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Sample records for biotic puccinia psidii

  1. Combining a climatic niche model of an invasive fungus with its host species distributions to identify risks to natural assets: Puccinia psidii Sensu Lato in Australia.

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    Darren J Kriticos

    Full Text Available Puccinia psidii sensu lato (s.l. is an invasive rust fungus threatening a wide range of plant species in the family Myrtaceae. Originating from Central and South America, it has invaded mainland USA and Hawai'i, parts of Asia and Australia. We used CLIMEX to develop a semi-mechanistic global climatic niche model based on new data on the distribution and biology of P. psidii s.l. The model was validated using independent distribution data from recently invaded areas in Australia, China and Japan. We combined this model with distribution data of its potential Myrtaceae host plant species present in Australia to identify areas and ecosystems most at risk. Myrtaceaeous species richness, threatened Myrtaceae and eucalypt plantations within the climatically suitable envelope for P. psidii s.l in Australia were mapped. Globally the model identifies climatically suitable areas for P. psidii s.l. throughout the wet tropics and sub-tropics where moist conditions with moderate temperatures prevail, and also into some cool regions with a mild Mediterranean climate. In Australia, the map of species richness of Myrtaceae within the P. psidii s.l. climatic envelope shows areas where epidemics are hypothetically more likely to be frequent and severe. These hotspots for epidemics are along the eastern coast of New South Wales, including the Sydney Basin, in the Brisbane and Cairns areas in Queensland, and in the coastal region from the south of Bunbury to Esperance in Western Australia. This new climatic niche model for P. psidii s.l. indicates a higher degree of cold tolerance; and hence a potential range that extends into higher altitudes and latitudes than has been indicated previously. The methods demonstrated here provide some insight into the impacts an invasive species might have within its climatically suited range, and can help inform biosecurity policies regarding the management of its spread and protection of valued threatened assets.

  2. Cloning and characterization of gene-resistant analogs (RGAs) involved in rust (Puccinia psidii) resistance in Eucalyptus grandis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcelo Luiz Laia; Acelino Couto Alfenas; Sergio Hermnio Brommonschenkel; Shinitiro Oda; Eduardo Jose de Melo; Inae Marie de Arau jo Silva; Janana Fernandes Goncalves; Ariadne Marques

    2015-01-01

    Disease-resistant genes play an important role in defending against a variety of pathogens and insect pests in plants. Most of the disease-resistant genes encode pro-teins with conserved leucine rich repeat and nucleotide binding site domains. In this study, we cloned and char-acterized gene-resistant analogs (RGAs) from Eucalyptus grandis using degenerate PCR, with primers specifically targeting these two domains. The amplified fragments were cloned into the pGEM-T vector and transformed into Escherichia coli. Among the 90 clones obtained, 13 were sequenced and compared with each other and with previ-ously identified gene-resistant diseases. A BLASTX search in GenBank revealed high similarities among the con-served domains of these cloned genes with RGA genes. Some clones, however, showed no significant similarity with DNA sequences in GenBank. Southern blotting ana-lysis identified several polymorphic RFLP loci between distinct genotypes. However, none of them co-segregated with the Puccinia psidii Winter resistance gene 1 (Ppr1) in a population study.

  3. A baseline analysis of the distribution, host-range, and severity of the rust Puccinia Psidii in the Hawaiian islands, 2005-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Puccinia psidii was first described by Winter (1884) on guava (Psidium guajava L.) in Brazil. The rust is still a major pest of native guava in Brazil and is often referred to as “guava rust” internationally. It is unusual among rust fungi because of its broad and ever-expanding host-range within the Myrtaceae plant family (Simpson et al. 2006). The pathogen is regarded as a major threat to Eucalyptus plantations and other Myrtaceae worldwide (Coutinho et al. 1998, Grgurinovic et al. 2006, Glen et al. 2007). Infections of leaves and meristems are particularly severe on susceptible seedlings, cuttings, young trees, and coppice, causing plants to be stunted and multi-branched, inhibiting normal growth and development, and sometimes causing death to young seedlings (Booth et al. 2000, Rayachhetry et al. 2001). The fungus has expanded its host-range in Brazil, affecting both native and introduced Myrtaceae (Coutinho et al. 1998). Since its discovery in 1884, P. psidii has continually been discovered to have an expanding host-range within the Myrtaceae, affecting hosts throughout much of South and Central America and the Caribbean. Spreading out originally from Brazil in 1884, the fungus has been reported on hosts in the following countries (first record in parentheses): Paraguay (1884), Uruguay (1889), Ecuador (1891), Colombia (1913), Puerto Rico (1913), Cuba (1926), Dominican Republic (1933), Venezuela (1934), Jamaica (1936), Argentina (1946), Dominica (1948), Trinidad and Tobago (1951), Guatemala (1968), United States (Florida; 1977), Mexico (1981), El Salvador (1987), and Costa Rica (1998) (Simpson et al. 2006). It is possible that P. psidii was present in El Salvador and Costa Rica prior to 1980, but was not reported until 1987 and 1998, respectively. Until recently, Puccinia psidii was restricted to the Neotropics, Mexico, and the state of Florida in the United States. While the rust has been present in Florida for over 30 years, only recently has it spread

  4. An economic approach to assessing import policies designed to prevent the arrival of invasive species: the case of Puccinia psidii in Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Kimberly; D'Evelyn, Sean; Loope, Lloyd; Wada, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Since its first documented introduction to Hawai‘i in 2005, the rust fungus Puccinia psidii has already severely damaged Syzygium jambos (Indian rose apple) trees and the federally endangered Eugenia koolauensis (nioi). Fortunately, the particular strain has yet to cause serious damage to Metrosideros polymorpha (‘ōhi‘a), which comprises roughly 80% of the state's native forests and covers 400,000 ha. Although the rust has affected less than 5% of Hawaii's ‘ōhi‘a trees thus far, the introduction of more virulent strains and the genetic evolution of the current strain are still possible. Since the primary pathway of introduction is Myrtaceae plant material imported from outside the state, potential damage to ‘ōhi‘a can be minimized by regulating those high-risk imports. We discuss the economic impact on the state's florist, nursery, landscaping, and forest plantation industries of a proposed rule that would ban the import of non-seed Myrtaceae plant material and require a 1-year quarantine of seeds. Our analysis suggests that the benefits to the forest plantation industry of a complete ban on non-seed material would likely outweigh the costs to other affected sectors, even without considering the reduction in risk to ‘ōhi‘a. Incorporating the value of ‘ōhi‘a protection would further increase the benefit–cost ratio in favor of an import ban.

  5. An analysis of the risk of introduction of additional strains of the rust puccinia psidii Winter ('Ohi'a Rust) to Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loope, Lloyd; La Rosa, Anne Marie

    2010-01-01

    In April 2005, the rust fungus Puccinia psidii (most widely known as guava rust or eucalyptus rust) was found in Hawai'i. This was the first time this rust had been found outside the Neotropics (broadly-defined, including subtropical Florida, where the rust first established in the 1970s). First detected on a nursery-grown 'ohi'a plant, it became known as ''ohi'a rust'in Hawai'i. The rust spread rapidly and by August 2005 had been found throughout the main Hawaiian Islands. The rust probably reached Hawai'i via the live plant trade or via the foliage trade. In Hawai'i, the rust has infected three native plant species and at least eight non-native species. Effects have been substantial on the endangered endemic plant Eugenia koolauensis and the introduced rose apple, Syzygium jambos. Billions of yellow, asexual urediniospores are produced on rose apple, but a complete life cycle (involving sexual reproduction) has not yet been observed. The rust is autoecious (no alternate host known) on Myrtaceae. The strain introduced into Hawai'i is found sparingly on 'ohi'a (Metrosideros polymorpha), the dominant tree of Hawai'i's forests, with sporadic damage detected to date. The introduction of a rust strain that causes widespread damage to 'ohi'a would be catastrophic for Hawai'i's native biodiversity. Most imports of material potentially contaminated with rust are shipped to Hawai'i from Florida and California (from which P. psidii was reported in late 2005 by Mellano, 2006). Florida is known to have multiple strains. The identity of the strain or strains in California is unclear, but one of them is known to infect myrtle, Myrtus communis, a species commonly imported into Hawai'i. It is important to ecosystem conservation and commercial forestry that additional rust strains or genotypes be prevented from establishing in Hawai'i. The purpose of this analysis of risk is to evaluate the need for an interim rule by the Hawai'i Department of Agriculture to regulate plant

  6. Avaliação da resistência de espécies de eucalipto à ferrugem (Puccinia psidii Winter

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    Diene Elen Miranda da Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A incidência da ferrugem ocorre em mudas no viveiro e em plantas jovens no campo, essa doença causada por Puccinia psidii é uma das mais severas do eucalipto. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo quantificar a resistência parcial das espécies de Eucalyptus propinqua, E. citriodora, E. grandis, E. urophylla, E. microcorys, E. urograndis (E. grandis x E. urophylla, E. robusta, E. saligna, E. dunnie, E. phaeotricha à ferrugem do eucalipto. Para isso foi conduzido experimento em casa de vegetação no Departamento de Entomologia e Fitopatologia da UFRRJ. Foram utilizadas 100 mudas de eucalipto com três meses de idade, obtidas a partir de sementes. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi inteiramente casualizado, com dez tratamentos e dez repetições, sendo uma planta por repetição. A inoculação foi realizada por meio da atomização de folhas com suspensão de uredósporos na concentração de 2x10(4 esporos/mL, obtidos a partir de pústulas frescas. Em seguida, as mudas foram incubadas em câmara úmida e escura por 48h. Foram avaliados os parâmetros de resistência: número médio de pústulas por folíolo, severidade, período latente médio e AACPD. Os dados obtidos foram transformados em e arcsen , e submetidos à análise de variância e à comparação de médias pelo teste de Scott-Knott ao nível de 5% de probabilidade, por meio do software SAEG. Foram encontradas diferenças significativas entre as espécies de eucalipto para os parâmetros estudados. Eucalyptus urograndis (E. grandis x E. urophylla apresentou um menor número médio de pústulas por folíolo, menor severidade, maior período latente médio e valores menores da área abaixo da curva do progresso da doença, tendo dessa forma maior resistência parcial à ferrugem.

  7. Economic analysis of the proposed rule to prevent arrival of new genetic strains of the rust fungus Puccinia psidii in Hawai?i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Kimberly; D'Evelyn, Sean; Loope, Lloyd; Wada, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Since its first documented introduction to Hawai‘i in 2005, the rust fungus P. psidii has already severely damaged Syzygium jambos (Indian rose apple) trees and the federally endangered Eugenia koolauensis (nioi). Fortunately, the particular strain has yet to cause serious damage to ‘ōhi‘a, which comprises roughly 80% of the state’s native forests and covers 400,000 ha. Although the rust has affected less than 5% of Hawaii’s ‘ōhi‘a trees thus far, the introduction of more virulent strains and the genetic evolution of the current strain are still possible. Since the primary pathway of introduction is Myrtaceae plant material imported from outside the state, potential damage to ‘ohi‘a can be minimized by regulating those high-risk imports. We discuss the economic impact on the state’s florist, nursery, landscaping, and forest plantation industries of a proposed rule that would ban the import of non-seed Myrtaceae plant material and require a one-year quarantine of seeds. Our analysis suggests that the benefits to the forest plantation industry of a complete ban on non-seed material would likely outweigh the costs to other affected sectors, even without considering the reduction in risk to ‘ōhi‘a. Incorporating the value of ‘ōhi‘a protection would further increase the benefit-cost ratio in favor of an import ban.

  8. [Sexual dimorphism of guava weevil Conotrachelus psidii Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)].

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    Silva-Filho, Gilson; Bailez, Omar E; Viana-Bailez, Ana M

    2007-01-01

    We investigate structural and behavioral differences between male and female adults of guava weevil, Conotrachelus psidii Marshall, 1922 to help in sex determination. Weevils collected from a commercial guava orchard were individually caged and maintained under laboratory conditions. Every day ten individuals were grouped and their behavior was observed. During mating the males and females were identified. Fifty weevils of each sex were killed and they were observed with stereoscopic microscope. The antenna insertion on the rostrum and hair on the thorax and abdomen surfaces were examined. Length and width of body, pronotum, last abdominal sternite and rostrum were also taken. Behaviorally, the male weevils produce audible sound by stridulation of abdomen while females do not. In the females, the body and pronotum width and body a rostrum length were higher than in the males, but the last abdominal sternite was smaller. Three other structural differences were visible with the naked eye: 1) the anterior region of pronotum have scarce hair or have not in the females and hair is dense in the males; 2) the last tergite of females is hidden by the penultimate tergite whereas in the males is visible; 3) the first abdominal sternite of females is more prominent, very convex and without or with little bristle. In the males it is slightly concave and with abundant hair. The male-female differences found in this work allow, without hurt or change insect behavior, an efficient sex determination of guava weevil. PMID:17934614

  9. Isolation, purification and characterization of extracellular protease produced by marine-derived endophytic fungus Xylaria psidii KT30

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    Bugi Ratno Budiarto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate, purify and characterize extracellular protease produced by Xylaria psidii (X. psidii KT30. Methods: In the present study, the extracellular protease secreted by X. psidii KT30 was isolated and purified by using three steps of protein purification, then the purified protease was characterized by applying qualitative and quantitative enzymatic assays. Results: Extracellular protease with molecular mass 71 kDa has been purified successfully by applying diethylaminoethanol-Sepharose followed by sephadex SG75 with its final specific protease activity of 0.091 IU/mg. Protease was the most active at temperature 60 °C and pH 7. The activity of enzyme was abolished mostly by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, showing it is family of serine protease. Conclusions: Extracellular serine protease produced by X. psidii KT30 with good biochemical properties displayed some promising results for its further application in field of biotechnology or medicine.

  10. Population biology of Puccinia graminis

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    Berlin, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Barberry has made a noticeable comeback in the agricultural landscape after the repeal in 1994 of a law requiring its eradication. It has brought with it not only biological diversity, but also stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis (Pers.). Rusts have been known and feared for centuries. This thesis presents the results of studies of the population structure of P. graminis and connects this information to the epidemiology of stem rust. The studies were done by using SSR (simple sequence repea...

  11. Field evaluation of durum wheat landraces for prevailing abiotic and biotic stresses in highland rainfed regions of Iran

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    Reza Mohammadi; Behzad Sadeghzadeh; Hasan Ahmadi; Nowzar Bahrami; Ahmed Amri

    2015-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses are major limiting factors for high crop productivity worldwide. A landrace collection consisting of 380 durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum) entries originating in several countries along with four check varieties were evaluated for biotic stresses: yellow rust (Puccinia striiformis Westendorf f. sp. tritici) and wheat stem sawfly (WSS) Cephus cinctus Norton (Hymenoptera: Cephidae), and abiotic stresses: cold and drought. The main objectives were to (i) q...

  12. FRAKSINASI PROTEIN KAPANG LAUT Xylaria psidii KT30 DAN SITOTOKSISITASNYA TERHADAP SEL HeLa [Fractionation of Proteins of Marine Fungus Xylaria psidii KT30 and their Cytotoxicity against HeLa Cells

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    Mita Gebriella Inthe

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the most common cause of death for Indonesian women after human breast cancer. One of the efforts of cancer treatment is the utilization of natural compounds. One of the microorganisms having the potential as anticancer agent is endophytic fungi. Endophytic fungi from the marine habitat can be isolated from sea weeds, sea grasses, sponges, and mangroves. Xylaria psidii KT30, a marine fungus used in this study was isolated from red seaweed Kappaphycus alvarezii. Xylaria psidii KT30 was cultivated in potato dextrose broth medium for nine days at room temperature 27-29°C in shaking condition. This study aimed to obtain protein fractions from X. psidii KT30 and determine their toxicity againt Chang and HeLa cells. The fractionation process was conducted using DEAE Sephadex A-50 column chromatography and the toxicity was determined by Brine Shrimp Lethality Test (BSLT. The metabolites excreted in the culture broth was extracted using 90% of ammonium sulphate. The extract was then tested for their toxicity against HeLa and Chang cells by Microculture Tetrazolium Technique (MTT assay.The results revealed that LC50 of the protein extract of X. psidii KT30 was 104.95 ppm and IC50 was 69.9 ppm. Based on the National Cancer Institute (NCI, this value showed moderate cytotoxicity against HeLa cells.

  13. Morfologia externa de Thyridia psidii cetoides (Rosenberg & Talbot. I. Cabeça e apêndices (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae External morphology of Thyridia psidii cetoides (Rosenberg & Talbot. I. Cabeça e apêndices (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae

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    Jorge Manuel Saraiva Bizarro

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A detailed study of the morphology of the head of Thyridia psidii cetoides (Rosenberg & Talbot, 1914 (Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae adults from both sexes is presented. The material was obtained at the city's plant nursery "Horto Florestal de Curitiba", Paraná, Brazil; mainly by rearing eggs and larvae collected there on Cyphomandra betacea (Canavilles Sendtner, 1845 (Solanaceae. When possible, all the results obtained were compared with those already available in the literature concerning external morphology studies pertinent to other Nymphalidae subfamilies (Brassolinae, Morphinae and Danainae.

  14. Amplified fragment length polymorphism and virulence polymorphism in Puccinia hordei

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    Puccinia hordei is the causal agent of barley leaf rust. To study the genetic diversity in P. hordei, 45 isolates with diverse virulence patterns and geographical origins were analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism markers. Two pathotypes of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici and one is...

  15. Control del picudo de la guayaba Conotrachelus psidii Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) con nematodos entomopatógenos

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    Delgado Ochica, Clara Yalexy

    2012-01-01

    El picudo de la guayaba Conotrachelus psidii es una de las principales plagas del cultivo de la guayaba en la provincia de Vélez-Colombia, causa pérdidas severas en la calidad y cantidad de los frutos. El control biológico aparece como una opción viable para el manejo de la plaga y en especial, los nematodos entomopatógenos-NEPs han mostrado buenos resultados (63-90% mortalidad) para el control de larvas de cuarto instar del picudo de la guayaba. En el presente trabajo se evaluó la eficacia d...

  16. The specifics of elicitor effect on Triticum aestivum macromorphogenesis under simultaneous lesion by Septoria tritici and Puccinia recondita

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    I.V. Zhuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Phytopathogenic fungi interrupt the macromorphogenesis of wheat (Triticum aestivum but biotic elicitors stimulate the nonspecific tolerance, growth and development of plant stems. It is shown that oxalic acid as a biotic elicitor and donor of nitric oxide signal molecule (sodium nitroprusside stimulate stem growth in height and last leaves length, as well as grain quantity and productivity both in cv. ‘Poliska 90’ and cv. ‘Stolychna’ under Septoria tritici and Puccinia recondita infection in field trials. It is detected that the degree of infected leaf area decreased in both treated cultivars under Saari-Prescott scale. Cv. ‘Poliska 90’ is more sensitive to both fungal pathogens than cv. ‘Stolychna’, but elicitor influence on its architectonics was no less than on cv. ‘Stolychna’.

  17. Microscopical observations of Sphaerellopsis filum, a parasite of Puccinia recondita

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    Agnieszka Płachecka

    2012-01-01

    Sphaerellopsis filum is a well-known parasite associated with many species of rust fungi. It is of frequent occurrence as parasite of cereal rusts: Puccinia recondita, P. coronata, P. graminis, P. hordei and P. striiformis. Uredial sori of Puccinia recondita f.sp. tritici infected with Sphaerellopsis filum were examined by light and scanning microscope to determine morphology of hyperparasite as well as the parasite-hyperparasite contact. The microscopical examination of infected uredinia cle...

  18. Morfologia externa de Thyridia psidii cetoides (Rosenberg & Talbot (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae. III. Abdome e apêndices External morphology of Thyridia psidii cetoides (Rosenberg & Talbot. III. Abdomen and appendages (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Manuel Saraiva Bizarro

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A detailed study of the abdominal external morphology of both sexes of Thyridia psidii cetoides (Rosenberg & Talbot, 1914 is presented. The material for this research was obtained at the city's plant nursery "Horto Florestal de Curitiba", Paraná, Brazil; mainly by rearing eggs and larvae collected on Cyphomandra betacea (Canavilles Sendtner, 1845 (Solanaceae. When possible, the results obtained were compared with those already available in the literature concerning other Nymphalidae subfamilies morphology (Brassolinae, Morphinae and Danainae; the most striking feature being the asymmetrical valvae of the male and the length and faint sclerotinization of the third abdominal sternite in both sexes. A resume containing the main morphological differences to other nymphalid subfamillies, found throughout this research concerning head, thorax and abdome, is presented.

  19. Acyl-homoserine lactones from Erwinia psidii R. IBSBF 435T, a guava phytopathogen (Psidium guajava L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomini, Armando M; Manfio, Gilson P; Araújo, Welington L; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2005-08-10

    The phytopathogen Erwinia psidii R. IBSBF 435T causes rot in branches, flowers, and fruits of guava (Psidium guajava L.), being responsible for crop losses, and has no effective control. It was demonstrated that this strain produces two compounds [S-(-)-N-hexanoyl and N-heptanoyl-homoserine lactone], both belonging to the class of quorum-sensing signaling substances. A protocol using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection with chiral stationary phase is described for the absolute configuration determination of a natural acyl-homoserine lactone. Biological assays with specific reporter and synthesis of identified substances are also described. This is the first report on the N-heptanoyl-homoserine lactone occurrence in the Erwinia genus. PMID:16076103

  20. Microscopical observations of Sphaerellopsis filum, a parasite of Puccinia recondita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Płachecka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sphaerellopsis filum is a well-known parasite associated with many species of rust fungi. It is of frequent occurrence as parasite of cereal rusts: Puccinia recondita, P. coronata, P. graminis, P. hordei and P. striiformis. Uredial sori of Puccinia recondita f.sp. tritici infected with Sphaerellopsis filum were examined by light and scanning microscope to determine morphology of hyperparasite as well as the parasite-hyperparasite contact. The microscopical examination of infected uredinia clearly showed the intimate connection of S. filum with its rust host.

  1. Longevity of Puccinia horiana teliospores under various environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccinia horiana Henn. is a quarantine-significant fungal pathogen and causal agent of chrysanthemum white rust (CWR). The pathogen and disease were first discovered in the United States in 1977 and quickly eradicated. During the early 1990s, CWR re-emerged on several instances, but in each instance...

  2. Plant biotic interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    occurring after infestation by olive fly larvae. The last research article by Niu et al.(2016) describes a growth-promoting rhizobacterium that primes induced systemic resistance by suppressing a host R gene-targeting micro RNA pairs and activating host immune responses. This finding further supports the important roles of plant endogenous small RNAs in plant-pathogen interactions. Hailing Jin, Professor Special Issue Editor UC President’s Chair Director of Genetics, Genomics and Bioinformatics Graduate Program, Center for Plant Cell Biology, Institute for Integrative Genome Biology, University of California, Riverside, USA doi:10.1111/jipb.12476 ©2016 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences REFERENCES Alagna F, Kal enbach M, Pompa A, De Marchis F, Rao R, Baldwin IT, Bonaventure G, Baldoni L (2016) Olive fruits infested with olive fly larvae respond with an ethylene burst and the emission of specific volatiles. J Integr Plant Biol 58:413–425 Castiblanco LF, Sundin GW (2016) New insights on molecular regulation of biofilm formation in plant-associated bacteria. J Integr Plant Biol 58:362–372 da GraSca JV, Douhan GW, Halbert SE, Keremane ML, Lee RF, Vidalakis G, Zhao H (2016) Huanglongbing: An overview of a complex pathosystem ravaging the world’s citrus. J Integr Plant Biol 58:373–387 Giovino A, Martinel i F, Saia S (2016) Rhynchophorus ferrugineus attack affects a group of compounds rather than rearranging Phoenix canariensis metabolic pathways. J Integr Plant Biol 58:388–396 Huang J, Yang M, Zhang X (2016) The function of smal RNAs in plant biotic stress response. J Integr Plant Biol 58:312–327 Kaloshian I, Wal ing LL (2016) Hemipteran and dipteran pests: Effectors and plant host immune regulators. J Integr Plant Biol 58:350–361 Mermigka G, Verret F, Kalantidis K (2016) RNA silencing movement in plants. J Integr Plant Biol 58:328–342 Niu D, Xia J, Jiang C, Qi B, Ling X, Lin S, Zhang W, Guo J, Jin H, Zhao H (2016) Bacil us cereus AR156

  3. Aspectos biológicos e técnica de criação do gorgulho-da-goiaba, Conotrachelus psidii marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

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    Fabricio Iglesias Valente; Vera Lúcia Rodrigues Machado Benassi

    2014-01-01

    Considerada praga-chave da cultura da goiaba, Conotrachelus psidii Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) tem causado grandes prejuízos em vários países produtores desta fruta. A pesquisa objetivou avaliar os parâmetros biológicos da praga, sob condições controladas, através do desenvolvimento de uma técnica de criação que permitiu efetuar observações diárias de pré-pupas e pupas. Constatou-se que o substrato adequado para manutenção dessas fases foi o solo argiloso umedecido com viabilidade de...

  4. Virulencia, producción y desplazamiento de nematodos entomopatógenos sobre larvas del picudo de la guayaba Conotrachelus psidii Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) en laboratorio.

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Sáenz Aponte; Yalexy Delgado-Ochica

    2012-01-01

    The guava weevil Conotrach­elus psidii Marshall is a major pest affecting guava cultiva­tion in Santander, Colombia; it causes serious losses in the quality and the volume of fruit produced. Biological control is a viable option for pest management; entomo­pathogenic nematodes (EPNs), particularly, have shown good results (63-90% mortality) in controlling fourth in­star larvae of the guava weevil. In this study we evaluated the effect of seven species of EPNs isolated in Colom­bia: Steinernem...

  5. Virulencia, producción y desplazamiento de nematodos entomopatógenos sobre larvas del picudo de la guayaba Conotrachelus psidii Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en laboratorio.

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    Adriana Sáenz Aponte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The guava weevil Conotrach­elus psidii Marshall is a major pest affecting guava cultiva­tion in Santander, Colombia; it causes serious losses in the quality and the volume of fruit produced. Biological control is a viable option for pest management; entomo­pathogenic nematodes (EPNs, particularly, have shown good results (63-90% mortality in controlling fourth in­star larvae of the guava weevil. In this study we evaluated the effect of seven species of EPNs isolated in Colom­bia: Steinernema websteri JCL006, Steinernema sp. 1 JCL024, Steinernema sp. 2 JCL007, Steinernema sp. 3 JCL027, S. co­lombiense SNI0198, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora HNI0100 and Heterorhabditis sp. SL0708 on fourth instar larvae of the guava weevil in laboratory conditions, and measured the production and the displacement of the most viru­lent. Heterorhabditis sp. SL0708 induced mortality of 85%, Steinernema sp. 1 JCL024 75% and S. colombiense SNI0198 55%, the other species of EPNs, less than 25% mortality. Increased production of JI by weevil larva was recorded in Heterorhabditis sp. SL0708, which also showed greater recognition capability when the host was C. psidii.

  6. Uranium Isotopes Fingerprint Biotic Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Stylo, Malgorzata Alicja; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth's history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and t...

  7. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  8. A literature review on biotic homogenization

    OpenAIRE

    Guangmei Wang; Jingcheng Yang; Chuangdao Jiang; Hongtao Zhao; Zhidong Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Biotic homogenization is the process whereby the genetic, taxonomic and functional similarity of two or more biotas increases over time. As a new research agenda for conservation biogeography, biotic homogenization has become a rapidly emerging topic of interest in ecology and evolution over the past decade. However, research on this topic is rare in China. Herein, we introduce the development of the concept of biotic homogenization, and then discuss methods to quantify its three components (...

  9. Field evaluation of durum wheat landraces for prevailing abiotic and biotic stresses in highland rainfed regions of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza; Mohammadi; Behzad; Sadeghzadeh; Hasan; Ahmadi; Nowzar; Bahrami; Ahmed; Amri

    2015-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses are major limiting factors for high crop productivity worldwide. A landrace collection consisting of 380 durum wheat(Triticum turgidum L. var. durum) entries originating in several countries along with four check varieties were evaluated for biotic stresses:yellow rust(Puccinia striiformis Westendorf f. sp. tritici) and wheat stem sawfly(WSS) Cephus cinctus Norton(Hymenoptera: Cephidae), and abiotic stresses: cold and drought. The main objectives were to(i) quantify phenotypic diversity and identify variation in the durum wheat landraces for the different stresses and(ii) characterize the agronomic profiles of landraces in reaction to the stresses. Significant changes in reactions of landraces to stresses were observed.Landraces resistant to each stress were identified and agronomically characterized.Percentage reduction due to the stresses varied from 11.4%(yellow rust) to 21.6%(cold stress) for 1000-kernel weight(TKW) and from 19.9(yellow rust) to 91.9%(cold stress) for grain yield. Landraces from Asia and Europe showed enhanced genetic potential for both grain yield and cold tolerance under highland rainfed conditions of Iran. The findings showed that TKW and yield productivity could be used to assess the response of durum wheat landraces to different stresses. In conclusion, landraces showed high levels of resistance to both biotic and abiotic stresses, and selected landraces can serve in durum wheat breeding for adaptation to cold and drought-prone environments.

  10. Field evaluation of durum wheat landraces for prevailing abiotic and biotic stresses in highland rainfed regions of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Mohammadi; Behzad Sadeghzadeh; Hasan Ahmadi; Nowzar Bahrami; Ahmed Amri

    2015-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses are major limiting factors for high crop productivity worldwide. A landrace collection consisting of 380 durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum) entries originating in several countries along with four check varieties were evaluated for biotic stresses:yellow rust (Puccinia stri formis Westendorf f. sp. tritici) and wheat stem sawfly (WSS) Cephus cinctus Norton (Hymenoptera:Cephidae), and abiotic stresses:cold and drought. The main objectives were to (i) quantify phenotypic diversity and identify variation in the durum wheat landraces for the different stresses and (ii) characterize the agronomic profiles of landraces in reaction to the stresses. Significant changes in reactions of landraces to stresses were observed. Landraces resistant to each stress were identified and agronomically characterized. Percentage reduction due to the stresses varied from 11.4% (yellow rust) to 21.6% (cold stress) for 1000-kernel weight (TKW) and from 19.9 (yellow rust) to 91.9%(cold stress) for grain yield. Landraces from Asia and Europe showed enhanced genetic potential for both grain yield and cold tolerance under highland rainfed conditions of Iran. The findings showed that TKW and yield productivity could be used to assess the response of durum wheat landraces to different stresses. In conclusion, landraces showed high levels of resistance to both biotic and abiotic stresses, and selected landraces can serve in durum wheat breeding for adaptation to cold and drought-prone environments.

  11. Identification of promising host-induced silencing targets among genes preferentially transcribed in haustoria of Puccinia

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Chuntao; Downey, Samantha I.; Klages-Mundt, Naeh L.; Ramachandran, Sowmya; Chen, Xianming; Szabo, Les J; Pumphrey, Michael; Hulbert, Scot H

    2015-01-01

    Background The cereal rust fungi are destructive pathogens that affect grain production worldwide. Although the genomic and transcript sequences for three Puccinia species that attack wheat have been released, the functions of large repertories of genes from Puccinia still need to be addressed to understand the infection process of these obligate parasites. Host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) has emerged a useful tool to examine the importance of rust fungus genes while growing within host pla...

  12. Mining and survey of simple sequence repeats in wheat rust Puccinia sp

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Rajender; Pandey, Bharati; Danishuddin, Mohd; Sheoran, Sonia; Sharma, Pradeep; Chatrath, Ravish

    2011-01-01

    The abundance and inherent potential for extensive allelic variations in simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites resulted in valuable source for genetic markers in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed and compared the abundance and organisation of SSR in the genome of two important fungal pathogens of wheat, brown or leaf rust (Puccinia triticina) and black or stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici). P. triticina genome with two fold genome size as compared to P. graminis tri...

  13. Monoclonal antibodies for the detection of Puccinia striiformis urediniospores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Frøkiær, Hanne; Hearty, Stephen; O'Kennedy, Richard; Hejgaard, Jørn; Nicolaisen, Mogens; Justesen, Annemarie Fejer

    2007-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Pst causes yellow rust disease in wheat plants leading to crop losses. The organism spreads by releasing wind-dispersed urediniospores from infected plants. In this study a library of novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was developed against Pst urediniospores. Nine m......Ab-producing cell lines were cloned and their cross-reactivities characterised against a panel of airborne fungal spores representing genera commonly found in the same environment as Pst. Two specific mAbs were used to develop a competitive ELISA (Pst mAb4) and a subtractive inhibition ELISA (Pst mAb8). Standard...... curves for both assays had good intra- and interday reproducibility. The subtractive inhibition ELISA had greater sensitivity with a detection limit of 1.5 105 spores ml1. Cross-reactivity studies of Pst mAb8 in the subtractive inhibition ELISA, showed reaction with other Puccinia spores only, suggesting...

  14. Primeira ocorrência de ferrugem em capim-limão causada por Puccinia cymbopogonis no Brasil First report of the lemongrass rust fungi caused by Puccinia cymbopogonis in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    João Batista Vida; Aníbal Alves de Carvalho Júnior; Jaqueline Rosemeire Verzignassi

    2006-01-01

    È registrada a primeira ocorrência de ferrugem em capim-limão (Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf), causada por Puccinia cymbopogonis Mass., no Brasil, Estado do Paraná.It is reported the first occurrence of the lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf) rust fungi caused by Puccinia cymbopogonis Mass. in Brazil, State of Paraná.

  15. Primeira ocorrência de ferrugem em capim-limão causada por Puccinia cymbopogonis no Brasil First report of the lemongrass rust fungi caused by Puccinia cymbopogonis in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Vida

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available È registrada a primeira ocorrência de ferrugem em capim-limão (Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf, causada por Puccinia cymbopogonis Mass., no Brasil, Estado do Paraná.It is reported the first occurrence of the lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf rust fungi caused by Puccinia cymbopogonis Mass. in Brazil, State of Paraná.

  16. (1R,2S,6R)-Papayanal: a new male-specific volatile compound released by the guava weevil Conotrachelus psidii (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Frías, Alicia; Murata, Yasuhiro; Simões Bento, José Maurício; Osorio, Coralia

    2016-05-01

    The guava weevil, Conotrachelus psidii is an aggressive pest of guava (Psidium guajava L.) that causes irreparable damages inside the fruit. The volatile compounds of male and female insects were separately collected by headspace solid-phase microextraction or with dynamic headspace collection on a polymer sorbent, and comparatively analyzed by GC-MS. (1R,2S,6R)-2-Hydroxymethyl-2,6-dimethyl-3-oxabicyclo[4.2.0]octane (papayanol), and (1R,2S,6R)-2,6-dimethyl-3-oxabicyclo[4.2.0]octane-2-carbaldehyde (papayanal) were identified (ratio of 9:1, respectively) as male-specific guava weevil volatiles. Papayanal structure was confirmed by comparison of spectroscopic (EIMS) and chromatographic (retention time) data with those of the synthetic pure compound. The behavioral response of the above-mentioned compounds was studied in a Y-tube olfactometer bioassay, and their role as aggregation pheromone candidate components was suggested in this species. PMID:26873673

  17. Concerted action of two avirulent spore effectors activates Reaction to Puccinia graminis 1 (Rpg1)-mediated cereal stem rust resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    The barley stem rust resistance gene Reaction to Puccinia graminis 1 (Rpg1), encoding a receptor-like kinase, confers durable resistance to the stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. The fungal urediniospores form adhesion structures with the leaf epidermal cells within 1 h of inocula...

  18. Estudio de los semioquímicos responsables de la interacción entre la guayaba (Psidium guajava L) y el picudo de la guayaba Conotrachelus psidii Marshall

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Frías, Alicia Adela

    2015-01-01

    El picudo de la guayaba Conotrachelus psidii Marshall es considerado como una de las principales plagas del cultivo de la guayaba en Colombia y en otros países productores como Brasil. Este insecto-plaga se encuentra ampliamente distribuido en las diferentes zonas de producción de guayaba en Colombia y causa pérdidas significativas en los departamentos de Santander y Boyacá. Este estudio se realizó con el objetivo de identificar los compuestos orgánicos volátiles (VOCs) r...

  19. Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species Coordinately Regulate the Germination of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici Urediniospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shuining; Gao, Zhijuan; Wang, Chenfang; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng; Zhang, Hongchang

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as signaling molecules in a number of critical signal transduction pathways in plants, including plant biotic interactions. In addition to the role of plant-derived NO and ROS in plant resistance, which has been well documented, pathogen-produced NO and ROS have recently emerged as important players in fungal development and pathogenesis. However, the effects of pathogenic fungi-derived NO and ROS on signaling pathways during fungal pre-infection development remain unknown. Here, using a combination of pharmacological approaches and confocal microscopy, we investigated the roles of NO and ROS during the germination of Puccinia striiformis Westend f. sp. tritici (Pst) the wheat stripe rust pathogen. Both NO and ROS have a crucial role in uredinial germination. The scavengers of NO and ROS delayed spore germination and decreased the lengths of germ tubes. A similar phenotype was produced after treatment with the promoter. However, the spores germinated and grew normally when the levels of NO and ROS were simultaneously elevated by the application of a promoter of NO and a donor of ROS. Confocal laser microscopy indicated that both NO and ROS preferentially localized at the germ pores and apexes of growing germ tubes when the ROS/NO ratio in the spores was maintained in a specific range. We concluded that both NO and ROS are critical signaling molecules in the pre-infection development of Pst and that the polar growth of the germ tube is coordinately regulated by NO and ROS. PMID:26941716

  20. Durable resistance to Puccinia triticina by accumulation of resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošković Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The individual use of single race-specific resistance genes with major phenotypic effects has rarely provided lasting resistance. However, breeding and combining or pyramiding of resistance genes into individual cultivars has had considerable success, particularly in situations in which the pathogen does not reproduce sexually, as in the case of wheat leaf rust pathogen. In European-Mediterranean region perfomed international investigations of wheat leaf rust proved that breeding of new lines of wheat resistant to Puccinia triticina Eriks. for differentiation of pathogen population, as well as for sources of durable resistance is necessary. Breeding of such resistant lines has proved necessary due to the unsatisfatory survey results of these regions on standard isogenic Lr lines. It has become clear that these regions needed new, more efficient differential resistance genes, as well as sources of resistance. In the beginning, after extensive screening tests of several International Rust Nurseries, 18 donors of resistance had been selected as crosses with recurrent parents' varieties Princ and Starke. These hybrid lines had been comparatively tested with twenty six Lr single gene lines using twenty especially virulent cultures of P. triticina in order to check the presence of these known Lr genes in our hybrid lines. Considerable influence of recurrent parent to the number of resistant genes in used donors was demonstrated. On the other hand, considerable influence of the pathogen culture was established to the number of resistance genes in used donors. In order to enhance resistance and pyramiding genes in these hybrids, the most interesting selected eight lines have been crossed with only effective isogenic ones, containing the strong genes Lr9, Lr19 and Lr24. On the basis of different segregation rations of all crossing combinations it was proved that no one of resistant donors contained the applied strong resistant genes. It means that our

  1. Biotic Interaction in Space and Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Andreas Kelager

    further enhance the risk of extinction. Maculinea alcon is selected as an umbrella for conservation and numerous aspects of its biology has been studied extensively. This thesis explores the spatio-temporal impact of the tight biotic dependence in this tritrophic interaction system and integrates...

  2. Life cycle of Puccinia crupinae, a candidate fungal biological control agent for Crupina vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupina vulgaris (Common crupina, Asteraceae) is an introduced weed pest in the western United States. An isolate of the rust fungus Puccinia crupinae from the Greece is currently under evaluation as a candidate for biological control of C. crupina in a Biosafety Level 3 (BL-3) containment greenhou...

  3. DIVERSITY OF PUCCINIA KUEHNII AND P. MELANOCEPHALA CAUSING RUST DISEASES ON BRAZILIAN SUGARCANE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarcane industry in Brazil suffers yield loss due to brown rust (Puccinia melanocephala) since 1986 and orange rust (P. kuehnii) as recent as 2009. The main control measure for both diseases has been cultivar resistance. Nevertheless, recent onsets of orange rust on previously resistant cultivars ...

  4. Changes in the population structure of stem rust agent (PUCCINIA GRAMINIS) under low dose chronic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data concerning the changes in population structure of Puccinia graminis, a causal agent of stem rust under low dose chronic radiation are present. The structure has been changed in 10-km ChNPP zone by appearance of a new population with high frequency of more virulent clones as compared to other regions of Ukraine

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF SIMPLE SEQUENCE REPEAT MARKERS FOR THE PLANT PATHOGENIC RUST FUNGUS, PUCCINIA GRAMINIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-four dinucleotide simple sequence repeat markers were developed for the phytopathogenic fungus, Puccinia graminis. The identified loci were polymorphic, with allelic diversity ranging from 2 to 11 alleles. Levels of heterozygosity ranged from 0.000 to 0.960 and 0.113 to 0.846 for observed and...

  6. Understanding the genetic landscape of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, from a global to country perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the recent sequencing of the wheat stem rust pathogen (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, Pgt) genome, an array of molecular tools has now become available to characterize the genetic variation of Pgt and develop new diagnostic methods for identification and detection of the Ug99 race group. The...

  7. Evaluation of resistance and tolerance in wheat against Puccinia striiformis and in barley against Erysiphe graminis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhouse tests are reported in which components of a relative resistance of wheat to Puccinia striiformis were evaluated. Decrease in sporulation on the flag leaves correlated well to smaller yield reductions as measured in field tests. On the basis of further greenhouse and field experiments, tolerance of spring barley cultivars against Erysiphe graminis was calculated by means of a 'tolerance-quotient'. (author)

  8. Inheritance of Resistance to Race TTKS of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici in Spring Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race TTKS (or Ug99) of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, present in eastern Africa, is virulent to many stem rust resistance genes present in wheat cultivars worldwide. Spring wheat cultivars Ivan, Keene and Stoa, and breeding lines SD3746 and 97S0254-8-1, were found to be resistant to race TTKS bas...

  9. Microarray analysis identified Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici genes involved in infection and sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) causes stripe rust, one of the most important diseases of wheat worldwide. To identify Pst genes involved in infection and sporulation, a custom oligonucleotide Genechip was made using sequences of 442 genes selected from Pst cDNA libraries. Microarray analy...

  10. Sporulation capacity and longevity of Puccinia horiana teliospores in infected chrysanthemum leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    PUCCINIA HORIANA is a quarantine-significant fungal pathogen and causal agent of Chrysanthemum white rust, first discovered in the U.S. in 1977. The disease was eradicated and for many years successfully controlled by fungicides and strict regulatory measures. However, recently Chrysanthemum white r...

  11. Recent invasion of world-wide wheat growing areas by two aggressive strains of Puccinia striiformis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Stephanie; Ali, Sajid; Justesen, Annemarie Fejer;

    2012-01-01

    The ever more frequent and severe large-scale epidemics of wheat yellow/stripe rust disease (caused by Puccinia striiformis) pose a severe threat to the world’s wheat production (Hovmøller et al. 2010). The onset of a new series of world-wide wheat yellow rust epidemics in 2000 has been linked to...

  12. POPULATION GENETICS OF THE WHEAT LEAF RUST FUNGUS, PUCCINIA TRITICINA IN CENTRAL ASIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina, is a major disease of wheat in Central Asia. Single uredinial isolates from Armenia, Azerbaijan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, and Kyrgyzstan, 131 in total, were tested for virulence to 20 isolines of Thatcher wheat with single leaf rust resistan...

  13. First Report of Puccinia lagenophorae on Common Groundsel (Senecio vulgaris) in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccinia lagenophorae, a rust fungus from Europe and Australia, has been studied for biological control of Common groundsel (Senecio vulgaris) in North America. It has since been found in the United States (California, Oklahoma, and on the East Coast). In September, 2005, it was found in two locat...

  14. First Report of Orange Rust of Sugarcane Caused by Puccinia kuehnii in Ivory Coast and Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange rust of sugarcane caused by Puccinia kuehnii was detected in Florida in 2007. It was hypothesized that the pathogen originated from Africa because brown rust of sugarcane (syn. common rust) was introduced to the Western Hemisphere from Africa. Requests for rust infected sugarcane samples were...

  15. Virulences, population structures and genomics of Puccinia striiformis and interactions with its plant hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccinia striiformis, an obligate biotrophic fungal species, has different formae speciales primarily infect wheat, barley, and grasses. The forma specialis P. striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) causes one of the most important diseases of wheat in the world. In addition to its primary host of wheat...

  16. Population divergence in the wheat leaf rust fungus Puccinia triticina is correlated with wheat evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine if the evolutionary history of the obligate pathogen on wheat, Puccinia triticina, is correlated with adaptation to hosts with different ploidy levels. Sequence data from 15 loci with different levels of polymorphism were generated. Phylogenetic analyses ...

  17. Das IPS-Modell Weizen : Untersuchungen zur Effektivität und Funktionalität unter niedersächsischen Anbau- und Klimabedingungen (1998 - 2001) sowie zum bundesweiten Auftreten von Puccinia striiformis und Puccinia recondita (1993 - 2001)

    OpenAIRE

    Finger, Imme

    2004-01-01

    In den Jahren 1997/98 bis 2000/01 wurde in Kooperation mit den Landwirtschaftskammern Hannover und Weser-Ems ein Monitoring zur Erfassung wirtschaftlich bedeutender Weizenpathogene durchgeführt mit dem Ziel, das IPS-Modell Weizen unter niedersächsischen Anbau- und Klimabedingungen zu überprüfen. Als überregional wichtigste Schaderreger traten Septoria tritici und Erysiphe graminis auf. Puccinia striiformis, Puccinia recondita und Drechslera tritici-repentis erreichten in einzelnen Fallstudien...

  18. Concerted action of two avirulent spore effectors activates Reaction to Puccinia graminis 1 (Rpg1)-mediated cereal stem rust resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Nirmala, Jayaveeramuthu; Drader, Tom; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Yin, Chuntao; Hulbert, Scot; Steber, Camille M; Steffenson, Brian J.; Les J Szabo; von Wettstein, Diter; Kleinhofs, Andris

    2011-01-01

    The barley stem rust resistance gene Reaction to Puccinia graminis 1 (Rpg1), encoding a receptor-like kinase, confers durable resistance to the stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. The fungal urediniospores form adhesion structures with the leaf epidermal cells within 1 h of inoculation, followed by hyphae and haustorium formation. The RPG1 protein is constitutively expressed and not phosphorylated. On inoculation with avirulent urediniospores, it is phosphorylated in vivo wit...

  19. Puccinia chunjii, a close relative of the cereal stem rusts revealed by molecular phylogeny and morphological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miao; Hambleton, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    A rust specimen with macroscopic similarities to the cereal stem rusts was collected on Elymus sp. from Gansu province, China. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS and COI DNA sequences indicated the fungus was closely related but distinct as a strongly supported sister taxon to the Puccinia graminis species complex. Microscopic examination revealed diagnostic teliospore characteristics, differentiating it from P. graminis and other morphologically similar rusts. Herein, we designate a name for this new lineage, Puccinia chunjii sp. nov. PMID:22492408

  20. Uji Ketahanan Beberapa Varietas Jagung (Zea Mays l.)Terhadap Penyakit Karat Daun (Puccinia Polysora Underw.)Di Dataran Rendah

    OpenAIRE

    Irawan, Denny

    2016-01-01

    Denny Irawan, “ Resistance Test of Maize Varieties (Zea mays L.) to Leaf Rust Disease Attack (Puccinia polysora Underw.) In the Lowlands”. Supervised by Dr. Ir. Hasanuddin, MS and Ir. Lahmuddin Lubis, MP. This study aims to determine the resistance of some varieties of maize (Zea mays L.) to leaf rust disease (Puccinia polysora Underw.) in the lowlands. Research conducted in the village of Tanjung Selamat, Medan. Research using randomized block design with 10 treatments and three replications...

  1. The geographic scaling of biotic interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo, Miguel B.; Rozenfeld, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    A central tenet of ecology and biogeography is that the broad outlines of species ranges are determined by climate, whereas the effects of biotic interactions are manifested at local scales. While the first proposition is supported by ample evidence, the second is still a matter of controversy. To address this question, we develop a mathematical model that predicts the spatial overlap, i.e. co-occurrence, between pairs of species subject to all possible types of interactions. We then identify...

  2. Uji Ketahanan Beberapa Varietas dan Pengaruh Jarak Tanam Terhadap Penyakit Karat Daun (Puccinia polysora Underw) pada Tanaman Jagung (Zea mays L.) di Dataran Rendah

    OpenAIRE

    Aditya, Sukma

    2015-01-01

    Sukma Aditya, "Some Resistance Test Plant Varieties and Influence Distance Against Disease Leaf Rust (Puccinia polysora Underw) In the Corn Plantation (Zea mays l.) In the Lowlands". Supervised by Dr. Ir. Hasanuddin, MS, and Ir. Mukhtar Pinem Iskandar, M. Agr. This study aims to determine the resistance of some varieties of maize (Zea mays L.) and plant spacing influence on leaf rust disease (Puccinia The results showed Bisi 13 varieties resistant to corn leaf rust disease (Puccinia polyso...

  3. Aspectos biológicos e técnica de criação do gorgulho-da-goiaba, Conotrachelus psidii marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio Iglesias Valente

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Considerada praga-chave da cultura da goiaba, Conotrachelus psidii Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae tem causado grandes prejuízos em vários países produtores desta fruta. A pesquisa objetivou avaliar os parâmetros biológicos da praga, sob condições controladas, através do desenvolvimento de uma técnica de criação que permitiu efetuar observações diárias de pré-pupas e pupas. Constatou-se que o substrato adequado para manutenção dessas fases foi o solo argiloso umedecido com viabilidade de 78%, sendo este o tipo de solo utilizado na técnica de criação, que foi desenvolvida para trabalhos em câmara climatizada, à temperatura constante de 25 ± 1º C, fotoperíodo de 12 horas e UR de 70% ± 10%. Quanto aos aspectos biológicos, a duração média do período de ovo, larva, pré-pupa, pupa e ovo-pupa foi de: 4,25; 12,2; 106,6; 14,88 e 138,4 dias, respectivamente. A duração média do período da fase adulta, no solo, início da alimentação, pré-oviposição, longevidade e pós-oviposição foi de, 22; 11; 51,9; 149,32 e 7,18 dias, respectivamente. O período médio de oviposição foi de 120,27 dias, com um número médio de 343,63 ovos por fêmea. A técnica de criação desenvolvida permitiu acompanhar diariamente o desenvolvimento de pré-pupas, pupas e adultos do gorgulho-da-goiaba, sem que eles necessitassem reconstruir nova câmara, mostrando ser menos estressante e onerosa do ponto de vista energético.

  4. Identification of rust (Puccinia helianthi Schw.) races in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Tan A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), with its high oil quality, is one of the major and most valuable oilseed crops in the world. Sunflower rust, caused by Puccinia helianthi Schw., is one of the major foliar diseases of sunflower. The pathogen is present wherever sunflower is grown in the world and causes important yield losses when severe epidemics occur. The objective of this study was to identify the races of sunflower rust under field conditions in the fi...

  5. Stem rust (Puccinia graminis ssp. graminicola Urban) its hosts and harmfulness in grasses grown for seed

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Prończuk

    2013-01-01

    Stem rust development on four species of grasses was studied in field experiments conducted at Radzików in 1997-2001. Population of Puccinia graminis ssp. graminicola from different hosts was characterised and their harmfulness for grass grown for seed was estimated. The materials for study were ecotypes and strains of Lolium perenne, Festuca rubra, Poa pratensis and Deschampsia caespitosa collected in breeding nursery and cultivars and strains of L.perenne, F.rubra, P.pratensis cultivated f...

  6. Resistance against barley leaf rust (Puccinia hordei) in West-European spring barley germplasm

    OpenAIRE

    Niks, Rients; Walther, Ursula; Jaiser, Heidi; Martinez, Fernando; Rubiales, Diego

    2000-01-01

    International audience The level and type of resistance against leaf rust (Puccinia hordei) was determined in modern spring barley germplasm. In field trials all over Europe most accessions were in some locations and years significantly less infected than the moderately resistant reference ,Grit'. Differentiating P. hordei isolates indicated that most accessions carried hypersensitivity (Rph) genes. A virulence survey indicated that among the known resistance genes, only Rph7 is still full...

  7. Testing of wheat to durable resistance and survey approach for Puccinia recondita tritici

    OpenAIRE

    Bošković Jelena; Bošković Momčilo; Prijić Željana

    2008-01-01

    The main objective within new approach in international pathogenicity surveys of Puccinia recondita tritici was to provide genetically diverse sources of resistance (wheat lines with pyramiding resistant genes) to be used in a survey of wheat leaf rust pathogen in European-Mediterranean regions and to search for and document pathogenicity of P. recondita tritici cultures useful in differentiating sources of resistance. Emphasis is placed on sources of resistance and their usefulness rather th...

  8. Antifungal Activity of Decursinol Angelate Isolated from Angelica gigas Roots Against Puccinia recondita

    OpenAIRE

    Mi-Young Yoon; Kyoung Soo Jang; Gyung Ja Choi; Young Sup Kim; Yong Ho Choi; Jin-Cheol Kim; Byeongjin Cha

    2011-01-01

    Rust causes significant losses in the yield and quality of various crops. The development of new effective and environmentally benign agents against the pathogen is of great interest. In the course of searching a natural antifungal compound from medicinal plants, we found that the methanol extract of Angelica gigas roots had a potent control efficacy against wheat leaf rust (WLR) caused by Puccinia recondita. The antifungal substance was isolated from the methanol extract by silica gel column...

  9. Modeling biotic habitat high risk areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despain, D.G.; Beier, P.; Tate, C.; Durtsche, B.M.; Stephens, T.

    2000-01-01

    Fire, especially stand replacing fire, poses a threat to many threatened and endangered species as well as their habitat. On the other hand, fire is important in maintaining a variety of successional stages that can be important for approach risk assessment to assist in prioritizing areas for allocation of fire mitigation funds. One example looks at assessing risk to the species and biotic communities of concern followed by the Colorado Natural Heritage Program. One looks at the risk to Mexican spottled owls. Another looks at the risk to cutthroat trout, and a fourth considers the general effects of fire and elk.

  10. Abiotic Versus Biotic Pathogens: Replicative Growth in Host Tissues Key to Discriminating Between Biotoxic Injury and Active Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.

    2012-01-01

    Life can be defined as a self-sustaining chemical system capable of undergoing Darwinian evolution; a self-bounded, self-replicating, and self-perpetuating entity [1]. This definition should hold for terrestrial as well as extraterrestrial life-forms. Although, it is reasonable to expect that a Mars life-form would be more adaptable to Mars-like conditions than to Earth-like environments, it remains possible that negative ecological or host interactions might occur if Mars microbiota were to be inadvertently released into the terrestrial environment. A biogenic infectious agent can be defined as a self-sustaining chemical system capable of undergoing Darwinian evolution and derives its sustenance from a living cell or from the by-products of cell death. Disease can be de-fined as the detrimental alteration of one or more ordered metabolic processes in a living host caused by the continued irritation of a primary causal factor or factors; disease is a dynamic process [2]. In contrast, an injury is due to an instantaneous event; injury is not a dynamic process [2]. A causal agent of disease is defined as a pathogen, and can be either abiotic or biotic in nature. Diseases incited by biotic pathogens are the exceptions, not the norms, in terrestrial host-microbe interactions. Disease induction in a plant host can be conceptually characterized using the Disease Triangle (Fig. 1) in which disease occurs only when all host, pathogen, and environ-mental factors that contribute to the development of disease are within conducive ranges for a necessary minimum period of time. For example, plant infection and disease caused by the wheat leaf rust fungus, Puccinia recondita, occur only if virulent spores adhere to genetically susceptible host tissues for at least 4-6 hours under favorable conditions of temperature and moisture [3]. As long as one or more conditions required for disease initiation are not available, disease symptoms will not develop.

  11. Resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses in avena

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Martín, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Oat is an important grain and forage crop cultivated over than 9 million hectares globally. However, drought and biotrophic fungal diseases, such as crown rust (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae) and powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. avenae) seriously threaten oat production. To combat this, agricultural scientists must develop a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms through which plants can tolerate/resist stress and translate this to crop breeding programmes. Thu...

  12. Biotic Resources Abundance and the Corresponding Causes in Panxi Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yun; SU Chunjiang; LIU Xingliang; MAN Zhenchuang; LI Ping

    2006-01-01

    This paper gives a detailed introduction to the biotic resources in Panxi Area and lists the most typical biotic resources in this area. The authors of this paper adopt the biotic resource abundance evaluation index model Ri=(S0i-S1i)×S1i-1(i=1,2,3,…n) to make a quantitative calculation of the biotic resource abundance in this area, and the calculation results show that this area abounds in biotic resources. Through the analysis of the causes of abundant biotic resources in this area, the luxuriant biotic resources in Panxi Area are largely attributed to the complex and varied environment, atrocious climate in history and the introduction of alien species. The purpose of this paper is to point out that biotic resource exploitation is one of the driving forces of economic development in this area, and to emphasize the necessity of biotic resource preservation and its harmonious development with the environment.

  13. Omics approaches to understand the nature of virulence in Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Stephanie; Kemen, Eric; Brown, James K. M.; Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Hovmøller, Mogens Støvring; Justesen, Annemarie Fejer

    2009-01-01

    New genomic and transcriptomic methods greatly facilitate the study of the biology and evolution of fungal plant pathogens. The obligate biotrophic and asexually reproducing rust fungus Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici (Pst) forms haustoria during plant infection and delivers proteins and other...... Puccinia striiformis effectors and to provide new insights into the molecular basis of virulence/avirulence as well as pathogen evolution....

  14. Triticale biotic stresses--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseniuk, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Triticale has been considered as resistant to diseases over a long time. Although, many authors perpetuate this opinion, it is no longer true. However, in comparison to wheat and rye triticale still may look as a healthy crop, but its healthiness has been steadily declining. It could be explained by steady expansion of the growing area and longer exposure to pathogens. On the other hand, triticale is a crop on which meet pathogens of wheat and rye, but there is evidence that on triticale embedded more so called "wheat pathogens", than rye ones. For such an notable example may serve races of Puccinia recondita. In the latter respect triticale also appears to be a bridge facilitating a direct contact between the pathogens, e.g. between physiological forms of the most important cereal rusts. Such contacts stimulate somatic hybridization on bridging triticale plant and may finally result in new hybrid pathotypes carrying virulence genes (factors) to all three hosts, i.e. triticale, wheat and rye. In addition to all triticale commercial and agronomical values, triticale still is and it will continue to be bridging transfers of resistance genes to various pathogens and pests mainly from rye to wheat. The paper will describe main diseases affecting triticale worldwide. The first disease which occurred on this cereal in epidemic proportions was stem rust (Pucinia graminis f. sp. tritici) in Australia. Leaf and stripe rusts (P. recondita f. sp. tritici and P. striiformis) are also have gained in importance everywhere triticale is grown. In recent years, at least in Poland, powdery mildew caused by Blumeria graminis occurred in epidemic proportions in quite a number of winter triticale cultivars. Similar phenomenon has been observed with quite a number of other diseases caused by facultative pathogens, such as the most damaging to triticale the Stagonospora spp. leaf and glume blotch disease complex and other pathogens like Cochliobolus sativus, Fusarium culmorum, and F

  15. Determination of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici races of wheat in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    MERT, Zafer; Karakaya, Aziz; DÜŞÜNCELİ, Fazıl; AKAN, Kadir; ÇETİN, Lütfi

    2012-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is one of the most important diseases limiting wheat production in Turkey. Surveys were conducted in 2007 and 2008 in order to determine the races of the pathogen present in Turkey. In 2007, it was found that 91 (43%) out of 207 inspected wheat fields were infected with stem rust, and in 2008, it was found that 61 (25%) out of 242 inspected fields were infected. From these samples, 40 single pustule isolates were obtained...

  16. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Immunosensor for Detection of urediniospores from Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Hearty, Stephen; Frøkiær, Hanne;

    This study describes a generic biosensing principle for detection of fungal spores using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The approach involves the use of a mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) and a SPR sensor for label-free detection of the model organism Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici (Pst). We...... quantification was possible in this complex matrix. To the best of our knowledge, this study simultaneously represents the first use of SPR technology for fungal spore detection and the first report of a successful biosensor-based detection strategy for Pst...

  17. End-Triassic nonmarine biotic events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Spencer G. Lucas; Lawrence H. Tanner

    2015-01-01

    The Late Triassic was a prolonged interval of elevated extinction rates and low origination rates that manifested themselves in a series of extinctions during Carnian, Norian and Rhaetian time. Most of these extinctions took place in the marine realm, particularly af-fecting radiolarians, conodonts, bivalves, ammonoids and reef-building organisms. On land, the case for a Late Triassic mass extinction is much more tenuous and has largely focused on tetrapod vertebrates (amphibians and reptiles), though some workers advocate a sudden end-Triassic (TJB) extinction of land plants. Nevertheless, an extensive literature does not identify a major extinction of land plants at the TJB, and a comprehensive review of palynological records concluded that TJB vegetation changes were non-uniform (different changes in dif-ferent places), not synchronous and not indicative of a mass extinction of land plants. Claims of a substantial perturbation of plant ecology and diversity at the TJB in East Greenland are indicative of a local change in the paleolfora largely driven by lithofacies changes resulting in changing taphonomic iflters. Plant extinctions at the TJB were palaeogeographically localized events, not global in extent. With new and more detailed stratigraphic data, the perceived TJB tetrapod extinction is mostly an artifact of coarse temporal resolution, the compiled cor-relation effect. The amphibian, archosaur and synapsid extinctions of the Late Triassic are not concentrated at the TJB, but instead occur stepwise, beginning in the Norian and extending into the Hettangian. There was a disruption of the terrestrial ecosystem across the TJB, but it was more modest than generally claimed. The ecological severity of the end-Triassic non-marine biotic events are relatively low on the global scale. Biotic turnover at the end of the Triassic was likely driven by the CAMP (Central Atlantic Magmatic Province) eruptions, which caused signiifcant environmental perturbations (cooling

  18. Evaluation of wheat (Triticum aestivum) stem rust (Puccinia graminis tritici) resistant mutants obtained by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work was initiated in 1974 with the objective of attempting selection of mutant lines resistant to stem rust (Puccinia graminis tritici) from wheat variety BH-1146. Seeds were irradiated with 60Co using the CENA source and selection was made from M2 progenies. The selected plants showed a low level of symptons of rust infection. After further inoculation and selection, eight lines were considered mutants and named TICENA. Studies of the productivity of the mutants were initiated under different conditions of cultivation in Brazil. The productivity and reaction to stem rust and leaf rust (Puccinia recondita) of the mutants were compared with the performance of the original variety. One of the mutant lines (TICENA-4) showed resistance to stem rust as well as low incidence of symptons of stem rust at all sites, whereas other lines showed varying degrees of resistance according to the site of cultivation. Three lines showed a tendency toward higher productivity than the original cultivar, whereas the productivity of others was lower than or equal to that of the original cultivar. (Author)

  19. Evaluation of wheat (Triticum aestivum) stem rust (Puccinia graminis tritici) resistant mutants obtained by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, A.A.; Felicio, J.C.; Camargo, C.E. (Instituto Agronomico de Campinas (Brazil)); Barros, B.C.; Tulmann Neto, A.; Menten, J.O.M.; Ando, A. (Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Piracicaba (Brazil))

    Work was initiated in 1974 with the objective of attempting selection of mutant lines resistant to stem rust (Puccinia graminis tritici) from wheat variety BH-1146. Seeds were irradiated with /sup 60/Co using the CENA source and selection was made from M/sub 2/ progenies. The selected plants showed a low level of symptons of rust infection. After further inoculation and selection, eight lines were considered mutants and named TICENA. Studies of the productivity of the mutants were initiated under different conditions of cultivation in Brazil. The productivity and reaction to stem rust and leaf rust (Puccinia recondita) of the mutants were compared with the performance of the original variety. One of the mutant lines (TICENA-4) showed resistance to stem rust as well as low incidence of symptons of stem rust at all sites, whereas other lines showed varying degrees of resistance according to the site of cultivation. Three lines showed a tendency toward higher productivity than the original cultivar, whereas the productivity of others was lower than or equal to that of the original cultivar.

  20. Proteome analysis of wheat leaf rust fungus, Puccinia triticina, infection structures enriched for haustoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao; Rampitsch, Christof; Soltani, Bahram; Mauthe, Wayne; Linning, Rob; Banks, Travis; McCallum, Brent; Bakkeren, Guus

    2011-03-01

    Puccinia triticina (Pt) is a representative of several cereal-infecting rust fungal pathogens of major economic importance world wide. Upon entry through leaf stomata, these fungi establish intracellular haustoria, crucial feeding structures. We report the first proteome of infection structures from parasitized wheat leaves, enriched for haustoria through filtration and sucrose density centrifugation. 2-D PAGE MS/MS and gel-based LC-MS (GeLC-MS) were used to separate proteins. Generated spectra were compared with a partial proteome predicted from a preliminary Pt genome and generated ESTs, to a comprehensive genome-predicted protein complement from the related wheat stem rust fungus, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) and to various plant resources. We identified over 260 fungal proteins, 16 of which matched peptides from Pgt. Based on bioinformatic analyses and/or the presence of a signal peptide, at least 50 proteins were predicted to be secreted. Among those, six have effector protein signatures, some are related and the respective genes of several seem to belong to clusters. Many ribosomal structural proteins, proteins involved in energy, general metabolism and transport were detected. Measuring gene expression over several life cycle stages of ten representative candidates using quantitative RT-PCR, all were shown to be strongly upregulated and four expressed solely upon infection. PMID:21280219

  1. Spread, genetic variation and methods for the detection of Puccinia kuehnii, the causal agent of sugarcane orange rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarcane is susceptible to infection by two rust pathogens, Puccinia melanocephala and P. kuehnii, causing brown and orange rust, respectively. Orange rust of sugarcane was first reported in the Western hemisphere in Florida in July 2007. The pathogen was found to be distributed widely throughout t...

  2. QTLs for resistance to the false brome rust Puccinia brachypodii in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbieri, M.; Marcel, T.C.; Niks, R.E.; Francia, E.; Pasquariello, M.; Mazzamurro, V.; Garvin, D.F.; Pecchioni, N.

    2012-01-01

    The potential of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon L. (Brachypodium) for studying grass–pathogen interactions is still underexploited. We aimed to identify genomic regions in Brachypodium associated with quantitative resistance to the false brome rust fungus Puccinia brachypodii. The inbred li

  3. Host status of barley to Puccinia coronata from couch grass and P. striiformis from wheat and brome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niks, R.E.; Heyzen, van S.; Szabo, L.J.; Alemu, S.K.

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenicity and identity was studied of a field sample (PcE) of crown rust fungus Puccinia coronata collected in Hungary on wild couch grass (Elymus repens) and of a field sample (Psb) of stripe rust (P. striiformis) collected in the Netherlands on California brome (Bromus carinatus). We focus

  4. InIdentification and characterization of pathotypes in Puccinia horiana, a rust pathogen of Chrysanthemum x morifolium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backer, de M.; Alaei, H.; Bockstaele, van E.; Roldan-Ruiz, I.; Lee, van der T.; Maes, M.; Heungens, K.

    2011-01-01

    Puccinia horiana is the causal agent of chrysanthemum white rust or Japanese rust. This microcyclic autoecious rust has a quarantine status and can cause major damage in the commercial production of Chrysanthemum x morifolium. Given the international and often trans-continental production of plantin

  5. Identification of resistance to races of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici with broad virulence in triticale (X Triticosecale)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triticale (X Triticosecale), a hybrid between wheat (Triticum aestivum) and rye (Secale cereale), is known to be an excellent source of resistance to wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. A collection of 567 triticale accessions originating from 21 countries was evaluated for ...

  6. Role of Berberis spp. as alternate hosts in generating new races of Puccinia graminis and P. striiformis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The common barberry and several other Berberis spp. serve as the alternate hosts to two important rust pathogens of small grains and grasses, Puccinia graminis and P. striiformis. Barberry eradication has been practiced for centuries as a means to control stem rust. Diverse virulence variations have...

  7. Resistance to the Ug99 race group of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici in wheat-intra/intergeneric hybrid derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    New races of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stem rust, threaten global wheat production. In particular, races belonging to the Ug99 race group, threaten wheat yield. Genetic resistance remains the most effective means for controlling this disease. A collection of 546 whe...

