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Sample records for biotech educatoriowa biotech

  1. Profiles of four projects in Biotech Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Finn

    2004-01-01

    In April 2004, Copenhagen Business School opens a centre for research on biotech business. Biotech Business includes a number of senior and junior researchers from CBS. Initially the centre takes its point of departure in four projects included in the research program on Competence, Organisation...... and Management in Biotech Industries (COMBI). Starting in March 2004, COMBI is funded jointly by The Danish Social Research Council, firms and organisations in the Danish biotech industry and CBS. This presentation refers exclusively to four COMBI projects....

  2. A global need for women's biotech leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith-Doerr, L.; Kemekliene, G.; Teutonico, R.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing women's participation in leadership of biotech policy making, funding, research and implementation will strengthen the race to solve global problems......Increasing women's participation in leadership of biotech policy making, funding, research and implementation will strengthen the race to solve global problems...

  3. Does medical mystery threaten biotech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raphals, P.

    1990-11-02

    A puzzling medical syndrome caused by substances grown in a genetically engineered bacterium could have profound consequences for the entire biotechnology industry-if Jeremy Rifkin has his way. Rifkin, the controversial biotech critic, has filed a petition based on the eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome (EMS) with the Food and Drug Administration. In it, he asks that the FDA's review of all products made by genetic engineering techniques be suspended until strict new rules are in place to protect the public. The problem is that no one yet knows whether the specific contaminant that has caused up to 5000 EMS cases and 27 deaths was actually the result of genetic engineering. It might well have been the result of problems with chemical purification steps that have little to do with molecular genetics. Until now there has been no way to resolve that uncertainty. But help is on the way-in the form of a recently published animal model of the disease that should eventually enable researchers to pinpoint the precise cause of the syndrome.

  4. Business Ethics 101 for the biotech industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Biotechnology companies face ethical challenges of two distinct types: bioethical challenges faced on account of the nature of work in the life sciences, and corporate ethical challenges on account of their nature as commercial entities. The latter set of challenges has received almost no attention at all in the academic literature or media. This paper begins to remedy that lacuna, examining ethical issues that arise specifically on account of the status of biotech companies as commercial entities. The focus here is on three representative issues: product safety, corporate social responsibility, and corporate governance. It is argued that each of these issues poses particular ethical challenges for companies in the biotech sector. In the area of product safety, it is noted that biotech companies face particular challenges in determining what counts as a "safe" product, given the contentious nature of what might count as a "harm" in the biotech field. In the area of corporate social responsibility, the adoption of a "stakeholder approach" and an attempt to manage the social consequences of products pose special challenges for biotech companies. This is due to the enormous range of groups and individuals claiming to have a stake in the doings of such companies, and the trenchant controversies over just what the social consequences of various biotechnologies might be. In the area of corporate governance, biotech companies need to seek out and follow best practices regarding the ways in which information, authority, and influence flow between a company's shareholders, managers, and Board of Directors, if they are to avoid duplicating the ethical and financial scandal that brought down ImClone. An important meta-issue, here--one that renders each of these corporate ethical challenges more vexing--is the difficulty of finding the appropriate benchmarks for ethical corporate behavior in a field as controversial, and as rapidly evolving, as biotechnology. Three

  5. Entrepreneurial culture in innovative biotech clusters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruel, Hubertus Johannes Maria; Frolova, P.; Groen, Arend J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the determinants of entrepreneurial culture in innovative biotech clusters. A literature review led to the identification of nine determinants. For the empirical study four clusters in Western Europe with a high entrepreneurial culture were selected. Cluster

  6. Investor Outlook: After the Biotech Bubble Popped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven; Yang, Jerry

    2016-03-01

    After a few torrid years of value appreciation, the biotech "bubble" has precipitously popped over the past few months. In this report, we take a look at some of the factors that drove the run-up in valuations, the triggers that led to their substantial pullback, and where the industry may be headed from here. Gene therapy/editing companies have been particularly affected by these dynamics, raising a new set of questions and challenges for the group.

  7. Biotech Business Lessons for Defense Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    repudiates what func- tional personnel hold dear—that their hurdles are vital to some moral or ethical responsibility to protect or safeguard...94 Strategic Studies Quarterly ♦ Summer 2016 Biotech Business Lessons for Defense Acquisition Col David L. Peeler Jr., USAF Abstract The desire to...examples and lessons from private business sectors would serve DOD interests well. ✵ ✵ ✵ ✵ ✵ Acquisition reform! No other two words so stress or trouble

  8. 77 FR 35353 - Biotech Life Sciences Trade Mission to Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Biotech Life Sciences Trade Mission to... Commercial Service (CS) is organizing a Biotech Life Sciences trade mission to Australia, October 29-November.... biotechnology and life science firms. The goals of the trade mission to Australia are to (1) increase U.S...

  9. Indian Biotech Bazaar: a swot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek

    2007-05-01

    Biotechnology is a life science-based technique especially used in agriculture, medicine and food sciences. It is generally defined as the manipulation in organisms to generate products for the welfare of the world. Biotechnology combines disciplines such as genetics, biochemistry, microbiology, and cell biology along with information technology, chemical engineering, robotics etc. It includes basic industries such as food processing, tissue culture, plant development and other sophisticated ones such as recombinant therapeutics and diagnostics. Biotechnology, globally recognized as a rapidly emerging and far-reaching technology, is aptly described as the "technology of hope" for its promise of food, health and environmental sustainability. In India, biotechnology employs more than 10 000 people and generates roughly US$ 500 million in revenue annually. The biotechnology market has increased its sales from Rs. 50 billion in 1997 to Rs.70 billion in 2000, and is expected to cross Rs. 240 billion by the year 2010. In India, the human health biotech products account for 60% of the total market; agribiotech and veterinary 25%, medical devices, contract research and development (R&D), reagents and supplies constitute the remaining 15% Moreover, to facilitate foreign investment, capital and government policies are being revised. Other important industries include industrial enzyme manufacture, bioinformatics, and medical devices. Biotechnology has had limited appeal so far on our capital markets, and we have less then a dozen biotech companies listed on the public markets.

  10. Financial risk of the biotech industry versus the pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golec, Joseph; Vernon, John A

    2009-01-01

    The biotech industry now accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of total R&D spending on new medicines. However, compared with the pharmaceutical industry, the biotech industry is financially fragile. This article illustrates the financial fragility of the biotech and pharmaceutical industries in the US and the implications of this fragility for the effects that government regulation could have on biotech firms. Graphical analysis and statistical tests were used to show how the biotech industry differs from the pharmaceutical industry. The two industries' characteristics were measured and compared, along with various measures of firms' financial risk and sensitivity to government regulation. Data from firms' financial statements provided accounting-based measures and firms' stock returns applied to a multifactor asset pricing model provided financial market measures. The biotech industry was by far the most research-intensive industry in the US, averaging 38% R&D intensity (ratio of R&D spending to total firm assets) over the past 25 years, compared with an average of 25% for the pharmaceutical industry and 3% for all other industries. Biotech firms exhibited lower and more volatile profits and higher market-related and size-related risk, and they suffered more negative stock returns in response to threatened government price regulation. Biotech firms' financial risks increase their costs of capital and make them more sensitive to government regulations that affect their financial prospects. As biotech products grow to represent a larger share of new medicines, general stock market conditions and government regulations could have a greater impact on the level of innovation of new medicines.

  11. 76 FR 17621 - Biotech Life Science Trade Mission to China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Biotech Life Science Trade Mission to... Commercial Service (CS) is organizing a Biotechnology Life Sciences trade mission to China on October 17-20... representatives from a variety of U.S. biotechnology and life science firms and trade organizations. The mission...

  12. China's Biotech Policies and Their Impacts on U.S. Agricultural Exports to China

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Baohui; Marchant, Mary A.

    2006-01-01

    China is a key player in global agricultural markets, and the number one importer of U.S. soybeans and cotton, whereby soybeans and cotton are two of the main biotech commodities commercialized in the United States. As of 2005, 87% of soybeans and 79% of cotton planted in the U.S. were biotech. Thus, changes in China's biotech policies may have a significant impact on U.S. biotech commodity exports to China. An understanding of the evolution of China's biotech regulations and factors that may...

  13. Implementation of the resource recovery concept in the biotech industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitic, Aleksandar; Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; S.B.A. Udugama, Isuru

    The concept of circular economy is attracting significant attention in modern biotech industry. Downstream processing plants are usually focused on the removal of impurities instead of their recovery in the form of value-added products for additional revenues. For example, carboxylic acids......, carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, inorganic ions and water itself are amongst various resources that are found in wastewater streams coming from bio-based production processes. Such compounds have a high value at the global market and could potentially be used as raw materials for the manufacturing feed and food...

  14. Deutsche Biotech-Unternehmen und ihre Innovationsfähigkeit im internationalen Vergleich : eine institutionentheoretische Analyse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, K.S.G.

    2006-01-01

    German Biotech-Companies and their Innovativeness in International Comparison – an Institutionalist Analysis 1 Introduction In the mid-1990s, legal changes and policy initiatives in Germany led to the rapid emergence of a biotechnology industry. Initially, German biotech companies focused on the

  15. The path- and place-dependent nature of scientific knowledge production in biotech 1986-2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimeriks, Gaston; Boschma, Ron

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the worldwide spatial evolution of scientific knowledge production in biotechnology in the period 1986-2008. We employ new methodology that identifies new key topics in biotech on the basis of frequent use of title worlds in major biotech journals as an indication of new

  16. The path- and place-dependent nature of scientific knowledge production in biotech 1986-2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimeriks, G.J.; Boschma, R.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the worldwide spatial evolution of scientific knowledge production in biotechnology in the period 1986–2008. We employ new methodology that identifies new key topics in biotech on the basis of frequent use of title worlds in major biotech journals as an indication of new

  17. A global overview of biotech (GM) crops: adoption, impact and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Clive

    2010-01-01

    In the early 1990s, some were skeptical that genetically modified (GM) crops, now referred to as biotech crops, could deliver improved products and make an impact at the farm level. There was even more skepticism that developing countries would adopt biotech crops. The adoption of and commercialization of biotech crops in 2008 is reviewed. The impact of biotech crops are summarized including their contribution to: global food, feed and fiber security; a safer environment; a more sustainable agriculture; and the alleviation of poverty, and hunger in the developing countries of the world. Future prospects are discussed. Notably, Egypt planted Bt maize for the first time in 2008 thereby becoming the first country in the Arab world to commercialize biotech crops.

  18. State Incentives for Innovation, Star Scientists, and Jobs: Evidence from Biotech. Upjohn Institute Working Paper No. 14-203

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Enrico; Wilson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the effects of state-provided financial incentives for biotech companies, which are part of a growing trend of placed-based policies designed to spur innovation clusters. We estimate that the adoption of subsidies for biotech employers by a state raises the number of star biotech scientists in that state by about 15 percent over a…

  19. Biotech pilgrims and the transnational quest for stem cell cures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Priscilla

    2010-10-01

    Thousands of patients with incurable neurodegenerative conditions from more than 60 countries have sought fetal cell transplants in China since 2001. Drawing on 24 months of ethnographic fieldwork, I investigate these transnational encounters occurring in the realm of experimental medicine. Critiquing popular notions of "medical tourism," I develop the alternative concept of "biotech pilgrimage" to reveal how faith intertwines with technology, travel, and the political economies of health care and medical research in a global era. Insights from pilgrimage theory enable us to question assumptions of leisure embedded in claims of tourism while also exploring new biopolitical practices that extend beyond the borders of the nation-state. I also demonstrate how materialist visions of salvation underlie medical practice and contribute to China's rising influence as a global technological leader.

  20. Shaking Up Biotech/Pharma: Can Cues Be Taken from the Tech Industry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C Katherine

    2017-06-01

    The biotech and pharma (biotech/pharma) industry is in dire need of finding ways to increase efficacy, efficiency, and affordability of its products. The information and technology industry ("tech") industry, which is an industry similarly founded on inventions and innovation, may provide some food for thought. This perspective will demonstrate the shift that biotech/pharma is already making and will propose that the industry has an opportunity to compel change by adopting some aspects of the tech industry with regards to models for technology/product development and leadership attributes.

  1. The development of China's medical biotech industry needs to be driven by innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zailin; Dai, Yuehan

    2006-11-01

    The Chinese biotech industry is going through a period of fast growth, and with its huge population, China is predicted to be the biggest single-country market in the world. However, the Chinese biotech industry has to tackle the critical issue of innovation, which should be the driving force for China's development into an advanced and responsible country. Here, in this article, the authors review the history of the Chinese biotech industry, exemplified by the development of genetically engineered drugs during the last 20 years, and also point out its the future.

  2. 77 FR 14852 - Advanced Growing Systems, Inc., Advantage Capital Development Corp., Amazon Biotech, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] Advanced Growing Systems, Inc., Advantage Capital Development Corp., Amazon Biotech, Inc., Andover Holdings, Inc. a/k/a Andover Energy Holdings, Inc... securities of Amazon [[Page 14853

  3. The Swiss biotech referendum: A case study of science communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cueni, Thomas B.

    1999-01-01

    On June 7 , 1998, the Swiss citizens voted on a constitutional amendment, which could have jeopardised the future of biotechnological research in Switzerland. Scientists and opinion leaders around the world expected the referendum with great anxiety. 'Nature', in an editorial, had firmly stated that the Swiss way showed 'how not to run a country', the 'Economist', a week prior to the referendum, had written that the Swiss might be the only people in the world who decided on their own to forego a world class position in scientific research. In fact, the Swiss did none of that. They rejected the constitutional amendment with an overwhelming majority of 67 per cent of the votes, and what started out as a dramatic threat to scientific research in Switzerland became a platform in favour of modern biotechnology. The presentation addresses some of the key features of the Swiss biotech campaign, analyses the success factors of the campaign, provides an insight in the most in-depth collection of data on public perception of biotechnology in the world, and draws conclusions as to what extent the Swiss experience can be of use in the way to communicate on modem science. The result of the Swiss referendum has convincingly shown that successful communication of modem science is possible if - scientists, authorities, and the industry accept the challenge to cope with the demands of communicating with the public at large, - there is a clear understanding that the public's needs may often be based on psychological rather than on logic scientific reasons, - all participants in the dialogue are willing to forego scientific jargon for clear understandable language, i.e. understand that it is hardly the public's fault if messages do not get across, - everybody accepts that dialogue, information, and education on modem science is a long-haul task. The Swiss biotech referendum was seen as a major threat to Switzerland as a leading country of scientific research. However, something which

  4. 3D-BioPrinting: The future of Red Biotech

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crupi, Annunziata; Teodori, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Every day Science moves little steps forward, contributing to the progress of our society. Sometimes, however, a single invention revolutionizes the world. Indeed, the invention of woodblock printing and development of industrial-scale printing-press in the 15. century have changed our society. 3D-printing is now boosting another revolution. The production of custom-made objects from a virtual model will trigger a rapid development of a more versatile, less expensive manufacturing sector for the on-demand market. The real revolution, however, is represented by 3D-printing in biomedicine. 3D-bioprinting represents the future of the Red-Biotech. This technology, indeed, will be able to build ex-novo organs using biocompatible materials and human cells; replace the allograft transplants, eliminating waiting lists that often make the difference between life and death; and provide more predictive, less expensive experimental models, replacing animal tests. The high innovation content of this technology, can make the difference between being obsolete and new [it

  5. Trends in global approvals of biotech crops (1992–2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldemita, Rhodora R; Reaño, Ian Mari E; Solis, Renando O; Hautea, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT With the increasing number of genetically modified (GM) events, traits, and crops that are developed to benefit the global population, approval of these technologies for food, feed, cultivation and import in each country may vary depending on needs, demand and trade interest. ISAAA established a GMO Approval Database to document global approvals of biotech crops. GM event name, crops, traits, developer, year of approval for cultivation, food/feed, import, and relevant dossiers were sourced from credible government regulatory websites and biosafety clearinghouses. This paper investigates the trends in GM approvals for food, feed and cultivation based on the number of approving countries, GM crops, events, and traits in the last 23 y (1992–2014), rationale for approval, factors influencing approvals, and their implications in GM crop adoption. Results show that in 2014, there was an accumulative increase in the number of countries granting approvals at 29 (79% developing countries) for commercial cultivation and 31 (70% developing countries) for food and 19 (80% developing developing) for feed; 2012 had the highest number of approving countries and cultivation approvals; 2011 had the highest number of country approvals for feed, and 2014 for food approvals. Herbicide tolerance trait had the highest events approved, followed by insect tolerance traits. Approvals for food product quality increased in the second decade. Maize had the highest number of events approved (single and stacked traits), and stacked traits product gradually increased which is already 30% of the total trait approvals. These results may indicate understanding and acceptance of countries to enhance regulatory capability to be able to benefit from GM crop commercialization. Hence, the paper provided information on the trends on the growth of the GM crop industry in the last 23 y which may be vital in predicting future GM crops and traits. PMID:26039675

  6. Trends in global approvals of biotech crops (1992-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldemita, Rhodora R; Reaño, Ian Mari E; Solis, Renando O; Hautea, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing number of genetically modified (GM) events, traits, and crops that are developed to benefit the global population, approval of these technologies for food, feed, cultivation and import in each country may vary depending on needs, demand and trade interest. ISAAA established a GMO Approval Database to document global approvals of biotech crops. GM event name, crops, traits, developer, year of approval for cultivation, food/feed, import, and relevant dossiers were sourced from credible government regulatory websites and biosafety clearinghouses. This paper investigates the trends in GM approvals for food, feed and cultivation based on the number of approving countries, GM crops, events, and traits in the last 23 y (1992-2014), rationale for approval, factors influencing approvals, and their implications in GM crop adoption. Results show that in 2014, there was an accumulative increase in the number of countries granting approvals at 29 (79% developing countries) for commercial cultivation and 31 (70% developing countries) for food and 19 (80% developing developing) for feed; 2012 had the highest number of approving countries and cultivation approvals; 2011 had the highest number of country approvals for feed, and 2014 for food approvals. Herbicide tolerance trait had the highest events approved, followed by insect tolerance traits. Approvals for food product quality increased in the second decade. Maize had the highest number of events approved (single and stacked traits), and stacked traits product gradually increased which is already 30% of the total trait approvals. These results may indicate understanding and acceptance of countries to enhance regulatory capability to be able to benefit from GM crop commercialization. Hence, the paper provided information on the trends on the growth of the GM crop industry in the last 23 y which may be vital in predicting future GM crops and traits.

  7. Firm Strategy and the Asian Advantage : The Case of the Emerging Biotech Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Umali, Celia L.

    2006-01-01

    Asia is considered by many to be the next biotech hub of the world as countries in the region are striving to develop the sector to be the next engine of growth of their respective economies. Recently many pharmacentical firms derive new products from the biotech sector. This paper on one hand examines the strategies pharmaceutical firms adopt to compete in the domestic and global market place and on the other hand evaluates the Asian advantages in terms of market and globalization drivers. F...

  8. Biotech/GM crops in horticulture: plum cv. HoneySweet resistant to plum pox virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commercialization of Biotech crops started in 1995. By 2011, genetically modified (GM) crops were grown world-wide on 160 million ha. Only 114.507 ha of GM crops were grown in Europe, of that, 114.490 ha were Bt maize and 17 ha were potato for industrial starch production. Currently, developing c...

  9. How Is Corporate Social Responsibility Addressed by Biotech Firms? a Case Study Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bustamante, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the biotech high-tech sector as a way to achieve competitive advantages. After presenting the importance of science for high-tech firms, the paper focuses on the social and economic role of CSR. Next, the primary reasons for firms' engagement in CSR activities are presented, followed by…

  10. 76 FR 42682 - China Biotech Life Sciences Trade Mission-Clarification and Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration China Biotech Life Sciences Trade... Life Science Trade Mission to China, 76 FR 17,621, Mar. 30, 2011, to clarify eligibility and amend the... representatives from a variety of U.S. biotechnology and life science firms and trade organizations. In response...

  11. Screening DNA chip and event-specific multiplex PCR detection methods for biotech crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Hun

    2014-11-01

    There are about 80 biotech crop events that have been approved by safety assessment in Korea. They have been controlled by genetically modified organism (GMO) and living modified organism (LMO) labeling systems. The DNA-based detection method has been used as an efficient scientific management tool. Recently, the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA chip have been developed as simultaneous detection methods for several biotech crops' events. The event-specific multiplex PCR method was developed to detect five biotech maize events: MIR604, Event 3272, LY 038, MON 88017 and DAS-59122-7. The specificity was confirmed and the sensitivity was 0.5%. The screening DNA chip was developed from four endogenous genes of soybean, maize, cotton and canola respectively along with two regulatory elements and seven genes: P35S, tNOS, pat, bar, epsps1, epsps2, pmi, cry1Ac and cry3B. The specificity was confirmed and the sensitivity was 0.5% for four crops' 12 events: one soybean, six maize, three cotton and two canola events. The multiplex PCR and DNA chip can be available for screening, gene-specific and event-specific analysis of biotech crops as efficient detection methods by saving on workload and time. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Parameters of Regional Cooperative Behavior in the German Biotech Industry – A Quantitative Social Network Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo; Strotebeck, Falk

    We analyse the determinants of network formation in Germany’s biotechnology industry using social network analysis combined with a regression approach for count data. Outcome variable of interest is the degree centrality of German regions, which is specified as a function of the region’s innovative...... and economic performance as well as biotech-related policy variables. The inclusion of the latter allows us to shed new light on the question to what extent R&D-based cluster policies are able to impact on the formation of the German biotech network. Our results show that policy indicators such as the volume...... of public funding for collaborative R&D activity are positively correlated with the region’s overall and interregional degree centrality. However, besides this direct funding effect, we do not observe any further (non-pecuniary) advantages such as prestige or image effects. Regarding the role played...

  13. Knowledge management in the QbD paradigm: manufacturing of biotech therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwig, Christoph; Garcia-Aponte, Oscar F; Golabgir, Aydin; Rathore, Anurag S

    2015-07-01

    In the quality by design (QbD) paradigm, global regulatory agencies have introduced the concepts of quality risk management and knowledge management (KM) as enablers for an enhanced pharmaceutical quality system. Although the concept of quality risk management has been well elucidated in the literature, the topic of KM has received relatively scant attention. In this paper we present an opinion on KM in the QbD paradigm as it relates to the manufacturing of biotech therapeutic products. Both academic and industrial viewpoints have been considered and key gaps have been elucidated. The authors conclude that there is an urgent need for the biotech industry to create efficient KM approaches if they wish to be successful in QbD implementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Open Data for Research and Strategic Monitoring in the Pharmaceutical and Biotech Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldissera Giovani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Open data is considered the new oil. As oil can be used to produce fertilisers, pesticides, lubricants, plastics and many other derivatives, so data is considered the commodity to use and re-use to create value. The number of initiatives supporting free access to data has increased in the last years and open data is becoming the norm in the public sector; the approach empowers stakeholders and nurtures the economy. Even if at early stage, private companies also are adapting to the open data market. A survey was conducted to which thirteen companies of different size (from micro enterprises to world-leading pharmas in the pharmaceutical and biotech sector and representing four business models archetypes of companies exploiting open data (aggregators, developers, enrichers and enablers participated. The information collected provides a snapshot of the use of open data by the pharmaceutical and biotech industry in 2015–2016. The companies interviewed use open data to complement proprietary data for research purposes, to implement licensing-in/licensing-out strategies, to map partnerships and connections among players or to identify key expertise and hire staff. Pharmaceutical and biotech companies have made of the protection of knowledge a dogma at the foundation of their business models, but using and contributing to the open data movement may change their approach to intellectual property and innovation.

  15. Biotech crops: imperative for achieving the millenium development goals and sustainability of agriculture in the climate change era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husaini, Amjad M; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    Biotechnological intervention in the development of crops has opened new vistas in agriculture. Central to the accomplishment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), biotech-agriculture is essential in meeting these targets. Biotech crops have already made modest contributions toward ensuring food and nutrition security by reducing losses and increasing productivity, with less pesticide input. These crops could help address some of the major challenges in agriculture-based economies created by climate change. Projections of global climate change expect the concentration of greenhouse gases to increase, aridization of the environment to increase, temperature fluctuations to occur sharply and frequently, and spatial and temporal distribution of rainfall to be disturbed-all of which will increase abiotic stress-related challenges to crops. Countering these challenges and to meet the food requirement of the ever-increasing world population (expected to reach 9 billion by 2030) we need to (1) develop and use biotech crops for mitigating adverse climatic changes; (2) develop biotech crops resilient to adverse environmental conditions; and (3) address the issues/non-issues raised by NGO's and educate the masses about the benefits of biotech crops.

  16. Growth and profitability in small privately held biotech firms: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännback, Malin; Carsrud, Alan; Renko, Maija; Ostermark, Ralf; Aaltonen, Jaana; Kiviluoto, Niklas

    2009-06-01

    This paper reports on preliminary findings on a study of the relationship of growth and profitability among small privately held Finnish Life Science firms. Previous research results concerning growth and profitability are mixed, ranging from strongly positive to a negative relationship. The conventional wisdom states that growth is a prerequisite for profitability. Our results suggest that the reverse is the case. A high profitability-low growth biotech firm is more probably to make the transition to high profitability-high growth than a firm that starts off with low profitability and high growth.

  17. Solid lipid nanoparticles for hydrophilic biotech drugs: optimization and cell viability studies (Caco-2 & HEPG-2 cell lines)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Severino, P.; Andreani, T.; Jäger, Alessandro; Chaud, M. V.; Santana, M. H. A.; Silva, A. M.; Souto, E. B.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 81, 23 June (2014), s. 28-34 ISSN 0223-5234 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/1600 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : lipid nanoparticles * double emulsion * hydrophilic biotech drugs Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.447, year: 2014

  18. Capacity optimization and scheduling of a multiproduct manufacturing facility for biotech products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Munawar A; Dhakre, Ankita; Rathore, Anurag S; Patil, Nitin

    2014-01-01

    A general mathematical framework has been proposed in this work for scheduling of a multiproduct and multipurpose facility involving manufacturing of biotech products. The specific problem involves several batch operations occurring in multiple units involving fixed processing time, unlimited storage policy, transition times, shared units, and deterministic and fixed data in the given time horizon. The different batch operations are modeled using state-task network representation. Two different mathematical formulations are proposed based on discrete- and continuous-time representations leading to a mixed-integer linear programming model which is solved using General Algebraic Modeling System software. A case study based on a real facility is presented to illustrate the potential and applicability of the proposed models. The continuous-time model required less number of events and has a smaller problem size compared to the discrete-time model. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  19. Exzellenz in der Bildung für eine innovative Schweiz: Die Position des Wirtschaftsdachverbandes Chemie Pharma Biotech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennhauser, Marcel

    2018-02-01

    In Switzerland, the chemical, pharma and biotech industries make a substantial and sustained contribution to the Swiss economy. The company members of scienceindustries employ around 70,000 people in Switzerland. Since 1980 value creation and productivity have increased markedly. As a result the share of the Swiss gross value added has grown continually to reach 5.6% in 2015. Exports have also increased. Today the chemical, pharma and biotech industry contributes around 45% of all Swiss exports and is therefore the largest Swiss export industry. This article describes the key requirements from the viewpoint of the chemical-pharma industry in order that Switzerland can continue to compete as an innovative location in global competition.

  20. What Will Be the Benefits of Biotech Wheat for European Agriculture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricroch, Agnès E

    2017-01-01

    In European countries, wheat occupies the largest crop area with high yielding production. France, a major producer and exporter in Europe, ranks the fifth producer worldwide. Biotic stresses are European farmers' major challenges (fungal and viral diseases, and insect pests) followed by abiotic ones such as drought and grain protein composition. During the last 40 years, 1136 scientific articles on biotech wheat were published by USA followed by China, Australia, Canada, and European Union with the UK. European research focuses on pests and diseases resistances using widely marker-assisted selection (MAS). Transgenesis is used in basic research to develop resistance against some fungi (Fusarium head blight) while RNA interference (RNAi) silencing is used against some fungi and virus. Transgenic plants were also transformed with genes from various species for drought tolerance. The UK (mostly with transgenesis and site-specific nucleases) and France (with no transgenic tools but with MAS and site-specific nucleases) are the main countries carrying out research programs for both biotic stress and drought tolerance. Thus, few European countries used transgenesis for gluten protein composition and RNAi-mediated silencing in celiac disease. Because of vandalism field trials of transgenics dropped since 2000. No transgenic wheat is cultivated in Europe for political reasons.

  1. Trait stacking for biotech crops: an essential consideration for agbiotech development projects for building trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezezika Obidimma C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of agricultural biotechnology humanitarian projects for food security in the last five years has been rapid in developing countries and is expected to rise sharply over the coming years. An extremely critical issue in these projects involves building trust with the community and farmers they aim to serve. For the first time, our social audit engagement with one of these initiatives, the Water Efficient Maize for Africa project, has revealed that a critical but unrecognized component of building trust with farmers involves publicly addressing the concerns surrounding stacked trait crops. As a result, we argue in this article that it is critical to actively anticipate the concerns that could be raised over trait stacking by incorporating them into global access plans of such initiatives early in order to facilitate adoption, provide the best value to the small-scale farmer and gain trust with the community whom these projects aim to serve. This perspective, based on an actual international social audit, should be of value to scientists, funders and partners involved in biotech development initiatives for food security.

  2. A history of plant biotechnology: from the Cell Theory of Schleiden and Schwann to biotech crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil, Indra K

    2008-09-01

    Plant biotechnology is founded on the principles of cellular totipotency and genetic transformation, which can be traced back to the Cell Theory of Matthias Jakob Schleiden and Theodor Schwann, and the discovery of genetic transformation in bacteria by Frederick Griffith, respectively. On the 25th anniversary of the genetic transformation of plants, this review provides a historical account of the evolution of the theoretical concepts and experimental strategies that led to the production and commercialization of biotech (transformed or transgenic) plants expressing many useful genes, and emphasizes the beneficial effects of plant biotechnology on food security, human health, the environment, and conservation of biodiversity. In so doing, it celebrates and pays tribute to the contributions of scores of scientists who laid the foundation of modern plant biotechnology by their bold and unconventional thinking and experimentation. It highlights also the many important lessons to be learnt from the fascinating history of plant biotechnology, the significance of history in science teaching and research, and warns against the danger of the growing trends of ignoring history and historical illiteracy.

  3. Next biotech plants: new traits, crops, developers and technologies for addressing global challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricroch, Agnès E; Hénard-Damave, Marie-Cécile

    2016-08-01

    Most of the genetically modified (GM) plants currently commercialized encompass a handful of crop species (soybean, corn, cotton and canola) with agronomic characters (traits) directed against some biotic stresses (pest resistance, herbicide tolerance or both) and created by multinational companies. The same crops with agronomic traits already on the market today will continue to be commercialized, but there will be also a wider range of species with combined traits. The timeframe anticipated for market release of the next biotech plants will not only depend on science progress in research and development (R&D) in laboratories and fields, but also primarily on how demanding regulatory requirements are in countries where marketing approvals are pending. Regulatory constraints, including environmental and health impact assessments, have increased significantly in the past decades, delaying approvals and increasing their costs. This has sometimes discouraged public research entities and small and medium size plant breeding companies from using biotechnology and given preference to other technologies, not as stringently regulated. Nevertheless, R&D programs are flourishing in developing countries, boosted by the necessity to meet the global challenges that are food security of a booming world population while mitigating climate change impacts. Biotechnology is an instrument at the service of these imperatives and a wide variety of plants are currently tested for their high yield despite biotic and abiotic stresses. Many plants with higher water or nitrogen use efficiency, tolerant to cold, salinity or water submergence are being developed. Food security is not only a question of quantity but also of quality of agricultural and food products, to be available and accessible for the ones who need it the most. Many biotech plants (especially staple food) are therefore being developed with nutritional traits, such as biofortification in vitamins and metals. The main

  4. Insect-resistant biotech crops and their impacts on beneficial arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatehouse, A. M. R.; Ferry, N.; Edwards, M. G.; Bell, H. A.

    2011-01-01

    With a projected population of 10 billion by 2050, an immediate priority for agriculture is to achieve increased crop yields in a sustainable and cost-effective way. The concept of using a transgenic approach was realized in the mid-1990s with the commercial introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops. By 2010, the global value of the seed alone was US $11.2 billion, with commercial biotech maize, soya bean grain and cotton valued at approximately US $150 billion. In recent years, it has become evident that insect-resistant crops expressing δ-endotoxin genes from Bacillus thuringiensis have made a significant beneficial impact on global agriculture, not least in terms of pest reduction and improved quality. However, because of the potential for pest populations to evolve resistance, and owing to lack of effective control of homopteran pests, alternative strategies are being developed. Some of these are based on Bacillus spp. or other insect pathogens, while others are based on the use of plant- and animal-derived genes. However, if such approaches are to play a useful role in crop protection, it is desirable that they do not have a negative impact on beneficial organisms at higher trophic levels thus affecting the functioning of the agro-ecosystem. This widely held concern over the ecological impacts of GM crops has led to the extensive examination of the potential effects of a range of transgene proteins on non-target and beneficial insects. The findings to date with respect to both commercial and experimental GM crops expressing anti-insect genes are discussed here, with particular emphasis on insect predators and parasitoids. PMID:21444317

  5. Insect-resistant biotech crops and their impacts on beneficial arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatehouse, A M R; Ferry, N; Edwards, M G; Bell, H A

    2011-05-12

    With a projected population of 10 billion by 2050, an immediate priority for agriculture is to achieve increased crop yields in a sustainable and cost-effective way. The concept of using a transgenic approach was realized in the mid-1990s with the commercial introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops. By 2010, the global value of the seed alone was US $11.2 billion, with commercial biotech maize, soya bean grain and cotton valued at approximately US $150 billion. In recent years, it has become evident that insect-resistant crops expressing δ-endotoxin genes from Bacillus thuringiensis have made a significant beneficial impact on global agriculture, not least in terms of pest reduction and improved quality. However, because of the potential for pest populations to evolve resistance, and owing to lack of effective control of homopteran pests, alternative strategies are being developed. Some of these are based on Bacillus spp. or other insect pathogens, while others are based on the use of plant- and animal-derived genes. However, if such approaches are to play a useful role in crop protection, it is desirable that they do not have a negative impact on beneficial organisms at higher trophic levels thus affecting the functioning of the agro-ecosystem. This widely held concern over the ecological impacts of GM crops has led to the extensive examination of the potential effects of a range of transgene proteins on non-target and beneficial insects. The findings to date with respect to both commercial and experimental GM crops expressing anti-insect genes are discussed here, with particular emphasis on insect predators and parasitoids.

  6. Judicial activism, the Biotech Directive and its institutional implications – Is the Court acting as a legislator or a court when defining the ‘human embryo’?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faeh, Andrea Beata

    2015-01-01

    The Court of Justice of the European Union (Court) delivered a preliminary ruling in 2011 in the case of Oliver Brüstle v Greenpeace on the interpretation of Article 6(2) of the Biotech Directive and thereby established an autonomous concept of the term ‘human embryo’. The Brüstle decision raises...

  7. Explaining ICT Infrastructure and E-Commerce Uses and Benefits in Industrial Clusters-Evidence from a Biotech Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; Steinfield, Charles

    2006-01-01

    in an industrial cluster might utilize and derive benefit from a public, broadband ICT infrastructure, particularly in support of e-commerce applications. A case study of a successful biotech cluster in Denamrk and Sweden-The Medicon Valley-provides a preliminary test of these expectations. Distinctions in uses...... and benefits based upon firm size are considered. A key finding is that small firms that would not otherwise be expected to gain from global e-commerce can rely on the cluster "brand" to enable trade with unknown and distant partners.......The literature on Industrial Clusters has not focused heavely on the role of the ICT infrastructure, nor on the potentail implications of electronic commerce. In this paper, we examine the theoretical bases for bringing these research streams together, and develop expectations for how firms...

  8. Accumulation and Circulation of the Knowledge Needed for Biotech Business Promotion by Engineers of R&D Section in an IT Enterprise: The Case of Hitachi Software Engineering Co., Ltd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Ota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Much research has been carried out on the accumulation and effective use of knowledge as a company-specific form of intellectual property. However, insufficient attention has been given to research focusing on the effects of micro-level knowledge absorption and its effective use. In this paper, we try to demonstrate what should be done in order to promote new biotech business from the perspective of each engineer’s knowledge, through a micro-level investigation focusing on the life science business section of one IT enterprise. Based on the results of a questionnaire survey of engineers, interviews of several engineers, and patent data analysis, we discuss the progress of the biotech business in an IT enterprise from the aspect of accumulation and circulation of knowledge in a core technology field, the IT business, and a technology field of new entry, the biotech business. This paper reports that the positive growth cycle of biotech business promotion in an IT enterprise, using Hitachi Software Engineering Co., Ltd. as a case, attained by incorporating the latest biotech knowledge from junior engineers and utilizing IT knowledge from middle engineers leads to the recruiting of qualified students.Keywords: accumulation and circulation of the knowledge, biotech business, open innovation, patent data analysis, questionnaire survey

  9. What affects the innovation performance of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the biotechnology industry? An empirical study on Korean biotech SMEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung-Nam; Lee, Yoon-Sik

    2008-10-01

    Research-intensive small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) play a crucial role in the advancement of the biotechnology industry. This paper explored the impacts of internal and contextual variables on innovative activity in Korea and compared the results of this analysis with previous studies of other countries. Our analysis of 149 Korean biotech SMEs showed that the ratio of R&D expenditure to sales, the ratio of R&D employees to total employees, CEO characteristics, governmental support and international networking are positively correlated with a firm's innovation performance. The results may help decision makers to better foster SMEs in the Korean biotechnology industry.

  10. Public administration and R&D localisation by pharmaceutical and biotech companies: a theoretical framework and the Italian case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jommi, Claudio; Paruzzolo, Silvia

    2007-04-01

    This article has two objectives. It firstly provides a general framework for variables that influence R&D (Research and Development) localisation by pharmaceutical and biotech companies. The analysis of R&D localization includes both in-house R&D and contracted R&D. Following a systematic literature search, these variables were classified into four distinct categories: regulatory environment, institutional framework, national systems of innovation and local development and specialisation. The authors highlight that some of these factors directly depend on the action of public administrations (e.g., patent protection, price regulation, public investments in research, and incentives to private companies); others are indirectly influenced by public policies (e.g., GDP growth rate, infrastructures). This theoretical framework was used to analyse the Italian case-study. Pros and cons of the Italian context were investigated from the point of view of multinational pharmaceutical companies and the Italian Association of Biotech Companies. Interviews were chosen as the most appropriate data gathering technique given the exploratory nature of the study of the Italian context. The paper is divided into five parts. A brief introduction provides figures showing that Europe has been loosing positions compared with other Continents and the same has occurred in Italy compared with other EU countries. The second one illustrates the methodology. The third one is focused on variables affecting R&D localisation. In the fourth section the Italian case-study is discussed. Theoretical and empirical findings are summarised and discussed in the conclusions.

  11. Plant Biotech Lab Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tant, Carl

    This book provides laboratory experiments to enhance any food science/botany curriculum. Chapter 1, "Introduction," presents a survey of the techniques used in plant biotechnology laboratory procedures. Chapter 2, "Micronutrition," discusses media and nutritional requirements for tissue culture studies. Chapter 3, "Sterile Seeds," focuses on the…

  12. The present state of research and exploitation of biotech (GM) crops in horticulture: results of research on plum cv. 'HoneySweet' resistant to plum pox virus (Sharka) and the deregulation of this cultivar in the CR & Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentically modified (GM) crops were grown world-wide on 160 million ha in 2011. Only 114.57 ha of GM crops were grown in Europe, of that, 114.90 ha were Bt maize and 17 ha were potato for industrial starch production. Commercialization of Biotech crops started in 1995. Currently, developing count...

  13. Rifkin broadens challenge in biotech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M

    1984-07-20

    Jeremy Rifkin has petitioned a U.S. district court, the National Institutes of Health, and the Environmental Protection Agency in a campaign to prevent private companies, as well as universities, from releasing genetically modified organisms into the environment until the possible environmental impact of these experiments has been analyzed. Rifkin is seeking to stop Advanced Genetic Sciences and Cetus Corporation from conducting field tests respectively of modified frost-resistant bacteria and disease-resistant plants. His efforts have already led scientists at Stanford University to postpone voluntarily the planting of corn seed containing recombinant DNA.

  14. Space Biotech: Hindsight, Insight, Foresight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Over the past forty years, microgravity has inspired and enabled applications in a wide range of sectors including medicine, materials, computers, communications, and national defense. Trends show that demand for high-tech solutions is increasing in these sectors, solutions that require higher resolution, greater precision, novel materials, innovative processes, and more sophisticated tools. These are areas where microgravity can offer unique capabilities for innovation. The Emerging Space Office (ESO) has engaged in multiple studies over the past year that have found that microgravity RD is one of the most promising technology areas for contributing to economic growth and to NASAs mission. The focus of these studies was on terrestrial markets rather than NASA applications, applied research rather than basic research, and commercial rather than academic investigators. There have been more success stories than are generally appreciated and there are significant areas of promising future potential. Many of the problems that have limited commercial microgravity development in the past are being solved. Microgravity research and development (RD) requires iteration and learning, as rapidly as possible. New technologies enable high throughput and rapid data collection in increasingly small payloads. The International Space Station is in orbit and provides a laboratory that is available 247 at least until 2024. Frequent flights by commercial space providers to and from the ISS now enable the fast learning cycles needed by high-tech industries. Launch costs are decreasing and the ability to return payloads to Earth is increasing. New commercial space laboratories, such as those being developed by SpaceX and Bigelow Aerospace, are in the final stages of development and testing. This ecosystem for microgravity RD has never been available before. These are game-changer conditions for attracting high-tech industries to space for terrestrial, as well as NASA, applications. However, few know that these capabilities are available or how to use them. In aggregate, the potential value for new applications from microgravity RD over the next ten years could add billions of dollars per year in terrestrial applications to the future economy, create new jobs, and generate a wide range of public benefits in medical advances, while broadening the customer base for the emerging space industry.

  15. PHP-HT (VitaResc Biotech).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, A; Wiley, E

    2001-04-01

    VitaResc (formerly Apex) is developing PHP-HT, pyridoxalated hemoglobin polyoxyethylene conjugate, for the potential treatment of nitric oxide-induced shock (characterized by hypotension), associated with various etiologies, initially in septic shock. A phase I safety study and an initial phase I/II patient trial for NO-induced shock have been completed, and VitaResc has enrolled patients in three of five planned cohorts in a continuation of these trials to include a protocol of continuous infusion and dose escalation [330680,349187,390918]. The results from the dose escalation trials are expected to provide the basis for a randomized, controlled phase II/III pivotal trial of PHP-HT [390918]. VitaResc has licensed PHP-HT exclusively from Ajinomoto for all indications, worldwide, except Japan [275263]. Ajinomoto originally developed the human derived and chemically modified hemoglobin preparation as a blood substitute, but no development has been reported by the company since 1997 [275277,303577]. The other potential indications of PHP-HT include shock associated with burns, pancreatitis, hemodialysis and cytokine therapies [275277]. VitaResc expects the annual market potential of PHP-HT to exceed 1 billion dollars [330680].

  16. Communicating financials in the biotech industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte

    2008-01-01

    , Novozymes. Research indicates that besides accommodating a legal demand for the disclosure of company financial details, the annual report, in particular the letter to the shareholders or the CEO's letter, serves the purpose of marketing the company to its constituents (Bowman 1984; Bülow-Møller 2003...... discourse. In this context, the rhetorical appeals of rationality, credibility and affect play an important role. Further, the New Rhetorical focus on audience, involving the concept of ‘presence', as well Conceptual Metaphor Theory's focus on metaphor's cognitive and functional qualities yields useful...

  17. Structure, Employment and Performance in Biotech Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Finn; Dahlgren, Johan Henrich; Lund Jensen, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    This report studies employment effects associated with the adoption of modern biotechnology in Danish industry. In this context we also examine industry structure, patterns of job creation, key outputs such as patents and the pipeline of projects in clinical trials. To see the development of Danish...... economy to perform in the transition towards knowledge and sciencebased competitiveness. That is so because DDFs to an unusual extent depend on the ability of their framework to perform as an innovation system, by which we refer to advantages growing out of interactions and complementarities between e.......g. universities, firms and venture capital. That makes DDFs a sensitive "seismograph" for the ability of the Danish innovation system to foster new science-based technologies.Key words: Employment, Biotechnology, Firm size distribution, Industry structure,Firm performanceJEL Codes: J21, L11, L22, L25, L65, O57...

  18. IDC perspectives on biotech SMME development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fourie, Christo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This presentation discusses the focus areas of the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC), and what the IDC has achieved in terms of technology development and commercialization, especially in Biotechnology. It also focuses on future technology...

  19. agri-biotech applications' biosafety initiative

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    these workshops are: Mexico, Costa Rica, in Mexico being the recipient, Monsanto (USA). Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Brazil, technology donor, and Rockefeller Foundation. Malaysia, Thailand, the People's Republic of financial donor; (4) training of a Mexican. China, Indonesia and the Philippines. scientist in the USA in ...

  20. Biotech Information-Sharing Memorandum of Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA, FDA, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Biotechnology Regulatory Services share the regulatory oversight over genetically engineered plants and the foods derived from such plants.

  1. Communicating Biotech Advances: Fiction versus Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małyska, Aleksandra; Bolla, Robert; Twardowski, Tomasz

    2018-02-01

    Bioscience novels use selected technologies of genetic engineering and synthetic biology to create entertaining stories. These novels are usually based on scientific knowledge, but they may arouse public concerns about technology and drive public reluctance to accept innovative technologies. The scientific community must adopt more efficient communication and transparency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The new era of biotech insulin analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange, J

    1997-07-01

    Many of the structural properties of insulin have evolved in response to the requirements of biosynthesis, processing, transport and storage in the pancreatic beta cells, properties that are not necessary for the biological action of the hormone. It is therefore not surprising that wild-type insulin has far from optimal characteristics for replacement therapy. For example, native human insulin self-associates to hexameric units, which limits the possibilities for the absorption of the molecule by various routes. During the last decade new techniques of molecular design have emerged and recombinant DNA technology offers new and exciting opportunities for rational protein drug design. This review describes examples of recent advances in insulin engineering aimed at optimizing the hormone for therapy. Such approaches focus on improvements in the pharmacokinetic properties, storage stability, and feasibility for less intrusive routes of administration.

  3. Outlook: directed development: catalysing a global biotech industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Anthony; Perkins, Tom

    2005-09-01

    Governments are increasingly relying on directed development tools or proactive public-policy approaches to stimulate scientific and economic development for their biotechnology industries. This article will discuss the four main tools of directed development in biotechnology and the lessons learned from current global efforts utilizing these tools.

  4. Careers at Biotech Start-Ups and in Entrepreneurship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froshauer, Susan

    2017-11-01

    The world of biotechnology "start-ups" and entrepreneurship offers exciting new avenues for driving state-of-the-art research using an arsenal of multidisciplinary skills, whether your role is as part of a team or as a leader. Although traditionally these positions may not be as secure as those offered by some of the larger companies, the small start-up culture provides opportunities for contributing at many levels to a wide range of responsibilities: from scientific discovery to delivery of proof of concept and intellectual property; from analysis of market opportunities and competitive intelligence to creation of time lines and business plans for a first product. Often, if you get in on the ground level, you get to validate your own concept, pitch to potential investors, argue value, build a team, engage advisors, and then, with funding in hand, launch an entirely new research and development (R&D) enterprise. Many of the skills and much of the experience gained while pursuing a graduate degree can be put to good use in these arenas as well. This path, however, is not for the faint of heart; it requires not only a strong scientific background and organizational skills, but also the ability to work well on a team, excellent communication skills, and persistence when faced with delays or disappointment. With increasing responsibilities in the small company come the requirements for aptitudes for leadership, strategic and financial planning, networking, negotiating, and managing both projects and personnel. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  5. Licensing biotech intellectual property in university-industry partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdoff, Vladimir; Fairbairn, Daryl

    2015-01-20

    Appropriate negotiation and drafting of license agreements are critical to successfully establishing and managing the expansive and complex relationships that are becoming more common between industry and universities. More often than not, the resulting licensing agreements become quite lengthy and complex, and the key principles become difficult to discern among all the details. This summary provides a short, nonexhaustive introduction to some of the essential components of these licenses with the intent of providing the non-licensing professional a better appreciation of some of the key commercial and legal terms from both an academic and company perspective, keeping in mind some of the considerations that particularly apply to biotechnology deals. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  6. THE ROLE OF BIOTECH:'\\OLOGY IN CROP IMPROVEMENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    The isolation of cell or protoplast. culture media and regeneration of plants under each kind ... with 3% sucrose and agar was used to germinate embryos of several .'vfc111ihot .... Should invest in m J.:m b "':echnology research in agriculture such ... R ibon~1cle1c acid-Aids in protein synthesis of transrer and mcssen;cr Ri\\.

  7. Nig J. Biotech. Vol. 21 (2010) 35 – 40

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    Available online at ... and the beverage has been drunk there for the past 2000 – 3000 ... market is embracing other types of tea that are made ... The mineral contents of the .... after the birth of a child (Swerdlow, 2000). ... In: Analysis of Foods.

  8. Establishing a biotech-modern-agriculture for China | Zhengbin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    China, with a large population and small amount of arable land, is a populous as well as a large agricultural country. In order to ensure food security, agricultural sustainable development and prosperity of agriculture economy, modern agriculture based on biotechnology combined with modern equipment must be ...

  9. Evaluation and Audience Acceptance in Biotech News Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte; Vestergaard, Torben

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that news texts are not value neutral and that in these texts even genuinely factual statements can function as evaluations. Hence, only an analysis of the types of evaluation used will reveal the true picture of the attitudinal import of reporting texts. The paper explores...... these features by analysing the coverage of the biotechnology debate in one of the largest Danish newspapers, Politiken, during the first 9 months of 2004. The aim of this analysis is to uncover how seemingly objective and ‘neutral' accounts of events and state of affairs can be used by journalists...

