WorldWideScience

Sample records for biosphere-atmosphere interface influencing

  1. Ecological research in the large-scale biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazonia: early results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, M.; Alencar, A.; Asner, G.P.; Braswell, B.; Bustamante, M.; Davidson, E.; Feldpausch, T.; Fernandes, E.; Goulden, M.; Kabat, P.; Kruijt, B.; Luizão, F.; Miller, S.; Markewitz, D.; Nobre, A.D.; Nobre, C.A.; Priante Filho, N.; Rocha, da H.; Silva Dias, P.; Randow, von C.; Vourlitis, G.L.

    2004-01-01

    The Large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is a multinational, interdisciplinary research program led by Brazil. Ecological studies in LBA focus on how tropical forest conversion, regrowth, and selective logging influence carbon storage,. nutrient dynamics, trace gas fluxes,

  2. Using observations to evaluate biosphere-atmosphere interactions in models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julia; Konings, Alexandra G.; Alemohammad, Seyed H.; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere interactions influence the hydrologic cycle by altering climate and weather patterns (Charney, 1975; Koster et al., 2006; Seneviratne et al., 2006), contributing up to 30% of precipitation and radiation variability in certain regions (Green et al., 2017). They have been shown to contribute to the persistence of drought in Europe (Seneviratne et al., 2006), as well as to increase rainfall in the Amazon (Spracklen et al., 2012). Thus, a true representation of these feedbacks in Earth System Models (ESMs) is crucial for accurate forecasting and planning. However, it has been difficult to validate the performance of ESMs since often-times surface and atmospheric flux data are scarce and/or difficult to observe. In this study, we use the results of a new global observational study (using remotely sensed solar-induced fluorescence to represent the biosphere flux) (Green et al., 2017) to determine how well a suite of 13 ESMs capture biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks. We perform a Conditional Multivariate Granger Causality analysis in the frequency domain with radiation, precipitation and temperature as atmospheric inputs and GPP as the biospheric input. Performing the analysis in the frequency domain allows for separation of feedbacks at different time-scales (subseasonal, seasonal or interannual). Our findings can be used to determine whether there is agreement between models, as well as, to pinpoint regions or time-scales of model bias or inaccuracy, which will provide insight on potential improvement. We demonstrate that in addition to the well-known problem of convective parameterization over land in models, the main issue in representing feedbacks between the land and the atmosphere is due to the misrepresentation of water stress. These results provide a direct quantitative assessment of feedbacks in models and how to improve them. References: Charney, J.G. Dynamics of deserts and drought in the Sahel. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological

  3. TRMM LBA (LARGE SCALE BIOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE) EXPERIMENT (AMPR) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) was deployed during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission - Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment...

  4. Atmospheric Ozone And Its Biosphere - Atmosphere Exchange In A Mangrove Forest Ecosystem A Case Study From Sundarbans NE Coast Of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manab Kumar Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Temporal variation of atmospheric O3 and its biosphere atmosphere exchange were monitored in the Sundarbans mangrove forest from January 2011 to December 2011 on bimonthly basis. O3 mixing ratios at 10 m and 20 m heights over the forest atmosphere ranged between 14.66 1.88 to 37.90 0.91 and 19.32 6.27 to 39.80 10.13 ppbv respectively having maximal premonsoon and minimal monsoon periods. Average daytime O3 mixing ratio was 1.69 times higher than nighttime indicates significant photo chemical production of O3 in forest atmosphere. Annual averaged O3 mixing ratio in 10 m height was 13.2 lower than 20 m height induces exchange of O3 across mangrove biosphere atmosphere interface depending upon micrometeorological conditions of the forest ecosystem. Annual average biosphere atmosphere O3 exchange flux in this mangrove forest environment was 0.441 g m-2 s-1. Extrapolating the value for entire forest surface area the mangrove ecosystem acts as a sink of 58.4GgO3 annually indicating significant contribution of Sundarbans mangroves towards regional atmospheric O3 budget as well as climate change.

  5. Biosphere-atmosphere Exchange of CO2 in a Subtropical Mangrove Wetland in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Neogi, S.; Lai, D. Y. F.

    2017-12-01

    Mangrove ecosystems play an important role in the global carbon cycle due to their high primary productivity, carbon-rich sediment, and sensitivity to climate change. Yet, there is currently a paucity of studies that quantify the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of GHGs in mangrove wetlands continuously at the ecosystem level. In this study, the temporal variability of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) between the Kandelia obovata mangrove and the atmosphere was determined in the Mai Po Marshes Nature Reserve of subtropical Hong Kong using an eddy covariance system between February 2016 and January 2017. The daytime half-hourly NEE ranged between -5.0 and +3.3 µmol m-2 s-1, while the maximum nighttime NEE could reach +5.0 µmol m-2 s-1 during the wet, warm season. Temperature, photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and surface water salinity were some key physical and hydrological controls of NEE. Tidal activity could also exert profound influence on CO2 fluxes in this mangrove ecosystem by exporting dissolved carbon to adjacent estuary and inhibiting soil respiration during the inundation period. Overall, this coastal mangrove was a net sink of atmospheric CO2. Our results suggest that the ability of subtropical mangrove ecosystems in sequestering CO2 could be highly dependent on future changes in temperature, precipitation, and salinity.

  6. The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia: Analyzing Regional Land Use Change Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Keller; Maria Assunção Silva-Dias; Daniel C. Nepstad; Meinrat O. Andreae

    2004-01-01

    The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is a multi-disciplinary, multinational scientific project led by Brazil. LBA researchers seek to understand Amazonia in its global context especially with regard to regional and global climate. Current development activities in Amazonia including deforestation, logging, cattle ranching, and agriculture...