  8. 3-D imaging of temporal and spatial development of Puccinia striiformis haustoria in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Chris Khadgi; Justesen, Annemarie Fejer; Hovmøller, Mogens Støvring

    2012-01-01

    Differentiation of haustoria on primary infection hyphae of the fungal pathogen Puccinia striiformis was studied in wheat seedlings with two-photon microscopy in combination with a classical staining technique. Our results showed a significant increase in the average haustorium size 22, 44, 68, 9...

  9. Century-old Mystery of Puccinia striiformis Life History Solved with the Identification of Berberis as an Alternate Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    The life history of Puccinia striiformis remains a mystery because the alternate host has never been found. Inoculation of grasses using aeciospores from naturally infected Berberis chinensis and B. koreana resulted in infection on Poa pratensis, producing uredinia typical of stripe rust caused by P...

  10. Plant Responses to Simultaneous Biotic and Abiotic Stress: Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Ben Rejeb

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants are constantly confronted to both abiotic and biotic stresses that seriously reduce their productivity. Plant responses to these stresses are complex and involve numerous physiological, molecular, and cellular adaptations. Recent evidence shows that a combination of abiotic and biotic stress can have a positive effect on plant performance by reducing the susceptibility to biotic stress. Such an interaction between both types of stress points to a crosstalk between their respective signaling pathways. This crosstalk may be synergistic and/or antagonistic and include among others the involvement of phytohormones, transcription factors, kinase cascades, and reactive oxygen species (ROS. In certain cases, such crosstalk can lead to a cross-tolerance and enhancement of a plant’s resistance against pathogens. This review aims at giving an insight into cross-tolerance between abiotic and biotic stress, focusing on the molecular level and regulatory pathways.

  11. Biotic interactions mediate soil microbial feedbacks to climate change

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Crowther, T. W.; Thomas, S.M.; Maynard, D.S.; Baldrian, Petr; Covey, K.; Frey, S. D.; van Diepen, L. T. A.; Bradford, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 22 (2015), s. 7033-7038. ISSN 0027-8424 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : global change * soil feedback * biotic interaction Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.674, year: 2014

  12. Biotic recovery from mass extinction : IGCP project No. 335

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hladil, Jindřich

    Prague : Czech Geological Survey, 2013 - (Pašava, J.; Vymazalová, A.), s. 70-73 ISBN 978-80-7075-844-1 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : geology * biotic recovery Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  13. Preliminary Biotic Survey of Cane Creek, Calhoun County, AL

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A biotic survey of Cane Creek (Calhoun County, AL) was completed in the Fall (1992) and Winter (1993) at six sites within Cane Creek to determine the effects of...

  14. Veinal-mesophyll interaction under biotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosek, Michał; Rozpądek, Piotr; Kornaś, Andrzej; Kuźniak, Elżbieta; Schmitt, Annegret; Miszalski, Zbigniew

    2015-08-01

    According to microscopic observations, germinating hyphae of Botrytis cinerea, though easily penetrating Mesembryanthemum crystallinum mesophyll tissue, are limited in growth in mid-ribs and only occasionally reach vascular bundles. In mid-ribs of C3 and CAM leaves, we found significantly lower rbcL (large RubisCO subunit) abundance. Moreover, in CAM leaves, minute transcript contents for pepc1 (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase) and nadpme1 (malic enzyme) genes found in the mid-ribs suggest that they perform β-carboxylation at a low rate. The gene of the main H2O2-scavenging enzyme, catL (catalase), showed lower expression in C3 mid-rib parts in comparison to mesophyll. This allows maintenance of higher H2O2 quantities in mid-rib parts. In C3 leaves, pathogen infection does not impact photosynthesis. However, in CAM plants, the expression profiles of rbcL and nadpme1 were similar under biotic stress, with transcript down-regulation in mid-ribs and up-regulation in mesophyll (however, in case of rbcL not significant). After B. cinerea infection in C3 plants, transcripts for both antioxidative proteins strongly increased in mid-ribs, but not in mesophyll. In infected CAM plants, a significant transcript increase in the mesophyll was parallel to its decrease in the mid-rib region (however, in the case of catL this was not significant). Pathogen infection modified the expression of carbon and ROS metabolism genes in mid-ribs and mesophyll, resulting in the establishment of successful leaf defense. PMID:26276405

  15. Genetic improvement of rice for biotic and abiotic stress tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    ANSARI, MAHMOOD UR RAHMAN; Shaheen, Tayyaba; BUKHARI, SHAZAI; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is among the most important food crops that provide a staple food for nearly half of the world's population. Rice crops are prone to various types of stresses, both biotic and abiotic. Biotic stresses include insect pests, fungus, bacteria, viruses, and herbicide toxicity. Among abiotic stresses, drought, cold, and salinity are also well studied in rice. Various genes have been identified, cloned, and characterized to combat these stresses and protect rice crops. T...

  16. Uji Ketahanan Beberapa Varietas Dan Pengaruh Jarak Tanam Terhadap Penyakit Karat Daun (Puccinia Polysora Underw) Pada Tanaman Jagung (Zea Mays L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Aditya, Sukma

    2013-01-01

    Sukma Aditya, "Some Resistance Test Plant Varieties and Influence Distance Against Disease Leaf Rust (Puccinia polysora Underw) In the Corn Plantation (Zea mays l.) In the Lowlands". Supervised by Dr. Ir. Hasanuddin, MS, and Ir. Mukhtar Pinem Iskandar, M. Agr. This study aims to determine the resistance of some varieties of maize (Zea mays L.) and plant spacing influence on leaf rust disease (Puccinia polysora Underw.) In the lowlands. Research conducted in the village of Tanjung Selamat, Med...

  17. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Immunosensor for Detection of urediniospores from Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Hearty, Stephen; Frøkiær, Hanne; Leonard, Paul; Hejgaard, Jørn; O’Kennedy, Richard; Nicolaisen, Mogens; Justesen, Annemarie Fejer

    This study describes a generic biosensing principle for detection of fungal spores using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The approach involves the use of a mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) and a SPR sensor for label-free detection of the model organism Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici (Pst). We...... developed mAbs towards intact whole spores and used a subtractive inhibition format for detection of spores in solution. Assay conditions was optimised and a detection limit of 3.9 x 103 spores/ml was achieved. We further examined spiked Pst samples in a background of a related spore and found that Pst...... quantification was possible in this complex matrix. To the best of our knowledge, this study simultaneously represents the first use of SPR technology for fungal spore detection and the first report of a successful biosensor-based detection strategy for Pst...

  18. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Immunosensor for Detection of urediniospores from Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Hearty, Stephen; Frøkiær, Hanne; Leonard, Paul; Hejgaard, Jørn; O'Kennedy, Richard; Nicolaisen, Mogens; Justesen, Annemarie Fejer

    2006-01-01

    This study describes a generic biosensing principle for detection of fungal spores using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The approach involves the use of a mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) and a SPR sensor for label-free detection of the model organism Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici (Pst). We...... developed mAbs towards intact whole spores and used a subtractive inhibition format for detection of spores in solution. Assay conditions was optimised and a detection limit of 3.9 x 103 spores/ml was achieved. We further examined spiked Pst samples in a background of a related spore and found that Pst...... quantification was possible in this complex matrix. To the best of our knowledge, this study simultaneously represents the first use of SPR technology for fungal spore detection and the first report of a successful biosensor-based detection strategy for Pst...

  19. Genetic variation in Puccinia graminis collected from oats, rye, and barberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Anna; Djurle, Annika; Samils, Berit; Yuen, Jonathan

    2012-10-01

    Puccinia graminis, the causal agent of stem rust, was collected from its alternate host barberry (Berberis spp.) and two different uredinial hosts, oats (Avena sativa) and rye (Secale cereale). The samples were analyzed using 11 polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. There were large differences between fungal populations on oats (P. graminis f. sp. avenae) and rye (P. graminis f. sp. secalis), and the genetic variation within the different formae speciales was also high. It was possible to distinguish between the two formae speciales on barberry. Additional genotypic groups not present in the field samples from oats and rye were also identified on barberry. Our results confirm the importance of barberry in maintaining the populations of P. graminis in Sweden and the importance of the sexual stage for the survival of the pathogen. PMID:22734559

  20. The occurrence and biotic activity of Phomopsis diachenii Sacc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Machowicz-Stefaniak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Phomopsis diachenii was isolated from caraway cultivars Konczewicki, firstly in 2006 and next in 2007. Single cultures were obtained from the roots and the stem base of eight six-week-old seedlings and from the stems of two plants with symptoms of necrosis, in the second year of planting. This fungus was isolated from the plant parts superficially disinfected on malt agar medium with an addition 0.01% of streptomycin. The identification of the species was made on PDA medium. The biotic interactions between P. diachenii and S. carvi and other species of phyllosphere fungi of caraway were studied. Interactions among the fungi, i.e. between P. diachenii and one of the fungi representing the studied community, were examined using the biotic series method. The biotic effects of the fungi in dual cultures were evaluated after 10 and 20 days of common growth and were expressed as the individual biotic effect (IBE. It was shown that P. diachenii is a weak competitor because its growth was limited by numerous species of phyllosphere fungi. The obtained results indicated the dominance of biotic activity of P. diachenii over that of S. carvi. It is possible that P. diachenii has a greater ability to survive in the phyllosphere fungal community than S. carvi, causing septoriosis of caraway.

  1. Regulation of abiotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosskinsky, Dominik Kilian; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas Georg

    2016-01-01

    Plant hormones (phytohormones) are signal molecules produced within the plant, and occur in very low concentrations. In the present chapter, the current knowledge on the regulation of biotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones is summarized with special focus on the novel insights into...... the complex hormonal crosstalk of classical growth stimulating plant hormones within the naturally occurring biotic and abiotic multistress environment of higher plants. The MAPK- and phytohormone-cascades which comprise a multitude of single molecules on different signalling levels, as well as...... interactions and cross-regulations within and between these signalling pathways allow very specific and fine-tuned modulation of plant immunity. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation system (ERAD) is a quality control system that degrades improperly folded proteins from the secretory...

  2. Changing the game: using integrative genomics to probe virulence mechanisms of the stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici

    OpenAIRE

    Melania eFigueroa; Narayana Mithur Upadhyaya; Jana eSperschneider; Robert ePark; Les eSzabo; Brian eSteffenson; Jeffrey eEllis; Peter eDodds

    2016-01-01

    The recent resurgence of wheat stem rust caused by new virulent races of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) poses a threat to food security. These concerns have catalyzed an extensive global effort towards controlling this disease. Substantial research and breeding programs target the identification and introduction of new stem rust resistance (Sr) genes in cultivars for genetic protection against the disease. Such resistance genes typically encode immune receptor proteins that recognize ...

  3. Changing the Game: Using Integrative Genomics to Probe Virulence Mechanisms of the Stem Rust Pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici

    OpenAIRE

    Figueroa, Melania; Upadhyaya, Narayana M.; Sperschneider, Jana; Park, Robert F.; Szabo, Les J.; Steffenson, Brian; Ellis, Jeff G.; Dodds, Peter N.

    2016-01-01

    The recent resurgence of wheat stem rust caused by new virulent races of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) poses a threat to food security. These concerns have catalyzed an extensive global effort toward controlling this disease. Substantial research and breeding programs target the identification and introduction of new stem rust resistance (Sr) genes in cultivars for genetic protection against the disease. Such resistance genes typically encode immune receptor proteins that recognize s...

  4. Relationships Between Stem Rust ( Puccinia graminis triticiEriks. and Henn.) Resistances and Morphological Traits in Some Wheat (Triticumspp.) Hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    ULUKAN, Hakan; ÖZGEN, Murat

    1999-01-01

    This research was carried out to determine whether dominant morphological features could be used instead of disease tests as markers of lines resistant to stem rust ( Puccinia graminis tritici Eriks. and Henn.). Of the 13 species used as material in the hybridization program, 9 were non-resistant and 4 were resistant. Experiments were carried out separately, because of the different genetic structure in seedling resistance and adult resistance. It was determined that in view of the morphologi...

  5. Development of novel markers, using computationally extracted classi type EST-SSRs, in wheat leaf rust fungus Puccinia triticina

    OpenAIRE

    Sipahi Hülya; Yumurtaci Ayşen; Mert Zafer

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the development of EST-simple sequence repeats markers and the detection of their transferability and their utility for evaluating wheat leaf rust pathogen diversity. A total of 44,407 publicly available EST sequences derived from Puccinia triticina were computationally mined. Di-nucleotide repeat density covered the vast majority of assembled ESTs (45%). The tri-repeat motif (TCT) and penta-repeat motif (TTCTT) were the most repeated ...

  6. Susceptibility to Rust (Puccinia Sp.) in Cultivars of Italian and Perennial Ryegrass Grown in Two Locations of Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi Russi; Massimo Romani; Luciano Pecetti

    2011-01-01

    A large set of foreign varieties of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and perennial ryegrass (L. perenne) were evaluated for their response to natural rust infection in two Italian locations (Lodi in the north; Perugia in the centre of the country) at three-year intervals in 2001, 2004 and 2007, to acquire information on novel germplasm for Italy and verify any spatial and temporal variation in the varietal response to the disease. Crown rust (caused by Puccinia coronata) on Italian ryegr...

  7. TOPOLOGY DESIGN OPTIMIZATION BASED ON BIOTIC BRANCH NET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Xiaohong; Li Guojie; Yamazaki Koestu

    2005-01-01

    The biotic branch nets are extreme high-tech product. In order to achieve a certain functional objective, they can adjust their growth direction and growth velocity by according to the varying growth environment. An innovative and effective methodology of topology design optimization based on the growth mechanism of biotic branch nets is suggested, and it is applied to a layout design problem of a conductive cooling channel in a heat transfer system. The effectiveness of the method is validated by the FEM analysis.

  8. A FIASCO-Based Approach for Detection and Diagnosis of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tai-guo; WANG Xi; GAO Li; LIU Bo; CHEN Wan-quan; XIANG Wen-sheng

    2014-01-01

    Stem or black rust of wheat, caused by the fungus Puccinia graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici Eriks.&E. Henn. (Pgt), has historically caused severe losses to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production worldwide. In the Fujian and Guangdong provinces of China, six moderate-to-severe epidemics of wheat stem rust have occurred, which caused destructive losses of wheat between 1949 and 1966, although these were brought under control by integrated management. A rapid and reliable detection of the pathogen will contribute to the accurate forecast and seasonal control of this disease. The objective of this study was to develop a diagnostic molecular marker generated from simple sequence repeats (SSR) for the early rapid identiifcation of P. graminis. The genomic DNA of P. graminis, Puccinia striiformis, Puccinia triticina and seven other species was ampliifed by a pair of SSR primers generated by the FIASCO (fast isolation by AFLP sequences containing repeats) enrichment protocol. The primer set Pgtw (f)/Pgtw (r) generated a polymorphic pattern displaying a 330-bp DNA fragment speciifc for P. graminis whereas no DNA fragment was obtained from other non-target wheat fungal pathogens. The detection limit of the primer was 1 ng DNA in a 25-mL PCR reaction. The SSR markers of P. graminis can also be used to detect the presence of latent hyphae in Pgt-infected wheat leaves as early as 30 h post-inoculation. A rapid approach to distinguish P. graminis from similar pathogenic fungi would be anticipated in further study.

  9. Biotic Communities. [Project ECOLogy ELE Pak, Amoe-Thorson Pak].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoe, Ruth; Thorson, Michael

    This is one of a series of units for environmental education developed by the Highline Public Schools. This unit provides a number of activities to introduce students to ways of studying biotic communities, help them become good observers, and provide them with opportunities to use their skills. The materials include suggested activities, and…

  10. Scaled biotic disruption during early Eocene global warming events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Gibbs

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Late Paleocene and early Eocene hyperthermals are transient warming events associated with massive perturbations of the global carbon cycle, and are considered partial analogues for current anthropogenic climate change. Because the magnitude of carbon release varied between the events, they are natural experiments ideal for exploring the relationship between carbon cycle perturbations, climate change and biotic response. Here we quantify marine biotic variability through three million years of the early Eocene that include five hyperthermals, utilizing a method that allows us to integrate the records of different plankton groups through scenarios ranging from background to major extinction events. Our long time-series calcareous nannoplankton record indicates a scaling of biotic disruption to climate change associated with the amount of carbon released during the various hyperthermals. Critically, only the three largest hyperthermals, the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2 and the I1 event, show above-background variance, suggesting that the magnitude of carbon input and associated climate change needs to surpass a threshold value to cause significant biotic disruption.

  11. Compartment specific importance of glutathione during abiotic and biotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd eZechmann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The tripeptide thiol glutathione (γ-L-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine is the most important sulfur containing antioxidant in plants and essential for plant defense against abiotic and biotic stress conditions. It is involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species, redox signaling, the modulation of defense gene expression and important for the regulation of enzymatic activities. Even though changes in glutathione contents are well documented in plants and its roles in plant defense are well established, still too little is known about its compartment specific importance during abiotic and biotic stress conditions. Due to technical advances in the visualization of glutathione and the redox state of plants through microscopical methods some progress was made in the last few years in studying the importance of subcellular glutathione contents during stress conditions in plants. This review summarizes the data available on compartment specific importance of glutathione in the protection against abiotic and biotic stress conditions such as high light stress, exposure to cadmium, drought, and pathogen attack (Pseudomonas, Botrytis, Tobacco Mosaic Virus. The data will be discussed in connection with the subcellular accumulation of ROS during these conditions and glutathione synthesis which are both highly compartment specific (e.g. glutathione synthesis takes place in chloroplasts and the cytosol. Thus this review will reveal the compartment specific importance of glutathione during abiotic and biotic stress conditions.

  12. A direct-gradient multivariate index of biotic condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Aycock, J.N.; Killgore, K. J.

    2012-01-01

    Multimetric indexes constructed by summing metric scores have been criticized despite many of their merits. A leading criticism is the potential for investigator bias involved in metric selection and scoring. Often there is a large number of competing metrics equally well correlated with environmental stressors, requiring a judgment call by the investigator to select the most suitable metrics to include in the index and how to score them. Data-driven procedures for multimetric index formulation published during the last decade have reduced this limitation, yet apprehension remains. Multivariate approaches that select metrics with statistical algorithms may reduce the level of investigator bias and alleviate a weakness of multimetric indexes. We investigated the suitability of a direct-gradient multivariate procedure to derive an index of biotic condition for fish assemblages in oxbow lakes in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Although this multivariate procedure also requires that the investigator identify a set of suitable metrics potentially associated with a set of environmental stressors, it is different from multimetric procedures because it limits investigator judgment in selecting a subset of biotic metrics to include in the index and because it produces metric weights suitable for computation of index scores. The procedure, applied to a sample of 35 competing biotic metrics measured at 50 oxbow lakes distributed over a wide geographical region in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley, selected 11 metrics that adequately indexed the biotic condition of five test lakes. Because the multivariate index includes only metrics that explain the maximum variability in the stressor variables rather than a balanced set of metrics chosen to reflect various fish assemblage attributes, it is fundamentally different from multimetric indexes of biotic integrity with advantages and disadvantages. As such, it provides an alternative to multimetric procedures.

  13. Cloning and characterization of the actin gene from Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Qiong; Chang, Qing; Zhuang, Hua; Huang, Li-Li; Kang, Zhen-Sheng

    2012-06-01

    The fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stripe rust, is an obligate biotrophic basidiomycete. Urediniospores are the most common spore type involved in the epidemiology of this disease. Tip growth of germ tubes of germinated urediniospores is a key step during infection of wheat, but few studies have investigated it so far. Recent research has found that actin is closely associated with hyphal tip growth. In this study, we have cloned and obtained the full-length actin cDNA from P. striiformis f. sp. tritici and characterized its expression. Furthermore, actin filament (F-actin) patterns were visualized microscopically during germ tube formation. The most conspicuous actin-containing structures were actin patches. They were mainly concentrated near the hyphal tip and scattered throughout the cortex. By using cytochalasin B, we observed that depolymerization of F-actin greatly reduced the germination rate of urediniospores and disrupted the transport of vesicles to the germ tube tip, indicating that F-actin played a key role in the tip growth of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici. This work helps us to understand the tip growth mechanism of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici, and may provide a theoretical framework for designing novel pesticides. PMID:22806107

  14. Genetics of resistance to race TTKSK of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici in Triticum monococcum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, M N; Jin, Y

    2011-12-01

    Race TTKSK (or Ug99) of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici possesses virulence to several stem rust resistance genes commonly present in wheat cultivars grown worldwide. New variants detected in the race TTKSK lineage further broadened the virulence spectrum. The identification of sources of genetic resistance to race TTKSK and its relatives is necessary to enable the development and deployment of resistant varieties. Accessions of Triticum monococcum, an A-genome diploid wild and cultivated wheat, have previously been characterized as resistant to stem rust. Three resistance genes were identified and introgressed into hexaploid wheat: Sr21, Sr22, and Sr35. The objective of this study was to determine the genetic control and allelic relationships of resistance to race TTKSK in T. monococcum accessions identified through evaluations at the seedling stage. Generation F(2) progeny of 8 crosses between resistant and susceptible accessions and 13 crosses between resistant accessions of T. monococcum were evaluated with race TTKSK and often with North American races, including races QFCSC, TTTTF, and MCCFC. For a selected population segregating for three genes conferring resistance to race TTKSK, F(2:3) progeny were evaluated with races TTKSK, QFCSC, and TTTTF. In that population, we detected two genes conferring resistance to race TTKSK that are different from Sr21, Sr22, and Sr35. One of the new genes was effective to all races tested. The identification of these genes will facilitate the development of varieties with new resistance to race TTKSK. PMID:22070278

  15. Management of Brown Leaf Rust, Puccinia recondita of Wheat Using Natural Products and Biocontrol Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy A. Eldoksch

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of biocontrol agents and natural products on brown leaf rust, Puccinia recondita f.sp. tritici, of wheat were studied under greenhouse and field conditions in 1998/99 and 1999/2000 seasons. Under greenhouse conditions, application of Plant guard (Trichoderma harizianum, Rhizo-N (Bacillus subtilis and the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae gave reasonable control of leaf rust severity with disease reduction percentages of 64.29, 57.14 and 19.14%, respectively. Field application of formulated natural products during two successive seasons gave effective control of brown rust disease. Natural oil, peppermint oil, jojoba oil, eucalyptus oil and chenopodium oil were the most effective treatments in reducing leaf rust severity and also in improving grain yield. All natural products significantly reduced the rust disease incidence in wheat by 55.5-98.2% and subsequently led to an increase in the grain yield that ranged from 8.5-51.8%. Of the biocontrol agents applied in the field, Plant guard was the most effective treatment followed by yeast and then Rhizo-N. These bioagents significantly improved grain yield and increased 100 kernel weight relative to the untreated control. Sumi-8 fungicide (diniconazole showed complete protection against rust disease incidence in both greenhouse and field trials.

  16. Quantitative Determination of Germinability of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici Urediospores Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqiong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst is an important disease on wheat. In this study, quantitative determination of germinability of Pst urediospores was investigated by using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS combined with quantitative partial least squares (QPLS and support vector regression (SVR. The near infrared spectra of the urediospore samples were acquired using FT-NIR MPA spectrometer and the germination rate of each sample was measured using traditional spore germination method. The best QPLS model was obtained with vector correction as the preprocessing method of the original spectra and 4000–12000 cm−1 as the modeling spectral region while the modeling ratio of the training set to the testing set was 4 : 1. The best SVR model was built when vector normalization was used as the preprocessing method, the modeling ratio was 5 : 1 and the modeling spectral region was 8000–11000 cm−1. The results showed that the effect of the best model built using QPLS or SVR was satisfactory. This indicated that quantitative determination of germinability of Pst urediospores using near infrared spectroscopy technology is feasible. A new method based on NIRS was provided for rapid, automatic, and nondestructive determination of germinability of Pst urediospores.

  17. Antifungal Activity of Decursinol Angelate Isolated from Angelica gigas Roots Against Puccinia recondita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Yoon

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Rust causes significant losses in the yield and quality of various crops. The development of new effective and environmentally benign agents against the pathogen is of great interest. In the course of searching a natural antifungal compound from medicinal plants, we found that the methanol extract of Angelica gigas roots had a potent control efficacy against wheat leaf rust (WLR caused by Puccinia recondita. The antifungal substance was isolated from the methanol extract by silica gel column chromatography, alumina column chromatography and C18 preparative HPLC. It was identified as decursinol angelate by EI-MS and 1H-NMR data. In in vivo test, decursinol angelate effectively suppressed the development of WLR and red pepper anthracnose (RPA among the 6 plant diseases tested. In addition, the wettable powder-type formulation of ethyl acetate extract of A. gigas roots significantly suppressed the development of WLR. The crude extract containing decursinol angelate and the chemical appear to be a potential candidate for control of WLR. In addition, this is the first report on the in vivo antifungal activity of decursinol angelate against WLR as well as RPA

  18. EDP: A computer program for analysis of biotic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Michael A.; Bolton, James C.

    1992-07-01

    Analyzing fossils for evidence of biotic interactions such as parasitism, commensalism, and predation can be accomplished using skeletal relationships (e.g. overlapping growth) on individual specimens and statistical information on populations of specimens. The latter approach provides information for use in larger scale paleocommunity analyses. This approach requires a large data set and extensive amounts of information management. The types of information that are needed include data concerning the identity of host and epibiont species, orientation of epibionts on hosts, position of encrustation, growth directions, region of occurrence, and associated fauna. We have written the Epibiont Digitizing Program (EDP) to collect the data necessary to study biotic interactions in the fossil record. The program is operator-interactive at all stages and versatile enough to allow modification depending upon the specific needs of the researcher.

  19. Especificidade de Puccinia pampeana a cultivares de Capsicum spp. e outras solanáceas Specificity of Puccinia pampeana to Capsicum spp. cultivars and other solanaceous plants. Summa Phytopathologica

    OpenAIRE

    Martha Maria Passador; Edson Luiz Furtado; Mário Barreto Figueiredo

    2009-01-01

    A ferrugem de espécies de Capsicum spp. (pimenta e pimentão), é causada pelo fungo Puccinia pampeana, pode causar perdas totais em plantios de diversas espécies de Capsicum, onde preodminam temperaturas ao redor de 21ºC. Esta ferrugem, mesmo sendo específica do gênero Capsicum, e mesmo muitas espécies dentro deste gênero sendo suscetíveis, algumas apresentam reação de hipersensibilidade. Foi o caso de Capsicum annuum (pimenta cv. Cayenne) e C. chinense (pimenta cv. Habañero), que após a forma...

  20. Early Triassic Marine Biotic Recovery: The Predators' Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Scheyer, Torsten M.; Carlo Romano; Jim Jenks; Hugo Bucher

    2014-01-01

    Examining the geological past of our planet allows us to study periods of severe climatic and biological crises and recoveries, biotic and abiotic ecosystem fluctuations, and faunal and floral turnovers through time. Furthermore, the recovery dynamics of large predators provide a key for evaluation of the pattern and tempo of ecosystem recovery because predators are interpreted to react most sensitively to environmental turbulences. The end-Permian mass extinction was the most severe crisis e...

  1. Managing biotic interactions for ecological intensification of agroecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Gaba, Sabrina; Bretagnolle, François; Rigaud, Thierry; Philippot, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture faces the challenge of increasing food production while simultaneously reducing the use of inputs and delivering other ecosystem services. Ecological intensification of agriculture is a paradigm shift, which has recently been proposed to meet such challenges through the manipulation of biotic interactions. While this approach opens up new possibilities, there are many constraints related to the complexity of agroecosystems that make it difficult to implement. Future advances, whic...

  2. Crosstalk in Plant Responses to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Keceli, Mehmet Ali

    2015-01-01

    In order to protect themselves against several biotic and abiotic stresses, plants are equipped with an array of defense mechanisms. Induced defenses and stress responses play a major role in plant disease resistance and are regulated by a network of interconnected signal transduction pathways with the plant hormones ethylene (ET), jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) as the crucial mediators. These specific hormone-mediated signaling cascades trigger the expression of distinct sets of ...

  3. Development of a new biotic index to assess freshwater pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a new biotic index of species pollution value (SPV) and community pollution value (CPV) based on the correlation of protozoan communities with chemical water quality to assess freshwater pollution. Five hundred and twenty-three species of protozoa SPV were established based on the data of River Hangjiang and Lake Donghu. The present research was conducted in order to further consummate the biotic index. Protozoa of the water system in Changde City were collected from 16 stations using the PFU method and the water chemical parameters of the stations were analyzed. The results showed that CPV calculated from SPV had a close correlation with the degree of water pollution (p < 0.00001), which indicated that the method is reliable. By combining the data of River Hangjiang, Lake Donghu and Changde City, the final form of SPV was accomplished and the SPV list increased to 757. The ultimate water standard evaluated by CPV calculated from SPV was proposed. - A new biotic index of water quality based on protozoa is described

  4. Application of radiation processing to produce biotic elicitor for sugarcane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugarcane is the main raw material for production of sugar and ethanol. In Vietnam, it was reported in 1998 that the area for sugar cane growth was about 257,000 ha. Up to now, the biotic elicitor, oligosaccharide has not been used for sugarcane yet. This study has been carried out to investigate the elicitation and the growth promotion effect of irradiated chitosan (oligochitosan) for sugarcane. The field test results indicated that alpha chitosan (shrimp shell) and beta chitosan (squid pen) samples with the content of water soluble oligomer of about 75% and 70% respectively were the most effective. The disease ratio of sugar cane tree-trunk treated with irradiated chitosan before harvesting time decreased to 30-40% compared to non-treated one. In addition, the productivity of sugarcane increased to about 20%. The combination of metal ion (Zn2+, Cu2+) with oligochitosan did not show the synergic elicitation effect. The results revealed that biotic elicitor made from chitosan by radiation degradation method is very promising for field application not only for protection of disease infection but also for growth promotion of plants. It is believed that this biotic elicitor could be used for safe and sustainable development of agriculture. (author)

  5. Infection of Brachypodium distachyon by Formae Speciales of Puccinia graminis: Early Infection Events and Host-Pathogen Incompatibility

    OpenAIRE

    Figueroa, Melania; Alderman, Stephen; Garvin, David F; Pfender, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Puccinia graminis causes stem rust, a serious disease of cereals and forage grasses. Important formae speciales of P. graminis and their typical hosts are P. graminis f. sp. tritici (Pg-tr) in wheat and barley, P. graminis f. sp. lolii (Pg-lo) in perennial ryegrass and tall fescue, and P. graminis f. sp. phlei-pratensis (Pg-pp) in timothy grass. Brachypodium distachyon is an emerging genetic model to study fungal disease resistance in cereals and temperate grasses. We characterized the P. gra...

  6. Molecular markers for tracking the origin and worldwide distribution of invasive strains of Puccinia striiformis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Stephanie; Ali, Sajid; Kemen, Eric; Nazari, Kumarse; Bahri, Bochra A.; Enjalbert, Jérôme; Hansen, Jens G.; Brown, James K.M.; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Jones, Jonathan; de Vallavieille-Pope, Claude; Hovmøller, Mogens S.; Justesen, Annemarie Fejer

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the origin and dispersal pathways is instrumental to mitigate threats and economic and environmental consequences of invasive crop pathogens. In the case of Puccinia striiformis causing yellow rust on wheat, a number of economically important invasions have been reported, e.g., the ...... as the most plausible origin of the two invasive strains. The SCAR markers developed in the present study provide a rapid, inexpensive, and efficient tool to track the distribution of P. striiformis invasive strains, PstS1 and PstS2....

  7. Virulence and Molecular Polymorphism in International Collections of the Wheat Leaf Rust Fungus Puccinia triticina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmer, J A; Liu, J Q

    2000-04-01

    ABSTRACT Collections of Puccinia triticina, the wheat leaf rust fungus, were obtained from Great Britain, Slovakia, Israel, Germany, Australia, Italy, Spain, Hungary, South Africa, Uruguay, New Zealand, Brazil, Pakistan, Nepal, and eastern and western Canada. All single-uredinial isolates derived from the collections were tested for virulence polymorphism on 22 Thatcher wheat lines that are near-isogenic for leaf rust resistance genes. Based on virulence phenotype, selected isolates were also tested for randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) using 11 primers. The national collections were placed into 11 groups based on previously established epidemiological zones. Among the 131 single-uredinial isolates, 105 virulence phenotypes and 82 RAPD phenotypes were described. In a modified analysis of variance, 26% of the virulence variation was due to differences in isolates between groups, with the remainder attributable to differences within groups. Of the RAPD variation, 36% was due to differences in isolates between groups. Clustering based on the average virulence distance (simple distance coefficient) within and between groups resulted in eight groups that differed significantly. Collections from Australia-New Zealand, Spain, Italy, and Britain did not differ significantly for virulence. Clustering of RAPD marker differences (1 - Dice coefficient) distinguished nine groups that differed significantly. Collections from Spain and Italy did not differ significantly for RAPD variation, neither did collections from western Canada and South America. Groups of isolates distinguished by avirulent/virulent infection types to wheat lines with resistance genes Lr1, Lr2a, Lr2c, and Lr3 also differed significantly for RAPD distance, showing a general relationship between virulence and RAPD phenotype. The results indicated that on a worldwide level collections of P. triticina differ for virulence and molecular backgrounds. PMID:18944595

  8. Stem rust (Puccinia graminis ssp. graminicola Urban its hosts and harmfulness in grasses grown for seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Prończuk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem rust development on four species of grasses was studied in field experiments conducted at Radzików in 1997-2001. Population of Puccinia graminis ssp. graminicola from different hosts was characterised and their harmfulness for grass grown for seed was estimated. The materials for study were ecotypes and strains of Lolium perenne, Festuca rubra, Poa pratensis and Deschampsia caespitosa collected in breeding nursery and cultivars and strains of L.perenne, F.rubra, P.pratensis cultivated for seed. It was found that the changes in environmental conditions during last years influenced earlier occurrence of stem rust on grasses in Poland. All examined species were the host of P.graminis ssp. graminicola, however the period of infection of particular hosts were different. L.perenne and D.caespitosa were infected in early summer but F.rubra and P.pratensis in late summer or in the autumn. Morphological analysis of spores of P.graminis ssp. graminicola have shoved significant differences between populations obtained from L.perenne and D.caespitosa. Some differences were found between populations from F.rubra and P.pratensis also, but they need more study. Every year occurrence of stem rust on L.perenne and D.caespitosa and its relation with spring temperature in Radzików indicated that populations of patogen could overwinter in local turf. Incidental appearance of stem rust on F.rubra and P.pratensis in centre of Poland allowed to suppose that spores of these forms might be transfer by wind from other regions. The investigation revealed that stem rust can be dangerous for L.perenne grown for seed when infection occurs at flowering time. It has been established that infection of F.rubra and P.pratensis in autumn should not be disregarded. Damages of leaves by P.graminis ssp. graminicola substantially limited plant heading in the next year.

  9. Inheritance of prehaustorial resistance to Puccinia graminis f. sp. avenae in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracatos, Peter M; Ayliffe, Michael; Khatkar, Mehar S; Fetch, Tom; Singh, Davinder; Park, Robert F

    2014-11-01

    Rust pathogens within the genus Puccinia cause some of the most economically significant diseases of crops. Different formae speciales of P. graminis have co-evolved to mainly infect specific grass hosts; however, some genotypes of other closely related cereals can also be infected. This study investigated the inheritance of resistance to three diverse pathotypes of the oat stem rust pathogen (P. graminis f. sp. avenae) in the 'Yerong' ✕ 'Franklin' (Y/F) barley doubled haploid (DH) population, a host with which it is not normally associated. Both parents, 'Yerong' and 'Franklin', were immune to all P. graminis f. sp. avenae pathotypes; however. there was transgressive segregation within the Y/F population, in which infection types (IT) ranged from complete immunity to mesothetic susceptibility, suggesting the presence of heritable resistance. Both QTL and marker-trait association (MTA) analysis was performed on the Y/F population to map resistance loci in response to P. graminis f. sp. avenae. QTL on chromosome 1H ('Yerong' Rpga1 and Rpga2) were identified using all forms of analysis, while QTL detected on 5H ('Franklin' Rpga3 and Rpga4) and 7H (Rpga5) were only detected using MTA or composite interval mapping-single marker regression analysis respectively. Rpga1 to Rpga5 were effective in response to all P. graminis f. sp. avenae pathotypes used in this study, suggesting resistance is not pathotype specific. Rpga1 co-located to previously mapped QTL in the Y/F population for adult plant resistance to the barley leaf scald pathogen (Rhynchosporium secalis) on chromosome 1H. Histological evidence suggests that the resistance observed within parental and immune DH lines in the population was prehaustorial and caused by callose deposition within the walls of the mesophyll cells, preventing hyphal penetration. PMID:25025780

  10. Sexual structures and recombination of the wheat rust fungus Puccinia striiformis on Berberis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Algaba, Julian; Walter, Stephanie; Sørensen, Chris K; Hovmøller, Mogens S; Justesen, Annemarie F

    2014-09-01

    An isolate of the basidiomycete Puccinia striiformis, which causes yellow (stripe) rust on wheat, was selfed on the newly discovered alternate host, Berberis vulgaris. This allowed a study of the segregation of molecular markers and virulence in the progeny isolates, and of the development of fungal sexual structures and spore forms. Pycnia and aecia were obtained after inoculation of B. vulgaris with basidiospores resulting from germinating teliospores from infected wheat leaves. Subsequent inoculation of wheat with aeciospores from bulked aecia resulted in 16 progeny isolates of the S1 generation. Genotyping with 42 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers confirmed a parental origin of progeny isolates. Of the 42 analyzed loci, 15 were heterozygous in the parental isolate and 14 revealed segregation in the progenies. This resulted in 11 new multilocus genotypes (MLGs), which confirmed segregation following sexual reproduction. Additionally, parental and progeny isolates were phenotyped using a genetic stock of wheat genotypes representing 21 resistance genes. All S1 progeny isolates had virulence for 14 out of 15 loci where the parental isolate was virulent. This was consistent with the hypothesis that virulence in plant pathogens is often recessive to avirulence, i.e., only expressed in a homozygous state. Furthermore, no segregation was observed for five out of six loci, for which the parental isolate had an avirulent phenotype. The results for one of the two segregating virulence/avirulence loci suggested that the parental isolate was heterozygous with Avr alleles resulting in different but clearly avirulent phenotypes. The other locus indicated that additional genes modifying the phenotypic expression of avirulence were involved. PMID:25042987

  11. Using transcription of six Puccinia triticina races to identify the effective secretome during infection of wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myron eBruce

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat leaf rust, caused by the basidiomycete Puccinia triticina, can cause yield losses of up to 20% in wheat producing regions. During infection, the fungus forms haustoria that secrete proteins into the plant cell and effect changes in plant transcription, metabolism and defense. It is hypothesized that new races emerge as a result of overcoming plant resistance via changes in the secreted effector proteins. To understand gene expression during infection and find genetic differences associated with races, RNA from wheat leaves infected with six different rust races, at six days post inoculation, was sequenced using Illumina. As P. triticina is an obligate biotroph, RNA from both the host and fungi were present and separated by alignment to the P. triticina genome and a wheat EST reference. A total of 222,571 rust contigs were assembled from 165 million reads. An examination of the resulting contigs revealed 532 predicted secreted proteins among the transcripts. Of these, 456 were found in all races. Fifteen genes were found with amino acid changes, corresponding to putative avirulence effectors potentially recognized by 11 different leaf rust resistance (Lr genes. Thirteen of the potential avirulence effectors have no homology to known genes. One gene had significant similarity to cerato-platanin, a known fungal elicitor, and another showed similarity to fungal tyrosinase, an enzyme involved in melanin synthesis. Temporal expression profiles were developed for these genes by qRT-PCR and show that the 15 genes share similar expression patterns from infection initiation to just prior to spore eruption.

  12. Resistance to Puccinia graminis f. sp. avenae in Barley Is Associated with the Rpg5 Locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracatos, Peter; Singh, Davinder; Fetch, Tom; Park, Robert

    2015-04-01

    In barley, gene Rpg5 was first identified for providing resistance to the rye stem rust pathogen (Puccinia graminis f. sp. secalis). A subsequent study determined that Rpg5 is required for rpg4-mediated resistance to the wheat stem rust pathogen (P. graminis f. sp. tritici) including pathotype TTKSK ("Ug99"), which poses a major threat to global wheat and barley production. Based on the effectiveness of Rpg5 against P. graminis f. sp. tritici and P. graminis f. sp. secalis, we assessed whether it also conferred resistance to the oat stem rust pathogen (P. graminis f. sp. avenae). A barley F8 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population was produced by crossing 'Q21861' (Rpg1 and Rpg5) with '73-G1' (Rpg1), which is susceptible to P. graminis f. sp. avenae, P. graminis f. sp. secalis, and some pathotypes of P. graminis f. sp. tritici. Seedling tests were performed on the F8 RIL population using Australian pathotypes of P. graminis f. sp. tritici, P. graminis f. sp. secalis, P. graminis f. sp. avenae, and a putative somatic hybrid between P. graminis f. sp. tritici and P. graminis f. sp. secalis known as the 'Scabrum' rust. Segregation in the responses to all rust isolates for the RILs was identical (50 resistant: 52 susceptible), and fitted a 1:1 ratio (X2=0.039, P=0.843), indicating that resistance to all isolates was monogenetically inherited. Screening of the RILs and the parental lines with perfect markers for the functional Rpg1 and Rpg5 resistance alleles indicated that Rpg1 was fixed, while Rpg5 was positive in all resistant lines and negative in all susceptible lines. This suggests that different formae speciales of P. graminis may share common effectors, and that the Rpg5 locus confers resistance to both P. graminis f. sp. tritici and P. graminis f. sp. secalis and the heterologous formae speciales of P. graminis, P. graminis f. sp. avenae. PMID:25870923

  13. Extratos de Lentinula edodes e Agaricus blazei sobre Bipolaris sorokiniana e Puccinia recondita f. sp. tritici, in vitro Extracts of Lentinula edodes and Agaricus blazei on Bipolaris sorokiniana and Puccinia recondita f. sp. tritici., in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Grade Fiori-Tutida

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de buscar medidas alternativas para o controle de Bipolaris sorokiniana e Puccinia recondita f. sp. tritici testou-se o efeito fungitóxico in vitro dos cogumelos Lentinula edodes e Agaricus blazei sobre esses fungos. Os extratos brutos aquosos de ambos os cogumelos não tiveram efeito significativo tanto no crescimento micelial quanto na germinação de esporos de B. sorokiniana. Por outro lado, os extratos dos cogumelos inibiram a germinação de esporos de P. recondita f. sp. tritici, com destaque para o isolado LE 96/17 de L. edodes que apresentou inibição da ordem de 52,4%.With the purpose of finding alternative ways to control Bipolaris sorokiniana and Puccinia recondita f. sp. triciti, the fungitoxic effect in vitro of Lentinula edodes and Agaricus blazei mushrooms was tested on these fungi. The aqueous crude extract of both mushrooms did not have significant effect on mycelial growth and spore germination of B. sorokiniana . On the other hand, the mushroom extracts inhibited the germination of P. recondita f. sp. tritici uredospores, particularly on the L. edodes (96/17, which exhibited the largest inhibition of spore germination (52,38%.

  14. Development of novel markers, using computationally extracted classi type EST-SSRs, in wheat leaf rust fungus Puccinia triticina

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    Sipahi Hülya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the development of EST-simple sequence repeats markers and the detection of their transferability and their utility for evaluating wheat leaf rust pathogen diversity. A total of 44,407 publicly available EST sequences derived from Puccinia triticina were computationally mined. Di-nucleotide repeat density covered the vast majority of assembled ESTs (45%. The tri-repeat motif (TCT and penta-repeat motif (TTCTT were the most repeated motif. A set of 103 Class I type sequences containing simple sequence repeats were further analyzed by BLASTX similarity. Nineteen primer pairs flanking regions of EST-SSRs were designed. Of the 19 primer pairs tested, 10 successfully amplified fragments. Their polymorphism was evaluated with 8 Puccinia triticina (Pt single-uredinal isolates collected from the different regions of Turkey. These newly developed EST-SSR primer pairs can be implicated as stable markers for pathogen diversity analysis. It was also shown that some leaf rust EST-SSR markers were capable of cross-amplification in P. graminis f. sp. tritici.

  15. Detection of Puccinia kuehnii Causing Sugarcane Orange Rust with a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification-Based Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Amaresh; Keizerweerd, Amber T; Grisham, Michael P

    2016-03-01

    Puccinia kuehnii is a fungal pathogen that causes orange rust in sugarcane, which is now prevalent in many countries. At the early stage of disease, it is almost indistinguishable from brown rust, which is caused by Puccinia melanocephala. Although several PCR assays are available to detect these diseases, the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-based assay has been reported to be more economical and easier to perform. Under isothermal conditions, DNA is amplified with high specificity and rapidity. Moreover, visual judgment of color change without further post-amplification processing makes the method convenient. The present study was undertaken to detect P. kuehnii genomic DNA using four primers corresponding to a unique DNA sequence of P. kuehnii. The LAMP assay was found to be optimal when 8 mM MgSO4 was used and the reaction was incubated at 63 °C for 90 min. Positive samples showed a color change from orange to green upon SYBR Green I dye addition. Specificity of the LAMP test was checked with DNA of P. melanocephala, which showed no reaction. Sensitivity of the LAMP method was observed to be the same as real-time PCR at 0.1 ng, thus providing a rapid and more affordable option for early disease detection. PMID:26837389

  16. Development of a molecular assay system for the rapid detection and identification of Ug99 and related races of Puccinia graminis

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the last decade the complexity and distribution of the Ug99 race group of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici has dramatically expanded. In order to provide rapid tools, a two-stage molecular assay system has been developed using real-time polymerase chain reaction methodologies and TaqMan probes. S...

  17. Genome analyses of the wheat yellow (stripe) rust pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici reveal polymorphic and haustorial expressed secreted proteins as candidate effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background Wheat yellow (stripe) rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (PST) is one of the most devastating diseases of wheat worldwide. To design effective breeding strategies that maximize the potential for durable disease resistance it is important to understand the molecular basis o...

  18. New races of Puccinia striiformis found in Europe reveal race-specificity of long-term effective adult plant resistance in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Chris Khadgi; Hovmøller, Mogens Støvring; Leconte, Marc;

    2014-01-01

    esistance to Puccinia striiformis was examined in nine wheat recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from a cross between ‘Camp Rémy’ (resistant parent) and ‘Récital’ (susceptible parent) using an isolate of a strain common to the northwestern European population before 2011 (old) and two additional isol...

  19. VIRULENCE AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF A WORLD-WIDE COLLECTION OF PUCCINIA TRITICINA FROM DURUM WHEAT COMPARED TO US BREAD WHEAT RACES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina, has recently become more prevalent on durum wheat in Europe, North and South America. We determined the virulence specificities of P. triticina isolates from durum wheat from Argentina, Chile, Ethiopia, France, Mexico, Spain and the USA, and 10 representative ...

  20. Genome-wide identification of QTLs conferring high-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance to stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) is a durable type of resistance in wheat. The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring HTAP resistance to stripe rust in a population consisting of 16...

  1. Spontaneous loss of Yr2 avirulence in two lineages of Puccinia striiformis did not affect pathogen fitness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Chris Khadgi; Justesen, Annemarie Fejer; Hovmøller, Mogens Støvring

    Fitness costs associated with the emergence of virulence (loss of avirulence) have been a subject of much debate in plant pathology. Here, differences in fitness between two pairs of wild types and spontaneous virulence mutants in Puccinia striiformis were studied. The mutants differed from their...

  2. Emerging Yr26-virulent races of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici are threatening the wheat production in the Sichuan Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici , is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat in the world. The Sichuan Basin is one of the most important regions of wheat production and stripe rust epidemics in China. Stripe rust resistance gene Yr26 (the same gene as Yr24) has bee...

  3. First report of a variant within wheat stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) race TTKSF in South Africa and Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven races have been described in the Ug99 lineage of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (1). Variants of Ug99 previously recorded in South Africa are TTKSF, TTKSP and PTKST (2). In December 2010, severe stem rust infection was observed on the winter wheat cultivar Matlabas at Afrikaskop in the easte...

  4. Genetic Differentiation within the Puccinia triticina Population in South America and Comparison with the North American Population Suggests Common Ancestry and Intercontinental Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina is the most prevalent and widespread disease of wheat in South America. The objective of this study was to determine the number of genetically differentiated groups of P. triticina that are currently present in South America, and to compare the South American ...

  5. Managing biotic interactions for ecological intensification of agroecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SabrinaGaba

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture faces the challenge of increasing food production while simultaneously reducing the use of inputs and delivering other ecosystem services. Ecological intensification of agriculture is a paradigm shift, which has recently been proposed to meet such challenges through the manipulation of biotic interactions. While this approach opens up new possibilities, there are many constraints related to the complexity of agroecosystems that make it difficult to implement. Future advances, which are essential to guide agricultural policy, require an eco-evolutionary framework to ensure that ecological intensification is beneficial in the long term.

  6. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    The microbial desulfurization of organosulfur compounds occurs by unprecedented and largely unexplored biochemical processes. A study of such biotic desulfurizations can be expected to give rise to new and useful chemistry and enzymology. The potential value of understanding and harnessing these processes is seen in relation to the need for methods for the removal of organically bound sulfur from coal and the degradation of organic sulfur-containing pollutants. This research effort has been directed towards an examination of desulfurization ability in well characterized microorganisms, the isolation of bacteria with desulfurization ability from natural sources, the characterization and mechanistic evaluation of the observed biocatalytic processes, the development of biomimetic synthetic organic chemistry based on biotic desulfurization mechanisms and the design and preparation of improved coal model compounds for use in microbial selection processes. A systematic approach to studying biodesulfurizations was undertaken in which organosulfur compounds have been broken down into classes based on the oxidation state of the sulfur atom and the structure of the rest of the organic material. Microbes have been evaluated in terms of ability to degrade organosulfur compounds with sulfur in its sulfonic acid oxidation state. These compounds are likely intermediates in coal desulfurization and are present in the environment as persistent pollutants in the form of detergents. It is known that oxygen bonded to sulfur lowers the carbon-sulfur bond energy, providing a thermodynamic basis for starting with this class of compounds.

  7. Combat erosion prone conditions with biotic growth mediums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2009-10-01

    This article discussed methods of preserving soils in order to support remediation activities at 2 sites with sandy subsoil conditions and a lack of organic materials. An advanced hydroseeding technology was used to control erosion at the sites. Biotic Earth is a wheat straw-based hydromulch mixed with peat moss. The straw is used as an erosion control material, while the peat moss is used as an organic addition to the soil. Biotic Earth was applied at a site near James Bay where topsoil could not be salvaged. The aim of the project was to establish vegetation within a single season without the use of topsoil. The product was also used to combat the erosion challenges at a wastewater lagoon development in Manitoba that involved the protection of 70,000 m{sup 2} of eroded slopes and channels that threatened to undermine the lagoon structure. Vegetation was established on the sand beams surrounding the lagoon. Erosion control blankets were used to kick-start vegetation growth. The specialized hydroseeding proposal was selected as the lowest cost option among several alternatives. It was concluded that vegetation growth in the region was rapid and consistent through the planted areas. 12 figs.

  8. Regulation of Translation Initiation under Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

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    Ana B. Castro-Sanz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants have developed versatile strategies to deal with the great variety of challenging conditions they are exposed to. Among them, the regulation of translation is a common target to finely modulate gene expression both under biotic and abiotic stress situations. Upon environmental challenges, translation is regulated to reduce the consumption of energy and to selectively synthesize proteins involved in the proper establishment of the tolerance response. In the case of viral infections, the situation is more complex, as viruses have evolved unconventional mechanisms to regulate translation in order to ensure the production of the viral encoded proteins using the plant machinery. Although the final purpose is different, in some cases, both plants and viruses share common mechanisms to modulate translation. In others, the mechanisms leading to the control of translation are viral- or stress-specific. In this paper, we review the different mechanisms involved in the regulation of translation initiation under virus infection and under environmental stress in plants. In addition, we describe the main features within the viral RNAs and the cellular mRNAs that promote their selective translation in plants undergoing biotic and abiotic stress situations.

  9. Stage-specific gene expression during urediniospore germination in Puccinia striiformis f. sp tritici

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    Han Qingmei

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici is an obligate biotrophic pathogen that causes leaf stripe rust on wheat. Although it is critical to understand molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis in the wheat stripe rust fungus for developing novel disease management strategies, little is known about its genome and gene functions due to difficulties in molecular studies with this important pathogen. To identify genes expressed during early infection stages, in this study we constructed a cDNA library with RNA isolated from urediniospores of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici germinated for 10 h. Results A total of 4798 ESTs were sequenced from the germinated urediniospore library and assembled into 315 contigs and 803 singletons. About 23.9% and 13.3% of the resulting 1118 unisequences were homologous to functionally characterized proteins and hypothetical proteins, respectively. The rest 62.8% unisequences had no significant homologs in GenBank. Several of these ESTs shared significant homology with known fungal pathogenicity or virulence factors, such as HESP767 of the flax rust and PMK1, GAS1, and GAS2 of the rice blast fungus. We selected six ESTs (Ps28, Ps85, Ps87, Ps259, Ps261, and Ps159 for assaying their expression patterns during urediniospore germination and wheat infection by quantitative real-time PCR. All of them had the highest transcript level in germinated urediniospores and a much less transcript level in un-germinated urediniospores and infected wheat tissues (1–7 dpi. The transcript level of Ps159 increased at later infection stages (6–7 dpi. Our data indicated that these genes were highly expressed in germinated urediniospores and may play important roles in fungal-plant interactions during early infection stages in the wheat stripe rust fungus. Conclusion Genes expressed in germinated urediniospores of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici were identified by EST analysis. Six of them were confirmed by quantitative real

  10. Population Diversity ofPuccinia graminis is Sustained Through Sexual Cycle on Alternate Hosts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Jin; Matt Rouse; Jim Groth

    2014-01-01

    A high degree of virulence diversity has been maintained in the population ofPuccinia graminis f. sp.tritici (Pgt) in northwestern United States. AlthoughBerberis vulgaris is present in the region andPgthas been isolated from aecial infections onB. vulgaris, the population is too diverse to be explained by the limited presence ofB. vulgaris alone. Since 2008, we have isolatedP. graminis from aecial infections on fruits ofMahonia repens andMahonia aquifolium from northwestern United States. These two native woody shrub species, widely distributed in western North America, were once classiifed as resistant to P. graminis based on artiifcial inoculations. By isolatingP. graminis from aecia, we established that M. repens andM. aquifolium along withB. vulgaris (albeit infrequent) serve as the alternate hosts ofP. graminis in the region. The isolates ofP. graminis from Mahonia of North America had diverse virulence patterns and most of the isolates could be differentiated on Morocco, Line E, Chinese Spring, Little Club, LMPG-6, Rusty, and other genotypes that are considered to be universally susceptible to mostPgt isolates. This discovery explained the persistence of virulence diversity ofPgt observed in isolates derived from uredinia on cereal crops in the region. In addition to cereal crops, uredinial stage of theP. graminis population is sustained by wild grasses, especiallyElymus glaucus, a native grass sharing the same habitat with the rusted Mahonia spp. Although virulence to some important stem rust resistance genes was observed in some isolates derived from Mahonia of North America when tested against single stem rust resistance gene stocks, the overall virulence is very limited in these isolates. This is likely a result of limited selection pressure on the rust population. In contrast to northwestern United Sates, thePgt population in east of the Rocky Mountains of North America has declined steadily with a single race, QFCSC, being predominant in the last

  11. Considerations in forecasting the demand for carbon sequestration and biotic storage technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trexler, M.C. [Trexler and Associates, Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has identified forestry and other land-use based mitigation measures as possible sources and sinks of greenhouse gases. An overview of sequestration and biotic storage is presented, and the potential impacts of the use of carbon sequestration as a mitigation technology are briefly noted. Carbon sequestration is also compare to other mitigation technologies. Biotic mitigation technologies are concluded to be a legitimate and potentially important part of greenhouse gas mitigation due to their relatively low costs, ancillary benefits, and climate impact. However, not all biotic mitigation techniques perfectly match the idealized definition of a mitigation measure, and policies are becoming increasingly biased against biotic technologies.

  12. Differential gene expression in nearly isogenic lines with QTL for partial resistance to Puccinia hordei in barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Thierry C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The barley-Puccinia hordei (barley leaf rust pathosystem is a model for investigating partial disease resistance in crop plants and genetic mapping of phenotypic resistance has identified several quantitative trait loci (QTL for partial resistance. Reciprocal QTL-specific near-isogenic lines (QTL-NILs have been developed that combine two QTL, Rphq2 and Rphq3, the largest effects detected in a recombinant-inbred-line (RIL population derived from a cross between the super-susceptible line L94 and partially-resistant line Vada. The molecular mechanism underpinning partial resistance in these QTL-NILs is unknown. Results An Agilent custom microarray consisting of 15,000 probes derived from barley consensus EST sequences was used to investigate genome-wide and QTL-specific differential expression of genes 18 hours post-inoculation (hpi with Puccinia hordei. A total of 1,410 genes were identified as being significantly differentially expressed across the genome, of which 55 were accounted for by the genetic differences defined by QTL-NILs at Rphq2 and Rphq3. These genes were predominantly located at the QTL regions and are, therefore, positional candidates. One gene, encoding the transcriptional repressor Ethylene-Responsive Element Binding Factor 4 (HvERF4 was located outside the QTL at 71 cM on chromosome 1H, within a previously detected eQTL hotspot for defence response. The results indicate that Rphq2 or Rphq3 contains a trans-eQTL that modulates expression of HvERF4. We speculate that HvERF4 functions as an intermediate that conveys the response signal from a gene(s contained within Rphq2 or Rphq3 to a host of down-stream defense responsive genes. Our results also reveal that barley lines with extreme or intermediate partial resistance phenotypes exhibit a profound similarity in their spectrum of Ph-responsive genes and that hormone-related signalling pathways are actively involved in response to Puccinia hordei. Conclusions

  13. Characterization of a tryptophan 2-monooxygenase gene from Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici involved in auxin biosynthesis and rust pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chuntao; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gang, David R; Hulbert, Scot H

    2014-03-01

    The plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is best known as a regulator of plant growth and development but its production can also affect plant-microbe interactions. Microorganisms, including numerous plant-associated bacteria and several fungi, are also capable of producing IAA. The stem rust fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici induced wheat plants to accumulate auxin in infected leaf tissue. A gene (Pgt-IaaM) encoding a putative tryptophan 2-monooxygenase, which makes the auxin precursor indole-3-acetamide (IAM), was identified in the P. graminis f. sp. tritici genome and found to be expressed in haustoria cells in infected plant tissue. Transient silencing of the gene in infected wheat plants indicated that it was required for full pathogenicity. Expression of Pgt-IaaM in Arabidopsis caused a typical auxin expression phenotype and promoted susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. PMID:24350783

  14. Transfer of label from 3H-glucose in Digitaria eriantha leaves to the rust fungus Puccinia digitariae Pole Evans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digitaria eriantha pentzii was fed 3H-glucose prior to inoculation with uredospores of Puccinia digitariae Pole Evans. Twenty-one hours after inoculation, uptake of label from 3H-glucose by the primary infection structures of P. digitariae was demonstrated employing autoradiography. These results indicate that an exchange of nutrients between host and pathogen occurs very early on in the infection process, during the formation of the primary infection structures. Despite contrary reports that obligate parasites receive no nutrition before establishment of haustoria, this study supports the work of Andrews, who demonstrated uptake of 3H-glucose label from lettuce cotyledons into the primary and secondary infection vesicles, appressoria, and germ tubes of Bremia lactucae

  15. Epistasis and Maternal Effect in Resistance to Puccinia coronata Cda.f.sp.avenae Eriks in Oats (Avena sp.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bnejdi F; Hammami I; Allagui M B; Saadoun M; el Gazzah M

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to investigate the mode of heredity for resistance in oats (Arena sp.) to crown rust caused by Puccinia coronata Cda.f.sp.avenae Eriks.Eight generations of 2 crosses were used to estimate genetic effects and narrow-sense heritability (NSH).Separate generation means analysis (GMA) indicated a complex gene action controlling this trait with additive,dominance,epistatic and maternal effects (ME).The genetic model which assumed no epistasis and no ME did not accurately describe the resistance to P.coronata.In both crosses,the digenic epistatic model with ME epistatic components were negative in most cases,suggesting that gene effects contributed more to the resistance than to the susceptibility.The estimated values of NSH were 15-99% depending upon the cross and isolates.The results indicated that appropriate choice of maternal parent and recurrent selection would increase resistance to crown rust in oats.

  16. Population genetic diversity of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici on different wheat varieties in Tianshui, Gansu Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Gangming; Zhuang, Hua; Wang, Fuping; Wei, Guorong; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2013-01-01

    Population genetic diversity in Tianshui city was analyzed with SSR markers in 605 single-pustule isolates of the stripe rust pathogen, Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), obtained from 19 varieties of wheat. Significant differences in genetic diversity among populations were defected. Genetic diversity was highest in population on Tian 863-13, a highly resistant variety, whereas genetic diversity was lowest in population on Huixianhong, a highly susceptible variety. Seven populations from seven varieties that carried the common Yr18 resistance gene were clustered as one sub-group at 0.88 similarity coefficient, which showed that resistance gene selection had close relation with pathogen's component. The results of present study can provide a theoretical basis for integrated management of wheat stripe rust and effective deployment of resistance genes in Pst over-summering zones in China. PMID:23054697

  17. Temporal dynamics of biotic and abiotic drivers of litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Shaw, E Ashley; Wall, Diana H; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Climate, litter quality and decomposers drive litter decomposition. However, little is known about whether their relative contribution changes at different decomposition stages. To fill this gap, we evaluated the relative importance of leaf litter polyphenols, decomposer communities and soil moisture for litter C and N loss at different stages throughout the decomposition process. Although both microbial and nematode communities regulated litter C and N loss in the early decomposition stages, soil moisture and legacy effects of initial differences in litter quality played a major role in the late stages of the process. Our results provide strong evidence for substantial shifts in how biotic and abiotic factors control litter C and N dynamics during decomposition. Taking into account such temporal dynamics will increase the predictive power of decomposition models that are currently limited by a single-pool approach applying control variables uniformly to the entire decay process. PMID:26947573

  18. Development and Validation of an Aquatic Fine Sediment Biotic Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relyea, Christina D.; Minshall, G. Wayne; Danehy, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The Fine Sediment Biotic Index (FSBI) is a regional, stressor-specific biomonitoring index to assess fine sediment (Chironomidae. This reduced the 685 taxa from all data sets to 206. Of these 93 exhibited some sensitivity to fine sediment which we classified into four categories: extremely, very, moderately, and slightly sensitive; containing 11, 22, 30, and 30 taxa, respectively. Categories were weighted and a FSBI score calculated by summing the sensitive taxa found in a stream. There were no orders or families that were solely sensitive or resistant to fine sediment. Although, among the three orders commonly regarded as indicators of high water quality, the Plecoptera (5), Trichoptera (3), and Ephemeroptera (2) contained all but one of the species or species groups classified as extremely sensitive. Index validation with an independent data set of 255 streams found FSBI scores to accurately predict both high and low levels of measured fine sediment.

  19. Location and foraging as basis for classification of biotic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabibullin, Viner F

    2016-06-01

    Ecologists face an overwhelming diversity of ecological relationships in natural communities. In this paper, I propose to differentiate various types of the interspecific relations on the basis of two factors: relative localization and foraging activity of interacting partners. I advocate recognition of four types of environments: internal, surface, proximate external and distant external. Then I distinguish four types of synoikia-one partner lives in different degree of proximity to another; and four types of synmensalism: one partner forages in different degree of proximity to another. Intersection of localization-based (four subtypes of synoikia) and foraging-based (four subtypes of synmensalism) rows results in 16 types of interactions. This scheme can serve as a framework that manages diverse biotic interactions in a standardized way. I have made the first step to set up nomenclature standards for terms describing interspecific interactions and hope that this will facilitate research and communication. PMID:27160993

  20. [Philosophy of the mutual biotic system of man-environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, D P

    2009-06-01

    With regard to environmental changes, outstanding importance is meanwhile to be attached to the cultural side of human evolution. The evolution both of mankind and of its environment are mutually dependent as processes of change and together they form a complete biotic system. First disorders of balance concerning the close relationship network between mankind and environment eventually developed following man's change from the biosphere to the "noosphere" created by him. In the course of the "neolithic revolution" mankind, while becoming more and more settled, began to become increasingly estranged from its ecological surroundings. Environmental problems caused by man led to climatic changes already about 8,000 years ago. So far they have caused an extraordinary climatic stability following the Ice Age. "Environmental art" i. e. an improved evolution - is required to escape an imminent "collapse" caused by pollution. Nowadays mankind is on the way to being the almost exclusive carrier of future evolution of this planet. PMID:19544720

  1. Early Triassic marine biotic recovery: the predators' perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten M Scheyer

    Full Text Available Examining the geological past of our planet allows us to study periods of severe climatic and biological crises and recoveries, biotic and abiotic ecosystem fluctuations, and faunal and floral turnovers through time. Furthermore, the recovery dynamics of large predators provide a key for evaluation of the pattern and tempo of ecosystem recovery because predators are interpreted to react most sensitively to environmental turbulences. The end-Permian mass extinction was the most severe crisis experienced by life on Earth, and the common paradigm persists that the biotic recovery from the extinction event was unusually slow and occurred in a step-wise manner, lasting up to eight to nine million years well into the early Middle Triassic (Anisian in the oceans, and even longer in the terrestrial realm. Here we survey the global distribution and size spectra of Early Triassic and Anisian marine predatory vertebrates (fishes, amphibians and reptiles to elucidate the height of trophic pyramids in the aftermath of the end-Permian event. The survey of body size was done by compiling maximum standard lengths for the bony fishes and some cartilaginous fishes, and total size (estimates for the tetrapods. The distribution and size spectra of the latter are difficult to assess because of preservation artifacts and are thus mostly discussed qualitatively. The data nevertheless demonstrate that no significant size increase of predators is observable from the Early Triassic to the Anisian, as would be expected from the prolonged and stepwise trophic recovery model. The data further indicate that marine ecosystems characterized by multiple trophic levels existed from the earliest Early Triassic onwards. However, a major change in the taxonomic composition of predatory guilds occurred less than two million years after the end-Permian extinction event, in which a transition from fish/amphibian to fish/reptile-dominated higher trophic levels within ecosystems became

  2. Concerted action of two avirulent spore effectors activates Reaction to Puccinia graminis 1 (Rpg1)-mediated cereal stem rust resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmala, Jayaveeramuthu; Drader, Tom; Lawrence, Paulraj K; Yin, Chuntao; Hulbert, Scot; Steber, Camille M; Steffenson, Brian J; Szabo, Les J; von Wettstein, Diter; Kleinhofs, Andris

    2011-08-30

    The barley stem rust resistance gene Reaction to Puccinia graminis 1 (Rpg1), encoding a receptor-like kinase, confers durable resistance to the stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. The fungal urediniospores form adhesion structures with the leaf epidermal cells within 1 h of inoculation, followed by hyphae and haustorium formation. The RPG1 protein is constitutively expressed and not phosphorylated. On inoculation with avirulent urediniospores, it is phosphorylated in vivo within 5 min and subsequently degraded. Application of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide loops prevented the formation of adhesion structures for spore attachment, the phosphorylation of RPG1, and germination of the viable spores. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid affinity chromatography of proteins from the ungerminated avirulent rust spores led to the purification and identification of a protein with fibronectin type III and breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein domains and a vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 9 with a coupling of ubiquitin to endoplasmic reticulum degradation domain. Both proteins are required to induce in vivo phosphorylation and degradation of RPG1. Combined application of both proteins caused hypersensitive reaction on the stem rust-resistant cultivar Morex but not on the susceptible cultivar Steptoe. Expression studies indicated that mRNA of both genes are present in ungerminated urediniospores and are constitutively transcribed in sporelings, infected leaves, and haustoria in the investigated avirulent races. Evidence is presented that RPG1, in yeast, interacts with the two protein effectors from the urediniospores that activate cooperatively the stem rust resistance protein RPG1 long before haustoria formation. PMID:21873196

  3. The contribution of biotic and abiotic processes during azo dye reduction in anaerobic sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der F.P.; Bisschops, I.A.E.; Blanchard, V.G.; Bouwman, R.H.M.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Azo dye reduction results from a combination of biotic and abiotic processes during the anaerobic treatment of dye containing effluents. Biotic processes are due to enzymatic reactions whereas the chemical reaction is due to sulfide. In this research, the relative impact of the different azo dye red

  4. 中国伞形科植物上柄锈菌的二个新记录%TWO NEW RECORDS OF PUCCINIA ON UMBELLIFERAE IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏淑霞; 庄剑云

    2001-01-01

    @@A recent study of unnamed rust specimens collected by H.Y. Liu and R. Liu in Xinjiang of northwestern China in 1959 has uncovered 2 new Chinese records of the genus Puccinia parasitic on the plants belonging to Umbelliferae. The specimens are deposited in the Herbarium Mycologicum Academiae Sinicae (HMAS) in Beijing. The following descriptions of these species are provided based on the Xinjiang's specimens.