  10. Frugal Biotech Applications of Low-Temperature Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machala, Zdenko; Graves, David B

    2017-09-01

    Gas discharge low-temperature air plasma can be utilized for a variety of applications, including biomedical, at low cost. We term these applications 'frugal plasma' - an example of frugal innovation. We demonstrate how simple, robust, low-cost frugal plasma devices can be used to safely disinfect instruments, surfaces, and water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cleanroom energy benchmarking in high-tech and biotech industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschudi, William; Benschine, Kathleen; Fok, Stephen; Rumsey, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Cleanrooms, critical to a wide range of industries, universities, and government facilities, are extremely energy intensive. Consequently, energy represents a significant operating cost for these facilities. Improving energy efficiency in cleanrooms will yield dramatic productivity improvement. But more importantly to the industries which rely on cleanrooms, base load reduction will also improve reliability. The number of cleanrooms in the US is growing and the cleanroom environmental systems' energy use is increasing due to increases in total square footage and trends toward more energy intensive, higher cleanliness applications. In California, many industries important to the State's economy utilize cleanrooms. In California these industries utilize over 150 cleanrooms with a total of 4.2 million sq. ft. (McIlvaine). Energy intensive high tech buildings offer an attractive incentive for large base load energy reduction. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvement exist in virtually all operating cleanrooms as well as in new designs. To understand the opportunities and their potential impact, Pacific Gas and Electric Company sponsored a project to benchmark energy use in cleanrooms in the electronics (high-tech) and biotechnology industries. Both of these industries are heavily dependent intensive cleanroom environments for research and manufacturing. In California these two industries account for approximately 3.6 million sq. ft. of cleanroom (McIlvaine, 1996) and 4349 GWh/yr. (Sartor et al. 1999). Little comparative energy information on cleanroom environmental systems was previously available. Benchmarking energy use allows direct comparisons leading to identification of best practices, efficiency innovations, and highlighting previously masked design or operational problems

  12. Biotechnology regulation: limiting or contributing to biotech development?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Grethe

    2001-01-01

    to the European arena, their role and extension are still an issue. In this paper, the often anticipated innovation-inhibiting effects of regulation are questioned by giving an account of regulations and debates in Denmark. An account which includes the shifting positions of industry, the research community......Modern biotechnology has been characterized by being surrounded by scientific and public debate and by interest conflicts. An early Danish debate and regulation has been criticized for inhibiting or retarding development and thus growth. Though much regulation and debate have been transferred...

  13. What Hold us Together? Analyzing Biotech Field Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackeline Amantino de Andrade

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes to analyze the formation of biotechnological field bringing actor-network theory’s lens as contribution. Based on conclusions of studies developed by Walter Powell and colleagues it was held a research to analyze the diversity of institutional relations that are active by hemophilia therapies, the principle of generalized symmetry adopted for actor-network theory is highlight to identify how socio-technical associations are assembled. Besides the interorganizational relations, research’s findings indicate the scientific and technological contents have a significant mediating role to create and sustain those connections of knowledge. So, it is emphasized the need of a boarder theoretical discussion to enlarge explanations about the dynamics of organizational fields as well as innovation processes.

  14. The industrial application requirement for biotech inventions in light of recent EPO & UK case law:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo; Nilsson, David

    2012-01-01

    In this study we illuminate and discuss the most recent developments in respect of the interpretation of the “industrial application” requirement with respect to gene and protein related inventions in Europe. The analysis will focus on the relevant provisions of the EPC and decisional practice from...... the European Patent Organisation (“EPO”), particularly decisions from the Technical Board of Appeal 3.3.08 (the “Board”). To get a glimpse of the national dimension, we will also look at the first patent judgment from the "new" UK Supreme Court, i.e. the groundbreaking decision in HGS v Eli Lilly, In the final...... discussion, we will elaborate on two issues in particular; (i) determine which types of qualities an invention should have in order to meet the industrial application requirement in the first place; and (ii) what type of evidence an applicant is expected to present in respect of (potential) applications...

  15. Validation of cross-contamination control in biological safety cabinet for biotech/pharmaceutical manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shih-Cheng; Shiue, Angus; Tu, Jin-Xin; Liu, Han-Yang; Chiu, Rong-Ben

    2015-12-01

    For class II, type A2 biological safety cabinets (BSC), NSF/ANSI Standard 49 should be conformed in cabinet airflow velocity derivation, particle contamination, and aerodynamic flow properties. However, there exists a potential problem. It has been built that the cabinet air flow stabilize is influenced by the quantity of downflow of air and the height above the cabinet exhaust opening. Three air downflow quantities were compared as an operating apparatus was placed from 20 to 40 cm above the bench of the cabinet. The results show that the BSC air downflow velocity is a function of increased sampling height, displaying that containment is improvingly permitted over product protection as the sampling height decreases. This study investigated the concentration gradient of particles at various heights and downflow air quantity from the bench of the BSC. Experiment results indicate that performance near the bench was better than in the rest of the BSC. In terms of height, the best cleanliness was measured at a height of 10 cm over the bench; it reduced actually with add in height. The empirical curves accommodate, founded on the concentration gradient of particle created was elaborated for evaluating the particle concentration at different heights and downflow air quantity from the source of the bench of the BSC. The particle image velocimetry system applied for BSC airflow research to fix amount of airflow patterns and air distribution measurement and results of measurements show how obstructions can greatly influence the airflow and contaminant transportation in a BSC.

  16. Process-driven information management system at a biotech company: concept and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, Alberto; Funeriu, Sandra; Ioannou, John; Wang, Jinyi; Lee, Man-Ling; Palmer, Chris; Bamford, Bob; Hewitt, Robin

    2004-01-01

    While established pharmaceutical companies have chemical information systems in place to manage their compounds and the associated data, new startup companies need to implement these systems from scratch. Decisions made early in the design phase usually have long lasting effects on the expandability, maintenance effort, and costs associated with the information management system. Careful analysis of work and data flows, both inter- and intradepartmental, and identification of existing dependencies between activities are important. This knowledge is required to implement an information management system, which enables the research community to work efficiently by avoiding redundant registration and processing of data and by timely provision of the data whenever needed. This paper first presents the workflows existing at Anadys, then ARISE, the research information management system developed in-house at Anadys. ARISE was designed to support the preclinical drug discovery process and covers compound registration, analytical quality control, inventory management, high-throughput screening, lower throughput screening, and data reporting.

  17. The Sociology of the Gene: Genetics and Education on the Eve of the Biotech Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkin, Jeremy

    1998-01-01

    Researchers in molecular biology are discovering an increasing genetic basis for a wide range of mental diseases, moods, behaviors, and personality traits. Findings are creating the context for a new sociobiology favoring a genetic interpretation of human motivations and drives. Genetic engineering will give some people unprecedented power over…

  18. 2012 in review - part II: overcoming the obstacles in the pharma/biotech industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabasseda, X; Dulsat, C; Navarro, D; Cruces, E; Graul, A I; Jago, C; Tracy, M

    2013-02-01

    As highlighted in the first part of this review published last month, the year 2012 saw the approval of a remarkable number of new drugs, and among the new drugs reaching the market, a significant proportion were orphan drugs developed for treating less prevalent diseases. These drugs are certainly not expected to become blockbusters, but are of high interest because of their efficacy in a narrow spectrum of patients. This trend aligns with the general tendency of staying away from fit-for-all blockbusters into personalized medicine as one of the strategies for overcoming the patent cliff that resulted in a long list of drugs going off patent and being approved as generics also during last year. The emerging scenario resulting from new developments in the form of new drugs and biosimilars and newly available generic medications paralleled by strategic movements within the pharmaceutical industry to reinforce their position in the market, as reflected by merger and acquisition deals accompanied by significant efforts into prioritization resulting in spin-off and split transactions, is reviewed in this second part. This paper includes a significant amount of data in tables for quick review and to profile the new strategic movements in drug pipelines. Further information, including details on mechanisms of action, current status, itemized pharmacology, pharmacokinetic and clinical trial research findings and updated information can be found in the proprietary databases Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM) and Thomson Reuters Cortellis™. Copyright 2013 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  19. Who benefits from gm crops? Feeding the biotech giants, not the world's poor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Villar, J.; Freese, B.; Holder, H.; Chandrasekaran, K.; Rodriguez, L.

    2009-02-15

    The biotechnology industry has aggressively touted GM as a solution to hunger and the global food crisis. Their arguments have been accepted by many politicians. This Friends of the Earth International (FoEI) report looks behind the spin and exposes the reasons why GM crops cannot, and are unlikely to ever, contribute to poverty reduction, global food security or sustainable farming (authors' abstract)

  20. Blueprints for green biotech: development and application of standards for plant synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patron, Nicola J

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology aims to apply engineering principles to the design and modification of biological systems and to the construction of biological parts and devices. The ability to programme cells by providing new instructions written in DNA is a foundational technology of the field. Large-scale de novo DNA synthesis has accelerated synthetic biology by offering custom-made molecules at ever decreasing costs. However, for large fragments and for experiments in which libraries of DNA sequences are assembled in different combinations, assembly in the laboratory is still desirable. Biological assembly standards allow DNA parts, even those from multiple laboratories and experiments, to be assembled together using the same reagents and protocols. The adoption of such standards for plant synthetic biology has been cohesive for the plant science community, facilitating the application of genome editing technologies to plant systems and streamlining progress in large-scale, multi-laboratory bioengineering projects. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. Research in Undergraduate Instruction: A Biotech Lab Project for Recombinant DNA Protein Expression in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockman, Mark; Ordman, Alfred B.; Campbell, A. Malcolm

    1996-06-01

    In the sophomore-level Molecular Biology and Biotechnology course at Beloit College, students learn basic methods in molecular biology in the context of pursuing a semester-long original research project. We are exploring how DNA sequence affects expression levels of proteins. A DNA fragment encoding all or part of the guanylate monokinase (gmk) sequence is cloned into pSP73 and expressed in E. coli. A monoclonal antibody is made to gmk. The expression level of gmk is determined by SDS gel elctrophoresis, a Western blot, and an ELISA assay. Over four years, an increase in enrollment in the course from 9 to 34 students, the 85% of majors pursuing advanced degrees, and course evaluations all support the conclusion that involving students in research during undergraduate courses encourages them to pursue careers in science.

  2. Additive Biotech-Chances, challenges, and recent applications of additive manufacturing technologies in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krujatz, Felix; Lode, Anja; Seidel, Julia; Bley, Thomas; Gelinsky, Michael; Steingroewer, Juliane

    2017-10-25

    The diversity and complexity of biotechnological applications are constantly increasing, with ever expanding ranges of production hosts, cultivation conditions and measurement tasks. Consequently, many analytical and cultivation systems for biotechnology and bioprocess engineering, such as microfluidic devices or bioreactors, are tailor-made to precisely satisfy the requirements of specific measurements or cultivation tasks. Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies offer the possibility of fabricating tailor-made 3D laboratory equipment directly from CAD designs with previously inaccessible levels of freedom in terms of structural complexity. This review discusses the historical background of these technologies, their most promising current implementations and the associated workflows, fabrication processes and material specifications, together with some of the major challenges associated with using AM in biotechnology/bioprocess engineering. To illustrate the great potential of AM, selected examples in microfluidic devices, 3D-bioprinting/biofabrication and bioprocess engineering are highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Scientific Advances with Aspergillus Species that Are Used for Food and Biotech Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesebeke, Rob Te; Record, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Yeast and filamentous fungi have been used for centuries in diverse biotechnological processes. Fungal fermentation technology is traditionally used in relation to food production, such as for bread, beer, cheese, sake and soy sauce. Last century, the industrial application of yeast and filamentous fungi expanded rapidly, with excellent examples such as purified enzymes and secondary metabolites (e.g. antibiotics), which are used in a wide range of food as well as non-food industries. Research on protein and/or metabolite secretion by fungal species has focused on identifying bottlenecks in (post-) transcriptional regulation of protein production, metabolic rerouting, morphology and the transit of proteins through the secretion pathway. In past years, genome sequencing of some fungi (e.g. Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus niger) has been completed. The available genome sequences have enabled identification of genes and functionally important regions of the genome. This has directed research to focus on a post-genomics era in which transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics methodologies will help to explore the scientific relevance and industrial application of fungal genome sequences.

  4. The global competition for talent: Life science and biotech careers, international mobility, and competitiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuvik, A.N.

    2015-01-01

    This study argues that skilled human mobility and specifically that for occupations linked to innovation, such as for science and technology, has undergone a rapid and continuing internationalization. This change has theoretical implications and requires a greater merging of theories in diverse

  5. Coaching Small Biotech Companies into Success: The Value-adding Function of VC

    OpenAIRE

    Terttu Luukkonen,; Mari Maunula,

    2006-01-01

    The paper reports an empirical study on the non-financial value-added provided by Venture Capital investors to their investee firms. This study will use a four-class grouping of the various non-financial value-adding capabilities provided by VC firms, namely, scouting, monitoring, signalling and value-adding services. The study examines biotechnology industry in Finland. Finland has a dual system with independent (partially ever-green) VC companies and public or semi-public VC organisations. ...

  6. [European Marketing Authorisation: a long process. Experiences of small biotech companies with the ATMP regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljovčić, Z

    2011-07-01

    On 30 December 2008, the Regulation (EC) 1394/2007 on advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) entered into force. Herewith the first EU-wide regulatory framework for ATMPs was established. It requires a central marketing authorisation application to the EMA (European Medicinal Agency). This new framework especially changes the code of regulatory practice for tissue engineered products (TEPs), as no registration procedure had been previously required for autologous TEPs. This also meant that no clinical proof of efficacy achieved by a pivotal clinical trial was necessary. Difficulties and their background as well as the vast requirements for product development that have to be addressed by small companies within a very short time frame are presented. Hereby, it is obvious that regulatory experience which is required to identify and implement the resulting implications was not in place yet and still had to be established. The lack of regulatory experience also resulted in difficulties with scientific advice preparation, expectations toward regulatory agencies, consultants, and transformation of regulatory requirements. Addressing the regulatory requirements within the transition period is even more difficult for entrepreneurs with products which are assigned for indications resulting in complex challenges to the trial design. Due to the enormous time pressure to generate data and due to the implied financial pressure, different adaptation strategies are evolving. In Germany the "hospital exemption" according to §4b AMG (German Medicinal Products Law) is of major importance. A reorientation toward acellular products and a slow down in development of new ATMP products is expected.

  7. Who benefits from gm crops? Feeding the biotech giants, not the world's poor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Villar, J.; Freese, B.; Holder, H.; Chandrasekaran, K.; Rodriguez, L.

    2009-02-01

    The biotechnology industry has aggressively touted GM as a solution to hunger and the global food crisis. Their arguments have been accepted by many politicians. This Friends of the Earth International (FoEI) report looks behind the spin and exposes the reasons why GM crops cannot, and are unlikely to ever, contribute to poverty reduction, global food security or sustainable farming (authors' abstract)

  8. How to practice creative thinking skills through scaffolding on biotech content?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natadiwijaya, I. F.; Rahmat, A.; Redjeki, S.; Anggraeni, S.

    2018-05-01

    Biotechnology content is a more applicative field of science, so learners should be able to have creative thinking skills in applying concepts to problem solving. In this research, Scaffolding learning has been conducted, which is student form of concept development based on constructivism learning paradigm and students build creative thinking skill through the creation of biotechnology product ideas. The research design was R & D method. The subject of this research is a semester V biology education student at Wiralodra University. The instruments used are biotechnology creative thinking tests and program implementation observations. The data of creative thinking test was analyzed using inferential statistic, while the observation sheet used descriptive analysis. The result of this research is the result of students’ creative thinking skill as well as description of the recommended shape and characteristics of the program, with the following results. The scaffolding learning program has a significant influence on students’ creative thinking skill, and the program that trains creative thinking skill is built through two phases, namely phase 1 in concept building where students build their own knowledge, and phase 2 where students build thinking skills creatively through the creation of biotechnology product ideas.

  9. Market entry and exit by biotech and device companies funded by venture capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Lawton R; Housman, Michael G; Robinson, Charles A

    2009-01-01

    Start-up companies in the biotechnology and medical device sectors are important sources of health care innovation. This paper describes the role of venture capital in supporting these companies and charts the growth in venture capital financial support. The paper then uses longitudinal data to describe market entry and exit by these companies. Similar factors are associated with entry and exit in the two sectors. Entries and exits in one sector also appear to influence entry in the other. These findings have important implications for developing innovative technologies and ensuring competitive markets in the life sciences.

  10. A Quantitative PCR-Electrochemical Genosensor Test for the Screening of Biotech Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Moura-Melo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The design of screening methods for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs in food would improve the efficiency in their control. We report here a PCR amplification method combined with a sequence-specific electrochemical genosensor for the quantification of a DNA sequence characteristic of the 35S promoter derived from the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV. Specifically, we employ a genosensor constructed by chemisorption of a thiolated capture probe and p-aminothiophenol gold surfaces to entrap on the sensing layer the unpurified PCR amplicons, together with a signaling probe labeled with fluorescein. The proposed test allows for the determination of a transgene copy number in both hemizygous (maize MON810 trait and homozygous (soybean GTS40-3-2 transformed plants, and exhibits a limit of quantification of at least 0.25% for both kinds of GMO lines.

  11. 2012 AAPS National Biotech Conference Open Forum: a perspective on the current state of immunogenicity prediction and risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajadhyaksha, Manoj; Subramanyam, Meena; Rup, Bonnie

    2013-10-01

    The immunogenicity profile of a biotherapeutic is determined by multiple product-, process- or manufacturing-, patient- and treatment-related factors and the bioanalytical methodology used to monitor for immunogenicity. This creates a complex situation that limits direct correlation of individual factors to observed immunogenicity rates. Therefore, mechanistic understanding of how these factors individually or in concert could influence the overall incidence and clinical risk of immunogenicity is crucial to provide the best benefit/risk profile for a given biotherapeutic in a given indication and to inform risk mitigation strategies. Advances in the field of immunogenicity have included development of best practices for monitoring anti-drug antibody development, categorization of risk factors contributing to immunogenicity, development of predictive tools, and development of effective strategies for risk management and mitigation. Thus, the opportunity to ask "where we are now and where we would like to go from here?" was the main driver for organizing an Open Forum on Improving Immunogenicity Risk Prediction and Management, conducted at the 2012 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists' (AAPS) National Biotechnology Conference in San Diego. The main objectives of the Forum include the following: to understand the nature of immunogenicity risk factors, to identify analytical tools used and animal models and management strategies needed to improve their predictive value, and finally to identify collaboration opportunities to improve the reliability of risk prediction, mitigation, and management. This meeting report provides the Forum participant's and author's perspectives on the barriers to advancing this field and recommendations for overcoming these barriers through collaborative efforts.

  12. Teaching and implementing autonomous robotic lab walkthroughs in a biotech laboratory through model-based visual tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtczyk, Martin; Panin, Giorgio; Röder, Thorsten; Lenz, Claus; Nair, Suraj; Heidemann, Rüdiger; Goudar, Chetan; Knoll, Alois

    2010-01-01

    After utilizing robots for more than 30 years for classic industrial automation applications, service robots form a constantly increasing market, although the big breakthrough is still awaited. Our approach to service robots was driven by the idea of supporting lab personnel in a biotechnology laboratory. After initial development in Germany, a mobile robot platform extended with an industrial manipulator and the necessary sensors for indoor localization and object manipulation, has been shipped to Bayer HealthCare in Berkeley, CA, USA, a global player in the sector of biopharmaceutical products, located in the San Francisco bay area. The determined goal of the mobile manipulator is to support the off-shift staff to carry out completely autonomous or guided, remote controlled lab walkthroughs, which we implement utilizing a recent development of our computer vision group: OpenTL - an integrated framework for model-based visual tracking.

  13. The value of trust in biotech crop development: a case study of Bt cotton in Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezezika Obidimma C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Agricultural biotechnology public-private partnerships (PPPs have been recognized as having great potential in improving agricultural productivity and increasing food production in sub-Saharan Africa. However, there is much public skepticism about the use of GM (genetically modified crops and suspicion about private sector involvement in agbiotech projects. This case study sought to understand the role of trust in the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt cotton in Burkina Faso project by exploring practices and challenges associated with trust-building, and determining what makes these practices effective from the perspective of multiple stakeholders. Methods We conducted semi-structured, face-to-face interviews to obtain stakeholders’ understanding of trust in general as well as in the context of agbiotech PPPs. Relevant documents and articles were analyzed to generate descriptions of how trust was operationalized in this evolving agbiotech PPP. Data was analyzed based on emergent themes to create a comprehensive narrative on how trust is understood and built among the partners and with the community. Results We derived four key lessons from our findings. First, strong collaboration between research, industry and farmers greatly contributes to both the success of, and fostering of trust in, the partnership. Second, this case study also revealed the important, though often unrecognized, role of researchers as players in the communication strategy of the project. Third, effective and comprehensive communication takes into account issues such as illiteracy and diversity. Fourth, follow-up at the field level and the need for a multifaceted communications strategy is important for helping push the project forward. Conclusions Burkina Faso’s well-established and effective cotton selling system laid the foundation for the implementation of the Bt cotton project – particularly, the strong dialogue and the receptivity to collaboration. Interviewees reported that establishing and maintaining trust among partners, researchers and the community in Burkina Faso greatly contributed to the success of the PPP. By addressing challenges to building trust and engaging in trust-building practices early on, improvements in the effectiveness of agbiotech PPPs are likely.

  14. R&D INTENSITY AND IPO UNDERPRICING: CASE STUDY ON PHARMACEUTICAL AND BIOTECH INDUSTRIES IN THE US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy C. Efrata

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric information between the issuer to potential investors believed by some academics in finance as one of the main causes of the phenomenon of underpricing at the time of the initial public offering (IPO. On science and technology-based company main problem lies in how to conduct assessments on the future value of a product that is still in the development stage. The issue became more prominent on pharmaceutical companies and biotechnology, due to the characteristics of this industry is the high expense, complex process, and the lengthy process of research and development (R & D of a product. This study describes the characteristics above is associated with the phenomenon of underpricing when companies conduct IPO. The samples are 82 pharmaceutical companies and biotechnology conduct IPO in the United States stock market in 1998-2005. The results of this study revealed a negative correlation between the intensity of R & D and IPO underpricing phenomenon in this industry. These studies have identified R & D as the main source of information asymmetry that led to the phenomenon of underpricing for pharmaceutical companies and biotechnology.

  15. Analytical criteria for performance characteristics of IgE binding methods for evaluating safety of biotech food products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhauser, Thomas; van Ree, Ronald; Poulsen, Lars K.; Bannon, Gary A.

    2008-01-01

    There is detailed guidance on how to perform bioinformatic analyses and enzymatic degradation studies for genetically modified crops under consideration for approval by regulatory agencies; however, there is no consensus in the scientific community on the details of how to perform IgE serum studies.

  16. Electrochemical sensor for multiplex screening of genetically modified DNA: identification of biotech crops by logic-based biomolecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Ching; Chuang, Min-Chieh; Ho, Ja-An Annie

    2013-12-15

    Genetically modified (GM) technique, one of the modern biomolecular engineering technologies, has been deemed as profitable strategy to fight against global starvation. Yet rapid and reliable analytical method is deficient to evaluate the quality and potential risk of such resulting GM products. We herein present a biomolecular analytical system constructed with distinct biochemical activities to expedite the computational detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The computational mechanism provides an alternative to the complex procedures commonly involved in the screening of GMOs. Given that the bioanalytical system is capable of processing promoter, coding and species genes, affirmative interpretations succeed to identify specified GM event in terms of both electrochemical and optical fashions. The biomolecular computational assay exhibits detection capability of genetically modified DNA below sub-nanomolar level and is found interference-free by abundant coexistence of non-GM DNA. This bioanalytical system, furthermore, sophisticates in array fashion operating multiplex screening against variable GM events. Such a biomolecular computational assay and biosensor holds great promise for rapid, cost-effective, and high-fidelity screening of GMO. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Where to implement local biotech innovations? A framework for multi-scale socio-economic and environmental impact assessment of Green Bio-Refineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cong, Ronggang; Stefaniak, Irena; Madsen, Bjarne

    2017-01-01

    Green Bio-Refineries (GBRs) have economic and environmental potentials through changing land use from cereals to grass production and provision of grass-based protein feed for livestock production and other valuable byproducts. However, the potentials are dependent on local conditions of the GBRs...

  18. Current barriers, challenges and opportunities for the development of effective STI vaccines: point of view of vaccine producers, biotech companies and funding agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodet, Betty

    2014-03-20

    Several barriers limit the development of vaccines against sexually transmitted diseases (STIs). Critical scientific information is missing that makes the feasibility and the likelihood of success of vaccines against genital herpes, chlamydia, gonorrhea and trichomonas uncertain: the immunity induced by natural infection is absent or imperfect which seriously limits the capacity to define the types of immune responses that an effective vaccine must induce. Reliable animal models are lacking and a number of crucial clinical questions are still unanswered about the goal of these vaccines and definition of endpoints for clinical trials. In the absence of a clear recognition of the need for vaccines against these diseases, there is no motivation for public or private research and industry to invest in the development of vaccines against STIs. The STI burden should be evaluated not only in terms of mortality and morbidity, but also in terms of economic and psycho-social impact. A global public-private consortium could mobilize the joint efforts of all stakeholders involved in the research, development and implementation of STI vaccines of the public and private sectors; ensure that sufficient resources are applied to R&D of vaccines against these STIs; and provide the pull-push forces that are necessary to overcome the barriers to develop safe and effective vaccines against these diseases. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Sectoral Innovatiohn Performance in the Biotechnology Sector. Final Report. Task 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enzing, C.M.; Valk, T. van der

    2010-01-01

    In general the biotechnology sector can be qualified as a science driven and high tech sector. This applies for both the group of biotech start-ups that are present in each of the three sub-sectors (red biotech: health/pharma, green biotech: agrifood and white biotech: chemicals) as for the red

  20. Assessment of Biotechnology Policies and International Trade in Key Markets for U.S. Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Marchant, Mary A.; Song, Baohui

    2005-01-01

    The United States leads the world in agricultural biotechnology research, adoption, commercialization, and exports. Our biotech commodities are highly dependent on international markets. Thus, any biotech policy changes by key importing countries may affect U.S. agricultural biotech product exports. This article identifies key markets for U.S. agricultural exports including biotech commodities and discusses current and proposed biotech policies in key markets for U.S. agricultural exports foc...

  1. Create a translational medicine knowledge repository--research downsizing, mergers and increased outsourcing have reduced the depth of in-house translational medicine expertise and institutional memory at many pharmaceutical and biotech companies: how will they avoid relearning old lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Bruce H; Marincola, Francesco M

    2011-05-10

    Pharmaceutical industry consolidation and overall research downsizing threatens the ability of companies to benefit from their previous investments in translational research as key leaders with the most knowledge of the successful use of biomarkers and translational pharmacology models are laid off or accept their severance packages. Two recently published books may help to preserve this type of knowledge but much of this type of information is not in the public domain. Here we propose the creation of a translational medicine knowledge repository where companies can submit their translational research data and access similar data from other companies in a precompetitive environment. This searchable repository would become an invaluable resource for translational scientists and drug developers that could speed and reduce the cost of new drug development.

  2. Create a translational medicine knowledge repository - Research downsizing, mergers and increased outsourcing have reduced the depth of in-house translational medicine expertise and institutional memory at many pharmaceutical and biotech companies: how will they avoid relearning old lessons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pharmaceutical industry consolidation and overall research downsizing threatens the ability of companies to benefit from their previous investments in translational research as key leaders with the most knowledge of the successful use of biomarkers and translational pharmacology models are laid off or accept their severance packages. Two recently published books may help to preserve this type of knowledge but much of this type of information is not in the public domain. Here we propose the creation of a translational medicine knowledge repository where companies can submit their translational research data and access similar data from other companies in a precompetitive environment. This searchable repository would become an invaluable resource for translational scientists and drug developers that could speed and reduce the cost of new drug development.

  3. Innovative Tools for Scientific and Technological Education in Italian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucci, Annalisa; Mini, Roberta; Ferro, Elisa; Martelli, Paola; Trabalzini, Lorenza

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the project "Biotech a Scuola" ("Biotech at School"), financed by the Italian Ministry of Education within the SeT program (Special Project for Scientific-Technological Education). The project involved the University of Siena, five senior and junior secondary schools in the Siena area, and a private…

  4. Valuation in life sciences: a practical guide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bogdan, Boris; Villiger, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    ... apply valuation methodologies in life sciences. One of the complicating factors is that, compared to other industries, valuation of biotech innovation is much more demanding. The long 10-15-year development and clinical trials process still represents the main risks faced by any biotech company. Added to that is the fact that getting a drug across the regulato...

  5. Gene cuisine or Frankenfood? The theory of reasoned action as an audience segmentation strategy for messages about genetically modified foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Kami J; Weiner, Judith; Parrott, Roxanne L

    2005-12-01

    Genetically modified (GM) foods are currently a controversial topic about which the lay public in the United States knows little. Formative research has demonstrated that the lay public is uncertain and concerned about GM foods. This study (N = 858) extends focus group research by using the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) to examine attitudes and subjective norms related to GM foods as a theoretical strategy for audience segmentation. A hierarchical cluster analysis revealed four unique audiences based on their attitude and subjective norm toward GM foods (ambivalent-biotech, antibiotech, biotech-normer, and biotech individual). Results are discussed in terms of the theoretical and practical significance for audience segmentation.

  6. The Role of Transgenic Crops in the Future of Global Food and Feed

    OpenAIRE

    O. Škubna; H. Řezbová

    2012-01-01

    The paper is aimed on the problematic of biotech crops planting (GM, transgenic crops). The main aim of this paper is to analyze the trends in the main biotech crops planting groups in the sense of their use for food and feed in the future. The selected groups of biotech crops analyzed in this article are soybeans, maize (corn), cotton and rapeseed (canola). The used methods are chain and basic indexes and regression analysis of times series/ trend data - for predicting on next four years (20...

  7. Co-transfer of gfp, CHS and hptII genes into Oncidium Sharry Baby ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... 3Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, 43000, ... Key words: Biolistic gun, co-transformation, orchidaceae, protocorm-like-body. ... *Corresponding author: E-mail: janna@biotech.upm.edu.my.

  8. Search Results | Page 13 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 121 - 130 of 9175 ... Lessons learned from PAN Asia projects on ICTs in rural areas ... INDIGENOUS POPULATION ETHNIC MINORITIES TRADITIONAL CULTURE FOOD CONSUMPTION DIET NUTRITIVE ... Sharing environmental responsibility in Southeast Mexico ... Indian Biotech Industry and Patent Pooling.

  9. Biodegradation of Polyethylene by Bacillus sp. Indigenous to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    Nig J. Biotech. Vol. 26 (2013) 68-79 .... determining the formation of new functional groups or disappearance of groups in the polymer ((Milstein et al., 1994). .... This is evident by the various degradation products revealed by the. FTIR spectra.

  10. Democratization of Science and Biotechnological Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sulaiman.adebowale

    Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa, 2008 ... tendant ideas of Science Communication and Public Understanding of Biotech- .... human development in the new South Africa – no matter how development.

  11. Search Results | Page 2 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 11 - 20 of 8491 ... India Emerging: The Reality Checks supplies a modern ... Food and Agriculture HERDING VACCINES BIOTECH INDUSTRY ... IDRC funds research that supports gender equality and facilitates women's empowerment.

  12. Eesti teadlaste HIV-vaktsiini süstitakse katseks aafriklastele / Villu Päärt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Päärt, Villu, 1972-

    2006-01-01

    Vt. ka Postimees : na russkom jazõke 5. apr., lk. 2. Tartu teadlaste leiutatud ning Soome biotehnoloogiafirma FIT Biotech arendatavat vaktsiini katsetatakse Lõuna-Aafrika Vabariigis 60 surmaviirusega nakatunud inimese peal. Lisa: Eestlaste HIV-vaktsiini senine lugu

  13. Search Results | Page 24 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 231 - 240 of 869 ... Regional patterns and controls of ecosystem salinization with grassland ... Water subsidies from mountains to deserts : their role in sustaining ... biotech firms in developing countries reveals a surprisingly high level of ...

  14. Predicting allergenicity of proteins using Physical–Chemical Property (PCP) motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motivation: Quantitative guidelines to distinguish allergenic proteins from related, but non-allergenic ones are urgently needed for regulatory agencies, biotech companies and physicians. Cataloguing the SDAP database has indicated that allergenic proteins populate a relatively small number of prote...

  15. RET gene mutations and polymorphisms in medullary thyroid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    51 clinically diagnosed MTC patients, 39 family members of patients and 50 normal individuals. The method of .... Documentation system (Amersham Pharmacia Biotech,. Uppsala ... direct nucleotide sequencing to identify the mutations, using.

  16. Active pharmaceutical ingredient (api) from an estuarine fungus, Microdochium nivale (Fr.)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosale, S.H.; Patil, K.B.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Jagtap, T.G.

    Various marine habitats sustain variety of bio-sources of ecological and biotech potentials. Pharmaceutical potential compound Cyclosporine A was reported from marine fungus Microdochium nivale associated with Porteresia coarctata, a marine salt...

  17. Notes on Commercialization of Biotechnology Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy Jakobsen, Palle

    This book introduces aspects of commercialization of biomedical & biotech research including pharmaceutical drug and medical device development, innovation concepts, patent protection & commercialisation of research by securing investments in new companies and by licensing of the commersialisatio...

  18. Experiment list: SRX032893 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Adipocyte Culture || strain=3T3-L1 || cell type=Cultured Adipocytes || chip antibody=PPARgamma || antibody vendor=Santa Cruz Biotech...nology || antibody catalog number=sc-7196X http://dbarch

  19. Experiment list: SRX029315 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available | cell type=CD34+CD133+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) || antibody=anti-GABP-alpha || antibody manufacturer=Santa Cruz Biotech...nology http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/e

  20. Ganguly, Dr Nirmal Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 11 November 1941. Specialization: Microbiology, Immunology, Biotechnology and Public Health Address: Visiting Professor of Eminence, Translational Health Science & Technology Institute, NCR Biotech Science Cluster, Faridabad-Gurgaon Expressway, Faridabad 121 001, Haryana Contact: Office: (011) ...

  1. Estonian science breeds world-class researches / ToivoTänavsuu, Hille Tänavsuu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tänavsuu, Toivo

    2010-01-01

    Eesti teadusfirmadest: biotehnoloogia ettevõtted Celecure AS, Protobios OÜ, Icosagen AS, Asper Biotech AS ja Solis BioDyne OÜ, geenitehnoloogia firma Genorama OÜ, keemiatehnoloogia ettevõte AS Cambrex Tallinn

  2. Search Results | Page 51 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 501 - 510 of 9603 ... Lessons learned from PAN Asia projects on ICTs in rural areas ... INDIGENOUS POPULATION ETHNIC MINORITIES TRADITIONAL CULTURE FOOD CONSUMPTION DIET NUTRITIVE ... Sharing environmental responsibility in Southeast Mexico ... Indian Biotech Industry and Patent Pooling.

  3. Brief communication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Keywords. Infection frequency; insects; pests; polymerase chain reaction; Wolbachia ... management of uzifly, a parasitoid of silkworn (Puttaraju and. Prakash 2005a ... supply unit EP S200V/400 mA (Amersham Pharmacia. Biotech USA).

  4. Eestis levinud HIVi erilisus jätab nakatunud vaktsiinilootuseta / Villu Päärt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Päärt, Villu, 1972-

    2002-01-01

    Soome biotehnoloogiafirma FIT Biotech on loobumas kavast katsetada Eesti teadlaste leiutatud vaktsiini ka siinsete HIV-positiivsete katserühmal, sest Eestis on levinud maailmas üliharuldane HI-viiruse G-alatüüp

  5. In vivo activities of Baicalin against Chlamydia trachomatis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-03-15

    Rasmussen et al., 1997). The infectivity of the chlamydia was expressed as the number of inclusion forming units. Baicalin (HPLC Content > 98.0%) from Chongqing Green Valley. Bio-tech Co. LTD. (Chongqing, China).

  6. Traditional knowledge and patient protection: conflicting views on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and biotech companies continue to search for new and better drugs to treat them. ... And yet, even though the importance of these biological resources to global ... as international legal regulations on patent law and traditional knowledge.

  7. Pharmacological effects of two cytolysins isolated from the sea ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2009-12-07

    Email, cebimar@infomed.sld.cu) ... (Amersham Pharmacia Biotech, Uppsala, Sweden) and ionic exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose 52 (Whatman, ... In each well, a fixed concentration of toxin was present at a.

  8. Art, Science and the Invention of Things That Last

    KAUST Repository

    Edwards, David

    2018-01-01

    Silicon Valley (for IT) or Boston (for biotech) where cultures of learning, experimentation, and production or commercialization coexist, and where a high degree of interdisciplinary collaboration occurs. In this lecture, David Edwards will highlight

  9. Isolation and characterization of a new Pseudomonas- related strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-04-02

    Apr 2, 2014 ... with TIANamp Bacteria DNA DP302 Kit (Beijing Tiangen Biotech) ... Bootstrap analysis was performed 1000 times using the ... MSM media were shown in Figure 1. ..... Publishing Associates/Wiley Interscience, New York.

  10. Adejumo et al., Afr., J. Infect. Dis.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dr adejumo

    1/2 Alere Determine™, Japan 2012) and Uni-Gold™ (Trinity Biotech PLC, Wicklow, Ireland. 2013) were used in parallel algorithm. However, STAT-PAK® was used as tie breaker when there was discordant result. Definition of outcome variable.

  11. Medical Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as medical books, journals, magazines, pharma or biotech marketing, films, online video, exhibits, posters, wall charts, educational ... of the health career profession with strong communication skills, medical illustrators work closely with clients to interpret ...

  12. 76 FR 52670 - 2011 Technology Transfer Summit North America Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... conference will be further enhanced by the TTS Initiative Business Social Network, an online business... leading universities and research institutes together with biotech & pharma licensing & business... relating to partnering, licensing & business development. Conference speakers for the 2011 include: --Kathy...

  13. NJB VOL.34 Original Lower.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    important sources of renewable biological ... The plantain (Musa paradisiaca) and banana chemicals (Nowak et ... fermentable sugars available for bio-ethanol ..... peels. Afr. J. Biochem. Res. 9(9): 104 - 109. 70. Osho et al./ Nig. J. Biotech. Vol.

  14. Experiment list: SRX543048 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nology http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/ea...CID.adh murine thymic lymphoma || development stage=DN3 || chip antibody=rabbit anti-Miz-1 || chip antibody vendor=Santa Cruz Biotech

  15. Between Precautionary Principle and "Sound Science": Distributing the Burdens of Proof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belt, v.d. H.; Gremmen, B.

    2002-01-01

    Opponents of biotechnology ofteninvoke the Precautionary Principle to advancetheir cause, whereas biotech enthusiasts preferto appeal to ``sound science.'' Publicauthorities are still groping for a usefuldefinition. A crucial issue in this debate isthe distribution of the burden of proof amongthe

  16. Developing South Africa's biomanufacturing industry through a hub for open innovation: Experiences from the Biomanufacturing Industry Development Centre

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Visser, Daniel F

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available -Human Moringa fortified foods Sliek Nutrition-Human Lactose free products ConnectMe Speciality chemical Biopolymer Abxtracts Speciality chemical Hydroxytyrosol Biomoringa Agroprocessing Processed moringa leaves/seeds Lighthouse Biotech Probiotics Grapeseed...

  17. Development of carotenoid-enriched vegetables with increased nutritional quality and visual appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are a class of red, orange and yellow pigments widely distributed in nature. Biotech approach has been proved to be effective in successfully engineering of carotenoid content in food crops with better health and visual appearance....

  18. SCIENCE WHERE CULTURE MATTERS: A NEO-CLASSICAL ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SCIENCE WHERE CULTURE MATTERS: A NEO-CLASSICAL APPROACH TO EXPLORE UNTAPPED BACTERIAL DIVERSITY. MILIND WATVE; Dept of Microbiology, Abasaheb Garware College, Pune. www.culturematters.org; * Life Research Foundation, Pune; * Evolvus Biotech Pvt. Ltd.,Pune ...

  19. Keeping enzymes kosher

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Biotech companies increasingly seek certification for compliance with religious and dietary requirements in order to address new consumer markets. Technology plays a crucial role in such inspections alongside centuries old traditions and practices......Biotech companies increasingly seek certification for compliance with religious and dietary requirements in order to address new consumer markets. Technology plays a crucial role in such inspections alongside centuries old traditions and practices...

  20. Greater Philadelphia Bioinformatics Alliance (GPBA) 3rd Annual Retreat 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Biotech in recent days. The start of Biotech from the Agriculture ie rural side will be discussed and advancement will be discussed in detail towards...such advances in the food and Agricultural aspect. The significant results which not only makes the advancements of the understanding the public but...authored journal publications in human genetics, bioethics for industry and genetics education. Karl V. Steiner, Dr. Ing., Associate Director, Delaware

  1. A CADD-alog of strategies in pharma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Wendy A.

    2017-03-01

    A special issue on computer-aided drug design (CADD) strategies in pharma discusses how CADD groups in different environments work. Perspectives were collected from authors in 11 organizations: four big pharmaceutical companies, one major biotechnology company, one smaller biotech, one private pharmaceutical company, two contract research organizations (CROs), one university, and one that spans the breadth of big pharmaceutical companies and one smaller biotech.

  2. Editorial: Latest methods and advances in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Yup; Jungbauer, Alois

    2014-01-01

    The latest "Biotech Methods and Advances" special issue of Biotechnology Journal continues the BTJ tradition of featuring the latest breakthroughs in biotechnology. The special issue is edited by our Editors-in-Chief, Prof. Sang Yup Lee and Prof. Alois Jungbauer and covers a wide array of topics in biotechnology, including the perennial favorite workhorses of the biotech industry, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell and Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The technological, economic and institutional aspects behind the development of biotechnology industry in Turku region, Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Viljamaa, Kimmo

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the recent development of biotechnology related industry in the Finnish city of Turku, where especially pharmaceutical industry has adopted the use of post-1970s molecular biology breakthroughs in ?biotechnology?. Finland is now listed in numbers of biotech firms as the 10th largest in Europe and Turku is the only Finnish city mentioned in the European Commission report among the 20 most significant European biotech centres (2000). The interest of study is to scrutinise th...

  4. Network embeddedness in the internationalization of biotechnology entrepreneurs

    OpenAIRE

    Leppäaho, Tanja; Chetty, Sylvie; Dimitratos, Pavlos

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates how entrepreneurs of biotech enterprises embed in domestic and international networks so as to internationalize. We advance a contextual framework of embeddedness of internationalizing entrepreneurs, providing a contribution (i) by synthesizing and applying existing conceptual insights from the networking literature to provide a more culturally sensitive view of getting embedded for international entrepreneurship in the biotech industry and (ii) by adding insights into...

  5. Risk mitigation strategies for viral contamination of biotechnology products: consideration of best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Amy S; Cherney, Barry; Brorson, Kurt; Clouse, Kathleen; Kozlowski, Steven; Hughes, Patricia; Friedman, Rick

    2011-01-01

    CONFERENCE PROCEEDING Proceedings of the PDA/FDA Adventitious Viruses in Biologics: Detection and Mitigation Strategies Workshop in Bethesda, MD, USA; December 1-3, 2010 Guest Editors: Arifa Khan (Bethesda, MD), Patricia Hughes (Bethesda, MD) and Michael Wiebe (San Francisco, CA) Viral contamination of biotech product facilities is a potentially devastating manufacturing risk and, unfortunately, is more common than is generally reported or previously appreciated. Although viral contaminants of biotech products are thought to originate principally from biological raw materials, all potential process risks merit evaluation. Limitations to existing methods for virus detection are becoming evident as emerging viruses have contaminated facilities and disrupted supplies of critical products. New technologies, such as broad-based polymerase chain reaction screens for multiple virus types, are increasingly becoming available to detect adventitious viral contamination and thus, mitigate risks to biotech products and processes. Further, the industry embrace of quality risk management that promotes improvements in testing stratagems, enhanced viral inactivation methods for raw materials, implementation and standardization of robust viral clearance procedures, and efforts to learn from both epidemiologic screening of raw material sources and from the experience of other manufacturers with regard to this problem will serve to enhance the safety of biotech products available to patients. Based on this evolving landscape, we propose a set of principles for manufacturers of biotech products: Pillars of Risk Mitigation for Viral Contamination of Biotech Products.

  6. Patent holdings of US biotherapeutic companies in major markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Teena E; Yerram, Chandra Bindu; Saberwal, Gayatri

    2009-05-01

    In previous studies we examined the (United States, US) patent holdings of 109 largely North American biotech companies developing therapeutics that, in particular, have an interest in discovery stage science. There appears little correlation between the number of patents and the number of products of individual companies. Here we quantified and compared the 103 US-headquartered companies' patent holdings in Australia, Canada, Europe, Japan and the US. The companies demonstrate variable and surprising patterns of patent holdings across these countries or regions. For most companies, patent holdings are not in proportion to the importance of the country as a biotech or pharma market. These results have implications for the patenting strategies of small biotech companies involved in drug discovery.

  7. Nanobiotech in big pharma: a business perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würmseher, Martin; Firmin, Lea

    2017-03-01

    Since the early 2000s, numerous publications have presented major scientific opportunities that can be achieved through integrating insights from the area of nanotech into biotech (nanobiotech). This paper aims to explore the economic significance that nanobiotech has gained in the established pharmaceutical industry (big pharma). The empirical investigation draws on patent data as well as product revenue data; and to put the results into perspective, the amounts are compared with the established/traditional biotech sector. The results indicate that the new technology still plays only a minor role - at least from a commercial perspective.

  8. Biotecnologie in Europa. Rilevazione dei caratteri delle imprese in alcuni paesi

    OpenAIRE

    Frigero Piercarlo

    2003-01-01

    This is an attempt to survey the characteristics of firms in the European biotech industry. Databases of biotech firms on the web are reviewed to prepare a set of names useful for subsequent analysis. More than 650 firms are then chosen, through their patent applications to the European Patent Office and the US Patent and Trademark Office. Counting the number of patents is the first step in evaluating the role of national industry in 11 countries. To avoid unusable cases of patents not strict...

  9. Industry Responsibilities in Tackling Direct-to-Consumer Marketing of Unproven Stem Cell Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Z; Fu, W; Paciulli, D; Sipp, D

    2017-08-01

    The direct-to-consumer marketing of unproven stem cell interventions (SCIs) is a serious public health concern. Regulations and education have had modest impact, indicating that different actors must play a role to stop this unfettered market. We consider the role of the biotech industry in tackling unproven SCIs. Grounded in the concept of corporate social responsibility, we argue that biotech companies should screen consumers to ensure that products and services are being used appropriately and educate employees about unproven SCIs. © 2017 ASCPT.

  10. New challenges and opportunities for industrial biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2012-08-20

    Industrial biotechnology has not developed as fast as expected due to some challenges including the emergences of alternative energy sources, especially shale gas, natural gas hydrate (or gas hydrate) and sand oil et al. The weaknesses of microbial or enzymatic processes compared with the chemical processing also make industrial biotech products less competitive with the chemical ones. However, many opportunities are still there if industrial biotech processes can be as similar as the chemical ones. Taking advantages of the molecular biology and synthetic biology methods as well as changing process patterns, we can develop bioprocesses as competitive as chemical ones, these including the minimized cells, open and continuous fermentation processes et al.

  11. Financial Times Global Pharmaceutical & Biotechnology Conference 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scattereggia, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The Financial Times Global Pharmaceutical & Biotechnology conference, held in London, included topics covering the current and future challenges confronting the pharma and biotech industry, and presented possible solutions to those challenges. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the industry challenges for big pharma companies, diversification as a solution to industry problems, overcoming challenges with collaborations and M&As, and the role of emerging markets in the pharma industry. Other subjects discussed included the expected impact of personalized medicine on the industry, the entry of big pharma into the generics market and the problems that are confronting the small pharma and biotech industry.

  12. Research Strategies in Science-based Start-ups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Finn; Dahlgren, Johan Henrich; Lund Jensen, Rasmus

    develop a contingency view on complex problem solving which structures the argument into three steps:1) Characterising the problem architectures addressed by different types of DBFs;2) Testing and confirming that DBFs form requisite research strategies, by which we refer to problem solving approaches......Although biotech start-ups fail or succeed based on their research few attempts have been made to examine if and how they strategize in this core of their activity. Popular views on Dedicated Biotech Firms (DBFs) see the inherent uncertainty of research as defying notions of strategizing, directing...

  13. Offshoring of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakonsson, Stine

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is an investigation into the internationalization of innovation in the Danish food-related biotech industry. The process of the internationalization of innovation in food and ingredients into new markets has followed a similar path: first, the companies enter new markets with their p......This chapter is an investigation into the internationalization of innovation in the Danish food-related biotech industry. The process of the internationalization of innovation in food and ingredients into new markets has followed a similar path: first, the companies enter new markets...

  14. Engineering insect-resistant crops: A review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dgeorge

    African Journal of Biotechnology ... Transgenic crops engineered for enhanced levels of resistance to insect ... this background that research work targeting other candidate genes such as ... nisms, and potential deleterious environmental effects. ... The global market value of biotech crops was esti- .... located in repeat 11.

  15. Ethical perception of modern biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-30

    Sep 30, 2011 ... 1Social Impact of Biotechnology Development in Malaysia Research ... purpose of this paper is to examine the ethical perception of modern ... and social benefits of modern biotechnology, consumer .... Company or organisation directly involved in the production of ...... Food safety battle: organic vs. biotech.

  16. Kernel compositions of glyphosate-tolerant and corn rootworm-protected MON 88017 sweet corn and insect-protected MON 89034 sweet corn are equivalent to that of conventional sweet corn (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Kassie L; Festa, Adam R; Goddard, Scott D; Harrigan, George G; Taylor, Mary L

    2015-03-25

    Monsanto Co. has developed two sweet corn hybrids, MON 88017 and MON 89034, that contain biotechnology-derived (biotech) traits designed to enhance sustainability and improve agronomic practices. MON 88017 confers benefits of glyphosate tolerance and protection against corn rootworm. MON 89034 provides protection against European corn borer and other lepidopteran insect pests. The purpose of this assessment was to compare the kernel compositions of MON 88017 and MON 89034 sweet corn with that of a conventional control that has a genetic background similar to the biotech sweet corn but does not express the biotechnology-derived traits. The sweet corn samples were grown at five replicated sites in the United States during the 2010 growing season and the conventional hybrid and 17 reference hybrids were grown concurrently to provide an estimate of natural variability for all assessed components. The compositional analysis included proximates, fibers, amino acids, sugars, vitamins, minerals, and selected metabolites. Results highlighted that MON 88017 and MON 89034 sweet corns were compositionally equivalent to the conventional control and that levels of the components essential to the desired properties of sweet corn, such as sugars and vitamins, were more affected by growing environment than the biotech traits. In summary, the benefits of biotech traits can be incorporated into sweet corn with no adverse effects on nutritional quality.

