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Sample records for biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide pban

  1. The arginine residue within the C-terminal active core of Bombyx mori pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN is essential for receptor binding and activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi eKawai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In most lepidopteran insects, the biosynthesis of sex pheromones is regulated by pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN. Bombyx mori PBAN (BomPBAN consists of 33 amino acid residues and contains a C-terminus FSPRLamide motif as the active core. Among neuropeptides containing the FXPRLamide motif, the arginine (Arg, R residue two positions from the C-terminus is highly conserved across several neuropeptides, which can be designated as RXamide peptides. The purpose of this study was to reveal the role of the Arg residue in the BomPBAN active core. We synthesized a ten-residue peptide corresponding to the C-terminal part of BomPBAN with a series of point mutants at the 2nd position (ie, Arg from the C-terminus, termed the C2 position, and measured their efficacy in stimulating Ca2+ influx in insect cells concomitantly expressing a fluorescent PBAN receptor chimera (PBANR-EGFP and loaded with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, Fura Red-AM. PBAN analogs with the C2 position replaced with alanine (Ala, A, aspartic acid (Asp, D, serine (Ser, S or L-2-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc decreased PBAN-like activity. RC2A (SKTRYFSPALamide and RC2D (SKTRYFSPDLamide had the lowest activity and could not inhibit the activity of PBAN C10 (SKTRYFSPRLamide. We also prepared Rhodamine Red-labeled PBAN analogs of the mutants and examined their ability to bind PBANR. In contrast to 100 nM Rhodamine Red-PBAN C10, none of the mutants at the same concentration exhibited PBANR binding. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the C2 Arg residue in BomPBAN is essential for PBANR binding and activation.

  2. The release of a pheromonotropic neuropeptide, PBAN, in the turnip moth Agrotis segetum, exhibits a circadian rhythm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Závodská, Radka; von Wowern, G.; Löfstedt, C.; Rosén, W. Q.; Šauman, Ivo

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 5 (2009), s. 435-440 ISSN 0022-1910 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : pheromone biosynthesis activating * neuropeptide (PBAN) * circadian rhythm Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.235, year: 2009

  3. Molecular structure and diversity of PBAN/Pyrokinin family peptides in ants

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    Man-Yeon eChoi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides are the largest group of insect hormones. They are produced in the central and peripheral nervous systems and affect insect development, reproduction, feeding and behavior. A variety of neuropeptide families have been identified in insects. One of these families is the PBAN/pyrokinin family defined by a common FXPRLamide or similar amino acid fragment at the C-terminal end. These peptides, found in all insects studied thus far, have been conserved throughout evolution. The most well studied physiological function is regulation of moth sex pheromone biosynthesis through the Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neurohormone (PBAN, although several developmental functions have also been reported. Over the past years we have extended knowledge of the PBAN/pyrokinin family of peptides to ants, focusing mainly on the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. The fire ant is one of the most studied social insects and over the last 60 years a great deal has been learned about many aspects of this ant, including the behaviors and chemistry of pheromone communication. However, virtually nothing is known about the regulation of these pheromone systems. Recently, we demonstrated the presence of PBAN/pyrokinin immunoreactive neurons in the fire ant, and identified and characterized PBAN and additional neuropeptides. We have mapped the fire ant PBAN gene structure and determined the tissue expression level in the central nervous system of the ant. We review here our research to date on the molecular structure and diversity of ant PBAN/pyrokinin peptides in preparation for determining the function of the neuropeptides in ants and other social insects.

  4. Ant trail pheromone biosynthesis is triggered by a neuropeptide hormone.

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    Man-Yeon Choi

    Full Text Available Our understanding of insect chemical communication including pheromone identification, synthesis, and their role in behavior has advanced tremendously over the last half-century. However, endocrine regulation of pheromone biosynthesis has progressed slowly due to the complexity of direct and/or indirect hormonal activation of the biosynthetic cascades resulting in insect pheromones. Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN was identified that stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis in a lepidopteran moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site, and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. Despite that PBAN-like peptides (∼200 have been identified from various insect Orders, their role in pheromone regulation had not expanded to the other insect groups except for Lepidoptera. Here, we report that trail pheromone biosynthesis in the Dufour's gland (DG of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is regulated by PBAN. RNAi knock down of PBAN gene (in subesophageal ganglia or PBAN receptor gene (in DG expression inhibited trail pheromone biosynthesis. Reduced trail pheromone was documented analytically and through a behavioral bioassay. Extension of PBAN's role in pheromone biosynthesis to a new target insect, mode of action, and behavioral function will renew research efforts on the involvement of PBAN in pheromone biosynthesis in Insecta.

  5. Identification of lipases involved in PBAN stimulated pheromone production in Bombyx mori using the DGE and RNAi approaches.

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    Mengfang Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN is a neurohormone that regulates sex pheromone synthesis in female moths. Bombyx mori is a model organism that has been used to explore the signal transduction pattern of PBAN, which is mediated by a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR. Although significant progress has been made in elucidating PBAN-regulated lipolysis that releases the precursor of the sex pheromone, little is known about the molecular components involved in this step. To better elucidate the molecular mechanisms of PBAN-stimulated lipolysis of cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs, the associated lipase genes involved in PBAN- regulated sex pheromone biosynthesis were identified using digital gene expression (DGE and subsequent RNA interference (RNAi. RESULTS: Three DGE libraries were constructed from pheromone glands (PGs at different developed stages, namely, 72 hours before eclosion (-72 h, new emergence (0 h and 72 h after eclosion (72 h, to investigate the gene expression profiles during PG development. The DGE evaluated over 5.6 million clean tags in each PG sample and revealed numerous genes that were differentially expressed at these stages. Most importantly, seven lipases were found to be richly expressed during the key stage of sex pheromone synthesis and release (new emergence. RNAi-mediated knockdown confirmed for the first time that four of these seven lipases play important roles in sex pheromone synthesis. CONCLUSION: This study has identified four lipases directly involved in PBAN-stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis, which improve our understanding of the lipases involved in releasing bombykol precursors from triacylglycerols (TAGs within the cytoplasmic LDs.

  6. Identification of specific sites in the third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminus of the Bombyx mori PBAN receptor crucial for ligand-induced internalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex pheromone production in most moths is mediated by the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR). Similar to other rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors, the silkmoth Bombyx mori PBANR (BmPBANR) undergoes agonist-induced internalization. Despite interest in developing...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... been shown to be regulated by a cephalic endocrine peptidic factor: pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN), having 33 amino acid residues. Antisera against synthetic Heliothis zea-PBAN were developed. Using these polyclonals, immunoreactivity was mapped in the nervous system of Achaea janata.

  8. Tissue localization and partial characterization of pheromone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Achaea janata; immunocytochemistry; MALDI-MS; pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN); RP-HPLC. Abstract. Female sex pheromone production in certain moth species have been shown to be regulated by a cephalic endocrine peptidic factor: pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide ...

  9. Neuropeptide W

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    Fumiko eTakenoya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide W (NPW, which was first isolated from the porcine hypothalamus, exists in two forms, consisting of 23 (NPW23 or 30 (NPW30 amino acids. These neuropeptides bind to one of two neuropeptide W receptors, either NPBWR1 (otherwise known as GPR7 or NPBWR2 (GPR8, which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor family. GPR7 is expressed in the brain and peripheral organs of both humans and rodents, whereas GPR8 is not found in rodents. GPR7 mRNA in rodents is widely expressed in several hypothalamic regions, including the paraventricular, supraoptic, ventromedial, dorsomedial, suprachiasmatic and arcuate nuclei. These observations suggest that GPR7 plays a crucial role in the modulation of neuroendocrine function. The intracerebroventricular infusion of NPW has been shown to suppress food intake and body weight and to increase both heat production and body temperature, suggesting that this neuropeptide functions as an endogenous catabolic signaling molecule. Here we summarize our current understanding of the distribution and function of NPW in the brain.

  10. Neuropeptides, Microbiota, and Behavior.

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    Holzer, P

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota and the brain interact with each other through multiple bidirectional signaling pathways in which neuropeptides and neuroactive peptide messengers play potentially important mediator roles. Currently, six particular modes of a neuropeptide link are emerging. (i) Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters contribute to the mutual microbiota-host interaction. (ii) The synthesis of neuroactive peptides is influenced by microbial control of the availability of amino acids. (iii) The activity of neuropeptides is tempered by microbiota-dependent autoantibodies. (iv) Peptide signaling between periphery and brain is modified by a regulatory action of the gut microbiota on the blood-brain barrier. (v) Within the brain, gut hormones released under the influence of the gut microbiota turn into neuropeptides that regulate multiple aspects of brain activity. (vi) Cerebral neuropeptides participate in the molecular, behavioral, and autonomic alterations which the brain undergoes in response to signals from the gut microbiota. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immunochemical analysis of neuropeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehfeld, J.F.; Hilsted, L.

    1987-01-01

    Measurement of neuropeptides requires assays that take into account the basic characteristics of bioactive peptides, i.e. the structural homology; the molecular heterogeneity of a given neuropeptide system; the widespread synthesis in different neurons and cells; and cell-specific processing of the primary translation product. Development of libraries of sensitive radioimmunoassays (RIAs), each of which is monospecific for essential sequences of propeptides, comply with some of the needs. Processing-site specific RIAs have proven particularly useful in combination with chromatography and enzymography. 4 references, 1 figure

  12. Neuropeptides in cnidarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J.P.; Williamson, Michael; Hansen, Georg Nørgaard

    2002-01-01

    Cnidarians are the lowest animal group having a nervous system. In the primitive nervous systems of cnidarians, peptides play important roles as neurotransmitters or neurohormones. So far, we have isolated and sequenced about 35 neuropeptides from different cnidarian classes (Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa,...

  13. Coexistence of neuropeptides in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1983-01-01

    Using a technique for simultaneous visualisation of two antigens in one section, oxytocin-like immunoreactivity has been found to coexist with bombesin-like immunoreactivity in neurons of the basal disk, gastric region and tentacles of hydra. Neurons with oxytocin-like immunoreactivity in peduncle...... and hypostome, on the other hand, have little or no bombesin-like material. Oxytocin-like immunoreactivity never coexists with FMRFamide-immunoreactivity. The neurons with oxytocin- and FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity, however, are often found to be closely intermingled. The results show that coexistence......, as well as non-coexistence, of neuropeptides is a phylogenetically old principle....

  14. Neuropeptides in Lower Urinary Tract (LUT) Function

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    Arms, Lauren; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous neuropeptide/receptor systems including vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P, neurokinin A, bradykinin, and endothelin-1 are expressed in the lower urinary tract (LUT) in both neural and non-neural (e.g., urothelium) components. LUT neuropeptide immunoreactivity is present in afferent and autonomic efferent neurons innervating the bladder and urethra and in the urothelium of the urinary bladder. Neuropeptides have tissue-specific distributions and functions in the LUT and exhibit neuroplastic changes in expression and function with LUT dysfunction following neural injury, inflammation and disease. LUT dysfunction with abnormal voiding including urinary urgency, increased voiding frequency, nocturia, urinary incontinence and pain may reflect a change in the balance of neuropeptides in bladder reflex pathways. LUT neuropeptide/receptor systems may represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21290237

  15. Neuropeptides in Lower Urinary Tract (LUT) Function

    OpenAIRE

    Arms, Lauren; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous neuropeptide/receptor systems including vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P, neurokinin A, bradykinin, and endothelin-1 are expressed in the lower urinary tract (LUT) in both neural and non-neural (e.g., urothelium) components. LUT neuropeptide immunoreactivity is present in afferent and autonomic efferent neurons innervating the bladder and urethra and in the urothelium of the urinary bla...

  16. Emerging functions for neuropeptide Y5 receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, A.; Michel, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Y5 subtype of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors has raised considerable interest as a mediator of NPY-stimulated food intake, but with the advent of recent data, this hypothesis has come into question. Moreover, Y5 receptor-selective drugs might not be specific for food intake because additional

  17. Zerumbone improved immunoreactivity of neuropeptides in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of this investigation was to explore the improvement effect of oral administration of zerumbone on the density of protein gene product; calcitonin gene related peptide and neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve fibers against monosodium iodoacetate induced osteoarthritis changes in rat's knee synovial ...

  18. Neuropeptides controlling energy balance: orexins and neuromedins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Joshua P.; Kotz, Catherine M.; Novak, Colleen M.; Billington, Charles J.; Teske, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    In this section we review the feeding and energy expenditure effects of orexin (also known as hypocretin) and neuromedin. Orexins are multifunctional neuropeptides that affect energy balance by participating in regulation of appetite, arousal, and spontaneous physical activity. Central orexin signaling for all functions originates in the lateral hypothalamus–perifornical area, and is likely functionally differentiated based on site of action and on interacting neural influences. The effect of orexin on feeding is likely related to arousal in some ways, but is nonetheless a separate neural process that depends on interactions with other feeding related neuropeptides. In a pattern distinct from other neuropeptides, orexin stimulates both feeding and energy expenditure. Orexin increases in energy expenditure are mainly by increasing spontaneous physical activity, and this energy expenditure effect is more potent than the effect on feeding. Global orexin manipulations, such as in transgenic models, produce energy balance changes consistent with a dominant energy expenditure effect of orexin. Neuromedins are gut-brain peptides that reduce appetite. There are gut sources of neuromedin, but likely the key appetite related neuromedin producing neurons are in hypothalamus and parallel other key anorectic neuropeptide expression in the arcuate to paraventricular hypothalamic projection. As with other hypothalamic feeding related peptides, hindbrain sites are likely also important sources and targets of neuromedin anorectic action. Neuromedin increases physical activity in addition to reducing appetite, thus producing a consistent negative energy balance effect. Together with the various other neuro-peptides, -transmitters, -modulators and –hormones, neuromedin and orexin act in the appetite network to produce changes in food intake and energy expenditure, which ultimately influences the regulation of body weight. PMID:22249811

  19. Discovery of novel representatives of bilaterian neuropeptide families and reconstruction of neuropeptide precursor evolution in ophiuroid echinoderms

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    Abylkassimova, Nikara; Hugall, Andrew F.; O'Hara, Timothy D.; Elphick, Maurice R.

    2017-01-01

    Neuropeptides are a diverse class of intercellular signalling molecules that mediate neuronal regulation of many physiological and behavioural processes. Recent advances in genome/transcriptome sequencing are enabling identification of neuropeptide precursor proteins in species from a growing variety of animal taxa, providing new insights into the evolution of neuropeptide signalling. Here, detailed analysis of transcriptome sequence data from three brittle star species, Ophionotus victoriae, Amphiura filiformis and Ophiopsila aranea, has enabled the first comprehensive identification of neuropeptide precursors in the class Ophiuroidea of the phylum Echinodermata. Representatives of over 30 bilaterian neuropeptide precursor families were identified, some of which occur as paralogues. Furthermore, homologues of endothelin/CCHamide, eclosion hormone, neuropeptide-F/Y and nucleobinin/nesfatin were discovered here in a deuterostome/echinoderm for the first time. The majority of ophiuroid neuropeptide precursors contain a single copy of a neuropeptide, but several precursors comprise multiple copies of identical or non-identical, but structurally related, neuropeptides. Here, we performed an unprecedented investigation of the evolution of neuropeptide copy number over a period of approximately 270 Myr by analysing sequence data from over 50 ophiuroid species, with reference to a robust phylogeny. Our analysis indicates that the composition of neuropeptide ‘cocktails’ is functionally important, but with plasticity over long evolutionary time scales. PMID:28878039

  20. Kinetic Profile of Neuropeptide-Receptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederpelt, Indira; Bunnik, Julia; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2016-12-01

    Currently, drug discovery focusses only on quantifying pharmacological parameters, sometimes including binding kinetics, of drug candidates. For a complete understanding of a drug's desired binding kinetics, the kinetics of both the target and its endogenous ligands should be considered. This is because the release and binding kinetics of endogenous ligands in addition to receptor internalization rates are significant contributors to drug-target interactions. Here, we discuss the kinetic profile of three neuropeptides and their receptors; gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), neuropeptide Y receptors, and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF 1 R). These three examples provide new insights into the importance of kinetic profiles which could improve the understanding of desired drug-target binding kinetics and advance drug discovery for various neurological and psychiatric illnesses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Neuropeptide levels in Dercum's disease (adiposis dolorosa

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    H. Brorson

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dercum’s disease (adiposis dolorosa is characterised by adiposity and chronic pain in the adipose tissue. It has been proposed that conditions encompassing chronic pain have altered concentrations of neuropeptides involved in pain transmission. The aim of this investigation was to examine whether patients with Dercum’s disease have abnormal concentrations of different neuropeptides. In cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and in plasma (P from 53 patients with Dercum’s disease substance P-like immunoreactivity (SP-LI, neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI, b-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (b-END-LI, calcitonin gene-related peptidelike immunoreactivity (CGRP-LI, met-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity (m-ENK-LI, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-like immunoreactivity (VIP-LI, somatostatin (SOM-LI, g2-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-like immunoreactivity (g2-MSH-LI, and dynorphin-like immunoreactivity (DYN-LI were measured. Three of the substances were also measured in a control group. The CSF concentration of SP was statistically significantly lower in the Dercum group than in the control group, whereas NPY-LI and b-END-LI were borderline statistically significantly lower and higher, respectively, in Dercum patients compared to controls. Compared with reference values, CSF-MSH-LI levels were slightly elevated and CSF-NPY-LI levels were slightly lowered in the Dercum group. The other substances in both CSF and plasma were within the reference values with a high degree of statistical significance. In conclusion, altered levels of neuropeptides that have previously been seen in different pain conditions cannot clearly be demonstrated in Dercum’s disease.

  2. Comparison of Caenorhabditis elegans NLP peptides with arthropod neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husson, Steven J; Lindemans, Marleen; Janssen, Tom; Schoofs, Liliane

    2009-04-01

    Neuropeptides are small messenger molecules that can be found in all metazoans, where they govern a diverse array of physiological processes. Because neuropeptides seem to be conserved among pest species, selected peptides can be considered as attractive targets for drug discovery. Much can be learned from the model system Caenorhabditis elegans because of the availability of a sequenced genome and state-of-the-art postgenomic technologies that enable characterization of endogenous peptides derived from neuropeptide-like protein (NLP) precursors. Here, we provide an overview of the NLP peptide family in C. elegans and discuss their resemblance with arthropod neuropeptides and their relevance for anthelmintic discovery.

  3. Neuropeptide delivery to the brain: a von Willebrand factor signal peptide to direct neuropeptide secretion

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    de Backer Marijke WA

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple neuropeptides, sometimes with opposing functions, can be produced from one precursor gene. To study the roles of the different neuropeptides encoded by one large precursor we developed a method to overexpress minigenes and establish local secretion. Results We fused the signal peptide from the Von Willebrand Factor (VWF to a furin site followed by a processed form of the Agouti related protein (AgRP, AgRP83-132 or α-melanocyte stimulating hormone. In vitro, these minigenes were secreted and biologically active. Additionally, the proteins of the minigenes were not transported into projections of primary neurons, thereby ensuring local release. In vivo administration of VWF-AgRP83-132 , using an adeno-associated viral vector as a delivery vehicle, into the paraventricular hypothalamus increased body weight and food intake of these rats compared to rats which received a control vector. Conclusions This study demonstrated that removal of the N-terminal part of full length AgRP and addition of a VWF signal peptide is a successful strategy to deliver neuropeptide minigenes to the brain and establish local neuropeptide secretion.

  4. Transcriptomic identification of starfish neuropeptide precursors yields new insights into neuropeptide evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmens, Dean C.; Mirabeau, Olivier; Moghul, Ismail; Pancholi, Mahesh R.; Wurm, Yannick; Elphick, Maurice R.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides are evolutionarily ancient mediators of neuronal signalling in nervous systems. With recent advances in genomics/transcriptomics, an increasingly wide range of species has become accessible for molecular analysis. The deuterostomian invertebrates are of particular interest in this regard because they occupy an ‘intermediate' position in animal phylogeny, bridging the gap between the well-studied model protostomian invertebrates (e.g. Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans) and the vertebrates. Here we have identified 40 neuropeptide precursors in the starfish Asterias rubens, a deuterostomian invertebrate from the phylum Echinodermata. Importantly, these include kisspeptin-type and melanin-concentrating hormone-type precursors, which are the first to be discovered in a non-chordate species. Starfish tachykinin-type, somatostatin-type, pigment-dispersing factor-type and corticotropin-releasing hormone-type precursors are the first to be discovered in the echinoderm/ambulacrarian clade of the animal kingdom. Other precursors identified include vasopressin/oxytocin-type, gonadotropin-releasing hormone-type, thyrotropin-releasing hormone-type, calcitonin-type, cholecystokinin/gastrin-type, orexin-type, luqin-type, pedal peptide/orcokinin-type, glycoprotein hormone-type, bursicon-type, relaxin-type and insulin-like growth factor-type precursors. This is the most comprehensive identification of neuropeptide precursor proteins in an echinoderm to date, yielding new insights into the evolution of neuropeptide signalling systems. Furthermore, these data provide a basis for experimental analysis of neuropeptide function in the unique context of the decentralized, pentaradial echinoderm bauplan. PMID:26865025

  5. In silico prediction of neuropeptides in Hymenoptera parasitoid wasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juhua; Zhao, Jianhua; Tian, Xiaoli

    2018-01-01

    Parasitoid wasps of the order Hymenoptera, the most diverse groups of animals, are important natural enemies of arthropod hosts in natural ecosystems and can be used in biological control. To date, only one neuropeptidome of a parasitoid wasp, Nasonia vitripennis, has been identified. This study aimed to identify more neuropeptides of parasitoid wasps, by using a well-established workflow that was previously adopted for predicting insect neuropeptide sequences. Based on publicly accessible databases, totally 517 neuropeptide precursors from 24 parasitoid wasp species were identified; these included five neuropeptides (CNMamide, FMRFamide-like, ITG-like, ion transport peptide-like and orcokinin B) that were identified for the first time in parasitoid wasps, to our knowledge. Next, these neuropeptides from parasitoid wasps were compared with those from other insect species. Phylogenetic analysis suggested the divergence of AST-CCC within Hymenoptera. Further, the encoding patterns of CAPA/PK family genes were found to be different between Hymenoptera species and other insect species. Some neuropeptides that were not found in some parasitoid superfamilies (e.g., sulfakinin), or considerably divergent between different parasitoid superfamilies (e.g., sNPF) might be related to distinct physiological processes in the parasitoid life. Information of neuropeptide sequences in parasitoid wasps can be useful for better understanding the phylogenetic relationships of Hymenoptera and further elucidating the physiological functions of neuropeptide signaling systems in parasitoid wasps.

  6. Micellar nanomedicine of human neuropeptide Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmis, Antonina; Lim, Sok Bee; Desai, Esha; Jeon, Eunjung; Lee, Bao-Shiang; Rubinstein, Israel; Onyüksel, Hayat

    2011-08-01

    Human neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an important biologics that regulates a multitude of physiological functions and could be amenable to therapeutic manipulations in certain disease states. However, rapid (within minutes) enzymatic degradation and inactivation of NPY precludes its development as a drug. Accordingly, we determined whether self-association of NPY with biocompatible and biodegradable sterically stabilized phospholipid micelles (SSM) improves its stability and bioactivity. We found that in saline NPY spontaneously aggregates; however, in the presence of SSM it self-associates with the micelles as monomers. Three NPY molecules self-associate with 1 SSM at saturation. This process stabilizes the peptide in α-helix conformation, abrogates its degradation by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and potentiates NPY-induced inhibition of cAMP elaboration in SK-N-MC cells. Collectively, these data indicate that self-association of NPY with SSM stabilizes and protects the peptide in active monomeric conformation, thereby amplifying its bioactivity in vitro. We propose further development of NPY in SSM as a novel, long-acting nanomedicine. Human neuropeptide Y (NPY) regulates a multitude of physiological functions and could be amenable to therapeutic manipulations, which is currently limited by its short half life. Self-association of NPY with spherically stabilized micelles (SSM) protects and stabilizes the peptide in active monomeric conformation, thereby amplifying its bioactivity in vitro, enabling future therapeutic considerations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuropeptide Signaling in Crustaceans Probed by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhidan

    Neuropeptides are one of the most diverse classes of signaling molecules whose identities and functions are not yet fully understood. They have been implicated in the regulation of a wide range of physiological processes, including feeding-related and motivated behaviors, and also environmental adaptations. In this work, improved mass spectrometry-based analytical platforms were developed and applied to the crustacean systems to characterize signaling molecules. This dissertation begins with a review of mass spectrometry-based neuropeptide studies from both temporal- and spatial-domains. This review is then followed by several chapters detailing a few research projects related to the crustacean neuropeptidomic characterization and comparative analysis. The neuropeptidome of crayfish, Orconectes rusticus is characterized for the first time using mass spectrometry-based tools. In vivo microdialysis sampling technique offers the capability of direct sampling from extracellular space in a time-resolved manner. It is used to investigate the secreted neuropeptide and neurotransmitter content in Jonah crab, Cancer borealis, in this work. A new quantitation strategy using alternative mass spectrometry data acquisition approach is developed and applied for the first time to quantify neuropeptides. Coupling of this method with microdialysis enables the study of neuropeptide dynamics concurrent with different behaviors. Proof-of-principle experiments validating this approach have been carried out in Jonah crab, Cancer borealis to study feeding- and circadian rhythm-related neuropeptide changes using micoridialysis in a time-resolved manner. This permits a close correlation between behavioral and neurochemical changes, providing potential candidates for future validation of regulatory roles. In addition to providing spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) technique enables the characterization of signaling molecules while preserving the temporal resolution. A

  8. Differential neuropeptide responses to starvation with ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, T; Makino, S; Nishiyama, M; Asaba, K; Hashimoto, K

    2001-12-01

    During starvation, counterregulatory responses to loss of food (i.e. responses that lead to an increase in appetite) occur in the central nervous system (CNS). This study was designed to examine whether middle-aged rats show greater or smaller behavioural, peripheral and central hormonal responses during starvation compared to young rats. In experiment 1, refeeding following 4 days of starvation was measured in both middle-aged (72-week-old) and young (9-week-old) rats. The level of refeeding was similar to each prestarved level until 3 days after the end of starvation in both groups. From the 4th day, the level of refeeding in young rats increased and reached beyond the prestarved level, whereas refeeding in middle-aged rats remained similar to the prestarved level. Thus, overall refeeding throughout 7 days was greater in young rats than in middle-aged rats. In experiment 2, middle-aged and young rats were starved for 4 days and were killed in the morning. Middle-aged rats showed a smaller plasma corticosterone response than that of young rats. The magnitude of decreases in plasma glucose, insulin and leptin was similar in both groups. In the arcuate nucleus, the starvation-induced increase in neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA and the decrease in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA were smaller in middle-aged rats than in young rats. In contrast, the starvation-induced decrease in corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was greater in middle-aged rats than young rats. The magnitude of decrease in type-2 CRH receptor mRNA in the ventromedial hypothalamus was similar in both groups. The results indicate that (a) ageing impaired refeeding response (b), middle-aged rats showed the same directional neuropeptide mRNA responses as seen in young rats during starvation and (c) the magnitude of these counterregulatory responses in the CNS in middle-aged versus young rats was not uniform, but rather was site-specific or neuropeptide

  9. Neuropeptide S Receptor Induces Neuropeptide Expression and Associates with Intermediate Phenotypes of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; McKinzie, Sanna; Busciglio, Irene; Burton, Duane; Zucchelli, Marco; D’Amato, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims NPSR1, the receptor for neuropeptide S (NPS), is expressed by gastrointestinal (GI) enteroendocrine (EE) cells, and is involved in inflammation, anxiety and nociception. NPSR1 polymorphisms are associated with asthma and inflammatory bowel disease. We aimed to determine whether NPS induces expression of GI neuropeptides; and to associate NPSR1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with symptom phenotype and GI functions in health and functional GI disorders (FGID). Methods The effect of NPS on mRNA expression of neuropeptides was assessed using real-time PCR in NPSR1-tranfected HEK293 cells. Seventeen NPSR1 SNPs were successfully genotyped in 699 subjects from a regional cohort of 466 FGID patients and 233 healthy controls. Associations were sought using sex-adjusted regression analysis and false discovery rate (FDR) correction. Results NPS-NPSR1 signaling induced increased expression of CCK, VIP, PYY, and somatostatin. There were no significant associations with phenotypes of FGID symptoms. There were several NPSR1 SNPs associated with individual motor or sensory functions; the associations of SNPs rs2609234, rs6972158 and rs1379928 with colonic transit rate remained significant after FDR correction. The rs1379928 polymorphism was also associated with pain, gas and urgency sensory ratings at 36 mm Hg distension, the level pre-specified for formal testing. Associations with rectal sensory ratings were not significant after FDR correction. Conclusions Expression of several neuropeptides is induced upon NPS-NPSR1 signaling; NPSR1 variants are associated with colonic transit in FGID. The role of the NPS system in FGID deserves further study. PMID:19732772

  10. NeuroPep: a comprehensive resource of neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Mingxia; Yin, Sanwen; Jang, Richard; Wang, Jian; Xue, Zhidong; Xu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides play a variety of roles in many physiological processes and serve as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of some nervous-system disorders. In recent years, there has been a tremendous increase in the number of identified neuropeptides. Therefore, we have developed NeuroPep, a comprehensive resource of neuropeptides, which holds 5949 non-redundant neuropeptide entries originating from 493 organisms belonging to 65 neuropeptide families. In NeuroPep, the number of neuropeptides in invertebrates and vertebrates is 3455 and 2406, respectively. It is currently the most complete neuropeptide database. We extracted entries deposited in UniProt, the database (www.neuropeptides.nl) and NeuroPedia, and used text mining methods to retrieve entries from the MEDLINE abstracts and full text articles. All the entries in NeuroPep have been manually checked. 2069 of the 5949 (35%) neuropeptide sequences were collected from the scientific literature. Moreover, NeuroPep contains detailed annotations for each entry, including source organisms, tissue specificity, families, names, post-translational modifications, 3D structures (if available) and literature references. Information derived from these peptide sequences such as amino acid compositions, isoelectric points, molecular weight and other physicochemical properties of peptides are also provided. A quick search feature allows users to search the database with keywords such as sequence, name, family, etc., and an advanced search page helps users to combine queries with logical operators like AND/OR. In addition, user-friendly web tools like browsing, sequence alignment and mapping are also integrated into the NeuroPep database. Database URL: http://isyslab.info/NeuroPep © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. Neuropeptide Control of Feeding Behavior in Birds and Its Difference with Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Tachibana, Tetsuya; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Feeding is an essential behavior for animals to sustain their lives. Over the past several decades, many neuropeptides that regulate feeding behavior have been identified in vertebrates. These neuropeptides are called “feeding regulatory neuropeptides.” There have been numerous studies on the role of feeding regulatory neuropeptides in vertebrates including birds. Some feeding regulatory neuropeptides show different effects on feeding behavior between birds and other vertebrates, particularly...

  12. Review: Neuropeptide Control of Feeding Behavior in Birds and its Difference with Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsuya Tachibana; Kazuyoshi Tsutsui

    2016-01-01

    Feeding is an essential behavior for animals to sustain their lives. Over the past several decades, many neuropeptides that regulate feeding behavior have been identified in vertebrates. These neuropeptides are called feeding regulatory neuropeptides. There have been numerous studies on the role of feeding regulatory neuropeptides in vertebrates including birds. Some feeding regulatory neuropeptides show different effects on feeding behavior between birds and other vertebrates, particularly m...

  13. The Role of Hypothalamic Neuropeptides in Neurogenesis and Neuritogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bakos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is a source of neural progenitor cells which give rise to different populations of specialized and differentiated cells during brain development. Newly formed neurons in the hypothalamus can synthesize and release various neuropeptides. Although term neuropeptide recently undergoes redefinition, small-size hypothalamic neuropeptides remain major signaling molecules mediating short- and long-term effects on brain development. They represent important factors in neurite growth and formation of neural circuits. There is evidence suggesting that the newly generated hypothalamic neurons may be involved in regulation of metabolism, energy balance, body weight, and social behavior as well. Here we review recent data on the role of hypothalamic neuropeptides in adult neurogenesis and neuritogenesis with special emphasis on the development of food intake and social behavior related brain circuits.

  14. Immunologists getting nervous: neuropeptides, dendritic cells and T cell activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIt is increasingly recognised that the immune and nervous systems are closely integrated to optimise defence systems within the lung. In this commentary, the contribution of various neuropeptides such as substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive

  15. Advances in Mass Spectrometric Tools for Probing Neuropeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchberger, Amanda; Yu, Qing; Li, Lingjun

    2015-07-01

    Neuropeptides are important mediators in the functionality of the brain and other neurological organs. Because neuropeptides exist in a wide range of concentrations, appropriate characterization methods are needed to provide dynamic, chemical, and spatial information. Mass spectrometry and compatible tools have been a popular choice in analyzing neuropeptides. There have been several advances and challenges, both of which are the focus of this review. Discussions range from sample collection to bioinformatic tools, although avenues such as quantitation and imaging are included. Further development of the presented methods for neuropeptidomic mass spectrometric analysis is inevitable, which will lead to a further understanding of the complex interplay of neuropeptides and other signaling molecules in the nervous system.

  16. Analoghi del Neuropeptide S modificati in posizione 5

    OpenAIRE

    Del Zoppo, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is the last neuropeptide identified via Reverse Pharmacology techniques. NPS selectively binds and activates a previously orphan GPCR 154, now named NPSR, producing intracellular calcium mobilization and cAMP levels. Biological functions modulated by the NPS/NPSR system include anxiety, arousal, locomotion, food intake, memory, and drug addiction. The primary sequence of NPS (in humans SFRNGVGTGMKKTSFQRAKS) is highly conserved among vertebrates especially a...

  17. New techniques, applications and perspectives in neuropeptide research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaney, Kellen; Buchberger, Amanda R; Atkinson, Louise; Gründer, Stefan; Mousley, Angela; Li, Lingjun

    2018-02-08

    Neuropeptides are one of the most diverse classes of signaling molecules and have attracted great interest over the years owing to their roles in regulation of a wide range of physiological processes. However, there are unique challenges associated with neuropeptide studies stemming from the highly variable molecular sizes of the peptides, low in vivo concentrations, high degree of structural diversity and large number of isoforms. As a result, much effort has been focused on developing new techniques for studying neuropeptides, as well as novel applications directed towards learning more about these endogenous peptides. The areas of importance for neuropeptide studies include structure, localization within tissues, interaction with their receptors, including ion channels, and physiological function. Here, we discuss these aspects and the associated techniques, focusing on technologies that have demonstrated potential in advancing the field in recent years. Most identification and structural information has been gained by mass spectrometry, either alone or with confirmations from other techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and other spectroscopic tools. While mass spectrometry and bioinformatic tools have proven to be the most powerful for large-scale analyses, they still rely heavily on complementary methods for confirmation. Localization within tissues, for example, can be probed by mass spectrometry imaging, immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassays. Functional information has been gained primarily from behavioral studies coupled with tissue-specific assays, electrophysiology, mass spectrometry and optogenetic tools. Concerning the receptors for neuropeptides, the discovery of ion channels that are directly gated by neuropeptides opens up the possibility of developing a new generation of tools for neuroscience, which could be used to monitor neuropeptide release or to specifically change the membrane potential of neurons. It is expected

  18. Autonomic dysfunction and neuropeptide Y in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, M; Iannuccelli, C; Alessandri, C; Paradiso, M; Riccieri, V; Libri, F; Valesini, G

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome associated with widespread pain and various other signs and symptoms. Several of these multisystem features could be explained on the basis of autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate ANS dysfunction in FM based on time-domain heart rate variability (HRV) analysis and serum neuropeptide Y (NPY) levels in 51 patients with FM, 25 patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), and 15 healthy controls (NHS). Compared with the SSc and NHS groups, the FM group had significantly higher NPY levels, and in the FM subgroup subjected to HRV analysis (25/51 patients, 49%), certain HRV indices were significantly reduced. In this subgroup, NPY was significantly correlated with the SDANN index and the NN50, but neither NPY or HRV parameters showed any significant correlation with clinical aspects of the FM. These findings suggest that autonomic dysfunction and NPY are crucial elements in the pathophysiology of FM. Additional studies are necessary to define the complex roles played by NPY and ANS in modulating pain and immunological functions of different diseases.

  19. The neuropeptide oxytocin modulates consumer brand relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürst, Andreas; Thron, Jesko; Scheele, Dirk; Marsh, Nina; Hurlemann, René

    2015-10-09

    Each year, companies invest billions of dollars into marketing activities to embellish brands as valuable relationship partners assuming that consumer brand relationships (CBRs) and interpersonal relationships rest upon the same neurobiological underpinnings. Given the crucial role of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) in social bonding, this study tests whether OXT-based mechanisms also determine the bond between consumers and brands. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled study involving 101 subjects and analyzed the effect of intranasal OXT on consumers' attribution of relationship qualities to brands, brands paired with human celebrity endorsers, and familiar persons. OXT indeed promoted the attribution of relationship qualities not only in the case of social and semi-social stimuli, but also brands. Intriguingly, for subjects scoring high on autistic-like traits, the effect of OXT was completely reversed, evident in even lower relationship qualities across all stimulus categories. The importance of OXT in a CBR context is further corroborated by a three-fold increase in endogenous release of OXT following exposure to one's favorite brand and positive associations between baseline peripheral OXT concentrations and brand relationship qualities. Collectively, our findings indicate that OXT not only plays a fundamental role in developing interpersonal relationships, but also enables relationship formation with objects such as brands.

  20. Neuropeptide Mapping of Dimmed Cells of Adult Drosophila Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesner, Max; Predel, Reinhard; Neupert, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    Neuropeptides are structurally highly diverse messenger molecules that act as regulators of many physiological processes such as development, metabolism, reproduction or behavior in general. Differentiation of neuropeptidergic cells often corresponds with the presence of the transcription factor DIMMED. In the central nervous system of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, DIMMED commonly occurs in neuroendocrine neurons that release peptides as neurohormones but also in interneurons with complex branching patterns. Fly strains with green fluorescence protein (GFP)-expressing dimmed cells make it possible to systematically analyze the processed neuropeptides in these cells. In this study, we mapped individual GFP-expressing neurons of adult D. melanogaster from the dimmed (c929)>GFP line. Using single cell mass spectrometry, we analyzed 10 types of dimmed neurons from the brain/gnathal ganglion. These cells included neuroendocrine cells with projection into the retrocerebral complex but also a number of large interneurons. Resulting mass spectra not only provided comprehensive data regarding mature products from 13 neuropeptide precursors but also evidence for the cellular co-localization of neuropeptides from different neuropeptide genes. The results can be implemented in a neuroanatomical map of the D. melanogaster brain. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Expression of neuropeptides and their degrading enzymes in ACD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, H; Lee, W J; Lee, Y W; Chang, S-E; Choi, J-H; Kim, M N; Kim, B J; Choi, Y S; Suh, H S

    2010-04-01

    Sensory neuropeptides such as neurokinin A or substance P modulate skin and immune cells the functions of neurokinin receptor activation during neurogenic inflammation. Zinc metalloproteases, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), effectively control the bioavailability of these neuropeptide mediators, which are released from sensory nerves, immune and skin cells during cutaneous responses to endogenous or exogenous noxious stimuli. Recently, studies have suggested that neuropeptides are one of the major pathogenetic fact in many dermatoses, such as allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. To investigate the expression of major neuropeptides, SP and its degrading enzymes such as NEP and ACE, in the lesions of ACD. A skin biopsy was obtained from 10 patients with ACD. We analysed the expression of these molecules by immunohistochemical staining, confocal laser scanning microscopy, western blotting and reverse transcription PCR. There was a significant increase in expression of SP in keratinocytes from ACD lesions compared with those in control skin. There was also increased expression of ACE but not NEP in ACD. Neuropeptides and their degrading enzymes, particularly SP and ACE, have a significant role in the pathogenesis of ACD.

  2. A secreted antibacterial neuropeptide shapes the microbiome of Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, René; Schröder, Katja; Murillo Rincón, Andrea P; Fraune, Sebastian; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Herbst, Eva-Maria; Wittlieb, Jörg; Schwentner, Martin; Grötzinger, Joachim; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2017-09-26

    Colonization of body epithelial surfaces with a highly specific microbial community is a fundamental feature of all animals, yet the underlying mechanisms by which these communities are selected and maintained are not well understood. Here, we show that sensory and ganglion neurons in the ectodermal epithelium of the model organism hydra (a member of the animal phylum Cnidaria) secrete neuropeptides with antibacterial activity that may shape the microbiome on the body surface. In particular, a specific neuropeptide, which we call NDA-1, contributes to the reduction of Gram-positive bacteria during early development and thus to a spatial distribution of the main colonizer, the Gram-negative Curvibacter sp., along the body axis. Our findings warrant further research to test whether neuropeptides secreted by nerve cells contribute to the spatial structure of microbial communities in other organisms.Certain neuropeptides, in addition to their neuromodulatory functions, display antibacterial activities of unclear significance. Here, the authors show that a secreted neuropeptide modulates the distribution of bacterial communities on the body surface during development of the model organism Hydra.

  3. The neuropeptide bursicon acts in cuticle metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shengzhang; Zhang, Hongwei; Chen, Xi; Stanley, David; Yu, Xiaoping; Song, Qisheng

    2015-06-01

    Bursicon is a heterodimeric neuropeptide formed of bursicon α (burs α) and bursicon β (burs β) that controls cuticle tanning and wing expansion in insects. Burs α-α and burs β-β homodimers are also formed; they act via an unknown receptor to induce expression of prophylactic immune and stress genes during molting. Based on the hypothesis that burs β-β and/or bursicon influence expression of additional genes acting after the molt, we prepared and sequenced six Drosophila cDNA libraries from groups of flies separately injected with burs β-β, bursicon, or blank control. Compared to the control, the burs β-β treatments led to upregulation (by at least 1.5-fold) of 262 genes at 0.5 h postinjection (PI) and 298 genes at 1 h PI; 323 genes at 0.5 h PI and 269 genes at 1h PI were downregulated (by at least 0.67). Similar changes were recorded following bursicon injections. Of these genes, expression of seven transcripts encoding cuticle proteins was upregulated and three downregulated by burs β-β; expression of nine transcripts encoding cuticle proteins were upregulated and four downregulated following bursicon treatments. Expression of dozens of genes involved in chitin metabolism was altered by the experimental treatments. We recorded parallel changes in expression of selected genes by transcriptome and qPCR analysis. These findings support our hypothesis that burs β-β and bursicon influence expression of additional genes acting after the molt. We report that burs β-β and bursicon act in cuticle synthesis and degradation by regulating the expression of cuticular protein and chitin metabolizing related genes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Neuropeptide Control of Feeding Behavior in Birds and Its Difference with Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Tetsuya; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Feeding is an essential behavior for animals to sustain their lives. Over the past several decades, many neuropeptides that regulate feeding behavior have been identified in vertebrates. These neuropeptides are called "feeding regulatory neuropeptides." There have been numerous studies on the role of feeding regulatory neuropeptides in vertebrates including birds. Some feeding regulatory neuropeptides show different effects on feeding behavior between birds and other vertebrates, particularly mammals. The difference is marked with orexigenic neuropeptides. For example, melanin-concentrating hormone, orexin, and motilin, which are regarded as orexigenic neuropeptides in mammals, have no effect on feeding behavior in birds. Furthermore, ghrelin and growth hormone-releasing hormone, which are also known as orexigenic neuropeptides in mammals, suppress feeding behavior in birds. Thus, it is likely that the feeding regulatory mechanism has changed during the evolution of vertebrates. This review summarizes the recent knowledge of peptidergic feeding regulatory factors in birds and discusses the difference in their action between birds and other vertebrates.

  5. Brain neuropeptides in central ventilatory and cardiovascular regulation in trout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude eLe Mével

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many neuropeptides and their G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are present within the brain area involved in ventilatory and cardiovascular regulation but only a few mammalian studies have focused on the integrative physiological actions of neuropeptides on these vital cardio-respiratory regulations. Because both the central neuroanatomical substrates that govern motor ventilatory and cardiovascular output and the primary sequence of regulatory peptides and their receptors have been mostly conserved through evolution, we have developed a trout model to study the central action of native neuropeptides on cardio-ventilatory regulation. In the present review, we summarize the most recent results obtained using this non-mammalian model with a focus on PACAP, VIP, tachykinins, CRF, urotensin-1, CGRP, angiotensin-related peptides, urotensin-II, NPY, and PYY. We propose hypotheses regarding the physiological relevance of the results obtained.

  6. A radioactive assay for the degradation of neuropeptide Y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, R.; Lucius, R.; Mentlein, R.

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in the mammalian central nervous system. Like other neuropeptides, NPY is inactivated by specialized neuro-peptidases. To trace the degradation of NPY, an assay was established using biotinylated NPY. Biotinyl-NPY was radiolabeled with Na 125 I by the chloramine-T method and bound to a streptavidin-agarose matrix. The amount of radiolabeling was analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC. The assay was carried out with five peptidases and inhibitors to demonstrate different specific activity. Measurable amounts of radioactivity were released by treatment with endopeptidase-24.18, plasmin, and trypsin, whereas dipetidylpeptidase IV (DPPIV) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) showed no activity in this assay. In the case of DPPIV this is due to a resistance of the assay to aminopeptidase attack. The assay is useful to study the specific degradation of NPY particularly by endopeptidases in all kinds of biological samples. (authors). 31 refs., 6 figs

  7. Regulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc eDo-Rego

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic pathways leading to the synthesis of bioactive steroids in the brain are now almost completely elucidated in various groups of vertebrates and, during the last decade, the neuronal mechanisms involved in the regulation of neurosteroid production have received increasing attention. This report reviews the current knowledge concerning the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones and neuropeptides on the biosynthesis of neurosteroids. Anatomical studies have been carried out to visualize the neurotransmitter- or neuropeptide-containing fibers contacting steroid-synthesizing neurons as well as the neurotransmitter, peptide hormones or neuropeptide receptors expressed in these neurons. Biochemical experiments have been conducted to investigate the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones or neuropeptides on neurosteroid biosynthesis, and to characterize the type of receptors involved. Thus, it has been found that glutamate, acting through kainate and/or AMPA receptors, rapidly inactivates P450arom, and that melatonin produced by the pineal gland and eye inhibits the biosynthesis of 7-hydroxypregnenolone (7-OH-5P, while prolactin produced by the adenohypophysis enhances the formation of 7-OH-5P. It has also been demonstrated that the biosynthesis of neurosteroids is inhibited by GABA, acting through GABAA receptors, and neuropeptide Y, acting through Y1 receptors. In contrast, it has been shown that the octadecaneuropetide ODN, acting through central-type benzodiazepine receptors, the triakontatetraneuropeptide TTN, acting though peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, and vasotocine, acting through V1a-like receptors, stimulate the production of neurosteroids. Since neurosteroids are implicated in the control of various neurophysiological and behavioral processes, these data suggest that some of the neurophysiological effects exerted by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides may be mediated via the regulation

  8. Neuropeptides and the microbiota-gut-brain axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Peter; Farzi, Aitak

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides are important mediators both within the nervous system and between neurons and other cell types. Neuropeptides such as substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, somatostatin and corticotropin-releasing factor are also likely to play a role in the bidirectional gut-brain communication. In this capacity they may influence the activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota and its interaction with the gut-brain axis. Current efforts in elucidating the implication of neuropeptides in the microbiota-gut-brain axis address four information carriers from the gut to the brain (vagal and spinal afferent neurons; immune mediators such as cytokines; gut hormones; gut microbiota-derived signalling molecules) and four information carriers from the central nervous system to the gut (sympathetic efferent neurons; parasympathetic efferent neurons; neuroendocrine factors involving the adrenal medulla; neuroendocrine factors involving the adrenal cortex). Apart from operating as neurotransmitters, many biologically active peptides also function as gut hormones. Given that neuropeptides and gut hormones target the same cell membrane receptors (typically G protein-coupled receptors), the two messenger roles often converge in the same or similar biological implications. This is exemplified by NPY and peptide YY (PYY), two members of the PP-fold peptide family. While PYY is almost exclusively expressed by enteroendocrine cells, NPY is found at all levels of the gut-brain and brain-gut axis. The function of PYY-releasing enteroendocrine cells is directly influenced by short chain fatty acids generated by the intestinal microbiota from indigestible fibre, while NPY may control the impact of the gut microbiota on inflammatory processes, pain, brain function and behaviour. Although the impact of neuropeptides on the interaction between the gut microbiota and brain awaits to be analysed, biologically active peptides

  9. Tachykinin neuropeptides in cerebellar granule neurons: an immunocytochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Barbato

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that exogenously administered neurokinin A and neurokinin B, but not substance P, increased the sensitivity of cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs to glutamate. In the present study, the presence of tachykinin neuropeptides in CGNs was tested by confocalbased immunofluorescence.We found that neurokinin A and neurokinin B are present in CGNs but absent in astrocytes. while substance P is abundant in astrocytes but absent in CGNs. It is postulated that the different localization of tachykinin neuropeptides in CGNs and astroglial cells has a physiological role in the modulation of excitatory transmission.

  10. Use of targetable gfp-tagged neuropeptide for visualizing neuropeptide release following execution of a behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Qasim M; Ewer, John

    2004-05-01

    Previous work has shown that a transgene consisting of a fusion between the rat atrial natriuretic peptide and a green fluorescent protein reporter (ANF-gfp) is processed, localized, and released, as would be an endogenous neuropeptide when it is expressed in the nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster using the GAL4/UAS expression system. Here we have tested the utility of this targetable transgene for detecting neuropeptide release following the execution of a peptide-controlled behavior. For the behavior we used ecdysis, the behavior expressed by insects to shed their old cuticle at the end of the molt. We found that larval ecdysis was accompanied by a readily detectable reduction in gfp fluorescence from relevant secretory cells in the periphery and peptidergic neurons in the CNS. We also found that expression of the ANF-gfp products did not have detrimental effects on larval ecdysis or adult circadian rhythmicity, when the transgene was expressed in peptidergic cells that are known to control these behaviors. Finally, we used a broadly expressed GAL4 driver to show that the UAS-ANF-gfp transgene could be used to identify axons that show a reduction in gfp fluorescence following the expression of ecdysis behavior. These findings, coupled with the availability of an increasing number of strains bearing different GAL4 drivers, suggest that this transgene will be a useful tool for identifying peptidergic neurons and secretory cells (and, eventually, their secretory product) that release their peptide content during the occurrence, in the intact animal, of a developmental, physiological or behavioral process of interest. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Neurobiol 59: 181-191, 2004

  11. Molecular cloning of a preprohormone from sea anemones containing numerous copies of a metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide: a likely role for dipeptidyl aminopeptidase in neuropeptide precursor processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leviev, I; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1995-01-01

    cleavage sites, and therefore, are also likely to be produced from the precursor. Thus, there are at least 37 closely related neuropeptides localized on the precursor protein, making this precursor one of the most productive preprohormones known so far. This report also shows that unusual processing sites......Neuropeptides are an important group of hormones mediating or modulating neuronal communication. Neuropeptides are especially abundant in evolutionarily "old" nervous systems, such as those of cnidarians, the lowest animal group having a nervous system. Cnidarians often have a life cycle including...... the precursor protein for this metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide from sea anemones. The precursor protein is 514-amino acid residues long and contains 10 copies of the immature, authentic neuropeptide (Gln-Gln-Pro-Gly-Leu-Trp-Gly). All neuropeptide copies are preceded by Xaa-Pro or Xaa-Ala sequences...

  12. Neuropeptides and social behavior of rats tested in dyadic encounters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesink, R.J.M.; Ree, J.M. van

    1984-01-01

    The effects of various neuropeptides on social behavior was studied in a test procedure in which 7-day isolated animals were tested together with non-isolated partners in dyadic encounters. The short-term isolation procedure increased the frequency and duration of social activities of the rats, but

  13. Is fibromyalgia an autoimmune disorder of endogenous vasoactive neuropeptides?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Donald R

    2004-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder characterised by soft tissue pain, disturbance of function an often prolonged course and variable fatigue and debility. A clearly defined aetiology has not been described. This paper proposes that immunological aberration is likely and this may prove to be associated with an expanding group of novel vasoactive neuropeptides. Vasoactive neuropeptides act as hormones, neurotransmitters, immune modulators and neurotrophes. They are readily catalysed to small peptide fragments. They and their binding sites are immunogenic and are known to be associated with a range of autoimmune conditions. They have a vital role in maintaining vascular flow in organs, and in thermoregulation, memory and concentration. They are co-transmitters for acetylcholine, are potent immune regulators with primarily anti-inflammatory activity, and have a significant role in protection of the nervous system to toxic assault and the maintenance of homeostasis. Failure of these substances has adverse consequences for homeostasis. This paper describes a biologically plausible mechanism for the development of FM based on loss of immunological tolerance to the vasoactive neuropeptides. The proposed mechanism of action is that inflammatory cytokines are provoked by tissue injury from unaccustomed exercise or physical injury. This may trigger a response by certain vasoactive neuropeptides which then undergo autoimmune dysfunction as well as affecting their receptor binding sites. The condition may potentially arise de novo perhaps in genetically susceptible individuals. FM is postulated to be an autoimmune disorder and may include dysfunction of purine nucleotide metabolism and nociception.

  14. Neuropeptide Y in the adult and fetal human pineal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Badiu, Corin

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y was isolated from the porcine brain in 1982 and shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals. The peptide has been demonstrated to be present in sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the pineal gland in many mammalian species. In this investigation, we s...

  15. Mice lacking neuropeptide Y show increased sensitivity to cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Woldbye, David Paul Drucker

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing data implicating neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the neurobiology of addiction. This study explored the possible role of NPY in cocaine-induced behavior using NPY knockout mice. The transgenic mice showed a hypersensitive response to cocaine in three animal models of cocaine addiction...

  16. Expression of GFSKLYFamide-like neuropeptide in the digestive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neuropeptides are key mediators of physiological processes in animals and a considerable amount of information has been accumulated on their diversity and functions across phyla. However, progress in echinoderm neurobiology has been much slower than others. The sea cucumber Holothuria scabra is an ...

  17. Third ventricle neuropeptide-Y infusion effect on metabolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of this study was to determine whether neuropeptide-Y affects the mean plasma concentrations of metabolic parameters such as thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), growth hormone (GH), insulin, glucagon, glucose, fatty acid and urea in the goats fed different energy content in diets. 16 goats were randomly ...

  18. Oxytocin: the neuropeptide of love reveals some of its secrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Inga D

    2007-04-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin is synthesized in the brain and released from neurohypophyseal terminals into the blood and within defined brain regions that regulate emotional, cognitive, and social behaviors. A recent study of CD38-/- mice (Jin et al., 2007) has demonstrated an essential role for the transmembrane receptor CD38 in secretion of oxytocin into the blood.

  19. Neuropeptides and Microglial Activation in Inflammation, Pain, and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniglia, Lila; Ramírez, Delia; Durand, Daniela; Saba, Julieta; Turati, Juan; Caruso, Carla; Scimonelli, Teresa N; Lasaga, Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    Microglial cells are responsible for immune surveillance within the CNS. They respond to noxious stimuli by releasing inflammatory mediators and mounting an effective inflammatory response. This is followed by release of anti-inflammatory mediators and resolution of the inflammatory response. Alterations to this delicate process may lead to tissue damage, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Chronic pain, such as inflammatory or neuropathic pain, is accompanied by neuroimmune activation, and the role of glial cells in the initiation and maintenance of chronic pain has been the subject of increasing research over the last two decades. Neuropeptides are small amino acidic molecules with the ability to regulate neuronal activity and thereby affect various functions such as thermoregulation, reproductive behavior, food and water intake, and circadian rhythms. Neuropeptides can also affect inflammatory responses and pain sensitivity by modulating the activity of glial cells. The last decade has witnessed growing interest in the study of microglial activation and its modulation by neuropeptides in the hope of developing new therapeutics for treating neurodegenerative diseases and chronic pain. This review summarizes the current literature on the way in which several neuropeptides modulate microglial activity and response to tissue damage and how this modulation may affect pain sensitivity.

  20. Neuropeptide Y in the Adult and Fetal Human Pineal Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Møller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide Y was isolated from the porcine brain in 1982 and shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals. The peptide has been demonstrated to be present in sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the pineal gland in many mammalian species. In this investigation, we show by use of immunohistochemistry that neuropeptide Y is present in nerve fibers of the adult human pineal gland. The fibers are classical neuropeptidergic fibers endowed with large boutons en passage and primarily located in a perifollicular position with some fibers entering the pineal parenchyma inside the follicle. The distance from the immunoreactive terminals to the pinealocytes indicates a modulatory function of neuropeptide Y for pineal physiology. Some of the immunoreactive fibers might originate from neurons located in the brain and be a part of the central innervation of the pineal gland. In a series of human fetuses, neuropeptide Y-containing nerve fibers was present and could be detected as early as in the pineal of four- to five-month-old fetuses. This early innervation of the human pineal is different from most rodents, where the innervation starts postnatally.

  1. Neuropeptides and Microglial Activation in Inflammation, Pain, and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Carniglia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglial cells are responsible for immune surveillance within the CNS. They respond to noxious stimuli by releasing inflammatory mediators and mounting an effective inflammatory response. This is followed by release of anti-inflammatory mediators and resolution of the inflammatory response. Alterations to this delicate process may lead to tissue damage, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Chronic pain, such as inflammatory or neuropathic pain, is accompanied by neuroimmune activation, and the role of glial cells in the initiation and maintenance of chronic pain has been the subject of increasing research over the last two decades. Neuropeptides are small amino acidic molecules with the ability to regulate neuronal activity and thereby affect various functions such as thermoregulation, reproductive behavior, food and water intake, and circadian rhythms. Neuropeptides can also affect inflammatory responses and pain sensitivity by modulating the activity of glial cells. The last decade has witnessed growing interest in the study of microglial activation and its modulation by neuropeptides in the hope of developing new therapeutics for treating neurodegenerative diseases and chronic pain. This review summarizes the current literature on the way in which several neuropeptides modulate microglial activity and response to tissue damage and how this modulation may affect pain sensitivity.

  2. Identification of the Drosophila and Tribolium receptors for the recently discovered insect RYamide neuropeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Caitlin; Hauser, Frank; Krogh-Meyer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    short neuropeptides F. Amazingly, these neuropeptides show no cross-reactivity to the Tribolium RYamide receptor, while the Drosophila RYamide receptor is only very slightly activated by high concentrations (>10(-6)M) of neuropeptide F and short neuropeptide F-1, showing that the two RYamide receptors...

  3. Molecular cloning of a preprohormone from sea anemones containing numerous copies of a metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide: a likely role for dipeptidyl aminopeptidase in neuropeptide precursor processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leviev, I; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1995-01-01

    the precursor protein for this metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide from sea anemones. The precursor protein is 514-amino acid residues long and contains 10 copies of the immature, authentic neuropeptide (Gln-Gln-Pro-Gly-Leu-Trp-Gly). All neuropeptide copies are preceded by Xaa-Pro or Xaa-Ala sequences...... a polyp, a medusa, and a planula larva stage. Recently, a neuropeptide, sea anemones that induces metamorphosis in a hydroid planula larva to become a hydropolyp [Leitz, T., Morand, K. & Mann, M. (1994) Dev. Biol. 163, 440-446]. Here, we have cloned...

  4. Neuropeptide systems and new treatments for nicotine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijnzeel, Adriaan W

    2017-05-01

    The mildly euphoric and cognitive enhancing effects of nicotine play a role in the initiation of smoking, while dysphoria and anxiety associated with smoking cessation contribute to relapse. After the acute withdrawal phase, smoking cues, a few cigarettes (i.e., lapse), and stressors can cause relapse. Human and animal studies have shown that neuropeptides play a critical role in nicotine addiction. The goal of this paper is to describe the role of neuropeptide systems in the initiation of nicotine intake, nicotine withdrawal, and the reinstatement of extinguished nicotine seeking. The reviewed studies indicate that several drugs that target neuropeptide systems diminish the rewarding effects of nicotine by preventing the activation of dopaminergic systems. Other peptide-based drugs diminish the hyperactivity of brain stress systems and diminish withdrawal-associated symptom severity. Blockade of hypocretin-1 and nociceptin receptors and stimulation of galanin and neurotensin receptors diminishes the rewarding effects of nicotine. Both corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 and kappa-opioid receptor antagonists diminish dysphoria and anxiety-like behavior associated with nicotine withdrawal and inhibit stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. Furthermore, blockade of vasopressin 1b receptors diminishes dysphoria during nicotine withdrawal, and melanocortin 4 receptor blockade prevents stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. The role of neuropeptide systems in nicotine-primed and cue-induced reinstatement is largely unexplored, but there is evidence for a role of hypocretin-1 receptors in cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. Drugs that target neuropeptide systems might decrease the euphoric effects of smoking and improve relapse rates by diminishing withdrawal symptoms and improving stress resilience.

  5. Identification and characterization of a POU transcription factor in the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tian-Yi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The POU family genes containing the POU domain are common in vertebrates and invertebrates and play critical roles in cell-type-specific gene expression and cell fate determination. Results Har-POU, a new member of the POU gene family, was cloned from the suboesophageal ganglion of Helicoverpa armigera (Har, and its potential functions in the development of the central nervous system (CNS were analyzed. Southern blot analysis suggests that a single copy of this gene is present in the H. armigera haploid genome. Har-POU mRNA is distributed widely in various tissues and expressed highly in the CNS, salivary gland, and trachea. In vitro-translated Har-POU specifically bound canonical octamer motifs on the promoter of diapause hormone and pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (DH-PBAN gene in H. armigera. Expression of the Har-POU gene is markedly higher in the CNS of nondiapause-destined pupae than in diapause-destined pupae. Expression of the Har-POU gene in diapausing pupae was upregulated quickly by injection of ecdysone. Conclusion Har-POU may respond to ecdysone and bind to the promoter of DH-PBAN gene to regulate pupal development in H. armigera.

  6. The evolution and variety of RFamide-type neuropeptides: insights from deuterostomian invertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Richard Elphick

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Five families of neuropeptides that have a C-terminal RFamide motif have been identified in vertebrates: 1. gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH, 2. neuropeptide FF (NPFF 3. pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide (QRFP, 4. prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP and 5. Kisspeptin. Experimental demonstration of neuropeptide-receptor pairings combined with comprehensive analysis of genomic and/or transcriptomic sequence data indicate that, with the exception of the deuterostomian PrRP system, the evolutionary origins of these neuropeptides can be traced back to the common ancestor of bilaterians. Here we review the occurrence of homologs of vertebrate RFamide-type neuropeptides and their receptors in deuterostomian invertebrates - urochordates, cephalochordates, hemichordates and echinoderms. Extending analysis of the occurrence of the RFamide motif in other bilaterian neuropeptide families reveals RFamide-type peptides that have acquired modified C-terminal characteristics in the vertebrate lineage (e.g. NPY/NPF, neuropeptide families where the RFamide motif is unique to protostomian members (e.g. CCK/sulfakinins and RFamide-type peptides that have been lost in the vertebrate lineage (e.g. luqins. Furthermore, the RFamide motif is also a feature of neuropeptide families with a more restricted phylogenetic distribution (e.g. the prototypical FMRFamide-related neuropeptides in protostomes. Thus, the RFamide motif is both an ancient and a convergent feature of neuropeptides, with conservation, acquisition or loss of this motif occurring in different branches of the animal kingdom.

  7. Metabolic Labeling to Quantify Drosophila Neuropeptides and Peptide Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Thomas Otto; Chen, Jiangtian; Megha; Wegener, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Neuropeptides and peptide hormones are involved in the regulation of most if not all body functions, ranging from physiology to neuronal processing and the control of behavior. To assess their functions, it is often vital to determine when and in which quantities they are produced, stored, and released. The latter is especially difficult to assess in small insects, such as the genetically amenable fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and cannot be achieved merely by quantifying mRNA transcripts. We have adapted and optimized methods to quantify neuropeptides and peptide hormones by metabolic labeling followed by LC-MS. In this chapter, we describe the labeling protocols used in our laboratory and discuss problems and pitfalls that we encountered.

  8. Regulation of Neurosteroid Biosynthesis by Neurotransmitters and Neuropeptides

    OpenAIRE

    Do Rego, Jean Luc; Seong, Jae Young; Burel, Delphine; Leprince, Jerôme; Vaudry, David; Luu-The, Van; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Pelletier, Georges; Vaudry, Hubert

    2012-01-01

    The enzymatic pathways leading to the synthesis of bioactive steroids in the brain are now almost completely elucidated in various groups of vertebrates and, during the last decade, the neuronal mechanisms involved in the regulation of neurosteroid production have received increasing attention. This report reviews the current knowledge concerning the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones, and neuropeptides on the biosynthesis of neurosteroids. Anatomical studies have been carried out...

  9. Platelet neuropeptide Y is critical for ischemic revascularization in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Tilan, Jason U.; Everhart, Lindsay M.; Abe, Ken; Kuo-Bonde, Lydia; Chalothorn, Dan; Kitlinska, Joanna; Burnett, Mary Susan; Epstein, Stephen E.; Faber, James E.; Zukowska, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that the sympathetic neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y (NPY) is potently angiogenic, primarily through its Y2 receptor, and that endogenous NPY is crucial for capillary angiogenesis in rodent hindlimb ischemia. Here we sought to identify the source of NPY responsible for revascularization and its mechanisms of action. At d 3, NPY−/− mice demonstrated delayed recovery of blood flow and limb function, consistent with impaired collateral conductance, while ischemic capillary...

  10. Neuropeptide/Receptor expression and plasticity in micturition pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Liana; Girard, Beatrice; Arms, Lauren; Guertin, Pierre; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    Several motor behaviors such as locomotion, respiration, sexual function, and micturition are generated by rhythmic and stereotyped motor patterns of activity. In most cases, these functions are primarily controlled by signals and neuronal commands that originate from the brainstem and spinal cord. Defined as the storage and periodic elimination of urine, micturition requires a complex neural control system that coordinates the activities of a variety of effector organs including the smooth muscle of the urinary bladder and the smooth and striated muscle of the urethral sphincters. The lower urinary tract (LUT) reflex mechanisms, organized at the level of the lumbosacral spinal cord, are modulated predominantly by supraspinal controls. These LUT mechanisms include: (1) storage reflexes organized at the spinal level; (2) elimination reflexes organized at a supraspinal site in the pons; and (3) spinal storage reflexes modulated by inputs from the rostral pons. Precise coordination of the reciprocal functions of the urinary bladder and urethra and complex neural organization are required for normal function. Numerous neuropeptide/receptor systems are expressed in central and peripheral nervous system pathways that regulate the LUT and expression can also be found in both neural and non-neural (e.g., urothelium) components. Neuropeptides have tissue-specific distributions and functions in the LUT and exhibit neuroplastic changes in expression and function with LUT dysfunction with neural injury, inflammation, stress and disease. LUT dysfunction with abnormal voiding including urinary urgency, increased voiding frequency, nocturia, urinary incontinence, urinary retention, continence, detrusor dysynergia and/or pain may reflect a change in the balance of neuropeptides in central and peripheral bladder reflex pathways. LUT neuropeptide/receptor systems in LUT pathways may thus represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  11. Exploring the Sea Urchin Neuropeptide Landscape by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Eric B.; Annangudi, Suresh P.; Wadhams, Andinet A.; Richmond, Timothy A.; Yang, Ning; Southey, Bruce R.; Romanova, Elena V.; Schoofs, Liliane; Baggerman, Geert; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2018-04-01

    Neuropeptides are essential cell-to-cell signaling messengers and serve important regulatory roles in animals. Although remarkable progress has been made in peptide identification across the Metazoa, for some phyla such as Echinodermata, limited neuropeptides are known and even fewer have been verified on the protein level. We employed peptidomic approaches using bioinformatics and mass spectrometry (MS) to experimentally confirm 23 prohormones and to characterize a new prohormone in nervous system tissue from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, the purple sea urchin. Ninety-three distinct peptides from known and novel prohormones were detected with MS from extracts of the radial nerves, many of which are reported or experimentally confirmed here for the first time, representing a large-scale study of neuropeptides from the phylum Echinodermata. Many of the identified peptides and their precursor proteins have low homology to known prohormones from other species/phyla and are unique to the sea urchin. By pairing bioinformatics with MS, the capacity to characterize novel peptides and annotate prohormone genes is enhanced. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. [Modification of the FF neuropeptide enhances its hypertensive effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapel'ko, V I; Bespalova, Zh D; Efremov, E E; Lakomkin, V L; Orlova, Ts R; Lakomkin, S V; Sidorova, M V; Az'muko, A A; Molokoedov, A S; Sharf, T V

    2009-05-01

    Neuropeptide FF (H-Phe-Leu-Phe-Gln-Pro-Gln-Arg-Phe-NH2) injected intravenously temporarily enhanced the arterial pressure (AP) and the heart rate (HR). However, its role in the regulation of blood circulation is obscure. To study the properties of the molecule, its analogue was synthesized, in which proline in position 7 was substituted with glycine, and leucine in the position 2 with norleucine. Modified neuropeptide FF (FFm) also temporarily and in a dose-dependent manner increased the AP and HR; however, the equal degree of increase was reached at doses of FFm being 5-7 times lesser as compared with the natural peptide. The application of the FFm at hemorrhagic shock excluded mortality of animals during the experiment, considerably increased the degree of AP and HR restoration in the remaining experiments, and improved the survival of animals in 24 hours. It has been found that the level of antibodies to the fragment of hFF1 receptor in the serum is lower in spontaneously hypertensive rats SHR as compared with Wistar rats, but it is increased in patients of cardiological profile as compared with donors. The findings suggest involvement of neuropeptide FF in the regulation of blood circulation; however, the precise mechanisms remain to be determined.

  13. Neuropeptide Y and its involvement in chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz-delCastillo, Marta; Woldbye, David P D; Heegaard, Anne Marie

    2018-01-01

    Chronic pain is a serious condition that significantly impairs the quality of life, affecting an estimate of 1.5 billion people worldwide. Despite the physiological, emotional and financial burden of chronic pain, there is still a lack of efficient treatments. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a highly...... and Y2 receptors. Intrathecal administration of NPY in animal models of neuropathic, inflammatory or postoperative pain has been shown to cause analgesia, even though its exact mechanisms are still unclear. It remains to be seen whether these promising central antinociceptive effects of NPY can...... be transferred into a future treatment for chronic pain....

  14. A review of neuropeptide and neuroendocrine dysregulation in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailer, Ursula F; Kaye, Walter H

    2003-02-01

    Neuropeptides play an important role in the regulation of feeding behavior and obesity. The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve a complicated interplay between peripheral systems (including gustatory stimulation, gastrointestinal peptide secretion, and vagal afferent nerve responses) and central nervous system (CNS) neuropeptides and/or monoamines. These neuronal systems include neuropeptides (CRH, opioids, neuropeptide-Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY), vasopressin and oxytocin, CCK, and leptin) and monamines (serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine). In addition to regulating eating behavior, a number of CNS neuropeptides participate in the regulation of neuroendocrine pathways. Thus, clinical studies have evaluated the possibility that CNS neuropeptide alterations may contribute to dysregulated secretion of the gonadal hormones, cortisol, thyroid hormones and growth hormone in the eating disorders. Most of the neuroendocrine and neuropeptide alterations apparent during symptomatic episodes of AN and BN tend to normalize after recovery. This observation suggests that most of the disturbances are consequences rather than causes of malnutrition, weight loss and/or altered meal patterns. Still, an understanding of these neuropeptide disturbances may shed light on why many people with AN or BN cannot easily "reverse" their illness and even after weight gain and normalized eating patterns, many individuals who have recovered from AN or BN have physiological, behavioral and psychological symptoms that persist for extended periods of time.

  15. Combined gene overexpression of neuropeptide Y and its receptor Y5 in the hippocampus suppresses seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Casper René; Nikitidou, Litsa; Sørensen, Andreas Toft

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that recombinant adeno-associated viral vector-induced hippocampal overexpression of neuropeptide Y receptor, Y2, exerts a seizure-suppressant effect in kindling and kainate-induced models of epilepsy in rats. Interestingly, additional overexpression of neuropeptide Y...

  16. Genomics, transcriptomics, and peptidomics of neuropeptides and protein hormones in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Predel, Reinhard; Neupert, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides and protein hormones are ancient molecules that mediate cell-to-cell communication. The whole genome sequence from the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, along with those from other insect species, provides an opportunity to study the evolution of the genes encoding neuropeptide...

  17. Neuropeptide S mitigates spatial memory impairment induced by rapid eye movement sleep deprivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhengqing; Huang, Liuqing; Wu, Huijuan; Li, Yanpeng; Zhang, Lin; Yin, You; Xiang, Zhenghua; Zhao, Zhongxin

    2010-06-23

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation causes learning and memory deficits. Neuropeptide S, a newly discovered neuropeptide, has been shown to regulate arousal, anxiety, and may enhance long-term memory formation and spatial memory. However, it is unknown whether neuropeptide S could improve the REM sleep deprivation-induced memory impairment. Here, we report that 72-h REM sleep deprivation in rats resulted in spatial memory impairment and reduced phosphorylation level of cAMP-response element binding protein in the hippocampus, both of which were reversed by central administration of neuropeptide S. The results suggest that neuropeptide S mitigates spatial memory impairment in rats induced by 72-h REM sleep deprivation, possibly through activating cAMP-response element binding protein phosphorylation in the hippocampus.

