recorded in Guaniguanico successions (western Cuba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszczółkowski, Andrzej; Myczyński, Ryszard

    2010-03-01

    In the Guaniguanico Mountains of western Cuba, the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous limestones occur in three stratigraphic successions, which have accumulated along the proto-Caribbean margin of North America. The Late Jurassic subsidence and shallow-water carbonate deposition of the Guaniguanico successions have no counterpart on the northeastern Maya block, but some distant similarities with the southeastern Gulf of Mexico may exist. Four facies types have been distinguished in the Tithonian-Lower Valanginian deposits of the Guaniguanico tectonic units. Drowning of the Late Jurassic carbonate bank of the Sierra de los Organos occurred at the Kimmeridgian/Tithonian boundary. During this boundary interval, sedimentation in the west Cuban area and southwestern margin of the Maya block (Mexico) has evolved in a similar way in response to a major second-order transgression. The Lower Tithonian ammonite assemblages of the Guaniguanico successions indicate, in general, the neritic zone. Presence of juvenile gastropods and lack of adult specimens suggest unfavorable environment for these molluscs, probably related to low oxygenation levels. The Early Tithonian transgressive phase terminated about the lower boundary of the Chitinoidella Zone. The Late Tithonian "regressive" phase is weakly marked, whereas the latest Tithonian-earliest Berriasian strata were deposited during a deepening phase. The latter transgressive phase has ended in the Late Berriasian Oblonga Subzone. We correlate the bioturbated pelagic biomicrites of the Tumbitas Member of the Guasasa Formation with a significant fall of the sea level during the latest Berriasian-Early Valanginian. The average sedimentation rate for the Tumbitas Member biomicrites was about three times faster than for the Berriasian Tumbadero Member limestones. Sedimentation rates for the Tumbitas Member and the Valanginian limestones at the DSDP Site 535 in the southeastern Gulf of Mexico were similar. In the Los Organos succession

  20. The distribution of gamma-emitting radionuclides in surface subtidal sediments near the Sellafield plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. G.; Roberts, P. D.; Miller, J. M.

    1988-08-01

    Detailed distributions of total gamma activity, 137Cs, 106Ru and 95Zr + 95Nb in surface seabed sediments near the Sellafield plant are presented. The results are derived from a towed seabed gamma-ray spectrometer survey in September, 1982. All the distributions are similar, with contours of equal activity parallel to the coast defining a 'ridge' of higher activity which is displaced northwards relative to the outfall. This pattern appears to be largely a response to the transport of particle-associated radioeffluent modified in places by the type of seabed sediment present. At greater distance from Sellafield, the uptake of nuclides from solution seems to be more important. Nuclide concentrations decrease with increasing distance from Sellafield; rates of decrease being in the order Zr + Nb > Ru > Cs. This can be related to the levels of the nuclides discharged, their sorption characteristics and their half lives. The pattern of seabed activity seems to have been fairly stable over the period 1978 - 1985, but there is evidence of a small northward shift. Concentrations of 137Cs and 106Ru in 1985 were considerably lower than in 1978 or 1982. This is explicable in terms of the fall in discharge levels allied, in the case of Ru, to its short half life and, for Cs, the desorption observed in laboratory experiments. Nuclide ratios in sediment samples yield apparent transit times for the transport of nuclides in the survey area of 1·7 - 3·7 years. These times are generally greater than those obtained from sediments in the more distant Solway Firth and Ravenglass Estuary. It is suggested that they reflect fairly intense bioturbation causing mixing of relatively recent effluent with that from earlier discharges. This is supported by structures observed in X-radiographs of box cores, an abundant burrowing benthos and by interpretations of nuclide profiles and radiocarbon dating of sediment cores by other workers. A lag effect, of up to two years across the survey area

  1. Cohesive Sediment Erodibility and Evolution of a Mud Deposit on the Palos Verdes Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, C. R.; Ferre, B.; Murray, C. J.; Sanford, L. P.; Warner, J. C.; Wiberg, P. L.

    2006-12-01

    We have added a cohesive-sediment erodibility algorithm to ROMS, a three-dimensional numerical model for circulation and sediment transport. The new code implements an algorithm developed by Sanford ("Modeling a dynamically varying mixed sediment bed with erosion, deposition, bioturbation, consolidation, and armoring", Computers and Geosciences, in review.) The algorithm assumes that cohesive sediment has a critical stress for erosion that varies (typically increasing) with depth in the sediment, determined by various physical and biological properties or processes. Erosion and deposition alter this profile, but it is reestablished over a characteristic time scale which is longer than typical resuspension events (a few days) but probably less than a year. The critical stress profile limits the amount of sediment that can be eroded during to the mass available at the maximum stress applied during the event. Because the critical stress profile varies with time, the response to events depends on the history of sediment disturbance and recovery. The shapes of the critical stress profiles can vary both horizontally and vertically. In this pilot application, the shapes of the profiles were determined from geostatistical modeling of field data collected on a mud deposit on the Palos Verdes Shelf off Los Angeles. The data include about 30 traditional grain-size measurements, 10 erosion-chamber experiments, and 160 measurements of the penetration depths of a sediment-profiling camera. The penetration depths were highly correlated (r=0.84) with the slope of the erodibility profiles determined by the erosion chamber. Maps of erodibility (i.e., slope and offset of the critical stress profiles) on the Palos Verdes Shelf were made with Gaussian simulation and collocated cokriging of the erosion-chamber data conditioned on the camera-penetration data. These and maps of bottom grain-size distribution were used to initialize the bed sediment in ROMS. Model runs were made for the

  2. Identifying tectonic and climatic drivers for deep-marine siliciclastic systems: Middle Eocene, Spanish Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, K. T.; Scotchman, J. I.; Robinson, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    middle Eocene climatic record is characterized by eccentricity-modulated precession cycles (Westerhold & Rohl 2009), The age model for the Ainsa basin yields an average sediment accumulation rate of ~40 cm kyr-1, that is consistent with that inferred from the spectral analysis on bioturbation intensity for fine-grained sedimentation (~30 cm kyr-1). References Scotchman, J.I., Pickering, K.T. & Robinson, S.A. 2009. Sub-Milankovitch millennial-scale climate variability in Middle Eocene deep-marine sediments. AGU Fall Meeting San Francisco 2009. Westerhold, T. & Rohl, U. 2009. High resolution cyclostratigraphy of the early Eocene - new insights into the origin of the Cenozoic cooling trend. Climate of the Past, 5, 309-327.

  3. A cross-section analysis of sedimentary organic matter in a mangrove ecosystem under dry climate conditions: The Somone estuary, Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakho, Issa; Mesnage, Valérie; Copard, Yoann; Deloffre, Julien; Faye, Guilgane; Lafite, Robert; Niang, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Mangrove sediments are an important organic matter (OM) reservoir and play a major role in the carbon cycle. Since the 1990s, these ecosystems were subjected to numerous studies, in order to quantify the sedimentary sink for organic carbon (OC) and to characterize the organic matter sources, but remain poorly studied in Western Africa. The aim of our study is to quantify the organic carbon content and to identify the OM origin stored in the Somone mangrove sediments. Studied area is characterized by a (i) dry climate conditions with a higher rate of evaporation, (ii) lack of freshwater input by river, and (iii) tide dominated system. Here, we focus on physico-chemical properties of sediments (temperature, pH and redox), sediment grain size, water content, particulate organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon from a series of 40 cm-deep cores in four tidal contexts: mudflat, Rhizophora, and Avicennia mangroves and barren area. Results show that total organic carbon (TOC) contents range between 0.34 and 3.92 wt.% and are higher in sediments from mudflat and Rhizophora mangrove than in sediments from Avicennia mangrove and barren area. Indeed, sediments stored under Avicennia is subjected to suboxic conditions initiated by roots system and crabs bioturbation; while under Rhizophora and mudflat, local anoxic conditions are prevalent as suggest the negative Eh values and the occurrence of framboidal pyrites. Mangrove sediments of the Somone estuary contain an autochthonous lignocellulosic-derived organic matter. The youngest and stunted form of the Somone mangrove explains the low organic carbon content of sediments; where dry climate conditions limit the organic matter production by the mangrove forest. The shallow depth at which the organic matter of the former mudflat was found confirms that the Somone mangrove is subjected to a low sedimentation rate. This suggests that organic carbon burial depends on others processes than sedimentation. Then, in the Somone