  17. Taming Living Logic using Formal Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baig, Hasan; Madsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    One of the goals of synthetic biology is to build genetic circuits to control the behavior of a cell for different application domains, such as medical, environmental, and biotech. During the design process of genetic circuits, biologists are often interested in the probability of a system to work...

  18. CYTOKINE - The Official Journal of the International Cytokine Society. Volume 11, Number 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-09

    using the contour-clamped homogeneous electric field ( CHEF ) system (Pulsaphor Plus; Pharmacia LKB Biotech- nology, Uppsala, Sweden). The conditions...reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) are frequent companions at sites of acute inflammation. We have previously shown that in human monocytes LPS, IL-1 and

  19. Advances in Protein Precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golubovic, M.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are biological macromolecules, which are among the key components of all living organisms. Proteins are nowadays present in all fields of biotech industry, such as food and feed, synthetic and pharmaceutical industry. They are isolated from their natural sources or produced in different

  20. Networked Success and Failure at Hybritech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mark Peter

    2011-01-01

    The author presents an historical account of scientific work conducted at a commercial biotech firm in San Diego called Hybritech. It tells of disruptions in research programs following the acquisition of the company by the pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly in 1986. The story centers on responses to an organizational challenge that research managers…

  1. Akadeemikust ettevõtja võitleb viirustega / Kaire Talviste

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Talviste, Kaire, 1979-

    2012-01-01

    Molekulaarbioloog Mart Ustavi tööst bioloogiliste ravimite väljatöötamisel. HIV1/AIDS vaktsiini väljatöötamisest FIT Biotech Oy Eesti filiaalis a-tel 2000-2011. M. Ustavi biotehnoloogia firma Icosagen Grupp tehnoloogilistest arendustest

  2. Reduction of Exudates (Browning) in Sugarcane Micro Propagation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of this variety, ascorbic acid and citric acid was added as constituent of the media using MS and stock at different concentrations. The browning was reduced drastically at the addition of 0.1g/litre ascorbic acid and 0.15g/litre citric acid. Keywords: reduction, exudates browning, micro propagation, sugarcane. Nig J. Biotech.

  3. Eesti HIVi alatüüp jõuab registrisse / Villu Päärt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Päärt, Villu, 1972-

    2005-01-01

    Ülemaailmses HIV- andmebaasis on registreerimisel HI-viiruse alatüüp, mida on seni avastatud ainult Eestis. Mosaiik-HIV on segu peamiselt Aafrikas esinevast viiruse vormist ning Ukrainas levinud tüübist, selgub biotehnoloogiafirma FIT Biotech uuringust. Kommenteerib Tartu Ülikooli tehnoloogiainstituudi direktor Mart Ustav

  4. American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture - Homepage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Literacy? What We Do Resources Sustainable Agriculture Food and Farm Facts Free Resources & Lesson Agriculture Food and Farm Facts Free Resources & Lesson Plans Bringing Biotech to Life Learn About Beef and their families about agriculture at the USA Science & Engineering Festival in April. Read More

  5. Eesti firma hakkab koostöös soomlastega välja töötama Ebola viiruse ravimit / Joosep Värk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Värk, Joosep

    2014-01-01

    Eesti biotehnoloogiafirma Icosagen hakkab koos Soome ettevõtte FIT Biotech Oy'ga välja töötama Ebola viiruse vastast vaktsiini, arendustöös osaleb professor Andres Meritsa juhtimisel ka Tartu Ülikooli Tehnoloogiainstituudi rakendusviroloogia labor. Vestlusest Tartu Ülikooli biomeditsiinitehnoloogia professori Mart Ustaviga

  6. Tartu teadlased aitavad välja mõelda Ebola-vastast vaktsiini / Aime Jõgi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jõgi, Aime, 1958-

    2014-01-01

    Eesti biotehnoloogiafirma Icosagen hakkab koos Soome ettevõtte FIT Biotech Oy'ga välja töötama Ebola viiruse vastast vaktsiini, arendustöös osaleb ka Tartu Ülikooli Tehnoloogiainstituudi rakendusviroloogia labor

  7. Yathindra, Prof. Narayanarao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narayanarao Ph.D. (Madras). Date of birth: 12 March 1944. Specialization: Computational Structural Biology Address: Director, Institute of Bioinformatics and Applied Biotechnology, Biotech Park (Next to Arvind Mills), Electronic City, Phase 1 (Behind 3M), Bengaluru 560 100, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2852 8900-03

  8. INNOVATIVE AND INDUSTRIAL-PERFORMANCE IN PHARMACEUTICAL RESEARCH-AND-DEVELOPMENT, A MANAGEMENT CONTROL PERSPECTIVE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OMTA, SWF; BOUTER, LM; VANENGELEN, JML

    In this paper management control is related to innovative and industrial performance in 14 non-biotech pharmaceutical companies. The study consisted of questionnaires, sent to the heads of the different research departments of European research laboratories of leading pharmaceutical companies,

  9. Academic Centers and/as Industrial Consortia: US Microelectronics Research 1976-2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mody, Cyrus C.M.

    2017-01-01

    In the U.S., in the late 1970s and early 1980s, academic research centers that were tightly linked to the semiconductor industry began to proliferate – at exactly the same time as the first academic start-up companies in biotech, and slightly before the first U.S. industrial semiconductor research

  10. Development of somaclones in sugarcane genotype BF-162 and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pris

    2012-02-21

    Feb 21, 2012 ... Baksha R, Alam R, Karim MZ, Paul SK, Hossain MA, Miah MAS,. Rahman ABMM (2002). In vitro Shoot Tip Culture of Sugarcane. (Saccharum officinarum) Variety Isd 28. Int. Quarterly J. Biotech. 1: 67-72. Brisibe E, Miyake AH, Taniguchi T, Maeda E (1994). Regulation of somatic embryogenesis in long-term ...

  11. Technology and international strategies in born global firms: evidence from The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anne van Delft; Sumit Kundu; Hein Roelfsema

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the internationalization strategies of biotech firms in the Netherlands. We find that many of these firms are born internationals in the sense that from their inception they are actively engaged in international cooperation. However, we find that the nature of potential

  12. Pages 522 - 529.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Objective: To compare the ANGPTL3 mRNA and protein expression, exon mutation and promoter district CpG island methylation state ... tissue samples (the liver, muscle (lean meat, lean) and ... ice-cold Trizol reagent (Changsha Axybio bio-tech ... To synthesize single- .... normalized, temperature-shifted, difference curves.

  13. Hepatitis B virus surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C virus rapid tests underestimate hepatitis prevalence among HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Jespersen, S; Medina, C

    2014-01-01

    . RESULTS: Two rapid tests were used in Guinea-Bissau: HBsAg Strip Ref 2034 (VEDA.LAB, Alençon, France; sensitivity 62.3%; specificity 99.2%) and HEPA-SCAN (Bhat Bio-Tech, Bangalore, India; sensitivity 57.1%; specificity 99.7%). In the two tests the ability to obtain the correct outcome depended...

  14. Biotechnology Education in India: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kirti; Mehra, Kavita; Govil, Suman; Singh, Nitu

    2013-01-01

    Among the developing countries, India is one of those that recognises the importance of biotechnology. The trajectory of different policies being formulated over time is proof that the government is progressing towards achieving self-sufficiency. However, to cater to the ever-growing biotech industry, skilled manpower is required. This article…

  15. Recent advances in smart biotechnology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milcovich, Gesmi; Lettieri, Stefania; Antunes, Filipe E.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past ten years, the global biopharmaceutical market has remarkably grown, with ten over the top twenty worldwide high performance medical treatment sales being biologics. Thus, biotech R&D (research and development) sector is becoming a key leading branch, with expanding revenues. Biotec...

  16. Experiment list: SRX262791 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available IH3T3_MRTFB_LAT || cell line=NIH3T3 fibroblasts || genotype=normal || chip antibody=MRTF-B || chip antibody vendor=Santa Cruz Biotech...nology http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/ea

  17. Experiment list: SRX262787 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available IH3T3_MRTFA_LAT || cell line=NIH3T3 fibroblasts || genotype=normal || chip antibody=MRTF-A || chip antibody vendor=Santa Cruz Biotech...nology http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/ea

  18. Preliminary format design guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Calaon, Matteo; Nørregaard, J.

    2013-01-01

    The strategic research centre PolyNano aims at becoming the Danish competence centre for production-ready fabrication of polymer, nano-scale lab-on-a-chip (LoC) devices. In order to provide a competitive edge for Danish biotech companies launching LoC products by removal of the technology barrier...

  19. Smallholder adoption and economic impacts of tissue culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... ISSN 1684–5315 © 2009 Academic Journals. Full Length ... Key words: Biotechnology, adoption, tissue culture bananas, Kenya. INTRODUCTION ... Recent studies about the agronomic and economic impacts of biotech- ..... accused scientist for 'playing God', others have supported biotechnologies.

  20. 76 FR 44924 - Cardinal Health, Inc.; Analysis of Agreement Containing Consent Order to Aid Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... Nuclear pharmacies provide radiopharmaceuticals to local hospitals and cardiology clinics, which use the... prohibiting unfair or deceptive acts or practices or unfair methods of competition. The attached Analysis to... Cardinal's acquisition of Biotech's nuclear pharmacies in the Southwestern United States. Under the terms...

  1. Ryntäys Viroon jatkuu / Eeva-Riitta Seies

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Seies, Eeva-Riitta

    2002-01-01

    Soome kontsern Vapo ostis ASi Tootsi Turvas enamusaktsiad. Soome ettevõte Fit Biotech ostis Tartu biotehnoloogiaettevõtte Quattromed ja Soome toiduainetetööstuse ettevõte Saarioinen Oy Eesti tütarfirma omandas üle 66-protsendilise osaluse valmistoidufirmas Meleco AS

  2. Pikkani osalusega ettevõte jahib rahamahukat geenianalüüsi / Väinu Rozental

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rozental, Väinu, 1957-

    2002-01-01

    Geenivaramu lepingusüsteem mängib geenianalüüsi tegemisel suured trumbid kätte geenivaramu eestvedajate Jaanus Pikani ja Andres Metspalu osalusega Tartus geenianalüüsiga tegelevale AS-ile Asper Biotech

  3. Xiao et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2013) 10(6):444 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cadewumi

    in Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice and determination of the number of NK cells ... included Mouse CD4+, CD8+, antibody, Lianke Biotech Co., Ltd., Shanghai; .... The growth of transplanted lung tumours in mice of Solanum lyratum Thunb ...

  4. Production of Microbial Protease from Selected Soil Fungal Isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of Microbial Protease from Selected Soil Fungal Isolates. ... Nigerian Journal of Biotechnology ... and 500C. The optimal pH on the enzyme production was observed to be between pH 3.5 and 5.5 for the organisms. Keywords: Soil microorganism, fungal isolate, incubation period, microbial enzyme. Nig J. Biotech.

  5. Unlocking the full potential of Open Innovation in the Life Sciences through a classification system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niclas; Minssen, Timo

    2018-01-01

    Open Innovation (OI) holds much promise as a new business model for collaborative value creation in life science. From a corporate perspective, benefits include faster access to new relevant technology; the opportunity for Biotechs and Small to Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) to explore new marke...

  6. A universal, rapid, and inexpensive method for genomic DNA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MOHAMMED BAQUR SAHIB A. AL-SHUHAIB

    gels, containing 7% glycerol, and 1×TBE buffer. The gels were run under 200 .... Inc. Germany, GeneaidTM DNA Isolation Kit, Geneaid. Biotech., New Taipei City, .... C. L. and Arsenos G. 2015 Comparison of eleven methods for genomic DNA ...

  7. Soybean Peptide as Additive on Yellow Feather Broiler Chicks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GM soybean and sold on the Chinese market by China CF Duqing (Heze) Biotech Co. Ltd, Shandong Prov-ince, China. For the purpose of this study, the peptide was designated marketed soybean peptide (MSBP). In order to show its efficacy ...

  8. Ben's Plastic Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    This article shares a story of Ben who as a result of his premature birth, suffered a brain hemorrhage resulting in cerebral palsy, which affected his left side (left hemiparesis) and caused learning disabilities. Despite these challenges, he graduated from college and currently works doing information management for a local biotech start-up…

  9. DTREEv2, a computer-based support system for the risk assessment of genetically modified plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pertry, I.; Nothegger, C.; Sweet, J.; Kuiper, H.A.; Davies, H.; Iserentant, D.; Hull, R.; Mezzetti, B.; Messens, K.; Loose, De M.; Oliveira, de D.; Burssens, S.; Gheysen, G.; Tzotzos, G.

    2014-01-01

    Risk assessment of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) remains a contentious area and a major factor influencing the adoption of agricultural biotech. Methodologically, in many countries, risk assessment is conducted by expert committees with little or no recourse to databases and expert systems

  10. Uninformed and disinformed society and the GMO market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twardowski, Tomasz; Małyska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    The EU has a complicated regulatory framework, and this is slowing down the approval process of new genetically modified (GM) crops. Currently, labeling of GM organisms (GMOs) is mandatory in all Member States. However, the USA, in which GMO labeling is not mandatory, continues to lead the production of biotech crops, biopharmaceuticals, biomaterials, and bioenergy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahadevan, Dr Perurmadom Ramaiyer Ph.D. (Princeton). Date of birth: 20 May 1928. Date of death: 27 April 2003. Specialization: Molecular Biology, Mycobacteria, Leprosy and Industrial Biotechnology Last known address: Maanya Biotech Limited, Plot No. 151A, Road No. 12, MLAs' Colony, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 ...

  12. Valuable biomolecules from nine North Atlantic red macroalgae: Amino acids, fatty acids, carotenoids, minerals and metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Bruhn, Annette; Eybye, Karin Loft

    2016-01-01

    In modern society, novel marine resources are scrutinized pursuing compounds of use in the medical, pharmaceutical, biotech, food or feed industry. Few of the numerous marine macroalgae are currently exploited. In this study, the contents of nutritional compounds from nine common North Atlantic r...

  13. Bioprocessing of wheat straw into nutritionally rich and digested cattle feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Bhuvnesh; Jain, Kavish Kumar; Kalra, Anup; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2014-01-01

    Wheat straw was fermented by Crinipellis sp. RCK-1, a lignin degrading fungus, under solid state fermentation conditions. The fungus degraded 18.38% lignin at the expense of 10.37% cellulose within 9 days. However, when wheat straw fermented for different duration was evaluated in vitro, the 5 day fungal fermented wheat straw called here “Biotech Feed” was found to possess 36.74% organic matter digestibility (OMD) and 5.38 (MJ/Kg Dry matter) metabolizable energy (ME). The Biotech Feed was also observed to be significantly enriched with essential amino acids and fungal protein by fungal fermentation, eventually increasing its nutritional value. The Biotech Feed upon in vitro analysis showed potential to replace 50% grain from concentrate mixture. Further, the calves fed on Biotech Feed based diets exhibited significantly higher (pintake (DMI: 3.74 Kg/d), dry matter digestibility (DMD: 57.82%), total digestible nutrients (TDN: 54.76%) and comparatively gained 50 g more daily body weight. PMID:25269679

  14. Nigerian Journal of Biotechnology (Vol. 33)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ladaf 2

    Ganiyu et. al. / Nig. J. Biotech. 33 (2017) 131-135 high quality DNA makes it simplified even for weighed on an electronic metlar balance and ground numerous samples. into a fine powder in liquid nitrogen with a pestle and. Genetic analyses of plant rely on high yields mortar, transferred into a 1.5 ml tube and temporarily.

  15. An Efficient Experimental Design Strategy for Modelling and Characterization of Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tajsoleiman, Tannaz; Semenova, Daria; Oliveira Fernandes, Ana Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Designing robust, efficient and economic processes is a main challenge for the biotech industries. To achieve a well-designed bioprocess, understanding the ongoing phenomena and the involved reaction kinetics is crucial. By development of advanced miniaturized reactors, a promising opportunity ar...

  16. Download

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... In this work, the expression of the CBM22-2 in transgenic tobacco plants was evaluated. Histological examinations of .... Total RNA was isolated from 3 to 5 g transformed in-vitro shoots as described elsewhere .... PhD thesis, School of Biotechnology, Department of Wood Biotech- nology, Royal Institute of ...

  17. The trends and future of biotechnology crops for insect pest control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biotech crops, including those that are genetically modified (GM) with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) endotoxins for insect resistance, have been cultivated commercially and adopted in steadily increasing numbers of countries over the past 14 years. This review discusses the current status of insect resistant transgenic crops and ...

  18. The Rhetorical Helix of the Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Industries: Strategies of Transformation through Definition, Description and Ingratiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretton, Linda Burak

    2009-01-01

    The current pharmaceutical industry, whose origins date from the early 20th century, and the biotechnology industry, which emerged in the 1980s both have foundations built on the modern scientific method and share a mission to develop new drugs for humans and animals. At the same time, they are also made distinct by size (small biotechs versus…

  19. Re-engineering the two-component systems as light-regulated in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siya Ma

    2017-10-20

    Oct 20, 2017 ... designed using Oligo 7 and synthesized at Shanghai Sangon. Biotech. .... It serves as a bridge to construct pPRORR-GFPuv-HK-Cph1-pSP73. (c) In addition to the ... selected in this study, which span a variety of functions. (table 2). .... signals can be replaced with light, which is simple and easy to control.

  20. Public perceptions of farm animal cloning in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Jesper

    This report presents a picture of European opinion on farm animal cloning. In the report, both agricultural and biomedical applications of farm animal cloning are considered. With the arrival of Dolly, animal cloning became an integral part of the biotech debate, but this debate did not isolate...... animal cloning as a single issue....

  1. Consensus recommendations for a standardized Brain Tumor Imaging Protocol in clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M. Ellingson (Benjamin M.); M. Bendszus (Martin); J. Boxerman (Jerrold); D. Barboriak (Daniel); B.J. Erickson (Bradley J.); M. Smits (Marion); S.J. Nelson (Sarah J.); E. Gerstner (Elizabeth); B. Alexander (Brian); G. Goldmacher (Gregory); W. Wick (Wolfgang); M.A. Vogelbaum (Michael); M. Weller (Michael); E. Galanis (Evanthia); J. Kalpathy-Cramer (Jayashree); L. Shankar; P. Jacobs (Paula); W.B. Pope (Whitney B.); D. Yang (Dewen); C. Chung (Caroline); R.H. Knopp; S. Cha (Soonme); M.J. van den Bent (Martin); S.M. Chang (Susan); W.K. Al Yung; T.F. Cloughesy (Timothy F.); P.Y. Wen (Patrick Y.); M.R. Gilbert (Mark R.); A. Whitney (Andrew); D. Sandak (David); A. Musella (Al); C. Haynes (Chas); M. Wallace (Max); D.F. Arons (David F.); A. Kingston (Ann)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractA recent joint meeting was held on January 30, 2014, with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), National Cancer Institute (NCI), clinical scientists, imaging experts, pharmaceutical and biotech companies, clinical trials cooperative groups, and patient advocate groups to discuss

  2. Experiment list: SRX142525 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Cruz Biotech || antibody vendorid=sc-197 || control=Control_50bp || control description=This data represents a control being...on=Immortal cells || control=Control_50bp || control description=This data represents a control being compar

  3. Beyond the Boundary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorm Hansen, Birgitte

    2011-01-01

    . Drawing on interviews with the head of a research center in plant biology, this article argues that biology and biotech are "symbionts". In order to be viable and productive, symbiosis needs to be carefully managed and given room for divergence within mutual dependence. This process does not take place...

  4. Final Report: Northern Virginia Community College Training for Biotechnology Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Johanna V

    2010-05-31

    The intent of this project was to expand Northern Virginia Community College's capability to offer training to support the Biotechnology Industry in the northern Virginia region. The general goal of this project was to create a College Biotechnology Program; specific goals of the project were to a) design curricula/courses to prepare students to become entry-level lab technicians, b) redesign and equip lab space to better suit the needs of the program, c) develop partnerships with the local industry through outreach and the formation on an advisory board, d) recruit students into the program, and e) provide instructional support for local high school teachers. At the end of the grant period, NOVA has successfully created two new curricula in biotechnology: an Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) in Biotechnology (initiated in Fall 2008) and a Career Studies Certificate for Biotechnology Lab Technicians (to be initiated in Fall 2010). These curricula were designed with advice from an external advisory committee which is comprised of representatives from industry, transfer institutions and high school administrators. To date, almost all courses have been designed and piloted; the equipment needed for the courses and the initial supplies were paid for by the grant as was the re-modeling of some lab space to be used for the biotech courses. In order to market the program, the NOVA Biotech Program has also established relationships with the local high schools. Presentations were given at several local high schools and on-site workshops were held for high school students and teachers. As a result, close to 1000 students have attended program open houses, presentations within the high schools, or workshops held in the summer. Over 100 teachers have received information and/or training in biotechnology. These outreach efforts as well as high quality curricula have started to attract a number of students to the program – for example, there are currently 70 students

  5. The moderating role of absorptive capacity and the differential effects of acquisitions and alliances on Big Pharma firms' innovation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, K D S; Pennings, H P G; van den Bosch, J F; Commandeur, H R; Claassen, E

    2017-01-01

    In the context of increased pharmaceutical innovation deficits and Big Pharma blockbusters' patent expirations, this paper examines the moderating role of firms' absorptive capacity in external innovation activities of Big Pharma firms. The study indicates a rising interest of Big Pharma in acquisitions of and alliances with biotechnology companies. Unfortunately, this increased interest is not reflected in the number of new drugs generated by Big Pharma. We find that acquisitions of biotech companies have negatively affected Big Pharma firms' innovation performance on average but these acquisitions might have a positive effect at higher levels of acquiring firms' absorptive capacity. Moreover, also acquisitions of pharma companies and alliances with biotech companies only have a positive effect on innovation performance at sufficiently high levels of absorptive capacity. The moderating role of absorptive capacity implicates that a tight integration of internal R&D efforts and (unrelated) external knowledge is crucial for harnessing complementarity effects.

  6. New challenges and opportunities for industrial biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology has not developed as fast as expected due to some challenges including the emergences of alternative energy sources, especially shale gas, natural gas hydrate (or gas hydrate) and sand oil et al. The weaknesses of microbial or enzymatic processes compared with the chemical processing also make industrial biotech products less competitive with the chemical ones. However, many opportunities are still there if industrial biotech processes can be as similar as the chemical ones. Taking advantages of the molecular biology and synthetic biology methods as well as changing process patterns, we can develop bioprocesses as competitive as chemical ones, these including the minimized cells, open and continuous fermentation processes et al. PMID:22905695

  7. State regulation of the biotechnology (GM agricultural products: analysis of different approaches in the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Vladimirovna Yakovleva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although GM crops are cultivated on 175 million hectares in 27 countries, the regulation of agricultural biotechnology is in its becoming. In the future, many countries, of course, will lead to market biotech products, and the main focus will be biosafety issues for humans and the environment. Some countries have special regulatory mechanisms, others do not have the original national regulatory system, but their actions are under the provisions of international treaties for the production and handling of GM products. What are the main components of a strict but not stifling regulatory system? What are the disadvantages of existing systems? The article presents an overview of the state regulation systems of biotech agricultural products in the US, the EU, Argentina, South Africa and Brazil.

  8. Strategic alliances and market risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenaar, Matthias; Hiscocks, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Strategic alliances in product development and marketing are crucial to the biotechnology industry. Many alliances, however, are terminated before the drug reaches the market. In this article we make the case that strategic alliances can fail because of how they are negotiated. Alliance contracts are often inflexible and do not allow for changes in market conditions. We propose a model for contract valuation that can assist biotech and/or pharma deal makers in negotiating alliances that have a higher chance of survival in uncertain market conditions. The model makes use of variable royalties and milestone payments. Because licensing is key to the biotech and/or pharma business model this article will be of interest not only to professionals in licensing, but to all professionals active in the industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Conference Report: The 2016 Olten Meeting at the Basel Life Science Week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzelmann, Elsbeth

    2016-12-21

    "This 'telephone' has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us." This was an internal memo written by Western Union in 1876. That's right. Without efficient knowledge sharing and technology transfer, even the best scientific development may prove to be a damp squib for a long time. The Basel Life Science Week was created in order to promote scientific and economic exchange and pave the way for innovative ideas. That's why NTN Swiss Biotech has moved its traditional 'Olten Meeting' to the Basel Life Science Week. It is the ideal setting for NTN Swiss Biotech and the School of Life Sciences FHNW to present innovative developments within its network of academic and industrial partners in the future-oriented disciplines of Molecular Diagnostics and Medicinal Chemistry. Short summaries of the key lectures are reported below.

  10. Clinical and Immunological Effects in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung-Cancer after Vaccination with Dendritic Cells Exposed to an Allogeneic Tumor Cell Lysate*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Noerregaard, Lotte; Kvistborg, Pia; Zocca, Mai-Britt

    2013-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the clinical and immunological effects of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination of patients with NSCLC. Autologous DCs were pulsed with a MAGE containing allogeneic melanoma cell lysate (MelCancerVac®, Dandrit Biotech, Copenhagen, Denmark). Imiquimod cream, proleukin and celeco......Background: We evaluated the clinical and immunological effects of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination of patients with NSCLC. Autologous DCs were pulsed with a MAGE containing allogeneic melanoma cell lysate (MelCancerVac®, Dandrit Biotech, Copenhagen, Denmark). Imiquimod cream, proleukin...... and celecoxib were used as adjuvants to the vaccines. The objective of the study was to evaluate specific T cell response in vitro by IFN EliSpot. Secondary objec- tives were overall survival, response and quality of life (QoL). Results: Twenty-two patients initiated the vaccination program consisting of ten...

  11. New challenges and opportunities for industrial biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guo-Qiang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Industrial biotechnology has not developed as fast as expected due to some challenges including the emergences of alternative energy sources, especially shale gas, natural gas hydrate (or gas hydrate and sand oil et al. The weaknesses of microbial or enzymatic processes compared with the chemical processing also make industrial biotech products less competitive with the chemical ones. However, many opportunities are still there if industrial biotech processes can be as similar as the chemical ones. Taking advantages of the molecular biology and synthetic biology methods as well as changing process patterns, we can develop bioprocesses as competitive as chemical ones, these including the minimized cells, open and continuous fermentation processes et al.

  12. The gap between science and perception: the case of plant biotechnology in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einsele, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    Although the global area of biotech crops continues to climb for the tenth consecutive year at a sustainable double-digit growth rate, the acceptance of biotech products from agriculture in Europe is still low. There is a gap between science and perception. It is a strong belief that the public turning against science and against GM food has been encouraged by the negative activities of NGO groups. Scientists have to overcome the purely risk-based discussion, and the benefits of plant biotechnology have to be made literally visible. GM food should be available, the benefits should be tangible and the consumer should have fun with such novel food. The gap could be reduced if genetically modified plants and the products thereof were regulated in the same way as classical products.

  13. A cheat sheet to navigate the complex maze of pharmaceutical exclusivities in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, Marta Cavero; Peng, Bo

    2017-07-01

    As the two leading markets for pharmaceutical and biotech companies, the USA and Europe offer incentives to stimulate drug innovation, including patent and regulatory exclusivities. These exclusivities extend periods during which companies can market their products free of generic or other competition and recoup their investment. Pharmaceutical and biotech companies should carefully assess the different types of exclusivities available when developing regulatory submissions, patent filing strategies. The authors have previously summarized the USA exclusivities in an earlier publication. This article focuses on European exclusivities. Due to space limitations, it focuses on small molecule drugs. Analogously to the format previously used, we have provided a cheat sheet of European exclusivities for small molecule drugs in Figure 1 .

  14. Recent developments in membrane-based separations in biotechnology processes: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, A S; Shirke, A

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-based separations are the most ubiquitous unit operations in biotech processes. There are several key reasons for this. First, they can be used with a large variety of applications including clarification, concentration, buffer exchange, purification, and sterilization. Second, they are available in a variety of formats, such as depth filtration, ultrafiltration, diafiltration, nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, and microfiltration. Third, they are simple to operate and are generally robust toward normal variations in feed material and operating parameters. Fourth, membrane-based separations typically require lower capital cost when compared to other processing options. As a result of these advantages, a typical biotech process has anywhere from 10 to 20 membrane-based separation steps. In this article we review the major developments that have occurred on this topic with a focus on developments in the last 5 years.

  15. Science communication in policy making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coumou, Hilde; van der Werf Kulichova, Z.; Wehrmann, C.

    2014-01-01

    Policy making regarding application of agricultural biotechnology has been controversial. This study investigates what determines the motivation of European biotech scientists to actively participate in policy making. To do this, a conceptual framework was developed based on the Theory of Planned...... Behavior. The framework was operationalized in semi-structured interviews with 17 European biotech scientists to collect data about their motivation to involve in GMO policy making. The results of this qualitative study suggest that the attitude of the scientists towards active participation in policy...... making is dependent on their view of the way science and decision making relate to each other. The respondents who are currently active in policy making seem to be driven by commitment to the public good. However, many respondents feel social pressure from environmental NGOs to withdraw from engagement...

  16. Economic governance of property rights: comparative analysis on the collection of royalties in genetically modified soybean seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Fowler de Avila Monteiro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the governance of property rights on genetically modified (GM soybean seeds. Specifically, the article undertakes a comparative analysis on the collection of royalties in GM soybean seeds in the U.S. and Brazil. For each country, the authors describe the regulatory framework governing the protection of biotechnology innovations in agriculture and investigate the mechanisms of royalty collection in GM soybean seeds. The paper also offers econometric evidence linking the capture of value on biotech innovations and the protection mechanisms deployed by biotech firms. The results suggest that, subject to the institutional environment, firms may choose to transact a GM attribute separated from the seed, building specialized governance structures framed around the genetic attribute and not around the seed as a whole.

  17. Inherent Anticipation in the Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Michael; Evans, Georgia; Zappia, Andrew

    2015-04-15

    Pharmaceutical and biotech research often involves discovering new properties of, or new methods to use, existing compositions. The doctrine of inherent anticipation, however, prevents the issuance and/or validity of a patent for discoveries deemed to have been implicitly disclosed in the prior art. This can be a barrier to patent rights in these technologies. Inherent anticipation therefore creates uncertainty for patent protection in the pharmaceutical and biotech sciences. Despite this uncertainty, Federal Circuit jurisprudence provides guidance on the boundaries of the inherent anticipation doctrine. In view of the case law, certain strategies may be employed to protect inventions that may potentially be viewed as inherent in the prior art. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  18. Establishing a Consortium for the Study of Rare Diseases: The Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminara, Jennifer; Tuchman, Mendel; Krivitzky, Lauren; Krischer, Jeffrey; Lee, Hye-Seung; LeMons, Cynthia; Baumgartner, Matthias; Cederbaum, Stephen; Diaz, George A.; Feigenbaum, Annette; Gallagher, Renata C.; Harding, Cary O.; Kerr, Douglas S.; Lanpher, Brendan; Lee, Brendan; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; McCandless, Shawn E.; Merritt, J. Lawrence; Oster-Granite, Mary Lou; Seashore, Margretta R.; Stricker, Tamar; Summar, Marshall; Waisbren, Susan; Yudkoff, Marc; Batshaw, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium (UCDC) was created as part of a larger network established by the National Institutes of Health to study rare diseases. This paper reviews the UCDC’s accomplishments over the first six years, including how the Consortium was developed and organized, clinical research studies initiated, and the importance of creating partnerships with patient advocacy groups, philanthropic foundations and biotech and pharmaceutical companies. PMID:20188616

  19. Phase 2 Clinical Trials: D-Methionine to Reduce Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Pharmaceuticals: Task completed. KP Pharmaceutical Technology, Indianapolis , Indiana is the drug manufacturer for this clinical trial. e. FDA/Regulatory...and Open House at Fort Jackson. j. June 8-9: Dr. Campbell interviewed with the Wall Street Journal at Fort Jackson. k. June 10-11, 2015: Dr...recommended by DoD Operational Medicine, Dr. Campbell, in conjunction with her business partner Jennifer Seibert, started a new biotech company, MetArmor

  20. [Biopiracy: about its legal meanings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez García, Hugo Saúl

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the legal meanings of biopiracy concept, linked to subjects such as intellectual property rights on genetic resources, bioprospecting contracts, right to food, and food security. It overcomes the critical function of biopiracy concept related to world-wide extended tendencies: privatization and technification. Likewise, protectionism shows the opportunity that biopiracy concept represents for the enrichment of the legal interpretation related to the bioethical statue of biotech developments.

  1. A novel hybrid technology for remediation of molasses-based raw effluents

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verma, A.K.; Raghukumar, C.; Naik, C.G.

    . Ltd., Chagallu, Andhra Pradesh, India. Conventional aeration tank inlet (CAT I) and Conventional aeration tank outlet (CAT O) were provided by the Emmellen Biotech Pharmaceuticals Ltd., Mahad, Maharashtra, India. 2.2. Physico-chemical analyses..., color units and turbidity (Table 1). As per the information furnished by the concerned industries, ROF and ROR were reverse osmosis feed and rejects respectively. CAT I and CAT O were anaerobically digested, while CAT O was further subjected...

  2. CONSUMER BIOTECHNOLOGY FOOD AND NUTRITION INFORMATION SOURCES: THE TRUST FACTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Ekanem, Enefiok P.; Muhammad, Safdar; Tegegne, Fisseha; Singh, Surendra P.

    2004-01-01

    Although much has been written on consumer attitudes toward genetically modified foods, not much is known about how or where consumers get the information for the decisions they make about genetically modified foods. This paper reports on the media used by consumers in acquiring information about biotech food and nutrition issues, and examines how much trust consumers put in selected information sources. The paper also discusses how socio-economic variables affect level of trust in selected s...

  3. Agribusiness Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    sheer enormity of this ultra modernized industry. Hybridized or biotech corn seeds are now nearly impervious to pesticides and herbicides. From...efficient routes of commerce of many thousands of miles - a fresh head of broccoli and lettuce lands in the chilled and computer controlled misting...cumulatively, seemingly minor and insignificant changes in food production methods (i.e. packaged precut lettuce ), society (desire for convenience foods

  4. Virtual Learning Simulations in High School: Effects on Cognitive and Non-cognitive Outcomes and Implications on the Development of STEM Academic and Career Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Thisgaard, Malene; Makransky, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The present study compared the value of using a virtual learning simulation compared to traditional lessons on the topic of evolution, and investigated if the virtual learning simulation could serve as a catalyst for STEM academic and career development, based on social cognitive career theory. The investigation was conducted using a crossover repeated measures design based on a sample of 128 high school biology/biotech students. The results showed that the virtual learning simulation increas...

  5. Allele frequency distribution for 21 autosomal STR loci in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaijenbrink, T; van Driem, G L; Opgenort, J R M L; Tuladhar, N M; de Knijff, P

    2007-05-24

    The allele frequency distributions of 21 autosomal loci contained in the AmpFlSTR Identifiler, the Powerplex 16 and the FFFL multiplex PCR kits, was studied in 953 unrelated individuals from Nepal. Several new alleles (i.e. not yet reported in the NIST Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet DataBase [http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/]) have been detected in the process.

  6. Eesti teadlaste kiip võitleb vähiga

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Vt. ka Linnaleht : Tallinn : na russkom jazõke 28. sept., lk. 4. Biotehnoloogiaettevõte Asper Biotech alustas Valgamaal kogutud DNA-proovide analüüsimist kahe kõige enam levinud päriliku vähi - rinnavähi ja jämesoolevähi - suhtes spetsiaalselt selle uuringu jaoks Eesti biokeskuses väljatöötatud ja maailmas unikaalse geenikiibi abil

  7. Patenting activity in biotechnology and pharmaceuticals: a comparative analysis of the Nordic Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Enrico Sorisio

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to study innovative activity, as measured by patent indicators, in pharmaceutical and biotechnological sectors in the Nordic Countries. The biotech sector in general and pharmaceutical in particular is one of the areas selected for strategic investments in every Nordic country. In terms of patents granted by country of inventors Denmark plays a leading role followed by Sweden, while patenting activity in Finland and Norway is lower. A concentration of patents tow...

  8. Use of Bifunctional Immunotherapeutic Agents to Target Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Science 270, 1500–1502. 32. Pasqualini , R., Koivunen, E., and Ruoslahti, E. (1997) v integrins as receptors for tumor targeting by circulating ligands...Nat. Biotech- nol. 15, 542–546. 33. Arap, W., Pasqualini , R., and Ruoslahti, E. (1998) Cancer treatment by targeted drug delivery to tumor...Cancer Res. 2, 663–673. 47. Arap, W., Pasqualini , R., and Ruoslahti, E. (1998) Cancer treatment by targeted drug delivery to tumor vasculature in a

  9. Traditional knowledge and patent protection: conflicting views on international patent standards

    OpenAIRE

    Andrzejewski, A

    2010-01-01

    As diseases continue to spread around the globe, pharmaceutical and biotech companies continue to search for new and better drugs to treat them. Most of these companies have realised that useful compounds for these purposes may be found in the natural resources that indigenous and local communities use. And yet, even though the importance of these biological resources to global health and economic livelihood is well recognised, the legal ownership and control of this traditional knowledge is ...

  10. Inactivated probiotic Bacillus coagulans GBI-30 induces complex immune activating, anti-inflammatory, and regenerative markers in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Gitte S; Cash, Howard A; Farmer, Sean; Keller, David

    2017-01-01

    Gitte S Jensen,1 Howard A Cash,2 Sean Farmer,2 David Keller2 1NIS Labs, Esplanade, Klamath Falls, OR, USA, 2Ganeden Biotech Inc., Landerbrook Drive Suite, Mayfield Heights, OH, USA Objective: The aim of this study was to document the immune activating and anti-inflammatory effects of inactivated probiotic Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 (Staimune™) cells on human immune cells in vitro.Methods: In vitro cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy blood do...

  11. Centrality and get-richer mechanisms in interregional knowledge networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo; Strotebeck, Falk

    2018-01-01

    and relate them to sector-region-specific and overall regional attributes in an explorative regression approach. The results indicate that fit-get-richer mechanisms proxied by regional endowments and policy factors such as biotech research and development funding categories and human capital matter...... for network formation. We find that these correlations differ across centrality measures and that empirical evidence for a richer-get-richer mechanism is limited....

  12. Brachymetatarsia of the Fourth Metatarsal, Lengthening Scarf Osteotomy with Bone Graft

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Ankit; Lidder, Surjit; R. Armitage, Andrew; S. Rajaratnam, Samuel; D. Skyrme, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with left fourth metatarsal shortening causing significant psychological distress. She underwent lengthening scarf osteotomy held with an Omnitech® screw (Biotech International, France) with the addition of two 1 cm cancellous cubes (RTI Biologics, United States). A lengthening z-plasty of the extensor tendons and skin were also performed. At 6 weeks the patient was fully weight bearing and at one-year follow up, the patient was satisfied and discharged. A modifie...

  13. Innovation in biotechnology: current and future states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollett, G R

    2012-01-01

    Innovation is assumed to be a good thing in health care, just as it is elsewhere, and to be crucial to the availability of greater choices for consumers. But what is it? Very little definition is provided when the term is used. This report discusses the following aspects of biotech innovation: innovation in medicinal products, innovation in manufacturing processes, and innovation in regulatory science (both oversight and licensure).

  14. A venture capital view of challenges, opportunities, and innovation in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, L T

    2011-02-01

    Small biotech companies have been an important source of innovation, pipelines, and new products for the pharmaceutical industry, and are primarily financed by venture capital (VC). The significant changes happening within the VC industry have broad implications for these small companies. This includes a shift to financing later-stage programs with increasing interest in orphan or specialty indications. Nontraditional sources of capital and innovative risk-sharing structures can enable early-stage companies.

  15. Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (WRIB) Poster Award winners 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Neil; Lowe, John; Coddens, Annelies

    2017-07-01

    The 11th WRIB held in Los Angeles, CA, USA in April 2017. It drew over 750 professionals representing large Pharmas, Biotechs, CROs and multiple regulatory agencies from around the world, from the global bioanalytical community. Bioanalysis and Bioanalysis Zone are very proud to be supporting the WRIB Poster Awards again this year, and we feature the profiles of the authors of the winning posters. Visit www.bioanalysis-zone.com to see the winning posters in full.

  16. Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria-Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    transfected with RNA. NatBiotech. 1998;16:364-369. 20. Heiser A, Dahm P, Yancey DR, et al. Human dendritic cells transfected with RNA encoding prostate...specific antigen stimulate prostate-specific CTL responses in vitro. J Immunol. 2000;164(10):5508-5514. 21. Heiser A, Maurice MA, Yancey DR...primary and metastatic tumors. Cancer Res. 2001;61(8):3388-3393. 22. Heiser A, Coleman D, Dannull J, et al. Autologous dendritic cells transfected

  17. Intranasal delivery of Huperzine A to the brain using lactoferrin-conjugated N-trimethylated chitosan surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Meng,Qingqing; Wang,Aiping; Hua,Hongchen; Jiang,Ying; Wang,Yiyun; Mu,Hongjie; Wu,Zimei; Sun,Kaoxiang

    2018-01-01

    Qingqing Meng,1,* Aiping Wang,1,2,* Hongchen Hua,1 Ying Jiang,1 Yiyun Wang,1 Hongjie Mu,1 Zimei Wu,1 Kaoxiang Sun1 1School of Pharmacy, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Drug Delivery System and Biotech Drugs in Universities of Shandong, Yantai University, Yantai, People’s Republic of China; 2State Key Laboratory of Long-Acting and Targeting Drug Delivery System, Shandong Luye Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd, Yantai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contribute...

  18. Molecular Mechanisms and Treatment Strategies for Obesity-Associated Coronary Artery Disease, an Imminent Military Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    in response to another ‘hit.’ This two-hit model of UPR-induced apoptosis is critical to understanding how FC enrichment kills macrophages. In this...Schering- Plough Research Grant, 1989-1995, Responsible Investigator, $50,000 per annum Individual National Research Supplement Award for Postdoctoral...Association grant-in-aid study section (1994) Consultant for Merck, Schering- Plough , Warner-Lambert, Berlex, Eli Lilly, Pfizer, Talaria Biotech, ReddyUS

  19. Potential Impacts of Pharmaceutical Uses of Transgenic Tobacco: The Case of Human Serum Albumin and Gaucher's Disease Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kostandini, Gentian

    2004-01-01

    This thesis examines the size and distribution of benefits from the use of transgenic tobacco as a production vehicle for pharmaceutical proteins. Ex-ante welfare benefits are estimated for the introduction of two biotech innovations. In both cases economic surplus model with imperfect competition is employed to assess the size and distribution of benefits from these alternative uses of tobacco. An introductory chapter presents an overview of the topic followed by chapters 2 and 3 which conta...

  20. Recombinant protein expression in microbial systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rosano, Germán L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of recombinant DNA technology during the early 70's set a revolution in molecular biology. This set of techniques was strengthened even further later on with the introduction of the polymerase chain reaction and allowed scientists to explore and understand essential life processes in an easy and straightforward way. It also marked the birth of the modern biotech industry. At that time, it was shown that eukaryotic DNA could be propagated in Escherichia coli (Morrow et al., 1974)...

  1. The ethics of big data in big agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Carbonell (Isabelle M.)

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the ethics of big data in agriculture, focusing on the power asymmetry between farmers and large agribusinesses like Monsanto. Following the recent purchase of Climate Corp., Monsanto is currently the most prominent biotech agribusiness to buy into big data. With wireless sensors on tractors monitoring or dictating every decision a farmer makes, Monsanto can now aggregate large quantities of previously proprietary farming data, enabling a privileged position with unique in...

  2. ACTIVITY OF BRYOPHYLLUM PINNATUM S. KURZ EXTRACTS ON

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Filter paper disc (6mm diameter) were cut and sterilized (in Bijou bottles) in oven at 110oC for. 1hour. 28g of Biotech Nutrient agar was dissolved in 1 liter distilled water in a conical flask and autoclaved. (to sterilized it) for 1 hour. 20ml of the sterilized medium was poured into the sterilized Petri dishes, covered and allowed ...

  3. Just how good an investment is the biopharmaceutical sector?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, Richard T; Anaya, Nicholas; Zhang, Yuwei; Vilanilam, Christian; Siah, Kien Wei; Wong, Chi Heem; Lo, Andrew W

    2017-12-01

    Uncertainty surrounding the risk and reward of investments in biopharmaceutical companies poses a challenge to those interested in funding such enterprises. Using data on publicly traded stocks, we track the performance of 1,066 biopharmaceutical companies from 1930 to 2015-the most comprehensive financial analysis of this sector to date. Our systematic exploration of methods for distinguishing biotech and pharmaceutical companies yields a dynamic, more accurate classification method. We find that the performance of the biotech sector is highly sensitive to the presence of a few outlier companies, and confirm that nearly all biotech companies are loss-making enterprises, exhibiting high stock volatility. In contrast, since 2000, pharmaceutical companies have become increasingly profitable, with risk-adjusted returns consistently outperforming the market. The performance of all biopharmaceutical companies is subject not only to factors arising from their drug pipelines (idiosyncratic risk), but also from general economic conditions (systematic risk). The risk associated with returns has profound implications both for patterns of investment and for funding innovation in biomedical R&D.

  4. State responses to biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews biotechnology legislation in the 50 states for 11 policy areas spanning 1990-2010, an era of immense growth in biotechnology, genetic knowledge, and significant policy development. Policies regarding health insurance, life insurance, long-term care insurance, DNA data bank collection, biotech research protection, biotech promotion and support, employment discrimination, genetic counselor licensing, human cloning, and genetic privacy each represent major policy responses arising from biotechnology and coinciding with key areas of state regulation (insurance, criminal justice, economic development, labor law, health and safety, privacy, and property rights). This analysis seeks to answer three questions regarding biotechnology legislation at the state level: who is acting (policy adoption), when is policy adopted (policy timing), and what is policy doing (policy content). Theoretical concerns examine state ideology (conservative or liberal), policy type (economic or moral), and the role of external events (federal law, news events, etc.) on state policy adoption. Findings suggest ideological patterns in adoption, timing, and content of biotech policy. Findings also suggest economic policies tend to be more uniform in content than moral policies, and findings also document a clear link between federal policy development, external events, and state policy response.

  5. Australia's bio-regulatory framework: leading the way for stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Biotechnology in Australia has flourished over the past five years. During this time the number of companies has doubled to over 370, and over 40 companies are now publicly listed. The total market capitalization of the biotechnology companies listed on the Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) in 2003 was US$1.5 billion. Total market capitalization of the health and biotech companies on the ASX was US$13 billion. The size of the total Australian pharmaceutical market in 2003 was US$9 billion. This article highlights the role of Australia in advancing stem cell research and its contribution to biotechnology research, development and commercialization.

  6. Brachymetatarsia of the fourth metatarsal, lengthening scarf osteotomy with bone graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Desai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old girl presented with left fourth metatarsal shortening causing significant psychological distress. She underwent lengthening scarf osteotomy held with an Omnitech® screw (Biotech International, France with the addition of two 1 cm cancellous cubes (RTI Biologics, United States. A lengthening z-plasty of the extensor tendons and skin were also performed. At 6 weeks the patient was fully weight bearing and at one-year follow up, the patient was satisfied and discharged. A modified technique of lengthening scarf osteotomy is described for congenital brachymatatarsia. This technique allows one stage lengthening through a single incision with graft incorporation by 6 weeks.

  7. Gone with transgenic cotton cropping in the USA. A perception of the presentations and interactions at the Beltwide Cotton Conferences, New Orleans (Louisiana, USA, 4-7/01/2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fok, M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2010 Beltwide Cotton Conferences provided a new vision of the consequences of about 15 years of widespread and uncoordinated cropping of transgenic cotton in the United States. Insect-resistant and/or herbicide-tolerant cotton varieties modified parasite complexes, namely those of insects and weeds damaging cotton crops. The Conferences have revealed that the adaptation solutions so far proposed make illusory the expectations at the launch of transgenic cotton, in terms of effective pest control, cost reduction, and antagonism between chemical and biotech methods. The USA case points out that the technical and economic sustainability of transgenic varieties must lie in a systemic and coordinated approach.

  8. A searching and reporting system for relational databases using a graph-based metadata representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Robin; Gobbi, Alberto; Lee, Man-Ling

    2005-01-01

    Relational databases are the current standard for storing and retrieving data in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. However, retrieving data from a relational database requires specialized knowledge of the database schema and of the SQL query language. At Anadys, we have developed an easy-to-use system for searching and reporting data in a relational database to support our drug discovery project teams. This system is fast and flexible and allows users to access all data without having to write SQL queries. This paper presents the hierarchical, graph-based metadata representation and SQL-construction methods that, together, are the basis of this system's capabilities.

  9. Review on Micro- and Nanolithography Techniques and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werayut Srituravanich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews major micro- and nanolithography techniques and their applications from commercial micro devices to emerging applications in nanoscale science and engineering. Micro- and nanolithography has been the key technology in manufacturing of integrated circuits and microchips in the semiconductor industry. Such a technology is also sparking a magnificent transformation of nanotechnology. The lithography techniques including photolithography, electron beam lithography, focused ion beam lithography, soft lithography, nanoimprint lithography and scanning probe lithography are discussed. Furthermore, their applications are reviewed and summarized into four major areas: electronics and microsystems, medical and biotech, optics and photonics, and environment and energy harvesting.

  10. Analysis of Cry8Ka5-binding proteins from Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasu, Erich Y T; Firmino, Alexandre A P; Dias, Simoni C; Rocha, Thales L; Ramos, Hudson B; Oliveira, Gustavo R; Lucena, Wagner; Carlini, Célia R; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria Fátima

    2010-07-01

    Biotech crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins present a valuable approach for insect control. Cry8Ka5, which is highly toxic to the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis), was used as a model to study toxin-ligand interactions. Three Cry-binding proteins were detected after toxin overlay assays. Following de novo sequencing, a heat-shock cognate protein and a V-ATPase were identified, whilst a approximately 120 kDa protein remained unknown. Additional Cry8Ka5-binding proteins were visualized by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis ligand blots. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Commentary on patents: Don`t dismiss Rifkin`s damning of gene patents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyle, R.

    1995-07-01

    Biotech may have less to fear from Rifkin than from its own inclination to dismiss the fact that the evolution of ethics and patent laws applying to patenting genes has been haphazard. Perhaps it is time for the biotechnology industry to get behind the establishment of an effective forum for opening much-needed dialogue. Perhaps a Senate proposal to establish a bioethics commission, which reportedly has bogged down in partisan politics, is just such a venue for the government and private sector to begin to hash out the ethical and legal dilemmas that are indisputably at the heart of the biotechnology industry, and its future success.