  7. The large scale biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazonia (LBA); concise experimental plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LBAScience Planning Group (Cachoeira Paulista),

    1996-01-01

    The large-scale biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazonia (LBA) aims at enhancing knowledge of the climatological, ecological, biogeochemical, and hydrological functioning of Amazonia. It will address the effects of changes in land use and climate on these functions, including also the

  8. Cloud and rain processes in a biosphere-atmosphere interaction context in the Amazon Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva Dias, M.A.F.; Rutledge, S.; Kabat, P.; Silva Dias, P.L.; Nobre, C.; Fisch, G.; Dolman, A.J.; Zipser, E.; Garstang, M.; Manzi, A.O.; Fuentes, J.D.; Rocha, H.R.; Marengo, J.; Plana-Fattori, A.; Sá, L.D.A.; Alvalá, R.C.S.; Andreae, M.O.; Artaxo, P.; Gielow, R.; Gatti, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the results from the first major mesoscale atmospheric campaign of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) Program. The campaign, collocated with a Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite validation campaigns, was conducted in

  9. Studying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 through Carbon-13 stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van der I.R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Thesis ‘Studying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 through carbon-13 stable isotopes’ Ivar van der Velde Making predictions of future climate is difficult, mainly due to large uncertainties in the carbon cycle. The rate at which carbon is stored in the oceans and terrestrial

  10. Studying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 through Carbon-13 stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van der I.R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Thesis ‘Studying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 through

    carbon-13 stable isotopes’

    Ivar van der Velde

    Making predictions of future climate is difficult, mainly due to large uncertainties in the carbon cycle. The rate at which carbon is stored in the oceans and

  11. Assessing filtering of mountaintop CO2 mole fractions for application to inverse models of biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Heck

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a widely recognized need to improve our understanding of biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchanges in areas of complex terrain including the United States Mountain West. CO2 fluxes over mountainous terrain are often difficult to measure due to unusual and complicated influences associated with atmospheric transport. Consequently, deriving regional fluxes in mountain regions with carbon cycle inversion of atmospheric CO2 mole fraction is sensitive to filtering of observations to those that can be represented at the transport model resolution. Using five years of CO2 mole fraction observations from the Regional Atmospheric Continuous CO2 Network in the Rocky Mountains (Rocky RACCOON, five statistical filters are used to investigate a range of approaches for identifying regionally representative CO2 mole fractions. Test results from three filters indicate that subsets based on short-term variance and local CO2 gradients across tower inlet heights retain nine-tenths of the total observations and are able to define representative diel variability and seasonal cycles even for difficult-to-model sites where the influence of local fluxes is much larger than regional mole fraction variations. Test results from two other filters that consider measurements from previous and following days using spline fitting or sliding windows are overly selective. Case study examples showed that these windowing-filters rejected measurements representing synoptic changes in CO2, which suggests that they are not well suited to filtering continental CO2 measurements. We present a novel CO2 lapse rate filter that uses CO2 differences between levels in the model atmosphere to select subsets of site measurements that are representative on model scales. Our new filtering techniques provide guidance for novel approaches to assimilating mountain-top CO2 mole fractions in carbon cycle inverse models.

  12. The ACCENT-VOCBAS field campaign on biosphere-atmosphere interactions in a Mediterranean ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, S.; Mereu, S.; Scarascia Mugnozza, G.; Vitale, M.; Manes, F.; Frattoni, M.; Ciccioli, P.; Loreto, F.

    2009-04-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere interactions were investigated on a sandy dune Mediterranean ecosystem in a field campaign held in 2007 within the frame of the European Projects ACCENT and VOCBAS. The campaign was carried out in the Presidential estate of Castelporziano, a peri-urban park close to Rome where several investigations on the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) in Mediterranean area were performed in the past 15 years. While specific aspects of the campaign will be discussed in companion papers, the general climatic and physiological aspects will be presented here together with information regarding BVOC emission from the most common plants present in this ecosystem. During the campaign regular air movements were observed, dominated by moderate nocturnal land breeze and diurnal sea breeze. A regular daily increase of ozone concentration in the air was also observed, but daily peaks of ozone were much lower than those measured downwind of the Rome conurbation. The site was ideal as a natural photochemical reactor to observe reaction, transport and deposition processes occurring in the Mediterranean basin, where a sea-land breeze circulation system allows a strong mixing between biogenic and anthropogenic emissions and secondary pollutants. The campaign investigated emissions from a poorly studied and largely biodiverse ecosystem, often subjected to a combination of environmental stresses and to anthropogenic pollution. Measurements were run in May, when plant physiological conditions were still optimal, in absence of severe drought and heat stress. Foliar rates of photosynthesis and transpiration were as high as generally recorded in unstressed Mediterranean sclerophyllous plants. Most of the plant species emitted high level of monoterpenes, despite measurements being made in a period in which emissions of volatile isoprenoids could be restrained by developmental and environmental factors, such as leaf age and relatively low air temperature. No

  13. Workplan for Catalyzing Collaboration with Amazonian Universities in the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. Foster; Moreira, Adriana

    1997-01-01

    Success of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmospheric Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) program depends on several critical factors, the most important being the effective participation of Amazonian researchers and institutions. Without host-county counterparts, particularly in Amazonia, many important studies cannot he undertaken due either to lack of qualified persons or to legal constraints. No less important, the acceptance of the LBA program in Amazonia is also dependent on what LBA can do for improving the scientific expertise in Amazonia. Gaining the active investment of Amazonian scientists in a comprehensive research program is not a trivial task. Potential collaborators are few, particularly where much of the research was to be originally focused - the southern arc of Brazilian Amazonia. The mid-term goals of the LBA Committee on Training and Education are to increase the number of collaborators and to demonstrate that LBA will be of benefit to the region.