  4. Extended power-law scaling of heavy-tailed random air-permeability fields in fractured and sedimentary rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guadagnini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the scaling behaviors of two field-scale log permeability data sets showing heavy-tailed frequency distributions in three and two spatial dimensions, respectively. One set consists of 1-m scale pneumatic packer test data from six vertical and inclined boreholes spanning a decameters scale block of unsaturated fractured tuffs near Superior, Arizona, the other of pneumatic minipermeameter data measured at a spacing of 15 cm along three horizontal transects on a 21 m long and 6 m high outcrop of the Upper Cretaceous Straight Cliffs Formation, including lower-shoreface bioturbated and cross-bedded sandstone near Escalante, Utah. Order q sample structure functions of each data set scale as a power ξ(q of separation scale or lag, s, over limited ranges of s. A procedure known as extended self-similarity (ESS extends this range to all lags and yields a nonlinear (concave functional relationship between ξ(q and q. Whereas the literature tends to associate extended and nonlinear power-law scaling with multifractals or fractional Laplace motions, we have shown elsewhere that (a ESS of data having a normal frequency distribution is theoretically consistent with (Gaussian truncated (additive, self-affine, monofractal fractional Brownian motion (tfBm, the latter being unique in predicting a breakdown in power-law scaling at small and large lags, and (b nonlinear power-law scaling of data having either normal or heavy-tailed frequency distributions is consistent with samples from sub-Gaussian random fields or processes subordinated to tfBm or truncated fractional Gaussian noise (tfGn, stemming from lack of ergodicity which causes sample moments to scale differently than do their ensemble counterparts. Here we (i demonstrate that the above two data sets are consistent with sub-Gaussian random fields subordinated to tfBm or tfGn and (ii provide maximum likelihood estimates of parameters characterizing the

  5. {sup 239+240}Pu in the Barents Sea Regions. Sources and radioecological assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iosjpe, Mikhail [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, P.O. Box 55, N-1332 Oesteraas (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    The radioecological assessment for {sup 239+240}Pu in the Barents sea regions was made using the compartment modelling approach. The following sources of radioactive contamination were under consideration: global fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, transport of {sup 239+240}Pu from the Sellafield and La Hauge nuclear plants and underwater testing of nuclear weapons in Chernaya Bay, Novaya Zemlya. The box model developed at NRPA uses a modified approach for compartmental modeling, which takes into account the dispersion of radionuclides over time. The box structures for surface, mid-depth and deep water layers have been developed based on the description of polar, Atlantic and deep waters in the Arctic Ocean and the Northern Seas, as well as site-specific information for the boxes. The volume of the three water layers in each box has been calculated using detailed bathymetry together with Geographical Information Systems. The box model includes the processes of advection of radioactivity between compartments, sedimentation, diffusion of radioactivity through pore water in sediments, resuspension, mixing due to bioturbation, particle mixing and a burial process for radionuclides in deep sediment layers. Radioactive decay is calculated for all compartments. The contamination of biota is further calculated from the known radionuclide concentrations in filtered seawater in the different water regions. Doses to man are calculated on the basis of seafood consumptions, in accordance with available data for seafood catches and assumptions about human diet in the respective areas. Dose to biota are determined on the basis of calculated radionuclide concentrations in marine organisms, water and sediment, using dose conversion factors. Results of the calculations show that atmospheric deposition is the dominant source for the Barents Sea, except for the Chernaya Bay region. It is also demonstrated that the impact of the Sellafield nuclear facilities has

  6. Physical vs. Chemical Weathering Controls of Soils' Capacity to Store Carbon: Hillslope Transects under Different Climatic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, K.; Wackett, A.; Amundson, R.; Heimsath, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Soil C storage is balanced by photosynthetic production and microbial decomposition of organic matter (OM). Recently, this view has been expanded to account for the effects of physical erosion of OM in determining soil C storage. In parallel, the focus on OM quality as a primary determinant of C turnover has shifted to OM-mineral interactions. These recent advances necessitates our ability to discern how physical erosion, which controls the production, breakdown, and removal of colluvial soils, and chemical weathering, which generates secondary phyllosilicate and iron oxides, independently and collaboratively affect soils' capacity to store C. Here we present soil organic C contents and storages as a function of soil properties that are controlled by physical vs. chemical weathering processes. The study site includes two hillslopes under different climates in SW Australia. The wetter site has continuous canopy of eucalyptus, while the drier site is covered by grasses with scattered eucalyptus overstorey. The two hillslope transects share similar granodiorite parent materials and denudation rates. Bioturbation-driven soil creep appears equally effective at both sites. In eroding areas, chemical weathering has created greater mineral surface area in the soils of wetter site, while physical soil production and erosion resulted in forming the eroding soils of similar thicknesses at both sites. In the drier site, however, vegetation density varies significantly with topography-dependent soil moisture, which appears to have resulted in a soil toposequence where impacts of localized overland-flow erosion is evident through soil mineral surface area, texture, and C contents. These soil properties, in contrast, are largely homogeneous across the wetter hillslope transect presumably because of the lack of localized overland-flow erosion. As a result, at the depositional areas, the drier site exhibits greater or similar soil C storages, which sharply contrasts with the

  7. Varves in lake sediments - a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolitschka, Bernd; Francus, Pierre; Ojala, Antti E. K.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-06-01

    Downcore counting of laminations in varved sediments offers a direct and incremental dating technique for high-resolution climatic and environmental archives with at least annual and sometimes even seasonal resolution. The pioneering definition of varves by De Geer (1912) had been restricted to rhythmically deposited proglacial clays. One century later the meaning of 'varve' has been expanded to include all annually deposited laminae in terrestrial and marine settings. Under favourable basin configurations and environmental conditions, limnic varves are formed due to seasonality of depositional processes from the lake's water column and/or transport from the catchment area. Subsequent to deposition of topmost laminae, the physical preservation of the accumulating varved sequence requires the sustained absence of sediment mixing, for example via wave action or macrobenthic bioturbation. Individual (sub)laminae in varved lake sediments typically express contrasting colours, always differ in terms of their organic, chemical and/or mineralogical compositions, and often also differ with regard to grain-size. Various predominating climatic and depositional conditions may result in clastic, biogenic or endogenic (incl. evaporitic) varved sediments and their mixtures. To reliably establish a varve chronology, the annual character of laminations needs to be determined and verified in a multidisciplinary fashion. Sources and influences of possible errors in varve chronologies are best determined and constrained by repeated varve counts, and by including radioisotopes and correlation with historically documented events. A well-established varve chronology greatly enhances the scientific value of laminated limnic archives by securely anchoring the wealth of multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental information in the form of time-series for multidisciplinary investigations. Applications of varved records are discussed with special reference to advances since the 1980s. These span fields

  8. Nitrogen isotope chemostratigraphy across the Permian-Triassic boundary at Chaotian, Sichuan, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, M.; Ueno, Y.; Nishizawa, M.; Isozaki, Y.; Takai, K.; Yao, J.; Ji, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen isotopic compositions of upper Permian to lowermost Triassic rocks were analyzed at Chaotian, Sichuan, China, to clarify changes in the oceanic N cycle around the Permian-Triassic boundary (P-TB) including the entire Changhsingian (Late Late Permian) prior to the extinction. The analyzed ca. 40 m thick interval across the P-TB at Chaotian consists of three stratigraphic units: the upper Wujiaping Formation, the Dalong Formation, and the lowermost Feixianguan Formation, in ascending order. The upper Wujiaping Formation is composed of dark gray limestone with diverse shallow-marine fossils, such as calcareous algae, deposited on the shallow shelf. In contrast, the overlying Dalong Formation, ca. 25 m thick, is mainly composed of thinly bedded black mudstone and siliceous mudstone containing abundant radiolarians, deposited on the relatively deep slope/basin. Absence of bioturbation, substantially high TOC contents, and abundant occurrence of pyrite framboids in the Dalong Formation indicate deposition under anoxic conditions. The lowermost Feixianguan Formation is composed of thinly bedded gray marl and micritic limestone with minor fossils, deposited on the relatively shallow slope. δ15N values are in positive values around +1 to +2‰ in the upper Wujiaping Formation implying denitrification and/or anammox in the ocean. δ15N values gradually decrease to -1‰ in the lower Dalong Formation and are consistently low (around 0‰) in the middle Dalong to lowermost Feixianguan Formation. No clear δ15N shift is recognized across the extinction horizon. The consistently low δ15N values suggest the enhanced N fixation in the ocean during the Changhsingian at Chaotian. Composite profiles based on previous and the present studies demonstrate the substantial δ15N variation on a global scale in the late Permian to earliest Triassic; a systematic δ15N difference by low and high latitudes is particularly clarified. Although the enhanced N fixation throughout the

  9. Ecohydrologic Investigations of Shallow Lateral Subsurface Flow in Tropical Soils using Time-Lapse Surface Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, F. L.; Mojica, A.; Abebe, N. A.; Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama Canal Watershed Experiment, Agua Salud Project