  18. Genomics, transcriptomics, and peptidomics of Daphnia pulex neuropeptides and protein hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dircksen, Heinrich; Neupert, Susanne; Predel, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    We report 43 novel genes in the water flea Daphnia pulex encoding 73 predicted neuropeptide and protein hormones as partly confirmed by RT-PCR. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identified 40 neuropeptides by mass matches and 30 neuropeptides by fragmentation sequencing. Single genes encode adipokinetic...... hormone, allatostatin-A, allatostatin-B, allatotropin, Ala(7)-CCAP, CCHamide, Arg(7)-corazonin, DENamides, CRF-like (DH52) and calcitonin-like (DH31) diuretic hormones, two ecdysis-triggering hormones, two FIRFamides, one insulin, two alternative splice forms of ion transport peptide (ITP), myosuppressin......, neuroparsin, two neuropeptide-F splice forms, three periviscerokinins (but no pyrokinins), pigment dispersing hormone, proctolin, Met(4)-proctolin, short neuropeptide-F, three RYamides, SIFamide, two sulfakinins, and three tachykinins. There are two genes for a preprohormone containing orcomyotropin...

  19. G-protein coupling and signalling of Y1-like neuropeptide Y receptors in SK-N-MC cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feth, F.; Rascher, W.; Michel, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    We have studied [125I]neuropeptide Y-binding sites and neuropeptide Y-mediated second messenger responses in human SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells with special reference to the role of G-proteins. Neuropeptide Y stimulated two second messenger responses in SK-N-MC cells, inhibition of cAMP accumulation

  20. The neuropeptide transcriptome of a model echinoderm, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Matthew L; Elphick, Maurice R

    2012-12-01

    Neuronal secretion of peptide signaling molecules (neuropeptides) is an evolutionarily ancient feature of nervous systems. Here we report the identification of 20 cDNAs encoding putative neuropeptide precursors in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Phylum Echinodermata), providing new insights on the evolution and diversity of neuropeptides. Identification of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-like peptide precursor (SpGnRHP) is consistent with the widespread phylogenetic distribution of GnRH-type neuropeptides in the bilateria. A protein (SpTRHLP) comprising multiple copies of peptides that share structural similarity with thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is the first TRH-like precursor to be identified in an invertebrate. SpCTLP is the first calcitonin-like peptide with two N-terminally located cysteine residues to be found in a non-chordate species. Discovery of two proteins (SpPPLNP1, SpPPLNP2) comprising homologs of molluscan pedal peptides and arthropod orcokinins indicates the existence of a bilaterian family of pedal peptide/orcokinin-type neuropeptides. Other proteins identified contain peptides that do not share apparent sequence similarity with known neuropeptides. These include Spnp5, which comprises multiple copies of C-terminally amidated peptides that have an N-terminal Ala-Asn motif (AN peptides), and Spnp9, Spnp10 and Spnp12, which contain putative neuropeptides with a C-terminal Phe-amide, Ser-amide or Pro-amide, respectively. Several proteins (Spnp11, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20) contain putative neuropeptides with multiple cysteine residues (2, 6 or 8), which may mediate formation of intramolecular or intermolecular disulphide bridges. Looking ahead, the identification of these neuropeptide precursors in S. purpuratus has provided a strong basis for a comprehensive analysis of neuropeptide function in this model echinoderm species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of sensory neuropeptides on human cutaneous wound healing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chéret, J; Lebonvallet, N; Buhé, V; Carre, J L; Misery, L; Le Gall-Ianotto, C

    2014-06-01

    Close interactions exist between primary sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and skin cells. The PNS may be implicated in the modulation of different skin functions as wound healing. Study the influence of sensory neurons in human cutaneous wound healing. We incubated injured human skin explants either with rat primary sensory neurons from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or different neuropeptides (vasoactive intestinal peptide or VIP, calcitonin gene-related peptide or CGRP, substance P or SP) at various concentrations. Then we evaluated their effects on the proliferative and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling phases, dermal fibroblasts adhesion and differentiation into myofibroblasts. Thus, DRG and all studied neuromediators increased fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation and act on the expression ratio between collagen type I and type III in favor of collagen I, particularly between the 3rd and 7th day of culture. Furthermore, the enzymatic activities of matrix metalloprotesases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were increased in the first days of wound healing process. Finally, the adhesion of human dermal fibroblasts and their differentiation into myofibroblasts were promoted after incubation with neuromediators. Interestingly, the most potent concentrations for each tested molecules, were the lowest concentrations, corresponding to physiological concentrations. Sensory neurons and their derived-neuropeptides are able to promote skin wound healing. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuropeptides in brain: Effects of microwave irradiation and decapitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathe, A.A.; Stenfors, C.; Brodin, E.; Theodorsson, E.

    1990-01-01

    Substance P (SP)-, neurokinin A (NKA)- neurotensin (NT)-, neuropeptide Y (NPY)- and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-like immunoreactivity (LI) were measured and characterized by specific radioimmunoassays (RIA) and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in extracts of rat brain. Concentrations of SP-LI, NKA-LI and NT-LI in brains of decapitated animals were 59, 49 and 64 percent lower compared to those found in animals sacrificed by focused microwave irradiation (MW). In contrast, no difference in brain NPY-LI and VIP-LI levels was found between animals killed by MW and decapitation. HPLC chromatograms of SP-, NKA-, NT- and NPY-LI showed the same immunoreactive components in extracts of brains from both groups of animals. Thus, no additional immunoreactive components were formed by MW compared to those found after decapitation. The present findings may reflect an MW-induced inhibition of peptidase activity or, perhaps, a more efficient extraction of certain neuropeptides following MW treatment. The results imply that the traditional methods of sacrifice may result in the measurement of spuriously low tissue concentrations of some peptides, e.g. tachykinins, in brain

  3. Allatotropin: An Ancestral Myotropic Neuropeptide Involved in Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzugaray, María Eugenia; Adami, Mariana Laura; Diambra, Luis Anibal; Hernandez-Martinez, Salvador; Damborenea, Cristina; Noriega, Fernando Gabriel; Ronderos, Jorge Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell-cell interactions are a basic principle for the organization of tissues and organs allowing them to perform integrated functions and to organize themselves spatially and temporally. Peptidic molecules secreted by neurons and epithelial cells play fundamental roles in cell-cell interactions, acting as local neuromodulators, neurohormones, as well as endocrine and paracrine messengers. Allatotropin (AT) is a neuropeptide originally described as a regulator of Juvenile Hormone synthesis, which plays multiple neural, endocrine and myoactive roles in insects and other organisms. Methods A combination of immunohistochemistry using AT-antibodies and AT-Qdot nanocrystal conjugates was used to identify immunoreactive nerve cells containing the peptide and epithelial-muscular cells targeted by AT in Hydra plagiodesmica. Physiological assays using AT and AT- antibodies revealed that while AT stimulated the extrusion of the hypostome in a dose-response fashion in starved hydroids, the activity of hypostome in hydroids challenged with food was blocked by treatments with different doses of AT-antibodies. Conclusions AT antibodies immunolabeled nerve cells in the stalk, pedal disc, tentacles and hypostome. AT-Qdot conjugates recognized epithelial-muscular cell in the same tissues, suggesting the existence of anatomical and functional relationships between these two cell populations. Physiological assays indicated that the AT-like peptide is facilitating food ingestion. Significance Immunochemical, physiological and bioinformatics evidence advocates that AT is an ancestral neuropeptide involved in myoregulatory activities associated with meal ingestion and digestion. PMID:24143240

  4. Neuropeptide FF receptors as novel targets for limbic seizure attenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelli, Jeanelle; Meurs, Alfred; Bihel, Frederic; Hammoud, Hassan; Schmitt, Martine; De Kock, Joery; Utard, Valerie; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Bertin, Isabelle; Buffel, Ine; Coppens, Jessica; Tourwe, Dirk; Maes, Veronique; De Prins, An; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Massie, Ann; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Boon, Paul; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frederic; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well established anticonvulsant and first-in-class antiepileptic neuropeptide. In this study, the controversial role of NPY1 receptors in epilepsy was reassessed by testing two highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands and a mixed NPY1/NPFF receptor antagonist BIBP3226 in a rat model for limbic seizures. While BIBP3226 significantly attenuated the pilocarpine-induced seizures, neither of the highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands altered the seizure severity. Administration of the NPFF1/NPFF2 receptor antagonist RF9 also significantly attenuated limbic seizure activity. To further prove the involvement of NPFF receptors in these seizure-modulating effects, low and high affinity antagonists for the NPFF receptors were tested. We observed that the low affinity ligand failed to exhibit anticonvulsant properties while the two high affinity ligands significantly attenuated the seizures. Continuous NPFF1 receptor agonist administration also inhibited limbic seizures whereas bolus administration of the NPFF1 receptor agonist was without effect. This suggests that continuous agonist perfusion could result in NPFF1 receptor desensitization and mimic NPFF1 receptor antagonist administration. Our data unveil for the first time the involvement of the NPFF system in the management of limbic seizures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Allatotropin: an ancestral myotropic neuropeptide involved in feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Alzugaray

    Full Text Available Cell-cell interactions are a basic principle for the organization of tissues and organs allowing them to perform integrated functions and to organize themselves spatially and temporally. Peptidic molecules secreted by neurons and epithelial cells play fundamental roles in cell-cell interactions, acting as local neuromodulators, neurohormones, as well as endocrine and paracrine messengers. Allatotropin (AT is a neuropeptide originally described as a regulator of Juvenile Hormone synthesis, which plays multiple neural, endocrine and myoactive roles in insects and other organisms.A combination of immunohistochemistry using AT-antibodies and AT-Qdot nanocrystal conjugates was used to identify immunoreactive nerve cells containing the peptide and epithelial-muscular cells targeted by AT in Hydra plagiodesmica. Physiological assays using AT and AT- antibodies revealed that while AT stimulated the extrusion of the hypostome in a dose-response fashion in starved hydroids, the activity of hypostome in hydroids challenged with food was blocked by treatments with different doses of AT-antibodies.AT antibodies immunolabeled nerve cells in the stalk, pedal disc, tentacles and hypostome. AT-Qdot conjugates recognized epithelial-muscular cell in the same tissues, suggesting the existence of anatomical and functional relationships between these two cell populations. Physiological assays indicated that the AT-like peptide is facilitating food ingestion.Immunochemical, physiological and bioinformatics evidence advocates that AT is an ancestral neuropeptide involved in myoregulatory activities associated with meal ingestion and digestion.

  6. Neuropeptides Modulate Female Chemosensory Processing upon Mating in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashiq Hussain

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A female's reproductive state influences her perception of odors and tastes along with her changed behavioral state and physiological needs. The mechanism that modulates chemosensory processing, however, remains largely elusive. Using Drosophila, we have identified a behavioral, neuronal, and genetic mechanism that adapts the senses of smell and taste, the major modalities for food quality perception, to the physiological needs of a gravid female. Pungent smelling polyamines, such as putrescine and spermidine, are essential for cell proliferation, reproduction, and embryonic development in all animals. A polyamine-rich diet increases reproductive success in many species, including flies. Using a combination of behavioral analysis and in vivo physiology, we show that polyamine attraction is modulated in gravid females through a G-protein coupled receptor, the sex peptide receptor (SPR, and its neuropeptide ligands, MIPs (myoinhibitory peptides, which act directly in the polyamine-detecting olfactory and taste neurons. This modulation is triggered by an increase of SPR expression in chemosensory neurons, which is sufficient to convert virgin to mated female olfactory choice behavior. Together, our data show that neuropeptide-mediated modulation of peripheral chemosensory neurons increases a gravid female's preference for important nutrients, thereby ensuring optimal conditions for her growing progeny.

  7. Vasoactive neuropeptides in clinical ophthalmology: An association with autoimmune retinopathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R Staines

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Donald R Staines1,2, Ekua W Brenu2, Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik21Queensland Health, Gold Coast Population Health Unit, Southport, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia; 2Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Population Health and Neuroimmunology Unit, Bond University, Robina, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: The mammalian eye is protected against pathogens and inflammation in a relatively immune-privileged environment. Stringent mechanisms are activated that regulate external injury, infection, and autoimmunity. The eye contains a variety of cells expressing vasoactive neuropeptides (VNs, and their receptors, located in the sclera, cornea, iris, ciliary body, ciliary process, and the retina. VNs are important activators of adenylate cyclase, deriving cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP from adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Impairment of VN function would arguably impede cAMP production and impede utilization of ATP. Thus VN autoimmunity may be an etiological factor in retinopathy involving perturbations of purinergic signaling. A sound blood supply is necessary for the existence and functional properties of the retina. This paper postulates that impairments in the endothelial barriers and the blood–retinal barrier, as well as certain inflammatory responses, may arise from disruption to VN function. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors and purinergic modulators may have a role in the treatment of postulated VN autoimmune retinopathy.Keywords: retinopathy, autoimmune, vasoactive neuropeptides, phosphodiesterase inhibitors

  8. C. elegans Stress-Induced Sleep Emerges from the Collective Action of Multiple Neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Ravi D; Chow, Elly S; Wang, Han; Schwarz, Erich M; Sternberg, Paul W

    2016-09-26

    The genetic basis of sleep regulation remains poorly understood. In C. elegans, cellular stress induces sleep through epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent activation of the EGF receptor in the ALA neuron. The downstream mechanism by which this neuron promotes sleep is unknown. Single-cell RNA sequencing of ALA reveals that the most highly expressed, ALA-enriched genes encode neuropeptides. Here we have systematically investigated the four most highly enriched neuropeptides: flp-7, nlp-8, flp-24, and flp-13. When individually removed by null mutation, these peptides had little or no effect on stress-induced sleep. However, stress-induced sleep was abolished in nlp-8; flp-24; flp-13 triple-mutant animals, indicating that these neuropeptides work collectively in controlling stress-induced sleep. We tested the effect of overexpression of these neuropeptide genes on five behaviors modulated during sleep-pharyngeal pumping, defecation, locomotion, head movement, and avoidance response to an aversive stimulus-and we found that, if individually overexpressed, each of three neuropeptides (nlp-8, flp-24, or flp-13) induced a different suite of sleep-associated behaviors. These overexpression results raise the possibility that individual components of sleep might be specified by individual neuropeptides or combinations of neuropeptides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Neuropeptides and Mechanical Loading on Bone Cell Resorption in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong-Min Yoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides such as vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP are present in nerve fibers of bone tissues and have been suggested to potentially regulate bone remodeling. Oscillatory fluid flow (OFF-induced shear stress is a potent signal in mechanotransduction that is capable of regulating both anabolic and catabolic bone remodeling. However, the interaction between neuropeptides and mechanical induction in bone remodeling is poorly understood. In this study, we attempted to quantify the effects of combined neuropeptides and mechanical stimuli on mRNA and protein expression related to bone resorption. Neuropeptides (VIP or CGRP and/or OFF-induced shear stress were applied to MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells and changes in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB ligand (RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG mRNA and protein levels were quantified. Neuropeptides and OFF-induced shear stress similarly decreased RANKL and increased OPG levels compared to control. Changes were not further enhanced with combined neuropeptides and OFF-induced shear stress. These results suggest that neuropeptides CGRP and VIP have an important role in suppressing bone resorptive activities through RANKL/OPG pathway, similar to mechanical loading.

  10. Innate immune properties of selected human neuropeptides against Moraxella catarrhalis and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustyniak Daria

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerable evidence supports the concept of active communication between the nervous and immune systems. One class of such communicators are the neuropeptides (NPs. Recent reports have highlighted the antimicrobial activity of neuropeptides, placing them among the integral components of innate immune defense. This study examined the action of four human neuropeptides: calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, neuropeptide Y (NPY, substance P (SP and somatostatin (SOM, which are accessible in the upper respiratory tract, against two human-specific respiratory pathogens. We studied: (i neuropeptide-mediated direct antibacterial activity exerted against Moraxella catarrhalis and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, and (ii indirect immunomodulatory role of these neuropeptides in the neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis of indicated pathogens. Results We found that 100 micromolar concentrations of CGRP, NPY, SP, and SOM effectively permeabilized bacterial membranes and showed (except SOM bactericidal activity against both pathogens. SOM acted only bacteriostatically. However the killing efficacy was dependent on the bactericidal assay used. The rank order of killing NP effect was: NPY ≥ CGRP > SP >> SOM and correlated with their potency to permeabilize bacterial membranes. The killing and permeabilization activity of the analyzed NPs showed significant correlation with several physicochemical properties and amino acid composition of the neuropeptides. M. catarrhalis was more sensitive to neuropeptides than nontypeable H. influenzae. The immunomodulatory bimodal effect of physiological concentrations of CGRP, NPY, and SP on the phagocytic function of human neutrophils against M. catarrhalis and H. influenzae was observed both in the ingestion (pathogen uptake and reactive oxygen species generation stages. This effect was also dependent on the distinct type of pathogen recognition (opsonic versus nonopsonic. Conclusions The present

  11. More than two decades of research on insect neuropeptide GPCRs: an overview

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    Jelle eCaers

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the state of the art on neuropeptide receptors in insects. Most of these receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and are involved in the regulation of virtually all physiological processes during an insect’s life. More than twenty years ago a milestone in invertebrate endocrinology was achieved with the characterization of the first insect neuropeptide receptor, i.e. the Drosophila tachykinin-like receptor. However, it took until the release of the Drosophila genome in 2000 that research on neuropeptide receptors boosted. In the last decade a plethora of genomic information of other insect species also became available, leading to a better insight in the functions and evolution of the neuropeptide signaling systems and their intracellular pathways. It became clear that some of these systems are conserved among all insect species, indicating that they fulfill crucial roles in their physiological processes. Meanwhile, other signaling systems seem to be lost in several insect orders or species, suggesting that their actions were superfluous in those insects, or that other neuropeptides have taken over their functions. It is striking that the deorphanization of neuropeptide GPCRs gets much attention, but the subsequent unraveling of the intracellular pathways they elicit, or their physiological functions are often hardly examined. Especially in insects besides Drosophila this information is scarce if not absent. And although great progress made in characterizing neuropeptide signaling systems, even in Drosophila several predicted neuropeptide receptors remain orphan, awaiting for their endogenous ligand to be determined. The present review gives a précis of the insect neuropeptide receptor research of the last two decades. But it has to be emphasized that the work done so far is only the tip of the iceberg and our comprehensive understanding of these important signaling systems will still increase substantially in

  12. Neuropeptide y promotes neurogenesis in murine subventricular zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agasse, Fabienne; Bernardino, Liliana; Kristiansen, Heidi

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells of the subventricular zone (SVZ) represent a reliable source of neurons for cell replacement. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) promotes neurogenesis in the hippocampal subgranular layer and the olfactory epithelium and may be useful for the stimulation of SVZ dynamic in brain repair purposes. We...... describe that NPY promotes SVZ neurogenesis. NPY (1 microM) treatments increased proliferation at 48 hours and neuronal differentiation at 7 days in SVZ cell cultures. NPY proneurogenic properties are mediated via the Y1 receptor. Accordingly, Y1 receptor is a major active NPY receptor in the mouse SVZ......-Jun-NH(2)-terminal kinase signal in growing axons, consistent with axonogenesis. NPY, as a promoter of SVZ neurogenesis, is a crucial factor for future development of cell-based brain therapy. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article....

  13. Neuropeptide Y inhibits hippocampal seizures and wet dog shakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldbye, D P; Madsen, T M; Larsen, P J

    1996-01-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular neuropeptide Y (NPY) or somatostatin were studied upon hippocampal EEG seizures elicited by electrical stimulation of the rat dentate gyrus or subiculum. At doses of 6 and 12 nmol, the latter dose being more effective, NPY reduced the primary afterdischarge...... effects in the dentate gyrus and subiculum, but also in areas to which epileptiform EEG activity spreads before reverberating. In addition, NPY strongly reduced seizure-related 'wet dog shakes' (WDS). This is consistent with previous studies showing that the dentate gyrus is essential for the generation...... of WDS. However, NPY inhibited WDS even when 1.ADDs were evoked which did not differ from those of vehicle rats, indicating extra-dentate inhibition by NPY as well. No effects were seen with somatostatin. These results show that NPY exerts antiepileptiform effects in vivo, suggesting that increased NPY...

  14. Diversity and abundance: the basic properties of neuropeptide action in molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Tibor

    2011-05-15

    Neuropeptides, the most diverse group of signaling molecules, are responsible for regulating a variety of cellular and behavioral processes in all vertebrate and invertebrate animals. The role played by peptide signals in information processing is fundamentally different from that of conventional neurotransmitters. Neuropeptides may act as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators and are released at either synaptic or non-synaptic sites. Peptide signals control developmental processes, drive specific behaviors or contribute to the mechanisms of learning and memory storage. Co-transmission within or across peptide families, and between peptide and non-peptide signaling molecules, is common; this ensures the great versatility of their action. How these tasks are fulfilled when multiple neuropeptides are released has become an important topic for peptide research. Although our knowledge concerning the physiological and behavioral roles of most of the neuropeptides isolated from molluscs is incomplete, this article provides examples to address the complexity of peptide signaling. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Localization of neuropeptide gene expression in larvae of an echinoderm, the starfish Asterias rubens

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    Tatiana D Mayorova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides are an ancient class of neuronal signaling molecules that regulate a variety of physiological and behavioral processes in animals. The life cycle of many animals includes a larval stage(s that precedes metamorphic transition to a reproductively active adult stage but, with the exception of Drosophila melanogaster and other insects, research on neuropeptide signaling has hitherto largely focused on adult animals. However, recent advances in genome/transcriptome sequencing have facilitated investigation of neuropeptide expression/function in the larvae of protostomian (e.g. the annelid Platynereis dumerilii and deuterostomian (e.g. the urochordate Ciona intestinalis invertebrates. Accordingly, here we report the first multi-gene investigation of larval neuropeptide precursor expression in a species belonging to the phylum Echinodermata - the starfish Asterias rubens. Whole-mount mRNA in situ hybridization was used to visualize in bipinnaria and brachiolaria stage larvae the expression of eight neuropeptide precursors: L-type SALMFamide (S1, F-type SALMFamide (S2, vasopressin/oxytocin-type, NGFFYamide, thyrotropin-releasing hormone-type, gonadotropin-releasing hormone-type, calcitonin-type and corticotropin-releasing hormone-type. Expression of only three of the precursors (S1, S2, NGFFYamide was observed in bipinnaria larvae but by the brachiolaria stage expression of all eight precursors was detected. An evolutionarily conserved feature of larval nervous systems is the apical organ and in starfish larvae this comprises the bilaterally symmetrical lateral ganglia, but only the S1 and S2 precursors were found to be expressed in these ganglia. A prominent feature of brachiolaria larvae is the attachment complex, comprising the brachia and adhesive disk, which mediates larval attachment to a substratum prior to metamorphosis. Interestingly, all of the neuropeptide precursors examined here are expressed in the attachment complex, with

  16. Localization of Neuropeptide Gene Expression in Larvae of an Echinoderm, the Starfish Asterias rubens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorova, Tatiana D; Tian, Shi; Cai, Weigang; Semmens, Dean C; Odekunle, Esther A; Zandawala, Meet; Badi, Yusef; Rowe, Matthew L; Egertová, Michaela; Elphick, Maurice R

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides are an ancient class of neuronal signaling molecules that regulate a variety of physiological and behavioral processes in animals. The life cycle of many animals includes a larval stage(s) that precedes metamorphic transition to a reproductively active adult stage but, with the exception of Drosophila melanogaster and other insects, research on neuropeptide signaling has hitherto largely focused on adult animals. However, recent advances in genome/transcriptome sequencing have facilitated investigation of neuropeptide expression/function in the larvae of protostomian (e.g., the annelid Platynereis dumerilii ) and deuterostomian (e.g., the urochordate Ciona intestinalis ) invertebrates. Accordingly, here we report the first multi-gene investigation of larval neuropeptide precursor expression in a species belonging to the phylum Echinodermata-the starfish Asterias rubens . Whole-mount mRNA in situ hybridization was used to visualize in bipinnaria and brachiolaria stage larvae the expression of eight neuropeptide precursors: L-type SALMFamide (S1), F-type SALMFamide (S2), vasopressin/oxytocin-type, NGFFYamide, thyrotropin-releasing hormone-type, gonadotropin-releasing hormone-type, calcitonin-type and corticotropin-releasing hormone-type. Expression of only three of the precursors (S1, S2, NGFFYamide) was observed in bipinnaria larvae but by the brachiolaria stage expression of all eight precursors was detected. An evolutionarily conserved feature of larval nervous systems is the apical organ and in starfish larvae this comprises the bilaterally symmetrical lateral ganglia, but only the S1 and S2 precursors were found to be expressed in these ganglia. A prominent feature of brachiolaria larvae is the attachment complex, comprising the brachia and adhesive disk, which mediates larval attachment to a substratum prior to metamorphosis. Interestingly, all of the neuropeptide precursors examined here are expressed in the attachment complex, with distinctive

  17. Genomics and peptidomics of neuropeptides and protein hormones present in the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Frank; Neupert, Susanne; Williamson, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptides and protein hormones constitute a very important group of signaling molecules, regulating central physiological processes such as reproduction, development, and behavior. Using a bioinformatics approach, we screened the recently sequenced genome of the parasitic wasp, Nasonia vitrip...... melanogaster, Aedes aegypti (both Diptera), Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera), Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera), Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera), and Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera). This lower number of neuropeptide genes might be related to Nasonia's parasitic life....

  18. Prevention of Stress-Impaired Fear Extinction Through Neuropeptide S Action in the Lateral Amygdala

    OpenAIRE

    Chauveau, Frédéric; Lange, Maren Denise; Jüngling, Kay; Lesting, Jörg; Seidenbecher, Thomas; Pape, Hans-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Stressful and traumatic events can create aversive memories, which are a predisposing factor for anxiety disorders. The amygdala is critical for transforming such stressful events into anxiety, and the recently discovered neuropeptide S transmitter system represents a promising candidate apt to control these interactions. Here we test the hypothesis that neuropeptide S can regulate stress-induced hyperexcitability in the amygdala, and thereby can interact with stress-induced alterations of fe...

  19. Interaction of Mimetic Analogs of Insect Kinin Neuropeptides with Arthropod Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    insect excretory system . J Exp Biol 1981; 90:1‑15. 61. O’Donnell MJ, Maddrell SHP. Paracellular and transcellular routes for water and solute...U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2881 F/B Road, College Station, Texas, USA. Email: nachman@tamu.edu Neuropeptide Systems as Targets for Parasite and...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 28 Neuropeptide Systems as Targets for Parasite and Pest Control Unfortunately, insect kinin peptides are unsuitable

  20. Neuropeptide Y in Alcohol Addiction and Affective Disorders

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    Annika Thorsell

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide Y (NPY, a neuropeptide highly conserved throughout evolution, is present at high levels in the central nervous system (CNS, as well as in peripheral tissues such as the gut and cardiovascular system. The peptide exerts its effects via multiple receptor subtypes, all belonging to the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Of these subtypes, the Y1 and the Y2 are the most thoroughly characterized, followed by the Y5 subtype. NPY and its receptors have been shown to be of importance in central regulation of events underlying, for example, affective disorders, drug/alcohol use disorders, and energy homeostasis. Furthermore, within the CNS, NPY also affects sleep regulation and circadian rhythm, memory function, tissue growth, and plasticity. The potential roles of NPY in the etiology and pathophysiology of mood and anxiety disorders, as well as alcohol use disorders, have been extensively studied. This focus was prompted by early indications for an involvement of NPY in acute responses to stress, and, later, also data pointing to a role in alterations within the CNS during chronic, or repeated, exposure to adverse events. These functions of NPY, in addition to the peptide’s regulation of disease states, suggest that modulation of the activity of the NPY system via receptor agonists/antagonists may be a putative treatment mechanism in affective disorders as well as alcohol use disorders. In this review, we present an overview of findings with regard to the NPY system in relation to anxiety and stress, acute as well as chronic; furthermore we discuss post-traumatic stress disorder and, in part depression. In addition, we summarize findings on alcohol use disorders and related behaviors. Finally, we briefly touch upon genetic as well as epigenetic mechanisms that may be of importance for NPY function and regulation. In conclusion, we suggest that modulation of NPY-ergic activity within the CNS, via ligands aimed at different receptor

  1. Neuropeptide Y system in the retina: From localization to function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Carvalho, Ana; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2015-07-01

    The retina is a highly complex structure where several types of cells communicate through countless different molecules to codify visual information. Each type of cells plays unique roles in the retina, presenting a singular expression of neurotransmitters. Some neurotransmitter systems in the retina are well understood, while others need to be better explored to unravel the intricate signaling system involved. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a 36 amino acid peptide, is one of the most common peptide neurotransmitter in the CNS and a highly conserved peptide among species. We review the localization of NPY and NPY receptors (mainly NPY Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5) in retinal cells. Common features of the expression of NPY and NPY receptors in mammalian and non-mammalian species indicate universal roles of this system in the retina. In the present review, we highlight the putative roles of NPY receptor activation in the retina, discussing, in particular, their involvement in retinal development, neurotransmitter release modulation, neuroprotection, microglia and Muller cells function, retinal pigmented epithelium changes, retinal endothelial physiology and proliferation of retinal progenitor cells. Further studies are needed to confirm that targeting the NPY system might be a potential therapeutic strategy for retinal degenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuropeptides as endogenous neuronal growth regulatory factors on serotonergic maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila-Garcia, M.I.

    1989-01-01

    Products of the proopiomelanocortin molecule as well as leu- and met-enkephalin were tested for their effects on serotonergic neuronal maturation. High affinity uptake of ({sup 3}H)5-HT and morphometrics using immunocytochemistry specific for serotonergic neurons were used to monitor neuronal maturation. Cultured brainstem raphe neurons from 14 day fetuses, in the presence or absence of target tissue, were administered neuropeptides at various concentrations for 1,3 or 5 days in culture. ACTH peptides stimulate neurite length and, with the endorphins, the expression of ({sup 3}H)5-HT uptake by serotonergic fetal neurons cultured alone but had no effect when these neurons were cocultured with hippocampal target cells. A daily dose of leu-enkephalin to these cells inhibited neuronal uptake after 5 days of exposure and decreased neurite cell length in 24 hr cultures. In contrast, a single dose of leu-enkephalin at plating stimulated uptake after 5 days while co-administration of bacitracin inhibited uptake expression. Naloxone reversed the opioid effect and stimulated uptake when administered alone. Desulfated-CCK, which resembles leu-enkephalin, was equally potent as leu-enkephalin in inhibiting uptake.

  3. Plasma neuropeptide Y levels differ in distinct diabetic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Aysegül; Rasul, Sazan; Dimitrov, Alexander; Handisurya, Ammon; Gartner, Wolfgang; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Wagner, Ludwig; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Base, Wolfgang

    2010-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an important hormone in appetite regulation. Although the contribution of NPY to metabolic disease has been previously demonstrated, there are only a few reports addressing NPY plasma levels under distinct diabetic conditions. In this study we evaluated NPY plasma levels in diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) patients with (n=34) and without (n=34) diabetic polyneuropathy (PNP) and compared these with age and gender matched healthy controls (n=34). We also analyzed NPY plasma levels in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) patients with age and pregnancy-week matched controls with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). NPY concentration was determined using a commercially available radioimmunoassay kit. In addition, metabolic parameters of DM2 and GDM patients were recorded. One-way ANOVA tests with appropriate post hoc corrections showed elevated levels of NPY in DM2 patients with and without PNP when compared with those of healthy controls (122.32±40.86 and 117.33±29.92 vs. 84.65±52.17 pmol/L; pwomen with NGT (74.87±14.36 vs. 84.82±51.13 pmol/L, respectively). Notably, the NPY concentration correlated positively with insulin levels in DM2 patients (R=0.35, pDM2 pathology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Platelet neuropeptide Y is critical for ischemic revascularization in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilan, Jason U; Everhart, Lindsay M; Abe, Ken; Kuo-Bonde, Lydia; Chalothorn, Dan; Kitlinska, Joanna; Burnett, Mary Susan; Epstein, Stephen E; Faber, James E; Zukowska, Zofia

    2013-06-01

    We previously reported that the sympathetic neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y (NPY) is potently angiogenic, primarily through its Y2 receptor, and that endogenous NPY is crucial for capillary angiogenesis in rodent hindlimb ischemia. Here we sought to identify the source of NPY responsible for revascularization and its mechanisms of action. At d 3, NPY(-/-) mice demonstrated delayed recovery of blood flow and limb function, consistent with impaired collateral conductance, while ischemic capillary angiogenesis was reduced (~70%) at d 14. This biphasic temporal response was confirmed by 2 peaks of NPY activation in rats: a transient early increase in neuronally derived plasma NPY and increase in platelet NPY during late-phase recovery. Compared to NPY-null platelets, collagen-activated NPY-rich platelets were more mitogenic (~2-fold vs. ~1.6-fold increase) for human microvascular endothelial cells, and Y2/Y5 receptor antagonists ablated this difference in proliferation. In NPY(+/+) mice, ischemic angiogenesis was prevented by platelet depletion and then restored by transfusion of platelets from NPY(+/+) mice, but not NPY(-/-) mice. In thrombocytopenic NPY(-/-) mice, transfusion of wild-type platelets fully restored ischemia-induced angiogenesis. These findings suggest that neuronally derived NPY accelerates the early response to femoral artery ligation by promoting collateral conductance, while platelet-derived NPY is critical for sustained capillary angiogenesis.

  5. Mast cell subsets and neuropeptides in leprosy reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes Sérgio Luiz Gomes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The immunohistochemical identification of neuropeptides (calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, substance P, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone and gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone quantification of mast cells and their subsets (tryptase/chymase-immunoreactive mast cells = TCMC and tryptase-immunoreactive mast cells = TMC were determined in biopsies of six patients with leprosy reactions (three patients with type I reaction and three with type II. Biopsies were compared with those taken from the same body site in the remission stage of the same patient. We found a relative increase of TMC in the inflammatory infiltrate of the reactional biopsies compared to the post-reactional biopsy. Also, the total number of mast cells and the TMC/TCMC ratio in the inflammatory infiltrate was significantly higher than in the intervening dermis of the biopsies of both periods. No significant difference was found regarding neuroptide expression in the reactional and post-reactional biopsies. The relative increase of TMC in the reactional infiltrates could implicate this mast cell subset in the reported increase of the immune response in leprosy reactions.

  6. Discovery of Novel Proline-Based Neuropeptide FF Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy; Decker, Ann M; Langston, Tiffany L; Mathews, Kelly M; Siemian, Justin N; Li, Jun-Xu; Harris, Danni L; Runyon, Scott P; Zhang, Yanan

    2017-10-18

    The neuropeptide FF (NPFF) system has been implicated in a number of physiological processes including modulating the pharmacological activity of opioid analgesics and several other classes of drugs of abuse. In this study, we report the discovery of a novel proline scaffold with antagonistic activity at the NPFF receptors through a high throughput screening campaign using a functional calcium mobilization assay. Focused structure-activity relationship studies on the initial hit 1 have resulted in several analogs with calcium mobilization potencies in the submicromolar range and modest selectivity for the NPFF1 receptor. Affinities and potencies of these compounds were confirmed in radioligand binding and functional cAMP assays. Two compounds, 16 and 33, had good solubility and blood-brain barrier permeability that fall within the range of CNS permeant candidates without the liability of being a P-glycoprotein substrate. Finally, both compounds reversed fentanyl-induced hyperalgesia in rats when administered intraperitoneally. Together, these results point to the potential of these proline analogs as promising NPFF receptor antagonists.

  7. The hypothalamic neuropeptide FF network is impaired in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharuk, Valeri D; Buijs, Ruud M; Jhamandas, Jack H; Swaab, Dick F

    2014-07-01

    The human hypothalamus contains the neuropeptide FF (NPFF) neurochemical network. Animal experiments demonstrated that NPFF is implicated in the central cardiovascular regulation. We therefore studied expression of this peptide in the hypothalamus of individuals who suffered from essential hypertension (n = 8) and died suddenly due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and compared to that of healthy individuals (controls) (n = 6) who died abruptly due to mechanical trauma of the chest. The frozen right part of the hypothalamus was cut coronally into serial sections of 20 μm thickness, and each tenth section was stained immunohistochemically using antibody against NPFF. The central section through each hypothalamic nucleus was characterized by the highest intensity of NPFF immunostaining and thus was chosen for quantitative densitometry. In hypertensive patients, the area occupied by NPFF immunostained neuronal elements in the central sections through the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh), paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (Pa), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST), perinuclear zone (PNZ) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), dorso- (DMH), ventromedial (VMH) nuclei, and perifornical nucleus (PeF) was dramatically decreased compared to controls, ranging about six times less in the VMH to 15 times less in the central part of the BST (BSTC). The NPFF innervation of both nonstained neuronal profiles and microvasculature was extremely poor in hypertensive patients compared to control. The decreased NPFF expression in the hypothalamus of hypertensive patients might be a cause of impairment of its interaction with other neurochemical systems, and thereby might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  8. Microbial symbionts accelerate wound healing via the neuropeptide hormone oxytocin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theofilos Poutahidis

    Full Text Available Wound healing capability is inextricably linked with diverse aspects of physical fitness ranging from recovery after minor injuries and surgery to diabetes and some types of cancer. Impact of the microbiome upon the mammalian wound healing process is poorly understood. We discover that supplementing the gut microbiome with lactic acid microbes in drinking water accelerates the wound-healing process to occur in half the time required for matched control animals. Further, we find that Lactobacillus reuteri enhances wound-healing properties through up-regulation of the neuropeptide hormone oxytocin, a factor integral in social bonding and reproduction, by a vagus nerve-mediated pathway. Bacteria-triggered oxytocin serves to activate host CD4+Foxp3+CD25+ immune T regulatory cells conveying transplantable wound healing capacity to naive Rag2-deficient animals. This study determined oxytocin to be a novel component of a multi-directional gut microbe-brain-immune axis, with wound-healing capability as a previously unrecognized output of this axis. We also provide experimental evidence to support long-standing medical traditions associating diet, social practices, and the immune system with efficient recovery after injury, sustained good health, and longevity.

  9. The effect of tachykinin neuropeptides on amyloid {beta} aggregation

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    Flashner, Efrat [The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Raviv, Uri, E-mail: raviv@chem.ch.huji.ac.il [The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Friedler, Assaf, E-mail: assaf@chem.ch.huji.ac.il [The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Mechanistic explanation of how tachykinin neuropeptides reduce A{beta}-induced neurotoxicity. {yields} Biophysical studies suggest that tachykinins do not modulate the distribution of A{beta} oligomeric states, but rather may incorporate into the fibrils. {yields} A possible strategy to inhibit toxicity of amyloid fibrils. -- Abstract: A hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is production of amyloid {beta} peptides resulting from aberrant cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. Amyloid {beta} assembles into fibrils under physiological conditions, through formation of neurotoxic intermediate oligomers. Tachykinin peptides are known to affect amyloid {beta} neurotoxicity in cells. To understand the mechanism of this effect, we studied how tachykinins affect A{beta}(1-40) aggregation in vitro. Fibrils grown in the presence of tachykinins exhibited reduced thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, while their morphology, observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), did not alter. Cross linking studies revealed that the distribution of low molecular weight species was not affected by tachykinins. Our results suggest that there may be a specific interaction between tachykinins and A{beta}(1-40) that allows them to co-assemble. This effect may explain the reduction of A{beta}(1-40) neurotoxicity in cells treated with tachykinins.

  10. A Randomized Dose-Ranging Study of Neuropeptide Y in Patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Sehrish; Van Dam, Nicholas T; Horn, Sarah R; Kautz, Marin M; Parides, Michael; Costi, Sara; Collins, Katherine A; Iacoviello, Brian; Iosifescu, Dan V; Mathé, Aleksander A; Southwick, Steven M; Feder, Adriana; Charney, Dennis S; Murrough, James W

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety and trauma-related disorders are among the most prevalent and disabling medical conditions in the United States, and posttraumatic stress disorder in particular exacts a tremendous public health toll. We examined the tolerability and anxiolytic efficacy of neuropeptide Y administered via an intranasal route in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder. Twenty-six individuals were randomized in a cross-over, single ascending dose study into 1 of 5 cohorts: 1.4 mg (n=3), 2.8 mg (n=6), 4.6 mg (n=5), 6.8 mg (n=6), and 9.6 mg (n=6). Each individual was dosed with neuropeptide Y or placebo on separate treatment days 1 week apart in random order under double-blind conditions. Assessments were conducted at baseline and following a trauma script symptom provocation procedure subsequent to dosing. Occurrence of adverse events represented the primary tolerability outcome. The difference between treatment conditions on anxiety as measured by the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory immediately following the trauma script represented efficacy outcomes. Twenty-four individuals completed both treatment days. Neuropeptide Y was well tolerated up to and including the highest dose. There was a significant interaction between treatment and dose; higher doses of neuropeptide Y were associated with a greater treatment effect, favoring neuropeptide Y over placebo on Beck Anxiety Inventory score (F1,20=4.95, P=.038). There was no significant interaction for State-Trait Anxiety Inventory score. Our study suggests that a single dose of neuropeptide Y is well tolerated up to 9.6 mg and may be associated with anxiolytic effects. Future studies exploring the safety and efficacy of neuropeptide Y in stress-related disorders are warranted. The reported study is registered at: http://clinicaltrials.gov (ID: NCT01533519). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  11. Role of sympathetic nervous system and neuropeptides in obesity hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Hall

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is the most common cause of human essential hypertension in most industrialized countries. Although the precise mechanisms of obesity hypertension are not fully understood, considerable evidence suggests that excess renal sodium reabsorption and a hypertensive shift of pressure natriuresis play a major role. Sympathetic activation appears to mediate at least part of the obesity-induced sodium retention and hypertension since adrenergic blockade or renal denervation markedly attenuates these changes. Recent observations suggest that leptin and its multiple interactions with neuropeptides in the hypothalamus may link excess weight gain with increased sympathetic activity. Leptin is produced mainly in adipocytes and is believed to regulate energy balance by acting on the hypothalamus to reduce food intake and to increase energy expenditure via sympathetic activation. Short-term administration of leptin into the cerebral ventricles increases renal sympathetic activity, and long-term leptin infusion at rates that mimic plasma concentrations found in obesity raises arterial pressure and heart rate via adrenergic activation in non-obese rodents. Transgenic mice overexpressing leptin also develop hypertension. Acute studies suggest that the renal sympathetic effects of leptin may depend on interactions with other neurochemical pathways in the hypothalamus, including the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R. However, the role of this pathway in mediating the long-term effects of leptin on blood pressure is unclear. Also, it is uncertain whether there is resistance to the chronic renal sympathetic and blood pressure effects of leptin in obese subjects. In addition, leptin also has other cardiovascular and renal actions, such as stimulation of nitric oxide formation and improvement of insulin sensitivity, which may tend to reduce blood pressure in some conditions. Although the role of these mechanisms in human obesity has not been elucidated, this

  12. Neuropeptide Y and neurovascular control in skeletal muscle and skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Gary J.; Jackson, Dwayne N.; Mattar, Louis; Johnson, John M.; Shoemaker, J. Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a ubiquitous peptide with multiple effects on energy metabolism, reproduction, neurogenesis, and emotion. In addition, NPY is an important sympathetic neurotransmitter involved in neurovascular regulation. Although early studies suggested that the vasoactive effects of NPY were limited to periods of high stress, there is growing evidence for the involvement of NPY on baseline vasomotor tone and sympathetically evoked vasoconstriction in vivo in both skeletal muscle and the cutaneous circulation. In Sprague-Dawley rat skeletal muscle, Y1-receptor activation appears to play an important role in the regulation of basal vascular conductance, and this effect is similar in magnitude to the α1-receptor contribution. Furthermore, under baseline conditions, agonist and receptor-based mechanisms for Y1-receptor-dependent control of vascular conductance in skeletal muscle are greater in male than female rats. In skin, there is Y1-receptor-mediated vasoconstriction during whole body, but not local, cooling. As with the NPY system in muscle, this neural effect in skin differs between males and females and in addition, declines with aging. Intriguingly, skin vasodilation to local heating also requires NPY and is currently thought to be acting via a nitric oxide pathway. These studies are establishing further interest in the role of NPY as an important vasoactive agent in muscle and skin, adding to the complexity of neurovascular regulation in these tissues. In this review, we focus on the role of NPY on baseline vasomotor tone in skeletal muscle and skin and how NPY modulates vasomotor tone in response to stress, with the aim of compiling what is currently known, while highlighting some of the more pertinent questions yet to be answered. PMID:19571208

  13. The Neuropeptide Oxytocin Induces a Social Altruism Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Nina; Scheele, Dirk; Gerhardt, Holger; Strang, Sabrina; Enax, Laura; Weber, Bernd; Maier, Wolfgang; Hurlemann, René

    2015-11-25

    Current psychological concepts of social and ecological responsibility emphasize the relevance of altruism, suggesting that more altruistic individuals are more likely to engage in sustainable behaviors. Emerging evidence indicates a central role of the neuropeptide oxytocin in promoting altruism. Whether this influence extends to ecological responsibility or is limited to the social domain remains unknown. In two independent experiments involving 172 human participants, we addressed this question by exposing subjects to a sustainability-related monetary donation task, with the option to support either socially or ecologically framed charities. We found that oxytocin induced a context-dependent change in altruistic behavior away from pro-environmental toward pro-social donations, while keeping constant the overall proportion of donated money. This pro-social bias transcended to the domain of sustainable consumption. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that altruistic priorities vary as a function of oxytocin system activity, which has implications for the promotion of pro-environmental attitudes and eco-friendly behaviors. Individual responses to ecological and social sustainability require a shift in personal priorities away from selfish to more altruistic behaviors. Emerging evidence indicates a central role of the hypothalamic peptide oxytocin in promoting altruism, but whether the influence of oxytocin benefits altruistic decision-making in the context of ecological and social sustainability is unclear. In two independent behavioral experiments involving 172 human subjects, we show that heightened oxytocin system activity induces a social altruism bias at the cost of ecological responsibility. Our results have fundamental implications for policy interventions and business strategies designed to sustain ecological resources by suggesting that a social framing may attract more individuals to engage in pro-environmental and eco-friendly behaviors. Copyright

  14. The effect of neuropeptide FF in the amygdala kindling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffel, I; Meurs, A; Portelli, J; Raedt, R; De Herdt, V; Poppe, L; De Meulenaere, V; Wadman, W; Bihel, F; Schmitt, M; Vonck, K; Bourguignon, J-J; Simonin, F; Smolders, I; Boon, P

    2016-09-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) and its receptors (NPFF1 R and NPFF2 R) are differentially distributed throughout the central nervous system. NPFF reduces cortical excitability in rats when administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), and both NPFF and NPFF1 R antagonists attenuate pilocarpine-induced limbic seizures. In this study, our aim was to determine whether NPFF exerts anticonvulsant or anti-epileptogenic effects in the rat amygdala kindling model for temporal lobe seizures. Male Wistar rats were implanted with a recording/stimulation electrode in the right amygdala and a cannula in the left lateral ventricle. In a first group of animals, the afterdischarge threshold (ADT) was determined after a single i.c.v. infusion of saline (n = 8) or NPFF (1 nmol/h for 2 h; n = 10). Subsequently, daily infusion of saline (n = 8) or NPFF (1 nmol/h for 2 h; i.c.v.; n = 9) was performed, followed by a kindling stimulus (ADT+200 μA). Afterdischarge duration and seizure severity were evaluated after every kindling stimulus. A second group of rats (n = 7) were fully kindled, and the effect of saline or a high dose of NPFF (10 nmol/h for 2 h, i.c.v.) on ADT and the generalized seizure threshold (GST) was subsequently determined. In naive rats, NPFF significantly increased the ADT compared to control (435 ± 72 μA vs 131 ± 23 μA [P < 0.05]). When rats underwent daily stimulations above the ADT, NPFF did not delay or prevent kindling acquisition. Furthermore, a high dose of NPFF did not alter ADT or GST in fully kindled rats. I.c.v. administration of NPFF reduced excitability in the amygdala in naive, but not in fully kindled rats, and had no effect on kindling acquisition. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Relationship of neuropeptide FF receptors with pubertal maturation of gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, Jennifer F; Heidorn, Neely L; Ryu, Vitaly; Czaja, Krzysztof; Nonneman, Danny J; Barb, C Richard; Hausman, Gary J; Rohrer, Gary A; Prezotto, Ligia D; McCosh, Richard B; Wright, Elane C; White, Brett R; Freking, Bradley A; Oliver, William T; Hileman, Stanley M; Lents, Clay A

    2017-03-01

    Mechanisms governing the timing of puberty in pigs are poorly understood. A genome-wide association study for age at first estrus in pigs identified candidate genes including neuropeptide FF receptor 2 (NPFFR2), which is a putative receptor for RFamide-related peptides (RFRP). RFRP has been shown to negatively regulate secretion of reproductive hormones from hypothalamic and pituitary tissue of pigs in culture. Here, the porcine NPFFR2 gene was further screened and four potentially functional variants were identified to be associated with age at first estrus in pigs (1,288 gilts). The RFRP neurons in the porcine hypothalamus were localized in the paraventricular and dorsomedial nuclei with RFRP fibers in the lateral hypothalamic area. There were marked changes in expression of NPFF receptors in the anterior pituitary gland and hypothalamus of gilts beginning with the peripubertal period. The hypothesis that NPFF receptor function is related to secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) in gilts was tested with various NPFF receptor ligands. The NPFF receptor antagonist RF9 stimulated a pulse-like release of LH in prepubertal gilts. The putative NPFF receptor agonist RFRP3 modestly suppressed LH pulses in ovariectomized (OVX) prepubertal gilts. A porcine-specific RFRP2 failed to have an effect on LH secretion in OVX prepubertal gilts despite its high degree of homology to avian gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone. Results indicate that an RFRP system is present in the pig and that NPFFR2 is important for pubertal onset in gilts. It is not clear if this regulation involves major control of LH secretion or another unknown mechanism. © Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of Reproduction 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Effects of ghrelin on circulating neuropeptide Y levels in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiro, Vittorio; Saccani-Jotti, Gloria; Rubino, Pasquale; Manfredi, Guido; Melani, Andrea; Chiodera, Paolo

    2006-12-01

    Ghrelin is a 28 amino-acid peptide with a strong GH-releasing activity and a complex role in regulation of appetite, fuel utilization, body weight and composition. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well-known stimulator of pathways favouring food intake and energy storage. Recently, studies in rodents suggested a possible mediation of ghrelin action by NPY. In contrast, until now no evidence of ghrelin-NPY interaction in humans has been provided. In the present study, we examined whether ghrelin influences NPY secretion in normal men. Twelve healthy normal men (aged 24-35 years; body mass index (BMI) 22.3+/-0.93 kg/m2) were tested twice at 08.00 AM on two different days, in random order at weekly intervals, after an overnight fast and rest in bed. An intravenous bolus of 1 microg/kg body weight ghrelin (esperimental test) or an equal amount of normal saline (control test) was injected at time 0. Blood was taken before and over 90 minutes after injections, and was used for the measurement of plasma NPY levels. Plasma levels of NPY slightly, but significantly rose in response to ghrelin, with a mean peak level at 15 min after injection, whereas no significant change was observed after saline administration. Our results show a significant enhancement of plasma NPY levels under ghrelin stimulation. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a ghrelin-NPY interaction in humans, which may suggest a possible mediation of ghrelin action by NPY in humans.

  17. Gene expression and pharmacology of nematode NLP-12 neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Paul; Leech, Suzie; Marks, Nikki J; Geary, Timothy G; Maule, Aaron G

    2006-05-31

    This study examines the biology of NLP-12 neuropeptides in Caenorhabditis elegans, and in the parasitic nematodes Ascaris suum and Trichostrongylus colubriformis. DYRPLQFamide (1 nM-10 microM; n > or =6) produced contraction of innervated dorsal and ventral Ascaris body wall muscle preparations (10 microM, 6.8+/-1.9 g; 1 microM, 4.6+/-1.8 g; 0.1 microM, 4.1+/-2.0 g; 10 nM, 3.8+/-2.0 g; n > or =6), and also caused a qualitatively similar, but quantitatively lower contractile response (10 microM, 4.0+/-1.5 g, n=6) on denervated muscle strips. Ovijector muscle displayed no measurable response (10 microM, n=5). nlp-12 cDNAs were characterised from A. suum (As-nlp-12) and T. colubriformis (Tc-nlp-12), both of which show sequence similarity to C. elegans nlp-12, in that they encode multiple copies of -LQFamide peptides. In C. elegans, reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis showed that nlp-12 was transcribed throughout the life cycle, suggesting that DYRPLQFamide plays a constitutive role in the nervous system of this nematode. Transcription was also identified in both L3 and adult stages of T. colubriformis, in which Tc-nlp-12 is expressed in a single tail neurone. Conversely, As-nlp-12 is expressed in both head and tail tissue of adult female A. suum, suggesting species-specific differences in the transcription pattern of this gene.

  18. The Neuropeptides FLP-2 and PDF-1 Act in Concert To Arouse Caenorhabditis elegans Locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Didi; Taylor, Kelsey P; Hall, Qi; Kaplan, Joshua M

    2016-11-01

    During larval molts, Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a sleep-like state (termed lethargus) that is characterized by the absence of feeding and profound locomotion quiescence. The rhythmic pattern of locomotion quiescence and arousal linked to the molting cycle is mediated by reciprocal changes in sensory responsiveness, whereby arousal is associated with increased responsiveness. Sensory neurons arouse locomotion via release of a neuropeptide (PDF-1) and glutamate. Here we identify a second arousing neuropeptide (FLP-2). We show that FLP-2 acts via an orexin-like receptor (FRPR-18), and that FLP-2 and PDF-1 secretion are regulated by reciprocal positive feedback. These results suggest that the aroused behavioral state is stabilized by positive feedback between two neuropeptides. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  19. Current Evidence for a Role of Neuropeptides in the Regulation of Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Catalani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides drive a wide diversity of biological actions and mediate multiple regulatory functions involving all organ systems. They modulate intercellular signalling in the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as the cross talk among nervous and endocrine systems. Indeed, neuropeptides can function as peptide hormones regulating physiological homeostasis (e.g., cognition, blood pressure, feeding behaviour, water balance, glucose metabolism, pain, and response to stress, neuroprotection, and immunomodulation. We aim here to describe the recent advances on the role exerted by neuropeptides in the control of autophagy and its molecular mechanisms since increasing evidence indicates that dysregulation of autophagic process is related to different pathological conditions, including neurodegeneration, metabolic disorders, and cancer.

  20. Neuropeptide Receptor Ligands for the Treatment of Schizophrenia: Focus on Neurotensin and Tachykinins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, Guy

    2015-01-01

    There is a wealth of evidence that various neuropeptides and their receptor ligands modulate schizophrenia- related behaviors in preclinical animal models, suggesting that neuropeptide systems may represent potential novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of schizophrenia. In particular, neurotensin and tachykinins have been the subject of significant research efforts, generating compelling preclinical data in the schizophrenia field. However, clinical studies with notably selective tachykinin NK3 receptor antagonists in schizophrenia have been disappointing, and they were unable to confirm the promising therapeutic potential from animal studies, thereby questioning the therapeutic utility of these compounds for this condition. This article reviews preclinical and clinical findings on ligands for neurotensin and tachykinin receptors in schizophrenia, and provides possible explanations for the failure so far to develop small-molecule neuropeptide ligands for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  1. Influences of an analog of the neuropeptide ACTH 4--9 on mentally retarded adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, B B; Sandman, C A

    1979-01-01

    In a double-blind procedure, 24 mentally retarded adults received 0 mg, 5mg, or 20 mg of an analog of the neuropeptide ACTH 4--9. Following treatment with peptide, the subjects were given the Trails B Test (from the Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Battery), the Peabody Picture Vocabulary test, the Benton Visual Retention Test, a concept-formation task, and a standard orienting sequence. The results of the behavioral tests suggested that attentional processes were enhanced in subjects treated with the peptide. The present study, in conjunction with another investigation using the neuropeptide ACTH/MSH 4--10 (Sandman, George, Walker, Nolan & Kastin, 1976), indicates that attentional deficits in mentally retarded adults, traditionally assumed to be irreversible, may be influenced by treatment with fragments of the neuropeptides ACTH and MSH.

  2. The Neuropeptides FLP-2 and PDF-1 Act in Concert To Arouse Caenorhabditis elegans Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Didi; Taylor, Kelsey P.; Hall, Qi; Kaplan, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    During larval molts, Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a sleep-like state (termed lethargus) that is characterized by the absence of feeding and profound locomotion quiescence. The rhythmic pattern of locomotion quiescence and arousal linked to the molting cycle is mediated by reciprocal changes in sensory responsiveness, whereby arousal is associated with increased responsiveness. Sensory neurons arouse locomotion via release of a neuropeptide (PDF-1) and glutamate. Here we identify a second arousing neuropeptide (FLP-2). We show that FLP-2 acts via an orexin-like receptor (FRPR-18), and that FLP-2 and PDF-1 secretion are regulated by reciprocal positive feedback. These results suggest that the aroused behavioral state is stabilized by positive feedback between two neuropeptides. PMID:27585848

  3. Immunohistochemical localization of neuropeptide FF-like in the brain of the turtle: Relation to catecholaminergic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz, M.; Smeets, W.J.A.J.; Lopez, J.M.; Moreno, N.; Morona, R.; Dominguez, L.; Gonzalez, A.

    2008-01-01

    A previous study in the lizard Gekko gecko has revealed that neuropeptide FF (NPFF, a neuropeptide involved in nociception, cardiovascular regulation, and endocrine function) is widely distributed throughout the brain and spinal cord. Although the distribution of NPFF immunoreactivity shares many

  4. Phosphopeptidomics Reveals Differential Phosphorylation States and Novel SxE Phosphosite Motifs of Neuropeptides in Dense Core Secretory Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietz, Christopher B.; Toneff, Thomas; Mosier, Charles; Podvin, Sonia; O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; Hook, Vivian

    2018-03-01

    Neuropeptides are vital for cell-cell communication and function in the regulation of the nervous and endocrine systems. They are generated by post-translational modification (PTM) steps resulting in small active peptides generated from prohormone precursors. Phosphorylation is a significant PTM for the bioactivity of neuropeptides. From the known diversity of distinct neuropeptide functions, it is hypothesized that the extent of phosphorylation varies among different neuropeptides. To assess this hypothesis, neuropeptide-containing dense core secretory vesicles from bovine adrenal medullary chromaffin cells were subjected to global phosphopeptidomics analyses by liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Phosphopeptides were identified directly by LC-MS/MS and indirectly by phosphatase treatment followed by LC-MS/MS. The data identified numerous phosphorylated peptides derived from neuropeptide precursors such as chromogranins, secretogranins, proenkephalin and pro-NPY. Phosphosite occupancies were observed at high and low levels among identified peptides and many of the high occupancy phosphopeptides represent prohormone-derived peptides with currently unknown bioactivities. Peptide sequence analyses demonstrated SxE as the most prevalent phosphorylation site motif, corresponding to phosphorylation sites of the Fam20C protein kinase known to be present in the secretory pathway. The range of high to low phosphosite occupancies for neuropeptides demonstrates cellular regulation of neuropeptide phosphorylation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Discovery of a novel insect neuropeptide signaling system closely related to the insect adipokinetic hormone and corazonin hormonal systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karina Kiilerich; Stafflinger, Elisabeth; Schneider, Martina

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a central role in the physiology of insects. One large family of insect neuropeptides are the adipokinetic hormones (AKHs), which mobilize lipids and carbohydrates from the insect fat body. Other peptides are the corazonins that are...

  6. Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Induced Overexpression of Neuropeptide Y Y2 Receptors in the Hippocampus Suppresses Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldbye, David P. D.; Angehagen, Mikael; Gotzsche, Casper R.; Elbrond-Bek, Heidi; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Christiansen, Soren H.; Olesen, Mikkel V.; Nikitidou, Litsa; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Kokaia, Merab

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors overexpressing neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus exerts seizure-suppressant effects in rodent epilepsy models and is currently considered for clinical application in patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure suppression by neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus is…

  7. Effect of incubation temperature on neuropeptide Y and neuropeptide Y receptors in turkey and chicken satellite cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel L; McCormick, Janet L; Velleman, Sandra G

    2018-05-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an appetite stimulating peptide released from the central nervous system and impacts the function of many different cell types. A recent transcriptome study showed that NPY expression was altered when turkey breast muscle satellite cells were incubated at low or high temperatures, suggesting NPY may mediate temperature effects on satellite cells. However, to date minimal information exists describing the expression and function of NPY in satellite cells. The objective of this study was to determine how temperature impacts NPY and NPY receptor gene expression in satellite cells isolated from turkeys and chickens with differing genetic lineages. Two broiler and two turkey breast muscle satellite cell lines were incubated at 35, 38 or 41 °C during proliferation and differentiation. In both turkey lines, NPY, and receptors NPY2R and NPY5R expression increased at elevated temperatures after 72 h of proliferation. During differentiation NPY and NPY5R expression increased in both turkey lines with higher temperatures, whereas NPY2R was minimally affected by temperature. In contrast, in both chicken cell lines there were few significant differences for NPY and NPY receptor expression across temperature during proliferation. During differentiation, the temperature effect was different in the two chicken cell lines. In the BPM8 chicken line, there were few differences in NPY and NPY receptors across temperature; whereas elevated temperatures increased NPY, NPY2R, and NPY5R expression in the 708 line. The differences between turkey and chicken lines suggest NPY has species specific satellite cell functions in response to heat stress. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular insights into land snail neuropeptides through transcriptome and comparative gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kevin J; Wang, Tianfang; Zhao, Min; Bell, Francesca; Kuballa, Anna V; Storey, Kenneth B; Cummins, Scott F

    2015-04-17

    Snails belong to the molluscan class Gastropoda, which inhabit land, freshwater and marine environments. Several land snail species, including Theba pisana, are crop pests of major concern, causing extensive damage to agriculture and horticulture. A deeper understanding of their molecular biology is necessary in order to develop methods to manipulate land snail populations. The present study used in silico gene data mining of T. pisana tissue transcriptomes to predict 24,920 central nervous system (CNS) proteins, 37,661 foot muscle proteins and 40,766 hepatopancreas proteins, which together have 5,236 unique protein functional domains. Neuropeptides, metabolic enzymes and epiphragmin genes dominated expression within the CNS, hepatopancreas and muscle, respectively. Further investigation of the CNS transcriptome demonstrated that it might contain as many as 5,504 genes that encode for proteins destined for extracellular secretion. Neuropeptides form an important class of cell-cell messengers that control or influence various complex metabolic events. A total of 35 full-length neuropeptide genes were abundantly expressed within T. pisana CNS, encoding precursors that release molluscan-type bioactive neuropeptide products. These included achatin, allototropin, conopressin, elevenin, FMRFamide, LFRFamide, LRFNVamide, myomodulins, neurokinin Y, PKYMDT, PXFVamide, sCAPamides and several insulin-like peptides. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of neural ganglia confirmed the presence of many of these neuropeptides. Our results provide the most comprehensive picture of the molecular genes and proteins associated with land snail functioning, including the repertoire of neuropeptides that likely play significant roles in neuroendocrine signalling. This information has the potential to expedite the study of molluscan metabolism and potentially stimulate advances in the biological control of land snail pest species.

  9. Prevention of stress-impaired fear extinction through neuropeptide s action in the lateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, Frédéric; Lange, Maren Denise; Jüngling, Kay; Lesting, Jörg; Seidenbecher, Thomas; Pape, Hans-Christian

    2012-06-01

    Stressful and traumatic events can create aversive memories, which are a predisposing factor for anxiety disorders. The amygdala is critical for transforming such stressful events into anxiety, and the recently discovered neuropeptide S transmitter system represents a promising candidate apt to control these interactions. Here we test the hypothesis that neuropeptide S can regulate stress-induced hyperexcitability in the amygdala, and thereby can interact with stress-induced alterations of fear memory. Mice underwent acute immobilization stress (IS), and neuropeptide S and a receptor antagonist were locally injected into the lateral amygdala (LA) during stress exposure. Ten days later, anxiety-like behavior, fear acquisition, fear memory retrieval, and extinction were tested. Furthermore, patch-clamp recordings were performed in amygdala slices prepared ex vivo to identify synaptic substrates of stress-induced alterations in fear responsiveness. (1) IS increased anxiety-like behavior, and enhanced conditioned fear responses during extinction 10 days after stress, (2) neuropeptide S in the amygdala prevented, while an antagonist aggravated, these stress-induced changes of aversive behaviors, (3) excitatory synaptic activity in LA projection neurons was increased on fear conditioning and returned to pre-conditioning values on fear extinction, and (4) stress resulted in sustained high levels of excitatory synaptic activity during fear extinction, whereas neuropeptide S supported the return of synaptic activity during fear extinction to levels typical of non-stressed animals. Together these results suggest that the neuropeptide S system is capable of interfering with mechanisms in the amygdala that transform stressful events into anxiety and impaired fear extinction.

  10. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słoniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the α1 and β2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides

  11. Settlement induction of Acropora palmata planulae by a GLW-amide neuropeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, P. M.; Szmant, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Complex environmental cues dictate the settlement of coral planulae in situ; however, simple artificial cues may be all that is required to induce settlement of ex situ larval cultures for reef re-seeding and restoration projects. Neuropeptides that transmit settlement signals and initiate the metamorphic cascade have been isolated from hydrozoan taxa and shown to induce metamorphosis of reef-building Acropora spp. in the Indo-Pacific, providing a reliable and efficient settlement cue. Here, the metamorphic activity of six GLW-amide cnidarian neuropeptides was tested on larvae of the Caribbean corals Acropora palmata, Montastraea faveolata and Favia fragum. A. palmata planulae were induced to settle by the exogenous application of the neuropeptide Hym-248 (concentrations ≥1 × 10-6 M), achieving 40-80% attachment and 100% metamorphosis of competent planulae (≥6 days post-fertilization) during two spawning seasons; the remaining neuropeptides exhibited no activity. Hym-248 exposure rapidly altered larval swimming behavior (96% metamorphosis after 6 h. In contrast , M. faveolata and F. fragum planulae did not respond to any GLW-amides tested, suggesting a high specificity of neuropeptide activators on lower taxonomic scales in corals. Subsequent experiments for A. palmata revealed that (1) the presence of a biofilm did not enhance attachment efficiency when coupled with Hym-248 treatment, (2) neuropeptide-induced settlement had no negative effects on early life-history developmental processes: zooxanthellae acquisition and skeletal secretion occurred within 12 days, colonial growth occurred within 36 days, and (3) Hym-248 solutions maintained metamorphic activity following storage at room temperature (10 days), indicating its utility in remote field settings. These results corroborate previous studies on Indo-Pacific Acropora spp. and extend the known metamorphic activity of Hym-248 to Caribbean acroporids. Hym-248 allows for directed and reliable settlement of

  12. Analysis and evaluation of (neuro)peptides in honey bees exposed to pesticides in field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ramos, María Del Mar; Gómez Ramos, María José; Martínez Galera, María; Gil García, María Dolores; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2018-04-01

    During the last years, declines in honey bee colonies are being registered worldwide. Cholinergic pesticides and their extensive use have been correlated to the decline of pollinators and there is evidence that pesticides act as neuroendocrine disruptors affecting the metabolism of neuropeptides. However, there is a big absence of studies with quantitative results correlating the effect of pesticide exposure with changes on neuropeptides insects, and most of them are conducted under laboratory conditions, typically with individual active ingredients. In this study, we present an analytical workflow to evaluate pesticide effects on honey bees through the analysis of (neuro)peptides. The workflow consists of a rapid extraction method and liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole for preselected neuropeptides. For non-target analysis, high resolution mass spectrometry, multivariate analysis and automatic identification of discriminated peptides using a specific software and protein sequence databases. The analytical method was applied to the analysis of target and non-target (neuro)peptides in honey bees with low and high content of a wide range of pesticides to which have been exposed in field conditions. Our findings show that the identification frequency of target neuropeptides decreases significantly in honey bees with high concentration of pesticides (pesticide concentrations ≥ 500 μg kg -1 ) in comparison with the honey bees with low content of pesticides (pesticide concentrations ≤ 20 μg kg -1 ). Moreover, the principal component analysis in non-target search shows a clear distinction between peptide concentration in honey bees with high level of pesticides and honey bees with low level. The use of high resolution mass spectrometry has allowed the identification of 25 non-redundant peptides responsible for discrimination between the two groups, derived from 18 precursor proteins. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Myotropic activity and immunolocalization of selected neuropeptides of the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides (Coleoptera: Silphidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbański, Arkadiusz; Lubawy, Jan; Marciniak, Paweł; Rosiński, Grzegorz

    2018-01-15

    Burying beetles (Nicrophorus sp.) are necrophagous insects with developed parental care. Genome of Nicrophorus vespilloides has been recently sequenced, which makes them interesting model organism in behavioral ecology. However, we know very little about their physiology, including the functioning of their neuroendocrine system. In this study, one of the physiological activities of proctolin, myosuppressin (Nicve-MS), myoinhibitory peptide (Trica-MIP-5) and the short neuropeptide F (Nicve-sNPF) in N. vespilloides have been investigated. The tested neuropeptides were myoactive on N. vespilloides hindgut. After application of the proctolin increased hindgut contraction frequency was observed (EC 50 value was 5.47 × 10 -8 mol/L). The other tested neuropeptides led to inhibition of N. vespilloides hindgut contractions (Nicve-MS: IC 50 = 5.20 × 10 -5 mol/L; Trica-MIP-5: IC 50 = 5.95 × 10 -6 mol/L; Nicve-sNPF: IC 50 = 4.08 × 10 -5 mol/L). Moreover, the tested neuropeptides were immunolocalized in the nervous system of N. vespilloides. Neurons containing sNPF and MIP in brain and ventral nerve cord (VNC) were identified. Proctolin-immunolabeled neurons only in VNC were observed. Moreover, MIP-immunolabeled varicosities and fibers in retrocerebral complex were observed. In addition, our results have been supplemented with alignments of amino acid sequences of these neuropeptides in beetle species. This alignment analysis clearly showed amino acid sequence similarities between neuropeptides. Moreover, this allowed to deduce amino acid sequence of N. vespilloides proctolin (RYLPTa), Nicve-MS (QDVDHVFLRFa) and six isoforms of Nicve-MIP (Nicve-MIP-1-DWNRNLHSWa; Nicve-MIP-2-AWQNLQGGWa; Nicve-MIP-3-AWQNLQGGWa; Nicve-MIP-4-AWKNLNNAGWa; Nicve-MIP-5-SEWGNFRGSWa; Nicve-MIP-6- DPAWTNLKGIWa; and Nicve-sNPF-SGRSPSLRLRFa). © 2018 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  14. Chronic antipsychotic treatment selectively alters nerve growth factor and neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity and the distribution of choline acetyl transferase in rat brain regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelucci, F; Aloe, L; Gruber, SHM; Fiore, M; Mathe, AA

    Neuropeptides and neurotrophins play a number of roles in the central nervous system (CNS). Nerve growth factor NGF), the first characterized member of the family of neurotrophins, influences the synthesis of some neuropeptides, including neuropeptide Y (NPY), a peptide amply expressed in the CNS,

  15. Effects of Neuropeptides In The Development Of The Atopic Dermatitis Of Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Kojima

    2004-01-01

    Conclusions: It is suggested that repeated contact allergic dermatitis or mental stress may promote the development and exacerbation of AD and that substance P has a role in this response. In addition, it seems that an anti-allergic drug, such as olopatadine hydrochloride, possibly downregulates substance P, thereby suppressing the development of AD. In the future, the development and clinical application of a drug that strongly influences the release of neuropeptides, such as substance P, and the expression of neuropeptide receptors would be expected for the treatment of AD.

  16. Anorexia in human and experimental animal models: physiological aspects related to neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Uezono, Yasuhito; Ueta, Yoichi

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia, a loss of appetite for food, can be caused by various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, firstly, clinical aspects of anorexia nervosa are summarized in brief. Secondly, hypothalamic neuropeptides responsible for feeding regulation in each hypothalamic nucleus are discussed. Finally, three different types of anorexigenic animal models; dehydration-induced anorexia, cisplatin-induced anorexia and cancer anorexia-cachexia, are introduced. In conclusion, hypothalamic neuropeptides may give us novel insight to understand and find effective therapeutics strategy essential for various kinds of anorexia.

  17. Identifying neuropeptide and protein hormone receptors in Drosophila melanogaster by exploiting genomic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Frank; Williamson, Michael; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    insect genome, that of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, was sequenced in 2000, and about 200 GPCRs have been annnotated in this model insect. About 50 of these receptors were predicted to have neuropeptides or protein hormones as their ligands. Since 2000, the cDNAs of most of these candidate...... receptors have been cloned and for many receptors the endogenous ligand has been identified. In this review, we will give an update about the current knowledge of all Drosophila neuropeptide and protein hormone receptors, and discuss their phylogenetic relationships. Udgivelsesdato: 2006-Feb...