  5. PHYSIOLOGICAL RACES AND VIRULENCE DIVERSITY OF PUCCINIA GRAMINIS PERS. F. SP. TRITICI ERIKS. & E. HENN. ON WHEAT IN TIGRAY REGION OF ETHIOPIA

    OpenAIRE

    Getaneh Woldeab; Woubit Dawit; Teklay Abebe

    2013-01-01

    Wheat stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici is a disease that causes complete annihilation of wheat crops over wide areas during epidemic years. The highland of Ethiopia is considered as a hot spot area for the development of stem rust complex. Hence, this study was carried out to detect the virulence diversity of P. graminis f. sp. tritici in Southern Tigray. The findings of this paper were based on race analysis through inoculation of stem rust populations, isolation and mult...

  6. Next generation sequencing provides rapid access to the genome of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stripe rust

    OpenAIRE

    Cantu, D.; Govindarajulu, M; Kozik, A.; Wang, M.; Chen, X.; Kojima, KK; Jurka, J; Michelmore, RW; Dubcovsky, J

    2011-01-01

    Background: The wheat stripe rust fungus (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, PST) is responsible for significant yield losses in wheat production worldwide. In spite of its economic importance, the PST genomic sequence is not currently available. Fortunately Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has radically improved sequencing speed and efficiency with a great reduction in costs compared to traditional sequencing technologies. We used Illumina sequencing to rapidly access the genomic sequence ...

  7. Next Generation Sequencing Provides Rapid Access to the Genome of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, the Causal Agent of Wheat Stripe Rust

    OpenAIRE

    Cantu, Dario; Govindarajulu, Manjula; Kozik, Alex; Wang, Meinan; Chen, Xianming; Kojima, Kenji K.; Jurka, Jerzy; Michelmore, Richard W; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Background The wheat stripe rust fungus (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, PST) is responsible for significant yield losses in wheat production worldwide. In spite of its economic importance, the PST genomic sequence is not currently available. Fortunately Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has radically improved sequencing speed and efficiency with a great reduction in costs compared to traditional sequencing technologies. We used Illumina sequencing to rapidly access the genomic sequence o...

  8. Analyse der Virulenzsituation des Roggenschwarzrostes (Puccinia graminis f. sp. secalis) im ökologischen Landbau zur Züchtung resistenten Roggens

    OpenAIRE

    Klocke, Bettina; Flath, Kerstin; Schmitt, Anne-Kristin; Miedaner, Thomas; Schmiedchen, Brigitta; Spieß, Hartmut; Szabo, Lilla; Wilde, Peer

    2013-01-01

    Organic Agriculture is especially affected by the increasing spread of stem rust in rye (Puccinia graminis f. sp. secalis) because there is a lack of resistant cultivars in Germany. To analyze the virulence situation of rye stem rust, 71 single-pustule-isolates were established and 30 of those were tested with a differential set consisting of 19 lines. The isolates could be classified into 22 different pathotypes. Only seven pathotypes could be found more than once. Most of the isolates showe...

  9. Uji Efektivitas Fungisida Sistemik Dan Non Sistemik Terhadap Perkembangan Penyakit Karat (Puccinia arachidis. Speg) Pada Tanaman Kacang Tanah (Arachis hypogeae. L)

    OpenAIRE

    Nelwati

    2012-01-01

    Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh fungisida sistemik dan non-sistemik terhadap perkembangan penyakit karat daun ( Puccinia arachidis. Speg ) pada tanaman kacang tanah (Arachis hypogaea. L). Penelitian ini dilaksanakan di Tanjung Sari kecamatan Medan Selayang dengan ketinggian ± 25 m diatas permukaan laut. Penelitian ini menggunakan Rancangan Acak Kelompok (RAK) non faktorial tediri dari 5 ulangan 5 perlakuan FO kontrol, F1 fungisida Score 250 EC dengan dosis 1,87 ml/l a...

  10. Shared influence of pathogen and host genetics on a trade-off between latent period and spore production capacity in the wheat pathogen, Puccinia triticina

    OpenAIRE

    Pariaud, Benedicte; van den Berg, , F.; van den Bosch,; Powers, , S. J.; Kaltz, O.; Lannou, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Crop pathogens are notorious for their rapid adaptation to their host. We still know little about the evolution of their life cycles and whether there might be trade-offs between fitness components, limiting the evolutionary potential of these pathogens. In this study, we explored a trade-off between spore production capacity and latent period in Puccinia triticina, a fungal pathogen causing leaf rust on wheat. Using a simple multivariate (manova) technique, we showed that the covariance betw...

  11. Evidence for biotic controls on topography and soil production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roering, Joshua J.; Marshall, Jill; Booth, Adam M.; Mort, Michele; Jin, Qusheng

    2010-09-01

    The complex interplay of biological, physical, and chemical processes in pedogenesis and hillslope evolution limits our ability to predict and interpret landscape dynamics. Here, we synthesize a suite of observations from the steep, forested Oregon Coast Range to analyze the role of trees in topographic modification and bedrock-to-soil conversion. Using topographic data derived from airborne lidar, we demonstrate that the topographic signature of forest-driven soil and bedrock disturbance is pervasive. For length scales greater than 7.5 m, the land surface is defined by ridge-valley landforms, whereas smaller scales are dominated by pit-mound features generated by the turnover of large coniferous trees. From field surveys, the volume of bedrock incorporated in overturned rootwads increases rapidly with diameter for large conifers, reflecting the highly nonlinear increase in root biomass with tree diameter. Because trees younger than 60 years detach negligible bedrock, short timber harvest intervals may limit the extent to which root systems penetrate bedrock and facilitate bedrock fracturing and biogeochemical weathering. Using ground-penetrating radar, we show that the rootwads of large trees root achieve substantial penetration (1-3 m) into shallow bedrock. The radar transects also reveal that variations in soil thickness have characteristic length scales of 1 to 5 m, consistent with the scale of large rootwads, indicating that both the landscape surface and soil-bedrock interface exhibit a biogenic imprint. In our study area, the residence time of bedrock within dense rooting zones directly below large trees is similar to the time required for trees to occupy the entire forest floor through multiple cycles of forest succession, suggesting that biological modification of shallow bedrock is ubiquitous. Given increases in erosion rate, the ability of roots to initiate soil production may decline as bedrock exhumation through the biotic zone is rapid relative to the

  12. The Importance of Biotic vs. Abiotic Drivers of Local Plant Community Composition Along Regional Bioclimatic Gradients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Klanderud

    Full Text Available We assessed if the relative importance of biotic and abiotic factors for plant community composition differs along environmental gradients and between functional groups, and asked which implications this may have in a warmer and wetter future. The study location is a unique grid of sites spanning regional-scale temperature and precipitation gradients in boreal and alpine grasslands in southern Norway. Within each site we sampled vegetation and associated biotic and abiotic factors, and combined broad- and fine-scale ordination analyses to assess the relative explanatory power of these factors for species composition. Although the community responses to biotic and abiotic factors did not consistently change as predicted along the bioclimatic gradients, abiotic variables tended to explain a larger proportion of the variation in species composition towards colder sites, whereas biotic variables explained more towards warmer sites, supporting the stress gradient hypothesis. Significant interactions with precipitation suggest that biotic variables explained more towards wetter climates in the sub alpine and boreal sites, but more towards drier climates in the colder alpine. Thus, we predict that biotic interactions may become more important in alpine and boreal grasslands in a warmer future, although more winter precipitation may counteract this trend in oceanic alpine climates. Our results show that both local and regional scales analyses are needed to disentangle the local vegetation-environment relationships and their regional-scale drivers, and biotic interactions and precipitation must be included when predicting future species assemblages.

  13. Especificidade de Puccinia pampeana a cultivares de Capsicum spp. e outras solanáceas Specificity of Puccinia pampeana to Capsicum spp. cultivars and other solanaceous plants. Summa Phytopathologica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Maria Passador

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A ferrugem de espécies de Capsicum spp. (pimenta e pimentão, é causada pelo fungo Puccinia pampeana, pode causar perdas totais em plantios de diversas espécies de Capsicum, onde preodminam temperaturas ao redor de 21ºC. Esta ferrugem, mesmo sendo específica do gênero Capsicum, e mesmo muitas espécies dentro deste gênero sendo suscetíveis, algumas apresentam reação de hipersensibilidade. Foi o caso de Capsicum annuum (pimenta cv. Cayenne e C. chinense (pimenta cv. Habañero, que após a formação dos espermogônios (11 dias, apresentou manchas necróticas na região periférica aos espermogônios, aos 15 dias após a inoculação, não havendo evolução da infecção. Também foi observada reação de hipersensibilidade, de forma mais moderada em folhas C. annuum (pimenta serrano e C. baccatum (chapéu-de-frade. Com relação às outras solanáceas inoculadas (jiló e berinjela não foram observados os sintomas e sinais da infecção.The Capsicum spp. (pepper and green pepper rust is caused by the fungus Puccinia pampeana. This is an important disease in these crops which may cause complete losses in crops of several species of Capsicum. Although specific to the genus Capsicum, and despite the fact that many species within this genus are susceptible to rust, some of them have shown a hypersensitivity reaction. That was the case with Capsicum annuum (Cayenne pepper and C. chinense (datil pepper, which, after spermogonia formation (11 days, showed necrotic spots in the peripheral region of the spermogonia 15 days after inoculation, without evolution of the infection. A milder hypersensitivity reaction was also observed only in leaves of C. annuum (chili pepper and C. baccatum ("chapéu-de-frade". With regard to other solanaceous plants inoculated ("jiló" and eggplant, no symptoms or signs of infection were observed.

  14. Capacidade de combinação e heterose para resistência a Puccinia polysora Underw. em milho Combining capacity and heterosis for resistance to Puccinia polysora Underw. in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herberte Pereira da Silva

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A resistência genética é o método mais eficiente de controle das doenças foliares da cultura do milho. Para avaliar a capacidade específica e geral de combinação (CEC e CGC, respectivamente e heterose para resistência a Puccinia polysora, nove linhagens e seus 36 híbridos F1 foram utilizados em experimentos conduzidos em três ambientes. A severidade da doença foi avaliada na planta inteira (PI e na folha posicionada no ponto de inserção da espiga principal (AFA. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi em blocos casualizados com três repetições e a parcela experimental foi representada por uma fileira de 5 m de comprimento. A análise da variância para as reações a ferrugem polissora foram feitas usando a análise II do método de Gardner & Eberhart, associado ao método 4, modelo I de Griffing. A análise dialélica em diferentes ambientes mostrou efeitos altamente significativos (PGenetic resistance is the most efficient way of controlling maize leaf diseases. To evaluate the specific and general combining ability (CGE and CGC, respectively as well as heterosis for resistance to Puccinia polysora, nine inbred lines and a partial diallel set of their 36 F1 hybrids were used in experiments conducted in three environments. Disease severity was evaluated in the whole plant (PI and in the leaf positioned at the point of insertion of the main ear (AFA. Trials were conducted in a randomized block design 5 m row plots. Analyses of variance for disease severity were performed by Gardner and Eberhart's Analysis II, in combination with Griffing's Method 4, Model I. The diallel analysis of environments indicated highly significant environment (E, CGC and CGC x E effects for both evaluation methods; CEC effects significant for PI but not for AFA; interactions CEC x E not significant for both disease severity variables. CGC effects were more important than CEC. This suggests that additive genetic effects are more important as sources of

  15. Biotic homogenization can decrease landscape-scale forest multifunctionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas, Fons; Manning, Pete; Soliveres, Santiago; Allan, Eric; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Verheyen, Kris; Wirth, Christian; Zavala, Miguel A; Ampoorter, Evy; Baeten, Lander; Barbaro, Luc; Bauhus, Jürgen; Benavides, Raquel; Benneter, Adam; Bonal, Damien; Bouriaud, Olivier; Bruelheide, Helge; Bussotti, Filippo; Carnol, Monique; Castagneyrol, Bastien; Charbonnier, Yohan; Coomes, David Anthony; Coppi, Andrea; Bestias, Cristina C; Dawud, Seid Muhie; De Wandeler, Hans; Domisch, Timo; Finér, Leena; Gessler, Arthur; Granier, André; Grossiord, Charlotte; Guyot, Virginie; Hättenschwiler, Stephan; Jactel, Hervé; Jaroszewicz, Bogdan; Joly, François-Xavier; Jucker, Tommaso; Koricheva, Julia; Milligan, Harriet; Mueller, Sandra; Muys, Bart; Nguyen, Diem; Pollastrini, Martina; Ratcliffe, Sophia; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten; Selvi, Federico; Stenlid, Jan; Valladares, Fernando; Vesterdal, Lars; Zielínski, Dawid; Fischer, Markus

    2016-03-29

    Many experiments have shown that local biodiversity loss impairs the ability of ecosystems to maintain multiple ecosystem functions at high levels (multifunctionality). In contrast, the role of biodiversity in driving ecosystem multifunctionality at landscape scales remains unresolved. We used a comprehensive pan-European dataset, including 16 ecosystem functions measured in 209 forest plots across six European countries, and performed simulations to investigate how local plot-scale richness of tree species (α-diversity) and their turnover between plots (β-diversity) are related to landscape-scale multifunctionality. After accounting for variation in environmental conditions, we found that relationships between α-diversity and landscape-scale multifunctionality varied from positive to negative depending on the multifunctionality metric used. In contrast, when significant, relationships between β-diversity and landscape-scale multifunctionality were always positive, because a high spatial turnover in species composition was closely related to a high spatial turnover in functions that were supported at high levels. Our findings have major implications for forest management and indicate that biotic homogenization can have previously unrecognized and negative consequences for large-scale ecosystem multifunctionality. PMID:26979952

  16. Suppression of Salicylic Acid-Mediated Plant Defense Responses During Initial Infection of Dyer's Woad by Puccinia thlaspeos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Puccinia thlaspeos is a microcyclic rust pathogen that is being investigated as a potential biocontrol agent of the noxious weed, dyer’s woad (Isatis tinctoria. Although, the initial events in the colonization of dyer’s woad by the rust pathogen has been elucidated using scanning electron microscopy and PCR, little is known regarding the susceptibility response of this plant to its rust pathogen. Approach: The induction kinetics and amplitude of the Salicylic Acid (SA-responsive Pathogenesis-Related (PR genes, PR-1, â-1, 3-glucanase and ChiA in the compatible interaction between the rust pathogen Puccinia thlaspeos and dyer’s woad were examined during the first 72 h of the infection process. Furthermore SA, an inducer of plant defense response was applied to infected plants in order to reprogram the host defense response at periods that coincided with key events of the infection process. Results: PR genes were upregulated following host penetration by the pathogen. A subsequent pathogen-mediated suppression of PR genes was seen that corresponded with haustorium formation. This was followed by a second up-regulation of these genes that was, in turn, followed by a second long-term pathogen-induced suppression of the defense response that appears to allow successful infections in dyer’s woad. Exogenous application of SA to uninoculated plants led to activation of defense responses by 8 h after treatment. In treatments where inoculated plants were treated with SA, responses differed depending on the timing of SA application. Application of SA at times corresponding to the pre-haustorial and posthaustorial phases of infection triggered an up-regulation of defense genes and increased protection against the pathogen. However, the application of SA during haustorium formation could not override the pathogen-mediated suppression of defense responses and consequently, did not offer the host increased protection. Conclusion

  17. Draft Genome of the Wheat Rust Pathogen (Puccinia triticina) Unravels Genome-Wide Structural Variations during Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, Kanti; Rawal, Hukam C; Dubey, Himanshu; Jaswal, Rajdeep; Devanna, B N; Gupta, Deepak Kumar; Bhardwaj, Subhash C; Prasad, P; Pal, Dharam; Chhuneja, Parveen; Balasubramanian, P; Kumar, J; Swami, M; Solanke, Amolkumar U; Gaikwad, Kishor; Singh, Nagendra K; Sharma, Tilak Raj

    2016-01-01

    Leaf rust is one of the most important diseases of wheat and is caused by Puccinia triticina, a highly variable rust pathogen prevalent worldwide. Decoding the genome of this pathogen will help in unraveling the molecular basis of its evolution and in the identification of genes responsible for its various biological functions. We generated high quality draft genome sequences (approximately 100- 106 Mb) of two races of P. triticina; the variable and virulent Race77 and the old, avirulent Race106. The genomes of races 77 and 106 had 33X and 27X coverage, respectively. We predicted 27678 and 26384 genes, with average lengths of 1,129 and 1,086 bases in races 77 and 106, respectively and found that the genomes consisted of 37.49% and 39.99% repetitive sequences. Genome wide comparative analysis revealed that Race77 differs substantially from Race106 with regard to segmental duplication (SD), repeat element, and SNP/InDel characteristics. Comparative analyses showed that Race 77 is a recent, highly variable and adapted Race compared with Race106. Further sequence analyses of 13 additional pathotypes of Race77 clearly differentiated the recent, active and virulent, from the older pathotypes. Average densities of 2.4 SNPs and 0.32 InDels per kb were obtained for all P. triticina pathotypes. Secretome analysis demonstrated that Race77 has more virulence factors than Race 106, which may be responsible for the greater degree of adaptation of this pathogen. We also found that genes under greater selection pressure were conserved in the genomes of both races, and may affect functions crucial for the higher levels of virulence factors in Race77. This study provides insights into the genome structure, genome organization, molecular basis of variation, and pathogenicity of P. triticina The genome sequence data generated in this study have been submitted to public domain databases and will be an important resource for comparative genomics studies of the more than 4000 existing

  18. BOOTSTRAPPING AND MONTE CARLO METHODS OF POWER ANALYSIS USED TO ESTABLISH CONDITION CATEGORIES FOR BIOTIC INDICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotic indices have been used ot assess biological condition by dividing index scores into condition categories. Historically the number of categories has been based on professional judgement. Alternatively, statistical methods such as power analysis can be used to determine the ...

  19. Biotic versus geomorphic control of landscape soil carbon accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hemelryck, Hendrik; Govers, Gerard; Van Oost, Kristof

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is the largest terrestrial pool of carbon. In order to assess the impact of increasing human-induced land use changes and future climate on this huge reservoir, it is important to understand the complex process of carbon cycling at different temporal and spatial scales. A key challenge in this effort is the correct representation in global assessments and models of those processes that vary strongly over small scales and are strongly affected by the spatial distribution of carbon stocks (both horizontally and vertically) within the landscape. Many studies have shown that spatial variation of SOC storage at the landscape scale is related to topography as a result of either the redistribution of soil or spatial variation in biological C fluxes (input and decomposition). The objective of this study, is to assess the relative importance of biotic versus geomorphic controls in determining SOC patterns and their potential interactions. Therefore the relationships between topography on the one hand and SOC and carbon isotopes on the other hand, were quantified along an erosional gradient. For this purpose, a grassland area and two agricultural fields with a different management regime (conventional tillage, reduced tillage) were selected. All field sites have a similar topography but are characterized by different rates of soil redistribution, related to management regime. Our results show clearly that for temperate climate regions without moisture/nutrient deficit, soil redistribution is the main driver for spatial variations in SOC, dwarfing any biological effects. From the results, the impact of soil redistribution on carbon dynamics by the continued maintenance of a disequilibrium between carbon in-and output at different landscape positions is reconstructed and we discuss the implications for C sequestration processes.

  20. Quantitative patterns between plant volatile emissions induced by biotic stresses and the degree of damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülo eNiinemets

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants have to cope with a plethora of biotic stresses such as herbivory and pathogen attacks throughout their life cycle. The biotic stresses typically trigger rapid emissions of volatile products of lipoxygenase pathway (LOX products, various C6 aldehydes, alcohols and derivatives, also called green leaf volatiles associated with oxidative burst. Further a variety of defense pathways is activated, leading to induction of synthesis and emission of a complex blend of volatiles, often including methyl salicylate, indole, mono-, homo- and sesquiterpenes. The airborne volatiles are involved in systemic responses leading to elicitation of emissions from non-damaged plant parts. For several abiotic stresses, it has been demonstrated that volatile emissions are quantitatively related to the stress dose. The biotic impacts under natural conditions vary in severity from mild to severe, but it is unclear whether volatile emissions also scale with the severity of biotic stresses in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, biotic impacts are typically recurrent, but it is poorly understood how direct stress-triggered and systemic emission responses are silenced during periods intervening sequential stress events. Here we review the information on induced emissions elicited in response to biotic attacks, and argue that biotic stress severity vs. emission rate relationships should follow principally the same dose-response relationships as previously demonstrated for several abiotic stresses. Analysis of several case studies investigating the elicitation of emissions in response to chewing herbivores, aphids, rust fungi, powdery mildew and Botrytis, suggests that induced emissions do respond to stress severity in dose-dependent manner. Bi-phasic emission kinetics of several induced volatiles have been demonstrated in these experiments, suggesting that next to immediate stress-triggered emissions, biotic stress elicited emissions typically have a secondary

  1. WATER QUALITY ANALYSIS OF LOTIC ECOSYSTEMS FROM UPPER MUREŞ RIVER CATCHMENT AREA USING DIFFERENT BIOTIC INDICES

    OpenAIRE

    Milca PETROVICI; Maria - Mirela BOGDĂNESCU; Mălina PÎRVU

    2012-01-01

    Present paper approach the issue of assessing the water quality of tributaries located in the upper basin of the river Mureş, taking into account changes in the value of biotic indices. In this sense, have been selected the next five biotic indices: Ephemeroptera Plecoptera Trichoptera index (EPT), Total Invertebrates index (T), Chironomidae index (Ch), EPT / Total invertebrates index (EPT / T), EPT / Chironomidae index (EPT / Ch) and % Chironomidae index (% Chironomidae). Considering all the...

  2. Biotic potential and reproductive parameters of Spodoptera eridania (Stoll) (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) in the laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Débora Goulart Montezano; Alexandre Specht; Daniel Ricardo Sosa-Gómez; Vânia Ferreira Roque-Specht; Neiva Monteiro de Barros

    2013-01-01

    Biotic potential and reprodutcive parameters of Spodoptera eridania (Stoll) (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) in the laboratory: This study aimed to evaluate the biotic potential and reproductive parameters of Spodoptera eridania (Stoll, 1782) under controlled conditions (25 ± 1ºC, 70 ± 10% RH and 14 hour photophase). The longevity, pre-, post- and oviposition periods, fecundity and fertility of 15 couples was evaluated. The longevity of females (10.80 days) was not significantly higher than those of ...

  3. Biotic and abiotic factors affecting territorial and reproductive behaviour of dragonflies (Odonata)

    OpenAIRE

    KYBICOVÁ, Tereza

    2015-01-01

    Habitat selection, territorial behaviour and reproductive behaviour of dragonflies (Odonata) are discussed and biotic and abiotic factors affecting their territorial and reproductive behaviour are reviewed. The most important biotic factors are predation risk affecting larval survival and the presence of aquatic vegetation, which provides spatial structure. The review is complemented by a field study of territorial and reproductive behavior of dragonflies at an experimental site, at which the...

  4. Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina) resistance in wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivars grown in Northern Europe 1992-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysing, Shu-Chin; Singh, Ravi P; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Merker, Arnulf; Liljeroth, Erland; Diaz, Oscar

    2006-12-01

    Diversity of resistance to leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina can be enhanced in wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivars through a better knowledge of resistance genes that are present in important cultivars and germplasm. Multi-pathotype tests on 84 wheat cultivars grown in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden during 1992-2002 and 39 differential testers enabled the postulation of nine known genes for seedling resistance to leaf rust. Genes Lr1, Lr2a, Lr3, Lr10, Lr13, Lr14a, Lr17, Lr23 and Lr26 were found singly or in combination in 47 of the cultivars (55.9%). The most frequently occurring genes in cultivars grown in Sweden were Lr13 (20.4%), Lr14a (14.8%) and Lr26 (14.8%). Lr14a was the most common gene in cultivars grown in Norway (18.7%), Lr13 in Denmark (35.5%) and Lr10 in Finland (20.0%). Although 28 cultivars (33.3%) exhibited a response pattern that could not be assigned to resistance genes or combinations present in the tester lines, several pathotypes carried virulence and hence these genes or combinations are of limited use. Nine cultivars (10.7%) lacked detectable seedling resistance. One cultivar was resistant to all pathotypes used in the study. PMID:17362328

  5. TaMCA1, a regulator of cell death, is important for the interaction between wheat and Puccinia striiformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yingbin; Wang, Xiaojie; Wang, Kang; Li, Huayi; Duan, Xiaoyuan; Tang, Chunlei; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-01-01

    Metacaspase orthologs are conserved in fungi, protozoa and plants, however, their roles in plant disease resistance are largely unknown. In this study, we identified a Triticum aestivum metacaspase gene, TaMCA1, with three copies located on chromosomes 1A, 1B and 1D. The TaMCA1 protein contained typical structural features of type I metacaspases domains, including an N-terminal pro-domain. Transient expression analyses indicated that TaMCA1 was localized in cytosol and mitochondria. TaMCA1 exhibited no caspase-1 activity in vitro, but was able to inhibit cell death in tobacco and wheat leaves induced by the mouse Bax gene. In addition, the expression level of TaMCA1 was up-regulated following challenge with the Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst). Knockdown of TaMCA1 via virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) enhanced plant disease resistance to Pst, and the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Further study showed that TaMCA1 decreased yeast cell resistance similar to the function of yeast metacaspase, and there was no interaction between TaMCA1 and TaLSD1. Based on these combined results, we speculate that TaMCA1, a regulator of cell death, is important during the compatible interaction of wheat and Pst. PMID:27230563

  6. Susceptibility to Rust (Puccinia Sp. in Cultivars of Italian and Perennial Ryegrass Grown in Two Locations of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Pecetti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A large set of foreign varieties of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum and perennial ryegrass (L. perenne were evaluated for their response to natural rust infection in two Italian locations (Lodi in the north; Perugia in the centre of the country at three-year intervals in 2001, 2004 and 2007, to acquire information on novel germplasm for Italy and verify any spatial and temporal variation in the varietal response to the disease. Crown rust (caused by Puccinia coronata on Italian ryegrass and stem rust (caused by P. graminis on perennial rygrass were consistently recorded in appreciable amount (average susceptibility score > 2.0 on a 1-9 scale. Vice-versa, crown rust on perennial and stem rust on Italian ryegrass seldom affected appreciably the crop. Strong interactions of variety response (to the prevailing pathogen with locations and years of evaluation were observed in both ryegrasses. Subsequently, the repeatability of results between locations, or between years within locations, as measured by rank correlations of variety scores, was sometimes only moderate or low. However, despite such interactions, a few promising varieties were identified in each species with consistently low susceptibility across evaluation environments, which deserve further investigation for a possible direct utilisation, or as donors of useful genes for breeding purposes.

  7. Development of a host-induced RNAi system in the wheat stripe rust fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chuntao; Jurgenson, James E; Hulbert, Scot H

    2011-05-01

    Rust fungi cause devastating diseases of wheat and other cereal species globally. Genetic resistance is the preferred method to control rusts but the effectiveness of race-specific resistance is typically transient due to the genetic plasticity of rust populations. The advent of RNA interference (RNAi) technology has shown promise for the engineering of resistance to some biotrophic pathogens in plants by altering the expression of essential pathogens' genes. Gene fragments from the rust fungi Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici or P. graminis f. sp. tritici were delivered to plant cells through the Barley stripe mosaic virus system, and some reduced the expression of the corresponding genes in the rust fungus. The ability to detect suppression was associated with the expression patterns of the fungal genes because reduction was only detected in transcripts with relatively high levels of expression in fungal haustoria. The results indicate that an in planta RNAi approach can be used in functional genomics research for rust fungi and that it could potentially be used to engineer durable resistance. PMID:21190437

  8. Susceptibility to Rust (Puccinia Sp. in Cultivars of Italian and Perennial Ryegrass Grown in Two Locations of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Russi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A large set of foreign varieties of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum and perennial ryegrass (L. perenne were evaluated for their response to natural rust infection in two Italian locations (Lodi in the north; Perugia in the centre of the country at three-year intervals in 2001, 2004 and 2007, to acquire information on novel germplasm for Italy and verify any spatial and temporal variation in the varietal response to the disease. Crown rust (caused by Puccinia coronata on Italian ryegrass and stem rust (caused by P. graminis on perennial rygrass were consistently recorded in appreciable amount (average susceptibility score > 2.0 on a 1-9 scale. Vice-versa, crown rust on perennial and stem rust on Italian ryegrass seldom affected appreciably the crop. Strong interactions of variety response (to the prevailing pathogen with locations and years of evaluation were observed in both ryegrasses. Subsequently, the repeatability of results between locations, or between years within locations, as measured by rank correlations of variety scores, was sometimes only moderate or low. However, despite such interactions, a few promising varieties were identified in each species with consistently low susceptibility across evaluation environments, which deserve further investigation for a possible direct utilisation, or as donors of useful genes for breeding purposes.

  9. Ultrastructure of the Rust Fungus Puccinia miscanthi in the Teliospore Stage Interacting with the Biofuel Plant Miscanthus sinensis

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    Ki Woo Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of the the rust fungus Puccinia miscanthi with the biofuel plant Miscanthus sinensis during the teliospore phase was investigated by light and electron microscopy. P. miscanthi telia were oval-shaped and present on both the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces. Teliospores were brown, one-septate (two-celled, and had pedicels attached to one end. Transmission electron microscopy revealed numerous electron-translucent lipid globules in the cytoplasm of teliospores. Extensive cell wall dissolution around hyphae was not observed in the host tissues beneath the telia. Hyphae were found between mesophyll cells in the leaf tissues as well as in host cells. Intracellular hyphae, possibly haustoria, possessed electron-dense fungal cell walls encased by an electron-transparent fibrillar extrahaustorial sheath that had an electron-dense extrahaustorial membrane. The infected host cells appeared to maintain their membrane-bound structures such as nuclei and chloroplasts. These results suggest that the rust fungus maintains its biotrophic phase with most mesophyll cells of M. sinensis. Such a nutritional mode would permit the rust fungus to obtain food reserves for transient growth in the course of host alteration.

  10. Glycerol-3-phosphate metabolism in wheat contributes to systemic acquired resistance against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuheng Yang

    Full Text Available Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P is a proposed regulator of plant defense signaling in basal resistance and systemic acquired resistance (SAR. The GLY1-encoded glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH and GLI1-encoded glycerol kinase (GK are two key enzymes involved in the G3P biosynthesis in plants. However, their physiological importance in wheat defense against pathogens remains unclear. In this study, quantification analysis revealed that G3P levels were significantly induced in wheat leaves challenged by the avirulent Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst race CYR23. The transcriptional levels of TaGLY1 and TaGLI1 were likewise significantly induced by avirulent Pst infection. Furthermore, knocking down TaGLY1 and TaGLI1 individually or simultaneously with barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing (BSMV-VIGS inhibited G3P accumulation and compromised the resistance in the wheat cultivar Suwon 11, whereas the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA and the expression of the SA-induced marker gene TaPR1 in plant leaves were altered significantly after gene silencing. These results suggested that G3P contributes to wheat systemic acquired resistance (SAR against stripe rust, and provided evidence that the G3P function as a signaling molecule is conserved in dicots and monocots. Meanwhile, the simultaneous co-silencing of multiple genes by the VIGS system proved to be a powerful tool for multi-gene functional analysis in plants.

  11. A conidiation-related gene is highly expressed at the resting urediospore stage in Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Duan, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Shi, Xue-Xia; Chen, Yue-Ying; Zhang, Hong; Huang, Li-Li; Kang, Zhen-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    The production and germination of asexual spores in a diverse group of fungi play a crucial role in their infection cycles. These processes are regulated by a set of genes, namely, conidiation-related genes, involved in the production, morphological characteristics, and differentiation of conidia. In this study, we identified and characterized the PsCon1 gene, which is the first conidiation-related gene identified in Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst). Sequence analysis revealed that PsCON1 has two conserved conidiation-specific protein 6 domains. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and insertion/deletion variations were detected in the coding region of PsCon1 among five Pst races. Quantitative RT-PCR assays revealed that PsCon1 was expressed at the highest level in resting urediospores of Pst, and gradually decreased after germination and infection. However, at 312 hpi, at the stage of forming large amounts of urediospores on leaves, the amount of PsCon1 mRNA was sharply increased but only 0.1-fold that of resting urediospores. Subcellular localization assays indicated PsCon1 heterologously expressed in Fusarium graminearum was located in the cytoplasm of conidia. The results suggest that PsCon1 may play a role in formation or survival of Pst urediospores. PMID:22961642

  12. An annotated list of Urediniomycetes (rust fungi from South Africa 1: Melampsoraceae and Pucciniaceae, excluding Puccinia and Uromyces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. van Reenen

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Up-to-date information is given on the identity, occurrence, nomenclature, host ranges, geographical distribution and literature references of the Urediniomycetes in South Africa. Species of the family Melampsoraceae and all species of the family Pucciniaceae other than those in the genera Puccinia Pers. and  Uromyces (Link Unger are listed. New species records since 1945 include the following:  Melampsora allii-populirui Kleb..  Melampsora coleosporioides Dietel.  Melampsora laricipopulina Kleb.. Melampsora medusae Thiim., Frommea obtusa-duchesneae (Arthur Arthur. Hemileia gardeniae-thunbergiae Maubl. & Roger.  Phakopsora gossypii (Arthur Hirats. F. Uromycladium tepperianum (Sacc. McAlpine and  Tranzschelia discolor (Fuckel Tranzschel & M.A. Litv. Although many species of rusts have already been recorded, these are thought to represent only a small percentage of the rust population in southern Africa. Furthermore, only a small portion of rust specimens at present housed at PREM have so far been studied. Continued research on this economically important group of fungi is therefore essential.

  13. Endogenous silencing of Puccinia triticina pathogenicity genes through in planta-expressed sequences leads to the suppression of rust diseases on wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Vinay; McCallum, Brent; Bakkeren, Guus

    2013-02-01

    Rust fungi are destructive plant pathogens. The draft genomes of several wheat-infecting species have been released and potential pathogenicity genes identified through comparative analyses to fungal pathogens that are amenable to genetic manipulation. Functional gene analysis tools are needed to understand the infection process of these obligate parasites and to confirm whether predicted pathogenicity genes could become targets for disease control. We have modified an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated in planta-induced transient gene silencing (PITGS) assay for use in Triticum spp. (wheat), and used this assay to target predicted wheat leaf rust fungus, Puccinia triticina (Pt) pathogenicity genes, a MAP kinase (PtMAPK1), a cyclophilin (PtCYC1) and calcineurin B (PtCNB), to analyze their roles in disease. Agroinfiltration effectively delivered hairpin silencing constructs in wheat, leading to the generation of fungal gene-specific siRNA molecules in infiltrated leaves, and resulting in up to 70% reduction in transcription of the endogenous target genes in superinfected Pt. In vivo silencing caused severe disease suppression, compromising fungal growth and sporulation, as viewed by confocal microscopy and measured by reductions in fungal biomass and emergence of uredinia. Interestingly, using the same gene constructs, suppression of infection by Puccinia graminis and Puccinia striiformis was also achieved. Our results show that A. tumefaciens-mediated PITGS can be used as a reverse-genetics tool to discover gene function in rust fungi. This proof-of-concept study indicates that the targeted fungal transcripts might be important in pathogenesis, and could potentially be used as promising targets for developing RNA interference-based resistance against rust fungi. PMID:23110316

  14. Comparative genomics of Australian isolates of the wheat stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici reveals extensive polymorphism in candidate effector genes

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhyaya, Narayana M.; Garnica, Diana P.; Karaoglu, Haydar; Sperschneider, Jana; Nemri, Adnane; XU, BO; Mago, Rohit; Cuomo, Christina A.; Rathjen, John P.; Park, Robert F.; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Dodds, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    The wheat stem rust fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) is one of the most destructive pathogens of wheat. In this study, a draft genome was built for a founder Australian Pgt isolate of pathotype (pt.) 21-0 (collected in 1954) by next generation DNA sequencing. A combination of reference-based assembly using the genome of the previously sequenced American Pgt isolate CDL 75-36-700-3 (p7a) and de novo assembly were performed resulting in a 92 Mbp reference genome for Pgt isolate 21-...

  15. Enhanced nitrobenzene removal and column longevity by coupled abiotic and biotic processes in zero-valent iron column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao; Wu, Jinhua; Huang, Weilin;

    2015-01-01

    In this study, abiotic zero-valent iron (ZVI) column and biotic ZVI column were employed to investigate abiotic and biotic effects between iron and microorganisms on NB removal and column longevity. Physical removal and kinetics analysis revealed that NB was largely removed through adsorption and....../or co-precipitation and the reduction of NB to aniline (AN) via abiotic reaction in the abiotic column and via both abiotic and biotic reactions in the biotic column. Due to the interactive effect of ZVI and microorganisms, more effective iron consumption and more reactive minerals such as green rust...... and iron sulfide were found in the biotic column. This led to approximately 50% higher total NB removal and 6 times higher AN production in the biotic column as compared to the abiotic column during the entire operation. According to the NB breakthrough curves, longer stability and longer life-span of...

  16. Abiotic vs. biotic influences on habitat selection of coexisting species: Climate change impacts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T.E.

    2001-01-01

    Species are commonly segregated along gradients of microclimate and vegetation. I explore the question of whether segregation is the result of microhabitat partitioning (biotic effects) or choice of differing microclimates (abiotic effects). I explored this question for four ground-nesting bird species that are segregated along a microclimate and vegetation gradient in Arizona. Birds shifted position of their nests on the microhabitat and microclimate gradient in response to changing precipitation over nine years. Similarly, annual bird abundance varied with precipitation across 12 yr. Those shifts in abundance and nesting microhabitat with changing precipitation demonstrate the importance of abiotic influences on bird distributions and habitat choice. However, nest-site shifts and microhabitat use also appear to be influenced by interactions among coexisting species. Moreover, shifts in habitat use by all species caused nest predation (i.e., biotic) costs that increased with increasing distance along the microclimate gradient. These results indicate that abiotic and biotic costs can strongly interact to influence microhabitat choice and abundances of coexisting species. Global climate change impacts have been considered largely in terms of simple distributional shifts, but these results indicate that shifts can also increase biotic costs when species move into habitat types for which they are poorly adapted or that create new biotic interactions.

  17. An evaluation of biotic ligand models predicting acute copper toxicity to Daphnia magna in wastewater effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Carlos; Scrimshaw, Mark; Comber, Sean; Churchley, John

    2011-04-01

    The toxicity of Cu to Daphnia magna was investigated in a series of 48-h immobilization assays in effluents from four wastewater treatment works. The assay results were compared with median effective concentration (EC50) forecasts produced by the HydroQual biotic ligand model (BLM), the refined D. magna BLM, and a modified BLM that was constructed by integrating the refined D. magna biotic ligand characterization with the Windermere humic aqueous model (WHAM) VI geochemical speciation model, which also accommodated additional effluent characteristics as model inputs. The results demonstrated that all the BLMs were capable of predicting toxicity by within a factor of two, and that the modified BLM produced the most accurate toxicity forecasts. The refined D. magna BLM offered the most robust assessment of toxicity in that it was not reliant on the inclusion of effluent characteristics or optimization of the dissolved organic carbon active fraction to produce forecasts that were accurate by within a factor of two. The results also suggested that the biotic ligand stability constant for Na may be a poor approximation of the mechanisms governing the influence of Na where concentrations exceed the range within which the biotic ligand stability constant value had been determined. These findings support the use of BLMs for the establishment of site-specific water quality standards in waters that contain a substantial amount of wastewater effluent, but reinforces the need for regulators to scrutinize the composition of models, their thermodynamic and biotic ligand parameters, and the limitations of those parameters. PMID:21184526

  18. Transgenic crops with an improved resistance to biotic stresses. A review

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    Tohidfar, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pests, diseases and weeds (biotic stresses are significant limiting factors for crop yield and production. However, the limitations associated with conventional breeding methods necessitated the development of alternative methods for improving new varieties with higher resistance to biotic stresses. Molecular techniques have developed applicable methods for genetic transformation of a wide range of plants. Genetic engineering approach has been demonstrated to provide enormous options for the selection of the resistance genes from different sources to introduce them into plants to provide resistance against different biotic stresses. Literature. In this review, we focus on strategies to achieve the above mentioned objectives including expression of insecticidal, antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral resistance and herbicide detoxification for herbicide resistance. Conclusion. Regardless of the concerns about commercialization of products from genetically modified (GM crops resistant to biotic stresses, it is observed that the cultivation area of these crops is growing fast each year. Considering this trend, it is expected that production and commercialization of GM crops resistant to biotic stresses will continue to increase but will also extend to production of crops resistant to abiotic stresses (e.g. drought, salinity, etc. in a near future.

  19. TaSYP71, a Qc-SNARE, Contributes to Wheat Resistance against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minjie; Peng, Yan; Li, Huayi; Deng, Lin; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-01-01

    N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) are involved in plant resistance; however, the role of SYP71 in the regulation of plant-pathogen interactions is not well known. In this study, we characterized a plant-specific SNARE in wheat, TaSYP71, which contains a Qc-SNARE domain. Three homologs are localized on chromosome 1AL, 1BL, and 1DL. Using Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression, TaSYP71 was localized to the plasma membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana. Quantitative real-time PCR assays revealed that TaSYP71 homologs was induced by NaCl, H2O2 stress and infection by virulent and avirulent Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) isolates. Heterologous expression of TaSYP71 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe elevated tolerance to H2O2. Meanwhile, H2O2 scavenging gene (TaCAT) was downregulated in TaSYP71 silenced plants treated by H2O2 compared to that in control, which indicated that TaSYP71 enhanced tolerance to H2O2 stress possibly by influencing the expression of TaCAT to remove the excessive H2O2 accumulation. When TaSYP71 homologs were all silenced in wheat by the virus-induced gene silencing system, wheat plants were more susceptible to Pst, with larger infection area and more haustoria number, but the necrotic area of wheat mesophyll cells were larger, one possible explanation that minor contribution of resistance to Pst was insufficient to hinder pathogen extension when TaSYP71 were silenced, and the necrotic area was enlarged accompanied with the pathogen growth. Of course, later cell death could not be excluded. In addition, the expression of pathogenesis-related genes were down-regulated in TaSYP71 silenced wheat plants. These results together suggest that TaSYP71 play a positive role in wheat defense against Pst. PMID:27148348

  20. Generation and analysis of expression sequence tags from haustoria of the wheat stripe rust fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. Tritici

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    Han Qingmei

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst, is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. worldwide. In spite of its agricultural importance, the genomics and genetics of the pathogen are poorly characterized. Pst transcripts from urediniospores and germinated urediniospores have been examined previously, but little is known about genes expressed during host infection. Some genes involved in virulence in other rust fungi have been found to be specifically expressed in haustoria. Therefore, the objective of this study was to generate a cDNA library to characterize genes expressed in haustoria of Pst. Results A total of 5,126 EST sequences of high quality were generated from haustoria of Pst, from which 287 contigs and 847 singletons were derived. Approximately 10% and 26% of the 1,134 unique sequences were homologous to proteins with known functions and hypothetical proteins, respectively. The remaining 64% of the unique sequences had no significant similarities in GenBank. Fifteen genes were predicted to be proteins secreted from Pst haustoria. Analysis of ten genes, including six secreted protein genes, using quantitative RT-PCR revealed changes in transcript levels in different developmental and infection stages of the pathogen. Conclusions The haustorial cDNA library was useful in identifying genes of the stripe rust fungus expressed during the infection process. From the library, we identified 15 genes encoding putative secreted proteins and six genes induced during the infection process. These genes are candidates for further studies to determine their functions in wheat-Pst interactions.

  1. Effects of Different Cultivation Patterns of Wheat on Population Structure of Puccinia striiformis West.f. sp. tritici

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li; Jinbin; Liu; Lin; Yang; Jing; Lan; Mingqing; Chen; Mengqi; Yang; Jincheng; Chen; Xiangdong; Li; Yueqiu; Zhu; Youyong; Li; Chengyun

    2014-01-01

    The paper was to study the effects of different cultivation patterns( mix cultivation and monocultivation) of wheat on population structure of Puccinia striiformis West. f. sp. tritici in the fields. Five race-specific-markers( CY32,CY31,CY29,CY23 and Shuiyuan pathotype) were used to survey 113 infected samples collected from two cultivation patterns. The results indicated that frequency of race-specific-markers under monocultivation was higher than that under mix cultivation; the dominant race-specific-markers were CY32 and CY29 under monocultivation,and the frequency of detection were 81. 5% and 78. 5%,respectively. The dominant race-specific-markers were CY29 and Shuiyuan pathotype under mix cultivation,and the frequency of detection are 41. 7% and 18. 8%,respectively.Several race-specific-markers were detected in single infected leaf,and 41. 7% of infected single leaf were detected with more than two race-specific-markers,58. 3% of infected single leaf were detected with one race-specific-marker under mix cultivation pattern,while there were 75. 0% infected leaves with more than two race-specific-markers and 25. 0% infected single leaf detected with one race-specific-marker under monocultivation pattern. The results indicated that mix cultivation pattern of wheat can reduce races on single leaf,affect the distribution of races in infected leaves,and suppress the occurrence frequency of dominant races of P. striiformis in the fields significantly,subsequently reduced severity and prevalence of the disease.

  2. Histology and Ultrastructure of Incompatible Combination Between Puccinia striiformis and Wheat Cultivars with Low Reaction Type Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Zhen-sheng; WANG Yao; HUANG Li-li; WEI Guo-rong; ZHAO Jie

    2003-01-01

    The incompatible combinations between races of Puccinia striiformis and wheat cuitivars withlow reaction type resistance were examined by means of fluorescent microscopy, differential interference con-trast microscopy and electron microscopy. The incompatible combinations consisted of wheat cultivar Niuzhuteplus CY28, Hybrid46 plus CY29 and Tianxuan882 plus CY29, while the compatible combination was wheatcultivar Huixianhong plus CY28. The observation revealed a striking difference in the fungal development andthe host responses between susceptible and resistant wheat cuitivars following infection by the pathogen. Themain histological manifestation of the pathogen development in the resistant wheat cultivars include inhibitionof hyphal growth, delay of hyphal branching and colony formation, decrease of formation of haustorial mothercells and haustoria, and occurrence of host cell necrosis. The observation by electron microscopy demonstratedthat a series of abnormal changes occurred in intercellular hyphae, haustorial mother cells and haustoria dur-ing pathogen development in the resistant wheat cultivars. The cytoplasm became more electron-dense and vac-uoles in the cytoplasm increased in number and size. The cell walls of hyphae, haustorial mother cells werethickened irregularly. The organeiles were disorderly distributed in the cytoplasm and the haustorial mothercells and haustoria lost their physiological function. In the final stage of the pathogen development, the inter-cellular hyphae, haustorial mother cells and haustoria became necrotic and collapsed. The structural defensereactions such as formation of cell wall apposition, collar and encasement of haustorium were essentially morepronounced in the infected wheat leaves of the resistant cultivars than in the susceptible one. In addition, therelationship between the host resistance expression and the histological and cytological features occurred in theincompatible combination was discussed in this paper.

  3. TaSYP71, a Qc-SNARE, Contributes to Wheat Resistance against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjie eLiu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs are involved in plant resistance; however, the role of SYP71 in the regulation of plant–pathogen interactions is not well known. In this study, we characterized a plant-specific SNARE in wheat, TaSYP71, which contains a Qc-SNARE domain. Three homologues are localized on chromosome 1AL, 1BL and 1DL. Using Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression, TaSYP71 was localized to the plasma membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana. Quantitative real-time PCR assays revealed that TaSYP71 homologues was induced by NaCl, H2O2 stress and infection by virulent and avirulent Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst isolates. Heterologous expression of TaSYP71 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe elevated tolerance to H2O2. Meanwhile, H2O2 scavenging gene (TaCAT was downregulated in TaSYP71 silenced plants treated by H2O2 compared to that in control, which indicated that TaSYP71 enhanced tolerance to H2O2 stress possibly by influencing the expression of TaCAT to remove the excessive H2O2 accumulation. When TaSYP71 homologues were all silenced in wheat by the virus-induced gene silencing system, wheat plants were more susceptible to Pst, with larger infection area and more haustoria number, but the necrotic area of wheat mesophyll cells were larger, one possible explanation that minor contribution of resistance to Pst was insufficient to hinder pathogen extension when TaSYP71were silenced, and the necrotic area was enlarged accompanied with the pathogen growth. Of course, later cell death could not be excluded. In addition, the expression of pathogenesis-related genes were down-regulated in TaSYP71 silenced wheat plants. These results together suggest that TaSYP71 play a positive role in wheat defence against Pst.

  4. GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF PHYSIOLOGIC RACES OF PUCCINIA TRITICINA AND POSTULATION OF RESISTANCE GENES IN NEW WHEAT CULTIVARS IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A.A. Najeeb

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the geographical distribution for physiologic races of Puccinia triticina and identification of leaf rust resistance genes (Lr ,s in the recent Egyptian wheat cultivars are essential for maximizing resistance in future-bred cultivars. The  aim   of   this   study   was   to   know   the   status  of resistance in Egyptian wheat cultivars against wheat leaf rust and the most frequent race distributed. Infected samples were collected from five Governorates, i.e.,  Dakahlia,  Kafr el-Sheikh,  Beheira,  Sharqia  and  Sohag comprised the wheat growing area in Egypt. These samples were isolated, purified and identified on the differential stes. Gene postulation was done using fifteen identified races on Egyptian wheat cultivars correlated with Lr genes. Thirty three races identified during three seasons 2009/2010, 2010/2011 and 2011/2012. The most frequent race was TK (10% followed by race BB (7.58%, PK (6.55%, TT (4.82%, PT (3.79% and MT (3.44%. Moreover, races; BB, TT and PT were present during three seasons while these races appeared in some Governorates and disappeared in other Governorates. On the other hand, the most frequently occurring gene in ten Egyptian wheat cultivars was Lr35 (70%, followed by Lr22 (60%, Lr27 (40%, Lr34 (30%, Lr19 (30%,Lr18 (10%, Lr36 (10% and Lr46 (10%, eight out of sixteen Lr genes were not present in the tested cultivars. It is concluded that there was a good variation in Lr genes carried by wheat cultivars commercially grown in Egypt. Therefore, strategies for deploying resistance genes to prolong effective disease resistance are suggested to control wheat leaf rust disease.

  5. Do Karst Rivers “deserve” their own biotic index? A ten years study on macrozoobenthos in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađa Biljana

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present the results of a ten year survey of the aquatic macroinvertebrate fauna along four karst rivers: Jadro, Žrnovnica, Grab and Ruda, all of them situated in the Middle Dalmatia region of Croatia, in an attempt to construct the Iliric Biotic Index, which will be more applicable for the water quality analysis than the most frequently applied biotic index in Croatia, the Italian Modification of Extended Biotic Index. The rivers geologically belong to the Dinaric karst, unique geological phenomena in Europe. Benthic macroinvertebrates were collected along each river at 15 sites by standard methods of sampling along with several physicochemical parameters, including: temperature, dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, alkalinity, hardness and pH. Univariate and multivariate techniques revealed differences in the macroinvertebrate community structure as well as in physicochemical parameters between the Karst rivers and continental rivers. Based on those differences, the Iliric Biotic Index was proposed as the standard of karst river water quality in Croatia in accordance with the EU Water Framework Directive. Differences between the Iliric Biotic Index and the most commonly used biotic indices in the European Community and the USA (The Biological Monitoring Working Party (B.M.W.P. scores, i.e. Extended Biotic Index, Indice Biotique, Family Biotic Index suggest that karst rivers need a new biotic index.

  6. Bread wheat selection against abiotic and biotic stresses in highland Balochistan, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. ssp. aestivum) lines were screened in multi-location trials in highland Balochistan, Pakistan from 1982 (F2) to 1990 (fixed lines). Objective of the study was to select and evaluate desirable genotypes for winter planting, Of 816 entries, only four successfully passed through the observation nurseries and yield trials. After nine years of testing only genotype ICW81.1471 was selected for wide-scale agronomic testing. Although the yield potential of this genotype was not significantly higher than that of the local check, it had the important advantage of possessing good resistance to yellow rust (Puccinia striiformis West) The results showed that exposure of segregating population to the prevailing environmental stresses of cold and drought was an effective selection procedure for identifying genotypes which are resistant to such stresses. Effective selection can be made for other desirable attributes such as disease and pest resistance, plant height and time to maturity. (author)

  7. Aerobic bacterial catabolism of persistent organic pollutants - potential impact of biotic and abiotic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Baldrian, Petr; Schmidt, Stefan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2016-04-01

    Several aerobic bacteria possess unique catabolic pathways enabling them to degrade persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The catabolic activity of aerobic bacteria employed for removal of POPs in the environment may be modulated by several biotic (i.e. fungi, plants, algae, earthworms, and other bacteria) and abiotic (i.e. zero-valent iron, advanced oxidation, and electricity) agents. This review describes the basic biochemistry of the aerobic bacterial catabolism of selected POPs and discusses how biotic and abiotic agents enhance or inhibit the process. Solutions allowing biotic and abiotic agents to exert physical and chemical assistance to aerobic bacterial catabolism of POPs are also discussed. PMID:26851837

  8. The abundance of biotic exoplanets and life on planets of Red Dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandel, Amri; Gale, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    The Kepler mission has shown that Earthlike planets orbiting within the Habitable Zones of their host stars are common. We derive an expression for the abundance of life bearing (biotic) extra-solar-system planets (exoplanets) in terms of the (yet unknown) probability for the evolution of biotic life. This "biotic probability" may be estimated by future missions and observations, e.g. spectral analyses of the atmospheres of exoplanets, looking for biomarkers. We show that a biotic probability in the range 0.001-1 implies that a biotic planet may be expected within ~10-100 light years from Earth. Of particular interest in the search for exolife are planets orbiting Red Dwarf (RD) stars, the most frequent stellar type. Previous researches suggested that conditions on planets near RDs would be inimical to life, e.g. the Habitable Zone of RDs is small, so their habitable planets would be close enough to be tidally locked. Recent calculations show that this and other properties of RDs, presumed hostile for the evolution of life, are less severe than originally estimated. We conclude that RD planets could be hospitable for the evolution of life as we know it, not less so than planets of solar-type stars. This result, together with the large number of RDs and their Kepler planet-statistics, makes finding life on RD planets ~10-1000 times more likely than on planets of solar-type stars. Our nearest biotic RD-planet is likely to be 2-10 times closer than the nearest solar-type one.

  9. Application of Irradiated Pro biotic Microorganism in Black Tiger Shrimp (Penaeus monodon Fabricius) Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine shrimp culture in Thailand has been developed continuously for the past two decades. This development will ensure the highest level of shrimp quality that will be suitable for the consumption of the people in the country and also aboard. The trend of culture system emphasizes on disease prevention more than treatment which will consequently limit the application of drug and chemicals. Application of pro biotic has been one means of this prevention that are commonly practiced by shrimp farmers. This research was conducted to compare the efficacy of normal Bacillus subtilis isolate from shrimp intestine and an irradiated B. subtilis as a pro biotic in shrimp feed. It was found that overall results were quite the same. These included the broth Co-culture assay. Effects on immune functions were conducted with Penaeus monodon with initial average weight of 17 gms by feeding with 3 gms/kg feed of spore of these two pro biotic for two mouths. The results indicated that both pro biotic caused significant improvement on percent phagocytosis only at the forth week of feeding trial and the overall enhancement of bactericidal activity. However, total haemocyte count and phenoloxidase activity were not altered. Total bacterial count in shrimp intestine was also conducted during the two month trial. the results indicated significant reduction of Vibrio spp. of both pro biotic groups when compared with the control. Number of Bacillus spp. in intestine were continuously high even after pro biotic treatment had been stopped Growth rate of experiment and control shrimp was not significantly different.

  10. 山地生柄锈菌和修氏柄锈菌在中国的发现%THE OCCURRENCE OF PUCCINIA MONTICOLA KOM. AND PUCINIA SJUZEVII TRANZSCHEL & EREM. IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李壮; 庄剑云

    2005-01-01

    @@ Recently two species of the genus Puccinia representing new records for China have come to our attention.Descriptions, illustrations and taxonomic notes of both are herewith presented, based on the specimens collected in China. The specimens examined are kept in Institute of Mycology, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun (HMJAU)and Herbarium Mycologicum Academiae Sinicae, Beijing (HMAS).

  11. WATER QUALITY ANALYSIS OF LOTIC ECOSYSTEMS FROM UPPER MUREŞ RIVER CATCHMENT AREA USING DIFFERENT BIOTIC INDICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milca PETROVICI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Present paper approach the issue of assessing the water quality of tributaries located in the upper basin of the river Mureş, taking into account changes in the value of biotic indices. In this sense, have been selected the next five biotic indices: Ephemeroptera Plecoptera Trichoptera index (EPT, Total Invertebrates index (T, Chironomidae index (Ch, EPT / Total invertebrates index (EPT / T, EPT / Chironomidae index (EPT / Ch and % Chironomidae index (% Chironomidae. Considering all these indices, it was found existence of a medium to best quality water in Mureş tributaries from Harghita Mountains and a good quality water which comes from the Maramureş Mountains and Transylvania Plateau.

  12. Why are biotic iron pools uniform across high- and low-iron pelagic ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, P. W.; Strzepek, R. F.; Ellwood, M. J.; Hutchins, D. A.; Nodder, S. D.; Twining, B. S.; Wilhelm, S. W.

    2015-07-01

    Dissolved iron supply is pivotal in setting global phytoplankton productivity and pelagic ecosystem structure. However, most studies of the role of iron have focussed on carbon biogeochemistry within pelagic ecosystems, with less effort to quantify the iron biogeochemical cycle. Here we compare mixed-layer biotic iron inventories from a low-iron (~0.06 nmol L-1) subantarctic (FeCycle study) and a seasonally high-iron (~0.6 nmol L-1) subtropical (FeCycle II study) site. Both studies were quasi-Lagrangian, and had multi-day occupation, common sampling protocols, and indirect estimates of biotic iron (from a limited range of available published biovolume/carbon/iron quotas). Biotic iron pools were comparable (~100 ± 30 pmol L-1) for low- and high-iron waters, despite a tenfold difference in dissolved iron concentrations. Consistency in biotic iron inventories (~80 ± 24 pmol L-1, largely estimated using a limited range of available quotas) was also conspicuous for three Southern Ocean polar sites. Insights into the extent to which uniformity in biotic iron inventories was driven by the need to apply common iron quotas obtained from laboratory cultures were provided from FeCycle II. The observed twofold to threefold range of iron quotas during the evolution of FeCycle II subtropical bloom was much less than reported from laboratory monocultures. Furthermore, the iron recycling efficiency varied by fourfold during FeCycle II, increasing as stocks of new iron were depleted, suggesting that quotas and iron recycling efficiencies together set biotic iron pools. Hence, site-specific differences in iron recycling efficiencies (which provide 20-50% and 90% of total iron supply in high- and low-iron waters, respectively) help offset the differences in new iron inputs between low- and high-iron sites. Future parameterization of iron in biogeochemical models must focus on the drivers of biotic iron inventories, including the differing iron requirements of the resident biota

  13. Biotic and abiotic oxidation and reduction of iron at circumneutral pH are inseparable processes under natural conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ionescu, Danny; Heim, Christine; Polerecky, L.; Thiel, Volker; de Beer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation and reduction of iron can occur through abiotic (chemical) and biotic (microbial) processes. Abiotic iron oxidation is a function of pH and O2 concentration. Biotic iron oxidation is carried out by a diverse group of bacteria, using O2 or NO3 as terminal electron acceptors. At circumneutra

  14. Contrasting intra-annual patterns of six biotic groups with different dispersal mode and ability in Mediterranean temporary ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Boix, Dani; Caria, Maria Carmela; Gascón, Stéphanie; Mariani, Maria Antonietta; Sala, Jordi; Ruhi, Albert; Compte Ciurana, Jordi; Bagella, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    The temporal patterns of six biotic groups (amphibians, macroinvertebrates with active and passive dispersal mode, microcrustaceans, vascular plants and phytoplankton) and the responses of each biotic group to environmental variation (water, pond and landscape variables) were studied in a set of Sardinian temporary ponds.

  15. Identification of expressed genes during compatible interaction between stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis and wheat using a cDNA library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Lili

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst, is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat worldwide. To establish compatibility with the host, Pst forms special infection structures to invade the plant with minimal damage to host cells. Although compatible interaction between wheat and Pst has been studied using various approaches, research on molecular mechanisms of the interaction is limited. The aim of this study was to develop an EST database of wheat infected by Pst in order to determine transcription profiles of genes involved in compatible wheat-Pst interaction. Results Total RNA, extracted from susceptible infected wheat leaves harvested at 3, 5 and 8 days post inoculation (dpi, was used to create a cDNA library, from which 5,793 ESTs with high quality were obtained and clustered into 583 contigs and 2,160 singletons to give a set of 2,743 unisequences (GenBank accessions: GR302385 to GR305127. The BLASTx program was used to search for homologous genes of the unisequences in the GenBank non-redundant protein database. Of the 2,743 unisequences, 52.8% (the largest category were highly homologous to plant genes; 16.3% to fungal genes and 30% of no-hit. The functional classification of all ESTs was established based on the database entry giving the best E-value using the Bevan's classification categories. About 50% of the ESTs were significantly homologous to genes encoding proteins with known functions; 20% were similar to genes encoding proteins with unknown functions and 30% did not have significant homology to any sequence in the database. The quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis determined the transcription profiles and their involvement in the wheat-Pst interaction for seven of the gene. Conclusion The cDNA library is useful for identifying the functional genes involved in the wheat-Pst compatible interaction, and established a new database for studying Pst pathogenesis genes

  16. Infection of Brachypodium distachyon by formae speciales of Puccinia graminis: early infection events and host-pathogen incompatibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melania Figueroa

    Full Text Available Puccinia graminis causes stem rust, a serious disease of cereals and forage grasses. Important formae speciales of P. graminis and their typical hosts are P. graminis f. sp. tritici (Pg-tr in wheat and barley, P. graminis f. sp. lolii (Pg-lo in perennial ryegrass and tall fescue, and P. graminis f. sp. phlei-pratensis (Pg-pp in timothy grass. Brachypodium distachyon is an emerging genetic model to study fungal disease resistance in cereals and temperate grasses. We characterized the P. graminis-Brachypodium pathosystem to evaluate its potential for investigating incompatibility and non-host resistance to P. graminis. Inoculation of eight Brachypodium inbred lines with Pg-tr, Pg-lo or Pg-pp resulted in sporulating lesions later accompanied by necrosis. Histological analysis of early infection events in one Brachypodium inbred line (Bd1-1 indicated that Pg-lo and Pg-pp were markedly more efficient than Pg-tr at establishing a biotrophic interaction. Formation of appressoria was completed (60-70% of germinated spores by 12 h post-inoculation (hpi under dark and wet conditions, and after 4 h of subsequent light exposure fungal penetration structures (penetration peg, substomatal vesicle and primary infection hyphae had developed. Brachypodium Bd1-1 exhibited pre-haustorial resistance to Pg-tr, i.e. infection usually stopped at appressorial formation. By 68 hpi, only 0.3% and 0.7% of the Pg-tr urediniospores developed haustoria and colonies, respectively. In contrast, development of advanced infection structures by Pg-lo and Pg-pp was significantly more common; however, Brachypodium displayed post-haustorial resistance to these isolates. By 68 hpi the percentage of urediniospores that only develop a haustorium mother cell or haustorium in Pg-lo and Pg-pp reached 8% and 5%, respectively. The formation of colonies reached 14% and 13%, respectively. We conclude that Brachypodium is an apt grass model to study the molecular and genetic components of

  17. Changing the Game: Using Integrative Genomics to Probe Virulence Mechanisms of the Stem Rust Pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Melania; Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Sperschneider, Jana; Park, Robert F; Szabo, Les J; Steffenson, Brian; Ellis, Jeff G; Dodds, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    The recent resurgence of wheat stem rust caused by new virulent races of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) poses a threat to food security. These concerns have catalyzed an extensive global effort toward controlling this disease. Substantial research and breeding programs target the identification and introduction of new stem rust resistance (Sr) genes in cultivars for genetic protection against the disease. Such resistance genes typically encode immune receptor proteins that recognize specific components of the pathogen, known as avirulence (Avr) proteins. A significant drawback to deploying cultivars with single Sr genes is that they are often overcome by evolution of the pathogen to escape recognition through alterations in Avr genes. Thus, a key element in achieving durable rust control is the deployment of multiple effective Sr genes in combination, either through conventional breeding or transgenic approaches, to minimize the risk of resistance breakdown. In this situation, evolution of pathogen virulence would require changes in multiple Avr genes in order to bypass recognition. However, choosing the optimal Sr gene combinations to deploy is a challenge that requires detailed knowledge of the pathogen Avr genes with which they interact and the virulence phenotypes of Pgt existing in nature. Identifying specific Avr genes from Pgt will provide screening tools to enhance pathogen virulence monitoring, assess heterozygosity and propensity for mutation in pathogen populations, and confirm individual Sr gene functions in crop varieties carrying multiple effective resistance genes. Toward this goal, much progress has been made in assembling a high quality reference genome sequence for Pgt, as well as a Pan-genome encompassing variation between multiple field isolates with diverse virulence spectra. In turn this has allowed prediction of Pgt effector gene candidates based on known features of Avr genes in other plant pathogens, including the related flax rust

  18. Changing the game: using integrative genomics to probe virulence mechanisms of the stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melania eFigueroa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent resurgence of wheat stem rust caused by new virulent races of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt poses a threat to food security. These concerns have catalyzed an extensive global effort towards controlling this disease. Substantial research and breeding programs target the identification and introduction of new stem rust resistance (Sr genes in cultivars for genetic protection against the disease. Such resistance genes typically encode immune receptor proteins that recognize specific components of the pathogen, known as avirulence (Avr proteins. A significant drawback to deploying cultivars with single Sr genes is that they are often overcome by evolution of the pathogen to escape recognition through alterations in Avr genes. Thus, a key element in achieving durable rust control is the deployment of multiple effective Sr genes in combination, either through conventional breeding or transgenic approaches, to minimize the risk of resistance breakdown. In this situation, evolution of pathogen virulence would require simultaneous changes in multiple Avr genes in order to bypass recognition. However, choosing the optimal Sr gene combinations to deploy is a challenge that requires detailed knowledge of the pathogen Avr genes with which they interact and the virulence phenotypes of Pgt existing in nature. Identifying specific Avr genes from Pgt will provide screening tools to enhance pathogen virulence monitoring, assess heterozygosity and propensity for mutation in pathogen populations, and confirm individual Sr gene functions in crop varieties carrying multiple effective resistance genes. Towards this goal, much progress has been made in assembling a high quality reference genome sequence for Pgt, as well as a Pan-genome encompassing variation between multiple field isolates with diverse virulence spectra. In turn this has allowed prediction of Pgt effector gene candidates based on known features of Avr genes in other plant pathogens

  19. Infection of Brachypodium distachyon by formae speciales of Puccinia graminis: early infection events and host-pathogen incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Melania; Alderman, Stephen; Garvin, David F; Pfender, William F

    2013-01-01

    Puccinia graminis causes stem rust, a serious disease of cereals and forage grasses. Important formae speciales of P. graminis and their typical hosts are P. graminis f. sp. tritici (Pg-tr) in wheat and barley, P. graminis f. sp. lolii (Pg-lo) in perennial ryegrass and tall fescue, and P. graminis f. sp. phlei-pratensis (Pg-pp) in timothy grass. Brachypodium distachyon is an emerging genetic model to study fungal disease resistance in cereals and temperate grasses. We characterized the P. graminis-Brachypodium pathosystem to evaluate its potential for investigating incompatibility and non-host resistance to P. graminis. Inoculation of eight Brachypodium inbred lines with Pg-tr, Pg-lo or Pg-pp resulted in sporulating lesions later accompanied by necrosis. Histological analysis of early infection events in one Brachypodium inbred line (Bd1-1) indicated that Pg-lo and Pg-pp were markedly more efficient than Pg-tr at establishing a biotrophic interaction. Formation of appressoria was completed (60-70% of germinated spores) by 12 h post-inoculation (hpi) under dark and wet conditions, and after 4 h of subsequent light exposure fungal penetration structures (penetration peg, substomatal vesicle and primary infection hyphae) had developed. Brachypodium Bd1-1 exhibited pre-haustorial resistance to Pg-tr, i.e. infection usually stopped at appressorial formation. By 68 hpi, only 0.3% and 0.7% of the Pg-tr urediniospores developed haustoria and colonies, respectively. In contrast, development of advanced infection structures by Pg-lo and Pg-pp was significantly more common; however, Brachypodium displayed post-haustorial resistance to these isolates. By 68 hpi the percentage of urediniospores that only develop a haustorium mother cell or haustorium in Pg-lo and Pg-pp reached 8% and 5%, respectively. The formation of colonies reached 14% and 13%, respectively. We conclude that Brachypodium is an apt grass model to study the molecular and genetic components of incompatiblity

  20. Biotic regulation of CO2 uptake-climate responses: links to vegetation proproperties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identifying the plant traits and patterns of trait distribution in communities that are responsible for biotic regulation of CO2 uptake-climate responses remains a priority for modelling terrestrial C dynamics. We used remotely-sensed estimates of GPP from plots planted to different combinations of...