  12. Bioceres: AG Biotechnology from Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Feeney

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this case we present a business decision-making situation in which the CEO of an Argentine Ag Biotech company, Bioceres, has to decide the best way to commercialize a new drought-tolerant transgenic technology. The company was founded by twenty three farmers, who shared a common dream that Argentina could become a benchmark in the development of Ag biotechnology. The case has strategic and financial implications, as well as decision-making situation involving a joint venture with an American biotechnology company. It also introduces to discussion the business models of Ag biotechnology companies in developing countries.

  13. Protocolo para obtenção do plasma rico em plaquetas de cães

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Vanessa Borges costa [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    Biotechnology as the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) have been widely used in tissue repair, aiming to accelerate the healing of wounds. The potencial of PRP to reduce the recovery time of injuries depends on the concentration of platelets, its function and their growth factors. The lack of protocols for obtaining PRP in dogs, combined with variations of the same, hinders the use of biotech. The aim of this study was to test three different protocols for obtaining PRP and verify effectiveness in d...

  14. The current status of immunotoxins: an overview of experimental and clinical studies as presented at the Third International Symposium on Immunotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uckun, F M; Frankel, A

    1993-02-01

    The Third International Symposium on Immunotoxins was held on June 19-21, 1992 in Orlando, Florida. This symposium was sponsored by NATO, NIH, Pierce Chemical Company, Walt Disney Cancer Institute at Florida Hospital, Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Xoma, Immunogen, Seragen, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Chiron, Ortho Biotech, Upjohn, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, Abbot Laboratories, Lilly Research Laboratories, and Evans & Sutherland. The Pierce Immunotoxin Award which recognizes outstanding contributions to immunotoxin research and development, was presented to Drs David FitzGerald, Fatih Uckun, David Eisenberg, and Ira Wool, for their contributions to the immunotoxin field.

  15. Experiment list: SRX150477 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osis=Fibrocystic Disease 70636654,97.7,24.3,106225 GSM935397: Harvard ChipSeq MCF10A-Er-Src 4OHTAM 1uM 4hr c-Fos Harvard... Control source_name=MCF10A-Er-Src || biomaterial_provider=Struhl laboratory || lab=Harvard || l... a leucine-zipper. || antibody vendorname=Santa Cruz Biotech || antibody vendorid=sc-7202 || control=Harvard..._Control || control description=input library was prepared at Harvard. || control=Harvard..._Control || control description=input library was prepared at Harvard. || controlid=wgEncodeEH002871

  16. Experiment list: SRX150476 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osis=Fibrocystic Disease 60050220,94.5,18.5,85444 GSM935396: Harvard ChipSeq MCF10A-Er-Src 4OHTAM 1uM 36hr c-Fos Harvard... Control source_name=MCF10A-Er-Src || biomaterial_provider=Struhl laboratory || lab=Harvard || l...is a leucine-zipper. || antibody vendorname=Santa Cruz Biotech || antibody vendorid=sc-7202 || control=Harvard..._Control || control description=input library was prepared at Harvard. || control=Harvard..._Control || control description=input library was prepared at Harvard. || controlid=wgEncodeEH0028

  17. Experiment list: SRX150478 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osis=Fibrocystic Disease 66690540,98.1,24.9,110111 GSM935398: Harvard ChipSeq MCF10A-Er-Src 4OHTAM 1uM 12hr c-Fos Harvard... Control source_name=MCF10A-Er-Src || biomaterial_provider=Struhl laboratory || lab=Harvard || ...lab description=Struhl - Harvard University || datatype=ChipSeq || datatype descr... is a leucine-zipper. || antibody vendorname=Santa Cruz Biotech || antibody vendorid=sc-7202 || control=Harvard..._Control || control description=input library was prepared at Harvard. || control=Harvard

  18. Experiment list: SRX150517 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osis=Fibrocystic Disease 50667127,93.3,23.9,80828 GSM935438: Harvard ChipSeq MCF10A-Er-Src EtOH 0.01pct c-Fos Harvard... Control source_name=MCF10A-Er-Src || biomaterial_provider=Struhl laboratory || lab=Harvard || lab description=Struhl - Harv...me=Santa Cruz Biotech || antibody vendorid=sc-7202 || control=Harvard_Control || control description=input l...ibrary was prepared at Harvard. || control=Harvard_Control || control description...=input library was prepared at Harvard. || controlid=wgEncodeEH002871 || replicate=1 http://dbarchive.biosci

  19. Experiment list: SRX150570 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osis=Fibrocystic Disease 64692659,93.8,19.3,37417 GSM935491: Harvard ChipSeq MCF10A-Er-Src 4OHTAM 1uM 4hr c-Myc Harvard... Control source_name=MCF10A-Er-Src || biomaterial_provider=Struhl laboratory || lab=Harvard || la...ntibody vendorname=Santa Cruz Biotech || antibody vendorid=sc-764 || control=Harvard_Control || control desc...ription=input library was prepared at Harvard. || control=Harvard_Control || cont...rol description=input library was prepared at Harvard. || controlid=wgEncodeEH002871 || replicate=1 http://d

  20. Environmental Technologies Summary Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    This book lists the companies and their technology, which have new excellent technology authentication and technology verification. They are as in the following : sewage advanced treatment technology using a three-stage Bio-Ceramic Filtration by Shinwoo engineering.co.kr, Twist Filter by Sungshin engineering.co.kr, Sewage advanced treatment technology using CIMEN-DOC by Taeyeong/CI biotech.co.kr, DeNipho using pump ejector and Bio Green Media by Green Technology.co.kr, Automatic integrated management system using Envi-SIS by Sallasanup.com Kozone.co.kr and Geoworks.co.kr.

  1. Study of the association degree between cerebral magnetic resonance signal and the transcranial sonography Estudio del grado de asociación entre la señal de resonancia magnética cerebral y la ecografía transcraneal Estudi del grau d'associació entre el senya de ressonancia magnètica cerebral i l'ecografia transcranial

    OpenAIRE

    Carrascosa Morales, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    El coregistre d'una imatge d'ecografia transcraneal amb un volum de ressonància magnètica cerebral i estudi del grau d'associació entre elles. Projecte el·laborat amb Transmural Biotech SL English: The study tries to achieve a multimodal registration between a transcranial sonography (TCS) and a cerebral magnetic resonance volume. After the registration stage, a statistical analysis of each brain matter (white matter, gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid) was performed to demonstrate the...

  2. Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy--49th annual meeting. Part 2. 12-15 September 2009, San Francisco, CA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ben; Murch, Lisa

    2009-11-01

    The Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy held in San Francisco included topics covering new therapeutic developments for the treatment of infectious diseases. This conference report highlights selected presentations on several antibiotics in development including a broad-spectrum penem beta-lactam antibiotic, a novel siderophore monobactam, as well as other novel antibiotics. Investigational drugs discussed include sulopenem and sulopenem etzadroxil (both Pfizer Inc), BAL-30072 (Basilea Pharmaceutica International Ltd), TP-120 and TP-787 (both Tetraphase Pharmaceuticals Inc), NAI-107 (New Anti Infectives Consortium/NexThera Biosciences) and ABI-200 (AdRem Biotech/US Department of Agriculture).

  3. Development of anti-inflammatory drugs - the research and development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Richard Graham

    2014-01-01

    The research and development process for novel drugs to treat inflammatory diseases is described, and several current issues and debates relevant to this are raised: the decline in productivity, attrition, challenges and trends in developing anti-inflammatory drugs, the poor clinical predictivity of experimental models of inflammatory diseases, heterogeneity within inflammatory diseases, 'improving on the Beatles' in treating inflammation, and the relationships between big pharma and biotechs. The pharmaceutical research and development community is responding to these challenges in multiple ways which it is hoped will lead to the discovery and development of a new generation of anti-inflammatory medicines. © 2013 Nordic Pharmacological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The year's new drugs & biologics, 2017, part II - News that shaped the industry in 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graul, A I; Dulsat, C; Pina, P; Tracy, M; D'Souza, P

    2018-02-01

    This eagle's-eye overview of the drug industry in 2017 provides insight into some of last year's top stories, including the growing opioid crisis affecting the U.S. and other developed countries and the 2017-2018 influenza epidemic, with a spotlight on the need for a universal flu vaccine. As in previous years, we also review orphan drug development, new agency-supported programs such as PRIME and RMAT, pipeline attrition and drug pricing, as well as pharma/biotech mergers and acquisitions of note. Finally, we take a glimpse into the crystal ball to anticipate the new drugs that will be approved in 2018. Copyright 2018 Clarivate Analytics.

  5. Brachymetatarsia of the fourth metatarsal, lengthening scarf osteotomy with bone graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Ankit; Lidder, Surjit; R Armitage, Andrew; S Rajaratnam, Samuel; D Skyrme, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with left fourth metatarsal shortening causing significant psychological distress. She underwent lengthening scarf osteotomy held with an Omnitech(®) screw (Biotech International, France) with the addition of two 1 cm cancellous cubes (RTI Biologics, United States). A lengthening zplasty of the extensor tendons and skin were also performed. At 6 weeks the patient was fully weight bearing and at one-year follow up, the patient was satisfied and discharged. A modified technique of lengthening scarf osteotomy is described for congenital brachymatatarsia. This technique allows one stage lengthening through a single incision with graft incorporation by 6 weeks.

  6. Blind Technology Transfer or Technological Knowledge Leakage: a Case Study from the South

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Codner

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Blurring boundaries between science and technology is a new phenomenon especially in fields such as biotechnology. The present work shows the fate of biotech research papers on foreign patents produced during the last decade in Quilmes National University. It aims at recognizing the flow of scientific knowledge developed at a public university towards foreign companies and organizations as well as reflecting on its technological value, the role of technology transfer management, the institutional significance of technology transfer processes and the need to develop innovative public policies for solving structural failures caused by industrial underdevelopment

  7. Clinical Comparison of the Treponema pallidum CAPTIA Syphilis-G Enzyme Immunoassay with the Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody Absorption Immunoglobulin G Assay for Syphilis Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Halling, V. W.; Jones, M. F.; Bestrom, J. E.; Wold, A. D.; Rosenblatt, J. E.; Smith, T. F.; Cockerill, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, a treponema-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme immunoassay (EIA), the CAPTIA Syphilis-G (Trinity Biotech, Jamestown, N.Y.), has become available as a diagnostic test for syphilis. A total of 89 stored sera previously tested by the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) IgG assay were evaluated by the CAPTIA EIA. The FTA-ABS IgG procedure was performed by technologists unblinded to results of rapid plasmid reagin (RPR) testing of the same specimens. Borderline CAPTI...

  8. Sowing the seeds of skepticism: Russian state news and anti-GMO sentiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorius, Shawn F; Lawrence-Dill, Carolyn J

    2018-03-21

    Biotech news coverage in English-language Russian media fits the profile of the Russian information warfare strategy described in recent military reports. This raises the question of whether Russia views the dissemination of anti-GMO information as just one of many divisive issues it can exploit as part of its information war, or if GMOs serve more expansive disruptive purposes. Distinctive patterns in Russian news provide evidence of a coordinated information campaign that could turn public opinion against genetic engineering. The recent branding of Russian agriculture as the ecologically clean alternative to genetically engineered foods is suggestive of an economic motive behind the information campaign against western biotechnologies.

  9. Dépendance à la trajectoire et création d’une trajectoire dans les controverses sur la sphère bioénergétique au Danemark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bente Hessellund; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2015-01-01

    and a measure to reduce climate impact and nuisances from slurry, while NGOs fear slurry-based biogas is used as argument for increased animal husbandry. A biotech company develops enzymes for processing of biomass for second generation biofuels, which has obtained some support, while others see this as merely...... and the environmental impacts of using bioenergy: Energy companies convert coal fired power plants into imported biomass to sustain the role of these power plants in the transition towards renewable energy, while some NGOs claim that this practice will not reduce emissions. Farmers see slurry as a source for biogas...

  10. Use of combinatorial chemistry to speed drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rádl, S

    1998-10-01

    IBC's International Conference on Integrating Combinatorial Chemistry into the Discovery Pipeline was held September 14-15, 1998. The program started with a pre-conference workshop on High-Throughput Compound Characterization and Purification. The agenda of the main conference was divided into sessions of Synthesis, Automation and Unique Chemistries; Integrating Combinatorial Chemistry, Medicinal Chemistry and Screening; Combinatorial Chemistry Applications for Drug Discovery; and Information and Data Management. This meeting was an excellent opportunity to see how big pharma, biotech and service companies are addressing the current bottlenecks in combinatorial chemistry to speed drug discovery. (c) 1998 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  11. Gold nanoparticles extraction from dielectric scattering background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xin; Wang, Jingxin

    2014-11-01

    The unique advantages such as brightness, non-photobleaching, good bio-compatibility make gold nanoparticles desirable labels and play important roles in biotech and related research and applications. Distinguishing gold nanoparticles from other dielectric scattering particles is of more importance, especially in bio-tracing and imaging. The enhancement image results from the localized surface plasmon resonance associated with gold nanopartilces makes themselves distinguishable from other dielectric particles, based on which, we propose a dual-wavelength detection method by employing a high sensitive cross-polarization microscopy.

  12. Life cycle inventory and risk assessment of genetic modified perennial ryegrass in a technology foresight perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, K.; Rasmussen, B.; Schleisner, L.

    2000-01-01

    important and uncertain fac-tors for the future direction of GM crops: 1) publicparticipation in regulation, 2) utility value for the consumers, 3) being first to market GM-ryegrass, and 4) an efficient professional network. Based on the identified drivers several scenar-ios were constructed, of which two......, a methodological approach is suggested to analyse the uncertainties that the biotech industry and the authorities face when implementing genetically modified (GM) crops. These uncertainties embracescientific rationality regarding technological development and risk assessments, as well as ethic political and social...

  13. Assessing the impacts of industrial water use in Life Cycle Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lévová, Tereza; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2011-01-01

    Use of freshwater gives rise to important environmental impacts to consider in the sustainability analysis of an industry or a product. Water use impacts are highly dependent on the local or regional conditions, and apart from the quantity that is extracted and used, the impact of the freshwater...... use also depends on the local sensitivity to freshwater extraction, and the change in the quality from water intake to discharge of the usedwater. A methodology is presented catering to these characteristics of the water use issue and demonstrated on an industrial case study from the biotech industry....

  14. Biorefineries to integrate fuel, energy and chemical production processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica Bargiacchi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The world of renewable energies is in fast evolution and arouses political and public interests, especially as an opportunity to boost environmental sustainability by mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. This work aims at examining the possibilities related to the development of biorefineries, where biomass conversion processes to produce biofuels, electricity and biochemicals are integrated. Particular interest is given to the production processes of biodiesel, bioethanol and biogas, for which present world situation, problems, and perspectives are drawn. Potential areas for agronomic and biotech researches are also discussed. Producing biomass for biorefinery processing will eventually lead to maximize yields, in the non food agriculture.

  15. Managing Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Heidi; Vintergaard, Christian

    Logically it seems that companies pursuing different business strategies wouldalso manage their relationships with other firms accordingly. Nevertheless, due tothe lack of research in the field of network strategies, this link still remainsinadequately examined. Based on the well-known framework...... isprovided, that the relation between a company's strategy, structure and processesin fact have a considerable influence on its pattern of network behaviour. Threecase studies from the Danish biotech industry exemplify and illustrate how acompany's strategy is directly correlated with how it manages its...... of networkbehaviour, knowing how to manage this relation becomes essential, especiallyduring the development of new strategies....

  16. Stem cell treatments in China: rethinking the patient role in the global bio-economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haidan; Gottweis, Herbert

    2013-05-01

    The paper looks in detail at patients that were treated at one of the most discussed companies operating in the field of untried stem cell treatments, Beike Biotech of Shenzhen, China. Our data show that patients who had been treated at Beike Biotech view themselves as proactively pursuing treatment choices that are not available in their home countries. These patients typically come from a broad variety of countries: China, the United Kingdom, the United States, South Africa and Australia. Among the patients we interviewed there seemed to be both an awareness of the general risks involved in such experimental treatments and a readiness to accept those risks weighed against the possible benefits. We interpret this evidence as possibly reflecting the emergence of risk-taking patients as 'consumers' of medical options as well as the drive of patients to seek treatment options in the global arena, rather than being hindered by the ethical and regulatory constraints of their home countries. Further, we found that these patients tend to operate in more or less stable networks and groups in which they interact and cooperate closely and develop opinions and assessments of available treatment options for their ailments. These patients also perform a multiple role as patients, research subjects, and research funders because they are required to pay their way into treatment and research activities. This new social dynamics of patienthood has important implications for the ethical governance of stem cell treatments. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Destination bioeconomy - The path towards a smarter, more sustainable future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont-Inglis, Joanna; Borg, Agnes

    2018-01-25

    Five years following the publication of the EU Bioeconomy Strategy, this article discusses the state of play of the bioeconomy in Europe. Placing specific focus on Industrial Biotech, it outlines ten pragmatic recommendations from BIO-TIC [BIO-TIC, A roadmap to a thriving industrial biotechnology sector in Europe, 2015], an EU FP7 funded project completed in 2015 and coordinated by EuropaBio, comprehensively examining the hurdles to the development of a bioeconomy in Europe, enabled by industrial biotech. These include improving opportunities for feedstock producers within the bioeconomy; investigating the scope for using novel biomass; developing a workforce which can maintain Europe's competitiveness in industrial biotechnology; introducing a long-term, stable and transparent policy and incentive framework to promote the bioeconomy; improving public perception and awareness of industrial biotechnology and bio-based products; identifying, leveraging and building upon EU capabilities for pilot and demonstration facilities; promoting the use of co-products from processing; improving the bioconversion and downstream processing steps; improving access to financing for large-scale biorefinery projects; developing stronger relationships between conventional and non-conventional players. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. An Asian perspective on GMO and biotechnology issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Paul P S

    2008-01-01

    Of the 102 million hectares that made up the global area of biotech crops in 2006, less than 8% (7.6 million ha) were in Asia. Three biotech crops are currently planted in significant areas in four Asian countries with government regulatory approval; namely, cotton, corn (maize), and canola. However, the amount of GM crop material imported into the Asian region for processing into food and animal feed is very substantial, and almost every country imports GM food. The issues which concern Asian scientists, regulators, and the lay public resemble those of other regions - biosafety, food safety, ethics and social justice, competitiveness, and the "EU" trade question. Most Asian countries now have regulatory systems for approving the commercialization of GM crops, and for approving food safety of GM crops. In Asia, because of the varied cultures, issues concerning the use of genes derived from animals arouse much emotion for religious and diet choice reasons. Because many Asian producers and farmers are small-scale, there is also concern about technology dependency and to whom the benefits accrue. All consumers surveyed have expressed concern about potential allergenic and long-term toxic effects, neither of which is grounded on scientific facts. Because of Asia's growing demand for high volumes of quality food, it is likely that GM crops will become an increasing feature of our diet.

  19. Bioactive wound healing, bioaesthetics and biosurgery: three pillars of product development. Interview with Geoff MacKay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Geoff

    2006-03-01

    Tissue regeneration specialist company Organogenesis Inc. was one of the first biotech companies formed. Incorporated in 1985, the company was originally a spin-off from a research program at MIT. For the first 10-15 years, Organogenesis was heavily research based, but then gradually moved into development. The company's flagship product is Apligraf--a living, bilayered skin construct with two FDA-approved indications: diabetic foot ulcers and venous leg ulcers. As Apligraf neared the market, it was necessary to 'graft' a manufacturing capability onto the company. As a consequence the company moved south from Massachusetts's cradle of biotechnology to Canton, MA, USA. Having experienced many of the highs and lows that characterize the biotech industry, the company is now consolidating its position as a center of expertise in commercializing living, cell-based products. The company has now built a sales, marketing and reimbursement team with the unique skill set to integrate novel technology into the US healthcare system. President & Chief Executive Officer Geoff MacKay takes great pride in the leading role that Organogenesis is playing in ushering in the field of tissue regeneration. Here, he discusses with Regenerative Medicine's Elisa Manzotti the 'three pillars' of the Organogenesis pipeline: bioactive wound healing, bioaesthetics and biosurgery. He focuses both on the rewards, and the trials and tribulations, of the commercialization of living cell-based technology.

  20. The evolution of biotechnology and its impact on health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evens, Ronald; Kaitin, Kenneth

    2015-02-01

    For more than three decades the field of biotechnology has had an extraordinary impact on science, health care, law, the regulatory environment, and business. During this time more than 260 novel biotechnology products were approved for over 230 indications. Global sales of these products exceeded $175 billion in 2013 and have helped sustain a vibrant life sciences sector that includes more than 4,600 biotech companies worldwide. In this article we examine the evolution of biotechnology during the past three decades and the profound impact that it has had on health care through four interrelated and interdependent tracks: innovations in science, government activity, business development, and patient care. The future impact of biotechnology is promising, as long as the public and private sectors continue to foster policies and provide funds that lead to scientific breakthroughs; governments continue to offer incentives for private-sector biotech innovation; industry develops business models for cost-effective research and development; and all stakeholders establish policies to ensure that the therapeutic advances that mitigate or cure medical conditions that currently have inadequate or no available therapies are accessible to the public at a reasonable cost. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  1. Recent Patents in Agricultural Biotechnology; Focus on Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhzoum, Abdullah; Venkataraman, Srividhya; Tremouillaux-Guiller, Jocelyne; Hefferon, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural biotechnology, including the generation of genetically modified food crops, has been the subject of much controversy over the last few years. Initially serving the basic needs of farmers, Ag Biotech has more recently gained much appeal for its opportunities with respect to both the nutritional and pharmaceutical sciences. The following review describes a number of recently approved patents that could have direct implications for the field of medicine. Topics range from the development of pharmaceuticals in plants using hairy roots or virus expression vectors, to the role of epigenetics for improving the nutritional value of food crops. Many of these patents were developed by smaller companies or publically funded research institutes, disproving the perception that intellectual property in Ag Biotech is restricted to only large multinational corporations. The review concludes with a discussion of the future of these technologies in the face of the current negative political climate. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Maize transformation technology development for commercial event generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Que, Qiudeng; Elumalai, Sivamani; Li, Xianggan; Zhong, Heng; Nalapalli, Samson; Schweiner, Michael; Fei, Xiaoyin; Nuccio, Michael; Kelliher, Timothy; Gu, Weining; Chen, Zhongying; Chilton, Mary-Dell M.

    2014-01-01

    Maize is an important food and feed crop in many countries. It is also one of the most important target crops for the application of biotechnology. Currently, there are more biotech traits available on the market in maize than in any other crop. Generation of transgenic events is a crucial step in the development of biotech traits. For commercial applications, a high throughput transformation system producing a large number of high quality events in an elite genetic background is highly desirable. There has been tremendous progress in Agrobacterium-mediated maize transformation since the publication of the Ishida et al. (1996) paper and the technology has been widely adopted for transgenic event production by many labs around the world. We will review general efforts in establishing efficient maize transformation technologies useful for transgenic event production in trait research and development. The review will also discuss transformation systems used for generating commercial maize trait events currently on the market. As the number of traits is increasing steadily and two or more modes of action are used to control key pests, new tools are needed to efficiently transform vectors containing multiple trait genes. We will review general guidelines for assembling binary vectors for commercial transformation. Approaches to increase transformation efficiency and gene expression of large gene stack vectors will be discussed. Finally, recent studies of targeted genome modification and transgene insertion using different site-directed nuclease technologies will be reviewed. PMID:25140170

  3. Agricultural biotechnology and smallholder farmers in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Vivienne M; Ferroni, Marco

    2012-04-01

    Agricultural biotechnology holds much potential to contribute towards crop productivity gains and crop improvement for smallholder farmers in developing countries. Over 14 million smallholder farmers are already benefiting from biotech crops such as cotton and maize in China, India and other Asian, African and Central/South American countries. Molecular breeding can accelerate crop improvement timescales and enable greater use of diversity of gene sources. Little impact has been realized to date with fruits and vegetables because of development timescales for molecular breeding and development and regulatory costs and political considerations facing biotech crops in many countries. Constraints to the development and adoption of technology-based solutions to reduce yield gaps need to be overcome. Full integration with broader commercial considerations such as farmer access to seed distribution systems that facilitate dissemination of improved varieties and functioning markets for produce are critical for the benefits of agricultural biotechnology to be fully realized by smallholders. Public-private partnerships offer opportunities to catalyze new approaches and investment while accelerating integrated research and development and commercial supply chain-based solutions. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. THE IMPORTANCE OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COMPANY AND INCUBATOR FOR BIOTECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Ferreira Alves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The biotechnology activities development demands an intense academic and scientific basis, a productive sector capable of transforming academic research in scientific products and services, and the creation of an institutional environment to promote the sector’s development. Moreover, many biotechnology companies establish formal partnerships with Universities (by technological incubator to expand innovative capacity coming into the market. The importance of biotechnology for developing countries is perceived by its ability to promote national development based on knowledge and innovation. In Brazil, the government establishes technological incubators to accelerate the company consolidation. In this way, it is important to study the relationship between the actors involved. In this context, this article aims to analyze the relationship between a technological incubator and a biotech company. To do so, the qualitative approach was adopted to reach the objective. Interviews with incubator’s employees of a Brazilian University and biotechnology company’s managers were conducted. The results show that the company-incubator interaction promoted projects approval which were able to support new researches development and to purchase production equipment. Incubated companies have higher chances of survival in the market from the interaction with University, through the technological incubator. The relationship between the incubator and the biotech company is considered a fundamental condition for biotechnology activities development.

  5. Essential Drugs Production in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoheir Ezziane

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to elucidate various essential drugs in the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS countries. It discusses the opportunities and challenges of the existing biotech infrastructure and the production of drugs and vaccines in member states of the BRICS. This research is based on a systematic literature review between the years 2000 and 2014 of documents retrieved from the databases Embase, PubMed/Medline, Global Health, and Google Scholar, and the websites of relevant international organizations, research institutions and philanthropic organizations. Findings vary from one member state to another. These include useful comparison between the BRICS countries in terms of pharmaceuticals expenditure versus total health expenditure, local manufacturing of drugs/vaccines using technology and know-how transferred from developed countries, and biotech entrepreneurial collaborations under the umbrella of the BRICS region. This study concludes by providing recommendations to support more of inter collaborations among the BRICS countries as well as between BRICS and many developing countries to shrink drug production costs. In addition, this collaboration would also culminate in reaching out to poor countries that are not able to provide their communities and patients with cost-effective essential medicines.

  6. Gene Editing and CRISPR Therapeutics: Strategies Taught by Cell and Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    A few years ago, we assisted in the demonstration for the first time of the revolutionary idea of a type of adaptive-immune system in the bacteria kingdom. This system, named CRISPR, and variants engineered in the lab, have been demonstrated as functional with extremely high frequency and fidelity in almost all eukaryotic cells studied to date. The capabilities of this RNA-guided nuclease have added to the interest that was announced with the advent of previous technologies for genome editing tools, such as ZFN and TALEN. The capabilities exhibited by these gene editors, opens up a novel scenario that indicates the promise of a next-generation medicine based on precision and personalized objectives, mostly due to the change in the paradigm regarding gene-surgery. This has certainly attracted, like never before, the attention of the biotech business and investor community. This chapter offers a brief overview of some of the factors that have contributed to a rapid entry into the biotech and pharmaceutical company's pipeline, focusing on how cell and gene therapies (CGT), collectively known as advanced therapies, have become the driving forces toward the therapeutic uses of gene editing technology. The sum of all those efforts for more than 30years has contributed to the new paradigm of considering genes as medicines. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Energy from waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajidas, A.

    2010-01-01

    In accordance with the fast growing population, the demand for energy and the discharge of waste are also increasing day by day. So, there is two method of waste treatment that practiced by our company, centralised and de centralised. For de centralised treatment, there are some advantages like no collection, no transportation, small investment and for disadvantages, more treatment plants are needed. Waste of food materials and other bio degradable wastes generated in Factory canteens, Convents, Hospitals, Hostels, Hotels and other industrial organizations can be treated in an eco-friendly way for the production of cooking gas in very large scale. BIOTECH has completed the installation of 52 Nos. power generation projects using market /slaughter house waste. The power generated from these projects is being utilized for energy requirements of the concerned markets and to meet the in-house requirements of the projects. In recognition of our selfless services to the society through our system of waste management and the generation of Energy from waste. BIOTECH was honored by conferring on it the prestigious International Ashden Award GREEN OSCAR 2007. (Author)

  8. Genetically modified crops: the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khush Gurdev S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The major scientific advances of the last century featured the identification of the structure of DNA, the development of molecular biology and the technology to exploit these advances. These breakthroughs gave us new tools for crop improvement, including molecular marker-aided selection (MAS and genetic modification (GM. MAS improves the efficiency of breeding programs, and GM allows us to accomplish breeding objectives not possible through conventional breeding approaches. MAS is not controversial and is now routinely used in crop improvement programs. However, the international debate about the application of genetic manipulation to crop improvement has slowed the adoption of GM crops in developing as well as in European countries. Since GM crops were first introduced to global agriculture in 1996, Clive James has published annual reports on the global status of commercialized GM crops as well as special reports on individual GM crops for The International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA. His 34th report, Global Status of Commercialized Biotech/ GM crops: 2011 [1] is essential reading for those who are concerned about world food security.

  9. Next Generation Biopharmaceuticals: Product Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2018-04-11

    Therapeutic proteins show a rapid market growth. The relatively young biotech industry already represents 20 % of the total global pharma market. The biotech industry environment has traditionally been fast-pasted and intellectually stimulated. Nowadays the top ten best selling drugs are dominated by monoclonal antibodies (mABs).Despite mABs being the biggest medical breakthrough in the last 25 years, technical innovation does not stand still.The goal remains to preserve the benefits of a conventional mAB (serum half-life and specificity) whilst further improving efficacy and safety and to open new and better avenues for treating patients, e.g., improving the potency of molecules, target binding, tissue penetration, tailored pharmacokinetics, and reduced adverse effects or immunogenicity.The next generation of biopharmaceuticals can pose specific chemistry, manufacturing, and control (CMC) challenges. In contrast to conventional proteins, next-generation biopharmaceuticals often require lyophilization of the final drug product to ensure storage stability over shelf-life time. In addition, next-generation biopharmaceuticals require analytical methods that cover different ways of possible degradation patterns and pathways, and product development is a long way from being straight forward. The element of "prior knowledge" does not exist equally for most novel formats compared to antibodies, and thus the assessment of critical quality attributes (CQAs) and the definition of CQA assessment criteria and specifications is difficult, especially in early-stage development.

  10. Maize transformation technology development for commercial event generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Que, Qiudeng; Elumalai, Sivamani; Li, Xianggan; Zhong, Heng; Nalapalli, Samson; Schweiner, Michael; Fei, Xiaoyin; Nuccio, Michael; Kelliher, Timothy; Gu, Weining; Chen, Zhongying; Chilton, Mary-Dell M

    2014-01-01

    Maize is an important food and feed crop in many countries. It is also one of the most important target crops for the application of biotechnology. Currently, there are more biotech traits available on the market in maize than in any other crop. Generation of transgenic events is a crucial step in the development of biotech traits. For commercial applications, a high throughput transformation system producing a large number of high quality events in an elite genetic background is highly desirable. There has been tremendous progress in Agrobacterium-mediated maize transformation since the publication of the Ishida et al. (1996) paper and the technology has been widely adopted for transgenic event production by many labs around the world. We will review general efforts in establishing efficient maize transformation technologies useful for transgenic event production in trait research and development. The review will also discuss transformation systems used for generating commercial maize trait events currently on the market. As the number of traits is increasing steadily and two or more modes of action are used to control key pests, new tools are needed to efficiently transform vectors containing multiple trait genes. We will review general guidelines for assembling binary vectors for commercial transformation. Approaches to increase transformation efficiency and gene expression of large gene stack vectors will be discussed. Finally, recent studies of targeted genome modification and transgene insertion using different site-directed nuclease technologies will be reviewed.

  11. Essential drugs production in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS): opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezziane, Zoheir

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work is to elucidate various essential drugs in the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) countries. It discusses the opportunities and challenges of the existing biotech infrastructure and the production of drugs and vaccines in member states of the BRICS. This research is based on a systematic literature review between the years 2000 and 2014 of documents retrieved from the databases Embase, PubMed/Medline, Global Health, and Google Scholar, and the websites of relevant international organizations, research institutions and philanthropic organizations. Findings vary from one member state to another. These include useful comparison between the BRICS countries in terms of pharmaceuticals expenditure versus total health expenditure, local manufacturing of drugs/vaccines using technology and know-how transferred from developed countries, and biotech entrepreneurial collaborations under the umbrella of the BRICS region. This study concludes by providing recommendations to support more of inter collaborations among the BRICS countries as well as between BRICS and many developing countries to shrink drug production costs. In addition, this collaboration would also culminate in reaching out to poor countries that are not able to provide their communities and patients with cost-effective essential medicines.

  12. Exploring the characteristics of innovation alliances of Dutch Biotechnology SMEs and their policy implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp J.P. Garbade

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Policy makers are becoming increasingly aware of the fact that R&D intensive SMEs play a pivotal role in providing sustainable economic growth by maintaining a high rate of innovation. To compensate for their financial vulnerability, these SMEs increasingly conduct innovation in alliances. This paper aims to explore the impact of different alliance characteristics on the performance of Dutch biotechnology SMEs. The conceptual model was tested using a sample of 18 biotech SMEs reporting about 40 alliances. The main findings indicate that alliance performance is positively related to the level of complementarity, the cognitive distance and tacit knowledge transfer by the human resources exchanges. Policy makers are recommended to support innovation alliances by providing the infrastructure in which alliances can flourish, e.g. through stimulating the foundation of cluster organizations that can function as innovation brokers. These cluster organizations can provide network formation, demand articulation, internationalization and innovation process support to their member companies and can act as a go-between among alliance partners. As part of the innovation process support activities, they can organize special workshops for biotech SMEs on how to successfully behave in an innovation alliance.

  13. Aqueous two-phase extraction as a platform in the biomanufacturing industry: economical and environmental sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, P A J; Azevedo, A M; Sommerfeld, S; Bäcker, W; Aires-Barros, M R

    2011-01-01

    The biotech industry is, nowadays, facing unparalleled challenges due to the enhanced demand for biotechnology-based human therapeutic products, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). This has led companies to improve substantially their upstream processes, with the yield of monoclonals increasing to titers never seen before. The downstream processes have, however, been overlooked, leading to a production bottleneck. Although chromatography remains the workhorse of most purification processes, several limitations, such as low capacity, scale-related packing problems, low chemical and proteolytic stability and resins' high cost, have arisen. Aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) has been successfully revisited as a valuable alternative for the capture of antibodies. One of the important remaining questions for this technology to be adopted by the biotech industries is, now, how it compares to the currently established platforms in terms of costs and environmental impact. In this report, the economical and environmental sustainability of the aqueous two-phase extraction process is evaluated and compared to the currently established protein A affinity chromatography. Accordingly, the ATPE process was shown to be considerably advantageous in terms of process economics, especially when processing high titer cell culture supernatants. This alternative process is able to purify continuously the same amount of mAbs reducing the annual operating costs from 14.4 to 8.5 million (US$/kg) when cell culture supernatants with mAb titers higher than 2.5 g/L are processed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Commercialisation of science in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, G.

    2003-01-01

    Major changes are occurring across the science and technology (S and T) landscape in this country. Messages from Federal and State Governments in recent times could not have been clearer - in return for 'taxpayer $ into ideas' (in other words, funding for front end basic research) there is an expectation that 'ideas will be translated into $' (in other words, commercialisation will be pursued aggressively). As we in Australian S and T are constantly reminded, with part justification only, Australian researchers (especially in the life sciences) are good at generating a wealth of ideas but not much wealth from ideas. It is claimed that despite scientific excellence, many in the sector are risk averse, immobile, prone to academic snobbery, better employees than employers, not entrepreneurial etc, etc. Regardless of the veracity of any of this, the 1990s has seen a change with many more scientists interested in pursuing the progression of ideas to research to invention to intellectual property to competitive advantage to commercialisation to wealth, jobs and social development to profits and tax dollars to increased support for innovation, R and D, basic research etc. In regard to biomedical research, it has been said that '... medical biotechnology was the first business with enough glamour to persuade eminent scientists that the entrepreneurial spirit and academic respectability are not mutually exclusive. Maybe it's OK to be a science-literate businessman and to make money from science. Successful biotech companies emerge when good science meets excellent management and that combination, in an enabling environment, attracts informed investors and partners. Biotech companies may focus on a single product, a portfolio, or a technology platform and the majority are destined not to become, and have no intention of becoming, an integrated biopharmaceutical or agrochemical company. Their capacity to raise funds is influenced by 'signals' that the technology, the people

  15. Thermo- and mesophilic aerobic batch biodegradation of high-strength distillery wastewater (potato stillage)--utilisation of main carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzywonos, Małgorzata; Cibis, Edmund; Lasik, Małgorzata; Nowak, Jacek; Miśkiewicz, Tadeusz

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the study was to ascertain the extent to which temperature influences the utilisation of main carbon sources (reducing substances determined before and after hydrolysis, glycerol and organic acids) by a mixed culture of thermo- and mesophilic bacteria of the genus Bacillus in the course of aerobic batch biodegradation of potato stillage, a high-strength distillery effluent (COD=51.88 g O(2)/l). The experiments were performed at 20, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60 and 63 degrees C, at pH 7, in a 5l working volume stirred-tank bioreactor (Biostat B, B. Braun Biotech International) with a stirrer speed of 550 rpm and aeration at 1.6 vvm. Particular consideration was given to the following issues: (1) the sequence in which the main carbon sources in the stillage were assimilated and (2) the extent of their assimilation achieved under these conditions.

  16. Conditional Knockdown of Endogenous MicroRNAs in CHO Cells Using TET-ON-SanDI Sponge Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Alan; Lao, Nga; Clynes, Martin; Barron, Niall

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs of about 22 nucleotides in length and have proven to be useful targets for genetic modifications for desirable phenotype in the biotech industry. The use of constitutively expressed "miRNA sponge" vectors in which multiple, tandem miRNA binding sites containing transcripts are transcriptionally regulated by a constitutive promoter for down regulating the levels of endogenous microRNAs in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has shown to be more advantageous than using synthetic antisense oligonucleotides. The application of miRNA sponges in biotechnological processes, however, could be more effective, if expression of miRNA sponges could be tuned. In this chapter, we present a method for the generation of stable CHO cell lines expressing a TET-ON-SanDI-miRNA-sponge that is in theory expressed only in the presence of an inducer.

  17. The Controversies over Bioenergy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Andersen, Bente Hessellund

    2012-01-01

    convert coal fired power plants to biomass in order to sustain the role of these power plants. Their increasing use of imported wood pellets is criticized for increasing greenhouse gas emissions because of fast logging of years of forest growth. A Danish biotech company is developing enzymes...... a prominent role in several Danish climate and energy plans, alongside with wind and solar energy, and energy savings. There are major controversies about targets for bioenergy with respect to acceptable types, sources and amounts of biomass. Strong path dependency is identified. Energy companies in Denmark...... for processing of biomass for biofuels. The alignment with the private car regime is strong, because biofuel enables continuation of fuel-driven vehicles as dominating transportation mode. Danish farmers see manure as important source for biogas while arguing for reduction of climate impact and nuisances from...

  18. [Conflicts of interest: should we lower our guard?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fiore, Luca

    2015-07-01

    Conflicts of interest affect the scientific communication and information: their effects on the physician's prescribing behavior have been frequently studied and clearly documented. Recently, the New England Journal of Medicine published a series of papers questioning the radical positions on this topic, asking to reconsider the most intransigent approach, so that it may be possible a productive collaboration between academic medicine and pharmaceutical industry, in the interest of the patient. The papers published in the New England Journal of Medicine confirm the difficulties experienced by the biomedical journals: the support of the industry is essential and most of the authors and referees has ties with pharmaceutical or biotech companies. The debate among the various stakeholders is vital but should be open and transparent, with the aim to restore credibility to all the parties concerned: academic medicine, pharmaceutical industry and scientific publishers.

  19. Microbial Cell Factories for the Production of Terpenoid Flavor and Fragrance Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schempp, Florence M; Drummond, Laura; Buchhaupt, Markus; Schrader, Jens

    2018-03-14

    Terpenoid flavor and fragrance compounds are of high interest to the aroma industry. Microbial production offers an alternative sustainable access to the desired terpenoids independent of natural sources. Genetically engineered microorganisms can be used to synthesize terpenoids from cheap and renewable resources. Due to its modular architecture, terpenoid biosynthesis is especially well suited for the microbial cell factory concept: a platform host engineered for a high flux toward the central C 5 prenyl diphosphate precursors enables the production of a broad range of target terpenoids just by varying the pathway modules converting the C 5 intermediates to the product of interest. In this review typical terpenoid flavor and fragrance compounds marketed or under development by biotech and aroma companies are given, and the specificities of the aroma market are discussed. The main part of this work focuses on key strategies and recent advances to engineer microbes to become efficient terpenoid producers.

  20. Managing Front-End Innovation through Idea Markets at Novozymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauto, Giancarlo; Valentin, Finn; Hatzack, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Online collaboration is a powerful tool for boosting idea generation in large corporations. However, management may experience an overload of proposals from employees. To improve front-end innovation, the Danish industrial biotech company Novozymes implemented an internal idea competition in which...... a relatively small number of highly motivated participants screened their colleagues' inventions through an "idea market." The idea competition fulfilled its goals of generating two ideas with high growth potential within a short time, uncovering and recombining old proposals that inventors had not previously...... been able to advance in the organization and focusing managerial attention on the selection process. The campaign is an effective tool to recombine existing knowledge that had not been utilized. The process demonstrated that asking participants to comment on proposals improves idea generation...

  1. INTERACTION OF RECOMBINANT DIPHTHERIA TOXOIDS WITH CELLULAR RECEPTORS in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Manoilov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to compare in vitro characteristics of reception of the natural diphtheria toxin — DT and its nontoxic recombinant analogs — toxoids. For assessing ligand-receptor interaction the method of immunoenzyme analysis and ELISA was used, where the bonding layer recombinant analogues of diphtheria toxin cell receptor HB-EGF from sensitive and resistant to the toxin of the organisms were served. According to the results of ELISA the natural diphtheria toxin, in contrast to recombinant toxoids — CRM197, and B subunit, interacted with mouse HB-EGF with a very low affinity. While human HB-EGF with an equally high affinity connected as toxoids as native diphtheria toxin. Therefore, the analyzed recombinant analogs of toxin obtained in E. coli cells did not reproduce in full measure the receptor specificity of the natural toxin, which should be considered in the case of using these proteins as biotech products.

  2. Practical capillary electrophoresis

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberger, Robert

    2000-01-01

    In the 1980s, capillary electrophoresis (CE) joined high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as the most powerful separation technique available to analytical chemists and biochemists. Published research using CE grew from 48 papers in the year of commercial introduction (1988) to 1200 in 1997. While only a dozen major pharmaceutical and biotech companies have reduced CE to routine practice, the applications market is showing real or potential growth in key areas, particularly in the DNA marketplace for genomic mapping and forensic identification. For drug development involving small molecules (including chiral separations), one CE instrument can replace 10 liquid chromatographs in terms of speed of analysis. CE also uses aqueous rather than organic solvents and is thus environmentally friendlier than HPLC. The second edition of Practical Capillary Electrophoresis has been extensively reorganized and rewritten to reflect modern usage in the field, with an emphasis on commercially available apparatus and ...

  3. Next generation platforms for high-throughput bio-dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repin, Mikhail; Turner, Helen C.; Garty, Guy; Brenner, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Here the general concept of the combined use of plates and tubes in racks compatible with the American National Standards Institute/the Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening microplate formats as the next generation platforms for increasing the throughput of bio-dosimetry assays was described. These platforms can be used at different stages of bio-dosimetry assays starting from blood collection into micro-tubes organised in standardised racks and ending with the cytogenetic analysis of samples in standardised multi-well and multichannel plates. Robotically friendly platforms can be used for different bio-dosimetry assays in minimally equipped laboratories and on cost-effective automated universal biotech systems. (authors)

  4. Monitoring Quality of Biotherapeutic Products Using Multivariate Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Anurag S; Pathak, Mili; Jain, Renu; Jadaun, Gaurav Pratap Singh

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring the quality of pharmaceutical products is a global challenge, heightened by the implications of letting subquality drugs come to the market on public safety. Regulatory agencies do their due diligence at the time of approval as per their prescribed regulations. However, product quality needs to be monitored post-approval as well to ensure patient safety throughout the product life cycle. This is particularly complicated for biotechnology-based therapeutics where seemingly minor changes in process and/or raw material attributes have been shown to have a significant effect on clinical safety and efficacy of the product. This article provides a perspective on the topic of monitoring the quality of biotech therapeutics. In the backdrop of challenges faced by the regulatory agencies, the potential use of multivariate data analysis as a tool for effective monitoring has been proposed. Case studies using data from several insulin biosimilars have been used to illustrate the key concepts.

  5. LIGNOCELLULOSE AS AN ALTERNATIVE SOURCE FOR OBTAINING OF BIOBUTANOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Shulga

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy and environmental crisis facing the world force us to reconsider the effectiveness or find an alternative use of renewable natural resources, especially organic «waste» by using environmentally friendly technologies. Microbial conversion of renewable resources of biosphere to produce useful products, including biofuels, currently is an actual biotech problem. Anaerobic bacteria of Clostridiaceae family are known as butanol producers, but unfortunately, the microbiological synthesis is currently not economical one. In order to make cost-effective aceton-butanol-ethanol fermentation, solventproducing strains using available cheap raw materials, such as agricultural waste or plant biomass, are required. Opportunities and ways to obtaine economic and ecological processing of lignocellulosic wastes for biobutanol creation are described in the review .

  6. Impact of T-shaped skill and top management support on innovation speed; the moderating role of technology uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Hamdi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the moderating role of technology uncertainty on the relationship between team contextual factors of top management support and T-shaped skills with innovation speed. For the purpose of this study, the data were collected from 227 new products from 147 biotechnology firms in Malaysia. The overall results confirmed the moderating effect of technology uncertainty on the relationship between T-shaped skills, as well as top management support with innovation speed. The results further confirmed that under the high technology uncertainty, this effect is higher in comparison to the low and medium uncertainty. This indicates that the effect of top management support and T-shaped skills on innovation speed improves when technology uncertainty increases. On the practical side, the report equips biotech firms with valuable insights to develop effective strategies.

  7. Patent Assessment Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burke, Paul F.; Reitzig, Markus

    2006-01-01

    The increasing number of patent applications worldwide and the extension of patenting to the areas of software and business methods have triggered a debate on "patent quality". While patent quality may have various dimensions, this paper argues that consistency in the decision making on the side...... of the patent office is one important dimension, particularly in new patenting areas (emerging technologies). In order to understand whether patent offices appear capable of providing consistent assessments of a patent's technological quality in such novel industries from the beginning, we study the concordance...... of the European Patent Office's (EPO's) granting and opoposition decisions for individual patents. We use the historical example of biotech patens filed between 1978 until 1986, the early stage of the industry. Our results indicate that the EPO shows systematically different assessments of technological quality...

  8. How Patent Function Integration with R&D Influence the Value of Patents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beukel, Karin; Valentin, Finn

    Patent strategies are endogenous to firm appropriability. However, to what extent does firm’s R&D teams’ engagement with patent experts influence the value of patents? We estimate the relationship between firm’s R&D use of patent functions on patent value in Biotech firms. Controlling...... for characteristics of scientific team, firm effects, and other patent value indicators, we find that having a firm specific (in-house) internal patent function is a driver of patent value. In addition, we find that the way in which patent functions create patent value differs dependent on whether the firm has...... internal patent function or not. In-house patent functions create value through narrow patents, whereas, firms with no in-house patent function create valuable patents by the use of broader scoped patents. Our results point to a strong effect of firm specific patent functions, but also explain how firms...

  9. National differences in FEI support and innovation management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how Front End Innovation (FEI) is supported among companies of different nationality within the context of Pharmaceutical R&D. The present study is carried out in order to contribute to the development of a clearer understanding of active facilitation of innovation management...... and front end innovation in theory and practice. I aim to show how different aspects of company size, type and nationality affect the way innovation management and FEI is supported within organizations. This is examined through an in-depth case study of the Danish pharmaceutical company, H. Lundbeck A....../S, and a comparative study including seven European and American Biotech and Pharmaceutical companies. The findings from the study reveal a number of similarities and differences in innovation management and FEI support among the different companies and present propositions of important aspects to consider...

  10. Efficient protein production by yeast requires global tuning of metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Mingtao; Bao, Jichen; Hallstrom, Bjorn M.

    2017-01-01

    The biotech industry relies on cell factories for production of pharmaceutical proteins, of which several are among the top-selling medicines. There is, therefore, considerable interest in improving the efficiency of protein production by cell factories. Protein secretion involves numerous...... intracellular processes with many underlying mechanisms still remaining unclear. Here, we use RNA-seq to study the genome-wide transcriptional response to protein secretion in mutant yeast strains. We find that many cellular processes have to be attuned to support efficient protein secretion. In particular...... that by tuning metabolism cells are able to efficiently secrete recombinant proteins. Our findings provide increased understanding of which cellular regulations and pathways are associated with efficient protein secretion....

  11. Catumaxomab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Rolf; Seimetz, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Catumaxomab, a monoclonal bispecific trifunctional antibody, was approved in the european Union in April 2009 for the intraperitoneal treatment of patients with malignant ascites. The marketing authorization holder Fresenius Biotech GmbH developed catumaxomab (Removab®) together with its partner TRiOn Pharma GmbH, Germany. it is the first substance worldwide with a regulatory label for the treatment of malignant ascites due to epithelial carcinomas. Since the peritoneum is of mesothelial origin and therefore lacks epCAM expression, the intraperitoneal administration of catumaxomab is an attractive targeted immunotherapeutic approach. Catumaxomab is able to destroy epCAM positive tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity known as the main cause of malignant ascites. in addition, catumaxomab is a potential therapeutic option for several primary tumors since the epCAM molecule is expressed on the majority of epithelial carcinomas. This review focuses on the clinical development of catumaxomab and indicates future directions. PMID:20190561

  12. Uncertainty as Certaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzinger, Tom

    I am trying to make money in the biotech industry from complexity science. And I am doing it with inspiration that I picked up on the edge of Appalachia spending time with June Holley and ACEnet when I was a Wall Street Journal reporter. I took some of those ideas to Pittsburgh, in biotechnology, in a completely private setting with an economic development focus, but also with a mission t o return profit to private capital. And we are doing that. I submit as a hypothesis, something we are figuring out in the post- industrial era, that business evolves. It is not the definition of business, but business critically involves the design of systems in which uncertainty is treated as a certainty. That is what I have seen and what I have tried to put into practice.