  18. Prevertebrate Local Gene Duplication Facilitated Expansion of the Neuropeptide GPCR Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seongsik; Furlong, Michael; Sim, Mikang; Cho, Minah; Park, Sumi; Cho, Eun Bee; Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Kim, Jaebum; Seong, Jae Young

    2015-11-01

    In humans, numerous genes encode neuropeptides that comprise a superfamily of more than 70 genes in approximately 30 families and act mainly through rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Two rounds of whole-genome duplication (2R WGD) during early vertebrate evolution greatly contributed to proliferation within gene families; however, the mechanisms underlying the initial emergence and diversification of these gene families before 2R WGD are largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed 25 vertebrate rhodopsin-like neuropeptide GPCR families and their cognate peptides using phylogeny, synteny, and localization of these genes on reconstructed vertebrate ancestral chromosomes (VACs). Based on phylogeny, these GPCR families can be divided into five distinct clades, and members of each clade tend to be located on the same VACs. Similarly, their neuropeptide gene families also tend to reside on distinct VACs. Comparison of these GPCR genes with those of invertebrates including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Branchiostoma floridae, and Ciona intestinalis indicates that these GPCR families emerged through tandem local duplication during metazoan evolution prior to 2R WGD. Our study describes a presumptive evolutionary mechanism and development pathway of the vertebrate rhodopsin-like GPCR and cognate neuropeptide families from the urbilaterian ancestor to modern vertebrates. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Crustacean neuropeptide genes of the CHH/MIH/GIH family: implications from molecular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siu-Ming; Gu, Pei-Li; Chu, Ka-Hou; Tobe, Stephen S

    2003-12-01

    The crustacean eyestalk CHH/MIH/GIH gene family represents a unique group of neuropeptide originally identified in crustaceans. These neuropeptides shared a high degree of amino acid identity, and the conservation of cysteine residues at the same relative positions. Based on their biological, biochemical, and molecular properties, they can be divided into the CHH and MIH subtypes with two major members in each subtype. In the shrimp, the CHH-subtypes can be divided into two forms (CHH-A and CHH-B). The CHH-A gene also comprises several isoforms which shared a high overall sequence identity. Although the MIH subtypes are postulated to have evolved from the CHH subtypes, the number of major MIH subtypes in each species has yet to be confirmed. While most of the genes consist of the basic plan of three exons and two introns, other alternative spliced variants have recently been described. Moreover, these alternative forms are usually expressed in non-eyestalk tissues. These findings suggest that these neuropeptides may have a broader spectrum of functions in crustaceans. The results from phylogenetic analysis suggest that the evolution of this group of neuropeptides occurs in a manner similar is to the gene duplication and mutation events hypothesized for the origin of the prolactin and growth hormone gene family of the vertebrate pituitary system.

  20. Anorexigenní neuropeptid CART v regulaci příjmu potravy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nagelová, Veronika; Železná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 4 (2014), s. 354-357 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/10/1368 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : CART * cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript * anorexigenic neuropeptide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.272, year: 2014

  1. Neuropeptide Y enhances potassium excretion by mechanisms distinct from those controlling sodium excretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, A.; Michel, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an established modulator of renal function. Although NPY reduces renal blood flow and does not alter glomerular filtration rate, it enhances diuresis and natriuresis. Although initial studies on natriuresis did not detect kaliuresis, we now report that a retrospective

  2. Study of plasma neuropeptide levels in patients with acute cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Youfen; Lan Suixin; Chen Yu; He Ling; Huang Yuan; Ma Yaling

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between the dynamic changes of plasma neuropeptide (β-EP, NT, NPY) levels and the pathogenesis as well as clinical outcomes of acute cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Methods: The concentrations of serum neuropeptides (β-EP, NT, NPY) were measured on the 1 st, 3 rd, 7 th, 14 th day after the onset of disease with RIA in 103 patients with acute cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases (38 cases of acute cerebral infarction, 32 cases of cerebral hemorrhage, 33 cases of acute myocardial infarction and acute heart failure) and 66 controls. Results: 1. NPY, NT and β-EP levels in patients with acute cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease were significantly higher than those in controls (p<0.01). (F=39.54, p<0.01; F=33.38, p<0.01; F=8.38, p<0.01 For β-EP, NPY and NT respectively). 2. The plasma neuropeptide levels were highest at onset and gradually lowered till to normal levels on the 14 th day. Conclusion: Plasma neuropeptide levels were closely related to the pathogenesis and clinical outcome of acute cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, study of which might be useful in the clinical management of the diseases

  3. High diversity in neuropeptide immunoreactivity patterns among three closely related species of Dinophilidae (Annelida)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerbl, Alexandra; Conzelmann, Markus; Jékely, Gáspár

    2017-01-01

    groups other than insects. In this study, we compare the immunoreactivity patterns of 14 neuropeptides in three closely related microscopic dinophilid annelids (Dinophilus gyrociliatus, D. taeniatus and Trilobodrilus axi). The brains of all three species were found to consist of around 700 somata...

  4. A phosphoproteomics approach to elucidate neuropeptide signal transduction controlling insect metamorphosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rewitz, Kim F; Larsen, Martin R; Lobner-Olesen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    In insects, the neuropeptide prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) stimulates production of ecdysone (E) in the prothoracic glands (PGs). E is the precursor of the principal steroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), that is responsible for eliciting molting and metamorphosis. In this study, we used ...

  5. Unique translational modification of an invertebrate neuropeptide: a phosphorylated member of the adipokinetic hormone peptide family

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gäde, G.; Šimek, Petr; Clark, K. D.; Auerswald, L.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 393, č. 3, (2006), s. 705-713 ISSN 0264-6021 Grant - others:National Research Foundation, Pretoria(ZA) 2053806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone (AKH) * arthropod * neuropeptide Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.100, year: 2006

  6. Interaction of neuropeptide Y genotype and childhood emotional maltreatment on brain activity during emotional processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opmeer, Esther M.; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Tol, Marie-Jose; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Woudstra, Saskia; van Buchem, Mark A.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Veltman, Dick J.; Aleman, Andre

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been associated with stress reactivity in affective disorders and is most densely expressed in the amygdala. An important stressor associated with affective disorders is the experience of childhood emotional maltreatment (CEM). We investigated whether the interaction of NPY

  7. Peripheral site of action of levodropropizine in experimentally-induced cough: role of sensory neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzo, A; Melillo, G; Clavenna, G; Omini, C

    1992-06-01

    The mechanism of action of levodropropizine has been investigated in different models of experimentally-induced cough in guinea-pigs. In particular it has been demonstrated that the antitussive drug has a peripheral site of action by injecting the drug intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). In these experiments levodropropizine (40 micrograms/50 microliters i.c.v.) did not prevent electrically-induced cough. On the other hand, codeine (5 micrograms/50 microliters i.c.v.) markedly prevented coughing. A difference in the potency ratio of levodropropizine and codeine has been demonstrated in capsaicin-induced cough; after oral administration, codeine was about two to three times more potent than levodropropizine. However, after aerosol administration the two compounds were equipotent. These data might suggest a peripheral site of action for levodropropizine which is related to sensory neuropeptides. Further support for the role of sensory neuropeptides in the mechanism of action of levodropropizine comes from the results obtained in capsaicin-desensitized animals. In this experimental model levodropropizine failed to prevent the vagally elicited cough in neuropeptide-depleted animals, whereas codeine did not differentiate between control and capsaicin-treated animals. In conclusion, our results support the suggestion that levodropropizine has a peripheral site of action. In addition, the interference with the sensory neuropeptide system may explain, at least in part, its activity in experimentally-induced cough.

  8. Indomethacin inhibits the natriuretic effects of neuropeptide Y in anesthetized rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, A.; Limmroth, V.; Michel, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a unique modulator of renal function that enhances urine flow and sodium excretion despite marked reductions in renal blood flow. We investigated whether the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin alters the renal NPY effects in anesthetized rats. Treatment with 5 mg/kg

  9. Vasopressin (VP) and neuropeptide FF (NPFF) systems in the normal and hypertensive human brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goncharuk, Valeri D.; Buijs, Ruud M.; Jhamandas, Jack H.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2011-01-01

    Vasopressin (VP)-, neuropeptide FF (NPFF)-, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-expressing neurons were studied by means of single and double immunocytochemistry in the human brainstem of controls who died suddenly due to trauma and of patients who suffered from essential hypertension and died due to

  10. Limbic substrates of the effects of neuropeptide Y on intake of and motivation for palatable food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandit, R.; Luijendijk, M.C.; Vanderschuren, L.J.M.J.; la Fleur, S.E.; Adan, R.A.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Neuropeptide Y (NPY), given centrally augments food intake and the motivation to work for palatable food. Here, the brain regions were identified through which NPY increases food intake and motivation. Methods: NPY was infused into three brain regions implicated in food intake and

  11. Limbic substrates of the effects of neuropeptide Y on intake of and motivation for palatable food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandit, Rahul; Luijendijk, Mieneke C. M.; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Adan, Roger A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), given centrally augments food intake and the motivation to work for palatable food. Here, the brain regions were identified through which NPY increases food intake and motivation. NPY was infused into three brain regions implicated in food intake and motivation: the lateral

  12. Neuropeptides encoded within a neural transcriptome of the giant triton snail Charonia tritonis, a Crown-of-Thorns Starfish predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, U; Suwansa-Ard, S; Maikaeo, L; Motti, C A; Hall, M R; Cummins, S F

    2017-12-01

    Neuropeptides represent a diverse class of signaling molecules originating from neural tissues. These chemical modulators orchestrate complex physiological events including those associated with growth and reproduction. De novo transcriptome sequencing of a cerebral ganglion library of the endangered giant triton snail (Charonia tritonis) was undertaken in an effort to identify key neuropeptides that control or influence its physiology. The giant triton snail is considered a primary predator of the corallivore Acanthaster planci (Crown-of-Thorns Starfish) that is responsible for a significant loss in coral cover on reefs in the Indo-Pacific. The transcriptome library was assembled into contigs, and then bioinformatic analysis was used to identify a repertoire of 38 giant triton snail neuropeptide precursor genes, and various isoforms, that encode conserved molluscan neuropeptides. C. tritonis neuropeptides show overall precursor organisation consistent with those of other molluscs. These include those neuropeptides associated with mollusc reproduction such as the APGWamide, buccalin, conopressin, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), NKY and egg-laying hormone. These data provide a foundation for further studies targeted towards the functional characterisation of neuropeptides to further understand aspects of the biology of the giant triton snail, such as elucidating its reproductive neuroendocrine pathway to allow the development of knowledge based captive breeding programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High-definition De Novo Sequencing of Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (CHH)-family Neuropeptides*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chenxi; Hui, Limei; Cao, Weifeng; Lietz, Christopher B.; Jiang, Xiaoyue; Chen, Ruibing; Catherman, Adam D.; Thomas, Paul M.; Ge, Ying; Kelleher, Neil L.; Li, Lingjun

    2012-01-01

    A complete understanding of the biological functions of large signaling peptides (>4 kDa) requires comprehensive characterization of their amino acid sequences and post-translational modifications, which presents significant analytical challenges. In the past decade, there has been great success with mass spectrometry-based de novo sequencing of small neuropeptides. However, these approaches are less applicable to larger neuropeptides because of the inefficient fragmentation of peptides larger than 4 kDa and their lower endogenous abundance. The conventional proteomics approach focuses on large-scale determination of protein identities via database searching, lacking the ability for in-depth elucidation of individual amino acid residues. Here, we present a multifaceted MS approach for identification and characterization of large crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH)-family neuropeptides, a class of peptide hormones that play central roles in the regulation of many important physiological processes of crustaceans. Six crustacean CHH-family neuropeptides (8–9.5 kDa), including two novel peptides with extensive disulfide linkages and PTMs, were fully sequenced without reference to genomic databases. High-definition de novo sequencing was achieved by a combination of bottom-up, off-line top-down, and on-line top-down tandem MS methods. Statistical evaluation indicated that these methods provided complementary information for sequence interpretation and increased the local identification confidence of each amino acid. Further investigations by MALDI imaging MS mapped the spatial distribution and colocalization patterns of various CHH-family neuropeptides in the neuroendocrine organs, revealing that two CHH-subfamilies are involved in distinct signaling pathways. PMID:23028060

  14. High-definition de novo sequencing of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH)-family neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chenxi; Hui, Limei; Cao, Weifeng; Lietz, Christopher B; Jiang, Xiaoyue; Chen, Ruibing; Catherman, Adam D; Thomas, Paul M; Ge, Ying; Kelleher, Neil L; Li, Lingjun

    2012-12-01

    A complete understanding of the biological functions of large signaling peptides (>4 kDa) requires comprehensive characterization of their amino acid sequences and post-translational modifications, which presents significant analytical challenges. In the past decade, there has been great success with mass spectrometry-based de novo sequencing of small neuropeptides. However, these approaches are less applicable to larger neuropeptides because of the inefficient fragmentation of peptides larger than 4 kDa and their lower endogenous abundance. The conventional proteomics approach focuses on large-scale determination of protein identities via database searching, lacking the ability for in-depth elucidation of individual amino acid residues. Here, we present a multifaceted MS approach for identification and characterization of large crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH)-family neuropeptides, a class of peptide hormones that play central roles in the regulation of many important physiological processes of crustaceans. Six crustacean CHH-family neuropeptides (8-9.5 kDa), including two novel peptides with extensive disulfide linkages and PTMs, were fully sequenced without reference to genomic databases. High-definition de novo sequencing was achieved by a combination of bottom-up, off-line top-down, and on-line top-down tandem MS methods. Statistical evaluation indicated that these methods provided complementary information for sequence interpretation and increased the local identification confidence of each amino acid. Further investigations by MALDI imaging MS mapped the spatial distribution and colocalization patterns of various CHH-family neuropeptides in the neuroendocrine organs, revealing that two CHH-subfamilies are involved in distinct signaling pathways.

  15. Immobilization contributes to exaggerated neuropeptide signaling, inflammatory changes, and nociceptive sensitization after fracture in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tian-Zhi; Wei, Tzuping; Li, Wen-Wu; Li, Xiang-Qi; Clark, J David; Kingery, Wade S

    2014-10-01

    A tibia fracture cast immobilized for 4 weeks can induce exaggerated substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide signaling and neuropeptide-dependent nociceptive and inflammatory changes in the hind limbs of rats similar to those seen in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Four weeks of hind limb cast immobilization can also induce nociceptive and vascular changes resembling CRPS. To test our hypothesis that immobilization alone could cause exaggerated neuropeptide signaling and inflammatory changes, we tested 5 cohorts of rats: 1) controls; 2) tibia fracture and hind limb casted; 3) hind limb casted, no fracture; 4) tibia fracture with intramedullary pinning, no cast; and 5) tibia fracture with intramedullary pinning and hind limb casting. After 4 weeks, the casts were removed and hind limb allodynia, unweighting, warmth, edema, sciatic nerve neuropeptide content, cutaneous and spinal cord inflammatory mediator levels, and spinal c-Fos activation were measured. After fracture with casting, there was allodynia, unweighting, warmth, edema, increased sciatic nerve substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, increased skin neurokinin 1 receptors and keratinocyte proliferation, increased inflammatory mediator expression in the hind paw skin (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, nerve growth factor) and cord (IL-1β, nerve growth factor), and increased spinal c-Fos activation. These same changes were observed after cast immobilization alone, except that spinal IL-1β levels were not increased. Treating cast-only rats with a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist inhibited development of nociceptive and inflammatory changes. Four weeks after fracture with pinning, all nociceptive and vascular changes had resolved and there were no increases in neuropeptide signaling or inflammatory mediator expression. Collectively, these data indicate that immobilization alone increased neuropeptide signaling and caused nociceptive and inflammatory changes similar

  16. Relation between stressful life events, neuropeptides and cytokines: results from the LISA birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberth, Gunda; Weber, Annegret; Röder, Stefan; Elvers, Horst-Dietrich; Krämer, Ursula; Schins, Roel P F; Diez, Ulrike; Borte, Michael; Heinrich, Joachim; Schäfer, Thomas; Herbarth, Olf; Lehmann, Irina

    2008-12-01

    Stressful life events evidently have an impact on development of allergic diseases, but the mechanism linking stress to pathological changes of immune system function is still not fully understood. The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between stressful life events, neuropeptide and cytokine concentrations in children. Within the LISAplus (Life style-Immune system-Allergy) study, blood samples from children of 6 yr of age were analysed for concentration of the neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), somatostatin (SOM), substance P (SP) and the Th1/Th2 cytokines interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin (IL)-4. Life events such as severe disease or death of a family member, unemployment or divorce of the parents were assessed with a questionnaire filled in by the parents. For 234 children, blood analysis and questionnaire data regarding life events were available. Children with separated/divorced parents showed high VIP levels and high concentrations of the Th2 cytokine IL-4 in their blood. Severe diseases and death of a family member were neither associated with neuropeptide levels nor with cytokine concentrations. Unemployment of the parents was associated with decreased IFN-gamma concentrations in children's blood but not with neuropeptide levels, whereas children experiencing concomitant severe disease and death of a family member had reduced SP blood levels. The neuropeptide VIP might be a mediator between stressful life events and immune regulation contributing to the Th2 shifted immune response in children with separated/divorced parents. Unemployment of the parents was associated with immune regulation in children on the basis of a still unknown mechanism whereas reduced SP levels seem to have no effect on immune regulation.

  17. Neuropeptide FF and prolactin-releasing peptide decrease cortical excitability through activation of NPFF receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffel, Ine; Meurs, Alfred; Portelli, Jeanelle; Raedt, Robrecht; De Herdt, Veerle; Sioncke, Lynn; Wadman, Wytse; Bihel, Frederic; Schmitt, Martine; Vonck, Kristl; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frederic; Smolders, Ilse; Boon, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Drugs with a novel mechanism of action are needed to reduce the number of people with epilepsy that are refractory to treatment. Increasing attention is paid to neuropeptide systems and several anticonvulsant neuropeptides have already been described, such as galanin, ghrelin, and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Many others, however, have not been investigated for their ability to affect epileptic seizures. In this study, the potential anticonvulsant activities of three members of the RF-amide neuropeptide family, neuropeptide FF (NPFF), prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), and kisspeptin (Kp) and other receptor ligands (NPFF1/2 R, GPR10, and GRP54, respectively) were tested in the motor cortex stimulation model. A train of pulses with increasing intensity (0-10 mA over 150 s, 50 Hz, pulse width 2 msec) was delivered to the motor cortex of rats. The threshold intensity for eliciting a motor response (i.e., motor threshold) was determined through behavioral observation and used as a measure for cortical excitability. The threshold was determined before, during, and after the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of various NPFF1/2 R, GPR10, and GPR54 receptor ligands. NPFF and PrRP significantly increased the motor threshold by a maximum of 143 ± 27 and 83 ± 13 μA, respectively, for the doses of 1 nmol/h (p < 0.05). The increase of motor threshold by NPFF and PrRP was prevented by pretreatment and co-treatment with the NPFF1/2 R antagonist RF9. Pretreatment with a selective NPFF1 R antagonist also prevented the threshold increase induced by NPFF. Kp did not increase motor threshold. Intracerebroventricular infusion of NPFF or PrRP decreases cortical excitability in rats through activation of NPFFRs. Furthermore, the NPFF1 R is required for the NPFF-induced decrease in cortical excitability. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. Is chronic fatigue syndrome an autoimmune disorder of endogenous neuropeptides, exogenous infection and molecular mimicry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Donald R

    2004-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is a disorder characterised by prolonged fatigue and debility and is mostly associated with post-infection sequelae although ongoing infection is unproven. Immunological aberration is likely and this may prove to be associated with an expanding group of vasoactive neuropeptides in the context of molecular mimicry and inappropriate immunological memory. Vasoactive neuropeptides including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate activating polypeptide (PACAP) belong to the secretin/glucagon superfamily and act as hormones, neurotransmitters, immune modulators and neurotrophes. They are readily catalysed to smaller peptide fragments by antibody hydrolysis. They and their binding sites are immunogenic and are known to be associated with a range of autoimmune conditions. Vasoactive neuropeptides are widely distributed in the body particularly in the central, autonomic and peripheral nervous systems and have been identified in the gut, adrenal gland, reproductive organs, vasculature, blood cells and other tissues. They have a vital role in maintaining vascular flow in organs, and in thermoregulation, memory and concentration. They are co-transmitters for acetylcholine, nitric oxide, endogenous opioids and insulin, are potent immune regulators with primarily anti-inflammatory activity, and have a significant role in protection of the nervous system to toxic assault, promotion of neural development and the maintenance of homeostasis. This paper describes a biologically plausible mechanism for the development of CFS based on loss of immunological tolerance to the vasoactive neuropeptides following infection, significant physical exercise or de novo. It is proposed that release of these substances is accompanied by a loss of tolerance either to them or their receptor binding sites in CFS. Such an occurrence would have predictably serious consequences resulting from compromised function of the key roles these substances perform. All

  19. Neuropeptides in Heteroptera: Identification of allatotropin-related peptide and tachykinin-related peptides using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, the peptidomic analysis of neuropeptides from the retrocerebral complex and abdominal perisympathetic organs of polyphagous stinkbugs (Pentatomidae) revealed the group-specific sequences of pyrokinins, CAPA peptides (CAPA-periviscerokinins/PVKs and CAPA-pyrokinin), myosuppressin, corazonin...

  20. Hepatic vagotomy alters limbic and hypothalamic neuropeptide responses to insulin-dependent diabetes and voluntary lard ingestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    la Fleur, Susanne E.; Manalo, Sotara L.; Roy, Monica; Houshyar, Hani; Dallman, Mary F.

    2005-01-01

    Hypothalamic anorexigenic [corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and proopiomelanocortin] peptides decrease and the orexigen, neuropeptide Y, increases with diabetic hyperphagia. However, when diabetic rats are allowed to eat lard (saturated fat) as well as chow, both caloric intake and hypothalamic

  1. Food intake regulating-neuropeptides are expressed and regulated through pregnancy and following food restriction in rat placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cepeda Libia A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropeptide Y (NPY, agouti related peptide (AgRP, cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART and melanocortins, the products of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC, are hypothalamic peptides involved in feeding regulation and energy homeostasis. Recent evidence has demonstrated their expression in rat and human placenta. Methods In the current study, we have investigated the expression of those neuropeptides in the rat placenta by real-time PCR using a model of maternal food restriction. Results Our results showed that placental-derived neuropeptides were regulated through pregnancy and following food restriction. Conclusion These data could indicate that placental-derived neuropeptides represent a local regulatory circuit that may fine-tune control of energy balance during pregnancy.

  2. Classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides involved in major depression in a multi-neurotransmitter system: a focus on antidepressant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Felix-Martin; Coveñas, R

    2013-01-01

    We summarize the alterations of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides and the corresponding subreceptors involved in major depression. Neuronal circuits in the brainstem, hippocampus and hypothalamus are developed, since they can be used to derive a multimodal pharmacotherapy. In this sense, serotonin hypoactivity could occur through a strong presynaptic inhibition of glutaminergic neurons via the subtype 5 of metabotropic glutaminergic receptors, and noradrenaline hypoactivity could be due to an enhanced presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic neurons via GABAB receptors. In the hippocampus, dopamine hypoactivity leads to a decreased positive effect. In clinical trials, the antidepressant effect of drugs interfering with the mentioned subreceptors, for example the triple reuptake inhibitor amitifadine, is being investigated. Moreover, the alterations of neuropeptides, such as corticotropin-releasing hormone, neuropeptide Y and galanin are pointed out. The additional antidepressant effect of analogs, agonists and antagonists of the mentioned neuropeptides should be examined.

  3. Neuropeptide imaging on an LTQ with vMALDI source: The complete `all-in-one' peptidome analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaert, Peter D.; Conaway, Maria C. Prieto; Pekar, Tonya M.; Miller, Ken

    2007-02-01

    Direct tissue imaging was performed on dissected insect tissue using a MALDI ion trap to visualize endogenous neuropeptides. Coupling tissue imaging to tandem MSn allows for the identification of previously known species and the ability to identify new ones by de novo sequencing, as searchable databases for insects are sparse. Direct tissue imaging is an attractive technique for the study of neuropeptides as minimal sample preparation is required prior to mass spectrometry. We successfully identified neuropeptides present in the corpora cardiaca and allata of Acheta domesticus (the house cricket). Diagnostic fragments at low m/z were used to distinguish between lipids and neuropeptides. The distribution of peptides appears to be more differentially localized than that of phospholipids, which seem to be more evenly distributed within the tissue.

  4. The Role of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in Uncontrolled Alcohol Drinking and Relapse Behavior Resulting from Exposure to Stressful Events

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thiele, Todd E; Knapp, Darin J; Breese, George; McCown, Thomas J

    2007-01-01

    .... An interesting candidate is neuropeptide Y (NPY). Recent evidence suggests that low NPY levels promote high alcohol consumption, and it has been established the NPY protects against stress and anxiety...

  5. Transcriptome and peptidome characterisation of the main neuropeptides and peptidic hormones of a euphausiid: the Ice Krill, Euphausia crystallorophias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Yves Toullec

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ice krill, Euphausia crystallorophias is one of the species at the base of the Southern Ocean food chain. Given their significant contribution to the biomass of the Southern Ocean, it is vitally important to gain a better understanding of their physiology and, in particular, anticipate their responses to climate change effects in the warming seas around Antarctica. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Illumina sequencing was used to produce a transcriptome of the ice krill. Analysis of the assembled contigs via two different methods, produced 36 new pre-pro-peptides, coding for 61 neuropeptides or peptide hormones belonging to the following families: Allatostatins (A, B et C, Bursicon (α and β, Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormones (CHH and MIH/VIHs, Crustacean Cardioactive Peptide (CCAP, Corazonin, Diuretic Hormones (DH, the Eclosion Hormone (EH, Neuroparsin, Neuropeptide F (NPF, small Neuropeptide F (sNPF, Pigment Dispersing Hormone (PDH, Red Pigment Concentrating Hormone (RPCH and finally Tachykinin. LC/MS/MS proteomics was also carried out on eyestalk extracts, which are the major site of neuropeptide synthesis in decapod crustaceans. Results confirmed the presence of six neuropeptides and six precursor-related peptides previously identified in the transcriptome analyses. CONCLUSIONS: This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of neuropeptide hormones in a Eucarida non-decapod Malacostraca, several of which are described for the first time in a non-decapod crustacean. Additionally, there is a potential expansion of PDH and Neuropeptide F family members, which may reflect certain life history traits such as circadian rhythms associated with diurnal migrations and also the confirmation via mass spectrometry of several novel pre-pro-peptides, of unknown function. Knowledge of these essential hormones provides a vital framework for understanding the physiological response of this key Southern Ocean species to climate change

  6. Insulin ameliorating endotoxaemia-induced muscle wasting is associated with the alteration of hypothalamic neuropeptides and inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Kaipeng; Yu, Wenkui; Lin, Zhiliang; Tan, Shanjun; Bai, Xiaowu; Gao, Tao; Xi, Fengchan; Li, Ning

    2015-05-01

    Septic patients always develop muscle wasting, which delays the rehabilitation and contributes to the increased complications and mortality. Previous studies have implied the crucial role of central inflammation and neuropeptides in the energy balance and muscle metabolism. Insulin has been confirmed to attenuate muscle degradation and inhibit inflammation. We tested the hypothesis whether insulin ameliorating muscle wasting was associated with modulating hypothalamic inflammation and neuropeptides. Thirty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were in intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg/kg) or saline, followed by subcutaneous injection of insulin (5 IU/kg) or saline. Twenty-four hours after injection, skeletal muscle and hypothalamus tissues were harvested. Muscle wasting was measured by the mRNA expression of two E3 ubiquitin ligases, muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF-1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), as well as 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) and tyrosine release. Hypothalamic inflammatory markers and neuropeptides expression were also measured in four groups. LPS injection led to significant increase in hypothalamic inflammation as well as muscle wasting. Also, increased hypothalamic neuropeptides, proopiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine and amphetamine-related transcript (CART) and neuropeptides Y (NPY) and decreased agouti-related protein (AgRP) were observed. Insulin treatment ameliorated endotoxaemia-induced muscle wasting and hypothalamic inflammation, and attenuated the alteration of neuropeptides, POMC, CART and AgRP. Hypothalamic inflammation and neuropeptides are involved in the endotoxaemia-induced muscle wasting. Insulin treatment can reduce muscle wasting, which is associated with reduced hypothalamic inflammation and alteration of hypothalamic neuropeptides. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Transcriptomic analysis of neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite: evidence of roles in larval settlement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Cheng Yan

    Full Text Available The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in

  8. Transcriptomic analysis of neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite: evidence of roles in larval settlement.

    KAUST Repository

    Yan, Xing-Cheng

    2012-10-02

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  9. Transcriptomic Analysis of Neuropeptides and Peptide Hormones in the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite: Evidence of Roles in Larval Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xing-Cheng; Chen, Zhang-Fan; Sun, Jin; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Wu, Rudolf S. S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  10. Towards understanding the free and receptor bound conformation of neuropeptide Y by fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Michael; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2009-06-01

    Despite a considerable sequence identity of the three mammalian hormones of the neuropeptide Y family, namely neuropeptide Y, peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide, their structure in solution is described to be different. A so-called pancreatic polypeptide-fold has been identified for pancreatic polypeptide, whereas the structure of the N-terminal segment of neuropeptide Y is unknown. This element is important for the binding of neuropeptide Y to two of its relevant receptors, Y(1) and Y(5), but not to the Y(2) receptor subtype. In this study now, three doubly fluorescent-labeled analogs of neuropeptide Y have been synthesized that still bind to the Y(5) receptor with high affinity to investigate the conformation in solution and, for the first time, to probe the conformational changes upon binding of the ligand to its receptor in cell membrane preparations. The results obtained from the fluorescence resonance energy transfer investigations clearly show considerable differences in transfer efficiency that depend both on the solvent as well as on the peptide concentration. However, the studies do not support a pancreatic polypeptide-like folding of neuropeptide Y in the presence of membranes that express the human Y(5) receptor subtype.

  11. [Neuropeptides, Cytokines and Thymus Peptides as Effectors of Interactions Between Thymus and Neuroendocrine System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkhovskaya, T I; Belova, O V; Zimina, I V; Kryuchkova, A V; Moskvina, S N; Bystrova, O V; Arion, V Ya; Sergienko, V I

    2015-01-01

    The review presents data on mutual influence of nervous system and thymus, realized through the neuroendocrine-immune interactions. The pres- ence of adrenergic and peptidergic nerves in thymus creates conditions for implementation of the effect of neuropeptides secreted by them. These neuropeptides induce activation of thymus cells receptors and influence on the main processes in thymus, including T-lymphocyte maturation, cytokine and hormones production. In turn, thymuspeptides and/or cytokines, controlled by them, enter the brain and exert influence on neuro- nalfunction, which creates the basis for changes of behavior and homeostasis maintenance in response to infection. Ageing and some infectious, autoimmune, neurodegenerative and cancer diseases are accompanied by distortion of interactions between thymus and central nervous system. Mechanisms of signaling pathways, which determine these interactions, are not revealed yet, and their understanding will promote the development of effective therapeutic strategies.

  12. CD and 31P NMR studies of tachykinin and MSH neuropeptides in SDS and DPC micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sydney C.; Brown, Taylor C.; Gonzalez, Javier D.; Levonyak, Nicholas S.; Rush, Lydia A.; Cremeens, Matthew E.

    2016-02-01

    Secondary structural characteristics of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA), neurokinin B (NKB), α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide (α-MSH), γ1-MSH, γ2-MSH, and melittin were evaluated with circular dichroism in phosphite buffer, DPC micelles, and SDS micelles. CD spectral properties of γ1-MSH and γ2-MSH as well as 31P NMR of DPC micelles with all the peptides are reported for the first time. Although, a trend in the neuropeptide/micelle CD data appears to show increased α-helix content for the tachykinin peptides (SP, NKA, NKB) and increased β-sheet content for the MSH peptides (α-MSH, γ1-MSH, γ2-MSH) with increasing peptide charge, the lack of perturbed 31P NMR signals for all neuropeptides could suggest that the reported antimicrobial activity of SP and α-MSH might not be related to a membrane disruption mode of action.

  13. Sensory Neurons Arouse C. elegans Locomotion via Both Glutamate and Neuropeptide Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwon Choi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available C. elegans undergoes periods of behavioral quiescence during larval molts (termed lethargus and as adults. Little is known about the circuit mechanisms that establish these quiescent states. Lethargus and adult locomotion quiescence is dramatically reduced in mutants lacking the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1. Here, we show that the aroused locomotion of npr-1 mutants results from the exaggerated activity in multiple classes of sensory neurons, including nociceptive (ASH, touch sensitive (ALM and PLM, and stretch sensing (DVA neurons. These sensory neurons accelerate locomotion via both neuropeptide and glutamate release. The relative contribution of these sensory neurons to arousal differs between larval molts and adults. Our results suggest that a broad network of sensory neurons dictates transitions between aroused and quiescent behavioral states.

  14. Differential suppression of seizures via Y2 and Y5 neuropeptide Y receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldbye, David P D; Nanobashvili, Avtandil; Sørensen, Andreas Vehus

    2005-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) prominently inhibits epileptic seizures in different animal models. The NPY receptors mediating this effect remain controversial partially due to lack of highly selective agonists and antagonists. To circumvent this problem, we used various NPY receptor knockout mice with the......, while activation of Y5 receptors in extra-hippocampal regions reduces generalized seizures in vivo.......Neuropeptide Y (NPY) prominently inhibits epileptic seizures in different animal models. The NPY receptors mediating this effect remain controversial partially due to lack of highly selective agonists and antagonists. To circumvent this problem, we used various NPY receptor knockout mice...... with the same genetic background and explored anti-epileptic action of NPY in vitro and in vivo. In Y2 (Y2-/-) and Y5 (Y5-/-) receptor knockouts, NPY partially inhibited 0 Mg2+-induced epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices. In contrast, in double knockouts (Y2Y5-/-), NPY had no effect, suggesting...

  15. Sensory Neurons Arouse C. elegans Locomotion via Both Glutamate and Neuropeptide Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzigeorgiou, Marios; Hu, Zhitao; Schafer, William R.; Kaplan, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    C. elegans undergoes periods of behavioral quiescence during larval molts (termed lethargus) and as adults. Little is known about the circuit mechanisms that establish these quiescent states. Lethargus and adult locomotion quiescence is dramatically reduced in mutants lacking the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1. Here, we show that the aroused locomotion of npr-1 mutants results from the exaggerated activity in multiple classes of sensory neurons, including nociceptive (ASH), touch sensitive (ALM and PLM), and stretch sensing (DVA) neurons. These sensory neurons accelerate locomotion via both neuropeptide and glutamate release. The relative contribution of these sensory neurons to arousal differs between larval molts and adults. Our results suggest that a broad network of sensory neurons dictates transitions between aroused and quiescent behavioral states. PMID:26154367

  16. Substrates for Neuronal Cotransmission With Neuropeptides and Small Molecule Neurotransmitters in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nässel, Dick R.

    2018-01-01

    It has been known for more than 40 years that individual neurons can produce more than one neurotransmitter and that neuropeptides often are colocalized with small molecule neurotransmitters (SMNs). Over the years much progress has been made in understanding the functional consequences of cotransmission in the nervous system of mammals. There are also some excellent invertebrate models that have revealed roles of coexpressed neuropeptides and SMNs in increasing complexity, flexibility, and dynamics in neuronal signaling. However, for the fly Drosophila there are surprisingly few functional studies on cotransmission, although there is ample evidence for colocalization of neuroactive compounds in neurons of the CNS, based both on traditional techniques and novel single cell transcriptome analysis. With the hope to trigger interest in initiating cotransmission studies, this review summarizes what is known about Drosophila neurons and neuronal circuits where different neuropeptides and SMNs are colocalized. Coexistence of neuroactive substances has been recorded in different neuron types such as neuroendocrine cells, interneurons, sensory cells and motor neurons. Some of the circuits highlighted here are well established in the analysis of learning and memory, circadian clock networks regulating rhythmic activity and sleep, as well as neurons and neuroendocrine cells regulating olfaction, nociception, feeding, metabolic homeostasis, diuretic functions, reproduction, and developmental processes. One emerging trait is the broad role of short neuropeptide F in cotransmission and presynaptic facilitation in a number of different neuronal circuits. This review also discusses the functional relevance of coexisting peptides in the intestine. Based on recent single cell transcriptomics data, it is likely that the neuronal systems discussed in this review are just a fraction of the total set of circuits where cotransmission occurs in Drosophila. Thus, a systematic search for

  17. Neuropeptide S Receptor (NPSR) Gene - Converging Evidence for a Role in Panic Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Domschke, Katharina; Reif, Andreas; Weber, Heike; Richter, Jan; Hohoff, Christa; Ohrmann, Patricia; Pedersen, Anya; Bauer, Jochen; Suslow, Thomas; Kugel, Harald; Heindel, Walter L; Baumann, Christian; Klauke, Benedikt; Jacob, Christian; Maier, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Animal studies have suggested neuropeptide S (NPS) and its receptor (NPSR) to be involved in the pathogenesis of anxiety-related behavior. In the present study, a multilevel approach was applied to further elucidate the role of NPS in the etiology of human anxiety. The functional NPSR A/T (Asn107Ile) variant (rs324981) was investigated for association with (1) panic disorder with and without agoraphobia in two large, independent case-control studies, (2) dimensional an...

  18. Substrates for Neuronal Cotransmission With Neuropeptides and Small Molecule Neurotransmitters in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick R. Nässel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been known for more than 40 years that individual neurons can produce more than one neurotransmitter and that neuropeptides often are colocalized with small molecule neurotransmitters (SMNs. Over the years much progress has been made in understanding the functional consequences of cotransmission in the nervous system of mammals. There are also some excellent invertebrate models that have revealed roles of coexpressed neuropeptides and SMNs in increasing complexity, flexibility, and dynamics in neuronal signaling. However, for the fly Drosophila there are surprisingly few functional studies on cotransmission, although there is ample evidence for colocalization of neuroactive compounds in neurons of the CNS, based both on traditional techniques and novel single cell transcriptome analysis. With the hope to trigger interest in initiating cotransmission studies, this review summarizes what is known about Drosophila neurons and neuronal circuits where different neuropeptides and SMNs are colocalized. Coexistence of neuroactive substances has been recorded in different neuron types such as neuroendocrine cells, interneurons, sensory cells and motor neurons. Some of the circuits highlighted here are well established in the analysis of learning and memory, circadian clock networks regulating rhythmic activity and sleep, as well as neurons and neuroendocrine cells regulating olfaction, nociception, feeding, metabolic homeostasis, diuretic functions, reproduction, and developmental processes. One emerging trait is the broad role of short neuropeptide F in cotransmission and presynaptic facilitation in a number of different neuronal circuits. This review also discusses the functional relevance of coexisting peptides in the intestine. Based on recent single cell transcriptomics data, it is likely that the neuronal systems discussed in this review are just a fraction of the total set of circuits where cotransmission occurs in Drosophila. Thus, a

  19. Central and Peripheral Significance of Neuropeptide Y and Its Related Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-15

    477 Steroid Hormone Regulation of Brain Neuropeptide Y mRNA Levels. Bx’ P. CAMP and J. D. WHITE...but not in the dentate gyms after neonatal treatment with corticosterone in the rat. Acta Physiol. Scand. 138: 577-579. 18. FUXE, K.. L. F. AGNATI, A...the hypothalamus. ’, Inves- tigations carried out in vitro suggest that the stimulatory effects of NPY on LHRH secretion in steroid -treated

  20. Central neuropeptide Y (NPH) expression and function : role in stress, experimental anxiety, and cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Thorsell, Annika

    2000-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a 36 amino acid peptide abundantly expressed throughout the mammalian nervous system, has been implicated in experimental anxiety and stress related responses, feeding, and learning and memory. These functions are mediated via different receptor subtype populations (Y1-Y6), all belonging to the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. The Y1 -subtype has been shown to mediate the anxiolytic effects of NPY, while the Y2 subtype is involved in regulation o...

  1. Activity patterns of neurosecretory cells releasing pheromonotropic neuropeptides in the moth Bombyx mori

    OpenAIRE

    Ichikawa, Toshio

    1998-01-01

    Short- and long-term firing patterns of neurosecretory cells releasing pheromonotropic neuropeptides in the silkworm moth Bombyx mori were examined. The cells showed three types of rhythmic changes in firing activity. Bursting activities with an interval of several seconds were synchronized with rhythmic abdominal motions for calling behavior. A slow fluctuation in firing activity over a period of several minutes depended on cyclic alternations of the flow of hemolymph. The electrical activit...

  2. Prokineticin 2 Is a Hypothalamic Neuropeptide That Potently Inhibits Food Intake

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, JV; Bataveljic, A; Patel, NA; Bewick, GA; Roy, D; Campbell, D; Greenwood, HC; Murphy, KG; Hameed, S; Jethwa, PH; Ebling, FJP; Vickers, SP; Cheetham, S; Ghatei, MA; Bloom, SR

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Prokineticin 2 (PK2) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide expressed in central nervous system areas known to be involved in food intake. We therefore hypothesized that PK2 plays a role in energy homeostasis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We investigated the effect of nutritional status on hypothalamic PK2 expression and effects of PK2 on the regulation of food intake by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of PK2 and anti-PK2 antibody. Subsequently, we investigated the potential mechanis...

  3. Control of sleep-to-wake transitions via fast amino acid and slow neuropeptide transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosqueiro, Thiago; Lecea, Luis de; Huerta, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC) modulates cortical, subcortical, cerebellar, brainstem and spinal cord circuits and it expresses receptors for neuromodulators that operate on a time scale of several seconds. Evidence from anatomical, electrophysiological and optogenetic experiments has shown that LC neurons receive input from a group of neurons called hypocretin neurons that release a neuropeptide called hypocretin. It is less well known how these two groups of neurons can be coregulated using GABAergic (GABA standing for gamma aminobutyric acid) neurons. As the time scale for GABA A inhibition is several orders of magnitude faster than that for the hypocretin neuropeptide effect, we investigate the limits of circuit activity regulation using a realistic model of neurons. Our investigation shows that GABA A inhibition is insufficient to control the activity levels of the LCs. Although slower forms of GABA A can in principle work, there is not much plausibility due to the low probability of the presence of slow GABA A and lack of robust stability at the maximum firing frequencies. The best possible control mechanism predicted by our modeling analysis is the presence of inhibitory neuropeptides, which exert effects on a similar time scale to the hypocretin/orexin. Although the nature of these inhibitory neuropeptides has not been identified yet, it provides the most efficient mechanism in the modeling analysis. Finally, we present a reduced mean-field model that perfectly captures the dynamics and the phenomena generated by this circuit. This investigation shows that brain communication involving multiple time scales can be better controlled by employing orthogonal mechanisms of neural transmission to decrease interference between cognitive processes and hypothalamic functions. (paper)

  4. Quantitative structure activity relationship of benzoxazinone derivatives as neuropeptide Y Y5 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deswal, S; Roy, N

    2006-04-01

    Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) has been established for 30 benzoxazinone derivatives acting as neuropeptide Y Y5 receptor antagonists. The genetic algorithm and multiple linear regression were used to generate the relationship between biological activity and calculated descriptors. Model with good statistical qualities was developed using four descriptors from topological, thermodynamic, spatial and electrotopological class. The validation of the model was done by cross validation, randomization and external test set prediction.

  5. NPY/neuropeptide Y enhances autophagy in the hypothalamus: a mechanism to delay aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveleira, Célia A; Botelho, Mariana; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    Aging was recently described as a life event programmed by the hypothalamus, a key brain region that is crucial for the neuroendocrine interaction between the central nervous system and the periphery. Autophagy impairment is a hallmark of aging, contributing to the aging phenotype and to the aggravation of age-related diseases. Since hypothalamic autophagy decreases with age, strategies to promote autophagy in the hypothalamus may be relevant for control of the aging process. NPY (neuropeptide Y) is an endogenous neuropeptide mainly produced by the hypothalamus. We recently reported, for the first time, that NPY stimulates autophagy in rodent hypothalamus and mediates caloric restriction-induced autophagy in hypothalamic neurons. Moreover, we observed that NPY acts through NPY1R (neuropeptide Y receptor Y1) or NPY5R activation involving a concerted action of different signaling pathways. Since both hypothalamic autophagy and NPY levels decrease with age, modulation of NPY levels could provide new putative therapeutic tools to ameliorate age-related deteriorations and extend longevity.

  6. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) promotes inflammation-induced tumorigenesis by enhancing epithelial cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppsson, Sabrina; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Chandrasekharan, Bindu

    2017-02-01

    We have demonstrated that neuropeptide Y (NPY), abundantly produced by enteric neurons, is an important regulator of intestinal inflammation. However, the role of NPY in the progression of chronic inflammation to tumorigenesis is unknown. We investigated whether NPY could modulate epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis, and thus regulate tumorigenesis. Repeated cycles of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) were used to model inflammation-induced tumorigenesis in wild-type (WT) and NPY knockout (NPY -/- ) mice. Intestinal epithelial cell lines (T84) were used to assess the effects of NPY (0.1 µM) on epithelial proliferation and apoptosis in vitro. DSS-WT mice exhibited enhanced intestinal inflammation, polyp size, and polyp number (7.5 ± 0.8) compared with DSS-NPY -/- mice (4 ± 0.5, P inflammation-induced tumorigenesis by NPY-epithelial cross talk as mediated by activation of PI3-K signaling and downregulation of miR-375. Our work exemplifies a novel role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in regulating inflammation-induced tumorigenesis via two modalities: first by enhanced proliferation (PI3-K/pAkt), and second by downregulation of microRNA-375 (miR-375)-dependent apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells. Our data establish the existence of a microRNA-mediated cross talk between enteric neurons producing NPY and intestinal epithelial cells, and the potential of neuropeptide-regulated miRNAs as potential therapeutic molecules for the management of inflammation-associated tumors in the gut.

  7. Changes of cerebral contents of neuropeptides in rat models of multiple ischemic dementia (MID)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Xianghong; Guo Jingcai; Song Changyi; Wang Shejiao; Chen Wei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the significance of changes of cerebral contents of the neuropeptides somatostatin (SS), arginine vasopressin (AVP) and substance P in rat models of MID. Methods: The rat models consisted of 15 rats undergoing intracarotid injection of autogenous thrombus powder. Another group of 15 rats undergoing sham operation served as controls. Learning and memory ability in these rats was assessed with daily passive avoidance task testing for 10 consecutive days. The animals were sacrificed on 30d and contents of the neuropeptides in tissue homogenate from different areas of brain (frontal cortex, temporal cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and corpus striatum) were measured with (RIA). Results: On the first day of passive avoidance task testing, the frequency of errors in the MID group and the control group was about the same. From the third day on, the frequency of errors in the MID group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05). The neuropeptides contents of all these cerebral areas in the MID group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01) with the only exception of the contents of substance P in thalamus (no significant difference between the contents in the two groups). Conclusion: The impairment of learning and memory in rat models with MID was possibly related to the lowered contents of SS, AVP and substance P in the brain tissue. (authors)

  8. Central Modulation of Neuroinflammation by Neuropeptides and Energy-Sensing Hormones during Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Maldonado-Ruiz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS senses energy homeostasis by integrating both peripheral and autonomic signals and responding to them by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides release. Although it is previously considered an immunologically privileged organ, we now know that this is not so. Cells belonging to the immune system, such as B and T lymphocytes, can be recruited into the CNS to face damage or infection, in addition to possessing resident immunological cells, called microglia. In this way, positive energy balance during obesity promotes an inflammatory state in the CNS. Saturated fatty acids from the diet have been pointed out as powerful candidates to trigger immune response in peripheral system and in the CNS. However, how central immunity communicates to peripheral immune response remains to be clarified. Recently there has been a great interest in the neuropeptides, POMC derived peptides, ghrelin, and leptin, due to their capacity to suppress or induce inflammatory responses in the brain, respectively. These may be potential candidates to treat different pathologies associated with autoimmunity and inflammation. In this review, we will discuss the role of lipotoxicity associated with positive energy balance during obesity in proinflammatory response in microglia, B and T lymphocytes, and its modulation by neuropeptides.

  9. Crustose coralline algae and a cnidarian neuropeptide trigger larval settlement in two coral reef sponges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Whalan

    Full Text Available In sessile marine invertebrates, larval settlement is fundamental to population maintenance and persistence. Cues contributing to the settlement choices and metamorphosis of larvae have important implications for the success of individuals and populations, but cues mediating larval settlement for many marine invertebrates are largely unknown. This study assessed larval settlement in two common Great Barrier Reef sponges, Coscinoderma matthewsi and Rhopaloeides odorabile, to cues that enhance settlement and metamorphosis in various species of scleractinian coral larvae. Methanol extracts of the crustose coralline algae (CCA, Porolithon onkodes, corresponding to a range of concentrations, were used to determine the settlement responses of sponge larvae. Cnidarian neuropeptides (GLW-amide neuropeptides were also tested as a settlement cue. Settlement in both sponge species was approximately two-fold higher in response to live chips of CCA and optimum concentrations of CCA extract compared to 0.2 µm filtered sea water controls. Metamorphosis also increased when larvae were exposed to GLW-amide neuropeptides; R. odorabile mean metamorphosis reached 42.0±5.8% compared to 16.0±2.4% in seawater controls and in C. matthewsi mean metamorphosis reached 68.3±5.4% compared to 36.7±3.3% in seawater controls. These results demonstrate the contributing role chemosensory communication plays in the ability of sponge larvae to identify suitable habitat for successful recruitment. It also raises the possibility that larvae from distinct phyla may share signal transduction pathways involved in metamorphosis.

  10. Annotation of novel neuropeptide precursors in the migratory locust based on transcript screening of a public EST database and mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Loof Arnold

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For holometabolous insects there has been an explosion of proteomic and peptidomic information thanks to large genome sequencing projects. Heterometabolous insects, although comprising many important species, have been far less studied. The migratory locust Locusta migratoria, a heterometabolous insect, is one of the most infamous agricultural pests. They undergo a well-known and profound phase transition from the relatively harmless solitary form to a ferocious gregarious form. The underlying regulatory mechanisms of this phase transition are not fully understood, but it is undoubtedly that neuropeptides are involved. However, neuropeptide research in locusts is hampered by the absence of genomic information. Results Recently, EST (Expressed Sequence Tag databases from Locusta migratoria were constructed. Using bioinformatical tools, we searched these EST databases specifically for neuropeptide precursors. Based on known locust neuropeptide sequences, we confirmed the sequence of several previously identified neuropeptide precursors (i.e. pacifastin-related peptides, which consolidated our method. In addition, we found two novel neuroparsin precursors and annotated the hitherto unknown tachykinin precursor. Besides one of the known tachykinin peptides, this EST contained an additional tachykinin-like sequence. Using neuropeptide precursors from Drosophila melanogaster as a query, we succeeded in annotating the Locusta neuropeptide F, allatostatin-C and ecdysis-triggering hormone precursor, which until now had not been identified in locusts or in any other heterometabolous insect. For the tachykinin precursor, the ecdysis-triggering hormone precursor and the allatostatin-C precursor, translation of the predicted neuropeptides in neural tissues was confirmed with mass spectrometric techniques. Conclusion In this study we describe the annotation of 6 novel neuropeptide precursors and the neuropeptides they encode from the

  11. Functional characterization of a second pedal peptide/orcokinin-type neuropeptide signaling system in the starfish Asterias rubens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming; Egertová, Michaela; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Jones, Alexandra M; Elphick, Maurice R

    2018-04-01

    Molluscan pedal peptides (PPs) and arthropod orcokinins (OKs) are prototypes of a family of neuropeptides that have been identified in several phyla. Recently, starfish myorelaxant peptide (SMP) was identified as a PP/OK-type neuropeptide in the starfish Patiria pectinifera (phylum Echinodermata). Furthermore, analysis of transcriptome sequence data from the starfish Asterias rubens revealed two PP/OK-type precursors: an SMP-type precursor (A. rubens PP-like neuropeptide precursor 1; ArPPLNP1) and a second precursor (ArPPLNP2). We reported previously a detailed analysis of ArPPLNP1 expression in A. rubens and here we report the first functional characterization ArPPLNP2-derived neuropeptides. Sequencing of a cDNA encoding ArPPLNP2 revealed that it comprises eleven related neuropeptides (ArPPLN2a-k), the structures of several of which were confirmed using mass spectrometry. Analysis of the expression of ArPPLNP2 and neuropeptides derived from this precursor using mRNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed a widespread distribution, including expression in radial nerve cords, circumoral nerve ring, digestive system, tube feet and innervation of interossicular muscles. In vitro pharmacology revealed that the ArPPLNP2-derived neuropeptide ArPPLN2h has no effect on the contractility of tube feet or the body wall-associated apical muscle, contrasting with the relaxing effect of ArPPLN1b (ArSMP) on these preparations. ArPPLN2h does, however, cause dose-dependent relaxation of cardiac stomach preparations, with greater potency/efficacy than ArPPLN1b and with similar potency/efficacy to the SALMFamide neuropeptide S2. In conclusion, there are similarities in the expression patterns of ArPPLNP1 and ArPPLNP2 but our data also indicate specialization in the roles of neuropeptides derived from these two PP/OK-type precursors in starfish. © 2017 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Functional characterization of a second pedal peptide/orcokinin‐type neuropeptide signaling system in the starfish Asterias rubens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming; Egertová, Michaela; Zampronio, Cleidiane G.; Jones, Alexandra M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Molluscan pedal peptides (PPs) and arthropod orcokinins (OKs) are prototypes of a family of neuropeptides that have been identified in several phyla. Recently, starfish myorelaxant peptide (SMP) was identified as a PP/OK‐type neuropeptide in the starfish Patiria pectinifera (phylum Echinodermata). Furthermore, analysis of transcriptome sequence data from the starfish Asterias rubens revealed two PP/OK‐type precursors: an SMP‐type precursor (A. rubens PP‐like neuropeptide precursor 1; ArPPLNP1) and a second precursor (ArPPLNP2). We reported previously a detailed analysis of ArPPLNP1 expression in A. rubens and here we report the first functional characterization ArPPLNP2‐derived neuropeptides. Sequencing of a cDNA encoding ArPPLNP2 revealed that it comprises eleven related neuropeptides (ArPPLN2a‐k), the structures of several of which were confirmed using mass spectrometry. Analysis of the expression of ArPPLNP2 and neuropeptides derived from this precursor using mRNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed a widespread distribution, including expression in radial nerve cords, circumoral nerve ring, digestive system, tube feet and innervation of interossicular muscles. In vitro pharmacology revealed that the ArPPLNP2‐derived neuropeptide ArPPLN2h has no effect on the contractility of tube feet or the body wall‐associated apical muscle, contrasting with the relaxing effect of ArPPLN1b (ArSMP) on these preparations. ArPPLN2h does, however, cause dose‐dependent relaxation of cardiac stomach preparations, with greater potency/efficacy than ArPPLN1b and with similar potency/efficacy to the SALMFamide neuropeptide S2. In conclusion, there are similarities in the expression patterns of ArPPLNP1 and ArPPLNP2 but our data also indicate specialization in the roles of neuropeptides derived from these two PP/OK‐type precursors in starfish. PMID:29218721

  13. A neuropeptide FF agonist blocks the acquisition of conditioned place preference to morphine in C57Bl/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Stéphane; Betourne, Alexandre; Marty, Virginie; Daumas, Stéphanie; Halley, Hélène; Lassalle, Jean-Michel; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Frances, Bernard

    2006-05-01

    Neuropeptide FF behaves as an opioid-modulating peptide that seems to be involved in morphine tolerance and physical dependence. Nevertheless, the effects of neuropeptide FF agonists on the rewarding properties of morphine remain unknown. C57BL6 mice were conditioned in an unbiased balanced paradigm of conditioned place preference to study the effect of i.c.v. injections of 1DMe (D-Tyr1(NMe)Phe3]NPFF), a stable agonist of the neuropeptide FF system, on the acquisition of place conditioning by morphine or alcohol (ethanol). Morphine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or ethanol (2 g/kg, i.p.) induced a significant place preference. Injection of 1DMe (1-20 nmol), given 10 min before the i.p. injection of the reinforcing drug during conditioning, inhibited the rewarding effect of morphine but had no effect on the rewarding effect of ethanol. However, a single injection of 1DMe given just before place preference testing was unable to inhibit the rewarding effects of morphine. By itself, 1DMe was inactive but an aversive effect of this agonist could be evidenced if the experimental procedure was biased. These results suggest that neuropeptide FF, injected during conditioning, should influence the development of rewarding effects of morphine and reinforce the hypothesis of strong inhibitory interactions between neuropeptide FF and opioids.

  14. Characterization of a new fish-derived bioactive neuropeptide involved in bone remodelling. Its physiological function and therapeutic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Suarez-Bregua

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A complex network of autocrine and paracrine signals, hormones and neuronal factors preserve the structural integrity of the skeleton and regulate mineral metabolism in vertebrates. We have characterized a new neuropeptide belonging to parathyroid hormone (PTH family. PTH family members are known to play a key role in maintaining mineral homeostasis, bone remodeling and in regulating embryonic development of skeleton and other tissues. This new neuropeptide is synthesized by two clusters of neurons located in lateral hypothalamus as showed in whole mount in situ hybridization. The functional characterization of the gene using a stable transgenic line revealed its key role in the regulation of bone mineral density. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses and comparative genomics results of conserved synteny reveal that this new neuropeptide is a new ohnolog of the PTH family present in teleosts and some tetrapods like chicken, but absent in mammals . Our findings suggest a new brain to bone pathway, where neuronal factors from hypothalamus signal to receptors on bone cells promoting bone remodeling. Further investigations about this new neuropeptide system would be relevant for developing therapies for bone mineral disorders in humans, since this neuropeptide has a conserved domain similar to other PTH-related peptides which have anabolic effects on bone.

  15. Regulation of sleep by neuropeptide Y-like system in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Chunxia He

    Full Text Available Sleep is important for maintenance of normal physiology in animals. In mammals, neuropeptide Y (NPY, a homolog of Drosophila neuropeptide F (NPF, is involved in sleep regulation, with different effects in human and rat. However, the function of NPF on sleep in Drosophila melanogaster has not yet been described. In this study, we investigated the effects of NPF and its receptor-neuropeptide F receptor (NPFR1 on Drosophila sleep. Male flies over-expressing NPF or NPFR1 exhibited increased sleep during the nighttime. Further analysis demonstrated that sleep episode duration during nighttime was greatly increased and sleep latency was significantly reduced, indicating that NPF and NPFR1 promote sleep quality, and their action on sleep is not because of an impact of the NPF signal system on development. Moreover, the homeostatic regulation of flies after sleep deprivation was disrupted by altered NPF signaling, since sleep deprivation decreased transcription of NPF in control flies, and there were less sleep loss during sleep deprivation and less sleep gain after sleep deprivation in flies overexpressing NPF and NPFR1 than in control flies, suggesting that NPF system auto-regulation plays an important role in sleep homeostasis. However, these effects did not occur in females, suggesting a sex-dependent regulatory function in sleep for NPF and NPFR1. NPF in D1 brain neurons showed male-specific expression, providing the cellular locus for male-specific regulation of sleep by NPF and NPFR1. This study brings a new understanding into sleep studies of a sexually dimorphic regulatory mode in female and male flies.

  16. Synergism between soluble guanylate cyclase signaling and neuropeptides extends lifespan in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abergel, Rachel; Livshits, Leonid; Shaked, Maayan; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Gross, Einav

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen (O 2 ) homeostasis is important for all aerobic animals. However, the manner by which O 2 sensing and homeostasis contribute to lifespan regulation is poorly understood. Here, we use the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to address this question. We demonstrate that a loss-of-function mutation in the neuropeptide receptor gene npr-1 and a deletion mutation in the atypical soluble guanylate cyclase gcy-35 O 2 sensor interact synergistically to extend worm lifespan. The function of npr-1 and gcy-35 in the O 2 -sensing neurons AQR, PQR, and URX shortens the lifespan of the worm. By contrast, the activity of the atypical soluble guanylate cyclase O 2 sensor gcy-33 in these neurons is crucial for lifespan extension. In addition to AQR, PQR, and URX, we show that the O 2 -sensing neuron BAG and the interneuron RIA are also important for the lifespan lengthening. Neuropeptide processing by the proprotein convertase EGL-3 is essential for lifespan extension, suggesting that the synergistic effect of joint loss of function of gcy-35 and npr-1 is mediated through neuropeptide signal transduction. The extended lifespan is regulated by hypoxia and insulin signaling pathways, mediated by the transcription factors HIF-1 and DAF-16. Moreover, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear to play an important function in lifespan lengthening. As HIF-1 and DAF-16 activities are modulated by ROS, we speculate that joint loss of function of gcy-35 and npr-1 extends lifespan through ROS signaling. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. FLP-1 neuropeptides modulate sensory and motor circuits in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntschuh, Ingrid; Raps, Daniel A; Joseph, Ivor; Reid, Christopher; Chait, Alexander; Totanes, Raubern; Sawh, Michelle; Li, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes infect over one quarter of the population worldwide, causing morbidity in over one billion people. Current anthelmintic drugs are beginning to lose effectiveness due to the presence of resistant strains. We are interested in the role of neuropeptides, which regulate behaviors in all organisms, as another possible target for anthelmintic drugs. FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) are a family of neuropeptides that are conserved throughout the animal kingdom. In particular, nematodes contain the largest family of FaRPs identified thus far and many of these FaRPs are identical among different nematode species; FaRPs in nematodes are collectively referred to as FLPs (FMRFamide-like peptides). However, little is known about the function of these FLPs. We are using the non-parasitic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for examining FLPs in nematodes. C. elegans contains at least 31 flp genes that encode 72 potential FLPs. Among the flp genes, flp-1 is one of the few that is universally found in nematodes. FLP-1 neuropeptides were previously reported to be involved in sensory and motor functions. However, previous alleles of flp-1 also disrupted a neighboring gene, daf-10. To understand the phenotypes of flp-1, new alleles that specifically disrupt flp-1 were characterized. The previously reported locomotory and egg-laying defects were found to be due to loss of flp-1, while the osmolarity defect is due to loss of daf-10. In addition, loss of flp-1 and daf-10 both cause several phenotypes that increase in severity in the double mutants by disrupting different neurons in the neural circuits.

  18. Drosophila DH31 Neuropeptide and PDF Receptor Regulate Night-Onset Temperature Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Tadahiro; Tang, Xin; Umezaki, Yujiro; Chu, Michelle L; Hamada, Fumika N

    2016-11-16

    Body temperature exhibits rhythmic fluctuations over a 24 h period (Refinetti and Menaker, 1992) and decreases during the night, which is associated with sleep initiation (Gilbert et al., 2004; Kräuchi, 2007a,b). However, the underlying mechanism of this temperature decrease is largely unknown. We have previously shown that Drosophila exhibit a daily temperature preference rhythm (TPR), in which their preferred temperatures increase during the daytime and then decrease at the transition from day to night (night-onset) (Kaneko et al., 2012). Because Drosophila are small ectotherms, their body temperature is very close to that of the ambient temperature (Stevenson, 1985), suggesting that their TPR generates their body temperature rhythm. Here, we demonstrate that the neuropeptide diuretic hormone 31 (DH31) and pigment-dispersing factor receptor (PDFR) contribute to regulate the preferred temperature decrease at night-onset. We show that PDFR and tethered-DH31 expression in dorsal neurons 2 (DN2s) restore the preferred temperature decrease at night-onset, suggesting that DH31 acts on PDFR in DN2s. Notably, we previously showed that the molecular clock in DN2s is important for TPR. Although PDF (another ligand of PDFR) is a critical factor for locomotor activity rhythms, Pdf mutants exhibit normal preferred temperature decreases at night-onset. This suggests that DH31-PDFR signaling specifically regulates a preferred temperature decrease at night-onset. Thus, we propose that night-onset TPR and locomotor activity rhythms are differentially controlled not only by clock neurons but also by neuropeptide signaling in the brain. Body temperature rhythm (BTR) is fundamental for the maintenance of functions essential for homeostasis, such as generating metabolic energy and sleep. One major unsolved question is how body temperature decreases dramatically during the night. Previously, we demonstrated that a BTR-like mechanism, referred to as temperature preference rhythm (TPR

  19. Metabolism of cryptic peptides derived from neuropeptide FF precursors: the involvement of insulin-degrading enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Mielczarek, Przemyslaw; Niedziolka, Magdalena; Silberring, Jerzy

    2014-09-22

    The term "cryptome" refers to the subset of cryptic peptides with bioactivities that are often unpredictable and very different from the parent protein. These cryptic peptides are generated by proteolytic cleavage of proteases, whose identification in vivo can be very challenging. In this work, we show that insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is able to degrade specific amino acid sequences present in the neuropeptide pro-NPFFA (NPFF precursor), generating some cryptic peptides that are also observed after incubation with rat brain cortex homogenate. The reported experimental findings support the increasingly accredited hypothesis, according to which, due to its wide substrate selectivity, IDE is involved in a wide variety of physiopathological processes.

  20. Molecular fingerprint of neuropeptide S-producing neurons in the mouse brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaobin; Zeng, Joanne; Zhou, Anni

    2011-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) has been associated with a number of complex brain functions, including anxiety-like behaviors, arousal, sleep-wakefulness regulation, drug-seeking behaviors, and learning and memory. In order to better understand how NPS influences these functions in a neuronal network context...... of incoming neurotransmission, controlling neuronal activity of NPS-producing neurons. Stress-induced functional activation of NPS-producing neurons was detected by staining for the immediate-early gene c-fos, thus supporting earlier findings that NPS might be part of the brain stress response network....

  1. Three different prohormones yield a variety of Hydra-RFamide (Arg-Phe-NH2) neuropeptides in Hydra magnipapillata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darmer, D; Hauser, F; Nothacker, H P

    1998-01-01

    from H. magnipapillata, each of which gives rise to a variety of RFamide neuropeptides. Preprohormone A contains one copy of unprocessed Hydra-RFamide I (QWLGGRFG), II (QWFNGRFG), III/IV [(KP)HLRGRFG] and two putative neuropeptide sequences (QLMSGRFG and QLMRGRFG). Preprohormone B has the same general....... Southern blot analyses suggest that preprohormones A and B are each coded for by a single gene, whereas one or possibly two closely related genes code for preprohormone C. Northern blot analyses and in situ hybridizations show that the gene coding for preprohormone A is expressed in neurons of both...... the head and foot regions of Hydra, whereas the genes coding for preprohormones B and C are specifically expressed in neurons of different regions of the head. All of this shows that neuropeptide biosynthesis in the primitive metazoan Hydra is already rather complex. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-Jun-1...

  2. Pedal peptide/orcokinin-type neuropeptide signaling in a deuterostome: The anatomy and pharmacology of starfish myorelaxant peptide in Asterias rubens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming; Egertová, Michaela; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Jones, Alexandra M; Elphick, Maurice R

    2017-12-15

    Pedal peptide (PP) and orcokinin (OK) are related neuropeptides that were discovered in protostomian invertebrates (mollusks, arthropods). However, analysis of genome/transcriptome sequence data has revealed that PP/OK-type neuropeptides also occur in a deuterostomian phylum-the echinoderms. Furthermore, a PP/OK-type neuropeptide (starfish myorelaxant peptide, SMP) was recently identified as a muscle relaxant in the starfish Patiria pectinifera. Here mass spectrometry was used to identify five neuropeptides (ArPPLN1a-e) derived from the SMP precursor (PP-like neuropeptide precursor 1; ArPPLNP1) in the starfish Asterias rubens. Analysis of the expression of ArPPLNP1 and neuropeptides derived from this precursor in A. rubens using mRNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed a widespread pattern of expression, with labeled cells and/or processes present in the radial nerve cords, circumoral nerve ring, digestive system (e.g., cardiac stomach) and body wall-associated muscles (e.g., apical muscle) and appendages (e.g., tube feet and papulae). Furthermore, our data provide the first evidence that neuropeptides are present in the lateral motor nerves and in nerve processes innervating interossicular muscles. In vitro pharmacological tests with SMP (ArPPLN1b) revealed that it causes dose-dependent relaxation of apical muscle, tube foot and cardiac stomach preparations from A. rubens. Collectively, these anatomical and pharmacological data indicate that neuropeptides derived from ArPPLNP1 act as inhibitory neuromuscular transmitters in starfish, which contrasts with the myoexcitatory actions of PP/OK-type neuropeptides in protostomian invertebrates. Thus, the divergence of deuterostomes and protostomes may have been accompanied by an inhibitory-excitatory transition in the roles of PP/OK-type neuropeptides as regulators of muscle activity. © 2017 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Pedal peptide/orcokinin‐type neuropeptide signaling in a deuterostome: The anatomy and pharmacology of starfish myorelaxant peptide in Asterias rubens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming; Egertová, Michaela; Zampronio, Cleidiane G.; Jones, Alexandra M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pedal peptide (PP) and orcokinin (OK) are related neuropeptides that were discovered in protostomian invertebrates (mollusks, arthropods). However, analysis of genome/transcriptome sequence data has revealed that PP/OK‐type neuropeptides also occur in a deuterostomian phylum—the echinoderms. Furthermore, a PP/OK‐type neuropeptide (starfish myorelaxant peptide, SMP) was recently identified as a muscle relaxant in the starfish Patiria pectinifera. Here mass spectrometry was used to identify five neuropeptides (ArPPLN1a‐e) derived from the SMP precursor (PP‐like neuropeptide precursor 1; ArPPLNP1) in the starfish Asterias rubens. Analysis of the expression of ArPPLNP1 and neuropeptides derived from this precursor in A. rubens using mRNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed a widespread pattern of expression, with labeled cells and/or processes present in the radial nerve cords, circumoral nerve ring, digestive system (e.g., cardiac stomach) and body wall‐associated muscles (e.g., apical muscle) and appendages (e.g., tube feet and papulae). Furthermore, our data provide the first evidence that neuropeptides are present in the lateral motor nerves and in nerve processes innervating interossicular muscles. In vitro pharmacological tests with SMP (ArPPLN1b) revealed that it causes dose‐dependent relaxation of apical muscle, tube foot and cardiac stomach preparations from A. rubens. Collectively, these anatomical and pharmacological data indicate that neuropeptides derived from ArPPLNP1 act as inhibitory neuromuscular transmitters in starfish, which contrasts with the myoexcitatory actions of PP/OK‐type neuropeptides in protostomian invertebrates. Thus, the divergence of deuterostomes and protostomes may have been accompanied by an inhibitory–excitatory transition in the roles of PP/OK‐type neuropeptides as regulators of muscle activity. PMID:28880392

  4. Mass Spectrometric Measurement of Neuropeptide Secretion in the Crab, Cancer borealis, by In Vivo Microdialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhidan; Schmerberg, Claire M.; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides (NPs), a unique and highly important class of signaling molecules across the animal kingdom, have been extensively characterized in the neuronal tissues of various crustaceans. Because many NPs are released into circulating fluid (hemolymph) and travel to distant sites in order to exhibit physiological effects, it is important to measure the secretion of these NPs from living animals. In this study, we report on extensive characterization of NPs released in the crab Cancer borealis by utilizing in vivo microdialysis to sample NPs from the hemolymph. We determined the necessary duration for collection of microdialysis samples, enabling more comprehensive identification of NP content while maintaining the temporal resolution of sampling. Analysis of in vivo microdialysates using a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap™ Q-Exactive mass spectrometer revealed that more than 50 neuropeptides from 9 peptide families—including the allatostatin, RFamide, orcokinin, tachykinin-related peptide and RYamide families–were released into the circulatory system. The presence of these peptides both in neuronal tissues as well as in hemolymph indicates their putative hormonal roles, a finding that merits further investigation. Preliminary quantitative measurement of these identified NPs suggested several potential candidates that may be associated with the circadian rhythm in Cancer borealis. PMID:25537886

  5. Novel and ultra-rare damaging variants in neuropeptide signaling are associated with disordered eating behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lutter

    Full Text Available Eating disorders develop through a combination of genetic vulnerability and environmental stress, however the genetic basis of this risk is unknown.To understand the genetic basis of this risk, we performed whole exome sequencing on 93 unrelated individuals with eating disorders (38 restricted-eating and 55 binge-eating to identify novel damaging variants. Candidate genes with an excessive burden of predicted damaging variants were then prioritized based upon an unbiased, data-driven bioinformatic analysis. One top candidate pathway was empirically tested for therapeutic potential in a mouse model of binge-like eating.An excessive burden of novel damaging variants was identified in 186 genes in the restricted-eating group and 245 genes in the binge-eating group. This list is significantly enriched (OR = 4.6, p<0.0001 for genes involved in neuropeptide/neurotrophic pathways implicated in appetite regulation, including neurotensin-, glucagon-like peptide 1- and BDNF-signaling. Administration of the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exendin-4 significantly reduced food intake in a mouse model of 'binge-like' eating.These findings implicate ultra-rare and novel damaging variants in neuropeptide/neurotropic factor signaling pathways in the development of eating disorder behaviors and identify glucagon-like peptide 1-receptor agonists as a potential treatment for binge eating.

  6. Sensory Neuropeptides and Endogenous Opioids Expression in Human Dental Pulp with Asymptomatic Inflammation: In Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Chavarria-Bolaños

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study quantified the expression of substance P (SP, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, β-endorphins (β-End, and methionine-enkephalin (Met-Enk in human dental pulp following orthodontic intrusion. Methods. Eight patients were selected according to preestablished inclusion criteria. From each patient, two premolars (indicated for extraction due to orthodontic reasons were randomly assigned to two different groups: the asymptomatic inflammation group (EXPg, which would undergo controlled intrusive force for seven days, and the control group (CTRg, which was used to determine the basal levels of each substance. Once extracted, dental pulp tissue was prepared to determine the expression levels of both neuropeptides and endogenous opioids by radioimmunoassay (RIA. Results. All samples from the CTRg exhibited basal levels of both neuropeptides and endogenous opioids. By day seven, all patients were asymptomatic, even when all orthodontic-intrusive devices were still active. In the EXPg, the SP and CGRP exhibited statistically significant different levels. Although none of the endogenous opioids showed statistically significant differences, they all expressed increasing trends in the EXPg. Conclusions. SP and CGRP were identified in dental pulp after seven days of controlled orthodontic intrusion movement, even in the absence of pain.

  7. Contribution of Dynorphin and Orexin Neuropeptide Systems to the Motivational Effects of Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rachel I; Moorman, David E; Becker, Howard C

    2018-03-11

    Understanding the neural systems that drive alcohol motivation and are disrupted in alcohol use disorders is of critical importance in developing novel treatments. The dynorphin and orexin/hypocretin neuropeptide systems are particularly relevant with respect to alcohol use and misuse. Both systems are strongly associated with alcohol-seeking behaviors, particularly in cases of high levels of alcohol use as seen in dependence. Furthermore, both systems also play a role in stress and anxiety, indicating that disruption of these systems may underlie long-term homeostatic dysregulation seen in alcohol use disorders. These systems are also closely interrelated with one another - dynorphin/kappa opioid receptors and orexin/hypocretin receptors are found in similar regions and hypocretin/orexin neurons also express dynorphin - suggesting that these two systems may work together in the regulation of alcohol seeking and may be mutually disrupted in alcohol use disorders. This chapter reviews studies demonstrating a role for each of these systems in motivated behavior, with a focus on their roles in regulating alcohol-seeking and self-administration behaviors. Consideration is also given to evidence indicating that these neuropeptide systems may be viable targets for the development of potential treatments for alcohol use disorders.