  14. Studies of land-cover, land-use, and biophysical properties of vegetation in the Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere experiment in Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar A. Robertsa; Michael Keller; Joao Vianei Soares

    2003-01-01

    We summarize early research on land-cover, land-use, and biophysical properties of vegetation from the Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere (LBA) experiment in Amazoˆnia. LBA is an international research program developed to evaluate regional function and to determine how land-use and climate modify biological, chemical and physical processes there. Remote sensing has...

  15. Influence of interface properties on fracture behaviour of concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An attempt has been made in this paper to study the interface and its influence on the behaviour of concrete using sandwich, and direct rock-mortar compact specimens under mode I and mode II loading effects. 3. Research significance. The stress–strain response in high strength concrete has been observed to be linear up ...

  16. Influence of interface roughness in quantum cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivas, K. A.; Winge, D. O.; Franckié, M.; Wacker, A.

    2015-01-01

    We use a numerical model based on non-equilibrium Green's functions to investigate the influence of interface roughness (IFR) scattering in terahertz quantum cascade lasers. We confirm that IFR is an important phenomenon that affects both current and gain. The simulations indicate that IFR causes a leakage current that transfers electrons from the upper to the lower laser state. In certain cases, this current can greatly reduce gain. In addition, individual interfaces and their impact on the renormalized single particle energies are studied and shown to give both blue- and red-shifts of the gain spectrum

  17. The interactions between soil-biosphere-atmosphere land surface model with a multi-energy balance (ISBA-MEB) option in SURFEXv8 - Part 1: Model description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Aaron; Samuelsson, Patrick; Gollvik, Stefan; Napoly, Adrien; Jarlan, Lionel; Brun, Eric; Decharme, Bertrand

    2017-02-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are pushing towards improved realism owing to an increasing number of observations at the local scale, constantly improving satellite data sets and the associated methodologies to best exploit such data, improved computing resources, and in response to the user community. As a part of the trend in LSM development, there have been ongoing efforts to improve the representation of the land surface processes in the interactions between the soil-biosphere-atmosphere (ISBA) LSM within the EXternalized SURFace (SURFEX) model platform. The force-restore approach in ISBA has been replaced in recent years by multi-layer explicit physically based options for sub-surface heat transfer, soil hydrological processes, and the composite snowpack. The representation of vegetation processes in SURFEX has also become much more sophisticated in recent years, including photosynthesis and respiration and biochemical processes. It became clear that the conceptual limits of the composite soil-vegetation scheme within ISBA had been reached and there was a need to explicitly separate the canopy vegetation from the soil surface. In response to this issue, a collaboration began in 2008 between the high-resolution limited area model (HIRLAM) consortium and Météo-France with the intention to develop an explicit representation of the vegetation in ISBA under the SURFEX platform. A new parameterization has been developed called the ISBA multi-energy balance (MEB) in order to address these issues. ISBA-MEB consists in a fully implicit numerical coupling between a multi-layer physically based snowpack model, a variable-layer soil scheme, an explicit litter layer, a bulk vegetation scheme, and the atmosphere. It also includes a feature that permits a coupling transition of the snowpack from the canopy air to the free atmosphere. It shares many of the routines and physics parameterizations with the standard version of ISBA. This paper is the first of two parts; in part one

  18. Influence of interface properties on fracture behaviour of concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hardened concrete is a three-phase composite consisting of cement paste, aggregate and interface between cement paste and aggregate. The interface in concrete plays a key role on the overall performance of concrete. The interface properties such as deformation, strength, fracture energy, stress intensity and its ...

  19. Poled-glass devices: Influence of surfaces and interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage-Pedersen, Jacob; Jacobsen, Rune Shim; Kristensen, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Devices in periodically poled glass must have a large periodic variation of the built-in field. We show that the periodic variation can be severely degraded by charge dynamics taking place at the external (glass–air) interface or at internal (glass–glass) interfaces if the interfaces have imperfe...

  20. A Biosphere Assessment: Influence due to Geosphere-Biosphere Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo

    2009-01-01

    Recently the geosphere-biosphere interfaces (GBIs), which is recognized as a zone (GBIZ) beyond the simple conceptual boundaries between the geosphere and biosphere modeling domains for safety assessment, has been raised to an important issue for the biosphere assessment. For the licensing process of the repository, the final step of a series of safety and performance assessment should be concerned how nuclides released from the geological media could make their farther transfer in the biosphere giving rise to doses to humans. Unlike in the case of geosphere, the distinct characteristics of biosphere modeling includes the potential release and subsequent exposure taking place not in the near future with rather unreliable predictions of human behavior at the time of its release. And also unlike the near- and far-field of geospheres such as near field engineering structures and natural geological media, the biosphere is not conceived as a barrier itself that could be well designed or optimized, which always causes the necessity of site-specific modeling approach as much as possible. Through every step of whole geosphere and biosphere modeling, nuclides transport from various geological media to the biosphere over the GBI, biosphere modeling can be done independently, not even knowing what happens in the geosphere, making access possible to it in a separate manner, even though, to some extent, it might somehow need to be accounted for geosphere transport, as is similarly being currently done in many other countries. In general, to show the performance of the repository, dose exposure to the critical group due to nuclide release from the repository should be evaluated and the results compared to the risk or dose presented by regulatory bodies, as safety and performance criteria for HLW repository are usually expressed in terms of quantitative risk or dose. For a real site-specific treatment and incorporation of geological features such as aquifers into the biosphere