  13. Biotechnology SMEs, start-ups, spin-offs or microenterprises are they molecules coming from the research results? If so, what place do they hold in the global industrial tissue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doddoli, Roberto

    2007-02-01

    In recent years, the number of biotech enterprises in Europe has grown spectacularly, largely fueled by the increasing number of entrepreneurial initiatives from Europe's leading research institutes. The place held on the economic market by these enterprises, is a question that market analysts have been asking themselves since their rapid growth and, more particularly, their over valuation which, at times, has led to the crash of their shares on the stock markets. To be sure, this article does not claim to go into an in-depth financial analysis to explain the details of certain "shipwrecks". Rather, it just would like to provide some useful indications for all those having embarked, or desirous of doing so, in the creation of biomedical enterprises.

  14. Fostering a new dialogue to improve access to finance for European biopharma SMEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantelot, Emmanuel; Suojanen, Christian

    2010-12-31

    This article reviews the current economic crisis as it impacts upon European biopharma SMEs and their ability to secure investment and funding. In particular it presents an analysis of a broader, pre-crisis structural problem in Europe related to the lack of institutional investors for Europe's life sciences venture capital funds and the impact this has both on the funds available for investment by VCs into Europe's biotech companies, and the effect on the type and stage of biopharma companies able to raise money. This article also presents an overview of an on-going stakeholder dialogue to address these issues and the proposals raised so far for possible solutions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Virtual Learning Simulations in High School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisgaard, Malene Warming; Makransky, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The present study compared the value of using a virtual learning simulation compared to traditional lessons on the topic of evolution, and investigated if the virtual learning simulation could serve as a catalyst for STEM academic and career development, based on social cognitive career theory....... The investigation was conducted using a crossover repeated measures design based on a sample of 128 high school biology/biotech students. The results showed that the virtual learning simulation increased knowledge of evolution significantly, compared to the traditional lesson. No significant differences between...... the simulation and lesson were found in their ability to increase the non-cognitive measures. Both interventions increased self-efficacy significantly, and none of them had a significant effect on motivation. In addition, the results showed that the simulation increased interest in biology related tasks...

  16. Oncorine, the World First Oncolytic Virus Medicine and its Update in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Min

    2018-01-01

    The oncolytic viruses now hold a promise of new therapeutic strategy for cancer. Its concept has inspired a wave of commercial research and development activities for the products of this category in China since 1998. The first commercialized oncolytic virus product in the world, Oncorine (H101), developed by Shanghai Sunway Biotech Co., Ltd since 1999, was approved by Chinese SFDA in November, 2005 for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in combination with chemotherapy after the phase III clinical trial, and finally acquired GMP certificate in August, 2006. This review introduces how Oncorine was successfully developed in China, and how the Chinese market responded after it was launched into the market in 2006. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Religious coalition opposes gene patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, J S

    1995-05-19

    The biotechnology industry is concerned about a coalition of mainstream religious leaders, working with Jeremy Rifkin of the Foundation of Economic Trends, who oppose the patenting of human and animal life forms, body parts, and genes. The coalition called a press conference on May 18 to ask the government to prohibit the current patenting practices for genetic engineering. The biotechnology industry argues that patents indicate that a company's research tool has significant value, and encourages capitalists to invest their dollars in the development of new treatments for diseases. They also argue that the 29 biotech drugs that are on the market have been developed as a result of patents on genes. Although most business leaders are united in opposing restrictions, many scientists are divided, citing both religious and scientific reasons.

  18. Stakeholder Thinking in Sustainability Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Hove Henriksen, Morten; Frier, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The objective of the paper is to describe and discuss how the biotech company Novozymes integrates stakeholder thinking into everyday sustainability practices. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on first-hand experiences as well as secondary information from Novozymes' sta...... to make sense of stakeholder thinking. Originality/value – The contribution of this paper is to provide a detailed analysis of how various stakeholder relations management methods can be used in practice to integrate sustainability in an organisation.......' stakeholder-oriented sustainability activities. Findings – The paper illustrates how a company is striving to transform the general stakeholder principles into concrete, manageable actions. Moreover, the paper describes some of the needs, challenges, and paradoxes experienced by an organisation that is trying...

  19. The rise (and decline?) of biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinch, Michael S

    2014-11-01

    Since the 1970s, biotechnology has been a key innovator in drug development. An analysis of FDA-approved therapeutics demonstrates pharmaceutical companies outpace biotechs in terms of new approvals but biotechnology companies are now responsible for earlier-stage activities (patents, INDs or clinical development). The number of biotechnology organizations that contributed to an FDA approval began declining in the 2000s and is at a level not seen since the 1980s. Whereas early biotechnology companies had a decade from first approval until acquisition, the average acquisition of a biotechnology company now occurs months before their first FDA approval. The number of hybrid organizations that arise when pharmaceutical companies acquire biotechnology is likewise declining, raising questions about the sustainability of biotechnology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Traditional Knowledge and Patent Protection: Conflicting Views On International Patent Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Andrzejewski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available As diseases continue to spread around the globe, pharmaceutical and biotech companies continue to search for new and better drugs to treat them. Most of these companies have realised that useful compounds for these purposes may be found in the natural resources that indigenous and local communities use. And yet, even though the importance of these biological resources to global health and economic livelihood is well recognised, the legal ownership and control of this traditional knowledge is still very controversial. This article undertakes a comparative analysis of American and European, as well as international legal regulations on patent law and traditional knowledge. Key questions include: What is traditional knowledge? How have the national patent laws of these countries treated the protection of plant variety and plant genetic resources? What are the existing international standards for patents, and what implications do they have for protecting traditional knowledge? And finally, what protection systems are emerging for the future?

  1. Labeling of genetically modified food: closer to reality in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlers, Anton E

    2013-01-01

    Within the broader context of several related biotech developments, including the proliferation of GM food in American grocery stories, the recent decision by Whole Foods Market, Inc. to require the labeling of all genetically modified (GM) organism products sold in its stores by 2018, and the development of GM animals for consumption, this essay asks whether the United States is inching towards a policy of mandatory GM food labeling. The analysis highlights aspects of the biotechnology policy debate in the United States and European Union, and traces public opinion as well as grassroots and legislative efforts aimed at GM food labeling. Findings show that activities at the federal level do not suggest any major regulatory changes regarding labeling in the near future; however, a growing number of individual states are considering GM food labeling legislation and political momentum in favor of labeling has picked up in recent years. Voluntary labeling by food companies may also become increasingly common.

  2. Marine Bacterial Genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Henrique

    For decades, terrestrial microorganisms have been used as sources of countless enzymes and chemical compounds that have been produced by pharmaceutical and biotech companies and used by mankind. There is a need for new chemical compounds, including antibiotics,new enzymatic activities and new...... microorganisms to be used as cell factories for production. Therefore exploitation of new microbial niches and use of different strategies is an opportunity to boost discoveries. Even though scientists have started to explore several habitats other than the terrestrial ones, the marine environment stands out...... as a hitherto under-explored niche. This thesis work uses high-throughput sequencing technologies on a collection of marine bacteria established during the Galathea 3 expedition, with the purpose of unraveling new biodiversity and new bioactivities. Several tools were used for genomic analysis in order...

  3. Genetically modified plants: Decade of commercial cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović-Drinić Snežana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The year 2005 marks the beginning of the 10th consecutive year of commercial cultivation of genetically modified plants all around the world. The first GM variety of crops appeared on market during 1995 year and from that global area of biotech crops increased to 81 mil hectares in 2004. Genetically modified plant tolerant to herbicides, resistant to insects, improved quality have been developed. The use of GMO, their release into environment cultivation, utilization as food and feed is regulated in the EU by set of directives: 90/220, 2001/18, 2002/53, 1830/2003. Informer Yugoslavia the low about GMO was adopted in may 2001. That law consist of common regulation and it is in accordinance with EU regulation. Detection of genetic modification in seed and food could be done by PCR or ELISA methods.

  4. A comparative study on the immunogenicity, safety and tolerance of purified duck embryo vaccine (PDEV) manufactured in India (Vaxirab) and Switzerland (Lyssavac-N): a randomized simulated post-exposure study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra, Bangalore Jayakrishnappa; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Ashwathnarayana, Doddabele Hanumanthaiah; Sampath, Gadey; datta, Soma Subhra; Sudarshan, Mysore Kalappa; Venkatesh, Gonibeedu Manjunatah; Muhamuda, Kader; Bilagumba, Gangaboraiah; Shamanna, Manjula

    2007-12-05

    Purified duck embryo vaccine (PDEV, Vaxirab) for rabies prophylaxis is now indigenously manufactured in India under technology transfer from Berna Biotech who made the original PDEV (Lyssavac). In the present study we have compared the two vaccines in terms of safety, immunogenicity and tolerance. The study was conducted in 220 adult healthy volunteers. It was observed that both vaccines produced neutralizing antibody titers (as determined by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test, RFFIT) more than 0.5 IU/mL (minimum level for seroconversion) on all days tested but the titers on days 90 and 180 were significantly higher with Lyssavac. The adverse reactions produced were slightly more with Lysssavac but both vaccines were well tolerated. In conclusion, the indigenously produced PDEV (Vaxirab) was found to be equally safe and immunogenic as the original PDEV (Lyssavac) manufactured at Switzerland.

  5. Seafood Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børresen, Torger

    This presentation will fill the total picture of this conference between fisheries and aquaculture, blue biotech and bioconservation, by considering the optimal processing technology of marine resources from the raw material until the seafood reaches the plate of the consumer. The situation today...... must be performed such that total traceability and authenticity of the final products can be presented on demand. The most important aspects to be considered within seafood technology today are safety, healthy products and high eating quality. Safety can be divided into microbiological safety...... and not presenting any safety risk per se. Seafood is healthy due to the omega-3 fatty acids and the nutritional value of vitamins, peptides and proteins. The processing technology must however be performed such that these valuable features are not lost during production. The same applies to the eating quality. Any...

  6. Phylogenetic similarity of the canine parvovirus wild-type isolates on the basis of VP1/VP2 gene fragment sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rypul, K; Chmielewski, R; Smielewska-Loś, E; Klimentowski, S

    2002-04-01

    Biological material was taken from dogs with diarrhoea. Faecal samples were taken from within live animals and intestinal tract fragments (i.e. small intestine, and stomach) were taken from dead animals. In total, 18 specimens were investigated from dogs housed alone or in large groups. To test for the presence of the virus, latex (On Site Biotech, Uppsala, Sweden) and direct immunofluorescence tests were performed. At the same time, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers complementary to a conservative region of VP1/VP2 was carried out. The products of amplification were analysed on 2% agarose gel. The purified products were cloned with the Template Generation System (Finnzymes, Espoo, Finland) using a transposition reaction and positive clones were searched using the 'colony screening by PCR' method. The sequencing gave 12 sequences of VP1/VP2 gene fragments that were of high similarity. Among the 12 analysed sequences, six exhibited 88% similarity, four exhibited 100% similarity and two exhibited 71% similarity.

  7. Manufacturing, regulatory and commercial challenges of biopharmaceuticals production: a Finnish perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Närhi, Marko; Nordström, Katrina

    2005-04-01

    Biopharmaceuticals product development is a broad and multidisciplinary field. Science and technology are combined with new manufacturing, regulatory and commercial challenges. However, although there is ample literature on the molecular biology and biochemistry of products, the implementation of processes from test tube to commercial scale has not received similar attention. Consequently, the present study aims to highlight, from practical point of view, some of the key issues involved with manufacturing technologies of biopharmaceuticals at a commercial scale. Regulatory requirements and investments are also addressed based on the practical experiences of start-up and small companies. Finland is used as a case-example of such companies as this is a EU-member state with strong technological growth and rapidly increasing number of biotech companies.

  8. Structure-Based Virtual Screening of Commercially Available Compound Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireev, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    Virtual screening (VS) is an efficient hit-finding tool. Its distinctive strength is that it allows one to screen compound libraries that are not available in the lab. Moreover, structure-based (SB) VS also enables an understanding of how the hit compounds bind the protein target, thus laying ground work for the rational hit-to-lead progression. SBVS requires a very limited experimental effort and is particularly well suited for academic labs and small biotech companies that, unlike pharmaceutical companies, do not have physical access to quality small-molecule libraries. Here, we describe SBVS of commercial compound libraries for Mer kinase inhibitors. The screening protocol relies on the docking algorithm Glide complemented by a post-docking filter based on structural protein-ligand interaction fingerprints (SPLIF).

  9. Plant Research Department annual report 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kossmann, J.; Jakobsen, Iver; Nielsen, K.K.

    2004-01-01

    In 2003 the Plant Research Department (PRD) at Risø National Laboratory was involved in establishing the consortium Plant Biotech Denmark, which is unifying most of the Danish Plant Biotechnology activities. Within the consortium, PRD has the uniqueopportunity to be the only life science department...... to genes, which are widely applicable in the life sciences, such as non-invasive and non-destructive technologies to determine metabolite concentrationswith high spatial and temporal resolution. The Plant Research Department applies these and state-of-the-art technologies to increase knowledge to develop...... located in an environment that is largely dominated by physicists. PRD is challenged to optimally interface Plant Biology with the different fields of expertise that are established at Risø NationalLaboratory. These activities are mainly related to develop novel post-genomic tools to assign function...

  10. Development of an agricultural biotechnology crop product: testing from discovery to commercialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privalle, Laura S; Chen, Jingwen; Clapper, Gina; Hunst, Penny; Spiegelhalter, Frank; Zhong, Cathy X

    2012-10-17

    "Genetically modified" (GM) or "biotech" crops have been the most rapidly adopted agricultural technology in recent years. The development of a GM crop encompasses trait identification, gene isolation, plant cell transformation, plant regeneration, efficacy evaluation, commercial event identification, safety evaluation, and finally commercial authorization. This is a lengthy, complex, and resource-intensive process. Crops produced through biotechnology are the most highly studied food or food component consumed. Before commercialization, these products are shown to be as safe as conventional crops with respect to feed, food, and the environment. This paper describes this global process and the various analytical tests that must accompany the product during the course of development, throughout its market life, and beyond.

  11. Plant biotechnology for food security and bioeconomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jihong Liu; Zhang, Peng

    2013-09-01

    This year is a special year for plant biotechnology. It was 30 years ago, on January 18 1983, one of the most important dates in the history of plant biotechnology, that three independent groups described Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation at the Miami Winter Symposium, leading to the production of normal, fertile transgenic plants (Bevan et al. in Nature 304:184-187, 1983; Fraley et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 80:4803-4807, 1983; Herrera-Estrella et al. in EMBO J 2:987-995, 1983; Vasil in Plant Cell Rep 27:1432-1440, 2008). Since then, plant biotechnology has rapidly advanced into a useful and valuable tool and has made a significant impact on crop production, development of a biotech industry and the bio-based economy worldwide.

  12. International and national initiatives in biobanking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ectors, N

    2011-01-01

    Translational research and biobanking are "in", also in Flanders and in Belgium. In Flanders the Advice report 120 from the Flemish Council for Science and innovation, entitled "Extension of translational research in Flanders" paved the way for the Center for Medical Innovation. The Center for Medical Innovation aims at promoting collaboration between Flemish Universities, university hospitals, pharma and biotech industry and the Flemish Government specifically in the domain of translational research. The Initiative # 27 of the Cancer plan from the Federal Government aims at financing a virtual interuniversity tumor bank in order to promote "cancer" translational research in a collaborative network between academic structures, general hospitals en different industrial partners (pharmacy, biotechnology, diagnostics, ...) active in research in Belgium. However, the scientific interest in the human tissues is not new, at all. This text aims at giving an overview of the development and evolutions of "biobanking" initiatives.

  13. Rapid prototyping of an adaptive light-source for mobile manipulators with EasyKit and EasyLab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtczyk, Martin; Barner, Simon; Geisinger, Michael; Knoll, Alois

    2008-08-01

    While still not common in day-to-day business, mobile robot platforms form a growing market in robotics. Mobile platforms equipped with a manipulator for increased flexibility have been used successfully in biotech laboratories for sample management as shown on the well-known ESACT meetings. Navigation and object recognition is carried out by the utilization of a mounted machine vision camera. To cope with the different illumination conditions in a large laboratory, development of an adaptive light source was indispensable. We present our approach of rapid developing a computer controlled, adaptive LED light within one single business day, by utilizing the hardware toolbox EasyKit and our appropriate software counterpart EasyLab.

  14. ‘I Wish I Could Work in my Spare Time’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raastrup Kristensen, Anders; Pedersen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Work–life balance has become an important topic for both mainstream and critical scholars. We will provide here an empirical analysis of work–life balance from the theoretical perspective of Gilbert Simondon. In such a perspective, individuals’ efforts to balance work with life should be viewed...... as part of an individuation process, neither reducible to the sphere of work nor of life. Qualitative data gathered at a global biotech firm has demonstrated how problems related to work–life balance, such as working while ill and working from home, illustrate ways employees become individuated....... The article ends by discussing the contribution and relevance of Simondon’s thinking to current theories of work–life balance in relation to research methodology and ethics....

  15. Microfluidic screening and whole-genome sequencing identifies mutations associated with improved protein secretion by yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Mingtao; Bai, Yunpeng; Sjostrom, Staffan L.

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for biotech-based production of recombinant proteins for use as pharmaceuticals in the food and feed industry and in industrial applications. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is among preferred cell factories for recombinant protein production, and there is increasing...... interest in improving its protein secretion capacity. Due to the complexity of the secretory machinery in eukaryotic cells, it is difficult to apply rational engineering for construction of improved strains. Here we used high-throughput microfluidics for the screening of yeast libraries, generated by UV...... mutagenesis. Several screening and sorting rounds resulted in the selection of eight yeast clones with significantly improved secretion of recombinant a-amylase. Efficient secretion was genetically stable in the selected clones. We performed whole-genome sequencing of the eight clones and identified 330...

  16. Integration of fragment screening and library design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Gregg; Ab, Eiso; Schultz, Jan

    2007-12-01

    With more than 10 years of practical experience and theoretical analysis, fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has entered the mainstream of the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. An array of biophysical techniques has been used to detect the weak interaction between a fragment and the target. Each technique presents its own requirements regarding the fragment collection and the target; therefore, in order to optimize the potential of FBDD, the nature of the target should be a driving factor for simultaneous development of both the library and the screening technology. A roadmap is now available to guide fragment-to-lead evolution when structural information is available. The next challenge is to apply FBDD to targets for which high-resolution structural information is not available.

  17. Production and estimation of alkaline protease by immobilized Bacillus licheniformis isolated from poultry farm soil of 24 Parganas and its reusability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamba Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial alkaline protease has become an important industrial and commercial biotech product in the recent years and exerts major applications in food, textile, detergent, and pharmaceutical industries. By immobilization of microbes in different entrapment matrices, the enzyme produced can be more stable, pure, continuous, and can be reused which in turn modulates the enzyme production in an economical manner. There have been reports in support of calcium alginate and corn cab as excellent matrices for immobilization of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis, respectively. This study has been carried out using calcium alginate, κ-carrageenan, agar-agar, polyacrylamide gel, and gelatin which emphasizes not only on enzyme activity of immobilized whole cells by different entrapment matrices but also on their efficiency with respect to their reusability as first attempt. Gelatin was found to be the best matrix among all with highest enzyme activity (517 U/ml at 24 h incubation point and also showed efficiency when reused.

  18. Probiotics and blood pressure: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upadrasta A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aditya Upadrasta, Ratna Sudha Madempudi Centre for Research and Development, Unique Biotech Limited, Alexandria Knowledge Park, Shamirpet, Hyderabad, India Abstract: Gut microbiota play a significant role in host metabolic processes, and recent metagenomic surveys have revealed that they are involved in host immune modulation and influence host development and physiology (organ development. Initially, probiotics are identified as potential therapeutics to treat gastrointestinal disorders and to revitalize the disturbed gut ecosystem. Currently, studies are exploring the potential for expanded uses of probiotics for improving the health conditions in metabolic disorders that increase the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. Further investigations are required to evaluate targeted and effective use of the wide variety of probiotic strains in various metabolic disorders to improve the overall health status of the host. This review addresses the causes of hypertension and the hypotensive effect of probiotics, with a focus on their mechanistic action. Keywords: probiotics, hypertension, ACE, gut microbiota, metabolic disorders, metagenomics

  19. Prevalence of leptospiral DNA among wild rodents from a selected area in Beguk Dam Labis, Segamat, Johor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifah, I; Rahmat, M S; Hayarti, K B; Paramasvaran, S; Azizah, M R; Imran, F; Normaznah, Y

    2012-12-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging infectious disease. The differential diagnosis of leptospirosis is difficult due to the varied and often "flu like" symptoms which may result in a missed or delayed diagnosis. Leptospira is the aetiological agent of leptospirosis, a bacterial zoonosis with worldwide distribution. There are over 230 known serovars in the genus Leptospira. The true prevalence of leptospirosis in Malaysia is unknown or underestimated. Our goal was to determine the prevalence for Leptospira infection in rodents in a selected area in Beguk Dam Labis, Segamat, Johor. A study was carried out on 69 serum samples of trapped wild rodents. DNA was extracted from the sera using Leptospira PCR kit (Shanghai ZJ Bio-Tech Co., Ltd). Of 69 rodent serum samples tested by PCR, 9 (13%) showed positive results. In this study we found that (13%) of wild rodents caught in Beguk Dam Labis were infected by Leptospira.

  20. Current issues connected with usage of genetically modified crops in production of feed and livestock feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, K; Mazur, M; Sieradzki, Z

    2008-01-01

    Progress, which is brought by new advances in modern molecular biology, allowed interference in the genome of live organisms and gene manipulation. Introducing new genes to the recipient organism enables to give them new features, absent before. Continuous increase in the area of the biotech crops triggers continuous discussion about safety of genetically modified (GM) crops, including food and feed derived from them. Important issue connected with cultivation of genetically modified crops is a horizontal gene transfer and a bacterial antibiotic resistance. Discussion about safety of GM crops concerns also food allergies caused by eating genetically modified food. The problem of genetic modifications of GM crops used for livestock feeding is widely discussed, taking into account Polish feed law.

  1. Bio-Manufacturing to market pilot project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dressen, Tiffaney [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-09-25

    The Bio-Manufacturing to Market pilot project was a part of the AMJIAC, the Advanced Manufacturing Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge grant. This internship program set out to further define and enhance the talent pipeline from the University and local Community Colleges to startup culture in East Bay Area, provide undergraduate STEM students with opportunities outside academia, and provide startup companies with much needed talent. Over the 4 year period of performance, the Bio-Manufacturing to Market internship program sponsored 75 undergraduate STEM students who were able to spend anywhere from one to six semesters working with local Bay Area startup companies and DOE sponsored facilities/programs in the biotech, bio-manufacturing, and biomedical device fields.

  2. Effects of research tool patents on biotechnology innovation in a developing country: A case study of South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryu Tae-Kyu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concerns have recently been raised about the negative effects of patents on innovation. In this study, the effects of patents on innovations in the Korean biotech SMEs (small and medium-sized entrepreneurs were examined using survey data and statistical analysis. Results The survey results of this study provided some evidence that restricted access problems have occurred even though their frequency was not high. Statistical analysis revealed that difficulties in accessing patented research tools were not negatively correlated with the level of innovation performance and attitudes toward the patent system. Conclusion On the basis of the results of this investigation in combination with those of previous studies, we concluded that although restricted access problems have occurred, this has not yet deterred innovation in Korea. However, potential problems do exist, and the effects of restricted access should be constantly scrutinized.

  3. Effects of research tool patents on biotechnology innovation in a developing country: a case study of South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung-Nam; Ryu, Tae-Kyu; Lee, Yoon-Sik

    2009-03-26

    Concerns have recently been raised about the negative effects of patents on innovation. In this study, the effects of patents on innovations in the Korean biotech SMEs (small and medium-sized entrepreneurs) were examined using survey data and statistical analysis. The survey results of this study provided some evidence that restricted access problems have occurred even though their frequency was not high. Statistical analysis revealed that difficulties in accessing patented research tools were not negatively correlated with the level of innovation performance and attitudes toward the patent system. On the basis of the results of this investigation in combination with those of previous studies, we concluded that although restricted access problems have occurred, this has not yet deterred innovation in Korea. However, potential problems do exist, and the effects of restricted access should be constantly scrutinized.

  4. The Impact of Broccoli II & Tomato II on European patents in conventional breeding, GMO’s and Synthetic Biology:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo; Nordberg, Ana

    2015-01-01

    . The EBA has also clarified that this applies irrespective of if such claims are formulated in a product-by-process format or as a per se product . Moreover, the combined effect of Broccoli & Tomato I & II opens new opportunities for patenting GMOs - provided that all other patent criteria are also met...... if confronted with similar issues in the context of national implementations of the Biotech Directive, which have taken a very different view than the EBA. Moreover, the fierce European opposition against genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and Synthetic Biology remains a major challenge to the industry...... and Nordberg, A., The Impact of Broccoli II & Tomatoes II on European Patents in Conventional Breeding, GMO's and Synthetic Biology: The Grand Finale of a Juicy Patents Tale? (May 19, 2015). Univ. of Copenhagen Dept. of Economics Discussion. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2607865 or http...

  5. Art, Science and the Invention of Things That Last

    KAUST Repository

    Edwards, David

    2018-01-14

    Aesthetic creation involves a close collaboration between discovery, invention and cultural exhibition, as well as between learning and producing value. It is typified by the patterns of creative behavior in highly innovative communities like Silicon Valley (for IT) or Boston (for biotech) where cultures of learning, experimentation, and production or commercialization coexist, and where a high degree of interdisciplinary collaboration occurs. In this lecture, David Edwards will highlight the growing movement of aesthetic creation in the arts, sciences and engineering as a path for sustaining and improving the human condition in the longest term. He will highlight aesthetic creation in the light of the culture lab model of Le Laboratoire (Paris, Cambridge) and the new World Frontiers Forum with examples of learning, pubic experimentation and value creation particularly related to the future of sensory experience.

  6. Diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz-Ozturk, Ece; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-09-01

    Biomicrofluidics is an emerging field at the cross roads of microfluidics and life sciences which requires intensive research efforts in terms of introducing appropriate designs, production techniques, and analysis. The ultimate goal is to deliver innovative and cost-effective microfluidic devices to biotech, biomedical, and pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, creating an in-depth understanding of the transport phenomena of cells and biomolecules becomes vital and concurrently poses significant challenges. The present article outlines the recent advancements in diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules by highlighting transport principles from an engineering perspective, cell responses in microfluidic devices with emphases on diffusion- and flow-based microfluidic gradient platforms, macroscopic and microscopic approaches for investigating the diffusion phenomena of biomolecules, microfluidic platforms for the delivery of these molecules, as well as the state of the art in biological applications of mammalian cell responses and diffusion of biomolecules.

  7. Bridging regional innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Teis

    2013-01-01

    to assess the progress of integration in the regions, as well as the effect of cross-border innovation policies. Consequently, important questions are left unanswered, including the central research question of this paper: does the sudden removal of significant physical barriers directly impacts......The topics of regional innovation systems (RIS) and cross-border regions attract increasing attention, but few studies combine the themes. Further, the existing empirical studies of cross-border innovation and knowledge creation analyse one case at one point in time, thus, making it difficult...... collaboration activity in cross-border innovation systems? This paper examines regional integration in the Oresund Region over time. It deals with a specific part of the RIS, as it analyses research collaboration between actors from the Danish and Swedish sides, with a specific emphasis on the biotech industry...

  8. What Finance Can Learn from Biopharma Industry: A Transfer of Innovation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco COREA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The financial sector is living a profound crisis in order to keep pace with the continuous technological breakthroughs that come out daily, while other sectors seem to be historically more growth-by-innovation-based (e.g., the pharma/biotech sector. This work focuses on an interdisciplinary approach to innovation, and on insights that the banking sector can draw from the pharmaceutical one. Hence, a unique dataset has been built, and it collects information on the most relevant players for both the fields. Different indicators have been created as well in order to empirically test whether the financial industry is actually less innovative with respect to the pharmaceutical one, and to understand the best growing strategy for the banking industry. The results confirm that there is an innovation gap between the two industries, as well as identify the corporate venture capital as the best mean to drive business growth through innovation.

  9. The Battle for Patent Rights in Plant Biotechnology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Cédric

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes and analyzes the occurrence and extent of oppositions initiated against plant biotechnology patents granted by the European Patent Office (EPO). The opposition mechanism is a legal procedure that allows any third party to challenge the validity of patents awarded by the EPO....... Results indicate that the opposition rate is far greater in plant biotechnology than in other emerging industries. Consistent with theoretical predictions, the empirical findings suggest that opposed patents are disproportionately those that score high on features that proxy for their “value” or “quality......”. In contrast to previous findings, however, the results show that large-volume applicants are more likely to be opposed. Because the boundaries of plant biotech patents are ill-defined, large patent portfolios do not promote cooperative behavior such as licensing or settlements. The analysis rejects...

  10. What is human in humans? Responses from biology, anthropology, and philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibeau, Gilles

    2011-08-01

    Genomics has brought biology, medicine, agriculture, psychology, anthropology, and even philosophy to a new threshold. In this new context, the question about "what is human in humans" may end up being answered by geneticists, specialists of technoscience, and owners of biotech companies. The author defends, in this article, the idea that humanity is at risk in our age of genetic engineering, biotechnologies, and market-geared genetic research; he also argues that the values at the very core of our postgenomic era bring to its peak the science-based ideology that has developed since the time of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Harvey; finally, it shows that the bioindustry has invented a new genomythology that goes against the scientific evidence produced by the research in human sciences in which life is interpreted as a language.

  11. Commercial viability of CNS drugs: balancing the risk/reward profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ginger S

    2014-01-01

    CNS has historically been a formidable therapeutic area in which to innovate owing to biological (e.g., complex neurobiology, difficulty reaching the target), as well as clinical (e.g., subjective clinical endpoints, high placebo response, lack of biomarkers) challenges. In the current market where many of the larger diseases are dominated by a generic standard of care, commercial challenges now make the triple threat of scientific-clinical-commercial risk too much for many players to tackle. However, opportunities do exist for smaller biotech companies to concentrate on narrowly focused patient populations associated with high unmet need for which risk can be tightly defined. In CNS, there are two major areas to balance the risk/reward profile and create commercially viable opportunities: To realize value, all companies (start-ups and big players) must define, measure and quantify clear and meaningful value to all stakeholders: physicians, patients, caregivers and payers. © 2013.

  12. Pharmaceutical and biomedical applications of lipid-based nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Claudia; Leonardi, Antonio; Cupri, Sarha; Puglisi, Giovanni; Pignatello, Rosario

    2014-03-01

    Increasing attention is being given to lipid nanocarriers (LNs) as drug delivery systems, due to the advantages offered of a higher biocompatibility and lower toxicity compared with polymeric nanoparticles. Many administration routes are being investigated for LNs, including topical, oral and parenteral ones. LNs are also proposed for specific applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, diagnosis and medical devices production. However, the high number of published research articles does not match an equal amount of patents. A recent Review of ours, published in Pharmaceutical Patent Analyst, reported the patents proposing novel methods for the production of LNs. This review work discusses recent patents, filed in 2007-2013 and dealing with the industrial applications of lipid-based nanocarriers for the vectorization of therapeutically relevant molecules, as well as biotech products such as proteins, gene material and vaccines, in the pharmaceutical, diagnostic and biomedical areas.

  13. A review of advanced small-scale parallel bioreactor technology for accelerated process development: current state and future need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareither, Rachel; Pollard, David

    2011-01-01

    The pharmaceutical and biotech industries face continued pressure to reduce development costs and accelerate process development. This challenge occurs alongside the need for increased upstream experimentation to support quality by design initiatives and the pursuit of predictive models from systems biology. A small scale system enabling multiple reactions in parallel (n ≥ 20), with automated sampling and integrated to purification, would provide significant improvement (four to fivefold) to development timelines. State of the art attempts to pursue high throughput process development include shake flasks, microfluidic reactors, microtiter plates and small-scale stirred reactors. The limitations of these systems are compared to desired criteria to mimic large scale commercial processes. The comparison shows that significant technological improvement is still required to provide automated solutions that can speed upstream process development. Copyright © 2010 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  14. Outsourcing in bioanalysis: a CRO perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    Steve Lowes from Q 2 Solutions speaks to Sankeetha Nadarajah, Managing Commissioning Editor: about outsourcing strategy implementation. Steve started his industrial career at VG Biotech in the UK that became the LC-MS instrument entity of Waters Corporation. Since joining the CRO group that became Advion and then Q 2 Solutions, his career has focused on regulated bioanalysis with particular emphasis on LC-MS. He is a founding member of the Global Bioanalysis Consortium and a past-chair of the AAPS Bioanalytical Focus Group. At Q 2  Solutions, Steve leads the scientific disciplines around LC-MS bioanalysis for both small molecule and biomolecule applications including biomarker assays. Steve has over 40 peer-reviewed publications on bioanalysis and is a frequent speaker at national and international conferences.

  15. Microfluidic very large-scale integration for biochips: Technology, testing and fault-tolerant design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araci, Ismail Emre; Pop, Paul; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    2015-01-01

    of this paper is on continuous-flow biochips, where the basic building block is a microvalve. By combining these microvalves, more complex units such as mixers, switches, multiplexers can be built, hence the name of the technology, “microfluidic Very Large-Scale Integration” (mVLSI). A roadblock......Microfluidic biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers by integrating all the necessary functions for biochemical analysis using microfluidics. Biochips are used in many application areas, such as, in vitro diagnostics, drug discovery, biotech and ecology. The focus...... presents the state-of-the-art in the mVLSI platforms and emerging research challenges in the area of continuous-flow microfluidics, focusing on testing techniques and fault-tolerant design....

  16. The Innovating Self

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Tomas; Hellström, Christina; Berglund, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    This paper explores the relevance of the concept of self in the process of independent technological innovation. In‐depth interviews were conducted with technological innovators from start‐up firms in IT, biotech and advanced services concerning the subjective and social forms of engagement...... in the innovation process. Emerging factors in the interview data revealed aspects pertaining to the innovator’s reflexive self‐conception, innovator ego‐involvement in the venture, forms of commitment and control, personal and social stakes, and various self‐oriented cognitive strategies. It is argued...... that the self‐concept allows the innovator to come into view as a social and subjective being who is involved in reflexive activities such as dynamic role‐taking, “is” vs “ought” reflections and social negotiations....

  17. Non-Specific Reactions during Immunomagnetic Separation of Listeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Zachová

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems occurring during the immunomagnetic separation (IMS of Listeria using immunomagnetic particles Dynabeads® anti-Listeria (Dynal Biotech, Norway were specified. Characteristics of these particles were compared with anti-Listeria spp. magnetite particles (Quantum Magnetics, USA. Pure cultures of Listeria innocua, Arthrobacter spp., Bacillus subtilis, Citrobacter braakii, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae and Staphylococcus aureus were used to evaluate non-specific reactions during IMS. Gram-positive microorganisms, especially Staphylococcus aureus and Arthrobacter spp., were found to be responsible for non-specific reactions in most cases. The capacity of Dynabeads® anti-Listeria particles was determined to be about 10 % of the initial pure cultures of Listeria spp., after 10 min of incubation. Non-specific reactions during IMS of Listeria were examined on the artificially inoculated food samples in which Gram-positive bacteria showed the highest percentage of capture. Influence of washing in two buffers was also studied.

  18. The ethics of big data in big agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle M. Carbonell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the ethics of big data in agriculture, focusing on the power asymmetry between farmers and large agribusinesses like Monsanto. Following the recent purchase of Climate Corp., Monsanto is currently the most prominent biotech agribusiness to buy into big data. With wireless sensors on tractors monitoring or dictating every decision a farmer makes, Monsanto can now aggregate large quantities of previously proprietary farming data, enabling a privileged position with unique insights on a field-by-field basis into a third or more of the US farmland. This power asymmetry may be rebalanced through open-sourced data, and publicly-funded data analytic tools which rival Climate Corp. in complexity and innovation for use in the public domain.

  19. Social Capital, ICT Use and Company Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; Steinfield, Charles; Lopez-Nicolas, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    to information and opportunity predicted company performance, particularly for small start-up companies. The pattern of results complements prior work that establishes the importance of social capital in regional business clusters by demonstrating how certain ICT uses complement personal relationships to enhance......This study explores how some uses of ICTs, as well as having social capital and other means of access to knowledge resources, are related to company performance in a knowledge-intensive business cluster. Data were collected through a survey of companies in the Medicon Valley biotech region located...... in Denmark and Southern Sweden. Responding companies included established producers of biotechnology-related products as well as small biotechnology start-up firms emphasizing research and development.  The results suggest that when ICT use was aimed at accessing and enhancing human and intellectual capital...

  20. Social Capital, ICT Use and Company Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinfield, Charles; Scupola, Ada; López-Nicolás, Carolina

    2009-01-01

    to information and opportunity predicted company performance, particularly for small start-up companies. The pattern of results complements prior work that establishes the importance of social capital in regional business clusters by demonstrating how ICT use complements personal relationships to enhance......This study explores how some kinds of ICT uses, as well as social capital and other means of access to knowledge resources, are related to company performance in a knowledge-intensive business cluster. Data were collected through a survey of companies in the Medicon Valley biotech region located...... in Denmark and Southern Sweden. Responding companies included established producers of biotechnology-related products as well as small biotechnology start-up firms emphasizing research and development.  The results suggest that when ICT use was aimed at accessing and enhancing human and intellectual capital...

  1. Disclosures of Conflicts of Interest in Psychiatric Review Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, Andrew M.; Gorelick, David A.; Appelbaum, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    To characterize disclosures of conflicts of interest in review articles in psychiatry, we identified 285 reviews from ten high-impact journals in psychiatry and two in general medicine. Disclosures were reliably coded as biotech/pharmaceutical/other material interests, nonprofit/government, communication companies, or other. Authors in both types of journals frequently reported industry ties. However, reviews in psychiatric journals were significantly less likely to include industry-related disclosures (32% of reviews; 18% of authors) compared with general medical journals (64% of articles; 40% of authors). The most common types of industry-related disclosures were for consulting, research support, and speaking fees. Disclosures appeared to be of limited utility in helping readers assess possible biases, because the nature and extent of the relationship being disclosed was often unclear. Efforts to screen out authors with significant financial relationships pertaining to the topic under review may be more effective than disclosure in protecting the integrity of the medical literature. PMID:23364114

  2. Next generation vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2011-07-01

    In February this year, about 100 delegates gathered for three days in Vienna (Austria) for the Next Generation Vaccines conference. The meeting held in the Vienna Hilton Hotel from 23rd-25th February 2011 had a strong focus on biotech and industry. The conference organizer Jacob Fleming managed to put together a versatile program ranging from the future generation of vaccines to manufacturing, vaccine distribution and delivery, to regulatory and public health issues. Carefully selected top industry experts presented first-hand experience and shared solutions for overcoming the latest challenges in the field of vaccinology. The program also included several case study presentations on novel vaccine candidates in different stages of development. An interactive pre-conference workshop as well as interactive panel discussions during the meeting allowed all delegates to gain new knowledge and become involved in lively discussions on timely, interesting and sometimes controversial topics related to vaccines.

  3. Biopharma business models in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March-Chordà, I; Yagüe-Perales, R M

    2011-08-01

    This article provides new insights into the different strategy paths or business models currently being implemented by Canadian biopharma companies. Through a case-study methodology, seven biopharma companies pertaining to three business models were analyzed, leading to a broad set of results emerging from the following areas: activity, business model and strategy; management and human resources; and R&D, technology and innovation strategy. The three business models represented were: model 1 (conventional biotech oriented to new drug development, radical innovation and search for discoveries); model 2 (development of a technology platform, usually in proteomics and bioinformatics); and model 3 (incremental innovation, with shorter and less risky development timelines). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. STRENGTHENING BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sastrapradja

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The wave of biotechnology promises has struck not only the developed countries but the developing countries as well. The scientific community in Indonesia is aware of the opportunities and is eager to take an active part in this particular endeavour. Meanwhile resources are required to welcoming the biotech­nology era. The need of trained manpower, appropriate infrastructure and equipment, operational and maintenance costs requires serious consideration if a unit or a laboratory is expected to be functional in biotechnology. There is a good opportunity of applying biotechnology in the field of agriculture and industry considering the availability of biological resources in Indonesia. This paper outlines what have been done so far, the difficulties encountered and the efforts made to strengthening biotechnology research in Indonesia.

  5. Influence of the addition of bentonite clay in poli (butylene adipate co-terephthalic) / poly(lactic acid) membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, D.D.S.; Medeiros, K.M.; Araujo, E.M.; Melo, T.J.A.; Barbosa, R.

    2014-01-01

    The processes of membrane separation have been used in many different sectors of industrial activity, ranging from the chemical industry, food, pharmaceutical, medical and biotech. In this paper, a bentonite clay was added by melt intercalation in a poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalic acid)/poly(lactic acid) blend at levels 1 and 3 wt% of clay. After that, membranes were produced by solvent evaporation technique. From the XRD results, it was verified the possible formation of exfoliated/partially exfoliated structures in the membranes. By DSC, it was observed that the addition of clay did not promote alterations in glass transition temperature and crystalline melting of the PBAT/PLA matrix. The morphology of the membranes were observed by SEM and it was verified the clay formation of porous membranes. (author)

  6. Biocrystallography in Switzerland: achievements and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grütter, Markus G

    2014-01-01

    The first protein crystallography group in Switzerland was installed at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel approximately 40 years ago. Since then protein crystallography has grown and matured remarkably and is now established in the molecular biology, biochemistry or biological medicine departments of most major Swiss Universities as well as in the pharmaceutical industry and in biotech startup companies. Swiss X-ray biocrystallography groups have made remarkable contributions from the beginning and have brought Switzerland to the forefront in biostructural research during the last 5 to 10 years. Switzerland has now a leading position in the areas of supramolecular complexes, membrane proteins and structure-based drug design in pharmaceutical and biotech industries. Protein crystallography on the outer membrane protein ompF as well as the development of the lipidic cubic phase crystallization methodology has been pioneered at the Biozentrum. The latter found its somewhat late recognition through the recent explosion in structure determinations of the seven transmembrane helix G-coupled receptors. Highlights from Swiss structural biology groups in the field of supramolecular complexes include the structures of ribosomal particles, of the nucleosome and the pilus assembly complex of uropathogenic E. coli. On the membrane protein side advances in the field of ABC transporters and ion channels are world-recognized achievements of Swiss structural biology. Dedicated laboratories at many academic and industrial institutions, their current research programs, the availability of excellent infrastructure and the continuing efforts to build new facilities such as the SwissFEL indicate an even brighter future for structural biology in Switzerland.

  7. Evaluation of Two Commercial Systems for Automated Processing, Reading, and Interpretation of Lyme Borreliosis Western Blots▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnicker, M. J.; Jespersen, D. J.; Harring, J. A.; Rollins, L. O.; Bryant, S. C.; Beito, E. M.

    2008-01-01

    The diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis (LB) is commonly made by serologic testing with Western blot (WB) analysis serving as an important supplemental assay. Although specific, the interpretation of WBs for diagnosis of LB (i.e., Lyme WBs) is subjective, with considerable variability in results. In addition, the processing, reading, and interpretation of Lyme WBs are laborious and time-consuming procedures. With the need for rapid processing and more objective interpretation of Lyme WBs, we evaluated the performances of two automated interpretive systems, TrinBlot/BLOTrix (Trinity Biotech, Carlsbad, CA) and BeeBlot/ViraScan (Viramed Biotech AG, Munich, Germany), using 518 serum specimens submitted to our laboratory for Lyme WB analysis. The results of routine testing with visual interpretation were compared to those obtained by BLOTrix analysis of MarBlot immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG and by ViraScan analysis of ViraBlot and ViraStripe IgM and IgG assays. BLOTrix analysis demonstrated an agreement of 84.7% for IgM and 87.3% for IgG compared to visual reading and interpretation. ViraScan analysis of the ViraBlot assays demonstrated agreements of 85.7% for IgM and 94.2% for IgG, while ViraScan analysis of the ViraStripe IgM and IgG assays showed agreements of 87.1 and 93.1%, respectively. Testing by the automated systems yielded an average time savings of 64 min/run compared to processing, reading, and interpretation by our current procedure. Our findings demonstrated that automated processing and interpretive systems yield results comparable to those of visual interpretation, while reducing the subjectivity and time required for Lyme WB analysis. PMID:18463211

  8. Evaluation of two commercial systems for automated processing, reading, and interpretation of Lyme borreliosis Western blots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnicker, M J; Jespersen, D J; Harring, J A; Rollins, L O; Bryant, S C; Beito, E M

    2008-07-01

    The diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis (LB) is commonly made by serologic testing with Western blot (WB) analysis serving as an important supplemental assay. Although specific, the interpretation of WBs for diagnosis of LB (i.e., Lyme WBs) is subjective, with considerable variability in results. In addition, the processing, reading, and interpretation of Lyme WBs are laborious and time-consuming procedures. With the need for rapid processing and more objective interpretation of Lyme WBs, we evaluated the performances of two automated interpretive systems, TrinBlot/BLOTrix (Trinity Biotech, Carlsbad, CA) and BeeBlot/ViraScan (Viramed Biotech AG, Munich, Germany), using 518 serum specimens submitted to our laboratory for Lyme WB analysis. The results of routine testing with visual interpretation were compared to those obtained by BLOTrix analysis of MarBlot immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG and by ViraScan analysis of ViraBlot and ViraStripe IgM and IgG assays. BLOTrix analysis demonstrated an agreement of 84.7% for IgM and 87.3% for IgG compared to visual reading and interpretation. ViraScan analysis of the ViraBlot assays demonstrated agreements of 85.7% for IgM and 94.2% for IgG, while ViraScan analysis of the ViraStripe IgM and IgG assays showed agreements of 87.1 and 93.1%, respectively. Testing by the automated systems yielded an average time savings of 64 min/run compared to processing, reading, and interpretation by our current procedure. Our findings demonstrated that automated processing and interpretive systems yield results comparable to those of visual interpretation, while reducing the subjectivity and time required for Lyme WB analysis.

  9. Modeling of Filtration Processes—Microfiltration and Depth Filtration for Harvest of a Therapeutic Protein Expressed in Pichia pastoris at Constant Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukumar Sampath

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Filtration steps are ubiquitous in biotech processes due to the simplicity of operation, ease of scalability and the myriad of operations that they can be used for. Microfiltration, depth filtration, ultrafiltration and diafiltration are some of the most commonly used biotech unit operations. For clean feed streams, when fouling is minimal, scaling of these unit operations is performed linearly based on the filter area per unit volume of feed stream. However, for cases when considerable fouling occurs, such as the case of harvesting a therapeutic product expressed in Pichia pastoris, linear scaling may not be possible and current industrial practices involve use of 20–30% excess filter area over and above the calculated filter area to account for the uncertainty in scaling. In view of the fact that filters used for harvest are likely to have a very limited lifetime, this oversizing of the filters can add considerable cost of goods for the manufacturer. Modeling offers a way out of this conundrum. In this paper, we examine feasibility of using the various proposed models for filtration of a therapeutic product expressed in Pichia pastoris at constant pressure. It is observed that none of the individual models yield a satisfactory fit of the data, thus indicating that more than one fouling mechanism is at work. Filters with smaller pores were found to undergo fouling via complete pore blocking followed by cake filtration. On the other hand, filters with larger pores were found to undergo fouling via intermediate pore blocking followed by cake filtration. The proposed approach can be used for more accurate sizing of microfilters and depth filters.

  10. New Programs Utilizing Light Scattering and Flow Imaging Techniques for Macromolecular Crystal Growth and Fluid Dynamics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Phil Segre, a physicist by training, is a recent addition to the Biotech group, SD46, having joined NASA in August of 2000. Over the past two years he has been developing a laboratory for the study of macromolecular and protein crystal growth. The main apparatus for this work is a Dynamic Light Scattering apparatus, DLS, which is capable of making highly precise measurements of size distributions of both protein solutions and protein crystals. With Drs. Chernov and Thomas (USRA), he has begun a collaboration studying the affects of protein impurities on protein crystal growth and subsequent crystal quality. One of the hypotheses behind the differences between Earth and space grown protein crystals is that the absorption of harmful impurities is reduced in space due to the absence of convective flows. Using DLS measurements we are examining crystal growth with varying amounts of impurities and testing whether there is a strong physical basis behind this hypothesis. With Dr. Joe Ng of UAH he has been collaborating on a project to examine the folding/unfolding dynamics of large RNA complexes. A detailed understanding of this process is necessary for the handling of RNA in biotech applications, and the DLS instrument gives details and results beyond that of other instruments. With Prof. Jim McClymer of the University of Maine (summer faculty visitor to NASA in 2001, 2002), we have been studying the crystallization process in model colloidal suspensions whose behavior in some cases can mimic that of much smaller protein solutions. An understanding of the self-assembly of colloids is the first step in the process of engineering novel materials for photonic and light switching applications. Finally, he has begun an investigation into the physics of particle sedimentation. In addition to the DLS instrument he also has an instrument (called PIV) that can measure flow fields of fluids. The applications are to the dynamics of protein crystal motions both on earth and in

  11. Genetically modified foods and social concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghari, Behrokh Mohajer; Ardekani, Ali M

    2011-07-01

    Biotechnology is providing us with a wide range of options for how we can use agricultural and commercial forestry lands. The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops on millions of hectares of lands and their injection into our food chain is a huge global genetic experiment involving all living beings. Considering the fast pace of new advances in production of genetically modified crops, consumers, farmers and policymakers worldwide are challenged to reach a consensus on a clear vision for the future of world food supply. The current food biotechnology debate illustrates the serious conflict between two groups: 1) Agri-biotech investors and their affiliated scientists who consider agricultural biotechnology as a solution to food shortage, the scarcity of environmental resources and weeds and pests infestations; and 2) independent scientists, environmentalists, farmers and consumers who warn that genetically modified food introduces new risks to food security, the environment and human health such as loss of biodiversity; the emergence of superweeds and superpests; the increase of antibiotic resistance, food allergies and other unintended effects. This article reviews major viewpoints which are currently debated in the food biotechnology sector in the world. It also lays the ground-work for deep debate on benefits and risks of Biotech-crops for human health, ecosystems and biodiversity. In this context, although some regulations exist, there is a need for continuous vigilance for all countries involved in producing genetically engineered food to follow the international scientific bio-safety testing guidelines containing reliable pre-release experiments and post-release track of transgenic plants to protect public health and avoid future environmental harm.