  1. Using biotechnology and genomics to improve biotic and abiotic stress in apple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomic sequencing, molecular biology, and transformation technologies are providing valuable tools to better understand the complexity of how plants develop, function, and respond to biotic and abiotic stress. These approaches should complement but not replace a solid understanding of whole plant ...

  2. Genetics and regulation of combined abiotic and biotic stress tolerance in tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kissoudis, C.

    2016-01-01

    Projections on the impact of climate change on agricultural productivity foresee prolonged and/or increased stress intensities and enlargement of a significant number of pathogens habitats. This significantly raises the occurrence probability of (new) abiotic and biotic stress combinations. With str

  3. Pivoting from Arabidopsis to wheat to understand how agricultural plants integrate responses to biotic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we argue for a research initiative on gene-for-gene (g-f-g) interactions between wheat and its parasites. One aim is to begin a conversation between the disparate communities of plant pathology and entomology. Another is to understand how responses to biotic stress are integrated in an import...

  4. Development of a wireless computer vision instrument to detect biotic stress in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge of soil water deficits, crop water stress, and biotic stress from disease or insect pressure is important for optimal irrigation scheduling and water management. While spectral reflectance and thermometry provide a means to quantify crop stress remotely, measurements can be cumbersome, exp...

  5. The influences of forest stand management on biotic and abiotic risks of damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jactel, H.; Nicoll, B.C.; Branco, M.; Gonzalez-Olabarria, J.R.; Grodzki, W.; Långström, B.; Moreira, F.; Netherer, S.; Orazio, C.; Piou, D.; Santos, H.; Schelhaas, M.J.; Tojic, K.; Vodde, F.

    2009-01-01

    • This article synthesizes and reviews the available information on the effects of forestry practices on the occurrence of biotic and abiotic hazards, as well as on stand susceptibility to these damaging agents, concentrating on mammal herbivores, pest insects, pathogenic fungi, wind and fire. • The

  6. Biotic and abiotic variables show little redundancy in explaining tree species distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Elaine S.; Kienast, Felix; Pearman, Peter B.;

    2010-01-01

    Abiotic factors such as climate and soil determine the species fundamental niche, which is further constrained by biotic interactions such as interspecific competition. To parameterize this realized niche, species distribution models (SDMs) most often relate species occurrence data to abiotic var...

  7. Biotic interactions overrule plant responses to climate, depending on the species' biogeography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Welk

    Full Text Available This study presents an experimental approach to assess the relative importance of climatic and biotic factors as determinants of species' geographical distributions. We asked to what extent responses of grassland plant species to biotic interactions vary with climate, and to what degree this variation depends on the species' biogeography. Using a gradient from oceanic to continental climate represented by nine common garden transplant sites in Germany, we experimentally tested whether congeneric grassland species of different geographic distribution (oceanic vs. continental plant range type responded differently to combinations of climate, competition and mollusc herbivory. We found the relative importance of biotic interactions and climate to vary between the different components of plant performance. While survival and plant height increased with precipitation, temperature had no effect on plant performance. Additionally, species with continental plant range type increased their growth in more benign climatic conditions, while those with oceanic range type were largely unable to take a similar advantage of better climatic conditions. Competition generally caused strong reductions of aboveground biomass and growth. In contrast, herbivory had minor effects on survival and growth. Against expectation, these negative effects of competition and herbivory were not mitigated under more stressful continental climate conditions. In conclusion we suggest variation in relative importance of climate and biotic interactions on broader scales, mediated via species-specific sensitivities and factor-specific response patterns. Our results have important implications for species distribution models, as they emphasize the large-scale impact of biotic interactions on plant distribution patterns and the necessity to take plant range types into account.

  8. The importance of biotic entrainment for base flow fluvial sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Stephen P.; Johnson, Matthew F.; Mathers, Kate; Reeds, Jake; Extence, Chris

    2016-05-01

    Sediment transport is regarded as an abiotic process driven by geophysical energy, but zoogeomorphological activity indicates that biological energy can also fuel sediment movements. It is therefore prudent to measure the contribution that biota make to sediment transport, but comparisons of abiotic and biotic sediment fluxes are rare. For a stream in the UK, the contribution of crayfish bioturbation to suspended sediment flux was compared with the amount of sediment moved by hydraulic forcing. During base flow periods, biotic fluxes can be isolated because nocturnal crayfish activity drives diel turbidity cycles, such that nighttime increases above daytime lows are attributable to sediment suspension by crayfish. On average, crayfish bioturbation contributed at least 32% (474 kg) to monthly base flow suspended sediment loads; this biotic surcharge added between 5.1 and 16.1 t (0.21 to 0.66 t km-2 yr-1) to the annual sediment yield. As anticipated, most sediment was moved by hydraulic forcing during floods and the biotic contribution from baseflow periods represented between 0.46 and 1.46% of the annual load. Crayfish activity is nonetheless an important impact during baseflow periods and the measured annual contribution may be a conservative estimate because of unusually prolonged flooding during the measurement period. In addition to direct sediment entrainment by bioturbation, crayfish burrowing supplies sediment to the channel for mobilization during floods so that the total biotic effect of crayfish is potentially greater than documented in this study. These results suggest that in rivers, during base flow periods, bioturbation can entrain significant quantities of fine sediment into suspension with implications for the aquatic ecosystem and base flow sediment fluxes. Energy from life rather than from elevation can make significant contributions to sediment fluxes.

  9. Fungicidas, doses e volumes de calda no controle químico da ferrugem da folha da aveia (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae) Fungicides, rates and spray volumes in the chemical control of oats crown rust (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae)

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Ana R.; Walter Boller; CARLOS A. FORCELINI; Rubens Blum; André Lopes

    2007-01-01

    A ferrugem da folha (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae) é a doença mais destrutiva da aveia, e aplicações de fungicidas com volumes baixos de calda podem reduzir a eficácia do controle químico. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a eficiência técnica e econômica de fungicidas, doses e volumes de calda no controle da ferrugem da folha da aveia. O experimento foi conduzido no ano de 2003, na área experimental da FAMV/UPF, com a cultivar de aveia UPFA-20. Os tratamentos foram compostos pelas combin...

  10. Over-summering of wheat stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici) in the California Central valley: A case study Supervivencia estival de la roya estriada (Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici) del trigo en el Valle Central de California: Estudio de caso

    OpenAIRE

    Huib Tollenaar

    2012-01-01

    To study the over-summering of wheat stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici) in the California Central Valley (CCV), temperature records from various locations in the CCV during the period 1950-2009 were examined for the occurrence of lethal maximum temperatures for the uredinia and uredinio-mycelium of this fungus. The lethal upper threshold temperature for the uredinial stage of P.s. tritici, estimated to be 40.5 °C on the basis of data published elsewhere, and the sum, accumulated...

  11. How severe is the modern biotic crisis?——A comparison of global change and biotic crisis between Permian-Triassic transition and modern times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongfu YIN; Weihong HE; Shucheng XIE

    2011-01-01

    A comparison of the modern condition with the Permian-Triassic Boundary (PTB) times was made to estimate how severe the modern biotic crisis is. About the global changes, the two periods are correlative in carbon dioxide concentration and carbon isotope negative excursion, UV strengthening, temperature increase, ocean acidification, and weathering enhancement. The following tendencies of biotic crises are also correlative: acceleration of extinction rates accompanied by parabolic curve of extinction with a turning interval representing the critical crisis; decline of the three main ecosystems: reefs, tropical rain forests and marine phytoplankton. It is also interesting to note that certain leading organism in both periods undergo accelerated evolution during the crisis. The comparison shows that the modem crisis is about at the tuming point from decline to decimation. The extinction curve is now parabolic, and the extinction rate has been accelerated, but the decimation is not yet in real. This is also justified by the modem situation of the three main ecosystems. Modem biotic decline may worsen into decimation and mass extinction but may also get better and recover to ordinary evolution. Since human activities are the main cause of the deterioration of environments and organisms, mankind should be responsible and able to strive for the recovery of the crisis. For the future of mankind, Homo sapiens may become extinct, I.e.,disappear without leaving descendants, or evolve into a new and more advanced species, I.e., disappear but leave descendants. For a better future, mankind should be conscious of the facing danger and act as a whole to save biodiversity and harmonize with the environments.

  12. Análisis de virulencia de la roya de la hoja (puccinia triticina eriks.) del trigo (triticum aestivum l.) en los valles altos de México

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar Mario Villaseñor Espín; Julio Huerta Espino; Santos Gerardo Leyva Mir; Eduardo Villaseñor Mir; Eduardo Espitia Rangel

    2003-01-01

    Un estudio de Puccinia triticina en los Valles Altos de México durante el año 2000, determinó la presencia de 13 razas fisiológicas; siendo MCJ/SP la más predominante con un 27% de frecuencia, seguida de MBD/QM con un 24%. Todas las razas fueron virulentas para los genes Lr1, 3, 12, 13, 14a, 14b, 20, 22a, 22b, 32, 33, 34, 35 y 37, pero avirulentas en plántula a los genes Lr3ka, 9, 16, 19, 24, 25, 29, 30 y 36. Se identificaron cinco razas nuevas: MCJ/QN, MBJ/QL y M(B)J/ QM en Singuilucan, Hida...

  13. Transfer of label from /sup 3/H-glucose in Digitaria eriantha leaves to the rust fungus Puccinia digitariae Pole Evans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, M.E.; Garnett, H.M.

    1985-08-01

    Digitaria eriantha pentzii was fed /sup 3/H-glucose prior to inoculation with uredospores of Puccinia digitariae Pole Evans. Twenty-one hours after inoculation, uptake of label from /sup 3/H-glucose by the primary infection structures of P. digitariae was demonstrated employing autoradiography. These results indicate that an exchange of nutrients between host and pathogen occurs very early on in the infection process, during the formation of the primary infection structures. Despite contrary reports that obligate parasites receive no nutrition before establishment of haustoria, this study supports the work of Andrews, who demonstrated uptake of /sup 3/H-glucose label from lettuce cotyledons into the primary and secondary infection vesicles, appressoria, and germ tubes of Bremia lactucae.

  14. Evidence for Increased Aggressiveness in a Recent Widespread Strain of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici Causing Stripe Rust of Wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milus, Eugene A; Kristensen, Kristian; Hovmøller, Mogens S

    2009-01-01

    Stripe rust (yellow rust) of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, has become more severe in eastern United States, Australia, and elsewhere since 2000. Recent research has shown that this coincided with a global spread of two closely related strains that were similar based on...... virulence phenotype and amplified fragment length polymorphism. The objective of this research was to quantify differences in aggressiveness among isolates representative of the pre-2000 and post-2000 populations. Representative isolates were evaluated at low (10 to 18°C) and high (12 to 28°C) temperature....... At the low temperature regime, new isolates sporulated 2.1 days (16%) sooner, grew 0.3 mm per day (18%) faster, produced 999 (140%) more spores per inoculation site per day, and produced 6.5 (71%) more spores per mm2 of lesion per day compared with old isolates. At the high temperature regime, new...

  15. Cytological effect of Tilt 250 EC in the successive phases of the Triticale rust disease process caused by Puccinia recondita f. sp. tritici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Brzezicka-Szymczyk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The disease process caused by rust (Puccinia recondita f. sp. tritici in Triticale (Triticale-Wittmack cv. Bolero and the effect of the application of the propikonazole - Tilt 250 EC are described. In plants not protected chemically one could observe the whole pathogen developmental cycle ending with the appearance of uredinia with urediniospores. The highest pathogen susceptibility to chemical agent was observed at the time of inoculation, during incubation and at the beginning of the actual disease. By inhibiting the ergosterol biosynthesis in the fungus cells the preparation (propikonazole inhibited the development of the intra- and extracellular mycelium. The mycelium degeneration manifested itself by the irregular growth of intercellular hyphae, perforation of septa, homogenization of protoplasts and cell collapse. The thickening of the cell wall, modification of the perihaustorial space and protoplast obliteration were observed in the haustoria.

  16. Above- and Belowground Trophic Interactions on Creeping Thistle (Cirsium arvense) in High- and Low-Diversity Plant Communities: Potential for Biotic Resistance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Graça, O.; Rousseau, P.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2004-01-01

    The capacity of local communities to control introduced plants is called biotic resistance. Biotic resistance has been almost exclusively tested for plant competition and aboveground herbivores and pathogens, while neglecting root herbivores and soil pathogens. Here, we present biotic resistance by

  17. Above- and Belowground Trophic Interactions on Creeping Thistle (Cirsium arvense) in High- and Low-Diversity Plant Communities: Potential for Biotic Resistance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Graça, O.; Rousseau, P.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2004-01-01

    The capacity of local communities to control introduced plants is called biotic resistance. Biotic resistance has been almost exclusively tested for plant competition and above-ground herbivores and pathogens, while neglecting root herbivores and soil pathogens. Here, we present biotic resistance by

  18. Biotic and Climatic Velocity Identify Contrasting Areas of Vulnerability to Climate Change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Carroll

    Full Text Available Metrics that synthesize the complex effects of climate change are essential tools for mapping future threats to biodiversity and predicting which species are likely to adapt in place to new climatic conditions, disperse and establish in areas with newly suitable climate, or face the prospect of extirpation. The most commonly used of such metrics is the velocity of climate change, which estimates the speed at which species must migrate over the earth's surface to maintain constant climatic conditions. However, "analog-based" velocities, which represent the actual distance to where analogous climates will be found in the future, may provide contrasting results to the more common form of velocity based on local climate gradients. Additionally, whereas climatic velocity reflects the exposure of organisms to climate change, resultant biotic effects are dependent on the sensitivity of individual species as reflected in part by their climatic niche width. This has motivated development of biotic velocity, a metric which uses data on projected species range shifts to estimate the velocity at which species must move to track their climatic niche. We calculated climatic and biotic velocity for the Western Hemisphere for 1961-2100, and applied the results to example ecological and conservation planning questions, to demonstrate the potential of such analog-based metrics to provide information on broad-scale patterns of exposure and sensitivity. Geographic patterns of biotic velocity for 2954 species of birds, mammals, and amphibians differed from climatic velocity in north temperate and boreal regions. However, both biotic and climatic velocities were greatest at low latitudes, implying that threats to equatorial species arise from both the future magnitude of climatic velocities and the narrow climatic tolerances of species in these regions, which currently experience low seasonal and interannual climatic variability. Biotic and climatic velocity, by

  19. Biotic and Climatic Velocity Identify Contrasting Areas of Vulnerability to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Carlos; Lawler, Joshua J.; Roberts, David R.; Hamann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Metrics that synthesize the complex effects of climate change are essential tools for mapping future threats to biodiversity and predicting which species are likely to adapt in place to new climatic conditions, disperse and establish in areas with newly suitable climate, or face the prospect of extirpation. The most commonly used of such metrics is the velocity of climate change, which estimates the speed at which species must migrate over the earth’s surface to maintain constant climatic conditions. However, “analog-based” velocities, which represent the actual distance to where analogous climates will be found in the future, may provide contrasting results to the more common form of velocity based on local climate gradients. Additionally, whereas climatic velocity reflects the exposure of organisms to climate change, resultant biotic effects are dependent on the sensitivity of individual species as reflected in part by their climatic niche width. This has motivated development of biotic velocity, a metric which uses data on projected species range shifts to estimate the velocity at which species must move to track their climatic niche. We calculated climatic and biotic velocity for the Western Hemisphere for 1961–2100, and applied the results to example ecological and conservation planning questions, to demonstrate the potential of such analog-based metrics to provide information on broad-scale patterns of exposure and sensitivity. Geographic patterns of biotic velocity for 2954 species of birds, mammals, and amphibians differed from climatic velocity in north temperate and boreal regions. However, both biotic and climatic velocities were greatest at low latitudes, implying that threats to equatorial species arise from both the future magnitude of climatic velocities and the narrow climatic tolerances of species in these regions, which currently experience low seasonal and interannual climatic variability. Biotic and climatic velocity, by approximating

  20. Biotic pump of atmospheric moisture as driver of the hydrological cycle on land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Makarieva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the basic geophysical and ecological principles are jointly analyzed that allow the landmasses of Earth to remain moistened sufficiently for terrestrial life to be possible. 1. Under gravity, land inevitably loses water to the ocean. To keep land moistened, the gravitational water runoff must be continuously compensated by the atmospheric ocean-to-land moisture transport. Using data for five terrestrial transects of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program we show that the mean distance to which air fluxes can transport moisture over non-forested areas, does not exceed several hundred kilometers; precipitation decreases exponentially with distance from the ocean. 2. In contrast, precipitation over extensive natural forests does not depend on the distance from the ocean along several thousand kilometers, as illustrated for the Amazon and Yenisey river basins and Equatorial Africa. This points to the existence of an active biotic pump transporting atmospheric moisture inland from the ocean. 3. Physical principles of the biotic moisture pump are investigated based on the previously unstudied properties of atmospheric water vapor, which can be either in or out of aerostatic equilibrium depending on the lapse rate of air temperature. A novel physical principle is formulated according to which the low-level air moves from areas with weak evaporation to areas with more intensive evaporation. Due to the high leaf area index, natural forests maintain high evaporation fluxes, which support the ascending air motion over the forest and "suck in" moist air from the ocean, which is the essence of the biotic pump of atmospheric moisture. In the result, the gravitational runoff water losses from the optimally moistened forest soil can be fully compensated by the biotically enhanced precipitation at any distance from the ocean. 4. It is discussed how a continent-scale biotic water pump mechanism could be produced by natural selection acting on

  1. Next generation sequencing provides rapid access to the genome of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stripe rust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Cantu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The wheat stripe rust fungus (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, PST is responsible for significant yield losses in wheat production worldwide. In spite of its economic importance, the PST genomic sequence is not currently available. Fortunately Next Generation Sequencing (NGS has radically improved sequencing speed and efficiency with a great reduction in costs compared to traditional sequencing technologies. We used Illumina sequencing to rapidly access the genomic sequence of the highly virulent PST race 130 (PST-130. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We obtained nearly 80 million high quality paired-end reads (>50x coverage that were assembled into 29,178 contigs (64.8 Mb, which provide an estimated coverage of at least 88% of the PST genes and are available through GenBank. Extensive micro-synteny with the Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (PGTG genome and high sequence similarity with annotated PGTG genes support the quality of the PST-130 contigs. We characterized the transposable elements present in the PST-130 contigs and using an ab initio gene prediction program we identified and tentatively annotated 22,815 putative coding sequences. We provide examples on the use of comparative approaches to improve gene annotation for both PST and PGTG and to identify candidate effectors. Finally, the assembled contigs provided an inventory of PST repetitive elements, which were annotated and deposited in Repbase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The assembly of the PST-130 genome and the predicted proteins provide useful resources to rapidly identify and clone PST genes and their regulatory regions. Although the automatic gene prediction has limitations, we show that a comparative genomics approach using multiple rust species can greatly improve the quality of gene annotation in these species. The PST-130 sequence will also be useful for comparative studies within PST as more races are sequenced. This study illustrates the power of NGS for

  2. Effects of biotic and radiation stresses on plants and their pathogens in 30-km Chernobyl exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results obtained independently both in greenhouse and in field trials in 30-km Chernobyl exclusion zone demonstrated a decrease in plant disease resistance. The data obtained suggest that active form- and race-producing processes occurred under chronic radiation in 30-km Chernobyl zone. As a result a population structure of Puccinia graminis has been changed by appearance of a 'new' population with high frequency of more virulent clones. We believe a monitoring over microevolution processes in population of plant and their pathogens in 30-km Chernobyl zone is essential. (authors)

  3. Métodos de preservação in vitro de urediniósporos de Puccinia kuehnii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Tibolla

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar métodos de preservação de urediniósporos de Puccinia kuehnii, conduziram-se dois bioensaios sendo o primeiro (B1 com diferentes métodos de desidratação e o segundo (B2, com diferentes métodos de reidratação. Em B1 foi adicionado um grânulo de sílica gel para preservação dos urediniósporos nos tubos de microcentrífuga. Foram coletadas folhas com sintomas de ferrugem alaranjada, P. kuehnii, da cultivar de cana-de-açúcar SP89 1115. Os urediniósporos do agente causal de ferugem foram extraídos das folhas com o auxílio de bomba a vácuo. Posteriormente, estes foram acondicionados em tubos de microcentrífuga. Os tratamentos para B1 foram: l- desidratação em sílica gel, liofilização e sem desidratação; ll- temperatura ambiente (20ºC, geladeira (5ºC, congelador (-20ºC e deep-freezer (-80ºC. Para B2 os tratamentos foram: l- desidratação em sílica gel e sem desidratação; ll- temperatura ambiente (20ºC, geladeira (5ºC, congelador (-20ºC e deep-freezer (-80ºC; lll- com reidratação e sem reidratação nas avaliações. Para ambos os bioensaios foi realizada a germinação inicial, outras aos 15 e 30 dias de armazenamento e posteriormente a cada 30 dias, até 180 dias. Prepararam-se suspensões de urediniósporos em água e uma alíquota de 0,1 mL foi transferida para placas de Petri contendo meio ágar-água (15g L-1. Essas permaneceram a 20ºC, no escuro. Para a avaliação da viabilidade, procedeu-se a contagem de 200 urediniósporos por placa. Os dados foram submetidos à análise de variância não paramétrica de Kruskal-Wallis e complementadas com o teste de Dunn. Os resultados demonstraram que a viabilidade decresceu em função do tempo, sendo que os melhores tratamentos atingiram 27,6% e 6,6% aos 30 dias, e 12,0% e 1,9% aos 60 dias, para B1 e B2, respectivamente. O método da desidratação em sílica gel seguido do armazenamento a -80ºC foi o único que apresentou uredini

  4. Daily variation of zooplankton abundance and evenness in the Rosana reservoir, Brazil: biotic and abiotic inferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica M. Takahashi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The zooplankton community presents stochastic temporal fluctuation and heterogeneous spatial variation determined by the relationships among the organisms and environmental conditions. We predicted that the temporal and spatial zooplankton distribution is heterogeneous and discrete, respectively, and that the daily variation of most abundant species is related to environmental conditions, specifically the availability of resources. Zooplankton samples were collected daily at three sampling stations in a lateral arm of the Rosana Reservoir (SP/PR. The zooplankton did not present significant differences in abundance and evenness among sampling stations, but the temporal variation of these attributes was significant. Abiotic variables and algal resource availability have significantly explained the daily variation of the most abundant species (p<0.001, however, the species distribution makes inferences on biotic relationships between them. Thus, not only the food resource availability is influential on the abundance of principal zooplankton species, but rather a set of factors (abiotic variables and biotic relationships.

  5. Evolution and Adaptation of Wild Emmer Wheat Populations to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Raats, Dina; Sela, Hanan; Klymiuk, Valentina; Lidzbarsky, Gabriel; Feng, Lihua; Krugman, Tamar; Fahima, Tzion

    2016-08-01

    The genetic bottlenecks associated with plant domestication and subsequent selection in man-made agroecosystems have limited the genetic diversity of modern crops and increased their vulnerability to environmental stresses. Wild emmer wheat, the tetraploid progenitor of domesticated wheat, distributed along a wide range of ecogeographical conditions in the Fertile Crescent, has valuable "left behind" adaptive diversity to multiple diseases and environmental stresses. The biotic and abiotic stress responses are conferred by series of genes and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control complex resistance pathways. The study of genetic diversity, genomic organization, expression profiles, protein structure and function of biotic and abiotic stress-resistance genes, and QTLs could shed light on the evolutionary history and adaptation mechanisms of wild emmer populations for their natural habitats. The continuous evolution and adaptation of wild emmer to the changing environment provide novel solutions that can contribute to safeguarding food for the rapidly growing human population. PMID:27296141

  6. A biotic game design project for integrated life science and engineering education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nate J Cira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Engaging, hands-on design experiences are key for formal and informal Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM education. Robotic and video game design challenges have been particularly effective in stimulating student interest, but equivalent experiences for the life sciences are not as developed. Here we present the concept of a "biotic game design project" to motivate student learning at the interface of life sciences and device engineering (as part of a cornerstone bioengineering devices course. We provide all course material and also present efforts in adapting the project's complexity to serve other time frames, age groups, learning focuses, and budgets. Students self-reported that they found the biotic game project fun and motivating, resulting in increased effort. Hence this type of design project could generate excitement and educational impact similar to robotics and video games.

  7. A biotic game design project for integrated life science and engineering education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, Nate J; Chung, Alice M; Denisin, Aleksandra K; Rensi, Stefano; Sanchez, Gabriel N; Quake, Stephen R; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H

    2015-03-01

    Engaging, hands-on design experiences are key for formal and informal Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education. Robotic and video game design challenges have been particularly effective in stimulating student interest, but equivalent experiences for the life sciences are not as developed. Here we present the concept of a "biotic game design project" to motivate student learning at the interface of life sciences and device engineering (as part of a cornerstone bioengineering devices course). We provide all course material and also present efforts in adapting the project's complexity to serve other time frames, age groups, learning focuses, and budgets. Students self-reported that they found the biotic game project fun and motivating, resulting in increased effort. Hence this type of design project could generate excitement and educational impact similar to robotics and video games. PMID:25807212

  8. Mercury anomalies and the timing of biotic recovery following the end-Triassic mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Alyson M.; Ritterbush, Kathleen; Yager, Joyce A.; West, A. Joshua; Ibarra, Yadira; Bottjer, David J.; Berelson, William M.; Bergquist, Bridget A.; Corsetti, Frank A.

    2016-04-01

    The end-Triassic mass extinction overlapped with the eruption of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), and release of CO2 and other volcanic volatiles has been implicated in the extinction. However, the timing of marine biotic recovery versus CAMP eruptions remains uncertain. Here we use Hg concentrations and isotopes as indicators of CAMP volcanism in continental shelf sediments, the primary archive of faunal data. In Triassic-Jurassic strata, Muller Canyon, Nevada, Hg levels rise in the extinction interval, peak before the appearance of the first Jurassic ammonite, remain above background in association with a depauperate fauna, and fall to pre-extinction levels during significant pelagic and benthic faunal recovery. Hg isotopes display no significant mass independent fractionation within the extinction and depauperate intervals, consistent with a volcanic origin for the Hg. The Hg and palaeontological evidence from the same archive indicate that significant biotic recovery did not begin until CAMP eruptions ceased.

  9. Overexpression of VOZ2 confers biotic stress tolerance but decreases abiotic stress resistance in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, Yusuke; Fujiwara, Sumire; Kubo, Yasuyuki; Sato, Masa H.

    2013-01-01

    VOZ (vascular plant one zinc-finger protein) is a plant specific one-zinc finger type transcriptional activator, which is highly conserved through land plant evolution. We have previously shown that loss-of-function mutations in VOZ1 and VOZ2 showed increased cold and drought stress tolerances whereas decreased biotic stress resistance in Arabidopsis. Here, we demonstrate that transgenic plants overexpressing VOZ2 impairs freezing and drought stress tolerances but increases resistance to a fu...

  10. Silicon, the silver bullet for mitigating biotic and abiotic stress, and improving grain quality, in rice?

    OpenAIRE

    Meharg, Caroline; Meharg, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate silicon fertilization greatly boosts rice yield and mitigates biotic and abiotic stress, and improves grain quality through lowering the content of cadmium and inorganic arsenic. This review on silicon dynamics in rice considers recent advances in our understanding of the role of silicon in rice, and the challenges of maintaining adequate silicon fertility within rice paddy systems. Silicon is increasingly considered as an element required for optimal plant performance, particularly ...

  11. Temperature, precipitation and biotic interactions as determinants of tree seedling recruitment across the tree line ecotone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingstad, Lise; Olsen, Siri Lie; Klanderud, Kari; Vandvik, Vigdis; Ohlson, Mikael

    2015-10-01

    Seedling recruitment is a critical life history stage for trees, and successful recruitment is tightly linked to both abiotic factors and biotic interactions. In order to better understand how tree species' distributions may change in response to anticipated climate change, more knowledge of the effects of complex climate and biotic interactions is needed. We conducted a seed-sowing experiment to investigate how temperature, precipitation and biotic interactions impact recruitment of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings in southern Norway. Seeds were sown into intact vegetation and experimentally created gaps. To study the combined effects of temperature and precipitation, the experiment was replicated across 12 sites, spanning a natural climate gradient from boreal to alpine and from sub-continental to oceanic. Seedling emergence and survival were assessed 12 and 16 months after sowing, respectively, and above-ground biomass and height were determined at the end of the experiment. Interestingly, very few seedlings were detected in the boreal sites, and the highest number of seedlings emerged and established in the alpine sites, indicating that low temperature did not limit seedling recruitment. Site precipitation had an overall positive effect on seedling recruitment, especially at intermediate precipitation levels. Seedling emergence, establishment and biomass were higher in gap plots compared to intact vegetation at all temperature levels. These results suggest that biotic interactions in the form of competition may be more important than temperature as a limiting factor for tree seedling recruitment in the sub- and low-alpine zone of southern Norway. PMID:26065402

  12. An evaluation of biotic ligand models predicting acute copper toxicity to Daphnia magna in wastewater effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Constantino, C.; Scrimshaw, M; Comber, S; Churchley, J.

    2011-01-01

    This is the author's accepted manuscript. The final published article is available from the link below. Copyright @ 2010 SETAC. The toxicity of Cu to Daphnia magna was investigated in a series of 48-h immobilization assays in effluents from four wastewater treatment works. The assay results were compared with median effective concentration (EC50) forecasts produced by the HydroQual biotic ligand model (BLM), the refined D. magna BLM, and a modified BLM that was constructed by integrating t...

  13. The effect of sewage effluent on trace metal speciation: implications for the biotic ligand model approach

    OpenAIRE

    Constantino, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University This research examined the suitability of the biotic ligand model (BLM) approach for assessing environmental risk in surface waters consisting substantially of treated sewage effluent, and the implications of its use within a compliance-based regulatory framework aimed at controlling discharges of metals into the aquatic environment. The results from a series of Daphnia magna acute copp...

  14. Biotic homogenization and differentiation in weed vegetation over the last 70 years

    OpenAIRE

    Šilc Urban

    2015-01-01

    Biotic homogenization is the increasing similarity of the species composition of communities over time and represents a loss of biodiversity. We analysed changes in weed vegetation over a period of 70 years by comparing three datasets (from 1939, 2002 and 2012) sampled with the same methodology. We present the results of changes in species richness, homogenization and differentiation as expanding neophytes and generalist species. The species richness of weed communitie...

  15. Abiotic and biotic controls on local spatial distribution and performance of Boechera stricta

    OpenAIRE

    Naithani, Kusum J.; Ewers, Brent E.; Adelman, Jonathan D.; Siemens, David H.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the relative influence of biotic and abiotic factors on community dynamics using an integrated approach and highlights the influence of space on genotypic and phenotypic traits in plant community structure. We examined the relative influence of topography, environment, spatial distance, and intra- and interspecific interactions on spatial distribution and performance of Boechera stricta (rockcress), a close perennial relative of model plant Arabidopsis. First, using Ba...

  16. Rhizodeposition and biotic interactions in the rhizosphere of Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Hordeum vulgare L.

    OpenAIRE

    Haase, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Biochemical processes at the soil-plant interface are largely regulated by organic and inorganic compounds released by roots and microorganisms. Several abiotic and biotic factors are suspected to stimulate rhizodeposition and, thus, contribute to enriching of the rhizosphere with plant-derived compounds. This thesis focused on the effects of two factors, (i) the elevation of atmospheric CO2 concentration accompanied by nutrient limitation in the soil and (ii) low-level root infestation by pl...

  17. Performance of Lychnis flos-cuculi from fragmented populations under experimental biotic interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Galeuchet, D J; Perret, C; Fischer, M.

    2005-01-01

    To study genetic effects of habitat fragmentation on plant performance and plant response to biotic interactions, we performed a greenhouse study with plants from 27 populations of the common plant Lychnis flos-cuculi differing in size, isolation, and microsatellite heterozygosity. We germinated seeds of 449 plants and grew up to nine offspring per maternal plant in single pots assigned to a factorial competition-by-pathogen infection treatment. We applied competition by sowing seeds of the g...

  18. Relative importance of biotic and abiotic soil components to plant growth and insect herbivore population dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn L Vandegehuchte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plants are affected by several aspects of the soil, which have the potential to exert cascading effects on the performance of herbivorous insects. The effects of biotic and abiotic soil characteristics have however mostly been investigated in isolation, leaving their relative importance largely unexplored. Such is the case for the dune grass Ammophila, whose decline under decreasing sand accretion is argued to be caused by either biotic or abiotic soil properties. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By manipulating dune soils from three different regions, we decoupled the contributions of region, the abiotic and biotic soil component to the variation in characteristics of Ammophila arenaria seedlings and Schizaphis rufula aphid populations. Root mass fraction and total dry biomass of plants were affected by soil biota, although the latter effect was not consistent across regions. None of the measured plant properties were significantly affected by the abiotic soil component. Aphid population characteristics all differed between regions, irrespective of whether soil biota were present or absent. Hence these effects were due to differences in abiotic soil properties between regions. Although several chemical properties of the soil mixtures were measured, none of these were consistent with results for plant or aphid traits. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Plants were affected more strongly by soil biota than by abiotic soil properties, whereas the opposite was true for aphids. Our results thus demonstrate that the relative importance of the abiotic and biotic component of soils can differ for plants and their herbivores. The fact that not all effects of soil properties could be detected across regions moreover emphasizes the need for spatial replication in order to make sound conclusions about the generality of aboveground-belowground interactions.

  19. Effect of Mining Activities in Biotic Communities of Villa de la Paz, San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Espinosa-Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mining is one of the most important industrial activities worldwide. During its different stages numerous impacts are generated to the environment. The activities in the region have generated a great amount of mining residues, which have caused severe pollution and health effects in both human population and biotic components. The aim of this paper was to assess the impact of mining activities on biotic communities within the district of Villa de la Paz. The results showed that the concentrations of As and Pb in soil were higher than the national regulations for urban or agricultural areas. The bioavailability of these metals was certified by the presence of them in the roots of species of plants and in kidneys and livers of wild rodents. In regard to the community analysis, the sites that were located close to the mining district of Villa de la Paz registered a lower biological diversity, in both plants and wild rodents, aside from showing a change in the species composition of plant communities. The results of this study are evidence of the impact of mining on biotic communities, and the need to take into account the wildlife in the assessment of contaminated sites.

  20. Function of ABA in Stomatal Defense against Biotic and Drought Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Woo Lim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA regulates many key processes involved in plant development and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. Under stress conditions, plants synthesize ABA in various organs and initiate defense mechanisms, such as the regulation of stomatal aperture and expression of defense-related genes conferring resistance to environmental stresses. The regulation of stomatal opening and closure is important to pathogen defense and control of transpirational water loss. Recent studies using a combination of approaches, including genetics, physiology, and molecular biology, have contributed considerably to our understanding of ABA signal transduction. A number of proteins associated with ABA signaling and responses—especially ABA receptors—have been identified. ABA signal transduction initiates signal perception by ABA receptors and transfer via downstream proteins, including protein kinases and phosphatases. In the present review, we focus on the function of ABA in stomatal defense against biotic and abiotic stresses, through analysis of each ABA signal component and the relationships of these components in the complex network of interactions. In particular, two ABA signal pathway models in response to biotic and abiotic stress were proposed, from stress signaling to stomatal closure, involving the pyrabactin resistance (PYR/PYR-like (PYL or regulatory component of ABA receptor (RCAR family proteins, 2C-type protein phosphatases, and SnRK2-type protein kinases.

  1. Benefits of Biotic Pollination for Non-Timber Forest Products and Cultivated Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehel Shiny

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity supplies multiple goods and services to society and is critical for the support of livelihoods across the globe. Many indigenous people depend upon non-timber forest products (NTFP and crops for a range of goods including food, medicine, fibre and construction materials. However, the dependency of these products on biotic pollination services is poorly understood. We used the biologically and culturally diverse Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve in India to characterise the types of NTFP and crop products of 213 plant species and asses their degree of dependency on animal pollination. We found that 80 per cent of all species benefited from animal pollination in their reproduction, and that 62 per cent of crop products and 40 per cent of NTFP benefited from biotic pollination in their production. Further we identified the likely pollinating taxa documented as responsible for the production of these products, mainly bees and other insects. A lower proportion of indigenous plant products (39 per cent benefited from biotic pollination than products from introduced plants (61 per cent. We conclude that pollinators play an important role in the livelihoods of people in this region.

  2. Predominance of biotic over abiotic formation of halogenated hydrocarbons in hypersaline sediments in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruecker, A; Weigold, P; Behrens, S; Jochmann, M; Laaks, J; Kappler, A

    2014-08-19

    Volatile halogenated organic compounds (VOX) contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. There is evidence of natural VOX formation in many environments ranging from forest soils to salt lakes. Laboratory studies have suggested that VOX formation can be chemically stimulated by reactive Fe species while field studies have provided evidence for direct biological (enzymatic) VOX formation. However, the relative contribution of abiotic and biotic processes to global VOX budgets is still unclear. The goals of this study were to quantify VOX release from sediments from a hypersaline lake in Western Australia (Lake Strawbridge) and to distinguish between the relative contributions of biotic and abiotic VOX formation in microbially active and sterilized microcosms. Our experiments demonstrated that the release of organochlorines from Lake Strawbridge sediments was mainly biotic. Among the organochlorines detected were monochlorinated, e.g., chloromethane (CH3Cl), and higher chlorinated VOX compounds such as trichloromethane (CHCl3). Amendment of sediments with either Fe(III) oxyhydroxide (ferrihydrite) or a mixture of lactate/acetate or both ferrihydrite and lactate/acetate did not stimulate VOX formation. This suggests that although microbial Fe(III) reduction took place, there was no stimulation of VOX formation via Fe redox transformations or the formation of reactive Fe species under our experimental conditions. PMID:25073729

  3. Biotic Homogenization Caused by the Invasion of Solidago canadensis in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guo-qi; ZHANG Chao-bin; MA Ling; QIANG Sheng; John A Silander; Li Li Qi

    2013-01-01

    Although studies argue that invasive species can cause biotic differentiation, some cases show that biological invasions actually decrease biodiversity through biotic homogenization. The concept of biotic homogenization through the invasion of a certain serious invasive plant species merit more studies. Hence, we used field surveys to quantitatively compare invasive populations of Solidago canadensis (SC) in China with the control sites (adjacent sites to SC present sites yet without the species) and SC native populations in the USA. We found that plant communities in SC invaded habitats shared similarities with those in SC native ranges. Bray-Curtis similarity clearly showed that the composition of plant communities in SC invaded habitats were similar to those in SC native ranges. Both in the native and introduced range, plant communities with SC present were characterized by SC being dominant, significantly lower species richness,α-diversity andβ-diversity, as well as a decrease in the correlation coefficient between geographic distance and floristic similarities. SC favors fertile and moist loam habitat, while it dominated in various habitats in China, where more than 20 different dominants should have occurred. In conclusion, serious invasive species can quickly remodel and homogenize diverse communities by dominating them.

  4. Genome-wide association study for crown rust (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae) and powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. avenae) resistance in an oat (Avena sativa) collection of commercial varieties and landraces

    OpenAIRE

    Montilla-Bascón, Gracia; Rispail, Nicolas; Sánchez-Martín, Javier; Rubiales, Diego; Mur, Luis A. J.; Langdon, Tim; Howarth, Catherine J.; Prats, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Diseases caused by crown rust (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae) and powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. avenae) are among the most important constraints for the oat crop. Breeding for resistance is one of the most effective, economical, and environmentally friendly means to control these diseases. The purpose of this work was to identify elite alleles for rust and powdery mildew resistance in oat by association mapping to aid selection of resistant plants. To this aim, 177 oat accessions...

  5. Constructing Physical and Genomic Maps for Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, the Wheat Stripe Rust Pathogen, by Comparing Its EST Sequences to the Genomic Sequence of P. graminis f. sp. tritici, the Wheat Stem Rust Pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Zhensheng Kang; Meinan Wang; Xianming Chen; Jinbiao Ma

    2010-01-01

    The wheat stripe rust fungus, Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), does not have a known alternate host for sexual reproduction, which makes it impossible to study gene linkages through classic genetic and molecular mapping approaches. In this study, we compared 4,219 Pst expression sequence tags (ESTs) to the genomic sequence of P. graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), the wheat stem rust fungus, using BLAST searches. The percentages of homologous genes varied greatly among different Pst libr...

  6. Effet de l’hôte et de la température sur la structure de la population de Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, agent de la rouille jaune du blé au Moyen Orient

    OpenAIRE

    EL AMIL, Rola

    2015-01-01

    The adaptation of fungal pathogen to its hosts and to the climate variation, in particular to the temperature, was investigated on wheat stripe (yellow) rust, caused by the biotroph fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) in the Middle East, focusing on Lebanon and Syria. This disease is a major problem for the crop in the region. Specific resistance genes were postulated in 138 wheat genotypes including elite lines, grown varieties and local landraces, using an array of 11 French pa...

  7. The effects of flow rate and concentration on nitrobenzene removal in abiotic and biotic zero-valent iron columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao; Wu, Jinhua; Huang, Weilin;

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the effects of varying nitrobenzene (NB) loadings via increasing flow rate or influent NB concentration mode on the removal efficiency in zero-valent iron (ZVI) columns sterilized (abiotic) or preloaded with acclimated microorganisms (biotic). It was shown that...... physical sequestration via adsorption/co-precipitation and reductive transformation of NB to aniline (AN) were the two major mechanisms for the NB removal in both abiotic and biotic ZVI columns. The NB removal efficiency decreased in both columns as the flow rate increased from 0.25 to 1.0 mL min− 1.......6% in the abiotic column and from 85.6 to 62.5% in the biotic column. The results also showed that the sequestration capacity and chemical reduction capacity were respectively 72% and 157.6% higher in the biotic column than in the abiotic column at the same tested hydraulic conditions and NB loadings...

  8. Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal. Phase I. Final report. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licensing and regulation of commercial low-level waste (CLLW) burial facilities require that anticipated risks associated with burial sites be evaluated for the life of the facility. This work reviewed the existing capability to evaluate dose to man resulting from the potential redistribution of buried radionuclides by plants and animals that we have termed biotic transport. Through biotic transport, radionuclides can be moved to locations where they can enter exposure pathways to man. We found that predictive models currently in use did not address the long-term risks resulting from the cumulative transport of radionuclides. Although reports in the literature confirm that biotic transport phenomena are common, assessments routinely ignore the associated risks or dismiss them as insignificant without quantitative evaluation. To determine the potential impacts of biotic transport, we made order-of-magnitude estimates of the dose to man for biotic transport processes at reference arid and humid CLLW disposal sites. Estimated doses to site residents after assumed loss of institutional control were comparable to dose estimates for the intruder-agricultural scenario defined in the DEIS for 10 CFR 61 (NRC). The reported lack of potential importance of biotic transport at low-level waste sites in earlier assessment studies is not confirmed by order of magnitude estimates presented in this study. 17 references, 10 figures, 8 tables

  9. Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal. Phase I. Final report. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, D.H.; Cadwell, L.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.; Simmons, M.A.

    1984-05-01

    Licensing and regulation of commercial low-level waste (CLLW) burial facilities require that anticipated risks associated with burial sites be evaluated for the life of the facility. This work reviewed the existing capability to evaluate dose to man resulting from the potential redistribution of buried radionuclides by plants and animals that we have termed biotic transport. Through biotic transport, radionuclides can be moved to locations where they can enter exposure pathways to man. We found that predictive models currently in use did not address the long-term risks resulting from the cumulative transport of radionuclides. Although reports in the literature confirm that biotic transport phenomena are common, assessments routinely ignore the associated risks or dismiss them as insignificant without quantitative evaluation. To determine the potential impacts of biotic transport, we made order-of-magnitude estimates of the dose to man for biotic transport processes at reference arid and humid CLLW disposal sites. Estimated doses to site residents after assumed loss of institutional control were comparable to dose estimates for the intruder-agricultural scenario defined in the DEIS for 10 CFR 61 (NRC). The reported lack of potential importance of biotic transport at low-level waste sites in earlier assessment studies is not confirmed by order of magnitude estimates presented in this study. 17 references, 10 figures, 8 tables.

  10. Special biotic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, N.S. (Univ. of New Mexico (US))

    1989-01-01

    This book reveals in human, technological, and political detail, the story of the nation's premier nuclear ordnance laboratory during its formative years. As the only externally published history of Sandia National Laboratories, this volume fills a gap in the history of the atomic era. Through the use of primary sources from numerous archives and oral history collections, as well as laboratory records, the author places the development of the laboratory in both national and international context. The simple narration of events is expanded to include the hows and whys of technological innovations, their subsequent impact, and the political temper of the times.

  11. Biotic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Representative plant communities are described. The major community is dominated by sagebrush/cheatgrass-sandberg blue grass. Mammal, bird and insect species inhabiting the 200 Area plateau are representative of surrounding regions. Prairie falcons are the only species present possibly threatened with extinction. They do not nest on the plateau but probably forage over the area

  12. Gene discovery in EST sequences from the wheat leaf rust fungus Puccinia triticina sexual spores, asexual spores and haustoria, compared to other rust and corn smut fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wynhoven Brian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rust fungi are biotrophic basidiomycete plant pathogens that cause major diseases on plants and trees world-wide, affecting agriculture and forestry. Their biotrophic nature precludes many established molecular genetic manipulations and lines of research. The generation of genomic resources for these microbes is leading to novel insights into biology such as interactions with the hosts and guiding directions for breakthrough research in plant pathology. Results To support gene discovery and gene model verification in the genome of the wheat leaf rust fungus, Puccinia triticina (Pt, we have generated Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs by sampling several life cycle stages. We focused on several spore stages and isolated haustorial structures from infected wheat, generating 17,684 ESTs. We produced sequences from both the sexual (pycniospores, aeciospores and teliospores and asexual (germinated urediniospores stages of the life cycle. From pycniospores and aeciospores, produced by infecting the alternate host, meadow rue (Thalictrum speciosissimum, 4,869 and 1,292 reads were generated, respectively. We generated 3,703 ESTs from teliospores produced on the senescent primary wheat host. Finally, we generated 6,817 reads from haustoria isolated from infected wheat as well as 1,003 sequences from germinated urediniospores. Along with 25,558 previously generated ESTs, we compiled a database of 13,328 non-redundant sequences (4,506 singlets and 8,822 contigs. Fungal genes were predicted using the EST version of the self-training GeneMarkS algorithm. To refine the EST database, we compared EST sequences by BLASTN to a set of 454 pyrosequencing-generated contigs and Sanger BAC-end sequences derived both from the Pt genome, and to ESTs and genome reads from wheat. A collection of 6,308 fungal genes was identified and compared to sequences of the cereal rusts, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt and stripe rust, P. striiformis f. sp

  13. Biotic potential and reproductive parameters of Spodoptera eridania (Stoll (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae in the laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Goulart Montezano

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biotic potential and reprodutcive parameters of Spodoptera eridania (Stoll (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae in the laboratory: This study aimed to evaluate the biotic potential and reproductive parameters of Spodoptera eridania (Stoll, 1782 under controlled conditions (25 ± 1ºC, 70 ± 10% RH and 14 hour photophase. The longevity, pre-, post- and oviposition periods, fecundity and fertility of 15 couples was evaluated. The longevity of females (10.80 days was not significantly higher than those of males (9.27 days. The mean durations of the pre, post and oviposition periods were 2.067, 0.600 and 8.133 days, respectively. The mean fecundity per female was 1,398 eggs and the mean fertility was 1,367.50 larvae. On average, females copulated 1.133 times. A strong positive correlation was observed between the number of mating and fecundity (r = 0.881, P <0.001. However a strong negative correlation was observed between the number of copulations and the duration of the pre-oviposition period (r = -0.826, P = 0.002 and longevity (r = -0.823, P = 0.001. The biotic potential of S. eridania was estimated at 1.894 x 10(25 individuals/female/year. The net reproductive rate (Ro was 560.531 times per generation and the mean generation time (T was 35.807 days. The intrinsic rate of increase (rm was 0.177, with a finite rate of increase (l of 1.193, per week

  14. Development of a biotic ligand model to predict the acute toxicity of cadmium to Daphnia pulex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to develop a biotic ligand model (BLM) to predict the acute toxicity of cadmium to Daphnia pulex. Organisms were cultured in moderately soft water and standard 48 h acute toxicity tests were used to determine EC50s in various water chemistries where the effects of Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+, Cl-, K+, pH, and two sources of natural organic matter (Suwannee River and Nordic Reservoir) were evaluated. Overall, toxicity responses were consistent with the free-ion activity model and the principles inherent in the BLM. Increases in Ca2+ resulted in higher EC50s, indicating that Cd2+ competes with Ca2+ for uptake at the biotic ligand. Similar cation competition effects were observed when Mg2+ was varied but with a less pronounced protective effect relative to Ca2+. Changes in Na+ and K+ concentrations had no significant effect on Cd toxicity. EC50 values did not change significantly when pH was adjusted over a range from 8.0 to 6.1. Additions of natural organic matter resulted in elevated dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations that significantly reduced Cd bioavailability via complexation of Cd2+. An existing biotic ligand model (HydroQual BLM ver 2.2.3) was tested for its ability to predict acute Cd toxicity to D. pulex. Once the BLM was adjusted for the relatively sensitivity of D. pulex the protective effects of Ca and DOC could be predicted reasonably well but other test chemistries did not match with measured EC50s. Binding constants derived from the test results were used to develop a modified BLM for the effects of Cd on D. pulex that accounted for the moderating effect of Ca and Mg on acute toxicity but overestimated the protective effect of DOC.

  15. Development of a biotic ligand model to predict the acute toxicity of cadmium to Daphnia pulex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford, Matthew [Department of Biology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5 (Canada); McGeer, James C., E-mail: jmcgeer@wlu.ca [Department of Biology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5 (Canada)

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a biotic ligand model (BLM) to predict the acute toxicity of cadmium to Daphnia pulex. Organisms were cultured in moderately soft water and standard 48 h acute toxicity tests were used to determine EC50s in various water chemistries where the effects of Ca{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, Cl{sup -}, K{sup +}, pH, and two sources of natural organic matter (Suwannee River and Nordic Reservoir) were evaluated. Overall, toxicity responses were consistent with the free-ion activity model and the principles inherent in the BLM. Increases in Ca{sup 2+} resulted in higher EC50s, indicating that Cd{sup 2+} competes with Ca{sup 2+} for uptake at the biotic ligand. Similar cation competition effects were observed when Mg{sup 2+} was varied but with a less pronounced protective effect relative to Ca{sup 2+}. Changes in Na{sup +} and K{sup +} concentrations had no significant effect on Cd toxicity. EC50 values did not change significantly when pH was adjusted over a range from 8.0 to 6.1. Additions of natural organic matter resulted in elevated dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations that significantly reduced Cd bioavailability via complexation of Cd{sup 2+}. An existing biotic ligand model (HydroQual BLM ver 2.2.3) was tested for its ability to predict acute Cd toxicity to D. pulex. Once the BLM was adjusted for the relatively sensitivity of D. pulex the protective effects of Ca and DOC could be predicted reasonably well but other test chemistries did not match with measured EC50s. Binding constants derived from the test results were used to develop a modified BLM for the effects of Cd on D. pulex that accounted for the moderating effect of Ca and Mg on acute toxicity but overestimated the protective effect of DOC.

  16. Biotic Composition In Transgressive Levels Of Pennsylvanian Cyclothems: Bachende Limestone, Cantabrian Zone, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrochano, D.; Barba, P.

    2009-12-01

    Distribution of biotic communities in eustatic cyclothems can be used as an indicator of relative sea level changes. Photic zone and wave base are controlled by glacio-eustatic fluctuations and have direct implications in biota distribution. Our study consists of quantitative and qualitative analysis of skeletal and nonskeletal grains in cyclothems from Bachende Limestone (Middle Pennsylvanian). Bachende Limestone was deposited in a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate ramp located in the distal parts of a foreland basin, developed during Pennsylvanian times in the Cantabrian Zone, Spain. This stratigraphic unit includes several high frequency transgressive-regressive sequences (cyclothems). The lower part of the cycles is formed by carbonates corresponding to the transgressive system track, while the upper part includes siliciclastics that represents the progradation of deltaic bodies during regression. Microfacies analysis shows two different biotic communities related with changes of base level. Early transgressive system track, is dominated by ooids, quartz grains, fusulinids, calcisphers and photozoan organisms, like calcareous algae Anthracoporella, Beresella and Archaelythophyllum. The lack of siliciclastic input during transgressions favoured the photosynthetic activity. Late transgressive assemblage is characterized by heterozoan association (red algae, bryozoans, brachiopods, rugose solitary corals and crinoids), the abundance of the foraminifer Ozawainella and the presence of pyrite. These sediments are related to deep subtidal environments and they are followed by maximum flooding interval (drowning surface), formed by dark shales with crinoids and brachiopods. Changes in paleodepth and in paleoceanographic conditions, including sediment influx, nutrients and temperature, strongly influence the biotic distribution in the cyclothem. Waxing and waning of Gondwana continental ice-sheets seems to be the most important factor controlling these changes.

  17. Abiotic constraints eclipse biotic resistance in determining invasibility along experimental vernal pool gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Fritz; Collinge, Sharon K

    2007-04-01

    Effective management of invasive species requires that we understand the mechanisms determining community invasibility. Successful invaders must tolerate abiotic conditions and overcome resistance from native species in invaded habitats. Biotic resistance to invasions may reflect the diversity, abundance, or identity of species in a community. Few studies, however, have examined the relative importance of abiotic and biotic factors determining community invasibility. In a greenhouse experiment, we simulated the abiotic and biotic gradients typically found in vernal pools to better understand their impacts on invasibility. Specifically, we invaded plant communities differing in richness, identity, and abundance of native plants (the "plant neighborhood") and depth of inundation to measure their effects on growth, reproduction, and survival of five exotic plant species. Inundation reduced growth, reproduction, and survival of the five exotic species more than did plant neighborhood. Inundation reduced survival of three species and growth and reproduction of all five species. Neighboring plants reduced growth and reproduction of three species but generally did not affect survival. Brassica rapa, Centaurea solstitialis, and Vicia villosa all suffered high mortality due to inundation but were generally unaffected by neighboring plants. In contrast, Hordeum marinum and Lolium multiflorum, whose survival was unaffected by inundation, were more impacted by neighboring plants. However, the four measures describing plant neighborhood differed in their effects. Neighbor abundance impacted growth and reproduction more than did neighbor richness or identity, with growth and reproduction generally decreasing with increasing density and mass of neighbors. Collectively, these results suggest that abiotic constraints play the dominant role in determining invasibility along vernal pool and similar gradients. By reducing survival, abiotic constraints allow only species with the

  18. Nicotiana tabacum Tsip1-Interacting Ferredoxin 1 Affects Biotic and Abiotic Stress Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Sung Un; Lee, In-Ju; Ham, Byung-Kook; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Tsip1, a Zn finger protein that was isolated as a direct interactor with tobacco stress-induced 1 (Tsi1), plays an important role in both biotic and abiotic stress signaling. To further understand Tsip1 function, we searched for more Tsip1-interacting proteins by yeast two-hybrid screening using a tobacco cDNA library. Screening identified a new Tsip1-interacting protein, Nicotiana tabacum Tsip1-interacting ferredoxin 1 (NtTfd1), and binding specificity was confirmed both in vitro and in vivo...

  19. Carbon trading and carbon taxation: how to consider biotic sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoto Protocol (KP) to the UNFCCC includes land-use change and forestry in the carbon accounting process, limited to afforestation, reforestation and deforestation since 1990, and explicitly provides for the option of using a variety of flexibility mechanisms to meet the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets stipulated in a more cost-efficient manner. Domestically, different countries might adopt different approaches to achieve their emission reduction objectives, such as carbon trading or carbon taxation, and it is not clear to date what the implications for bioenergy use, forestry, and land-use change can be expected to be. With respect to national GHG emissions trading, the main issues studied in this paper are: Should trading of fossil fuel emissions allowances be coupled with trading of biotic credits and debits? Should credits for carbon sequestration in forests be auctioned or grandfathered? Should there be a distinction between a carbon permit issued for an additional biotic sink and those issued for fossil fuel carbon emissions? Is there a difference for biotic carbon sinks and sources between one-time permits and permits that allow a continued release of GHG over some pre-specified time? Should permits be issued only for the carbon-stock changes that count under the KP? With respect to national carbon taxation schemes, two questions are investigated: Should a tax credit be given for afforestation/reforestation (and a tax debit for deforestation)? Should tax credits also be given for projects that sequester carbon but do not count under the KP (such as forest protection rather than forest management)? For both schemes a crucial point is that by the formulation chosen in the KP two different classes of forest are created (i.e. those counted and those not counted under the KP), so that the implications for land prices might be significant. From a conceptual point of view this paper addresses the above-mentioned questions and contrasts some of the major

  20. Secreted protein gene derived-single nucleotide polymorphisms (SP-SNPs) reveal population diversity and differentiation of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chongjing; Wan, Anmin; Wang, Meinan; Jiwan, Derick A; See, Deven R; Chen, Xianming

    2016-05-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is a powerful molecular marker technique that has been widely used in population genetics and molecular mapping studies for various organisms. However, the technique has not been used for studying Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), the wheat stripe rust pathogen. In this study, we developed over a hundred secreted protein gene-derived SNP (SP-SNP) markers and used 92 markers to study the population structure of Pst. From 352 isolates collected in the United States, we identified 242 multi-locus genotypes. The SP-SNP genotypes had a moderate, but significant correlation with the virulence phenotype data. Clustering of the multi-locus genotypes was consistent by various analyses, revealing distinct genetic groups. Analysis of molecular variance detected significant differences between the eastern and western US Pst populations. High heterozygosity was found in the US population with significant differences identified among epidemiological regions. Analysis of population differentiation revealed that populations between the eastern and western US were highly differentiated while moderate differentiation was found in populations within the western or eastern US. Isolates from the western US were more diverse than isolates from the eastern US. The information is useful for guiding the disease management in different epidemiological regions. PMID:27109369

  1. Comparative Analysis of Indices in the Study of Virulence Diversity Between and Within Populations of Puccinia recondita f. sp. tritici in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manisterski, J; Eyal, Z; Ben-Yehuda, P; Kosman, E

    2000-06-01

    ABSTRACT Isolates of Puccinia recondita f. sp. tritici (n = 260) obtained from bread, durum, and wild emmer wheat leaf collections throughout Israel during 1993 to 1997 were analyzed for virulence on a set of wheat differentials. The overall frequency of virulence increased on differentials possessing resistance genes Lr1, Lr2a, Lr3, and Lr26 and decreased on Lr17, Lr21, and Lr30. Genes Lr9 and Lr24 were resistant, while Lr18 was susceptible (98% in 1996) to all tested leaf rust isolates and Lr10 and Lr23 were susceptible to more than 78% of the isolates. Diversity between populations (years) was assessed using Kosman's H(KB) (based on degrees of similarity among distinct phenotypes) and H(KDis) (based on frequencies of individual virulences) and Nei's and Rogers' distances. The greatest difference occurred between the 1993 and 1994 populations. Phenotypic diversity within each population (year) was analyzed using the Shannon's, Simpson's, and Kosman's indices. The highest diversity within years was recorded in 1994 and significantly increased from 1993 to 1994 for all indices. The variance in the diversity between populations can be only partially explained by differences between corresponding diversities within population. The comparative analysis of diversity between and within populations over the 5 years enabled a detailed study of changes in the pathogen population. The results show that the different measures do not yield the same rank order of diversity. PMID:18944539

  2. Kenyan Isolates of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici from 2008 to 2014: Virulence to SrTmp in the Ug99 Race Group and Implications for Breeding Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Maria; Olivera, Pablo D; Rouse, Matthew N; Szabo, Les J; Johnson, Jerry; Gale, Sam; Luster, Douglas G; Wanyera, Ruth; Macharia, Godwin; Bhavani, Sridhar; Hodson, David; Patpour, Mehran; Hovmøller, Mogens S; Fetch, Thomas G; Jin, Yue

    2016-07-01

    Frequent emergence of new variants in the Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici Ug99 race group in Kenya has made pathogen survey a priority. We analyzed 140 isolates from 78 P. graminis f. sp. tritici samples collected in Kenya between 2008 and 2014 and identified six races, including three not detected prior to 2013. Genotypic analysis of 20 isolates from 2013 and 2014 collections showed that the new races TTHST, TTKTK, and TTKTT belong to the Ug99 race group. International advanced breeding lines were evaluated against an isolate of TTKTT (Sr31, Sr24, and SrTmp virulence) at the seedling stage. From 169 advanced lines from Kenya, 23% of lines with resistance to races TTKSK and TTKST were susceptible to TTKTT and, from two North American regional nurseries, 44 and 91% of resistant lines were susceptible. Three lines with combined resistance genes were developed to facilitate pathogen monitoring and race identification. These results indicate the increasing virulence and variability in the Kenyan P. graminis f. sp. tritici population and reveal vulnerabilities of elite germplasm to new races. PMID:27019064

  3. Some Effects of Abiotic Stress on Infection of Dyer's Woad (Isatis tinctoria L. by Puccinia thlaspeos C. Schub.: Implications for Biological Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The rust pathogen, Puccinia thlaspeos, is being studied as a potential biocontrol agent for the noxious weed dyer’s woad. Although its disease etiology is well understood, very little has been learned about the effect of environmental stresses on infection. Approach: Dyer’s woad plants were exposed to different levels of oxidative stress, salinity stress, osmotic stress, dehydration, and cold stress before being inoculated with the rust pathogen. Rust infections were subsequently detected in asymptomatic tissue using rust-selective primers with the polymerase chain reaction. Results: Mild abiotic stress appears to enable dyer’s woad plants to develop cross-tolerance to the rust pathogen. Plants exposed to the mildest level of salinity were only 60% infected. Those exposed to the lowest osmotic stress were only 50% infected while plants exposed to the shortest period of dehydration, or cold stress were both only 70% infected. Control plants were 100% infected for all experiments. On the other hand, exposing plants to mild oxidative stress did not lower infection while the highest level of oxidative stress significantly lowered infection to 55%. Conclusion: Crosstolerance to multiple stresses often a desirable trait for plants of economic importance, is a cause for concern in biocontrol of weeds because of its potential to adversely impact the efficacy of mycoherbicides.

  4. Population Genetic Structure and the Migration of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici Between the Gansu and Sichuan Basin Populations of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Junmin; Liu, Xiufeng; Li, Yong; Wan, Qiong; Ma, Zhanhong; Luo, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici is the causal pathogen of interregional epidemics of wheat stripe rust in China via long-distance migration. Gansu Province serves as putative inoculum center providing oversummering inoculum, while Sichuan Basin area serves as a region providing huge amounts of overwintering inoculum. Thus, the relationship between these two regions in population exchange and migration become important in prediction of interregional epidemics. In this study, we compared the population genetic structure and race composition between Gansu and Sichuan Basin populations to infer their migration relationships. A total of 526 isolates, spanning 3 years, were genotyped using eight pairs of amplified fragment length polymorphism markers, and a subset of 98 isolates were inoculated onto 19 Chinese differentials to perform the race analysis. Twenty-three common races and 26 shared genotypes supplied molecular evidence for migration between Gansu and Sichuan Basin populations. Bayesian assignment and principal component analysis revealed that the genetic group assignment of the Sichuan Basin populations (10SB and 11SB) changed in the spring to align with the fall Gansu populations in the prior seasons (09GS and 10GS), which indicated an asymmetric migration from Gansu Province to the Sichuan Basin area. The linkage disequilibrium and the parsimony tree length permutation test revealed a strong annual recombination signal in the Gansu populations and an inconsistent signal in the Sichuan Basin populations. PMID:26506459

  5. Obligate Biotrophy Features Unraveled by the Genomic Analysis of the Rust Fungi, Melampsora larici-populina and Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duplessis, Sebastien; Cuomo, Christina A.; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Aerts, Andrea; Tisserant, Emilie; Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Joly, David L.; Hacquard, Stephane; Amselem, Joelle; Cantarel, Brandi; Chiu, Readman; Couthinho, Pedro; Feau, Nicolas; Field, Matthew; Frey, Pascal; Gelhaye, Eric; Goldberg, Jonathan; Grabherr, Manfred; Kodira, Chinnappa; Kohler, Annegret; Kues, Ursula; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Mago, Rohit; Mauceli, Evan; Morin, Emmanuelle; Murat, Claude; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Park, Robert; Pearson, Matthew; Quesneville, Hadi; Rouhier, Nicolas; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Selles, Benjamin; Shapiro, Harris; Tangay, Philippe; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Peer, Yves Van de; Henrissat, Bernard; Rouze, Pierre; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Dodds, Peter N.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Zhong, Shaobin; Hamelin, Richard C.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Szabo, Les J.; Martin1, Francis

    2011-04-27

    Rust fungi are some of the most devastating pathogens of crop plants. They are obligate biotrophs, which extract nutrients only from living plant tissues and cannot grow apart from their hosts. Their lifestyle has slowed the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying host invasion and avoidance or suppression of plant innate immunity. We sequenced the 101 mega base pair genome of Melampsora larici-populina, the causal agent of poplar leaf rust, and the 89 mega base pair genome of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat and barley stem rust. We then compared the 16,841 predicted proteins of M. larici-populina to the 18,241 predicted proteins of P. graminis f. sp tritici. Genomic features related to their obligate biotrophic life-style include expanded lineage-specific gene families, a large repertoire of effector-like small secreted proteins (SSPs), impaired nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways, and expanded families of amino-acid, oligopeptide and hexose membrane transporters. The dramatic upregulation of transcripts coding for SSPs, secreted hydrolytic enzymes, and transporters in planta suggests that they play a role in host infection and nutrient acquisition. Some of these genomic hallmarks are mirrored in the genomes of other microbial eukaryotes that have independently evolved to infect plants, indicating convergent adaptation to a biotrophic existence inside plant cells

  6. Construction and characterization of a full-length cDNA library for the wheat stripe rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici

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    Chen Xianming

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Puccinia striiformis is a plant pathogenic fungus causing stripe rust, one of the most important diseases on cereal crops and grasses worldwide. However, little is know about its genome and genes involved in the biology and pathogenicity of the pathogen. We initiated the functional genomic research of the fungus by constructing a full-length cDNA and determined functions of the first group of genes by sequence comparison of cDNA clones to genes reported in other fungi. Results A full-length cDNA library, consisting of 42,240 clones with an average cDNA insert of 1.9 kb, was constructed using urediniospores of race PST-78 of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici. From 196 sequenced cDNA clones, we determined functions of 73 clones (37.2%. In addition, 36 clones (18.4% had significant homology to hypothetical proteins, 37 clones (18.9% had some homology to genes in other fungi, and the remaining 50 clones (25.5% did not produce any hits. From the 73 clones with functions, we identified 51 different genes encoding protein products that are involved in amino acid metabolism, cell defense, cell cycle, cell signaling, cell structure and growth, energy cycle, lipid and nucleotide metabolism, protein modification, ribosomal protein complex, sugar metabolism, transcription factor, transport metabolism, and virulence/infection. Conclusion The full-length cDNA library is useful in identifying functional genes of P. striiformis.