  1. Influence of interface potential on the effective mass in Ge nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbagiovanni, E. G.; Cosentino, S.; Terrasi, A.; Mirabella, S.; Lockwood, D. J.; Costa Filho, R. N.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the interface potential on the effective mass of charge carriers is elucidated in this work. We develop a new theoretical formalism using a spatially dependent effective mass that is related to the magnitude of the interface potential. Using this formalism, we studied Ge quantum dots (QDs) formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) and co-sputtering (sputter). These samples allowed us to isolate important consequences arising from differences in the interface potential. We found that for a higher interface potential, as in the case of PECVD QDs, there is a larger reduction in the effective mass, which increases the confinement energy with respect to the sputter sample. We further understood the action of O interface states by comparing our results with Ge QDs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. It is found that the O states can suppress the influence of the interface potential. From our theoretical formalism, we determine the length scale over which the interface potential influences the effective mass

  2. Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of reactive nitrogen and greenhouse gases at the NitroEurope core flux measurement sites: Measurement strategy and first data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiba, U.; Drewer, J.; Tang, Y.S.

    2009-01-01

    -agricultural ecosystems. The NO and N2O emission ratio is influenced by soil type and precipitation. First budgets of reactive N entering and leaving the ecosystem and of net greenhouse gas exchange are outlined. Further information on rates of denitrification to N2 and biological N2 fixation is required to complete...... by a network of low-cost flux measurements (Level-2, 9 sites) and a network to infer reactive N fluxes at 58 sites (Level-1), for comparison with carbon (C) flux measurements. Measurements at the Level-3 sites include high resolution N2O, NO (also CH4, CO2) fluxes, wet and dry N deposition, leaching of N and C...... and N transformations in plant, litter and soil. Results for the first 11 months (1.8.2006 to 30.6.2007) suggest that the grasslands are the largest source of N2O, that forests are the largest source of NO and sink of CH4 and that N deposition rates influence NO and N2O fluxes in non...

  3. Influencing Factors on the Interface Microhardness of Lightweight Aggregate Concrete Consisting of Glazed Hollow Bead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight aggregate concrete consisting of glazed hollow bead (GHB as lightweight aggregate is studied for the influence of nanosilica (NS content, prewetting time for GHB, water-cement ratio, and curing humidity, on the interface structure between GHB and cement paste. This research analyzed the influences of various factors on the interface zone structure by measuring microhardness (HV and hydration degree of cement paste (HD nearby the interface zone (1 mm between GHB and cement paste at different periods of aging. Due to the sampling limitation, the interface zone in this test is within 1 mm away from the surface of lightweight aggregate. The HD of cement paste was determined through chemically combined water (CCW test. The results were expected to reflect the influence of various factors on the interface zone structure. Results showed that the rational control of the four factors studied could fully mobilize the water absorption and desorption properties of GHB to improve the characteristics of the interfacial transition zone.

  4. The influence of ERP implementation on the division of power at the production-sales interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J.; Boonstra, A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a model that demonstrates the influence of enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation on the power and interests of actors at the production-sales interface, and vice versa. Design/methodology/approach - An empirical in-depth

  5. The influence of deflation vectors at interfaces on the deflated conjugate gradient method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermolen, F.J.; Vuik, C.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the value of deflation vectors at interfaces on the rate of convergence of preconditioned conjugate gradient methods. Our set-up is a Laplace problem in two dimensions with continuous or discontinuous coeffcients that vary in several orders of magnitude. In the

  6. Influence of a lipid interface on protein dynamics in a fungal lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.j.; Bywater, R. P.

    2001-01-01

    Lipases catalyze lipolytic reactions and for optimal activity they require a lipid interface. To study the effect of a lipid aggregate on the behavior of the enzyme at the interfacial plane and how the aggregate influences an attached substrate or product molecule in time and space, we have...... forms strong hydrogen bonds with Ser-82, Ser-144, and Trp-88, suggesting that the formation of hydrogen bonds may be an important contribution to the mechanism by which product inhibition might take place....

  7. The interactions between soil-biosphere-atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model multi-energy balance (MEB) option in SURFEXv8 - Part 2: Introduction of a litter formulation and model evaluation for local-scale forest sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoly, Adrien; Boone, Aaron; Samuelsson, Patrick; Gollvik, Stefan; Martin, Eric; Seferian, Roland; Carrer, Dominique; Decharme, Bertrand; Jarlan, Lionel

    2017-04-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) need to balance a complicated trade-off between computational cost and complexity in order to adequately represent the exchanges of energy, water and matter with the atmosphere and the ocean. Some current generation LSMs use a simplified or composite canopy approach that generates recurrent errors in simulated soil temperature and turbulent fluxes. In response to these issues, a new version of the interactions between soil-biosphere-atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model has recently been developed that explicitly solves the transfer of energy and water from the upper canopy and the forest floor, which is characterized as a litter layer. The multi-energy balance (MEB) version of ISBA is first evaluated for three well-instrumented contrasting local-scale sites, and sensitivity tests are performed to explore the behavior of new model parameters. Second, ISBA-MEB is benchmarked against observations from 42 forested sites from the global micro-meteorological network (FLUXNET) for multiple annual cycles.It is shown that ISBA-MEB outperforms the composite version of ISBA in improving the representation of soil temperature, ground, sensible and, to a lesser extent, latent heat fluxes. Both versions of ISBA give comparable results in terms of simulated latent heat flux because of the similar formulations of the water uptake and the stomatal resistance. However, MEB produces a better agreement with the observations of sensible heat flux than the previous version of ISBA for 87.5 % of the simulated years across the 42 forested FLUXNET sites. Most of this improvement arises owing to the improved simulation of the ground conduction flux, which is greatly improved using MEB, especially owing to the forest litter parameterization. It is also shown that certain processes are also modeled more realistically (such as the partitioning of evapotranspiration into transpiration and ground evaporation), even if certain statistical performances are neutral. The