  8. Tailless and Atrophin control Drosophila aggression by regulating neuropeptide signalling in the pars intercerebralis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Shaun M.; Thomas, Amanda L.; Nomie, Krystle J.; Huang, Longwen; Dierick, Herman A.

    2014-02-01

    Aggressive behaviour is widespread throughout the animal kingdom. However, its mechanisms are poorly understood, and the degree of molecular conservation between distantly related species is unknown. Here we show that knockdown of tailless (tll) increases aggression in Drosophila, similar to the effect of its mouse orthologue Nr2e1. Tll localizes to the adult pars intercerebralis (PI), which shows similarity to the mammalian hypothalamus. Knockdown of tll in the PI is sufficient to increase aggression and is rescued by co-expressing human NR2E1. Knockdown of Atrophin, a Tll co-repressor, also increases aggression, and both proteins physically interact in the PI. tll knockdown-induced aggression is fully suppressed by blocking neuropeptide processing or release from the PI. In addition, genetically activating PI neurons increases aggression, mimicking the aggression-inducing effect of hypothalamic stimulation. Together, our results suggest that a transcriptional control module regulates neuropeptide signalling from the neurosecretory cells of the brain to control aggressive behaviour.

  9. Breakthrough in neuroendocrinology by discovering novel neuropeptides and neurosteroids: 2. Discovery of neurosteroids and pineal neurosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Haraguchi, Shogo

    2014-09-01

    Bargmann-Scharrer's discovery of "neurosecretion" in the first half of the 20th century has since matured into the scientific discipline of neuroendocrinology. Identification of novel neurohormones, such as neuropeptides and neurosteroids, is essential for the progress of neuroendocrinology. Our studies over the past two decades have significantly broadened the horizons of this field of research by identifying novel neuropeptides and neurosteroids in vertebrates that have opened new lines of scientific investigation in neuroendocrinology. We have established de novo synthesis and functions of neurosteroids in the brain of various vertebrates. Recently, we discovered 7α-hydroxypregnenolone (7α-OH PREG), a novel bioactive neurosteroid that acts as a key regulator for inducing locomotor behavior by means of the dopaminergic system. We further discovered that the pineal gland, an endocrine organ located close to the brain, is an important site of production of neurosteroids de novo from cholesterol (CHOL). The pineal gland secretes 7α-OH PREG and 3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone (3α,5α-THP; allopregnanolone) that are involved in locomotor rhythms and neuronal survival, respectively. Subsequently, we have demonstrated their mode of action and functional significance. This review summarizes the discovery of these novel neurosteroids and its contribution to the progress of neuroendocrinology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization, tissue distribution, and expression of neuropeptide Y in olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Tan, Xungang; Du, Shaojun; Sun, Wei; You, Feng; Zhang, Peijun

    2015-05-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36-amino acid peptide of the neuropeptide Y family that plays key roles in the regulation of food intake. In this study, we focused on NPY mRNA expression changes around feeding time and during food deprivation in olive flounder. The olive flounder NPY mRNA levels were analyzed in different tissues and a high level of expression was detected in the brain. We also demonstrated a correlation between NPY expression levels in the brain and feeding schedule. NPY expression levels in olive flounder maintained on a daily scheduled feeding regimen increased shortly before feeding and decreased after the scheduled feeding time. Compared with the -1 h group before feeding, NPY expression in the 3 h group after feeding decreased significantly ( PFood deprivation led to an 81.7% decrease in NPY mRNA levels in the 24 h fasted group ( Pfood intake in olive flounder. This result reveals the function of NPY in regulating food intake and its potential importance in olive flounder aquaculture.

  11. Beta-amyloid peptides undergo regulated co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toneff, Thomas; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Mosier, Charles; Abagyan, Armen; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2013-08-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are secreted from neurons, resulting in extracellular accumulation of Aβ and neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Because neuronal secretion is fundamental for the release of neurotransmitters, this study assessed the hypothesis that Aβ undergoes co-release with neurotransmitters. Model neuronal-like chromaffin cells were investigated, and results illustrate regulated, co-secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with peptide neurotransmitters (galanin, enkephalin, and NPY) and catecholamine neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine). Regulated secretion from chromaffin cells was stimulated by KCl depolarization and nicotine. Forskolin, stimulating cAMP, also induced co-secretion of Aβ peptides with peptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters. These data suggested the co-localization of Aβ with neurotransmitters in dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) that store and secrete such chemical messengers. Indeed, Aβ was demonstrated to be present in DCSV with neuropeptide and catecholamine transmitters. Furthermore, the DCSV organelle contains APP and its processing proteases, β- and γ-secretases, that are necessary for production of Aβ. Thus, Aβ can be generated in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV. Human IMR32 neuroblastoma cells also displayed regulated secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with the galanin neurotransmitter. These findings illustrate that Aβ peptides are present in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV, and undergo co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters that regulate brain functions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neurotransmitters and Neuropeptides: New Players in the Control of Islet of Langerhans' Cell Mass and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cairano, Eliana S; Moretti, Stefania; Marciani, Paola; Sacchi, Vellea Franca; Castagna, Michela; Davalli, Alberto; Folli, Franco; Perego, Carla

    2016-04-01

    Islets of Langerhans control whole body glucose homeostasis, as they respond, releasing hormones, to changes in nutrient concentrations in the blood stream. The regulation of hormone secretion has been the focus of attention for a long time because it is related to many metabolic disorders, including diabetes mellitus. Endocrine cells of the islet use a sophisticate system of endocrine, paracrine and autocrine signals to synchronize their activities. These signals provide a fast and accurate control not only for hormone release but also for cell differentiation and survival, key aspects in islet physiology and pathology. Among the different categories of paracrine/autocrine signals, this review highlights the role of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides. In a manner similar to neurons, endocrine cells synthesize, accumulate, release neurotransmitters in the islet milieu, and possess receptors able to decode these signals. In this review, we provide a comprehensive description of neurotransmitter/neuropetide signaling pathways present within the islet. Then, we focus on evidence supporting the concept that neurotransmitters/neuropeptides and their receptors are interesting new targets to preserve β-cell function and mass. A greater understanding of how this network of signals works in physiological and pathological conditions would advance our knowledge of islet biology and physiology and uncover potentially new areas of pharmacological intervention. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 756-767, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Neuropeptide co-expression in hypothalamic kisspeptin neurons of laboratory animals and the human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin eSkrapits

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic peptidergic neurons using kisspeptin (KP and its co-transmitters for communication are critically involved in the regulation of mammalian reproduction and puberty. This article provides an overview of neuropeptides present in KP neurons, with a focus on the human species. Immunohistochemical studies reveal that large subsets of human KP neurons synthesize neurokinin B, as also shown in laboratory species. In contrast, dynorphin described in KP neurons of rodents and sheep is found rarely in KP cells of human males and postmenopausal females. Similarly, galanin is detectable in mouse, but not human, KP cells, whereas substance P, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript and proenkephalin-derived opioids are expressed in varying subsets of KP neurons in humans, but not reported in ARC of other species. Human KP neurons do not contain neurotensin, cholecystokinin, proopiomelanocortin-derivatives, agouti-related protein, neuropeptide Y, somatostatin or tyrosine hydroxylase (dopamine. These data identify the possible co-transmitters of human KP cells. Neurochemical properties distinct from those of laboratory species indicate that humans use considerably different neurotransmitter mechanisms to regulate fertility.

  14. A Promising Therapeutic Target for Metabolic Diseases: Neuropeptide Y Receptors in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Human neuropeptide Y (hNPY is one of the most widely expressed neurotransmitters in the human central and peripheral nervous systems. It consists of 36 highly conserved amino acid residues, and was first isolated from the porcine hypothalamus in 1982. While it is the most recently discovered member of the pancreatic polypeptide family (which includes neuropeptide Y, gut-derived hormone peptide YY, and pancreatic polypeptide, NPY is the most abundant peptide found in the mammalian brain. In order to exert particular functions, NPY needs to bind to the NPY receptor to activate specific signaling pathways. NPY receptors belong to the class A or rhodopsin-like G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family and signal via cell-surface receptors. By binding to GPCRs, NPY plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including cortical excitability, stress response, food intake, circadian rhythms, and cardiovascular function. Abnormal regulation of NPY is involved in the development of a wide range of diseases, including obesity, hypertension, atherosclerosis, epilepsy, metabolic disorders, and many cancers. Thus far, five receptors have been cloned from mammals (Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5, and y6, but only four of these (hY1, hY2, hY4, and hY5 are functional in humans. In this review, we summarize the structural characteristics of human NPY receptors and their role in metabolic diseases.

  15. Habituation as an adaptive shift in response strategy mediated by neuropeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiel, Evan L.; Yu, Alex J.; Giles, Andrew C.; Rankin, Catharine H.

    2017-08-01

    Habituation is a non-associative form of learning characterized by a decremented response to repeated stimulation. It is typically framed as a process of selective attention, allowing animals to ignore irrelevant stimuli in order to free up limited cognitive resources. However, habituation can also occur to threatening and toxic stimuli, suggesting that habituation may serve other functions. Here we took advantage of a high-throughput Caenorhabditis elegans learning assay to investigate habituation to noxious stimuli. Using real-time computer vision software for automated behavioral tracking and optogenetics for controlled activation of a polymodal nociceptor, ASH, we found that neuropeptides mediated habituation and performed an RNAi screen to identify candidate receptors. Through subsequent mutant analysis and cell-type-specific gene expression, we found that pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) neuropeptides function redundantly to promote habituation via PDFR-1-mediated cAMP signaling in both neurons and muscles. Behavioral analysis during learning acquisition suggests that response habituation and sensitization of locomotion are parts of a shifting behavioral strategy orchestrated by pigment dispersing factor signaling to promote dispersal away from repeated aversive stimuli.

  16. The neuropeptide NLP-22 regulates a sleep-like state in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M D; Trojanowski, N F; George-Raizen, J B; Smith, C J; Yu, C-C; Fang-Yen, C; Raizen, D M

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptides have central roles in the regulation of homoeostatic behaviours such as sleep and feeding. Caenorhabditis elegans displays sleep-like quiescence of locomotion and feeding during a larval transition stage called lethargus and feeds during active larval and adult stages. Here we show that the neuropeptide NLP-22 is a regulator of Caenorhabditis elegans sleep-like quiescence observed during lethargus. nlp-22 shows cyclical mRNA expression in synchrony with lethargus; it is regulated by LIN-42, an orthologue of the core circadian protein PERIOD; and it is expressed solely in the two RIA interneurons. nlp-22 and the RIA interneurons are required for normal lethargus quiescence, and forced expression of nlp-22 during active stages causes anachronistic locomotion and feeding quiescence. Optogenetic stimulation of the RIA interneurons has a movement-promoting effect, demonstrating functional complexity in a single-neuron type. Our work defines a quiescence-regulating role for NLP-22 and expands our knowledge of the neural circuitry controlling Caenorhabditis elegans behavioural quiescence.

  17. Central amygdalar nucleus treated with orexin neuropeptides evoke differing feeding and grooming responses in the hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alò, Raffaella; Avolio, Ennio; Mele, Maria; Di Vito, Anna; Canonaco, Marcello

    2015-04-15

    Interaction of the orexinergic (ORXergic) neuronal system with the excitatory (glutamate, l-Glu) or the inhibitory (GABA) neurosignaling complexes evokes major homeostatic physiological events. In this study, effects of the two ORXergic neuropeptides (ORX-A/B) on their receptor (ORX-2R) expression changes were correlated to feeding and grooming actions of the hibernating hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). Infusion of the central amygdala nucleus (CeA) with ORX-A caused hamsters to consume notable quantities of food, while ORX-B accounted for a moderate increase. Interestingly the latter neuropeptide was responsible for greater frequencies of grooming with respect to both controls and the hamsters treated with ORX-A. These distinct behavioral changes turned out to be even greater in the presence of l-Glu agonist (NMDA) while the α1 GABAA receptor agonist (zolpidem, Zol) greatly reduced ORX-A-dependent feeding bouts. Moreover, ORX-A+NMDA mainly promoted greater ORX-2R expression levels with respect to ORX-A-treated hamsters while ORX-B+Zol was instead largely responsible for a down-regulatory trend. Overall, these features point to CeA ORX-2R sites as key sensory limbic elements capable of regulating eating and grooming responses, which may provide useful insights regarding the type of molecular mechanism(s) operating during feeding bouts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Cloning and analysis of three genes encoding type II CHH family neuropeptides from Fennropenaeus chinensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zai-Zhao; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2003-10-01

    On the basis of sequence similarity, the crustean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) family peptides have been classified into two types of hormones: type I and type II. Molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) is a neuropeptide member of type II CHH family. Molting in shrimp is controlled by MIH and ecdysone. By inhibiting the synthesis of ecdysone in the Y-organ, MIH indirectly suppresses the molting activity of shrimp. In this study, we reported the cloning and characterization of 3 gene fragments encoding type II CHH family neuropeptides of the shrimp Fennropenaeus chinensis. According to the complementary DNA sequence of the mult-inhibiting hormone of Fennropenaeus chinensis, 3 primers were designed and synthesized. MP1 and MP2 are sense primers, and MP3 is anti-sense primer. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using genomic DNA of Fennropenaeus chinensis as template. Three PCR products were obtained using primers MP1 and MP3. Their sizes are about 600 bp, 850 bp, 1050 bp, respectively. A 580 bp PCR product was obtained using primers MP2 and MP3. All the 4 PCR products were cloned into pMD18-T vector. The recombinant clones were sequenced using ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer. After sequencing, all the DNA sequences were searched in the GenBank by Blast program to find similar gene sequences. The searching results revealed 3 DNA fragment sequences were of high similarity with CHH family neuropeptide genes from various crustean species. The 3 DNA fragments were named as NP1, NP2, and NP3. Their sizes were 540 bp, 601 bp, and 826 bp, respectively. Using the mRNA sequences with the most similarity to the 3 sequence fragments as reference, the gene structure of the 3 DNA fragment sequences was analyzed. The exons of 3 sequence fragments were aligned with their similar sequences by Clustal W program. Both NP1 and NP2 consisted of 1 intron and 2 exons. NP3 consisted of 2 introns and 3 exons. Sequence analysis suggested that these 3 products belonged to sequence fragments of neuropeptide

  19. Identification and sequence analysis of pyrokinin/PBAN peptide of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-14

    Nov 14, 2011 ... granaries, and warehouses (Tang et al., 2008; Nayak and. Daglish, 2007). The insect had developed ... collected at a wheat warehouse in Zhongxiang, HuBei Province,. China in 2005. Under laboratory .... Data in the table represents the mean ± SD of three repeats. Within each column, data followed by.

  20. A Multifaceted Mass Spectrometric Method to Probe Feeding Related Neuropeptide Changes in Callinectes sapidus and Carcinus maenas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhuo; DeLaney, Kellen; Hui, Limei; Wang, Junhua; Sturm, Robert M.; Li, Lingjun

    2018-02-01

    Food intake is regulated by various neuromodulators, including numerous neuropeptides. However, it remains elusive at the molecular and cellular level as to how these important chemicals regulate internal processes and which regions of the neuronal organs are responsible for regulating the behavior. Here we report a comparative neuropeptidomic analysis of the brain and pericardial organ (PO) in response to feeding in two well-studied crustacean physiology model organisms, Callinectes sapidus and Carcinus maenas, using mass spectrometry (MS) techniques. A multifaceted MS-based approach has been developed to obtain complementary information on the expression changes of a large array of neuropeptides in the brain and PO. The method employs stable isotope labeling of brain and PO extracts for relative MS quantitation, capillary electrophoresis (CE)-MS for fractionation and high-specificity analysis, and mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) for in-situ molecular mapping of peptides. A number of neuropeptides, including RFamides, B-type allatostatins (AST-B), RYamides, and orcokinins exhibit significant changes in abundance after feeding in this investigation. Peptides from the AST-B family found in PO tissue were shown to have both altered expression and localization changes after feeding, indicating that they may be a class of vital neuropeptide regulators involved in feeding behavior. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. FRPR-4 Is a G-Protein Coupled Neuropeptide Receptor That Regulates Behavioral Quiescence and Posture in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Nelson

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides signal through G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs to regulate a broad array of animal behaviors and physiological processes. The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes approximately 100 predicted neuropeptide receptor GPCRs, but in vivo roles for only a few have been identified. We describe here a role for the GPCR FRPR-4 in the regulation of behavioral quiescence and locomotive posture. FRPR-4 is activated in cell culture by several neuropeptides with an amidated isoleucine-arginine-phenylalanine (IRF motif or an amidated valine-arginine-phenylalanine (VRF motif at their carboxy termini, including those encoded by the gene flp-13. Loss of frpr-4 function results in a minor feeding quiescence defect after heat-induced cellular stress. Overexpression of frpr-4 induces quiescence of locomotion and feeding as well as an exaggerated body bend posture. The exaggerated body bend posture requires the gene flp-13. While frpr-4 is expressed broadly, selective overexpression of frpr-4 in the proprioceptive DVA neurons results in exaggerated body bends that require flp-13 in the ALA neuron. Our results suggest that FLP-13 and other neuropeptides signal through FRPR-4 and other receptors to regulate locomotion posture and behavioral quiescence.

  2. Effects of cannabinoids on neuropeptide Y and β-endorphin expression in the rat hypothalamic arcuate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkali-Kassemi, Lamiae; El Ouezzani, Seloua; Magoul, Rabia; Merroun, Ikram; Lopez-Jurado, Maria; Errami, Mohammed

    2011-02-01

    The control of appetite and satiety is extremely complex and involves a balance between neurotransmitters and neuropeptides to stimulate and/or inhibit feeding behaviour. The effect of cannabinoids on food intake is well established, but little is known about the mechanism of action underlying their activity. In the present report, the effect of pharmacological manipulation of the cannabinoid receptor on the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides is investigated. We used an immunohistochemical approach to examine the effect of intracerebroventricular administration of the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 and the inverse agonist AM251 on neuropeptide Y (NPY) and the β-endorphin (β-end) neuronal hypothalamic systems. Double immunohistochemistry (c-fos/β-end) was used to assess the number of β-end neurons activated by the cannabinoid agonist. The present results showed that 1 μg WIN 55,212-2 increases β-end immunoreactivity within the arcuate nucleus while no significant changes were noted in the NPY-immunoreactive nerve fibres network in comparison to the control group. Injection of 1 μg AM251 decreases both NPY and β-end immunoreactivity within the arcuate nucleus. The number of β-end neurons exhibiting c-fos increased significantly in WIN 55,212-2 compared with the control group. These results suggest that cannabinoids affect the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides, notably the NPY and β-end systems, which may have implications in the orexigenic action of cannabinoids.

  3. Excitatory action of the native neuropeptide antho-rfamide on muscles in the pennatulid Renilla köllikeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anctil, M; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1989-01-01

    1. Antho-RFamide (pGlu-Gly-Arg-Phe-amide), a neuropeptide recently isolated from the sea pansy Renilla köllikeri induced sustained (tonic) contractions in the rachis and peduncle of the colony, and in the individual autozooid polyps. 2. The threshold concentration for this effect was 5 nM in summ...

  4. Y1 receptors for neuropeptide Y are coupled to mobilization of intracellular calcium and inhibition of adenylate cyclase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aakerlund, L; Gether, U; Fuhlendorff, J

    1990-01-01

    Two types of binding sites have previously been described for neuropeptide Y (NPY), called Y1 and Y2 receptors. The intracellular events following Y1 receptor activation was studied in the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-MC. Both NPY and the specific Y1 receptor ligand, [Leu31,Pro34]-NPY, caused...

  5. Development of a human vasopressin V-1a-receptor antagonist from an evolutionary-related insect neuropeptide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Di Giglio, M. G.; Muttenthaler, M.; Harpsoe, K.; Liutkeviciute, Z.; Keov, P.; Eder, T.; Rattei, T.; Arrowsmith, S.; Wray, S.; Marek, Aleš; Elbert, Tomáš; Alewood, P. F.; Gloriam, D. E.; Gruber, C. W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, Feb 1 (2017), č. článku 41002. ISSN 2045-2322 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : neuropeptide * inotocin * V1aR-antagonist Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016 https://www.nature.com/articles/srep41002

  6. Neuropeptide signaling sequences identified by pyrosequencing of the American dog tick synganglion transcriptome during blood feeding and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Kevin V; Khalil, Sayed M S; Ross, E; Grozinger, Christina M; Sonenshine, Daniel E; Michael Roe, R

    2010-01-01

    Ticks are important vectors of numerous pathogens that impact human and animal health. The tick central nervous system represents an understudied area in tick biology and no tick synganglion-specific transcriptome has been described to date. Here we characterize whole or partial cDNA sequences of fourteen putative neuropeptides (allatostatin, insulin-like peptide, ion-transport peptide, sulfakinin, bursicon alpha/beta, eclosion hormone, glycoprotein hormone alpha/beta, corazonin, four orcokinins) and five neuropeptide receptors (gonadotropin receptor, leucokinin-like receptor, sulfakinin receptor, calcitonin receptor, pyrokinin receptor) translated from cDNA synthesized from the synganglion of unfed, partially fed and replete female American dog ticks, Dermacentor variabilis. Their homology to the same neuropeptides in other taxa is discussed. Many of these neuropeptides such as an allatostatin, insulin-like peptide, eclosion hormone, bursicon alpha and beta and glycoprotein hormone alpha and beta have not been previously described in the Chelicerata. An insulin-receptor substrate protein was also found indicating that an insulin signaling network is present in ticks. A putative type-2 proprotein processing convertase was also sequenced that may be involved in cleavage at monobasic and dibasic endoproteolytic cleavage sites in prohormones. The possible physiological role of the proteins discovered in adult tick blood feeding and reproduction will be discussed. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuropeptide changes and neuroactive amino acids in CSF from humans and sheep with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs, Batten disease).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kay, G.W.; Verbeek, M.M.; Furlong, J.M.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Palmer, D.N.

    2009-01-01

    Anomalies in neuropeptides and neuroactive amino acids have been postulated to play a role in neurodegeneration in a variety of diseases including the inherited neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs, Batten disease). These are often indicated by concentration changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

  8. Three different prohormones yield a variety of Hydra-RFamide (Arg-Phe-NH2) neuropeptides in Hydra magnipapillata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darmer, D; Hauser, F; Nothacker, H P

    1998-01-01

    the head and foot regions of Hydra, whereas the genes coding for preprohormones B and C are specifically expressed in neurons of different regions of the head. All of this shows that neuropeptide biosynthesis in the primitive metazoan Hydra is already rather complex. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-Jun-1...

  9. Energy Balance Regulating Neuropeptides Are Expressed through Pregnancy and Regulated by Interleukin-6 Deficiency in Mouse Placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Pazos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The placenta produces a number of signaling molecules including metabolic and reproductive hormones as well as several inflammatory mediators. Among them, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, a well-known immune and metabolic regulator, acts peripherally modulating metabolic function and centrally increasing energy expenditure and reducing body fat. IL-6 interacts with key hypothalamic neuropeptidergic systems controlling energy homeostasis such as those producing the orexigenic/anabolic: neuropeptide Y (NPY and agouti-related peptide (AgRP and anorectic/catabolic neuropeptides: proopiomelanocortin (POMC and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART. Human and rat placenta have been identified as source of these neuropeptides, but their expression and regulation in murine placental tissues remain unknown. Therefore, placental mRNA levels of IL-6, NPY, AgRP, POMC, and CART at different pregnancy stages (gestational days 13, 15, and 18 were analyzed by real time PCR, as were the effect of IL-6 deficiency (IL-6 knockout mice on their placental expression. Our results showed that placenta-derived neuropeptides were regulated by gestational age and IL-6 throughout the second half of mouse pregnancy. These data suggest that IL-6 may participate in the fine tune control of energy balance during pregnancy by extending its action as a metabolic signal to the main organ at the fetomaternal interface: the placenta.

  10. Energy Balance Regulating Neuropeptides Are Expressed through Pregnancy and Regulated by Interleukin-6 Deficiency in Mouse Placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Patricia; Lima, Luis; Diéguez, Carlos; García, María C.

    2014-01-01

    The placenta produces a number of signaling molecules including metabolic and reproductive hormones as well as several inflammatory mediators. Among them, Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-known immune and metabolic regulator, acts peripherally modulating metabolic function and centrally increasing energy expenditure and reducing body fat. IL-6 interacts with key hypothalamic neuropeptidergic systems controlling energy homeostasis such as those producing the orexigenic/anabolic: neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and anorectic/catabolic neuropeptides: proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART). Human and rat placenta have been identified as source of these neuropeptides, but their expression and regulation in murine placental tissues remain unknown. Therefore, placental mRNA levels of IL-6, NPY, AgRP, POMC, and CART at different pregnancy stages (gestational days 13, 15, and 18) were analyzed by real time PCR, as were the effect of IL-6 deficiency (IL-6 knockout mice) on their placental expression. Our results showed that placenta-derived neuropeptides were regulated by gestational age and IL-6 throughout the second half of mouse pregnancy. These data suggest that IL-6 may participate in the fine tune control of energy balance during pregnancy by extending its action as a metabolic signal to the main organ at the fetomaternal interface: the placenta. PMID:24744782

  11. Energy Balance Regulating Neuropeptides Are Expressed through Pregnancy and Regulated by Interleukin-6 Deficiency in Mouse Placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Patricia; Lima, Luis; Diéguez, Carlos; García, María C

    2014-01-01

    The placenta produces a number of signaling molecules including metabolic and reproductive hormones as well as several inflammatory mediators. Among them, Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-known immune and metabolic regulator, acts peripherally modulating metabolic function and centrally increasing energy expenditure and reducing body fat. IL-6 interacts with key hypothalamic neuropeptidergic systems controlling energy homeostasis such as those producing the orexigenic/anabolic: neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and anorectic/catabolic neuropeptides: proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART). Human and rat placenta have been identified as source of these neuropeptides, but their expression and regulation in murine placental tissues remain unknown. Therefore, placental mRNA levels of IL-6, NPY, AgRP, POMC, and CART at different pregnancy stages (gestational days 13, 15, and 18) were analyzed by real time PCR, as were the effect of IL-6 deficiency (IL-6 knockout mice) on their placental expression. Our results showed that placenta-derived neuropeptides were regulated by gestational age and IL-6 throughout the second half of mouse pregnancy. These data suggest that IL-6 may participate in the fine tune control of energy balance during pregnancy by extending its action as a metabolic signal to the main organ at the fetomaternal interface: the placenta.

  12. Study of the Neuropeptide Function in Parkinson’s Disease Using the 6-Hydroxydopamine Model of Experimental Hemiparkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Banegas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease, one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, characterized by unilateral brain dopamine damage in its initial stages, remains unknown in many respects. It is especially necessary to improve the early diagnosis and, in order to improve the treatment, to go thoroughly into the knowledge of its pathophysiology. To do this, it is essential to perform studies in appropriate animal models of the disease. One of those is generated by the unilateral intracerebral administration of the neurotoxic 6-hydroxydopamine that produces clear asymmetrical cerebral dopamine depletion. Currently the neuronal coexistence of several neurotransmitters is obvious. Particularly interesting is the coexistence of dopamine with various neuropeptides. If the neuronal content of dopamine is asymmetrically altered in the early stages of the Parkinson’s disease, the coexisting neuropeptides may also be asymmetrically altered. Therefore, their study is important to appropriately understand the pathogenesis of the Parkinson’s disease. The function of the neuropeptides can be studied through their metabolism by neuropeptidases whose activity reflects the functional status of their endogenous substrates as well as the one of the peptides resulting from their hydrolysis. Here we review the 6-hydroxydopamine model of experimental hemiparkinsonism as an appropriate model to study the initial asymmetric stages of the disease. In particular, we analyze the consequences of unilateral brain dopamine depletions on the functionality of brain neuropeptides through the study of the activity of cerebral neuropeptidases.

  13. Time-dependent effects of neuropeptide Y infusion in the paraventricular hypothalamus on ingestive and associated behaviors in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, G; Strubbe, JH

    In this study the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) in the daily regulation of feeding, drinking, locomotor activity, and nestbox occupation was investigated. These behaviors were recorded during and after bilateral infusion of NPY into the PVN of

  14. Functional Characterization of Paralogous Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Type and Corazonin-Type Neuropeptides in an Echinoderm

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    Shi Tian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Homologs of the vertebrate neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH have been identified in invertebrates, including the insect neuropeptide corazonin (CRZ. Recently, we reported the discovery of GnRH-type and CRZ-type signaling systems in an echinoderm, the starfish Asterias rubens, demonstrating that the evolutionary origin of paralogous GnRH-type and CRZ-type neuropeptides can be traced back to the common ancestor of protostomes and deuterostomes. Here, we have investigated the physiological roles of the GnRH-type (ArGnRH and the CRZ-type (ArCRZ neuropeptides in A. rubens, using mRNA in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and in vitro pharmacology. ArGnRH precursor (ArGnRHP-expressing cells and ArGnRH-immunoreactive cells and/or processes are present in the radial nerve cords, circumoral nerve ring, digestive system (e.g., cardiac stomach and pyloric stomach, body wall-associated muscle (apical muscle, and appendages (tube feet, terminal tentacle. The general distribution of ArCRZ precursor (ArCRZP-expressing cells is similar to that of ArGnRHP, but with specific local differences. For example, cells expressing ArGnRHP are present in both the ectoneural and hyponeural regions of the radial nerve cords and circumoral nerve ring, whereas cells expressing ArCRZP were only observed in the ectoneural region. In vitro pharmacological experiments revealed that both ArGnRH and ArCRZ cause contraction of cardiac stomach, apical muscle, and tube foot preparations. However, ArGnRH was more potent/effective than ArCRZ as a contractant of the cardiac stomach, whereas ArCRZ was more potent/effective than ArGnRH as a contractant of the apical muscle. These findings demonstrate that both ArGnRH and ArCRZ are myoexcitatory neuropeptides in starfish, but differences in their expression patterns and pharmacological activities are indicative of distinct physiological roles. This is the first study to investigate the physiological roles of both Gn

  15. Neuropeptide Y, substance P, and human bone morphogenetic protein 2 stimulate human osteoblast osteogenic activity by enhancing gap junction intercellular communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, W.H.; Liu, Y.J.; Wang, W.; Zhang, Y.Z. [The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, The Provincial Key Laboratory for Orthopedic Biomechanics of Hebei, Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province (China)

    2015-02-13

    Bone homeostasis seems to be controlled by delicate and subtle “cross talk” between the nervous system and “osteo-neuromediators” that control bone remodeling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of interactions between neuropeptides and human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (hBMP2) on human osteoblasts. We also investigated the effects of neuropeptides and hBMP2 on gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). Osteoblasts were treated with neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP), or hBMP2 at three concentrations. At various intervals after treatment, cell viability was measured by the MTT assay. In addition, cellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin were determined by colorimetric assay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. The effects of NPY, SP and hBMP on GJIC were determined by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The viability of cells treated with neuropeptides and hBMP2 increased significantly in a time-dependent manner, but was inversely associated with the concentration of the treatments. ALP activity and osteocalcin were both reduced in osteoblasts exposed to the combination of neuropeptides and hBMP2. The GJIC of osteoblasts was significantly increased by the neuropeptides and hBMP2. These results suggest that osteoblast activity is increased by neuropeptides and hBMP2 through increased GJIC. Identification of the GJIC-mediated signal transduction capable of modulating the cellular activities of bone cells represents a novel approach to studying the biology of skeletal innervation.

  16. Convergent signalling in the action of integrins, neuropeptides, growth factors and oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozengurt, E

    1995-01-01

    These findings have important implications for signal transduction and cell regulation. Most obviously, they suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of a novel type of tyrosine kinase p125FAK is a point of convergence in the action of integrins, oncogenic forms of pp60src, mitogenic neuropeptides and growth factors (Fig. 3). One inference is that the signal transduction pathways initiated by these diverse groups of molecules have, at least in part, similar consequences for cellular function. The notion of convergence is reinforced by the striking similarity in the overall pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation produced through these different pathways. It is tempting to speculate that p125FAK, paxillin and p130 are components in a common programme of phosphorylation events stimulated by integrins, mitogenic neuropeptides and growth factors. The localization of p125FAK to focal adhesions is clearly consistent with a role for this protein as a junction point in the transduction of signals that regulate cell substrate adhesion and ultimately cell motility and cell shape, as suggested in Fig. 3. The existence of distinct pathways leading to p125FAK phosphorylation raises the possibility of synergistic interactions between integrins and G protein coupled receptors. In fact, integrin mediated p125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be mediated by a PKC dependent pathway (Vuori and Ruoslathi, 1993). By contrast, bombesin and LPA induce tyrosine phosphorylation of p125FAK and paxillin through a PKC independent pathway (Sinnett-Smith et al, 1993; Zachary et al, 1993; Seufferlein and Rozengurt, 1994). It is possible that tyrosine phosphorylation of p125FAK by bombesin, LPA and pp60v-src bypasses and perhaps mimics the phosphorylation caused by integrin activation. Further experimental work will be required to elucidate whether integrins and neuropeptides increase the autophosphorylation of Tyr-397 in p125FAK, as has been recently demonstrated in src-transformed cells

  17. Marked changes in neuropeptide expression accompany broadcast spawnings in the gastropod Haliotis asinina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    York Patrick S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A huge diversity of marine species reproduce by synchronously spawning their gametes into the water column. Although this species-specific event typically occurs in a particular season, the precise time and day of spawning often can not be predicted. There is little understanding of how the environment (e.g. water temperature, day length, tidal and lunar cycle regulates a population’s reproductive physiology to synchronise a spawning event. The Indo-Pacific tropical abalone, Haliotis asinina, has a highly predictable spawning cycle, where individuals release gametes on the evenings of spring high tides on new and full moons during the warmer half of the year. These calculable spawning events uniquely allow for the analysis of the molecular and cellular processes underlying reproduction. Here we characterise neuropeptides produced in H. asinina ganglia that are known in egg-laying molluscs to control vital aspects of reproduction. Results We demonstrate that genes encoding APGWamide, myomodulin, the putative proctolin homologue whitnin, FMRFamide, a schistosomin-like peptide (SLP, a molluscan insulin-related peptide (MIP and a haliotid growth-associated peptide (HGAP all are differentially expressed in the anterior ganglia during the two week spawning cycle in both male and female abalone. Each gene has a unique and sex-specific expression profile. Despite these differences, expression levels in most of the genes peak at or within 12 h of the spawning event. In contrast, lowest levels of transcript abundance typically occurs 36 h before and 24 h after spawning, with differences in peak and low expression levels being most pronounced in genes orthologous to known molluscan reproduction neuromodulators. Conclusions Exploiting the predictable semi-lunar spawning cycle of the gastropod H. asinina, we have identified a suite of evolutionarily-conserved, mollusc-specific and rapidly-evolving neuropeptides that appear to

  18. Assessment of both serum S-100B protein and neuropeptide-Y levels in childhood breath-holding spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Mustafa; Ciftci, Ahmet; Sarikaya, Suna; Kocaturk, Ozcan; Abuhandan, Mahmut; Taskin, Abdullah; Kandemir, Hasan; Yoldas, Tahır Kurtulus; Aksoy, Nurten

    2015-06-01

    Breath-holding spells are common paroxysmal events in children. Although the spells have a benign prognosis in the long term, they may be complicated by loss of consciousness, tonic-clonic movements, and occasionally seizures. Hence, this study aimed to measure the levels of serum S-100B proteins and neuropeptide-Y in the blood of children who experience breath-holding spells. The study groups consisted of 45 patients (13 females, 32 males) with breath-holding spells and a control group of 32 healthy individuals (12 females, 20 males). The serum S-100B levels were measured using commercially available ELISA kits. The neuropeptide-Y levels in the serum were measured with RayBio® Human/Mouse/Rat Neuropeptide Y ELISA kits. The mean serum S-100B protein level of the breath-holding spells group was 56.38 ± 13.26 pg/mL, and of the control group, 48.53 ± 16.77 pg/mL. The mean neuropeptide-Y level was 62.29 ± 13.89 pg/mL in the breath-holding spells group and 58.24 ± 12.30 pg/mL in the control group. There were significant differences between the groups with respect to serum S-100B protein levels (p = 0.025), while there was no statistically significant difference in neuropeptide-Y levels between the breath-holding spells group and the control group (p = 0.192). The findings of this study suggest that frequent and lengthy breath-holding may lead to the development of neuronal metabolic dysfunction or neuronal damage which is most likely related to hypoxia. In light of these findings, future studies should be conducted using biochemical and radiological imaging techniques to support these results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A differential role for neuropeptides in acute and chronic adaptive responses to alcohol: behavioural and genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippa Mitchell

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged alcohol consumption in humans followed by abstinence precipitates a withdrawal syndrome consisting of anxiety, agitation and in severe cases, seizures. Withdrawal is relieved by a low dose of alcohol, a negative reinforcement that contributes to alcohol dependency. This phenomenon of 'withdrawal relief' provides evidence of an ethanol-induced adaptation which resets the balance of signalling in neural circuits. We have used this as a criterion to distinguish between direct and indirect ethanol-induced adaptive behavioural responses in C. elegans with the goal of investigating the genetic basis of ethanol-induced neural plasticity. The paradigm employs a 'food race assay' which tests sensorimotor performance of animals acutely and chronically treated with ethanol. We describe a multifaceted C. elegans 'withdrawal syndrome'. One feature, decrease reversal frequency is not relieved by a low dose of ethanol and most likely results from an indirect adaptation to ethanol caused by inhibition of feeding and a food-deprived behavioural state. However another aspect, an aberrant behaviour consisting of spontaneous deep body bends, did show withdrawal relief and therefore we suggest this is the expression of ethanol-induced plasticity. The potassium channel, slo-1, which is a candidate ethanol effector in C. elegans, is not required for the responses described here. However a mutant deficient in neuropeptides, egl-3, is resistant to withdrawal (although it still exhibits acute responses to ethanol. This dependence on neuropeptides does not involve the NPY-like receptor npr-1, previously implicated in C. elegans ethanol withdrawal. Therefore other neuropeptide pathways mediate this effect. These data resonate with mammalian studies which report involvement of a number of neuropeptides in chronic responses to alcohol including corticotrophin-releasing-factor (CRF, opioids, tachykinins as well as NPY. This suggests an evolutionarily conserved role

  20. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a Drosophila receptor for the neuropeptides capa-1 and -2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Annette; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The Drosophila Genome Project website contains an annotated gene (CG14575) for a G protein-coupled receptor. We cloned this receptor and found that the cloned cDNA did not correspond to the annotated gene; it partly contained different exons and additional exons located at the 5(')-end of the ann......The Drosophila Genome Project website contains an annotated gene (CG14575) for a G protein-coupled receptor. We cloned this receptor and found that the cloned cDNA did not correspond to the annotated gene; it partly contained different exons and additional exons located at the 5(')-end...... of the annotated gene. We expressed the coding part of the cloned cDNA in Chinese hamster ovary cells and found that the receptor was activated by two neuropeptides, capa-1 and -2, encoded by the Drosophila capability gene. Database searches led to the identification of a similar receptor in the genome from...

  1. Role of the melanin-concentrating hormone neuropeptide in sleep regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyron, Christelle; Sapin, Emilie; Leger, Lucienne; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice

    2009-11-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), a neuropeptide secreted by a limited number of neurons within the tuberal hypothalamus, has been drawn in the field of sleep only fairly recently in 2003. Since then, growing experimental evidence indicates that MCH may play a crucial role in the homeostatic regulation of paradoxical sleep (PS). MCH-expressing neurons fire specifically during PS. When injected icv MCH induces a 200% increase in PS quantities in rats and the lack of MCH induces a decrease in sleep quantities in transgenic mice. Here, we review recent studies suggesting a role for MCH in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle, in particular PS, including insights on (1) the specific activity of MCH neurons during PS; (2) how they might be controlled across the sleep-wake cycle; (3) how they might modulate PS; (4) and finally whether MCH might take part in the expression of some symptoms observed in primary sleep disorders.

  2. Neuropeptide Y Y5 receptor antagonism attenuates cocaine-induced effects in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Jensen, Morten; Weikop, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Several studies suggest a role for neuropeptide Y (NPY) in addiction to drugs of abuse, including cocaine. However, the NPY receptors mediating addiction-related effects remain to be determined. Objectives To explore the potential role of Y5 NPY receptors in cocaine-induced behavioural...... effects. Methods The Y5 antagonist L-152,804 and Y5-knockout (Y5-KO) mice were tested in two models of cocaine addiction-related behaviour: acute self-administration and cocaine-induced hyperactivity. We also studied effects of Y5 receptor antagonism on cocaine-induced c-fos expression and extracellular...... dopamine with microdialysis as well as dopamine transporter-mediated uptake of dopamine in vitro. Immunocytochemistry was used to determine whether dopamine neurons express Y5-like immunoreactivity. Results In self-administration, L-152,804 prominently decreased nose-poking for the peak dose of cocaine...

  3. The Neuropeptide Corazonin Controls Social Behavior and Caste Identity in Ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gospocic, Janko; Shields, Emily J; Glastad, Karl M; Lin, Yanping; Penick, Clint A; Yan, Hua; Mikheyev, Alexander S; Linksvayer, Timothy A; Garcia, Benjamin A; Berger, Shelley L; Liebig, Jürgen; Reinberg, Danny; Bonasio, Roberto

    2017-08-10

    Social insects are emerging models to study how gene regulation affects behavior because their colonies comprise individuals with the same genomes but greatly different behavioral repertoires. To investigate the molecular mechanisms that activate distinct behaviors in different castes, we exploit a natural behavioral plasticity in Harpegnathos saltator, where adult workers can transition to a reproductive, queen-like state called gamergate. Analysis of brain transcriptomes during the transition reveals that corazonin, a neuropeptide homologous to the vertebrate gonadotropin-releasing hormone, is downregulated as workers become gamergates. Corazonin is also preferentially expressed in workers and/or foragers from other social insect species. Injection of corazonin in transitioning Harpegnathos individuals suppresses expression of vitellogenin in the brain and stimulates worker-like hunting behaviors, while inhibiting gamergate behaviors, such as dueling and egg deposition. We propose that corazonin is a central regulator of caste identity and behavior in social insects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurotrophic and Neurotoxic Effects of Amyloid |beta Protein: Reversal by Tachykinin Neuropeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankner, Bruce A.; Duffy, Lawrence K.; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    1990-10-01

    The amyloid β protein is deposited in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease but its pathogenic role is unknown. In culture, the amyloid β protein was neurotrophic to undifferentiated hippocampal neurons at low concentrations and neurotoxic to mature neurons at higher concentrations. In differentiated neurons, amyloid β protein caused dendritic and axonal retraction followed by neuronal death. A portion of the amyloid β protein (amino acids 25 to 35) mediated both the trophic and toxic effects and was homologous to the tachykinin neuropeptide family. The effects of the amyloid β protein were mimicked by tachykinin antagonists and completely reversed by specific tachykinin agonists. Thus, the amyloid β protein could function as a neurotrophic factor for differentiating neurons, but at high concentrations in mature neurons, as in Alzheimer's disease, could cause neuronal degeneration.

  5. Increased tissue concentration of neuropeptide Y in the duodenal mucosa in coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoelund, K.; Ekman, R. (Lund Univ. (Sweden))

    1989-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is localized to intestinal nerve fibres, of which there are few in normal duodenal mucosa. In the duodenal mucosa of 10 patients with coeliac disease and in a control group of 21 patients with other gastrointestinal symptoms, but with normal function of the small intestine, we studied the frequency of such fibres by immunohistochemistry and the tissue concentration of NPY by radioimmunoassay. Patients with coeliac disease had an increased number of NPY nerve fibres and significantly elevated tissue concentrations compared with the control group. The eluted fractions obtained by high-pressure liquid chromatography of duodenal extracts showed the same immunoreactive components in the two groups. This study therefore suggested proliferation of the peptide-containing nerve system in coeliac disease. The increased NPY levels in the duodenal mucosa may be of functional significance for the disease symptoms. 24 refs.

  6. Neuropeptide Y and sex hormone interactions in humoral and neuronal regulation of bone and fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Ayse; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Baldock, Paul A; Sainsbury, Amanda

    2010-07-01

    The hypothalamus regulates the skeleton and adipose tissue via endocrine mechanisms. Changes in sex steroid levels in menopause and aging are central to the associated changes in bone mass and adiposity. Whereas many of these effects occur via direct actions on osteoblasts or adipocytes, sex hormones can also mediate effects on bone and adipose tissue via interaction with neuronal pathways. A key hypothalamic regulator of bone and adipose tissue is neuropeptide Y (NPY), which coordinately influences these tissues via effects on neuroendocrine and sympathetic nervous output. Better understanding of the interaction between NPY and sex steroids in regulating skeletal and energy homeostasis could lead to more effective treatments for osteoporosis and obesity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of sub-nanomolar dipeptidic ligands of neuropeptide FF receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gealageas, Ronan; Schneider, Séverine; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Bertin, Isabelle; Schmitt, Martine; Laboureyras, Emilie; Dugave, Christophe; Mollereau, Catherine; Simonnet, Guy; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frédéric; Bihel, Frédéric

    2012-12-15

    Based on our earlier reported neuropeptide FF receptors antagonist (RF9), we carried out an extensive structural exploration of the N-terminus part of the amidated dipeptide Arg-Phe-NH(2) in order to establish a structure-activity relationships (SAR) study towards both NPFF receptor subtypes. This SAR led to the discovery of dipeptides (12, 35) with subnanomolar affinities towards NPFF1 receptor subtype, similar to endogenous ligand NPVF. More particularly, compound 12 exhibited a potent in vivo preventive effect on opioid-induced hyperalgesia at low dose. The significant selectivity of 12 toward NPFF1-R indicates that this receptor subtype may play a critical role in the anti-opioid activity of NPFF-like peptides. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Control of neuropeptide expression by parallel activity-dependent pathways in caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojo Romanos, Teresa; Petersen, Jakob Gramstrup; Pocock, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring of neuronal activity within circuits facilitates integrated responses and rapid changes in behavior. We have identified a system in Caenorhabditis elegans where neuropeptide expression is dependent on the ability of the BAG neurons to sense carbon dioxide. In C. Elegans, CO 2 sensing...... is predominantly coordinated by the BAG-expressed receptor-type guanylate cyclase GCY-9. GCY-9 binding to CO 2 causes accumulation of cyclic GMP and opening of the cGMP-gated TAX-2/TAX-4 cation channels; provoking an integrated downstream cascade that enables C. Elegans to avoid high CO 2. Here we show that c...... to sense changes in carbon dioxide and CREB transcription factor. Such regulation may be required in particular environmental conditions to enable sophisticated behavioral decisions to be performed....

  9. Differential Effect of Neuropeptides on Excitatory Synaptic Transmission in Human Epileptic Hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledri, Marco; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Madsen, Marita G.

    2015-01-01

    therapy is an evolving innovative approach that may prove useful for clinical applications. In animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), gene therapy treatments based on viral vectors encoding NPY or galanin have been shown to effectively suppress seizures. However, how this translates to human TLE...... remains unknown. A unique possibility to validate these animal studies is provided by a surgical therapeutic approach, whereby resected epileptic tissue from temporal lobes of pharmacoresistant patients are available for neurophysiological studies in vitro. To test whether NPY and galanin have...... antiepileptic actions in human epileptic tissue as well, we applied these neuropeptides directly to human hippocampal slices in vitro. NPY strongly decreased stimulation-induced EPSPs in dentate gyrus and CA1 (up to 30 and 55%, respectively) via Y2 receptors, while galanin had no significant effect. Receptor...

  10. Vulnerability to psychogenic non-epileptic seizures is linked to low neuropeptide Y levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winterdahl, Michael; Miani, Alessandro; Vercoe, Moana

    2017-01-01

    ) and PNES symptoms in women with a history of sexual abuse. NPY has been associated with resilience to stress and we hypothesized that low levels would increase the extent and severity of PNES symptoms in this patient population. Serum levels of NPY, and related hormones were measured in fifteen female PNES......Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) is a conversion disorder that reflects underlying psychological distress. Female patients with PNES often present with a history of prolonged stressors, especially sexual abuse. In the current study, we studied the relationship between neuropeptide Y (NPY...... patients and sixty female controls. PNES patients reported more severe abuse histories, feeling of abandonment, and decreased perception of quality of life than controls. Importantly, they also had lower NPY levels. Our analysis indicates that low levels of NPY in PNES may confer greater vulnerability...

  11. Localisation of the neuropeptide PACAP and its receptors in the rat parathyroid and thyroid glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2011-01-01

    PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide) is widely distributed neuropeptide acting via three subtypes of receptors, PAC(1), VPAC(1) and VPAC(2). Here we examined the localisation and nature of PACAP-immunoreactive nerves in the rat thyroid and parathyroid glands and defined...... the distribution of PAC(1), VPAC(1) and VPAC(2) receptor mRNA's. In the parathyroid gland a large number of nerve fibres displaying PACAP-immunoreactivity were distributed beneath the capsule, around blood vessels and close to glandular cells. Most of the PACAP-nerves were sensory, since they co-stored CGRP...... (calcitonin-gene-related peptide) and were sensitive to capsaicin-treatment. mRNA's for PAC(1) and VPAC(2) receptors occurred in the parathyroid gland, mainly located in the glandular cells. In the thyroid gland PACAP-immunoreactive nerve fibres were associated with blood vessels, thyroid follicles...

  12. A key role for neuropeptide Y in lifespan extension and cancer suppression via dietary restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Takuya; Tamashiro, Yukari; Park, Daeui; Kusudo, Tatsuya; Fujie, Ryoko; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Kim, Sang Eun; Park, Seongjoon; Hayashi, Hiroko; Mori, Ryoichi; Yamashita, Hitoshi; Chung, Hae Young; Shimokawa, Isao

    2014-03-31

    Knowledge of genes essential for the life-extending effect of dietary restriction (DR) in mammals is incomplete. In this study, we found that neuropeptide Y (Npy), which mediates physiological adaptations to energy deficits, is an essential link between DR and longevity in mice. The lifespan-prolonging effect of lifelong 30% DR was attenuated in Npy-null mice, as was the effect on the occurrence of spontaneous tumors and oxidative stress responses in comparison to wild-type mice. In contrast, the physiological processes activated during adaptation to DR, including inhibition of anabolic signaling molecules (insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1), modulation of adipokine and corticosterone levels, and preferential fatty acid oxidation, were unaffected by the absence of Npy. These results suggest a key role for Npy in mediating the effects of DR. We also provide evidence that most of the physiological adaptations to DR could be achieved in mice without Npy.

  13. Transient expression of neuropeptide W in postnatal mouse hypothalamus--a putative regulator of energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoike, T; Skach, A G; Godwin, J K; Sinton, C M; Yamazaki, M; Abe, M; Natsume, R; Sakimura, K; Yanagisawa, M

    2015-08-20

    Neuropeptide B and W (NPB and NPW) are cognate peptide ligands for NPBWR1 (GPR7), a G protein-coupled receptor. In rodents, they have been implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine/autonomic responses, and social interactions. Although localization of these peptides and their receptors in adult rodent brain has been well documented, their expression in mouse brain during development is unknown. Here we demonstrate the transient expression of NPW mRNA in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of postnatal mouse brain and its co-localization with neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA. Neurons expressing both NPW and NPY mRNAs begin to emerge in the DMH at about postnatal day 0 (P-0) through P-3. Their expression is highest around P-14, declines after P-21, and by P-28 only a faint expression of NPW and NPY mRNA remains. In P-18 brains, we detected NPW neurons in the region spanning the subincertal nucleus (SubI), the lateral hypothalamic (LH) perifornical (PF) areas, and the DMH, where the highest expression of NPW mRNA was observed. The majority of these postnatal hypothalamic NPW neurons co-express NPY mRNA. A cross of NPW-iCre knock-in mice with a Cre-dependent tdTomato reporter line revealed that more than half of the reporter-positive neurons in the adult DMH, which mature from the transiently NPW-expressing neurons, are sensitive to peripherally administrated leptin. These data suggest that the DMH neurons that transiently co-express NPW and NPY in the peri-weaning period might play a role in regulating energy homeostasis during postnatal development. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Neuropeptide S overcomes short term memory deficit induced by sleep restriction by increasing prefrontal cortex activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasson, Julien; Canini, Frédéric; Poly-Thomasson, Betty; Trousselard, Marion; Granon, Sylvie; Chauveau, Frédéric

    2017-12-01

    Sleep restriction (SR) impairs short term memory (STM) that might be related to different processes. Neuropeptide S (NPS), an endogenous neuropeptide that improves short term memory, activates arousal and decreases anxiety is likely to counteract the SR-induced impairment of STM. The objective of the present study was to find common cerebral pathways in sleep restriction and NPS action in order to ultimately antagonize SR effect on memory. The STM was assessed using a spontaneous spatial alternation task in a T-maze. C57-Bl/6J male mice were distributed in 4 groups according to treatment (0.1nmol of NPS or vehicle intracerebroventricular injection) and to 20h-SR. Immediately after behavioural testing, regional c-fos immunohistochemistry was performed and used as a neural activation marker for spatial short term memory (prefrontal cortex, dorsal hippocampus) and emotional reactivity (basolateral amygdala and ventral hippocampus). Anxiety-like behaviour was assessed using elevated-plus maze task. Results showed that SR impaired short term memory performance and decreased neuronal activation in cingular cortex.NPS injection overcame SR-induced STM deficits and increased neuronal activation in infralimbic cortex. SR spared anxiety-like behavior in the elevated-plus maze. Neural activation in basolateral nucleus of amygdala and ventral hippocampus were not changed after SR.In conclusion, the present study shows that NPS overcomes SR-induced STM deficits by increasing prefrontal cortex activation independently of anxiety-like behaviour. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic association of objective sleep phenotypes with a functional polymorphism in the neuropeptide S receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, Janek; Sander, Christian; Burkhardt, Ralph; Häntzsch, Madlen; Mergl, Roland; Scholz, Markus; Hegerl, Ulrich; Hensch, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide S receptor (NPSR1) and its ligand neuropeptide S (NPS) have received increased attention in the last few years, as both establish a previously unknown system of neuromodulation. Animal research studies have suggested that NPS may be involved in arousal/wakefulness and may also have a crucial role in sleep regulation. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs324981 in NPSR1 has begun to shed light on a function of the NPS-system in human sleep regulation. Due to an amino acid exchange, the T-allele leads to an increased sensitivity of the NPSR1. In the only genome-wide association study to date on circadian sleep parameters in humans, an association was found between rs324981 and regular bedtime. However, the sleep parameters in this study were only measured by self-rating. Therefore, our study aimed to replicate these findings using an objective measure of sleep. The study included n = 393 white subjects (62-79 years) who participated in an actigraphic assessment for determining sleep duration, rest duration, sleep onset, rest onset and sleep onset latency. Genotyping of the SNP rs324981 was performed using the TaqMan OpenArray System. The genotype at rs324981 was not significantly associated with rest onset (bedtime) or sleep onset (p = .146 and p = .199, respectively). However, the SNP showed a significant effect on sleep- and rest duration (p = .007 and p = .003, respectively). Subjects that were homozygous for the minor T-allele had a significantly decreased sleep- and rest duration compared to A-allele carriers. The results of this study indicate that the sleep pattern in humans is influenced by the NPS-system. However, the previously reported association between bedtime and rs324981 could not be confirmed. The current finding of decreased sleep duration in T/T allele carriers is in accordance with studies in rodents reporting similar results after NPS application.

  16. Neuropeptide S receptor gene variation modulates anterior cingulate cortex Glx levels during CCK-4 induced panic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruland, Tillmann; Domschke, Katharina; Schütte, Valerie; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Kugel, Harald; Notzon, Swantje; Vennewald, Nadja; Ohrmann, Patricia; Arolt, Volker; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Zwanzger, Peter

    2015-10-01

    An excitatory-inhibitory neurotransmitter dysbalance has been suggested in pathogenesis of panic disorder. The neuropeptide S (NPS) system has been implicated in modulating GABA and glutamate neurotransmission in animal models and to genetically drive altered fear circuit function and an increased risk of panic disorder in humans. Probing a multi-level imaging genetic risk model of panic, in the present magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study brain glutamate+glutamine (Glx) levels in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during a pharmacological cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) panic challenge were assessed depending on the functional neuropeptide S receptor gene (NPSR1) rs324981 A/T variant in a final sample of 35 healthy male subjects. The subjective panic response (Panic Symptom Scale; PSS) as well as cortisol and ACTH levels were ascertained throughout the experiment. CCK-4 injection was followed by a strong panic response. A significant time×genotype interaction was detected (p=.008), with significantly lower ACC Glx/Cr levels in T allele carriers as compared to AA homozygotes 5min after injection (p=.003). CCK-4 induced significant HPA axis stimulation, but no effect of genotype was discerned. The present pilot data suggests NPSR1 gene variation to modulate Glx levels in the ACC during acute states of stress and anxiety, with blunted, i.e. possibly maladaptive ACC glutamatergic reactivity in T risk allele carriers. Our results underline the notion of a genetically driven rapid and dynamic response mechanism in the neural regulation of human anxiety and further strengthen the emerging role of the NPS system in anxiety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolic stress responses in Drosophila are modulated by brain neurosecretory cells that produce multiple neuropeptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Kahsai

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, neurosecretory cells that release peptide hormones play a prominent role in the regulation of development, growth, metabolism, and reproduction. Several types of peptidergic neurosecretory cells have been identified in the brain of Drosophila with release sites in the corpora cardiaca and anterior aorta. We show here that in adult flies the products of three neuropeptide precursors are colocalized in five pairs of large protocerebral neurosecretory cells in two clusters (designated ipc-1 and ipc-2a: Drosophila tachykinin (DTK, short neuropeptide F (sNPF and ion transport peptide (ITP. These peptides were detected by immunocytochemistry in combination with GFP expression driven by the enhancer trap Gal4 lines c929 and Kurs-6, both of which are expressed in ipc-1 and 2a cells. This mix of colocalized peptides with seemingly unrelated functions is intriguing and prompted us to initiate analysis of the function of the ten neurosecretory cells. We investigated the role of peptide signaling from large ipc-1 and 2a cells in stress responses by monitoring the effect of starvation and desiccation in flies with levels of DTK or sNPF diminished by RNA interference. Using the Gal4-UAS system we targeted the peptide knockdown specifically to ipc-1 and 2a cells with the c929 and Kurs-6 drivers. Flies with reduced DTK or sNPF levels in these cells displayed decreased survival time at desiccation and starvation, as well as increased water loss at desiccation. Our data suggest that homeostasis during metabolic stress requires intact peptide signaling by ipc-1 and 2a neurosecretory cells.

  18. Neuropeptide Y induces potent migration of human immature dendritic cells and promotes a Th2 polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttari, Brigitta; Profumo, Elisabetta; Domenici, Giacomo; Tagliani, Angela; Ippoliti, Flora; Bonini, Sergio; Businaro, Rita; Elenkov, Ilia; Riganò, Rachele

    2014-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a major autonomic nervous system and stress mediator, is emerging as an important regulator of inflammation, implicated in autoimmunity, asthma, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Yet the role of NPY in regulating phenotype and functions of dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen-presenting cells, remains undefined. Here we investigated whether NPY could induce DCs to migrate, mature, and polarize naive T lymphocytes. We found that NPY induced a dose-dependent migration of human monocyte-derived immature DCs through the engagement of NPY Y1 receptor and the activation of ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases. NPY promoted DC adhesion to endothelial cells and transendothelial migration. It failed to induce phenotypic DC maturation, whereas it conferred a T helper 2 (Th2) polarizing profile to DCs through the up-regulation of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 production. Thus, during an immune/inflammatory response NPY may exert proinflammatory effects through the recruitment of immature DCs, but it may exert antiinflammatory effects by promoting a Th2 polarization. Locally, at inflammatory sites, cell recruitment could be amplified in conditions of intense acute, chronic, or cold stress. Thus, altered or amplified signaling through the NPY-NPY-Y1 receptor-DC axis may have implications for the development of inflammatory conditions.-Buttari, B., Profumo, E., Domenici, G., Tagliani, A., Ippoliti, F., Bonini, S., Businaro, R., Elenkov, I., Riganò, R. Neuropeptide Y induces potent migration of human immature dendritic cells and promotes a Th2 polarization. © FASEB.

  19. Support for involvement of glutamate decarboxylase 1 and neuropeptide Y in anxiety susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Jonas; Sipilä, Tessa; Ripatti, Samuli; Kananen, Laura; Chen, Xiangning; Kendler, Kenneth S; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Pirkola, Sami; Hettema, John M; Hovatta, Iiris

    2012-04-01

    Genetic mapping efforts have identified putative susceptibility genes for human anxiety disorders. The most intensively studied genes are involved in neurotransmitter metabolism and signaling or stress response. In addition, neuropeptides and targets of anxiolytics have been examined. It has become apparent that gene × environment interactions may explain individual variation in stress resilience and predisposition to mental disorders. We aimed to replicate previous genetic findings in 16 putative anxiety susceptibility genes and further test whether they modulate the risk for developing an anxiety disorder in adulthood after childhood stress exposure. We tested 93 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for genetic association to anxiety disorders in the Finnish population-based Health 2000 sample (282 cases and 575 matched controls). In addition, we examined by logistic regression modeling whether the SNP genotypes modified the effect of the number of self-reported childhood adversities on anxiety disorder risk. The most significant evidence for association was observed in glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1) with phobias (P = 0.0005). A subsequent meta-analysis (N = 1985) incorporating previously published findings supported involvement of a single GAD1 risk haplotype in determining susceptibility to a broad range of internalizing disorders (P = 0.0009). We additionally found that SNPs and haplotypes in neuropeptide Y (NPY) modified the effect of childhood adversities on anxiety susceptibility (P = 0.003). In conclusion, we provide further support for involvement of mainly GAD1, but also NPY in determining predisposition to anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Neuropeptide FF Promotes Recovery of Corneal Nerve Injury Associated With Hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yunhai; Zhao, Xiaowen; Chen, Peng; Yu, Yang; Wang, Ye; Xie, Lixin

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how the neuropeptide FF (NPFF) promotes the recovery of corneal nerve injury associated with hyperglycemia. Gene expression was analyzed using neurotrophin and receptor RT2 profiler polymerase chain reaction arrays in trigeminal (TG) sensory neurons. The role of NPFF in the regeneration of diabetic TG nerves was investigated in vitro by using cultured TG neurons from diabetic BKS.Cg-m+/+Leprdb/J (db/db) mice and in vivo by following corneal injury healing responses. RF9, a selective NPFF receptor (NPFF2R) antagonist, was used to prevent the interactions between NPFF and NPFF2R. Using a mRNA real-time PCR array, NPFF was found to be significantly lower in diabetic TG sensory neurons. Hyperglycemia induced the deficiency of ocular properties in db/db mice. The application of NPFF enhanced neurite elongation in diabetic TG neurons. Through subconjunctival injection, NPFF promoted corneal nerve injury recovery and epithelial wound healing in db/db mice. Furthermore, the application of NPFF rescued the activation of SIRT1 and PPAR-gamma, and downregulated the expression of PTEN and Rb in diabetic TG neurons. The promotion of NPFF on diabetic corneal epithelial healing and corneal innervations was completely abolished by RF9. Moreover, subconjunctivally injected NPFF accelerated the reinnervation of corneal nerves via the ERK1/2 pathway. These results indicate that NPFF signaling through NPFFR2 contributes to diabetic corneal nerve injury recovery and epithelial wound healing. Neuropeptide FF is a potential neuroregenerative factor for diabetic sensory nerve injury. Chinese Abstract.

  1. Sequential expression of the neuropeptides substance P and somatostatin in granulomas associated with murine cysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Prema; White, A Clinton; Lewis, Dorothy E; Thornby, John; David, Elliott; Weinstock, Joel

    2002-08-01

    Neurocysticercosis, a parasitic infection of the human central nervous system caused by Taenia solium, is a leading cause of seizures. Seizures associated with neurocysticercosis are caused mainly by the host inflammatory responses to dying parasites in the brain parenchyma. We previously demonstrated sequential expression of Th1 cytokines in early-stage granulomas, followed by expression of Th2 cytokines in later-stage granulomas in murine cysticercosis. However, the mechanism leading to this shift in cytokine response in the granulomas is unknown. Neuropeptides modulate cytokine responses and granuloma formation in murine schistosomiasis. Substance P (SP) induces Th1 cytokine expression and granuloma formation, whereas somatostatin inhibits the granulomatous response. We hypothesized that neuropeptides might play a role in regulation of the granulomatous response in cysticercosis. To test this hypothesis, we compared expression of SP and expression of somatostatin in murine cysticercal granulomas by using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. We also compared expression with granuloma stage. Expression of SP mRNA was more frequent in the early-stage granulomas than in the late-stage granulomas (34 of 35 early-stage granulomas versus 1 of 13 late-stage granulomas). By contrast, somatostatin was expressed primarily in later-stage granulomas (13 of 14 late-stage granulomas versus 2 of 35 early-stage granulomas). The median light microscope grade of SP mRNA expression in the early-stage granulomas was significantly higher than that in the late-stage granulomas (P = 0.008, as determined by the Wilcoxon signed rank test). By contrast, somatostatin mRNA expression was higher at later stages (P = 0.008, as determined by the Wilcoxon signed rank test). SP and somatostatin are therefore temporally expressed in granulomas associated with murine cysticercosis, which may be related to differential expression of Th1 and Th2 cytokines.

  2. Novel Genes Involved in Controlling Specification of Drosophila FMRFamide Neuropeptide Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivik, Caroline; Bahrampour, Shahrzad; Ulvklo, Carina; Nilsson, Patrik; Angel, Anna; Fransson, Fredrik; Lundin, Erika; Renhorn, Jakob; Thor, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    The expression of neuropeptides is often extremely restricted in the nervous system, making them powerful markers for addressing cell specification . In the developing Drosophila ventral nerve cord, only six cells, the Ap4 neurons, of some 10,000 neurons, express the neuropeptide FMRFamide (FMRFa). Each Ap4/FMRFa neuron is the last-born cell generated by an identifiable and well-studied progenitor cell, neuroblast 5-6 (NB5-6T). The restricted expression of FMRFa and the wealth of information regarding its gene regulation and Ap4 neuron specification makes FMRFa a valuable readout for addressing many aspects of neural development, i.e., spatial and temporal patterning cues, cell cycle control, cell specification, axon transport, and retrograde signaling. To this end, we have conducted a forward genetic screen utilizing an Ap4-specific FMRFa-eGFP transgenic reporter as our readout. A total of 9781 EMS-mutated chromosomes were screened for perturbations in FMRFa-eGFP expression, and 611 mutants were identified. Seventy-nine of the strongest mutants were mapped down to the affected gene by deficiency mapping or whole-genome sequencing. We isolated novel alleles for previously known FMRFa regulators, confirming the validity of the screen. In addition, we identified novel essential genes, including several with previously undefined functions in neural development. Our identification of genes affecting most major steps required for successful terminal differentiation of Ap4 neurons provides a comprehensive view of the genetic flow controlling the generation of highly unique neuronal cell types in the developing nervous system. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Effect of different anesthesia methods on plasma neuropeptides levels during the peri-operative period in surgical patients with hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; He Haomin; Tian Xiaoping

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of different anesthesia methods on the levels of plasma neuropeptides during the peri-operative period in patients with hypertension. Methods: Ninety hypertensive patients undergoing upper abdominal operations were randomly allocated to equal divided epidural anesthesia, general anesthesia and combined Groups. Plasma neuropeptide Y(NPY) concentrations were measured before anesthesia, at 15 min after anesthesia, 20 min after operation and 10 min after completion of the operation. Results: BP, HR and NPY were significantly changed in both E group and G group after anesthesia and operation (compared vs before anesthesia, p<0.01). BP, HR and NPY were significantly changed in C group after operation compared with those in both E and G group (p<0.05) . Conclusion: The combined anesthesia method is effective in inhibits the stress response during upper abdominal operation in the hypertensive patients

  4. Nerve fibre studies in skin biopsies in peripheral neuropathies. I. Immunohistochemical analysis of neuropeptides in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberger, M; Schröder, H D; Schultzberg, M

    1989-01-01

    Standardised skin biopsies followed by immunohistochemical examination for the presence of terminal nerve fibres reacting for neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) were evaluated. Healthy subjects regularly displayed free nerve endings of both fibre types...... in the papillary and reticular dermis. Both fibre types were present close to blood vessels, while CGRP immunoreactive fibres were more often encountered near sweat gland acini compared to SP fibres. Diabetes mellitus complicated by polyneuropathy was accompanied by marked reduction of SP and CGRP reactive fibres...... in the dermis layers. Five type I diabetes patients without clinical or neurophysiological evidence of polyneuropathy also had reduced density of both fibre types, being significant for CGRP fibres when compared with controls. Skin biopsy with immunohistochemical staining for neuropeptides may represent...

  5. Different Neuropeptides are Expressed in Different Functional Subsets of Cholinergic Excitatory Motorneurons in the Nematode Ascaris suum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konop, Christopher J.; Knickelbine, Jennifer J.; Sygulla, Molly S.; Vestling, Martha M.; Stretton, Antony O. W.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides are known to have dramatic effects on neurons and synapses; however, despite extensive studies of the motorneurons in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum, their peptide content had not yet been described. We determined the peptide content of single excitatory motorneurons by mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry. There are 2 subsets of ventral cord excitatory motorneurons, each with neuromuscular output either anterior or posterior to their cell body, mediating forward or backward locomotion, respectively. Strikingly, the two sets of neurons contain different neuropeptides, with AF9 and 6 novel peptides (As-NLP-21.1-6) in anterior projectors, and the 6 afp-1 peptides in addition to AF2 in posterior projectors. In situ hybridization confirmed the expression of these peptides, validating the integrity of the dissection technique. This work identifies new components of the functional behavioral circuit, as well as potential targets for anti-parasitic drug development. PMID:25812635

  6. Different neuropeptides are expressed in different functional subsets of cholinergic excitatory motorneurons in the nematode Ascaris suum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konop, Christopher J; Knickelbine, Jennifer J; Sygulla, Molly S; Vestling, Martha M; Stretton, Antony O W

    2015-06-17

    Neuropeptides are known to have dramatic effects on neurons and synapses; however, despite extensive studies of the motorneurons in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum, their peptide content had not yet been described. We determined the peptide content of single excitatory motorneurons by mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry. There are two subsets of ventral cord excitatory motorneurons, each with neuromuscular output either anterior or posterior to their cell body, mediating forward or backward locomotion, respectively. Strikingly, the two sets of neurons contain different neuropeptides, with AF9 and six novel peptides (As-NLP-21.1-6) in anterior projectors, and the six afp-1 peptides in addition to AF2 in posterior projectors. In situ hybridization confirmed the expression of these peptides, validating the integrity of the dissection technique. This work identifies new components of the functional behavioral circuit, as well as potential targets for antiparasitic drug development.

  7. Host strain specific sex pheromone variation in Spodoptera frugiperda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svatos Ales

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera; Noctuidae consists of two distinct strains with different host plant preferences for corn and rice. To assess whether pheromonal-mediated behavioral isolation accompanies the habitat isolation on different host plants, we compared the sex pheromone composition among females of the two strains. Pheromone glands were extracted with or without injection of pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN. To assess the mode of inheritance of this variation, we also analyzed the pheromone composition of F1 hybrid females. Results Relative to intra-strain variation, the pheromone composition of the two strains differed significantly. Corn strain females contained significantly more of the second most abundant pheromone compound Z11-16:Ac (m, and significantly less of most other compounds, than rice strain females. When females were injected with PBAN before their glands were extracted, the differences between the strains were less pronounced but still statistically significant. The pheromone composition of hybrid females showed a maternal inheritance of the major component Z9-14:Ac (M as well as of Z11-16:Ac (m. Most other compounds showed an inheritance indicating genetic dominance of the corn strain. The within-strain phenotypic correlations among the various components were consistent with their hypothesized biosynthetic pathway, and between-strain differences in the correlation structure suggested candidate genes that may explain the pheromone differences between the two strains. These include Δ9- and Δ11 desaturases, and possibly also a Δ7-desaturase, although the latter has not been identified in insects so far. Conclusion The two host strains of S. frugiperda produce systematically differing female sex pheromone blends. Previously-documented geographic variation in the sexual communication of this species did not take strain identity into account, and thus may be

  8. NEUROPEPTIDE Y (NPY) SUPPRESSES ETHANOL DRINKING IN ETHANOL-ABSTINENT, BUT NOT NON-ETHANOL-ABSTINENT, WISTAR RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Gilpin, N.W.; Stewart, R.B.; Badia-Elder, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    In outbred rats, increases in brain neuropeptide Y (NPY) activity suppress ethanol consumption in a variety of access conditions, but only following a history of ethanol dependence. NPY reliably suppresses ethanol drinking in alcohol-preferring (P) rats and this effect is augmented following a period of ethanol abstinence. The purpose of this experiment was to examine the effects of NPY on 2-bottle choice ethanol drinking and feeding in Wistar rats that had undergone chronic ethanol vapor exp...