  7. A rapid genotyping method for an obligate fungal pathogen, Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici, based on DNA extraction from infected leaf and Multiplex PCR genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enjalbert Jérôme

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici (PST, an obligate fungal pathogen causing wheat yellow/stripe rust, a serious disease, has been used to understand the evolution of crop pathogen using molecular markers. However, numerous questions regarding its evolutionary history and recent migration routes still remains to be addressed, which need the genotyping of a large number of isolates, a process that is limited by both DNA extraction and genotyping methods. To address the two issues, we developed here a method for direct DNA extraction from infected leaves combined with optimized SSR multiplexing. Findings We report here an efficient protocol for direct fungal DNA extraction from infected leaves, avoiding the costly and time consuming step of spore multiplication. The genotyping strategy we propose, amplified a total of 20 SSRs in three Multiplex PCR reactions, which were highly polymorphic and were able to differentiate different PST populations with high efficiency and accuracy. Conclusion These two developments enabled a genotyping strategy that could contribute to the development of molecular epidemiology of yellow rust disease, both at a regional or worldwide scale.

  8. The SnRK1 Energy Sensor in Plant Biotic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsmans, Sander; Rodriguez, Marianela; De Coninck, Barbara; Rolland, Filip

    2016-08-01

    Our understanding of plant biotic interactions has grown significantly in recent years with the identification of the mechanisms involved in innate immunity, hormone signaling, and secondary metabolism. The impact of such interactions on primary metabolism and the role of metabolic signals in the response of the plants, however, remain far less explored. The SnRK1 (SNF1-related kinase 1) kinases act as metabolic sensors, integrating very diverse stress conditions, and are key in maintaining energy homeostasis for growth and survival. Consistently, an important role is emerging for these kinases as regulators of biotic stress responses triggered by viral, bacterial, fungal, and oomycete infections as well as by herbivory. While this identifies SnRK1 as a promising target for directed modification or selection for more quantitative and sustainable resistance, its central function also increases the chances of unwanted side effects on growth and fitness, stressing the need for identification and in-depth characterization of the mechanisms and target processes involved. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27156455

  9. Seed dispersers, seed predators, and browsers act synergistically as biotic filters in a mosaic landscape.

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    Regino Zamora

    Full Text Available In this study, we analize the functional influence of animals on the plants they interact with in a mediterranean mountain. We hypothesise that seed dispersers, seed predators, and browsers can act as biotic filters for plant communities. We analyse the combined effects of mutualistic (seed dispersal and antagonistic (seed predation, herbivory animal interactions in a mosaic landscape of Mediterranean mountains, basing our results on observational and experimental field. Most of the dispersed seeds came from tree species, whereas the population of saplings was composed predominantly of zoochorous shrub species. Seed predators preferentially consumed seeds from tree species, whereas seeds from the dominant fleshy-fruited shrubs had a higher probability of escaping these predators. The same pattern was repeated among the different landscape units by browsers, since they browsed selectively and far more intensely on tree-species saplings than on the surrounding shrubs. In synthesis, our work identifies the major biotic processes that appear to be favoring a community dominated by shrubs versus trees because seed dispersers, predators, and herbivores together favored shrub dispersal and establishment versus trees.

  10. Molecular Analysis of Rice CIPKs Involved in Both Biotic and Abiotic Stress Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi-feng; Gu Zhi-min; LIU Feng; MA Bo-jun; ZHANG Hong-sheng

    2011-01-01

    Plant calcineurin B-like (CBL) proteins have been proposed as important Ca2+ sensors and specifically interact with CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) in plant-specific calcium signaling.Here,we identified and isolated 15 CIPK genes in a japonica rice variety Nipponbare based on the predicted sequences of rice CIPK gene family.Gene structure analysis showed that these 15 genes were divided into intron-less and intron-rich groups,and OsCIPK3 and OsCIPK24 exhibited alternative splicing in their mature process.The phylogenetic analyses indicated that rice CIPKs shared an ancestor with Arabidopsis and poplar CIPKs.Analyses of gene expression showed that these OsCIPK genes were differentially induced by biotic stresses such as bacterial blight and abiotic stresses (heavy metal such as Hg2+,high salinity,cold and ABA).Interestingly,five OsCIPK genes,OsCIPK1,2,10,11 and 12,were transcriptionally up-regulated after bacterial blight infection whereas four OsCIPK genes,OsCIPK2,10,11 and 14,were induced by all treatments,indicating that some of OsCIPK genes are involved in multiple stress response pathways in plants.Our finding suggests that CIPKs play a key role in both biotic and abiotic stress responses.

  11. Manipulating biotic carbon sources and sinks for climate change mitigation: can science keep up with practice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for natural C sinks to be manipulated by human means to mitigate climate change has been discussed in the environmental literature for more than a decade. There now appears to be little doubt that changes in global land-use and land management practices could significantly slow the accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere. As a result, some forward-thinking companies and governmental bodies are acting now upon the biotic mitigation literature by developing actual mitigation projects. It is now national policy in the United States to encourage such activities. The future of C offsets, however, is unclear, due in large measure to lagging scientific knowledge. Large-scale private action likely will await regulatory signals that action will be accepted as a legitimate mitigation measure, perhaps providing retroactive regulatory credit, a source of tradeable emission entitlements, or credit against yet-to-be-established C taxes. The practical potential of most biotic mitigation approaches is unknown, and the entire concept remains subject to political challenge domestically and abroad. The ability to predict C benefits of individual mitigation projects is often tenuous and subject to debate. To allow expansion of C offset practices as quickly as possible, and hopefully to fund projects with many ancillary environmental and economic benefits, policy makers and project developers desperately need physical and social science data to be provided in a useable form. 25 refs., 1 tab

  12. Biotic interactions affect the colonization behavior of aquatic detritivorous macroinvertebrates in a heterogeneous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschut, Thomas A.; Meineri, Eric; Basset, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    It has previously been suggested that macroinvertebrates actively search for suitable patches to colonize. However, it is not well understood how the spatial arrangement of patches can affect colonization rates. In this study, we determined the importance of the environmental factors (distance, connectivity and resource availability) for patch colonization in an experimental system using Gammarus aequicauda (Amphipoda), Lekanesphaera hookeri (Isopoda) and Ecrobia ventrosa (Gastropoda). Furthermore, we also assessed how the relative importance of each of these environmental factors differed in interactions between the three species. The single species experiments showed that distance was the most important factor for G. aequicauda and E. ventrosa. However, while E. ventrosa preferred patches close to the release point, G. aequicauda strongly preferred patches further from the release point. High resource availability was a strong determinant for the patch colonization of G. aequicauda and L. hookeri. Connectivity was only of moderate importance in the study system for L. hookeri and E. ventrosa. The effects of the environmental factors were strongly affected by interspecific interactions in the multispecies experiments. For G. aequicauda, the distance preference was lowered in the presence of E. ventrosa. Moreover, while for L. hookeri the effect of resource availability was ruled out by the species interactions, resource availability gained importance for E. ventrosa in the presence of any of the other species. Our results suggest a strong link between environmental factors and biotic interactions in the colonization of habitat patches and indicate that the effect of biotic interactions is especially important for species sharing similar traits.

  13. Presence of riparian vegetation increases biotic condition of fish assemblages in two Brazilian reservoirs

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    Fabio Cop Ferreira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The riparian vegetation in lakes and reservoirs is source of course wood structures such as trunks and branches and is used as sheltering, spawning and foraging habitats for fishes. The reduction of these submerged structures can thus, affect the composition and structure of fish assemblages in reservoirs. Aim To evaluate the influence of riparian vegetation on the biotic condition of fish assemblage by adapting the Reservoir Fish Assemblage Index (RFAI to two reservoirs in the Upper Paranapanema river basin, São Paulo State, Brazil. Methods The RFAI was adapted from metrics related to the functional characteristics and composition of fish assemblages through a protocol of metric selection and validation, and to its response to the presence of riparian vegetation. Results The final RFAI was composed by nine metrics, been lower in sites without riparian vegetation as consequence of the predominance of larger individuals and the percent of piscivorous and detritivorous fishes. Conclusions These results suggest that increasing shore habitat complexity in reservoirs by maintaining riparian vegetation increases fish biotic integrity.

  14. Population Dynamics of Vibrios in Biotic Biofilm in the Aquatic Environment of Bangladesh

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    Mahmud Hasan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Vibrio sp. forming biofilm on biotic surface especially chitin and algae was investigated using artificial chitin and Anabaena variabilis from pure culture of laboratory and glued to plexiglass disc. The presence of culturable Vibrio spp. were investigated using cultural technique for TCBS agar medium after homogenization and physicochemical parameters were measured by standard techniques. The Pearson correlation coefficient applied by SPSS software. The results indicated that out of 13 sampling period, only V. cholerae O1 was isolated 7.7% sample while 30.8% samples were positive for V. cholerae non-O1, V. proteolyticus and V. mimicus from canal site. From pond ecosystem, all the chitin samples were negative for V. cholerae O1 but 15.4% were positive for V. cholerae non-O1 and V. proteolyticus and 30.8% samples were positive for V. mimicus. The biofilm formation is significantly correlated with the pH, DO and CO2 concentration present of the corresponding water. This study indicates that biotic surface like chitin and algae could function to form biofilm and the water physicochemical parameters have the relationship with the Vibrio community present in the samples.

  15. Biotic stress shifted structure and abundance of Enterobacteriaceae in the lettuce microbiome.

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    Armin Erlacher

    Full Text Available Lettuce cultivars are not only amongst the most popular vegetables eaten raw, they are also involved in severe pathogen outbreaks world-wide. While outbreaks caused by Enterobacteriaceae species are well-studied, less is known about their occurrence in natural environments as well as the impact of biotic stress. Here, we studied the ecology of the human health-relevant bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae and assessed the impact of biotic disturbances by a soil-borne phytopathogenic fungus and Gastropoda on their structure and abundance in mesocosm and pot experiments. Using a polyphasic approach including network analyses of 16S rRNA gene amplicon libraries, quantitative PCR and complementary fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH microscopy we found substantial yet divergent Enterobacteriaceae communities. A similar spectrum of 14 genera was identified from rhizo- and phyllospheres but the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae was on average 3fold higher in phyllosphere samples. Both stress factors shifted the bacterial community of the leaf habitat, characterized by increases of species abundance and diversity. For the rhizosphere, we observed significant structural shifts of Enterobacteriaceae communities but also a high degree of resilience. These results could be confirmed by FISH microscopy but it was difficult to visualize phyllosphere communities. Additional inoculation experiments with Escherichia coli as model revealed their presence below the wax layer as well as in the endosphere of leaves. The observed presence influenced by stress factors and the endophytic life style of Enterobacteriaceae on lettuce can be an important aspect in relation to human health.

  16. The abiotic and biotic drivers of rapid diversification in Andean bellflowers (Campanulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomarsino, Laura P; Condamine, Fabien L; Antonelli, Alexandre; Mulch, Andreas; Davis, Charles C

    2016-06-01

    The tropical Andes of South America, the world's richest biodiversity hotspot, are home to many rapid radiations. While geological, climatic, and ecological processes collectively explain such radiations, their relative contributions are seldom examined within a single clade. We explore the contribution of these factors by applying a series of diversification models that incorporate mountain building, climate change, and trait evolution to the first dated phylogeny of Andean bellflowers (Campanulaceae: Lobelioideae). Our framework is novel for its direct incorporation of geological data on Andean uplift into a macroevolutionary model. We show that speciation and extinction are differentially influenced by abiotic factors: speciation rates rose concurrently with Andean elevation, while extinction rates decreased during global cooling. Pollination syndrome and fruit type, both biotic traits known to facilitate mutualisms, played an additional role in driving diversification. These abiotic and biotic factors resulted in one of the fastest radiations reported to date: the centropogonids, whose 550 species arose in the last 5 million yr. Our study represents a significant advance in our understanding of plant evolution in Andean cloud forests. It further highlights the power of combining phylogenetic and Earth science models to explore the interplay of geology, climate, and ecology in generating the world's biodiversity. PMID:26990796

  17. Maximum Entropy Production and the Evolution of the Biotic Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleidon, A.

    2003-12-01

    The MEP hypothesis states that diabatic processes with sufficient degrees of freedom maintain states at which the rate of entropy production is maximized. A common example in climatology is the application of MEP to poleward heat transport, which leads to predicted equator-pole temperature gradients that are consistent with observations. Here the MEP hypothesis is applied to biotic activity as a diabatic process which affects the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and therefore the strength of the Earth's greenhouse effect. It is first shown with a conceptual climate model that there should be a minimum planetary albedo for which entropy production associated with absorption of solar radiation would be at a maximum as a consequence of the competing effects of surface temperature on the extent of snow cover and convective cloud cover. When pCO2 is simulated by a simple carbon cycle model, it is then shown that the application of MEP to biotic activity leads to an insensitivity of simulated surface temperature to long-term changes in solar luminosity. These predicted changes are consistent with the general suggested pattern of Earth system evolution (decreased greenhouse strength and roughly constant surface temperature through time) and share similarity with the Gaia hypothesis.

  18. Fragrance Allergens, Overview with a Focus on Recent Developments and Understanding of Abiotic and Biotic Activation

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    Johanna Bråred Christensson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fragrances and fragranced formulated products are ubiquitous in society. Contact allergies to fragrance chemicals are among the most common findings when patch-testing patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis, as well as in studies of contact allergy in the general population. The routine test materials for diagnosing fragrance allergy consist mainly of established mixes of fragrance compounds and natural extracts. The situation is more complex as several fragrance compounds have been shown to be transformed by activation inside or outside the skin via abiotic and/or biotic activation, thus increasing the risk of sensitization. For these fragrance chemicals, the parent compound is often non-allergenic or a very weak allergen, but potent sensitizers will be formed which can cause contact allergy. This review shows a series of fragrance chemicals with well-documented abiotic and/or biotic activation that are indicative and illustrative examples of the general problem. Other important aspects include new technologies such as ethosomes which may enhance both sensitization and elicitation, the effect on sensitization by the mixtures of fragrances found in commercial products and the effect of antioxidants. A contact allergy to fragrances may severely affect quality of life and many patients have multiple allergies which further impact their situation. Further experimental and clinical research is needed to increase the safety for the consumer.

  19. 'Trophic whales' as biotic buffers: weak interactions stabilize ecosystems against nutrient enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzmüller, Florian; Eisenhauer, Nico; Brose, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    Human activities may compromise biodiversity if external stressors such as nutrient enrichment endanger overall network stability by inducing unstable dynamics. However, some ecosystems maintain relatively high diversity levels despite experiencing continuing disturbances. This indicates that some intrinsic properties prevent unstable dynamics and resulting extinctions. Identifying these 'ecosystem buffers' is crucial for our understanding of the stability of ecosystems and an important tool for environmental and conservation biologists. In this vein, weak interactions have been suggested as stabilizing elements of complex systems, but their relevance has rarely been tested experimentally. Here, using network and allometric theory, we present a novel concept for a priori identification of species that buffer against externally induced instability of increased population oscillations via weak interactions. We tested our model in a microcosm experiment using a soil food-web motif. Our results show that large-bodied species feeding at the food web's base, so called 'trophic whales', can buffer ecosystems against unstable dynamics induced by nutrient enrichment. Similar to the functionality of chemical or mechanical buffers, they serve as 'biotic buffers' that take up stressor effects and thus protect fragile systems from instability. We discuss trophic whales as common functional building blocks across ecosystems. Considering increasing stressor effects under anthropogenic global change, conservation of these network-intrinsic biotic buffers may help maintain the stability and diversity of natural ecosystems. PMID:25420573

  20. A biotic video game smart phone kit for formal and informal biophysics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Honesty; Lee, Seung Ah; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar

    2015-03-01

    Novel ways for formal and informal biophysics education are important. We present a low-cost biotic game design kit that incorporates microbial organisms into an interactive gaming experience: A 3D-printable microscope containing four LEDs controlled by a joystick enable human players to provide directional light stimuli to the motile single-celled organism Euglena gracilis. These cellular behaviors are displayed on the integrated smart phone. Real time cell-tracking couples these cells into interactive biotic video game play, i.e., the human player steers Euglena to play soccer with virtual balls and goals. The player's learning curve in mastering this fun game is intrinsically coupled to develop a deeper knowledge about Euglena's cell morphology and the biophysics of its phototactic behavior. This kit is dual educational - via construction and via play - and it provides an engaging theme for a formal biophysics devices class as well as to be presented in informal outreach activities; its low cost and open soft- and hardware should enable wide adoption.

  1. Stomata prioritize their responses to multiple biotic and abiotic signal inputs.

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    Xiaobin Ou

    Full Text Available Stomata are microscopic pores in leaf epidermis that regulate gas exchange between plants and the environment. Being natural openings on the leaf surface, stomata also serve as ports for the invasion of foliar pathogenic bacteria. Each stomatal pore is enclosed by a pair of guard cells that are able to sense a wide spectrum of biotic and abiotic stresses and respond by precisely adjusting the pore width. However, it is not clear whether stomatal responses to simultaneously imposed biotic and abiotic signals are mutually dependent on each other. Here we show that a genetically engineered Escherichia coli strain DH5α could trigger stomatal closure in Vicia faba, an innate immune response that might depend on NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS burst. DH5α-induced stomatal closure could be abolished or disguised under certain environmental conditions like low [CO2], darkness, and drought, etc. Foliar spraying of high concentrations of ABA could reduce stomatal aperture in high humidity-treated faba bean plants. Consistently, the aggressive multiplication of DH5α bacteria in Vicia faba leaves under high humidity could be alleviated by exogenous application of ABA. Our data suggest that a successful colonization of bacteria on the leaf surface is correlated with stomatal aperture regulation by a specific set of environmental factors.

  2. Biotic games and cloud experimentation as novel media for biophysics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar; Blikstein, Paulo

    2014-03-01

    First-hand, open-ended experimentation is key for effective formal and informal biophysics education. We developed, tested and assessed multiple new platforms that enable students and children to directly interact with and learn about microscopic biophysical processes: (1) Biotic games that enable local and online play using galvano- and photo-tactic stimulation of micro-swimmers, illustrating concepts such as biased random walks, Low Reynolds number hydrodynamics, and Brownian motion; (2) an undergraduate course where students learn optics, electronics, micro-fluidics, real time image analysis, and instrument control by building biotic games; and (3) a graduate class on the biophysics of multi-cellular systems that contains a cloud experimentation lab enabling students to execute open-ended chemotaxis experiments on slimemolds online, analyze their data, and build biophysical models. Our work aims to generate the equivalent excitement and educational impact for biophysics as robotics and video games have had for mechatronics and computer science, respectively. We also discuss how scaled-up cloud experimentation systems can support MOOCs with true lab components and life-science research in general.

  3. Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear-waste disposal. Topical report on reference western arid low-level sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the work reported here was to develop an order of magnitude estimate for the potential dose to man resulting from biotic transport mechanisms at a reference western arid low-level waste site. A description of the reference site is presented that includes the waste inventories, site characteristics and biological communities. Parameter values for biotic transport processes are based on data reported in current literature. Transport and exposure scenarios are developed for assessing biotic transport during 100 years following site closure. Calculations of radionuclide decay and waste container decomposition are made to estimate the quantities available for biotic transport. Dose to a man occupying the reference site following the 100 years of biotic transport are calculated. These dose estimates are compared to dose estimates for the intruder-agricultural scenario reported in the DEIS for 10 CFR 61 (NRC). Dose to man estimates as a result of biotic transport are estimated to be of the same order of magnitude as the dose resulting from the more commonly evaluated human intrusion scenario. The reported lack of potential importance of biotic transport at low-level waste sites in earlier assessment studies is not confirmed by the findings presented in this report. These results indicate that biotic transport has the potential to influence low-level waste site performance. Through biotic transport, radionuclides may be moved to locations where they can enter exposure pathways to man

  4. Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear-waste disposal. Topical report on reference western arid low-level sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, D.H.; Cadwell, L.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.; Simmons, M.A.

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of the work reported here was to develop an order of magnitude estimate for the potential dose to man resulting from biotic transport mechanisms at a reference western arid low-level waste site. A description of the reference site is presented that includes the waste inventories, site characteristics and biological communities. Parameter values for biotic transport processes are based on data reported in current literature. Transport and exposure scenarios are developed for assessing biotic transport during 100 years following site closure. Calculations of radionuclide decay and waste container decomposition are made to estimate the quantities available for biotic transport. Dose to a man occupying the reference site following the 100 years of biotic transport are calculated. These dose estimates are compared to dose estimates for the intruder-agricultural scenario reported in the DEIS for 10 CFR 61 (NRC). Dose to man estimates as a result of biotic transport are estimated to be of the same order of magnitude as the dose resulting from the more commonly evaluated human intrusion scenario. The reported lack of potential importance of biotic transport at low-level waste sites in earlier assessment studies is not confirmed by the findings presented in this report. These results indicate that biotic transport has the potential to influence low-level waste site performance. Through biotic transport, radionuclides may be moved to locations where they can enter exposure pathways to man.

  5. A Big Bang or small bangs? Effects of biotic environment on hatching

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    Marina MANCA

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The beginning and end of diapause are two important transition points in cladoceran life history. The influence of environmental variables on the dynamics of these processes still deserves attention, especially as concerns the role of biotic factors. In this paper we focus on emergence from diapause, testing (1 whether ephippia of Daphnia obtusa Kurz can assess the presence in the water of typical planktivorous fish or ostracods, and (2 whether such an assessment results in changes in hatching strategy. Total number of hatchlings from D. obtusa ephippial eggs did not differ between the control and the treatments in which the presence of fish or ostracods could be detected (ANOVA, P = 0.884. However, hatching dynamics were different: most of the eggs hatched synchronously at day 4 (83.3% of the total hatchlings number in the control, while only a low proportion of eggs hatched on day 4 in the fish (38.3%, and ostracod treatments (24.0% of the total. Mean hatching time was longer, and variability larger, in the treatments than in the control; differences resulted statistically significant (ANOVA, P = 0.005. With respect to the control, representing a simple microcosm controlled by abiotic variables only, the treatments may be regarded as relatively complex environments, in which Daphnia is also exposed to biotic cues. Under these more complex conditions, the same number of hatchlings is obtained through different hatching dynamics. In the treatments, the first hatchlings appeared later and the hatching rate was more variable than in the control. These observations confirm previously observed patterns from laboratory experiments which tested the effect of competition and fluctuating environmental conditions (light:dark, temperature regimes on D. obtusa reproductive and demographic parameters. They are also in agreement with recently obtained evidence concerning the importance of biotic cues for hatching of ephippial eggs. Overall, the evidence

  6. A comparison of different biotic indices based on benthic macro-invertebrates in italian lakes

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    Laura MARZIALI

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Benthic macroinvertebrates samples were taken from Italian lakes with different geological, morphological and chemical characteristics. Thirty-two lowland small and large lakes sampled using a grab in soft substrate were selected to develop biotic indices. Diversity indices based on species numbers - abundances and indices using species sensitivity values were compared. The lakes selected were all situated in the Alpine Ecoregion below 800 m a.s.l. and had similar chemical composition but different levels of anthropogenic pressure. Lakes with data available in different years were included as separate lakes in the analysis; littoralsublittoral samples of large lakes were also separated from profundal samples yielding a total of 41 sites for analysis. Seven different biotic indices were compared: (1 Shannon diversity index (H, (2 weighted Shannon diversity index (Hw including in the calculation a sensitivity value assigned to each species, (3 a benthic quality index based on means of three different environmental variables, measuring trophic status, weighted by species abundances (BQITS, (4 an index based on weighted means using a larger set of environmental variables (BQIENV, (5 a modified BQITS, which included both species numbers and total abundance of individuals (BQIES, (6 an index calculated according to a rarefaction method (ES, (7 an index considering indicator species based on experts judgment (BQIEJ. The indices were compared with a trophic status index (TSI constructed by joining three environmental variables: O2% saturation in the hypolimnion during summer stratification, total phosphorous and transparency during full circulation. Comparisons were also made with another environmental stress index (ENI constructed on a larger number of variables. All the biotic indices had significant correlations with both TSI and ENI. BQIES, WFD compliant and well correlated with TSI and ENI, was selected to tentatively assign the investigated lakes

  7. Forest calcium depletion and biotic retention along a soil nitrogen gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perakis, Steven S.; Sinkhorn, Emily R.; Catricala, Christina; Bullen, Thomas D.; Fitzpatrick, John A.; Hynicka, Justin D.; Cromack, Kermit, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    High nitrogen (N) accumulation in terrestrial ecosystems can shift patterns of nutrient limitation and deficiency beyond N toward other nutrients, most notably phosphorus (P) and base cations (calcium [Ca], magnesium [Mg], and potassium [K]). We examined how naturally high N accumulation from a legacy of symbiotic N fixation shaped P and base cation cycling across a gradient of nine temperate conifer forests in the Oregon Coast Range. We were particularly interested in whether long-term legacies of symbiotic N fixation promoted coupled N and organic P accumulation in soils, and whether biotic demands by non-fixing vegetation could conserve ecosystem base cations as N accumulated. Total soil N (0–100 cm) pools increased nearly threefold across the N gradient, leading to increased nitrate leaching, declines in soil pH from 5.8 to 4.2, 10-fold declines in soil exchangeable Ca, Mg, and K, and increased mobilization of aluminum. These results suggest that long-term N enrichment had acidified soils and depleted much of the readily weatherable base cation pool. Soil organic P increased with both soil N and C across the gradient, but soil inorganic P, biomass P, and P leaching loss did not vary with N, implying that historic symbiotic N fixation promoted soil organic P accumulation and P sufficiency for non-fixers. Even though soil pools of Ca, Mg, and K all declined as soil N increased, only Ca declined in biomass pools, suggesting the emergence of Ca deficiency at high N. Biotic conservation and tight recycling of Ca increased in response to whole-ecosystem Ca depletion, as indicated by preferential accumulation of Ca in biomass and surface soil. Our findings support a hierarchical model of coupled N–Ca cycling under long-term soil N enrichment, whereby ecosystem-level N saturation and nitrate leaching deplete readily available soil Ca, stimulating biotic Ca conservation as overall supply diminishes. We conclude that a legacy of biological N fixation can increase N

  8. Regional consequences of a biotic interchange: insights from the Lessepsian invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, Rafal; Albano, Paolo G.; Chattopadhyay, Devapriya; Zuschin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The fossil record provides ample evidence of large-scale biotic interchanges and their pervasive effects on regional biotas, but mechanisms controlling such events are difficult to decipher in deep time. Massive invasion of Indo-Pacific species into the Mediterranean Sea triggered by the opening of the Suez Canal offers a unique opportunity to examine the ecological consequences of breaking down biogeographic barriers. We developed an extensive database of taxonomic composition, body size and ecological characteristics of the Red Sea and Mediterranean bivalve fauna in order to link biotic selectivity of the invasion process with its effects on the recipient biota. Shallow-water occurrence and presence outside the tropical zone in other regions are the strongest predictors of the successful transition through the Suez Canal. Subsequent establishment of alien species in the Mediterranean Sea correlates with early arrival and preference for hard substrates. Finally, large-bodied species and hard-bottom dwellers are over-represented among the invasive aliens that have reached the spread stage and impose a strong impact on native communities. Although body size is important only at the last invasion stage, alien species are significantly larger compared to native Mediterranean bivalves. This reflects biogeographic difference in the body-size distributions of the source and recipient species pools related to the recent geological history of the Mediterranean Sea. Contrary to the general expectations on the effects of temperature on average body size, continued warming of the Mediterranean Sea accelerates the entry of tropical aliens and thus indirectly leads to increase in the proportion of large-bodied species in local communities and the regional biota. Invasion-driven shifts in species composition are stronger in hard-substrate communities, which host a smaller pool of incumbent species and are more susceptible to the establishment of newcomers. Analogous differences

  9. Simplification of Biotic Ligand Model and Evaluation of Predicted Results%Biotic Ligand Model的简化模型及预测性能评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王万宾; 陈莎; 吴敏; 苏德丽; 赵婧

    2014-01-01

    通过检索4物种(Fathead minnow、D.magna、D.pulex、Rainbow trout)在地表水中实测的铜半致死浓度(Observed_LC50),及Biotic Ligand Model(BLM)预测其半致死浓度(Predicted_LC50),得到4物种的预测精度依次为0.075、0.52、0.96、0.29,模型对Fathead minnow与Rainbow trout的预测性能较差.在此基础上,分析显示预测误差值与LA50呈指数关系,表明LA50值并非常数值.通过对BLM的LA50的校正,Fathead minnow与Rainbow trout的预测精度升为0.59、0.42.通过分析LA50与硬度的关系,发现BLM在软水环境中预测效果较差.另外,随机均匀生成500组水质参数组,通过BLM预测,筛选出4项敏感参数为DOC、pH、HCO[浓度及温度,并建立相应物种的LC50与其的多元线性关系,大大简化了生物配位模型.

  10. Postulación de Genes de Resistencia a la Roya de la Hoja (Puccinia triticina Ericks.) en Plántula y Planta Adulta en Genotipos Élite de Trigo Harinero (Triticum aestivum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Julio Huerta Espino; Singh, Ravi P.; Héctor Eduardo Villaseñor Mir; Eduardo Espitia Rangel; Santos Gerardo Leyva Mir

    2003-01-01

    El programa de mejoramiento genético de trigo (Triticum aestivum) del Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agrícolas y Pecuarias de México está trabajando para generar variedades que posean resistencia parcial o resistencia de planta adulta al hongo Puccinia triticina, para lo cual, es necesario conocer los genes que el germoplasma élite expresa a nivel de plántula y planta adulta. Se evaluaron 48 genotipos de trigo harinero inoculados con 18 razas fisiológicas de roya de la hoja...

  11. Mutation to Wider Virulence in Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici: Evidence for the Existence of Loci Which Allow the Fungus To Overcome Several Host Stem Rust Resistance Genes Simultaneously †

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, J. E.; Loegering, W. Q.

    1991-01-01

    Mutants of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici were obtained which were able to overcome simultaneously several host stem rust resistance (Sr) genes effective against the wild-type culture. These results suggest that, in addition to those Psr loci which relate specifically to host Sr genes in a “gene for gene” manner, one or more general loci may be present in this pathogen. The product(s) of these general genes may be necessary for the expression of various host Sr genes. The evolution of a sup...

  12. Evaluation of extended biotic index in watercourses by means of artificial substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1993 and 1994 a working group of biologists operating in Region Lombardia has carried out a study to evaluate the reliability of artificial substrates in the assessment of water quality by the Extended Biotic Index. Macroinvertebrate samples were collected by means of hand net and artificial substrates (up to 3 replicates) in 22 sampling sites of 15 watercourses of different typology (river, stream, irrigation channel) and water quality. Sampling efficiency and reliability in the calculation of E.B.I. and Quality Class by 1, 2 and 3 artificial substrates with respect to hand net have been evaluated. Influence of water quality, typology and original prevailing substrate in watercourses on the performance of artificial substrates has also been investigated. Results show a good agreement with other Authors' papers, confirming that artificial substrates represent a valid alternative macroinvertebrate sampling technique when traditional hand net sampler is useless

  13. Anatomic and histochemical examinations for the clarification of the contribution of biotic agents to forest dieback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, S.; Horsch, F.; Filby, G.; Fund, N.; Gross, S.; Hanisch, B.; Kilz, E.; Seidel, A. (comps.)

    1986-04-01

    In yellowed needles of firs and spruces from forest decline areas in the Southern Black Forest frequently necrotic phloem could be found, while the mesophyll cells were still intact. This first led to the assumption of a possible participation of phloemspecific pathogens (viruses, MLO). Needles suffering from atmospheric pollutants in contrast showed necroses of mesophyll cells with largely intact phloem. Identical symptoms with collapsed phloem and intact mesophyll could be observed in spruces which showed typical apical yellowing of the needles after cultivation in magnesium-free hydroponic solution. The symptoms on the yellowed needles in the higher Black Forest can therefore conclusively be explained with the there observed magnesium-deficiency. Possible interrelationships between biotic pathogens and nutritional status of the trees are discussed. In a number of yellowed, but also some green needles, fungal hyphae could be observed in the microscopical sections, preferably in the intercellulars. The significance of these fungi will further be investigated.

  14. Determination of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their precursors in biotic matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, Bohuslav; Hajslová, Jana; Kocourek, Vladimír

    2002-12-20

    Analytical method for the determination of ultra-trace levels of nitro-PAHs in various biotic matrices has been developed. Soxhlet extraction and/or solvent extraction enhanced by sonication were used for isolation of target analytes; GPC followed by SPE were employed for purification of crude extracts. GC-MS/NCI technique was utilised for identification/quantitation of target analytes. Performance characteristics of implemented method were obtained through thorough in-house validation procedure. The main sources of uncertainties were critically evaluated, possible strategies of their elimination/minimisation were considered and consequently employed. Examination of real-life samples of various foodstuffs (complete human diet, mate tea, pumpkin seed oil, parsley, sausages) was performed in this study. PMID:12489862

  15. Considerations on the Research of and Counter-measures Against Biotic Invasion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Ronghui; Lou Zhiping; Zhang Runzhi

    2002-01-01

    This article gives a brief introduction to the damage brought about by biotic invasion and its causes, and analyzes its impact on national development, ecological safety and the production of agriculture, forestry and animal husbandry. In addition, it expounds the necessity, urgency and cardinal significance in promoting related scientific research in this country. The authors stress that research work should be concentrated on the ecological effects of non-indigenous species in the light of the national demands, world research frontiers and high-tech application. That involves the process of an invasive organism's immigration and propagation, short-term evolution, latent buildup, ecological adaptation, competition and outbreak as well as the process in which the new ecosystem's original structure and functions unfold their role of rejection and assimilation.

  16. potential role of H2CN radicals in pre-biotic synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ab initio method, the minimum energy conformations and net charge distribution have been studied for H2CN radical isomers formed by addition of a H atom (or an electron) to HCN (or HNC) molecule. Calculations show that there are three possible isomers, namely H2CN(I), H2CN(II) and H2CN(III). The order of relative stability is (I) > (III) > (II). From quantum chemical study and the estimations in thermochemistry for the reactions (1) and (2), the possible role of H2CN radicals in pre-biotic organic synthesis has been discussed and it has been proposed that H2CN(III) radical is an important intermediate to synthesize amino acids. The results, show that HNC is also an important product in the evolution chain of biomolecules under some special conditions, such as the electric discharge for atmosphere

  17. Abiotic/biotic coupling in the rhizosphere: a reactive transport modeling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey R.; Steefel, Carl; Maher, Kate

    2014-01-01

    A new generation of models is needed to adequately simulate patterns of soil biogeochemical cycling in response changing global environmental drivers. For example, predicting the influence of climate change on soil organic matter storage and stability requires models capable of addressing complex biotic/abiotic interactions of rhizosphere and weathering processes. Reactive transport modeling provides a powerful framework simulating these interactions and the resulting influence on soil physical and chemical characteristics. Incorporation of organic reactions in an existing reactive transport model framework has yielded novel insights into soil weathering and development but much more work is required to adequately capture root and microbial dynamics in the rhizosphere. This endeavor provides many advantages over traditional soil biogeochemical models but also many challenges.

  18. Development of a Wireless Computer Vision Instrument to Detect Biotic Stress in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin J. Casanova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of crop abiotic and biotic stress is important for optimal irrigation management. While spectral reflectance and infrared thermometry provide a means to quantify crop stress remotely, these measurements can be cumbersome. Computer vision offers an inexpensive way to remotely detect crop stress independent of vegetation cover. This paper presents a technique using computer vision to detect disease stress in wheat. Digital images of differentially stressed wheat were segmented into soil and vegetation pixels using expectation maximization (EM. In the first season, the algorithm to segment vegetation from soil and distinguish between healthy and stressed wheat was developed and tested using digital images taken in the field and later processed on a desktop computer. In the second season, a wireless camera with near real-time computer vision capabilities was tested in conjunction with the conventional camera and desktop computer. For wheat irrigated at different levels and inoculated with wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, vegetation hue determined by the EM algorithm showed significant effects from irrigation level and infection. Unstressed wheat had a higher hue (118.32 than stressed wheat (111.34. In the second season, the hue and cover measured by the wireless computer vision sensor showed significant effects from infection (p = 0.0014, as did the conventional camera (p < 0.0001. Vegetation hue obtained through a wireless computer vision system in this study is a viable option for determining biotic crop stress in irrigation scheduling. Such a low-cost system could be suitable for use in the field in automated irrigation scheduling applications.

  19. Modelling uptake and toxicity of nickel in solution to Enchytraeus crypticus with biotic ligand model theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protons and other cations may inhibit metal uptake and alleviate metal toxicity in aquatic organisms, but less is known about these interactions in soil organisms. The present study investigated the influence of solution chemistry on uptake and toxicity of Ni in Enchytraeus crypticus after 14 days exposure. Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+ were found to exert significant effects on both uptake and toxicity of Ni. An extended Langmuir model, which incorporated cation competition effects, well predicted Ni uptake. The LC50{Ni2+} predicted by a developed Biotic Ligand Model matched well with observed values. These suggest that cation competition needs to be taken into account when modelling uptake and effects. The binding constants of Ni2+, Mg2+ and Na+ on the uptake and toxic action sites were similar, but for Ca2+ they differed. This indicates that the effect of Ca2+ on Ni2+ toxicity cannot simply be explained by the competition for entry into organism. - Highlights: • Enchytraeus crypticus was exposed to Ni in solutions with different cations. • Ni body concentration was not a good predictor of toxicity. • Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+ exert significant effects on both uptake and toxicity of Ni. • The extended Langmuir model and BLM well predicted Ni uptake and toxicity. • But the mechanism of Ca interaction with Ni is different from that of Mg and Na. - Biotic Ligand Models predict Ni toxicity to Enchytraeus crypticus but do not take into account the different roles of Ca in affecting Ni uptake and effects

  20. Can we trace biotic dispersals back in time? Introducing backward flow connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ferrarini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Connectivity in ecology deals with the problem of how species dispersal will happen given actual landscape and species presence/absence over such landscape. Hence it can be considered a forward (ahead in time scientific problem. I observe here that a backward theory of connectivity could be of deep interest as well: given the actual species presence/absence on the landscape, where with the highest probability such species is coming from? In other words, can we trace biotic dispersals back in time? Recently I have introduced a modelling and theoretical approach to ecological connectivity that is alternative to circuit theory and is able to fix the weak point of the "from-to" connectivity approach. The proposed approach holds also for mountain and hilly landscapes. In addition, it doesn't assume any intention for a species to go from source points to sink ones, because the expected path for the species is determined locally (pixel by pixel by landscape features. In this paper, I introduce a new theoretical and modelling approach called "backward flow connectivity". While flow connectivity predicts future species dispersal by minimizing at each step the potential energy due to fictional gravity over a frictional landscape, backward flow connectivity does exactly the opposite, i.e. maximizes potential energy at each step sending back the species to higher levels of potential energy due to fictional gravity on the frictional landscape. Using backward flow connectivity, one has at hand a new tool to revert timeline of species dispersal, hence being able to trace backward biotic dispersals. With few modifications, the applications of backward flow connectivity can be countless, for instance tracing back-in-time not only plants and animals but also ancient human migrations and viral paths.

  1. Sebkhet Karkura: an example of a semi-arid Mediterranean wetland rich in biotic sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsamad, Esam O.; Elbabour, Mansour M.

    2014-05-01

    Habitat wetlands in Libya may be grouped into several distinct varieties, according to climate, water supply, soils, and biotic diversity. They include coastal Sebkhas (salt marshes), karst lakes, Wadi estuaries, below sea-level desert lakes, and balat flats (playas) where the soil is saturated part of some rainy seasons forming a kind of ephemeral, shallow lakes in pre-desert areas. The most prominent, however, are the extensive coastal salt marshes. These have either organic or inorganic soils, or both, depending on their location and climate conditions. Soils common to most coastal wetlands are composed largely of inorganic material in the form of sand, silt, or clay; in addition to organic material formed by decayed plants and various biotic sediments. For the purpose of the present poster, however, Sebkhet Karkura, an extensive stretch of about 50 km square (20 km long by an average width of 2.5 km) of Sebkha/wetland formation, located about 80 km southwest of Benghazi, will serve as an example of coastal Sebkhas. Here, the sediments are consisting mostly of dark earth brown sandy silt with salt and gypsum. Pure-salt deposits are normally extracted for salt processing in the area. Loams, silt, gravel, and calcareous sand are also present. At the surface of the wetland, calcarenites are fairly common but sand-beach and sand-dunes are representing the major sediments along the coastal wetland area. The recent biotal components of these sediments are described and a number of recent small-sized benthic seashells, belonging to phylum mollusca, have been investigated along the seaside of Sabkhet Karkura and several species have been identified. It is worth noting that Sebkhet Karkura, as well as other similar coastal wetlands, currently face serious threats due to human action, especially over exploitation of their resources, urban encroachments, dredging, and solid waste dumping. Increased awareness on the part of the general public of wetland ecological values

  2. Ecosystem development in roadside grasslands: Biotic control, plant-soil interactions, and dispersal limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Palacios, P.; Bowker, M.A.; Maestre, F.T.; Soliveres, S.; Valladares, F.; Papadopoulos, J.; Escudero, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roadside grasslands undergoing secondary succession are abundant, and represent ecologically meaningful examples of novel, human-created ecosystems. Interactions between plant and soil communities (hereafter plant-soil interactions) are of major importance in understanding the role of biotic control in ecosystem functioning, but little is known about these links in the context of ecosystem restoration and succession. The assessment of the key biotic communities and interactions driving ecosystem development will help practitioners to better allocate the limited resources devoted to roadside grassland restoration. We surveyed roadside grasslands from three successional stages (0-2, 7-9, and > 20 years) in two Mediterranean regions of Spain. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate how interactions between plants, biological soil crusts (BSCs), and soil microbial functional diversity (soil microorganisms) affect indicators of ecosystem development and restoration: plant similarity to the reference ecosystem, erosion control, and soil C storage and N accumulation. Changes in plant community composition along the successional gradient exerted the strongest influence on these indicators. High BSC cover was associated with high soil stability, and high soil microbial functional diversity from late-successional stages was associated with high soil fertility. Contrary to our expectations, the indirect effects of plants, mediated by either BSCs or soil microorganisms, were very weak in both regions, suggesting a minor role for plant-soil interactions upon ecosystem development indicators over long periods. Our results suggest that natural vegetation dynamics effectively improved ecosystem development within a time frame of 20 years in the grasslands evaluated. They also indicate that this time could be shortened if management actions focus on: (1) maintaining wellconserved natural areas close to roadsides to enhance plant compositional changes towards late

  3. Ecotoxicological assessment of flocculant modified soil for lake restoration using an integrated biotic toxicity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Honggang; Pan, Gang

    2016-06-15

    Flocculant modified soils/clays are being increasingly studied as geo-engineering materials for lake restoration and harmful algal bloom control. However, the potential impacts of adding these materials in aquatic ecological systems remain unclear. This study investigated the potential effects of chitosan, cationic starch, chitosan modified soils (MS-C) and cationic starch modified soils (MS-S) on the aquatic organisms by using a bioassay battery. The toxicity potential of these four flocculants was quantitatively assessed using an integrated biotic toxicity index (BTI). The test system includes four aquatic species, namely Chlorella vulgaris, Daphnia magna, Cyprinus carpio and Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri, which represent four trophic levels in the freshwater ecosystem. Results showed that median effect concentrations (EC50) of the MS-C and MS-S were 31-124 times higher than chitosan and cationic starch, respectively. D. magna was the most sensitive species to the four flocculants. Histological examination of C. carpio showed that significant pathological changes were found in gills. Different from chitosan and cationic starch, MS-C and MS-S significantly alleviated the acute toxicities of chitosan and cationic starch. The toxicity order of the four flocculants based on BTI were cationic starch > chitosan > MS-S > MS-C. The results suggested that BTI can be used as a quantitative and comparable indicator to assess biotic toxicity for aquatic geo-engineering materials. Chitosan or cationic starch modified soil/clay materials can be used at their optimal dosage without causing substantial adverse effects to the bioassay battery in aquatic ecosystem. PMID:26321048

  4. Niche-habitat mechanisms and biotic interactions explain the coexistence and abundance of congeneric sandgrouse species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-López, Ana; Viñuela, Javier; Suárez, Francisco; Hervás, Israel; García, Jesús T

    2014-09-01

    Ascertaining which niche processes allow coexistence between closely related species is of special interest in ecology. We quantified variations in the environmental niches and densities of two congeneric species, the pin-tailed and the black-bellied sandgrouse (Pterocles alchata and Pterocles orientalis) in allopatry and sympatry under similar abiotic, habitat and dispersal contexts to understand their coexistence. Using principal component analysis, we defined environmental gradients (niche dimensions) including abiotic, habitat and anthropogenic variables, and calculated niche breadth, position and overlap of both species in sympatry and allopatry. Additionally, sandgrouse density was modelled as a function of the niche dimensions and the density of the other species. We found evidence that each species occupies distinct environmental niches in sympatry and in allopatry. The black-bellied sandgrouse exploits a broader range of environmental conditions (wider niche breadth) while the pin-tailed sandgrouse reaches high densities where conditions seem to match its optimum. In sympatry, both species shift their niches to intermediate positions, indicating the importance of abiotic factors in setting coexistence areas. Environmental conditions determine regional densities of pin-tailed sandgrouse whereas biotic interactions explain the density of the black-bellied sandgrouse in areas with abiotic conditions similarly conducive for both species. Highly suitable areas for the pin-tailed sandgrouse fall beyond the upper thermal limit of the black-bellied sandgrouse, leading to niche segregation and low densities for the latter. Finally, local niche shift and expansion plus possible heterospecific aggregation allow the pin-tailed sandgrouse to thrive in a priori less favourable environments. This work provides insight into how different mechanisms allow species coexistence and how species densities vary in sympatry compared to allopatry as a result of environmental

  5. Identification of microRNAs and their corresponding targets involved in the susceptibility interaction of wheat response to Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hao; Wang, Ting; Feng, Chuanxin; Zhang, Qiong; Zhang, Xinmei; Huang, Lili; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play very important roles in plant defense responses. However, little is known about their roles in the susceptibility interaction between wheat and Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst). In this study, two miRNA libraries were constructed from the leaves of the cultivar Xingzi 9104 inoculated with the virulent Pst race CYR32 and sterile water, respectively. A total of 1316 miRNA candidates, including 173 known miRNAs that were generated from 98 pre-miRNAs, were obtained. The remaining 1143 miRNA candidates included 145 conserved and 998 wheat-specific miRNAs that were generated from 87 and 1088 pre-miRNAs, respectively. The 173 known and 145 conserved miRNAs were sub-classified into 63 miRNA families. The target genes of wheat miRNAs were also confirmed using degradome sequencing technology. Most of the annotated target genes were related to signal transduction or energy metabolism. Additionally, we found that miRNAs and their target genes form complicated regulation networks. The expression profiles of miRNAs and their corresponding target genes were further analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and the results indicate that some miRNAs are involved in the compatible wheat-Pst susceptibility interaction. Importantly, tae-miR1432 was highly expressed when wheat was challenged with CYR32, and the corresponding target gene, predicted to be a calcium ion-binding protein, also exhibited upregulated expression but a divergent expression trend. PC-3P-7484, a specific wheat miRNA, was highly expressed in the wheat response to Pst infection, while the expression of the corresponding target gene ubiquillin was dramatically downregulated. These data provide the foundation for evaluating the important regulatory roles of miRNAs in wheat-Pst susceptibility interaction. PMID:26563616

  6. Scientific Opinion on the risk to plant health posed by Puccinia horiana Hennings for the EU territory, with the identification and evaluation of risk reduction options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Plant Health (PLH

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Panel on Plant Health conducted a pest risk assessment for Puccinia horiana Hennings (the causal agent of chrysanthemum white rust for the EU territory, identified risk management options and evaluated their effectiveness. The assessment was conducted taking into account current EU legislation. The Panel also provided an opinion on the effectiveness of the present EU requirements against this organism, listed in Council Directive 2000/29/EC. Two major pathways for entry were identified: plant material of susceptible hosts for propagation purposes and cut flowers of Chrysanthemum × morifolium. The probability of further entry of the pest was considered unlikely, as the existing certification schemes for propagation material should reduce the risk of importing infected cuttings. For cut flowers, pest transfer to susceptible hosts is associated with the potentially incorrect disposal of cut flower waste within the vicinity of places of production, which is considered a rare event. The probability of establishment and further spread were both considered very likely. The current overall impact in the risk assessment area was considered minor, with medium uncertainty, mainly because standard protective actions are taken in most EU production areas. Risk reduction options to reduce the probability of entry and spread and mitigate the impact were analysed. Council Directive 2000/29/EC addresses mainly the sanitary status of the propagation material. The Directive cannot prevent the entry, establishment and spread, or mitigate the impact, of the pathogen. Were the current regulation to be removed, the frequency of introduction would probably increase. This poses a risk because, although the pest is widespread in the risk assessment area, not all Member States are infested and not all pest pathotypes are present. If a statutory certification system, with associated import requirements for propagation material of host plants, were introduced, this

  7. Changes of Nitric Oxide and Its Relationship with H2O2 and Ca2+ in Defense Interactions between Wheat and Puccinia Triticina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Qiao

    Full Text Available In this research, the wheat cultivar 'Lovrin 10' and Puccinia triticina races 165 and 260 were used to constitute compatible and incompatible combinations to investigate the relationship between NO and H2O2 and between NO and calcium (Ca(2+ signaling in the cell defense process by pharmacological means. The specific fluorescent probe DAF-FM DA was coupled with confocal laser scanning microscopy and used to label intracellular nitric oxide (NO and monitoring the real-time NO dynamics during the processes of wheat defense response triggered by P. triticina infection. The results showed that at 4 h after inoculation, weak green fluorescence was observed in the stomatal guard cells at the P. triticina infection site in the incompatible combination, which indicates a small amount of NO production. Twelve hours after inoculation, the fluorescence of NO in- cell adjacent to the stomata gradually intensified, and the NO fluorescent area also expanded continuously; the green fluorescence primarily occurred in the cells undergoing a hypersensitive response (HR at 24-72 h after inoculation. For the compatible combination, however, a small amount of green fluorescence was observed in stomata where the pathogenic contact occurred at 4 h after inoculation, and fluorescence was not observed thereafter. Injections of the NO scavenger c-PTIO prior to inoculation postponed the onset of NO production to 48 h after inoculation and suppressed HR advancement. The injection of imidazole, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, or EGTA, an extracellular calcium chelator, in the leaves prior to inoculation, delayed the onset of NO production in the incompatible combination and suppressed HR advancement. Combined with our previous results, it could be concluded that, Ca(2+ and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 are involved in upstream of NO production to induce the HR cell death during P. triticina infection, and Ca(2+, NO and H2O2 are jointly involved in the signal transduction process of HR

  8. Comparative genomics of Australian isolates of the wheat stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici reveals extensive polymorphism in candidate effector genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Garnica, Diana P; Karaoglu, Haydar; Sperschneider, Jana; Nemri, Adnane; Xu, Bo; Mago, Rohit; Cuomo, Christina A; Rathjen, John P; Park, Robert F; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Dodds, Peter N

    2014-01-01

    The wheat stem rust fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) is one of the most destructive pathogens of wheat. In this study, a draft genome was built for a founder Australian Pgt isolate of pathotype (pt.) 21-0 (collected in 1954) by next generation DNA sequencing. A combination of reference-based assembly using the genome of the previously sequenced American Pgt isolate CDL 75-36-700-3 (p7a) and de novo assembly were performed resulting in a 92 Mbp reference genome for Pgt isolate 21-0. Approximately 13 Mbp of de novo assembled sequence in this genome is not present in the p7a reference assembly. This novel sequence is not specific to 21-0 as it is also present in three other Pgt rust isolates of independent origin. The new reference genome was subsequently used to build a pan-genome based on five Australian Pgt isolates. Transcriptomes from germinated urediniospores and haustoria were separately assembled for pt. 21-0 and comparison of gene expression profiles showed differential expression in ∼10% of the genes each in germinated spores and haustoria. A total of 1,924 secreted proteins were predicted from the 21-0 transcriptome, of which 520 were classified as haustorial secreted proteins (HSPs). Comparison of 21-0 with two presumed clonal field derivatives of this lineage (collected in 1982 and 1984) that had evolved virulence on four additional resistance genes (Sr5, Sr11, Sr27, SrSatu) identified mutations in 25 HSP effector candidates. Some of these mutations could explain their novel virulence phenotypes. PMID:25620970

  9. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Race TKTTF of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici that Caused a Wheat Stem Rust Epidemic in Southern Ethiopia in 2013-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, Pablo; Newcomb, Maria; Szabo, Les J; Rouse, Matthew; Johnson, Jerry; Gale, Samuel; Luster, Douglas G; Hodson, David; Cox, James A; Burgin, Laura; Hort, Matt; Gilligan, Christopher A; Patpour, Mehran; Justesen, Annemarie F; Hovmøller, Mogens S; Woldeab, Getaneh; Hailu, Endale; Hundie, Bekele; Tadesse, Kebede; Pumphrey, Michael; Singh, Ravi P; Jin, Yue

    2015-07-01

    A severe stem rust epidemic occurred in southern Ethiopia during November 2013 to January 2014, with yield losses close to 100% on the most widely grown wheat cultivar, 'Digalu'. Sixty-four stem rust samples collected from the regions were analyzed. A meteorological model for airborne spore dispersal was used to identify which regions were most likely to have been infected from postulated sites of initial infection. Based on the analyses of 106 single-pustule isolates derived from these samples, four races of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici were identified: TKTTF, TTKSK, RRTTF, and JRCQC. Race TKTTF was found to be the primary cause of the epidemic in the southeastern zones of Bale and Arsi. Isolates of race TKTTF were first identified in samples collected in early October 2013 from West Arsi. It was the sole or predominant race in 31 samples collected from Bale and Arsi zones after the stem rust epidemic was established. Race TTKSK was recovered from 15 samples from Bale and Arsi zones at low frequencies. Genotyping indicated that isolates of race TKTTF belongs to a genetic lineage that is different from the Ug99 race group and is composed of two distinct genetic types. Results from evaluation of selected germplasm indicated that some cultivars and breeding lines resistant to the Ug99 race group are susceptible to race TKTTF. Appearance of race TKTTF and the ensuing epidemic underlines the continuing threats and challenges posed by stem rust not only in East Africa but also to wider-scale wheat production. PMID:25775107

  10. Variability generation in sugar cane for resistance to mosaic viruses and rusts (puccinia melanocephala) by means of the cultivation of explants and irradiated callus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the purpose to generate sugar cane variability in vitro, in order the obtain genotypes resistant to the mosaic viruses and to the rusts (Puccinia melanocephala), callus coming from cultivars susceptible to the mosaic viruses (B 6749, B 7987 and PR 62258) and to the rusts (B 4362 and PR 641791) were irradiated with different gamma radiation dose. The IVIC cobalt source was used, being applied two, four, eight and twelve krads. The effect of irradiation on the percentage of regeneration of plants for each dose and variety was evaluated. The regenerated plants were taken to shelter, where they were inoculated with the mosaic viruses B (SCMB-B). The asymptomatic subclons were transplanted to field in August of 1992, to evaluate the presence of symptoms of mosaic and rusts. A high proportion of the plants didn't show symptoms of illnesses, being obtained 2,35% of sick plants coming from cultivar B 6749 and 0,72 from cultivar PR 62258. This low incidence of infection remained stable up to the following year of evaluation. The genetic variation was studied through isoenzymatics pattern, peroxidase specifically. This analysis allowed to detect variation in the number and intensity of the bands among the subclons and in the original variety. 229 subclons were selected from cultivar B 6749 and they were incorporated to the program of cultivation improvement. Among them 60 subclons, with good agronomic and productivity characteristics, were chosen and continue being evaluated to be incorporated to the regional essays, last phase of the selection process

  11. The effect of Puccinia komarovii Tranzsch. infection on characters of Impatiens parviflora DC. in Galio sylvatici-Carpinetum (R. Tx. 1937 Oberd. 1957 forest association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Piskorz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine how internal diversity of oak-hornbeam forest modifies the course and effects of infestation of small-flowered balsam (Impatiens parviflora with rust Puccinia komarovii. The study investigated the effect of the disease on the demography of the population, and the habit and biomass allocation of the infested specimens, as well as the initiation of non-specific defense mechanisms. It was shown that: 1 the percentage of infected specimens was independent of the undergrowth-coverage rate and of the I. parviflora density; 2 infected populations differ from healthy ones in the seasonal dynamics of abundance changes; 3 high mortality is observed as early as May and the first part of June, i.e. it pertains to specimens, which did not begin reproduction; 4 the presence of infection and its intensity stimulate the growth of the stem and the hypocotyl; 5 fresh weight of infected specimens is by almost 30% lower in comparison to the weight of uninfected plants; the weight of badly infected plants decreases by 20% in comparison to the less severely infected balsam plants; the weight of generative organs drops most significantly, even by over 50%; 6 biomass allocation does not fluctuate considerably; 7 reproduction effort expressed by the ratio of the weight of fruits (or only seeds to the total biomass shows a distinct downward trend; 8 the environmental factor does not affect the force of defense mechanisms, the strength of biochemical response of diseased plants depends on the degree of their infestation.

  12. Virulence and Simple Sequence Repeat Marker Segregation in a Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici Population Produced by Selfing a Chinese Isolate on Berberis shensiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuan; Zhan, Gangming; Chen, Xianming; Tungruentragoon, Angkana; Lu, Xia; Zhao, Jie; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-02-01

    Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stripe rust, frequently produces new races overcoming resistance in wheat cultivars. A recently identified race, V26 with virulence to Yr26 and many other stripe rust resistance genes, has a high potential to cause epidemics in China. In this study, teliospores from a single-urediniospore isolate of V26 (Pinglan 17-7) produced on the wheat line 92R137 (Yr26) were used to produce a sexual population through selfing by infecting Berberis shensiana plants under controlled conditions. One hundred and eighteen progeny isolates and the parental isolate were phenotyped for virulence/avirulence on 24 Yr gene lines of wheat. These progeny isolates were all avirulent to Yr5, Yr8, Yr15, and YrTr1 and virulent to Yr1, Yr2, Yr7, Yr9, Yr10, Yr17, Yr24, Yr25, Yr26, YrA, YrExp2, and YrV23, indicating that the parental isolate is homozygous avirulent or homozygous virulent at these loci. The progeny population segregated for avirulence to Yr6, Yr43, and YrSP at one locus (3 avirulent:1 virulent ratio); for virulence to Yr27 and Yr28 at one locus (3 virulent:1 avirulent); and for Yr4, Yr32, and Yr44 at two loci (15 virulent:1 avirulent). Among the eight segregating avirulence/virulence loci, association was found between virulence to Yr4 and Yr32, as well as between virulence to Yr6 and Yr43 based on χ(2) tests. From 82 genotypically different progeny isolates, 24 pathotypes and 82 multilocus genotypes were identified. The results show that a highly diverse population can be produced from a single isolate by selfing on a barberry plant and sexually produced population can be used to genetically characterize virulence of the stripe rust pathogen. PMID:26551448

  13. Molecular implications from ssr markers for stripe rust (puccinia striiformis F.Sp. tritici) resistance gene in bread wheat line N95175

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici is one of the most devastating diseases of wheat in China as well as in Pakistan. In the present studies F2 population was established by crossing N95175 resistant to stripe rust race CYR32 with two susceptible lines Huixianhong and Abbondanza to molecularly tag resistance gene existing in wheat line N95175. The segregation of phenotype was accorded with an expected 3:1 ratio in both combinations studied and fit the model of a single dominant gene controlling stripe rust resistance in N95175. Thirty five SSR primer pairs were screened on the parents and bulks and also on individuals since resistance gene to be located in chromosome 1B. The result indicated that most of resistant plants amplified same band as resistant parent while susceptible plants amplified same as susceptible parents studied and considered that markers co-segregated with resistant loci in N95175. This yellow rust resistance gene was considered to be Yr26 originally thought to be also located in chromosome arm 1BS linked to marker loci Xgwm273 and Xgwm11 with genetic distances ranging from 1.075cM to 2.74cM in both combinations studied. However, the closest loci were observed 2.67cM for Xgwm273 and 1.075cM for Xgwm11 in Huixianhong XN95175 and Abbondanza XN95175 crosses respectively. Hence, it has been concluded that the PCR-based micro satellite markers Xgwm273 and Xgwm11 located in chromosome 1B were shown to be very effective for the detection of Yr26 gene in segregating population and can be applied in future wheat breeding strategies. (author)

  14. PHYSIOLOGICAL RACES AND VIRULENCE DIVERSITY OF PUCCINIA GRAMINIS PERS. F. SP. TRITICI ERIKS. & E. HENN. ON WHEAT IN TIGRAY REGION OF ETHIOPIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getaneh Woldeab

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheat stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici is a disease that causes complete annihilation of wheat crops over wide areas during epidemic years. The highland of Ethiopia is considered as a hot spot area for the development of stem rust complex. Hence, this study was carried out to detect the virulence diversity of P. graminis f. sp. tritici in Southern Tigray. The findings of this paper were based on race analysis through inoculation of stem rust populations, isolation and multiplication of single-pustule of the pathogen and race determination by inoculating on stem rust differential hosts. The phenotypic characterization of P. graminis f. sp. tritici resulted in identification of 20 races from 32 isolates, which included the most prevalent races TTSNK, RRJJC and HRJJC with a frequency of 9.4% each and the most virulent races TTKSK and TTSSK each making 85% of Sr genes ineffective. Three important races (TTSSK, TTSNK and RRTTF are new to the study area and the country (Ethiopia as a whole putting a significant wheat proportion at risk. Among 20 wheat stem rust differential hosts, four were found effective for 75% and more of the races identified. Differential host carrying Sr24 was effective to all, while gene SrTmp was effective to 90% of the races followed by Sr17 and Sr31 each effective for 75%. In contrast, differential hosts carrying SrMcN, Sr9b, Sr9g and Sr10 were ineffective to 96.9, 93.8, 87.5 and 81.2% of the isolates tested, respectively. Thus, use of effective Sr genes such as Sr24 and SrTmp in single cultivar through gene pyramiding has paramount importance as the additive effects of several genes gives the cultivar a wider base  stem rust resistance along with periodic race survey. 

  15. Identifying QTL for high-temperature adult-plant resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) in the spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar 'Louise'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Arron Hyrum; Chen, X M; Garland-Campbell, K; Kidwell, K K

    2009-10-01

    Over time, many single, all-stage resistance genes to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are circumvented by race changes in the pathogen. In contrast, high-temperature, adult-plant resistance (HTAP), which only is expressed during the adult-plant stage and when air temperatures are warm, provides durable protection against stripe rust. Our objective was to identify major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for HTAP resistance to stripe rust in the spring wheat cultivar 'Louise'. The mapping population consisted of 188 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) from a Louise (resistant) by 'Penawawa' (susceptible) cross. F(5:6) lines were evaluated for stripe rust reaction under natural infection in replicated field trials at five locations in the US Pacific Northwest in 2007 and 2008. Infection type (IT) and disease severity were recorded for each RIL 2-4 times per location. In all environments, Penawawa, the susceptible parent, was rated with an IT ranging from 6 to 8 at all growth stages evaluated. In contrast, Louise, the resistant parent, was rated with an IT of 2 or 3 across growth stages. Distribution of IT values was bimodal, indicating a single major gene was affecting the trait. The parents and RIL population were evaluated with 295 polymorphic simple sequence repeat and one single nucleotide polymorphism markers. One major QTL, designated QYrlo.wpg-2BS, associated with HTAP resistance in Louise, was detected on chromosome 2BS (LOD scores ranging from 5.5 to 62.3 across locations and years) within a 16.9 cM region flanked by Xwmc474 and Xgwm148. SSR markers associated with QYrlo.wpg-2BS are currently being used in marker-based forward breeding strategies to transfer the target region into adapted germplasm to improve the durability of resistance in resulting cultivars. PMID:19644666

  16. Selection of parents for crossing based on genotyping and phenotyping for stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis) resistance and agronomic traits in bread wheat breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Irfaq; Khan, Mir Ajab; Khan, Abdul Jabbar; Khattak, Gul Sanat Shah; Mohammad, Tila; Ahmad, Mushtaq

    2011-01-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) germplasm consisting of 45 genotypes were clustered phenotypically using ten morphological traits and Area Under Disease Progress Curve (AUDPC) as measure of stripe rust resistance. The clustering was ratified by using twenty three molecular markers (SSR, EST and STS) linked to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) resistant QTLs. The aim was to asses the extent of genetic variability among the genotypes in order to select the parents for crossing between the resistant and susceptible genotypes with respect to stripe rust. The Euclidian dissimilarity values resulted from phenotypic data regarding morphological traits and AUDPC were used to construct a dendrogram for clustering the accessions. Using un-weighted pair group method with arithmetic means, another dendrogram resulted from the similarity coefficient values was used to distinguish the genotypes with respect to stripe rust. Clustering based on phenotypic data produced two major groups and five clusters (with Euclidian dissimilarity ranging from 244 to 16.16) whereas genotypic data yielded two major groups and four clusters (with percent similarity coefficient values ranging from 0.1 to 46.0) to separate the gene pool into highly resistant, resistant, moderately resistant, moderately susceptible and susceptible genotypes. With few exceptions, the outcome of both type of clustering was almost similar and resistant as well as susceptible genotypes came in the same clusters of molecular genotyping as yielded by phenotypic clustering. As a result seven genotypes (Bakhtawar-92, Frontana, Saleem 2000, Tatara, Inqilab-91, Fakhre Sarhad and Karwan) of diverse genetic background were selected for pyramiding stripe rust resistant genes as well as some other agronomic traits after hybridization. PMID:22329159

  17. Stable carbon isotope analysis to distinguish biotic and abiotic degradation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane in groundwater sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette Martina; Hunkeler, Daniel; Tuxen, Nina;

    2014-01-01

    The fate and treatability of 1,1,1-TCA by natural and enhanced reductive dechlorination was studied in laboratory microcosms. The study shows that compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) identified an alternative 1,1,1-TCA degradation pathway that cannot be explained by assuming biotic reductive...

  18. Impact of phenolic compounds and related enzymes in Sorghum varieties for resistance and susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stresses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicko, M.H.; Gruppen, H.; Barro, C.; Traore, A.S.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Contents of phenolic compounds and related enzymes before and after sorghum grain germination were compared between varieties either resistant or susceptible to biotic (sooty stripe, sorghum midge, leaf anthracnose, striga, and grain molds) and abiotic (lodging, drought resistance, and photoperiod s

  19. Seperating the role of biotic interactions and climate in determining adaptive response of plants to climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomiolo, S.; Putten, van der W.H.; Tielbörger, K.