  8. Influence of Dilation on the Strength of Sand – Steel Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolzyk-Szypcio, Katarzyna

    2017-12-01

    In this paper the sand-steel interface behaviour is analysed on the basis of frictional state theory. It is shown that for a small stress level the influence of dilatancy is fundamentally similar for sand-steel and sand-sand behaviour for a direct shear test. The use of the new parameter describes the influence of surface roughness on stress-dilatancy relationship. The peak strength of sand-steel is analysed. Values of the new parameter grow with normalised roughness for smooth surface and are constant for intermediate and rough surfaces. It is also shown that values of normalised friction coefficient obtained theoretically are similar with those shown in literature.

  9. Influence of confining prestress on the transition from interface defeat to penetration in ceramic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Lundberg

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Replica scaled impact experiments with unconfined ceramic targets have shown that the transition velocity, i.e., the impact velocity at which interface defeat ceases and ceramic penetration occurs, decreased as the length scale increased. A possible explanation of how this scale effect is related to the formation of a cone crack in the ceramic has been presented by the authors in an earlier paper. Here, the influence of confinement and prestress on cone cracking and transition velocity is investigated. The hypothesis is that prestress will suppress the formation and growth of the cone crack by lowering the driving stress. A set of impact experiments has been performed in which the transition velocity for four different levels of prestress has been determined. The transition velocities as a function of the level of confining prestress is compared to an analytical model for the influence of prestress on the formation and extension of the cone crack in the ceramic material. Both experiments and model indicate that prestress has a strong influence on the transition from interface defeat to penetration, although the model underestimates the influence of prestress.

  10. Influence of interface-included disorder on classical quantum conductivity of CdTe:In epitaxial layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusakowski, J.; Karpierz, K.; Grynberg, M.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.; Contreras, S.; Callen, O.

    1997-01-01

    An influence of disorder originated from the substrate/layer interface on electrical properties of CdTe:In layers was investigated by means of the Hall effect and magnetoresistance measurements at low temperatures. An estimation of a scattering rate due to interface induced disorder is given. Characteristic features of a magnetic field dependence of magnetoresistance are explained by an influence of quantum interference of scattered electron waves both in the hopping and the free electron conductivity regimes. (author)

  11. Influence of the nature of interfaces on the capillary transport in layered materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derluyn, Hannelore; Janssen, Hans; Carmeliet, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and quantitative analysis of capillary transport across the interface brick–mortar joint in masonry. Moisture profiles are measured with X-ray projection. The influence of curing conditions is analyzed by considering three types of mortars: cured in a mould......, between capillary wet and dry bricks. A decrease in moisture inflow for the mortars cured between bricks is measured. The pore structure and the moisture transport properties of mortar change significantly due to water extraction from the initially wet mortar to the bricks during curing. Numerical...

  12. Influence of heterojunction interface on exciplex emission from organic light-emitting diodes under electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shengyi; Zhang, Xiulong; Lou, Zhidong; Hou, Yanbing [Beijing Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing (China)

    2008-03-15

    In this paper, electroluminescence from organic light-emitting diodes based on 2-(4'-biphenyl)-5-(4{sup ''}-tert-butylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PBD) and N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (TPD) is reported. Based on the exciplex emission from the TPD/PBD interface under high electric fields, the influence of the TPD/PBD interface on exciplex emission was investigated by increasing the number of TPD/PBD interfaces while keeping both the total thickness of the TPD layer and the PBD layer constant in the multiple quantum-wells (MQW) device ITO/TPD/[PBD/TPD]{sub n}/PBD/Al (n is the well number that was varied from 0 to 3). Our experimental data shows that exciplex emission can be enhanced by suitably increasing the well number of this kind of MQW-like device. (orig.)

  13. Influence of semiconductor/metal interface geometry in an EMR sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2013-02-01

    The extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) is well known to be strongly dependent on geometric parameters. While the influence of the aspect ratios of the metal and semiconductor areas has been thoroughly investigated, the geometry of the semiconductor/metal interface has been neglected so far. However, from a fabrication point of view, this part plays a crucial role. In this paper, the performance of a bar-type hybrid EMR sensor is investigated by means of finite element method and experiments with respect to the hybrid interface geometry. A 3-D model has been developed, which simulates the EMR effect in case of fields in different directions. The semiconductor/metal interface has been investigated in terms of different layer thicknesses and overlaps. The results show that those parameters can cause a change in the output sensitivity of 2%-10%. In order to maintain a high sensitivity and keep the fabrication relatively simple and at low cost, a device with a thin metal shunt having a large overlap on the top of the semiconductor bar would provide the best solution. © 2001-2012 IEEE.

  14. The comparison of gamma-radiation and electrical stress influences on oxide and interface defects in power VDMOSFET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorić-Veljković Snežana M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of oxide and interface defects in n-channel power vertical double-diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors, firstly degraded by the gamma-irradiation and electric field and subsequently recovered and annealed, is presented. By analyzing the transfer characteristic shifts, the changes of threshold voltage and underlying changes of gate oxide and interface trap densities during the stress (recovery, annealing of investigated devices, it is shown that these two types of stress influence differently on the gate oxide and the SiO2-Si interface. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI171026

  15. Influence of peak oral temperatures on veneer–core interface stress state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Marrelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is a growing interest for the use of Y-TZP zirconia as core material in veneered all-ceramic prostheses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of CET on the stress distribution of a porcelain layered to zirconia core single crowns by finite elements analysis. Material and methods: CET of eight different porcelains was considered during the analysis. Results: Results of this study indicated that the mismatch in CET between the veneering porcelain and the Y-TZP zirconia core has to be minimum (0.5–1 μm/mK so as to decrease the growing of residual stresses which could bring chipping. Conclusions: The stress state due to temperature variation should be carefully taken into consideration while studying the effect of mechanical load on zirconia core crown by FEA. The interfacial stress state can be increased by temperature variation up to 20% with respect to the relative failure parameter (interface strength in this case. This means that stress due to mechanical load combined to temperature variation-induced stress can lead porcelain veneer–zirconia core interfaces to failure.