    2010-12-01

    The hydrologic effects of deforestation and aforestation in the tropics remain an area of active research. Hydrologic predictions of land-use change effects remain elusive. One of the unique features of catchment hydrology in the tropics is the effect of intense, continuous biological activity by insects, shrubs, trees, and small mammals. Sapprolitic soils derived from weathered bedrock cover widespread areas. These soils have low matrix permeabilities on the order of 1 mm/h, are 10 to 20 m in thickness and have relatively low activity because they have been depleted of light cations by annual rainfall over 2000 mm. As part of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama Canal Watershed Experiment, Agua Salud Project, we have observed shallow subsurface flow in tropical soils in central Panama using an introduced salinity contrast and surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). In 2009 and 2010, experiments were conducted in a 30 year-old secondary succession forest, and in two former pasture sites that were planted with native timber species and teak, respectively, in 2008. At each site, saline water (NaCl tagged with LiBr) was introduced to the soil using two different methods: soil pits and ponded surface applications. Results showed the strongest response in the case of ponded surface applications with observed changes in resistivity between -50% and 50%. In soil pit applications, the change in electrical resistivity varied from -10% to 10%. Results suggest that in the case of surface application, a transient perched water table is created near the bottom of the bioturbation layer that activates the downslope macropore network and results in bulk flow velocities that are significantly higher than observed soil matrix permeabilities. When heavy rainfall occurred during tests, increased mobility of the salinity contrast more clearly showed the active layer where most flow occurred. Time-series ERT observations enabled measurements of downslope bulk

  10. Searching for Pre-2004 Tsunami Deposits in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, M.; Alam, S.; Atwater, B.; Charoentitirat, T.; Charusiri, P.; Choowong, M.; Fernando, S.; Jankaew, K.; Jittanoon, V.; Kongko, W.; Maxcia, C.; Pailoplee, S.; Phantuwongraj, S.; Rajendran, K.; Rhodes, B.; Srichan, N.; Tejakusuma, I.; Yulianto, E.

    2007-05-01

    beach deposits, we were not able to identify any with confidence. In future searches, it may be beneficial to target natural ponds near upland areas where accumulation of organics and fines may help to separate tsunami deposits from other sandy deposits. Our findings suggest that the apparent scarcity of pre- 2004 tsunami deposits in Phangnga Province may be due in part to extensive placer mining of the coastal plain, bioturbation of mangrove soils, and difficulty in distinguishing tsunami from beach deposits.

  11. Community characteristics of macrobenthos in the Huanghe (Yellow River) Estuary during water and sediment discharge regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Zhonghua; LI Fan; WEI Jiali; LI Shaowen; LV Zhenbo; GAO Yanjie; CONG Xuri

    2016-01-01

    demonstrate that anthropogenic activity is having both long-term (3 decadal) and short term (1-month) impacts on the structure of the macrobenthic community of the Huanghe Estuary. In conclusion, human activities WSDR influence the habitat environment of macro benthos, including the water temperature, nutrients, bioturbation, and so on. Therefore, we suggest the necessity to strengthen regulations of land-derived organic pollutant input to maintain the ecological balance of the Huanghe Estuary.

  12. Flux and accumulation of sedimentary particles off the continental slope of Pakistan: a comparison of water column and seafloor estimates from the oxygen minimum zone, NE Arabian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Schulz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of bioturbation, the laminated muds from the oxygen-minimum zone (OMZ off Pakistan provide a unique opportunity to precisely determine the vertical and lateral sediment fluxes in the near shore part of the northeastern Arabian Sea, and to explore the effects of the margin topography and the low oxygen conditions on the accumulation of organic matter and other particles. West of Karachi, in the Hab river area of EPT and WPT (Eastern and Western PAKOMIN Traps, 16 short sediment profiles from water depths between 250 m and 1970 m on a depth transect crossing the OMZ (~ 120 to ~ 1200 m water depth were investigated, and correlated on the basis of a thick, light-gray- to reddish-colored turbidite layer. Varve counting yielded a date for this layer of AD 1905 to 1888. We adopted the young age which agrees with 210Pb- dating, and used this isochronous stratigraphic marker bed to calculate sediment accumulation rates, that we could directly compare with the flux rates from the sediment traps installed within the water column above. All traps in the area show exceptionally high, pulsed winter fluxes of up to 5000 mg m−2 d−1 in this margin environment. The lithic flux at the sea floor is as high as 4000 mg m−2 d−1 , and agrees remarkably well with the bulk winter flux of material. This holds as well for the individual bulk components (organic carbon, calcium carbonate, opal, lithic fraction. However, the high winter flux events (HFE by their extreme mass of remobilized matter terminated the recording in the shallow traps by clogging the funnels. Based on our comparisons, we argue that HFE for the past 5000 yr most likely occurred as regular events within the upper OMZ off Pakistan. Coarse fraction and foraminiferal accumulation rates from sediment surface samples along the Hab transect show distribution patterns that seem to be a function of water depth and distance from the shelf. Some of these sediment fractions show sudden

  13. Filed-Analog Study: Efficiency of microbial fossilization in sulfate-rich playas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glamoclija, M.; Zeidan, M.; Potochniak, S.

    2015-12-01

    from the fossil ones. Bioturbation and re-precipitation is a potential issue for any fossil finding, and especially for evaporitic settings. White Sands playas represent an excellent model system to evaluate preservation potential of evaporitic playa deposits and their potential value in a context of a sample return mission.

  14. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the coastal Monte Léon and Santa Cruz formations (Early Miocene) at Rincón del Buque, Southern Patagonia: A revisited locality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raigemborn, M. Sol; Matheos, Sergio D.; Krapovickas, Verónica; Vizcaíno, Sergio F.; Bargo, M. Susana; Kay, Richard F.; Fernicola, Juan C.; Zapata, Luciano

    2015-07-01

    Sedimentological, ichnological and paleontological analyses of the Early Miocene uppermost Monte León Formation and the lower part of the Santa Cruz Formation were carried out in Rincón del Buque (RDB), a fossiliferous locality north of Río Coyle in Santa Cruz Province, Patagonia, Argentina. This locality is of special importance because it contains the basal contact between the Monte Léon (MLF) and the Santa Cruz (SCF) formations and because it preserves a rich fossil assemblage of marine invertebrates and marine trace fossils, and terrestrial vertebrates and plants, which has not been extensively studied. A ˜90 m-thick section of the MLF and the SCF that crops out at RDB was selected for this study. Eleven facies associations (FA) are described, which are, from base to top: subtidal-intertidal deposits with Crassotrea orbignyi and bioturbation of the Skolithos-Cruziana ichnofacies (FA1); tidal creek deposits with terrestrial fossil mammals and Ophiomorpha isp. burrows (FA2); tidal flat deposits with Glossifungites ichnofacies (FA3); deposits of tidal channels (FA4) and tidal sand flats (FA5) both with and impoverish Skolithos ichnofacies associated; marsh deposits (FA6); tidal point bar deposits recording a depauperate mixture of both the Skolithos and Cruziana ichnofacies (FA7); fluvial channel deposits (FA8); fluvial point bar deposits (FA9); floodplain deposits (FA10); and pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits of the floodplain where terrestrial fossil mammal remains occur (FA11). The transition of the MLF-SCF at RDB reflects a changing depositional environment from the outer part of an estuary (FA1) through the central (FA2-6) to inner part of a tide-dominated estuary (FA7). Finally a fluvial system occurs with single channels of relatively low energy and low sinuosity enclosed by a broad, low-energy floodplain dominated by partially edaphized ash-fall, sheet-flood, and overbank deposits (FA8-11). Pyroclastic and volcaniclastic materials throughout the

  15. Initial Results from a New Lake Elsinore Sediment Core Reveal Evidence for Hydrologic Change During the Late-Glacial/Holocene Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantozzi, J. M.; Kirby, M. E.; Lund, S.; Hiner, C.

    2010-12-01

    While there are several well-developed records of marine climate from Southern California that span the late-Glacial/Holocene transition, there are currently no high-resolution terrestrial counterparts. In June 2010, a 20 meter sediment core covering 10-30 meters below the sediment-water interface was extracted from the depocenter of Lake Elsinore, California - the largest natural, permanent lake in the region. Here, we present the initial results of a multi-proxy study on the section of this sediment core that spans the late-Glacial/Holocene transition (10-18.5 m below the sediment-water line [bswl]). Initial results reveal three distinct sediment units. Unit I (10-15m bswl) is composed of a homogeneous, often mottled (bioturbated?), gray mud with high and moderately variable magnetic susceptibility values (avg=1.20±0.29x10-7m3/kg), low organic matter content (6.50±0.83%), and highly variable carbonate content (12.21±4.89%). Unit II (15-17m bswl) is a transitional unit that begins as a gray mud similar to that of Unit I and transitions into a massive to laminated brown mud with low and variable magnetic susceptibility values (0.88±0.38x10-7m3/kg), increasing organic matter content (11.52±2.19%), and highly variable carbonate content (10.84±4.75%). Unit III (17-18.5m bswl) is characterized by a massive to laminated brown mud with very low and stable magnetic susceptibility values (0.87±0.19x10-7m3/kg), declining organic matter content (11.21±2.02%), and low to negligible carbonate content (5.0±0.87%). Together, these data indicate a significant change in Lake Elsinore’s depositional environment that is likely related to hydrologic change (i.e. average lake level) during the late Glacial to Holocene transition - a change that has not previously been documented in Southern California.