    2015-01-01

    Altered rainfall regimes will greatly affect the response of plant species to climate change. However, little is known about how direct effects of changing precipitation on plant performance may depend on other abiotic factors and biotic interactions. We used reciprocal transplants between climatica

  20. Biotic development comparisons of a wetland constructed to treat mine water drainage with a natural wetland system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using 5-yr of baseline data from a constructed wetland, the authors compared the biotic changes in this wetland to conditions in a natural wetland to determine if biotic development patterns were similar. The constructed wetland was built in 1985 to treat a coal mine discharge and was planted with broadleaf cattail (Typha latifolia) within the three-cell, 0.26 ha wetland. Species richness in permanent quadrants of the constructed wetland declined over the study period, while cattail coverage increased. Plant species composition diversified at the edges, with several species becoming established. The constructed wetland deepened and expanded slightly in area coverage during the study period. The constructed wetland supported herptofaunal communities that appeared more stable through time than those of the natural wetland and sustained a rudimentary food chain dependent upon autotrophic algal populations. Despite fundamental differences in substrate base, morphology, and water flow patterns, biotic trends for the constructed wetland coincided with succession-like patterns at the natural wetland. They suggest that further shifts in the biotic composition of the constructed wetland are likely, but the system should continue to persist if primary production meets or exceeds the microbial metabolic requirements necessary to treat mine drainage

  1. Climatic and biotic changes around the Carboniferous/Permian boundary recorded in the continental basins of the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Opluštil, S.; Šimůnek, Z.; Zajíc, Jaroslav; Mencl, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 1 (2013), s. 114-151. ISSN 0166-5162 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : biotic change * Bohemian Massif * Carboniferous-Permian transition * continental basin Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.313, year: 2013

  2. Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal: Phase 2, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results reported here establish the relevance and propose a method for including biotic transport in the assessment and licensing process for commercial low-level waste disposal sites. Earlier work identified the biotic transport mechanisms and process scenarios linking biotic transport with dose to man, and developed models for assessment of impacts. Model modification and improvement efforts in enhancing the ability to represent soil erosion and soil transport within the trench cover. Two alternative hypotheses on plant root uptake were incorporated into the model to represent transport of radionuclides by roots that penetrate the buried waste. Enhancements were also made to the scenario for future site intruder activities. Representation of waste package decomposition in the model was confirmed as the best available alternative. Results from sensitivity analyses indicate that additional information is needed to evaluate the alternative hypotheses for plant root uptake of buried wastes. Site-specific evaluations of the contribution from biotic transport to the potential dose to man establish the relevance in the assessment process. The BIOPORT/MAXI1 computer software package is proposed for dose assessments of commercial low-level waste disposal sites

  3. Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal: Phase 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, D.H.; Cadwell, L.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Prohammer, L.A.; Simmons, M.A.

    1986-11-01

    The results reported here establish the relevance and propose a method for including biotic transport in the assessment and licensing process for commercial low-level waste disposal sites. Earlier work identified the biotic transport mechanisms and process scenarios linking biotic transport with dose to man, and developed models for assessment of impacts. Model modification and improvement efforts in enhancing the ability to represent soil erosion and soil transport within the trench cover. Two alternative hypotheses on plant root uptake were incorporated into the model to represent transport of radionuclides by roots that penetrate the buried waste. Enhancements were also made to the scenario for future site intruder activities. Representation of waste package decomposition in the model was confirmed as the best available alternative. Results from sensitivity analyses indicate that additional information is needed to evaluate the alternative hypotheses for plant root uptake of buried wastes. Site-specific evaluations of the contribution from biotic transport to the potential dose to man establish the relevance in the assessment process. The BIOPORT/MAXI1 computer software package is proposed for dose assessments of commercial low-level waste disposal sites.

  4. Effects of the prebiotics GroBiotic-A and inulin on the intestinal microbiota of red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two separate feeding trials examined the effects of dietary supplementation of the prebiotics GroBiotic®-A and inulin on growth performance and gastrointestinal tract microbiota of the red drum Sciaenops ocellatus. In the first feeding trial, fishmeal-based diets without prebiotics or supplemented ...

  5. Cross-tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants: a focus on resistance to aphid infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Rasool, Brwa; Davey, Jack W; Hancock, Robert D

    2016-03-01

    Plants co-evolved with an enormous variety of microbial pathogens and insect herbivores under daily and seasonal variations in abiotic environmental conditions. Hence, plant cells display a high capacity to respond to diverse stresses through a flexible and finely balanced response network that involves components such as reduction-oxidation (redox) signalling pathways, stress hormones and growth regulators, as well as calcium and protein kinase cascades. Biotic and abiotic stress responses use common signals, pathways and triggers leading to cross-tolerance phenomena, whereby exposure to one type of stress can activate plant responses that facilitate tolerance to several different types of stress. While the acclimation mechanisms and adaptive responses that facilitate responses to single biotic and abiotic stresses have been extensively characterized, relatively little information is available on the dynamic aspects of combined biotic/abiotic stress response. In this review, we consider how the abiotic environment influences plant responses to attack by phloem-feeding aphids. Unravelling the signalling cascades that underpin cross-tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses will allow the identification of new targets for increasing environmental resilience in crops. PMID:26936830

  6. Influence of Solar Radiation and Biotic Interactions on Bacterial and Eukaryotic Communities Associated with Sewage Decomposition in Ambient Water - Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewage and ambient water both consist of a highly complex array of bacteria and eukaryotic microbes. When these communities are mixed, the persistence of sewage-derived pathogens in environmental waters can represent a significant public health concern. Solar radiation and biotic...

  7. Annual grass invasion in sagebrush-steppe: The relative importance of climate, soil properties and biotic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sheel; Sheley, Roger L.

    2016-01-01

    The invasion by winter-annual grasses (AGs) such as Bromus tectorum into sagebrush steppe throughout the western USA is a classic example of a biological invasion with multiple, interacting climate, soil and biotic factors driving the invasion, although few studies have examined all components together. Across a 6000-km2 area of the northern Great Basin, we conducted a field assessment of 100 climate, soil, and biotic (functional group abundances, diversity) factors at each of 90 sites that spanned an invasion gradient ranging from 0 to 100 % AG cover. We first determined which biotic and abiotic factors had the strongest correlative relationships with AGs and each resident functional group. We then used regression and structural equation modeling to explore how multiple ecological factors interact to influence AG abundance. Among biotic interactions, we observed negative relationships between AGs and biodiversity, perennial grass cover, resident species richness, biological soil crust cover and shrub density, whereas perennial and annual forb cover, tree cover and soil microbial biomass had no direct linkage to AG. Among abiotic factors, AG cover was strongly related to climate (increasing cover with increasing temperature and aridity), but had weak relationships with soil factors. Our structural equation model showed negative effects of perennial grasses and biodiversity on AG cover while integrating the negative effects of warmer climate and positive influence of belowground processes on resident functional groups. Our findings illustrate the relative importance of biotic interactions and climate on invasive abundance, while soil properties appear to have stronger relationships with resident biota than with invasives.

  8. Localisation of genes for resistance against ¤Blumeria graminis¤ f.sp. ¤hordei¤ and ¤Puccinia graminis¤ in a cross between a barley cultivar and a wild barley (¤Hordeum vulgare¤ ssp. ¤spontaneum¤) line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backes, G.; Madsen, L.H.; Jaiser, H.; Stougaard, J.; Herz, M.; Mohler, V.; Jahoor, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aims of this investigation have been to map new (quantitative) resistance genes against powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei L., and leaf rust, caused by Puccinia hordei L., in a cross between the barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare) cultivar "Vada" and the wild barley...

  9. BIOTIC INTEGRITY OF STREAMS IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATOR OPERABLE UNITS, 1996 TO 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paller, M; Susan Dyer, S

    2004-11-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been divided into six Integrator Operable Units (IOUs) that correspond to the watersheds of the five major streams on the SRS (Upper Three Runs, Fourmile Branch, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs) and the portions of the Savannah River and Savannah River Swamp associated with the SRS. The streams are the primary integrators within each IOU because they potentially receive, through surface or subsurface drainage, soluble contaminants from all waste sites within their watersheds. If these contaminants reach biologically significant levels, they would be expected to effect the numbers, types, and health of stream organisms. In this study, biological sampling was conducted within each IOU as a measure of the cumulative ecological effects of the waste sites within the IOUs. The use of information from biological sampling to assess environmental quality is often termed bioassessment. The IOU bioassessment program included 38 sites in SRS streams and nine sites in the Savannah River. Sampling was conducted in 1996 to 1998, 2000, and 2003. Four bioassessment methods were used to evaluate ecological conditions in the IOU streams: the Index of Biotic Integrity, the Fish Health Assessment Index, measurement of fish tissue contaminant levels, and two benthic macroinvertebrate indices. The Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) is an EPA supported method based on comparison of ecologically important and sensitive fish assemblage variables between potentially disturbed and reference (i.e., undisturbed) sites. It is designed to assess the ability of a stream to support a self-sustaining biological community and ecological processes typical of undisturbed, natural conditions. Since many types of contaminants can bioaccumulate, fish tissue contaminant data were used to determine the types of chemicals fish were exposed to and their relative magnitudes among IOUs. The Fish Health Assessment Index (HAI) is an EPA supported method for assessing

  10. Environmental and biotic changes across the Permian Triassic boundary in western Tethys: The Bulla parastratotype, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farabegoli, Enzo; Perri, M. Cristina; Posenato, Renato

    2007-01-01

    The sedimentary and biotic evolution of a 190 m interval of shallow marine and lagoonal facies in the Bellerophon and Werfen formations in the Southern Alps has allowed comparison of western with eastern Tethys: Meishan D section (southern China), Salt Range (Pakistan) and Abadeh (Iran). Results are as follows: The upper part of the Bellerophon Fm. (Changhsingian changxingensis-deflecta Zone) shows only modest biotic variation connected with tectonically driven local variation and perhaps to more general climatic variation. The δ13C decrease starting in the uppermost 30 m of the Bellerophon Fm. is correlated with decrease in global organic productivity starting about 1 m below the PTB in Chinese sequences and 20 m below in the Abadeh section. This interval culminated in a regression truncated by an unconformity-paraconformity (Unconformity 1). The uppermost Bellerophon Fm. is a ca. 1 m transgressive-regressive sedimentary cycle, the informally named Bulla Mbr (Changhsingian: Early praeparvus Zone). The maximum flooding interval of this unit possibly had a slight increase in biodiversity, mainly in foraminifers, algae and brachiopods. The high increase in biodiversity previously reported may, in part, reflect abundance of biota and organic matter reworked into transgressive and regressive intervals. We suggest partial correlation of the basal unconformity of the Bulla Mbr (Unconformity 1) with the regressive uppermost Bed 24e of the Meishan D section marking the disappearance of foraminifers and algae in the eastern Tethys. We also suggest diachronous disappearance of benthic taxa in Tethys, with the Southern Alps acting like a refugium. The main extinction (first extinction phase, mainly regarding foraminifers) in the Southern Alps occurred in a thin ca. 25 cm interval including the uppermost regressive Bulla Mbr, Unconformity 2, and possibly, the basal transgressive bed of the Tesero Mbr of the Werfen Fm. This interval is correlated in part with regressive Bed 26

  11. An Index of Biotic Integrity for shallow streams of the Hondo River basin, Yucatan Peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) is proposed, based on the fish communities and populations in streams of the Hondo River basin, Mexico-Belize. Freshwater environments in this area are threatened by exotic fishes, eutrophication, and pesticide pollution, among other problems. This IBI should allow to identify the most vulnerable sites and eventually guide rehabilitation efforts. Data on composition, structure, and function of fish communities were evaluated. Twenty-three sites in the Mexican part of the basin were explored; a stratified sample of 13 sites was used to design the IBI, and the rest were used to test and refine the index. Thirty-four candidate indicator metrics were scanned for their correlation with an index of water and habitat quality (IWHQ), as well as for the possible influence of stream width and altitude or distance to the Hondo River mainstem. Twelve variables were selected to constitute the IBI: relative abundances of Astyanax aeneus, 'Cichlasoma' urophthalmus, Poecilia mexicana, Poecilia sp. (a new species, probably endemic to the upper Hondo River basin), Xiphophorus hellerii, and X. maculatus; relative abundances of bentholimnetic, herbivore, and sensitive species; percentage of native and tolerant species; and Pielou's evenness index. Most of the sites have a low-medium quality and integrity, showing impact due to partial channelization or to suboptimal water quality, reflected in scarcity or absence of sensitive species, frequent excess of tolerant species, occasional presence of exotics, dominance of herbivores (perhaps due to proliferation of filamentous algae), or dominance of the opportunistic species P. mexicana. The streams with better water and habitat quality are those farthest away from the river mainstem, probably because of lower human population and economical production. - Research Highlights: → An Index of Biotic Integrity based on fishes is proposed for streams of the Hondo River basin. → Twelve variables were

  12. Drinking water biotic safety of particles and bacteria attached to fines in activated carbon process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei; LIN Tao; WANG Leilei

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,the drinking water biotic safety of particles and bacteria attached to fines in activated carbon process was investigated by actual treatment process and advanced treatment pilot trial with granular activated carbon.In the experiment,the particles were detected by IBR particle calculating instrument,the activated carbon fines were counted on the basis of the most probable number (MPN) with a microscope,the total number of bacteria was analyzed between the conventional agar culture medium and the one with R2A,and the bacteria attached to activated carbon fines was resolved by the homogenization technique.The experimental results showed that the average total number of particles was 205 CNT/mL in the activated carbon effluent during a filter cycle,of which the number of particles with sizes>2μm was 77 CNT/mL more than the present particle control criterion of the American drinking water product standard (50 CNT/mL).The backwash of low density and long duration lowered particle number in the effluent.The MPN of activated carbon frees in the effluent was between 400 and 600 CNT/L,which accounted for less than 5‰ of the total particles from activated carbon filtration for a poor relative level (R2= 0.34).The microorganisms in activated carbon effluent consisted mostly of heterotrophic bacillus and the total bacteria number was five times as high as that of the inflow,i.e.the effluent from sand filter.The actual bacteria number may be truly indicated by the detection technique with R2A culture medium compared with the traditional agar cultivation.The inactivation efficiency of bacteria attached to activated carbon fines was less than 40% under 1.1 mg/L of chlorine contacting for 40 min.Results showed that the particles and bacteria attached to activated carbon fines may influence drinking water biotic safety,and that the effective control measures need to be further investigated.

  13. Effect of biotic lignin decomposition on the fate of radiocesium-contaminated plant litter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fungi are the most important components in the fate of radionuclides deposited in forests following the Fukushima nuclear accident. Pruned woody parts and litter contain a considerable amount of radiocesium. Studies that focused on the migration of radiocesium have demonstrated that its ecological half-life is lower in the humus layer than in the deeper soil zone, suggesting a substantial contribution of litter decomposition on the mobilization of radiocesium. Furthermore, white-rot fungi appear to play a key role in the mobilization of radiocesium because they are the primary source of enzymes necessary to degrade the litter organic matter. Cell walls are the primary component of plant litter; they are composed of cellulose, hemi-cellulose, and lignin. Although cellulose is the most abundant organic compound in litter, the strength of the cell wall is limited by rigid hemi-cellulose complexes that protect the surrounding cellulose microfibrils. In the cell wall, lignin fills the spaces between cellulose and hemi-cellulose; thus, the biotic degradation of lignin could be considered a primary step in litter decomposition. The contribution of the amount of lignin on the fate of radiocesium has not been identified, which limits the possibility of predicting the effect of the bacterial community structure that determines the biodegradation activity of lignin on the vertical migration of radiocesium. Here, we directly addressed the role of lignin as controller of the distribution of radiocesium in soil-ecosystems. Radiocesium-contaminated litter samples were collected with traps set under the target stands, i.e., Japanese flowering cherry trees (Prunus x yedoensis cv. Somei-Yoshino) and Japanese cedars (Cryptomeria japonica) at Abiko (Laboratory of Environmental Science, CRIEPI) located approximately 200 km SSW from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011. The litter samples were inoculated with white-rot fungi having ligno-celluloses-degrading activity, i

  14. Research on mutant barley population under biotic and abiotic stress condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barley is one of the most important cereals with 8.5 million tons production, 3.5 million hectares of sowing area and 2.2 ton/ha yield in Turkey which is also one of the gene centres of barley. Barley is grown in every regions of Turkey where climatic conditions are available for the crop. But barley is the predominant crop in the driest land areas throughout the Anatolian plateau. Winters on that plateau are especially severe. Temperatures of -30 deg C can occur in the mountainous areas in the east, and snow may lie on the ground 120 days of the year. In the west, winter temperatures average below 1 deg C. Summers are hot and dry with temperatures above 30 deg C. Annual precipitation averages about 300 to 400 milimeters and rains mainly in winter. Because of all of these prerequisite conditions, winter barley dominates in Turkey, which indirectly refers to water economy. According to the above mentioned reasons the objectives of this investigation were: a) Improvement of drought resistance, lodding resistance and high yielding barley varieties by mutation breeding in Central Anatolian Region. b ) Determination and selection of abiotic stress such as salt resistance and biotic stress such as net blotch (Drestera teress). In our barley mutation breeding programme under Central Anatolian conditions well adapted Tokak 157/37 variety has been used. We applied 50, 150, 250 Gy gamma ray doses. Selection began at M2 generation. Agronomical characters including earliness, straw length, lodging resistance and disease resistance are monitored in the field and greenhouse. Mutant lines have been tested for salt resistance in the hydrophonic culture which contains 180 mMol and 220 mMol NaCl concentrations. Biotic stress characters such as net blotch, (Drechslera teres) resistance are tested in the greenhouse. Some parameters have been obtained after harvest. Preliminary yield trial and advanced yield trial are started after M4 generations. In M6 generation, we had some

  15. Effect of biotic lignin decomposition on the fate of radiocesium-contaminated plant litter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashida, Shin-nosuke; Yoshihara, Toshihiro [Environmental Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Abiko 1646, Abiko-shi, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Fungi are the most important components in the fate of radionuclides deposited in forests following the Fukushima nuclear accident. Pruned woody parts and litter contain a considerable amount of radiocesium. Studies that focused on the migration of radiocesium have demonstrated that its ecological half-life is lower in the humus layer than in the deeper soil zone, suggesting a substantial contribution of litter decomposition on the mobilization of radiocesium. Furthermore, white-rot fungi appear to play a key role in the mobilization of radiocesium because they are the primary source of enzymes necessary to degrade the litter organic matter. Cell walls are the primary component of plant litter; they are composed of cellulose, hemi-cellulose, and lignin. Although cellulose is the most abundant organic compound in litter, the strength of the cell wall is limited by rigid hemi-cellulose complexes that protect the surrounding cellulose microfibrils. In the cell wall, lignin fills the spaces between cellulose and hemi-cellulose; thus, the biotic degradation of lignin could be considered a primary step in litter decomposition. The contribution of the amount of lignin on the fate of radiocesium has not been identified, which limits the possibility of predicting the effect of the bacterial community structure that determines the biodegradation activity of lignin on the vertical migration of radiocesium. Here, we directly addressed the role of lignin as controller of the distribution of radiocesium in soil-ecosystems. Radiocesium-contaminated litter samples were collected with traps set under the target stands, i.e., Japanese flowering cherry trees (Prunus x yedoensis cv. Somei-Yoshino) and Japanese cedars (Cryptomeria japonica) at Abiko (Laboratory of Environmental Science, CRIEPI) located approximately 200 km SSW from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011. The litter samples were inoculated with white-rot fungi having ligno-celluloses-degrading activity, i

  16. Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal. Topical report on reference eastern humid low-level sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the work reported here was to develop an order-of-magnitude estimate for the potential dose to man resulting from biotic transport mechanisms at a humid reference low-level waste site in the eastern US. A description of the reference site is presented that includes the waste inventories, site characteristics and biological communites. Parameter values for biotic transport processes are based on data reported in current literature. Transport and exposure scenarios are developed for assessing biotic transport during 500 years following site closure. Calculations of radionuclide decay and waste container decomposition are made to estimate the quantities available for biotic transport. Doses to man are calculated for the biological transport of radionucludes at the reference site after loss of institutional control. These dose estimates are compared to dose estimates we calculated for the intruder-agricultural scenarios reported in the DEIS for 10 CFR 61 (NRC). Dose to man estimates as a result of cumulative biotic transport are calculated to be of the same order-of-magnitude as the dose resulting from the more commonly evaluated human intrusion scenario. The reported lack of potential importance of biotic transport at low-level waste sites in earlier assessment studies is not confirmed by findings presented in this report. Through biotic transport, radionuclides can be moved to locations where they can enter exposure pathways to man

  17. Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal. A report on Tasks 1 and 2 of Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the work reported here was to evaluate the relevance of biotic transport to the assessment of impacts and licensing of low-level waste disposal sites. Available computer models and their recent applications at low-level waste disposal sites are considered. Biotic transport mechanisms and processes for both terrestrial and aquatic systems are presented with examples from existing waste disposal sites. Following a proposed system for ranking radionuclides by their potential for biotic transport, recommendations for completing Phase I research are presented. To evaluate the long-term importance of biotic transport at low-level waste sites, scenarios for biotic pathways and mechanisms need to be developed. Scenarios should begin with a description of the waste form and should include a description of biotic processes and mechanisms, approximations of the magnitude of materials transported, and a linkage to processes or mechanisms in existing models. Once these scenarios are in place, existing models could be used to evaluate impacts resulting from biotic transport and to assess the relevance to site selection and licensing of low-level waste disposal sites

  18. Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal. A report on Tasks 1 and 2 of Phase I. [Shallow land burial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, D.H.; Cadwell, L.L.; Cushing, C.E. Jr.; Harty, R.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Simmons, M.A.; Soldat, J.K.; Swartzman, B.

    1982-07-01

    The purpose of the work reported here was to evaluate the relevance of biotic transport to the assessment of impacts and licensing of low-level waste disposal sites. Available computer models and their recent applications at low-level waste disposal sites are considered. Biotic transport mechanisms and processes for both terrestrial and aquatic systems are presented with examples from existing waste disposal sites. Following a proposed system for ranking radionuclides by their potential for biotic transport, recommendations for completing Phase I research are presented. To evaluate the long-term importance of biotic transport at low-level waste sites, scenarios for biotic pathways and mechanisms need to be developed. Scenarios should begin with a description of the waste form and should include a description of biotic processes and mechanisms, approximations of the magnitude of materials transported, and a linkage to processes or mechanisms in existing models. Once these scenarios are in place, existing models could be used to evaluate impacts resulting from biotic transport and to assess the relevance to site selection and licensing of low-level waste disposal sites.

  19. Identifying Biotic Integrity and Water Chemistry Relations in Nonwadeable Rivers of Wisconsin: Toward the Development of Nutrient Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Brian M.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2007-10-01

    We sampled 41 sites on 34 nonwadeable rivers that represent the types of rivers in Wisconsin, and the kinds and intensities of nutrient and other anthropogenic stressors upon each river type. Sites covered much of United States Environmental Protection Agency national nutrient ecoregions VII—Mostly Glaciated Dairy Region, and VIII—Nutrient Poor, Largely Glaciated upper Midwest. Fish, macroinvertebrates, and three categories of environmental variables including nutrients, other water chemistry, and watershed features were collected using standard protocols. We summarized fish assemblages by index of biotic integrity (IBI) and its 10 component measures, and macroinvertebrates by 2 organic pollution tolerance and 12 proportional richness measures. All biotic and environmental variables represented a wide range of conditions, with biotic measures ranging from poor to excellent status, despite nutrient concentrations being consistently higher than reference concentrations reported for the regions. Regression tree analyses of nutrients on a suite of biotic measures identified breakpoints in total phosphorus (~0.06 mg/l) and total nitrogen (~0.64 mg/l) concentrations at which biotic assemblages were consistently impaired. Redundancy analyses (RDA) were used to identify the most important variables within each of the three environmental variable categories, which were then used to determine the relative influence of each variable category on the biota. Nutrient measures, suspended chlorophyll a, water clarity, and watershed land cover type (forest or row-crop agriculture) were the most important variables and they explained significant amounts of variation within the macroinvertebrate ( R 2 = 60.6%) and fish ( R 2 = 43.6%) assemblages. The environmental variables selected in the macroinvertebrate model were correlated to such an extent that partial RDA analyses could not attribute variation explained to individual environmental categories, assigning 89% of the

  20. 1984 Biotic Studies of Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A portion of Yucca Mountain on and adjacent to the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, is being considered as a possible location for a national high-level radioactive waste repository. The geologic and environmental characteristics of the site are being investigated to determine its suitability for further characterization. Goals of biotic studies were to identify species of concern, describe major floral and faunal associations, determine exposure levels of external background radiation, and assess possible impacts of characterization and operational activities. The species composition of dominant small mammals inhabiting major vegetation associations in 1984 varied little compared with results of similar surveys conducted in 1982 and 1983. Total captures were lower and reproduction was apparently curtailed. Merriam's kangaroo rat and the long tailed pocket mouse continued to be the most abundant species. Diversity of resident species did not differ significantly between the trapping lines. The composition and relative abundance of associated species was more variable. Western harvest mice were trapped for the first time, but pinyon mice, which were present in prior years, were not trapped. Five desert tortoises were observed during surveys of possible sites for repository surface facilities. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Multivariate classification of river sites based on abiotic and biotic data - suggestion of a robust solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring of aquatic biological communities has become a standard approach in surface water monitoring and a part of complex systems for assessing surface water quality. The main problem of this approach is how to relate biological communities to abiotic properties of sites and water quality classes. There are several methods used to solve this problem, including simple univariate methods such as saprobic indices or more complex multivariate methods like RIVPACS or BEAST. We are proposing a new point of view for assessing water quality - a method based on robust multivariate analysis of macrozoobenthos communities and abiotic properties of sites. There are two main components - robust true distances of sites based on several data views - biotic, static and dynamic abiotic proper ties, and selection of reference groups (i.e. quality classes). The analysed sites are compared to a reference model using their distances from reference groups' centroids and probabilistically assigned to quality classes. The method is currently being implemented in software designed for water quality analyses. (authors)

  2. Abiotic and biotic factors that influence the bioavailability of gold nanoparticles to aquatic macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, J Brad; Klaine, Stephen J

    2013-09-17

    This research identified and characterized factors that influenced nanomaterial bioavailability to three aquatic plants: Azolla caroliniana Willd, Egeria densa Planch., and Myriophyllum simulans Orch. Plants were exposed to 4-, 18-, and 30-nm gold nanoparticles. Uptake was influenced by nanoparticle size, the presence of roots on the plant, and dissolved organic carbon in the media. Statistical analysis of the data also revealed that particle uptake was influenced by a 4-way (plant species, plant roots, particle size, and dissolved organic carbon) interaction suggesting nanoparticle bioavailability was a complex result of multiple parameters. Size and species dependent absorption was observed that was dependent on the presence of roots and nanoparticle size. The presence of dissolved organic carbon was found to associate with 4- and 18-nm gold nanoparticles in suspension and form a nanoparticle/organic matter complex that resulted in (1) minimized particle aggregation and (2) a decrease of nanoparticle absorption by the aquatic plants. The same effect was not observed with the 30-nm nanoparticle treatment. These results indicate that multiple factors, both biotic and abiotic, must be taken into account when predicting bioavailability of nanomaterials to aquatic plants. PMID:23947987

  3. Circulation of copper in the biotic compartments of a freshwater dammed reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study concerns a chronic copper release in an aquatic ecosystem: Mirgenbach reservoir; which is characterized by high salinity, conductivity and hardness, a eutrophic state and a high temperature. To study the bioavailability of copper in the biotic compartments, the sampling covered the entire food chain (phyto- and zooplankton, macroalgae, aquatic plants, crustaceans, mollusks, and fish). Of the organisms present, the filter feeder Dreissena polymorpha, the detritivorous Bithynia tentaculata and Orconectes limosus were most contaminated by copper. The level of copper found in fish was the lowest. Body copper concentrations recorded in the present study show large variability between species even in some that are closely related. In most cases, however, the metal handling strategy, feeding habits, morphology and ecology can, at least partially, explain the metal content recorded. Pollution factors have been used to assess the state of contamination of the food chain. This study showed finally that the copper in the lake is bioavailable and bioaccumulated by organisms up to high levels and some effects of long-term toxicity of copper on benthic community and planktonic biomass were pointed out

  4. Identifying Watershed, Landscape, and Engineering Design Factors that Influence the Biotic Condition of Restored Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Doll

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Restored stream reaches at 79 sites across North Carolina were sampled for aquatic macroinvertebrates using a rapid bioassessment protocol. Morphological design parameters and geographic factors, including watershed and landscape parameters (e.g., valley slope, substrate, were also compiled for these streams. Principal component regression analyses revealed correlations between design and landscape variables with macroinvertebrate metrics. The correlations were strengthened by adding watershed variables. Ridge regression was used to find the best-fit model for predicting dominant taxa from the “pollution sensitive” orders of Ephemeroptera (mayflies, Plecoptera (stoneflies, and Trichoptera (caddisflies, or EPT taxa, resulting in coefficient weights that were most interpretable relative to site selection and design parameters. Results indicate that larger (wider streams located in the mountains and foothills where there are steeper valleys, larger substrate, and undeveloped watersheds are expected to have higher numbers of dominant EPT taxa. In addition, EPT taxa numbers are positively correlated with accessible floodplain width and negatively correlated with width-to-depth ratio and sinuosity. This study indicates that both site selection and design should be carefully considered in order to maximize the resulting biotic condition and associated potential ecological uplift of the stream.

  5. Chemical controls on abiotic and biotic release of geogenic arsenic from Pleistocene aquifer sediments to groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillispie, Elizabeth C; Andujar, Erika; Polizzotto, Matthew L

    2016-08-10

    Over 150 million people in South and Southeast Asia consume unsafe drinking water from arsenic-rich Holocene aquifers. Although use of As-free water from Pleistocene aquifers is a potential mitigation strategy, such aquifers are vulnerable to geogenic As pollution, placing millions more people at potential risk. The goal of this research was to define chemical controls on abiotic and biotic release of geogenic As to groundwater. Batch incubations of sediments with natural chemical variability from a Pleistocene aquifer in Cambodia were conducted to evaluate how interactions among arsenic, manganese and iron oxides, and dissolved and sedimentary organic carbon influenced As mobilization from sediments. The addition of labile dissolved organic carbon produced the highest concentrations of dissolved As after >7 months, as compared to sediment samples incubated with sodium azide or without added carbon, and the extent of As release was positively correlated with the percent of initial extractable Mn released from the sediments. The mode of As release was impacted by the source of DOC supplied to the sediments, with biological processes responsible for 81% to 85% of the total As release following incubations with lactate and acetate but only up to 43% to 61% of the total As release following incubations with humic and fulvic acids. Overall, cycling of key redox-active elements and organic-carbon reactivity govern the potential for geogenic As release to groundwater, and results here may be used to formulate better predictions of the arsenic pollution potential of aquifers in South and Southeast Asia. PMID:27463026

  6. Development and validation of a chronic copper biotic ligand model for Ceriodaphnia dubia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biotic ligand model (BLM) to predict chronic Cu toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia was developed and tested. The effect of cationic competition, pH and natural organic matter complexation of Cu was examined to develop the model. There was no effect of cationic competition using increasing Ca and Na concentrations in our exposures. However, we did see a significant regression of decreasing toxicity (measured as the IC25; concentration at which there was a 25% inhibition of reproduction) as Mg concentration increased. However, taking into account the actual variability of the IC25 and since the relative increase in IC25 due to additional Mg was small (1.5-fold) Mg competition was not included in the model. Changes in pH had a significant effect on Cu IC25, which is consistent with proton competition as often suggested for acute BLMs. Finally, natural organic matter (NOM) was added to exposures resulting in significant decreases in toxicity. Therefore, our predictive model for chronic Cu toxicity to C. dubia includes the effect of pH and NOM complexation. The model was validated with Cu IC25 data generated in six natural surface waters collected from across Canada. Using WHAM VI, we calculated Cu speciation in each natural water and using our model, we generated 'predicted' IC25 data. We successfully predicted all Cu IC25 within a factor of 3 for the six waters used for validation

  7. Increased biotic metabolism of the biosphere inferred from observed data and models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田汉勤[1; CharlesA.S.Hall[2; 叶琦[3

    2000-01-01

    A 35 year record ot production and respiration in tne Northern Hemisphere bas been derived from monthly records of atmospheric concentration, fossil fuel combustion, and oceanic absorption of carbon dioxide using a method developed by Hall et al. The original conclusion of Hall et al. that there was no significant change in biotic metabolism, is confirmed by measuring both production and respiration from 1958 to 1972. But the analysis of the subsequent record shows that both production and respiration have been enhanced since the early 1970s by some large scale global change, probably of human origin. Our results also show that high-latitude regions in the Northern Hemisphere are changing more than regions further south. Nevertheless, the ratio of production to respiration (P/R) remains unchanged during the time period examined. Thus, no argument can be made for net carbon storage of or release from the biosphere from this analysis, although the turnover rate of the biosphere appears to be enhanced.

  8. Increased biotic metabolism of the biosphere inferred from observed data and models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A 35 year record of production and respiration in the Northern Hemisphere bas been derived from monthly records of atmospheric concentration, fossil fuel combustion, and oceanic absorption of carbon dioxide using a method developed by Hall et al. The original conclusion of Hall et al. that there was no significant change in biotic metabolism, is confirmed by measuring both production and respiration from 1958 to 1972. But the analysis of the subsequent record shows that both production and respiration have been enhanced since the early 1970s by some large scale global change, probably of human origin. Our results also show that high-latitude regions in the Northern Hemisphere are changing more than regions further south. Nevertheless, the ratio of production to respiration (P/R) remains unchanged during the time period examined. Thus, no argument can be made for net carbon storage of or release from the biosphere from this analysis, although the turnover rate of the biosphere appears to be enhanced.

  9. The timing and pattern of biotic recovery following the end-Permian mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhong-Qiang; Benton, Michael J.

    2012-06-01

    The aftermath of the great end-Permian period mass extinction 252 Myr ago shows how life can recover from the loss of >90% species globally. The crisis was triggered by a number of physical environmental shocks (global warming, acid rain, ocean acidification and ocean anoxia), and some of these were repeated over the next 5-6 Myr. Ammonoids and some other groups diversified rapidly, within 1-3 Myr, but extinctions continued through the Early Triassic period. Triassic ecosystems were rebuilt stepwise from low to high trophic levels through the Early to Middle Triassic, and a stable, complex ecosystem did not re-emerge until the beginning of the Middle Triassic, 8-9 Myr after the crisis. A positive aspect of the recovery was the emergence of entirely new groups, such as marine reptiles and decapod crustaceans, as well as new tetrapods on land, including -- eventually -- dinosaurs. The stepwise recovery of life in the Triassic could have been delayed either by biotic drivers (complex multispecies interactions) or physical perturbations, or a combination of both. This is an example of the wider debate about the relative roles of intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of large-scale evolution.

  10. The interplay between habitat structure and chemical contaminants on biotic responses of benthic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Pinto, Mariana; Matias, Miguel G; Coleman, Ross A

    2016-01-01

    Habitat structure influences the diversity and distribution of organisms, potentially affecting their response to disturbances by either affecting their 'susceptibility' or through the provision of resources that can mitigate impacts of disturbances. Chemical disturbances due to contamination are associated with decreases in diversity and functioning of systems and are also likely to increase due to coastal urbanisation. Understanding how habitat structure interacts with contaminants is essential to predict and therefore manage such effects, minimising their consequences to marine systems. Here, we manipulated two structurally different habitats and exposed them to different types of contaminants. The effects of contamination and habitat structure interacted, affecting species richness. More complex experimental habitats were colonized by a greater diversity of organisms than the less complex habitats. These differences disappeared, however, when habitats were exposed to contaminants, suggesting that contaminants can override effects of habitats structure at small spatial scales. These results provide insight into the complex ways that habitat structure and contamination interact and the need to incorporate evidence of biotic responses from individual disturbances to multiple stressors. Such effects need to be taken into account when designing and planning management and conservation strategies to natural systems. PMID:27168991

  11. Unraveling Aspects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Mediated Enhanced Production of Rice under Biotic Stress of Rhizoctonia solani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Suchi; Bist, Vidisha; Srivastava, Sonal; Singh, Poonam C.; Trivedi, Prabodh K.; Asif, Mehar H.; Chauhan, Puneet S.; Nautiyal, Chandra S.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a necrotrophic fungi causing sheath blight in rice leading to substantial loss in yield. Excessive and persistent use of preventive chemicals raises human health and environment safety concerns. As an alternative, use of biocontrol agents is highly recommended. In the present study, an abiotic stress tolerant, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (SN13) is demonstrated to act as a biocontrol agent and enhance immune response against R. solani in rice by modulating various physiological, metabolic, and molecular functions. A sustained tolerance by SN13 primed plant over a longer period of time, post R. solani infection may be attributed to several unconventional aspects of the plants’ physiological status. The prolonged stress tolerance observed in presence of SN13 is characterized by (a) involvement of bacterial mycolytic enzymes, (b) sustained maintenance of elicitors to keep the immune system induced involving non-metabolizable sugars such as turanose besides the known elicitors, (c) a delicate balance of ROS and ROS scavengers through production of proline, mannitol, and arabitol and rare sugars like fructopyranose, β-D-glucopyranose and myoinositol and expression of ferric reductases and hypoxia induced proteins, (d) production of metabolites like quinazoline and expression of terpene synthase, and (e) hormonal cross talk. As the novel aspect of biological control this study highlights the role of rare sugars, maintenance of hypoxic conditions, and sucrose and starch metabolism in B. amyloliquefaciens (SN13) mediated sustained biotic stress tolerance in rice. PMID:27200058

  12. Biotic nitrogen fixation in the bryosphere is inhibited more by drought than warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Jonathan A; Gonzalez, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    The boreal forest is of particular interest to climate change research due to its large circumpolar distribution and accumulated soil carbon pool. Carbon uptake in this ecosystem is nitrogen (N)-limited, therefore factors affecting carbon or nitrogen dynamics in the boreal forest can have consequences for global climate. We used a 2-year field experiment to investigate the response of biotic nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria associated with boreal forest bryophytes, in a factorial experiment combining simulated climate change with habitat fragmentation treatments. We simulated climate change conditions using open-top greenhouse chambers in the field, which increased mean and maximum temperatures, and created a precipitation gradient from ambient levels in the center to extreme drought conditions at the periphery of the chamber. The dry patches near the chamber walls exhibited almost no N-fixation, despite having similar densities of cyanobacteria (predominantly Stigonema sp.) as other patches. Rates of N-fixation were best explained by a model containing moisture, fragmentation, cyanobacteria density and time; warming was not a significant variable affecting N-fixation. There was no significant interaction between warming and fragmentation. These results suggest that cyanobacteria responded physiologically to drought by reducing N-fixation activity long before any changes in density. Ecosystem processes, such as N-fixation, can respond in the short term to environmental change much more rapidly than changes in the underlying community structure. Such rapid physiological responses may occur faster than demographic insurance effects of biodiversity. PMID:27098528

  13. Unraveling Aspects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Mediated Enhanced Production of Rice under Biotic Stress of Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Suchi; Bist, Vidisha; Srivastava, Sonal; Singh, Poonam C; Trivedi, Prabodh K; Asif, Mehar H; Chauhan, Puneet S; Nautiyal, Chandra S

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a necrotrophic fungi causing sheath blight in rice leading to substantial loss in yield. Excessive and persistent use of preventive chemicals raises human health and environment safety concerns. As an alternative, use of biocontrol agents is highly recommended. In the present study, an abiotic stress tolerant, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (SN13) is demonstrated to act as a biocontrol agent and enhance immune response against R. solani in rice by modulating various physiological, metabolic, and molecular functions. A sustained tolerance by SN13 primed plant over a longer period of time, post R. solani infection may be attributed to several unconventional aspects of the plants' physiological status. The prolonged stress tolerance observed in presence of SN13 is characterized by (a) involvement of bacterial mycolytic enzymes, (b) sustained maintenance of elicitors to keep the immune system induced involving non-metabolizable sugars such as turanose besides the known elicitors, (c) a delicate balance of ROS and ROS scavengers through production of proline, mannitol, and arabitol and rare sugars like fructopyranose, β-D-glucopyranose and myoinositol and expression of ferric reductases and hypoxia induced proteins, (d) production of metabolites like quinazoline and expression of terpene synthase, and (e) hormonal cross talk. As the novel aspect of biological control this study highlights the role of rare sugars, maintenance of hypoxic conditions, and sucrose and starch metabolism in B. amyloliquefaciens (SN13) mediated sustained biotic stress tolerance in rice. PMID:27200058

  14. Causes of variation in biotic interaction strength and phenotypic selection along an altitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezquida, Eduardo T; Benkman, Craig W

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the causes of variation in biotic interaction strength and phenotypic selection remains one of the outstanding goals of evolutionary ecology. Here we examine the variation in strength of interactions between two seed predators, common crossbills (Loxia curvirostra) and European red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris), and mountain pine (Pinus uncinata) at and below tree limit in the Pyrenees, and how this translates into phenotypic selection. Seed predation by crossbills increased whereas seed predation by squirrels decreased with increasing elevation and as the canopy became more open. Overall, seed predation by crossbills averaged about twice that by squirrels, and the intensity of selection exerted by crossbills averaged between 2.6 and 7.5 times greater than by squirrels. The higher levels of seed predation by crossbills than squirrels were related to the relatively open nature of most of the forests, and the higher intensity of selection exerted by crossbills resulted from their higher levels of seed predation. However, most of the differences in selection intensity between crossbills and squirrels were the result of habitat features having a greater effect on the foraging behavior of squirrels than of crossbills, causing selection to be much lower for squirrels than for crossbills. PMID:24593660

  15. Mercury bioaccumulation in an estuarine predator: Biotic factors, abiotic factors, and assessments of fish health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smylie, Meredith S; McDonough, Christopher J; Reed, Lou Ann; Shervette, Virginia R

    2016-07-01

    Estuarine wetlands are major contributors to mercury (Hg) transformation into its more toxic form, methylmercury (MeHg). Although these complex habitats are important, estuarine Hg bioaccumulation is not well understood. The longnose gar Lepisosteus osseus (L. 1758), an estuarine predator in the eastern United States, was selected to examine Hg processes due to its abundance, estuarine residence, and top predator status. This study examined variability in Hg concentrations within longnose gar muscle tissue spatially and temporally, the influence of biological factors, potential maternal transfer, and potential negative health effects on these fish. Smaller, immature fish had the highest Hg concentrations and were predominantly located in low salinity waters. Sex and diet were also important factors and Hg levels peaked in the spring. Although maternal transfer occurred in small amounts, the potential negative health effects to young gar remain unknown. Fish health as measured by fecundity and growth rate appeared to be relatively unaffected by Hg at concentrations in the present study (less than 1.3 ppm wet weight). The analysis of biotic and abiotic factors relative to tissue Hg concentrations in a single estuarine fish species provided valuable insight in Hg bioaccumulation, biomagnification, and elimination. Insights such as these can improve public health policy and environmental management decisions related to Hg pollution. PMID:27086072

  16. Assessing the fit of biotic ligand model validation data in a risk management decision context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Douglas B

    2015-10-01

    Biotic ligand models (BLMs) have advanced the ability to predict the concentrations of metals in surface waters likely to harm aquatic organisms. BLMs have been developed for several metals including Cu, Zn, Cd, and Ag. Additionally, the US Environmental Protection Agency has published guidance on the use of a BLM to develop water quality criteria for Cu. To validate the predictive performance of many BLMs, model predictions based on test water quality have been compared with corresponding laboratory toxicity measurements. Validation results are typically described in the published literature in terms of the proportion of predicted effect concentrations that fall within a factor of 2 of measured values. In this article, an alternative is presented using a receiver operating characteristics approach and regression prediction limit analyses, quantifying the probabilities of true and false predictions of excess toxicity risk based on toxic unit calculations and a risk management threshold of 1. The approaches are applied to a published Zn BLM and 3 simulated data sets that reflect attributes of other published BLM validation data. The overall accuracy of the unified Zn BLM is estimated to be 80% to 90%, and analyses of simulated data suggest a similar level of accuracy for other published BLMs. Further application of these validation methods to other BLMs may provide more complete and transparent information on their possible predictive value when used in the management of risks due to aqueous metals. PMID:25779880

  17. Shedding light on the formation of the pre-biotic molecule formamide with ASAI

    CERN Document Server

    López-Sepulcre, A; Mendoza, E; Lefloch, B; Ceccarelli, C; Vastel, C; Bachiller, R; Cernicharo, J; Codella, C; Kahane, C; Kama, M; Tafalla, M

    2015-01-01

    Formamide (NH2CHO) has been proposed as a pre-biotic precursor with a key role in the emergence of life on Earth. While this molecule has been observed in space, most of its detections correspond to high-mass star-forming regions. Motivated by this lack of investigation in the low-mass regime, we searched for formamide, as well as isocyanic acid (HNCO), in 10 low- and intermediate-mass pre-stellar and protostellar objects. The present work is part of the IRAM Large Programme ASAI (Astrochemical Surveys At IRAM), which makes use of unbiased broadband spectral surveys at millimetre wavelengths. We detected HNCO in all the sources and NH2CHO in five of them. We derived their abundances and analysed them together with those reported in the literature for high-mass sources. For those sources with formamide detection, we found a tight and almost linear correlation between HNCO and NH2CHO abundances, with their ratio being roughly constant -between 3 and 10- across 6 orders of magnitude in luminosity. This suggests ...

  18. Environmental and biotic correlates to lionfish invasion success in Bahamian coral reefs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Anton

    Full Text Available Lionfish (Pterois volitans, venomous predators from the Indo-Pacific, are recent invaders of the Caribbean Basin and southeastern coast of North America. Quantification of invasive lionfish abundances, along with potentially important physical and biological environmental characteristics, permitted inferences about the invasion process of reefs on the island of San Salvador in the Bahamas. Environmental wave-exposure had a large influence on lionfish abundance, which was more than 20 and 120 times greater for density and biomass respectively at sheltered sites as compared with wave-exposed environments. Our measurements of topographic complexity of the reefs revealed that lionfish abundance was not driven by habitat rugosity. Lionfish abundance was not negatively affected by the abundance of large native predators (or large native groupers and was also unrelated to the abundance of medium prey fishes (total length of 5-10 cm. These relationships suggest that (1 higher-energy environments may impose intrinsic resistance against lionfish invasion, (2 habitat complexity may not facilitate the lionfish invasion process, (3 predation or competition by native fishes may not provide biotic resistance against lionfish invasion, and (4 abundant prey fish might not facilitate lionfish invasion success. The relatively low biomass of large grouper on this island could explain our failure to detect suppression of lionfish abundance and we encourage continuing the preservation and restoration of potential lionfish predators in the Caribbean. In addition, energetic environments might exert direct or indirect resistance to the lionfish proliferation, providing native fish populations with essential refuges.

  19. Development and evaluation of the Lake Multi-biotic Integrity Index for Dongting Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A Lake Multi-biotic Integrity Index (LMII for the China’s second largest interior lake (Dongting Lake was developed to assess the water quality status using algal and macroinvertebrate metrics. Algae and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages were sampled at 10 sections across 3 subregions of Dongting Lake. We used a stepwise process to evaluate properties of candidate metrics and selected ten for the LMII: Pampean diatom index, diatom quotient, trophic diatom index, relative abundance diatoms, Margalef index of algae, percent sensitive diatoms, % facultative individuals, % Chironomidae individuals, % predators individuals, and total number of macroinvertebrate taxa. We then tested the accuracy and feasibility of the LMII by comparing the correlation with physical-chemical parameters. Evaluation of the LMII showed that it discriminated well between reference and impaired sections and was strongly related to the major chemical and physical stressors (r = 0.766, P<0.001. The re-scored results from the 10 sections showed that the water quality of western Dongting Lake was good, while that of southern Dongting Lake was relatively good and whereas that of eastern Dongting Lake was poor. The discriminatory biocriteria of the LMII are suitable for the assessment of the water quality of Dongting Lake. Additionally, more metrics belonging to habitat, hydrology, physics and chemistry should be considered into the LMII, so as to establish comprehensive assessment system which can reflect the community structure of aquatic organisms, physical and chemical characteristics of water environment, human activities, and so on.

  20. Biotic Interactions in Microbial Communities as Modulators of Biogeochemical Processes: Methanotrophy as a Model System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Adrian; Angel, Roey; Veraart, Annelies J.; Daebeler, Anne; Jia, Zhongjun; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Boon, Nico; Bodelier, Paul L. E.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial interaction is an integral component of microbial ecology studies, yet the role, extent, and relevance of microbial interaction in community functioning remains unclear, particularly in the context of global biogeochemical cycles. While many studies have shed light on the physico-chemical cues affecting specific processes, (micro)biotic controls and interactions potentially steering microbial communities leading to altered functioning are less known. Yet, recent accumulating evidence suggests that the concerted actions of a community can be significantly different from the combined effects of individual microorganisms, giving rise to emergent properties. Here, we exemplify the importance of microbial interaction for ecosystem processes by analysis of a reasonably well-understood microbial guild, namely, aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). We reviewed the literature which provided compelling evidence for the relevance of microbial interaction in modulating methane oxidation. Support for microbial associations within methane-fed communities is sought by a re-analysis of literature data derived from stable isotope probing studies of various complex environmental settings. Putative positive interactions between active MOB and other microbes were assessed by a correlation network-based analysis with datasets covering diverse environments where closely interacting members of a consortium can potentially alter the methane oxidation activity. Although, methanotrophy is used as a model system, the fundamentals of our postulations may be applicable to other microbial guilds mediating other biogeochemical processes. PMID:27602021

  1. Unraveling aspects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens mediated enhanced production of rice under biotic stress of Rhizoctonia solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchi eSrivastava

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia solani (RS is a necrotrophic fungi causing sheath blight in rice leading to substantial loss in yield. Excessive and persistent use of preventive chemicals raises human health and environment safety concerns. As an alternative, use of biocontrol agents is highly recommended. In the present study an abiotic stress tolerant, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (SN13 is demonstrated to act as a biocontrol agent and enhance immune response against RS in rice by modulating various physiological, metabolic and molecular functions. A sustained tolerance by SN13 primed plant over a longer period of time, post RS infection may be attributed to several unconventional aspects of the plants’ physiological status. The prolonged stress tolerance observed in presence of SN13 is characterized by (a involvement of bacterial mycolytic enzymes, (b sustained maintenance of elicitors to keep the immune system induced involving non-metabolizable sugars such as turanose besides the known elicitors, (c a delicate balance of ROS and ROS scavengers through production of proline, mannitol and arabitol and rare sugars like fructopyranose, β-d glucopyranose and myoinositol and expression of ferric reductases and hypoxia induced proteins, (d production of metabolites like quinozoline and expression of terpene synthase and (e hormonal cross talk. As the novel aspect of biological control this study highlights the role of rare sugars, maintenance of hypoxic conditions, and sucrose and starch metabolism in Bacillus amyloliquifaciens (SN13 mediated sustained biotic stress tolerance in rice.

  2. Effects of preconditioning the rhizosphere of different plant species on biotic methane oxidation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndanga, Éliane M; Lopera, Carolina B; Bradley, Robert L; Cabral, Alexandre R

    2016-09-01

    The rhizosphere is known as the most active biogeochemical layer of the soil. Therefore, it could be a beneficial environment for biotic methane oxidation. The aim of this study was to document - by means of batch incubation tests - the kinetics of CH4 oxidation in rhizosphere soils that were previously exposed to methane. Soils from three pre-exposure to CH4 zones were sampled: the never-before pre-exposed (NEX), the moderately pre-exposed (MEX) and the very pre-exposed (VEX). For each pre-exposure zone, the rhizosphere of several plant species was collected, pre-incubated, placed in glass vials and submitted to CH4 concentrations varying from 0.5% to 10%. The time to the beginning of CH4 consumption and the CH4 oxidation rate were recorded. The results showed that the fastest CH4 consumption occurred for the very pre-exposed rhizosphere. Specifically, a statistically significant difference in CH4 oxidation half-life was found between the rhizosphere of the VEX vegetated with a mixture of different plants and the NEX vegetated with ryegrass. This difference was attributed to the combined effect of the preconditioning level and plant species as well as to the organic matter content. Regardless of the preconditioning level, the oxidation rate values obtained in this study were comparable to those reported in the reviewed literature for mature compost. PMID:27177464

  3. Gut Microbial Translocation in Critically Ill Children and Effects of Supplementation with Pre- and Pro Biotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Papoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial translocation as a direct cause of sepsis is an attractive hypothesis that presupposes that in specific situations bacteria cross the intestinal barrier, enter the systemic circulation, and cause a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Critically ill children are at increased risk for bacterial translocation, particularly in the early postnatal age. Predisposing factors include intestinal obstruction, obstructive jaundice, intra-abdominal hypertension, intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury and secondary ileus, and immaturity of the intestinal barrier per se. Despite good evidence from experimental studies to support the theory of bacterial translocation as a cause of sepsis, there is little evidence in human studies to confirm that translocation is directly correlated to bloodstream infections in critically ill children. This paper provides an overview of the gut microflora and its significance, a focus on the mechanisms employed by bacteria to gain access to the systemic circulation, and how critical illness creates a hostile environment in the gut and alters the microflora favoring the growth of pathogens that promote bacterial translocation. It also covers treatment with pre- and pro biotics during critical illness to restore the balance of microbial communities in a beneficial way with positive effects on intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation.

  4. Gut microbial translocation in critically ill children and effects of supplementation with pre- and pro biotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoff, Paola; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Cerasaro, Carla; Caresta, Elena; Midulla, Fabio; Moretti, Corrado

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial translocation as a direct cause of sepsis is an attractive hypothesis that presupposes that in specific situations bacteria cross the intestinal barrier, enter the systemic circulation, and cause a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Critically ill children are at increased risk for bacterial translocation, particularly in the early postnatal age. Predisposing factors include intestinal obstruction, obstructive jaundice, intra-abdominal hypertension, intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury and secondary ileus, and immaturity of the intestinal barrier per se. Despite good evidence from experimental studies to support the theory of bacterial translocation as a cause of sepsis, there is little evidence in human studies to confirm that translocation is directly correlated to bloodstream infections in critically ill children. This paper provides an overview of the gut microflora and its significance, a focus on the mechanisms employed by bacteria to gain access to the systemic circulation, and how critical illness creates a hostile environment in the gut and alters the microflora favoring the growth of pathogens that promote bacterial translocation. It also covers treatment with pre- and pro biotics during critical illness to restore the balance of microbial communities in a beneficial way with positive effects on intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation. PMID:22934115

  5. Environmental and biotic correlates to lionfish invasion success in Bahamian coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Andrea; Simpson, Michael S; Vu, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Lionfish (Pterois volitans), venomous predators from the Indo-Pacific, are recent invaders of the Caribbean Basin and southeastern coast of North America. Quantification of invasive lionfish abundances, along with potentially important physical and biological environmental characteristics, permitted inferences about the invasion process of reefs on the island of San Salvador in the Bahamas. Environmental wave-exposure had a large influence on lionfish abundance, which was more than 20 and 120 times greater for density and biomass respectively at sheltered sites as compared with wave-exposed environments. Our measurements of topographic complexity of the reefs revealed that lionfish abundance was not driven by habitat rugosity. Lionfish abundance was not negatively affected by the abundance of large native predators (or large native groupers) and was also unrelated to the abundance of medium prey fishes (total length of 5-10 cm). These relationships suggest that (1) higher-energy environments may impose intrinsic resistance against lionfish invasion, (2) habitat complexity may not facilitate the lionfish invasion process, (3) predation or competition by native fishes may not provide biotic resistance against lionfish invasion, and (4) abundant prey fish might not facilitate lionfish invasion success. The relatively low biomass of large grouper on this island could explain our failure to detect suppression of lionfish abundance and we encourage continuing the preservation and restoration of potential lionfish predators in the Caribbean. In addition, energetic environments might exert direct or indirect resistance to the lionfish proliferation, providing native fish populations with essential refuges. PMID:25184250

  6. Biotic and abiotic variables influencing plant litter breakdown in streams: a global study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyero, Luz; Pearson, Richard G; Hui, Cang; Gessner, Mark O; Pérez, Javier; Alexandrou, Markos A; Graça, Manuel A S; Cardinale, Bradley J; Albariño, Ricardo J; Arunachalam, Muthukumarasamy; Barmuta, Leon A; Boulton, Andrew J; Bruder, Andreas; Callisto, Marcos; Chauvet, Eric; Death, Russell G; Dudgeon, David; Encalada, Andrea C; Ferreira, Verónica; Figueroa, Ricardo; Flecker, Alexander S; Gonçalves, José F; Helson, Julie; Iwata, Tomoya; Jinggut, Tajang; Mathooko, Jude; Mathuriau, Catherine; M'Erimba, Charles; Moretti, Marcelo S; Pringle, Catherine M; Ramírez, Alonso; Ratnarajah, Lavenia; Rincon, José; Yule, Catherine M

    2016-04-27

    Plant litter breakdown is a key ecological process in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Streams and rivers, in particular, contribute substantially to global carbon fluxes. However, there is little information available on the relative roles of different drivers of plant litter breakdown in fresh waters, particularly at large scales. We present a global-scale study of litter breakdown in streams to compare the roles of biotic, climatic and other environmental factors on breakdown rates. We conducted an experiment in 24 streams encompassing latitudes from 47.8° N to 42.8° S, using litter mixtures of local species differing in quality and phylogenetic diversity (PD), and alder (Alnus glutinosa) to control for variation in litter traits. Our models revealed that breakdown of alder was driven by climate, with some influence of pH, whereas variation in breakdown of litter mixtures was explained mainly by litter quality and PD. Effects of litter quality and PD and stream pH were more positive at higher temperatures, indicating that different mechanisms may operate at different latitudes. These results reflect global variability caused by multiple factors, but unexplained variance points to the need for expanded global-scale comparisons. PMID:27122551

  7. Sr36- and Sr5-Mediated Resistance Response to Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici Is Associated with Callose Deposition in Wheat Guard Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; McCallum, B D; Fetch, T; Bakkeren, G; Saville, B J

    2015-06-01

    Race-specific resistance of wheat to Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici is primarily posthaustorial and often involves the induction of a hypersensitive response (HR). The aim of this study was to investigate host defense responses induced in interactions between P. graminis f. sp. tritici races and wheat lines carrying different race-specific stem rust resistance (Sr) genes. In incompatible interactions between wheat lines carrying Sr36 in three genetic backgrounds (LMPG, Prelude, or W2691) and avirulent P. graminis f. sp. tritici races MCCFC or RCCDM, callose accumulated within 24 h in wheat guard cells contacted by a P. graminis f. sp. tritici appressorium, and P. graminis f. sp. tritici ingress was inhibited following appressorium formation. Accordingly, the expression of transcripts encoding a callose synthase increased in the incompatible interaction between LMPG-Sr36 and avirulent P. graminis f. sp. tritici race MCCFC. Furthermore, the inhibition of callose synthesis through the infiltration of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DDG) increased the ability of P. graminis f. sp. tritici race MCCFC to infect LMPG-Sr36. A similar induction of callose deposition in wheat guard cells was also observed within 24 h after inoculation (hai) with avirulent P. graminis f. sp. tritici race HKCJC on LMPG-Sr5 plants. In contrast, this defense response was not induced in incompatible interactions involving Sr6, Sr24, or Sr30. Instead, the induction of an HR and cellular lignification were noted. The manifestation of the HR and cellular lignification was induced earlier (24 hai) and was more extensive in the resistance response mediated by Sr6 compared with those mediated by Sr24 or Sr30. These results indicate that the resistance mediated by Sr36 is similar to that mediated by Sr5 but different from those triggered by Sr6, Sr24, or Sr30. Resistance responses mediated by Sr5 and Sr36 are prehaustorial, and are a result of very rapid recognition of molecules derived from avirulent isolates of

  8. Elucidation of the role of oleosin in off-flavour generation in soymeal through supercritical CO₂ and biotic elicitor treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sweta; Memba, Lucia Joseph; Dahuja, Anil; Vinutha, T; Saha, Supradip; Sachdev, Archana

    2016-08-15

    Defatting soybean by sophisticated oil extraction method utilising supercritical CO2 resulted in a significant decrease in the residual phospholipids (PLs) compared with soymeal obtained by conventional cold percolation method utilising hexane as the extraction solvent. Interestingly, the levels of residual PLs showed a proportionate relationship with thiobarbituric acid (TBA) number, an indicator of lipid peroxidation responsible for off-flavour generation. Furthermore, two oleosins (18 and 24 kDa) were isolated from the oil bodies extracted from soybean seeds and positively characterised for phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity, suggesting their plausible involvement in off-flavour generation in soymeal. The treatment of soybean seeds, before oil extraction, with different concentrations of biotic elicitors such as chitosan and jasmonic acid also significantly reduced the levels of residual PLs as well as the TBA number. The biotic elicitor treatment could thus prove to be an important strategy for the reduction of off-flavour in protein-rich soymeal. PMID:27006239

  9. Selected Abiotic and Biotic Environmental Stress Factors Affecting Two Economically Important Sugarcane Stalk Boring Pests in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Showler, Allan T.

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane, Saccharum spp., in the United States is attacked by a number of different arthropod pests. The most serious among those pests are two stalk boring moths in the Family Crambidae: the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.), and the Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar). The two species are affected by abiotic and biotic environmental stress factors. Water deficit and excessive soil nitrogen alter physical and physiochemical aspects of the sugarcane plant that make the crop i...

  10. Combined Effects of Soil Biotic and Abiotic Factors, Influenced by Sewage Sludge Incorporation, on the Incidence of Corn Stalk Rot

    OpenAIRE

    Ghini, Raquel; Fortes, Nara Lúcia Perondi; Juan A Navas-Cortés; Silva, Carlos Alberto; Bettiol, Wagner

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the combined effects of soil biotic and abiotic factors on the incidence of Fusarium corn stalk rot, during four annual incorporations of two types of sewage sludge into soil in a 5-years field assay under tropical conditions and to predict the effects of these variables on the disease. For each type of sewage sludge, the following treatments were included: control with mineral fertilization recommended for corn; control without fertilization; sew...

  11. QTLs for Tolerance of Drought and Breeding for Tolerance of Abiotic and Biotic Stress: An Integrated Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Shalabh Dixit; B Emma Huang; Ma Teresa Sta Cruz; Maturan, Paul T; Jhon Christian E Ontoy; Arvind Kumar

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The coupling of biotic and abiotic stresses leads to high yield losses in rainfed rice (Oryza sativa L.) growing areas. While several studies target these stresses independently, breeding strategies to combat multiple stresses seldom exist. This study reports an integrated strategy that combines QTL mapping and phenotypic selection to develop rice lines with high grain yield (GY) under drought stress and non-stress conditions, and tolerance of rice blast. METHODOLOGY: A blast-tole...

  12. Geomicrobiological perspective on the pattern and causes of the 5-million-year Permo/Triassic biotic crisis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shucheng XIE; Yongbiao WANG

    2011-01-01

    The pattern and causes of Permo/Triassic biotic crisis were mainly documented by faunal and terrestrial plant records. We reviewed herein the geomicrobiological perspective on this issue based on the reported cyanobacterial record. Two episodic cyanobacterial blooms were observed to couple with carbon isotope excursions and faunal mass extinction at Meishan section, suggestive of the presence of at least two episodic biotic crises across the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB). The two episodes of cyanobacterial blooms, carbon isotope excursions and faunal mass extinction were, respectively, identified in several sections of the world, inferring the presence of two global changes across the PTB. Close associations among the three records (cyanobacterial bloom, shift in carbon isotope composition, and faunal extinction) were subsequently observed in three intervals in the Early Triassic, the protracted recovery period as previously thought, inferring the occurrence of more episodes of global changes.Spatiotemporal association of cyanobacterial blooms with volcanic materials in South China, and probably in South-east Asia, infers their causal relationship. Volcanism is believed to trigger the biotic crisis in several ways and to cause the close association among microbial blooms, the carbon isotope excursions and faunal mass extinctions in four intervals from the latest Permian to the Early Triassic.The major episodes of the well-known Siberian flood eruption are proposed to be responsible for the extinctions in the Early Triassic, but their synchronicity with the endPermian extinction awaits more precise dating data to confirm. Geomicrobial records are thus suggestive of a long-term episodic biotic crisis (at least four episodes)lasting from the latest Permian to the end of the Early Triassic, induced by the global volcanic eruptions and sea level changes during Pangea formation.

  13. The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) in the high latitudes of the North Atlantic: Temperature and Biotic change

    OpenAIRE

    M. Polling; Houben, A. J. P.; Firth, J; Coxall, H.; J. S. Eldrett; Schouten, S.; Reichart, G.-J.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly high resolution isotope- and novel organic geochemical proxy records have revealed that the long-term cooling trend of the middle Eocene was interrupted by a warming phase designated the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO). It is suggested to represent an increase in sea surface temperatures of about 4°C, lasting approximately 400 kyr. The temperature evolution of the MECO is notably well-documented in the Southern Ocean. However, records of temperature- and biotic change durin...

  14. A zone-specific fish-based biotic index as a management tool for a temperate estuary (Zeeschelde, Belgium)

    OpenAIRE

    Breine, J.J.; Quataert, P.; STEVENS, M.; Ollevier, F. P; Volckaert, F.A.M.J.; Maes, J

    2009-01-01

    Fish-based indices monitor changes in surface waters and are invaluable to summarise complex information on the environment (Harrison & Whitfield, 2004). A Zone-specific fishbased multimetric Estuarine index of Biotic Integrity (Z-EBI) was developed based on a 13 year time series of fish surveys from the Zeeschelde estuary (Belgium). Sites were preclassified using indicators of anthropogenic impact. Metrics showing a monotone response with pressure classes were selected for further analysis. ...

  15. A Zone-Specific Fish-Based Biotic Index as a Management Tool for the Zeeschelde Estuary (Belgium)

    OpenAIRE

    Breine, Jan; Quataert, Paul; Stevens, Maarten; Ollevier, Frans; Volckaert, Filip; VAN DEN BERGH Ericia; MAES JOACHIM

    2010-01-01

    Fish-based indices monitor changes in surface waters and are a valuable aid in communication by summarising complex information about the environment (Harrison and Whitfield, 2004). A zone-specific fish-based multimetric estuarine index of biotic integrity (Z-EBI) was developed based on a 13 year time series of fish surveys from the Zeeschelde estuary (Belgium). Sites were pre-classified using indicators of anthropogenic impact. Metrics showing a monotone response with pressure cl...

  16. Interactive influence of biotic and abiotic cues on the plasticity of preferred body temperatures in a predator–prey system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smolinský, Radovan; Gvoždík, Lumír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 170, č. 1 (2012), s. 47-55. ISSN 0029-8549 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/10/2170; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Aeshna * Biotic interactions * Preferred temperature * Reciprocal plasticity * Thermal acclimation * Triturus Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.011, year: 2012

  17. Early biotic interactions among introduced and native benthic species unveil cryptic predation and shifts in larval behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Ordóñez, Víctor; Rius, Marc; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Pineda, M. C.; Pascual, Marta; Turon, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent introductions of non-indigenous species generate novel interactions that vary with local conditions and the composition of the receiving community. Most studies examine relationships of newcomers with native species, but interactions among introduced species could also affect community shifts. As early ontogenetic stages are particularly vulnerable to biotic interactions, we explored direct and indirect interactions across early life-history stages in space-dominating ...

  18. Application of remote sensing techniques for the identification of biotic stress in plum trees caused by the Plum pox virus

    OpenAIRE

    Krezhova Dora; Stoev Antoniy; Petrov Nikolay; Maneva Svetla

    2015-01-01

    Two hyperspectral remote sensing techniques, spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence, were used for the identification of biotic stress (sharka disease) in plum trees at an early stage without visible symptoms on the leaves. The research was focused on cultivars that are widely spread in Bulgaria: ‘Angelina’, ‘Black Diamond’ and ‘Mirabelle’. Hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence data were collected by means of a portable multichannel fibre-optics spectrometer in the visible and...

  19. Physical Stress, Not Biotic Interactions, Preclude an Invasive Grass from Establishing in Forb-Dominated Salt Marshes

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang HE; Cui, Baoshan; An, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Background Biological invasions have become the focus of considerable concern and ecological research, yet the relative importance of abiotic and biotic factors in controlling the invasibility of habitats to exotic species is not well understood. Spartina species are highly invasive plants in coastal wetlands; however, studies on the factors that control the success or failure of Spartina invasions across multiple habitat types are rare and inconclusive. Methodology and Principal Findings We ...