  16. Conversational interfaces for task-oriented spoken dialogues: design aspects influencing interaction quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niculescu, A.I.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the design and evaluation of speech-based conversational interfaces for task-oriented dialogues. Conversational interfaces are software programs enabling interaction with computer devices through natural language dialogue. Even though processing conversational speech is

  17. On the influence of internal interfaces and properties of multiphase hard material coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilz, G.

    1992-04-01

    In the system TiC-TiB 2 -B 4 C-SiC coatings with different amounts of phase boundaries were prepared by magnetron sputtering: multilayer coatings with 10, 100 and 1000 individual layers and a total thickness of 5 μm as well as single layer multiphase coatings deposited from multiphase targets on heated and unheated substrates. To know the influence of internal interfaces in those coatings, structure and properties of the corresponding single phase coatings were studied also. TEM examinations of cross-section samples showed that B 4 C and SiC coatings are amorphous whereas TiC and TiB 2 coatings are crystalline with a texture which depends on deposition parameters and is developed with growing thickness of the coating. Therefore the texture of TiC and TiB 2 layers in multilayer coatings depends on the thickness of the individual layer. While the texture of single layers in multilayer SiC-TiC, SiC-TiB 2 , B 4 C-TiB 2 , and B 4 C-SiC coatings corresponds to the structure of single phase coatings of the same thickness, in TiC-TiB 2 coatings the texture of the individual layers is also influenced by the texture of the previous layer. The occurence of mixing zones between the layers depends on the materials, but also on the crystallinity of the previous layer. (orig.(MM) [de

  18. Numerical Methods for a Multicomponent Two-Phase Interface Model with Geometric Mean Influence Parameters

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2015-07-16

    In this paper, we consider an interface model for multicomponent two-phase fluids with geometric mean influence parameters, which is popularly used to model and predict surface tension in practical applications. For this model, there are two major challenges in theoretical analysis and numerical simulation: the first one is that the influence parameter matrix is not positive definite; the second one is the complicated structure of the energy function, which requires us to find out a physically consistent treatment. To overcome these two challenging problems, we reduce the formulation of the energy function by employing a linear transformation and a weighted molar density, and furthermore, we propose a local minimum grand potential energy condition to establish the relation between the weighted molar density and mixture compositions. From this, we prove the existence of the solution under proper conditions and prove the maximum principle of the weighted molar density. For numerical simulation, we propose a modified Newton\\'s method for solving this nonlinear model and analyze its properties; we also analyze a finite element method with a physical-based adaptive mesh-refinement technique. Numerical examples are tested to verify the theoretical results and the efficiency of the proposed methods.

  19. Marginal Adaptation and Quality of Interfaces in Lithium Disilicate Crowns - Influence of Manufacturing and Cementation Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo Freire, C A; Borges, G A; Caldas, Dbm; Santos, R S; Ignácio, S A; Mazur, R F

    To evaluate the cement line thickness and the interface quality in milled or injected lithium disilicate ceramic restorations and their influence on marginal adaptation using different cement types and different adhesive cementation techniques. Sixty-four bovine teeth were prepared for full crown restoration (7.0±0.5 mm in height, 8.0 mm in cervical diameter, and 4.2 mm in incisal diameter) and were divided into two groups: CAD/CAM automation technology, IPS e.max CAD (CAD), and isostatic injection by heat technology, IPS e.max Press (PRESS). RelyX ARC (ARC) and RelyX U200 resin cements were used as luting agents in two activation methods: initial self-activation and light pre-activation for one second (tack-cure). Next, the specimens were stored in distilled water at 23°C ± 2°C for 72 hours. The cement line thickness was measured in micrometers, and the interface quality received scores according to the characteristics and sealing aspects. The evaluations were performed with an optical microscope, and scanning electron microscope images were presented to demonstrate the various features found in the cement line. For the cement line thickness, data were analyzed with three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Games-Howell test (α=0.05). For the variable interface quality, the data were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U-test, the Kruskal-Wallis test, and multiple comparisons nonparametric Dunn test (α=0.05). The ANOVA presented statistical differences among the ceramic restoration manufacturing methods as well as a significant interaction between the manufacturing methods and types of cement (pcement line thickness values when compared to the ARC with both cementation techniques (pmanufacturing methods and cementation techniques. The PRESS ceramics obtained lower scores than did the CAD ceramics when using ARC cement (pcemented with self-adhesive resin cement resulted in a thinner cement line that is statistically different from that of CAD or pressed

  20. Influence of ions on two-dimensional and three-dimensional atomic force microscopy at fluorite-water interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazawa, Keisuke; Watkins, Matthew Benjamin; Shluger, Alexander L.; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Recent advancement in liquid-environment atomic force microscopy (AFM) has enabled us to visualize three-dimensional (3D) hydration structures as well as two-dimensional (2D) surface structures with subnanometer-scale resolution at solid-water interfaces. However, the influence of ions present in solution on the 2D- and 3D-AFM measurements has not been well understood. In this study, we perform atomic-scale 2D- and 3D-AFM measurements at fluorite-water interfaces in pure water and a supersatu...