  16. Evaluating sensitivity of silicate mineral dissolution rates to physical weathering using a soil evolution model (SoilGen2.25)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opolot, E.; Finke, P. A.

    2015-11-01

    Silicate mineral dissolution rates depend on the interaction of a number of factors categorized either as intrinsic (e.g. mineral surface area, mineral composition) or extrinsic (e.g. climate, hydrology, biological factors, physical weathering). Estimating the integrated effect of these factors on the silicate mineral dissolution rates therefore necessitates the use of fully mechanistic soil evolution models. This study applies a mechanistic soil evolution model (SoilGen) to explore the sensitivity of silicate mineral dissolution rates to the integrated effect of other soil-forming processes and factors. The SoilGen soil evolution model is a 1-D model developed to simulate the time-depth evolution of soil properties as a function of various soil-forming processes (e.g. water, heat and solute transport, chemical and physical weathering, clay migration, nutrient cycling, and bioturbation) driven by soil-forming factors (i.e., climate, organisms, relief, parent material). Results from this study show that although soil solution chemistry (pH) plays a dominant role in determining the silicate mineral dissolution rates, all processes that directly or indirectly influence the soil solution composition play an equally important role in driving silicate mineral dissolution rates. Model results demonstrated a decrease of silicate mineral dissolution rates with time, an obvious effect of texture and an indirect but substantial effect of physical weathering on silicate mineral dissolution rates. Results further indicated that clay migration and plant nutrient recycling processes influence the pH and thus the silicate mineral dissolution rates. Our silicate mineral dissolution rates results fall between field and laboratory rates but were rather high and more close to the laboratory rates possibly due to the assumption of far from equilibrium reaction used in our dissolution rate mechanism. There is therefore a need to include secondary mineral precipitation mechanism in our

  17. Depleted Radiocarbon in Deep Water in the Southwest Pacific and Southern Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, E. L.; Cook, M. S.; Elmore, A. C.; Guilderson, T. P.

    2011-12-01

    The relative 14C ages of surface and deep marine waters reflect the balance between air-sea exchange of 14CO2 in deep-water formation areas, the radioactive decay of 14C during subsurface circulation, and the mixing between adjacent water masses. The Δ14C of the interior ocean is known to vary due to the major reorganization of circulation and CO2 sequestration associated with glacial to interglacial climate changes. Using benthic and planktonic 14C ages from deep-sea sediment cores from the southwest Pacific, east of New Zealand, we have constructed a composite depth profile of 14C ages from the late glaciation through the early deglaciation. By using regionally widespread tepha layers as independent stratigraphic markers we can estimate atmosphere- ocean Δ14C differences. Relative to the atmosphere, our estimates of the Δ14C at intermediate depths (above 1600 m) are broadly consistent with ventilation similar to today. In contrast, the Δ14C of upper and mid-depth deep water (~2000-3800 m) at several points between the late glacial and early deglaciation (24-15 ka) indicate a deep water mass with significantly lower Δ14C than we would expect for a deep circulation similar to today's. The Δ14C depletions are range from 50-500%, with the gradient between deep and intermediate waters both shallower and steeper than today. Below 3800 m, deep water Δ14C appear less depleted. Benthic-planktonic Δ14C differences at all depths show greater relative differences than modern, with the largest differences in upper deep waters. The data from these deep Pacific cores may be susceptible to biases from dissolution and/or bioturbation. However, our consistently low Δ14C estimates of deep water during the late glacial support the hypothesis that there was a 14C-depleted CO2 rich water mass in the deep Pacific Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum that was released to the atmosphere through exchange in the Southern Ocean during the deglaciation.

  18. Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by Fukushima coastal biota - Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by marine biota: application to Fukushima assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vives i Batlle, Jordi [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    Radiological assessments to non-human marine biota are usually carried out by assuming that the activity concentration in an organism is proportional to the activity concentration in an adjacent volume of water, via a concentration factor (CF). It is also assumed that radionuclides in the water are in isotopic equilibrium with the sediments via a sediment distribution coefficient (K{sub d}). These assumptions are not valid in accidental situations where the biota and the sediments react with a time delay to large variations of activity concentration in seawater. A simple dynamic model was developed to factorise the dynamics of radionuclide uptake and turnover in biota and sediments, as determined by a balance between the residence time of radionuclides in seawater/sediments and the biological half-life of elimination in the biota. The model calculates activity concentration of {sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr in seabed sediment, fish, crustaceans, molluscs and macro-algae from surrounding activity concentrations in seawater, with which to derive internal and external dose rates. A central element of this new model is the inclusion of sediment processes in dynamic transfer modelling. The model is adapted to include depletion of radionuclides adsorbed onto suspended particulates (particle scavenging), molecular diffusion, pore water mixing and bioturbation (modelled effectively as a diffusive process) represented by a simple set of differential equations that is coupled with the biological uptake/turnover processes. In this way, the model is capable of reproducing activity concentration in sediment to give a more realistic calculation of the external dose to biota compared with the simpler approach based on CF and K{sub d} values used in previous assessments. The model is applied to the assessment of the radiological impact of the Fukushima accident on marine biota in the early phase of the accident. It is shown that previous assessment of the

  19. Sediment chemoautotrophy in the coastal ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez-Cardenas, Diana; Meysman, Filip J. R.; van Breugel, Peter; Boschker, Henricus T. S.

    2016-04-01

    A key process in the biogeochemistry of coastal sediments is the reoxidation of reduced intermediates formed during anaerobic mineralization which in part is performed by chemoautotrophic micro-organisms. These microbes fix inorganic carbon using the energy derived from reoxidation reactions and in doing so can fix up to 32% of the CO2 released by mineralization. However the importance and distribution of chemoautotrophy has not been systematically investigated in these environments. To address these issues we surveyed nine coastal sediments by means of bacterial biomarker analysis (phospholipid derived fatty acids) combined with stable isotope probing (13C-bicarbonate) which resulted in an almost doubling of the number of observations on coastal sedimentary chemoautotrophy. Firstly, sediment chemoautotrophy rates from this study and rates compiled from literature (0.07 to 36 mmol C m-2 d-1) showed a power-law relation with benthic oxygen uptake (3.4 to 192 mmol O2 m-2 d-1). Benthic oxygen uptake was used as a proxy for carbon mineralization to calculate the ratio of the CO2 fixed by chemoautotrophy over the total CO2 released through mineralization. This CO2 efficiency was 3% in continental shelf, 9% in nearshore and 21% in salt marsh sediments. These results suggest that chemoautotrophy plays an important role in C-cycling in reactive intertidal sediments such as salt marshes rather than in the organic-poor, permeable continental shelf sediments. Globally in the coastal ocean our empirical results show that chemoautotrophy contributes ˜0.05 Pg C y-1 which is four times less than previous estimates. Secondly, five coastal sediment regimes were linked to the depth-distribution of chemoautotrophy: 1) permeable sediments dominated by advective porewater transport, 2) bioturbated sediments, and cohesive sediments dominated by diffusive porewater transport characterized by either 3) canonical sulfur oxidation, 4) nitrate-storing Beggiatoa, or 5) electrogenic sulfur

  20. Canada's National Building Stone: Tyndall Stone from Manitoba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Brian R.; Young, Graham A.; Dobrzanski, Edward P.