  9. The Role of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in Uncontrolled Alcohol Drinking and Relapse Behavior Resulting from Exposure to Stressful Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    1997. 11] Gilpin NW, Misra K, Koob GF, Neuropeptide. Y in the central nucleus of the amygdala suppresses dependence-induced increases in alcohol...271. Breese GR, Chu K, Dayas CV, Funk D, Knapp DJ, Koob GF, Le AD, O’Dell L, Overstreet DH, Roberts AJ, Sinha R, Valdez GR, Weiss F (2005) Stress...Psychopharmacology 148:164–170. Griebel G, Perrault G, Sanger DJ (1998) Characterization of the behavioral profile of the non-peptide CRF receptor antagonist CP

  10. Enhanced food intake by progesterone-treated female rats is related to changes in neuropeptide genes expression in hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmańska, Ewa; Sucajtys-Szulc, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Progesterone-treated females eat more food, but the mechanism underlying this effect is not well understood. The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of progesterone on neuropeptide genes expression in rat hypothalamus. Experiments were carried out on female and male Wistar rats. Animals were treated with progesterone (100 mg per rat) for 28 days. NPY and CART mRNA levels in hypothalamus were quantified by real-time PCR. The serum progesterone concentration was determined by radioimmunoassay. Progesterone administration to females caused an increase in food intake, body mass, and white adipose tissue mass. Elevated circulating progesterone concentration up-regulated NPY and down-regulated CART genes expression in hypothalamus of females. In males, elevated blood progesterone concentration had no effect on food intake, body and fat mass and on the neuropeptide genes expression in hypothalamus. Moreover, administration of progesterone in females resulted in decrease of PR mRNA level in hypothalamus. No effect of progesterone administration on PR mRNA level in hypothalamus of males was found. The changes in neuropeptide genes expression in hypothalamus may lead to stimulation of appetite and might explain the observed increase in food intake, body and adipose tissue mass in progesterone-treated females.

  11. Classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides involved in generalized epilepsy in a multi-neurotransmitter system: How to improve the antiepileptic effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Felix-Martin; Coveñas, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    Here, we describe in generalized epilepsies the alterations of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides acting at specific subreceptors. In order to consider a network context rather than one based on focal substrates and in order to make the interaction between neurotransmitters and neuropeptides and their specific subreceptors comprehensible, neural networks in the hippocampus, thalamus, and cerebral cortex are described. In this disease, a neurotransmitter imbalance between dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons and between presynaptic GABAergic neurons (hypoactivity) and glutaminergic neurons (hyperactivity) occurs. Consequently, combined GABA A agonists and NMDA antagonists could furthermore stabilize the neural networks in a multimodal pharmacotherapy. The antiepileptic effect and the mechanisms of action of conventional and recently developed antiepileptic drugs are reviewed. The GASH:Sal animal model can contribute to examine the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs. The issues of whether the interaction of classical neurotransmitters with other subreceptors (5-HT 7 , metabotropic 5 glutaminergic, A 2A adenosine, and alpha nicotinic 7 cholinergic receptors) or whether the administration of agonists/antagonists of neuropeptides might improve the therapeutic effect of antiepileptic drugs should be addressed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Genetic and Reflex Epilepsies, Audiogenic Seizures and Strains: From Experimental Models to the Clinic". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sympathetic control of skeletal muscle function: possible co-operation between noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y in rabbit jaw muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, C; Deriu, F; Roatta, S; Santarelli, R; Azzena, G B; Passatore, M

    1996-07-19

    Stimulation of the cervical sympathetic nerve at 10/s increases by 12.9 +/- 0.7% peak tension of maximal twitches in the directly stimulated jaw muscles and markedly depresses (41.6 +/- 1.3%) the tonic vibration reflex (TVR) elicited in the same muscles by vibration of the mandible. Both effects are not significantly influenced by administration of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists. When both alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors are blocked, sympathetic stimulation induces a very small increase in twitch tension (3.8 +/- 0.7%), while no detectable change in the TVR is observed. Close arterial injection of alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine mimics the effects induced by sympathetic stimulation on twitch tension and TVR, dose-dependently. The noradrenaline co-transmitter neuropeptide Y also produces a long-lasting, dose-dependent increase in the twitch tension which is unaffected by blockade of adrenergic receptors as well as of the neuromuscular junctions. Contribution of neuropeptide Y to the sympathetically-induced reduction of the stretch reflex is not clearly demonstrated. These data suggest that co-operation between noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y may be effective in determining sympathetic modulation of skeletal muscle function.

  13. Neuropeptide Y, stressful life events and personality trait conscientiousness: Preliminary associations from a Swedish longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melas, Philippe A; Guban, Peter; Rahman, Md Shafiqur; Lavebratt, Catharina; Forsell, Yvonne

    2018-05-01

    The heritability of the Five-Factor Model (FFM) of human personality is high, but few genes have been identified to underlie FFM traits. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a pleiotropic gene implicated in stress resilience that contains two well-studied functional SNPs: (1) rs16147, which lies in the NPY promoter and affects expression levels, and (2) rs16139, which lies in the coding sequence of NPY's precursor peptide, pre-pro NPY, and affects precursor processing. In the present study we examined whether these two polymorphisms are associated with FFM traits, using a Swedish cohort (rs16147, N = 2113; and rs16139, N = 1971), and found a significant association with rs16139. Specifically, the minor G-allele of the SNP, which encodes proline instead of leucine and leads to higher processing of pre-pro NPY into mature NPY, was associated with higher levels of conscientiousness. Next, we looked at exposure to life adversities, both in childhood and adulthood, and found that stressful life events were significantly associated with reduced levels of conscientiousness. These data provide insights into the neurobiology of human personality. However, given the difficulty in replicating genetic and environmental associations with behaviorally complex traits, these findings should be considered preliminary and warrant replication in additional cohorts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Neuroendocrine-autonomic integration in the paraventricular nucleus: novel roles for dendritically released neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J E

    2015-06-01

    Communication between pairs of neurones in the central nervous system typically involves classical 'hard-wired' synaptic transmission, characterised by high temporal and spatial precision. Over the last two decades, however, knowledge regarding the repertoire of communication modalities used in the brain has notably expanded to include less conventional forms, characterised by a diffuse and less temporally precise transfer of information. These forms are best suited to mediate communication among entire neuronal populations, now recognised to be a fundamental process in the brain for the generation of complex behaviours. In response to an osmotic stressor, the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) generates a multimodal homeostatic response that involves orchestrated neuroendocrine (i.e. systemic release of vasopressin) and autonomic (i.e. sympathetic outflow to the kidneys) components. The precise mechanisms that underlie interpopulation cross-talk between these two distinct neuronal populations, however, remain largely unknown. The present review summarises and discusses a series of recent studies that have identified the dendritic release of neuropeptides as a novel interpopulation signalling modality in the PVN. A current working model is described in which it is proposed that the activity-dependent dendritic release of vasopressin from neurosecretory neurones in the PVN acts in a diffusible manner to increase the activity of distant presympathetic neurones, resulting in an integrated sympathoexcitatory population response, particularly within the context of a hyperosmotic challenge. The cellular mechanism underlying this novel form of intercellular communication, as well as its physiological and pathophysiological implications, is discussed. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  15. MGL-1 on AIY neurons translates starvation to reproductive plasticity via neuropeptide signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Haelim; Paik, Young-Ki

    2017-10-01

    Reproductive plasticity is the ability of an animal to modulate its reproductive functions in response to environmental changes. For example, Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living nematode, can adjust the onsets of oogenesis and embryogenesis under harsh environmental conditions, including starvation. However, the molecular mechanisms used to perceive and translate environmental signals into reproductive functional adjustments remain largely uncharacterized. We discovered that in C. elegans, the glutamate receptor homolog MGL-1 initiated reproductive plasticity in response to starvation. A genetic analysis of the mutant gene, mgl-1(tm1811), suggested that starvation delayed the onsets of oogenesis and embryogenesis via MGL-1. Cell-specific rescues of mgl-1 deletion mutants, which used transgenic lines designed to express MGL-1 in different neurons (e.g., RMD, AIA, AIY, and NSM), suggested that only AIY-rescued animals exhibited normal delays in oogenesis and embryogenesis equivalent to those of wild-type animals, suggesting recovery. Furthermore, in AIY neurons, MGL-1 appears to use neuropeptide signaling, rather than glutamate, to translate starvation stimuli into delayed oogenesis and embryogenesis. Our findings, which reveal molecular linkages between starvation signals and reproductive alterations, may provide a basis for understanding energy reallocation mechanisms, as the mgl-1 deletion mutant exhibited more severe reductions in lifespan and fat accumulation than did wild-type animals under starvation conditions. Taken together, MGL-1 is the molecular driver underlying the translation of starvation signals to reproduction plasticity in an AIY neuron-specific manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Recruitment and diversification of an ecdysozoan family of neuropeptide hormones for black widow spider venom expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCowan, Caryn; Garb, Jessica E

    2014-02-25

    Venoms have attracted enormous attention because of their potent physiological effects and dynamic evolution, including the convergent recruitment of homologous genes for venom expression. Here we provide novel evidence for the recruitment of genes from the Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (CHH) and arthropod Ion Transport Peptide (ITP) superfamily for venom expression in black widow spiders. We characterized latrodectin peptides from venom gland cDNAs from the Western black widow spider (Latrodectus hesperus), the brown widow (Latrodectus geometricus) and cupboard spider (Steatoda grossa). Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences with homologs from other spider, scorpion and wasp venom cDNAs, as well as CHH/ITP neuropeptides, show latrodectins as derived members of the CHH/ITP superfamily. These analyses suggest that CHH/ITP homologs are more widespread in spider venoms, and were recruited for venom expression in two additional arthropod lineages. We also found that the latrodectin 2 gene and nearly all CHH/ITP genes include a phase 2 intron in the same position, supporting latrodectin's placement within the CHH/ITP superfamily. Evolutionary analyses of latrodectins suggest episodes of positive selection along some sequence lineages, and positive and purifying selection on specific codons, supporting its functional importance in widow venom. We consider how this improved understanding of latrodectin evolution informs functional hypotheses regarding its role in black widow venom as well as its potential convergent recruitment for venom expression across arthropods. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Demonstration of expression of a neuropeptide-encoding gene in crustacean hemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Su-Hua; Chen, Yan-Jhou; Huang, Shao-Yen; Tsai, Wei-Shiun; Wu, Hsin-Ju; Hsu, Tsan-Ting; Lee, Chi-Ying

    2012-04-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) was originally identified in a neuroendocrine system-the X-organ/sinus gland complex. In this study, a cDNA (Prc-CHH) encoding CHH precursor was cloned from the hemocyte of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Analysis of tissues by a CHH-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed the presence of CHH in hemocytes, the levels of which were much lower than those in the sinus gland, but 2 to 10 times higher than those in the thoracic and cerebral ganglia. Total hemocytes were separated by density gradient centrifugation into layers of hyaline cell (HC), semi-granular cell (SGC), and granular cell (GC). Analysis of extracts of each layer using ELISA revealed that CHH is present in GCs (202.8±86.7 fmol/mg protein) and SGCs (497.8±49.4 fmol/mg protein), but not in HCs. Finally, CHH stimulated the membrane-bound guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity of hemocytes in a dose-dependent manner. These data for the first time confirm that a crustacean neuropeptide-encoding gene is expressed in cells essential for immunity and its expression in hemocytes is cell type-specific. Effect of CHH on the membrane-bound GC activity of hemocyte suggests that hemocyte is a target site of CHH. Possible functions of the hemocyte-derived CHH are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Neuropeptide Y on Stem Cells and Their Potential Applications in Disease Therapy

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    Song Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide Y (NPY, a 36-amino acid peptide, is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems and other peripheral tissues. It takes part in regulating various biological processes including food intake, circadian rhythm, energy metabolism, and neuroendocrine secretion. Increasing evidence indicates that NPY exerts multiple regulatory effects on stem cells. As a kind of primitive and undifferentiated cells, stem cells have the therapeutic potential to replace damaged cells, secret paracrine molecules, promote angiogenesis, and modulate immunity. Stem cell-based therapy has been demonstrated effective and considered as one of the most promising treatments for specific diseases. However, several limitations still hamper its application, such as poor survival and low differentiation and integration rates of transplanted stem cells. The regulatory effects of NPY on stem cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation may be helpful to overcome these limitations and facilitate the application of stem cell-based therapy. In this review, we summarized the regulatory effects of NPY on stem cells and discussed their potential applications in disease therapy.

  19. Neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive neurons in the cerebral cortex of humans and other haplorrhine primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghanti, Mary Ann; Conley, Tiffini; Sudduth, Jessica; Erwin, Joseph M.; Stimpson, Cheryl D.; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the distribution of neurons immunoreactive for neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the posterior part of the superior temporal cortex (Brodmann's area 22 or area Tpt) of humans and nonhuman haplorrhine primates. NPY has been implicated in learning and memory and the density of NPY-expressing cortical neurons and axons is reduced in depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. Due to the role that NPY plays in both cognition and neurodegenerative diseases, we tested the hypothesis that the density of cortical and interstitial neurons expressing NPY was increased in humans relative to other primate species. The study sample included great apes (chimpanzee and gorilla), Old World monkeys (pigtailed macaque, moor macaque, and baboon) and New World monkeys (squirrel monkey and capuchin). Stereologic methods were used to estimate the density of NPY-immunoreactive (-ir) neurons in layers I-VI of area Tpt and the subjacent white matter. Adjacent Nissl-stained sections were used to calculate local densities of all neurons. The ratio of NPY-ir neurons to total neurons within area Tpt and the total density of NPY-ir neurons within the white matter were compared among species. Overall, NPY-ir neurons represented only an average of 0.006% of the total neuron population. While there were significant differences among species, phylogenetic trends in NPY-ir neuron distributions were not observed and humans did not differ from other primates. However, variation among species warrants further investigation into the distribution of this neuromodulator system. PMID:23042407

  20. Humans and great apes share increased neocortical neuropeptide Y innervation compared to other haplorhine primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ann eRaghanti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide Y (NPY plays a role in a variety of basic physiological functions and has also been implicated in regulating cognition, including learning and memory. A decrease in neocortical NPY has been reported for Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression, potentially contributing to associated cognitive deficits. The goal of the present analysis was to examine variation in neocortical NPY-immunoreactive axon and varicosity density among haplorhine primates (monkeys, apes, and humans. Stereologic methods were used to measure the ratios of NPY-expressing axon length density to total neuron density (ALv/Nv and NPY-immunoreactive varicosity density to neuron density (Vv/Nv, as well as the mean varicosity spacing in neocortical areas 10, 24, 44, and 22 (Tpt of humans, African great apes, New World monkeys, and Old World monkeys. Humans and great apes showed increased cortical NPY innervation relative to monkey species for ALv/Nv and Vv/Nv. Furthermore, humans and great apes displayed a conserved pattern of varicosity spacing across cortical areas and layers, with no differences between cortical layers or among cortical areas. These phylogenetic differences may be related to shared life history variables and may reflect specific cognitive abilities.

  1. Beneficial effects of neuropeptide galanin on reinstatement of exercise-induced somatic and psychological trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Biao; Fang, Penghua; Guo, Lili; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Xu, Bo; Bo, Ping; Zhang, Zhenwen

    2017-04-01

    Galanin is a versatile neuropeptide that is distinctly upregulated by exercise in exercise-related tissues. Although benefits from exercise-induced upregulation of this peptide have been identified, many issues require additional exploration. This Review summarizes the information currently available on the relationship between galanin and exercise-induced physical and psychological damage. On the one hand, body movement, exercise damage, and exercise-induced stress and pain significantly increase local and circulatory galanin levels. On the other hand, galanin plays an exercise-protective role to inhibit the flexor reflex and prevent excessive movement of skeletal muscles through enhancing response threshold and reducing acetylcholine release. Additionally, elevated galanin levels can boost repair of the exercise-induced damage in exercise-related tissues, including peripheral nerve, skeletal muscle, blood vessel, skin, bone, articulation, and ligament. Moreover, elevated galanin levels may serve as effective signals to buffer sport-induced stress and pain via inhibiting nociceptive signal transmission and enhancing pain threshold. This Review deepens our understanding of the profitable roles of galanin in exercise protection, exercise injury repair, and exercise-induced stress and pain. Galanin and its agonists may be used to develop a novel preventive and therapeutic strategy to prevent and treat exercise-induced somatic and psychological trauma. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Monoamines and neuropeptides interact to inhibit aversive behaviour in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Holly; Wragg, Rachel; Hapiak, Vera; Castelletto, Michelle; Zahratka, Jeffrey; Harris, Gareth; Summers, Philip; Korchnak, Amanda; Law, Wenjing; Bamber, Bruce; Komuniecki, Richard

    2012-02-01

    Pain modulation is complex, but noradrenergic signalling promotes anti-nociception, with α(2)-adrenergic agonists used clinically. To better understand the noradrenergic/peptidergic modulation of nociception, we examined the octopaminergic inhibition of aversive behaviour initiated by the Caenorhabditis elegans nociceptive ASH sensory neurons. Octopamine (OA), the invertebrate counterpart of norepinephrine, modulates sensory-mediated reversal through three α-adrenergic-like OA receptors. OCTR-1 and SER-3 antagonistically modulate ASH signalling directly, with OCTR-1 signalling mediated by Gα(o). In contrast, SER-6 inhibits aversive responses by stimulating the release of an array of 'inhibitory' neuropeptides that activate receptors on sensory neurons mediating attraction or repulsion, suggesting that peptidergic signalling may integrate multiple sensory inputs to modulate locomotory transitions. These studies highlight the complexity of octopaminergic/peptidergic interactions, the role of OA in activating global peptidergic signalling cascades and the similarities of this modulatory network to the noradrenergic inhibition of nociception in mammals, where norepinephrine suppresses chronic pain through inhibitory α(2)-adrenoreceptors on afferent nociceptors and stimulatory α(1)-receptors on inhibitory peptidergic interneurons.

  3. Morphometric characteristics of neuropeptide Y immunoreactive neurons in cortex of human inferior parietal lobule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivokuća, Dragan; Puskas, Laslo; Puskas, Nela; Erić, Mirela

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate and precisely define the morphology of neurons immunoreactive to neuropeptide Y (NPY) in cortex of human inferior parietal lobule (IPL). Five human brains were used for immunohistochemical investigation of the shape and laminar distribution of NPY neurons in serial section in the supramarginal and angular gyrus. Immunoreactivity to NPY was detected in all six layers of the cortex of human IPL. However a great number of NPY immunoreactive neurons were found in the white matter under the IPL cortex. The following types of NPY immunoreactive neurons were found: Cajal-Retzius, pyramidal, inverted pyramidal, "double bouquet" (bitufted), rare type 6, multipolar nonspinous, bipolar, voluminous "basket", and chandelier cells. These informations about morphometric characteristics of NPY immunoreactive neurons in cortical layers, together with morphometric data taken from brains having schizophrenia or Alzheimer's-type dementia may contribute to better understanding patogenesis of these neurological diseases. The finding of Cajal-Retzius neurons immunoreactive to NPY points to the need for further investigations because of great importance of these cells in neurogenesis and involvement in mentioned diseases instead of their rarity.

  4. Neuropeptide S-mediated facilitation of synaptic transmission enforces subthreshold theta oscillations within the lateral amygdala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Meis

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide S (NPS receptor system modulates neuronal circuit activity in the amygdala in conjunction with fear, anxiety and the expression and extinction of previously acquired fear memories. Using in vitro brain slice preparations of transgenic GAD67-GFP (Δneo mice, we investigated the effects of NPS on neural activity in the lateral amygdala as a key region for the formation and extinction of fear memories. We are able to demonstrate that NPS augments excitatory glutamatergic synaptic input onto both projection neurons and interneurons of the lateral amygdala, resulting in enhanced spike activity of both types of cells. These effects were at least in part mediated by presynaptic mechanisms. In turn, inhibition of projection neurons by local interneurons was augmented by NPS, and subthreshold oscillations were strengthened, leading to their shift into the theta frequency range. These data suggest that the multifaceted effects of NPS on amygdaloid circuitry may shape behavior-related network activity patterns in the amygdala and reflect the peptide's potent activity in various forms of affective behavior and emotional memory.

  5. The neuropeptide tachykinin is essential for pheromone detection in a gustatory neural circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Shruti; Chua, Jia Yi; Tan, Kah Junn; Calvert, Meredith E K; Weng, Ruifen; Ng, Wan Chin; Mori, Kenji; Yew, Joanne Y

    2015-06-17

    Gustatory pheromones play an essential role in shaping the behavior of many organisms. However, little is known about the processing of taste pheromones in higher order brain centers. Here, we describe a male-specific gustatory circuit in Drosophila that underlies the detection of the anti-aphrodisiac pheromone (3R,11Z,19Z)-3-acetoxy-11,19-octacosadien-1-ol (CH503). Using behavioral analysis, genetic manipulation, and live calcium imaging, we show that Gr68a-expressing neurons on the forelegs of male flies exhibit a sexually dimorphic physiological response to the pheromone and relay information to the central brain via peptidergic neurons. The release of tachykinin from 8 to 10 cells within the subesophageal zone is required for the pheromone-triggered courtship suppression. Taken together, this work describes a neuropeptide-modulated central brain circuit that underlies the programmed behavioral response to a gustatory sex pheromone. These results will allow further examination of the molecular basis by which innate behaviors are modulated by gustatory cues and physiological state.

  6. Developmental Ethanol Exposure Causes Reduced Feeding and Reveals a Critical Role for Neuropeptide F in Survival

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    Amanda Guevara

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Food intake is necessary for survival, and natural reward circuitry has evolved to help ensure that animals ingest sufficient food to maintain development, growth, and survival. Drugs of abuse, including alcohol, co-opt the natural reward circuitry in the brain, and this is a major factor in the reinforcement of drug behaviors leading to addiction. At the junction of these two aspects of reward are alterations in feeding behavior due to alcohol consumption. In particular, developmental alcohol exposure (DAE results in a collection of physical and neurobehavioral disorders collectively referred to as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD. The deleterious effects of DAE include intellectual disabilities and other neurobehavioral changes, including altered feeding behaviors. Here we use Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model organism to study the effects of DAE on feeding behavior and the expression and function of Neuropeptide F. We show that addition of a defined concentration of ethanol to food leads to reduced feeding at all stages of development. Further, genetic conditions that reduce or eliminate NPF signaling combine with ethanol exposure to further reduce feeding, and the distribution of NPF is altered in the brains of ethanol-supplemented larvae. Most strikingly, we find that the vast majority of flies with a null mutation in the NPF receptor die early in larval development when reared in ethanol, and provide evidence that this lethality is due to voluntary starvation. Collectively, we find a critical role for NPF signaling in protecting against altered feeding behavior induced by developmental ethanol exposure.

  7. Critical role of neuropeptides B/W receptor 1 signaling in social behavior and fear memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Nagata-Kuroiwa

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide B/W receptor 1 (NPBWR1 is a G-protein coupled receptor, which was initially reported as an orphan receptor, and whose ligands were identified by this and other groups in 2002 and 2003. To examine the physiological roles of NPBWR1, we examined phenotype of Npbwr1⁻/⁻ mice. When presented with an intruder mouse, Npbwr1⁻/⁻ mice showed impulsive contact with the strange mice, produced more intense approaches toward them, and had longer contact and chasing time along with greater and sustained elevation of heart rate and blood pressure compared to wild type mice. Npbwr1⁻/⁻ mice also showed increased autonomic and neuroendocrine responses to physical stress, suggesting that impairment of NPBWR1 leads to stress vulnerability. We also observed that these mice show abnormality in the contextual fear conditioning test. These data suggest that NPBWR1 plays a critical role in limbic system function and stress responses. Histological and electrophysiological studies showed that NPBWR1 acts as an inhibitory regulator on a subpopulation of GABAergic neurons in the lateral division of the CeA and terminates stress responses. These findings suggest important roles of NPBWR1 in regulating amygdala function during physical and social stress.

  8. Neuropeptide S is a stimulatory anxiolytic agent: a behavioural study in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, A; Vergura, R; Marzola, G; Ruzza, C; Guerrini, R; Salvadori, S; Regoli, D; Calo, G

    2008-05-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) was recently identified as the endogenous ligand of an orphan receptor, now referred to as the NPS receptor. In vivo, NPS produces a unique behavioural profile by increasing wakefulness and exerting anxiolytic-like effects. In the present study, we further evaluated the effects of in vivo supraspinal NPS in mice. Effects of NPS, injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), on locomotor activity (LA), righting reflex (RR) recovery and on anxiety states (measured with the elevated plus maze (EPM) and stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) tests) were assessed in Swiss mice. NPS (0.01-1 nmol per mouse) caused a significant increase in LA in naive mice, in mice habituated to the test cages and in animals sedated with diazepam (5 mg kg(-1)). In the RR assay, NPS dose dependently reduced the proportion of animals losing the RR in response to diazepam (15 mg kg(-1)) and their sleeping time. In the EPM and SIH test, NPS dose dependently evoked anxiolytic-like effects by increasing the time spent by animals in the open arms and reducing the SIH response, respectively. We provide further evidence that NPS acts as a novel modulator of arousal and anxiety-related behaviours by promoting a unique pattern of effects: stimulation associated with anxiolysis. Therefore, NPS receptor ligands may represent innovative drugs for the treatment of sleep and anxiety disorders.

  9. Characterization of normal and supersensitive dopamine receptors: Effects of ergot drugs and neuropeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuxe, K.; Agnati, L.F.; Koehler, C.; Kuonen, D.; Oegren, S.-O.; Andersson, K.; Hoekfelt, T.; Astra Pharmaceuticals AB, Soedertaelje; Modena Univ.

    1981-01-01

    Dopamine receptors have been characterized by use of radiolabelled dopamine agonists and antagonists. Using ibotenic acid induced lesions of the striatum, evidence was obtained that 3 H-N-propylnorapomorphine ( 3 H-NPA) binding sites and 3H-bromocriptine binding sites are located both on intrastriatal nerve cells and on extrinsic nerve terminals probably mainly originating in the cerebral cortex. Following a 6-hydroxydopamine induced lesion supersensitive dopamine receptors, an increase of binding sites for 3 H-NPA and after one year two different binding sites and behavioural supersensitivity have been observed. The dopamine receptor agonists and especially the dopaminergic ergot derivates have been characterized by studying their affinities for 3 H-bromocriptine, 3 H-spiperone 3 H-ADTN and 3 H-NPA binding sites in vitro and their effects on the specific in vivo binding of 3 H-spiperone and 3 H-NPA has been studied. There might exist 3 types of dopamine-receptors. Actions of dopaminergic ergot drugs have been evaluated at supersensitive dopamine receptors. There is a highly preferential action of CF25-397 at these receptors. Prolonged treatment with pergolide can produce a down regulation of normal dopamine receptors by reducing the density of such receptors. Colecystokinin peptides can in vitro reduce the number of 3 H-NPA binding sites in the striatum. Thus neuropeptides may represent neuromodulators in the dopamine synapses. (M.J.)

  10. Neuropeptide FF increases M2 activation and self-renewal of adipose tissue macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Syed F. Hassnain; Hoang, Anh Cuong; Ampem, Grace; Azegrouz, Hind; Balogh, Lajos; Thuróczy, Julianna; Gerling, Ivan C.; Nam, Sorim; Lim, Jong-Seok; Martinez-Ibañez, Juncal; Real, José T.; Paschke, Stephan; Quillet, Raphaëlle; Ayachi, Safia; Simonin, Frédéric; Schneider, E. Marion; Brinkman, Jacqueline A.; Seroogy, Christine M.

    2017-01-01

    The quantity and activation state of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) impact the development of obesity-induced metabolic diseases. Appetite-controlling hormones play key roles in obesity; however, our understanding of their effects on ATMs is limited. Here, we have shown that human and mouse ATMs express NPFFR2, a receptor for the appetite-reducing neuropeptide FF (NPFF), and that NPFFR2 expression is upregulated by IL-4, an M2-polarizing cytokine. Plasma levels of NPFF decreased in obese patients and high-fat diet–fed mice and increased following caloric restriction. NPFF promoted M2 activation and increased the proliferation of murine and human ATMs. Both M2 activation and increased ATM proliferation were abolished in NPFFR2-deficient ATMs. Mechanistically, the effects of NPFF involved the suppression of E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF128 expression, resulting in enhanced stability of phosphorylated STAT6 and increased transcription of the M2 macrophage–associated genes IL-4 receptor α (Il4ra), arginase 1 (Arg1), IL-10 (Il10), and alkylglycerol monooxygenase (Agmo). NPFF induced ATM proliferation concomitantly with the increase in N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (Ndrg2) expression and suppressed the transcription of Ifi200 cell-cycle inhibitor family members and MAF bZIP transcription factor B (Mafb), a negative regulator of macrophage proliferation. NPFF thus plays an important role in supporting healthy adipose tissue via the maintenance of metabolically beneficial ATMs. PMID:28581443

  11. The anti-inflammatory potential of neuropeptide FF in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Yuan; Sun, Tao; He, Ning; Li, Jing-Yi; Zhuang, Yan; Zeng, Qian; Yu, Jing; Fang, Quan; Wang, Rui

    2013-09-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) has many functions in regulating various biological processes. However, little attention has been focused on the anti-inflammatory effect of this peptide. In the present study, the in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of NPFF in both primary peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages was investigated. Our data showed that NPFF suppressed the nitric oxide (NO) production of macrophages in the inflammation process. RF9, a reported antagonist of NPFF receptors, completely blocked the NPFF-induced NO suppression, suggesting a NPFF receptors-mediated pathway is mainly involved. Down-regulation of the nitric oxide synthases significantly inhibited the NPFF-induced NO reduction, indicating the involvement of nitric oxide synthases. However, the nitric oxide synthases were not the only route by which NPFF modulated the NO levels of macrophages. Pharmacological antagonists of the NF-κB signal pathway also completely suppressed the NPFF-induced NO decline. Moreover, we also observed that NPFF is capable of blocking the LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 in macrophages, implying the involvement of the NF-κB signal pathway. Finally, we observed that NPFF markedly attenuated the carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema, indicating that NPFF is capable of exerting anti-inflammatory potency in vivo. Collectively, our findings reveal the potential role of NPFF in the anti-inflammatory field both in vitro and in vivo, which will be helpful for the further exploitation of NPFF utility therapeutically. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. A high-affinity, radioiodinatable neuropeptide FF analogue incorporating a photolabile p-(4-hydroxybenzoyl)phenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Lauriane; Moulédous, Lionel; Tafani, Jean A M; Germanier, Maryse; Zajac, Jean-Marie

    2014-05-15

    A new radioiodinated photoaffinity compound, [(125)I]YE(Bpa)WSLAAPQRFNH2, derived from a peptide present in the rat neuropeptide FF (NPFF) precursor was synthesized, and its binding characteristics were investigated on a neuroblastoma clone, SH-SY5Y, stably expressing rat NPFF2 receptors tagged with the T7 epitope. The binding of the probe was saturable and revealed a high-affinity interaction (KD=0.24nM) with a single class of binding sites. It was also able to affinity label NPFF2 receptor in a specific and efficient manner given that 38% of the bound radioligand at saturating concentration formed a wash-resistant binding after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Photoaffinity labeling with [(125)I]YE(Bpa)WSLAAPQRFamide showed two molecular forms of NPFF2 receptor with apparent molecular weights of 140 and 95kDa in a 2:1 ratio. The comparison of the results between photoaffinity labeling and Western blot analysis suggests that all receptor forms bind the probe irreversibly with the same efficiency. On membranes of mouse olfactory bulb, only the high molecular weight form of NPFF2 receptor is observed. [(125)I]YE(Bpa)WSLAAPQRFamide is an excellent radioiodinated peptidic ligand for direct and selective labeling of NPFF2 receptors in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuropeptide FF receptors exhibit direct and anti-opioid effects on mice dorsal raphe nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhong; Zajac, Jean-Marie

    2014-10-05

    By using acutely dissociated dorsal raphe nucleus neurons (DRN) from young mice, direct and anti-opioid effects of Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors were measured. The NPFF analog 1 DMe (10 µM) had no effect on resting Ca2+ channels but reduced the magnitude of Ca2+ transients induced by depolarization in 83.3% neurons tested, of which the inhibition rate is 45.4±2.9%. Pertussis toxin treatment reduced to 18.9% the number of responding neurons and attenuated by 47% the response of 1 DMe. In contrast, cholera toxin treatment had no significant effect. Eighteen minute perfusion with 1 DMe at a very low 10 nM concentration, that did not directly inhibit Ca2+ transients triggered by depolarization in every neuron, attenuated by 78% the inhibitory effect of Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) on Ca2+ transients, but not that of by serotonin. These results demonstrated for the first time that NPFF receptors on mice DRN inhibit Ca2+ transients induced by depolarization via Gi/o protein and also exhibit a specific anti-opioid activity on nociceptin receptors, and that their specific anti-opioid activity is not a direct consequence of their activity on Ca2+ transients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Neuropeptide FF inhibits LPS-mediated osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Long; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Li, Di-Jie; Zhao, Fan; Ma, Xiao-Li; Shang, Peng; Yang, Tuanming; Qian, Airong

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) has been implicated in many physiological processes. Previously, we have reported that NPFF modulates the viability and nitric oxide (NO) production of RAW264.7 macrophages. In this study, we investigated the influence of NPFF on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated osteoclast formation of RAW264.7 cells. Our results suggest that, NPFF dose-dependently (1 nM, 10 nM and 100 nM) inhibited osteoclast formation, TRAP enzyme activity and bone resorption in osteoclasts induced by LPS respectively. Moreover, LPS-provoked NO release was also inhibited by NPFF treatment, indicating a NO-dependent pathway is mainly involved. Furthermore, the alterations of osteoclast marker genes were also assessed including TRAP, Cathepsin K, MMP-9, NFATc1 and Runx2. NPFF downregulated LPS-caused gene augmentations of TRAP, Cathepsin K and MMP-9, whereas showed no influences on NFATc1 and Runx2. In addition, NPFF receptor 2 (NPFFR2) mRNA expression was also augmented in response to NPFF treatment, hinting the involvement of NPFFR2 pathway. It should be mentioned that RF9 (1 µ M), a reported pharmacological inhibitor for NPFF receptors, exerted NPFF-like agonist properties as to attenuate osteoclastogenesis. Collectively, our findings provide new evidence for the in vitro activity of NPFF on osteoclasts, which may be helpful to extend the scope of NPFF functions.

  15. Neuropeptide FF increases M2 activation and self-renewal of adipose tissue macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Syed F Hassnain; Hoang, Anh Cuong; Lin, Ya-Tin; Ampem, Grace; Azegrouz, Hind; Balogh, Lajos; Thuróczy, Julianna; Chen, Jin-Chung; Gerling, Ivan C; Nam, Sorim; Lim, Jong-Seok; Martinez-Ibañez, Juncal; Real, José T; Paschke, Stephan; Quillet, Raphaëlle; Ayachi, Safia; Simonin, Frédéric; Schneider, E Marion; Brinkman, Jacqueline A; Lamming, Dudley W; Seroogy, Christine M; Röszer, Tamás

    2017-06-30

    The quantity and activation state of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) impact the development of obesity-induced metabolic diseases. Appetite-controlling hormones play key roles in obesity; however, our understanding of their effects on ATMs is limited. Here, we have shown that human and mouse ATMs express NPFFR2, a receptor for the appetite-reducing neuropeptide FF (NPFF), and that NPFFR2 expression is upregulated by IL-4, an M2-polarizing cytokine. Plasma levels of NPFF decreased in obese patients and high-fat diet-fed mice and increased following caloric restriction. NPFF promoted M2 activation and increased the proliferation of murine and human ATMs. Both M2 activation and increased ATM proliferation were abolished in NPFFR2-deficient ATMs. Mechanistically, the effects of NPFF involved the suppression of E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF128 expression, resulting in enhanced stability of phosphorylated STAT6 and increased transcription of the M2 macrophage-associated genes IL-4 receptor α (Il4ra), arginase 1 (Arg1), IL-10 (Il10), and alkylglycerol monooxygenase (Agmo). NPFF induced ATM proliferation concomitantly with the increase in N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (Ndrg2) expression and suppressed the transcription of Ifi200 cell-cycle inhibitor family members and MAF bZIP transcription factor B (Mafb), a negative regulator of macrophage proliferation. NPFF thus plays an important role in supporting healthy adipose tissue via the maintenance of metabolically beneficial ATMs.

  16. NPFF2 receptor is involved in the modulatory effects of neuropeptide FF for macrophage cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-long; Sun, Tao; Zhang, Xiao-yuan; He, Ning; Zhuang, Yan; Li, Jing-yi; Fang, Quan; Wang, Kai-rong; Wang, Rui

    2014-05-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) interacts with specific receptors to regulate diverse biological processes. Its modulatory effect in the immune field, however, has not been fully explored yet. Here, we report that NPFF2 receptors may be functionally expressed in two immune cell models, the primary peritoneal macrophage and RAW 264.7 macrophage. Firstly, the mRNA levels of NPFF2 receptor were up-regulated in macrophages when treated with LPS for 24 to 72 h. Subsequently, our data hinted that NPFF regulates the viability of both kinds of macrophages. After treatment with RF9, a reported antagonist for both NPFF receptors, delayed or inhibited the NPFF-induced macrophages viability augmentation, suggesting the involvement of NPFF2 receptor. Furthermore, down-regulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthases (NOSs) partially significantly inhibited the viability augmentation of macrophages induced by NPFF, implying a nitric oxide synthases- dependent pathway is involved. However, the NOSs are not the only route by which NPFF affects the viability of macrophages. Pharmacological inhibitors of NF-κB signal pathway also blocked the NPFF-induced macrophages growth, suggesting the involvement of the NF-κB signal pathway. The regulation activity of NPFF for macrophages suggests that NPFF could act as a potential hormone in the control of immune system. Collectively, our data provide new evidence about the immune modulatory effect of NPFF, which will be helpful in extending the scope of NPFF functions.

  17. Cholesterol-rich lipid rafts are involved in Neuropeptide FF anti-Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhong; Zajac, Jean-Marie

    2015-11-30

    The participation of a signaling platform to the anti-Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) effect of Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors was investigated in both acutely dissociated neurons and SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The NPFF anti-N/OFQ, not anti-μ opioid effect, on the Ca 2+ transient triggered by depolarization was reversed by methyl-β-cyclodextrin which depletes cholesterol from cell membranes. While the inactive α-cyclodextrin had no effect. By using [ 35 S]GTPγS binding assay, a significant 20% decrease of the activity of Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptors induced by the NPFF analogue 1DMe was observed in detergent resistant membranes (DRMs) but not in total membranes of SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, siRNA knock-down of GRK2 indicated that GRK2, but not PKC, acted as the mediator in the NPFF anti-N/OFQ process. These data indicate that cholesterol-rich lipid rafts play an important role in the anti-N/OFQ effect of NPFF receptors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuropeptides and epitheliopeptides: structural and functional diversity in an ancestral metazoan Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshio

    2013-06-01

    Peptides are known to play important developmental and physiological roles in signaling. The rich diversity of peptides, with functions as diverse as intercellular communication, neurotransmission and signaling that spatially and temporally controls axis formation and cell differentiation, hints at the wealth of information passed between interacting cells. Little is known about peptides that control developmental processes such as cell differentiation and pattern formation in metazoans. The cnidarian Hydra is one of the most basic metazoans and is a key model system for study of the peptides involved in these processes. We developed a novel peptidomic approach for the isolation and identification of functional peptide signaling molecules from Hydra (the Hydra Peptide Project). Over the course of this project, a wide variety of novel neuropeptides were identified. Most of these peptides act directly on muscle cells and their functions include induction of contraction and relaxation. Some peptides are involved in cell differentiation and morphogenesis. Moreover, epitheliopeptides that are produced by epithelial cells were originally identified in Hydra. Some of these epitheliopeptides exhibit morphogen-like activities, whereas others are involved in regulating neuron differentiation, possibly through neuron-epithelial cell interactions. We also describe below our high-throughput reverse-phase nano-flow LCMALDI- TOF-MS/MS approach, which has proved a powerful tool for the discovery of novel peptide signaling molecules in Hydra.

  19. Hemodynamic effects of python neuropeptide gamma in the anesthetized python, Python regius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard, Nini; Galli, Gina; Taylor, Edwin W; Conlon, J Michael; Wang, Tobias

    2005-05-15

    The effects of python neuropeptide gamma (NPgamma) on hemodynamic parameters have been investigated in the anesthetized ball python (Python regius). Bolus intra-arterial injections of synthetic python NPgamma (1-300 pmol kg-1) produced a dose-dependent decrease in systemic arterial blood pressure (Psys) concomitant with increases in systemic vascular conductance (Gsys), total cardiac output and stroke volume, but only minor effects on heart rate. The peptide had no significant effect on pulmonary arterial blood pressure (Ppul) and caused only a small increase in pulmonary conductance (Gpul) at the highest dose. In the systemic circulation, the potency of the NK1 receptor-selective agonist [Sar9,Met(0(2))11] substance P was >100-fold greater than the NK2 receptor-selective agonist [betaAla8] neurokinin A-(4-10)-peptide suggesting that the python cardiovascular system is associated with a receptor that resembles the mammalian NK1 receptor more closely than the NK2 receptor. Administration of the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, L-nitro-arginine-methylester (L-NAME; 150 mg kg-1), resulted in a significant (Ppython, but neither nitric oxide nor prostaglandins mediate the vasodilatory action of NPgamma.

  20. The orexin neuropeptide system: Physical activity and hypothalamic function throughout the aging process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia N Zink

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a rising medical need for novel therapeutic targets of physical activity. Physical activity spans from spontaneous, low intensity movements to voluntary, high-intensity exercise. Regulation of spontaneous and voluntary movement is distributed over many brain areas and neural substrates, but the specific cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for mediating overall activity levels are not well understood. The hypothalamus plays a central role in the control of physical activity, which is executed through coordination of multiple signaling systems, including the orexin neuropeptides. Orexin producing neurons integrate physiological and metabolic information to coordinate multiple behavioral states and modulate physical activity in response to the environment. This review is organized around three questions: (1 How do orexin peptides modulate physical activity? (2 What are the effects of aging and lifestyle choices on physical activity? (3 What are the effects of aging on hypothalamic function and the orexin peptides? Discussion of these questions will provide a summary of the current state of knowledge regarding hypothalamic orexin regulation of physical activity during aging and provide a platform on which to develop improved clinical outcomes in age-associated obesity and metabolic syndromes.

  1. Identification of a role for the ventral hippocampus in neuropeptide S-elicited anxiolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Dine

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide S (NPS increasingly emerges as a potential novel treatment option for anxiety diseases like panic and posttraumatic stress disorder. However, the neural underpinnings of its anxiolytic action are still not clearly understood. Recently, we reported that neurons of the ventral hippocampus (VH take up intranasally administered fluorophore-conjugated NPS and, moreover, that application of NPS to mouse brain slices affects neurotransmission and plasticity at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses. Although these previous findings define the VH as a novel NPS target structure, they leave open whether this brain region is directly involved in NPS-mediated anxiolysis and how NPS impacts on neuronal activity propagation in the VH. Here, we fill this knowledge gap by demonstrating, first, that microinjections of NPS into the ventral CA1 region are sufficient to reduce anxiety-like behavior of C57BL/6N mice and, second, that NPS, via the NPS receptor, rapidly weakens evoked neuronal activity flow from the dentate gyrus to area CA1 in vitro. Additionally, we show that intranasally applied NPS alters neurotransmission and plasticity at CA3-CA1 synapses in the same way as NPS administered to hippocampal slices. Thus, our study provides, for the first time, strong experimental evidence for a direct involvement of the VH in NPS-induced anxiolysis and furthermore presents a novel mechanism of NPS action.

  2. Expression and purification of a neuropeptide nocistatin using two related plant viral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Aileen A L; Tachibana, Shinro; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Wong, Sek Man

    2002-05-01

    Both odontoglossum ringspot virus (ORSV) and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) were investigated as expression viral vectors for the expression of a neuropeptide nocistatin. Chimeras of ORSV and TMV were constructed by fusion of 17 amino acids of mouse nocistatin (mNST) to the C-terminal of the coat protein (CP) gene via a Factor Xa cleavage linker to yield ORSV-mNST and TMV-mNST. Expression of the mNST peptide was demonstrated by immuno-transmission electron microscopy, western blot, mass spectrometry and radioimmunoassay. Serial passaging of the chimeric viruses revealed loss of mNST from TMV-mNST by the fifth passage. The mNST was maintained in ORSV-mNST throughout six passages. The mNST peptide could be effectively cleaved and purified from chimeric ORSV CP. To our knowledge, this is the first successful attempt in obtaining a complete peptide with no additional amino acid sequence after expression and purification through the use of either ORSV or TMV as vectors.

  3. The gut peptide neuropeptide Y and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmusson, Ann M

    2017-02-01

    This article reviews the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the pathophysiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with which PTSD is highly comorbid. NPY is low in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of male combat veterans with PTSD and correlates negatively with sympathetic nervous system (SNS) hyperreactivity, PTSD symptoms and time to recovery. NPY regulation has not yet been evaluated in women with PTSD. NPY levels in bowel tissue are low in IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D) versus IBS with constipation. The density of ghrelin containing cells of the gastric oxyntic mucosa is markedly increased in IBS-D. PTSD-related SNS hyperreactivity may interact with this substrate to increase ghrelin release, which activates receptors in the lumbosacral spinal cord and basolateral amygdala to increase colonic motility and amygdala hyperreactivity, respectively. Loss of function gene polymorphisms in adrenergic α2-autoreceptors and increased corticotropin-releasing hormone, as observed in PTSD, are also thought to contribute to IBS-D. Knowledge of shared underlying NPY system-related neurobiological factors that contribute to the comorbidity of PTSD and gastrointestinal disorders may help guide research, development and prescription of targeted and more effective individualized therapeutic interventions.

  4. Inhibitory effects of NAMI-A-like ruthenium complexes on prion neuropeptide fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; He, Lei; Du, Weihong

    2015-05-01

    Prion diseases are a group of infectious and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by the conformational conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP) into its abnormal isoform PrP(Sc). PrP106-126 resembles PrP(Sc) in terms of physicochemical and biological characteristics and is used as a common model for the treatment of prion diseases. Inhibitory effects on fibril formation and neurotoxicity of the prion neuropeptide PrP106-126 have been investigated using metal complexes as potential inhibitors. Nevertheless, the binding mechanism between metal complexes and the peptide remains unclear. The present study is focused on the interaction of PrP106-126 with NAMI-A and NAMI-A-like ruthenium complexes, including KP418, KP1019, and KP1019-2. Results demonstrated that these ruthenium complexes could bind to PrP106-126 in a distinctive binding mode through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. NAMI-A-like ruthenium complexes can also effectively inhibit the aggregation and fibril formation of PrP106-126. The complex KP1019 demonstrated the optimal inhibitory ability upon peptide aggregation, and cytotoxicity because of its large aromatic ligand contribution. The studied complexes could also regulate the copper redox chemistry of PrP106-126 and effectually inhibit the formation of reactive oxygen species. Given these findings, ruthenium complexes with relatively low cellular toxicity may be used to develop potential pharmaceutical products against prion diseases.

  5. Expression of a neuropeptide similar to allatotropin in free living turbellaria (platyhelminthes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Mariana Laura; Damborenea, Cristina; Ronderos, Jorge Rafael

    2011-12-01

    Mechanisms coordinating cell-cell interaction have appeared early in evolution. Allatotropin (AT), a neuropeptide isolated based on its ability to stimulate the synthesis of juvenile hormones (JHs) in insects has also been found in other invertebrate phyla. Despite this function, AT has proved to be myotropic. In the present study we analyze its expression in two groups of Turbellaria (Catenulida, Macrostomida), and its probable relationship with muscle tissue. The results show the presence of an AT-like peptide in the free living turbellaria analyzed. The analysis of the expression of the peptide together with phalloidin, suggests a functional relationship between the peptide and muscle tissue, showing that it could be acting as a myoregulator. The finding of immunoreactive fibers associated with sensory organs like ciliated pits in Catenulida and eyes in Macrostomida makes probable that AT could play a role in the physiological mechanisms controlling circadian activities. Furthermore, the existence of AT in several phyla of Protostomata suggests that this peptide could be a synapomorphic feature of this group. Indeed, the presence in organisms that do not undergo metamorphosis, could be signaling that it was first involved in myotropic activities, being the stimulation of the synthesis of JHs a secondary function acquired by the phylum Arthropoda. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition of systemic inflammation by central action of the neuropeptide alpha-melanocyte- stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Hernàndez, R; Demitri, M T; Carlin, A; Meazza, C; Villa, P; Ghezzi, P; Lipton, J M; Catania, A

    1999-01-01

    The neuropeptide alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) reduces fever and acute inflammation in the skin when administered centrally. The aim of the present research was to determine whether central alpha-MSH can also reduce signs of systemic inflammation in mice with endotoxemia. Increases in serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha and nitric oxide, induced by intraperitoneal administration of endotoxin, were modulated by central injection of a small concentration of alpha-MSH. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and iNOS mRNA in lungs and liver were likewise modulated by central alpha-MSH. Lung myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration, was increased in endotoxemic mice; the increase was significantly less in lungs of mice treated with central alpha-MSH. Intraperitoneal administration of the small dose of alpha-MSH that was effective centrally did not alter any of the markers of inflammation. In experiments using immunoneutralization of central alpha-MSH, we tested the idea that endogenous peptide induced within the brain during systemic inflammation modulates host responses to endotoxic challenge in peripheral tissues. The data showed that proinflammatory agents induced by endotoxin in the circulation, lungs, and liver were significantly greater after blockade of central alpha-MSH. The results suggest that anti-inflammatory influences of neural origin that are triggered by alpha-MSH could be used to treat systemic inflammation.

  7. Anti-aggressive effects of neuropeptide S independent of anxiolysis in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela I Beiderbeck

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide S (NPS exerts robust anxiolytic and memory enhancing effects, but only in a non-social context. In order to study whether NPS affects aggressive behavior we used Wistar rats bred for low (LAB and high (HAB levels of innate anxiety-related behaviour, respectively, which were both described to display increased levels of aggression compared with Wistar rats not selectively bred for anxiety (NAB. Male LAB, HAB and NAB rats were tested for aggressive behavior towards a male intruder rat within their home cage (10 min, resident-intruder [RI] test. Intracerebroventricular (icv infusion of NPS (1 nmol significantly reduced inter-male aggression in LAB rats, and tended to reduce aggression in HAB and NAB males. However, local infusion of NPS (0.2 or 0.1 nmol NPS into either the nucleus accumbens or the lateral hypothalamus did not influence aggressive behavior. Social investigation in the RI test and general social motivation assessed in the social preference paradigm were not altered by icv NPS. The anti-aggressive effect of NPS is most likely not causally linked to its anxiolytic properties, as intraperitoneal administration of the anxiogenic drug pentylenetetrazole decreased aggression in LAB rats whereas the anxiolytic drug diazepam did not affect aggression of HAB rats. Thus, although NPS has so far only been shown to exert effects on non-social behaviors, our results are the first demonstration of anti-aggressive effects of NPS in male rats.

  8. Neuropeptide Y acts in the paraventricular nucleus to suppress sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Li, Baoxin; Reis, Wagner L; Clute-Reinig, Nicholas M; Stern, Javier E; Brooks, Virginia L

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a brain neuromodulator that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of energy balance, also acts centrally to inhibit sympathetic nerve activity (SNA); however, the site and mechanism of action are unknown. In chloralose-anaesthetized female rats, nanoinjection of NPY into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) dose-dependently suppressed lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation, and these effects were blocked by prior inhibition of NPY Y1 or Y5 receptors. Moreover, PVN injection of Y1 and Y5 receptor antagonists in otherwise untreated rats increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA, indicating that endogenous NPY tonically inhibits PVN presympathetic neurons. The sympathoexcitation following blockade of PVN NPY inhibition was eliminated by prior PVN nanoinjection of the melanocortin 3/4 receptor inhibitor SHU9119. Moreover, presympathetic neurons, identified immunohistochemically using cholera toxin b neuronal tract tracing from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), express NPY Y1 receptor immunoreactivity, and patch-clamp recordings revealed that both NPY and α–melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) inhibit and stimulate, respectively, PVN–RVLM neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that PVN NPY inputs converge with α-MSH to influence presympathetic neurons. Together these results identify endogenous NPY as a novel and potent inhibitory neuromodulator within the PVN that may contribute to changes in SNA that occur in states associated with altered energy balance, such as obesity and pregnancy. PMID:24535439

  9. A pharmacological study of NLP-12 neuropeptide signaling in free-living and parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Lise; Janssen, Tom; De Haes, Wouter; Beets, Isabel; Meelkop, Ellen; Grant, Warwick; Schoofs, Liliane

    2012-03-01

    NLP-12a and b have been identified as cholecystokinin/sulfakinin-like neuropeptides in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. They are suggested to play an important role in the regulation of digestive enzyme secretion and fat storage. This study reports on the identification and characterization of an NLP-12-like peptide precursor gene in the rat parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti. The S. ratti NLP-12 peptides are able to activate both C. elegans CKR-2 receptor isoforms in a dose-dependent way with affinities in the same nanomolar range as the native C. elegans NLP-12 peptides. The C-terminal RPLQFamide sequence motif of the NLP-12 peptides is perfectly conserved between free-living and parasitic nematodes. Based on systemic amino acid replacements the Arg-, Leu- and Phe- residues appear to be critical for high-affinity receptor binding. Finally, a SAR analysis revealed the essential pharmacophore in C. elegans NLP-12b to be the pentapeptide RPLQFamide. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis of new benzoxazinone derivatives as neuropeptide Y5 antagonists for the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens, Antoni; Mas, Josep; Port, Adriana; Castrillo, José Aurelio; Sanfeliu, Olga; Guitart, Xavier; Dordal, Alberto; Romero, Gonzalo; Fisas, M Angeles; Sánchez, Elisabeth; Hernández, Enrique; Pérez, Pilar; Pérez, Raquel; Buschmann, Helmut

    2005-03-24

    Screening of our internal chemical collection against the neuropeptide Y5 (NPY Y5) receptor allowed the identification of a benzoxazine derivative 5f as a hit that showed moderate affinity (IC(50) = 300 nM). With the aim of improving the in vitro potency, a series of 2-benzoxazinone derivatives have been synthesized and tested for NPY Y5 activity. Most of the compounds were found to be potent and selective NPY Y5 antagonists having nanomolar binding affinities for the NPY Y5 receptor and showing functional antagonism in the forskolin-induced cyclic AMP test. Prelimminary studies in order to understand the structure-activity relationship were undertaken. Selected compounds were further evaluated for in vivo efficacy, affording the lead compound 2-[4-(8-methyl-2-oxo-4H-benzo[d][1,3]oxazin-1-yl)piperidin-1-yl]-N-(9-oxo-9H-fluoren-3-yl)acetamide 5p, which displayed in vivo activity reducing food intake in rodents.

  11. Limbic substrates of the effects of neuropeptide Y on intake of and motivation for palatable food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Rahul; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; la Fleur, Susanne E; Adan, Roger A H

    2014-05-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), given centrally augments food intake and the motivation to work for palatable food. Here, the brain regions were identified through which NPY increases food intake and motivation. NPY was infused into three brain regions implicated in food intake and motivation: the lateral hypothalamus (LH), nucleus accumbens shell (NAc), and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Motivation for sucrose was assessed using a progressive-ratio schedule of reinforcement in which the effort to obtain successive rewards increased incrementally. To disentangle the effects of NPY on motivation for palatable food from food consumption, free-feeding experiments were performed in which animals had ad libitum access to sucrose pellets. Infusion of NPY into either VTA or NAc increased the motivation to respond for sucrose, whereas infusion of NPY in either NAc or LH increased sucrose consumption. In addition, the effect of intra-VTA NPY on motivation for food was attenuated after pretreatment with the dopamine receptor antagonist alpha-flupenthixol. Specific limbic substrates through which NPY influences consumption of and motivation for palatable food were identified by these data. The motivational effects of NPY are exerted through the VTA, its consummatory effects through the LH, and the NAc is involved in both. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  12. Molecular cloning of a preprohormone from Hydra magnipapillata containing multiple copies of Hydra-L Wamide (Leu-Trp-NH2) neuropeptides: evidence for processing at Ser and Asn residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leviev, I; Williamson, M; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1997-01-01

    The simple, freshwater polyp Hydra is often used as a model to study development in cnidarians. Recently, a neuropeptide, cloned a preprohormone...... from Hydra magnipapillata containing 11 (eight different) immature neuropeptide sequences that are structurally related to the metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide from sea anermones. During the final phase of our cloning experiments, another research team independently isolated and sequenced five...... most frequent one being Gly-Pro-Pro-Pro-Gly-Leu-Trp-NH2; Hydra-LWamide l; three copies). Based on their structural similarities with the metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide from sea anemones, the mature peptides derived from the Hydra-LWamide preprohormone are potential candidates for being...

  13. Effects of neuropeptide FF and related peptides on the antinociceptive activities of VD-hemopressin(α) in naive and cannabinoid-tolerant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jia-Xin; Wang, Zi-Long; Li, Ning; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Pei; Tang, Hong-Hai; Zhang, Ting; Yu, Hong-Ping; Zhang, Run; Zheng, Ting; Fang, Quan; Wang, Rui

    2015-11-15

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) system has recently been reported to modulate cannabinoid-induced antinociception. The aim of the present study was to further investigate the roles of NPFF system in the antinociceptive effects induced by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of mouse VD-hemopressin(α), a novel endogenous agonist of cannabinoid CB1 receptor, in naive and VD-hemopressin(α)-tolerant mice. The effects of NPFF system on the antinociception induced by VD-hemopressin(α) were investigated in the radiant heat tail-flick test in naive mice and VD-hemopressin(α)-tolerant mice. The cannabinoid-tolerant mice were produced by given daily injections of VD-hemopressin(α) (20 nmol, i.c.v.) for 5 days and the antinociception was measured on day 6. In naive mice, intracerebroventricular injection of NPFF dose-dependently attenuated central analgesia of VD-hemopressin(α). In contrast, neuropeptide VF (NPVF) and D.NP(N-Me)AFLFQPQRF-NH2 (dNPA), two highly selective agonists for Neuropeptide FF1 and Neuropeptide FF2 receptors, enhanced VD-hemopressin(α)-induced antinociception in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the VD-hemopressin(α)-modulating activities of NPFF and related peptides were antagonized by the Neuropeptide FF receptors selective antagonist 1-adamantanecarbonyl-RF-NH2 (RF9). In VD-hemopressin(α)-tolerant mice, NPFF failed to modify VD-hemopressin(α)-induced antinociception. However, both neuropeptide VF and dNPA dose-dependently potentiated the antinociception of VD-hemopressin(α) and these cannabinoid-potentiating effects were reduced by RF9. The present works support the cannabinoid-modulating character of NPFF system in naive and cannabinoid-tolerant mice. In addition, the data suggest that a chronic cannabinoid treatment modifies the pharmacological profiles of NPFF, but not the cannabinoid-potentiating effects of neuropeptide VF and dNPA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of single-dose neuropeptide Y on levels of hippocampal BDNF, MDA, GSH, and NO in a rat model of pentylenetetrazole-induced epileptic seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Maral Kir

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders, characterized by recurrent seizures, which may increase the content of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Th e objective of this study was to investigate the eff ects of Neuropeptide Y on oxidative and nitrosative balance and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels induced by pentylenetetrazole (a standard convulsant drug in the hippocampus of Wistar rats. Th ree groups of seven rats were treated intraperitoneally as follows: group  (saline + saline  ml saline, group  (salin + Pentylenetetrazole  ml saline  min before Pentylenetetrazole; and group  (Neuropeptide Y + Pentylenetetrazole  μg/kg Neuropeptide Y  min before  mg/kg Pentylenetetrazole. After  h, the animals were euthanized by decapitation. Hippocampus were isolated to evaluate the malondialdehyde, glutathione, nitric oxide, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in three rat groups. Th e results of this study demonstrated that while intraperitoneally administered neuropeptide Y did not result in a statistically signifi cant diff erence in BDNF levels, its administration caused a statistically signifi cant decrease in malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels and an increase in glutathione levels in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced epileptic seizure. Neuropeptide Y were able to reduce nitroxidative damage induced by pentylenetetrazole in the hippocampus of Wistar rats.

  15. Breakthrough in neuroendocrinology by discovering novel neuropeptides and neurosteroids: 1. Discovery of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) across vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Ubuka, Takayoshi

    2014-09-01

    Bargmann-Scharrer's discovery of "neurosecretion" in the first half of the 20th century has since matured into the scientific discipline of neuroendocrinology. Identification of novel neurohormones, such as neuropeptides and neurosteroids, is essential for the progress of neuroendocrinology. Our studies over the past two decades have significantly broadened the horizons of this field of research by identifying novel neuropeptides and neurosteroids in vertebrates that have opened new lines of scientific investigation in neuroendocrinology. Since the discovery of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in mammals at the beginning of 1970s, it was generally believed that GnRH is the only hypothalamic neuropeptide regulating gonadotropin release in vertebrates. In 2000, however, we discovered a novel hypothalamic neuropeptide that actively inhibits gonadotropin release in quail and termed it gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH). It now appears that GnIH is highly conserved across vertebrates, including humans, and serves a number of behavioral and physiological functions other than regulation of reproduction, providing enormous opportunity for investigators from a wide array of disciplines to study this neuropeptide. This review summarizes the discovery of GnIH and its contribution to the progress of neuroendocrinology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuropeptide Y gene polymorphisms confer risk of early-onset atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svati H Shah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide Y (NPY is a strong candidate gene for coronary artery disease (CAD. We have previously identified genetic linkage to familial CAD in the genomic region of NPY. We performed follow-up genetic, biostatistical, and functional analysis of NPY in early-onset CAD. In familial CAD (GENECARD, N = 420 families, we found increased microsatellite linkage to chromosome 7p14 (OSA LOD = 4.2, p = 0.004 in 97 earliest age-of-onset families. Tagged NPY SNPs demonstrated linkage to CAD of a 6-SNP block (LOD = 1.58-2.72, family-based association of this block with CAD (p = 0.02, and stronger linkage to CAD in the earliest age-of-onset families. Association of this 6-SNP block with CAD was validated in: (a 556 non-familial early-onset CAD cases and 256 controls (OR 1.46-1.65, p = 0.01-0.05, showing stronger association in youngest cases (OR 1.84-2.20, p = 0.0004-0.09; and (b GENECARD probands versus non-familial controls (OR 1.79-2.06, p = 0.003-0.02. A promoter SNP (rs16147 within this 6-SNP block was associated with higher plasma NPY levels (p = 0.04. To assess a causal role of NPY in atherosclerosis, we applied the NPY1-receptor-antagonist BIBP-3226 adventitially to endothelium-denuded carotid arteries of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice; treatment reduced atherosclerotic neointimal area by 50% (p = 0.03. Thus, NPY variants associate with atherosclerosis in two independent datasets (with strong age-of-onset effects and show allele-specific expression with NPY levels, while NPY receptor antagonism reduces atherosclerosis in mice. We conclude that NPY contributes to atherosclerosis pathogenesis.

  17. Neuropeptide Y-mediated long-term depression of excitatory activity in suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Pol, A N; Obrietan, K; Chen, G; Belousov, A B

    1996-09-15

    A brief exposure to light can shift the phase of mammalian circadian rhythms by 1 hr or more. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) administration to the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus, the circadian clock in the brain, also causes a phase shift in circadian rhythms. After a phase shift, the neural clock responds differently to light, suggesting that learning has occurred in neural circuits related to clock function. Thus, certain stimuli can produce effects that last for an extended period, but possible mechanisms of this long-term effect have not been previously examined at the cellular level. Here, we report that NPY caused a long-term depression in both electrical activity and intracellular calcium levels of neurons, as studied with whole-cell patch-clamp recording and Fura-2 digital imaging. In contrast to the immediate (1 sec) recovery after relief from glutamate receptor blockade, a brief single application of NPY (100 nM) depressed cytosolic Ca2+ for > 1 hr. The mechanism of this long-term calcium depression, a form of cellular learning, is dependent on the simultaneous release of glutamate and activation of NPY receptors, because both the extended response to NPY and any aftereffect were blocked by coapplication of glutamate receptor antagonists. Postsynaptic actions of NPY, mediated by both Y1- and Y2-like receptors, were short term and recovered rapidly. The primary site of long-term NPY actions may be on presynaptic glutamatergic axons, because the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents in the presence of tetrodotoxin was reduced by transient exposure to NPY in both cultures and slices.

  18. Anti-neuropeptide Y plasma immunoglobulins in relation to mood and appetite in depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Frederico D; Coquerel, Quentin; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Cravezic, Aurore; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Kiive, Evelyn; Déchelotte, Pierre; Harro, Jaanus; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2012-09-01

    Depression and eating disorders are frequently associated, but the molecular pathways responsible for co-occurrence of altered mood, appetite and body weight are not yet fully understood. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has potent antidepressant and orexigenic properties and low central NPY levels have been reported in major depression. In the present study, we hypothesized that in patients with major depression alteration of mood, appetite and body weight may be related to NPY-reactive autoantibodies (autoAbs). To test this hypothesis, we compared plasma levels and affinities of NPY-reactive autoAbs between patients with major depression and healthy controls. Then, to evaluate if changes of NPY autoAb properties can be causally related to altered mood and appetite, we developed central and peripheral passive transfer models of human autoAbs in mice and studied depressive-like behavior in forced-swim test and food intake. We found that plasma levels of NPY IgG autoAbs were lower in patients with moderate but not with mild depression correlating negatively with the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores and with immobility time of the forced-swim test in mice after peripheral injection of autoAbs. No significant differences in NPY IgG autoAb affinities between patients with depression and controls were found, but higher affinity of IgG autoAbs for NPY was associated with lower body mass index and prevented NPY-induced orexigenic response in mice after their central injection. These data suggest that changes of plasma levels of anti-NPY autoAbs are relevant to altered mood, while changes of their affinity may participate in altered appetite and body weight in patients with depressive disorder. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Neuropeptide Y mitigates neuropathology and motor deficits in mouse models of Machado-Joseph disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Neves, Joana; Gonçalves, Nélio; Cunha-Santos, Janete; Simões, Ana Teresa; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Hirai, Hirokazu; Kügler, Sebastian; Cavadas, Cláudia; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2015-10-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is a fatal, dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder associated with an expanded polyglutamine tract within the ataxin-3 protein, and characterized by progressive impairment of motor coordination, associated with neurodegeneration of specific brain regions, including cerebellum and striatum. The currently available therapies do not allow modification of disease progression. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been shown to exert potent neuroprotective effects by multiple pathways associated with the MJD mechanisms of disease. Thus, we evaluated NPY levels in MJD and investigated whether raising NPY by gene transfer would alleviate neuropathological and behavioural deficits in cerebellar and striatal mouse models of the disease. For that, a cerebellar transgenic and a striatal lentiviral-based models of MJD were used. NPY overexpression in the affected brain regions in these two mouse models was obtained by stereotaxic injection of adeno-associated viral vectors encoding NPY. Up to 8 weeks after viral injection, balance and motor coordination behaviour and neuropathology were analysed. We observed that NPY levels were decreased in two MJD patients' cerebella and in striata and cerebella of disease mouse models. Furthermore, overexpression of NPY alleviated the motor coordination impairments and attenuated the related neuropathological parameters, preserving cerebellar volume and granular layer thickness, reducing striatal lesion and decreasing mutant ataxin-3 aggregation. Additionally, NPY mediated increase of brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and decreased neuroinflammation markers. Our data suggest that NPY is a potential therapeutic strategy for MJD. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Neuropeptide Y2 receptors in anteroventral BNST control remote fear memory depending on extinction training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dilip; Tasan, Ramon; Sperk, Guenther; Pape, Hans-Christian

    2018-03-01

    The anterior bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST) is involved in reinstatement of extinguished fear, and neuropeptide Y2 receptors influence local synaptic signaling. Therefore, we hypothesized that Y2 receptors in anteroventral BNST (BNSTav) interfere with remote fear memory and that previous fear extinction is an important variable. C57BL/6NCrl mice were fear-conditioned, and a Y2 receptor-specific agonist (NPY 3-36 ) or antagonist (JNJ-5207787) was applied in BNSTav before fear retrieval at the following day. Remote fear memory was tested on day 16 in two groups of mice, which had (experiment 1) or had not (experiment 2) undergone extinction training after conditioning. In the group with extinction training, tests of remote fear memory revealed partial retrieval of extinction, which was prevented after blockade of Y2 receptors in BNSTav. No such effect was observed in the group with no extinction training, but stimulation of Y2 receptors in BNSTav mimicked the influence of extinction during tests of remote fear memory. Pharmacological manipulation of Y2 receptors in BNSTav before fear acquisition (experiment 3) had no effect on fear memory retrieval, extinction or remote fear memory. Furthermore, partial retrieval of extinction during tests of remote fear memory was associated with changes in number of c-Fos expressing neurons in BNSTav, which was prevented or mimicked upon Y2 blockade or stimulation in BNSTav. These results indicate that Y2 receptor manipulation in BNSTav interferes with fear memory and extinction retrieval at remote stages, likely through controlling neuronal activity in BNSTav during extinction training. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mass spectrometric analysis of activity-dependent changes of neuropeptide profile in the snail, Helix pomatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirger, Z; Lubics, A; Reglodi, D; Laszlo, Z; Mark, L; Kiss, T

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial snails are able to transform themselves into inactivity ceasing their behavioral activity under unfavorable environmental conditions. In the present study, we report on the activity-dependent changes of the peptide and/or polypeptide profile in the brain and hemolymph of the snail, Helix pomatia, using MALDI TOF and quadrupole mass spectrometry. The present data indicate that the snails respond to low temperature by increasing or decreasing the output of selected peptides. Average mass spectra of the brain and hemolymph revealed numerous peaks predominantly present during the active state (19 and 10 peptides/polypeptides, respectively), while others were observed only during hibernation (11 and 13). However, there were peptides and/or polypeptides or their fragments present irrespective of the activity states (49 and 18). The intensity of fourteen peaks that correspond to previously identified neuropeptides varied in the brain of active snails compared to those of hibernating animals. Among those the intensity of eight peptides increased significantly in active animals while in hibernated animals the intensity of another six peptides increased significantly. A new peptide or peptide fragment at m/z 1110.7 was identified in a brain of the snail with the following suggested amino acid sequence: GSGASGSMPATTS. This peptide was found to be more abundant in active animals because the intensity of the peptide was significantly higher compared to hibernating animals. In summary, our results revealed substantial differences in the peptide/polypeptide profile of the brain and hemolymph of active and hibernating snails suggesting a possible contribution of peptides in the process of hibernation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuropeptide processing in regional brain slices: Effect of conformation and sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.W.; Bijl, W.A.; van Nispen, J.W.; Brendel, K.; Davis, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    The central enzymatic stability of des-enkephalin-gamma-endorphin and its synthetic analogs [cycloN alpha 6, C delta 11]beta-endorphin-[6-17] and [Pro7, Lys(Ac)9]-beta-endorphin[6-17] was studied in vitro using a newly developed, regionally dissected rat brain slice, time course incubation procedure. Tissue slice viability was estimated as the ability of the brain slice to take up or release gamma-[3H]aminobutyric acid after high K+ stimulation. Results demonstrated stability of uptake/release up to 5 hr of incubation, suggesting tissue viability over this period. The estimated half-life of peptides based on the results obtained in our incubation protocol suggest that the peptides studied are metabolized at different rates in the individual brain regions tested. A good correlation exists between the high enzyme activity of neutral endopeptidase and the rapid degradation of des-enkephalin-gamma-endorphin and [cycloN alpha 6, C delata 11]beta-endorphin-[6-17] in caudate putamen. Proline substitution combined with lysine acetylation appears to improve resistance to enzymatic metabolism in caudate putamen and hypothalamus. However, cyclization of des-enkephalin-gamma-endorphin forming an amide bond between the alpha-NH2 of the N-terminal threonine and the gamma-COOH of glutamic acid did not improve peptide stability in any brain region tested. The present study has shown that the brain slice technique is a valid and unique approach to study neuropeptide metabolism in small, discrete regions of rat brain where peptides, peptidases and receptors are colocalized and that specific structural modifications can improve peptide stability

  3. Neuropeptide Y attenuates anxiety- and depression-like effects of cholecystokinin-4 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, S J; Borkar, C D; Nakhate, K T; Subhedar, N K; Kokare, D M

    2014-09-26

    We investigated the involvement of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the modulation of cholecystokinin-4 (CCK-4)-evoked anxiety and depression. Adult male mice were injected with vehicle, CCK-4, NPY, NPY Y1 receptor agonist [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY or antagonist BIBP3226, via intracerebroventricular route, and subjected to social interaction or forced swim test (FST) for the evaluation of anxiety- and depression-like phenotypes, respectively. To assess the interactions between the two systems, if any, NPYergic agents were administered prior to CCK-4 and the animals were subjected to these behavioral tests. Treatment with CCK-4 or BIBP3226 dose-dependently reduced social interaction time, while NPY or [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY produced opposite effect. CCK-4 treatment increased immobility time in FST. This effect was reversed by NPY and [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY, although BIBP3226 per se did not alter the immobility time. In a combination study, the anxiogenic or depressive effects of CCK-4 were attenuated by NPY or [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY and potentiated by BIBP3226. The brains of CCK-4 treated rats were processed for NPY immunohistochemistry. Following CCK-4 treatment, the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), ventral part of lateral division of the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BSTLV), hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and locus coeruleus showed a reduction in NPY-immunoreactive fibers. Population of NPY-immunopositive cells was also decreased in the AcbSh, BSTLV, prefrontal cortex and hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). However, NPY-immunoreaction in the fibers of the ARC and cells of the central nucleus of amygdala was unchanged. We conclude that, inhibition of NPY signaling in the brain by CCK-4 might be causal to anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuropeptide processing in regional brain slices: Effect of conformation and sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z.W.; Bijl, W.A.; van Nispen, J.W.; Brendel, K.; Davis, T.P. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The central enzymatic stability of des-enkephalin-gamma-endorphin and its synthetic analogs (cycloN alpha 6, C delta 11)beta-endorphin-(6-17) and (Pro7, Lys(Ac)9)-beta-endorphin(6-17) was studied in vitro using a newly developed, regionally dissected rat brain slice, time course incubation procedure. Tissue slice viability was estimated as the ability of the brain slice to take up or release gamma-(3H)aminobutyric acid after high K+ stimulation. Results demonstrated stability of uptake/release up to 5 hr of incubation, suggesting tissue viability over this period. The estimated half-life of peptides based on the results obtained in our incubation protocol suggest that the peptides studied are metabolized at different rates in the individual brain regions tested. A good correlation exists between the high enzyme activity of neutral endopeptidase and the rapid degradation of des-enkephalin-gamma-endorphin and (cycloN alpha 6, C delata 11)beta-endorphin-(6-17) in caudate putamen. Proline substitution combined with lysine acetylation appears to improve resistance to enzymatic metabolism in caudate putamen and hypothalamus. However, cyclization of des-enkephalin-gamma-endorphin forming an amide bond between the alpha-NH2 of the N-terminal threonine and the gamma-COOH of glutamic acid did not improve peptide stability in any brain region tested. The present study has shown that the brain slice technique is a valid and unique approach to study neuropeptide metabolism in small, discrete regions of rat brain where peptides, peptidases and receptors are colocalized and that specific structural modifications can improve peptide stability.