  1. Human influences on forest ecosystems: the southern wildland-urban interface assessment: summary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward A. Macie; L. Annie Hermansen

    2003-01-01

    This summary report synthesizes the findings contained in the Southern Wildland-Urban Interface Assessment (General Technical Report SRS-55). The Assessment provides a review of critical wildland-urban interface issues, challenges, and needs for the Southern United States. Topics include population and demographic trends, economic and tax issues, land use planning and...

  2. Influence of Learning Styles on Graphical User Interface Preferences for e-Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedic, Velimir; Markovic, Suzana

    2012-01-01

    Implementing Web-based educational environment requires not only developing appropriate architectures, but also incorporating human factors considerations. User interface becomes the major channel to convey information in e-learning context: a well-designed and friendly enough interface is thus the key element in helping users to get the best…

  3. The influence of bias voltage on YBa2Cu3O7-x/metal point contact interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grajcar, M.; Komenskeho Univ., Bratislava; Plecenik, A.; Slovenska Akademia Vied, Bratislava; Seidel, P.; Kus, P.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of DC bias voltage applied on YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x /metal point contact interface at 4.2-300 K temperature range. The spontaneous increase in time of the differential resistance of point contacts considerably depending on DC bias voltage, was experimentally observed at temperature above 200 K. The experimental data are simulated by a one-dimensional out-diffusion model of oxygen in the CuO chains of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO). The obtained results indicate a change of the surface barrier which oxygen must overcome to leave the YBCO if a DC bias voltage is applied to YBCO/metal-tip contact. This allows the control of the out-diffusion process of oxygen from the YBCO/metal point contact interface. The application of higher bias voltage (up to 2 V) enables the transport of oxygen, even below 200 K (down to 4.2 K), and changes the electrical properties of the YBCO/metal point contact interface. It is shown that the shape of the differential characteristics can be changed from a typical NIS contact with a strong tunnelling barrier to an NS contact with a high transparency at the interface. These changes are reiterated by changing the bias voltage polarity. The results indicate the possibility of controlling the electrical properties of the YBCO/metal interface by formation with an external bias voltage. (orig.)

  4. The influence of orientation and practical size on the interface fracture of a bone-nano composite cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilik, Igor; Khandaker, Morshed

    2010-01-01

    Clinical follow-up studies in cemented total hip arthroplasties found that femoral prosthesis loosening is caused by the fracture of the bone-cement interfaces. The research objectives were to determine whether orientation of the bone has any influence on the interface fracture strength, and to determine whether inclusion of micro/nano sizes MgO particles on Cobalt HV bone cement has any influence on the interface fracture strength. Flexural tests were conducted on five groups of specimens to find Young Modulus and bending strength: (1) longitudinal bone, (2) transverse bone, (3) pure cement particles, (4) cement with 36 im and 27 nm MgO particles, and (5) cement with 27nm MgO particles. Also, fracture tests were conducted on six groups of bone-cement specimen to find interface fracture toughness: (1) longitudinal bone-cement without MgO particles, (2) transverse bone-cement without MgO particles, (3) longitudinal bone-cement with 36 im MgO particles, (4) transverse bone-cement with 36 im MgO particles, (5) , longitudinal bone-cement with 27 nm MgO particles, and (6) transverse bone-cement with 27 nm MgO particles. Transverse bone specimen was 14% stiffer than longitudinal specimen, while bending strength and fracture toughness of longitudinal specimen was 29% and 2.6 times lower than the transverse specimen, respectively. Reduction of Young's modulus (7.3%), bending strength (27%) and fracture toughness (16%) was observed by the inclusion of microsize MgO particles, and a reduction of the Young's Modulus (19%), bending strength (21%),and fracture toughness (19%) for nanosize MgO particles. The interface toughness of the transverse bone infused with 27nm MgO was about 6 times higher than transverse bone infused with 36 im particles of MgO. Preliminary studies show that orientation of the bone has significant influence on the interface fracture. MgO particles size have a significant effect on the strength of the bone - cement interface.(Author)

  5. The Influence of Partial Knee Replacement Designs on Tensile Strain at Implant-Bone Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial knee replacement (PKR results in fast recovery and good knee mechanics and is ideal to treat medial knee osteoarthritis. Cementless PKR depends on bone growing into the implant surface for long-term fixation. Implant loosening may occur due to high tensile strain resulted from large mechanical loads during rehab exercises. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether external fixations such as superior screw and frontal flange could reduce the tensile strain at the implant-bone interface. Three medial PKRs were designed. The first PKR had no external fixations. A superior screw and a frontal flange were then added to the first PKR to form the second and third PKR designs, respectively. Finite element analysis was performed to examine the tensile strain at the implant-bone interface during weight-bearing exercises. The PKR with no external fixations exhibited high tensile strain at the anterior implant-bone interface. Both the screwed and flanged PKRs effectively reduced the tensile strain at the anterior implant-bone interface. Furthermore, the flanged PKR resulted in a more uniform reduction of the tensile strain than the screwed PKR. In conclusion, external fixations are necessary to alleviate tensile strain at the implant-bone interface during knee rehab exercises.