    2016-04-01

    Tyndall Stone is a distinctively mottled and highly fossiliferous dolomitic limestone that belongs to the Selkirk Member of the Red River Formation, of Late Ordovician (Katian) age. It has been quarried at Garson, Manitoba, 37 km northeast of Winnipeg, since 1895, although other quarries in the area go back to 1832. Tyndall Stone, so named because it was shipped by rail from nearby Tyndall, is currently produced by Gillis Quarries Limited. It has various uses as a dimension stone. Large slabs, most often cut parallel to bedding, face the exterior or interior of many important buildings such as the Parliament Buildings and the Canadian Museum of Civilization in the Ottawa area, the Empress Hotel in Victoria, and the provincial legislatures in Winnipeg and Regina, as well as many commercial buildings especially in the Canadian prairies. At the quarries, the stone is cut vertically, using eight foot (2.44 m) diameter saws mounted on one hundred foot (30.5 m) tracks, then split into 6-8 tonne blocks that are moved using front-end loaders. Gillis Quarries operates a large finishing plant with an area of about 4000 m2. Stone is processed along advanced cutting lines that feature eight primary saws and six gantry saw stations, allowing it to be made into a variety of sizes, shapes, and finishes. The Selkirk Member is 43 m thick and the stone is extracted from a 6-8 m thick interval within the lower part. The upper beds tend to be more buff-coloured than the grey lower beds due to weathering by groundwater. The stone is massive, but extracted blocks are less than ~1m thick due to splitting along stylolites. Consisting of bioturbated wackestone to packstone, the Tyndall Stone was deposited in a shallow-marine environment within the photic zone, in the central part of the vast equatorial epicontinental sea that covered much of Laurentia. Scattered thin, bioclastic grainstone lenses record brief, low-energy storm events. The distinctive mottles are formed by dolomitized

  1. Limnogeology in Brazil's "forgotten wilderness": a synthesis from the large floodplain lakes of the Pantanal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlue, Michael M.; Silva, Aguinaldo; Corradini, Fabricio A.; Zani, Hiran; Trees, Mark A.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Parolin, Mauro; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Cohen, Andrew S.; Assine, Mario L.

    2011-01-01

    Sediment records from floodplain lakes have a large and commonly untapped potential for inferring wetland response to global change. The Brazilian Pantanal is a vast, seasonally inundated savanna floodplain system controlled by the flood pulse of the Upper Paraguay River. Little is known, however, about how floodplain lakes within the Pantanal act as sedimentary basins, or what influence hydroclimatic variables exert on limnogeological processes. This knowledge gap was addressed through an actualistic analysis of three large, shallow (2- > Si4+ > Ca2+), mildly alkaline, freshwater systems, the chemistries and morphometrics of which evolve with seasonal flooding. Lake sills are bathymetric shoals marked by siliciclastic fans and marsh vegetation. Flows at the sills likely undergo seasonal reversals with the changing stage of the Upper Paraguay River. Deposition in deeper waters, typically encountered in proximity to margin-coincident topography, is dominated by reduced silty-clays with abundant siliceous microfossils and organic matter. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen, plus hydrogen index measured on bulk organic matter, suggest that contributions from algae (including cyanobacteria) and other C3-vegetation dominate in these environments. The presence of lotic sponge spicules, together with patterns of terrigenous sand deposition and geochemical indicators of productivity, points to the importance of the flood pulse for sediment and nutrient delivery to the lakes. Flood-pulse plumes, waves and bioturbation likewise affect the continuity of sedimentation. Short-lived radioisotopes indicate rates of 0.11-0.24 cm year-1 at sites of uninterrupted deposition. A conceptual facies model, developed from insights gained from modern seasonal processes, can be used to predict limnogeological change when the lakes become isolated on the floodplain or during intervals associated with a strengthened flood pulse. Amplification of the seasonal cycle over longer time scales

  2. Vertical and Interfacial Transport in Wetlands (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the fluxes connecting the water column, substrate, and atmosphere in wetland environments. To do this, analytical, numerical, and laboratory models have been used to quantify the hydrodynamic contributions to vertical fluxes. A key question is whether the hydrodynamic transport can be modeled as a diffusivity, and, if so, what the vertical structure of this diffusivity is. This question will be addressed in a number of flow types and for a number of fluxes. The fluxes of interest are heat, sediment, dissolved gases (such as methane and oxygen) and other dissolved solutes (such as nutrients and pollutants). The flows of interest include: unidirectional current, reversing flow (under waves, seiches, and tides), wind-sheared surface flows, and thermal convection. Rain and bioturbation can be important, but are not considered in the modeling work discussed herein. Specifically, we will present results on gas transport at wind-sheared free surface, sediment transport in unidirectional flow, and heat transfer in an oscillating flow cause by a seiche. All three of these will be used to consider the question of appropriate analytical models for vertical transport. The analytic models considered here are all 1D models that assume homogeneity in the horizontal plane. The numerical models use finite element methods and resolve the flow around individual vegetation stems in an idealized geometry. Laboratory models discussed herein also use an idealized geometry. Vegetation is represented by an array of cylinders, whose geometry is modeled after Scirpus spp. wetlands in Northern California. The laboratory model is constructed in a way that allows optical access to the flow, even in dense vegetation and far from boundaries. This is accomplished by using fluoropolymer plastics to construct vegetation models. The optical access allows us to employ particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to measure

  3. Early Callovian ingression in southwestern Gondwana. Palaeoenvironmental evolution of the carbonate ramp (Calabozo Formation) in southwestern Mendoza, Neuquen basin, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armella, Claudia; Cabaleri, Nora G.; Cagnoni, Mariana C.; Panarello, Héctor O.

    2013-08-01

    The carbonatic sequence of the Calabozo Formation (Lower Callovian) developed in southwestern Gondwana, within the northern area of the Neuquén basin, and is widespread in thin isolated outcrops in southwestern Mendoza province, Argentina. This paper describes the facies, microfacies and geochemical-isotopic analysis carried out in five studied localities, which allowed to define the paleoenvironmental conditions of a homoclinal shallow ramp model, highly influenced by sea level fluctuations, where outer, mid and inner ramp subenvironments were identified. The outer ramp subenvironment was only recognized in the south of the depocenter and is characterized by proximal outer ramp facies with shale levels and interbedded mudstone and packstone layers. The mid ramp subenvironment is formed by low energy facies (wackestone) affected by storms (packstones, grainstones and floatstones). The inner ramp subenvironment is the most predominant and is characterized by tidal flat facies (wackestones, packstones and grainstones) over which a complex of shoals (grainstones and packstones) dissected by tidal channels (packstone, grainstones and floatstones) developed. In the north area, protected environment facies were recorded (bioturbated wackestones and packstones). The vertical distribution of facies indicates that the paleoenvironmental evolution of the Calabozo Formation results from a highstand stage in the depocenter, culminating in a supratidal environment, with stromatolitic levels interbedded with anhydrite originated under restricted water circulation conditions due to a progressive isolation of the basin. δ13C and δ18O values of the carbonates of the Calabozo Formation suggest an isotopic signature influenced by local palaeoenvironmental parameters and diagenetic overprints. The δ13C and δ18O oscillations between the carbonates of the different studied sections are related with lateral facies variations within the carbonate ramp accompanied with dissimilar

  4. A chain of processes - from past climate variations to paleoclimate reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfeld, Kira; Laepple, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    dependence of the proxy interpretation on the archive type, location and recording seasonality. We identify common challenges such as bioturbation in marine or lacustrine sediments, and isotopic diffusion in ice-cores which both lead to a smoothing of the resulting signal. Where proxy communities have developed successful solutions or coping strategies, these could be useful for other types of paleoclimate data. Besides our goal to recognize cross-pollination potential we determine archive-proxy combinations that provide complementing climate information. Ultimately, the emerging proxy panorama will improve the potential of paleoclimate reconstructions and will contribute to a better understanding and reduction of uncertainties and caveats in paleoclimate data analysis. In order to populate and cross-reference the proxy network further we explicitly welcome and rely on the opportunity for feedback and discussion with experts at the EGU General Assembly 2014.

  5. Inventory and burial fluxes of Black Carbon in the Swedish continental shelf sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-García, L.; Cato, I.; Gustafsson, Ö.

    2009-04-01

    Highly condensed black carbon (BC) particles, mainly derived from incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuel, are involved in several important processes in the biogeosphere [1], including sedimentary carbon burial, sequestration of organic pollutants in soils and sediments, affecting Earth's radiative heat balance and even human respiratory health. BC is commonly found to constitute several to 20% of total sedimentary carbon, and thus plays an important but poorly constrained role in the global biogeospheric carbon cycle. Sequestration of biogenic carbon as BC is a direct sink of the element from the rapidly cycling atmosphere-biosphere reservoirs, whereas burial of petrogenic/fossil BC is simply a conversion of one form of geological carbon to another [2]. Considerable emphasis has been made on the relevant role this recalcitrant form of organic matter (OM) may play on the global C cycle and yet large uncertainty exists around BC detection and quantification. This work seeks to provide a large-scale estimate of the reservoir and burial sink flux of BC in sediments from the extensive Swedish continental shelf (SCS), as a first approach to global inventories. To this end, a total of 120 sediment samples were collected from the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) along the ?2000 km SCS stretch. The most recalcitrant fraction of the sedimentary OM was isolated and determined by means of a commonly applied method in biogeochemical studies of soils and sediments: chemo-thermal oxidation at 375˚ C in air (CTO-375). The obtained BC concentration was used to estimate the inventory and burial flux of BC in the SCS surface sediments, following [3], which takes into account key geophysical and geochemical properties of the nine distinct sedimentary regimes of the SCS that was separately assessed. Globally representative values of the sediment properties (e.g. density of dried sediments, bioturbated mixing depth, sedimentation rate or porosity over the mixed depth) were