  5. Plasma neuropeptide Y: a biomarker for symptom severity in chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey Jeanna M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a complex, multi-symptom illness with a multisystem pathogenesis involving alterations in the nervous, endocrine and immune systems. Abnormalities in stress responses have been identified as potential triggers or mediators of CFS symptoms. This study focused on the stress mediator neuropeptide Y (NPY. We hypothesized that NPY would be a useful biomarker for CFS. Methods The CFS patients (n = 93 were from the Chronic Fatigue and Related Disorders Clinic at the University of Miami and met the 1994 case definition of Fukuda and colleagues. Healthy sedentary controls (n = 100 were from NIH or VA funded studies. Another fatiguing, multi-symptom illness, Gulf War Illness (GWI, was also compared to CFS. We measured NPY in plasma using a radioimmunoassay (RIA. Psychometric measures, available for a subset of CFS patients included: Perceived Stress Scale, Profile of Mood States, ATQ Positive & Negative Self-Talk Scores, the COPE, the Beck Depression Inventory, Fatigue Symptom Inventory, Cognitive Capacity Screening Examination, Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-36, and the Quality of Life Scale. Results Plasma NPY was elevated in CFS subjects, compared to controls (p = .000 and to GWI cases (p = .000. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve analyses indicated that the predictive ability of plasma NPY to distinguish CFS patients from healthy controls and from GWI was significantly better than chance alone. In 42 patients with CFS, plasma NPY had significant correlations ( Conclusions This study is the first in the CFS literature to report that plasma NPY is elevated compared to healthy controls and to a fatigued comparison group, GWI patients. The significant correlations of NPY with stress, negative mood, general health, depression and cognitive function strongly suggest that this peptide be considered as a biomarker to distinguish subsets of CFS.

  6. Timing of neuropeptide coupling determines synchrony and entrainment in the mammalian circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharath Ananthasubramaniam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Robust synchronization is a critical feature of several systems including the mammalian circadian clock. The master circadian clock in mammals consists of about 20000 'sloppy' neuronal oscillators within the hypothalamus that keep robust time by synchronization driven by inter-neuronal coupling. The complete understanding of this synchronization in the mammalian circadian clock and the mechanisms underlying it remain an open question. Experiments and computational studies have shown that coupling individual oscillators can achieve robust synchrony, despite heterogeneity and different network topologies. But, much less is known regarding the mechanisms and circuits involved in achieving this coupling, due to both system complexity and experimental limitations. Here, we computationally study the coupling mediated by the primary coupling neuropeptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and its canonical receptor, VPAC2R, using the transcriptional elements and generic mode of VIP-VPAC2R signaling. We find that synchrony is only possible if VIP (an inducer of Per expression is released in-phase with activators of Per expression. Moreover, anti-phasic VIP release suppresses coherent rhythms by moving the network into a desynchronous state. Importantly, experimentally observed rhythms in VPAC2R have little effect on network synchronization, but can improve the amplitude of the SCN network rhythms while narrowing the network entrainment range. We further show that these findings are valid across several computational network models. Thus, we identified a general design principle to achieve robust synchronization: An activating coupling agent, such as VIP, must act in-phase with the activity of core-clock promoters. More generally, the phase of coupling is as critical as the strength of coupling from the viewpoint of synchrony and entrainment.

  7. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological characterization of a neuropeptide S tetrabranched derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzza, Chiara; Rizzi, Anna; Malfacini, Davide; Pulga, Alice; Pacifico, Salvatore; Salvadori, Severo; Trapella, Claudio; Reinscheid, Rainer K; Calo, Girolamo; Guerrini, Remo

    2015-02-01

    The peptide welding technology (PWT) is a novel chemical strategy that allows the synthesis of multibranched peptides with high yield, purity, and reproducibility. With this approach, a tetrabranched derivative of neuropeptide S (NPS) has been synthesized and pharmacologically characterized. The in vitro activity of PWT1-NPS has been studied in a calcium mobilization assay. In vivo, PWT1-NPS has been investigated in the locomotor activity (LA) and recovery of the righting reflex (RR) tests. In calcium mobilization studies, PWT1-NPS behaved as full agonist at the mouse NPS receptor (NPSR) being threefold more potent than NPS. The selective NPSR antagonists [ (t) Bu-D-Gly(5)]NPS and SHA 68 displayed similar potency values against NPS and PWT1-NPS. In vivo, both NPS (1-100 pmol, i.c.v.) and PWT1-NPS (0.1-100 pmol, i.c.v.) stimulated mouse LA, with PWT1-NPS showing higher potency than NPS. In the RR assay, NPS (100 pmol, i.c.v.) was able to reduce the percentage of mice losing the RR after diazepam administration and their sleep time 5 min after the i.c.v. injection, but it was totally inactive 2 h after the injection. On the contrary, PWT1-NPS (30 pmol, i.c.v.), injected 2 h before diazepam, displayed wake-promoting effects. This PWT1-NPS stimulant effect was no longer evident in mice lacking the NPSR receptor. The PWT1 technology can be successfully applied to the NPS sequence. PWT1-NPS displayed in vitro a pharmacological profile similar to NPS. In vivo PWT1-NPS mimicked NPS effects showing higher potency and long-lasting action.

  8. Role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the differentiation of Trpm-5-positive olfactory microvillar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Kharen L; Cunha, Carla; Hort, Yvonne; Tasan, Ramon; Sperk, Günther; Shine, John; Herzog, Herbert

    2018-04-01

    The mouse olfactory neuroepithelium (ON) is comprised of anatomically distinct populations of cells in separate regions; apical (sustentacular and microvillar), neuronal (olfactory sensory neurons) and basal (horizontal and globose basal cells). The existence of microvillar cells (MVCs) is well documented but their nature and function remains unclear. An important transcription factor for the differentiation of MVCs is Skn-1a, with loss of function of Skn-1a in mice resulting in a complete loss of Trpm-5 expressing MVCs, while olfactory sensory neuron differentiation is normal. Our previous research has shown that neuropeptide Y (NPY) is expressed in MVCs and is important in the neuroproliferation of olfactory precursors. This study showed that following X-ray irradiation of the snout of wildtype mice, which decreases the proliferation of basal precursor cells, the numbers of Trpm-5-positive MVCs is increased at 2 and 5 weeks post-irradiation compared to controls. Skn-1a expression in the ON following X-ray irradiation also increases at 2 weeks post-irradiation in a regionally specific manner matching the expression pattern of Trpm-5-positive MVCs. In parallel, NPYCre knock-in mice were used to examine the expression of Skn-1a following activation of NPY unilaterally in the ON (unilateral nasal irrigation of AAV-NPY-FLEX). These experiments demonstrated that Skn-1a is only expressed when NPY is activated in MVCs. Therefore the expression of NPY is necessary for the transcription factor-mediated differentiation of olfactory MVCs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Involvement of neuropeptide FF receptors in neuroadaptive responses to acute and chronic opiate treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhabazi, K; Trigo, J M; Mollereau, C; Moulédous, L; Zajac, J-M; Bihel, F; Schmitt, M; Bourguignon, J J; Meziane, H; Petit-demoulière, B; Bockel, F; Maldonado, R; Simonin, F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Opiates remain the most effective compounds for alleviating severe pain across a wide range of conditions. However, their use is associated with significant side effects. Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors have been implicated in several opiate-induced neuroadaptive changes including the development of tolerance. In this study, we investigated the consequences of NPFF receptor blockade on acute and chronic stimulation of opioid receptors in mice by using RF9, a potent and selective antagonist of NPFF receptors that can be administered systemically. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of RF9 were investigated on opioid pharmacological responses including locomotor activity, antinociception, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, rewarding properties and physical dependence. KEY RESULTS RF9 had no effect on morphine-induced horizontal hyperlocomotion and slightly attenuated the decrease induced in vertical activity. Furthermore, RF9 dose-dependently blocked the long-lasting hyperalgesia produced by either acute fentanyl or chronic morphine administration. RF9 also potentiated opiate early analgesic effects and prevented the development of morphine tolerance. Finally, RF9 increased morphine-induced conditioned place preference without producing any rewarding effect by itself and decreased naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome following chronic morphine treatment. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS The NPFF system is involved in the development of two major undesirable effects: tolerance and dependence, which are clinically associated with prolonged exposure to opiates. Our findings suggest that NPFF receptors are interesting therapeutic targets to improve the analgesic efficacy of opiates by limiting the development of tolerance, and for the treatment of opioid dependence. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Vasopressin (VP) and neuropeptide FF (NPFF) systems in the normal and hypertensive human brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharuk, Valeri D; Buijs, Ruud M; Jhamandas, Jack H; Swaab, Dick F

    2011-01-01

    Vasopressin (VP)-, neuropeptide FF (NPFF)-, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-expressing neurons were studied by means of single and double immunocytochemistry in the human brainstem of controls who died suddenly due to trauma and of patients who suffered from essential hypertension and died due to acute myocardial infarction, while in one case there was brain hemorrhage. In the control and hypertensive groups VP fibers and NPFF neurons and fibers were the most abundantly present in the dorsal vagal complex, especially in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. Numerous VP and NPFF fibers formed synaptic-like contacts with neuronal profiles in the dorsointermediate, centrointermediate, ventrointermediate, caudointermediate, and caudal parts of the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus as well as adjacent medial and intermediate subnuclei of the solitary nucleus. VP, but not NPFF, positive fibers were found to vastly contact TH-positive neuronal profiles in A2/C2, A2, and ambiguus nucleus (Amb). The density of VP fibers in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and Amb did not differ between hypertensive patients and controls, whereas the density of NPFF fibers in hypertensives was 3.19 times lower in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus and markedly decreased in the Amb. In both groups, VP and NPFF were scarcely present in the pain pathways, suggesting that these peptides are not crucially involved in nociceptive control in human. The reduction of NPFF release within the dorsal motor nucleus and Amb could serve as a possible cause of the impairment of cardiac vagal control in hypertensive patients.

  11. Neuropeptide Y, peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide in the gut-brain axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Peter; Reichmann, Florian; Farzi, Aitak

    2012-12-01

    The gut-brain axis refers to the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain. Four information carriers (vagal and spinal afferent neurons, immune mediators such as cytokines, gut hormones and gut microbiota-derived signalling molecules) transmit information from the gut to the brain, while autonomic neurons and neuroendocrine factors carry outputs from the brain to the gut. The members of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) family of biologically active peptides, NPY, peptide YY (PYY) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP), are expressed by cell systems at distinct levels of the gut-brain axis. PYY and PP are exclusively expressed by endocrine cells of the digestive system, whereas NPY is found at all levels of the gut-brain and brain-gut axis. The major systems expressing NPY comprise enteric neurons, primary afferent neurons, several neuronal pathways throughout the brain and sympathetic neurons. In the digestive tract, NPY and PYY inhibit gastrointestinal motility and electrolyte secretion and in this way modify the input to the brain. PYY is also influenced by the intestinal microbiota, and NPY exerts, via stimulation of Y1 receptors, a proinflammatory action. Furthermore, the NPY system protects against distinct behavioural disturbances caused by peripheral immune challenge, ameliorating the acute sickness response and preventing long-term depression. At the level of the afferent system, NPY inhibits nociceptive input from the periphery to the spinal cord and brainstem. In the brain, NPY and its receptors (Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5) play important roles in regulating food intake, energy homeostasis, anxiety, mood and stress resilience. In addition, PP and PYY signal to the brain to attenuate food intake, anxiety and depression-related behaviour. These findings underscore the important role of the NPY-Y receptor system at several levels of the gut-brain axis in which NPY, PYY and PP operate both as neural and endocrine messengers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  12. Neuropeptide Y, peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide in the gut–brain axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Peter; Reichmann, Florian; Farzi, Aitak

    2012-01-01

    The gut–brain axis refers to the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain. Four information carriers (vagal and spinal afferent neurons, immune mediators such as cytokines, gut hormones and gut microbiota-derived signalling molecules) transmit information from the gut to the brain, while autonomic neurons and neuroendocrine factors carry outputs from the brain to the gut. The members of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) family of biologically active peptides, NPY, peptide YY (PYY) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP), are expressed by cell systems at distinct levels of the gut–brain axis. PYY and PP are exclusively expressed by endocrine cells of the digestive system, whereas NPY is found at all levels of the gut–brain and brain–gut axis. The major systems expressing NPY comprise enteric neurons, primary afferent neurons, several neuronal pathways throughout the brain and sympathetic neurons. In the digestive tract, NPY and PYY inhibit gastrointestinal motility and electrolyte secretion and in this way modify the input to the brain. PYY is also influenced by the intestinal microbiota, and NPY exerts, via stimulation of Y1 receptors, a proinflammatory action. Furthermore, the NPY system protects against distinct behavioural disturbances caused by peripheral immune challenge, ameliorating the acute sickness response and preventing long-term depression. At the level of the afferent system, NPY inhibits nociceptive input from the periphery to the spinal cord and brainstem. In the brain, NPY and its receptors (Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5) play important roles in regulating food intake, energy homeostasis, anxiety, mood and stress resilience. In addition, PP and PYY signal to the brain to attenuate food intake, anxiety and depression-related behaviour. These findings underscore the important role of the NPY-Y receptor system at several levels of the gut–brain axis in which NPY, PYY and PP operate both as neural and endocrine messengers. PMID:22979996

  13. Seasonal Variation in Group Size Is Related to Seasonal Variation in Neuropeptide Receptor Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Leah C; Goodson, James L; Kingsbury, Marcy A

    2016-01-01

    In many species, seasonal variation in grouping behavior is widespread, with shifts towards territoriality in the breeding season and grouping in the winter. Compared to the hormonal and neural mechanisms of seasonal territorial aggression, the mechanisms that promote seasonal grouping have received little attention. We collected brains in spring and winter from wild-caught males of two species of emberizid sparrows that seasonally flock (the field sparrow, Spizella pusilla, and the dark-eyed junco, Junco hyemalis) and two species that do not seasonally flock (the song sparrow, Melospiza melodia, and the eastern towhee, Pipilo erythrophthalmus). We used receptor autoradiography to quantify seasonal plasticity in available binding sites for three neuropeptides known to influence social behavior. We examined binding sites for 125I-vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), 125I-sauvagine (SG, a ligand for corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors) and 125I-ornithine vasotocin analog (OVTA, a ligand for the VT3 nonapeptide). For all species and ligands, brain areas that exhibited a seasonal pattern in binding density were characterized by a winter increase. Compared to nonflocking species, seasonally flocking species showed different binding patterns in multiple brain areas. Furthermore, we found that winter flocking was associated with elevated winter 125I-VIP binding density in the medial amygdala, as well as 125I-VIP and 125I-OVTA binding density in the rostral arcopallium. While the functional significance of the avian rostral arcopallium is unclear, it may incorporate parts of the pallial amygdala. Our results point to this previously undescribed area as a likely hot spot of social modulation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Neuropeptide Y stimulates proliferation and migration in the 4T1 breast cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Philip J; Al-Khazraji, Baraa K; Novielli, Nicole M; Postovit, Lynne M; Chambers, Ann F; Jackson, Dwayne N

    2012-07-15

    Stress has long been thought of to be associated with increased risk of cancer. Chronic stress is associated with elevated levels of sympathetic neurotransmitter (norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y: NPY) release and immunosuppression. The expression of NPY receptors has been reported in human breast carcinomas. Recently, activation of the NPY Y5 receptor was shown to stimulate cell growth and increase migration in human breast cancer cells; however the effects of NPY have yet to be investigated in a murine model of breast cancer. Thus, the specific aims of the current study were to: (i) characterize NPY receptor expression in 4T1 breast cancer cells and orthotopic tumors grown in BALB/c mice and (ii) investigate the impact of NPY receptor activation on 4T1 cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Positive expression of NPY receptors (Y1R, Y2R and Y5R) was observed in cells and tumor tissue. As well, NPY treatment of 4T1 cells promoted a concentration-dependent increase in proliferation, through increased phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. Using NPY receptor antagonists (Y1R:BIBP3226, Y2R:BIIE0246 and Y5R:L-152,804), we found the proliferative response to be Y5R mediated. Additionally, NPY increased chemotaxis through Y2R and Y5R activation. These data are in congruence with those from human cell lines and highlight the 4T1 cell line as a translatable model of breast cancer in which the effects of NPY can be studied in an immunocompetent system. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  15. Modulation of the main porcine enteric neuropeptides by a single low-dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)SalmonellaEnteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikołajczyk, Anita; Gonkowski, Sławomir; Złotkowska, Dagmara

    2017-01-01

    The present research was conducted to investigate the influence of a low, single dose of LPS, which does not result in any clinical symptoms of intoxication on the expression of selected neuropeptides within the intestines of the domestic pig. This experiment was conducted on immature female pigs of the Pitrain × Duroc breed (n = five per group). Seven days after the intravenous injection of 10 mL saline solution for control animals and 5 μg/kg b.w. (in 10 mL saline solution) LPS Salmonella Enteritidis for the experimental group, the excised segments of duodenum, jejunum, ileum, ileocecal valve, caecum, descending colon, transverse colon, ascending colon and rectum were prepared to extract the main enteric neuropeptides, including GAL, NPY, SOM, SP, VIP. The results of this research indicate that single low-dose LPS S. Enteritidis produced changes in the content of the selected neuropeptides of the porcine intestine. The most visible changes were observed in the transverse colon, where LPS induced the increase of GAL expression from 19.41 ± 7.121 to 92.92 ± 11.447 ng/g tissue. The exact functions of the substances studied and mechanisms of responses to LPS action depend on the sections of the intestines. The mechanisms of observed changes are not fully understood, but fluctuations in neuronal active substance levels may be connected with neurodegenerative and/or pro-inflammatory activity of LPS.

  16. Spinal neuropeptide expression and neuropathic behavior in the acute and chronic phases after spinal cord injury: Effects of progesterone administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel, María F; Villar, Marcelo J; Brumovsky, Pablo R; González, Susana L

    2017-02-01

    Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) develop chronic pain that severely compromises their quality of life. We have previously reported that progesterone (PG), a neuroprotective steroid, could offer a promising therapeutic strategy for neuropathic pain. In the present study, we explored temporal changes in the expression of the neuropeptides galanin and tyrosine (NPY) and their receptors (GalR1 and GalR2; Y1R and Y2R, respectively) in the injured spinal cord and evaluated the impact of PG administration on both neuropeptide systems and neuropathic behavior. Male rats were subjected to spinal cord hemisection at T13 level, received daily subcutaneous injections of PG or vehicle, and were evaluated for signs of mechanical and thermal allodynia. Real time PCR was used to determine relative mRNA levels of neuropeptides and receptors, both in the acute (1day) and chronic (28days) phases after injury. A significant increase in Y1R and Y2R expression, as well as a significant downregulation in GalR2 mRNA levels, was observed 1day after SCI. Interestingly, PG early treatment prevented Y1R upregulation and resulted in lower NPY, Y2R and GalR1 mRNA levels. In the chronic phase, injured rats showed well-established mechanical and cold allodynia and significant increases in galanin, NPY, GalR1 and Y1R mRNAs, while maintaining reduced GalR2 expression. Animals receiving PG treatment showed basal expression levels of galanin, NPY, GalR1 and Y1R, and reduced Y2R mRNA levels. Also, and in line with previously published observations, PG-treated animals did not develop mechanical allodynia and showed reduced sensitivity to cold stimulation. Altogether, we show that SCI leads to considerable changes in the spinal expression of galanin, NPY and their associated receptors, and that early and sustained PG administration prevents them. Moreover, our data suggest the participation of galaninergic and NPYergic systems in the plastic changes associated with SCI-induced neuropathic pain

  17. Adeno-associated viral vector-induced overexpression of neuropeptide Y Y2 receptors in the hippocampus suppresses seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldbye, David Paul Drucker; Ängehagen, Mikael; Gøtzsche, Casper René

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors overexpressing neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus exerts seizure-suppressant effects in rodent epilepsy models and is currently considered for clinical application in patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure...... recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors. In two temporal lobe epilepsy models, electrical kindling and kainate-induced seizures, vector-based transduction of Y2 receptor complementary DNA in the hippocampus of adult rats exerted seizure-suppressant effects. Simultaneous overexpression of Y2...

  18. Development of a peptidomimetic antagonist of neuropeptide FF receptors for the prevention of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihel, Frédéric; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Schneider, Séverine; Bertin, Isabelle; Wagner, Patrick; Schmitt, Martine; Laboureyras, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoît; Schneider, Elodie; Mollereau, Catherine; Simonnet, Guy; Simonin, Frédéric; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques

    2015-03-18

    Through the development of a new class of unnatural ornithine derivatives as bioisosteres of arginine, we have designed an orally active peptidomimetic antagonist of neuropeptide FF receptors (NPFFR). Systemic low-dose administration of this compound to rats blocked opioid-induced hyperalgesia, without any apparent side-effects. Interestingly, we also observed that this compound potentiated opioid-induced analgesia. This unnatural ornithine derivative provides a novel therapeutic approach for both improving analgesia and reducing hyperalgesia induced by opioids in patients being treated for chronic pain.

  19. Nerve fibre studies in skin biopsies in peripheral neuropathies. I. Immunohistochemical analysis of neuropeptides in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberger, M; Schröder, H D; Schultzberg, M

    1989-01-01

    in the papillary and reticular dermis. Both fibre types were present close to blood vessels, while CGRP immunoreactive fibres were more often encountered near sweat gland acini compared to SP fibres. Diabetes mellitus complicated by polyneuropathy was accompanied by marked reduction of SP and CGRP reactive fibres...... in the dermis layers. Five type I diabetes patients without clinical or neurophysiological evidence of polyneuropathy also had reduced density of both fibre types, being significant for CGRP fibres when compared with controls. Skin biopsy with immunohistochemical staining for neuropeptides may represent...... a sensitive tool in evaluation of patients with peripheral neuropathies....

  20. The neuropeptides and protein hormones of the agricultural pest fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis: What do we learn from the genome sequencing and tissue-specific transcriptomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Shun-Hua; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-12-01

    Neuropeptides and protein hormones are very important signaling molecules, and are involved in the regulation and coordination of various physiological processes in invertebrates and vertebrates. Using a bioinformatics approach, we screened the recently sequenced genome and six tissue-specific transcriptome databases (central nervous system, fat body, ovary, testes, male accessory glands, antennae) of the oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) that is economically one of the most important pest insects of tropical and subtropical fruit. Thirty-nine candidate genes were found to encode neuropeptides or protein hormones. These include most of the known insect neuropeptides and protein hormones, with the exception of adipokinetic hormone-corazonin-related peptide, allatropin, diuretic hormone 34, diuretic hormone 45, IMFamide, inotocin, and sex peptide. Our results showed the neuropeptides and protein hormones of Diptera insects appear to have a reduced repertoire compared to some other insects. Moreover, there are also differences between B. dorsalis and the super-model of Drosophila melanogaster. Interesting features of the oriental fruit fly are the absence of genes coding for sex peptide and the presence of neuroparsin and two genes coding neuropeptide F. The majority of the identified neuropeptides and protein hormones is present in the central nervous system, with only a limited number of these in the other tissues. Moreover, we predicted their physiological functions via comparing with data of FlyBase and FlyAtlas. Taken together, owing to the large number of identified peptides, this study can be used as a reference about structure, tissue distribution and physiological functions for comparative studies in other model and important pest insects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mimicking of Arginine by Functionalized N(ω)-Carbamoylated Arginine As a New Broadly Applicable Approach to Labeled Bioactive Peptides: High Affinity Angiotensin, Neuropeptide Y, Neuropeptide FF, and Neurotensin Receptor Ligands As Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Max; Kuhn, Kilian K; Einsiedel, Jürgen; Hübner, Harald; Biselli, Sabrina; Mollereau, Catherine; Wifling, David; Svobodová, Jaroslava; Bernhardt, Günther; Cabrele, Chiara; Vanderheyden, Patrick M L; Gmeiner, Peter; Buschauer, Armin

    2016-03-10

    Derivatization of biologically active peptides by conjugation with fluorophores or radionuclide-bearing moieties is an effective and commonly used approach to prepare molecular tools and diagnostic agents. Whereas lysine, cysteine, and N-terminal amino acids have been mostly used for peptide conjugation, we describe a new, widely applicable approach to peptide conjugation based on the nonclassical bioisosteric replacement of the guanidine group in arginine by a functionalized carbamoylguanidine moiety. Four arginine-containing peptide receptor ligands (angiotensin II, neurotensin(8-13), an analogue of the C-terminal pentapeptide of neuropeptide Y, and a neuropeptide FF analogue) were subject of this proof-of-concept study. The N(ω)-carbamoylated arginines, bearing spacers with a terminal amino group, were incorporated into the peptides by standard Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis. The synthesized chemically stable peptide derivatives showed high receptor affinities with Ki values in the low nanomolar range, even when bulky fluorophores had been attached. Two new tritiated tracers for angiotensin and neurotensin receptors are described.

  2. The distribution of neuropeptide Y and dynorphin immunoreactivity in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, from birth to sexual maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepriano, L. M.; Schreibman, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y and dynorphin have been localized in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, at different ages and stages of development from birth to sexual maturity. Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y was found in perikarya and tracts of the nucleus olfactoretinalis, telencephalon, ventral tegmentum and in the neurohypophysis and in the three regions of the adenohypophysis. Immunoreactive dynorphin was found in nerve tracts in the olfactory bulb and in cells of the pars intermedia and the rostral pars distalis of the pituitary gland.

  3. Variants in the 5' region of the neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 gene (NPY2R) are associated with obesity in 5,971 white subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torekov, Signe Sørensen; Larsen, L H; Andersen, G

    2006-01-01

    The gene encoding neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 (NPY2R) is widely expressed in the central nervous system, with particularly high abundance in the hypothalamus, which is known to be important for appetite regulation. We tested whether variations in NPY2R are associated with obesity.......The gene encoding neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 (NPY2R) is widely expressed in the central nervous system, with particularly high abundance in the hypothalamus, which is known to be important for appetite regulation. We tested whether variations in NPY2R are associated with obesity....

  4. Synthesis and characterization of a selective peptide antagonist of neuropeptide Y vascular postsynaptic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, M. J.; Murphy, R.; Angus, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. A cyclic dimeric nonapeptide neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor antagonist, 1229U91, was synthesized by Fmoc chemistry and dimerised in solution. Its effects were assayed in mesenteric arteries from rats and mice, and in rat vas deferens. 2. Mesenteric arteries were cannulated and pressurised to 55 mmHg and the external diameters continuously measured. NPY, PYY, Leu31Pro34NPY and NPY(13-36) each caused concentration-related contractions with the order of potency PYY > or = Leu31Pro34NPY = NPY > NPY (13-36), consistent with the Y1 receptor subtype. 3. 1229U91 had no agonist activity in the arteries but caused a concentration-related rightward shift of NPY (mouse arteries) or Leu31Pro34NPY (rat) concentration-response curves. The antagonism was competitive with pKBS of 7.69 +/- 0.15 and 7.47 +/- 0.13 in the mouse and rat arteries, respectively. 4. Sympathetic nerves in the vas deferens were stimulated with a single electrical field pulse every 20 s and the twitch responses recorded. NPY, PYY, Leu31Pro34NPY and NPY(13-36) inhibited the twitches with the order of potency PYY > NPY > NPY(13-36) >> Leu31Pro34NPY, consistent with the Y2 receptor subtype. 5. 1229U91 inhibited the vas deferens twitch with a shallow concentration-response curve and a time-course of inhibition distinct from that of NPY. 1229U91 (30 microM) did not cause a rightward shift of the NPY concentration-response curve. 1229U91 is at least 5 orders of magnitude less potent in the vas deferens than in rat brain Y2 binding assays reported by others, suggesting that the brain and vas deferens Y2 receptors are different. 6. It is concluded that 1229U91 is a competitive antagonist of NPY Y1 vascular receptors and has additional properties that inhibit the electrically evoked twitch of the rat vas deferens. PMID:8732289

  5. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) receptors in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, T.; Niwa, M.; Yamashita, K.; Kataoka, Y.; Shigematsu, K. (Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan))

    1990-12-01

    1. Specific binding sites for neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) were investigated in rat brain areas using quantitative receptor autoradiography with {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter NPY ({sup 125}I-BH-NPY) and {sup 125}I-PYY, radioligands for PP-fold family peptides receptors. 2. There were no differences between localization of {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY binding sites in the rat brain. High densities of the binding sites were present in the anterior olfactory nucleus, lateral septal nucleus, stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus, and area postrema. 3. In cold ligand-saturation experiments done in the presence of increasing concentrations of unlabeled NPY and PYY, {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, molecular layer of the cerebellum, and area postrema was single and of a high affinity. There was a significant difference between the affinities of {sup 125}I-BH-NPY (Kd = 0.96 nM) and {sup 125}I-PYY binding (Kd = 0.05 nM) to the molecular layer of the cerebellum. The binding of the two radioligands to the other areas examined had the same affinities. 4. When comparing the potency of unlabeled rat pancreatic polypeptide (rPP), a family peptide of NPY and PYY, to inhibit the binding to the areas examined, rPP displaced {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY binding to the area postrema more potently than it did the binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, and molecular layer of the cerebellum. 5. Thus, the quantitative receptor autoradiographic method with {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY revealed differences in binding characteristics of specific NPY and PYY binding sites in different areas of the rat brain. The results provide further evidence for the existence of multiple NPY-PYY receptors in the central nervous system.

  6. Midbrain and forebrain patterning delivers immunocytochemically and functionally similar populations of neuropeptide Y containing GABAergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaira, S K; Nefzger, C M; Beh, S J; Pouton, C W; Haynes, J M

    2011-09-01

    Neurons differentiated in vitro from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the potential to serve both as models of disease states and in drug discovery programs. In this study, we use sonic hedgehog (SHH) and fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) to enrich for forebrain and midbrain phenotypes from mouse ESCs. We then investigate, using Ca(2+) imaging and [(3)H]-GABA release studies, whether the GABAergic neurons produced exhibit distinct functional phenotypes. At day 24 of differentiation, reverse transcriptase-PCR showed the presence of both forebrain (Bf-1, Hesx1, Pgc-1α, Six3) and midbrain (GATA2, GATA3) selective mRNA markers in developing forebrain-enriched cultures. All markers were present in midbrain cultures except for Bf-1 and Pgc-1α. Irrespective of culture conditions all GABA immunoreactive neurons were also immunoreactive to neuropeptide Y (NPY) antibodies. Forebrain and midbrain GABAergic neurons responded to ATP (1 mM), L-glutamate (30 μM), noradrenaline (30 μM), acetylcholine (30 μM) and dopamine (30 μM), with similar elevations of intracellular Ca(2+)([Ca(2+)](i)). The presence of GABA(A) and GABA(B) antagonists, bicuculline (30 μM) and CGP55845 (1 μM), increased the elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) in response to dopamine (30 μM) in midbrain, but not forebrain GABAergic neurons. All agonists, except dopamine, elicited similar [(3)H]-GABA release from forebrain and midbrain cultures. Dopamine (30 μM) did not stimulate significant [(3)H]-GABA release in midbrain cultures, although it was effective in forebrain cultures. This study shows that differentiating neurons toward a midbrain fate restricts the expression of forebrain markers. Forebrain differentiation results in the expression of forebrain and midbrain markers. All GABA(+) neurons contain NPY, and show similar agonist-induced elevations of [Ca(2+)](i) and [(3)H]-GABA release. This study indicates that the pharmacological phenotype of these particular neurons may be independent of the addition of

  7. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) receptors in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, T.; Niwa, M.; Yamashita, K.; Kataoka, Y.; Shigematsu, K.

    1990-01-01

    1. Specific binding sites for neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) were investigated in rat brain areas using quantitative receptor autoradiography with 125 I-Bolton-Hunter NPY ( 125 I-BH-NPY) and 125 I-PYY, radioligands for PP-fold family peptides receptors. 2. There were no differences between localization of 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY binding sites in the rat brain. High densities of the binding sites were present in the anterior olfactory nucleus, lateral septal nucleus, stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus, and area postrema. 3. In cold ligand-saturation experiments done in the presence of increasing concentrations of unlabeled NPY and PYY, 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, molecular layer of the cerebellum, and area postrema was single and of a high affinity. There was a significant difference between the affinities of 125 I-BH-NPY (Kd = 0.96 nM) and 125 I-PYY binding (Kd = 0.05 nM) to the molecular layer of the cerebellum. The binding of the two radioligands to the other areas examined had the same affinities. 4. When comparing the potency of unlabeled rat pancreatic polypeptide (rPP), a family peptide of NPY and PYY, to inhibit the binding to the areas examined, rPP displaced 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY binding to the area postrema more potently than it did the binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, and molecular layer of the cerebellum. 5. Thus, the quantitative receptor autoradiographic method with 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY revealed differences in binding characteristics of specific NPY and PYY binding sites in different areas of the rat brain. The results provide further evidence for the existence of multiple NPY-PYY receptors in the central nervous system

  8. Anorexia is Associated with Stress-Dependent Orexigenic Responses to Exogenous Neuropeptide Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, J; Delp, M S; Gilbert, E R; Siegel, P B; Cline, M A

    2016-05-01

    Chicken lines that have been divergently selected for either low (LWS) or high (HWS) body weight at 56 days of age for more than 57 generations have different feeding behaviours in response to a range of i.c.v. injected neurotransmitters. The LWS have different severities of anorexia, whereas the HWS become obese. Previously, we demonstrated that LWS chicks did not respond, whereas HWS chicks increased food intake, after central injection of neuropeptide Y (NPY). The present study aimed to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying the loss of orexigenic function of NPY in LWS. Chicks were divided into four groups: stressed LWS and HWS on day of hatch, and control LWS and HWS. The stressor was a combination of food deprivation and cold exposure. On day 5 post-hatch, each chick received an i.c.v. injection of vehicle or 0.2 nmol of NPY. Only the LWS stressed group did not increase food intake in response to i.c.v. NPY. Hypothalamic mRNA abundance of appetite-associated factors was measured at 1 h post-injection. Interactions of genetic line, stress and NPY treatment were observed for the mRNA abundance of agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and synaptotagmin 1 (SYT1). Intracerebroventricular injection of NPY decreased and increased AgRP and SYT1 mRNA, respectively, in the stressed LWS and increased AgRP mRNA in stressed HWS chicks. Stress was associated with increased NPY, orexin receptor 2, corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 1, melanocortin receptor 3 (MC3R) and growth hormone secretagogue receptor expression. In conclusion, the loss of responsiveness to exogenous NPY in stressed LWS chicks may be a result of the decreased and increased hypothalamic expression of AgRP and MC3R, respectively. This may induce an intensification of anorexigenic melanocortin signalling pathways in LWS chicks that block the orexigenic effect of exogenous NPY. These results provide insights onto the anorexic condition across species, and especially for forms of inducible anorexia

  9. Neuropeptide Y genotype, central obesity, and abdominal fat distribution: the POUNDS LOST trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaochen; Qi, Qibin; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Tao; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Bray, George A; Sacks, Frank M; Liang, Liming; Qi, Lu

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y is a key peptide affecting adiposity and has been related to obesity risk. However, little is known about the role of NPY variations in diet-induced change in adiposity. The objective was to examine the effects of NPY variant rs16147 on central obesity and abdominal fat distribution in response to dietary interventions. We genotyped a functional NPY variant rs16147 among 723 participants in the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies trial. Changes in waist circumference (WC), total abdominal adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) from baseline to 6 and 24 mo were evaluated with respect to the rs16147 genotypes. Genotype-dietary fat interaction was also examined. The rs16147 C allele was associated with a greater reduction in WC at 6 mo (P < 0.001). In addition, the genotypes showed a statistically significant interaction with dietary fat in relation to WC and SAT (P-interaction = 0.01 and 0.04): the association was stronger in individuals with high-fat intake than in those with low-fat intake. At 24 mo, the association remained statistically significant for WC in the high-fat diet group (P = 0.02), although the gene-dietary fat interaction became nonsignificant (P = 0.30). In addition, we found statistically significant genotype-dietary fat interaction on the change in total abdominal adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, and SAT at 24 mo (P = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.04): the rs16147 T allele appeared to associate with more adverse change in the abdominal fat deposition in the high-fat diet group than in the low-fat diet group. Our data indicate that the NPY rs16147 genotypes affect the change in abdominal adiposity in response to dietary interventions, and the effects of the rs16147 single-nucleotide polymorphism on central obesity and abdominal fat distribution were modified by dietary fat. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Neuropeptide glutamic acid-isoleucine (NEI)-induced paradoxical sleep in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Moe; Fukuda, Satoru; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Takata, Junko; Sawamura, Shigehito

    2017-01-01

    Neuropeptideglutamic acid-isoleucine (NEI) as well as melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) is cleaved from the 165 amino acid protein, prepro-melanin concentrating hormone (prepro-MCH). Among many physiological roles of MCH, we demonstrated that intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of MCH induced increases in REM sleep episodes as well as in non REM sleep episodes. However, there are no studies on the effect of NEI on the sleep-wake cycle. As for the sites of action of MCH for induction of REM sleep, the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) has been reported to be one of its site of action. Although MCH neurons contain NEI, GABA, MCH, and other neuropeptides, we do not know which transmitter(s) might induce REM sleep by acting on the vlPAG. Thus, we first examined the effect of icv injection of NEI on the sleep-wake cycle, and investigated how microinjection of either NEI, MCH, or GABA into the vlPAG affected REM sleep in rats. Icv injection of NEI (0.61μg/5μl: n=7) significantly increased the time spent in REM episodes compared to control (saline: 5μl; n=6). Microinjection of either NEI (61ng/0.2μl: n=7), MCH (100ng/0.2μl: n=6) or GABA (250mM/0.2μl: n=7) into the vlPAG significantly increased the time spent in REM episodes and the AUC. Precise hourly analysis of REM sleep also revealed that after those microinjections, NEI and MCH increased REM episodes at the latter phase, compared to GABA which increased REM episodes at the earlier phase. This result suggests that NEI and MCH may induce sustained REM sleep, while GABA may initiate REM sleep. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that NEI, a cleaved peptide from the same precursor, prepro-MCH, as MCH, induce REM sleep at least in part through acting on the vlPAG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Smoking is Associated with Reduced Leptin and Neuropeptide Y Levels and Higher Pain Experience in Patients with Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I. Bokarewa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Smoking deregulates neuroendocrine responses to pain supporting production of neuropeptide Y (NpY by direct stimulation of nicotinic receptors or by inhibiting adipokine leptin. Present study addressed the effect of cigarette smoking on adipokines and pain parameters, in 62 women with fibromyalgia (FM pain syndrome with unknown etiology. Pain was characterized by a visual analogue scale, tender point (TP counts, pressure pain threshold, and neuroendocrine markers NpY and substance P (sP. Levels of IGF-1, leptin, resistin, visfatin, and adiponectin were measured in blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Current smokers (n=18 had lower levels of leptin compared to ex-smokers (n=25, P=0.002, while the expected NpY increase was absent in FM patients. In smokers, this was transcribed in higher VAS-pain (P=0.04 and TP count (P=0.03, lower pain threshold (P=0.01, since NpY levels were directly related to the pain threshold (rho=0.414 and inversely related to TP counts (rho=-0.375. This study shows that patients with FM have no increase of NpY levels in response to smoking despite the low levels of leptin. Deregulation of the balance between leptin and neuropeptide Y may be one of the essential mechanisms of chronic pain in FM.

  12. Short neuropeptide F acts as a functional neuromodulator for olfactory memory in Kenyon cells of Drosophila mushroom bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapek, Stephan; Kahsai, Lily; Winther, Asa M E; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Nässel, Dick R

    2013-03-20

    In insects, many complex behaviors, including olfactory memory, are controlled by a paired brain structure, the so-called mushroom bodies (MB). In Drosophila, the development, neuroanatomy, and function of intrinsic neurons of the MB, the Kenyon cells, have been well characterized. Until now, several potential neurotransmitters or neuromodulators of Kenyon cells have been anatomically identified. However, whether these neuroactive substances of the Kenyon cells are functional has not been clarified yet. Here we show that a neuropeptide precursor gene encoding four types of short neuropeptide F (sNPF) is required in the Kenyon cells for appetitive olfactory memory. We found that activation of Kenyon cells by expressing a thermosensitive cation channel (dTrpA1) leads to a decrease in sNPF immunoreactivity in the MB lobes. Targeted expression of RNA interference against the sNPF precursor in Kenyon cells results in a highly significant knockdown of sNPF levels. This knockdown of sNPF in the Kenyon cells impairs sugar-rewarded olfactory memory. This impairment is not due to a defect in the reflexive sugar preference or odor response. Consistently, knockdown of sNPF receptors outside the MB causes deficits in appetitive memory. Altogether, these results suggest that sNPF is a functional neuromodulator released by Kenyon cells.

  13. Effects of Photoperiod Extension on Clock Gene and Neuropeptide RNA Expression in the SCN of the Soay Sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues Dardente

    Full Text Available In mammals, changing daylength (photoperiod is the main synchronizer of seasonal functions. The photoperiodic information is transmitted through the retino-hypothalamic tract to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN, site of the master circadian clock. To investigate effects of day length change on the sheep SCN, we used in-situ hybridization to assess the daily temporal organization of expression of circadian clock genes (Per1, Per2, Bmal1 and Fbxl21 and neuropeptides (Vip, Grp and Avp in animals acclimated to a short photoperiod (SP; 8h of light and at 3 or 15 days following transfer to a long photoperiod (LP3, LP15, respectively; 16h of light, achieved by an acute 8-h delay of lights off. We found that waveforms of SCN gene expression conformed to those previously seen in LP acclimated animals within 3 days of transfer to LP. Mean levels of expression for Per1-2 and Fbxl21 were nearly 2-fold higher in the LP15 than in the SP group. The expression of Vip was arrhythmic and unaffected by photoperiod, while, in contrast to rodents, Grp expression was not detectable within the sheep SCN. Expression of the circadian output gene Avp cycled robustly in all photoperiod groups with no detectable change in phasing. Overall these data suggest that synchronizing effects of light on SCN circadian organisation proceed similarly in ungulates and in rodents, despite differences in neuropeptide gene expression.

  14. The neuropeptide catestatin promotes vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through the Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xiaoxia [Department of Cardiology, People' s Hospital, Peking University, No. 11 South Avenue, Xi Zhi Men Xicheng District, Beijing 100044 (China); Zhou, Chunyan, E-mail: chunyanzhou@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Sun, Ningling, E-mail: nlsun@263.net [Department of Cardiology, People' s Hospital, Peking University, No. 11 South Avenue, Xi Zhi Men Xicheng District, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Catestatin stimulates proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner. {yields} Catestatin provokes sustained increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. {yields} Catestatin produces increased activation of calcineurin and promotes NFATc1 translocation into the nucleus. -- Abstract: The Chromogranin A-derived neuropeptide catestatin is an endogenous nicotinic cholinergic antagonist that acts as a pleiotropic hormone. Since catestatin shares several functions with other members derived from the chromogranin/secretogranin protein family and other neuropeptides which exert proliferative effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we therefore hypothesized that catestatin would regulate VSMC proliferation. The present study demonstrates that catestatin caused a dose-dependent induction of proliferation in rat aortic smooth muscle cells and furthermore evoked a sustained increase in intracellular calcium. This subsequently leaded to enhanced activation of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin and resulted in an activation of the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), initiating transcription of proliferative genes. In addition, cyclosporin A (CsA), a potent inhibitor of calcineurin, abrogated catestatin-mediated effect on VSMCs, indicating that the calcineurin-NFAT signaling is strongly required for catestatin-induced growth of VSMCs. The present study establishes catestatin as a novel proliferative cytokine on vascular smooth muscle cells and this effect is mediated by the Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway.

  15. Influence of Rotary Instrumentation with Continuous Irrigation on Pain and Neuropeptide Release Levels: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bıçakcı, Hazal; Çapar, İsmail Davut; Genç, Selin; İhtiyar, Alperen; Sütçü, Recep

    2016-11-01

    The first objective was to determine correlation among various experimental and clinical pain measurement procedures. The second objective was to evaluate the influence of rotary instrumentation with continuous irrigation on pain and neuropeptide release levels. Forty patients who had preoperative pain at the levels of 3-8 on the visual analogue scale were included. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were collected. Patients were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups, the standard preparation group and the preparation with continuous irrigation group. Apical fluid samples (AFS) were collected after instrumentation. In the second visit, the patients' pain levels were recorded, and GCF and AFS were obtained. Substance P, calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-10 levels were analyzed from the GCF and AFS samples. For comparison between groups, the Mann-Whitney test was used (P sessions between groups. The IL-10 level obtained from AFS significantly decreased in the second session in both groups (P session) and IL-10 (GCF) (second session) positively correlated with percussion pain (r = 0.425, P < .01) (r = 0.379, P < .05). Rotary preparation with continuous irrigation has not been more effective than the standard preparation method for reducing pain. Because of determination of the correlation between CGRP and IL-10 with percussion pain, these neuropeptides can be used in further studies. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The α-Helical Structure of Prodomains Promotes Translocation of Intrinsically Disordered Neuropeptide Hormones into the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirndorfer, Daniela; Seidel, Ralf P.; Nimrod, Guy; Miesbauer, Margit; Ben-Tal, Nir; Engelhard, Martin; Zimmermann, Richard; Winklhofer, Konstanze F.; Tatzelt, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Different neuropeptide hormones, which are either too small to adopt a stable conformation or are predicted to be intrinsically disordered, are synthesized as larger precursors containing a prodomain in addition to an N-terminal signal peptide. We analyzed the biogenesis of three unstructured neuropeptide hormones and observed that translocation of these precursors into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is critically dependent on the presence of the prodomain. The hormone domains could be deleted from the precursors without interfering with ER import and secretion, whereas constructs lacking the prodomain remained in the cytosol. Domain-swapping experiments revealed that the activity of the prodomains to promote productive ER import resides in their ability to adopt an α-helical structure. Removal of the prodomain from the precursor did not interfere with co-translational targeting of the nascent chain to the Sec61 translocon but with its subsequent productive translocation into the ER lumen. Our study reveals a novel function of prodomains to enable import of small or intrinsically disordered secretory proteins into the ER based on their ability to adopt an α-helical conformation. PMID:23532840

  17. The novel anticonvulsant neuropeptide and galanin analogue, NAX-5055, does not alter energy and amino acid metabolism in cultured brain cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldana, Blanca I; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2017-01-01

    A large body of evidence suggests that the neuropeptide galanin plays an important role in seizure control. In line with this, it was demonstrated that the galanin analogue, NAX-5055, exerts a potent anticonvulsant activity in animal seizure models. We recently found that the NAX-5055-mediated an...

  18. Differential effects of recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated neuropeptide Y overexpression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and lateral hypothalamus on feeding behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiesjema, Birgitte; Adan, Roger A. H.; Luijendijk, Mieneke C. M.; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that neuropeptide Y (NPY) increases food intake. The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the lateral hypothalamus (LH) are both involved in the acute, hyperphagic effects of NPY. Although it is obvious that increased energy intake may lead to obesity, it is less

  19. Mapping of neurons in the central nervous system of the guinea pig by use of antisera specific to the molluscan neuropeptide FMRFamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triepel, J; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1984-01-01

    Immunoreactive neurons were mapped in the central nervous system of colchicine-treated and untreated guinea pigs with the use of two antisera to the molluscan neuropeptide FMRFamide. These antisera were especially selected for their incapability to react with peptides of the pancreatic polypeptide...

  20. The Drosophila genes CG14593 and CG30106 code for G-protein-coupled receptors specifically activated by the neuropeptides CCHamide-1 and CCHamide-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karina K; Hauser, Frank; Williamson, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a novel neuropeptide, CCHamide, was discovered in the silkworm Bombyx mori (L. Roller et al., Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 38 (2008) 1147-1157). We have now found that all insects with a sequenced genome have two genes, each coding for a different CCHamide, CCHamide-1 and -2. We have also...... flea Daphnia pulex (Crustacea) and the tick Ixodes scapularis (Chelicerata)....

  1. A new case of neuropeptide coexpression (RGamide and LWamides) in Hydra, found by whole-mount, two-color double-labeling in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Georg N; Williamson, Michael; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2002-01-01

    The freshwater polyp Hydra has a primitive nervous system that expresses at least six different neuropeptide genes: (1) three genes, coding for the preprohormones-A, -B, and -C that each gives rise to a variety of peptides with the C-terminal sequence Arg-Phe-NH(2) (the Hydra-RFamides); (2) one g...

  2. Enduring Effects Of Traumatic Stress On Brain Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Corticotropin-Releasing Factor (CRF) Systems: Molecular and Neuropharmacologic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    preclinical evidence that neuropeptide Y (NPY) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) systems acutely modulate stress and dysphoria responses and 2...exhibit gender -specific alterations in circadian hypothalamus-pitu- itary-adrenal axis and depressive-like behavior. J Neurosci 26:5500–5510. hen R, Lewis

  3. The corticotropin-releasing factor-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and kinin neuropeptides modulate desiccation and starvation tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannell, Elizabeth; Dornan, Anthony J.; Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin

    2016-01-01

    Malpighian tubules are critical organs for epithelial fluid transport and stress tolerance in insects, and are under neuroendocrine control by multiple neuropeptides secreted by identified neurons. Here, we demonstrate roles for CRF-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and Drosophila melanogaster kinin...

  4. Macronutrient-induced differences in food intake relate with hepatic oxidative metabolism and hypothalamic regulatory neuropeptides in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figueiredo-Silva, A.C.; Subramanian, S.; Schrama, J.W.; Kaushik, S.J.; Geurden, I.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how dietary macronutrient-induced changes in voluntary food intake (FI) relate to changes in markers of hepatic oxidative metabolism and in the expression of FI regulatory neuropeptides in a teleost model, the rainbow trout. Rainbow trout were fed for 6 weeks with one of four

  5. Acute Central Neuropeptide Y Administration Increases Food Intake but Does Not Affect Hepatic Very Low-Density Lipoprotein (Vldl) Production in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerling, J.J.; Wang, Y.; Havekes, L.M.; Romijn, J.A.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Central neuropeptide Y (NPY) administration stimulates food intake in rodents. In addition, acute modulation of central NPY signaling increases hepatic production of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-triglyceride (TG) in rats. As hypertriglyceridemia is an important risk factor for

  6. Re-purposing of histological tissue sections for corroborative western blot analysis of hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide expression following delineation of transactivated structures by Fos immuno-mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenazi, Fahaad S H; Ibrahim, Baher A; Briski, Karen P

    2015-04-01

    Fos immunocytochemistry is a valuable anatomical mapping tool for distinguishing cells within complex tissues that undergo genomic activation, but it is seldom paired with corroborative molecular analytical techniques. Due to preparatory requirements that include protein cross-linking for specimen sectioning, histological tissue sections are regarded as unsuitable for those methods. Our studies show that pharmacological activation of the hindbrain energy sensor AMPK by AICAR elicits estradiol (E)-dependent patterns of Fos immunolabeling of hypothalamic metabolic loci. Here, Western blotting was applied to hypothalamic tissue removed from histological sections of E- versus oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) female rat brain to measure levels of metabolic transmitters associated with Fos-positive structures. In both E and O rats, AICAR treatment elicited alterations in pro-opiomelanocortin, neuropeptide Y, SF-1, and orexin-A neuropeptide expression that coincided with patterns of Fos labeling of structures containing neurons that synthesize these neurotransmitters, e.g. arcuate and ventromedial nuclei and lateral hypothalamic area. O, but not E animals also exhibited parallel augmentation of tissue corticotropin-releasing hormone neuropeptide levels and paraventricular nucleus Fos staining. Data demonstrate the utility of immunoblot analysis as a follow-through technique to capitalize on Fos mapping of transactivation sites in the brain. Findings that induction of Fos immunoreactivity coincides with adjustments in hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide expression affirms that this functional indicator reflects changes in neurotransmission in pathways governing metabolic outflow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Accelerated onset of the vesicovesical reflex in postnatal NGF-OE mice and the role of neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Beatrice; Peterson, Abbey; Malley, Susan; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2016-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the postnatal maturation of micturition from a somatovesical to a vesicovesical reflex are not known but may involve neuropeptides in the lower urinary tract. A transgenic mouse model with chronic urothelial overexpression (OE) of NGF exhibited increased voiding frequency, increased number of non-voiding contractions, altered morphology and hyperinnervation of the urinary bladder by peptidergic (e.g., Sub P and CGRP) nerve fibers in the adult. In early postnatal and adult NGF-OE mice we have now examined: (1) micturition onset using filter paper void assays and open-outlet, continuous fill, conscious cystometry; (2) innervation and neurochemical coding of the suburothelial plexus of the urinary bladder using immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative image analyses; (3) neuropeptide protein and transcript expression in urinary bladder of postnatal and adult NGF-OE mice using Q-PCR and ELISAs and (4) the effects of intravesical instillation of a neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor antagonist on bladder function in postnatal and adult NGF-OE mice using conscious cystometry. Postnatal NGF-OE mice exhibit age-dependent (R 2 =0.996-0.998; p≤0.01) increases in Sub and CGRP expression in the urothelium and significantly (p≤0.01) increased peptidergic hyperinnervation of the suburothelial nerve plexus. By as early as P7, NGF-OE mice exhibit a vesicovesical reflex in response to intravesical instillation of saline whereas littermate WT mice require perigenital stimulation to elicit a micturition reflex until P13 when vesicovesical reflexes are first observed. Intravesical instillation of a NK-1 receptor antagonist, netupitant (0.1μg/ml), significantly (p≤0.01) increased void volume and the interval between micturition events with no effects on bladder pressure (baseline, threshold, peak) in postnatal NGF-OE mice; effects on WT mice were few. NGF-induced pleiotropic effects on neuropeptide (e.g., Sub P) expression in the urinary bladder contribute to

  8. The therapeutic effect of the neuropeptide hormone somatostatin on Schistosoma mansoni caused liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeters Theo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neuropeptide somatostatin is one of the major regulatory peptides in the central nervous system and the digestive tract. Our recent work has delineated an association between fibrosis and low levels of endogenous somatostatin plasma levels in Schistosoma mansoni infected subjects. Based on these results this paper explores the therapeutic potential of somatostatin in a mouse model of hepatic fibrosis associated with S. mansoni infections. Methods Groups of outbred Swiss mice were infected with 100 S. mansoni cercariae, infection maintained till weeks 10 or 14, and then somatostatin therapy delivered in two regimens – Either a one or a two-day treatment. All animals were sacrificed one week after therapy and controlled for liver, spleen and total body weight. Circulating somatostatin levels in mice plasma were measured at the time of sacrifice by means of a radio-immuno assay. GraphPad Prism® was used for statistical calculations. Results Somatostatin administration showed little toxicity, probably due to its short half-life. Total liver and spleen weights of S. mansoni infected animals increased over time, with no changes observed due to somatostatin therapy. Total body weights were decreased after infection but were not affected by somatostatin therapy. Snap frozen liver sections were stained with haematoxylin-eosin or Masson's trichrome to study parasite count, hepatocyte status, granuloma size and cellularity. After somatostatin treatment mean egg counts per liver section (43.76 ± 3.56 were significantly reduced as compared to the egg counts in untreated mice after 10 weeks of infection (56.01 ± 3.34 (P = 0.03. Similar significant reduction in parasite egg counts were also observed after somatostatin treatment at 14 weeks of infection (56.62 ± 3.02 as compared to untreated animals (69.82 ± 2.77(P = 0.006. Fibrosis was assessed from the spectrophotometric determination of tissue hydroxyproline. Infection with S

  9. Combined Neuropeptide S and D-Cycloserine Augmentation Prevents the Return of Fear in Extinction-Impaired Rodents: Advantage of Dual versus Single Drug Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Verena; Murphy, Conor; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Muigg, Patrick; Neumann, Inga D.; Whittle, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite its success in treating specific anxiety disorders, the effect of exposure therapy is limited by problems with tolerability, treatment resistance, and fear relapse after initial response. The identification of novel drug targets facilitating fear extinction in clinically relevant animal models may guide improved treatment strategies for these disorders in terms of efficacy, acceleration of fear extinction, and return of fear. Methods: The extinction-facilitating potential of neuropeptide S, D-cycloserine, and a benzodiazepine was investigated in extinction-impaired high anxiety HAB rats and 129S1/SvImJ mice using a classical cued fear conditioning paradigm followed by extinction training and several extinction test sessions to study fear relapse. Results: Administration of D-cycloserine improved fear extinction in extinction-limited, but not in extinction-deficient, rodents compared with controls. Preextinction neuropeptide S caused attenuated fear responses in extinction-deficient 129S1/SvImJ mice at extinction training onset and further reduced freezing during this session. While the positive effects of either D-cycloserine or neuropeptide S were not persistent in 129S1/SvImJ mice after 10 days, the combination of preextinction neuropeptide S with postextinction D-cycloserine rendered the extinction memory persistent and context independent up to 5 weeks after extinction training. This dual pharmacological adjunct to extinction learning also protected against fear reinstatement in 129S1/SvImJ mice. Conclusions: By using the potentially nonsedative anxiolytic neuropeptide S and the cognitive enhancer D-cycloserine to facilitate deficient fear extinction, we provide here the first evidence of a purported efficacy of a dual over a single drug approach. This approach may render exposure sessions less aversive and more efficacious for patients, leading to enhanced protection from fear relapse in the long term. PMID:26625894

  10. Neuropeptide discovery in the Araneae (Arthropoda, Chelicerata, Arachnida): elucidation of true spider peptidomes using that of the Western black widow as a reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Andrew E; Chi, Megan

    2015-03-01

    The public deposition of large transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) datasets for the Araneae (true spiders) provides a resource for determining the structures of the native neuropeptides present in members of this chelicerate order. Here, the Araneae TSA data were mined for putative peptide-encoding transcripts using the recently deduced neuropeptide precursors from the Western black widow Latrodectus hesperus as query templates. Neuropeptide-encoding transcripts from five spiders, Latrodectus tredecimguttatus, Stegodyphus mimosarum, Stegodyphus lineatus, Stegodyphus tentoriicola and Acanthoscurria geniculata, were identified, including ones encoding members of the allatostatin A, allatostatin B, allatostatin C, allatotropin, CAPA/periviscerokinin/pyrokinin, crustacean cardioactive peptide, crustacean hyperglycemic hormone/ion transport peptide, diuretic hormone 31, diuretic hormone 44, eclosion hormone, FMRFamide-like peptide (FLP), GSEFLamide, insulin-like peptide, orcokinin, proctolin, short neuropeptide F, SIFamide, sulfakinin and tachykinin-related peptide (TRP) families. A total of 156 distinct peptides were predicted from the precursor proteins deduced from the S. mimosarum transcripts, with 65, 26, 21 and 12 peptides predicted from those deduced from the A. geniculata, L. tredecimguttatus, S. lineatus and S. tentoriicola sequences, respectively. Among the peptides identified were variant isoforms of FLP, orcokinin and TRP, peptides whose structures are similar to ones previously identified from L. hesperus. The prediction of these atypical peptides from multiple spiders suggests that they may be broadly conserved within the Araneae rather than being species-specific variants. Taken collectively, the data described here greatly expand the number of known Araneae neuropeptides, providing a foundation for future functional studies of peptidergic signaling in this important Chelicerate order. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of the therapeutic effects of sildenafil citrate, heparin and neuropeptides in a rat model of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalayci, Mehmet; Kocdor, Mehmet Ali; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Sahin, İbrahim; Sarac, Mehmet; Aksoy, Aziz; Yardim, Meltem; Dalkilic, Semih; Gursu, Onur; Aydin, Suna; Akkoc, Ramazan Fazil; Ugras, Meltem; Artas, Gokhan; Ozercan, İbrahim Hanifi; Ugur, Kader; Aydin, Suleyman

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of our investigative work has been to determine whether there can be therapeutic roles in the administration of sildenafil citrate, heparin and several neuropeptides on an animal model where gastric ulcers were induced with acetic acid, and to compare their efficacy. The animals were divided into 13 groups, with 4 animals in each. Gastric ulcers was induced in the animals of 12 groups with one untreated group being left as the control (Group I - control; given normal saline (NS)). The other groups were: Group II (ulcer+NS); Group III (5mg/kg sildenafil citrate, low dose); Group IV (10mg/kg sildenafil citrate, high dose); Group V (0.6mg/kg heparin, low dose); Group VI (6mg/kg heparin, high dose); Group VII (20nmol/kg des-acyl ghrelin); Group VIII (40nmol/kg des-acyl ghrelin); Group IX (4nmol/kg acyl ghrelin); Group X (8nmol/kg acly ghrelin); Group XI (20pmol/kg Nesfatin-1); Group XII (15nmol/kg Obestatin) and Group XIII (5nmol/kg Neuropeptide Y). Gastric neuropeptide expression was measured using an immunohistochemical method, and the amount in circulation was detected using ELISA. To compare with no treatment, the controls and other treatment groups, we recorded loss of the surface epithelium of the stomach, erosion, bleeding and inflammatory cell infiltration in the upper halves of the gastric glands. The muscularis and the layers beneath it were, however, apparently normal. The gastric mucosa healed with little or no inflammation when sildenafil citrate, low dose heparin, ghrelin, NUCB2/Nesfatin-1, obestatin, Neuropeptide Y were administered. Overall the data indicate that low dose heparin, and especially sildenafil citrate and neuropeptides, can be used clinically as an alternative approach in the treatment of the gastric ulcer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neuropeptide S in the basolateral amygdala mediates an adaptive behavioral stress response in a rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder by increasing the expression of BDNF and the neuropeptide YY1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Hagit; Vainer, Ella; Zeev, Kaplan; Zohar, Joseph; Mathé, Aleksander A

    2018-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a regulatory peptide that has anxiolytic and arousal-promoting effects in rodents. We used an animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to assess long-term behavioral effects of a single dose of NPS, microinjected into the basolateral amygdala (BLA) 1h following exposure to predator-scent stress (PSS). To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which NPS attenuates behavioral stress responses, expression levels of neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY-Y1 receptor (NPY-Y1R), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were evaluated in the hippocampus. The behavioral and molecular effects of NPS receptor antagonist (NPS-RA), NPY-Y1R antagonist (NPY-Y1RA), or both administered centrally were evaluated in the same manner. Circulating corticosterone levels were measured at different time points following PSS-exposure. Immediate post-exposure treatment with NPS had a marked protective effect; BLA microinfusion of NPS completely abolished the extreme behavioral response to PSS, restored the decreased expression of BDNF and, unexpectedly, PY-Y1R, but didn't affect the decreased expression of NPY. BLA microinfusion of both NPY-Y1RA and NPS-RA together had an additive effect, which completely prevented the anxiolytic effects of NPS in rats exposed to PSS and disrupted the expression of NPY-Y1R in the hippocampus following NPS infusion. It may therefore be hypothesized that NPS acts, directly or indirectly, on both the NPY-Y1R and NPS receptors and that the cross-talk between NPS and NPY-Y1R may be necessary for the anxiolytic effects of NPS post-exposure. The NPS system might thus contribute to a potential endogenous mechanism underlying the shift towards adaptive behavioral response and thereby might be relevant as a pharmacological target for attenuating stress-related sequelae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and gene silencing of two Drosophila receptors for the Drosophila neuropeptide pyrokinin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Carina; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The database of the Drosophila Genome Project contains the sequences of two genes, CG8784 and CG8795, predicted to code for two structurally related G protein-coupled receptors. We have cloned these genes and expressed their coding parts in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We found that both receptors...... can be activated by low concentrations of the Drosophila neuropeptide pyrokinin-2 (CG8784, EC(50) for pyrokinin-2, 1x10(-9)M; CG8795, EC(50) for pyrokinin-2, 5 x 10(-10)M). The precise role of Drosophila pyrokinin-2 (SVPFKPRLamide) in Drosophila is unknown, but in other insects, pyrokinins have...... embryos and first instar larvae. In addition to the two Drosophila receptors, we also identified two probable pyrokinin receptors in the genomic database from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. The two Drosophila pyrokinin receptors are, to our knowledge, the first invertebrate pyrokinin receptors...

  14. Association of the leucine-7 to proline-7 variation in the signal sequence of neuropeptide Y with major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Pernille; Woldbye, David P. D.; Hansen, Thomas v. O.

    2012-01-01

    disease controls with schizophrenia. Possible functional consequences of Leu7Pro were explored in vitro. Results: In contrast to previous studies, Pro7 appeared to be a risk allele for depression, being significantly more frequent in the depression sample (5.5 n = 593; p = 0.009; odds ratio, OR: 1......Objective: There is clear evidence of a genetic component in major depression, and several studies indicate that neuropeptide Y (NPY) could play an important role in the pathophysiology of the disease. A well-known polymorphism encoding the substitution of leucine to proline in the signal peptide...... sequence of NPY (Leu7Pro variation) was previously found to protect against depression. Our study aimed at replicating this association in a large Danish population with major depression. Method: Leu7Pro was studied in a sample of depressed patients and ethnically matched controls, as well as psychiatric...

  15. Neuropeptide Y Y5 receptor antagonism causes faster extinction and attenuates reinstatement in cocaine-induced place preference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Wörtwein, Gitta; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have suggested a role for neuropeptide Y (NPY) in addiction to drugs of abuse, including cocaine. Recently, our group showed a role for the NPY Y5 receptor in the modulation of acute reinforcing effects of cocaine using self-administration and hyperlocomotion paradigms....... In the present study, we further explored potential anti-addiction-related effects of Y5 antagonism in another murine model of cocaine addiction-related behavior: conditioned place-preference (CPP). Using this model, it was tested whether blockade or deficiency of the NPY Y5 receptor could influence...... the induction, extinction or reinstatement of a conditioned cocaine response. We found that the Y5 antagonist L-152,804 causes faster extinction and reduced reinstatement of cocaine-induced CPP but did not reduce the ability of cocaine to induce CPP. Similarly, Y5-KO mice displayed faster extinction...

  16. Neuropeptide Y release by pumiliotoxin-B in the electrically-stimulated mouse vas deferens: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Este, L; Falconieri-Erspamer, G; Severini, C; Erspamer, V; Renda, T G

    1999-01-01

    Morphologic and immunohistochemical studies were conducted to ascertain whether pumiliotoxin-B (PTX-B), an indolizine alkaloid from the skin of the Neotropical dendrobatid frog, Dendrobates pumilio, affects the anatomic and immunohistochemical features of the electrically stimulated mouse vas deferens preparations. PTX-B, at a concentration of 1 microM, consistently decreased the density pattern of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-immunoreactive nerve fibers contained within the circular muscular layer. The alkaloid also induced striking morphologic changes. It enlarged the lumen of the vasa and relaxed the muscular wall. Pretreatment with prazosin or haloperidol affected neither the release of NPY nor the morphologic changes; pretreatment with tetrodotoxin and guanethidine abolished NPY release and prevented the PTX-B-induced morphologic changes. PTX-B had no appreciable effect on the density and distribution pattern of nerve fibers immunostained for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, enkephalin, pancreatic polypeptide, 5-hydroxy-tryptamine and tyrosine hydroxylase.

  17. Interaction between neuropeptide Y (NPY) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in NPY-mediated neuroprotection against excitotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xapelli, S; Bernardino, L; Ferreira, R

    2008-01-01

    The neuroprotective effect of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor activation was investigated in organotypic mouse hippocampal slice cultures exposed to the glutamate receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA). Exposure of 2-week-old slice cultures, derived from 7......-day-old C57BL/6 mice, to 8 microm AMPA, for 24 h, induced degeneration of CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells, as measured by cellular uptake of propidium iodide (PI). A significant neuroprotection, with a reduction of PI uptake in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cell layers, was observed after incubation with a Y(2...... antagonist (BIBP3226, 1 microm) or a NPY-neutralizing antibody helped to disclose a neuroprotective role of endogenous NPY in CA1 region. Cultures exposed to 8 microm AMPA for 24 h, displayed, as measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a significant increase in BDNF. In such cultures...

  18. Neuropeptide s alters anxiety but not depression-like behaviors in the flinders sensitive line rats, a genetic animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathe, A.; Wegener, Gregers; Finger, B.

    2010-01-01

    the effects of centrally administered NPS on depression- and anxiety-related behaviors, using a well validated animal model of depression, the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats and their controls the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL). Methods: Male and female were tested. Seven days following insertion......Background: Neuropeptide S (NPS) and its receptor (NPSR) have been implicated in the mediation of anxiolytic-like behavior in rodents. However, little knowledge is available to what extent the NPS system is involved in depression-related behaviors. The aim of the present work was to characterize...... of cannula, 0.25 or 1.0 nmol NPS, or vehicle/5 ml were infused into the lateral ventricle. 45 min after NPS infusion animals were tested on elevated plus maze (EPM). Five days later the animals were subjected to the two-day forced swim test (FST); NPS or vehicle were injected 45 min before the second day FST...