  12. Economic governance of property rights: comparative analysis on the collection of royalties in genetically modified soybean seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Fowler de Avila Monteiro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the governance of property rights on genetically modified (GM soybean seeds. Specifically, the article undertakes a comparative analysis on the collection of royalties in GM soybean seeds in the U.S. and Brazil. For each country, the authors describe the regulatory framework governing the protection of biotechnology innovations in agriculture and investigate the mechanisms of royalty collection in GM soybean seeds. The paper also offers econometric evidence linking the capture of value on biotech innovations and the protection mechanisms deployed by biotech firms. The results suggest that, subject to the institutional environment, firms may choose to transact a GM attribute separated from the seed, building specialized governance structures framed around the genetic attribute and not around the seed as a whole.Este artigo examina a governança de direitos de propriedade em sementes transgênicas de soja. Especificamente, o estudo empreende uma análise comparativa sobre a cobrança de royalties em sementes transgênicas de soja nos EUA e no Brasil. Para cada país, os autores descrevem a estrutura regulatória que rege a proteção de inovações biotecnológicas na agricultura e investigam os mecanismos de cobrança de royalties em sementes transgênicas de soja. O artigo também examina evidências econométricas que relacionam a captura de valor sobre inovações biotecnológicas e os mecanismos de proteção utilizados por firmas de biotecnologia. Os resultados sugerem que, com base no ambiente institucional, uma firma pode optar por transacionar um atributo transgênico separado da semente, estabelecendo estruturas especializadas de governança que se emolduram em torno do atributo e não da semente em si.

  13. Comparison of Three Screening Test Kits for G6PD Enzyme Deficiency: Implications for Its Use in the Radical Cure of Vivax Malaria in Remote and Resource-Poor Areas in the Philippines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fe Esperanza Espino

    Full Text Available We evaluated a battery of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase diagnostic point-of-care tests (PoC to assess the most suitable product in terms of performance and operational characteristics for remote areas.Samples were collected in Puerto Princesa City, Palawan, Philippines and tested for G6PD deficiency with a fluorescent spot test (FST; Procedure 203, Trinity Biotech, Ireland, the semiquantitative WST8/1-methoxy PMS (WST; Dojindo, Japan and the Carestart G6PD Rapid Diagnostic Test (CSG; AccessBio, USA. Results were compared to spectrophotometry (Procedure 345, Trinity Biotech, Ireland. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each test with cut-off activities of 10%, 20%, 30% and 60% of the adjusted male median.The adjusted male median was 270.5 IU/10(12 RBC. FST and WST were tested on 621 capillary blood samples, the CSG was tested on venous and capillary blood on 302 samples. At 30% G6PD activity, sensitivity for the FST was between 87.7% (95%CI: 76.8% to 93.9% and 96.5% (95%CI: 87.9% to 99.5% depending on definition of intermediate results; the WST was 84.2% (95%CI: 72.1% to 92.5%; and the CSG was between 68.8% (95%CI: 41.3% to 89.0% and 93.8% (95%CI: 69.8% to 99.8% when the test was performed on capillary or venous blood respectively. Sensitivity of FST and CSG (tested with venous blood were comparable (p>0.05. The analysis of venous blood samples by the CSG yielded significantly higher results than FST and CSG performed on capillary blood (p<0.05. Sensitivity of the CSG varied depending on source of blood used (p<0.05.The operational characteristics of the CSG were superior to all other test formats. Performance and operational characteristics of the CSG performed on venous blood suggest the test to be a good alternative to the FST.

  14. Workshop Summary for Maintaining Innovation and Security in Biotechnology: Lessons Learned from Nuclear, Chemical, and Informational Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althouse, Paris [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-11

    In the fast-paced field of biotechnology where innovation has such far-reaching impacts on human health and the environment, dealing with the implications of possible illicit activities, accidents or unintended research consequences with potential detrimental societal impacts tends to remain in the background. While controls may be inevitable for the biotech industry, workshop attendees agreed that the way in which controls are implemented will play a major role in the agility and innovation of the biotechnology industry. There is little desire to slow down the pace of the gains while dealing with the security issues that arise. As was seen from the brief examinations of the Nuclear, Chemical, and Information Technology sectors explored in this workshop, establishing a regulatory regime needs to be a partnership between the public, corporate interests, scientists, and the government. Regulation is often written to combat perceived risk rather than actual risk—the public’s perceptions (occasionally even fictional portrayals) can spur regulatory efforts. This leads to the need for a thorough and continuing assessment of the risks posed by modern biotechnology. Inadequate or minimal risk assessment might expedite development in the short term but has potential negative long-term security and economic consequences. Industry and the technical community also often have a large role in setting regulatory policy, especially when well-crafted incentives are incorporated into the regulations. Such incentives might actually lead to enhanced innovation while poorly designed incentives can actually reduce safety and security. Any regulations should be as agile and flexible as the technology they regulate and when applied to biotechnologies they will need a new framework for thinking and implementing. The new framework should consider biotechnology as a technology and not simply a science since it is an extremely complex and adaptive system. This suggests the need to invest

  15. Patent first, ask questions later: morality and biotechnology in patent law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Margo A

    2003-12-01

    This Article explores the U.S. "patent first, ask questions later" approach to determining what subject matter should receive patent protection. Under this approach, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO or the Agency) issues patents on "anything under the sun made by man," and to the extent a patent's subject matter is sufficiently controversial, Congress acts retrospectively in assessing whether patents should issue on such interventions. This practice has important ramifications for morally controversial biotechnology patents specifically, and for American society generally. For many years a judicially created "moral utility" doctrine served as a type of gatekeeper of patent subject matter eligibility. The doctrine allowed both the USTPO and courts to deny patents on morally controversial subject matter under the fiction that such inventions were not "useful." The gate, however, is currently untended. A combination of the demise of the moral utility doctrine, along with expansive judicial interpretations of the scope of patent-eligible subject matter, has resulted in virtually no basis on which the USTPO or courts can deny patent protection to morally controversial, but otherwise patentable, subject matter. This is so despite position statements by the Agency to the contrary. Biotechnology is an area in which many morally controversial inventions are generated. Congress has been in react-mode following the issuance of a stream of morally controversial biotech patents, including patents on transgenic animals, surgical methods, and methods of cloning humans. With no statutory limits on patent eligibility, and with myriad concerns complicating congressional action following a patent's issuance, it is not Congress, the representative of the people, determining patent eligibility. Instead, it is patent applicants, scientific inventors, who are deciding matters of high public policy through the contents of the applications they file with the USTPO. This Article

  16. Monitoring the agricultural landscape for insect resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Joseph; Glaser, J. A.; Copenhaver, Ken

    Farmers in 25 countries on six continents are using plant biotechnology to solve difficult crop production challenges and conserve the environment. In fact, 13.3 million farmers, which include 90 percent of the farming in developing countries, choose to plant biotech crops. Over the past decade, farmers increased area planted in genetically modified (GM) crops by more than 10 percent each year, thus increasing their farm income by more than 44 billion US dollars (1996-2007), and achieved economic, environmental and social benefits in crops such as soybeans, canola, corn and cotton. To date, total acres of biotech crops harvested exceed more than 2 billion with a proven 13-year history of safe use. Over the next decade, expanded adoption combined with current research on 57 crops in 63 countries will broaden the advantages of genetically modified foods for growers, consumers and the environment. Genetically modified (GM) crops with the ability to produce toxins lethal to specific insect pests are covering a larger percentage of the agricultural landscape every year. The United States department of Agriculture (USDA) estimated that 63 percent of corn and 65 percent of cotton contained these specific genetic traits in 2009. The toxins could protect billions of dollars of loss from insect damage for crops valued at greater than 165 billion US dollars in 2008. The stable and efficient production of these crops has taken on even more importance in recent years with their use, not only as a food source, but now also a source of fuel. It is in the best interest of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to ensure the continued efficacy of toxin producing GM crops as their use reduces pesticides harmful to humans and animals. However, population genetics models have indicated the risk of insect pests developing resistance to these toxins if a high percentage of acreage is grown in these crops. The USEPA is developing methods to monitor the agricultural

  17. Herbal drug patenting in India: IP potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Niharika; Manchikanti, Padmavati; Dey, Satya Hari

    2011-09-01

    Herbal drugs are gaining worldwide prominence due to their distinct advantages. Developing countries have started exploring the ethnopharmacological approach of drug discovery and have begun to file patents on herbal drugs. The expansion of R&D in Indian herbal research organizations and presence of manufacturing units at non-Indian sites is an indication of the capability to develop new products and processes. The present study attempts to identify innovations in the Indian herbal drug sector by analyzing the patenting trends in India, US and EU. Based on key word and IPC based search at the IPO, USPTO, Esp@cenet and WIPO databases, patent applications and grant in herbal drugs by Indian applicants/assignees was collected for the last ten years (from 1st January 2001 to 31st October 2010). From this collection patents related to human therapeutic use only were selected. Analysis was performed to identify filing trends, major applicants/assignees, disease area and major plant species used for various treatments. There is a gradual increase in patent filing through the years. In India, individual inventors have maximum applications and grants. CSIR, among research organizations and Hindustan Unilever, Avesthagen, Piramal Life Science, Sahajanand Biotech and Indus Biotech among the companies have the maximum granted patents in India, US and EU respectively. Diabetes, cancer and inflammatory disorders are the major areas for patenting in India and abroad. Recent patents are on new herbal formulations for treatment of AIDS, hepatitis, skin disorders and gastrointestinal disorders. A majority of the herbal patents applications and grants in India are with individual inventors. Claim analysis indicates that these patents include novel multi-herb compositions with synergistic action. Indian research organizations are more active than companies in filing for patents. CSIR has maximum numbers of applications not only in India but also in the US and EU. Patents by research

  18. Dendritic platforms for biomimicry and biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Kalpana; Mohan, Anand; Thakur, Sourav; Kumar, Pradeep

    2018-02-15

    Dendrimers, commonly referred to as polymeric trees, offer endless opportunities for biotechnological and biomedical applications. By controlling the type, length, and molecular weight of the core, branches and end groups, respectively, the chemical functionality and topology of dendrimeric archetypes can be customized which further can be applied to achieve required solubility, biodegradability, diagnosis and other applications. Given the physicochemical variability of the dendrimers and their hybrids, this review attempts to discuss a full spectrum of recent advances and strides made by these "perfectly designed structures". An extensive biotech/biomimicry application profiling of dendrimers is provided with focus on complex archetypical designs such as protein biomimicry (angiogenic inhibitors, regenerative hydroxyapatite and collagen) and biotechnology applications. In terms of biotechnological advances, dendrimers have provided distinctive advantages in the fields of biocatalysis, microbicides, artificial lights, mitochondrial function modulation, vaccines, tissue regeneration and repair, antigen carriers and even biosensors. In addition, this review provides overview of the extensive chemo-functionalization opportunities available with dendrimers which makes them a perfect candidate for forming drug conjugates, protein hybrids, bio mimics, lipidic derivatives, metal deposits and nanoconjugates thereby making them the most multifunctional platforms for diverse biotechnological applications.

  19. Transient plant transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens: Principles, methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenek, Pavel; Samajova, Olga; Luptovciak, Ivan; Doskocilova, Anna; Komis, George; Samaj, Jozef

    2015-11-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is widely used as a versatile tool for development of stably transformed model plants and crops. However, the development of Agrobacterium based transient plant transformation methods attracted substantial attention in recent years. Transient transformation methods offer several applications advancing stable transformations such as rapid and scalable recombinant protein production and in planta functional genomics studies. Herein, we highlight Agrobacterium and plant genetics factors affecting transfer of T-DNA from Agrobacterium into the plant cell nucleus and subsequent transient transgene expression. We also review recent methods concerning Agrobacterium mediated transient transformation of model plants and crops and outline key physical, physiological and genetic factors leading to their successful establishment. Of interest are especially Agrobacterium based reverse genetics studies in economically important crops relying on use of RNA interference (RNAi) or virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) technology. The applications of Agrobacterium based transient plant transformation technology in biotech industry are presented in thorough detail. These involve production of recombinant proteins (plantibodies, vaccines and therapeutics) and effectoromics-assisted breeding of late blight resistance in potato. In addition, we also discuss biotechnological potential of recombinant GFP technology and present own examples of successful Agrobacterium mediated transient plant transformations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A nanobody:GFP bacterial platform that enables functional enzyme display and easy quantification of display capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Sofie; Fischer, Emil C; Martínez, Virginia; Seppälä, Susanna; Nørholm, Morten H H

    2016-05-03

    Bacterial surface display is an attractive technique for the production of cell-anchored, functional proteins and engineering of whole-cell catalysts. Although various outer membrane proteins have been used for surface display, an easy and versatile high-throughput-compatible assay for evaluating and developing surface display systems is missing. Using a single domain antibody (also called nanobody) with high affinity for green fluorescent protein (GFP), we constructed a system that allows for fast, fluorescence-based detection of displayed proteins. The outer membrane hybrid protein LppOmpA and the autotransporter C-IgAP exposed the nanobody on the surface of Escherichia coli with very different efficiency. Both anchors were capable of functionally displaying the enzyme Chitinase A as a fusion with the nanobody, and this considerably increased expression levels compared to displaying the nanobody alone. We used flow cytometry to analyse display capability on single-cell versus population level and found that the signal peptide of the anchor has great effect on display efficiency. We have developed an inexpensive and easy read-out assay for surface display using nanobody:GFP interactions. The assay is compatible with the most common fluorescence detection methods, including multi-well plate whole-cell fluorescence detection, SDS-PAGE in-gel fluorescence, microscopy and flow cytometry. We anticipate that the platform will facilitate future in-depth studies on the mechanism of protein transport to the surface of living cells, as well as the optimisation of applications in industrial biotech.

  1. Generation and characterization of the first immortalized alpaca cell line suitable for diagnostic and immunization studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Franceschi

    Full Text Available Raising of alpacas as exotic livestock for wool and meat production and as companion animals is growing in importance in the United States, Europe and Australia. Furthermore the alpaca, as well as the rest of the camelids, possesses the peculiarity of producing single-chain antibodies from which nanobodies can be generated. Nanobodies, due to their structural simplicity and reduced size, are very versatile in terms of manipulation and bio-therapeutic exploitation. In fact the biotech companies involved in nanobody production and application continue to grow in number and size. Hence, the development of reagents and tools to assist in the further growth of this new scientific and entrepreneurial reality is becoming a necessity. These are needed mainly to address alpaca disease diagnosis and prophylaxis, and to develop alpaca immunization strategies for nanobody generation. For instance an immortalized alpaca cell line would be extremely valuable. In the present work the first stabilized alpaca cell line from alpaca skin stromal cells (ASSCs was generated and characterized. This cell line was shown to be suitable for replication of viruses bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus and caprine herpesvirus-1 and the endocellular parasite Neospora caninum. Moreover ASSCs were easy to transfect and transduce by several methods. These two latter characteristics are extremely useful when recombinant antigens need to be produced in a host homologous system. This work could be considered as a starting point for the expansion of the biotechnologies linked to alpaca farming and industry.

  2. Nanoimprint lithography for microfluidics manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreindl, Gerald; Matthias, Thorsten

    2013-12-01

    The history of imprint technology as lithography method for pattern replication can be traced back to 1970's but the most significant progress has been made by the research group of S. Chou in the 1990's. Since then, it has become a popular technique with a rapidly growing interest from both research and industrial sides and a variety of new approaches have been proposed along the mainstream scientific advances. Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a novel method for the fabrication of micro/nanometer scale patterns with low cost, high throughput and high resolution. Unlike traditional optical lithographic approaches, which create pattern through the use of photons or electrons to modify the chemical and physical properties of the resist, NIL relies on direct mechanical deformation of the resist and can therefore achieve resolutions beyond the limitations set by light diffraction or beam scattering that are encountered in conventional lithographic techniques. The ability to fabricate structures from the micro- to the nanoscale with high precision in a wide variety of materials is of crucial importance to the advancement of micro- and nanotechnology and the biotech- sciences as a whole and will be discussed in this paper. Nanoimprinting can not only create resist patterns, as in lithography, but can also imprint functional device structures in various polymers, which can lead to a wide range of applications in electronics, photonics, data storage, and biotechnology.

  3. Wall Street's assessment of plastic surgery--related technology: a clinical and financial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, L M; Shaw, W W

    2000-02-01

    Many plastic surgeons develop technologies that are manufactured by Wall Street-financed companies. Others participate in the stock market as investors. This study examines the bioengineered skin industry to determine whether it integrates clinical and financial information as Wall Street tenets would predict, and to see whether the financial performance of these companies provides any lessons for practicing plastic surgeons. In efficient markets, the assumptions on which independent financial analysts base their company sales and earnings projections are clinically reasonable, the volatility of a company's stock price does not irrationally differ from that of its industry sector, and the buy/sell recommendations of analysts are roughly congruent. For the companies in this study, these key financial parameters were compared with a benchmark index of 69 biotech companies of similar age and annual revenues (Student's t test). Five bioengineered skin companies were included in the study. Analysts estimated that each company would sell its product to between 24 and 45 percent of its target clinical population. The average stock price volatility was significantly higher for study companies than for those in the benchmark index (p companies were significantly less congruent than those for the benchmark companies (p invest in the stock market, because of their unique clinical experience, may sometimes be in the position to evaluate new technologies and companies better than Wall Street experts. Well-timed trades that use this expertise can result in opportunities for profit.

  4. Global capacity, potentials and trends of solid waste research and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Michael A; Ronald, Mersky; Feng, Huan

    2017-09-01

    In this study, United States, China, India, United Kingdom, Nigeria, Egypt, Brazil, Italy, Germany, Taiwan, Australia, Canada and Mexico were selected to represent the global community. This enabled an overview of solid waste management worldwide and between developed and developing countries. These are countries that feature most in the International Conference on Solid Waste Technology and Management (ICSW) over the past 20 years. A total of 1452 articles directly on solid waste management and technology were reviewed and credited to their original country of research. Results show significant solid waste research potentials globally, with the United States leading by 373 articles, followed by India with 230 articles. The rest of the countries are ranked in the order of: UK > Taiwan > Brazil > Nigeria > Italy > Japan > China > Canada > Germany >Mexico > Egypt > Australia. Global capacity in solid waste management options is in the order of: Waste characterisation-management > waste biotech/composting > waste to landfill > waste recovery/reduction > waste in construction > waste recycling > waste treatment-reuse-storage > waste to energy > waste dumping > waste education/public participation/policy. It is observed that the solid waste research potential is not a measure of solid waste management capacity. The results show more significant research impacts on solid waste management in developed countries than in developing countries where economy, technology and society factors are not strong. This article is targeted to motivate similar study in each country, using solid waste research articles from other streamed databases to measure research impacts on solid waste management.

  5. The nature of outsourced preclinical research--the example of chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festel, Gunter W

    2013-09-01

    The possibility to buy standardized external services or even new and innovative methods within drug discovery has increased dramatically during the last decades. Service providers are able to provide timely and efficient solutions to any given problem within preclinical research. The outsourcing behavior depends on the specific company type. Generally, the outsourcing level of emerging pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies is much higher than established companies due to low or missing internal resources. Whereas the "make-or-buy" decisions of large and fully integrated pharmaceutical companies are mainly competency driven, those of mid-size and small pharmaceutical, as well as biotech companies show a specific combination of cost/capacity and competency. The three different cooperation models "price competition", "project selection," and "strategic partnership" were identified. For all types of companies, the cooperation model of "strategic partnership" offers access to high-level expertise while reducing fixed costs and complexity. This was shown using chemical synthesis as an example but is also true for other areas of preclinical research.

  6. A Wide-Field Fluorescence Microscope Extension for Ultrafast Screening of One-Bead One-Compound Libraries Using a Spectral Image Subtraction Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusermann, Wolf; Ludin, Beat; Pham, Nhan T; Auer, Manfred; Weidemann, Thomas; Hintersteiner, Martin

    2016-05-09

    The increasing involvement of academic institutions and biotech companies in drug discovery calls for cost-effective methods to identify new bioactive molecules. Affinity-based on-bead screening of combinatorial one-bead one-compound libraries combines a split-mix synthesis design with a simple protein binding assay operating directly at the bead matrix. However, one bottleneck for academic scale on-bead screening is the unavailability of a cheap, automated, and robust screening platform that still provides a quantitative signal related to the amount of target protein binding to individual beads for hit bead ranking. Wide-field fluorescence microscopy has long been considered unsuitable due to significant broad spectrum autofluorescence of the library beads in conjunction with low detection sensitivity. Herein, we demonstrate how such a standard microscope equipped with LED-based excitation and a modern CMOS camera can be successfully used for selecting hit beads. We show that the autofluorescence issue can be overcome by an optical image subtraction approach that yields excellent signal-to-noise ratios for the detection of bead-associated target proteins. A polymer capillary attached to a semiautomated bead-picking device allows the operator to efficiently isolate individual hit beads in less than 20 s. The system can be used for ultrafast screening of >200,000 bead-bound compounds in 1.5 h, thereby making high-throughput screening accessible to a wider group within the scientific community.

  7. Advancing Cancer Survivorship in a Country with 1.35 Billion People: The China Lymphoma Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven; Reno, Jamie

    Rates of lymphoma are rising rapidly and lymphoma is now the ninth most common cancer among Chinese males. The China Lymphoma Project was founded to increase awareness of lymphoma in China, including the survivability of the disease and the availability of potentially life-saving treatments, and to provide social support for men, women, and children in China who are living with the disease. The project is working with China government officials, several of the top cancer hospitals in China and the U.S., internationally known oncologists and cancer researchers, pharmaceutical and biotech companies in China and the U.S., healthcare and environmental companies, the Confucius Institute at San Diego State University, and the Asian Heritage Society. Advances in e-Health are being utilized to provide patient education and social support. The project will provide free e-books that profile lymphoma survivors (e.g., Kai-Fu Lee, creator of Google China), new videos, websites, pamphlets, blogs, video logs (vlogs), peer-to-peer counseling and support, and information about the latest treatments and oncology clinical trials.

  8. [Development of Human Health Discoveries. 10 years results of Young Innovative Company incubation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsac, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Medicine is evolving every day in its operating procedures and the services offered to patients, emphasizing personalized medicine, safety and medical benefits. The individual patient is more than ever the hub of healthcare organization. Medical innovation is thus a public health priority. However it requires an accurate assessment of medical utility and risk-benefit ratios, and in-depth analysis of economic and organizational impacts. Ten years of experience in the Paris Biotech Santé company incubator has identified key actions for effective support of research projects and the success of innovative companies. Strong expertise is needed to prepare development plans, ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and obtain research funding. During its first decade, this incubator has created 87 innovative companies employing 1500 people, raised more than 90 million euros of funding, and reached a cumulative company value of 1200 million euros. Key factors of success have been identified, but an analysis of the causes of failure shows that operational adjustments are mandatory, particularly a strong commitment from medical experts, in order to promote access to new and useful products for patients while at the same time assessing their social impact.

  9. Is Multitask Deep Learning Practical for Pharma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsundar, Bharath; Liu, Bowen; Wu, Zhenqin; Verras, Andreas; Tudor, Matthew; Sheridan, Robert P; Pande, Vijay

    2017-08-28

    Multitask deep learning has emerged as a powerful tool for computational drug discovery. However, despite a number of preliminary studies, multitask deep networks have yet to be widely deployed in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. This lack of acceptance stems from both software difficulties and lack of understanding of the robustness of multitask deep networks. Our work aims to resolve both of these barriers to adoption. We introduce a high-quality open-source implementation of multitask deep networks as part of the DeepChem open-source platform. Our implementation enables simple python scripts to construct, fit, and evaluate sophisticated deep models. We use our implementation to analyze the performance of multitask deep networks and related deep models on four collections of pharmaceutical data (three of which have not previously been analyzed in the literature). We split these data sets into train/valid/test using time and neighbor splits to test multitask deep learning performance under challenging conditions. Our results demonstrate that multitask deep networks are surprisingly robust and can offer strong improvement over random forests. Our analysis and open-source implementation in DeepChem provide an argument that multitask deep networks are ready for widespread use in commercial drug discovery.

  10. Highly porous polytriazole ion exchange membranes cast from solutions in non-toxic cosolvents

    KAUST Repository

    Chisca, Stefan

    2017-04-04

    The development of highly functionalized porous materials for protein separation is important for biotech processes. We report the preparation of highly porous polytriazole with sulfonic acid functionalization. The resulting ion exchange membranes are selective for protein adsorption. The starting material was a hydroxyl-functionalized polytriazole, which is an advantageous platform for further modification. The polymer was dissolved in a mixture of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim]OAc) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC), which can be both considered green solvents. The polymer solubilization was only possible due to an interesting effect of cosolvency, which is discussed, based in phase diagrams. Membranes were prepared by solution casting, followed by immersion in a non-solvent bath. We then grafted sulfone groups on the membranes, by reacting the hydroxyl groups with 1,3-propane sultone and 1,4-butane sultone. Lysozyme adsorption was successfully evaluated. Membranes modified with 1,4-butane sultone adsorbed more protein than those with 1,3-propane sultone.

  11. Out of Academics: Education, Entrepreneurship and Enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banes, Albert J

    2013-06-25

    The author started a niche biotech company in 1985 called Flexcell ® to distribute an enabling technology, mechanobiology devices, to the field. He was the first University of North Carolina faculty member to start a company and stay with it as he pursued his career in academics. That was an unpopular route at that time, but a path he was driven to navigate. Those interests, merged with his training, led to the design and manufacture of mechanobiology devices such as the Flexercell ® Strain Unit and the BioFlex ® flexible bottom culture plates to study fundamental responses of cells to strain. Principles in these devices were also incorporated into bioreactors for tissue engineering, which are standard in the marketplace today. In this article, the major roadblocks will be chronicled that were overcome to help build the field of mechanobiology and create a small biotechnology company. Through example, the author's formula for achieving milestones will be discussed including, the DRIVE it takes to get there ["DRIVE": Determination (Confidence), Research and Development (R&D) and Risk-Taking, Innovation (Imagination) and Intellectual Property, achieving Victory, and Enterprise].

  12. High-pressure applications in medicine and pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jerson L; Foguel, Debora; Suarez, Marisa; Gomes, Andre M O; Oliveira, Andrea C [Centro Nacional de Ressonancia Magnetica Nuclear, Departamento de Bioquimica Medica, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-590 (Brazil)

    2004-04-14

    High pressure has emerged as an important tool to tackle several problems in medicine and biotechnology. Misfolded proteins, aggregates and amyloids have been studied, which point toward the understanding of the protein misfolding diseases. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has also been used to dissociate non-amyloid aggregates and inclusion bodies. The diverse range of diseases that result from protein misfolding has made this theme an important research focus for pharmaceutical and biotech companies. The use of high pressure promises to contribute to identifying the mechanisms behind these defects and creating therapies against these diseases. High pressure has also been used to study viruses and other infectious agents for the purpose of sterilization and in the development of vaccines. Using pressure, we have detected the presence of a ribonucleoprotein intermediate, where the coat protein is partially unfolded but bound to RNA. These intermediates are potential targets for antiviral compounds. The ability of pressure to inactivate viruses, prions and bacteria has been evaluated with a view toward the applications of vaccine development and virus sterilization. Recent studies demonstrate that pressure causes virus inactivation while preserving the immunogenic properties. There is increasing evidence that a high-pressure cycle traps a virus in the 'fusion intermediate state', not infectious but highly immunogenic.

  13. Due diligence in the characterization of matrix effects in a total IL-13 Singulex™ method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Stephanie; Soderstrom, Catherine

    2014-04-01

    After obtaining her PhD in Cellular and Molecular biology from the University of Nevada, Reno, Stephanie has spent the last 15 years in the field of bioanalysis. She has held positions in academia, biotech, contract research and large pharma where she has managed ligand binding assay (discovery to Phase IIb clinical) and flow cytometry (preclinical) laboratories as well as taken the lead on implementing new/emergent technologies. Currently Stephanie leads Pfizer's Regulated Bioanalysis Ligand Binding Assay group, focusing on early clinical biomarker support. Interleukin (IL)-13, a Th2 cytokine, drives a range of physiological responses associated with the induction of allergic airway diseases and inflammatory bowel diseases. Analysis of IL-13 as a biomarker has provided insight into its role in disease mechanisms and progression. Serum IL-13 concentrations are often too low to be measured by standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques, necessitating the implementation of a highly sensitive assay. Previously, the validation of a Singulex™ Erenna(®) assay for the quantitation of IL-13 was reported. Herein we describe refinement of this validation; defining the impact of matrix interference on the lower limit of quantification, adding spiked matrix QC samples, and extending endogenous IL-13 stability. A fit-for-purpose validation was conducted and the assay was used to support a Phase II clinical trial.

  14. Evolution of the Novalux extended cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser (NECSEL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, John G.

    2016-03-01

    Novalux Inc was an enterprise founded by Aram Mooradian in 1998 to commercialise a novel electrically pumped vertical extended cavity semiconductor laser platform, initially aiming to produce pump lasers for optical fiber telecommunication networks. Following successful major investment in 2000, the company developed a range of single- and multi-mode 980 nm pump lasers emitting from 100-500 mW with excellent beam quality and efficiency. This rapid development required solution of several significant problems in chip and external cavity design, substrate and DBR mirror optimization, thermal engineering and mode selection. Output coupling to single mode fiber was exceptional. Following the collapse of the long haul telecom market in late 2001, a major reorientation of effort was undertaken, initially to develop compact 60-100 mW hybrid monolithically integrated pumplets for metro/local amplified networks, then to frequency-doubled blue light emitters for biotech, reprographics and general scientific applications. During 2001-3 I worked at Novalux on a career break from University College Cork, first as R&D Director managing a small group tasked with producing new capabilities and product options based on the NECSEL platform, including high power, pulsed and frequency doubled versions, then in 2002 as Director of New Product Realization managing the full engineering team, leading the transition to frequency doubled products.

  15. Protein crystallography and drug discovery: recollections of knowledge exchange between academia and industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom L. Blundell

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of structure-guided drug discovery is a story of knowledge exchange where new ideas originate from all parts of the research ecosystem. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin obtained insulin from Boots Pure Drug Company in the 1930s and insulin crystallization was optimized in the company Novo in the 1950s, allowing the structure to be determined at Oxford University. The structure of renin was developed in academia, on this occasion in London, in response to a need to develop antihypertensives in pharma. The idea of a dimeric aspartic protease came from an international academic team and was discovered in HIV; it eventually led to new HIV antivirals being developed in industry. Structure-guided fragment-based discovery was developed in large pharma and biotechs, but has been exploited in academia for the development of new inhibitors targeting protein–protein interactions and also antimicrobials to combat mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis. These observations provide a strong argument against the so-called `linear model', where ideas flow only in one direction from academic institutions to industry. Structure-guided drug discovery is a story of applications of protein crystallography and knowledge exhange between academia and industry that has led to new drug approvals for cancer and other common medical conditions by the Food and Drug Administration in the USA, as well as hope for the treatment of rare genetic diseases and infectious diseases that are a particular challenge in the developing world.

  16. Correlation of Salivary Statherin and Calcium Levels with Dental Calculus Formation: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Gowda Sadashivappa Pateel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Salivary constituents have a wide range of functions including oral calcium homeostasis. Salivary proteins such as statherin inhibit crystal growth of calcium phosphate in supersaturated solutions and interact with several oral bacteria to adsorb on hydroxyapatite. Concurrently, saliva, which is supersaturated with respect to calcium phosphates, is the driving force for plaque mineralization and formation of calculus. Thus, the aim of the present study was to estimate and correlate salivary statherin and calcium concentration to the dental calculus formation. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the relationship between salivary statherin, calcium, and dental calculus among 70 subjects, aged 20–55 years. Subjects were divided into 3 groups based on the calculus scores as interpreted by Calculus Index which was followed by collection of whole saliva using Super•SAL™. Salivary calcium levels were assessed by calorimetric method using Calcium Assay kit (Cayman Chemical, Michigan, USA and statherin levels by using ELISA Kit (Cusabio Biotech. Results. Statherin levels showed a weak negative correlation with the calcium levels and with calculus formation. The mean salivary statherin and calcium concentration were found to be 0.96 μg/ml and 3.87 mg/ml, respectively. Salivary statherin levels differed significantly among the three groups (p<0.05. Conclusions. Our preliminary data indicates that statherin could possibly play a role in the formation of dental calculus.

  17. Correlation of Salivary Statherin and Calcium Levels with Dental Calculus Formation: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pateel, Deepak Gowda Sadashivappa; Gunjal, Shilpa; Math, Swarna Y; Murugeshappa, Devarasa Giriyapura; Nair, Sreejith Muraleedharan

    2017-01-01

    Salivary constituents have a wide range of functions including oral calcium homeostasis. Salivary proteins such as statherin inhibit crystal growth of calcium phosphate in supersaturated solutions and interact with several oral bacteria to adsorb on hydroxyapatite. Concurrently, saliva, which is supersaturated with respect to calcium phosphates, is the driving force for plaque mineralization and formation of calculus. Thus, the aim of the present study was to estimate and correlate salivary statherin and calcium concentration to the dental calculus formation. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the relationship between salivary statherin, calcium, and dental calculus among 70 subjects, aged 20-55 years. Subjects were divided into 3 groups based on the calculus scores as interpreted by Calculus Index which was followed by collection of whole saliva using Super•SAL™. Salivary calcium levels were assessed by calorimetric method using Calcium Assay kit (Cayman Chemical, Michigan, USA) and statherin levels by using ELISA Kit (Cusabio Biotech). Statherin levels showed a weak negative correlation with the calcium levels and with calculus formation. The mean salivary statherin and calcium concentration were found to be 0.96  μ g/ml and 3.87 mg/ml, respectively. Salivary statherin levels differed significantly among the three groups ( p dental calculus.

  18. De novo biosynthesis of vanillin in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Esben H; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Kock, Gertrud R; Bünner, Camilla M; Kristensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Ole R; Okkels, Finn T; Olsen, Carl E; Motawia, Mohammed S; Hansen, Jørgen

    2009-05-01

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor compounds, with a global market of 180 million dollars. Natural vanillin is derived from the cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), but most of the world's vanillin is synthesized from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. We have established a true de novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin production from glucose in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also known as fission yeast or African beer yeast, as well as in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Productivities were 65 and 45 mg/liter, after introduction of three and four heterologous genes, respectively. The engineered pathways involve incorporation of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase from the dung mold Podospora pauciseta, an aromatic carboxylic acid reductase (ACAR) from a bacterium of the Nocardia genus, and an O-methyltransferase from Homo sapiens. In S. cerevisiae, the ACAR enzyme required activation by phosphopantetheinylation, and this was achieved by coexpression of a Corynebacterium glutamicum phosphopantetheinyl transferase. Prevention of reduction of vanillin to vanillyl alcohol was achieved by knockout of the host alcohol dehydrogenase ADH6. In S. pombe, the biosynthesis was further improved by introduction of an Arabidopsis thaliana family 1 UDP-glycosyltransferase, converting vanillin into vanillin beta-D-glucoside, which is not toxic to the yeast cells and thus may be accumulated in larger amounts. These de novo pathways represent the first examples of one-cell microbial generation of these valuable compounds from glucose. S. pombe yeast has not previously been metabolically engineered to produce any valuable, industrially scalable, white biotech commodity.

  19. ESPRIT: estimating species richness using large collections of 16S rRNA pyrosequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yijun; Cai, Yunpeng; Liu, Li; Yu, Fahong; Farrell, Michael L; McKendree, William; Farmerie, William

    2009-06-01

    Recent metagenomics studies of environmental samples suggested that microbial communities are much more diverse than previously reported, and deep sequencing will significantly increase the estimate of total species diversity. Massively parallel pyrosequencing technology enables ultra-deep sequencing of complex microbial populations rapidly and inexpensively. However, computational methods for analyzing large collections of 16S ribosomal sequences are limited. We proposed a new algorithm, referred to as ESPRIT, which addresses several computational issues with prior methods. We developed two versions of ESPRIT, one for personal computers (PCs) and one for computer clusters (CCs). The PC version is used for small- and medium-scale data sets and can process several tens of thousands of sequences within a few minutes, while the CC version is for large-scale problems and is able to analyze several hundreds of thousands of reads within one day. Large-scale experiments are presented that clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of the newly proposed algorithm. The source code and user guide are freely available at http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/people/sun/esprit.html.

  20. Valutazione del nuovo sistema automatizzato Triturus - Grifols nella diagnosi sierologica delle infezioni da complesso ToRCH e da virus di Epstein Barr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Sparacino

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The laboratory diagnosis of infections belonging to the ToRCH complex is mainly based of the determination of the immune status to each individual microrganism. In this report, the diagnostic performance of a new automated EIA plates processor system (SeraQuest - GRIFOLS, Pisa, Italy has been compared with other automaed methods: Enzygnost (Dade behring, Marburg, Germany, EIA Well (RADIM, Pomezia, Italy,VIDAS (bioMériuex, Marcy l’etoile, France. In addition, the diagnostic performance of SeraQuest has also been evaluated for the detection of specific immune response to Epstein Barr virus, in comparison with a conventional EIA test (Delta, Pomezia, Italy and with an immunoblotting method (Genelabs - AlfaBiotech, Milan, Italy.The overal evaluation of SeraQuest demonstrated that this test has sensitivity and specificity well comaparable with those of the other methods studied and that could be used as an alternative test in the serological diagnosis of ToRCH and EBV infections.

  1. Longitudinal Study of Cytokine Expression, Lipid Profile and Neuronal Growth Factors in Human Breast Milk from Term and Preterm Deliveries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carmen Collado

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast milk (BM is considered as a reference for infant nutrition. The role of bioactive components, such as cytokines, hormones, growth factors (GFs and fatty acids (FAs is poorly known, but they might be implicated in immune response development. The aim of this study was to identify the lipid profile and the spectrum of cytokines and neuronal GF in BM samples and analyse the influence of gestational age and lactation time on these components. This study used a longitudinal prospective method for the characterization of cytokines, FAs and GFs global profiles in 120 BM samples from 40 healthy mothers (20 preterm and 20 term collected as colostrum, transitional and mature milk. The cytokines were analysed by protein array (Ray Bio® Human Cytokine Array G6. Ray Biotech, Inc. Norcross, GA, USA and the FAs were analysed by gas chromatography. The FA profile was similar between the term and the preterm BM samples. Omega-3-α-linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and omega-6-linoleic acid were the most abundant in the term and preterm samples during lactation. Omega-3 ETA and omega-3 EPA we observed exclusively in the preterm samples. The cytokine profile showed a different trend based on gestational age. A significantly higher expression of neurotrophic factors was found in the mature preterm milk samples as compared to the mature term samples. Our study is the first to identify the influence and interactions of perinatal factors on cytokine, GFs and FAs in human milk.

  2. In vitro membrane binding and protein binding (IAM MB/PB technology to estimate in vivo distribution: applications in early drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klara Livia Valko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The drug discovery process can be accelerated by chromatographic profiling of the analogs to model in vivo distribution and the major non-specific binding. A balanced potency and chromatographically determined membrane and protein binding (IAM MB/PB data enable selecting drug discovery compounds for further analysis that have the highest probability to show the desired in vivo distribution behavior for efficacy and reduced chance for toxicity. Although the basic principles of the technology have already appeared in numerous publications, the lack of standardized procedures limited its widespread applications especially in academia and small drug discovery biotech companies. In this paper, the standardized procedures are described that has been trademarked as Regis IAM MB/PB Technology®. Comparison between the Drug Efficiency Index (DEI=pIC50-logVdu+2 and generally used Ligand Lipophilicity Efficiency (LLE has been made, demonstrating the advantage of measured IAM and HSA binding over calculated log P. The power of the proposed chromatographic technology is demonstrated using the data of marketed drugs.

  3. From global bioethics to ethical governance of biomedical research collaborations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlberg, Ayo; Rehmann-Sutter, Christoph; Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret; Lu, Guangxiu; Döring, Ole; Cong, Yali; Laska-Formejster, Alicja; He, Jing; Chen, Haidan; Gottweis, Herbert; Rose, Nikolas

    2013-12-01

    One of the features of advanced life sciences research in recent years has been its internationalisation, with countries such as China and South Korea considered 'emerging biotech' locations. As a result, cross-continental collaborations are becoming common generating moves towards ethical and legal standardisation under the rubric of 'global bioethics'. Such a 'global', 'Western' or 'universal' bioethics has in turn been critiqued as an imposition upon resource-poor, non-Western or local medical settings. In this article, we propose that a different tack is necessary if we are to come to grips with the ethical challenges that inter-continental biomedical research collaborations generate. In particular we ask how national systems of ethical governance of life science research might cope with increasingly global research collaborations with a focus on Sino-European collaboration. We propose four 'spheres' - deliberation, regulation, oversight and interaction - as a helpful way to conceptualise national systems of ethical governance. Using a workshop-based mapping methodology (workshops held in Beijing, Shanghai, Changsha, Xian, Shenzen and London) we identified three specific ethical challenges arising from cross-continental research collaborations: (1) ambiguity as to which regulations are applicable; (2) lack of ethical review capacity not only among ethical review board members but also collaborating scientists; (3) already complex, researcher-research subject interaction is further complicated when many nationalities are involved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Regenerative medicine in Europe: global competition and innovation governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Stuart; Salter, Brian

    2010-11-01

    Leading European nations with strong biotech sectors, such as the UK and Germany, are investing heavily in regenerative medicine, seeking competitive advantage in this emerging sector. However, in the broader biopharmaceutical sector, the EU is outperformed by the USA on all metrics, reflecting longstanding problems: limited venture capital finance, a fragmented patent system, and relatively weak relations between academia and industry. The current global downturn has exacerbated these difficulties. The crisis comes at a time when the EU is reframing its approach to the governance of innovation and renewing its commitment to the goal of making Europe the leading player in the global knowledge economy. If the EU is to gain a competitive advantage in the regenerative medicine sector then it must coordinate a complex multilevel governance framework that encompasses the EU, member states and regional authorities. This article takes stock of Europe's current competitive position within the global bioeconomy, drawing on a variety of metrics in the three intersecting spheres of innovation governance: science, market and society. These data then provide a platform for reviewing the problems of innovation governance faced by the EU and the strategic choices that have to be confronted in the regenerative medicine sector.

  5. High Content Screening: Understanding Cellular Pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Zaffar Ali Mohamed Amiroudine; Daryl Jesus Arapoc; Zainah Adam; Shafii Khamis

    2015-01-01

    High content screening (HCS) is the convergence between cell-based assays, high-resolution fluorescence imaging, phase-contrast imaging of fixed- or live-cell assays, tissues and small organisms. It has been widely adopted in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries for target identification and validation and as secondary screens to reveal potential toxicities or to elucidate a drugs mechanism of action. By using the ImageXpress® Micro XLS System HCS, the complex network of key players controlling proliferation and apoptosis can be reduced to several sentinel markers for analysis. Cell proliferation and apoptosis are two key areas in cell biology and drug discovery research. Understanding the signaling pathways in cell proliferation and apoptosis is important for new therapeutic discovery because the imbalance between these two events is predominant in the progression of many human diseases, including cancer. The DNA binding dye DAPI is used to determine the nuclear size and nuclear morphology as well as cell cycle phases by DNA content. Images together with MetaXpress® analysis results provide a convenient and easy to use solution to high volume image management. In particular, HCS platform is beginning to have an important impact on early drug discovery, basic research in systems cell biology, and is expected to play a role in personalized medicine or revealing off-target drug effects. (author)

  6. Awakening interest in the natural sciences - BASF's Kids' Labs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Cinthia

    2012-01-01

    At BASF's Ludwigshafen headquarters, kids and young adults in grades 1-13 can learn about chemistry in the Kids' Labs. Different programs exist for different levels of knowledge. In the two 'Hands-on Lab H(2)O & Co.' Kids' Labs, students from grades 1-6 explore the secrets of chemistry. BASF Kids' Labs have now been set up in over 30 countries. In Switzerland alone, almost 2,000 students have taken part in the 'Water Loves Chemistry' Kids' Lab since it was started in 2011. In Alsace, 600 students have participated to date. In the Teens' Lab 'Xplore Middle School', middle school students explore five different programs with the themes 'substance labyrinth', 'nutrition', 'coffee, caffeine & co.', 'cosmetics' and 'energy'. Biotechnological methods are the focus of the Teens' Lab 'Xplore Biotech' for students taking basic and advanced biology courses. In the 'Xplore High School' Teens' Lab, chemistry teachers present their own experimental lab instruction for students in basic and advanced chemistry courses. The Virtual Lab has been expanding the offerings of the BASF Kids' Labs since 2011. The online lab was developed by the company for the International Year Of Chemistry and gives kids and young adults the opportunity to do interactive experiments outside of the lab.

  7. Inclusion of Moloney murine leukemia virus elements upstream of the transgene cassette in an E1-deleted adenovirus leads to an unusual genomic integration in epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Changyu; O'Connell, Brian C.; Baum, Bruce J.

    2003-01-01

    Classically, the 5' and 3' long terminal repeats (LTRs) are considered necessary but not sufficient for retroviral integration. Recently, we reported that inclusion of these and additional elements from Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) facilitated transgene integration, without retroviral integrase, when placed in an adenoviral context (AdLTR-luc vector) (Nat. Biotech. 18 (2000), 176; Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 300 (2003), 115). To help understand this nonhomologous DNA recombination event, we constructed another vector, AdELP-luc, with 2.7 kb of MoMLV elements identically placed into an E1-deleted adenovirus type 5 backbone upstream of a luciferase cDNA reporter gene. Unlike AdLTR-luc, no MoMLV elements were placed downstream of the expression cassette. AdELP-luc readily infected epithelial cells in vitro. Southern hybridizations with DNA from cloned cells showed that disruption of the MoMLV sequences occurred. One cell clone, grown in vitro without any special selection medium for 9 months, exhibited stable vector integration and luciferase activity. Importantly, both Southern hybridization and FISH analyses showed that in addition to the MoMLV elements and expression cassette, substantial adenoviral sequence downstream of the luciferase cDNA was genomically integrated. These results suggest that the 2.7 kb of MoMLV sequence included in AdELP-luc have cis-acting functions and mediates an unusual integration event

  8. The entrepreneurial state debunking public vs. private sector myths

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzucato, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    This new bestseller from leading economist Mariana Mazzucato – named by the ‘New Republic’ as one of the ‘most important innovation thinkers’ today – is stirring up much-needed debates worldwide about the role of the State in innovation. Debunking the myth of a laggard State at odds with a dynamic private sector, Mazzucato reveals in case study after case study that in fact the opposite situation is true, with the private sector only finding the courage to invest after the entrepreneurial State has made the high-risk investments. Case studies include examples of the State’s role in the ‘green revolution’, in biotech and pharmaceuticals, as well as several detailed examples from Silicon Valley. In an intensely researched chapter, she reveals that every technology that makes the iPhone so ‘smart’ was government funded: the Internet, GPS, its touch-screen display and the voice-activated Siri. Mazzucato also controversially argues that in the history of modern capitalism the State has not on...

  9. A bright weekend: THE Port develops a better solution for the “Children of the Night”

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    THE Port Hackathon took place at CERN and Geneva’s Campus Biotech from 2 to 4 October. Among the various prototypes presented at the final event was a novel solution for the special mask that children suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum have to wear to reduce their risk of getting skin cancer. The whole initiative was triggered by an article published in one of the summer issues of the Bulletin.   Developing and testing the mask prototype at THE Port Hackathon, 2015. (Images: Andrey Loginov, Pierre Freyermuth, Antonio Bellotta/ THE Port)   “The improvements are really substantial and have made the president of the French Children of the Night Association really happy!” says Andy Butterworth from the team that worked on developing a prototype for a new mask during THE Port Hackathon. In his “normal” professional life, Andy is a radio-frequency expert working in the Beams department. During the hackathon, he worked with colleagues from CE...

  10. POWRS: position-sensitive motif discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian W Davis

    Full Text Available Transcription factors and the short, often degenerate DNA sequences they recognize are central regulators of gene expression, but their regulatory code is challenging to dissect experimentally. Thus, computational approaches have long been used to identify putative regulatory elements from the patterns in promoter sequences. Here we present a new algorithm "POWRS" (POsition-sensitive WoRd Set for identifying regulatory sequence motifs, specifically developed to address two common shortcomings of existing algorithms. First, POWRS uses the position-specific enrichment of regulatory elements near transcription start sites to significantly increase sensitivity, while providing new information about the preferred localization of those elements. Second, POWRS forgoes position weight matrices for a discrete motif representation that appears more resistant to over-generalization. We apply this algorithm to discover sequences related to constitutive, high-level gene expression in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and then experimentally validate the importance of those elements by systematically mutating two endogenous promoters and measuring the effect on gene expression levels. This provides a foundation for future efforts to rationally engineer gene expression in plants, a problem of great importance in developing biotech crop varieties.BSD-licensed Python code at http://grassrootsbio.com/papers/powrs/.

  11. Machine learning in computational biology to accelerate high-throughput protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, Anand; Monk, Jonathan; Tegel, Hanna; Uhlen, Mathias; Palsson, Bernhard O; Rockberg, Johan; Brunk, Elizabeth

    2017-08-15

    The Human Protein Atlas (HPA) enables the simultaneous characterization of thousands of proteins across various tissues to pinpoint their spatial location in the human body. This has been achieved through transcriptomics and high-throughput immunohistochemistry-based approaches, where over 40 000 unique human protein fragments have been expressed in E. coli. These datasets enable quantitative tracking of entire cellular proteomes and present new avenues for understanding molecular-level properties influencing expression and solubility. Combining computational biology and machine learning identifies protein properties that hinder the HPA high-throughput antibody production pipeline. We predict protein expression and solubility with accuracies of 70% and 80%, respectively, based on a subset of key properties (aromaticity, hydropathy and isoelectric point). We guide the selection of protein fragments based on these characteristics to optimize high-throughput experimentation. We present the machine learning workflow as a series of IPython notebooks hosted on GitHub (https://github.com/SBRG/Protein_ML). The workflow can be used as a template for analysis of further expression and solubility datasets. ebrunk@ucsd.edu or johanr@biotech.kth.se. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Hepatitis B virus surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C virus rapid tests underestimate hepatitis prevalence among HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hønge, Bl; Jespersen, S; Medina, C; Té, Ds; da Silva, Zj; Ostergaard, L; Laursen, Al; Wejse, C; Krarup, H; Erikstrup, C

    2014-10-01

    In the case of coinfection with HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatic disease progression is often accelerated, with higher rates of liver cirrhosis and liver-related mortality. We aimed to evaluate the performance of the rapid tests used routinely to detect HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HCV among HIV-infected patients in Guinea-Bissau. Blood samples from HIV-infected patients in Guinea-Bissau were stored after testing for HBsAg and anti-HCV with rapid tests. Samples were subsequently re-tested for HBsAg and anti-HCV in Denmark. Two rapid tests were used in Guinea-Bissau: HBsAg Strip Ref 2034 (VEDA.LAB, Alençon, France; sensitivity 62.3%; specificity 99.2%) and HEPA-SCAN (Bhat Bio-Tech, Bangalore, India; sensitivity 57.1%; specificity 99.7%). In the two tests the ability to obtain the correct outcome depended on the antigen and antibody concentrations, respectively. Sex, age, CD4 cell count and antiretroviral therapy status did not differ between false negative and true positive samples in either of the tests. The study is limited by a low number of anti-HCV positive samples. New diagnostic rapid tests should always be evaluated in the setting in which they will be used before implementation. © 2014 British HIV Association.