  6. Shallow lacustrine system of the Permian Pedra de Fogo Formation, Western Gondwana, Parnaíba Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Raphael Neto; Nogueira, Afonso César Rodrigues; Bandeira, José; Angélica, Rômulo Simões

    2016-04-01

    The Permian Period of the Parnaíba Basin, northern Brazil, represented here by deposits from the Pedra de Fogo Formation, records important events that occurred in Western Gondwana near its boundary with the Mesozoic Era. The analysis of outcrop based facies from the Permian Pedra de Fogo Formation, which is 100 m thick, carried out along the eastern and western borders of the Parnaiba Basin, allowed the identification of eleven sedimentary facies, which were grouped into three distinct facies associations (FA), representative of a shallow lacustrine system associated with mudflats and ephemeral rivers. Bioturbation, desiccation cracks, silcretes and various siliceous concretions characterize the Pedra de Fogo deposits. The FA1 mudflat deposits occur predominantly at the base of the Pedra de Fogo Formation and consist of laminated claystone/mudstone, mudcrack-bearing sandstones/mudstones and sandstones exhibiting cross-lamination, massive and megaripple bedding. Popcorn-like silicified nodules and casts indicate evaporite deposits. Other common features are silica concretions, silicified tepees and silcretes. FA2 represents nearshore deposits and consists of fine-grained sandstones with evenly parallel lamination, climbing ripple cross-lamination, massive and megaripple bedding and mudstone/siltstone showing evenly parallel lamination. FA3 refers to wadi/inundite deposits, generally organized as fining-upward cycles of metric size, composed of conglomerates and medium-grained pebbly sandstones showing massive bedding and cross-stratification, as well as claystone/siltstone showing evenly parallel to undulate lamination. Scour-and-fill features are isolated in predominantly tabular deposits composed of mudstones interbedded with fine to medium-grained sandstones showing planar to slightly undulate lamination. Silicified plant remains previously classified as belonging to the Psaronius genus found in the uppermost levels of the Pedra de Fogo Formation, near the

  7. A new Permian bivalve-dominated assemblage in the Rio do Rasto Formation, Paraná Basin, Brazil: Faunal turnover driven by regional-scale environmental changes in a vast epeiric sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Marcello Guimarães; Matos, Suzana Aparecida; Anelli, Luiz Eduardo; Rohn, Rosemarie; Warren, Lucas Veríssimo; David, Juliana Machado

    2015-12-01

    The basal portion of the Permian Rio do Rasto Formation (Serrinha Member), Passa Dois Group, Paraná Basin, Brazil, records an entirely new bivalve fauna intercalated between the underlying Pinzonella neotropica assemblage (uppermost portion of the Teresina Formation) and the overlying Leinzia similis assemblage (Rio do Rasto Formation). Mollusks of these assemblages lived in marginal shallow-water habitats of an immense epeiric sea and were dominated by endemic bivalve species. Taxonomic analysis revealed the presence of Terraia curvata (60.61%), Astartellopsis prosoclina (19.70%), Cowperesia emerita (10.61%), Leinzia curta (4.55%), Terraia bipleura (3.03%) and Beurlenella elongatella (1.52%), which are associated with conchostracans and plant remains. Species composition, abundance, and dominance in this novel assemblage differ notably from the preceding ones, suggesting a substantial evolutionary turnover. Regional-scale environmental changes recognized based on taphonomy, facies analysis, and geochemical data consist of progressive freshening of the marginal habitats of the Paraná Basin and taxic changes that include the following: (a) loss of genera, (b) decrease in bivalve abundance and ecological guilds, (c) disappearance of the dominant bivalve group (Pinzonellinae) and (d) diversification of Terrainae bivalves. The ecological signature also changed notably because only infaunal suspension-feeding bivalves are present, indicating a significant loss of functional diversity at the regional scale. Likely stressor factors (among others) are tied to freshening events, suggesting profound changes in (a) salinity, (b) primary productivity and (c) a lack of coarse, stable substrates coupled with high bioturbation rates. Hence, our regional example could offer valuable clues to benthic (bivalve) community responses in a habitat subjected to (a) rapid climate changes and (b) freshening events in shallow-water settings. Finally, the stratigraphic range of the

  8. Rhythmic bedding in prodeltaic deposits of the ancient Colorado River: Exploring genetic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waresak, Sandra; Nalin, Ronald; Lucarelli, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Prodeltaic deposits represent a valuable archive for the characterization of deltaic depositional systems, offering a distal, minimally reworked record of dominant processes active at the fluvial-marine interface. The Fish Creek Basin (CA, US) preserves a ~ 3-km thick, lower Pliocene, progradational deltaic succession formed when the ancestral Colorado River infiltrated a marine rift basin (the early Gulf of California). The unit in this succession interpreted as prodeltaic, corresponding to the upper Mud Hills Member of the Deguynos Formation, consists of ~ 300 m of muddy siltstones. A striking attribute of parts of this unit is the presence of rhythmic bedding, with consistently alternating silt- to fine sand-dominated and clay-dominated beds forming couplets with an average thickness of 12 cm. By performing a detailed sedimentological analysis of the rhythmites and investigating periodicities in bed thickness, our study aimed at reconstructing the mode of deposition of this enigmatic prodeltaic succession. We measured at high stratigraphic resolution 265 consecutive couplets, for a total thickness of 33 m. Individual beds have good lateral persistence of at least tens of meters and gradational to sharp, flat contacts. Observed sedimentary structures are concentrated on the coarser portion of the couplets and mostly consist of parallel and wavy lamination, with subordinate ripple cross-lamination and localized internal scours. Bioturbation appears low in intensity or absent. Most notably, grain size analysis performed with laser diffraction techniques on several couplets shows a consistent pattern of inverse grading transitioning to normal grading. The cumulative evidence of these sedimentological features indicates that deposition of the rhythmites was accomplished via hyperpycnal flows, each couplet most likely representing an individual event in a setting characterized by high overall depositional rates. We performed time series analysis on bed thickness of

  9. Upper Cretaceous chalk facies and depositional history recorded in the Mona-1 core, Mona Ridge, Danish North Sea: Plate 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surlyk, Finn

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The 331 m long core from the Mona-1 well in the Danish North Sea spans almost the entire Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group but only about 10% of Late Cretaceous time is represented. The succession comprises 14 facies representing pelagic deposition, turbidity flow, and mass-transport processes, including mudflow, debris flow, and slumping. Pelagic deposits vary mainly in terms of the concentration of siliciclastic material, the trace-fossil assemblage, and the presence or ab¬sence of primary sedimentary structures. Pelagic sedimentation was probably punctuated by the deposition of thin turbidites, and the resultant deposits were thoroughly bioturbated if deposited during normal oxygenation at the sea floor. Periodic benthic dysoxia resulted in the preservation of primary structures, as represented by laminated chalk which consists of thin pelagic laminae alternating with thin turbidites. In addition to the thin turbidites in the laminated chalk, four dif¬ferent turbidite facies are interpreted as representing high- to low-energy flows. Clast-supported chalk conglomerates have previously not been differentiated from other turbidites, but are here interpreted to be directly related to the down-slope evolution of debris flows. Debris flows are rep¬resented by matrix-supported conglomerates, which form one of the most common facies in the succession. High-concentration, gravity-driven suspension flows passed into dilute visco-plastic flows during the final stages of deposition and resulted in the deposition of structureless chalks. Limited shear deformation produced distinct quasi-facies from which the precursor facies can be deduced, whereas intense or continued shear deformation produced a shear-banded quasi-facies from which the precursor facies cannot be deduced in all cases. A series of major slump packages (14–18 in total are interpreted, forming over 40% of the succession; debrites appear to be the most common precursor facies involved in

  10. Seabed Filter Feasibility Study of Om Almisk Island

    KAUST Repository

    Sesler, Kathryn

    2012-06-01

    Freshwater access has always been and is continuing to be a severe problem in desert coastal regions, despite the fact that they have an unlimited supply of easily accessible saline water. Water desalination plants are well established and heavily relied upon throughout the Middle East, Saudi Arabia in particular. However, water desalination tends to be a very expensive and energy intensive solution to the problem. The transition from using open water intake systems and all of the pretreatment processes that they require, to using seabed water filters as an intake, would potentially reduce the lifetime costs, energy consumption, and environmental impacts commonly associated with water desalination. This is because the filtration process that the seabed filter generates, serves as sufficient pretreatment for seawater as well as eliminating any risk of entrainment or impingement of marine organisms. The main objective of this research is to conduct a feasibility study on Om Almisk Island, an island off the coast of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), to determine if it would be a suitable location to construct a seabed water filter as a replacement for the current open water intake. The Om Almisk Island site was evaluated through collection of sand samples over a radial grid around Om Almisk Island and sample analysis using grain size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity. The lack of mud, high hydraulic conductivity, proximity to KAUST, and the shallow waters of the sandy apron surrounding Om Almisk Island make this an ideal location for a seabed water filter to be used as an intake and pretreatment for the KAUST desalination plant. This location also has low tide change and the presence of benthic macrofauna to create bioturbation in the sediments, which could inhibit the growth of a schmutzdecke. If this biological layer forms, it could drastically reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the system. Due to the high hydraulic