  19. Effects of glucose, propionate and splanchnic hormones on neuropeptide mRNA concentrations in the ovine hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relling, A E; Lee, K; Loerch, S C; Reynolds, C K

    2012-08-01

    The capacity for glucose, propionate or hormones of splanchnic origin to influence appetite by directly regulating the expression of neuropeptides in the feeding centres of the hypothalamus of the ruminant is not described. Therefore, our objective was to measure the direct effect of metabolites (glucose and propionate) or hormones [insulin, cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and polypeptide YY (PYY)] on hypothalamic mRNA concentrations for neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) following in vitro incubation. Hypothalamic tissue from 4- to 5-month-old lambs was obtained at slaughter and immediately incubated in culture media for 2 h at 36 °C. Treatments included a control Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) containing 1 mm glucose or DMEM with the following additions: 10 mm glucose, 1 mm propionate, 1 nm insulin, 120 pm GLP-1, 100 pm PYY, 80 pm CCK or 10 mm glucose plus 1 nm insulin. The abundance of mRNA for NPY, AgRP and POMC was measured using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Fisher's protected LSD test was used to compare changes in relative mRNA concentrations for the hypothalamus incubated in the control media vs. the rest of the treatments. The media containing glucose plus insulin increased POMC mRNA concentration (p 0.20). Results of the present study are consistent with the concept that effects of propionate on feed intake in ruminants is not mediated through direct effects on the hypothalamus, and that insulin is required for an effect of glucose on hypothalamic POMC expression. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Adult exposure to tributyltin affects hypothalamic neuropeptide Y, Y1 receptor distribution, and circulating leptin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, E; Farinetti, A; Marraudino, M; Sterchele, D; Eva, C; Gotti, S; Panzica, G

    2016-07-01

    Tributyltin (TBT), a pesticide used in antifouling paints, is toxic for aquatic invertebrates. In vertebrates, TBT may act in obesogen- inducing adipogenetic gene transcription for adipocyte differentiation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that acute administration of TBT induces c-fos expression in the arcuate nucleus. Therefore, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that adult exposure to TBT may alter a part of the nervous pathways controlling animal food intake. In particular, we investigated the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) immunoreactivity. This neuropeptide forms neural circuits dedicated to food assumption and its action is mediated by Y1 receptors that are widely expressed in the hypothalamic nuclei responsible for the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. To this purpose, TBT was orally administered at a dose of 0.025 mg/kg/day/body weight to adult animals [male and female C57BL/6 (Y1-LacZ transgenic mice] for 4 weeks. No differences were found in body weight and fat deposition, but we observed a significant increase in feed efficiency in TBT-treated male mice and a significant decrease in circulating leptin in both sexes. Computerized quantitative analysis of NPY immunoreactivity and Y1-related β-galactosidase activity demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in NPY and Y1 transgene expression in the hypothalamic circuit controlling food intake of treated male mice in comparison with controls. In conclusion, the present results indicate that adult exposure to TBT is profoundly interfering with the nervous circuits involved in the stimulation of food intake. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  1. Evolution of pigment-dispersing factor neuropeptides in Panarthropoda: Insights from Onychophora (velvet worms) and Tardigrada (water bears).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Georg; Hering, Lars; Stosch, Juliane M; Stevenson, Paul A; Dircksen, Heinrich

    2015-09-01

    Pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) denotes a conserved family of homologous neuropeptides present in several invertebrate groups, including mollusks, nematodes, insects, and crustaceans (referred to here as pigment-dispersing hormone [PDH]). With regard to their encoding genes (pdf, pdh), insects possess only one, nematodes two, and decapod crustaceans up to three, but their phylogenetic relationship is unknown. To shed light on the origin and diversification of pdf/pdh homologs in Panarthropoda (Onychophora + Tardigrada + Arthropoda) and other molting animals (Ecdysozoa), we analyzed the transcriptomes of five distantly related onychophorans and a representative tardigrade and searched for putative pdf homologs in publically available genomes of other protostomes. This revealed only one pdf homolog in several mollusk and annelid species; two in Onychophora, Priapulida, and Nematoda; and three in Tardigrada. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the last common ancestor of Panarthropoda possessed two pdf homologs, one of which was lost in the arthropod or arthropod/tardigrade lineage, followed by subsequent duplications of the remaining homolog in some taxa. Immunolocalization of PDF-like peptides in six onychophoran species, by using a broadly reactive antibody that recognizes PDF/PDH peptides in numerous species, revealed an elaborate system of neurons and fibers in their central and peripheral nervous systems. Large varicose projections in the heart suggest that the PDF neuropeptides functioned as both circulating hormones and locally released transmitters in the last common ancestor of Onychophora and Arthropoda. The lack of PDF-like-immunoreactive somata associated with the onychophoran optic ganglion conforms to the hypothesis that onychophoran eyes are homologous to the arthropod median ocelli. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. RNAi-mediated disruption of neuropeptide genes, nlp-3 and nlp-12, cause multiple behavioral defects in Meloidogyne incognita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Manoranjan; Dutta, Tushar K; Phani, Victor; Papolu, Pradeep K; Shivakumara, Tagginahalli N; Rao, Uma

    2017-08-26

    Owing to the current deficiencies in chemical control options and unavailability of novel management strategies, root-knot nematode (M. incognita) infections remain widespread with significant socio-economic impacts. Helminth nervous systems are peptide-rich and appear to be putative drug targets that could be exploited by antihelmintic chemotherapy. Herein, to characterize the novel peptidergic neurotransmitters, in silico mining of M. incognita genomic and transciptomic datasets revealed the presence of 16 neuropeptide-like protein (nlp) genes with structural hallmarks of neuropeptide preproproteins; among which 13 nlps were PCR-amplified and sequenced. Two key nlp genes (Mi-nlp-3 and Mi-nlp-12) were localized to the basal bulb and tail region of nematode body via in situ hybridization assay. Mi-nlp-3 and Mi-nlp-12 were greatly expressed (in qRT-PCR assay) in the pre-parasitic juveniles and adult females, suggesting the association of these genes in host recognition, development and reproduction of M. incognita. In vitro knockdown of Mi-nlp-3 and Mi-nlp-12 via RNAi demonstrated the significant reduction in attraction and penetration of M. incognita in tomato root in Pluronic gel medium. A pronounced perturbation in development and reproduction of NLP-silenced worms was also documented in adzuki beans in CYG growth pouches. The deleterious phenotypes obtained due to NLP knockdown suggests that transgenic plants engineered to express RNA constructs targeting nlp genes may emerge as an environmentally viable option to manage nematode problems in crop plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of "Bioactive" amino acids leucine, glutamate, arginine and tryptophan on feed intake and mRNA expression of relative neuropeptides in broiler chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Songbo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Feed intake control is vital to ensuring optimal nutrition and achieving full potential for growth and development in poultry. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of L-leucine, L-glutamate, L-tryptophan and L-arginine on feed intake and the mRNA expression levels of hypothalamic Neuropeptide involved in feed intake regulation in broiler chicks. Leucine, glutamate, tryptophan or arginine was intra-cerebroventricularly (ICV administrated to 4d-old broiler chicks respectively and the feed intake were recorded at various time points. Quantitative PCR was performed to determine the hypothalamic mRNA expression levels of Neuropeptide Y (NPY, agouti related protein (AgRP, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC, melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R and corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF. Our results showed that ICV administration of L-leucine (0.15 or 1.5  μmol significantly (P P 

  4. Neuropeptide Y receptor genes on human chromosome 4q31-q32 map to conserved linkage groups on mouse chromosomes 3 and 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, C.M.; Frankel, W.N. [Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME (United States); Richards, J.E. [Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Npy1r and Npy2r, the genes encoding mouse type 1 and type 2 neuropeptide Y receptors, have been mapped by interspecific backcross analysis. Previous studies have localized the human genes encoding these receptors to chromosome 4q31-q32. We have now assigned Npy1r and Npy2r to conserved linkage groups on mouse Chr 8 and Chr 3, respectively, which correspond to the distal region of human chromosome 4q. Using yeast artificial chromosomes, we have estimated the distance between the human genes to be approximately 6 cM. Although ancient tandem duplication events may account for some closely spaced G-protein-coupled receptor genes, the large genetic distance between the human type 1 and type 2 neuropeptide Y receptor genes raises questions about whether this mechanism accounts for their proximity. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  5. CHARACTERISTIC INFLUENCE OF PULSE ELECTROTHERAPY (ELECTRICAL SLEEP AT A NEUROPEPTIDE-CYTOKINE LINKS IN ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION ACCOMPANIED BY A ASTHENONEUROTIC DISTURBANCES IN YOUNG MEN EMPLOYED IN STRESSFUL PROFESSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Gertsev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Disorders in functioning of major regulatory systems in patients with somatic diseases required development of new and effective integrated approaches to their treatment and prevention. Effective electrotherapy (electrical sleep is among these methods. Despite existence of studies proving high efficiency of electrical sleep results in therapeutic practice, some open questions remain concerning impact of this treatment upon neuropeptide-cytokine links of immune system, which is one of the most important effector of pathogenesis in cardiovascular diseases in young persons with hypertension from the group occupied with stressful jobs. In this connection, the aim of our study was to investigate the influence on electrical sleep upon neuropeptide-cytokine profile in arterial hypertension conditions accomplished by asthenic-neurotic disorders in young men from the group of stressful activities. The following treatment groups were formed: 1st (n = 12, antihypertensive therapy; 2nd (n = 10, complex therapeutic measures added to antihypertensive therapy plus minor tranquilizers; in the 3rd group (n = 12, electric sleep was performed. Neuropeptide-cytokine profile was investigated as serum contents of β-endorphin, proinflammatory (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10 cytokines. In the course of the clinical and laboratory examination, the authors have found that electric sleep applied in a complex primary schedule, with antihypertensive drug treatment in patients with hypertension and asthenic-neurotic disorders proved to exert optimizing effect upon functioning of neuropeptide-cytokine pool of immune system, which manifested by stimulation of beta-endorphin production, a decrease via regulation of proinflammatory effectors (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and increased anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10. 

  6. Association of PPARγ2 (Pro12Ala and Neuropeptide Y (Leu7Pro Gene Polymorphisms with Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Asian Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Bhushan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is prevalent in 7.5% in urban Asian Indians. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma2 (PPARγ2 has been implicated in adipocyte differentiation. Neuropeptide Y (NPY is also considered as a candidate gene for excess body fat accumulation. The association of PPARγ2 (Pro12Ala and NPY (Leu7Pro gene polymorphisms with OSA has not been studied in Asian Indians.

  7. Differential Releases of Dopamine and Neuropeptide Y from Histamine-Stimulated PC12 Cells Detected by an Aptamer-Modified Nanowire Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Subhasree; Hsieh, Ying-Jhu; Liu, Chia-Rung; Yeh, Nai-Hsing; Hung, Hui-Hsing; Lai, Yew-Seng; Chou, Ai-Chuan; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Pan, Chien-Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Silicon nanowire field-effect transistors modified with specific aptamers can directly detect the minute dopamine and neuropeptide Y released from cells. The binding of these molecules to the aptamers results in a conductance change of the transistor biosensor and illustrates the differential releasing mechanisms of these molecules stored in various vesicle pools. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Mass spectrometric identification of pEGFYSQRYamide: a crustacean peptide hormone possessing a vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY)-like carboxy-terminus

    OpenAIRE

    Stemmler, Elizabeth A.; Bruns, Emily A.; Gardner, Noah P.; Dickinson, Patsy S.; Christie, Andrew E.

    2007-01-01

    In invertebrates, peptides possessing the carboxy (C)-terminal motif -RXRFamide have been proposed as the homologs of vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY). Using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, in combination with sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation and chemical and enzymatic reactions, we have identified the peptide pEGFYSQRYamide from the neuroendocrine pericardial organ (PO) of the crab Pugettia producta. This peptide is likely the s...

  9. Abnormal Ergosterol Biosynthesis Activates Transcriptional Responses to Antifungal Azoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengcheng; Zhou, Mi; Wang, Wenzhao; Sun, Xianyun; Yarden, Oded; Li, Shaojie

    2018-01-01

    Fungi transcriptionally upregulate expression of azole efflux pumps and ergosterol biosynthesis pathway genes when exposed to antifungal agents that target ergosterol biosynthesis. To date, these transcriptional responses have been shown to be dependent on the presence of the azoles and/or depletion of ergosterol. Using an inducible promoter to regulate Neurospora crassa erg11 , which encodes the major azole target, sterol 14α-demethylase, we were able to demonstrate that the CDR4 azole efflux pump can be transcriptionally activated by ergosterol biosynthesis inhibition even in the absence of azoles. By analyzing ergosterol deficient mutants, we demonstrate that the transcriptional responses by cdr4 and, unexpectedly, genes encoding ergosterol biosynthesis enzymes ( erg genes) that are responsive to azoles, are not dependent on ergosterol depletion. Nonetheless, deletion of erg2 , which encodes C-8 sterol isomerase, also induced expression of cdr4 . Deletion of erg2 also induced the expression of erg24 , the gene encoding C-14 sterol reductase, but not other tested erg genes which were responsive to erg11 inactivation. This indicates that inhibition of specific steps of ergosterol biosynthesis can result in different transcriptional responses, which is further supported by our results obtained using different ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors. Together with the sterol profiles, these results suggest that the transcriptional responses by cdr4 and erg genes are associated with accumulation of specific sterol intermediate(s). This was further supported by the fact that when the erg2 mutant was treated with ketoconazole, upstream inhibition overrode the effects by downstream inhibition on ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. Even though cdr4 expression is associated with the accumulation of sterol intermediates, intra- and extracellular sterol analysis by HPLC-MS indicated that the transcriptional induction of cdr4 did not result in efflux of the accumulated intermediate(s). This study demonstrates, by detailed genetic and chemical analysis, that transcriptional responses by a major efflux pump and genes of the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway to ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors can be independent of the presence of the drugs and are linked with the accumulation of ergosterol intermediate(s).

  10. Evidence for intercellular communication in mosquito renal tubules: a putative role of gap junctions in coordinating and regulating the rapid diuretic effects of neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermarini, Peter M; Calkins, Travis L

    2014-07-01

    Adult female mosquitoes require a blood meal from a vertebrate host to successfully reproduce. During a single blood feeding, a female may ingest more than the equivalent of her own body mass, resulting in an acute stress to osmotic and ionic homeostasis. In response to this stress, the renal (Malpighian) tubules mediate a rapid diuresis that commences as soon as blood is ingested. The diuresis is regulated by neuropeptides (e.g., kinins, calcitonin-like peptide) that act on receptors in the Malpighian tubule epithelium. Interestingly, the expression of these receptors is discontinuous throughout the epithelium, which raises the question as to how Malpighian tubules mount such a rapid and synchronized response to neuropeptide stimulation. Here we propose a hypothesis that gap junctions functionally couple the epithelial cells of Malpighian tubules, resulting in a coordinated physiological response to the binding of neuropeptides. We review recent, relevant literature on the electrophysiology, physiology, and molecular biology of mosquito Malpighian tubules that indicate the presence of gap junctions in the epithelium. We also provide new physiological and immunochemical data that are consistent with the proposed hypothesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Release of neuropeptides from a neuro-cutaneous co-culture model: A novel in vitro model for studying sensory effects of ciguatoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Garrec, Raphaele; L'herondelle, Killian; Le Gall-Ianotto, Christelle; Lebonvallet, Nicolas; Leschiera, Raphael; Buhe, Virginie; Talagas, Matthieu; Vetter, Irina; Lewis, Richard J; Misery, Laurent

    2016-06-15

    Ciguatoxins are the major toxins responsible for ciguatera fish poisoning, a disease dominated by muco-cutaneous sensory disorders including paresthesiae, cold dysesthesia and pruritus. While the ciguatoxins are well known to target voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), the ensuing molecular mechanisms underlying these sensory disorders remain poorly understood. In this study, we propose a primary sensory neuron-keratinocyte co-culture as an appropriate model to study the neuro-cutaneous effects of ciguatoxins. Using this model, we show for the first time that nanomolar concentrations of Pacific ciguatoxin-2 (P-CTX-2) induced a VGSC-dependent release of substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). As these neuropeptides are known mediators of pain and itch sensations, the ciguatoxin-induced sensory disturbances in ciguatera fish poisoning may involve the release of these neuropeptides. We further determined time- and P-CTX-2 concentration-dependence of the release of SP and CGRP from the co-culture model. Moreover, we highlighted the influence of extracellular calcium on the release of neuropeptides elicited by P-CTX-2. These findings underline the usefulness of this novel in vitro model for studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the neuro-cutaneous effects of ciguatoxins, which may assist with identifying potential therapeutics for ciguatera fish poisoning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Autism and urinary exogenous neuropeptides: development of an on-line SPE-HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry method to test the opioid excess theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, K; Hanna, D; Whetstone, P; Hansen, R; Hammock, B D

    2007-08-01

    Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with unknown etiology. One hypothesis regarding etiology in autism is the "opioid peptide excess" theory that postulates that excessive amounts of exogenous opioid-like peptides derived from dietary proteins are detectable in urine and that these compounds may be pathophysiologically important in autism. A selective LC-MS/MS method was developed to analyze gliadinomorphin, beta-casomorphin, deltorphin 1, and deltorphin 2 in urine. The method is based on on-line SPE extraction of the neuropeptides from urine, column switching, and subsequent HPLC analysis. A limit of detection of 0.25 ng/mL was achieved for all analytes. Analyte recovery rates from urine ranged between 78% and 94%, with relative standard deviations of 0.2-6.8%. The method was used to screen 69 urine samples from children with and without autism spectrum disorders for the occurrence of neuropeptides. The target neuropeptides were not detected above the detection limit in either sample set.

  13. Recent advances in the understanding of how neuropeptide Y and α-melanocyte stimulating hormone function in adipose physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, Steven L.; Cline, Mark A.; Gilbert, Elizabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Communication between the brain and the adipose tissue has been the focus of many studies in recent years, with the “brain-fat axis” identified as a system that orchestrates the assimilation and usage of energy to maintain body mass and adequate fat stores. It is now well-known that appetite-regulating peptides that were studied as neurotransmitters in the central nervous system can act both on the hypothalamus to regulate feeding behavior and also on the adipose tissue to modulate the storage of energy. Energy balance is thus partly controlled by factors that can alter both energy intake and storage/expenditure. Two such factors involved in these processes are neuropeptide Y (NPY) and α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH). NPY, an orexigenic factor, is associated with promoting adipogenesis in both mammals and chickens, while α-MSH, an anorexigenic factor, stimulates lipolysis in rodents. There is also evidence of interaction between the 2 peptides. This review aims to summarize recent advances in the study of NPY and α-MSH regarding their role in adipose tissue physiology, with an emphasis on the cellular and molecular mechanisms. A greater understanding of the brain-fat axis and regulation of adiposity by bioactive peptides may provide insights on strategies to prevent or treat obesity and also enhance nutrient utilization efficiency in agriculturally-important species. PMID:27994947

  14. The novel neuropeptide phoenixin is highly co-expressed with nesfatin-1 in the rat hypothalamus, an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałasz, Artur; Rojczyk, Ewa; Bogus, Katarzyna; Worthington, John J; Wiaderkiewicz, Ryszard

    2015-04-10

    The hypothalamus regulates a number of autonomic functions essential for homeostasis; therefore, investigations concerning hypothalamic neuropeptides and their functions and distribution are of great importance in contemporary neuroscience. Recently, novel regulatory factors expressed in the hypothalamus have been discovered, of which nesfatin-1 and phoenixin (PNX), show intriguing similarities in their brain distributions. There are currently few studies characterizing PNX expression, so it is imperative to accurately trace its localization, with particular attention to the hypothalamic nuclei and nesfatin-1 co-expression. Using fluorescence and classical immunohistochemical stainings on adult rat brain, we visualized the potential co-expression of nesfatin-1 and PNX immunoreactive cells. We have demonstrated a distinct PNX-immunoreactivity in 21-32% of cells in the arcuate nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, ventromedial and lateral hypothalamus. Nesfatin-1 expression reached 45-68% of all neurons in the same sites, while co-expression was strikingly seen in the vast majority (70-86%) of PNX-immunoreactive neurons in the rat hypothalamic nuclei. Our results demonstrate for the first time, a wide distribution of PNX in the hypothalamus which could implicate a potential functional relationship with nesfatin-1, possibly in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or other autonomic functions, which require further study. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Neuropeptide-converting enzymes in cerebrospinal fluid: activities increased in pain from herniated lumbar dis, but not from coxarthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, C; Thornwall, M; Hansen, A C; Post, C; Gordh, T; Ordeberg, G; Nyberg, F

    1996-04-01

    We measured activities of dynorphin-converting enzyme (DCE), substance P endopeptidase (SPE) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in 13 patients with rhizopathic pain from an herniated lumbar disc, in 9 patients with pain from coxarthrosis and in 11 control patients without pain. In the patients with disc hernia and coxarthrosis, another sample of CSF was analyzed 3-12 months after treatment, when pain had subsided. The DCE activity in the patients was higher than that in both the control patients and the patients with pain from coxarthrosis (nociceptive pain). Similarly, the activity of SPE was lower in the patients with herniated lumbar disc than in controls and in the patients with coxarthrosis. After treatment, the difference in activity compared to controls was lower, but still significant in patients with herniated discs. The ACE activity did not differ from controls in patients with ischialgia, while it was increased in patients with coxarthrosis. This increase also remained after arthroplasty with pain relief. In conclusion, measurements of neuropeptides may be useful for evaluating neuropathic pain.

  16. Plasma low-molecular-weight proteome profiling identified neuropeptide-Y as a prostate cancer biomarker polypeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Koji; Tatsuguchi, Ayako; Saichi, Naomi; Toyama, Atsuhiko; Tamura, Kenji; Furihata, Mutsuo; Takata, Ryo; Akamatsu, Shusuke; Igarashi, Masahiro; Nakayama, Masato; Sato, Taka-Aki; Ogawa, Osamu; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Shuin, Taro; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2013-10-04

    In prostate cancer diagnosis, PSA test has greatly contributed to the early detection of prostate cancer; however, expanding overdiagnosis and unnecessary biopsies have emerged as serious issues. To explore plasma biomarkers complementing the specificity of PSA test, we developed a unique proteomic technology QUEST-MS (Quick Enrichment of Small Targets for Mass Spectrometry). The QUEST-MS method based on 96-well formatted sequential reversed-phase chromatography allowing efficient enrichment of <20 kDa proteins quickly and reproducibly. Plasma from 24 healthy controls, 19 benign prostate hypertrophy patients, and 73 prostate cancer patients were purified with QUEST-MS and analyzed by LC/MS/MS. Among 153 057 nonredundant peptides, 189 peptides showed prostate cancer specific detection pattern, which included a neurotransmitter polypeptide neuropeptide-Y (NPY). We further validated the screening results by targeted multiple reaction monitoring technology using independent sample set (n = 110). The ROC curve analysis revealed that logistic regression-based combination of NPY, and PSA showed 81.5% sensitivity and 82.2% specificity for prostate cancer diagnosis. Thus QUEST-MS technology allowed comprehensive and high-throughput profiling of plasma polypeptides and had potential to effectively uncover very low abundant tumor-derived small molecules, such as neurotransmitters, peptide hormones, or cytokines.

  17. Local neuropeptide signaling modulates serotonergic transmission to shape the temporal organization of C. elegans egg-laying behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navonil Banerjee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Animal behaviors are often composed of distinct alternating behavioral states. Neuromodulatory signals are thought to be critical for establishing stable behavioral states and for orchestrating transitions between them. However, we have only a limited understanding of how neuromodulatory systems act in vivo to alter circuit performance and shape behavior. To address these questions, we have investigated neuromodulatory signaling in the context of Caenorhabditis elegans egg-laying. Egg-laying activity cycles between discrete states-short bursts of egg deposition (active phases that alternate with prolonged quiescent periods (inactive phases. Here using genetic, pharmacological and optogenetic approaches for cell-specific activation and inhibition, we show that a group of neurosecretory cells (uv1 located in close spatial proximity to the egg-laying neuromusculature direct the temporal organization of egg-laying by prolonging the duration of inactive phases. We demonstrate that the modulatory effects of the uv1 cells are mediated by peptides encoded by the nlp-7 and flp-11 genes that act locally to inhibit circuit activity, primarily by inhibiting vesicular release of serotonin from HSN motor neurons. This peptidergic inhibition is achieved, at least in part, by reducing synaptic vesicle abundance in the HSN motor neurons. By linking the in vivo actions of specific neuropeptide signaling systems with the generation of stable behavioral outcomes, our study reveals how cycles of neuromodulation emanating from non-neuronal cells can fundamentally shape the organization of a behavioral program.

  18. The role of neuropeptide-Y in nandrolone decanoate-induced attenuation of antidepressant effect of exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Joksimovic

    Full Text Available Since the increased prevalence of anabolic androgenic steroids abuse in last few decades is usually accompanied by various exercise protocols, the scope of our study was to evaluate the effects of chronic nandrolone decanoate administration in supraphysiological dose and a prolonged swimming protocol (alone and simultaneously with nandrolone decanoate on depressive state in male rats. Simultaneously, we investigated the possible alterations in neuropeptide Y (NPY content in blood and the hippocampus, in order to determine the role of NPY in the modulation of depressive-like behavior.Exercise induced antidepressant effects in tail suspension test (decrease of the total duration of immobility, as well as significant increase in the number of hippocampal NPY-interneurons in CA1 region. Chronic nandrolone decanoate treatment attenuated the beneficial antidepressant effects of exercise as measured by the tail suspension test parameters. Simultaneously, nandrolone decanoate treatment resulted in diminution of NPY content both in blood (decreased serum levels and in hippocampus (the significant decrease in NPY expression in all three investigated hippocampal regions-CA1, CA2/3 and DG. Our findings indicate that alterations in serum and hippocampal NPY contents may underlie the changes in depressive state in rats. The exercise was beneficial as it exerted antidepressant effect, while chronic nandrolone decanoate treatment resulted in depressive-like behavior. Furthermore, the behavioral indicators of depression showed strong correlations with the serum levels and the hippocampal content of NPY.

  19. Using Gelatin Nanoparticle Mediated Intranasal Delivery of Neuropeptide Substance P to Enhance Neuro-Recovery in Hemiparkinsonian Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Zheng Zhao

    Full Text Available Intranasal administration of phospholipid-based gelatin nanoparticles (GNP was prepared to investigate the neuro-recovery effects of neuropeptide Substance P (SP on hemiparkinsonian rats.The SP-loaded gelatin nanoparticles (SP-GNP were prepared by a water-in-water emulsion method and possessed high stability, encapsulating efficiency and loading capacity. PC-12 cells were used to examine the growth enhancement of SP-GNP in vitro by MTT assays and flow cytometry (FCM. The therapeutic effects of SP-GNP on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA induced hemiparkinsonian rats were assessed by quantifying rotational behavior and the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, phosphorylated c-Jun protein (p-c-Jun and Caspase-3 (Cas-3 expressed in substantia nigra (SN region of hemiparkinsonian rats.PC-12 cells under SP-GNP treatment showed better cell viability and lower degree of apoptosis than those under SP solution treatment. Hemiparkinsonian rats under intranasal SP-GNP administration demonstrated better behavioral improvement, higher level of TH in SN along with much lower extent of p-c-Jun and Cas-3 than those under intranasal SP solution administration and intravenous SP-GNP administration.With the advantages of GNP and nose-to-brain pathway, SP can be effectively delivered into the damaged SN region and exhibit its neuro-recovery function through the inhibition on JNK pathway and dopaminergic neuron apoptosis.

  20. The levels of serum leptin and plasma neuropeptide Y in patients with various kinds of kidney diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Hongying; Liang Kun; Luo Nanping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum levels of leptin (LEP) and plasma levels of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in patients with various kinds of kidney disease. Methods: The serum concentrations of LEP and plasma concentrations of NPY were measured with radioimmunoassay in 176 patients with different kinds of kidney disease and 35 controls. Results: The serum level of LEP were significantly higher in patients with diabetic nephropathy, chronic renal insufficiency, patients on dialysis both before and after the procedure than those in controls (P<0.05, P<0.01, P<0.01 vs control). The level of plasma NPY were significantly higher in patients with chronic renal insufficiency, and patients on dialysis before and after the procedure than those in controls (P<0.01, P<0.01 vs control). The concentration of LEP and NPY dropped significantly after the procedure in patients on hemodialysis (P<0.05, P<0.05). The serum level of LEP were positively correlated with the level of plasma NPY in patients with chronic renal insufficiency and patients on hemodialysis (r=0.68, t=3.62, P<0.01, r=0.58, t=4.02, P<0.01). Conclusion: The level of LEP and NPY were significantly increased in patients with chronic renal disease and chronic renal failure. Hemodialysis could increase the clearance rate of LEP and NPY and improve the clinical nutritional status of the patients. (authors)

  1. An AAV promoter-driven neuropeptide Y gene delivery system using Sendai virosomes for neurons and rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P; de Fiebre, C M; Millard, W J; King, M A; Wang, S; Bryant, S O; Gao, Y P; Martin, E J; Meyer, E M

    1996-03-01

    An adeno-associated virus (AAV)-derived construct (pJDT95npy) containing rat neuropeptide Y (NPY) cDNA inserted downstream of endogenous AAV promoters was used to investigate AAV-driven NPY expression in postmitotic neurons in vitro and in the brain. NPY mRNA was expressed in NT2/N and rat brain primary neuronal cultures after transfection. There was a corresponding increase in the number of neurons staining for NPY-like immunoreactivity and an increase in NPY release during depolarization in the primary cultures. Injections of Sendai-virosome encapsulated pJDT95npy into neocortex increased NPY-like immunoreactivity in neurons but not glia indicating that the latter cell type did not have the translational, post-translational or storage capacity to accumulate the peptide. Injections into the rat hypothalamic para-ventricular nucleus increased body weight and food intake for 21 days, though NPY-like immunoreactivity remained elevated for at least 50 days. These studies demonstrate that AAV-derived constructs may be useful for delivering genes into post-mitotic neurons, and that Sendai virosomes are effective for delivering these constructs in vivo.

  2. Sendai virosomal infusion of an adeno-associated virus-derived construct containing neuropeptide Y into primary rat brain cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P; de Fiebre, C M; Millard, W J; Elmstrom, K; Gao, Y; Meyer, E M

    1995-05-05

    A novel neuronal gene-delivery system was investigated in primary neuron-enriched cultures with respect to driving the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY). This delivery system consists of an adeno-associated virus-derived (AAV) plasmid, pJDT95npy, encapsulated in reconstituted Sendai virosomes. pJDT95npy contains full length rat NPY cDNA inserted downstream from the P40 promoter in a cap-gene deleted AAV-derived construct. The rep-sequences under control of the P5 and P19 promoters are intact. Virosomally encapsulated pJDT95npy drove the expression of NPY mRNAs, predominantly by P40. Total cellular NPY immunoreactivity and release in the presence of depolarization increased following pJDT95npy-transfection. Neither empty virosomes nor virosomes containing pJDT95 affected NPY mRNA expression or immunoreactivity. This study demonstrates that an AAV-derived plasmid can drive exogenous gene expression in intact neurons after infusion by Sendai virosomes.

  3. Regulation of feeding behavior and plasma testosterone in response to central neuropeptide Y administration in a songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Scott; Deviche, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    In mammalian and avian model species, neuropeptide Y (NPY) simultaneously promotes feeding behavior and suppresses the secretion of reproductive hormones, thereby modulating the resource allocation trade-off between investing in essential somatic processes or in the reproductive system. Investigations into this dual role of NPY in birds have focused on domesticated species and, to our knowledge, no study has examined this role in songbirds. We determined whether NPY treatment acutely regulates feeding behavior and activity of the reproductive system in a male songbird, the Abert's Towhee, Melozone aberti. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of NPY promoted behaviors associated with feeding (decreased latency to initiate pecking in the food bowl, increased number of feeding bouts following treatment, and increased number of pecks into the food bowl during each feeding bout), and it stimulated hopping and drinking behavior. By contrast, we found no effect of NPY treatment on plasma testosterone secretion 60 min after treatment. These results suggest that in male Abert's Towhees NPY stimulates feeding behavior, but provide no evidence that this peptide concurrently influences testosterone secretion. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The effect of hemodialysis on the levels of plasma leptin and serum neuropeptide Y in uremia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; Liu Yan; Zhuang Wenqing

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the changes of plasma leptin and serum neuropeptide Y (NPY) levels in uremia patients after hemodialysis and to discuss the efficient method on improving uremia malnutrition. 69 uremia patients were divided into 3 groups: Group A with 32 patients using low- flux cellulosic dialyzer, Group B with 21 patients using low-flux polysulfone dialyzer(F6), and Group C with 16 patients using high-flux polysulfone dialyzer(F60) and blood dialyzer. 18 healthy volunteers were chosen as the control group. The plasma leptin and serum NPY levels were detected by RIA in uremia patients before and after dialysis and in control group. Compared with control, all uremia patients had obviously higher leptin and NPY levels before dialysis (P<0.01); Leptin and NPY levels in group A and B did not change after dialysis. The leptin levels were significantly decreased in group C after dialysis (P<0.05), but NPY levels did not change. There was no correlation between higher levels of leptin and NPY in uremia patients. They could not be cleared by hemodialysis alone. Hemo-filtration with high flux polysulfone dialyzer could increase the clearance efficiency of leptin and improve nutritional conditions for uremia patients. (authors)

  5. Recent advances in the understanding of how neuropeptide Y andα-melanocyte stimulating hormone function in adipose physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, Steven L; Cline, Mark A; Gilbert, Elizabeth R

    2016-01-01

    Communication between the brain and the adipose tissue has been the focus of many studies in recent years, with the "brain-fat axis" identified as a system that orchestrates the assimilation and usage of energy to maintain body mass and adequate fat stores. It is now well-known that appetite-regulating peptides that were studied as neurotransmitters in the central nervous system can act both on the hypothalamus to regulate feeding behavior and also on the adipose tissue to modulate the storage of energy. Energy balance is thus partly controlled by factors that can alter both energy intake and storage/expenditure. Two such factors involved in these processes are neuropeptide Y (NPY) and α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH). NPY, an orexigenic factor, is associated with promoting adipogenesis in both mammals and chickens, while α-MSH, an anorexigenic factor, stimulates lipolysis in rodents. There is also evidence of interaction between the 2 peptides. This review aims to summarize recent advances in the study of NPY and α-MSH regarding their role in adipose tissue physiology, with an emphasis on the cellular and molecular mechanisms. A greater understanding of the brain-fat axis and regulation of adiposity by bioactive peptides may provide insights on strategies to prevent or treat obesity and also enhance nutrient utilization efficiency in agriculturally-important species.

  6. Feeding induced by increasing doses of neuropeptide Y: dual effect on hypothalamic serotonin release in normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Rosana C T; Telles, Monica M; Guimarães, Regina B; Novo, Neil F; Juliano, Yara; Nascimento, Cláudia M O; Ribeiro, Eliane B

    2004-08-01

    Endogenous neuropeptide Y (NPY) levels increase during fasting and before dark onset in rats. The feeding that follows these states elicits the release of serotonin in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), as part of the physiological mechanisms controlling satiety. With the hypothesis that exogenous NPY-induced feeding should also stimulate serotonin, we measured its release in the LH of non-fasted rats, which received a single intracerebroventricular injection of either 1.0, 2.0, or 5.0 microg of NPY. After 1.0 microg, the cumulative 2-h intake was of 13 g and serotonin release significantly increased (54% peak). These feeding and serotonergic responses were highly similar to the ones we observed in a previous study, in which feeding followed an overnight fast. Thus, the 1.0 microg NPY dose stimulated intake while preserving the normal serotonergic activation. Contrarily, as the NPY dose was increased to either 2.0 or 5.0 microg, the cumulative 2-h intakes were of 18 g, but the serotonergic stimulation was absent. It is suggested that this dual NPY effect relies on a finely tuned control mechanism, reflecting the existence of a narrow range of NPY levels within which the serotonergic stimulation resembles those seen in physiological states.

  7. Association of neuropeptide Y promoter polymorphism (rs16147) with perceived stress and cardiac vagal outflow in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-An; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chang, Tieh-Ching; Huang, San-Yuan; Chang, Chuan-Chia

    2016-08-16

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is involved in resilience to stress, and higher vagal (parasympathetic) activity has been associated with greater stress resilience. Thus, we examined whether rs16147, a functional promoter polymorphism (C>T) of the NPY gene, could influence vagal tone during chronic high stress levels. NPY genotyping, chronic psychological stress level measurement (using the Perceived Stress Scale [PSS]), cardiac autonomic function assessment (using short-term heart rate variability [HRV]) were performed in 1123 healthy, drug-free Han Chinese participants who were divided into low- and high-PSS groups. In the high-PSS group (n = 522), the root mean square of successive heartbeat interval differences and high frequency power (both HRV indices of parasympathetic activity) were significantly increased in T/T homozygotes compared to C/C homozygotes. However, no significant between-genotype difference was found in any HRV variable in the low-PSS group (n = 601). Our results are the first to demonstrate that functional NPY variation alters chronic stress-related vagal control, suggesting a potential parasympathetic role for NPY gene in stress regulation.

  8. Neuropeptide Y deficiency attenuates responses to fasting and high-fat diet in obesity-prone mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hiralben R; Qi, Yong; Hawkins, Evan J; Hileman, Stanley M; Elmquist, Joel K; Imai, Yumi; Ahima, Rexford S

    2006-11-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) stimulates feeding and weight gain, but deletion of the NPY gene does not affect food intake and body weight in mice bred on a mixed genetic background. We reasoned that the orexigenic action of NPY would be evident in C57Bl/6J mice susceptible to obesity. NPY deficiency has no significant effect in mice fed a normal rodent diet. However, energy expenditure is elevated during fasting, and hyperphagia and weight gain are blunted during refeeding. Expression of agouti-related peptide (AGRP) in the hypothalamus is increased in NPY knockout (NPYko) than wild-type mice, but unlike wild type there is no further increase in AGRP when NPYko mice are fasted. Moreover, NPYko mice have higher oxygen consumption and uncoupling protein-1 expression in brown adipose tissue during fasting. The failure of an increase in orexigenic peptides and higher thermogenesis may contribute to attenuation of weight gain when NPYko mice are refed. C57Bl/6J mice lacking NPY are also less susceptible to diet-induced obesity (DIO) as a result of reduced feeding and increased energy expenditure. The resistance to DIO in NPYko mice is associated with a reduction in nocturnal feeding and increased expression of anorexigenic hypothalamic peptides. Insulin, leptin, and triglyceride levels increase with adiposity in both wild-type and NPYko mice.

  9. Neuropeptide S Increases locomotion activity through corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 in substantia nigra of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M S; Peng, Y L; Jiang, J H; Xue, H X; Wang, P; Zhang, P J; Han, R W; Chang, M; Wang, R

    2015-09-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS), the endogenous ligand of NPS receptor (NPSR), was reported to be involved in the regulation of arousal, anxiety, locomotion, learning and memory. The basal ganglia play a crucial role in regulating of locomotion-related behavior. Here, we found that NPSR protein of mouse was distributed in the substantia nigra (SN) and globus pallidus (LGP) by immunohistochemical analysis. However, less is known about the direct locomotion-related effects of NPS in both SN and LGP. Therefore, we investigated the role of NPS in locomotion processes, using the open field test. The results showed that NPS infused into the SN (0.03, 0.1, 1nmol) or LGP (0.01, 0.03, 0.1nmol) dose-dependently increased the locomotor activity in mice. SHA 68 (50mg/kg), an antagonist of NPSR, blocked the locomotor stimulant effect of NPS in both nuleus. Meanwhile, these effects of NPS were also counteracted by the CRF1 receptor antagonist antalarmin (30mg/kg, i.p.). In addition, we found that the expression of c-Fos was significantly increased after NPS was delivered into SN. In conclusion, these results indicate that NPS-NPSR system may regulate locomotion together with the CRF1 system in SN. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The VGF-Derived Neuropeptide TLQP-21 Shows No Impact on Hormone Secretion in the Isolated Perfused Rat Pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte Bayer; Svendsen, B; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    TLQP-21 is a VGF-derived neuropeptide proposed to be involved in regulation of metabolism. More specifically it has been suggested that TLQP-21 has the ability to enhance glucose stimulated insulin secretion, making it a candidate for treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes.In this study, we...... investigated the impact of TLQP-21 on insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin secretion in the perfused rat pancreas. We found that administration of 5 and 50 nM TLQP-21 had no impact on pancreatic hormone secretion at 3.5 or 8 mM glucose levels. Increasing TLQP-21 (200 nM) and glucose concentration (3.5 and 16 m......M) led to a nonsignificant decrease in glucagon secretion, though insulin and somatostatin secretory patterns remained unaffected. In a final set of experiments, perfusions were performed with infusion of 50 and 1 000 nM TLQP-21 to ensure sufficient stimulation. However, administration of TLQP-21 under...

  11. Neuropeptide S facilitates mice olfactory function through activation of cognate receptor-expressing neurons in the olfactory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Shao

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide S (NPS is a newly identified neuromodulator located in the brainstem and regulates various biological functions by selectively activating the NPS receptors (NPSR. High level expression of NPSR mRNA in the olfactory cortex suggests that NPS-NPSR system might be involved in the regulation of olfactory function. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. injection of NPS or co-injection of NPSR antagonist on the olfactory behaviors, food intake, and c-Fos expression in olfactory cortex in mice. In addition, dual-immunofluorescence was employed to identify NPS-induced Fos immunereactive (-ir neurons that also bear NPSR. NPS (0.1-1 nmol i.c.v. injection significantly reduced the latency to find the buried food, and increased olfactory differentiation of different odors and the total sniffing time spent in olfactory habituation/dishabituation tasks. NPS facilitated olfactory ability most at the dose of 0.5 nmol, which could be blocked by co-injection of 40 nmol NPSR antagonist [D-Val(5]NPS. NPS administration dose-dependently inhibited food intake in fasted mice. Ex-vivo c-Fos and NPSR immunohistochemistry in the olfactory cortex revealed that, as compared with vehicle-treated mice, NPS markedly enhanced c-Fos expression in the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON, piriform cortex (Pir, ventral tenia tecta (VTT, the anterior cortical amygdaloid nucleus (ACo and lateral entorhinal cortex (LEnt. The percentage of Fos-ir neurons that also express NPSR were 88.5% and 98.1% in the AON and Pir, respectively. The present findings demonstrated that NPS, via selective activation of the neurons bearing NPSR in the olfactory cortex, facilitates olfactory function in mice.

  12. Reconstructing SALMFamide Neuropeptide Precursor Evolution in the Phylum Echinodermata: Ophiuroid and Crinoid Sequence Data Provide New Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphick, Maurice R.; Semmens, Dean C.; Blowes, Liisa M.; Levine, Judith; Lowe, Christopher J.; Arnone, Maria I.; Clark, Melody S.

    2015-01-01

    The SALMFamides are a family of neuropeptides that act as muscle relaxants in echinoderms. Analysis of genome/transcriptome sequence data from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinoidea), the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Holothuroidea), and the starfish Patiria miniata (Asteroidea) reveals that in each species there are two types of SALMFamide precursor: an L-type precursor comprising peptides with a C-terminal LxFamide-type motif and an F-type precursor solely or largely comprising peptides with a C-terminal FxFamide-type motif. Here, we have identified transcripts encoding SALMFamide precursors in the brittle star Ophionotus victoriae (Ophiuroidea) and the feather star Antedon mediterranea (Crinoidea). We have also identified SALMFamide precursors in other species belonging to each of the five echinoderm classes. As in S. purpuratus, A. japonicus, and P. miniata, in O. victoriae there is one L-type precursor and one F-type precursor. However, in A. mediterranea only a single SALMFamide precursor was found, comprising two peptides with a LxFamide-type motif, one with a FxFamide-type motif, five with a FxLamide-type motif, and four with a LxLamide-type motif. As crinoids are basal to the Echinozoa (Holothuroidea + Echinoidea) and Asterozoa (Asteroidea + Ophiuroidea) in echinoderm phylogeny, one model of SALMFamide precursor evolution would be that ancestrally there was a single SALMFamide gene encoding a variety of SALMFamides (as in crinoids), which duplicated in a common ancestor of the Echinozoa and Asterozoa and then specialized to encode L-type SALMFamides or F-type SALMFamides. Alternatively, a second SALMFamide precursor may remain to be discovered or may have been lost in crinoids. Further insights will be obtained if SALMFamide receptors are identified, which would provide a molecular basis for experimental analysis of the functional significance of the “cocktails” of SALMFamides that exist in echinoderms. PMID:25699014

  13. Reconstructing SALMFamide neuropeptide precursor evolution in the phylum Echinodermata: ophiuroid and crinoid sequence data provide new insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice R Elphick

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The SALMFamides are a family of neuropeptides that act as muscle relaxants in echinoderms. Analysis of genome/transcriptome sequence data from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinoidea, the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Holothuroidea and the starfish Patiria miniata (Asteroidea reveals that in each species there are two types of SALMFamide precursor: an L-type precursor comprising peptides with a C-terminal LxFamide-type motif and an F-type precursor solely or largely comprising peptides with a C-terminal FxFamide-type motif. Here we have identified transcripts encoding SALMFamide precursors in the brittle star Ophionotus victoriae (Ophiuroidea and the feather star Antedon mediterranea (Crinoidea. We have also identified SALMFamide precursors in other species belonging to each of the five echinoderm classes. As in S. purpuratus, A. japonicus and P. miniata, in O. victoriae there is one L-type precursor and one F-type precursor. However, in A. mediterranea only a single SALMFamide precursor was found, comprising two peptides with a LxFamide-type motif, one with a FxFamide-type motif, five with a FxLamide-type motif and four with a LxLamide-type motif. As crinoids are basal to the Echinozoa (Holothuroidea + Echinoidea and Asterozoa (Asteroidea + Ophiuroidea in echinoderm phylogeny, one model of SALMFamide precursor evolution would be that ancestrally there was a single SALMFamide gene encoding a variety of SALMFamides (as in crinoids, which duplicated in a common ancestor of the Echinozoa and Asterozoa and then specialised to encode L-type SALMFamides or F-type SALMFamides. Alternatively, a second SALMFamide precursor may remain to be discovered or may have been lost in crinoids. Further insights will be obtained if SALMFamide receptors are identified, which would provide a molecular basis for experimental analysis of the functional significance of the cocktails of SALMFamides that exist in echinoderms.

  14. Adipocytokines, neuropeptide Y and insulin resistance in overweight women with gynoid and android type of adipose tissue distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbetzova, Maria M; Koleva, Daniela I; Mitkov, Mitko D; Atanassova, Iliana B; Nikolova, Julia G; Atanassova, Pepa K; Genchev, Gencho D

    2012-01-01

    The AIM of the study was to compare the levels of certain adipose tissue hormones in women with the two main morphological types of obesity - android and gynoid obesity. The study included 2 groups of age- and weight-matched women with android (n = 32) and gynoid (n = 27) type of obesity, and a group of age-matched healthy women (n = 24) with normal weight and body constitution. Leptin, resistin, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), neuropeptide Y (NPY), glucose and insulin were measured. HOMA index was calculated. Leptin levels in the women with gynoid obesity did not differ significantly from those in the controls and the women with android obesity. The controls had significantly lower leptin levels compared with the android obesity women. NPY was significantly higher in the control women compared to the women with android obesity and did not differ significantly between the two groups of obese women. TNFalpha levels in all groups were very similar. Resistin did not show significant differences between all groups but tended to have the lowest levels in the controls. In the women with android obesity, insulin was significantly higher than that in the women with gynoid obesity and the controls. Insulin resistance was found in the women with android obesity only. Basal insulin and HOMA index in the women with gynoid obesity did not differ significantly from the values in the control group. The results from this study contribute to understanding the association of adipose tissue hormones and insulin resistance in obesity. When adipose tissue is predominantly distributed in the abdominal area at similar amount and percentage of body fats, leptin production is higher and insulin resistance develops. In the gynoid type of adipose tissue predisposition, overt insulin resistance is not found, leptin levels does not differ significantly from those in the control group.

  15. Neuropeptide Y knockout mice reveal a central role of NPY in the coordination of bone mass to body weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Baldock

    Full Text Available Changes in whole body energy levels are closely linked to alterations in body weight and bone mass. Here, we show that hypothalamic signals contribute to the regulation of bone mass in a manner consistent with the central perception of energy status. Mice lacking neuropeptide Y (NPY, a well-known orexigenic factor whose hypothalamic expression is increased in fasting, have significantly increased bone mass in association with enhanced osteoblast activity and elevated expression of bone osteogenic transcription factors, Runx2 and Osterix. In contrast, wild type and NPY knockout (NPY (-/- mice in which NPY is specifically over expressed in the hypothalamus (AAV-NPY+ show a significant reduction in bone mass despite developing an obese phenotype. The AAV-NPY+ induced loss of bone mass is consistent with models known to mimic the central effects of fasting, which also show increased hypothalamic NPY levels. Thus these data indicate that, in addition to well characterized responses to body mass, skeletal tissue also responds to the perception of nutritional status by the hypothalamus independently of body weight. In addition, the reduction in bone mass by AAV NPY+ administration does not completely correct the high bone mass phenotype of NPY (-/- mice, indicating the possibility that peripheral NPY may also be an important regulator of bone mass. Indeed, we demonstrate the expression of NPY specifically in osteoblasts. In conclusion, these data identifies NPY as a critical integrator of bone homeostatic signals; increasing bone mass during times of obesity when hypothalamic NPY expression levels are low and reducing bone formation to conserve energy under 'starving' conditions, when hypothalamic NPY expression levels are high.

  16. Neuropeptide Y signal peptide Pro7 substitution protects against coronary artery atherosclerosis: the Helsinki Sudden Death Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilveskoski, Erkki; Viiri, Leena E; Mikkelsson, Jussi; Pörsti, Ilkka; Lehtimäki, Terho; Karhunen, Pekka J

    2008-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has a single nucleotide polymorphism at T1128C, leading to change of Leucine7 to Proline7. The Leu7Pro substitution has been linked to cardiovascular disease, but it is unknown whether the Pro7 allele is associated with increased or decreased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of the Leu7Pro polymorphism with coronary atherosclerosis and its consequences. We studied two autopsy series comprising 700 unselected middle-aged Caucasian men (Helsinki Sudden Death Study) who had died suddenly out of hospital. Areas of coronary artery atherosclerosis, narrowings of coronary arteries, and presence of myocardial infarction and/or coronary thrombosis were analyzed. All information including CHD risk factor data was obtained from 410 men. NPY genotype distribution was Leu7/Leu7=89.8%, Leu7/Pro7=10.0% and Pro7/Pro7=0.2%). Although the Pro7 allele was associated with reported hypertension (p=0.03), the men carrying Pro7 allele had lower area of fatty streaks (p=0.04), fibrotic lesions (p=0.07) and complicated lesions (p=0.004) in the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery and also less severe LAD narrowings (p=0.04) than men with the Leu7/Leu7 genotype. Supporting a protective role for the Pro7 allele against atherosclerosis, only 1 out of 46 men (2%) with coronary thrombosis carried the Pro7 allele (p=0.08 compared to men dying of other causes). This association weakened (OR 0.18 for Pro7 versus Leu7/Leu7, p=0.16) when adjusted for all available CHD risk factors. NPY Pro7 substitution protects middle-aged men from coronary artery atherosclerosis and might decrease the risk of acute coronary events.

  17. The circadian neuropeptide PDF signals preferentially through a specific adenylate cyclase isoform AC3 in M pacemakers of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Duvall

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide Pigment Dispersing Factor (PDF is essential for normal circadian function in Drosophila. It synchronizes the phases of M pacemakers, while in E pacemakers it decelerates their cycling and supports their amplitude. The PDF receptor (PDF-R is present in both M and subsets of E cells. Activation of PDF-R stimulates cAMP increases in vitro and in M cells in vivo. The present study asks: What is the identity of downstream signaling components that are associated with PDF receptor in specific circadian pacemaker neurons? Using live imaging of intact fly brains and transgenic RNAi, we show that adenylate cyclase AC3 underlies PDF signaling in M cells. Genetic disruptions of AC3 specifically disrupt PDF responses: they do not affect other Gs-coupled GPCR signaling in M cells, they can be rescued, and they do not represent developmental alterations. Knockdown of the Drosophila AKAP-like scaffolding protein Nervy also reduces PDF responses. Flies with AC3 alterations show behavioral syndromes consistent with known roles of M pacemakers as mediated by PDF. Surprisingly, disruption of AC3 does not alter PDF responses in E cells--the PDF-R(+ LNd. Within M pacemakers, PDF-R couples preferentially to a single AC, but PDF-R association with a different AC(s is needed to explain PDF signaling in the E pacemakers. Thus critical pathways of circadian synchronization are mediated by highly specific second messenger components. These findings support a hypothesis that PDF signaling components within target cells are sequestered into "circadian signalosomes," whose compositions differ between E and M pacemaker cell types.

  18. Neuropeptide S reduces fear and avoidance of con-specifics induced by social fear conditioning and social defeat, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoicas, Iulia; Menon, Rohit; Neumann, Inga D

    2016-09-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) has anxiolytic effects and facilitates extinction of cued fear in rodents. Here, we investigated whether NPS reverses social fear and social avoidance induced by social fear conditioning (SFC) and acute social defeat (SD), respectively, in male CD1 mice. Our results revealed that intracerebroventricular NPS (icv; 10 and 50 nmol/2 μl) reversed fear of unknown con-specifics induced by SFC and dose-dependently reduced avoidance of known aggressive con-specifics induced by SD. While 50 nmol of NPS completely reversed social avoidance and reinstated social preference, 10 nmol of NPS reduced social avoidance, but did not completely reinstate social preference in socially-defeated mice. Further, a lower dose (1 nmol/2 μl) of NPS facilitated the within-session extinction of cued fear, while a higher dose (10 nmol/2 μl) reduced the expression of cued fear. We could also confirm the anxiolytic effects of NPS (1, 10 and 50 nmol/2 μl) on the elevated plus-maze (EPM), which were not accompanied by alterations in locomotor activity either on the EPM or in the home cage. Finally, we could show that icv infusion of the NPS receptor 1 antagonist D-Cys((t)Bu)(5)-NPS (10 nmol/2 μl) did not alter SFC-induced social fear, general anxiety and locomotor activity. Taken together, our study extends the potent anxiolytic profile of NPS to a social context by demonstrating the reduction of social fear and social avoidance, thus providing the framework for studies investigating the involvement of the NPS system in the regulation of different types of social behaviour. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Alterations in the neuropeptide galanin system in major depressive disorder involve levels of transcripts, methylation, and peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barde, Swapnali; Rüegg, Joelle; Prud’homme, Josée; Ekström, Tomas J.; Palkovits, Miklos; Turecki, Gustavo; Bagdy, Gyorgy; Ihnatko, Robert; Theodorsson, Elvar; Juhasz, Gabriella; Diaz-Heijtz, Rochellys; Mechawar, Naguib; Hökfelt, Tomas G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a substantial burden to patients, families, and society, but many patients cannot be treated adequately. Rodent experiments suggest that the neuropeptide galanin (GAL) and its three G protein-coupled receptors, GAL1–3, are involved in mood regulation. To explore the translational potential of these results, we assessed the transcript levels (by quantitative PCR), DNA methylation status (by bisulfite pyrosequencing), and GAL peptide by RIA of the GAL system in postmortem brains from depressed persons who had committed suicide and controls. Transcripts for all four members were detected and showed marked regional variations, GAL and galanin receptor 1 (GALR1) being most abundant. Striking increases in GAL and GALR3 mRNA levels, especially in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus and the dorsal raphe nucleus, in parallel with decreased DNA methylation, were found in both male and female suicide subjects as compared with controls. In contrast, GAL and GALR3 transcript levels were decreased, GALR1 was increased, and DNA methylation was increased in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of male suicide subjects, however, there were no changes in the anterior cingulate cortex. Thus, GAL and its receptor GALR3 are differentially methylated and expressed in brains of MDD subjects in a region- and sex-specific manner. Such an epigenetic modification in GALR3, a hyperpolarizing receptor, might contribute to the dysregulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons implicated in the pathogenesis of MDD. Thus, one may speculate that a GAL3 antagonist could have antidepressant properties by disinhibiting the firing of these neurons, resulting in increased release of noradrenaline and serotonin in forebrain areas involved in mood regulation. PMID:27940914

  20. Neuropeptide Y2 receptor (NPY2R expression in saliva predicts feeding immaturity in the premature neonate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill L Maron

    Full Text Available The current practice in newborn medicine is to subjectively assess when a premature infant is ready to feed by mouth. When the assessment is inaccurate, the resulting feeding morbidities may be significant, resulting in long-term health consequences and millions of health care dollars annually. We hypothesized that the developmental maturation of hypothalamic regulation of feeding behavior is a predictor of successful oral feeding in the premature infant. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the gene expression of neuropeptide Y2 receptor (NPY2R, a known hypothalamic regulator of feeding behavior, in neonatal saliva to determine its role as a biomarker in predicting oral feeding success in the neonate.Salivary samples (n = 116, were prospectively collected from 63 preterm and 13 term neonates (post-conceptual age (PCA 26 4/7 to 41 4/7 weeks from five predefined feeding stages. Expression of NPY2R in neonatal saliva was determined by multiplex RT-qPCR amplification. Expression results were retrospectively correlated with feeding status at time of sample collection. Statistical analysis revealed that expression of NPY2R had a 95% positive predictive value for feeding immaturity. NPY2R expression statistically significantly decreased with advancing PCA (Wilcoxon test p value<0.01, and was associated with feeding status (chi square p value  =  0.013.Developmental maturation of hypothalamic regulation of feeding behavior is an essential component of oral feeding success in the newborn. NPY2R expression in neonatal saliva is predictive of an immature feeding pattern. It is a clinically relevant biomarker that may be monitored in saliva to improve clinical care and reduce significant feeding-associated morbidities that affect the premature neonate.

  1. Opposite effects of neuropeptide FF on central antinociception induced by endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-long; Fang, Quan; Han, Zheng-lan; Pan, Jia-xin; Li, Xu-hui; Li, Ning; Tang, Hong-hai; Wang, Pei; Zheng, Ting; Chang, Xue-mei; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) is known to be an endogenous opioid-modulating peptide. Nevertheless, very few researches focused on the interaction between NPFF and endogenous opioid peptides. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of NPFF system on the supraspinal antinociceptive effects induced by the endogenous µ-opioid receptor agonists, endomorphin-1 (EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (EM-2). In the mouse tail-flick assay, intracerebroventricular injection of EM-1 induced antinociception via µ-opioid receptor while the antinociception of intracerebroventricular injected EM-2 was mediated by both µ- and κ-opioid receptors. In addition, central administration of NPFF significantly reduced EM-1-induced central antinociception, but enhanced EM-2-induced central antinociception. The results using the selective NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptor agonists indicated that the EM-1-modulating action of NPFF was mainly mediated by NPFF2 receptor, while NPFF potentiated EM-2-induecd antinociception via both NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptors. To further investigate the roles of µ- and κ-opioid systems in the opposite effects of NPFF on central antinociception of endomprphins, the µ- and κ-opioid receptors selective agonists DAMGO and U69593, respectively, were used. Our results showed that NPFF could reduce the central antinociception of DAMGO via NPFF2 receptor and enhance the central antinociception of U69593 via both NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptors. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NPFF exerts opposite effects on central antinociception of endomorphins and provide the first evidence that NPFF potentiate antinociception of EM-2, which might result from the interaction between NPFF and κ-opioid systems.

  2. Opposite effects of neuropeptide FF on central antinociception induced by endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-long Wang

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide FF (NPFF is known to be an endogenous opioid-modulating peptide. Nevertheless, very few researches focused on the interaction between NPFF and endogenous opioid peptides. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of NPFF system on the supraspinal antinociceptive effects induced by the endogenous µ-opioid receptor agonists, endomorphin-1 (EM-1 and endomorphin-2 (EM-2. In the mouse tail-flick assay, intracerebroventricular injection of EM-1 induced antinociception via µ-opioid receptor while the antinociception of intracerebroventricular injected EM-2 was mediated by both µ- and κ-opioid receptors. In addition, central administration of NPFF significantly reduced EM-1-induced central antinociception, but enhanced EM-2-induced central antinociception. The results using the selective NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptor agonists indicated that the EM-1-modulating action of NPFF was mainly mediated by NPFF2 receptor, while NPFF potentiated EM-2-induecd antinociception via both NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptors. To further investigate the roles of µ- and κ-opioid systems in the opposite effects of NPFF on central antinociception of endomprphins, the µ- and κ-opioid receptors selective agonists DAMGO and U69593, respectively, were used. Our results showed that NPFF could reduce the central antinociception of DAMGO via NPFF2 receptor and enhance the central antinociception of U69593 via both NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptors. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NPFF exerts opposite effects on central antinociception of endomorphins and provide the first evidence that NPFF potentiate antinociception of EM-2, which might result from the interaction between NPFF and κ-opioid systems.

  3. Neuropeptide FF attenuates RANKL-induced differentiation of macrophage-like cells into osteoclast-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yulong; Chen, Xiaohu; Chen, Zhihao; Ma, Xiaoli; Li, Dijie; Shang, Peng; Qian, Airong

    2015-02-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) has been implicated in many physiological processes but not osteoclastogenesis. We previously demonstrated that NPFF modulates the viability and nitric oxide (NO) production of RAW264.7 macrophages. This study was designed to investigate the effect of NPFF on receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated differentiation of RAW264.7 cells into osteoclast-like cells. RAW264.7 cells were cultured in 96-stripwell plates or in Corning Osteo Assay Surface 96-well plates in the presence of various concentrations of NPFF with or without RANKL for 3 or 6 d. The differentiation of osteoclast-like cells was analyzed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) stain, TRAP activity and bone resorption capacity, respectively. The mRNA expression of NPFF2 receptor (NPFFR2) and osteoclast genes was evaluated by using real-time quantitative PCR which includes TRAP, RANK (receptor activator of NF-κB), Cathepsin K, MMP-9 (matrix metallopeptidase 9), Intβ3 (integrin β3) and NFATc1 (nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1). In addition, the influence of NPFF on the cell viability and NO release of RAW264.7 cells was measured by MTT assay and Griess method, respectively. NPFF dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast-like cells differentiation including TRAP-positive cell formation, TRAP activity and bone resorption capacity. Moreover, NO release and osteoclast gene expression of osteoclast-like cells were downregulated by NPFF. In addition, NPFFR2 gene expression in osteoclast-like cells was augmented in response to NPFF treatment. Our findings showed that NPFF could attenuate osteoclast-like cells differentiation in an in vitro osteoclastogenesis model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuropeptide FF activates ERK and NF kappa B signal pathways in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-long; Zhang, Xiao-yuan; He, Ning; Sun, Tao; Zhuang, Yan; Fang, Quan; Wang, Kai-rong; Wang, Rui

    2012-11-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) has been reported to play important roles in regulating diverse biological processes. However, little attention has been focused on the downstream signal transduction pathway of NPFF. Here, we used the differentiated neuroblastoma cell line, dSH-SY5Y, which endogenously expresses hNPFF2 receptor, to investigate the signal transduction downstream of NPFF. In particular we investigated the regulation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways by NPFF in these cells. NPFF rapidly and transiently stimulated ERK. H89, a selective inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), inhibited the NPFF-activated ERK pathway, indicating the involvement of PKA in the NPFF-induced ERK activation. Down-regulation of nitric oxide synthases also attenuated NPFF-induced ERK activation, suggesting that a nitric oxide synthase-dependent pathway is involved. Moreover, the core upstream components of the NF-κB pathway were also significantly activated in response to NPFF, suggesting that the NF-κB pathway is involved in the signal transduction pathway of NPFF. Collectively, these data demonstrate that nitric oxide synthases are involved in the signal transduction pathway of NPFF, and provide the first evidence for the interaction between NPFF and the NF-κB pathway. These advances in our interpretation of the NPFF pathway mechanism will aid the comprehensive understanding of its function and provide novel molecular insight for further study of the NPFF system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuropeptide FF attenuates the acquisition and the expression of conditioned place aversion to endomorphin-2 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zheng-lan; Wang, Zi-long; Tang, Hong-zhu; Li, Ning; Fang, Quan; Li, Xu-hui; Yang, Xiong-li; Zhang, Xiao-yu; Wang, Rui

    2013-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that the endogenous mu opioid (MOP) agonist endomorphin-2 (EM-2) produces conditioned place aversion (CPA) and in contrast, morphine exerts opposite action. Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) was reported to act as a functional antagonist of mu opioid receptor and to exert opioid-modulating activities. The present study examined the influence of NPFF on the rewarding action of EM-2, using the unbiased conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. For testing the effect of NPFF on the acquisition of EM-2-induced CPA, NPFF and EM-2 were co-injected on the conditioning days without drug treatment on the followed test day. To explore the effect of NPFF on the expression of EM-2-induced CPA, EM-2 was administered alone on the conditioning days, and NPFF was given 5 min before placement in the CPP apparatus on the test day. The results showed that NPFF (2.5, 5 and 10 nmol, i.c.v.) alone caused little place preference change. However, NPFF dose-dependently reversed the acquisition of CPA induced by 30 nmol EM-2 (i.c.v.). Similarly, the expression of EM-2-induced CPA was also reduced by NPFF. Moreover, the effects of NPFF on the acquisition and the expression of EM-2-induced CPA were completely blocked by the NPFF receptors antagonist RF9 (10 nmol, i.c.v.). However, central injection of NPFF neither changed the locomotor activity nor modified the locomotor action of EM-2. These data provide the first evidence for a functional interaction of the endogenous ligands for NPFF and MOP receptors, and further support an anti-opioid character of NPFF system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Islet neuropeptide Y receptors are functionally conserved and novel targets for the preservation of beta-cell mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Zara J; Tsakmaki, Anastasia; Fonseca Pedro, Patricia; King, Aileen J; Huang, Guo Cai; Amjad, Sakeena; Persaud, Shanta J; Bewick, Gavin A

    2018-03-01

    Two unmet therapeutic strategies for diabetes treatment are prevention of beta-cell death and stimulation of beta-cell replication. Our aim was to characterize the role of neuropeptide Y receptors in the control of beta-cell mass. We used endogenous and selective agonists of the NPY receptor system to explore its role in the prevention of beta-cell apoptosis and proliferation in islets isolated from both mouse and human donors. We further explored the intra-cellular signalling cascades involved, using chemical inhibitors of key signalling pathways. As proof of principle we designed a long-acting analogue of [Leu 31 Pro 34 ]-NPY, an agonist of the islet-expressed Y receptors, to determine if targeting this system could preserve beta-cell mass in vivo. Our data reveal that NPY Y1, 4 and 5 receptor activation engages a generalized and powerful anti-apoptotic pathway that protects mouse and human islets from damage. These anti-apoptotic effects were dependent on stimulating a Gαi-PLC-PKC signalling cascade, which prevented cytokine-induced NFkB signalling. NPY receptor activation functionally protected islets by restoring glucose responsiveness following chemically induced injury in both species. NPY receptor activation attenuated beta-cell apoptosis, preserved functional beta-cell mass and attenuated the hyperglycaemic phenotype in a low-dose streptozotocin model of diabetes. Taken together, our observations identify the islet Y receptors as promising targets for the preservation of beta-cell mass. As such, targeting these receptors could help to maintain beta-cell mass in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and may also be useful for improving islet transplantation outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Actions of neuropeptide Y on basal, cyclic AMP-induced and neurally evoked ion transport in porcine distal jejunum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D R; Boster, S L; Overend, M F; Parsons, A M; Treder, B G

    1990-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its homolog, peptide YY, are present respectively in neurons and endocrine cells within the mammalian small intestine. In this study, we examined the actions of NPY on ion transport in the porcine distal jejunum mucosa-submucosa in vitro. Peptide YY and NPY were equieffective in producing rapid and sustained decreases in basal short-circuit current (Isc), a bioelectrical measure of active ion transport, eliciting half-maximal decreases at respective serosal concentrations of 0.8 and 30 nmol/l. NPY-induced changes in Isc were due to increased mucosa-to-serosa and net Cl fluxes and were not affected by the absence of extracellular HCO3 ions. NPY activity was correlated with the magnitude of the basal Isc and appeared to depend on the spontaneous production of eicosanoids. The peptide also decreased Isc stimulated by forskolin and 8-bromo-cyclic AMP, but the ionic bases for this effect were complex and differed from those determined under basal conditions. NPY attenuated increases in Isc produced by electrical stimulation of enteric neurons with an IC50 = 5 nmol/l. The actions of the peptide on basal and cyclic AMP-induced ion transport were abolished by the neuronal conduction blocker tetrodotoxin, but not by the opiate antagonist naloxone. The alpha-adrenoceptor blocker phentolamine diminished the effects of NPY on basal, but not cyclic AMP-induced Isc. These results indicate that NPY is capable of modulating NaCl transport in the porcine jejunal mucosa under several different conditions. Furthermore, the effects of the peptide are mediated in part through noradrenergic nerves as well as enteric neurons of unknown chemical identity.

  8. Hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression is not affected by central serotonin in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancebo, María J; Ceballos, Francisco C; Pérez-Maceira, Jorge; Aldegunde, Manuel

    2013-09-01

    Mammalian studies have shown a link between serotonin (5-HT) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the acute regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis. Taking into account that the actions of 5-HT and NPY on food intake in fish are similar to those observed in mammals, the objective of this study was to characterize a possible short-term interaction between hypothalamic 5-HT and NPY, by examining whether 5-HT regulates NPY gene expression, to help clarify the mechanism underlying the observed anorexigenic action of central 5-HT in the rainbow trout. We used qRT-PCR to determine the levels of NPY mRNA in the hypothalamus-preoptic area (HPA) of rainbow trout after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a single dose of dexfenfluramine (dFF, 3mgkg(-1); 24h-fasted and fed fish) or intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of 5-HT (100μgkg(-1); 24h-fasted fish). Significant suppression of food intake was observed after administration of 5-HT and dFF. No significant changes in NPY gene expression were obtained 150min after administration of 5-HT or dFF. However, administration of the 5HT1B receptor agonist anpirtoline did not have any significant effect on food intake in rainbow trout. The results suggest that in fish, unlike in mammals, neither the NPY neurons of the HPA nor the 5-HT1B receptor subtype participate in the neural circuitry involved in the inhibition of food intake induced by central serotoninergic activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Aplysia Locomotion: Network and Behavioral Actions of GdFFD, a D-Amino Acid-Containing Neuropeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Yu; Yu, Ke; Wang, Ye; Chen, Song-An; Liu, Dan-Dan; Wang, Zheng-Yang; Su, Yan-Nan; Yang, Shao-Zhong; Chen, Ting-Ting; Livnat, Itamar; Vilim, Ferdinand S; Cropper, Elizabeth C; Weiss, Klaudiusz R; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Jing, Jian

    2016-01-01

    One emerging principle is that neuromodulators, such as neuropeptides, regulate multiple behaviors, particularly motivated behaviors, e.g., feeding and locomotion. However, how neuromodulators act on multiple neural networks to exert their actions remains poorly understood. These actions depend on the chemical form of the peptide, e.g., an alternation of L- to D-form of an amino acid can endow the peptide with bioactivity, as is the case for the Aplysia peptide GdFFD (where dF indicates D-phenylalanine). GdFFD has been shown to act as an extrinsic neuromodulator in the feeding network, while the all L-amino acid form, GFFD, was not bioactive. Given that both GdFFD/GFFD are also present in pedal neurons that mediate locomotion, we sought to determine whether they impact locomotion. We first examined effects of both peptides on isolated ganglia, and monitored fictive programs using the parapedal commissural nerve (PPCN). Indeed, GdFFD was bioactive and GFFD was not. GdFFD increased the frequency with which neural activity was observed in the PPCN. In part, there was an increase in bursting spiking activity that resembled fictive locomotion. Additionally, there was significant activity between bursts. To determine how the peptide-induced activity in the isolated CNS is translated into behavior, we recorded animal movements, and developed a computer program to automatically track the animal and calculate the path of movement and velocity of locomotion. We found that GdFFD significantly reduced locomotion and induced a foot curl. These data suggest that the increase in PPCN activity observed in the isolated CNS during GdFFD application corresponds to a reduction, rather than an increase, in locomotion. In contrast, GFFD had no effect. Thus, our study suggests that GdFFD may act as an intrinsic neuromodulator in the Aplysia locomotor network. More generally, our study indicates that physiological and behavioral analyses should be combined to evaluate peptide actions.

  10. Single gene deletions of orexin, leptin, neuropeptide Y, and ghrelin do not appreciably alter food anticipatory activity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M Gunapala

    Full Text Available Timing activity to match resource availability is a widely conserved ability in nature. Scheduled feeding of a limited amount of food induces increased activity prior to feeding time in animals as diverse as fish and rodents. Typically, food anticipatory activity (FAA involves temporally restricting unlimited food access (RF to several hours in the middle of the light cycle, which is a time of day when rodents are not normally active. We compared this model to calorie restriction (CR, giving the mice 60% of their normal daily calorie intake at the same time each day. Measurement of body temperature and home cage behaviors suggests that the RF and CR models are very similar but CR has the advantage of a clearly defined food intake and more stable mean body temperature. Using the CR model, we then attempted to verify the published result that orexin deletion diminishes food anticipatory activity (FAA but observed little to no diminution in the response to CR and, surprisingly, that orexin KO mice are refractory to body weight loss on a CR diet. Next we tested the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY and ghrelin and the anorexigenic hormone, leptin, using mouse mutants. NPY deletion did not alter the behavior or physiological response to CR. Leptin deletion impaired FAA in terms of some activity measures, such as walking and rearing, but did not substantially diminish hanging behavior preceding feeding time, suggesting that leptin knockout mice do anticipate daily meal time but do not manifest the full spectrum of activities that typify FAA. Ghrelin knockout mice do not have impaired FAA on a CR diet. Collectively, these results suggest that the individual hormones and neuropepetides tested do not regulate FAA by acting individually but this does not rule out the possibility of their concerted action in mediating FAA.

  11. Neuropeptide Y and α-MSH circadian levels in two populations with low body weight: anorexia nervosa and constitutional thinness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Galusca

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN presents an adaptive appetite regulating profile including high levels of ghrelin and 26RFa (orexigenic and low levels of leptin and PYY (anorexigenic. However, this adaptive mechanism is not effective in promoting food intake. The NPY/proopiomelanocortin (POMC system plays a crucial role in the regulation of feeding behavior as NPY is the most potent orexigenic neuropeptide identified so far and as the POMC-derived peptide α-MSH drastically reduces food intake, and this peptidergic system has not been thoroughly studied in AN.The aim of the present study was thus to investigate whether a dysfunction of the NPY/POMC occurs in two populations with low body weight, AN and constitutional thinness (CT.This was a cross-sectional study performed in an endocrinological unit and in an academic laboratory.Three groups of age-matched young women were studied: 23 with AN (AN, 22 CT and 14 normal weight controls.Twelve-point circadian profiles of plasma NPY and α-MSH levels were measured in the three groups of investigated subjects.No significant circadian variation of NPY was detected between the three groups. Plasma α-MSH levels were significantly lower in AN (vs controls all over the day. The CT group, compared to controls, presented lower levels of α-MSH in the morning and the evening, and an important rise during lunchtime.In AN patients, the NPY system is not up-regulated under chronic undernutrition suggesting that this may play a role in the inability of anorectic women to adapt food intake to their energy demand. In contrast, low circadian α-MSH levels integrate the adaptive profile of appetite regulation of this disease. Finally, in CT women, the important α-MSH peak detected during lunchtime could explain why these patients are rapidly food satisfied.

  12. Regulation of neuropeptide mRNA expression in the basal ganglia by intrastriatal and intranigral transplants in the rat Parkinson model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, C; Bentlage, C; Cenci, M A; Nikkhah, G; Björklund, A

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that intrastriatal transplants of dopamine (DA)-rich fetal ventral mesencephalic (VM) tissue can correct denervation-induced changes in the cellular expression of neuropeptide and receptor mRNAs in the rat Parkinson model. However, with the standard transplantation approach normalization of all cellular parameters has not been obtained. This may be due either to the incomplete striatal reinnervation achieved by these transplants, or to the ectopic placement of the grafts. In the present study we have used a microtransplantation approach to obtain a more complete reinnervation of the denervated striatum (20 micrograft deposits spread over the entire structure). Neurons were also implanted directly into the substantia nigra. In rats with multiple intrastriatal VM transplants the lesion-induced upregulation of mRNAs encoding for preproenkephalin (PPE), the D(2)-type DA-receptor, and the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD(67)) was normalized throughout the striatum, whereas the lesion-induced downregulation of preprotachykinin mRNA was unaffected. Intranigral grafts of either fetal DA-rich VM tissue or GABA-rich striatal tissue did not induce any changes in striatal neuropeptide and D(2)-receptor mRNA expression despite significant behavioral improvement. Comparison of the behavioral data with levels of neuropeptide expression showed that in rats with intrastriatal VM transplants a complete normalization of striatal PPE and GAD(67) mRNA expression did not translate into a complete recovery of spontaneous motor behaviors. The results show that extensive DA reinnervation of the host striatum by multiple VM microtransplants is insufficient to obtain full recovery of all lesion-induced changes at both the cellular and the behavioral level. A full reconstruction of the nigrostriatal pathway or, alternatively, modulation of basal ganglia function by grafting in non-striatal regions may be required to further improve the

  13. The alpha(2)-adrenoceptors do not modify the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, corticoliberine, and neuropeptide Y producing hypothalamic magnocellular neurons ion the Long Evans and Brattleboro rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundzikova, J; Pirnik, Z; Zelena, D

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamic supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei are activated by body salt-fluid variations. Stimulation of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors by an agonist-xylazine (XYL) activates oxytocinergic but not vasopressinergic magnocellular neurons. In this study, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH...... sections of 30 mum thickness double immunolabeled with Fos/neuropeptide were evaluated under light microscope. Under basal conditions, di/di in comparison with control Long Evans rats, displayed significantly higher number of TH, CRH, and NPY immunoreactive neurons in the SON and PVN (except NPY cells...