  13. Preeclampsia – Will Orphan Drug Status Facilitate Innovative Biological Therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sinuhe

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-related disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered by the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder: exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia is accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials, and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture that relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in pro- or anti-angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13, or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia. PMID:25767802

  14. Preeclampsia - will orphan drug status facilitate innovative biological therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sinuhe

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-related disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered by the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder: exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia is accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials, and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture that relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in pro- or anti-angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13, or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia.

  15. Biotechnology and genetic engineering in the new drug development. Part I. DNA technology and recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Kiepura, Katarzyna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical biotechnology has a long tradition and is rooted in the last century, first exemplified by penicillin and streptomycin as low molecular weight biosynthetic compounds. Today, pharmaceutical biotechnology still has its fundamentals in fermentation and bioprocessing, but the paradigmatic change affected by biotechnology and pharmaceutical sciences has led to an updated definition. The biotechnology revolution redrew the research, development, production and even marketing processes of drugs. Powerful new instruments and biotechnology related scientific disciplines (genomics, proteomics) make it possible to examine and exploit the behavior of proteins and molecules. Recombinant DNA (rDNA) technologies (genetic, protein, and metabolic engineering) allow the production of a wide range of peptides, proteins, and biochemicals from naturally nonproducing cells. This technology, now approximately 25 years old, is becoming one of the most important technologies developed in the 20(th) century. Pharmaceutical products and industrial enzymes were the first biotech products on the world market made by means of rDNA. Despite important advances regarding rDNA applications in mammalian cells, yeasts still represent attractive hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. In this review we describe these processes.

  16. Commercialization of new biotechnology: a systematic review of 16 commercial case studies in a novel manufacturing sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Matthew J; Thangaraj, Harry; Ma, Julian K-C

    2015-10-01

    The 1980s and 1990s saw a major expansion of biotechnology into new areas of science including genomics and recombinant technologies. This was coupled to the widespread emergence of academics into the commercial sector as they were encouraged to spin out companies or commercialize their intellectual property. There were many opportunities to raise investment, and extraordinary success stories were prominent across many areas of technology. The field of plant biotechnology for manufacturing recombinant pharmaceuticals (molecular pharming) emerged and was developed in this period. Like other biotechnologies, this was an exciting new development which offered some very obvious benefits and commercial advantages. In particularly, plant molecular pharming represented a highly novel and potentially disruptive manufacturing technology for recombinant proteins. Twenty-five years on, a series of interviews with senior members of sixteen of the most prominent companies involved in the field provides insight into the original drivers for commercialization, strategic thinking and planning behind key commercial decisions and an insider view into the major reasons for commercial success or failure. These observations and recurring themes identified across a number of commercial ventures remain relevant today, as new biotech companies continue to spin out of the world of academia. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Proteome map of Aspergillus nidulans during osmoadaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yonghyun; Nandakumar, M P; Marten, Mark R

    2007-09-01

    The model filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, when grown in a moderate level of osmolyte (+0.6M KCl), was previously found to have a significantly reduced cell wall elasticity (Biotech Prog, 21:292, 2005). In this study, comparative proteomic analysis via two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2de) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry was used to assess molecular level events associated with this phenomenon. Thirty of 90 differentially expressed proteins were identified. Sequence homology and conserved domains were used to assign probable function to twenty-one proteins currently annotated as "hypothetical." In osmoadapted cells, there was an increased expression of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase, as well as a decreased expression of enolase, suggesting an increased glycerol biosynthesis and decreased use of the TCA cycle. There also was an increased expression of heat shock proteins and Shp1-like protein degradation protein, implicating increased protein turnover. Five novel osmoadaptation proteins of unknown functions were also identified.

  18. Discussion point: should governments buy drug patents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Llano, Juan

    2007-06-01

    Between just 1995 and 2003, the number of new chemical entities fell from 45 to 25, while the costs increased by two and a half times in the same period. Firms in the USA accounted for more than half of biotech drugs from 1982 to 2003. European firms are losing competitiveness. In this hostile environment for investment in pharmaceutical R&D, providing quick access to market for real innovations is the main challenge for regulatory agencies. More initiatives, more entrepreneurial spirit and easier work regulation are needed to facilitate the growth of firms in this field, especially in emerging economies like the Spanish. A new open source model proposes the use of pre-competitive public platforms formed by young and qualified human capital carrying out research in areas not sufficiently attractive for private initiatives, followed by the introduction of pharmaceutical companies to carry out the clinical research. The last step would be fast and effective approval by assessment agencies. Governments should, therefore, facilitate the regulation of socially effective innovations, bringing in manufacturers to take part in the post-clinical trial period after entering the market. The gathering of incentives between regulatory agencies and pharmaceutical industry must be approached through innovation and authorization stimulating systems.

  19. Virtual Learning Simulations in High School: Effects on Cognitive and Non-cognitive Outcomes and Implications on the Development of STEM Academic and Career Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malene Thisgaard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study compared the value of using a virtual learning simulation compared to traditional lessons on the topic of evolution, and investigated if the virtual learning simulation could serve as a catalyst for STEM academic and career development, based on social cognitive career theory. The investigation was conducted using a crossover repeated measures design based on a sample of 128 high school biology/biotech students. The results showed that the virtual learning simulation increased knowledge of evolution significantly, compared to the traditional lesson. No significant differences between the simulation and lesson were found in their ability to increase the non-cognitive measures. Both interventions increased self-efficacy significantly, and none of them had a significant effect on motivation. In addition, the results showed that the simulation increased interest in biology related tasks, but not outcome expectations. The findings suggest that virtual learning simulations are at least as efficient in enhancing learning and self-efficacy as traditional lessons, and high schools can thus use them as supplementary educational methods. In addition, the findings indicate that virtual learning simulations may be a useful tool in enhancing student’s interest in and goals toward STEM related careers.

  20. High-Gain Avalanche Rushing amorphous Photoconductor (HARP) detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanioka, K. [NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories, 1-10-11 Kinuta, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 157-8510 (Japan)], E-mail: tanioka.k-jg@nhk.or.jp

    2009-09-01

    We have been studying a very sensitive image sensor since the early 1980s. In 1985, the author found for the first time that an experimental pickup tube with an amorphous selenium photoconductive target exhibits high sensitivity with excellent picture quality because of a continuous and stable avalanche multiplication phenomenon. We named the pickup tube with an amorphous photoconductive layer operating in the avalanche-mode 'HARP': High-gain Avalanche Rushing amorphous Photoconductor. A color camera equipped with the HARP pickup tubes has a maximum sensitivity of 11 lx at F8. This means that the HARP camera is about 100 times as sensitive as that of CCD camera for broadcasting. This ultrahigh-sensitivity HARP pickup tube is a powerful tool for reporting breaking news at night and other low-light conditions, the production of scientific programs, and numerous other applications, including medical diagnoses, biotech research, and nighttime surveillance. In addition, since the HARP target can convert X-rays into electrons directly, it should be possible to exploit this capability to produce X-ray imaging devices with unparalleled levels of resolution and sensitivity.

  1. Production of lentiviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto-Wilhelm Merten

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lentiviral vectors (LV have seen considerably increase in use as gene therapy vectors for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. This review presents the state of the art of the production of these vectors with particular emphasis on their large-scale production for clinical purposes. In contrast to oncoretroviral vectors, which are produced using stable producer cell lines, clinical-grade LV are in most of the cases produced by transient transfection of 293 or 293T cells grown in cell factories. However, more recent developments, also, tend to use hollow fiber reactor, suspension culture processes, and the implementation of stable producer cell lines. As is customary for the biotech industry, rather sophisticated downstream processing protocols have been established to remove any undesirable process-derived contaminant, such as plasmid or host cell DNA or host cell proteins. This review compares published large-scale production and purification processes of LV and presents their process performances. Furthermore, developments in the domain of stable cell lines and their way to the use of production vehicles of clinical material will be presented.

  2. The national synchrotron: ray of hope or ring of fire?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, T.

    2002-01-01

    While most agree the synchrotron will be a boost for Australian science, the author reports on concerns about the cost of building and operating the project Biotech industry representatives want to know how that $100 million will be used and want to see the government's justification for pouring more than a third of its total technology budget for 2001/2 into the synchrotron. They, and the opposition, also want to know where the private money will come from to make up the balance or whether the state will ultimately have to pitch in the rest itself. Indeed, an Auditor-General's report released last week warned of the need for comprehensive financial risk management of the facility. The National Synchrotron, to be built at Monash University, will be a hollow ring of about 60 metres diameter and initially housing nine beamlines, each capable of performing independent experiments simultaneously. According to Dr Richard Garrett, director of the Australian Synchrotron Research Program (http://www.ansto.gov.au/natfac/asrp.html) projection reports had indicated the local synchrotron user community would expand from about 350 researchers today to about 1200 by the time the National Synchrotron is built, with demand steadily increasing in the years following its completion

  3. Self-expandable polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered nitinol stent for the palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Oong; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Han, Byung Hoon; Shin, Dong Hoon [Gospel Hospital, College of Medicine, Kosin University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Ji Ho [Masan Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Masan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    We wanted to determine the technical and clinical efficacy of placing a self-expandable PTFE-covered nitinol stent for the management of inoperable malignant biliary obstruction. Thirty six patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstructions were treated by placement of self-expandable PTFE-covered nitinol stents (S and G Biotech Corporation, Seongnam, Korea). Clinical evaluation was done with assessment of the serum bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase levels, which were measured before and after stent placement within 1 week, at 1 month and at 3 months. The patient survival rate and stent patency rate were calculated with performing Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Successful stent placement was achieved in all the patients without procedure-related complication. Pancreatitis as an early complication occurred in two cases. The serum bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly decreased after the procedure. During the follow-up, recurrent obstructive jaundice occurred in six cases; stent migration occurred in four cases and tumor overgrowth occurred in two cases. The survival rates were 97%, 80%, 67% and 59% at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months, respectively. The stent patency rates were 96%, 92%, 86% and 86% at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months, respectively. Self-expandable PTFE-covered nitinol stent placement seems to be technically feasible and effective for the palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction.

  4. ExpTreeDB: web-based query and visualization of manually annotated gene expression profiling experiments of human and mouse from GEO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ming; Ye, Fuqiang; Zhu, Juanjuan; Li, Zongwei; Yang, Shuai; Yang, Bite; Han, Lu; Wu, Yongge; Chen, Ying; Li, Fei; Wang, Shengqi; Bo, Xiaochen

    2014-12-01

    Numerous public microarray datasets are valuable resources for the scientific communities. Several online tools have made great steps to use these data by querying related datasets with users' own gene signatures or expression profiles. However, dataset annotation and result exhibition still need to be improved. ExpTreeDB is a database that allows for queries on human and mouse microarray experiments from Gene Expression Omnibus with gene signatures or profiles. Compared with similar applications, ExpTreeDB pays more attention to dataset annotations and result visualization. We introduced a multiple-level annotation system to depict and organize original experiments. For example, a tamoxifen-treated cell line experiment is hierarchically annotated as 'agent→drug→estrogen receptor antagonist→tamoxifen'. Consequently, retrieved results are exhibited by an interactive tree-structured graphics, which provide an overview for related experiments and might enlighten users on key items of interest. The database is freely available at http://biotech.bmi.ac.cn/ExpTreeDB. Web site is implemented in Perl, PHP, R, MySQL and Apache. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Adsorption of Amino Acids and Glutamic Acid-Based Surfactants on Imogolite Clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Massimo; Gabbani, Alessio; Del Buffa, Stefano; Ridi, Francesca; Baglioni, Piero; Bordes, Romain; Holmberg, Krister

    2017-03-07

    Aluminum oxide surfaces are of utmost interest in different biotech applications, in particular for their use as adjuvants (i.e., booster of the immune response against infectious agents in vaccines production). In this framework, imogolite clays combine the chemical flexibility of an exposed alumina surface with 1D nanostructure. This work reports on the interaction between amino acids and imogolite, using turbidimetry, ζ-potential measurements, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as main characterization tools. Amino acids with different side chain functional groups were investigated, showing that glutamic acid (Glu) has the strongest affinity for the imogolite surface. This was exploited to prepare a composite material made of a synthetic surfactant bearing a Glu polar head and a hydrophobic C 12 alkyl tail, adsorbed onto the surface of imogolite. The adsorption of a model drug (rhodamine B isothiocyanate) by the hybrid was evaluated both in water and in physiological saline conditions. The findings of this paper suggest that the combination between the glutamate headgroup and imogolite represents a promising platform for the fabrication of hybrid nanostructures with tailored functionalities.

  6. Biotechnology's foreign policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbaum, Carl

    2002-01-01

    From its inception, biotechnology has been a uniquely international enterprise. An American and an Englishman working together elucidated the structure of DNA almost 50 years ago; more recently, the Human Genome Project linked researchers around the world, from the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston to the Beijing Human Genome Center. Today our industry's researchers hail from African villages and Manhattan high rises; from Munich and Melbourne; from London, Ontario, and London, England; from Scotland and Nova Scotia--New Scotland; from Calcutta and Calgary. But in the beginning, the infrastructure that supported these efforts--intellectual property, venture capital, streamlined technology transfer--was less widely dispersed and the world's brightest biotech researchers clustered in only half a dozen scientific Meccas. Previous technological revolutions have spread around the world. Following in their footsteps, biotechnology's global diaspora seems inevitable, especially since governments are promoting it. But as our science and business emigrate from early strongholds in the United States, Canada and Europe across oceans and borders and into new cultures, international tensions over biotechnology continue to grow. In just the last few years, controversies have rolled over R&D spending priorities, genetic patents, bioprospecting, transgenic agriculture and drug pricing. My premise today is that our industry needs to formulate its first foreign policy, one which is cognizant of the miserable judgments and mistakes of other industries--and avoids them.

  7. Consumers' Preferences for a Local Food Product: The Case of a New Carnaroli Rice Product in Lombardy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrazzi, Giovanni; Ventura, Vera; Ratti, Sabrina; Balzaretti, Claudia

    2017-04-13

    Italy, with a cultivated area of 218,000 ha, is a European leader of rice production. In particular Lombardy region accounts for 40% of total rice cultivation and the case study in object accounts for 3.2% of Lombardy total rice area (2773 ha). Starting from 2012, through a regional project titled Buono, Sano e Vicino (good, healthy and close), Riso e Rane rural district supported local rice farmers in developing innovation in rice production and promoting an alternative supply chain to increase farmers bargaining power and promote new market strategies. More specifically, the innovation introduced is a new biotech method for variety certification, named DNA controllato (DNA tested). In the first step of the project, the attention was focused on an Italian traditional variety of rice: Carnaroli rice. Thanks to a commercial agreement with one of the most important large retailers in Lombardy, the Riso e Rane rice is offered for sale both in the traditional and wholegrain version. In this context, this work aims to evaluate the determinants of consumer's quality perception of this product, through a preference study of the commercial rice package. Preliminary results reveal that consumers perceive information about origin, local food-system and tradition more easily than DNA tested certification. In conclusion, this work contributes to evaluate the role of bio economy applications to the food sector and offers new insights for the debate about the relationships between tradition and innovation.

  8. Virtual Learning Simulations in High School: Effects on Cognitive and Non-cognitive Outcomes and Implications on the Development of STEM Academic and Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thisgaard, Malene; Makransky, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The present study compared the value of using a virtual learning simulation compared to traditional lessons on the topic of evolution, and investigated if the virtual learning simulation could serve as a catalyst for STEM academic and career development, based on social cognitive career theory. The investigation was conducted using a crossover repeated measures design based on a sample of 128 high school biology/biotech students. The results showed that the virtual learning simulation increased knowledge of evolution significantly, compared to the traditional lesson. No significant differences between the simulation and lesson were found in their ability to increase the non-cognitive measures. Both interventions increased self-efficacy significantly, and none of them had a significant effect on motivation. In addition, the results showed that the simulation increased interest in biology related tasks, but not outcome expectations. The findings suggest that virtual learning simulations are at least as efficient in enhancing learning and self-efficacy as traditional lessons, and high schools can thus use them as supplementary educational methods. In addition, the findings indicate that virtual learning simulations may be a useful tool in enhancing student's interest in and goals toward STEM related careers.

  9. Healthcare biotechnology in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, L M

    2005-01-01

    Biotechnology in India has made great progress in the development of infrastructure, manpower, research and development and manufacturing of biological reagents, biodiagnostics, biotherapeutics, therapeutic and, prophylactic vaccines and biodevices. Many of these indigenous biological reagents, biodiagnostics, therapeutic and prophylactic vaccines and biodevices have been commercialized. Commercially when biotechnology revenue has reached $25 billions in the U.S. alone in 2000 excluding the revenues of biotech companies that were acquired by pharmaceutical companies, India has yet to register a measurable success. The conservative nature and craze of the Indian Industry for marketing imported biotechnology products, lack of Government support, almost non-existing national healthcare system and lack of trained managers for marketing biological and new products seem to be the important factors responsible for poor economic development of biotechnology in India. With the liberalization of Indian economy, more and more imported biotechnology products will enter into the Indian market. The conditions of internal development of biotechnology are not likely to improve in the near future and it is destined to grow only very slowly. Even today biotechnology in India may be called to be in its infancy.

  10. Science at the supermarket: multiplication, personalization and consumption of science in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateo, Luca

    2014-06-01

    Which is the kind science's psychological guidance upon everyday life? I will try to discuss some issues about the role that techno-scientific knowledge plays in sense-making and decision making about practical questions of life. This relation of both love and hate, antagonism and connivance is inscribable in a wider debate between a trend of science to intervene in fields that are traditionally prerogative of political, religious or ethical choices, and, on the other side, the position of those who aim at stemming "technocracy" and governing these processes. I argue that multiplication, personalization and consumption are the characteristics of the relationship between science, technology and society in the age of "multiculturalism" and "multi-scientism". This makes more difficult but intriguing the study and understanding of the processes through which scientific knowledge is socialized. Science topics, like biotech, climate change, etc. are today an unavoidable reference frame. It is not possible to not know them and to attach them to the most disparate questions. Like in the case of Moscovici's "Freud for all seasons", the fact itself that the members of a group or a society believe in science as a reference point for others, roots its social representation and the belief that it can solve everyday life problems.

  11. BOOKLET TO INSTITUTO PEDAGOGICO NACIONAL TEACHERS ABOUT SYMBIOSIS AND PROCESSES ON BIOTECHNOLOGY: THE BIOFERTILIZER Rhizobium sp IN Phaseolus vulgaris WITH ALTERNATIVE TO SYMBIOSIS FOR Phaseolus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Camila Quevedo Rubiano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of the thesis carried out in the research group of Biotechnology Teaching in Colombia, with the aim of providing teachers of Biology of Instituto Pedagogico Nacional a booklet that can strengthen the teaching of biotechnology processes using Rhizobium sp reduction of chemical fertilizers and symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris.   The booklet contains a proposal of practical activities that enable teachers of this institution to use spaces like the farm, enabling to teach biotechnology related to agronomy. Therefore, for this project was considered two Biological and Pedagogical approaches, the first is within the analytical empirical paradigm in the process of microbiological characterization of Rhizobium and their Biofertilizing ability in beans; and the teaching approach within the design of a booklet that includes the findings of this study as a contribution to the reduction of chemical fertilizers school farm. In order to have a complete analysis of the work it was subjected to quantitative and qualitative methods.   This biotech practice is included in the booklet showing in bioassays that bacteria has biofertilizer without inhibiting potential symbiosis, and that research and teaching biological concepts from scientific expertise can be promoted in Biology class for students to understand its context in a significant way, to be used in different levels of education; also it is a teaching strategy.

  12. Development and application of modern agricultural biotechnology in Botswana: the potentials, opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batlang, Utlwang; Tsurupe, Gorata; Segwagwe, Amogelang; Obopile, Motshwari

    2014-07-03

    In Botswana, approximately 40% of the population live in rural areas and derive most of their livelihood from agriculture by keeping livestock and practising arable farming. Due to the nature of their farming practises livestock and crops are exposed to diseases and environmental stresses. These challenges offer opportunities for application of biotechnology to develop adaptable materials to the country's environment. On the other hand, the perceived risk of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has dimmed the promise of the technology for its application in agriculture. This calls for a holistic approach to the application of biotechnology to address issues of biosafety of GMOs. We have therefore assessed the potentials, challenges and opportunities to apply biotechnology with specific emphasis on agriculture, taking cognisance of requirement for its research, development and application in research and teaching institutions. In order to achieve this, resource availability, infrastructure, human and laboratory requirements were analyzed. The analysis revealed that the country has the capacity to carry out research in biotechnology in the development and production of genetically modified crops for food and fodder crops. These will include gene discovery, genetic transformation and development of systems to comply with the world regulatory framework on biosafety. In view of the challenges facing the country in agriculture, first generation biotech crops could be released for production. Novel GM products for development may include disease diagnosis kits, animal disease vaccines, and nutrient use efficiency, drought, and pest and disease resistant food and fodder crops.

  13. PerturbationAnalyzer: a tool for investigating the effects of concentration perturbation on protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Li, Peng; Xu, Wenjian; Peng, Yuxing; Bo, Xiaochen; Wang, Shengqi

    2010-01-15

    The propagation of perturbations in protein concentration through a protein interaction network (PIN) can shed light on network dynamics and function. In order to facilitate this type of study, PerturbationAnalyzer, which is an open source plugin for Cytoscape, has been developed. PerturbationAnalyzer can be used in manual mode for simulating user-defined perturbations, as well as in batch mode for evaluating network robustness and identifying significant proteins that cause large propagation effects in the PINs when their concentrations are perturbed. Results from PerturbationAnalyzer can be represented in an intuitive and customizable way and can also be exported for further exploration. PerturbationAnalyzer has great potential in mining the design principles of protein networks, and may be a useful tool for identifying drug targets. PerturbationAnalyzer can be accessed from the Cytoscape web site http://www.cytoscape.org/plugins/index.php or http://biotech.bmi.ac.cn/PerturbationAnalyzer. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  14. The national synchrotron ray of hope or ring of fire?

    CERN Document Server

    Hollis, T

    2002-01-01

    While most agree the synchrotron will be a boost for Australian science, the author reports on concerns about the cost of building and operating the project Biotech industry representatives want to know how that $100 million will be used and want to see the government's justification for pouring more than a third of its total technology budget for 2001/2 into the synchrotron. They, and the opposition, also want to know where the private money will come from to make up the balance or whether the state will ultimately have to pitch in the rest itself. Indeed, an Auditor-General's report released last week warned of the need for comprehensive financial risk management of the facility. The National Synchrotron, to be built at Monash University, will be a hollow ring of about 60 metres diameter and initially housing nine beamlines, each capable of performing independent experiments simultaneously. According to Dr Richard Garrett, director of the Australian Synchrotron Research Program (http://www.ansto.gov.au/natf...

  15. Protein crystallography and drug discovery: recollections of knowledge exchange between academia and industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Tom L

    2017-07-01

    The development of structure-guided drug discovery is a story of knowledge exchange where new ideas originate from all parts of the research ecosystem. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin obtained insulin from Boots Pure Drug Company in the 1930s and insulin crystallization was optimized in the company Novo in the 1950s, allowing the structure to be determined at Oxford University. The structure of renin was developed in academia, on this occasion in London, in response to a need to develop antihypertensives in pharma. The idea of a dimeric aspartic protease came from an international academic team and was discovered in HIV; it eventually led to new HIV antivirals being developed in industry. Structure-guided fragment-based discovery was developed in large pharma and biotechs, but has been exploited in academia for the development of new inhibitors targeting protein-protein interactions and also antimicrobials to combat mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis. These observations provide a strong argument against the so-called 'linear model', where ideas flow only in one direction from academic institutions to industry. Structure-guided drug discovery is a story of applications of protein crystallography and knowledge exhange between academia and industry that has led to new drug approvals for cancer and other common medical conditions by the Food and Drug Administration in the USA, as well as hope for the treatment of rare genetic diseases and infectious diseases that are a particular challenge in the developing world.

  16. Regulation of biogenerics: a survey of viewpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Outi; Nordström, Katrina

    2004-01-01

    'Biogenerics' regulation has brought about a heated debate within the EU as the first biopharmaceuticals are going off patent. This study aims to examine the opportunities and challenges offered by biogenerics by surveying the viewpoints of experts in regulatory agencies and in companies developing novel biopharmaceuticals and biogenerics. Oral interviews were conducted in 2002 and 2003 with experts including representatives of the European Generic Medicines Association (EGA) and the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) in Brussels, three innovator biotech companies, and five other experts in Finland. Additionally, four biogenerics companies and one innovator company abroad answered a structured, written questionnaire. According to this study, biogenerics should be regulated on a case-by-case basis. The interviewees were not unanimous as to whether comparability can be addressed and which are the most challenging areas for proving comparability. Immunogenicity was considered to be a major problem for biogenerics. Therefore, a requirement for an intensified monitoring of the safety profile during post-marketing was thought to be justified in many cases.

  17. The establishment of a network of European human research tissue banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Samantha; Alexandre, Eliane; Clark, Brain; Combes, Robert; Fels, Lueder M; Gray, Neil; Jönsson-Rylander, Ann-Cathrine; Helin, Heikki; Koistinen, Jukka; Oinonen, Teija; Richert, Lysiane; Ravid, Rivka; Salonen, Jarmo; Teesalu, Tambet; Thasler, Wolfgang; Trafford, Jacki; Van Der Valk, Jan; Von Versen, Rudiger; Weiss, Thomas; Womack, Chris; Ylikomi, Timo

    2002-01-01

    This is a report of a workshop held on the establishment of human research tissue banking which was held in Levi, Finland 21-24 March 2002. There were 21 participants from 7 European countries. This meeting was attended by representatives from academia, research tissue banks and from the Biotech and Pharmaceutical Industries. The principal aim of the workshop was to find a way to progress the recommendations from ECVAM workshop 44 (ATLA 29, 125-134, 2001) and ECVAM workshop 32 (ATLA 26, 763-777, 1998). The workshop represented the first unofficial meeting of the European Network of Research Tissue Banks (ENRTB) steering group. It is expected that in the period preceding the next workshop the ENRTB steering group will co-ordinate the ethical, legislative and organisational aspects of research tissue banking. Key issues dealt with by the Levi workshop included the practical aspects of sharing expertise and experiences across the different European members. Such collaboration between research tissue banks and end users of such material seeks to ultimately enable shared access to human tissue for medical and pharmaco-toxicological research while maintaining strict adherence to differences in legal and ethical aspects related to the use of human tissue in individual countries.

  18. Latex allergy: new insights to explain different sensitization profiles in different risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixinho, C; Tavares-Ratado, P; Tomás, M R; Taborda-Barata, L; Tomaz, C T

    2008-07-01

    Differences in latex allergen sensitization profiles have been described between children subjected to repetitive surgical interventions and health care workers (HCW). 'Major' allergens for patients with spina bifida are Hev b 1, 3 and 7, while for HCW, 'major' allergens are Hev b 2, 5, 6.01 and 13. The reason for these differential sensitization profiles is currently unknown. To investigate latex allergen profiles on internal and external surfaces of natural rubber latex gloves. Eighty-two samples of commonly used surgical gloves (41 glove brands) were used for analysis. Specific allergen levels of Hev b 1, 3, 5 and 6.02 on both surfaces of the gloves were quantified using an enzyme immunometric assay, a FITkit (FIT Biotech, Tampere, Finland). Differences in allergen levels were observed between internal and external surfaces of all glove types. Concentrations of Hev b 1 and Hev b 3 were significantly higher on external surfaces, while internal surfaces had higher allergen levels of Hev b 5 and Hev b 6.02. Analysis of surgical and examination gloves, powdered and nonpowdered gloves also showed that the content of Hev b 5 and Hev b 6.02 was significantly higher on internal surfaces while that of Hev b 1 and Hev b 3 was higher on external surfaces. Our study showed different allergen profiles on internal and external surfaces of natural rubber latex gloves. These results may suggest a relationship between latex allergen localization and sensitization routes in different risk groups.

  19. Development of Plant Mutant Resources with an useful characters by Radiation Fusion Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Si Yong; Kim, Dong Sub; Lee, Geung Joo

    2009-02-01

    A mutation breeding is to use physical or chemical mutagens to induce mutagenesis, followed by individual selections with favorable traits. The mutation breeding has many advantages over other breeding methods, which include the usefulness for improving one or two inferior characteristics, applications to broad species with different reproductive systems or to diverse plant materials, native or plant introduction with narrow genetic background, time and cost-effectiveness, and valuable mutant resources for genomics researches. Recent applications of the radiation breeding techniques to developments of flowering plants or food crops with improved functional constituents heightened the public's interests in agriculture and in our genetic resources and seed industries. The goals of this project, therefore, include achieving advances in domestic seed industries and agricultural productivities by developing and using new radiation mutants with favored traits, protecting an intellectual property right of domestic seeds or germplasms, and sharing the valuable mutants and mutated gene information for the genomics and biotech researches that eventually leads to economic benefits

  20. Business models and opportunities for cancer vaccine developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrin, Alex

    2012-10-01

    Despite of growing oncology pipeline, cancer vaccines contribute only to a minor share of total oncology-attributed revenues. This is mainly because of a limited number of approved products and limited sales from products approved under compassionate or via early access entry in smaller and less developed markets. However revenue contribution from these products is extremely limited and it remains to be established whether developers are breaking even or achieving profitability with existing sales. Cancer vaccine field is well recognized for high development costs and risks, low historical rates of investment return and high probability of failures arising in ventures, partnerships and alliances. The cost of reimbursement for new oncology agents is not universally acceptable to payers limiting the potential for a global expansion, market access and reducing probability of commercial success. In addition, the innovation in cancer immunotherapy is currently focused in small and mid-size biotech companies and academic institutions struggling for investment. Existing R&D innovation models are deemed unsustainable in current "value-for-money" oriented healthcare environment. New business models should be much more open to collaborative, networked and federated styles, which could help to outreach global, markets and increase cost-efficiencies across an entire value chain. Lessons learned from some developing countries and especially from South Korea illustrate that further growth of cancer vaccine industry will depends not only on new business models but also will heavily rely on regional support and initiatives from different bodies, such as governments, payers and regulatory bodies.

  1. Plant Breeding by Using Radiation Mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Si Yong; Kim, Dong Sub; Lee, Geung Joo

    2007-06-01

    A mutation breeding is to use physical or chemical mutagens to induce mutagenesis, followed by individual selections with favorable traits. The mutation breeding has many advantages over other breeding methods, which include the usefulness for improving one or two inferior characteristics, applications to broad species with different reproductive systems or to diverse plant materials, native or plant introduction with narrow genetic background, time and cost-effectiveness, and valuable mutant resources for genomic researches. Recent applications of the radiation breeding techniques to developments of flowering plants or food crops with improved functional constituents heightened the public's interests in agriculture and in our genetic resources and seed industries. The goals of this project, therefore, include achieving advances in domestic seed industries and agricultural productivities by developing and using new radiation mutants with favored traits, protecting an intellectual property right of domestic seeds or germplasm, and sharing the valuable mutants and mutated gene information for the genomic and biotech researches that eventually leads to economic benefits

  2. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Small Business Program: A Comprehensive Ecosystem for Biomedical Product Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Kurt W

    2016-12-01

    Small companies working to develop products in the cardiovascular space face numerous challenges, from regulatory, intellectual property, and reimbursement barriers to securing funds to keep the lights on and reach the next development milestone. Most small companies that spin out from universities have the scientific knowledge, but product development expertise and business acumen are also needed to be successful. Other challenges include reduced interest in early stage technologies (Pharma & Biotech 2015 in Review, EP Vantage) and limited deal flow for cardiovascular products (Gormley B., Wall Street Journal, September 15, 2014). The NHLBI small business program is a comprehensive ecosystem designed to address these critical challenges and to provide resources and expertise to assist early stage companies developing cardiovascular and other products within the institute's mission. This article describes steps that NHLBI has taken to enhance our small business program to more effectively translate basic discoveries into commercial products to benefit patients and public health, including enhancing internal expertise and developing non-financial resources to assist small businesses as they develop their products and seek private sector investment and partnership.

  3. Thioaptamer Diagnostic System (TDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianbin

    2015-01-01

    AM Biotechnologies, LLC, in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a diagnostic device that quickly detects sampled biomarkers. The TDS quickly quantifies clinically relevant biomarkers using only microliters of a single sample. The system combines ambient-stable, long shelf-life affinity assays with handheld, microfluidic gel electrophoresis affinity assay quantification technology. The TDS is easy to use, operates in microgravity, and permits simultaneous quantification of 32 biomarkers. In Phase I of the project, the partners demonstrated that a thioaptamer assay used in the microfluidic instrument could quantify a specific biomarker in serum in the low nanomolar range. The team also identified novel affinity agents to bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and demonstrated their ability to detect BAP with the microfluidic instrument. In Phase II, AM Biotech expanded the number of ambient affinity agents and demonstrated a TDS prototype. In the long term, the clinical version of the TDS will provide a robust, flight-tested diagnostic capability for space exploration missions.

  4. Biological Treatment of Water Disinfection Byproducts using ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major disinfection by-products (DBPs) from the chlorination process of drinking water include trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acides (HAA5). THMs mainly consist of chloroform, and other harsh chemicals. Prolonged consumptions of drinking water containing high levels of THMs has been linked with diseases of the liver, kidneys, bladder, or central nervous system and may increase likelihood of cancer. A risk also exists for THMs exposure via inhalation while showering, bathing or washing clothes and dishes. Due to these risks, the U.S. EPA regulate THMs content in drinking water. This research investigates biological degradation of THM using chloroform as a model compound. The study aims to decrease possible risks of THMs through filtration. Throughout this year’s presentations, there is a common theme of health and safety concerns. UC researchers are working hard to clean water ways of naturally occurring contaminates as well as man-made toxins found in our waterways. The significance of these presentations translates into the promise of safer environments, and more importantly saved lives, as UC’s faculty continues to produce real-world solutions to problems threatening the world around us. A biotech process has been developed and demonstrated that effectively remove and treat volatile disinfection by-products from drinking water. The process strips low concentration disinfection by-products, such as trihalomethanes, that are formed during the chlori

  5. Micro factors bringing the pharmaceutical industry to a seismic shaking a qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierks, Raphaela Marie Louisa; Bruyère, Olivier; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2017-06-01

    Due to changing macro and micro factors, expiring patents and falling net income, pharmaceutical companies need to rethink their vertical business model. The trend shows cross-sectorial partnerships and consolidation to remain and compete on the market. Areas covered: Quantitative research interviewing a target group of 25 key executives from small, mid and large global pharmaceutical companies rounded with qualitative literature research completing the analysis. Expert commentary: Uncertainty in the industry due to changing external factors i.e. pricing pressures, regulations or an economic slowdown, slowing down innovations and new drug outcomes. Pharmaceutical companies understand the existing hurdles, and are critically optimistic implementing new business models. Also, various stakeholders are included in the value chain due to their growing importance. During the next years, the industry will be restructured from volume towards value, and only pharmaceutical companies' clairaudient and reciprocate to the changes with an out-off the box thinking will be able to resist on the market. Small biotech companies should focus on research, and big pharmaceutical companies entering at development focusing on the process until the distribution. This execution business recommendation would enable the best know-how at the right point, mitigating the risk and enhancing the patient outcomes.

  6. Phytochemicals Screening and Antioxidant Activity of Annona muricata Aqueous Extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosniza Razali; Hazlina Ahmad Hassali; Arapoc, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    Annona Muricata belongs to the family Annonaceae which is known to have anticancer, anti-inflammatory and many other bio activities. Leaves, twig, fruit and seed of A. muricata were collected from Suhan Biotech and dried. Hot and cold aqueous extracts were prepared for the preliminary screening of phytochemicals and aqueous extracts of A. muricata were evaluated for total phenolic, scavenging assay (DPPH; 1-1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) and cytotoxic activities. Phytochemicals screening of leaves extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids, terpenoid, reducing sugar, carbohydrate and anthocyanins. While for twig extracts it revealed the presence of coumarine. Antra quinones, terpenoid, flavonoid, reducing sugar, lipids and coumarine were found in fruit and seed extracts. The total phenolic content was found to be 2.372±0.922 μg GAE/ g, 85.85±6.23 μg GAE/ g, 53.56±8.39 μg GAE/ g and 54.67±13.33 μg GAE/ g for leaves, twig, fruit and seed respectively. On the other hand, all extract have showed IC_5_0 value more than 500 μg/ mL in DPPH scavenging assay. Cytotoxic evaluation of all extracts against HTB43, MCF-7 and MDAMB231 cell lines showed IC_5_0 value more than 250 μg/ mL. In conclusion, the results showed that aqueous extract of A.muricata was inappropriate as anticancer agen (author)

  7. Spanish strategy on bioeconomy: Towards a knowledge based sustainable innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainez, Manuel; González, José Manuel; Aguilar, Alfredo; Vela, Carmen

    2018-01-25

    Spain launched its own strategy on bioeconomy in January 2016 aiming at boosting a bioeconomy based on the sustainable and efficient production and use of biological resources. It highlights global societal challenges related with agricultural and biotechnological sciences in Spain and the great dynamism of the private sectors involved, particularly the agri-food, biotech and biomass sectors. The targeted sectors are food, agriculture and forestry, conditioned by water availability. It also includes the production of those industrial bioproducts and bioenergy obtained from the use and valorisation of wastes and residues and other non-conventional sources of biomass, in a circular economy. The strategy also puts a focus on rural and coastal development through several uses and services linked to ecosystems. The capacity to generate know-how in this area and the promotion of public and private collaboration are important pillars in order to enhance existing value chains and to create new ones. The strategy is led by R&I and Agriculture, Food and Environment policy managers and largely supported at regional level too. The strategic objective is the maintenance of the bioeconomy as an essential part of Spanish economy to contribute to the economic growth by creating new jobs and fostering investments. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Short Arginine Motifs Drive Protein Stickiness in the Escherichia coli Cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyne, Ciara; Crowley, Peter B

    2017-09-19

    Although essential to numerous biotech applications, knowledge of molecular recognition by arginine-rich motifs in live cells remains limited. 1 H, 15 N HSQC and 19 F NMR spectroscopies were used to investigate the effects of C-terminal -GR n (n = 1-5) motifs on GB1 interactions in Escherichia coli cells and cell extracts. While the "biologically inert" GB1 yields high-quality in-cell spectra, the -GR n fusions with n = 4 or 5 were undetectable. This result suggests that a tetra-arginine motif is sufficient to drive interactions between a test protein and macromolecules in the E. coli cytoplasm. The inclusion of a 12 residue flexible linker between GB1 and the -GR 5 motif did not improve detection of the "inert" domain. In contrast, all of the constructs were detectable in cell lysates and extracts, suggesting that the arginine-mediated complexes were weak. Together these data reveal the significance of weak interactions between short arginine-rich motifs and the E. coli cytoplasm and demonstrate the potential of such motifs to modify protein interactions in living cells. These interactions must be considered in the design of (in vivo) nanoscale assemblies that rely on arginine-rich sequences.

  9. Foundation-industry relationships--a new business model joint-venture philanthropy in therapy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartek, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    The business model for medical therapy development has changed drastically. Large companies that once conducted their own Research and Development (R&D) and funded all the preclinical studies, all phases of clinical development and marketing of the products are increasingly turning to others for more and more of the earlier work in hopes of being able to in-license a de-risked program well downstream, take it through the final phases of clinical development and into the marketplace. This new paradigm has required patient-advocacy foundations, especially in the rare-disease space, to become far more effective in building relationships with all the players along the therapy-development pathway -- academic scientists, government agencies, other foundations with overlapping interests, biotechs, small biopharmaceutical entities and even the larger industry companies. From the perspective of the patient-advocacy community, these increasingly essential public-private partnerships have taken on the nature of what could be called joint-venture philanthropy and involve a broad spectrum of collaborations and financial relationships between foundations and industry partners that are not without concerns about potential conflicts of interest.

  10. Dissecting the workforce and workplace for clinical endocrinology, and the work of endocrinologists early in their careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Claude; Bach, Mark A; Cappola, Anne R; Seely, Ellen W; Ehrenberg, Ronald G

    2011-04-01

    The United States lacks timely reliable mechanisms for assessing the professional work of subspecialty physicians. The aim was to use early-career members of The Endocrine Society as a model to estimate subspecialty physician involvement in patient care, teaching, research, and administration among clinical, academic, federal, and pharmaceutical/biotech workplaces and to assess the workforce for research within individual workplaces. Physicians joining The Endocrine Society from 1991-2005 and residing in North America were invited to complete a Web-based survey. This report relies on 817 early-career endocrinologists or 29.6% of eligible respondents. Respondents from all types of workplaces engaged in patient care, teaching, research, and administration. The time committed to the four tasks, however, differed significantly among workplaces. Research (basic, translational, disease, patient, population, and prevention) was accomplished within all workplaces, but the scope and scale of investigative work was employer dependent. Recipients of National Institutes of Health K08/23 awards succeeded in receiving federal research project grants (P Women in academic settings earned less than men (P < 0.01) and were less likely to occupy tenure-eligible positions (P < 0.01). Web-based surveys offer a simple tool for estimating the work of subspecialty physicians and provide a framework for improving biomedical investigation. Several interventions should be considered for endocrinology: recruit physicians from underrepresented demographic groups, increase K08/23 awards, incentivize investigative careers, and improve the national infrastructure for biomedical research.

  11. Genetically modified foods and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T H; Ho, H K; Leung, T F

    2017-06-01

    2015 marked the 25th anniversary of the commercial use and availability of genetically modified crops. The area of planted biotech crops cultivated globally occupies a cumulative two billion hectares, equivalent to twice the land size of China or the United States. Foods derived from genetically modified plants are widely consumed in many countries and genetically modified soybean protein is extensively used in processed foods throughout the industrialised countries. Genetically modified food technology offers a possible solution to meet current and future challenges in food and medicine. Yet there is a strong undercurrent of anxiety that genetically modified foods are unsafe for human consumption, sometimes fuelled by criticisms based on little or no firm evidence. This has resulted in some countries turning away food destined for famine relief because of the perceived health risks of genetically modified foods. The major concerns include their possible allergenicity and toxicity despite the vigorous testing of genetically modified foods prior to marketing approval. It is imperative that scientists engage the public in a constructive evidence-based dialogue to address these concerns. At the same time, improved validated ways to test the safety of new foods should be developed. A post-launch strategy should be established routinely to allay concerns. Mandatory labelling of genetically modified ingredients should be adopted for the sake of transparency. Such ingredient listing and information facilitate tracing and recall if required.

  12. Advances in fragment-based drug discovery platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orita, Masaya; Warizaya, Masaichi; Amano, Yasushi; Ohno, Kazuki; Niimi, Tatsuya

    2009-11-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has been established as a powerful alternative and complement to traditional high-throughput screening techniques for identifying drug leads. At present, this technique is widely used among academic groups as well as small biotech and large pharmaceutical companies. In recent years, > 10 new compounds developed with FBDD have entered clinical development, and more and more attention in the drug discovery field is being focused on this technique. Under the FBDD approach, a fragment library of relatively small compounds (molecular mass = 100 - 300 Da) is screened by various methods and the identified fragment hits which normally weakly bind to the target are used as starting points to generate more potent drug leads. Because FBDD is still a relatively new drug discovery technology, further developments and optimizations in screening platforms and fragment exploitation can be expected. This review summarizes recent advances in FBDD platforms and discusses the factors important for the successful application of this technique. Under the FBDD approach, both identifying the starting fragment hit to be developed and generating the drug lead from that starting fragment hit are important. Integration of various techniques, such as computational technology, X-ray crystallography, NMR, surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry, mass spectrometry and high-concentration screening, must be applied in a situation-appropriate manner.

  13. The year's new drugs & biologics 2014 - Part II: trends & challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graul, A I; Serebrov, M; Cruces, E; Tracy, M; Dulsat, C

    2015-02-01

    2014 was a year of continued high activity in the pharma and biotech industry, as evidenced in part I of this annual two-part review article published last month in this journal (1). As of December 23, 2014, a total of 55 new chemical and biological entities had reached their first markets worldwide, together with another 29 important new line extensions. Another 19 products were approved for the first time during the year but not yet launched by December 23. Furthermore, during the now-traditional year-end sprint, several regulatory agencies issued last-minute approvals for other compounds that missed the deadline for inclusion in that article, bringing the total of new approvals for the year to a somewhat higher number. In addition to the successful development, registration and launch of new drugs and biologics, there are various other trends and tendencies that serve as indicators of the overall health and status of the industry. These include the pursuit of novel programs designed by regulators to stimulate the development of drugs for diseases that are currently under-treated; the regular and pragmatic culling by companies of their R&D pipelines; and the decision to unify pipelines, portfolios and sales forces through mergers and acquisitions. Copyright 2015 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection of periprosthetic joint infections in presumed aseptic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yijuan; Lorenzen, Jan; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed

    2016-01-01

    Title: Detection of periprosthetic joint infections in presumed aseptic patients Yijuan Xu1, Jan Lorenzen1, Trine Rolighed Thomsen1,2, Kathrin Kluba3, Kathrin Chamaon3, Christoph Lohmann3 1. Danish Technological Institute, Aarhus, Denmark 2. Center for Microbial Communities, Department of Biotech......Title: Detection of periprosthetic joint infections in presumed aseptic patients Yijuan Xu1, Jan Lorenzen1, Trine Rolighed Thomsen1,2, Kathrin Kluba3, Kathrin Chamaon3, Christoph Lohmann3 1. Danish Technological Institute, Aarhus, Denmark 2. Center for Microbial Communities, Department...... of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Denmark 3. Department of Orthopaedics, Otto-von-Guericke University of Magdeburg, Germany Aim: ”The HypOrth project (New approaches in the development of Hypoallergenic implant material in Orthopaedics: Steps to personalised medicine......) aims to investigate adverse immune reactions to implant materials. For this project, it is of utmost importance to exclude patients with periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs). The aim of this study was to rule out PJIs in included patients using prolonged culture and next generation sequencing (NGS...

  15. Determination and validation of mTOR kinase-domain 3D structure by homology modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhlili W

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wiame Lakhlili,1 Gwénaël Chevé,2 Abdelaziz Yasri,2 Azeddine Ibrahimi1 1Laboratoire de Biotechnologie (MedBiotech, Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie de Rabat, Université Mohammed V de Rabat, Rabat, Morroco; 2OriBase Pharma, Cap Gamma, Parc Euromédecine, Montpellier, France Abstract: The AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway is considered as one of the commonly activated and deregulated signaling pathways in human cancer. mTOR is associated with other proteins in two molecular complexes: mTOR complex 1/Raptor and the mTOR complex 2/Rictor. Using the crystal structure of the related lipid kinase PI3Kγ, we built a model of the catalytic region of mTOR. The modeling of the three-dimensional (3D structure of the mTOR was performed by homology modeling program SWISS-MODEL. The quality and validation of the obtained model were performed using PROCHECK and PROVE softwares. The overall stereochemical property of the protein was assessed by the Ramachandran plot. The model validation was also done by docking of known inhibitors. In this paper, we describe and validate a 3D model for the mTOR catalytic site.Keywords: mTOR, homology modeling, mTOR kinase-domain, docking

  16. Walking between academia and industry to find successful solutions to biomedical challenges: an interview with Geoffrey Smith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Geoffrey; Cagan, Ross

    2015-10-01

    Geoffrey W. Smith is currently the Managing Director of Mars Ventures. He actually started his studies with a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Doctorate in Law but then, in part by chance and in part by following in his family footsteps, he stepped into the healthcare and biotech field. Since then, he has successfully contributed to the birth of a number of healthcare companies and has also held academic positions at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and at The Rockefeller University in New York, teaching about the interface between science and business. During 2014 he served as Senior Editor on Disease Models & Mechanisms, bringing to the editorial team his valuable experience in drug development and discovery. In this interview, Geoff talks to Ross Cagan, Editor-in-Chief of Disease Models & Mechanisms, about how he developed his incredibly varied career, sharing his views about industry, academia and science publishing, and discussing how academia and industry can fruitfully meet to advance bioscience, train the scientists and stakeholders of the future, and drive the successful discovery of new therapeutics to treat human disease. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. The changing roles of p&t committees: a look back at the last decade and a look forward to 2020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogenberg, F Randy; Gomes, Judith

    2014-11-01

    Market and regulatory changes in the last 10 years, as well as the Affordable Care Act, have resulted in significant modifications to health care delivery models. Traditionally, P&T committees limited the impact of their decisions to the populations associated with their hospital or health plan; however, as hospitals have begun to transform into larger health systems and even integrated payer organizations, P&T committees must consider both inpatient and outpatient needs of patients in multiple hospitals and ambulatory care settings. The function of the P&T committee has not necessarily changed, but its scope has expanded. Considerations of quality, cost (reimbursement), and access (accreditation) affecting P&T committees over the past decade will become even more important as new drugs and biotech therapies enter the market and the shortage of primary care physicians intensifies. Pharmacists, physical therapists, nurses, and physicians are assuming new leadership responsibilities, making them partners with P&T committees in improving clinical care and cost performance for health systems.

  18. Interview with a quality leader: Kent Bottles, MD, president of ICSI, on transforming care for the future. Interview by Susan V. White.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottles, Kent

    2010-01-01

    Kent Bottles, MD, President of the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement (ICSI). Dr. Bottles is a board-certified pathologist who specialized in surgical and cyto-pathology. He earned a medical degree from Case Western Reserve University in Ohio. He has extensive experience in integrated healthcare delivery systems, research, academia, commercial laboratories, genomics, proteomics, and management of biotech start-up companies. Dr. Bottles was vice president and chief medical officer of the Iowa Health System. Before that, he served as president and CEO of Grand Rapids Medical Education and Research Center for Health Professions, a multi-institutional consortium of healthcare organizations, and as president of Genomics Repository and chief knowledge officer, Genomics Collaborative Inc. Dr. Bottles has extensive academic experience, serving as Professor and Acting Head, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Iowa. He was also the founding medical director of managed care plans for University of Iowa employees. Dr. Bottles has addressed topics ranging from quality and patient safety and disruptive technology to patient-physician relationships and the future of medicine. He has received numerous honors, including the Rodney T. West Literary Achievement Award for the most important article on medical management presented by the American College of Physician Executives. He has broad clinical experience with the University of Iowa and the San Francisco General Hospital, and has been a national leader in changing the practice of pathology and laboratory medicine to meet the challenges of managed care.