  20. The WRKY transcription factors in the diploid woodland strawberry Fragaria vesca: Identification and expression analysis under biotic and abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Hu, Yang; Han, Yong-Tao; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Feng-Li; Feng, Jia-Yue

    2016-08-01

    WRKY proteins comprise a large family of transcription factors that play important roles in response to biotic and abiotic stresses and in plant growth and development. To date, little is known about the WRKY gene family in strawberry. In this study, we identified 62 WRKY genes (FvWRKYs) in the wild diploid woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca, 2n = 2x = 14) accession Heilongjiang-3. According to the phylogenetic analysis and structural features, these identified strawberry FvWRKY genes were classified into three main groups. In addition, eight FvWRKY-GFP fusion proteins showed distinct subcellular localizations in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts. Furthermore, we examined the expression of the 62 FvWRKY genes in 'Heilongjiang-3' under various conditions, including biotic stress (Podosphaera aphanis), abiotic stresses (drought, salt, cold, and heat), and hormone treatments (abscisic acid, ethephon, methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid). The expression levels of 33 FvWRKY genes were upregulated, while 12 FvWRKY genes were downregulated during powdery mildew infection. FvWRKY genes responded to drought and salt treatment to a greater extent than to temperature stress. Expression profiles derived from quantitative real-time PCR suggested that 11 FvWRKY genes responded dramatically to various stimuli at the transcriptional level, indicating versatile roles in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Interaction networks revealed that the crucial pathways controlled by WRKY proteins may be involved in the differential response to biotic stress. Taken together, the present work may provide the basis for future studies of the genetic modification of WRKY genes for pathogen resistance and stress tolerance in strawberry. PMID:27105420

  1. An Unified Framework to Integrate Biotic, Abiotic Processes and Human Activities in Spatially Explicit Models of Agricultural Landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Vinatier, Fabrice; Lagacherie, Philippe; Voltz, Marc; Petit, Sandrine; Lavigne, Claire; Brunet, Yves; Lescourret, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    Recent concern over possible ways to sustain ecosystem services has triggered important research worldwide on ecosystem processes at the landscape scale. Understanding this complexity of landscape functioning calls for coupled and spatially-explicit modeling approaches. However, disciplinary boundaries have limited the number of multi-process studies at the landscape scale, and current progress in coupling processes at this scale often reveals strong imbalance between biotic and abiotic proce...

  2. Rice Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Gene Family and Its Role in Biotic and Abiotic Stress Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jai S. Rohila; Yinong Yang

    2007-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MARK) cascade is an important signaling module that transduces extracellular stimuli into intracellular responses in eukaryotic organisms. An increasing body of evidence has shown that the MAPK-mediated cellular signaling is crucial to plant growth and development, as well as biotic and abiotic stress responses. To date, a total of 17 MARK genes have been identified from the rice genome. Expression profiling, biochemical characterization and/or functional analysis were carried out with many members of the rice MARK gene family, especially those associated with biotic and abiotic stress responses. In this review, the phylogenetic relationship and classification of rice MARK genes are discussed to facilitate a simple nomenclature and standard annotation of the rice MARK gene family. Functional data relating to biotic and abiotic stress responses are reviewed for each MARK group and show that despite overlapping in functionality, there is a certain level of functional specificity among different rice MAP kinases. The future challenges are to functionally characterize each MARK, to identify their downstream substrates and upstream kinases, and to genetically manipulate the MARK signaling pathway in rice crops for the improvement of agronomically important traits.

  3. Biotic and abiotic roles of leachate recirculation in batch mode solid-state anaerobic digestion of cattle manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degueurce, Axelle; Tomas, Nair; Le Roux, Sophie; Martinez, José; Peu, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Solid state anaerobic digestion, with leachate recirculation, is suitable for exploiting manure with a high solid content. The biotic and abiotic effects of the leachates were studied in lab-scale leach bed reactors (LBRs). LBRs were fed with cow manure and four leachates either biologically active or inert. The biotic impact of leachate was assessed by monitoring the microbial communities in the manure and in the leachates. LBRs with biologically active leachates, regardless to their origin, produced equivalent methane volumes (114.52±19.05 and 99.79±6.4NL/kgVS) while LBRs with inert leachates produced half less methane (60.22±5.71 and 58.87±13.2NL/kgVS) attesting to the biotic role of leachate. Moreover, its beneficial abiotic role is mainly due to its initial nutrient content, pH, and buffering capacity. The microbial community in the manure was strongly involved in methane production, and no transfer of microorganisms from the liquid phase was found (p<0.05). PMID:26512863

  4. An Index of Biotic Integrity for shallow streams of the Hondo River basin, Yucatan Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitter-Soto, Juan J., E-mail: jschmitt@ecosur.mx; Ruiz-Cauich, Lissie E.; Herrera, Roberto L.; Gonzalez-Solis, David

    2011-01-15

    An Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) is proposed, based on the fish communities and populations in streams of the Hondo River basin, Mexico-Belize. Freshwater environments in this area are threatened by exotic fishes, eutrophication, and pesticide pollution, among other problems. This IBI should allow to identify the most vulnerable sites and eventually guide rehabilitation efforts. Data on composition, structure, and function of fish communities were evaluated. Twenty-three sites in the Mexican part of the basin were explored; a stratified sample of 13 sites was used to design the IBI, and the rest were used to test and refine the index. Thirty-four candidate indicator metrics were scanned for their correlation with an index of water and habitat quality (IWHQ), as well as for the possible influence of stream width and altitude or distance to the Hondo River mainstem. Twelve variables were selected to constitute the IBI: relative abundances of Astyanax aeneus, 'Cichlasoma' urophthalmus, Poecilia mexicana, Poecilia sp. (a new species, probably endemic to the upper Hondo River basin), Xiphophorus hellerii, and X. maculatus; relative abundances of bentholimnetic, herbivore, and sensitive species; percentage of native and tolerant species; and Pielou's evenness index. Most of the sites have a low-medium quality and integrity, showing impact due to partial channelization or to suboptimal water quality, reflected in scarcity or absence of sensitive species, frequent excess of tolerant species, occasional presence of exotics, dominance of herbivores (perhaps due to proliferation of filamentous algae), or dominance of the opportunistic species P. mexicana. The streams with better water and habitat quality are those farthest away from the river mainstem, probably because of lower human population and economical production. - Research Highlights: {yields} An Index of Biotic Integrity based on fishes is proposed for streams of the Hondo River basin. {yields

  5. Biotic and Abiotic Degradation of CL-20 and RDX in Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, Fiona H.; Thompson, Karen T.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Fredrickson, Herbert L.

    2005-11-01

    The caged cyclic nitramine 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is a new explosive that has the potential to replace existing military explosives, but little is known about its environmental toxicity, transport, and fate. We quantified and compared the aerobic environmental fate of CL-20 to the widely used cyclic nitramine explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in surface and subsurface soil microcosms. Soil-free controls and biologically mediated processes. Both abiotic and biological processes significantly degraded CL-20 in all soils examined. Apparent abiotic, first-order degradation rates (k) for CL-20 were not significantly different between soil-free controls (0.018 < k < 0.030 d-1) and biologically attenuated soil controls (0.003 biotic and abiotic processes was important with CL-20. Our data suggest that CL-20 should be less recalcitrant than RDX in aerobic soils.

  6. Biotic and Sedimentologic Signals Associated with Tempestite Deposition from Baffin Bay, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nieuwenhuise, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    In efforts to determine hurricane frequency prior to historical records, the often used model of counting presumed washover fans as coarse-grained hurricane deposits that interfinger with fine-grained, quiet, lagoon sediments may be oversimplified. The complexities of hurricane depositional events versus the usual dynamic sedimentological processes of barrier island complexes often makes it difficult to distinguish between expected and typical migrating coarse-grained facies from true hurricane deposits. To avoid some of this potential confusion and to better recognize the frequency of strong hurricane events, it is suggested that studies be focused further inland than the washover fans and that in addition to sedimentological indicators, they include biotic and chemical discriminators as well. These results are part of a broader study examining hurricane deposition along the Texas coast. The focus of this study is on slowly accumulating algal mats near Baffin Bay, Texas, that are punctuated by known hurricane deposits. This marginal lagoonal setting is more than 16 miles away from the Padre Island shorefront. Two cores were taken in 1974 that captured sediments from Hurricane Carla (1970) and Hurricane Beulah (1967). Algal mat depositional rates are on the order of 1.25 cm per year whereas the hurricane sediments are on the order of 45 cm per event. Sediments display flood and ebb surge stages for each event. Additional cores in other parts of the coast have similar sediment accumulation rates. In general, periods of relatively quiet deposition are dominated by Cyprideis ovata and Ammonia becarrii which can tolerate the conditions of these euryhaline and algal-floored ponds. In contrast, hurricane deposits show clear evidence of additional bay and shallow marine assemblages along with coarse-grained sediments, shell and shell fragments, and significant amounts of mud settling after the retreat of the storm surge.

  7. Acute dysprosium toxicity to Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and development of the biotic ligand approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukov, Oliver; Smith, D Scott; McGeer, James C

    2016-01-01

    The toxicological understanding of rare earth elements (REEs) in the aquatic environment is very limited but of increasing concern. The objective of this research is to compare the toxicological effect of the REE dysprosium to the freshwater invertebrates Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and in the more sensitive organism, understand the toxicity modifying influence of Ca, Na, Mg, pH and dissolved organic matter (DOM). Standard methods (Environment Canada) were followed for testing and culture in media of intermediate hardness (60mg CaCO3 mg/L) at pH 7.8 with Ca at 0.5, Na 0.5, Mg 0.125 (mM) and 23°C. Acute toxicity tests were done with complexation (at dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of 9 and 13mg C/L) were evaluated. Dissolved Dy concentrations were lower than total (unfiltered) indicating precipitation, particularly at higher concentrations. Acute toxicity of Dy to H. azteca and D. pulex revealed Hyalella to be 1.4 times more sensitive than Daphnia. Additions of Ca and Na but not Mg provided significant protection against Dy toxicity to Hyalella. Similarly, low pH was associated with reduction in toxicity. Exposures which were pH buffered with and without MOPS were significantly different and indicated that MOPS enhanced Dy toxicity. DOM also mitigated Dy toxicity. Biotic ligand based parameters (LogK values) were calculated based on free ion relationships as determined by geochemical equilibrium modeling software (WHAM ver. 7.02). The logK value for Dy(3+) toxicity to Hyalella was 7.75 while the protective influence of Ca and Na were 3.95 and 4.10, respectively. This study contributes data towards the development of site specific water quality guidelines and criteria for Dy and possibly REEs in general and offers insight into the complex bio-geochemical nature of this element. PMID:26655658

  8. An application of the biotic ligand model to predict the toxic effects of metal mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Masashi; Nagai, Takashi

    2008-07-01

    The rapidly developing biotic ligand model (BLM) allows us to predict the toxicity of heavy metals in water of various chemistries; however, the current BLM predicts the toxicity of a single metal and not the toxic effects of metal mixtures. The toxic mechanisms of heavy metals are not yet completely understood, but hypocalcemia is suggested to be the most likely toxic mechanism for some metals. The BLM, which predicts the toxicity of metals by the amount of metals binding to ligand, is modified to predict the toxicity by the proportion of nonmetal binding ligand that is available for calcium uptake under the assumption that the organisms die because of hypocalcemia when so few ligands are available for calcium uptake. Because the proportion can be computed when multiple metals are present, the toxic effects of metal mixtures can be predicted. Zinc, copper, and cadmium toxicity to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are considered. All data are collected from the literature, and a meta-analysis using the modified version of the BLM is conducted. The present study found that the proportion of nonmetal binding ligand is a constant value for any test condition. The proportion is not influenced by water chemistry or by metal species. Using the nature of constant proportion, toxicities of metals are well estimated. In addition, the toxic effects of metal mixtures are the simple sum of the toxicities of each metal (additive effect) corresponding to the bioavailable form of the metals. In terms of total concentration of metals in water, however, nonadditive effects, such as antagonism and synergism, are possible. PMID:18260697

  9. Hydrologic and biotic control of nitrogen export during snowmelt: A combined conservative and reactive tracer approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, Kevin; Buffam, Ishi; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2007-06-01

    Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) stored in the snowpack are important sources of N in snow-covered ecosystems, yet we have limited knowledge of their fate during the melt period. Our objective was to quantify the role of hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in regulating stream fluxes of DIN (NO3- + NH4+) and DON in a forest-dominated and a wetland-dominated catchment during the snowmelt period. We combined isotopic hydrograph separation with concurrent measurements of meltwater DIN and DON to calculate "conservative" N export (hydrologic mixing only) and compared it with "reactive" N export (i.e., observed fluxes that include biogeochemical processes). On balance, N was retained in the catchments during snowmelt because of storage of meltwater N in soils, but our N export comparison revealed N generation (mostly as DON) from the mobilization of dissolved organic matter. In contrast, NO3-, which was highly enriched in snowpack meltwater, remained below detection in streams, and both catchments were sinks for NO3-, suggesting that denitrification and/or uptake may be important at the catchment scale. Over the melt period, the forest catchment was a greater total N source because of the convergence of lateral flow and near-stream riparian N sources in surface soils, which elevated stream DON and to a lesser extent NH4+. In contrast, preferential flow in the wetland catchment tended to dilute DIN in saturated peatland soils and in the stream, whereas DON varied little over time. These findings highlight the importance of hydrologic processes that store meltwater N in catchment soils but at the same time deliver DON from riparian sources to the stream. Further, model results suggest that biotic uptake and/or sorption effectively retain much of the meltwater DIN from the snowpack. Collectively, hydrologic storage and biogeochemical processes act to retain N that is likely important for boreal ecosystem production later in the

  10. Habitat-specific size structure variations in periwinkle populations ( Littorina littorea) caused by biotic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschweiler, Nina; Molis, Markus; Buschbaum, Christian

    2009-06-01

    Shell size distribution patterns of marine gastropod populations may vary considerably across different environments. We investigated the size and density structure of genetically continuous periwinkle populations ( Littorina littorea) on an exposed rocky and a sheltered sedimentary environment on two nearby islands in the south-eastern North Sea (German Bight). On the sedimentary shore, periwinkle density (917 ± 722 individuals m-2) was about three times higher than on the rocky shore (296 ± 168 individuals m-2). Mean (9.8 ± 3.9 mm) and maximum (22 mm) shell size of L. littorea on the sedimentary shore were smaller than on the rocky shore (21.5 ± 4.2 and 32 mm, respectively), where only few small snails were found. Additionally, periwinkle shells were thicker and stronger on the rocky than on the sedimentary shore. To ascertain mechanisms responsible for differences in population structures, we examined periwinkles in both environments for growth rate, predation pressure, infection with a shell boring polychaete ( Polydora ciliata) and parasitic infestation by trematodes. A crosswise transplantation experiment revealed better growth conditions on the sedimentary than on the rocky shore. However, crab abundance and prevalence of parasites and P. ciliata in adult snails were higher on the sedimentary shore. Previous investigations showed that crabs prefer large periwinkles infested with P. ciliata. Thus, we suggest that parasites and shell boring P. ciliata in conjunction with an increased crab predation pressure are responsible for low abundances of large periwinkles on the sedimentary shore while high wave exposure may explain low densities of juvenile L. littorea on the rocky shore. We conclude that biotic factors may strongly contribute to observed differences in size structure of the L. littorea populations studied on rocky and sedimentary shores.

  11. SERDP ER-1421 Abiotic and Biotic Mechanisms Controlling In Situ Remediation of NDMA: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; McKinley, James P.; Crocker, Fiona H.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Devary, Brooks J.; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Thompson, Karen T.

    2009-09-30

    This laboratory-scale project was initiated to investigate in situ abiotic/biotic mineralization of NDMA. Under iron-reducing conditions, aquifer sediments showed rapid abiotic NDMA degradation to dimethylamine (DMA), nitrate, formate, and finally, CO2. These are the first reported experiments of abiotic NDMA mineralization. The NDMA reactivity of these different iron phases showed that adsorbed ferrous iron was the dominant reactive phase that promoted NDMA reduction, and other ferrous phases present (siderite, iron sulfide, magnetite, structural ferrous iron in 2:1 clays) did not promote NDMA degradation. In contrast, oxic sediments that were biostimulated with propane promoted biomineralization of NDMA by a cometabolic monooxygenase enzyme process. Other monooxygenase enzyme processes were not stimulated with methane or toluene additions, and acetylene addition did not block mineralization. Although NDMA mineralization extent was the highest in oxic, biostimulated sediments (30 to 82%, compared to 10 to 26% for abiotic mineralization in reduced sediments), large 1-D column studies (high sediment/water ratio of aquifers) showed 5.6 times higher NDMA mineralization rates in reduced sediment (half-life 410 ± 147 h) than oxic biomineralization (half life 2293 ± 1866 h). Sequential reduced/oxic biostimulated sediment mineralization (half-life 3180 ± 1094 h) was also inefficient compared to reduced sediment. These promising laboratory-scale results for NDMA mineralization should be investigated at field scale. Future studies of NDMA remediation should focus on the comparison of this in situ abiotic NDMA mineralization (iron-reducing environments) to ex situ biomineralization, which has been shown successful in other studies.

  12. A comparison of survey methods to evaluate macrophyte index of biotic integrity performance in Minnesota lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondracek, Bruce C.; Koch, Justine D.; Beck, Marcus W.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes shape trophic web dynamics, provide food and refuge for macroinvertebrates and fish, and increase nutrient retention, sediment stabilization, and water clarity. Macrophytes are well-suited as indicators of ecological health because they are immobile, relatively easy to sample and identify, and respond to anthropogenic disturbance on an ecological time scale. Aquatic plant monitoring programs can provide valuable information to water resource managers, especially in conjunction with macrophyte-based indices of biotic integrity (IBI). However, there are several current sampling designs and the precision of IBI scores has not been evaluated across different surveys. We evaluated the performance of the Minnesota macrophyte-based IBI for two survey designs; a point intercept (PI) survey and a belt transect (BT) survey. PI surveys are time intensive, especially on large lakes, whereas BT are less time intensive and have been used historically in Minnesota. Our objectives were to compare the PI surveys with BT surveys on the same lakes, and to modify the BT survey (MT survey) to improve information obtained from BT surveys. BT surveys consistently overestimated IBI scores compared to the PI method (t = 6.268, df = 60, p < 0.001). Overall IBI scores calculated from MT surveys differed significantly from PI scores, but on average, MT surveys predicted scores only 3% lower than PI scores. Implementation of the Minnesota macrophyte-based IBI through the adoption of the MT survey approach would improve sampling efficiency and enable widespread documentation of the effects of landscape change, shifts in hydrologic regimes, and other anthropogenic activities on the integrity of lacustrine systems.

  13. 1983 biotic studies of Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 27.5-square-mile portion of Yucca Mountain on and adjacent to the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, is being considered as a potential location for a national high-level radioactive waste repository. Preliminary geologic and environmental characterization studies have been supported and more extensive studies are planned. Goals of the biotic surveys were to identify species of concern, describe major floral and faunal associations, and assess possible impacts of characterization and operational activities. Floral associations observed were characteristic of either the Mojave or Transition deserts that are widely distributed in southern Nevada. Diversity, in terms of total number of perennial species represented, was higher in Transition Desert associations than in Mojave Desert associations. Canopy coverage of associations fell within the range of reported values, but tended to be more homogeneous than expected. Annual vegetation was found to be diverse only where the frequency of Bromus rubens was low. Ground cover of winter annuals, especially annual grasses, was observed to be very dense in 1983. The threat of range fires on Yucca Mountain was high because of the increased amount of dead litter and the decreased amount of bare ground. Significant variability was observed in the distribution and relative abundance of several small mammal species between 1982 and 1983. Desert tortoise were found in low densities comparable with those observed in 1982. Evidence of recent activity, which included sighting of two live tortoises, was found in five areas on Yucca Mountain. Two of these areas have a high probability of sustaining significant impacts if a repository is constructed. Regeneration of aboveground shrub parts from root crowns was observed in areas damaged in 1982 by seismic testing with Vibroseis machines. These areas, which had been cleared to bare dirt by passage of the machines, also supported lush stands of winter annuals

  14. Geographic variation of floral traits in Nicotiana glauca : Relationships with biotic and abiotic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattero, Julieta; Sérsic, Alicia N.; Cocucci, Andrea A.

    2011-09-01

    Geographic pattern of phenotypic variation can appear in a clinal or a mosaic fashion and can evidence adaptive or non-adaptive variation. To shed light on the mechanisms underlying this variation, we studied the relationships between geographic variation of floral traits and both biotic and abiotic factors of the hummingbird-pollinated plant, Nicotiana glauca, across its natural range. We obtained floral measures of 38 populations from an area about 1600 km long and 1050 km wide and an altitude range from 7 to over 3400 m. We used a MANOVA to detect between-population differentiations in flower traits and a DFA to determine the traits that best discriminate between populations. To test for associations between floral traits and climatic variables we used correlation analysis. We explored any possible distance-based pattern of variation (either geographic or altitudinal) in floral traits or bill length of pollinators using Mantel tests. Finally, we used a multiple regression to analyze simultaneously the effects and relative importance of abiotic predictor variables and bill length on corolla length. We found a high variation in flower traits among populations. Morphometric traits were the ones that best discriminated across populations. There was a clinal pattern of floral phenotypic variation explained by climatic factors. Differences in floral phenotypic distances were structured by altitudinal distances but not by geographic distances. Bill length of the hummingbird pollinators was structured both by altitudinal and geographic distances. Differences in bill length of hummingbird pollinators explained differences in corolla length across populations. Our findings support the assumption of flower evolution at a broad geographic scale. Floral traits seem to be structured not only by altitude but also by climatic factors.

  15. Subalpine Species Response to Past Climate Change and Fire Activity: Are We Underestimating the Biotic Resilience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, C. L.; Iglesias, V.; Krause, T.

    2014-12-01

    Climate-change impacts on species distributions will be especially complex in mountain systems with steep environmental gradients and heterogeneous landscapes. In the western US, projected climate conditions include rising temperatures, decreased snowpack, and increased moisture deficits, all of which will impact species distributions at high elevations. Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis; WBP) is a keystone species in subalpine environments and one that is highly vulnerable to projected climate trends. In the past two decades, WBP populations dramatically declined as a result of bark beetle infestation, blister rust, high-severity fires, and drought. Species-niche modeling used to map future WPB distributions is based on the relation between present-day occurrence and bioclimatic parameters. While these models capture the realized niche, the full niche space inferred from paleo-observations appears to be much larger. To assess a broad range of bioclimatic conditions for WPB, we examined its response to past changes in climate, fire activity, and species competition. General additive modeling of pollen/charcoal data from the Greater Yellowstone area indicate that WBP reached maximum population size and distribution ~12,000 -7500 years ago and declined thereafter. Population dynamics tracked variations in summer insolation, such that WBP was most abundant when summer temperatures and fire frequency were higher than at present. Competition from lodgepole pine after ~10,000 years ago limited WBP at middle elevations. Paleoecological data indicate that the fundamental WBP niche is considerably larger than assumed, and simulations that project the demise of WBP in the next 50 years are probably too dramatic given WPB's ability to thrive under warm conditions and high fire activity in the past. Management strategies that reduce biotic competition and nonnative pathogens should help increase the future resilience of WBP and other subalpine species.

  16. The effects of flow rate and concentration on nitrobenzene removal in abiotic and biotic zero-valent iron columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weizhao; Wu, Jinhua; Huang, Weilin; Li, Yongtao; Jiang, Gangbiao

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of varying nitrobenzene (NB) loadings via increasing flow rate or influent NB concentration mode on the removal efficiency in zero-valent iron (ZVI) columns sterilized (abiotic) or preloaded with acclimated microorganisms (biotic). It was shown that physical sequestration via adsorption/co-precipitation and reductive transformation of NB to aniline (AN) were the two major mechanisms for the NB removal in both abiotic and biotic ZVI columns. The NB removal efficiency decreased in both columns as the flow rate increased from 0.25 to 1.0mLmin(-1) whereas the AN recovery increased accordingly, with relatively high AN recovery observed at the flow rate of 1.0mLmin(-1). At the constant flow rate of 0.5mLmin(-1), increasing influent NB concentration from 80 to 400μmolL(-1) resulted in decreasing of the overall NB removal efficiency from 79.5 to 48.6% in the abiotic column and from 85.6 to 62.5% in the biotic column. The results also showed that the sequestration capacity and chemical reduction capacity were respectively 72% and 157.6% higher in the biotic column than in the abiotic column at the same tested hydraulic conditions and NB loadings. The optimal flow rates and influent NB concentrations were at 0.5mLmin(-1) and 80μmolL(-1) for the abiotic column and 2.0mLmin-1 and 240μmolL(-1) for the biotic column, respectively. This study indicated that microorganisms not only enhanced overall reduction of NB, but also facilitated NB sequestration within the porous media and that the optimal loading conditions for overall removal, sequestration, and reduction of NB may be different. Optimal operation conditions should be found for preferred sequestration or transformation (or both) of the target contaminants to meet different goals of groundwater remediation with the ZVI-PRB systems. PMID:27093118

  17. Hydro-chemical study of the evolution of interstellar pre-biotic molecules during the collapse of molecular clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the stumbling blocks for studying the evolution of interstellar molecules is the lack of adequate knowledge about the rate coefficients of various reactions which take place in the interstellar medium and molecular clouds. Some theoretical models of rate coefficients do exist in the literature for computing abundances of complex pre-biotic molecules. So far these have been used to study the abundances of these molecules in space. However, in order to obtain more accurate final compositions in these media, we have calculated the rate coefficients for the formation of some of the most important interstellar pre-biotic molecules by using quantum chemical theory. We use these rates inside our hydro-chemical model to examine the chemical evolution and final abundances of pre-biotic species during the collapsing phase of a proto-star. We find that a significant amount of various pre-biotic molecules could be produced during the collapse phase of a proto-star. We thoroughly study the formation of these molecules via successive neutral-neutral and radical-radical/radical-molecular reactions. We present the time evolution of the chemical species with an emphasis on how the production of these molecules varies with the depth of a cloud. We compare the formation of adenine in interstellar space using our rate-coefficients and using those obtained from existing theoretical models. Formation routes of the pre-biotic molecules are found to be highly dependent on the abundances of the reactive species and the rate coefficients involved in the reactions. The presence of grains strongly affects the abundances of the gas phase species. We also carry out a comparative study between different pathways available for the synthesis of adenine, alanine, glycine and other molecules considered in our network. Despite the huge abundances of the neutral reactive species, production of adenine is found to be strongly dominated by the radical-radical/radical-molecular reaction pathways

  18. Hydro-chemical study of the evolution of interstellar pre-biotic molecules during the collapse of molecular clouds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liton Majumdar; Ankan Das; Sandip K. Chakrabarti; Sonali Chakrabarti

    2012-01-01

    One of the stumbling blocks for studying the evolution of interstellar molecules is the lack of adequate knowledge about the rate coefficients of various reactions which take place in the interstellar medium and molecular clouds.Some theoretical models of rate coefficients do exist in the literature for computing abundances of complex pre-biotic molecules.So far these have been used to study the abundances of these molecules in space.However,in order to obtain more accurate final compositions in these media,we have calculated the rate coefficients for the formation of some of the most important interstellar pre-biotic molecules by using quantum chemical theory.We use these rates inside our hydro-chemical model to examine the chemical evolution and final abundances of pre-biotic species during the collapsing phase of a proto-star.We find that a significant amount of various pre-biotic molecules could be produced during the collapse phase of a proto-star.We thoroughly study the formation of these molecules via successive neutral-neutral and radical-radical/radicalmolecular reactions.We present the time evolution of the chemical species with an emphasis on how the production of these molecules varies with the depth of a cloud.We compare the formation of adenine in interstellar space using our rate-coefficients and using those obtained from existing theoretical models.Formation routes of the pre-biotic molecules are found to be highly dependent on the abundances of the reactive species and the rate coefficients involved in the reactions.The presence of grains strongly affects the abundances of the gas phase species.We also carry out a comparative study between different pathways available for the synthesis of adenine,alanine,glycine and other molecules considered in our network.Despite the huge abundances of the neutral reactive species,production of adenine is found to be strongly dominated by the radical-radical/radical-molecular reaction pathways.If all the

  19. Fungicidas, doses e volumes de calda no controle químico da ferrugem da folha da aveia (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae Fungicides, rates and spray volumes in the chemical control of oats crown rust (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. de Oliveira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A ferrugem da folha (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae é a doença mais destrutiva da aveia, e aplicações de fungicidas com volumes baixos de calda podem reduzir a eficácia do controle químico. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a eficiência técnica e econômica de fungicidas, doses e volumes de calda no controle da ferrugem da folha da aveia. O experimento foi conduzido no ano de 2003, na área experimental da FAMV/UPF, com a cultivar de aveia UPFA-20. Os tratamentos foram compostos pelas combinações entre dois fungicidas (tebuconazole, Folicur, 0,75 L ha-1 e epoxiconazole + piraclostrobim, Opera, 0,5 L ha-1, quatro doses (40; 60; 80 e 100% da dose recomendada e dois volumes de calda (100 e 200 L ha-1. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos casualizados, com esquema fatorial (2x4x2 e quatro repetições. Avaliaram-se a severidade, o controle da ferrugem, a massa do hectolitro, a massa de mil grãos e o rendimento de grãos, realizando-se análise econômica. O volume de calda de 200 L ha-1 proporcionou maiores níveis de controle da doença. As aplicações dos fungicidas com volume de 200 L ha-1 e meia dose ou com 100 L ha-1 e dose cheia proporcionam níveis de controle da ferrugem equivalentes. O resultado econômico difere entre fungicidas e independe do volume de calda. Os efeitos de doses dependem do fungicida.Crown rust (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae is the most important disease of oats in Brazil. In susceptible oat cultivars, fungicides are needed to control the disease efficiently. However, spray at low volumes may reduce fungicide performance significantly. A field experiment with the oat cultivar UPFA-20 was carried out at the FAMV/UPF to evaluate the influence of fungicides, rates, and spray volumes on the efficacy of the chemical control for crown rust. The tested treatments combined two fungicides (tebuconazole, Folicur, 0,75 L ha-1; epoxiconazole + pyraclostrobin, Opera, 0,5 L ha-1, four rates (40; 60; 80 and 100

  20. Differences in Competitive Ability between Plants from Nonnative and Native Populations of a Tropical Invader Relates to Adaptive Responses in Abiotic and Biotic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-Yong Liao; Ru Zhang; Gregor F Barclay; Yu-Long Feng

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of competitive ability of invasive plant species is generally studied in the context of adaptive responses to novel biotic environments (enemy release) in introduced ranges. However, invasive plants may also respond to novel abiotic environments. Here we studied differences in competitive ability between Chromolaena odorata plants of populations from nonnative versus native ranges, considering biogeographical differences in both biotic and abiotic environments. An intraspecific ...

  1. An improved method for RNA extraction from urediniospores of and wheat leaves infected by an obligate fungal pathogen, Puccinia striiformis f. sp.tritici

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Li-Jie; QIAO Jia-xing; KONG Xin-yu; WANG Jun-juan; XU Xiang-ming; HU Xiao-ping

    2016-01-01

    Stripe rust, caused byPuccinia striformis f. sp.tritici, is an important wheat disease in China, seriously threatening wheat production. Understanding the winter survival of the fungus is a key for predicting the spring epidemics of the disease, which determines the crop loss. Estimation ofP. striformisf. sp. triticiwinter survival requires processing a large number of samples for sensitive detection of the pathogen in wheat leaf tissue using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). A bottleneck for the analysis is the acquisition of a good yield of high quality RNA suitable for qRT-PCR to distinguish dead and alive fungal hyphae inside leaves. Although several methods have been described in the literatures and commercial kits are available for RNA extraction, these methods are mostly too complicated, expensive and inefifcient. Thus, we modiifed three previously reported RNA extraction methods with common and low-cost reagents (LiCl, SDS and NaCl) to solve the problems and selected the best to obtain high quality and quantity RNA for use in qRT-PCR. In the three improved methods, the NaCl method was proven to be the best for extracting RNA from urediniospores of and wheat leaves infected byP. striformisf. sp. tritici, although the modiifed LiCl and SDS methods also increased yield of RNA compared to the previous methods. The improved NaCl method has the folowing advantages: 1) Complete transfer of urediniospores ofP. striformis f. sp. tritici from the mortar and pestle can ensure the initial amount of RNA for the qRT-PCR analysis; 2) the use of low-cost NaCl to replace more expensive Trizol can reduce the cost; 3) the yield and quality of RNA can be increased;4) the improved method is more suitable for a large number and high quantity of samples from ifelds. Using the improved NaCl method, the amount of RNA was increased three times from urediniospores ofP. striformis f. sp. triticicompared from the extraction kit. Approximately, 10.11 μg total

  2. Opportunities and challenges of indigenous biotic weather forecasting among the Borena herders of southern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayal, Desalegn Yayeh; Desta, Solomon; Gebru, Getachew; Kinyangi, James; Recha, John; Radeny, Maren

    2015-01-01

    The practical utilization of available modern as well as traditional weather forecasting systems builds herders' resiliency capacity to climatic shocks. The precision and reliability of the forecasting system determines its creditability and acceptance by the users to be proactive in the decisions they make based on the forecasted information. It has been postulated that traditional weather forecasting systems are becoming less reliable due to repeated faulty forecasts. The study assesses the current status of the Borana traditional weather forecasting system and how traditional experts make weather forecasts based on biotic indicators such as intestinal readings, changes in plant and animal body languages. Questionnaire survey, field observations, focus group discussions and interviews with relevant key informants were employed to obtain data. Collected field data was compared with National Metrological Service Agency instrumental data for consistency. Results reveal that herders made short term weather forecasts using intestinal readings, and observed changes in plant and animal body languages. The study shows the extent how public confidence in the accuracy of indigenous weather forecasting skills has been gradually eroded overtime due to faulty forecasts. The precision and credibility of the traditional weather forecast steadily declined and led to repeated faulty predictions. Poor documentation, oral based knowledge transfer system, influence of religion and modern education, aging and extinction of traditional experts were identified as the major causes undermining the vitality of traditional climate forecast. Traditional weather foresting knowledge and skill could have some utility and also serve as a starting point to scientifically study the relationship between various signs and implied climatic events. This article recommends before traditional Borana weather forecasting system completely disappears, a remedial action should be carried out to rescue this

  3. Regulation of copper homeostasis and biotic interactions by microRNA 398b in common bean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Naya

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are recognized as important post-transcriptional regulators in plants. Information about the roles of miRNAs in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., an agronomically important legume, is yet scant. The objective of this work was to functionally characterize the conserved miRNA: miR398b and its target Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase 1 (CSD1 in common bean. We experimentally validated a novel miR398 target: the stress up-regulated Nodulin 19 (Nod19. Expression analysis of miR398b and target genes -CSD1 and Nod19- in bean roots, nodules and leaves, indicated their role in copper (Cu homeostasis. In bean plants under Cu toxicity miR398b was decreased and Nod19 and CSD1, that participates in reactive oxygen species (ROS detoxification, were up-regulated. The opposite regulation was observed in Cu deficient bean plants; lower levels of CSD1 would allow Cu delivery to essential Cu-containing proteins. Composite common bean plants with transgenic roots over-expressing miR398 showed ca. 20-fold higher mature miR398b and almost negligible target transcript levels as well as increased anthocyanin content and expression of Cu-stress responsive genes, when subjected to Cu deficiency. The down-regulation of miR398b with the consequent up-regulation of its targets was observed in common bean roots during the oxidative burst resulting from short-time exposure to high Cu. A similar response occurred at early stage of bean roots inoculated with Rhizobium tropici, where an increase in ROS was observed. In addition, the miR398b down-regulation and an increase in CSD1 and Nod19 were observed in bean leaves challenged with Sclerotinia scleortiorum fungal pathogen. Transient over-expression of miR398b in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves infected with S. sclerotiorum resulted in enhanced fungal lesions. We conclude that the miR398b-mediated up-regulation of CSD and Nod19 is relevant for common bean plants to cope with oxidative stress generated in abiotic and biotic

  4. Coral Skeleton Density Banding: Biotic Response to Changes in Sea Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C. A.; Sivaguru, M.; Fried, G. A.; Fouke, B. W.

    2010-12-01

    Density bands in the CaCO3 (aragonite) skeleton of scleractinian corals are commonly used as chronometers, where crystalline couplets of high and low density bands represent the span of one year. Isotopic analysis of these density bands provides a sensitive reconstructive tool for paleoclimatology and paleoecology. However, the detailed biotic mechanisms controlling coral skeleton aragonite nucleation and crystallization events and resulting skeletal growth rate remain uncertain. The coral tissue organic matrix, composed of macromolecules secreted by the calicoblastic ectoderm, is closely associated with skeletal precipitation and is itself incorporated into the skeleton. We postulate that density banding is primarily controlled by changes in the rate of aragonite crystal precipitation mediated by the coral holobiont response to changes in sea surface temperature (SST). To test this hypothesis, data were collected from coral skeleton-tissue biopsies (2.5 cm in diameter) extracted from four species of Montastraea growing on the fringing reef tract of Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. Annual mean variation in SST on Curacao range from 29o in mid-September to 26o C in late February. Samples were collected at strategic time periods spanning the 3o C annual variations in SST. Our nanometer-scale optical analyses of skeletal morphology have revealed consistent changes between high- and low-skeletal density bands, resulting in an 11% increase in the volume of aragonite precipitated in high-density skeletal bands. The re-localization and/or change in abundance of mucus, carbonic anhydrase (a molecule that catalyzes the hydration of carbon dioxide), calmodulin (a calcium-binding protein) and the change in density of gastrodermal symbiotic dinoflagellates has permitted estimates of seasonally-fluctuating carbon allocation by the coral holobiont in response to changing environmental conditions. This digital reconstruction of over 2000 images of one-micron-thick histological

  5. Combined effects of climate and biotic interactions on the elevational range of a phytophagous insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Richard M; Gutiérrez, David; Lewis, Owen T; Gutiérrez, Javier; Díez, Sonia B; Wilson, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    1. The ranges of many species have expanded in cool regions but contracted at warm margins in response to recent climate warming, but the mechanisms behind such changes remain unclear. Particular debate concerns the roles of direct climatic limitation vs. the effects of interacting species in explaining the location of low latitude or low elevation range margins. 2. The mountains of the Sierra de Guadarrama (central Spain) include both cool and warm range margins for the black-veined white butterfly, Aporia crataegi, which has disappeared from low elevations since the 1970s without colonizing the highest elevations. 3. We found that the current upper elevation limit to A. crataegi's distribution coincided closely with that of its host plants, but that the species was absent from elevations below 900 m, even where host plants were present. The density of A. crataegi per host plant increased with elevation, but overall abundance of the species declined at high elevations where host plants were rare. 4. The flight period of A. crataegi was later at higher elevations, meaning that butterflies in higher populations flew at hotter times of year; nevertheless, daytime temperatures for the month of peak flight decreased by 6.2 degrees C per 1 km increase in elevation. 5. At higher elevations A. crataegi eggs were laid on the south side of host plants (expected to correspond to hotter microclimates), whereas at lower sites the (cooler) north side of plants was selected. Field transplant experiments showed that egg survival increased with elevation. 6. Climatic limitation is the most likely explanation for the low elevation range margin of A. crataegi, whereas the absence of host plants from high elevations sets the upper limit. This contrasts with the frequent assumption that biotic interactions typically determine warm range margins, and thermal limitation cool margins. 7. Studies that have modelled distribution changes in response to climate change may have underestimated

  6. The relative contribution of climatic, edaphic, and biotic drivers to risk of tree mortality from drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, R. G.; Moore, G. W.; Edgar, C. B.; Lawing, A. M.; Washington-Allen, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    In recorded history, the 2011 Texas Drought was comparable in severity only to a drought that occurred 300 years ago. By mid-September, 88% of the state experienced 'exceptional' conditions, with the rest experiencing 'extreme' or 'severe' drought. By recent estimates, the 2011 Texas Drought killed 6.2% of all the state's trees, at a rate nearly 9 times greater than average. The vast spatial scale and relatively uniform intensity of this drought has provided an opportunity to examine the comparative interactions among forest types, terrain, and edaphic factors across major climate gradients which in 2011 were subjected to extreme drought conditions that ultimately caused massive tree mortality. We used maximum entropy modeling (Maxent) to rank environmental landscape factors with the potential to drive drought-related tree mortality and test the assumption that the relative importance of these factors are scale-dependent. Occurrence data of dead trees were collected during the summer of 2012 from 599 field plots distributed across Texas with 30% used for model evaluation. Bioclimatic variables, ecoregions, soils characteristics, and topographic variables were modeled with drought-killed tree occurrence. Their relative contribution to the model was seen as their relative importance in driving mortality. To test determinants at a more local scale, we examined Landsat 7 scenes in East and West Texas with moderate-resolution data for the same variables above with the exception of climate. All models were significantly better than random in binomial tests of omission and receiver operating characteristic analyses. The modeled spatial distribution of probability of occurrence showed high probability of mortality in the east-central oak woodlands and the mixed pine-hardwood forest region in northeast Texas. Both regional and local models were dominated by biotic factors (ecoregion and forest type, respectively). Forest density and precipitation of driest month also

  7. Silver contamination on abiotic and biotic compartments of Nahuel Huapi National Park lakes, Patagonia, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ag contents of abiotic and biotic compartments of different lakes of Nahuel Huapi National Park, Patagonia, Argentina were analyzed. The water bodies studied were lakes Nahuel Huapi, Moreno, Escondido, Espejo Chico and Traful, the latter chosen as a reference lake. The Ag concentration profiles of short sediment cores, dated by 210Pb and 137Cs techniques, were analyzed, as well as suspended load collected from three sites of lake Nahuel Huapi. The biota studied were the native mussel Diplodon chilensis (digestive gland and total soft tissues pooled samples) and five species of fish, two native and three introduced (liver and muscle pooled samples). Ag contents were determined by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). The upper layers of the sediment cores sampled in lake Nahuel Huapi were enriched in Ag contents compared to deep layers in accumulation periods corresponding to the second half of the 20th century, but this enrichment was neither observed in the reference lake Traful, nor in lakes Espejo Chico and Escondido. Ag was enriched over background level (0.1 μg g-1) also in suspended load collected in lake Nahuel Huapi. Ag fluxes to sediments were computed for suspended load and enriched sediment core layers. Highest Ag fluxes, from 350 to 470 μg m-2 year-1, were measured in Nahuel Huapi near the site where the liquid effluents of the Bariloche city sewage treatment plant are released to the lake. The spatial distribution of the other Ag fluxes suggests that this is the main source of Ag to lake Nahuel Huapi and lateral transport occurs within the water body. Ag concentrations on biota samples were consistent with these conclusions. Mussels collected in lake Nahuel Huapi showed higher Ag concentrations than in the other lakes, especially when compared to lake Traful. Ag contents in mussels were strongly associated with sediment intake, but enriched probably due to sediment grain size sorting during the intake processes. Evidence of food chain

  8. Coupled biotic-abiotic oxidation of organic matter by biogenic MnO_{2}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Julia; Peña, Jasquelin

    2016-04-01

    Some reactive soil minerals are strongly implicated in stabilising organic matter. However, others can play an active role in the oxidation of organic molecules. In natural systems, layer-type manganese oxide minerals (MnO2) typically occur as biomineral assemblages consisting of mineral particles and microbial biomass. Both the mineral and biological fractions of the assemblage can be powerful oxidants of organic C. The biological compartment relies on a set of enzymes to drive oxidative transformations of reduced C-substrates, whereas MnO2 minerals are strong, less specific abiotic oxidants that are assumed to rely on interfacial interactions between C-substrates and the mineral surface. This project aims to understand the coupling between microbial C mineralization and abiotic C oxidation mediated by MnO2 in bacterial-MnO2 assemblages. Specifically, under conditions of high C turnover, microbial respiration can significantly alter local pH, dissolved oxygen and pool of available reductants, which may modify rates and mechanism of C oxidation by biotic and abiotic components. We first investigated changes in the solution chemistry of Pseudomonas putida suspensions exposed to varying concentrations of glucose, chosen to represent readily bioavailable substrates in soils. Glucose concentrations tested ranged between 0 and 5.5mM and changes in pH, dissolved oxygen and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon were tracked over 48h. We then combined literature review and wet-chemical experiments to compile the pH dependence of rates of organic substrate oxidation by MnO2, including glucose. Our results demonstrate a strong pH dependence for these abiotic reactions. In assemblages of P. putida - MnO2, kinetic limitations for abiotic C oxidation by MnO2 are overcome by changes in biogeochemical conditions that result from bacterial C metabolism. When extrapolated to a soil solution confronted to an input of fresh dissolved organic matter, bacterial C metabolism of the

  9. Study of Chemical Treatment Combined with Radiation to Prepare Biotic Elicitor for Utilization in Agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitosan was prepared from shrimp shell (alpha chitosan) and from squid pen (beta chitosan) with degree of deacetylation of about 70%. Degradation of chitosan in flake form by combined treatment with H2O2 and gamma Co-60 radiation was carried out. Results showed that combined treatment was highly effective for degradation of chitosan to obtain low molecular weight of 1-2 × 105. Oligochitosan was prepared by irradiation of chitosan solution of 50g/l (5%, w/v). The dose required for oligochitosan with water soluble content of more than 70% was of 32kGy and 48kGy for beta and alpha chitosan, respectively. Synergic effect of degradation of chitosan in solution with H2O2 and gamma Co-60 radiation was also investigated. The dose to obtain oligochitosan was reduced from 32kGy to 4kGy for beta chitosan and from 48kGy to 8kGy for alpha chitosan. The elicitation and growth promotion effect of oligochiotsan for sugarcane and rice were investigated. Results showed that oligochitosan with water soluble content of 70-80% (Mw~5,000-10,000) exhibited the most effective elicitation and growth promotion for plant. The optimum oligochitosan concentration by spraying was of 30 and 15ppm for sugarcane and rice, respectively. The disease index of Ustilgo scitaminea and Collectotrichum falcatum on sugarcane were reduced to 44.5 and 72.3% compared to control (100%). The productivity of sugarcane was increased about 13% (8tons/ha). The disease index of Pyricularia grisea on rice was reduced to 53.0% for leaf and 34.1% for neck of bloom compared to control (100%). The productivity of rice was increased for 11-26% (0.6-1.4 tons/ha). The obtained results indicated that oligochitosan is promising to use as a biotic elicitor for plant particularly for sugarcane and rice. The procedure for production of oligochitosan elicitor by γ- irradiation method was described. (author)

  10. [Comparison of biotic index used in monitoring of 2 lotic systems in north-western Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salusso, María M; Moraña, Liliana B

    2002-03-01

    Two lotic bodies located in a subtropical semi-arid region in north-western Argentina were studied: the Arias-Arenales and the Rosario rivers. Both rivers are located in Salta Province, and belong to the high basin of river Juramento, connected to the river Río de la Plata and the Atlantic Ocean. The study was conducted between March 1997 and March 1998. The region is known by its sustained economic development and one of the highest population growth rates in the country (4% per year). The objective of this work was the assessment of organic pollution spatial gradients in both rivers, as a function of the hydrological regime (a long period of drought from May to October and floodings the rest of the year). Three groups of biotic indices were applied to characterize the level of organic pollution and were based on planktonic microalgae to evaluate water quality. The relative performance of these indices was then compared for use to biomonitoring programs. The diversity indices: Shannon-Weaver and Whilm-Dorris were not highly sensible to detect moderate pollution. The saprobity indices (Pantle and Buck and Diatom Assemblage Index of Watanabe et al.), were useful to detect intermediate levels of organic load, but their sensitivity dropped at high pollution levels. The second index precisely discriminated the most deteriorated part of river Rosario, with values between 0.3-0.7 (extreme poli-saprobity). Raw sewage discharges along the most polluted sector of river Arias-Arenales were assigned a value between 10 and 11 in both periods of the hydrological regime. Both saprobity indices consider the same indicator pollution value of species. The first one is based on the relative abundance of the species while the second one is calculated with the species relative frequency. The second index is better than the first one in considering non-dominant species that were constant in each particular environmental condition. The principal component analysis allowed a

  11. Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals and sediments: insights from oxygen isotopes in phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Stout, Lisa M.; Varga, Tamas; Blake, Ruth E.

    2011-07-06

    A key question to address in the development of oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate (18Op) as a tracer of biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus in ancient and modern environments is the nature of isotopic signatures associated with uptake and cycling of mineral-bound phosphate by microorganisms. Here we present experimental results aimed at understanding the biotic and abiotic pathway of P cycling during biological uptake of phosphate sorbed to ferrihydrite and the selective uptake of specific sedimentary phosphate phases by Escherichia coli, Vibrio fischeri and Marinobacter aquaeolei. Results indicate that a significant fraction of ferrihydrite-bound phosphate is biologically available. The fraction of phosphate taken up by E. coli attained an equilibrium isotopic composition in a short time (<50 hrs) due to efficient O-isotope exchange between phosphate and water (biotic pathway). The difference in isotopic composition between newly equilibrated aqueous and residual sorbed phosphate promoted the exchange of intact phosphate radicals (abiotic pathway) so that this difference gradually became negligible. In sediment containing different P phases, E. coli and V. fischeri ‘extracted’ loosely sorbed phosphate first while M. aquaeolei preferred iron-oxide bound phosphate. Each bacterium imprinted a biotic isotopic signature on each P phase that it took up and cycled. For example, the 18Op value of the sorbed phosphate phase shifted gradually towards equilibrium isotopic composition and the value of Fe oxide-bound phosphate showed slight changes at first, but when new iron oxides were formed, co-precipitated/occluded phosphate retained 18O values of aqueous phosphate at that time. Concentrations and isotopic compositions of authigenic and detrital phosphates did not change, suggesting that these phosphate phases were not utilized by bacteria. These findings support burgeoning applications of 18Op as a tracer of phosphorus cycling in sediments, soils and aquatic

  12. Coupling effects of abiotic and biotic factors on molecular composition of dissolved organic matter in a freshwater wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Choi, Ilhwan; Lee, Jung-Joon; Hur, Jin

    2016-02-15

    In this study, temporal and spatial variations in five defined molecular size fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were examined for a well preserved wetland (Upo Wetland) and its surrounding areas, and the influencing factors were explored with many biotic and abioic parameters. For each DOM sample, the five size fractions were determined by size-exclusion chromatography coupled with organic carbon detector (SEC-OCD). For 2-year long monthly monitoring, bio-polymers (BP), humic substances (HS), building blocks (BB), low molecular-weight (LMW) neutrals, and LMW acids displayed the median values of 264, 1884, 1070, 1090, and 11 μg-CL(-1), respectively, accounting for 6.2%, 41.7%, 24.5%, 26.4%, and 0.4% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The dominant presence of HS indicated that terrestrial input played important roles in DOM composition of the freshwater ecosystem, which contrasted with coastal wetlands in other reports. Both seasonal and periodic patterns in the variations were found only for HS and BB among the size fractions. It was also notable that the sources of HS were seasonally shifted from aquagenic origin in winter to pedogenic origin in summer. The correlations among the size fractions revealed that BB and LMW neutrals might be degradation products from HS and humic-like substances (HS+BB), respectively, while LMW acids, from LMW neutrals. Principle component analysis revealed that the humic-like substances and the aromaticity of DOM were associated with temperature, chlorophyll a, phosphorous, and rainfall, whereas the other fractions and the molecular weight of HS were primarily affected by solar irradiation. Significant correlations between DOM composition and some biotic factors further suggested that DOM may even affect the biological communities, which provides an insight into the potential coupling effects of biotic and abiotic factors on DOM molecular composition in freshwater wetlands. PMID:26674681

  13. Differential Regulation of Genes Coding for Organelle and Cytosolic ClpATPases under Biotic and Abiotic Stresses in Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, Senthilkumar K; Dalal, Monika; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Bansal, Kailash C

    2016-01-01

    A sub-group of class I Caseinolytic proteases (Clps) function as molecular chaperone and confer thermotolerance to plants. We identified class I Clp family consisting of five ClpB/HSP100, two ClpC, and two ClpD genes from bread wheat. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these genes were highly conserved across grass genomes. Subcellular localization prediction revealed that TaClpC and TaClpD subgroup proteins and TaClpB1 proteins are potentially targeted to chloroplast, while TaClpB5 to mitochondria, and TaClpB2, TaClpB3, and TaClpB4 to cytoplasm. Spatio-temporal expression pattern analysis revealed that four TaClpB and TaClpD2 genes are expressed in majority of all tissues and developmental stages of wheat. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of expression levels of Clp genes in seven wheat genotypes under different abiotic stresses revealed that genes coding for the cytosolic Clps namely TaClpB2 and TaClpB3 were upregulated under heat, salt and oxidative stress but were downregulated by cold stress in most genotypes. In contrast, genes coding for the chloroplastic Clps TaClpC1, TaClpC2, and TaClpD1 genes were significantly upregulated by mainly by cold stress in most genotypes, while TaClpD2 gene was upregulated >2 fold by salt stress in DBW16. The TaClpB5 gene coding for mitochondrial Clp was upregulated in all genotypes under heat, salt and oxidative stresses. In addition, we found that biotic stresses also upregulated TaClpB4 and TaClpD1. Among biotic stresses, Tilletia caries induced TaClpB2, TaClpB3, TaClpC1, and TaClpD1. Differential expression pattern under different abiotic and biotic stresses and predicted differential cellular localization of Clps suggest their non-redundant organelle and stress-specific roles. Our results also suggest the potential role of Clps in cold, salt and biotic stress responses in addition to the previously established role in thermotolerance of wheat. PMID:27446158

  14. Counting and differentiating aquatic biotic nanoparticles by full-field interferometry: from laboratory tests to Tara Oceans sample analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Boccara, Martine; Bryan, Catherine Venien; Bailly-Bechet, Marc; Bowler, Chris; Boccara, Albert Claude

    2016-01-01

    There is a huge abundance of viruses and membrane vesicles in seawater. We describe a new full-field, incoherently illuminated, shot-noise limited, common-path interferometric detection method that we couple with the analysis of Brownian motion to detect, quantify, and differentiate biotic nanoparticles. We validated the method with calibrated nanoparticles and homogeneous DNA or RNA.viruses. The smallest virus size that we characterized with a suitable signal-to-noise ratio was around 30 nm in diameter. Analysis of Brownian motions revealed anisotropic trajectories for myoviruses.We further applied the method for vesicles detection and for analysis of coastal and oligotrophic samples from Tara Oceans circumnavigation.

  15. Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal. Estimation of radiation dose to man resulting from biotic transport: the BIOPORT/MAXI1 software package. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, D.H.; Cadwell, L.L.; Gano, K.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Prohammer, L.A.; Simmons, M.A.

    1985-10-01

    BIOPORT/MAXI1 is a collection of five computer codes designed to estimate the potential magnitude of the radiation dose to man resulting from biotic transport processes. Dose to man is calculated for ingestion of agricultural crops grown in contaminated soil, inhalation of resuspended radionuclides, and direct exposure to penetrating radiation resulting from the radionuclide concentrations established in the available soil surface by the biotic transport model. This document is designed as both an instructional and reference document for the BIOPORT/MAXI1 computer software package and has been written for two major audiences. The first audience includes persons concerned with the mathematical models of biological transport of commercial low-level radioactive wastes and the computer algorithms used to implement those models. The second audience includes persons concerned with exercising the computer program and exposure scenarios to obtain results for specific applications. The report contains sections describing the mathematical models, user operation of the computer programs, and program structure. Input and output for five sample problems are included. In addition, listings of the computer programs, data libraries, and dose conversion factors are provided in appendices.

  16. Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal. Estimation of radiation dose to man resulting from biotic transport: the BIOPORT/MAXI1 software package. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BIOPORT/MAXI1 is a collection of five computer codes designed to estimate the potential magnitude of the radiation dose to man resulting from biotic transport processes. Dose to man is calculated for ingestion of agricultural crops grown in contaminated soil, inhalation of resuspended radionuclides, and direct exposure to penetrating radiation resulting from the radionuclide concentrations established in the available soil surface by the biotic transport model. This document is designed as both an instructional and reference document for the BIOPORT/MAXI1 computer software package and has been written for two major audiences. The first audience includes persons concerned with the mathematical models of biological transport of commercial low-level radioactive wastes and the computer algorithms used to implement those models. The second audience includes persons concerned with exercising the computer program and exposure scenarios to obtain results for specific applications. The report contains sections describing the mathematical models, user operation of the computer programs, and program structure. Input and output for five sample problems are included. In addition, listings of the computer programs, data libraries, and dose conversion factors are provided in appendices

  17. TaWRKY68 responses to biotic stresses are revealed by the orthologous genes from major cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available WRKY transcription factors have been extensively characterized in the past 20 years, but in wheat, studies onWRKY genes and their function are lagging behind many other species. To explore the function of wheat WRKY genes, we identified a TaWRKY68 gene from a common wheat cultivar. It encodes a protein comprising 313 amino acids which harbors 19 conserved motifs or active sites. Gene expression patterns were determined by analyzing microarray data of TaWRKY68 in wheat and of orthologous genes from maize, rice and barley using Genevestigator. TaWRKY68 orthologs were identified and clustered using DELTA-BLAST and COBALT programs available at NCBI. The results showed that these genes, which are expressed in all tissues tested, had relatively higher levels in the roots and were up-regulated in response to biotic stresses. Bioinformatics results were confirmed by RT-PCR experiments using wheat plants infected by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Blumeria graminis, or treated with Deoxynivalenol, a Fusarium graminearum-induced mycotoxin in wheat or barley. In summary,TaWRKY68 functions differ during plant developmental stages and might be representing a hub gene function in wheat responses to various biotic stresses. It was also found that including data from major cereal genes in the bioinformatics analysis gave more accurate and comprehensive predictions of wheat gene functions.

  18. Process-Based Species Pools Reveal the Hidden Signature of Biotic Interactions Amid the Influence of Temperature Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Weinstein, Ben G; Borregaard, Michael K; Marske, Katharine A; Martin, Danny R; McGuire, Jimmy A; Parra, Juan L; Rahbek, Carsten; Graham, Catherine H

    2016-01-01

    A persistent challenge in ecology is to tease apart the influence of multiple processes acting simultaneously and interacting in complex ways to shape the structure of species assemblages. We implement a heuristic approach that relies on explicitly defining species pools and permits assessment of the relative influence of the main processes thought to shape assemblage structure: environmental filtering, dispersal limitations, and biotic interactions. We illustrate our approach using data on the assemblage composition and geographic distribution of hummingbirds, a comprehensive phylogeny and morphological traits. The implementation of several process-based species pool definitions in null models suggests that temperature-but not precipitation or dispersal limitation-acts as the main regional filter of assemblage structure. Incorporating this environmental filter directly into the definition of assemblage-specific species pools revealed an otherwise hidden pattern of phylogenetic evenness, indicating that biotic interactions might further influence hummingbird assemblage structure. Such hidden patterns of assemblage structure call for a reexamination of a multitude of phylogenetic- and trait-based studies that did not explicitly consider potentially important processes in their definition of the species pool. Our heuristic approach provides a transparent way to explore patterns and refine interpretations of the underlying causes of assemblage structure. PMID:27277404

  19. Using artificial neural networks to predict the distribution of bacterial crop diseases from biotic and abiotic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Watts

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Constructing accurate computational global distribution models is an important first step towards the understanding of bacterial crop diseases and can lead to insights into the biology of disease-causing bacteria species. We constructed artificial neural network models of the geographic distribution of six bacterial diseases of crop plants. These ANN modelled the distribution of these species from regional climatic factors and from regional assemblages of host crop plants. Multiple ANN were combined into ensembles using statistical methods. Tandem ANN, where an ANN combined the outputs of individual ANN, were also investigated. We found that for all but one species, superior accuracies were attained by methods that combined biotic and abiotic factors. These combinations were produced by both ensemble and cascaded ANN. This shows that firstly, ANN are able to model the geographic distribution of bacterial crop diseases, and secondly, that combining abiotic and biotic factors is necessary to achieve high modelling accuracies. The work reported in this paper therefore provides a basis for constructing models of the distribution of bacterial crop diseases.

  20. Impact of biotic and abiotic stresses on the competitive ability of multiple herbicide resistant wild oat (Avena fatua.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik A Lehnhoff

    Full Text Available Ecological theory predicts that fitness costs of herbicide resistance should lead to the reduced relative abundance of resistant populations upon the cessation of herbicide use. This greenhouse research investigated the potential fitness costs of two multiple herbicide resistant (MHR wild oat (Avena fatua populations, an economically important weed that affects cereal and pulse crop production in the Northern Great Plains of North America. We compared the competitive ability of two MHR and two herbicide susceptible (HS A. fatua populations along a gradient of biotic and abiotic stresses The biotic stress was imposed by three levels of wheat (Triticum aestivum competition (0, 4, and 8 individuals pot(-1 and an abiotic stress by three nitrogen (N fertilization rates (0, 50 and 100 kg N ha(-1. Data were analyzed with linear mixed-effects models and results showed that the biomass of all A. fatua populations decreased with increasing T. aestivum competition at all N rates. Similarly, A. fatua relative growth rate (RGR decreased with increasing T. aestivum competition at the medium and high N rates but there was no response with 0 N. There were no differences between the levels of biomass or RGR of HS and MHR populations in response to T. aestivum competition. Overall, the results indicate that MHR does not confer growth-related fitness costs in these A. fatua populations, and that their relative abundance will not be diminished with respect to HS populations in the absence of herbicide treatment.

  1. [Bacterioplankton index of biotic integrity (BP-IBI): an approach for assessing river ecosystem health in Dianchi watershed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Shu, Zhong-Ya

    2013-08-01

    The index of biotic integrity (IBI) has been widely applied to the health assessment of river ecosystems. However, the currently available IBI methods are lack of decomposer-based assessment. Based on the T-RFLP result of bacterioplankton, we developed the bacterioplankton index of biotic integrity (BP-IBI) after the screening of major environmental factors and candidate metrics to assess the health of the inflow rivers in Dianchi Watershed. The evaluation result indicated that the eco-health conditions of 11 reference sites were either level I (8 sites) or level II (3 sites), while the 27 damaged sites were level I (4 sites), level II (14 sites), level III (7 sites), and level IV (2 sites), and there was no level V site. Compared with the other IBI methods and the integrated pollution index, BP-IBI showed better effect in reflecting the influence of the key environmental factors, the land use types and the upstream water types in river ecosystems. Therefore, BP-IBI is a good method to characterize the health status of river ecosystems. PMID:24191542

  2. Scale Expansion of Community Investigations and Integration of the Effects of Abiotic and Biotic Processes on Maintenance of Species Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhong Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Information on the maintenance of diversity patterns from regional to local scales is dispersed among academic fields due to the local focus of community ecology. To better understand these patterns, the study of ecological communities needs to be expanded to larger scales and the various processes affecting them need to be integrated using a suitable quantitative method. We determined a range of communities on a flora-subregional scale in Yunnan province, China (383210.02 km2. A series of species pools were delimited from the regional to plot scales. Plant diversity was evaluated and abiotic and biotic processes identified at each pool level. The species pool effect was calculated using an innovative model, and the contribution of these processes to the maintenance of plant species diversity was determined and integrated: climate had the greatest effect at the flora-subregional scale, with historical and evolutionary processes contributing ∼11%; climate and human disturbance had the greatest effect at the local site pool scale; competition exclusion and stress limitation explained strong filtering at the successional stage pool scale; biotic processes contributed more on the local community scale than on the regional scale. Scale expansion combined with the filtering model approach solves the local problem in community ecology.

  3. Alternative Oxidase: A Mitochondrial Respiratory Pathway to Maintain Metabolic and Signaling Homeostasis during Abiotic and Biotic Stress in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg C. Vanlerberghe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Alternative oxidase (AOX is a non-energy conserving terminal oxidase in the plant mitochondrial electron transport chain. While respiratory carbon oxidation pathways, electron transport, and ATP turnover are tightly coupled processes, AOX provides a means to relax this coupling, thus providing a degree of metabolic homeostasis to carbon and energy metabolism. Beside their role in primary metabolism, plant mitochondria also act as “signaling organelles”, able to influence processes such as nuclear gene expression. AOX activity can control the level of potential mitochondrial signaling molecules such as superoxide, nitric oxide and important redox couples. In this way, AOX also provides a degree of signaling homeostasis to the organelle. Evidence suggests that AOX function in metabolic and signaling homeostasis is particularly important during stress. These include abiotic stresses such as low temperature, drought, and nutrient deficiency, as well as biotic stresses such as bacterial infection. This review provides an introduction to the genetic and biochemical control of AOX respiration, as well as providing generalized examples of how AOX activity can provide metabolic and signaling homeostasis. This review also examines abiotic and biotic stresses in which AOX respiration has been critically evaluated, and considers the overall role of AOX in growth and stress tolerance.

  4. Over-summering of wheat stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici in the California Central valley: A case study Supervivencia estival de la roya estriada (Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici del trigo en el Valle Central de California: Estudio de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huib Tollenaar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available To study the over-summering of wheat stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici in the California Central Valley (CCV, temperature records from various locations in the CCV during the period 1950-2009 were examined for the occurrence of lethal maximum temperatures for the uredinia and uredinio-mycelium of this fungus. The lethal upper threshold temperature for the uredinial stage of P.s. tritici, estimated to be 40.5 °C on the basis of data published elsewhere, and the sum, accumulated during ten consecutive days, of the respective lethal temperature quotients (ALTQio, accounting for the partial lethal effect of the daily ambient temperatures between 30 and 40.5 °C on the uredinial stage of P.s. tritici, were used as yardsticks for thermal lethality. The results indicate that, in these 60 yr, the uredinia and the uredinio-mycelium of P.s. tritici could not possibly have over-summered at any of the locations studied. The Sierra Nevada Mountains, together with the Tulelake Basin and the coastal zone of the Pacific Ocean are the only two areas in California with appropriate environmental conditions for the summer-survival of the uredinial stage of stripe rust. Therefore, it is presumed that the inoculum for the initial infections of P.s. tritici in wheat fields in the CCV during the following growing season originates in either one or both of these areas, although, a potential third source of inoculum for the initial infections of stripe rust in the CCV could also be involved. Namely, the possible presence of telia with viable teliospores of P.s. tritici in autumn on straw of the threshed wheat fields or on volunteer wheat plants in the CCV, in conjunction with the accidental concurrence of nearby stripe rust susceptible barberry (Berberis spp., could lead to the development of alternative, endogenous sources of inoculum in the CCV.Para estudiar la supervivencia estival de la roya estriada (Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici del trigo

  5. Herança da resistência à ferrugem da folha da aveia (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae Fraser & Led. em genótipos brasileiros de aveia branca Inheritance of oat leaf rust (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae Fraser & Led. resistance in white oat brazilian genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Alano Vieira

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A ferrugem da folha da aveia é a moléstia mais importante que ataca a cultura da aveia, ocorrendo em praticamente todas as áreas em que a aveia é cultivada. A forma mais indicada para o seu controle é a utilização de cultivares resistentes. Contudo, para que seja alcançada a resistência durável ao patógeno, é necessário que se conheça a genética da resistência à ferrugem da folha em aveia. O objetivo foi determinar a forma de herança da resistência a três isolados de Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae Fraser & Led., (coletados no sul do Brasil em genótipos brasileiros de aveia branca. Para a determinação da herança da resistência a cada um dos três isolados, foram utilizadas populações F2 geradas por meio de cruzamentos artificiais, entre genótipos resistentes (R e suscetíveis (S e entre genótipos resistentes (R. Desta forma, foram utilizadas populações F2 dos cruzamentos artificiais entre: i URPEL 15 (R x UFRGS 7 (S, UPF 16 (R x UFRGS 7 (S e URPEL 15 (R x UPF 16 (R, para a determinação da herança da resistência ao isolado um (1; ii URPEL 15 (R x UFRGS 7 (S, UPF 18 (R x UFRGS 7 (S e URPEL 15 (R x UPF 18 (R, para a determinação da herança da resistência ao isolado dois (2; iii URPEL 15 (R x UFRGS 7 (S e URPEL 15 (R x UPF 18 (S, para a determinação da herança da resistência ao isolado três (3. Os resultados obtidos evidenciaram que o genótipo URPEL 15 apresenta genes dominantes de resistência aos três isolados de ferrugem da folha da aveia avaliados, que o cultivar UPF 16 apresenta um gene recessivo de resistência ao isolado 1 e o cultivar UPF 18 apresenta um gene recessivo de resistência ao isolado 2. E que os genes de resistência apresentados pelos genótipos URPEL 15, UPF 16 e UPF 18, segregam de forma independente.Oat crown rust is the most important disease for the oat crop, occurring in practically all the areas where oat is cultivated. The most indicated form of control for this disease is

  6. Biotic and abiotic dynamics of a high solid-state anaerobic digestion box-type container system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Andreas; Probst, Maraike; Hinterberger, Stephan; Müller, Horst; Insam, Heribert

    2016-03-01

    A solid-state anaerobic digestion box-type container system for biomethane production was observed in 12 three-week batch fermentations. Reactor performance was monitored using physico-chemical analysis and the methanogenic community was identified using ANAEROCHIP-microarrays and quantitative PCR. A resilient community was found in all batches, despite variations in inoculum to substrate ratio, feedstock quality, and fluctuating reactor conditions. The consortia were dominated by mixotrophic Methanosarcina that were accompanied by hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium, Methanoculleus, and Methanocorpusculum. The relationship between biotic and abiotic variables was investigated using bivariate correlation analysis and univariate analysis of variance. High amounts of biogas were produced in batches with high copy numbers of Methanosarcina. High copy numbers of Methanocorpusculum and extensive percolation, however, were found to negatively correlate with biogas production. Supporting these findings, a negative correlation was detected between Methanocorpusculum and Methanosarcina. Based on these results, this study suggests Methanosarcina as an indicator for well-functioning reactor performance. PMID:26860425

  7. Transuranic concentrations in selected biotic and abiotic components of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Test Reactor Area ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRA leaching pond area was sampled from June through August 1976 and again in 1977 to determine the concentration of five transuranic radionuclides, Pu-238, Pu-239, Am-241, Cm-242, and Cm-244, in abiotic and biotic components of this freshwater ecosystem. Highest concentration ratios were obtained for periphytic, planktonic, and sediment components of the system. Concentrations of these radionuclides decreased with increasing trophic level organisms, i.e., aquatic insects and bird species. Plant species analyzed had concentration ratios of approximately one to two orders of magnitude. These data represent the first investigation of five transuranic radionuclides being concurrently studied within a single freshwater ecosystem. The complete transuranic inventory will be combined with limnological data to compare the distribution of these nuclides with data obtained from other freshwater systems. From these comparisons, models concerning the movement of the radionuclides within and away from a freshwater system will be developed

  8. Fe(II-III) Hydroxysalt Green Rusts; from Corrosion to Mineralogy and Abiotic to Biotic Reactions by Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxysalts commonly called green rusts are layered double hydroxides of formula [FeII(1-x)FeIIIx(OH)2]x+.[(x/n)An-.(m/n)H2O]x- constituted of brucite-like layers containing Fe cations in the centres of OH- octahedrons and interlayers, which anions and water molecules belong to. They play a key role in corrosion and environmental sciences as well as mineralogy since they are, on the one hand, intermediate products between Fe(II) and Fe(III) states and, on the other hand, can be the major iron-bearing mineral in hydromorphic gley soils. Their crystal structure, Moessbauer spectra, methods of synthesis, abiotic as well as biotic, and some applications are presented here.