  14. A dual-immunocytochemical method to localize c-fos protein in specific neurons based on their content of neuropeptides and connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J D; Larsen, P J; Sørensen, G G

    1994-01-01

    -immunocytochemical staining technique has been developed with avidin-biotin-peroxidase labelling using diaminobenzidine as the chromogen for c-fos protein located in the nucleus, and benzidine dihydrochloride (BDHC) in the presence of sodium nitroprusside to reveal cytoplasmic antigens (neuropeptide or retrograde tracer......) in the same section. The blue granular BDHC reaction product in the cytoplasm combined with the homogeneous brown nuclear DAB staining for c-fos protein provides excellent resolution of dual-labelled cells even in tissue sections of 40 microns in thickness. The high sensitivity of the avidin-biotin...

  15. Neuropeptide Y-stimulated [(35) S]GTPγs functional binding is reduced in the hippocampus after kainate-induced seizures in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbrønd-Bek, Heidi; Olling, Janne Damm; Gøtzsche, Casper René

    2014-01-01

    Kainate-induced seizures constitute a model of temporal lobe epilepsy where prominent changes are observed in the hippocampal neuropeptide Y (NPY) system. However, little is known about the functional state and signal transduction of the NPY receptor population resulting from kainate exposure. Thus....... Functional NPY binding was unchanged up to 12 h post-kainate, but decreased significantly in all hippocampal regions after 24 h and 1 week. Similarly, a decrease in [(125) I]-PYY binding was found in the dentate gyrus (DG) 1 week post-kainate. However, at 2 h, 6 h, and 12 h, [(125) I]-PYY binding...

  16. Feeding-induced changes in allatostatin-A and short neuropeptide F in the antennal lobes affect odor-mediated host seeking in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Christ

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is a model species in which the endogenous regulation of odor-mediated host seeking behavior has received some attention. Sugar feeding and host seeking in female A. aegypti are transiently inhibited following a blood meal. This inhibition is partially mediated by short neuropeptide F (sNPF. The paired antennal lobes (ALs, as the first processing centers for olfactory information, has been shown to play a significant role in the neuropeptidergic regulation of odor-mediated behaviors in insects. The expression of sNPF, along with other peptides in the ALs of A. aegypti, indicate parallel neuromodulatory systems that may affect olfactory processing. To identify neuropeptides involved in regulating the odor-mediated host seeking behavior in A. aegypti, we use a semi-quantitative neuropeptidomic analysis of single ALs to analyze changes in the levels of five individual neuropeptides in response to different feeding regimes. Our results show that the level of sNPF-2, allatostatin-A-5 (AstA-5 and neuropeptide-like precursor-1-5 (NPLP-1-5, but not of tachykinin-related-peptides and SIFamide (SIFa, in the AL of female mosquitoes, changes 24 h and 48 h post-blood meal, and are dependent on prior access to sugar. To assess the role of these neuropeptides in modulating host seeking behavior, when systemically injected individually, sNPF-2 and AstA-5 significantly reduced host seeking behavior. However, only the injection of the binary mixture of the two neuropeptides lead to a host seeking inhibition similar to that observed in blood fed females. We conclude that modulation of the odor mediated host seeking behavior of A. aegypti is likely regulated by a dual neuropeptidergic pathway acting in concert in the ALs.

  17. The tyrosine kinase receptor Tyro3 enhances lifespan and neuropeptide Y (Npy neuron survival in the mouse anorexia (anx mutation

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    Dennis Y. Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe appetite and weight loss define the eating disorder anorexia nervosa, and can also accompany the progression of some neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Although acute loss of hypothalamic neurons that produce appetite-stimulating neuropeptide Y (Npy and agouti-related peptide (Agrp in adult mice or in mice homozygous for the anorexia (anx mutation causes aphagia, our understanding of the factors that help maintain appetite regulatory circuitry is limited. Here we identify a mutation (C19T that converts an arginine to a tryptophan (R7W in the TYRO3 protein tyrosine kinase 3 (Tyro3 gene, which resides within the anx critical interval, as contributing to the severity of anx phenotypes. Our observation that, like Tyro3−/− mice, anx/anx mice exhibit abnormal secondary platelet aggregation suggested that the C19T Tyro3 variant might have functional consequences. Tyro3 is expressed in the hypothalamus and other brain regions affected by the anx mutation, and its mRNA localization appeared abnormal in anx/anx brains by postnatal day 19 (P19. The presence of wild-type Tyro3 transgenes, but not an R7W-Tyro3 transgene, doubled the weight and lifespans of anx/anx mice and near-normal numbers of hypothalamic Npy-expressing neurons were present in Tyro3-transgenic anx/anx mice at P19. Although no differences in R7W-Tyro3 signal sequence function or protein localization were discernible in vitro, distribution of R7W-Tyro3 protein differed from that of Tyro3 protein in the cerebellum of transgenic wild-type mice. Thus, R7W-Tyro3 protein localization deficits are only detectable in vivo. Further analyses revealed that the C19T Tyro3 mutation is present in a few other mouse strains, and hence is not the causative anx mutation, but rather an anx modifier. Our work shows that Tyro3 has prosurvival roles in the appetite regulatory circuitry and could also provide useful insights towards the development of interventions

  18. Characterization and tissue distribution of neuropeptide F in the eyestalk and brain of the male giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongrod, Sirorat; Changklungmoa, Narin; Chansela, Piyachat; Siangcham, Tanapan; Kruangkum, Thanapong; Suwansa-Ard, Saowaros; Saetan, Jirawat; Sroyraya, Morakot; Tinikul, Yotsawan; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Sobhon, Prasert

    2017-02-01

    We previously analyzed the central nervous system (CNS) transcriptome and found three isotypes of long neuropeptide F (MrNPF-I, -II, -III) and four isoforms of short NPF (sMrNPF) in the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii. We now validate the complete sequences of the MrNPF-I and -II precursor proteins, which show high similarity (91-95 %) to NPFs of the penaeus shrimp (PsNPF). MrNPF-I and -II precursors share 71 % amino acid identity, whereas the mature 32-amino-acid MrNPF-I and 69-amino-acid MrNPF-II are identical, except for a 37-amino-acid insert within the middle part of the latter. Both mature MrNPFs are almost identical to PsNPF-I and -II except for four amino acids at the mid-region of the peptides. Reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction revealed that transripts of MrNPF-I and -II were expressed in various parts of CNS including the eyestalk, brain and thoracic and abdominal ganglia, with the highest expression occurring in the brain and thoracic ganglia and with MrNPF-I showing five- to seven-fold higher expression than MrNPF-II. These peptides were also expressed in the midgut hindgut, and hepatopancreas, with MrNPF-I expression in the former two organs being at the same level as that in the brain and thoracic ganglia and about 4-fold higher than NPF-II. The expression of NPFs was also detected in the testes and spermatic duct but appeared much weaker in the latter. Other tissues that also expressed a considerable amount of NPF-I included the hematopoeitic tissue, heart and muscle. By immunohistochemistry, we detected MrNPFs in neurons of clusters 2, 3 and 4 and neuropils ME, MT and SG of the optic ganglia, neurons in cluster 6 and neuropils AMPN, PMPN, PT, PB and CB of the medial protocerebrum, neurons in clusters 9 and 11 and neurophils ON and OGTN of the deutocerebrum and neurons in clusters 14, 15 and 16 and neuropils TN and AnN of the tritocerebrum. Because of their high degree of conservation and strong and wide

  19. Interaction between retinoid acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1 in asthma.

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    Nathalie Acevedo

    Full Text Available Retinoid acid receptor-related Orphan Receptor Alpha (RORA was recently identified as a susceptibility gene for asthma in a genome-wide association study. To investigate the impact of RORA on asthma susceptibility, we performed a genetic association study between RORA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the vicinity of the asthma-associated SNP (rs11071559 and asthma-related traits. Because the regulatory region of a previously implicated asthma susceptibility gene, Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1, has predicted elements for RORA binding, we hypothesized that RORA may interact biologically and genetically with NPSR1. 37 RORA SNPs and eight NPSR1 SNPs were genotyped in the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE (2033 children and the European cross-sectional PARSIFAL study (1120 children. Seven RORA SNPs confined into a 49 kb region were significantly associated with physician-diagnosed childhood asthma. The most significant association with rs7164773 (T/C was driven by the CC genotype in asthma cases (OR = 2.0, 95%CI 1.36-2.93, p = 0.0003 in BAMSE; and 1.61, 1.18-2.19, p = 0.002 in the combined BAMSE-PARSIFAL datasets, respectively, and strikingly, the risk effect was dependent on the Gln344Arg mutation in NPSR1. In cell models, stimulation of NPSR1 activated a pathway including RORA and other circadian clock genes. Over-expression of RORA decreased NPSR1 promoter activity further suggesting a regulatory loop between these genes. In addition, Rora mRNA expression was lower in the lung tissue of Npsr1 deficient mice compared to wildtype littermates during the early hours of the light period. We conclude that RORA SNPs are associated with childhood asthma and show epistasis with NPSR1, and the interaction between RORA and NPSR1 may be of biological relevance. Combinations of common susceptibility alleles and less common functional polymorphisms may modify the joint risk effects on asthma susceptibility.

  20. Intranasally applied neuropeptide S shifts a high-anxiety electrophysiological endophenotype in the ventral hippocampus towards a "normal"-anxiety one.

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    Julien Dine

    Full Text Available The neurobiological basis of pathological anxiety and the improvement of its pharmacological treatment are a matter of intensive investigation. Here, using electrophysiological techniques in brain slices from animals of the high anxiety-related behavior (HAB and normal anxiety-related behavior (NAB mouse model, we show that basal neurotransmission at ventral hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses is weaker in HAB compared to NAB mice. We further demonstrate that paired-pulse facilitation (PPF and long-term potentiation (LTP at these synapses are more pronounced in slices from HAB animals. Based on previous findings, we also examined whether intranasal delivery of neuropeptide S (NPS, which increasingly emerges as a potential novel treatment option for anxiety symptoms occurring in a variety of diseases like anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, and major depression, impacts on the high-anxiety electrophysiological endophenotype in HAB mice. Strikingly, we detected enhanced basal neurotransmission and reduced PPF and LTP in slices from NPS-treated HAB animals. Collectively, our study uncovers a multifaceted high-anxiety neurophysiological endophenotype in the murine ventral hippocampus and provides the first evidence that an intranasally applied neuropeptide can shift such an endophenotype in an anxiety-regulating brain structure towards a "normal"-anxiety one.

  1. Distribution of peptidergic populations in the human dentate gyrus (somatostatin [SOM-28, SOM-12] and neuropeptide Y [NPY]) during postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebada-Sánchez, S; Insausti, R; González-Fuentes, J; Arroyo-Jiménez, M M; Rivas-Infante, E; Lagartos, M J; Martínez-Ruiz, J; Lozano, G; Marcos, P

    2014-10-01

    The postnatal development of the human hippocampal formation establishes the time and place at which we start autobiographical memories. However, data concerning the maturation of the neurochemical phenotypes characteristic of interneurons in the human hippocampus are scarce. We have studied the perinatal and postnatal changes of the dentate gyrus (DG) interneuron populations at three rostrocaudal levels. Immunohistochemically identified neurons and fibers for somatostatin (SOM-12 and SOM-28) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) and the co-localization of SOM-28 and NPY were analyzed. In total, 13 cases were investigated from late pregnancy (1 case), perinatal period (6 cases), first year (1 case), early infancy (3 cases), and late infancy (2 cases). Overall, the pattern of distribution of these peptides in the DG was similar to that of the adult. The distribution of cells was charted, and the cell density (number of positive cells/mm(2)) was calculated. The highest density corresponded to the polymorphic cell layer and was higher at pre- and perinatal periods. At increasing ages, neuron density modifications revealed a decrease from 5 postnatal months onward. In contrast, by late infancy, two immunoreactive bands for SOM-28 and NPY in the molecular layer were much better defined. Double-immunohistochemistry showed that NPY-positive neurons co-localized with SOM-28, whereas some fibers contained only one or other of the neuropeptides. Thus, this peptidergic population, presumably inhibitory, probably has a role in DG maturation and its subsequent functional activity in memory processing.

  2. The effects of serotonin1A receptor on female mice body weight and food intake are associated with the differential expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides and the GABAA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Isma; Hong, Andrew; Di, Jing; Aracena, Sonia; Banerjee, Probal; Shen, Chang-Hui

    2014-10-01

    Both common eating disorders anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are characteristically diseases of women. To characterize the role of the 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1A-R) in these eating disorders in females, we investigated the effect of saline or 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) treatment on feeding behavior and body weight in adult WT female mice and in adult 5-HT1A-R knockout (KO) female mice. Our results showed that KO female mice have lower food intake and body weight than WT female mice. Administration of 8-OH-DPAT decreased food intake but not body weight in WT female mice. Furthermore, qRT-PCR was employed to analyze the expression levels of neuropeptides, γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor subunit β (GABAA β subunits) and glutamic acid decarboxylase in the hypothalamic area. The results showed the difference in food intake between WT and KO mice was accompanied by differential expression of POMC, CART and GABAA β2, and the difference in body weight between WT and KO mice was associated with significantly different expression levels of CART and GABAA β2. As such, our data provide new insight into the role of 5-HT1A-R in both feeding behavior and the associated expression of neuropeptides and the GABAA receptor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary structure of the precursor for the sea anemone neuropeptide Antho-RFamide (less than Glu-Gly-Arg-Phe-NH2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darmer, D; Schmutzler, C; Diekhoff, D

    1991-01-01

    Neuropeptides containing the carboxylterminal sequence Arg-Phe-NH2 are found throughout the animal kingdom and are important substances mediating neuronal communication. Here, we have cloned the cDNA coding for the precursor protein of the sea anemone neuropeptide (Antho-RFamide) less than Glu......-Gly-Arg-Phe-NH2. This precursor is 334 amino acids in length and contains 19 copies of unprocessed Antho-RFamide (Gln-Gly-Arg-Phe-Gly), which are tandemly arranged in the C-terminal part of the protein. Paired basic residues (Lys-Arg) or single basic residues (Arg) occur at the C-terminal side of each Antho...... or glutamic acid residues. Such processing is, to our knowledge, hitherto unknown for peptidergic neurons. The Antho-RFamide precursor also contains two copies of the putative Antho-RFamide-related peptide Phe-Gln-Gly-Arg-Phe-NH2 and one copy of Tyr-Val-Pro-Gly-Arg-Tyr-NH2. In addition, the precursor protein...

  4. Inhalation of a racemic mixture (R,S)-linalool by rats experiencing restraint stress alters neuropeptide and MHC class I gene expression in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazushi; Yamamoto, Naoto; Fujiwara, Satoshi; Kamei, Asuka; Abe, Keiko; Nakamura, Akio

    2017-07-13

    Some odorants have physiological and psychological effects on organisms. However, little is known about the effects of inhaling them, particularly on the central nervous system. Using DNA microarray analysis, we obtained gene expression profiles of the hypothalamus from restraint stressed rats exposed to racemic (R,S)-linalool. Hierarchical clustering across all probe sets showed that this inhalation of (R,S)-linalool influenced the expression levels of a wide range of genes in the hypothalamus. A comparison of transcription levels revealed that the inhalation of (R,S)-linalool restored the expression of 560 stress-induced probe sets to a normal status. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis showed that these genes were associated with synaptic transmission via neurotransmitters including anxiolytic neuropeptides such as oxytocin and neuropeptide Y. These genes also included several major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules necessary for neural development and plasticity. Moreover, Upstream Regulator Analysis predicted that the hormone prolactin would be activated by the inhalation of (R,S)-linalool under stress. Our results reveal some of the molecular mechanisms associated with odor inhalation in the hypothalamus in organisms under stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuropeptide Y receptor-expressing dorsal horn neurons: role in nocifensive reflex and operant responses to aversive cold after CFA inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, L L; Wiley, R G

    2012-08-02

    The spinal Neuropeptide Y (NPY) system is a potential target for development of new pain therapeutics. NPY and two of its receptors (Y1 and Y2) are found in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord, a key area of nociceptive gating and modulation. Lumbar intrathecal injection of (NPY) is antinociceptive, reducing hyper-reflexia to thermal and mechanical stimulation, particularly after nerve injury and inflammation. We have also shown that intrathecal injection of the targeted cytotoxin, Neuropeptide Y-sap (NPY-sap), is also antinociceptive, reducing nocifensive reflex responses to noxious heat and formalin. In the present study, we sought to determine the role of dorsal horn Y1R-expressing neurons in pain by destroying them with NPY-sap and testing the rats on three operant tasks. Lumbar intrathecal NPY-sap (1) reduced Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced hyper-reflexia on the 10°C cold plate, (2) reduced cold aversion on the thermal preference and escape tasks, (3) was analgesic to noxious heat on the escape task, (4) reduced the CFA-induced allodynia to cold temperatures experienced on the thermal preference, feeding interference, and escape tasks, and (5) did not inhibit or interfere with morphine analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The corticotropin-releasing factor-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and kinin neuropeptides modulate desiccation and starvation tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, Elizabeth; Dornan, Anthony J; Halberg, Kenneth A; Terhzaz, Selim; Dow, Julian A T; Davies, Shireen-A

    2016-06-01

    Malpighian tubules are critical organs for epithelial fluid transport and stress tolerance in insects, and are under neuroendocrine control by multiple neuropeptides secreted by identified neurons. Here, we demonstrate roles for CRF-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and Drosophila melanogaster kinin (Drome-kinin, DK) in desiccation and starvation tolerance. Gene expression and labelled DH44 ligand binding data, as well as highly selective knockdowns and/or neuronal ablations of DH44 in neurons of the pars intercerebralis and DH44 receptor (DH44-R2) in Malpighian tubule principal cells, indicate that suppression of DH44 signalling improves desiccation tolerance of the intact fly. Drome-kinin receptor, encoded by the leucokinin receptor gene, LKR, is expressed in DH44 neurons as well as in stellate cells of the Malpighian tubules. LKR knockdown in DH44-expressing neurons reduces Malpighian tubule-specific LKR, suggesting interactions between DH44 and LK signalling pathways. Finally, although a role for DK in desiccation tolerance was not defined, we demonstrate a novel role for Malpighian tubule cell-specific LKR in starvation tolerance. Starvation increases gene expression of epithelial LKR. Also, Malpighian tubule stellate cell-specific knockdown of LKR significantly reduced starvation tolerance, demonstrating a role for neuropeptide signalling during starvation stress. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Increase of long-term 'diabesity' risk, hyperphagia, and altered hypothalamic neuropeptide expression in neonatally overnourished 'small-for-gestational-age' (SGA rats.

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    Karen Schellong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiological data have shown long-term health adversity in low birth weight subjects, especially concerning the metabolic syndrome and 'diabesity' risk. Alterations in adult food intake have been suggested to be causally involved. Responsible mechanisms remain unclear. METHODS AND FINDINGS: By rearing in normal (NL vs. small litters (SL, small-for-gestational-age (SGA rats were neonatally exposed to either normal (SGA-in-NL or over-feeding (SGA-in-SL, and followed up into late adult age as compared to normally reared appropriate-for-gestational-age control rats (AGA-in-NL. SGA-in-SL rats displayed rapid neonatal weight gain within one week after birth, while SGA-in-NL growth caught up only at juvenile age (day 60, as compared to AGA-in-NL controls. In adulthood, an increase in lipids, leptin, insulin, insulin/glucose-ratio (all p<0.05, and hyperphagia under normal chow as well as high-energy/high-fat diet, modelling modern 'westernized' lifestyle, were observed only in SGA-in-SL as compared to both SGA-in-NL and AGA-in-NL rats (p<0.05. Lasercapture microdissection (LMD-based neuropeptide expression analyses in single neuron pools of the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (ARC revealed a significant shift towards down-regulation of the anorexigenic melanocortinergic system (proopiomelanocortin, Pomc in SGA-in-SL rats (p<0.05. Neuropeptide expression within the orexigenic system (neuropeptide Y (Npy, agouti-related-peptide (Agrp and galanin (Gal was not significantly altered. In essence, the 'orexigenic index', proposed here as a neuroendocrine 'net-indicator', was increased in SGA-in-SL regarding Npy/Pomc expression (p<0.01, correlated to food intake (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Adult SGA rats developed increased 'diabesity' risk only if exposed to neonatal overfeeding. Hypothalamic malprogramming towards decreased anorexigenic activity was involved into the pathophysiology of this neonatally acquired adverse phenotype. Neonatal overfeeding

  8. Expression of regulatory neuropeptides in the hypothalamus of red deer (Cervus elaphus) reveals anomalous relationships in the seasonal control of appetite and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrell, G K; Ridgway, M J; Wellby, M; Pereira, A; Henry, B A; Clarke, I J

    2016-04-01

    Red deer are seasonal with respect to reproduction and food intake, so we tested the hypothesis that their brains would show seasonal changes in numbers of cells containing hypothalamic neuropeptides that regulate these functions. We examined the brains of male and female deer in non-breeding and breeding seasons to quantify the production of kisspeptin, gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and γ-melanocyte stimulating hormone (γ-MSH - an index of pro-opiomelanocortin production), using immunohistochemistry. These neuropeptides are likely to be involved in the regulation of reproductive function and appetite. During the annual breeding season there were more cells producing kisspeptin in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus than during the non-breeding season in males and females whereas there was no seasonal difference in the expression of GnIH. There were more cells producing the appetite stimulating peptide, NPY, in the arcuate/median eminence regions of the hypothalamus of females during the non-breeding season whereas the levels of an appetite suppressing peptide, γ-MSH, were highest in the breeding season. Male deer brains exhibited the converse, with NPY cell numbers highest in the breeding season and γ-MSH levels highest in the non-breeding season. These results support a role for kisspeptin as an important stimulatory regulator of seasonal breeding in deer, as in other species, but suggest a lack of involvement of GnIH in the seasonality of reproduction in deer. In the case of appetite regulation, the pattern exhibited by females for NPY and γ-MSH was as expected for the breeding and non-breeding seasons, based on previous studies of these peptides in sheep and the seasonal cycle of appetite reported for various species of deer. An inverse result in male deer most probably reflects the response of appetite regulating cells to negative energy balance during the mating season. Differences between the sexes in the seasonal

  9. Immunolocalization of the short neuropeptide F receptor in queen brains and ovaries of the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsiao-Ling; Pietrantonio, Patricia V

    2011-06-14

    Insect neuropeptides are involved in diverse physiological functions and can be released as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators acting within the central nervous system, and as circulating neurohormones in insect hemolymph. The insect short neuropeptide F (sNPF) peptides, related to the vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY) peptides, have been implicated in the regulation of food intake and body size, and play a gonadotropic role in the ovaries of some insect species. Recently the sNPF peptides were localized in the brain of larval and adult Drosophila. However, the location of the sNPF receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), has not yet been investigated in brains of any adult insect. To elucidate the sites of action of the sNPF peptide(s), the sNPF receptor tissue expression and cellular localization were analyzed in queens of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera), an invasive social insect. In the queen brains and subesophageal ganglion about 164 cells distributed in distinctive cell clusters (C1-C9 and C12) or as individual cells (C10, C11) were immuno-positive for the sNPF receptor. Most of these neurons are located in or near important sensory neuropils including the mushroom bodies, the antennal lobes, the central complex, and in different parts of the protocerebrum, as well as in the subesophageal ganglion. The localization of the sNPF receptor broadly links the receptor signaling pathway with circuits regulating learning and feeding behaviors. In ovaries from mated queens, the detection of sNPF receptor signal at the posterior end of oocytes in mid-oogenesis stage suggests that the sNPF signaling pathway may regulate processes at the oocyte pole. The analysis of sNPF receptor immunolocalization shows that the sNPF signaling cascade may be involved in diverse functions, and the sNPF peptide(s) may act in the brain as neurotransmitter(s) or neuromodulator(s), and in the ovaries as neurohormone(s). To our knowledge, this is the

  10. Copper(II) complexes of neuropeptide gamma with point mutations (S8,16A) products of metal-catalyzed oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszak, Marta; Jankowska, Elżbieta; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2013-12-01

    To obtain the information about the influence of the serine residues (S8,S16) on the acid-base properties of the neuropeptide gamma, the peptide with point mutations (S8,16A) and its N-acetyl derivative were synthesized. Any additional deprotonations were not observed. It means that the presence of serine residues is necessary in the amino acid sequence of the neuropeptide gamma to have its acid-base properties. The stability constants, stoichiometry and solution structures of copper(II) complexes of the neuropeptide gamma mutants D(1)AGH(4)GQIA(8)H(9)KRH(12)KTDA(16)FVGLM(21)-NH2 (S8,16A) 2ANPG and its N-acetyl derivative Ac-2ANPG were determined in aqueous solution. The equilibrium and structural properties of copper(II) complexes have been characterized by pH-metric, spectroscopic (UV-visible, CD, EPR) and mass spectrometric (MS) methods. At physiological pH7.4 the 2ANPG forms the CuH2L and CuHL complexes in equilibrium with 3N {NH2,βCOO(-)-D(1),2NIm} and 4N {NH2,N(-),2NIm} binding sites, respectively. The exchange Ser on Ala residues does not alter the coordination mode of the peptide. To elucidate the products of the copper(II)-catalyzed oxidation of 2ANPG and Ac-2ANPG the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method (LC-MS) and the Cu(II)/H2O2 as a model oxidizing system were employed. For solutions containing a 1:4 peptide-hydrogen peroxide molar ratio oxidation of the methionine residue to methionine sulphoxide was observed. For the 1:1:4 Cu(II)-2ANPG-H2O2 system oxidation of two His residues and cleavage of the G(3)H(4) peptide bond was observed, while for the 1:1:4 Cu(II)-Ac-2ANPG-H2O2 system oxidation of three histidine residues to 2-oxohistidines was also observed. © 2013.

  11. Postulated vasoactive neuropeptide immunopathology affecting the blood–brain/blood–spinal barrier in certain neuropsychiatric fatigue-related conditions: A role for phosphodiesterase inhibitors in treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Donald R Staines1,2, Ekua W Brenu2, Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik21Queensland Health, Gold Coast Population Health Unit, Southport, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia; 2Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Population Health and Neuroimmunology Unit, Bond University, Robina, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Neuropsychiatric symptoms occur in a number of neurological fatigue-related conditions including multiple sclerosis (MS, Parkinson’s disease (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. These conditions have been attributed variably to neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative processes. While autoimmune pathology, at least in part, has long been suspected in these conditions proof has been elusive. Autoimmune pathomechanisms affecting the blood–brain barrier (BBB or blood–spinal barrier (BSB may predispose the BBB/BSB to ‘leakiness’ and be a precursor to additional autoimmune events resulting in neuroinflammatory or neurodegenerative processes. The aim of the paper is to postulate immunopathology of the cerebrospinal perivascular compartment involving certain vasoactive neuropeptides, specifically pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, in the etiology of certain neuropsychiatric fatigue-related conditions such as MS, ALS, PD, and CFS. Vasoactive neuropeptides (VNs such as PACAP and VIP have critical roles as neurotransmitters, vasodilators including perfusion and hypoxia regulators, and immune and nociception modulators. PACAP and VIP are widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS and have key roles in CNS blood vessels including maintaining functional integrity of the BBB and BSB. Autoimmunity affecting these VNs would likely have a detrimental effect on BBB and BSB functioning arguably predisposing to further pathological processes. Virchow–Robin spaces (VRS are perivascular compartments surrounding small vessels within the CNS which

  12. Immunolocalization of the short neuropeptide F receptor in queen brains and ovaries of the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrantonio Patricia V

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insect neuropeptides are involved in diverse physiological functions and can be released as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators acting within the central nervous system, and as circulating neurohormones in insect hemolymph. The insect short neuropeptide F (sNPF peptides, related to the vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY peptides, have been implicated in the regulation of food intake and body size, and play a gonadotropic role in the ovaries of some insect species. Recently the sNPF peptides were localized in the brain of larval and adult Drosophila. However, the location of the sNPF receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, has not yet been investigated in brains of any adult insect. To elucidate the sites of action of the sNPF peptide(s, the sNPF receptor tissue expression and cellular localization were analyzed in queens of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera, an invasive social insect. Results In the queen brains and subesophageal ganglion about 164 cells distributed in distinctive cell clusters (C1-C9 and C12 or as individual cells (C10, C11 were immuno-positive for the sNPF receptor. Most of these neurons are located in or near important sensory neuropils including the mushroom bodies, the antennal lobes, the central complex, and in different parts of the protocerebrum, as well as in the subesophageal ganglion. The localization of the sNPF receptor broadly links the receptor signaling pathway with circuits regulating learning and feeding behaviors. In ovaries from mated queens, the detection of sNPF receptor signal at the posterior end of oocytes in mid-oogenesis stage suggests that the sNPF signaling pathway may regulate processes at the oocyte pole. Conclusions The analysis of sNPF receptor immunolocalization shows that the sNPF signaling cascade may be involved in diverse functions, and the sNPF peptide(s may act in the brain as neurotransmitter(s or neuromodulator(s, and in the ovaries

  13. Control of nematode parasites with agents acting on neuro-musculature systems: lessons for neuropeptide ligand discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard J; Robertson, Alan P

    2010-01-01

    rates are now often less than 100% and resistance of parasites to agents acting on the neuromuscular systems is present in a wide range of parasites of animals and humans hosts. In the face of this resistance the development of novel and effective agents is an urgent and imperative need. New drugs which act on the neuromuscular system have an advantage for medication for animals and humans because they have a rapid therapeutic effect within 3 hours of administration. The effects on the neuromuscular system include: spastic paralysis with drugs like levamisole and pyrantel; flaccid paralysis as with piperazine; or disruption of other vital muscular activity as with ivermectin. Figure 1 B and C, illustrates an example ofa spastic effect oflevamisole on infectious L3 larvae of Ostertagia ostertagiae, a parasite of pigs. The effect was produced within minutes of the in vitro application oflevamisole. In this chapter we comment on the properties of existing agents that have been used to control nematode parasites and that have an action on neuromuscular systems. We then draw attention to resistance that has developed to these compounds and comment on their toxicity and spectra of actions. We hope that some of the lessons that the use of these compounds has taught us may to be applied to any novel neuropeptide ligand that may be introduced. Our aim is then is to provide some warning signs for recognized but dangerous obstacles.

  14. Suppression of serotonin hyperinnervation does not alter the dysregulatory influences of dopamine depletion on striatal neuropeptide gene expression in rodent neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, G J; Walker, P D

    1999-10-15

    Sixty days following neonatal dopamine depletion (>98%) with 6-hydroxydopamine, preprotachykinin and preprodynorphin mRNA levels were significantly reduced (67 and 78% of vehicle controls, respectively) in the anterior striatum as determined by in situ hybridization while preproenkephalin mRNA expression was elevated (133% of vehicle controls). Suppression of the serotonin hyperinnervation phenomenon in the dopamine-depleted rat with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine yielded no significant alterations in reduced striatal preprotachykinin (66%) or preprodynorphin (64%) mRNA levels, while preproenkephalin mRNA expression remained significantly elevated (140%). These data suggest that striatal serotonin hyperinnervation does not contribute to the development of dysregulated striatal neuropeptide transmission in either direct or indirect striatal output pathways following neonatal dopamine depletion.

  15. Dipeptidylpeptidase-­IV, a key enzyme for the degradation of incretins and neuropeptides: activity and expression in the liver of lean and obese rats

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    E. Tarantola

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Given the scarcity of donors, moderately fatty livers (FLs are currently being considered as possible grafts for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT, notwithstanding their poor tolerance to conventional cold preservation. The behaviour of parenchymal and sinusoidal liver cells during transplantation is being studied worldwide. Much less attention has been paid to the biliary tree, although this is considered the Achille’s heel even of normal liver transplantation. To evaluate the response of the biliary compartment of FLs to the various phases of OLT reliable markers are necessary. Previously we demonstrated that Alkaline Phosphatase was scarcely active in bile canaliculi of FLs and thus ruled it out as a marker. As an alternative, dipeptidylpeptidase-IV (DPP-IV, was investigated. This ecto-peptidase plays an important role in glucose metabolism, rapidly inactivating insulin secreting hormones (incretins that are important regulators of glucose metabolism. DPP-IV inhibitors are indeed used to treat Type II diabetes. Neuropeptides regulating bile transport and composition are further important substrates of DPP-IV in the enterohepatic axis. DPP-IV activity was investigated with an azo-coupling method in the liver of fatty Zucker rats (fa/fa, using as controls lean Zucker (fa/+ and normal Wistar rats. Protein expression was studied by immunofluorescence with the monoclonal antibody (clone 5E8. In Wistar rat liver, DPP-IV activity and expression were high in the whole biliary tree, and moderate in sinusoid endothelial cells, in agreement with the literature. Main substrates of DPP-IV in hepatocytes and cholangiocytes could be incretins GLP-1 and GIP, and neuropeptides such as vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and substance P, suggesting that these substances are inactivated or modified through the biliary route. In lean Zucker rat liver the enzyme reaction and protein expression patterns were similar to those of Wistar rat. In obese rat liver

  16. The metabolism of neuropeptides. Both phosphoramidon-sensitive and captopril-sensitive metallopeptidases are present in the electric organ of Torpedo marmorata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A J; Dowdall, M J

    1984-01-01

    A membrane fraction from the electric organ of Torpedo marmorata hydrolyses the Gly3-Phe4 bond of [D-Ala2, Leu5]enkephalin as well as the Gly-His bond of benzoyl-Gly-His-Leu. The hydrolysis of benzoyl-Gly-His-Leu is completely inhibitable by Captopril (I50 = 19nM), consistent with peptidyl dipeptidase activity, but enkephalin hydrolysis is inhibited to a maximum of only 70%. The residual activity hydrolysing enkephalin is inhibited by phosphoramidon (I50 = 15nM) and therefore resembles endopeptidase-24.11, a mammalian plasma-membrane enzyme implicated in the metabolism of neuropeptides. Both enkephalin-hydrolysing activities in Torpedo electric organ are inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, like their mammalian counterparts. The peptidases may function in the hydrolysis of endogenous peptides or in neurotransmitter exocytosis in the electric organ. PMID:6383356

  17. Primary structure of the precursor for the anthozoan neuropeptide Antho-RFamide from Renilla köllikeri: Evidence for unusual processing enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinscheid, R K; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1994-01-01

    distributed over the precursor protein. Of the 36 Antho-RFamide sequences, 29 copies are separated by the five amino acid spacer sequence Arg-Glu/Gly-Asn/Ser/Asp-Glu/Lys-Glu. This implicates processing at single Arg and single Glu residues. Endoproteolytic cleavage at the C-terminal side of paired or single......, and possibly also at other residues, and thus liberate all Antho-RFamide sequences. The processing of one precursor molecule probably yields 38 neuropeptides.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...... basic residues is a well known initial step in the maturation of precursor proteins. Cleavage at the C-terminal side of acidic residues, however, is unusual and must be catalyzed by a new type of processing enzyme. This processing enzyme is most likely to be an endoprotease, because the simplest way...

  18. An analysis of possible off target effects following CAS9/CRISPR targeted deletions of neuropeptide gene enhancers from the mouse genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Elizabeth Anne; Khalaf, Abdulla Razak; Marini, Pietro; Brown, Andrew; Heath, Karyn; Sheppard, Darrin; MacKenzie, Alasdair

    2017-08-01

    We have successfully used comparative genomics to identify putative regulatory elements within the human genome that contribute to the tissue specific expression of neuropeptides such as galanin and receptors such as CB1. However, a previous inability to rapidly delete these elements from the mouse genome has prevented optimal assessment of their function in-vivo. This has been solved using CAS9/CRISPR genome editing technology which uses a bacterial endonuclease called CAS9 that, in combination with specifically designed guide RNA (gRNA) molecules, cuts specific regions of the mouse genome. However, reports of "off target" effects, whereby the CAS9 endonuclease is able to cut sites other than those targeted, limits the appeal of this technology. We used cytoplasmic microinjection of gRNA and CAS9 mRNA into 1-cell mouse embryos to rapidly generate enhancer knockout mouse lines. The current study describes our analysis of the genomes of these enhancer knockout lines to detect possible off-target effects. Bioinformatic analysis was used to identify the most likely putative off-target sites and to design PCR primers that would amplify these sequences from genomic DNA of founder enhancer deletion mouse lines. Amplified DNA was then sequenced and blasted against the mouse genome sequence to detect off-target effects. Using this approach we were unable to detect any evidence of off-target effects in the genomes of three founder lines using any of the four gRNAs used in the analysis. This study suggests that the problem of off-target effects in transgenic mice have been exaggerated and that CAS9/CRISPR represents a highly effective and accurate method of deleting putative neuropeptide gene enhancer sequences from the mouse genome. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Age-related changes in membrane fluidity and fluorescence intensity by tachykinin neuropeptide NKB and Aβ (25-35 with 17β estradiol in female rat brain

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    Rashmi Jha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available      Changes in the fluidity of membrane lipids are known to occur during aging and by lipid peroxidation. It is well documented that the fluidity state of the lipid phase in a membrane is important for the activity of intrinsic membrane proteins. Oxidants and fluidity of membrane lipids play a significant role in aging and age related neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of tachykinin neuropeptide, Neurokinin B (NKB and Amyloid beta fragment Aβ (25-35 on 17β estradiol (E2 treated aging female rat synaptosomes of different age groups. Aging brain functions were measured by membrane fluidity and fluorescent intensity with neuropeptides. An in-vitro incubation of Aβ (25-35 in E2 treated brain synaptosomes showed toxic effects on all the parameters. These effects of aging and Aβ (25–35 on membrane fluidity were restored by NKB and combined NKB and Aβ (25–35 with E2. Furthermore, we measured the Tryptophan (Trp fluorescence to monitor changes in proteins and to make inferences regarding structure and dynamics. Trp is a sensitive marker of protein oxidation and its fluorescence significantly increased in E2 treated synaptosomes of aging rats. Furthermore, to evaluate the effect of oxidative stress on the membrane and protein conformation, fluorescent probe 1-Anilino-8-Naphthalenesulfonate (ANS were used. An increase in ANS fluorescence in E2 treated synaptosomes of aging rats indicated that E2 is associated with significant conformational changes and surface hydrophobicity of membranes and proteins.

  20. Sympathetic nervous system catecholamines and neuropeptide Y neurotransmitters are upregulated in human NAFLD and modulate the fibrogenic function of hepatic stellate cells.

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    Barbara Sigala

    Full Text Available Sympathetic nervous system (SNS signalling regulates murine hepatic fibrogenesis through effects on hepatic stellate cells (HSC, and obesity-related hypertension with SNS activation accelerates progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, the commonest cause of chronic liver disease. NAFLD may lead to cirrhosis. The effects of the SNS neurotransmitters norepinephrine (NE, epinephrine (EPI and neuropeptide Y (NPY on human primary HSC (hHSC function and in NAFLD pathogenesis are poorly understood.to determine the mechanistic effects of NE/EPI/NPY on phenotypic changes in cultured hHSC, and to study SNS signalling in human NAFLD livers.Freshly isolated hHSC were assessed for expression of cathecholamine/neuropeptide Y receptors and for the synthesis of NE/EPI. The effects of NE/EPI/NPY and adrenoceptor antagonists prazosin (PRZ/propranolol (PRL on hHSC fibrogenic functions and the involved kinases and interleukin pathways were examined. Human livers with proven NAFLD were then assessed for upregulation of SNS signalling components.Activated hHSC express functional α/β-adrenoceptors and NPY receptors, which are upregulated in the livers of patients with cirrhotic NAFLD. hHSC in culture synthesize and release NE/EPI, required for their optimal basal growth and survival. Exogenous NE/EPI and NPY dose-dependently induced hHSC proliferation, mediated via p38 MAP, PI3K and MEK signalling. NE and EPI but not NPY increased expression of collagen-1α2 via TGF-β without involvement of the pro-fibrogenic cytokines leptin, IL-4 and IL-13 or the anti-fibrotic cytokine IL-10.hHSC synthesize and require cathecholamines for optimal survival and fibrogenic functionality. Activated hHSC express directly fibrogenic α/β-adrenoceptors and NPY receptors, upregulated in human cirrhotic NAFLD. Adrenoceptor and NPY antagonists may be novel anti-fibrotic agents in human NAFLD.

  1. Rudimentary expression of RYamide in Drosophila melanogaster relative to other Drosophila species points to a functional decline of this neuropeptide gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenstra, Jan A; Khammassi, Hela

    2017-04-01

    RYamides are arthropod neuropeptides with unknown function. In 2011 two RYamides were isolated from D. melanogaster as the ligands for the G-protein coupled receptor CG5811. The D. melanogaster gene encoding these neuropeptides is highly unusual, as there are four RYamide encoding exons in the current genome assembly, but an exon encoding a signal peptide is absent. Comparing the D. melanogaster gene structure with those from other species, including D. virilis, suggests that the gene is degenerating. RNAseq data from 1634 short sequence read archives at NCBI containing more than 34 billion spots yielded numerous individual spots that correspond to the RYamide encoding exons, of which a large number include the intron-exon boundary at the start of this exon. Although 72 different sequences have been spliced onto this RYamide encoding exon, none codes for the signal peptide of this gene. Thus, the RNAseq data for this gene reveal only noise and no signal. The very small quantities of peptide recovered during isolation and the absence of credible RNAseq data, indicates that the gene is very little expressed, while the RYamide gene structure in D. melanogaster suggests that it might be evolving into a pseudogene. Yet, the identification of the peptides it encodes clearly shows it is still functional. Using region specific antisera, we could localize numerous neurons and enteroendocrine cells in D. willistoni, D. virilis and D. pseudoobscura, but only two adult abdominal neurons in D. melanogaster. Those two neurons project to and innervate the rectal papillae, suggesting that RYamides may be involved in the regulation of water homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The impact of early life family structure on adult social attachment, alloparental behavior, and the neuropeptide systems regulating affiliative behaviors in the monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster

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    Todd H Ahern

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Early social attachments lie at the heart of emotional and social development in many mammals, including humans. In nature, monogamous prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster experience considerable natural variation in early social attachment opportunities due to differences in family structure (e.g., single-mothers, solitary breeding pairs, and communal groups. We exploited some of this natural variation in family structure to examine the influence of early social environment on the development of adult social behavior. First, we characterized the parental care received by pups reared biparentally (BP or by a single-mother (SM in the laboratory. Second, we examined whether BP- and SM-reared offspring differed in adult nurturing, bonding, and emotional behaviors. Finally, we investigated the effects of rearing condition on neuropeptide systems that regulate adult social behavior (oxytocin, vasopressin, and corticotropin-releasing factor [CRF]. Observations revealed that SM-reared pups were exposed more frequently (P<0.01, licked and groomed less (P<0.01, and matured more slowly (P<0.01 than BP-reared pups. In adulthood, there were striking socio-behavioral differences: SM-reared females showed low spontaneous, pup-directed alloparental behavior (P<0.01 and both males and females from the SM-reared condition showed delayed partner preference formation. While rearing did not impact neuropeptide receptor densities in the ventral forebrain as we predicted, SM-reared animals, particularly females, had increased OT content (P<0.01 and greater dorsal raphe CRF2 densities (P<0.05 and both measures correlated with licking and grooming experienced during the first 10 days of life. These results suggest that naturalistic variation in social rearing conditions can introduce diversity into adult nurturing and attachment behaviors.

  3. Conditional inactivation of neuropeptide Y Y1 receptors unravels the role of Y1 and Y5 receptors coexpressing neurons in anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Angela; Mele, Paolo; Bertocchi, Ilaria; Oberto, Alessandra; Bachmann, Alessia; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Palanza, Paola; Sprengel, Rolf; Eva, Carola

    2014-12-01

    The Y1 receptor (Y1R) and Y5 receptor (Y5R) for neuropeptide Y share similar actions in the regulation of anxiety. Previously demonstrated that conditional removal of the Y1R during postnatal development in the forebrain excitatory neurons leads to higher anxiety, increased hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis activity, and decreased body growth rate in male mice raised by foster mothers that exhibit high levels of maternal care. In the present study, we used the same conditional system to analyze the specific contribution to emotional behavior and stress response of the Y1R coexpressed with the Y5R. Using the Cre-loxP recombination system, we investigated anxious behavior, spatial memory, and metabolic functions of conditional knockout mice in which the inactivation of the Npy1r gene was induced in the Y5Rs expressing neurons of juvenile mice (Npy1r(Y5R-/-) ). Npy1r(Y5R-/-) mice show increased anxiety-related behavior but no changes in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis activity or in body weight growth, independently of gender and mouse strain used as foster mothers. Also, Npy1r(Y5R-/-) mice of both genders display increased spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze test. The results suggest that neuropeptide Y Y1R differentially expressed in the limbic system regulates anxiety and stress responses via distinct neurochemical circuits. In addition, we provide the first experimental genetic evidence that the Y1Rs coexpressed with the Y5R are involved in retention of spatial memory in male and female mice. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Serotonin 2A and 2C receptor biosynthesis in the rodent striatum during postnatal development: mRNA expression and functional linkage to neuropeptide gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, G J; Walker, P D

    2000-11-01

    The present study was designed to determine if there are region-specific differences in serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission and 5-HT receptor expression that may limit the stimulatory effects of the 5-HT releaser p-chloroamphetamine (pCA) on striatal neuropeptide gene expression to the posterior striatum (P-STR) during postnatal maturation. Sprague-Dawley rat brains from postnatal days (PND) 1-35 were processed for 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptor mRNA expression by in situ hybridization and monoamine analysis by HPLC. Within the P-STR, 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA expression reached young adult (PND 35) levels by PND 3, while levels in the A-STR were significantly less (range: 1.43 +/- 0.219-6. 36 +/- 0.478) than P-STR (5.36 +/- 0.854-12.11 +/- 1.08) at each respective age throughout the time course. 5-HT(2C) receptor mRNA expression reached young adult levels at PND 7 in the A-STR and by PND 3 in the P-STR. At each PND age 5-HT(2C) receptor mRNA levels within the P-STR were significantly less (6.23 +/- 1.02-12.32 +/- 0.427) than the A-STR (7.31 +/- 1.65-26.84 +/- 2.24). 5-HT content increased across the developmental time course within the P-STR (5.01 +/- 0.327-15.7 +/- 1.03 ng/mg protein) and A-STR (2.97 +/- 0. 223-11.2 +/- 0.701 ng/mg protein). Four hours following injection (i. p.) of pCA (10 mg/kg), preprotachykinin (PPT) mRNA levels increased 89% in the P-STR but not the anterior (A-STR) striatum of the 3-week-old rat, which were prevented by preinjection (30 min, i.p.) of the 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist ritanserin (1 mg/kg). Together, these data suggest that faster maturity of 5-HT(2A) receptor expression in the P-STR may be sufficient to convey the region-specific acute stimulatory effects of pCA on PPT mRNA transcription in the developing rodent striatum. These results provide further evidence that the influence of 5-HT on neuropeptide gene expression is far stronger in caudal vs. rostral striatal regions during postnatal development. Copyright 2000 Wiley

  5. Elevated expression of neuropeptide signaling genes in the eyestalk ganglia and Y-organ of Gecarcinus lateralis individuals that are refractory to molt induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Natalie L; Schulz, Hanna M; Oatman, Stephanie R; Mykles, Donald L

    2017-12-01

    Molting is induced in decapod crustaceans via multiple leg autotomy (MLA) or eyestalk ablation (ESA). MLA removes five or more walking legs, which are regenerated and become functional appendages at ecdysis. ESA eliminates the primary source of molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH), which suppress the production of molting hormones (ecdysteroids) from the molting gland or Y-organ (YO). Both MLA and ESA are effective methods for molt induction in Gecarcinus lateralis. However, some G. lateralis individuals are refractory to MLA, as they fail to complete ecdysis by 12weeks post-MLA; these animals are in the "blocked" condition. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify mRNA levels of neuropeptide and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling genes in YO, eyestalk ganglia (ESG), thoracic ganglion (TG), and brain of intact and blocked animals. Six of the seven neuropeptide signaling genes, three of four mTOR signaling genes, and Gl-elongation factor 2 (EF2) mRNA levels were significantly higher in the ESG of blocked animals. Gl-MIH and Gl-CHH mRNA levels were higher in the TG and brain of blocked animals and levels increased in both control and blocked animals in response to ESA. By contrast, mRNA levels of Gl-EF2 and five of the 10 MIH signaling pathway genes in the YO were two to four orders of magnitude higher in blocked animals compared to controls. These data suggest that increased MIH and CHH synthesis in the ESG contributes to the prevention of molt induction by MLA in blocked animals. The up-regulation of MIH signaling genes in the YO of blocked animals suggests that the YO is more sensitive to MIH produced in the ESG, as well as MIH produced in brain and TG of ESA animals. Both the up-regulation of MIH signaling genes in the YO and of Gl-MIH and Gl-CHH in the ESG, TG, and brain appear to contribute to some G. lateralis individuals being refractory to MLA and ESA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  6. Neuropeptides CRH, SP, HK-1, and Inflammatory Cytokines IL-6 and TNF Are Increased in Serum of Patients with Fibromyalgia Syndrome, Implicating Mast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilioni, Irene; Russell, Irwin J.; Stewart, Julia M.; Gleason, Rae M.

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic, idiopathic condition of widespread musculoskeletal pain affecting more women than men. Even though clinical studies have provided evidence of altered central pain pathways, the lack of definitive pathogenesis or reliable objective markers has hampered development of effective treatments. Here we report that the neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), substance P (SP), and SP-structurally-related hemokinin-1 (HK-1) were significantly (P = 0.026, P < 0.0001, and P = 0.002, respectively) elevated (0.82 ± 0.57 ng/ml, 0.39 ± 0.18 ng/ml, and 7.98 ± 3.12 ng/ml, respectively) in the serum of patients with FMS compared with healthy controls (0.49 ± 0.26 ng/ml, 0.12 ± 0.1 ng/ml, and 5.71 ± 1.08 ng/ml, respectively). Moreover, SP and HK-1 levels were positively correlated (Pearson r = 0.45, P = 0.002) in FMS. The serum concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were also significantly (P = 0.029 and P = 0.006, respectively) higher (2.97 ± 2.35 pg/ml and 0.92 ± 0.31 pg/ml, respectively) in the FMS group compared with healthy subjects (1.79 ± 0.62 pg/ml and 0.69 ± 0.16 pg/ml, respectively). In contrast, serum IL-31 and IL-33 levels were significantly lower (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.044, respectively) in the FMS patients (849.5 ± 1005 pg/ml and 923.2 ± 1284 pg/ml, respectively) in comparison with healthy controls (1281 ± 806.4 pg/ml and 3149 ± 4073 pg/ml, respectively). FMS serum levels of neurotensin were not different from controls. We had previously shown that CRH and SP stimulate IL-6 and TNF release from mast cells (MCs). Our current results indicate that neuropeptides could stimulate MCs to secrete inflammatory cytokines that contribute importantly to the symptoms of FMS. Treatment directed at preventing the secretion or antagonizing these elevated neuroimmune markers, both centrally and peripherally, may prove to be useful in the management of FMS. PMID

  7. Neuropeptide complexity in the crustacean central olfactory pathway: immunolocalization of A-type allatostatins and RFamide-like peptides in the brain of a terrestrial hermit crab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanska, Marta A; Tuchina, Oksana; Agricola, Hans; Hansson, Bill S; Harzsch, Steffen

    2012-09-11

    In the olfactory system of malacostracan crustaceans, axonal input from olfactory receptor neurons associated with aesthetascs on the animal's first pair of antennae target primary processing centers in the median brain, the olfactory lobes. The olfactory lobes are divided into cone-shaped synaptic areas, the olfactory glomeruli where afferents interact with local olfactory interneurons and olfactory projection neurons. The local olfactory interneurons display a large diversity of neurotransmitter phenotypes including biogenic amines and neuropeptides. Furthermore, the malacostracan olfactory glomeruli are regionalized into cap, subcap, and base regions and these compartments are defined by the projection patterns of the afferent olfactory receptor neurons, the local olfactory interneurons, and the olfactory projection neurons. We wanted to know how neurons expressing A-type allatostatins (A-ASTs; synonym dip-allatostatins) integrate into this system, a large family of neuropeptides that share the C-terminal motif -YXFGLamide. We used an antiserum that was raised against the A-type Diploptera punctata (Dip)-allatostatin I to analyse the distribution of this peptide in the brain of a terrestrial hermit crab, Coenobita clypeatus (Anomura, Coenobitidae). Allatostatin A-like immunoreactivity (ASTir) was widely distributed in the animal's brain, including the visual system, central complex and olfactory system. We focussed our analysis on the central olfactory pathway in which ASTir was abundant in the primary processing centers, the olfactory lobes, and also in the secondary centers, the hemiellipsoid bodies. In the olfactory lobes, we further explored the spatial relationship of olfactory interneurons with ASTir to interneurons that synthesize RFamide-like peptides. We found that these two peptides are present in distinct populations of local olfactory interneurons and that their synaptic fields within the olfactory glomeruli are also mostly distinct. We discuss our

  8. Neuropeptide complexity in the crustacean central olfactory pathway: immunolocalization of A-type allatostatins and RFamide-like peptides in the brain of a terrestrial hermit crab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polanska Marta A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the olfactory system of malacostracan crustaceans, axonal input from olfactory receptor neurons associated with aesthetascs on the animal’s first pair of antennae target primary processing centers in the median brain, the olfactory lobes. The olfactory lobes are divided into cone-shaped synaptic areas, the olfactory glomeruli where afferents interact with local olfactory interneurons and olfactory projection neurons. The local olfactory interneurons display a large diversity of neurotransmitter phenotypes including biogenic amines and neuropeptides. Furthermore, the malacostracan olfactory glomeruli are regionalized into cap, subcap, and base regions and these compartments are defined by the projection patterns of the afferent olfactory receptor neurons, the local olfactory interneurons, and the olfactory projection neurons. We wanted to know how neurons expressing A-type allatostatins (A-ASTs; synonym dip-allatostatins integrate into this system, a large family of neuropeptides that share the C-terminal motif –YXFGLamide. Results We used an antiserum that was raised against the A-type Diploptera punctata (Dip-allatostatin I to analyse the distribution of this peptide in the brain of a terrestrial hermit crab, Coenobita clypeatus (Anomura, Coenobitidae. Allatostatin A-like immunoreactivity (ASTir was widely distributed in the animal’s brain, including the visual system, central complex and olfactory system. We focussed our analysis on the central olfactory pathway in which ASTir was abundant in the primary processing centers, the olfactory lobes, and also in the secondary centers, the hemiellipsoid bodies. In the olfactory lobes, we further explored the spatial relationship of olfactory interneurons with ASTir to interneurons that synthesize RFamide-like peptides. We found that these two peptides are present in distinct populations of local olfactory interneurons and that their synaptic fields within the olfactory

  9. Treatment of trigeminal ganglion neurons in vitro with NGF, GDNF or BDNF: effects on neuronal survival, neurochemical properties and TRPV1-mediated neuropeptide secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patwardhan Amol M

    2005-01-01

    results illustrate that NGF, GDNF and BDNF differentially alter TG sensory neuron survival, neurochemical properties and TRPV1-mediated neuropeptide release in culture. In particular, our findings suggest that GDNF and NGF differentially modulate TRPV1-mediated neuropeptide secretion sensitivity, with NGF having a much greater effect on a per neuron basis than GDNF. These findings are discussed in relation to possible therapeutic roles for growth factors or their modulators in pathological pain states, especially as these relate to the trigeminal system.

  10. Hypothyroidism Induces Hypophagia Associated with Alterations in Protein Expression of Neuropeptide Y and Proopiomelanocortin in the Arcuate Nucleus, Independently of Hypothalamic Nuclei-Specific Changes in Leptin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvino, Camila; Império, Güínever Eustáquio; Wilieman, Marianna; Costa-E-Sousa, Ricardo Henrique; Souza, Luana Lopes; Trevenzoli, Isis Hara; Pazos-Moura, Carmen Cabanelas

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone and leptin are essential regulators of energy homeostasis. Both hormones stimulate energy expenditure but have opposite effects on appetite. The mechanisms behind food intake regulation in thyroid dysfunctions are poorly understood. It has been shown that hypothyroid rats exhibited impaired leptin anorexigenic effect and signaling in total hypothalamus, even though they were hypophagic. It was hypothesized that hypothyroidism modulates the expression of neuropeptides: orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC), independently of inducing nuclei-specific changes in hypothalamic leptin signaling. Adult male rats were rendered hypothyroid by administration of 0.03% methimazole in the drinking water for 21 days. Protein content of NPY, POMC, and leptin signaling (the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 [STAT3] pathway) were evaluated by Western blot, and mRNA levels by real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in arcuate (ARC), ventromedial (VMN), and paraventricular (PVN) hypothalamic nuclei isolated from euthyroid (eu) and hypothyroid (hypo) rats. Leptin anorexigenic effect was tested by recording food intake for two hours after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of leptin. Statistical differences were considered significant at p ≤ 0.05. Hypothyroidism was confirmed by decreased serum triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and increased thyrotropin, in addition to increased levels of pro-TRH mRNA in PVN and Dio2 mRNA in the ARC of hypo rats. Hypothyroidism decreased body weight and food intake associated with decreased protein content of NPY and increased content of POMC in the ARC. Conversely, hypothyroidism induced central resistance to the acute anorexigenic effect of leptin, since while euthyroid rats displayed reduced food intake after leptin i.c.v. injection, hypothyroid rats showed no response. Hypothyroid rats exhibited decreased leptin receptor (ObRb) protein content in

  11. Down-regulation of hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) expression after weaning is associated with hyperphagia-induced obesity in JCR rats overexpressing neuropeptide Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diané, Abdoulaye; Pierce, W David; Russell, James C; Heth, C Donald; Vine, Donna F; Richard, Denis; Proctor, Spencer D

    2014-03-14

    We hypothesised that hypothalamic feeding-related neuropeptides are differentially expressed in obese-prone and lean-prone rats and trigger overeating-induced obesity. To test this hypothesis, in the present study, we measured energy balance and hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA expressions in male JCR:LA-cp rats. We compared, in independent cohorts, free-feeding obese-prone (Obese-FF) and lean-prone (Lean-FF) rats at pre-weaning (10 d old), weaning (21-25 d old) and early adulthood (8-12 weeks). A group of Obese-pair-feeding (PF) rats pair-fed to the Lean-FF rats was included in the adult cohort. The body weights of 10-d-old Obese-FF and Lean-FF pups were not significantly different. However, when the pups were shifted from dams' milk to solid food (weaning), the obese-prone rats exhibited more energy intake over the days than the lean-prone rats and higher body and fat pad weights and fasting plasma glucose, leptin, insulin and lipid levels. These differences were consistent with higher energy consumption and lower energy expenditure. In the young adult cohort, the differences between the Obese-FF and Lean-FF rats became more pronounced, yielding significant age effects on most of the parameters of the metabolic syndrome, which were reduced in the Obese-PF rats. The obese-prone rats displayed higher NPY expression than the lean-prone rats at pre-weaning and weaning, and the expression levels did not differ by age. In contrast, POMC expression exhibited significant age-by-genotype differences. At pre-weaning, there was no genotype difference in POMC expression, but in the weanling cohort, obese-prone pups exhibited lower POMC expression than the lean-prone rats. This genotype difference became more pronounced at adulthood. Overall, the development of hyperphagia-induced obesity in obese-prone JCR rats is related to POMC expression down-regulation in the presence of established NPY overexpression.

  12. A high fat diet enhances the sensitivity of chick adipose tissue to the effects of centrally injected neuropeptide Y on gene expression of adipogenesis-associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Williams, Carli A; McConn, Betty R; Cline, Mark A; Gilbert, Elizabeth R

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how dietary macronutrient composition and exogenous neuropeptide Y (NPY) affect mRNA abundance of factors associated with lipid metabolism in chick adipose tissue. Chicks were fed one of three isocaloric (3000kcal metabolizable energy (ME)/kg) diets after hatch: high carbohydrate (HC; control), high fat (HF; 30% of ME from soybean oil) or high protein (HP; 25% crude protein). On day 4 post-hatch, vehicle or 0.2nmol of NPY was injected intracerebroventricularly and abdominal and subcutaneous fat depots collected 1h later. In abdominal fat, mRNA abundance of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) increased after NPY injection in HF diet-fed chicks. NPY injection decreased expression of PPARγ and sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1 (SREBP1) in the subcutaneous fat of HC diet-fed chicks, whereas SREBP1 expression was increased in the subcutaneous fat of HF diet-fed chicks after NPY injection. An acutely increased central concentration of NPY in chicks affects adipose tissue physiology in a depot- and diet-dependent manner. The chick may serve as a model to understand the relationship between diet and the brain-fat axis' role in maintaining whole body energy homeostasis, as well as to understand metabolic distinctions among fat depots. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional role of the extracellular N-terminal domain of neuropeptide Y subfamily receptors in membrane integration and agonist-stimulated internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Diana; Walther, Cornelia; Tennemann, Anja; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2009-01-01

    The N terminus is the most variable element in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), ranging from seven residues up to approximately 5900 residues. For family B and C GPCRs it is described that at least part of the ligand binding site is located within the N terminus. Here we investigated the role of the N terminus in the neuropeptide Y receptor family, which belongs to the class A of GPCRs. We cloned differentially truncated Y receptor mutants, in which the N terminus was partially or completely deleted. We found, that eight amino acids are sufficient for full ligand binding and signal transduction activity. Interestingly, we could show that no specific amino acids but rather the extension of the first transmembrane helix by any residues is sufficient for receptor activity but also for membrane integration in case of the hY(1) and the hY(4) receptors. In contrast, the complete deletion of the N terminus in the hY(2) receptors resulted in a mutant that is fully integrated in the membrane but does not bind the ligand very well and internalizes much slower compared to the wild type receptor. Interestingly, also these effects could be reverted by any N-terminal extension. Accordingly, the most important function of the N termini seems to be the stabilization of the first transmembrane helix to ensure the correct receptor structure, which obviously is essential for ligand binding, integration into the cell membrane and receptor internalization.

  14. The influence of physical exercise on alterations in concentrations of neuropeptide Y, leptin and other selected hormonal and metabolic parameters in sportspeople

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Zajadacz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the behaviour and relationships between hormones, and metabolic blood parameters essential for energetic balance control during rest, exercise and restitution. Two groups of young boys (17 cyclists and 11 canoeists were tested twice. Tests were performed on a cycloergometer. During the first study, anaerobic threshold was determined by a non-invasive method and in the second one - cyclists performed prolonged 2-hour exercise below anaerobic threshold and canoeists - 20-min effort above anaerobic threshold. Neuropeptide Y (NPY, leptin, insulin, C-peptide, metabolic clearance of insulin, growth hormone (GH, somatomedin C (IGF1 and glycaemia were analysed. Values of NPY and GH measured directly after exercise were significantly higher than the values of these parameters at rest, in both groups. However, effort did not cause significant changes in leptin concentration and insulin clearance in both groups. Besides, it was shown that 20-min exercise had no influence on insulin concentration in canoeists blood. In these studies significantly lower IGF1 value during restitution than directly after exercise was also noted in the cyclists group. Relations between measured hormonal parameters indicate that some mechanisms, which supply the organism with necessary energetic substrates during the effort, and accelerate the restitution are activated.

  15. Systemic Central Nervous System (CNS)-targeted Delivery of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) Reduces Neurodegeneration and Increases Neural Precursor Cell Proliferation in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Brian; Potkar, Rewati; Metcalf, Jeff; Thrin, Ivy; Adame, Anthony; Rockenstein, Edward; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-01-22

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant protein transmitters in the central nervous system with roles in a variety of biological functions including: food intake, cardiovascular regulation, cognition, seizure activity, circadian rhythms, and neurogenesis. Reduced NPY and NPY receptor expression is associated with numerous neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD). To determine whether replacement of NPY could ameliorate some of the neurodegenerative and behavioral pathology associated with AD, we generated a lentiviral vector expressing NPY fused to a brain transport peptide (apoB) for widespread CNS delivery in an APP-transgenic (tg) mouse model of AD. The recombinant NPY-apoB effectively reversed neurodegenerative pathology and behavioral deficits although it had no effect on accumulation of Aβ. The subgranular zone of the hippocampus showed a significant increase in proliferation of neural precursor cells without further differentiation into neurons. The neuroprotective and neurogenic effects of NPY-apoB appeared to involve signaling via ERK and Akt through the NPY R1 and NPY R2 receptors. Thus, widespread CNS-targeted delivery of NPY appears to be effective at reversing the neuronal and glial pathology associated with Aβ accumulation while also increasing NPC proliferation. Overall, increased delivery of NPY to the CNS for AD might be an effective therapy especially if combined with an anti-Aβ therapeutic. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Central neuropeptide Y receptors are involved in 3rd ventricular ghrelin induced alteration of colonic transit time in conscious fed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritter Michael

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feeding related peptides have been shown to be additionally involved in the central autonomic control of gastrointestinal functions. Recent studies have shown that ghrelin, a stomach-derived orexigenic peptide, is involved in the autonomic regulation of GI function besides feeding behavior. Pharmacological evidence indicates that ghrelin effects on food intake are mediated by neuropeptide Y in the central nervous system. Methods In the present study we examine the role of ghrelin in the central autonomic control of GI motility using intracerobroventricular and IP microinjections in a freely moving conscious rat model. Further the hypothesis that a functional relationship between NPY and ghrelin within the CNS exists was addressed. Results ICV injections of ghrelin (0.03 nmol, 0.3 nmol and 3.0 nmol/5 μl and saline controls decreased the colonic transit time up to 43%. IP injections of ghrelin (0.3 nmol – 3.0 nmol kg-1 BW and saline controls decreased colonic transit time dose related. Central administration of the NPY1 receptor antagonist, BIBP-3226, prior to centrally or peripherally administration of ghrelin antagonized the ghrelin induced stimulation of colonic transit. On the contrary ICV-pretreatment with the NPY2 receptor antagonist, BIIE-0246, failed to modulate the ghrelin induced stimulation of colonic motility. Conclusion The results suggest that ghrelin acts in the central nervous system to modulate gastrointestinal motor function utilizing NPY1 receptor dependent mechanisms.

  17. Postulated Role of Vasoactive Neuropeptide-Related Immunopathology of the Blood Brain Barrier and Virchow-Robin Spaces in the Aetiology of Neurological-Related Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Staines

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasoactive neuropeptides (VNs such as pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP have critical roles as neurotransmitters, vasodilators including perfusion and hypoxia regulators, as well as immune and nociception modulators. They have key roles in blood vessels in the central nervous system (CNS including maintaining functional integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB and blood spinal barrier (BSB. VNs are potent activators of adenylate cyclase and thus also have a key role in cyclic AMP production affecting regulatory T cell and other immune functions. Virchow-Robin spaces (VRSs are perivascular compartments surrounding small vessels within the CNS and contain VNs. Autoimmunity of VNs or VN receptors may affect BBB and VRS function and, therefore, may contribute to the aetiology of neurological-related conditions including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. VN autoimmunity will likely affect CNS and immunological homeostasis. Various pharmacological and immunological treatments including phosphodiesterase inhibitors and plasmapheresis may be indicated.

  18. Neuropeptide Kyotorphin Impacts on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Glucocorticoid-Mediated Inflammatory Response. A Molecular Link to Nociception, Neuroprotection, and Anti-Inflammatory Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perazzo, Juliana; Lima, Carla; Heras, Montserrat; Bardají, Eduard; Lopes-Ferreira, Mônica; Castanho, Miguel

    2017-08-16

    Neuropeptide kyotorphin (KTP) is a potent analgesic if administered directly into the brain. In contrast, KTP-amide (KTP-NH 2 ) is analgesic, neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory following systemic administration, albeit its mechanism of action is unknown. The aim of this study was to shed light on the mechanism of action of KTP-NH 2 at the molecular level. KTP-NH 2 does not inhibit the enkephalinases angiotensin-converting-enzyme and dipeptidyl-peptidase 3. Intravital microscopy showed that KTP-NH 2 decreased the number of rolling leukocytes in a mouse model of inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Pretreatment with metyrapone abrogated the action of KTP-NH 2 . Interestingly, stimulating rolling leukocytes using CXCL-1 is also counteracted by the KTP-NH 2 , but this effect is not abrogated by metyrapone. We conclude that KTP-NH 2 has dual action: a glucocorticoid-mediated action, which is dominant in the full-fledged LPS-induced inflammation model, and a glucocorticoid-independent mechanism, which is predominant in models in which leukocyte rolling is stimulated but inflammation is not totally developed.

  19. Neuropeptide FF analog RF9 is not an antagonist of NPFF receptor and decreases food intake in mice after its central and peripheral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletínská, Lenka; Tichá, Anežka; Nagelová, Veronika; Spolcová, Andrea; Blechová, Miroslava; Elbert, Tomáš; Zelezná, Blanka

    2013-03-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) belongs to the RF-amide family of peptides bearing the identical C-terminal amino acid sequence (R-F-NH2). In addition to NPFF, prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), another RF-amide, binds to NPFF receptors with high affinity. A selective antagonist of PrRP has not yet been identified, but a selective antagonist of NPFF, 1-adamantanecarbonyl-RF-NH2 (RF9), was recently reported to antagonize the hyperalgesic effect of NPFF after central administration to mice. In the present study, RF9 competed with NPFF analog D-Y-L-(N-Me)-F-Q-P-Q-R-F-NH2 (1DMe) in binding to CHO-K1 cell membranes transfected with the human NPFF2 receptor. In rat pituitary RC-4B/C cells, where the expression of the NPFF2 receptor was proved by immunodetection, RF9 did not reverse the phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK1/2 induced by [Tyr(1)]NPFF. In vivo experiments with fasted mice confirmed that centrally injected [Tyr(1)]NPFF significantly lowered food intake. However, RF9, a putative NPFF2 antagonist, did not reverse the anorectic effect of [Tyr(1)]NPFF. Paradoxically, RF9 itself exhibited an anorectic effect in fasted mice not only after intracerebroventricular but also after subcutaneous administration. This finding casts doubt on claims that RF9 is an NPFF antagonist. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Site-specific attenuation of food intake but not the latency to eat after hypothalamic injections of neuropeptide Y in dehydrated-anorexic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter-Venzon, Dawna; Watts, Alan G

    2009-12-01

    Anorexia that accompanies cellular dehydration in rats (DE-anorexia) offers a relatively simple model for investigating the functional organization of neural mechanisms that can suppress feeding during dehydration. Previous studies strongly suggest that the inputs that drive ingestive behavior control neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) remain active during DE-anorexia. Here we examine whether these two regions retain their sensitivity to neuropeptide Y (NPY). NPY is an important component in two major feeding-related inputs from the arcuate nucleus and the hindbrain. We found that intake responses to NPY injections in the LHA and PVH were suppressed in DE-anorexia, but the PVH remained less sensitive to the effects of NPY than the LHA in DE-anorexic animals. Indeed the higher dose of NPY (238 pmol) completely overcame shorter periods of DE-anorexia when injected into the LHA but not the PVH. However, the latency to eat after NPY injections remained unchanged from control animals, regardless of NPY dose, injection location, or intensity of anorexia. Furthermore, the onset and size of the strong and rapidly induced compensatory feeding that follows the return of water to DE-anorexic animals was also unaffected by any NPY injections. These data support the hypothesis that DE-anorexia develops as a consequence of the premature termination of regularly initiated meals, which perhaps involves processes that alter the sensitivity of satiety mechanisms downstream to the PVH and LHA.

  1. Two-color double-labeling in situ hybridization of whole-mount Hydra using RNA probes for five different Hydra neuropeptide preprohormones: evidence for colocalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, G N; Williamson, M; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    2000-01-01

    The freshwater polyp Hydra magnipapillata has a primitive nervous system that produces at least three distinct classes of neuropeptides: various peptides having the C-terminal sequence Arg-Phe-NH2 (the Hydra-RFamide family), Leu-Trp-NH2 (the Hydra-LWamide family), and a single peptide having the C......-terminal sequence Lys-Val-NH2 (Hydra-KVamide). The various Hydra-RFamides are synthesized by three different preprohormones: preprohormone-A, -B, and -C. The various Hydra-LWamides are synthesized by a single preprohormone (prepro-Hydra-LWamide), as is Hydra-KVamide (prepro-Hydra-KVamide). Using a wholemount double......-labeling two-color in situ hybridization technique and RNA probes specific for each of these five Hydra preprohormone mRNAs, we found that specific sets of neurons express each of the five preprohormones, except for the peduncle region of Hydra (an area just above the basal disk), where a population of neurons...

  2. Neuropeptide Y Y(1) and Y(2) receptor mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex of psychiatric subjects. Relationship of Y(2) subtype to suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caberlotto, L; Hurd, Y L

    2001-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that the neuropeptide Y (NPY) system is involved in the pathogenesis of mood disorder. In this study, Y(1) and Y(2) receptor mRNA expression levels were analyzed in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of subjects affected with major depression, bipolar disorder, or schiz