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seroprevalence among Inmates of the Penitentiary Complex of the Region of Campinas, State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusa Maria Osti

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Six hundred and ninety three male inmates from three penitentiaries, two (A and B maximum-security systems and one (C minimum-security facility, located in Campinas, State of São Paulo, Brazil were studied for the presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV antibodies, using a cross-sectional design. The search for anti-HIV antibodies in 693 samples of sera collected was carried out by two serological tests: (a the Microparticle enzyme immunoassay-HIV-1 and HIV-2 (MEIA (Abbott Laboratories and (b the Western Blot-HIV-1 (WB (Cambridge Biotech Corporation to confirm positive results with MEIA. Sera reactivity for HIV antibodies was 14.4%. The highest frequency of anti-HIV antibodies was found in the A and B maximum-security prisons: 17% and 21.5%, respectively. In prison C, the frequency of reagents was 10.9%. Seventy three inmates, initially negative in the MEIA test, were checked again five and seven months later. Three of them, all from the maximum-security facilities, became reactive in the MEIA test, with confirmation in the WB, suggesting that serological conversion had occurred after imprisonment.

  20. 4 and 6 interleukin's action in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, gingivitis and dental alveolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezniakova, Alla I; Cheremisina, Valentуna F

    The paper presents the results of studying the role of interleukins 4 and 6 in the pathogenesis of periodontal tissue diseases, specifically, in periodontitis, gingivitis and alveolitis. To study the nature of participation of IL-4 and IL-6 in the mechanisms of development of periodontitis, gingivitis and alveolitis. Studies were carried out on 80 nonlinear male rats with a body weight of 200.0 to 220.0 g divided into four groups of 20 animals each. The serum level of cytokines was determined by an enzyme immunoassay on the Multiscane Biotech analyzer using test systems manufactured by Caltag laboratories (USA). Statistical processing of the obtained digital results was processed with the help of the program "Statistica 8.0". Indicators of the reliability of changes between the control and intact groups also used the Student's test and the Excel program. The confidence level was taken at p gingivitis, where it decreased by 74% and its level became less with alveolitis and periodontitis, since in these diseases the level of IL-6 was practically the same from the control (p gingivitis, on the contrary, indicates the realization of a pathological reaction of the organism. The change in the levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory interleukins, especially with gingivitis, indicates a decrease in the body's adaptive reserves and may affect the further dynamics of the inflammatory process in the periodontal tissues.

  1. Managing dual use technology: it takes two to tango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Lalit; Mourya, D T

    2010-03-01

    Like nuclear energy, most technologies could have dual use-for health and well being and disaster and terror. Some research publications have brought to the forefront the tragic consequences of the latter potential through their possible use. Monitoring life science research and development (R&D) to prevent possible misuse is a challenging task globally, more so in developing economies like India, which are emerging as major biotech hubs. As a signatory to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention, India has put in motion a process of evolving a series of measures to manage dual-use technology. The Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) has taken a lead in drafting model codes of conduct, ethics and practice for use by other S&T agencies to tailor them as per their requirements. Taking cue from the discussions held by the editors of the various medical and science journals in the developed world, the Indian Journal of Medical Research, the official publication of the ICMR, is working on policy and uniform practice of publication of dual-use research results. The Government of India too has promulgated legal provisions to minimize the risks of misuse of technology, like the Weapons of Mass Destruction Act. Clearly, no single agency would be able to manage the dual-use of technology effectively. Multiple agencies have to come together to work in tandem for effective implementation of various measure and also like Janus, ensure that they are neither too restrictive nor intrusive to discourage the development of science.

  2. Web-based drug repurposing tools: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Elizabeth; Athri, Prashanth

    2017-10-06

    Drug repurposing (a.k.a. drug repositioning) is the search for new indications or molecular targets distinct from a drug's putative activity, pharmacological effect or binding specificities. With the ever-increasing rates of termination of drugs in clinical trials, drug repositioning has risen as one of the effective solutions against the risk of drug failures. Repositioning finds a way to reverse the grim but real trend that Eroom's law portends for the pharmaceutical and biotech industry, and drug discovery in general. Further, the advent of high-throughput technologies to explore biological systems has enabled the generation of zeta bytes of data and a massive collection of databases that store them. Computational analytics and mining are frequently used as effective tools to explore this byzantine series of biological and biomedical data. However, advanced computational tools are often difficult to understand or use, thereby limiting their accessibility to scientists without a strong computational background. Hence it is of great importance to build user-friendly interfaces to extend the user-base beyond computational scientists, to include life scientists who may have deeper chemical and biological insights. This survey is focused on systematically presenting the available Web-based tools that aid in repositioning drugs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The central dogma, "GMO" and defective epistemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliabue, Giovanni

    2017-10-02

    The expression "Genetically Modified Organisms" was coined to indicate a group of agricultural products (mostly crops and vegetables), modified through direct DNA recombination in order to obtain useful phenotypic traits or to inhibit undesirable characteristics. But the border between rDNA ("GMO") and other biotech methods is blurred. Moreover, the ill-assorted group is frequently charged with having peculiar, negative characteristics: many activists, part of the public and a few social science scholars think that "GMOs" are all dubious, even inherently dangerous. However, theoretical justifications of this alleged problematic nature which is supposed to be necessarily linked to the "splicing" of DNA, only when applied to agricultural products, are missing: the only text which tries to go in depth on the subject, an article by biologist Barry Commoner, takes aim at the wrong target, misunderstanding the Central Dogma. "GMO" is a term that has no clear reference, let alone in a detrimental sense. The only attempt to give it epistemological dignity fails.

  4. How to deal with the upcoming challenges in GMO detection in food and feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeders, Sylvia R M; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J; Roosens, Nancy H C

    2012-01-01

    Biotech crops are the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture. The commercialisation of GMO is in many countries strictly regulated laying down the need for traceability and labelling. To comply with these legislations, detection methods are needed. To date, GM events have been developed by the introduction of a transgenic insert (i.e., promoter, coding sequence, terminator) into the plant genome and real-time PCR is the detection method of choice. However, new types of genetic elements will be used to construct new GMO and new crops will be transformed. Additionally, the presence of unauthorised GMO in food and feed samples might increase in the near future. To enable enforcement laboratories to continue detecting all GM events and to obtain an idea of the possible presence of unauthorised GMO in a food and feed sample, an intensive screening will become necessary. A pragmatic, cost-effective, and time-saving approach is presented here together with an overview of the evolution of the GMO and the upcoming needs.

  5. How to Deal with the Upcoming Challenges in GMO Detection in Food and Feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia R. M. Broeders

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biotech crops are the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture. The commercialisation of GMO is in many countries strictly regulated laying down the need for traceability and labelling. To comply with these legislations, detection methods are needed. To date, GM events have been developed by the introduction of a transgenic insert (i.e., promoter, coding sequence, terminator into the plant genome and real-time PCR is the detection method of choice. However, new types of genetic elements will be used to construct new GMO and new crops will be transformed. Additionally, the presence of unauthorised GMO in food and feed samples might increase in the near future. To enable enforcement laboratories to continue detecting all GM events and to obtain an idea of the possible presence of unauthorised GMO in a food and feed sample, an intensive screening will become necessary. A pragmatic, cost-effective, and time-saving approach is presented here together with an overview of the evolution of the GMO and the upcoming needs.

  6. Detecting authorized and unauthorized genetically modified organisms containing vip3A by real-time PCR and next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chanjuan; van Dijk, Jeroen P; Scholtens, Ingrid M J; Staats, Martijn; Prins, Theo W; Voorhuijzen, Marleen M; da Silva, Andrea M; Arisi, Ana Carolina Maisonnave; den Dunnen, Johan T; Kok, Esther J

    2014-04-01

    The growing number of biotech crops with novel genetic elements increasingly complicates the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food and feed samples using conventional screening methods. Unauthorized GMOs (UGMOs) in food and feed are currently identified through combining GMO element screening with sequencing the DNA flanking these elements. In this study, a specific and sensitive qPCR assay was developed for vip3A element detection based on the vip3Aa20 coding sequences of the recently marketed MIR162 maize and COT102 cotton. Furthermore, SiteFinding-PCR in combination with Sanger, Illumina or Pacific BioSciences (PacBio) sequencing was performed targeting the flanking DNA of the vip3Aa20 element in MIR162. De novo assembly and Basic Local Alignment Search Tool searches were used to mimic UGMO identification. PacBio data resulted in relatively long contigs in the upstream (1,326 nucleotides (nt); 95 % identity) and downstream (1,135 nt; 92 % identity) regions, whereas Illumina data resulted in two smaller contigs of 858 and 1,038 nt with higher sequence identity (>99 % identity). Both approaches outperformed Sanger sequencing, underlining the potential for next-generation sequencing in UGMO identification.

  7. Yield oil of Jatropha curcas seeds of trees irrigated and fertilized with OMM-Tech; Rendimento de oleo de sementes de pinhao manso submetido a irrigacao e adubacao com OMM-Tech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelista, Adao W.P.; Alves Junior, Jose; Barbosa, Ricardo A.F.; Frazao, Joaquim J.; Araujo, Fausto J.M. [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Escola de Agronomia e Engenharia de Alimentos. Setor de Engenharia Rural], E-mail: awpego@bol.com.br

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of irrigation and application of Organo-Minerals-Marine + Biotech (OMM-Tech) in yield oil of Jatropha curcas seeds. The experiment was conducted in an experimental area located in Federal University of Lavras, Brazil. A randomized block experimental design with subdivided parcels and three replications was used. The parcels were submitted to different OMM-Tech fertilizer application methods: T1 = control (no OMM-Tech); T2 = soil application (120 kg ha{sup -1} of OMM-Tech in a powder form); T3 = leaf application (OMM-Tech in a liquid form with a 5% concentration); T4 = soil + leaf application (60 kg ha{sup -1} of OMM-Tech in powder form + OMM-Tech in liquid form with a 2.5% concentration). The sub-plots received two different water management treatments: irrigated and no irrigated. A drip irrigation system with drippers spaced by 0.50 m was used. We evaluated yield oil of seeds in first production year. Jatropha trees irrigated showed a higher seeds oil yield than no irrigated trees. However, fertilization with OMM-Tech no influenced seed oil yield. Seeds oil yield of Jatropha trees irrigated was 34%, and no irrigated 27%. (author)

  8. Plant Breeding by Using Radiation Mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Si Yong; Kim, Dong Sub; Lee, Geung Joo (and others)

    2007-06-15

    A mutation breeding is to use physical or chemical mutagens to induce mutagenesis, followed by individual selections with favorable traits. The mutation breeding has many advantages over other breeding methods, which include the usefulness for improving one or two inferior characteristics, applications to broad species with different reproductive systems or to diverse plant materials, native or plant introduction with narrow genetic background, time and cost-effectiveness, and valuable mutant resources for genomic researches. Recent applications of the radiation breeding techniques to developments of flowering plants or food crops with improved functional constituents heightened the public's interests in agriculture and in our genetic resources and seed industries. The goals of this project, therefore, include achieving advances in domestic seed industries and agricultural productivities by developing and using new radiation mutants with favored traits, protecting an intellectual property right of domestic seeds or germplasm, and sharing the valuable mutants and mutated gene information for the genomic and biotech researches that eventually leads to economic benefits.

  9. A perspective on 10-years HTS experience at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research - eighteen million assays and counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackovic, Kurt; Lessene, Guillaume; Falk, Hendrik; Leuchowius, Karl-Johan; Baell, Jonathan; Street, Ian

    2014-03-01

    The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research (WEHI) is Australia's longest serving medical research institute. WEHI's High Throughput Screening (HTS) Facility was established in 2003 with $5 million of infrastructure funds invested by WEHI, and the Victorian State Government's Strategic Technology Initiative through Bio21 Australia Ltd. The Facility was Australia's first truly academic HTS facility and was one of only a handful operating in publicly funded institutions worldwide at that time. The objectives were to provide access to enabling HTS technologies, such as assay design, liquid handling automation, compound libraries and expertise to promote translation of basic research in a national setting that has a relatively young biotech sector and does not have a big Pharma research presence. Ten years on and the WEHI HTS Facility has participated in over 92 collaborative projects, generated over 18 million data points, and most importantly, projects that began in the Facility have been commercialized successfully (due to strong ties with Business Development and emphasis on intellectual property management) and now have molecules progressing in clinical trials.

  10. Prospects for new antibacterials: can we do better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopapadakou, Nafsika H

    2014-02-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibacterial drugs has been increasing relentlessly over the past two decades. This includes common residents of the human body: Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin resistant or MRSA) Enteroccus faecalis and E. faecium (vancomycin resistant or VRE): Enterobacteriaceae (multiresistant, carbapenems included or CRE). It also includes environmental, opportunistic, but intrinsically multiresistant species: Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. Financial considerations have curtailed R&D activity in the antibacterial field in all, but a couple of large pharmaceutical companies and small biotech companies have largely been unable to fill the drug discovery gap. Antibacterials currently under development have targeted, almost exclusively, Gram-positive bacteria; hence, greater effort must be directed against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly enterobacteria. There also has to be more transparency and care in clinical development. To get ahead of the problem of resistance, we must look for first-in-class antibacterials and new targets. The need to innovate is best addressed through partnerships between drug-makers and public institutions. Such partnerships would provide a long-term view and stability to projects, but also balance the interests of corporate and public stakeholders.

  11. Refolding of proteins from inclusion bodies: rational design and recipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anindya; Li, Xiang; Leong, Susanna Su Jan

    2011-10-01

    The need to develop protein biomanufacturing platforms that can deliver proteins quickly and cost-effectively is ever more pressing. The rapid rate at which genomes can now be sequenced demands efficient protein production platforms for gene function identification. There is a continued need for the biotech industry to deliver new and more effective protein-based drugs to address new diseases. Bacterial production platforms have the advantage of high expression yields, but insoluble expression of many proteins necessitates the development of diverse and optimised refolding-based processes. Strategies employed to eliminate insoluble expression are reviewed, where it is concluded that inclusion bodies are difficult to eliminate for various reasons. Rational design of refolding systems and recipes are therefore needed to expedite production of recombinant proteins. This review article discusses efforts towards rational design of refolding systems and recipes, which can be guided by the development of refolding screening platforms that yield both qualitative and quantitative information on the progression of a given refolding process. The new opportunities presented by light scattering technologies for developing rational protein refolding buffer systems which in turn can be used to develop new process designs armed with better monitoring and controlling functionalities are discussed. The coupling of dynamic and static light scattering methodologies for incorporation into future bioprocess designs to ensure delivery of high-quality refolded proteins at faster rates is also discussed.

  12. The Sheffield RNAi Screening Facility (SRSF): portfolio growth and technology development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    The Sheffield RNAi Screening Facility (SRSF) (www.rnai.group.shef.ac.uk) was established in 2008 with Wellcome Trust and University of Sheffield funding, with the task to provide the first UK RNAi screening resource for academic groups interested in identifying genes required in a diverse range of biological processes using Drosophila cell culture. The SRSF has carried out a wide range of screens varying in sizes from bespoke small-scale libraries, targeting a few hundred genes, to high-throughput, genome-wide studies. The SRSF has grown and improved with a dedicated partnership of its academic customers based mainly in the UK. We are part of the UK Academics Functional Genomics Network, participating in organizing an annual meeting in London and are part of the University of Sheffield's D3N (www.d3n.org.uk), connecting academics, biotech and pharmaceutical companies with a multidisciplinary network in Drug Discovery and Development. Recently, the SRSF has been funded by the Yorkshire Cancer Research Fund to perform genome-wide RNAi screens using human cells as part of a core facility for regional Yorkshire Universities and screens are now underway. Overall the SRSF has carried out more than 40 screens from Drosophila and human cell culture experiments.

  13. La estructura social de la industria biotecnológica en Francia: un estudio de las relaciones inter-organizacionales a nivel inter-individual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piña-Stranger, Alvaro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Various authors have shown the importance of collaborative relationships for inter-organizational performance, the mode of governance or the trajectory of biotechnology companies. Most of these works analyze the exclusive contractual agreements between companies and their main relationships among individuals. We show that this purely economic approach presents a major limitation: the nature of contractual relationships does not explore in detail how players cooperate. We propose to extend the study of these inter-organizational social relations, seen through the resource exchange in inter-individual. An empirical study on the leaders of the biotechnology industry in the area of human health in France has allowed us to map their relationships and resources they exchange them. Our results confirm the existence of a system of exchange dense and multiple. It presents a hierarchical distribution of various types of resources, where the centre is different from the periphery relations denser, more numerous and more reciprocal. However, comparative analysis of different networks reveals that the relationships of the board are highly centralized, while those of friendship following a more even distribution. We suggest that this phenomenon is part of a compensation mechanism to less central actors to maintain inter-organizational relationships. Finally, two standards of the cooperation process, revealed by the relational behaviour of actors, have been discovered. We suggest that they reflect in part the difficult process of adjustment that must cross a science project out of the realm of academic research and develop in a private structure: the biotech company.

  14. The histamine H₃ receptor as a therapeutic drug target for metabolic disorders: status, challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancher, Jean-Marc

    2011-01-01

    Since the histamine-3 receptor (H₃R) was cloned in 1999, huge efforts have been made by most of the key players in the pharmaceutical industry as well as in smaller biotech companies to increase the knowledge on this peculiar receptor, with the ultimate goal of bringing new drugs to the market. This review gives a survey on the most valuable chemical tools discovered so far and the significant pharmacological experiments on metabolic disease models published to date. Pharmacology of H₃R antagonists turns out to be very complex due to various functional activities, species selectivity, presence of H₃R isoforms and the poorly understood dichotomy in efficacy between CNS and metabolic disease models. Adding an extra layer of complexity, researchers have to cope with some recurrent safety concerns, some of them being tightly linked to the nature of the H₃R pharmacophore. Therefore this review also strives to summarize the major hurdles and some of the contradictions seen in the H₃R field, together with a brief overview of the clinical trials currently running.

  15. From Darwinian to technological evolution: forgetting the human lottery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintino, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    The GRIN technologies (-geno, -robo, -info, -nano) promise to change the inner constitution of human body and its own existence. This transformation involves the structure of our lives and represent a brave new world that we have to explore and to manage. In this sense, the traditional tools of humanism seems very inadequate to think the biotech century and there is a strong demand of a new thought for the evolution and the concrete history of life. The posthuman philosophy tries to take this new path of human existence in all of its novelty since GRIN technologies seem to promise new and unexpected paths of evolution to living beings and, above all, man. For this, the post-human thought, as we see, is a new anthropological overview on the concrete evolution of human being, an overview that involves an epistemological revolution of the categories that humanism uses to conceptualize the journey that divides the Homo sapiens from the man. But, is this right?

  16. A patented strain of Bacillus coagulans increased immune response to viral challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Mira

    2009-03-01

    Viral respiratory tract infection is the most common illness among humans. Probiotics have been known to enhance the immune system and, therefore, may represent a significant therapeutic advancement for treating viral respiratory tract infections. A controlled study was conducted to evaluate the effects of the patented GanedenBC30 probiotic (Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086, marketed as Sustenex [Ganeden Biotech, Inc., Mayfield Heights, OH]) on the immune system when exposed to adenovirus and influenza in otherwise healthy adults. Ten healthy men and women (average age, 44 years) were instructed to consume 1 capsule of GanedenBC30 with water once a day for 30 days. At baseline and after completion of the 30-day treatment, blood levels of cytokines were measured in vitro after T-cell exposure to adenovirus and influenza A. Each participant served as his/her own control with baseline blood draw. The use of GanedenBC30 significantly increased T-cell production of TNF-alpha in response to adenovirus exposure (P = 0.027) and influenza A (H3N2 Texas strain) exposure (P = 0.004), but it did not have a significant effect on the response to other strains of influenza. No serious adverse events were reported throughout the study. The patented GanedenBC30 probiotic may be a safe and effective therapeutic option for enhancing T-cell response to certain viral respiratory tract infections.

  17. Evaluation of a New Technique for iFOBT Utilising a New Sample Collection Device with Increased Buffer Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns-Toepler, Markus; Hardt, Philip

    2017-07-01

    The aims of the present study were: (i) Evaluate specificity and sensitivity of Hb Smart enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (ScheBo Biotech) compared to colonoscopy results and (ii) assess stability of a new sample collection device containing a newly formulated buffer to extract haemoglobin using buffer and stool samples spiked with defined concentrations of haemoglobin. Stool samples were quantified with the ELISA method. The stability of haemoglobin in the extraction buffer and in native stool samples, respectively, was determined daily by ELISA during storage for 5 days at 4°C and at room temperature after addition of haemoglobin. Haemoglobin ELISA had a sensitivity of 78.4% for detection of CRC with a specificity of 98%. Haemoglobin extracted in corresponding extraction buffer demonstrated stability throughout storage for 5 days at 4°C and at room temperature. Hb Smart represents a very promising tool for large-scale screening of CRC with regard to sample handling, stability and analysis of haemoglobin in faeces. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. Entrepreneurism from the ground up: Entrepreneurism, innovation, and responsiveness in a start-up university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael Paul Anthony

    Colleges and universities are under increased pressure from internal and external constituencies for increased innovation and responsiveness. Entrepreneurial private industry models such as start-up businesses, corporate ventures and spin-off organizations have been recognized for their ability to quickly adapt to changing business environments and rapidly innovate to take advantage of new opportunities. This case study investigates these claims with regard to a start-up university founded with the identity of an entrepreneurial, interdisciplinary institution that prepares graduate level students for leadership careers as entrepreneurs in the bio-tech industry. By interviewing twenty-four administrators, faculty, and members of the Board of Trustees, including all but one of the founding full-time faculty, I present an "insider's" depiction of the lived experience of those most closely associated with the founding and subsequent institution building of this unique higher education organization. Initial chapters present a theory of higher education organizations, derived from Birnbaum (1988) and Bolman and Deal (1991), as driven by two primary tasks: resolving identity and establishing power and resources in relation to that identity. I also present Russell and Russell's (1992) theory of "entrepreneurial posture" in relation to a higher education organization. Subsequent chapters analyze the start-up university's environment, strategy, culture, and structure within the framework of the two primary organizational tasks and Russell and Russell's (1992) definition of an entrepreneurial organization.

  19. Panacea in progress: CRISPR and the future of its biological research introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Michael; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2017-08-01

    The elucidation of the CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats) adaptive immune system endogenous to most microbial life has culminated in progress in a diversity of scientific disciplines. The concurrently promising and eccentric nature of its theoretically plausible applications has wrought enthusiasm in the research community globally, potentiating advancements in human and animal health, ecological stability, and economic wellbeing, that would hitherto be considered the unattainable fancies of a futurist. It may be supposed that the tomes of science fiction are the true books of prophecy. Here, we narrate the scientific dialogue regarding CRISPR/Cas biotechnologies, from the happenstantial initial observation of the locus to the litany of intriguing contemporary endeavors. We discuss the mechanistic underpinnings in detail, and the corpulent body of literature on CRISPR-based biotech is digested into a germane and informative review. CRISPR applications such as microbiome engineering in order to enhance the human immune system beyond the fortitude of the wild type, bacterial genome editing in industrial and medical aspects, conquering antibiotic resistance, the development of novel antimicrobial techniques, the harvesting of solventogenic microbes, the development of antifungal therapies, and investigation of the genetic properties of fungi, are here represented, and the authors posit unconventional, and at times gainfully tangential, thoughts and concepts in order to encourage a reflective disposition towards this sophisticated device of nature: a panacea in progress, such that the most impassive and technical writing still carries the ring of poetry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Walking between academia and industry to find successful solutions to biomedical challenges: an interview with Geoffrey Smith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Geoffrey W. Smith is currently the Managing Director of Mars Ventures. He actually started his studies with a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Doctorate in Law but then, in part by chance and in part by following in his family footsteps, he stepped into the healthcare and biotech field. Since then, he has successfully contributed to the birth of a number of healthcare companies and has also held academic positions at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and at The Rockefeller University in New York, teaching about the interface between science and business. During 2014 he served as Senior Editor on Disease Models & Mechanisms, bringing to the editorial team his valuable experience in drug development and discovery. In this interview, Geoff talks to Ross Cagan, Editor-in-Chief of Disease Models & Mechanisms, about how he developed his incredibly varied career, sharing his views about industry, academia and science publishing, and discussing how academia and industry can fruitfully meet to advance bioscience, train the scientists and stakeholders of the future, and drive the successful discovery of new therapeutics to treat human disease.

  1. Development of bioengineering system for stem cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. S.; Shah, R.; Shah, C.

    2016-08-01

    From last decades, intensive research in the field of stem cells proliferation had been promoted due to the unique property of stem cells to self-renew themselves into multiples and has potential to replicate into an organ or tissues and so it's highly demanding though challenging. Bioreactor, a mechanical device, works as a womb for stem cell proliferation by providing nutritious environment for the proper growth of stem cells. Various factors affecting stem cells growth are the bioreactor mechanism, feeding of continuous nutrients, healthy environment, etc., but it always remains a challenge for controlling biological parameters. The present paper unveils the design of mechanical device commonly known as bioreactor in tissues engineering and biotech field, use for proliferation of stem cells and imparts the proper growing condition for stem cells. This high functional bioreactor provides automation mixing of cell culture and stem cells. This design operates in conjunction with mechanism of reciprocating motion. Compare to commercial bioreactors, this proposed design is more convenient, easy to operate and less maintenance is required as bioreactor culture bag is made of polyethylene which is single use purpose. Development of this bioengineering system will be beneficial for better growth and expansion of stem cell

  2. Competitive intelligence information management and innovation in small technology-based companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanev, Stoyan

    2007-05-01

    In this article we examine how (i) company type and (ii) the competitive intelligence information used by small technology-based companies affect their innovation performance. The focus is on the specific information types used and not on the information sources. Information topics are classified in four groups - customers (10), company (9), competitor (11) and industry (12). The sample consists of 45 small new technology-based companies, specialized suppliers, and service companies from a variety of sectors - software, photonics, telecommunications, biomedical engineering and biotech, traditional manufacturing etc. The results suggest that the total number of intelligence information topics companies use to make decisions about innovation is not associated with the number of their new products, processes, services and patents. Therefore the companies in our sample do not seem to have the resources, processes or value systems required to use different competitive intelligence information when making decisions on innovation or may rely more on their own internal logic than on external information. Companies are classified using a Pavitt-like taxonomy. Service companies are considered as a separate company type. This allows for explicitly studying both, the innovative role of new services in product driven companies, and the role of new product development in service companies.

  3. Preeclampsia – will Orphan Drug Status facilitate innovative biological therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinuhe eHahn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-relates disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered to the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder, exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia be accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture which relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13 or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia.

  4. Nonprofit pharma: solutions to what ails the industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, W H; Kodukula, K

    2011-01-01

    Nonprofit organizations (NPOs) play an increasingly important role providing solutions to the significant challenges faced today by both large pharmaceutical and smaller biotechnology companies, not to mention academia. NPOs chartered for the public benefit are common in the USA and in selected other parts of the world. SRI International, originally founded as the Stanford Research Institute in 1946, is one of the largest and most successful independent NPOs. To provide a perspective on NPO business models, a number of SRI case studies spanning a broad range of technical and business initiatives will be summarized, including basic and contract research, discovery and development of new drugs and biologics, pharmaceutical and biotech research and development and contract services, technology pivots, company spin-ins and spin-outs, and the creation of new NPOs. How to bridge the National Institute of Health's "Valley of Death" and how to navigate the Food and Drug Administration's "Critical Path" will be discussed. We conclude with lessons learned about collaborations and routes to commercialization, along with food for thought for bioscience companies and outsourcing participants. Throughout, we attempt to explain why the role of NPOs is important to both the scientific and business communities and to patients and caregivers.

  5. Oleic Acid, deglycosylated vitamin D-binding protein, nitric oxide: a molecular triad made lethal to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Marco; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Branca, Jacopo J V; Noakes, David; Morucci, Gabriele; Taubmann, Margit; Thyer, Lynda; Pacini, Stefania

    2014-07-01

    Oleic Acid (OA) has been shown to have anticancer properties mediated by interaction with proteins such as α-lactalbumin and lactoferrins. Therefore, we synthesized complexes of OA and Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF) that inhibits per se cancer cell proliferation and metastatic potential. We hypothesised that OA-GcMAF complexes could exploit the anticancer properties of both OA and GcMAF in a synergistic manner. We postulated that the stimulating effects of GcMAF on macrophages might lead to release of nitric oxide (NO). Patients with advanced cancer were treated at the Immuno Biotech Treatment Centre with OA-GcMAF-based integrative immunotherapy in combination with a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet, fermented milk products containing naturally-produced GcMAF, Vitamin D3, omega-3 fatty acids and low-dose acetylsalicylic acid. Measuring the tumour by ultrasonographic techniques, we observed a decrease of tumour volume of about 25%. These observations demonstrate that OA, GcMAF and NO can be properly combined and specifically delivered to advanced cancer patients with significant effects on immune system stimulation and tumour volume reduction avoiding harmful side-effects. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Extracts of Caesalpinia ferrea and Trichoderma sp. on the control of Colletotrichum sp. transmission in Sideroxylon obtusifolium seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.A.F.R. MELO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Recent research reports the importance of preserving plants in Brazilian semiarid regions, in this context, the scientific literature has reported different pharmacological studies from plant extracts with an antifungal potential, coming from forest species that can contribute as a control and management strategy in the transmission of phytopathogens. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of biotech treatments in controlling the transmission of Colletotrichum sp. in seeds of S. obtusifolium. In this study, 100 seeds were subjected to the following preventive treatments: fungicide Captan®, extract of Caesalpinia ferrea Mart. Ex. Tul., and biological control with Trichoderma spp. The biological control with Trichoderma spp. and the alternative control using C. ferrea extract provided a greater protection to seeds and seedlings of S. obtusifolium facing the transmissibility of Colletotrichum sp.The treatment based on plant extract is more efficient for this purpose only in large seeds and does not interfere on the germination percentage and speed. Therefore it is necessary to perform other studies with Trichoderma spp. and C. ferrea extract to test different doses of these products.

  7. Who owns what? Private ownership and the public interest in recombinant DNA technology in the 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Doogab

    2011-09-01

    This essay analyzes how academic institutions, government agencies, and the nascent biotech industry contested the legal ownership of recombinant DNA technology in the name of the public interest. It reconstructs the way a small but influential group of government officials and university research administrators introduced a new framework for the commercialization of academic research in the context of a national debate over scientific research's contributions to American economic prosperity and public health. They claimed that private ownership of inventions arising from public support would provide a powerful means to liberate biomedical discoveries for public benefit. This articulation of the causal link between private ownership and the public interest, it is argued, justified a new set of expectations about the use of research results arising from government or public support, in which commercialization became a new public obligation for academic researchers. By highlighting the broader economic and legal shifts that prompted the reconfiguration of the ownership of public knowledge in late twentieth-century American capitalism, the essay examines the threads of policy-informed legal ideas that came together to affirm private ownership of biomedical knowledge as germane to the public interest in the coming of age of biotechnology and genetic medicine.

  8. Personal profile: interview with Bill Andrews, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Bill

    2011-08-01

    Dr. William H. Andrews has worked in the biotech industry for 31 years, focusing the last 19 years on finding ways to extend human life span through the intervention of telomere shortening in human cells. Dr. Andrews earned his Ph.D. in Molecular and Population Genetics at the University of Georgia. He was a Senior Scientist at Armos Corporation and Codon Corporation, Director of Molecular Biology at Codon and at Geron Corporation, and Director of Technology Development at EOS Biosciences. He is presently the founder, President, and CEO of Sierra Sciences, a biotechnology company focused exclusively on finding drugs that will transiently induce the expression of endogenous telomerase in human cells. Sierra Sciences has already identified more than 30 such drugs and is presently characterizing their mechanism of action. While Director of Molecular Biology at Geron Corporation, Dr. Andrews was one of the principal discoverers of both the RNA and protein components of human telomerase and was awarded second place as "National Inventor of the Year" in 1997 for this work. He is presently a named inventor on 43 U.S- issued telomerase patents.

  9. High-pressure applications in medicine and pharmacology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jerson L; Foguel, Debora; Suarez, Marisa; Gomes, Andre M O; Oliveira, Andrea C

    2004-01-01

    High pressure has emerged as an important tool to tackle several problems in medicine and biotechnology. Misfolded proteins, aggregates and amyloids have been studied, which point toward the understanding of the protein misfolding diseases. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has also been used to dissociate non-amyloid aggregates and inclusion bodies. The diverse range of diseases that result from protein misfolding has made this theme an important research focus for pharmaceutical and biotech companies. The use of high pressure promises to contribute to identifying the mechanisms behind these defects and creating therapies against these diseases. High pressure has also been used to study viruses and other infectious agents for the purpose of sterilization and in the development of vaccines. Using pressure, we have detected the presence of a ribonucleoprotein intermediate, where the coat protein is partially unfolded but bound to RNA. These intermediates are potential targets for antiviral compounds. The ability of pressure to inactivate viruses, prions and bacteria has been evaluated with a view toward the applications of vaccine development and virus sterilization. Recent studies demonstrate that pressure causes virus inactivation while preserving the immunogenic properties. There is increasing evidence that a high-pressure cycle traps a virus in the 'fusion intermediate state', not infectious but highly immunogenic

  10. Self-expandable polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered nitinol stent for the palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Oong; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Han, Byung Hoon; Shin, Dong Hoon; Ko, Ji Ho

    2008-01-01

    We wanted to determine the technical and clinical efficacy of placing a self-expandable PTFE-covered nitinol stent for the management of inoperable malignant biliary obstruction. Thirty six patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstructions were treated by placement of self-expandable PTFE-covered nitinol stents (S and G Biotech Corporation, Seongnam, Korea). Clinical evaluation was done with assessment of the serum bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase levels, which were measured before and after stent placement within 1 week, at 1 month and at 3 months. The patient survival rate and stent patency rate were calculated with performing Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Successful stent placement was achieved in all the patients without procedure-related complication. Pancreatitis as an early complication occurred in two cases. The serum bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly decreased after the procedure. During the follow-up, recurrent obstructive jaundice occurred in six cases; stent migration occurred in four cases and tumor overgrowth occurred in two cases. The survival rates were 97%, 80%, 67% and 59% at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months, respectively. The stent patency rates were 96%, 92%, 86% and 86% at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months, respectively. Self-expandable PTFE-covered nitinol stent placement seems to be technically feasible and effective for the palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction

  11. Marine biotechnologies and synthetic biology, new issues for a fair and equitable profit-sharing commercial use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Jean-François; Tardieu-Guigues, Elisabeth

    2014-10-01

    The sea will be a source of economic development in the next years. Today the research works in marine biotechnologies supply new products and processes. The introduction in the laboratories of a new technology, synthesis biology, is going to increase the possibilities of creation of new products. Exploitation of product stemming from marine biodiversity has to be made with regard to various rights among which industrial property law, maritime law and the Convention on BioDiversity. All participants involved in the promotion of research in marine biotechnology must address the fair and equitable sharing of any commercial exploitation. Carrying out work involving synthetic biology has increased the number of unanswered questions about how operators should manage in order to avoid any threat of being sued for infringements of IP rights or for alleged bio-piracy. This paper, by no means exhaustive in the field, analyzes some of the issues raised on the modification to the landscape in marine biotechnology by the advent of synthetic biology. Such issues indicate how important the collaboration between researchers, industrialists, lawyers is for allowing proper use of marine biotech. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. La structure sociale de l’industrie des Biotechnologies en France: une étude des relations inter-organisationnelles au niveau inter-individuel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piña-Stranger, Alvaro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Various authors have shown the importance of collaborative relationships for inter-organizational performance, the mode of governance or the trajectory of biotechnology companies. Most of these works analyze the exclusive contractual agreements between companies and their main relationships among individuals. We show that this purely economic approach presents a major limitation: the nature of contractual relationships does not explore in detail how players cooperate. We propose to extend the study of these inter-organizational social relations, seen through the resource exchange in inter-individual. An empirical study on the leaders of the biotechnology industry in the area of human health in France has allowed us to map their relationships and resources they exchange them. Our results confirm the existence of a system of exchange dense and multiple. It presents a hierarchical distribution of various types of resources, where the centre is different from the periphery relations denser, more numerous and more reciprocal. However, comparative analysis of different networks reveals that the relationships of the board are highly centralized, while those of friendship following a more even distribution. We suggest that this phenomenon is part of a compensation mechanism to less central actors to maintain inter-organizational relationships. Finally, two standards of the cooperation process, revealed by the relational behaviour of actors, have been discovered. We suggest that they reflect in part the difficult process of adjustment that must cross a science project out of the realm of academic research and develop in a private structure: the biotech company.

  13. Consumers’ preferences for a local food product: the case of a new Carnaroli rice product in Lombardy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ferrazzi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Italy, with a cultivated area of 218,000 ha, is a European leader of rice production. In particular Lombardy region accounts for 40% of total rice cultivation and the case study in object accounts for 3.2% of Lombardy total rice area (2773 ha. Starting from 2012, through a regional project titled Buono, Sano e Vicino (good, healthy and close, Riso e Rane rural district supported local rice farmers in developing innovation in rice production and promoting an alternative supply chain to increase farmers bargaining power and promote new market strategies. More specifically, the innovation introduced is a new biotech method for variety certification, named DNA controllato (DNA tested. In the first step of the project, the attention was focused on an Italian traditional variety of rice: Carnaroli rice. Thanks to a commercial agreement with one of the most important large retailers in Lombardy, the Riso e Rane rice is offered for sale both in the traditional and wholegrain version. In this context, this work aims to evaluate the determinants of consumer’s quality perception of this product, through a preference study of the commercial rice package. Preliminary results reveal that consumers perceive information about origin, local food-system and tradition more easily than DNA tested certification. In conclusion, this work contributes to evaluate the role of bio economy applications to the food sector and offers new insights for the debate about the relationships between tradition and innovation.

  14. Evaluation of Container Closure System Integrity for Frozen Storage Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Alejandra; Roehl, Holger; Brown, Helen; Nikoloff, Jonas; Adler, Michael; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Sometimes, drug product for parenteral administration is stored in a frozen state (e.g., -20 °C or -80 °C), particularly during early stages of development of some biotech molecules in order to provide sufficient stability. Shipment of frozen product could potentially be performed in the frozen state, yet possibly at different temperatures, for example, using dry ice (-80 °C). Container closure systems of drug products usually consist of a glass vial, rubber stopper, and an aluminum crimped cap. In the frozen state, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of commonly used rubber stoppers is between -55 and -65 °C. Below their Tg, rubber stoppers are known to lose their elastic properties and become brittle, and thus potentially fail to maintain container closure integrity in the frozen state. Leaks during frozen temperature storage and transportation are likely to be transient, yet, can possibly risk container closure integrity and lead to microbial contamination. After thawing, the rubber stopper is supposed to re-seal the container closure system. Given the transient nature of the possible impact on container closure integrity in the frozen state, typical container closure integrity testing methods (used at room temperature conditions) are unable to evaluate and thus confirm container closure integrity in the frozen state. Here we present the development of a novel method (thermal physical container closure integrity) for direct assessment of container closure integrity by a physical method (physical container closure integrity) at frozen conditions, using a modified He leakage test. In this study, different container closure systems were evaluated with regard to physical container closure integrity in the frozen state to assess the suitability of vial/stopper combinations and were compared to a gas headspace method. In summary, the thermal physical container closure integrity He leakage method was more sensitive in detecting physical container closure

  15. Variaciones nucleotídicas de dos grupos de tepezcuintles, Agouti paca (Rodentia: Agoutidae, en cautiverio provenientes de dos localidades de Yucatán, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén C Montes-Pérez

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Estimamos las variaciones nucleotídicas entre dos grupos de tepezcuintles (Agouti paca provenientes de los estados de Campeche y Quintana Roo, México y, dentro de cada grupo. Se colectaron muestras sanguíneas de once A. paca mantenidos en cautiverio. El ADN de leucocitos se utilizó para efectuar la amplificación aleatoria de polimorfismos de ADN (RAPD. Se seleccionaron los iniciadores número tres 5’ -d(GTAGACCCGT-3’ y seis 5’ -d(CCCGTCAGCA-3’ del estuche (Ready.To.Go. RAPD Analysis Beads, Amersham Pharmacia Biotech, porque produjeron un adecuado número de bandas. Los patrones electroforéticos de bandas fueron procesados con el software para análisis filogenético basado en el método de UPGMA para estimar la variación nucleotídica. El árbol filogenético obtenido con el iniciador tres reveló una agrupación dicotómica entre los animales de ambos estados de la Península de Yucatán, con un valor de divergencia de 1.983 nucleótidos de cada cien. Los animales de Quintana Roo mostraron un agrupamiento con el iniciador seis y, otro grupo más con animales procedentes de Campeche. La variación nucleotídica entre estos dos grupos fue de 2.118 nucleótidos por cada cien. Las variaciones nucleotídicas dentro de los grupos procedentes de ambos estados, para los dos iniciadores, mostraron valores que fluctuaron entre 0.46 y 1.68 nucleótidos de cada cien, lo cual indica que la variación nucleotídica entre los dos grupos de animales es alrededor de dos nucleótidos por cada cien y, dentro de grupos es menor a 1.7 nucleótidos por cada cien.Nucleotidic variations of two captive groups of tepezcuintle, Agouti paca (Rodentia: Agoutidae, from two sites in Yucatan, Mexico. The objective of this work was to estimate the nucleotidic variation between two groups of tepezcuintles (Agouti paca from the states of Campeche and Quintana Roo, Mexico and within members of each group. Blood samples were collected from eleven A. paca kept in

  16. Translational Partnership Development Lead | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    , intellectual property, mouse study design, pharmacokinetics (PK), drug screening, industrial project management and other areas needed to facilitate rapid translation. Currently, FNLCR is seeking an expert who can work across organizational boundaries to catalyze these interactions with the primary objective to develop and enable strategies that will facilitate the identification of partners who can collaborate with CCR Investigators. The TPDL will work with the partners and NCI to facilitate the swift and effective translation of pre-clinical discoveries with high potential toward clinical application. A critical part of the TPDL function will be to strengthen interactions among groups with strong translational interests located at NCI-Frederick, including the Molecular Targets Laboratory (MTL), and the NIH main campus, including the National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS). KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES Advise Principal Investigators and senior leadership on project-based and organizational/translational strategies for discoveries. Enable partnerships and strengthen communications/collaborations within and outside of NIH with biotech industry and groups with strong translational interests/expertise. This includes continuing and strengthening the close collaboration with the Molecular Targets Laboratory (MTL) in Frederick as well as increasing interactions with groups that can facilitate drug development and translational work such as those at NCATS, the NCI’s Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD) and with current and potential industry partners. Facilitate outreach to biotech/pharma to develop partnerships furthering translational research projects that may lead to licensing or other agreements. Create outreach opportunities aimed at engaging PIs with potential drug development projects and provide guidance through the translational pipeline. Identify strategic improvements in CCR's technology and drug development process and infrastructure.

  17. Instrumentação interespinhosa na doença degenerativa da coluna lombar: medição da altura do disco no segmento instrumentado Instrumentación interespinosa en la enfermedad degenerativa de la columna lumbar: medición de la altura del disco en el segmento instrumentado Interspinous instrumentation in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease: disc height measurement on instrumented segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto de Castro Guimarães Consciência

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: na última década, a instrumentação interespinhosa vem sendo mais frequentemente utilizada. Apesar dos inúmeros artigos publicados em revistas internacionais de reconhecido mérito científico, são escassas as referências à modificação da altura do disco no segmento tratado, secundária àquela instrumentação. OBJECTIVO: quantificar uma eventual modificação da altura discal decorrente da aplicação de instrumentação interespinhosa (DIAM - Cousin-Biotech - Medtronic Sofamor Danek Inc©. MÉTODOS: o autor avalia um grupo de 20 pacientes com patologia degenerativa da coluna lombar e os seguintes critérios de inclusão: idade >40 e 6; Oswestry Disability Index (ODI >30; Zung Depression Rating Scale INTRODUCCIÓN: la instrumentación interespinosa tiene sido empleada con creciente frecuencia en la última década. Pero, apesar de las numerosas publicaciones científicas hechas en jornales científicos de reconocido mérito internacional, se han producido muy escasas referencias a una hipotética modificación de la altura discal dependiente de la técnica. OBJETIVO: cuantificar una eventual modificación de la altura discal inherente a la aplicación de instrumentación interespinosa. MÉTODOS: el autor hace una evaluación de un grupo de 20 pacientes con patología degenerativa de la columna lumbar, y diversos criterios de inclusión, a saber: edad >40 y 6; Oswestry Disability Index >30; Zung Depression Rating Scale INTRODUCTION: the use of interspinous instrumentation has been increasing in the last decade. However, in spite of the numerous papers seen in relevant scientific publications, there are very few references to an eventual disc height variation in the instrumented segment. OBJECTIVE: to certify eventual changes in disk height after interspinous instrumentation (DIAM - Cousin-Biotech - Medtronic Sofamor Danek Inc©. METHODS: the author evaluated 20 patients with degenerative lumbar disease and the following

  18. Produtividade e rendimento de sementes de pinhão-manso submetido à irrigação e adubação com OMM-Tech Response of Jatropha Curcas L. crop to irrigation and fertilization with OMM-Tech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adão W. P. Evangelista

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar os efeitos da irrigação e aplicação do fertilizante Organo-Minerais-Marinhos + Biotech® (OMM-Tech na produtividade e rendimento do pinhão-manso, um experimento foi instalado em Lavras - MG. O delineamento estatístico utilizado foi o de blocos casualizados, com parcelas subdivididas, contendo três repetições. As parcelas receberam tratamentos constituídos por três formas de aplicação do fertilizante OMM-Tech, ou seja: T1 = Testemunha (Sem OMM-Tech; T2 = via solo (120 kg ha-1 de OMM-Tech na forma de pó; T3 = via foliar (OMM-Tech na forma líquida e na concentração de 5%; e T4 = via solo + foliar (60 kg ha-1 de OMM-Tech na forma de pó + OMM-Tech na forma líquida, na concentração de 2,5%. As sub-parcelas receberam os tratamentos de manejo de água, ou seja, com e sem irrigação. O sistema de irrigação utilizado foi o gotejamento, com emissores espaçados a cada 0,50 m. Para avaliar a resposta da cultura, utilizaram-se dados de produtividade e rendimento de sementes referentes ao primeiro ano de produção. Os tratamentos aplicados produziram efeitos significativos sobre o rendimento e a produtividade da cultura. As plantas irrigadas e adubadas com OMM-Tech pó, via solo, na dose de 120 kg ha-1, foram as que apresentaram o melhor resultado.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of irrigation and application of Organo-Minerals-Marine+Biotech (OMM-Tech in yield and production efficiency of the Jatropha curcas. The experiment was conducted in an experimental area located in Federal University of Lavras, Brazil. A randomized block design with subdivided parcels and three replications was used. The parcels were submitted to different OMM-Tech fertilizer application methods: T1= control (no OMM-Tech; T2 = soil application (120 kg ha-1 of OMM-Tech in a powder form; T3 = leaf application (OMM-Tech in a liquid form with a 5% concentration; T4 = soil + leaf application (60 kg ha-1 of OMM-Tech as

  19. Enzymatic functionalization of a nanobody using protein insertion technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasson, O; Rhazi, N; Jacquin, O; Freichels, A; Jérôme, C; Ruth, N; Galleni, M; Filée, P; Vandevenne, M

    2015-10-01

    Antibody-based products constitute one of the most attractive biological molecules for diagnostic, medical imagery and therapeutic purposes with very few side effects. Their development has become a major priority of biotech and pharmaceutical industries. Recently, a growing number of modified antibody-based products have emerged including fragments, multi-specific and conjugate antibodies. In this study, using protein engineering, we have functionalized the anti-hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) camelid VHH antibody fragment (cAb-Lys3), by insertion into a solvent-exposed loop of the Bacillus licheniformis β-lactamase BlaP. We showed that the generated hybrid protein conserved its enzymatic activity while the displayed nanobody retains its ability to inhibit HEWL with a nanomolar affinity range. Then, we successfully implemented the functionalized cAb-Lys3 in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, potentiometric biosensor and drug screening assays. The hybrid protein was also expressed on the surface of phage particles and, in this context, was able to interact specifically with HEWL while the β-lactamase activity was used to monitor phage interactions. Finally, using thrombin-cleavage sites surrounding the permissive insertion site in the β-lactamase, we reported an expression system in which the nanobody can be easily separated from its carrier protein. Altogether, our study shows that insertion into the BlaP β-lactamase constitutes a suitable technology to functionalize nanobodies and allows the creation of versatile tools that can be used in innovative biotechnological assays. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of a laboratory-based professional development program for science educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amolins, Michael W; Ezrailson, Cathy M; Pearce, David A; Elliott, Amy J; Vitiello, Peter F

    2015-12-01

    The process of developing effective science educators has been a long-standing objective of the broader education community. Numerous studies have recommended not only depth in a teacher's subject area but also a breadth of professional development grounded in constructivist principles, allowing for successful student-centered and inquiry-based instruction. Few programs, however, have addressed the integration of the scientific research laboratory into the science classroom as a viable approach to professional development. Additionally, while occasional laboratory training programs have emerged in recent years, many lack a component for translating acquired skills into reformed classroom instruction. Given the rapid development and demand for knowledgeable employees and an informed population from the biotech and medical industries in recent years, it would appear to be particularly advantageous for the physiology and broader science education communities to consider this issue. The goal of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a laboratory-based professional development program focused on the integration of reformed teaching principles into the classrooms of secondary teachers. This was measured through the program's ability to instill in its participants elevated academic success while gaining fulfillment in the classroom. The findings demonstrated a significant improvement in the use of student-centered instruction and other reformed methods by program participants as well as improved self-efficacy, confidence, and job satisfaction. Also revealed was a reluctance to refashion established classroom protocols. The combination of these outcomes allowed for construction of an experiential framework for professional development in applied science education that supports an atmosphere of reformed teaching in the classroom. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.