  11. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: An offshore transgressive–regressive mudstone-dominated succession from the Sinemurian of Skåne, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surlyk, Finn

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A Sinemurian mudstone-dominated succession was exposed until recently in the Gantofta quarry in Skåne, southern Sweden. The deposits are placed in the Döshult and Pankarp Members of the Sinemurian–Aalenian Rya Formation. Similar facies of the same age are widespread in the Danish Basin where they constitute the F-Ib unit (F-I member of the Fjerritslev Formation. The Gantofta succession thus represents the easternmost extension of the environment characteristic of the Fjerritslev Formation and is essentially the only locality where it has been possible tostudy the facies of this formation in outcrop. Sedimentation seems to have taken place under relatively quiet tectonic conditions except for the possible fault-control of the basin margin. Thelower part of the Gantofta section is of Early and early Late Sinemurian age. It represents the upper part of the Döshult Member and consists of muddy, lower shoreface sandstones, abruptlyoverlain by dark, bioturbated, fossiliferous mudstones with thin storm siltstones and sandstones. They are overlain by the Upper Sinemurian Pankarp Member which comprises red-brown, restricted marine calcareous mudstones with an upwards increasing number of storm siltstones and sandstones reflecting general shallowing and shoreline progradation.The succession spans the greater part of two simple sequences with a distal sequence boundary located at the boundary between the Döshult Member and the Pankarp Member. The exposed part of the lower sequence includes a thick transgressive systems tract and a very thin highstand systems tract. The upper sequence is represented by an undifferentiated transgressive and highstand systems tract. An Early Sinemurian sea-level rise, a late Early Sinemurian highstand, an early Late Sinemurian fall and a Late Sinemurian minor rise and a major fall are recognised. Nearby boreholes show evidence for an end-Sinemurian – Early Pliensbachian major rise. This evolution corresponds well with

  12. Sedimentary structures formed by upper-regime flows on a Pleistocene carbonate ramp (Favignana Calcarenite, Sicily, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slootman, Arnoud; Moscariello, Andrea; Cartigny, Matthieu; de Boer, Poppe

    2015-04-01

    Antidune, chute-and-pool and cyclic step deposits are found in the outcrops of the Pleistocene calcarenite wedge of Favignana Island. These deposits were formed on a prograding carbonate ramp. Three zones are identified: inner-mid ramp (shoreface), ramp slope, and outer ramp (offshore). The ramp slope dips 3° to 10° and drops 30-40 m over 400-600 m. The ramp slope and outer ramp show a succession of bioturbated dune cross beds with up to 10 m-thick, intercalated event beds containing supercritical-flow structures. Grain sizes range from coarse sand to granules, with large rhodoliths (algal balls) and shells as gravel-sized clasts. It is our aim to provide insight into the processes that create upper-regime flow structures and the hydraulic parameters of their generating flows. During normal storms, wind-driven currents generated submarine dunes that migrated across the sea floor. During exceptional high-energy events (megastorms, tsunamis), large amounts of skeletal debris from the carbonate factory were transported towards the top of the ramp slope, where under the effect of gravity sustained supercritical sediment gravity flows were generated. In a case study of bedform evolution, we present the formation of a large downstream-asymmetric bedform with two antidunes superimposed on its upstream flank. A stepwise flow reconstruction reveals the progressive steepening of the antidunes until critical steepness is reached, and the first and, shortly after, the second antidune wave breaks. The two hydraulic jumps thus formed, developed a temporary cyclic step morphology (i.e. hydraulic jump, accelerating subcritical flow, supercritical chute, hydraulic jump etc.). The bedform geometries are used to reconstruct the nature of the catastrophic events that were active on the ramp slope. The wave length of the antidunes is measured from outcrop, which, through hydraulic equations, allows for estimation of mean flow velocity as a function of sediment concentration in the

  13. Modern non-tropical mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sediments and environments of the southwestern Gulf of California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfar, Jochen; Ingle, James C.; Godinez-Orta, Lucio

    2004-03-01

    Modern mixed carbonate-siliciclastic warm-temperate environments were studied in the southern Gulf of California (GOC), Mexico. The combined heterozoan and photozoan character is defined by the absence of true coral reef structures, calcareous green algae and non-skeletal grains, and the dominance of rhodoliths (unattached coralline red algae), mollusks and small coral patch reefs. The major carbonate producing environments are pocket bays, a shallow carbonate bioherm, high-energy rocky and sandy shorelines and mid-shelf settings. Sediments characterizing the pocket bays display heavily bioturbated bioclastic wackestone and grainstone textures. The rhodolith dominated bioherm is composed of coarse sediments exhibiting grainstone and rudstone textures with fine material being winnowed away by tidal currents. Rocky and sandy shorelines are characterized by erosion and mixing of up to boulder size granitic and volcaniclastic material with coralline red algal and molluskan carbonates. The mid-shelf settings are defined by a silt and fine sand sized non-carbonate matrix mixed with abundant molluskan fragments and foraminifera. Peak carbonate production takes place between 10 and 15 m water depth; below 40 m production significantly decreases, combined with a steep increase in the amount of siliciclastics. This is in contrast to many temperate and cool-water mixed-carbonate siliciclastic systems, where most carbonate production occurs in mid- to outer shelf settings. A full spectrum of sediments from pure carbonates (90-100% carbonate), allochem carbonates (50-90% carbonate) and allochemic mud or sand (<50% carbonate) was encountered in the study area. The absence of early diagenetic binding and cementation of the non-tropical carbonates facilitates mixing of carbonates and siliciclastics. The latter are mainly derived from adjacent Tertiary volcaniclastics and Mesozoic granites. Mixing takes place (1) as punctuated mixing during periodic short-term storm or hurricane

  14. Spatially limited mud turbidites on the Cascadia margin: segmented earthquake ruptures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Goldfinger

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of 23 thin, mostly mud-silt turbidites are found interspersed between larger, well-dated and regionally correlated paleoseismic sandy turbidites that extend along most of the Cascadia margin, northwestern United States. Investigation of the structure, distribution, and sedimentology of these thin mud-silt units supports the interpretation of these units as turbidites originating on the continental slope. Interpretation of mud turbidites is inhibited by bioturbation and lower response to analytical and imaging techniques; nevertheless most of the 23 interpreted beds exhibit most of the characteristics of coarser turbidites. These characteristics include sharp bases, fining upward sequences, darker color, increased gamma and CT density and magnetic susceptibility relative to the hemipelagic background, sparse microfossils, high lithic content, and evidence of transport from marine sources on the continental slope. New core data from sites south of Rogue Apron indicate that sandy and muddy turbidites may be correlated at least 150 km south to Trinidad Plunge Pool for the period ~ 4800 yr BP to present. Many of the mud turbidites initially described at Rogue Apron coarsen southward, becoming sandy turbidites. High-resolution Chirp seismic profiles reveal that turbidite stratigraphy along the base of the southern Cascadia continental slope is continuous, with little variation for at least 240 km along strike. The Chirp data show that turbidites along the Cascadia base of slope are ubiquitous, and likely not sourced solely from submarine canyon mouths, but may also have been delivered to the proximal abyssal plain as sheet flows from the open continental slope and coalescing local sources. Regional stratigraphy reveals that hemipelagic sedimentation rates and total Holocene turbidite thickness and mass are similar at widely separated sites, yet the total thickness of the Holocene section is greater by a factor of two in southern Cascadia

  15. Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178 (Antarctic Peninsula): Sedimentology of glacially influenced continental margin topsets and foresets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, N.; Daniels, J.; Osterman, L.E.; Januszczak, N.