  9. Development of index of biotic integrity expectations for the ecoregions of Indiana. I. Central corn belt plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Clean Water Act Amendments of 1987 mandate the development of biological criteria for evaluating the nation's surface waters. The requirements of Section 304(a) was implemented in Indiana to determine water resource degradation. A total of 197 headwater and wading stream sites were sampled in the Central Corn Belt Plain ecoregion in order to develop and calibrate an Index of Biotic Integrity for use in Indiana. Based on inherent variance within the ecoregion, sub-basins were established based on the concept of natural areas as recognized by Homoya et al. (1985). Site specific data; locality information; and species specific scoring criteria for tolerance classification, trophic guilds, and reproductive guilds are included in the appendix

  10. Benthic indicators to use in Ecological Quality classification of Mediterranean soft bottom marine ecosystems, including a new Biotic Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. SIMBOURA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A general scheme for approaching the objective of Ecological Quality Status (EcoQ classification of zoobenthic marine ecosystems is presented. A system based on soft bottom benthic indicator species and related habitat types is suggested to be used for testing the typological definition of a given water body in the Mediterranean. Benthic indices including the Shannon-Wiener diversity index and the species richness are re-evaluated for use in classification. Ranges of values and of ecological quality categories are given for the diversity and species richness in different habitat types. A new biotic index (BENTIX is proposed based on the relative percentages of three ecological groups of species grouped according to their sensitivity or tolerance to disturbance factors and weighted proportionately to obtain a formula rendering a five step numerical scale of ecological quality classification. Its advantage against former biotic indices lies in the fact that it reduces the number of the ecological groups involved which makes it simpler and easier in its use. The Bentix index proposed is tested and validated with data from Greek and western Mediterranean ecosystems and examples are presented. Indicator species associated with specific habitat types and pollution indicator species, scored according to their degree of tolerance to pollution, are listed in a table. The Bentix index is compared and evaluated against the indices of diversity and species richness for use in classification. The advantages of the BENTIX index as a classification tool for ECoQ include independence from habitat type, sample size and taxonomic effort, high discriminative power and simplicity in its use which make it a robust, simple and effective tool for application in the Mediterranean Sea.

  11. As Old as the hills: montane scorpions in Southwestern North America reveal ancient associations between biotic diversification and landscape history.

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    Robert W Bryson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The age of lineages has become a fundamental datum in studies exploring the interaction between geological transformation and biotic diversification. However, phylogeographical studies are often biased towards lineages that are younger than the geological features of the landscapes they inhabit. A temporally deeper historical biogeography framework may be required to address episodes of biotic diversification associated with geologically older landscape changes. Signatures of such associations may be retained in the genomes of ecologically specialized (stenotopic taxa with limited vagility. In the study presented here, genetic data from montane scorpions in the Vaejovis vorhiesi group, restricted to humid rocky habitats in mountains across southwestern North America, were used to explore the relationship between scorpion diversification and regional geological history. RESULTS: Strong phylogeographical signal was evident within the vorhiesi group, with 27 geographically cohesive lineages inferred from a mitochondrial phylogeny. A time-calibrated multilocus species tree revealed a pattern of Miocene and Pliocene (the Neogene period lineage diversification. An estimated 21 out of 26 cladogenetic events probably occurred prior to the onset of the Pleistocene, 2.6 million years ago. The best-fit density-dependent model suggested diversification rate in the vorhiesi group gradually decreased through time. CONCLUSIONS: Scorpions of the vorhiesi group have had a long history in the highlands of southwestern North America. Diversification among these stenotopic scorpions appears to have occurred almost entirely within the Neogene period, and is temporally consistent with the dynamic geological history of the Basin and Range, and Colorado Plateau physiographical provinces. The persistence of separate lineages at small spatial scales suggests that a combination of ecological stenotopy and limited vagility may make these scorpions particularly

  12. Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover and Identify Biotic Resources in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems: Preliminary Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert P. Breckenridge

    2006-04-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

  13. Kinetics of selenate sorption in soil as influenced by biotic and abiotic conditions: a stirred flow-through reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study (i) quantified the kinetics of selenate sorption and (ii) measured the influence of biotic processes in soil selenate stabilisation. Stirred flow-through reactor experiments were conducted on samples of a silty clay soil (pH = 8, Eh = 240–300 mV) from Bure (France) in both non-sterile and sterile conditions. Parameters of the proposed two-site sorption model (EK), adapted from van Genuchten and Wagenet (1989), were estimated by nonlinear regression. Fast selenate sorption on type-1 sites was moderate, with an equilibrium constant of 25.5 and 39.1 L/kg for non-sterile and sterile conditions. Rate-limited sorption on type-2 sites increased with time, and was predominant for longer periods of time in non-sterile conditions. At equilibrium, it would represent over 96% of the sorbed inventory, with mean sorption times of 17 h and 191 h for non-sterile and sterile conditions. Our results showed for Bure soil that (i) selenate sorption in flowing and mildly-oxidising conditions was strongly kinetically controlled, especially in non-sterile conditions, (ii) selenate desorption was much slower than sorption, which suggests its pseudo-irreversible stabilisation, and (iii) microbial activity increased the contribution of rate-limited sorption on type-2 sites, for which it increased sorption rate by a factor 7 but also facilitated its reversibility. This work stresses the limits of the Kd approach to represent selenate sorption in flowing conditions and supports an alternative formulation like the EK model, but also points out that biotic conditions are significant sources of variability for sorption parameters. - Highlights: • Selenate sorption was studied during stirred flow-through reactor experiments. • A two-site model of selenate sorption adequately described our observations. • Selenate sorption was strongly kinetically controlled. • Microbial activity increased the contribution of rate-limited sorption

  14. Associations between ectomycorrhizal fungi and bacterial needle endophytes in Pinus radiata: implications for biotic selection of microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Arlene Rúa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the ecological and evolutionary relationships between plants and their associated microbes have long been focused on single microbes, or single microbial guilds, but in reality, plants associate with a diverse array of microbes from a varied set of guilds. As such, multitrophic interactions among plant-associated microbes from multiple guilds represent an area of developing research, and can reveal how complex microbial communities are structured around plants. Interactions between coniferous plants and their associated microbes provide a good model system for such studies, as conifers host a suite of microorganisms including mutualistic ectomycorrhizal (ECM fungi and foliar bacterial endophytes. To investigate the potential role ECM fungi play in structuring foliar bacterial endophyte communities, we sampled three isolated, native populations of Monterey pine (Pinus radiata, and used constrained analysis of principal coordinates to relate the community matrices of the ECM fungi and bacterial endophytes. Our results suggest that ECM fungi may be important factors for explaining variation in bacterial endophyte communities but this effect is influenced by population and environmental characteristics, emphasizing the potential importance of other factors — biotic or abiotic — in determining the composition of bacterial communities. We also classified ECM fungi into categories based on known fungal traits associated with substrate exploration and nutrient mobilization strategies since variation in these traits allows the fungi to acquire nutrients across a wide range of abiotic conditions and may influence the outcome of multi-species interactions. Across populations and environmental factors, none of the traits associated with fungal foraging strategy types significantly structured bacterial assemblages, suggesting these ECM fungal traits are not important for understanding endophyte-ECM interactions. Overall, our results suggest

  15. Associations between Ectomycorrhizal Fungi and Bacterial Needle Endophytes in Pinus radiata: Implications for Biotic Selection of Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rúa, Megan A; Wilson, Emily C; Steele, Sarah; Munters, Arielle R; Hoeksema, Jason D; Frank, Anna C

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the ecological and evolutionary relationships between plants and their associated microbes have long been focused on single microbes, or single microbial guilds, but in reality, plants associate with a diverse array of microbes from a varied set of guilds. As such, multitrophic interactions among plant-associated microbes from multiple guilds represent an area of developing research, and can reveal how complex microbial communities are structured around plants. Interactions between coniferous plants and their associated microbes provide a good model system for such studies, as conifers host a suite of microorganisms including mutualistic ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi and foliar bacterial endophytes. To investigate the potential role ECM fungi play in structuring foliar bacterial endophyte communities, we sampled three isolated, native populations of Monterey pine (Pinus radiata), and used constrained analysis of principal coordinates to relate the community matrices of the ECM fungi and bacterial endophytes. Our results suggest that ECM fungi may be important factors for explaining variation in bacterial endophyte communities but this effect is influenced by population and environmental characteristics, emphasizing the potential importance of other factors - biotic or abiotic - in determining the composition of bacterial communities. We also classified ECM fungi into categories based on known fungal traits associated with substrate exploration and nutrient mobilization strategies since variation in these traits allows the fungi to acquire nutrients across a wide range of abiotic conditions and may influence the outcome of multi-species interactions. Across populations and environmental factors, none of the traits associated with fungal foraging strategy types significantly structured bacterial assemblages, suggesting these ECM fungal traits are not important for understanding endophyte-ECM interactions. Overall, our results suggest that both biotic species

  16. Habitability for Complex Life and the Development and Self-Limitations of the Biotic Enhancement of Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, D. W.; Volk, T.

    2014-12-01

    We submit that the tightly coupled coevolution of biota and climate is a critical driver of the self-organization of the biosphere over geologic time. The long-term carbon biogeochemical cycle includes a major influence of biology relevant to climatic, namely the biotic enhancement of weathering (BEW). According to a meta-analysis of field and experimental evidence, the likely magnitude of the present BEW is roughly two orders of magnitude, the culmination of its progressive increase over geologic time. Within the context of modeling this long-term cycle, this value can be used to estimate the likely abiotic temperature history of the Earth's surface, assuming plausible initial temperatures, and histories of volcanic outgassing and continental crust growth. The result of this modeling is that the Earth would have been habitable for thermophilic life (growing above 50 deg C) for the past 4.4 billion years, but not for low-temperature life, including plants and animals. Hence biospheric cooling due to biotic actions allowed the emergence of complex life. Much larger increases in BEW are self-limiting, since the atmospheric CO2 level would plunge below the lower limit potentially for photosynthesis, thereby driving a decline in the biological productivity and global BEW, related to reduced plant and soil activities, with the system being kept at this threshold or going back to higher CO2 levels, with scenarios dependent on volcanic outgassing and solar inputs. We will present astrobiological implications of this modeling. References: Schwartzman D (1999, 2002) Life, Temperature, and the Earth: The Self Organizing Biosphere. Columbia Univ. Press; Schwartzman, D. (2013) Keynote: The Geobiology of Weathering: The 13th Hypothesis. Goldschmidt Conference. (Schwartzman D. and Brantley S. (2013) Mineral. Mag. 77(5): 2170); Volk T (1998) Gaia's Body: Toward a Physiology of Earth. Copernicus.

  17. Analysis of benthic macroinvertebrates and biotic indices to evaluate water quality in rivers impacted by mining activities in northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvial I.E.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Catchments in the semiarid regions are especially susceptible to environmental perturbation associated with water scarcity, hydrological variations and overuse by anthropogenic activities. Using multivariate analysis to relate environmental and biological data, and diversity and biotic indices (ChBMWP, ChIBF, we analyzed the macroinvertebrate composition of 12 rivers of the semiarid region of northern Chile. A non-metric multidimensional scaling for macroinvertebrate taxa and a principal component analysis for environmental variables strongly separated upstream sites (e.g. Vacas Heladas and Malo Rivers, which presented low pH and high dissolved metal concentrations, from other sites. Effectively, CCA showed that metals and low pH, associated with the altitudinal gradient, determined the distributional patterns of macroinvertebrates in the Elqui catchment. The causes of these particular conditions could be related to geological processes and human impact. The biotic indices applied to the sampling sites corroborated and reflected these characteristics, with La Laguna and Turbio Rivers showing a diverse macroinvertebrate community and moderate to good water quality, and the Claro River showing favorable conditions for the development of aquatic biota, indicating its better quality relative to other stations. To the middle and low part of the basin, a change in the composition of the community was observed, with species that suggest an impact by an increase in organic matter, due to agricultural activities and urban settlements concentrated in this area. Our results suggest that macroinvertebrate taxa in northern Chile may be exceptional species, adapted to unfavorable geochemical conditions, and emphasize the need for protection of the semiarid basins of the region.

  18. Associations between Ectomycorrhizal Fungi and Bacterial Needle Endophytes in Pinus radiata: Implications for Biotic Selection of Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rúa, Megan A.; Wilson, Emily C.; Steele, Sarah; Munters, Arielle R.; Hoeksema, Jason D.; Frank, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the ecological and evolutionary relationships between plants and their associated microbes have long been focused on single microbes, or single microbial guilds, but in reality, plants associate with a diverse array of microbes from a varied set of guilds. As such, multitrophic interactions among plant-associated microbes from multiple guilds represent an area of developing research, and can reveal how complex microbial communities are structured around plants. Interactions between coniferous plants and their associated microbes provide a good model system for such studies, as conifers host a suite of microorganisms including mutualistic ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi and foliar bacterial endophytes. To investigate the potential role ECM fungi play in structuring foliar bacterial endophyte communities, we sampled three isolated, native populations of Monterey pine (Pinus radiata), and used constrained analysis of principal coordinates to relate the community matrices of the ECM fungi and bacterial endophytes. Our results suggest that ECM fungi may be important factors for explaining variation in bacterial endophyte communities but this effect is influenced by population and environmental characteristics, emphasizing the potential importance of other factors — biotic or abiotic — in determining the composition of bacterial communities. We also classified ECM fungi into categories based on known fungal traits associated with substrate exploration and nutrient mobilization strategies since variation in these traits allows the fungi to acquire nutrients across a wide range of abiotic conditions and may influence the outcome of multi-species interactions. Across populations and environmental factors, none of the traits associated with fungal foraging strategy types significantly structured bacterial assemblages, suggesting these ECM fungal traits are not important for understanding endophyte-ECM interactions. Overall, our results suggest that both biotic

  19. Expression of an engineered heterologous antimicrobial peptide in potato alters plant development and mitigates normal abiotic and biotic responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder K Goyal

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial cationic peptides (AMPs are ubiquitous small proteins used by living cells to defend against a wide spectrum of pathogens. Their amphipathic property helps their interaction with negatively charged cellular membrane of the pathogen causing cell lysis and death. AMPs also modulate signaling pathway(s and cellular processes in animal models; however, little is known of cellular processes other than the pathogen-lysis phenomenon modulated by AMPs in plants. An engineered heterologous AMP, msrA3, expressed in potato was previously shown to cause resistance of the transgenic plants against selected fungal and bacterial pathogens. These lines together with the wild type were studied for growth habits, and for inducible defense responses during challenge with biotic (necrotroph Fusarium solani and abiotic stressors (dark-induced senescence, wounding and temperature stress. msrA3-expression not only conferred protection against F. solani but also delayed development of floral buds and prolonged vegetative phase. Analysis of select gene transcript profiles showed that the transgenic potato plants were suppressed in the hypersensitive (HR and reactive oxygen species (ROS responses to both biotic and abiotic stressors. Also, the transgenic leaves accumulated lesser amounts of the defense hormone jasmonic acid upon wounding with only a slight change in salicylic acid as compared to the wild type. Thus, normal host defense responses to the pathogen and abiotic stressors were mitigated by msrA3 expression suggesting MSRA3 regulates a common step(s of these response pathways. The stemming of the pathogen growth and mitigating stress response pathways likely contributes to resource reallocation for higher tuber yield.

  20. Quantifying Variability in Four U.S. Streams Using a Long-Term Dataset: Patterns in Biotic Endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinders, Camille A.; McLaughlin, Douglas B.; Ragsdale, Renee L.

    2015-08-01

    Effective water resources assessment and management requires quantitative information on the variability of ambient and biological conditions in aquatic communities. Although it is understood that natural systems are variable, robust estimates of long-term variation in community-based structure and function metrics are rare in U.S. waters. We used a multi-year, seasonally sampled dataset from multiple sites ( n = 5-6) in four streams (Codorus Creek, PA; Leaf River, MS; McKenzie and Willamette Rivers, OR) to examine spatial and temporal variation in periphyton chlorophyll a, and fish and macroinvertebrate metrics commonly used in bioassessment programs. Within-site variation of macroinvertebrate metrics and benthic chlorophyll a concentration showed coefficient of variation ranging from 16 to 136 %. Scale-specific variability patterns (stream-wide, season, site, and site-season patterns) in standardized biotic endpoints showed that within-site variability patterns extended across sites with variability greatest in chlorophyll a and lowest in Hilsenhoff's Biotic Index. Across streams, variance components models showed that variance attributed to the interaction of space and time and sample variance accounted for the majority of variation in macroinvertebrate metrics and chlorophyll a, while most variation in fish metrics was attributed to sample variance. Clear temporal patterns in measured endpoints were rare and not specific to any one stream or assemblage, while apparent shifts in metric variability related to point source discharges were seen only in McKenzie River macroinvertebrate metrics in the fall. Results from this study demonstrate the need to consider and understand spatial, seasonal, and longer term variability in the development of bioassessment programs and subsequent decisions.

  1. Genome-wide association study for crown rust (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae) and powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. avenae) resistance in an oat (Avena sativa) collection of commercial varieties and landraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montilla-Bascón, Gracia; Rispail, Nicolas; Sánchez-Martín, Javier; Rubiales, Diego; Mur, Luis A J; Langdon, Tim; Howarth, Catherine J; Prats, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Diseases caused by crown rust (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae) and powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. avenae) are among the most important constraints for the oat crop. Breeding for resistance is one of the most effective, economical, and environmentally friendly means to control these diseases. The purpose of this work was to identify elite alleles for rust and powdery mildew resistance in oat by association mapping to aid selection of resistant plants. To this aim, 177 oat accessions including white and red oat cultivars and landraces were evaluated for disease resistance and further genotyped with 31 simple sequence repeat and 15,000 Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) markers to reveal association with disease resistance traits. After data curation, 1712 polymorphic markers were considered for association analysis. Principal component analysis and a Bayesian clustering approach were applied to infer population structure. Five different general and mixed linear models accounting for population structure and/or kinship corrections and two different statistical tests were carried out to reduce false positive. Five markers, two of them highly significant in all models tested were associated with rust resistance. No strong association between any marker and powdery mildew resistance at the seedling stage was identified. However, one DArT sequence, oPt-5014, was strongly associated with powdery mildew resistance in adult plants. Overall, the markers showing the strongest association in this study provide ideal candidates for further studies and future inclusion in strategies of marker-assisted selection. PMID:25798140

  2. Copper in the terrestrial environment: Verification of a laboratory-derived terrestrial biotic ligand model to predict earthworm mortality with toxicity observed in field soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Marijke; Groot, Arthur de; Vijver, Martina G; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2006-01-01

    This study was set up for validation of a regression model to predict mortality in the terrestrial earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa following exposure to copper. This model was derived from a terrestrial biotic ligand model and incorporates the protective effects of H+ and Na+ on copper toxicity.

  3. Processes influencing migration of bioavailable organic compounds from polymers - investigated during biotic and abiotic testing under static and non-static conditions with varying S/V-ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Arvin, Erik; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    The migration of bioavailable organic compounds (‘bioavailable migration’) from polymeric materials used for drinking water distribution was investigated by an abiotic test: Extracting materials under sterile conditions, and a biotic test: Extracting materials in presence of bacteria. Both tests ...

  4. Identification of abiotic and biotic reductive dechlorination in a chlorinated ethene plume after thermal source remediation by means of isotopic and molecular biology tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badin, Alice; Broholm, Mette Martina; Jacobsen, Carsten S.;

    2016-01-01

    was the predominant chlorinated ethene near the source area prior to thermal treatment. After thermal treatment, cDCE became predominant. The biotic contribution to these changes was supported by the presence of Dehalococcoides sp. DNA (Dhc) and Dhc targeted rRNA close to the source area. In contrast...

  5. Biotic ligand modeling approach: Synthesis of the effect of major cations on the toxicity of metals to soil and aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardestani, Masoud M; van Straalen, Nico M; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2015-10-01

    The biotic ligand model (BLM) approach is used to assess metal toxicity, taking into account the competition of other cations with the free metal ions for binding to the biotic ligand sites of aquatic and soil organisms. The bioavailable fraction of metals, represented by the free metal ion, is a better measure than the total concentration for assessing their potential risk to the environment. Because BLMs are relating toxicity to the fraction of biotic ligands occupied by the metal, they can be useful for investigating factors affecting metal bioaccumulation and toxicity. In the present review, the effects of major cations on the toxicity of metals to soil and aquatic organisms were comprehensively studied by performing a meta-analysis of BLM literature data. Interactions at the binding sites were shown to be species- and metal-specific. The main factors affecting the relationships between toxicity and conditional binding constants for metal binding at the biotic ligand appeared to be Ca(2+) , Mg(2+) , and protons. Other important characteristics of the exposure medium, such as levels of dissolved organic carbon and concentrations of other cations, should also be considered to obtain a proper assessment of metal toxicity to soil and aquatic organisms. PMID:25953362

  6. Evaluation of expression stability of candidate references genes among green and yellow pea cultivars (Pisum sativum L.) subjected to abiotic and biotic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry pea (Pisum sativum) is grown as human and animal feed throughout the world. Large yield losses in pea due to biotic and abiotic stresses compel an improved understanding of mechanisms of stress tolerance and genetic determinants conditioning these tolerances. The availability of stably expressed...

  7. Growth performance and resistance to Streptococcus iniae of juvenile Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fed diets supplemented with GroBiotic - A and Brewtech Dried Brewers Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary levels of Brewtech® dried brewers yeast (BY) and GroBiotic®-A (GB) on growth performance, proximate body composition, immune response and resistance of juvenile Nile tilapia to Streptococcus iniae challenge. A practical basal (control) diet ...

  8. Do biotic interactions shape both sides of the humped-back model of species richness in plant communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalet, Richard; Brooker, Robin W; Cavieres, Lohengrin A; Kikvidze, Zaal; Lortie, Christopher J; Pugnaire, Francisco I; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso; Callaway, Ragan M

    2006-07-01

    A humped-back relationship between species richness and community biomass has frequently been observed in plant communities, at both local and regional scales, although often improperly called a productivity-diversity relationship. Explanations for this relationship have emphasized the role of competitive exclusion, probably because at the time when the relationship was first examined, competition was considered to be the significant biotic filter structuring plant communities. However, over the last 15 years there has been a renewed interest in facilitation and this research has shown a clear link between the role of facilitation in structuring communities and both community biomass and the severity of the environment. Although facilitation may enlarge the realized niche of species and increase community richness in stressful environments, there has only been one previous attempt to revisit the humped-back model of species richness and to include facilitative processes. However, to date, no model has explored whether biotic interactions can potentially shape both sides of the humped-back model for species richness commonly detected in plant communities. Here, we propose a revision of Grime's original model that incorporates a new understanding of the role of facilitative interactions in plant communities. In this revised model, facilitation promotes diversity at medium to high environmental severity levels, by expanding the realized niche of stress-intolerant competitive species into harsh physical conditions. However, when environmental conditions become extremely severe the positive effects of the benefactors wane (as supported by recent research on facilitative interactions in extremely severe environments) and diversity is reduced. Conversely, with decreasing stress along the biomass gradient, facilitation decreases because stress-intolerant species become able to exist away from the canopy of the stress-tolerant species (as proposed by facilitation theory

  9. Abiotic versus biotic drivers of ocean pH variation under fast sea ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul G Matson

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is expected to have a major effect on the marine carbonate system over the next century, particularly in high latitude seas. Less appreciated is natural environmental variation within these systems, particularly in terms of pH, and how this natural variation may inform laboratory experiments. In this study, we deployed sensor-equipped moorings at 20 m depths at three locations in McMurdo Sound, comprising deep (bottom depth>200 m: Hut Point Peninsula and shallow environments (bottom depth ∼25 m: Cape Evans and New Harbor. Our sensors recorded high-frequency variation in pH (Hut Point and Cape Evans only, tide (Cape Evans and New Harbor, and water mass properties (temperature and salinity during spring and early summer 2011. These collective observations showed that (1 pH differed spatially both in terms of mean pH (Cape Evans: 8.009±0.015; Hut Point: 8.020±0.007 and range of pH (Cape Evans: 0.090; Hut Point: 0.036, and (2 pH was not related to the mixing of two water masses, suggesting that the observed pH variation is likely not driven by this abiotic process. Given the large daily fluctuation in pH at Cape Evans, we developed a simple mechanistic model to explore the potential for biotic processes--in this case algal photosynthesis--to increase pH by fixing carbon from the water column. For this model, we incorporated published photosynthetic parameters for the three dominant algal functional groups found at Cape Evans (benthic fleshy red macroalgae, crustose coralline algae, and sea ice algal communities to estimate oxygen produced/carbon fixed from the water column underneath fast sea ice and the resulting pH change. These results suggest that biotic processes may be a primary driver of pH variation observed under fast sea ice at Cape Evans and potentially at other shallow sites in McMurdo Sound.

  10. Serotonin attenuates biotic stress and leads to lesion browning caused by a hypersensitive response to Magnaporthe oryzae penetration in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Keiko; Fujita, Yoshikatsu; Ashizawa, Taketo; Suzuki, Fumihiko; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Hayano-Saito, Yuriko

    2016-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) of plants is one of the earliest responses to prevent pathogen invasion. A brown dot lesion on a leaf is visual evidence of the HR against the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae in rice, but tracking the browning process has been difficult. In this study, we induced the HR in rice cultivars harboring the blast resistance gene Pit by inoculation of an incompatible M. oryzae strain, which generated a unique resistance lesion with a brown ring (halo) around the brown fungal penetration site. Inoculation analysis using a plant harboring Pit but lacking an enzyme that catalyzes tryptamine to serotonin showed that high accumulation of the oxidized form of serotonin was the cause of the browning at the halo and penetration site. Our analysis of the halo browning process in the rice leaf revealed that abscisic acid enhanced biosynthesis of serotonin under light conditions, and serotonin changed to the oxidized form via hydrogen peroxide produced by light. The dramatic increase in serotonin, which has a high antioxidant activity, suppressed leaf damage outside the halo, blocked expansion of the browning area and attenuated inhibition of plant growth. These results suggest that serotonin helps to reduce biotic stress in the plant by acting as a scavenger of oxygen radicals to protect uninfected tissues from oxidative damage caused by the HR. The deposition of its oxide at the HR lesion is observed as lesion browning. PMID:26603141

  11. Effects of biotic and abiotic constraints on the symbiosis between rhizobia and the tropical leguminous trees Acacia and Prosopis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räsänen, Leena A; Lindström, Kristina

    2003-10-01

    N2-fixing, drought tolerant and multipurpose Acacia and Prosopis species are appropriate trees for reforestation of degraded areas in arid and semiarid regions of the tropics and subtropics. Acacia and Prosopis trees form N2-fixing nodules with a wide range of rhizobia, for example African acacias mainly with Sinorhizobium sp. and Mesorhizobium sp., and Australian acacias with Bradyrhizobium sp. Although dry and hot seasons restrict formation of N2-fixing nodules on Acacia and Prosopis spp., fully grown trees and their symbiotic partners are well adapted to survive in harsh growth conditions. This review on one hand deals with major constraints of arid and semiarid soils, i.e. drought, salinity and high soil temperature, which affect growth of trees and rhizobia, and on the other hand with adaptation mechanisms by which both organisms survive through unfavourable periods. In addition, defects in infection and nodulation processes due to various abiotic and biotic constraints are reviewed. This knowledge is important when Acacia and Prosopis seedlings are used for forestation of degraded areas in arid and semiarid tropics. PMID:15242281

  12. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Activity by Strawberry Tissue Protein Extracts during Plant Life Cycle and under Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walther Faedi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs, enzymes that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, inhibit protein synthesis by depurinating rRNA and many other polynucleotidic substrates. Although RIPs show antiviral, antifungal, and insecticidal activities, their biological and physiological roles are not completely understood. Additionally, it has been described that RIP expression is augmented under stressful conditions. In this study, we evaluated protein synthesis inhibition activity in partially purified basic proteins (hereafter referred to as RIP activity from tissue extracts of Fragaria × ananassa (strawberry cultivars with low (Dora and high (Record tolerance to root pathogens and fructification stress. Association between the presence of RIP activity and the crop management (organic or integrated soil, growth stage (quiescence, flowering, and fructification, and exogenous stress (drought were investigated. RIP activity was found in every tissue tested (roots, rhizomes, leaves, buds, flowers, and fruits and under each tested condition. However, significant differences in RIP distribution were observed depending on the soil and growth stage, and an increase in RIP activity was found in the leaves of drought-stressed plants. These results suggest that RIP expression and activity could represent a response mechanism against biotic and abiotic stresses and could be a useful tool in selecting stress-resistant strawberry genotypes.

  13. Testing an application of a biotic ligand model to predict acute toxicity of metal mixtures to rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yuichi; Kamo, Masashi; Naito, Wataru

    2015-04-01

    The authors tested the applicability of a previously developed biotic ligand model (BLM) to predict acute toxicity of single metals and metal mixtures (cadmium, lead, and zinc) to rainbow trout fry (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from a single available dataset. The BLM used in the present study hypothesizes that metals inhibit an essential cation (calcium) and organisms die as a result of its deficiency, leading to an assumption that the proportion of metal-binding ligand (f) is responsible for the toxic effects of metals on the survival of rainbow trout. The f value is a function of free-ion concentrations of metals computed by a chemical speciation model, and the function has affinity constants as model parameters. First, the survival effects of single metals were statistically modeled separately (i.e., f-survival relationship) by using the generalized linear mixed model with binomial distribution. The modeled responses of survival rates to f overlapped reasonably irrespective of metals tested, supporting the theoretical prediction from the BLM that f-survival relationships are comparable regardless of metal species. The authors thus developed the generalized linear mixed model based on all data pooled across the single-metal tests. The best-fitted model well predicted the survival responses observed in mixture tests (r = 0.97), providing support for the applicability of the BLM to predict effects of metal mixtures. PMID:25323464

  14. Combined Effects of Soil Biotic and Abiotic Factors, Influenced by Sewage Sludge Incorporation, on the Incidence of Corn Stalk Rot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Ghini

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the combined effects of soil biotic and abiotic factors on the incidence of Fusarium corn stalk rot, during four annual incorporations of two types of sewage sludge into soil in a 5-years field assay under tropical conditions and to predict the effects of these variables on the disease. For each type of sewage sludge, the following treatments were included: control with mineral fertilization recommended for corn; control without fertilization; sewage sludge based on the nitrogen concentration that provided the same amount of nitrogen as in the mineral fertilizer treatment; and sewage sludge that provided two, four and eight times the nitrogen concentration recommended for corn. Increasing dosages of both types of sewage sludge incorporated into soil resulted in increased corn stalk rot incidence, being negatively correlated with corn yield. A global analysis highlighted the effect of the year of the experiment, followed by the sewage sludge dosages. The type of sewage sludge did not affect the disease incidence. A multiple logistic model using a stepwise procedure was fitted based on the selection of a model that included the three explanatory parameters for disease incidence: electrical conductivity, magnesium and Fusarium population. In the selected model, the probability of higher disease incidence increased with an increase of these three explanatory parameters. When the explanatory parameters were compared, electrical conductivity presented a dominant effect and was the main variable to predict the probability distribution curves of Fusarium corn stalk rot, after sewage sludge application into the soil.

  15. Combined Effects of Soil Biotic and Abiotic Factors, Influenced by Sewage Sludge Incorporation, on the Incidence of Corn Stalk Rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghini, Raquel; Fortes, Nara Lúcia Perondi; Navas-Cortés, Juan A; Silva, Carlos Alberto; Bettiol, Wagner

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the combined effects of soil biotic and abiotic factors on the incidence of Fusarium corn stalk rot, during four annual incorporations of two types of sewage sludge into soil in a 5-years field assay under tropical conditions and to predict the effects of these variables on the disease. For each type of sewage sludge, the following treatments were included: control with mineral fertilization recommended for corn; control without fertilization; sewage sludge based on the nitrogen concentration that provided the same amount of nitrogen as in the mineral fertilizer treatment; and sewage sludge that provided two, four and eight times the nitrogen concentration recommended for corn. Increasing dosages of both types of sewage sludge incorporated into soil resulted in increased corn stalk rot incidence, being negatively correlated with corn yield. A global analysis highlighted the effect of the year of the experiment, followed by the sewage sludge dosages. The type of sewage sludge did not affect the disease incidence. A multiple logistic model using a stepwise procedure was fitted based on the selection of a model that included the three explanatory parameters for disease incidence: electrical conductivity, magnesium and Fusarium population. In the selected model, the probability of higher disease incidence increased with an increase of these three explanatory parameters. When the explanatory parameters were compared, electrical conductivity presented a dominant effect and was the main variable to predict the probability distribution curves of Fusarium corn stalk rot, after sewage sludge application into the soil. PMID:27176597

  16. The role of biotic and abiotic processes in determining equilibrium states and transient dynamics in tidal bio-geomorphic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Lio, C.; D'Alpaos, A.; Marani, M.

    2010-12-01

    A point model of the joint evolution of tidal landforms and biota is described and applied to explore the equilibrium states and the transient behaviour of tidal bio-geomorphic systems under varying physical and biological forcings. The model incorporates the dynamics of intertidal vegetation, benthic microbial assemblages, erosional, depositional, and sediment exchange processes, and wind-wave dynamics. Alternative stable states and punctuated equilibria emerge, characterized by possible sudden transitions of the system state, governed by vegetation type, disturbances of the benthic biofilm, sediment availability and marine transgressions or regressions. Multiple stable states are suggested to result from the interplay of erosion, deposition and biostabilization, providing a simple explanation for the ubiquitous presence of the typical landforms observed in tidal environments worldwide. The explicit and dynamically-coupled description of biotic and abiotic processes thus emerges as a key requirement for realistic and predictive models of the evolution of a tidal system as a whole. The analysis of such coupled processes indicates that hysteretic switches between stable states arise because of differences in the threshold values of relative sea level rise inducing transitions from vegetated to unvegetated equilibria and viceversa, with implications for the preservation of tidal environments under a climate change. Finally, we explore the transient behaviour of the system forced by synthetic and observed sea-level rise forcings and identify the effects of the characteristic response time of vegetation to environmental changes on the overall system dynamics.

  17. Role of miRNAs and siRNAs in biotic and abiotic stress responses of plants

    KAUST Repository

    Khraiwesh, Basel

    2012-02-01

    Small, non-coding RNAs are a distinct class of regulatory RNAs in plants and animals that control a variety of biological processes. In plants, several classes of small RNAs with specific sizes and dedicated functions have evolved through a series of pathways. The major classes of small RNAs include microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which differ in their biogenesis. miRNAs control the expression of cognate target genes by binding to reverse complementary sequences, resulting in cleavage or translational inhibition of the target RNAs. siRNAs have a similar structure, function, and biogenesis as miRNAs but are derived from long double-stranded RNAs and can often direct DNA methylation at target sequences. Besides their roles in growth and development and maintenance of genome integrity, small RNAs are also important components in plant stress responses. One way in which plants respond to environmental stress is by modifying their gene expression through the activity of small RNAs. Thus, understanding how small RNAs regulate gene expression will enable researchers to explore the role of small RNAs in biotic and abiotic stress responses. This review focuses on the regulatory roles of plant small RNAs in the adaptive response to stresses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant gene regulation in response to abiotic stress. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Technetium Reduction and Permanent Sequestration by Abiotic and Biotic Formation of Low-Solubility Sulfide Mineral Phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tratnyek, Paul G. [Oregon Health & Science Univ., Beaverton, OR (United States); Tebo, Bradley M. [Oregon Health & Science Univ., Beaverton, OR (United States); Fan, Dimin [Oregon Health & Science Univ., Beaverton, OR (United States); Anitori, Roberto [Oregon Health & Science Univ., Beaverton, OR (United States); Szecsody, Jim [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jansik, Danielle [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-14

    One way to minimize the mobility of the TcVII oxyanion pertechnetate (TcO4-) is to effect reduction under sulfidogenic conditions (generated abiotically by Fe0 or biotically) to form TcSx, which is significantly slower to oxidize than TcIVO2. In sediment systems, TcSx and other precipitates may oxidize more slowly due to oxygen diffusion limitations to these low permeability precipitate zones. In addition, the TcO4- reduction rate may be more rapid in the presence of sediment because of additional reductive surface phases. This project aims to provide a fundamental understanding of the feasibility of immobilization of TcO4- as TcSx in the vadose zone or groundwater by application nano zero-valent iron (nZVI), and sulfide or sulfate. Biotic batch experiments have used the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfotomaculum reducens. The iron sulfide mineral mackinawite was generated under these conditions, while vivianite was formed in nZVI only controls. The sulfide/bacteria-containing system consistently reduced aqueous pertechnetate rapidly (> 95% in the first hour), a rate similar to that for the sulfide-free, nZVI only system. Reduced Tc (aged for 3 months) generated in both SRB/nZVI systems was highly resistant to reoxidation. In reduced samples, Tc was found associated with solid phases containing Fe and S (D. reducens/nZVI) or Fe (nZVI only). Experiments using D. reducens without nZVI provided some additional insights. Firstly, stationary phase cultures were able to slowly reduce pertechnetate. Secondly, addition of pertechnetate at the beginning of cell growth (lag phase) resulted in a faster rate of Tc reduction, possibly indicating a direct (e.g. enzymatic) role for D. reducens in Tc reduction. Abiotic batch experiments were conducted with Na2S as the sulfide source. Pertechnetate reduction was

  19. Formation of pristane from α-tocopherol under simulated anoxic sedimentary conditions: A combination of biotic and abiotic degradative processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontani, Jean-François; Nassiry, Mina; Michotey, Valérie; Guasco, Sophie; Bonin, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Incubation of intact and oxidized α-tocopherol (vitamin E) in anaerobic sediment slurries allowed us to demonstrate that, as previously suggested by Goossens et al. (1984), the degradation of α-tocopherol in anoxic sediments results in the formation of pristane. The conversion of α-tocopherol to this isoprenoid alkane involves a combination of biotic and abiotic degradative processes, i.e. the anaerobic biodegradation (which seems to be mainly induced by denitrifying bacteria) of trimeric structures resulting from the abiotic oxidation of α-tocopherol. On the basis of the results obtained, it is proposed that in the marine environment most of the α-tocopherol present in phytoplanktonic cells should be quickly degraded within the water column and the oxic zone of sediments by way of aerobic biodegradation, photo- and autoxidation processes. Abiotic transformation of this compound mainly results in the production of trimeric oxidation products, sufficiently stable to be incorporated into anoxic sediments and whose subsequent anaerobic bacterial degradation affords pristane. These results confirm that the ratio pristane to phytane cannot be used as an indicator of the oxicity of the environment of deposition; in contrast, they support the use of PFI (Pristane Formation Index) as a proxy for the state of diagenesis of sedimentary organic matter.

  20. Selected Abiotic and Biotic Environmental Stress Factors Affecting Two Economically Important Sugarcane Stalk Boring Pests in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan T. Showler

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane, Saccharum spp., in the United States is attacked by a number of different arthropod pests. The most serious among those pests are two stalk boring moths in the Family Crambidae: the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F., and the Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar. The two species are affected by abiotic and biotic environmental stress factors. Water deficit and excessive soil nitrogen alter physical and physiochemical aspects of the sugarcane plant that make the crop increasingly vulnerable to E. loftini. Weed growth can be competitive with sugarcane but it also supports enhanced abundances and diversity of natural enemies that can suppress infestations of D. saccharalis. In an instance where the stalk borer is considered a stress factor, proximity of vulnerable crops to sugarcane can influence levels of E. loftini infestation of sugarcane. The adverse effects of each stress factor, in terms of stalk borer attack, can be reduced by adopting appropriate cultural practices, such as adequate irrigation, judicious use of nitrogen fertilizer, using noncompetitive weed growth, and not planting vulnerable crops near sugarcane fields. Understanding the relationships between stress factors and crop pests can provide valuable insights for plant breeders and tools for incorporation into integrated pest management strategies.

  1. Sulphur dioxide evokes a large scale reprogramming of the grape berry transcriptome associated with oxidative signalling and biotic defence responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Estelle; Ivanova, Aneta; Gordon, Colin S; Whelan, James; Considine, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    The grape and wine industries are heavily reliant on sulphite preservatives. However, the view that sulphites act directly on bacterial and fungal pathogens may be simplistic. Mechanisms of sulphur-enhanced defences are largely unknown; many sulphur-rich compounds enhance plant defences and sulphite can also have oxidative consequences via production of H(2)O(2) or sulphitolysis. To investigate the effects of sulphur dioxide (SO(2) ) on fresh table grapes (Vitis vinifera L. 'Crimson Seedless'), transcriptome analysis was carried out on berries treated with SO(2) under commercial conditions for 21 d. We found a broad perturbation of metabolic processes, consistent with a large-scale stress response. Transcripts encoding putative sulphur-metabolizing enzymes indicated that sulphite was directed towards chelation and conjugation, and away from oxidation to sulphate. The results indicated that redox poise was altered dramatically by SO(2) treatment, evidenced by alterations in plastid and mitochondrial alternative electron transfer pathways, up-regulation of fermentation transcripts and numerous glutathione S-transferases, along with a down-regulation of components involved in redox homeostasis. Features of biotic stress were up-regulated, notably signalling via auxin, ethylene and jasmonates. Taken together, this inventory of transcriptional responses is consistent with a long-term cellular response to oxidative stress, similar to the effects of reactive oxygen species. PMID:21689113

  2. BIOTIC STRESS IMPACT ON ACTIVITY OF VARIOUS FORMS OF ADENYLATE CYCLASE IN ORGANELLES OF POTATO PLANT CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomovatskaya L.A.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding significant interest towards study of adenylate cyclase plant signal system, there is still no complete picture of functioning and regulation mechanisms of this signal system in plants under biotic stress. With this in view, our study was aimed at identification of various forms of adenylate cyclase (transmembrane and “soluble” in the nucleus and chloroplasts of potato cells and modulation of their activity under the impact of exopolysaсcharides ofpotato ring rot pathogen. The investigations conducted allowed to conclude that two forms of adenylate cyclase function in nuclei and chloroplasts of potato plants: transmembrane and “soluble”. Activity of these forms of the enzyme extracted from plant cells of the two potato varieties contrasted by resistance to potato ring rot pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, changed in the reverse manner with the mediated impact of exopolysaсcharides secreted by virulent and mucinous strain of bacterial pathogen: in the plants of resistant сultivar it increased, in the plants of sensitive сultivar it was oppressed. It was concluded that activity of both forms of adenylate cyclase directly depended on the degree of resistance of a particular potato variety to given pathogen.

  3. High-precision geochronology links the Ferrar large igneous province with early-Jurassic ocean anoxia and biotic crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, S. D.; Bowring, S. A.; Fleming, T. H.; Elliot, D. H.

    2015-04-01

    Apparent synchrony between eruption/emplacement of large igneous province (LIP) magmas and mass extinction has led to the implication of magmatism as a primary trigger of global scale environmental change. Evaluating the efficacy of magmatism as a driver of global change depends on the relative timing of magmatism and environmental change, and the magma effusion/intrusion rate, both of which can be constrained by high-precision geochronology. Early Jurassic (Pliensbachian-Toarcian) global ocean anoxia and acidification, carbon isotope perturbations, and biotic crisis have been linked to "synchronous" eruption and emplacement of the Karoo and Ferrar LIPs. To better constrain the timing and duration of Ferrar magmatism, we apply the single crystal, chemical abrasion U-Pb ID-TIMS method to zircon crystals isolated from twenty Ferrar LIP sills and lavas, and the Dufek intrusion. Dates suggest that both intrusive and extrusive Ferrar magmatism occurred over an interval of 349 ± 49 kyr, beginning with intrusive magmatism as early as 182.779 ± 0.033 Ma. Lava eruption was synchronous with, and in some cases postdates intrusion. When coupled with existing geochronology on the Karoo province, our dates confirm broad synchrony between Karoo and Ferrar magmatism, though Karoo magmatism began demonstrably prior to Ferrar magmatism, starting as early as 183.246 ± 0.045 Ma. The short-lived magmatic history of the Ferrar LIP makes it a plausible trigger for early-Jurassic environmental change.

  4. Biotic mortality factors affecting emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) are highly dependent on life stage and host tree crown condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, D E; Duan, J J; Shrewsbury, P M

    2015-10-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is a serious invasive forest pest in North America responsible for killing tens to hundreds of millions of ash trees since it was accidentally introduced in the 1990 s. Although host-plant resistance and natural enemies are known to be important sources of mortality for EAB in Asia, less is known about the importance of different sources of mortality at recently colonized sites in the invaded range of EAB, and how these relate to host tree crown condition. To further our understanding of EAB population dynamics, we used a large-scale field experiment and life-table analyses to quantify the fates of EAB larvae and the relative importance of different biotic mortality factors at 12 recently colonized sites in Maryland. We found that the fates of larvae were highly dependent on EAB life stage and host tree crown condition. In relatively healthy trees (i.e., with a low EAB infestation) and for early instars, host tree resistance was the most important mortality factor. Conversely, in more unhealthy trees (i.e., with a moderate to high EAB infestation) and for later instars, parasitism and predation were the major sources of mortality. Life-table analyses also indicated how the lack of sufficient levels of host tree resistance and natural enemies contribute to rapid population growth of EAB at recently colonized sites. Our findings provide further evidence of the mechanisms by which EAB has been able to successfully establish and spread in North America. PMID:26072908

  5. Belowground neighbor perception in Arabidopsis thaliana studied by transcriptome analysis: roots of Hieracium pilosella cause biotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Christoph; Bauer, Sibylle; Müller, Benedikt; Bartelheimer, Maik

    2013-01-01

    Root-root interactions are much more sophisticated than previously thought, yet the mechanisms of belowground neighbor perception remain largely obscure. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses allow detailed insight into plant reactions to environmental cues. A root interaction trial was set up to explore both morphological and whole genome transcriptional responses in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana in the presence or absence of an inferior competitor, Hieracium pilosella. Neighbor perception was indicated by Arabidopsis roots predominantly growing away from the neighbor (segregation), while solitary plants placed more roots toward the middle of the pot. Total biomass remained unaffected. Database comparisons in transcriptome analysis revealed considerable similarity between Arabidopsis root reactions to neighbors and reactions to pathogens. Detailed analyses of the functional category "biotic stress" using MapMan tools found the sub-category "pathogenesis-related proteins" highly significantly induced. A comparison to a study on intraspecific competition brought forward a core of genes consistently involved in reactions to neighbor roots. We conclude that beyond resource depletion roots perceive neighboring roots or their associated microorganisms by a relatively uniform mechanism that involves the strong induction of pathogenesis-related proteins. In an ecological context the findings reveal that belowground neighbor detection may occur independently of resource depletion, allowing for a time advantage for the root to prepare for potential interactions. PMID:23967000

  6. Climatic Versus Biotic Constraints on Carbon and Water Fluxes in Seasonally Drought-affected Ponderosa Pine Ecosystems. Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, P. A.; Law, B. E.; Williams, M.; Irvine, J.; Kurpius, M.; Moore, D.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the relative importance of climatic versus biotic controls on gross primary production (GPP) and water vapor fluxes in seasonally drought-affected ponderosa pine forests. The study was conducted in young (YS), mature (MS), and old stands (OS) over 4 years at the AmeriFlux Metolius sites. Model simulations showed that interannual variation of GPP did not follow the same trends as precipitation, and effects of climatic variation were smallest at the OS (50%), and intermediate at the YS (climate, although leaf area is a function of climate in that climate can interact with age-related shifts in carbon allocation and affect whole-tree hydraulic conductance. Older forests, with well-established root systems, appear to be better buffered from effects of seasonal drought and interannual climatic variation. Interannual variation of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was also lowest at the OS, where NEE is controlled more by interannual variation of ecosystem respiration, 70% of which is from soil, than by the variation of GPP, whereas variation in GPP is the primary reason for interannual changes in NEE at the YS and MS. Across spatially heterogeneous landscapes with high frequency of younger stands resulting from natural and anthropogenic disturbances, interannual climatic variation and change in leaf area are likely to result in large interannual variation in GPP and NEE.

  7. A wheat lipid transfer protein (TdLTP4) promotes tolerance to abiotic and biotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Hela; Saibi, Walid; Alaoui, Meryem Mrani; Hmyene, Abdelaziz; Masmoudi, Khaled; Hanin, Moez; Brini, Faïçal

    2015-04-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are members of the family of pathogenesis-related proteins (PR-14) that are believed to be involved in plant defense responses. In this study, we report the isolation and characterization of a novel gene TdLTP4 encoding an LTP protein from durum wheat [Triticum turgidum L. subsp. Durum Desf.]. Molecular Phylogeny analyses of wheat TdLTP4 gene showed a high identity to other plant LTPs. Predicted three-dimensional structural model revealed the presence of six helices and nine loop turns. Expression analysis in two local durum wheat varieties with marked differences in salt and drought tolerance, revealed a higher transcript accumulation of TdLTP4 under different stress conditions in the tolerant variety, compared to the sensitive one. The overexpression of TdLTP4 in Arabidopsis resulted in a promoted plant growth under various stress conditions including NaCl, ABA, JA and H2O2 treatments. Moreover, the LTP-overexpressing lines exhibit less sensitivity to jasmonate than wild-type plants. Furthermore, detached leaves from transgenic Arabidopsis expressing TdLTP4 gene showed enhanced fungal resistance against Alternaria solani and Botrytis cinerea. Together, these data provide the evidence for the involvement of TdLTP4 gene in the tolerance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in crop plants. PMID:25703105

  8. [Biotic and abiotic factors that affect the quality of Schinopsis balansae Engl. and Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco Schltdl. seeds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzugaray, Claudia; Carnevale, Nélida J; Salinas, Adriana R; Pioli, Rosanna

    2007-06-01

    Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco (white quebracho) and Schinopsis balansae (red quebracho) are distinctive trees of the South American Park in Argentina. Quebrachos are found in forests that have been exploited very intensively. The object of this work was the identification of biotic and abiotic factors specially fungal pathogen that affect the quality of both species and its relation with germination. Seeds where evaluated through germination test and the percentage of the incidence of fungal agents in two different years of harvest was determined. In S. balansae the germination rate was 77% and of 27% in 2000 and 2001 harvests, respectively. Associations fungi-germination were found in 2001 for Alternaria spp., Curvularia spp., and Fusarium spp., showing an coefficient of correlation = -0.84; -0.85 and -0.73 (p quebracho-blanco seeds, the germination rate was 50% and 90% in 2000 and 2003 respectively, with a 42% of immature seeds in 2000 harvest that was associated to high precipitations and high temperatures during flowering and ripping of fruits. The incidence of pathogens was low and did not have association to germination. PMID:17604434

  9. Degradability of composites, prepared from ethylene-propylene copolymer and jute fiber under accelerated aging and biotic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of natural fiber as reinforcement for the thermoplastic composites is growing not only for ecological concern but also for wide range of applications. In the present article, three types of composites were prepared by melt mixing of ethylene-propylene (EP) copolymer and (i) 3% NaOH treated jute fiber, (ii) 17.5% NaOH treated jute fiber and (iii) commercial microcrystalline cellulose powder using maleated EP copolymer as compatibilizer. The obtained composites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and microscopic measurements. The durability of the composites was evaluated under polychromatic irradiation (λ ≥ 290 nm) and composting condition for different time intervals. It was found that the treatments on the natural fiber have influenced the service life of the end product. Composites made from microcrystalline cellulose showed better mechanical properties as well as photo-resistance. The specimen containing 3% NaOH treated fiber exhibited relatively lowest photo-resistance and biosusceptibility. It was found that the composites were less durable under both abiotic and biotic conditions in comparison of the neat polymer matrix

  10. Re-evaluation of metal bioaccumulation and chronic toxicity in Hyalella azteca using saturation curves and the biotic ligand model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgmann, U.; Norwood, W.P.; Dixon, D.G

    2004-10-01

    Bioaccumulation by Hyalella of all metals studied so far in our laboratory was re-evaluated to determine if the data could be explained satisfactorily using saturation models. Saturation kinetics are predicted by the biotic ligand model (BLM), now widely used in modelling acute toxicity, and are a pre-requisite if the BLM is to be applied to chronic toxicity. Saturation models provided a good fit to all the data. Since these are mechanistically based, they provide additional insights into metal accumulation mechanisms not immediately apparent when using allometric models. For example, maximum Cd accumulation is dependent on the hardness of the water to which Hyalella are acclimated. The BLM may need to be modified when applied to chronic toxicity. Use of saturation models for bioaccumulation, however, also necessitates the need for using saturation models for dose-response relationships in order to produce unambiguous estimates of LC50 values based on water and body concentrations. This affects predictions of toxicity at very low metal concentrations and results in lower predicted toxicity of mixtures when many metals are present at low concentrations.

  11. X1-homologous genes family as central components in biotic and abiotic stresses response in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongbao; Chen, Yajuan; Zhao, Dan; Li, Ruifen; Wang, Hongzhi; Zhang, Jiewei; Wei, Jianhua

    2014-03-01

    X1-homologous genes (XHS) encode plant specific proteins containing three basic domains (XH, XS, zf-XS). In spite of their physiological importance, systematic analyses of ZmXHS genes have not yet been explored. In this study, we isolated and characterized ten ZmXHS genes in a whole-of-genome analysis of the maize genome. A total of ten members of this family were identified in maize genome. The ten ZmXHS genes were distributed on seven maize chromosomes. Multiple alignment and motif display results revealed that most ZmXHS proteins share all the three conserved domains. Putative cis-elements involved in abiotic stress responsive, phytohormone, pollen-specific and quantitative, seed development and germination, light and circadian rhythms regulation, Ca(2+)-responsive, root hair cell-specific, and CO(2)-responsive transcriptional activation were observed in the promoters of ZmXHS genes. Yeast hybrid assay revealed that the XH domain of ZmXHS5 was necessary for interaction with itself and ZmXHS2. Microarray data showed that the ZmXHS genes had tissue-specific expression patterns in the maize developmental steps and biotic stresses response. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis results indicated that, except ZmXHS9, the other nine ZmXHS genes were induced in the seedling leaves by at least one of the four abiotic stresses applied. PMID:24676795

  12. Application of remote sensing techniques for the identification of biotic stress in plum trees caused by the Plum pox virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krezhova Dora

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two hyperspectral remote sensing techniques, spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence, were used for the identification of biotic stress (sharka disease in plum trees at an early stage without visible symptoms on the leaves. The research was focused on cultivars that are widely spread in Bulgaria: ‘Angelina’, ‘Black Diamond’ and ‘Mirabelle’. Hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence data were collected by means of a portable multichannel fibre-optics spectrometer in the visible and near infrared spectral ranges (400-1000 nm. Statistical and deterministic analyses were applied for assessing the significance of the differences between the spectral data of healthy (control and infected plum leaves. Comparative analyses were performed with complementary serological test DAS-ELISA, broadly implemented in plant virology. The strong relationship that was found between the results from the two remote sensing techniques and serological analysis indicates the applicability of hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence techniques for conducting health condition assessments of vegetation easily and without damage before the appearance of visible symptoms.

  13. The use of biotic and abiotic components of Red Sea coastal areas as indicators of ecosystem health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Wael A; Saleh, Yousef S; Marie, Mohamed-Assem S

    2016-03-01

    A biomonitoring study was conducted using some biotic (Pomadasys hasta and Lutjanus russellii fish) and abiotic (water and sediment) components of the Red Sea coast of Hodeida, Yemen Republic along two polluted sites (Al-Dawar beach and Urj village) in comparison to a reference site (Al-Nukhailah beach). The studied fish biomarkers included hepatosomatic index (HSI), condition factor (K), scaled mass index (SMI), catalase, glutathione-S-transferase (GST), malondialdehyde (MDA), total protein and albumin. In addition, metals (Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd) concentrations in water and sediment were measured and sediment pollution assessment was carried out using contamination factor (CF), geoaccumulation index (Igeo), pollution load index (PLI) and enrichment factor (EF). The studied metals concentration in water and sediment samples showed significant increase among the polluted sites in comparison to the reference site. Sediment pollution assessment generally confirmed that Urj village was the most contaminated site followed by Al-Dawar beach. Catalase, GST and MDA proved to be the most responsive biomarkers with increased values of GST and MDA at sites influenced by agricultural, urban and industrial activities while catalase, HSI, K, SMI, total protein and albumin showed the opposite trend. This study recommends monitoring of sediment Igeo and EF values as well as SMI, catalase, GST and MDA as sensitive indicators of different anthropogenic activities and their effects on aquatic ecosystems under complex and different gradients of metal pollution. In addition, P. hasta proved to be more sensitive towards the detected pollution condition. PMID:26547874

  14. Biotic and abiotic controls on nitrogen leaching losses into waterways during successive bovine urine application to soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilen, Amanda D; Chen, Chengrong R; Faggotter, Stephen J; Ellison, Tanya L; Burford, Michele A

    2016-07-01

    Cattle waste products high in nitrogen (N) that enter waterways via rainfall runoff can contribute to aquatic ecosystem health deterioration. It is well established that N leaching from this source can be reduced by plant assimilation, e.g. pasture grass. Additionally, N leaching can be reduced when there is sufficient carbon (C) in the soil such as plant litterfall to stimulate microbial processes, i.e. denitrification, which off-gas N from the soil profile. However, the relative importance of these two processes is not well understood. A soil microcosm experiment was conducted to determine the role of biotic processes, pasture grass and microbial activity, and abiotic processes such as soil sorption, in reducing N leaching loss, during successive additions of bovine urine. Pasture grass was the most effective soil cover in reducing N leaching losses, which leached 70% less N compared to exposed soil. Successive application of urine to the soil resulted in N accumulation, after which there was a breaking point indicated by high N leaching losses. This is likely to be due to the low C:N ratio within the soil profiles treated with urine (molar ratio 8:1) compared to water treated soils (30:1). In this experiment we examined the role of C addition in reducing N losses and showed that the addition of glucose can temporarily reduce N leaching. Overall, our results demonstrated that plant uptake of N was a more important process in preventing N leaching than microbial processes. PMID:27031296

  15. Combined Effects of Soil Biotic and Abiotic Factors, Influenced by Sewage Sludge Incorporation, on the Incidence of Corn Stalk Rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Nara Lúcia Perondi; Navas-Cortés, Juan A; Silva, Carlos Alberto; Bettiol, Wagner

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the combined effects of soil biotic and abiotic factors on the incidence of Fusarium corn stalk rot, during four annual incorporations of two types of sewage sludge into soil in a 5-years field assay under tropical conditions and to predict the effects of these variables on the disease. For each type of sewage sludge, the following treatments were included: control with mineral fertilization recommended for corn; control without fertilization; sewage sludge based on the nitrogen concentration that provided the same amount of nitrogen as in the mineral fertilizer treatment; and sewage sludge that provided two, four and eight times the nitrogen concentration recommended for corn. Increasing dosages of both types of sewage sludge incorporated into soil resulted in increased corn stalk rot incidence, being negatively correlated with corn yield. A global analysis highlighted the effect of the year of the experiment, followed by the sewage sludge dosages. The type of sewage sludge did not affect the disease incidence. A multiple logistic model using a stepwise procedure was fitted based on the selection of a model that included the three explanatory parameters for disease incidence: electrical conductivity, magnesium and Fusarium population. In the selected model, the probability of higher disease incidence increased with an increase of these three explanatory parameters. When the explanatory parameters were compared, electrical conductivity presented a dominant effect and was the main variable to predict the probability distribution curves of Fusarium corn stalk rot, after sewage sludge application into the soil. PMID:27176597

  16. The rpg4-mediated resistance to wheat stem rust (Puccinia graminis) in barley (Hordeum vulgare) requires Rpg5, a second NBS-LRR gene, and an actin depolymerization factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Richards, J; Gross, T; Druka, A; Kleinhofs, A; Steffenson, B; Acevedo, M; Brueggeman, R

    2013-04-01

    The rpg4 gene confers recessive resistance to several races of wheat stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) and Rpg5 provides dominant resistance against isolates of the rye stem rust (P. graminis f. sp. secalis) in barley. The rpg4 and Rpg5 genes are tightly linked on chromosome 5H, and positional cloning using high-resolution populations clearly separated the genes, unambiguously identifying Rpg5; however, the identity of rpg4 remained unclear. High-resolution genotyping of critical recombinants at the rpg4/Rpg5 locus, designated here as rpg4-mediated resistance locus (RMRL) delimited two distinct yet tightly linked loci required for resistance, designated as RMRL1 and RMRL2. Utilizing virus-induced gene silencing, each gene at RMRL1, i.e., HvRga1 (a nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat [NBS-LRR] domain gene), Rpg5 (an NBS-LRR-protein kinase domain gene), and HvAdf3 (an actin depolymerizing factor-like gene), was individually silenced followed by inoculation with P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ. Silencing each gene changed the reaction type from incompatible to compatible, indicating that all three genes are required for rpg4-mediated resistance. This stem rust resistance mechanism in barley follows the emerging theme of unrelated pairs of genetically linked NBS-LRR genes required for specific pathogen recognition and resistance. It also appears that actin cytoskeleton dynamics may play an important role in determining resistance against several races of stem rust in barley. PMID:23216085

  17. Inferring the contribution of sexual reproduction, migration and off-season survival to the temporal maintenance of microbial populations: a case study on the wheat fungal pathogen Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajid; Gladieux, Pierre; Rahman, Hidayatur; Saqib, Muhammad S; Fiaz, Muhammad; Ahmad, Habib; Leconte, Marc; Gautier, Angélique; Justesen, Annemarie F; Hovmøller, Mogens S; Enjalbert, Jérôme; de Vallavieille-Pope, Claude

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the mode of temporal maintenance of plant pathogens is an important domain of microbial ecology research. Due to the inconspicuous nature of microbes, their temporal maintenance cannot be studied directly through tracking individuals and their progeny. Here, we suggest a series of population genetic analyses on molecular marker variation in temporally spaced samples to infer about the relative contribution of sexual reproduction, off-season survival and migration to the temporal maintenance of pathogen populations. We used the proposed approach to investigate the temporal maintenance of wheat yellow rust pathogen, Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici (PST), in the Himalayan region of Pakistan. Multilocus microsatellite genotyping of PST isolates revealed high genotypic diversity and recombinant population structure across all locations, confirming the existence of sexual reproduction in this region. The genotypes were assigned to four genetic groups, revealing a clear differentiation between zones with and without Berberis spp., the alternate host of PST, with an additional subdivision within the Berberis zone. The lack of any differentiation between samples across two sampling years, and the very infrequent resampling of multilocus genotypes over years at a given location was consistent with limited over-year clonal survival, and a limited genetic drift. The off-season oversummering population in the Berberis zone, likely to be maintained locally, served as a source of migrants contributing to the temporal maintenance in the non-Berberis zone. Our study hence demonstrated the contribution of both sexual recombination and off-season oversummering survival to the temporal maintenance of the pathogen. These new insights into the population biology of PST highlight the general usefulness of the analytical approach proposed. PMID:24354737

  18. Comparison of cell death and accumulation of reactive oxygen species in wheat lines with or without Yr36 responding to Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici under low and high temperatures at seedling and adult-plant stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Ren, Bin; Kang, Zhensheng; Huang, Lili

    2016-05-01

    Yr36 is an important gene conferring resistance to stripe rust of wheat caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst). To determine if the Yr36 resistance is correlated to reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst and cell death, wheat near-isogenic lines with (UC1041 + Yr36) and without (UC1041) the gene were histologically characterized for response to Pst infection. Yr36 conferred stripe rust resistance at both seedling and adult-plant stages when the gene line was tested with Pst race CYR29 at a high-temperature (HT) cycle (12 °C at night and 33 °C during the day). At the HT cycle, the growth of secondary hyphae was obviously suppressed in both seedlings and adult plants of UC1041 + Yr36 compared with those of UC1041. The percentages of infection sites with necrotic host cells in UC1041 + Yr36 were significantly higher than UC1041 60 hours after inoculation (hai) at both seedling and adult-plant stages. Mesophyll cell death in the inoculated UC1041 + Yr36 leaves at the HT cycle was stronger than at a low-temperature (LT) cycle (12 °C at night and 18 °C during the day). At the HT cycle, the level of ROS burst started increasing in the inoculated leaves of UC1041 + Yr36 when Pst hyphae started differentiating and extending, and simultaneously, the number of penetration sites with hypersensitive cell death was also increasing. The results indicate that Yr36 product affects the ROS accumulation and cell death of the host in interaction of wheat with Pst. PMID:26070270

  19. Assessment of ecological quality status of Küçükçekmece Bay (Marmara Sea by applying BENTIX, AMBI, BOPA and BO2A biotic indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. CAGLAR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to explore the effectiveness of different biotic indexes in the Marmara Sea. The assessment of ecological quality status (EQS was performed by applying the biotic indexes BENTIX, AMBI, BOPA, BO2A and Shannon-Wienerdiversity, in combination with the estimation of total organic carbon (TOC content of sediments. BOPA and BO2A indexes tended to overestimate the EQS of the stations. BENTIX was the most efficient index as it demonstrated conceivable EQS results with respect to TOC load and successfuly determined “acceptable” or “not acceptable” status of the stations. TOC content of sediment, which significantly correlated with several benthic measures (S, N, AMBI, BENTIX, proved to be a valuable proxy measure in evaluating the likelihood of benthic impairment. When overall EQS of northern Marmara Sea was discussed, the region was designated as ecologically disturbed with only 25.7% of the stations in acceptable status.

  20. Copper in the terrestrial environment: Verification of a laboratory-derived terrestrial biotic ligand model to predict earthworm mortality with toxicity observed in field soils

    OpenAIRE

    Koster, Marijke; Groot, Arthur; Vijver, Martina G.; Willie J. G. M. Peijnenburg

    2006-01-01

    This study was set up for validation of a regression model to predict mortality in the terrestrial earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa following exposure to copper. This model was derived from a terrestrial biotic ligand model and incorporates the protective effects of H+ and Na+ on copper toxicity. Three soil sets were used for the experiments, all of which had a different copper contamination history over more than 20 years and were considered to be aged field soils. The soils were characteri...