    2001-01-01

    Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178 (February-April 1998) drilled two sites (Sites 1097 and 1103) on the outer Antarctic Peninsula Pacific continental shelf. Recovered strata are no older than late Miocene or early Pliocene (<4.6 Ma). Recovery at shallow depths in loosely consolidated and iceberg-turbated bouldery sediment was poor but improved with increasing depth and consolidation to allow description of lithofacies and biofacies and interpretation of depositional environment. Site 1097 lies on the outer shelf within Marguerite Trough which is a major outlet for ice expanding seaward from the Antarctic Peninsula and reached a maximum depth drilled of 436.6 m below the sea floor (mbsf). Seismic stratigraphic data show flat-lying upper strata resting on strata that dip gently seaward. Uppermost strata, to a depth of 150 mbsf, were poorly recovered, but data suggest they consist of diamictites containing reworked and abraded marine microfauna. This interval is interpreted as having been deposited largely as till produced by subglacial cannibalization of marine sediments (deformation till) recording ice sheet expansion across the shelf. Underlying gently dipping strata show massive, stratified and graded diamictite facies with common bioturbation and slump stuctures that are interbedded with laminated and massive mudstones with dropstones. The succession contains a well-preserved in situ marine microfauna typical of open marine and proglacial marine environments. The lower gently dipping succession at Site 1097 is interpreted as a complex of sediment gravity flows formed of poorly sorted glacial debris. Site 1103 was drilled in that part of the continental margin that shows uppermost flat-lying continental shelf topsets overlying steeper dipping slope foresets seaward of a structural mid-shelf high. Drilling reached a depth of 363 mbsf with good recovery in steeply dipping continental slope foreset strata. Foreset strata are dominated by massive and chaotically

  16. Upper Cretaceous chalk facies and depositional history recorded in the Mona-1 core, Mona Ridge, Danish North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Surlyk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The 331 m long core from the Mona-1 well in the Danish North Sea spans almost the entire Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group but only about 10% of Late Cretaceous time is represented. The succession comprises 14 facies representing pelagic deposition, turbidity flow, and mass-transport processes, including mudflow, debris flow, and slumping. Pelagic deposits vary mainly in terms of the concentration of siliciclastic material, the trace-fossil assemblage, and the presence or ab¬sence of primary sedimentary structures. Pelagic sedimentation was probably punctuated by the deposition of thin turbidites, and the resultant deposits were thoroughly bioturbated if deposited during normal oxygenation at the sea floor. Periodic benthic dysoxia resulted in the preservation of primary structures, as represented by laminated chalk which consists of thin pelagic laminae alternating with thin turbidites. In addition to the thin turbidites in the laminated chalk, four dif¬ferent turbidite facies are interpreted as representing high- to low-energy flows. Clast-supported chalk conglomerates have previously not been differentiated from other turbidites, but are here interpreted to be directly related to the down-slope evolution of debris flows. Debris flows are rep¬resented by matrix-supported conglomerates, which form one of the most common facies in the succession. High-concentration, gravity-driven suspension flows passed into dilute visco-plastic flows during the final stages of deposition and resulted in the deposition of structureless chalks. Limited shear deformation produced distinct quasi-facies from which the precursor facies can be deduced, whereas intense or continued shear deformation produced a shear-banded quasi-facies from which the precursor facies cannot be deduced in all cases. A series of major slump packages (14–18 in total are interpreted, forming over 40% of the succession; debrites appear to be the most common precursor facies involved in

  17. Planktic foraminiferal assemblages from laminated sediments of the northeastern Arabian Sea: a high-resolution study over the last two millennia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munz, Philipp; Lückge, Andreas; Siccha, Michael; Kucera, Michal; Schulz, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    Modern planktic foraminiferal assemblages in the Arabian Sea are largely controlled by seasonal shifts of surface water properties. Boreal summer (June-September) heating of the Asian landmass and Tibetan Plateau leads to northward migration of the ITCZ and develops an intense atmospheric pressure gradient. Strong monsoonal winds from the southwest lead to coastal- and open ocean upwelling, especially in the western Arabian Sea along the coast of Somalia and Oman. Opposite directed dry and cold winds lead to deep convective mixing during boreal winter (January-March) and breakup of the thermal stratification. Deepening of the mixed-layer thus enables nutrient transport into the photic zone with enhanced primary production. Here we study planktic foraminiferal assemblages from the dominantly winter monsoon controlled Pakistan Margin off Karachi. We sampled annually laminated sediments from box core SO90-39KG and ca. 2-m-long piston core SO130-275KL from the same station. High sedimentation rates and varve-like lamination provides a particular record with very precise age control. Box core 39KG offers a record of the last 100 years with 2-year-resolution and 275KL provides a ca. 10-year-resolution during the last 2100 years. We calculated foraminiferal flux rates after photometric identification and subtraction of light-colored event layers, consisting solely of terrigeneous matter to enable comparison with flux rates from sediment trap stations. We identified a total of 28 planktic foraminiferal (PF) species/morphotypes in the fraction >150μm. During the relatively short period of the past two millennia, several species showed comparatively large fluctuations on decadal time scales, not seen in bioturbated records. Globigerina bulloides, a species generally associated with high primary production rates, fluctuates between ca. 10% and 45%. Highest relative share was observed during periods 1593-1413, 1023-923, 483-393, 63- -7 years AD. Average PF accumulation rates

  18. Comparison between infaunal communities of the deep floor and edge of the Tonga Trench: Possible effects of differences in organic matter supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Daniel; Rowden, Ashley A.; Glud, Ronnie N.; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Clark, Malcolm R.

    2016-10-01

    Hadal trenches are characterised by environmental conditions not found in any other environment, thereby providing new opportunities to understand the processes that shape deep-sea benthic communities. Technological advances have led to an increase in the number of investigations in hadal trenches over the last two decades. However, more quantitative samples including the deepest parts of trenches is needed to better understand trends in benthic diversity, abundance, biomass and community structure in these extreme habitats, and how these may be shaped by environmental and/or evolutionary factors. In this study, we describe and compare the abundance, biomass, vertical distribution in the sediment, diversity, and community structure of nematodes and other infauna in sediments from the Horizon Deep ( 10 800 m) in the Tonga Trench and a site on the edge of the trench ( 6250 m). Mean nematode abundance was six times greater at the Horizon Deep site (387 ind. 10 cm-2) than at the trench edge site (65 ind. 10 cm-2). A similar pattern was observed for biomass (15 vs 2 μgDW 10 cm-2, respectively), which likely resulted from elevated organic matter supply at the Horizon Deep site. There was no significant difference in nematode species richness between the two sites, but diversity measured using rarefaction was significantly greater at the trench edge site than at the Horizon Deep site [ES(20); 13.8 vs 7.8]. Dominance was much more pronounced in the Horizon Deep, which may be due to competitive exclusion by a small number of opportunistic species. Nematode community structure differed significantly both between sites and among sediment depth layers. The presence of subsurface peaks in pigment concentrations, bacteria abundance, and nematode abundance at the Horizon Deep site is consistent with a recent turbidite event, and may also reflect high rates of bioturbation by larger fauna resulting from high food availability. Determining the relative influences of different

  19. A first attempt to reproduce basaltic soil chronosequences using a process-based soil profile model: implications for our understanding of soil evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M.; Gloor, M.; Lloyd, J.

    2012-04-01

    model, followed by a description of novel methods using tracers such as optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dates and meteoric 10Be to evaluate the modelled processes of bioturbation and surface erosion. We will also discuss comparisons of modelled properties with observations and conclude with implications on our understanding of soil evolution.

  20. Animating the biodynamics of soil thickness using process vector analysis: A dynamic denudation approach to soil formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.L.; Domier, J.E.J.; Johnson, D.N.

    2005-01-01

    This paper expands the dynamic denudation framework of landscape evolution by providing new process insights and details on how soil and its signature morphological feature, the biomantle, form and function in the environment. We examine soils and their biomantles from disparate parts of the world, from the tropics through midlatitudes and hyperarid through perhumid, a range that exhibits varying environments for, and of, life. We then explicate the process pathways that cause soils to thicken and thin, and to even disappear, then reform. We do this by examining thickness relationships, where soil thickness stand biomantle thickness bt are functions of upbuilding u and deepening d minus removal r processes, hence st/bt=f(u+d-r). Upbuilding has two subsets, u1, which includes all exogenous (allochthonous-outside) mineral and/or organic inputs to the soil system, and u2, which includes all endogenous (autochthonous-in situ) processes and productions, including weathering. Exogenous u1 inputs include eolian and slopewash inputs (sedimentations) of mineral and organic materials, mass wasting accumulations and the like. Endogenous u2 processes and productions include the sum of in situ bioturbations, biosynthetic productions, organic accumulations, biovoid productions, weathering and volume increases caused by their sum. Endogenous upbuildings, which dominantly occur in the biomantle, are basically biodynamic bd processes and productions, hence u2=bd. Therefore, if exogenous upbuildings u1 are minimal or zero, then biomantle thickness bt is expressed by bt=f(u2-r) or bt=f(bd-r). Drawing on these relationships, we employ a graphic-conceptual device called process vector analysis in a digital animation (see supplementary materials or cf. https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/jdomier/www/temp/ biomantle.html) that illustrates the main pathways that form both Earth's soil and its unique epidermis, the biomantle. We then discuss the main elements of the animation using still frames that