  6. The RNA core weakly influences the interactions of the bacteriophage MS2 at key environmental interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the RNA core on interfacial interactions of the bacteriophage MS2 was investigated. After removal of the RNA core, empty intact capsids were characterized and compared to untreated MS2. Electron density of untreated MS2 and RNA-free MS2 were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and synchrotron-based small angle spectroscopy (SAXS). Suspensions of both particles exhibited similar electrophoretic mobility across a range of pH values. Similar effects were observed at pH 5.9 across a range of NaCl or CaCl2 concentrations. We compared key interfacial interactions (particle-particle and particle/air-water interface) between suspensions of each type of particle using time resolved dynamic light scattering (TR-DLS) to observe and quantify aggregation kinetics and axisymmetric drop shape analysis to measure adsorption at the air-water interface. Both suspensions showed insignificant aggregation over 4 h in 600 mM NaCl solutions. In the presence of Ca2+ ions, aggregation of both types of particles was consistent with earlier aggregation studies and was characterized by both reaction-limited and diffusion-limited regimes occurring at similar [Ca2+]. However, the removal of the RNA from MS2 had no apparent effect on the aggregation kinetics of particles. Despite some differences in the kinetics of adsorption to the air-water interface, the changes in surface tension which result from particle adsorption showed no difference between the untreated MS2 and RNA-free MS2. The interactions and structure of particles at the air-water interface were further probed using interfacial dilational rheology. The surface elasticity (E s) and surface viscosity (ηs) at the interface were low for both the untreated virus and the RNA-free capsid. This observation suggests that the factors that impact the adsorption kinetics are not important for an equilibrated interface. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. The influence of interface on spin pumping effect in Ni80Fe20 /Tb bilayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjin Yue

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on the interface effect of the Ni80Fe20 (Py/terbium (Tb bilayer, the influence of interface on the magnetization dynamic damping is investigated systematically. Two series of Py (12 nm/Tb (d nm films with and without copper (Cu (1 nm interlayer are deposited on silicon (Si substrates by DC magnetron sputtering at room temperature. From vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM measurements, the saturation magnetization (Ms decreases with increasing Tb thickness in Py/Tb bilayer while the decrease of Ms is suppressed efficiently by inserting a Cu layer with even 1 nm of thickness. From the frequency dependence of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR linewidth, we can obtain the Gilbert damping coefficient (α, α is found to exhibit an extreme enhancement in comparison to the single Py layer and shows an increasing trend with increasing Tb thickness. By inserting the Cu layer, α decreases significantly. From theoretical fitting, the spin diffusion length (λSD and spin mixing conductance (g↑↓ are determined. It shows that the interface structure influences the spin mixing conductance but not the spin diffusion length.

  8. Influences of microgap and micromotion of implant-abutment interface on marginal bone loss around implant neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiawei

    2017-11-01

    To review the influences and clinical implications of micro-gap and micro-motion of implant-abutment interface on marginal bone loss around the neck of implant. Literatures were searched based on the following Keywords: implant-abutment interface/implant-abutment connection/implant-abutment conjunction, microgap, micromotion/micromovement, microleakage, and current control methods available. The papers were then screened through titles, abstracts, and full texts. A total of 83 studies were included in the literature review. Two-piece implant systems are widely used in clinics. However, the production error and masticatory load result in the presence of microgap and micromotion between the implant and the abutment, which directly or indirectly causes microleakage and mechanical damage. Consequently, the degrees of microgap and micromotion further increase, and marginal bone absorption finally occurs. We summarize the influences of microgap and micromotion at the implant-abutment interface on marginal bone loss around the neck of the implant. We also recommend some feasible methods to reduce their effect. Clinicians and patients should pay more attention to the mechanisms as well as the control methods of microgap and micromotion. To reduce the corresponding detriment to the implant marginal bone, suitable Morse taper or hybrid connection implants and platform switching abutments should be selected, as well as other potential methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrostatic Characterization of Solid/ Liquid Interfaces. Influence of Adsorbats Propriétés électrostatiques des interfaces solide/liquide. Influence des adsorbats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyklema J.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available As a rule, electrical double layers develop at the phase boundary between dispersed insoluble oxides and the liquid medium in which they are embedded. Such double layers can be characterized by their surface charge, which is a measurable quantity. This surface charge can be determined as a function of the pH (for oxides, the pAg (for silver halides or by corresponding quantities for other systems. The relation between the surface charge and the pH (etc. also depends on the extent of screening. Hence, uncharged or charged adsorbates exert their influence, and from the ensuing changes information can be obtained regarding these adsorates. Principles and consequences of these phenomena will be discussed. En règle générale, des couches doubles électriques se forment à la limite de phase entre des oxydes insolubles en dispersion et le milieu liquide dans lequel ils se trouvent. Ces couches doubles peuvent être caractérisées par leur charge de surface, qui est une grandeur mesurable. Cette charge de surface peut être déterminée en fonction du pH (pour les oxydes, du pAg (pour les halogénures d'argent ou par des quantités correspondantes pour d'autres systèmes. La relation entre la charge de surface et le pH (etc. dépend aussi de l'efficacité de la protection contre les forces électrostatiques. Les adsorbats, chargés ou non, exercent donc une influence et provoquent des modifications dont on peut tirer des informations sur les corps adsorbés. L'auteur étudie les principes et les conséquences de ces phénomènes.

  10. How Interface Design and Search Strategy Influence Children’s Search Performance and Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochmann-Mannak, Hanna; Lentz, Leo; Huibers, Theo W.C.; Sanders, Ted

    This chapter presents an experiment with 158 children, aged 10 to 12, in which search performance and attitudes towards an informational Website are investigated. The same Website was designed in 3 different types of interface design varying in playfulness of navigation structure and in playfulness

  11. Influence of roughness at interfaces on tunneling magnetoresistance in Fe/MgO/Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edalati Boostan, Saeideh [I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus Liebig University Giessen, D-35392 (Germany); Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradi, Hosein [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heiliger, Christian [I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus Liebig University Giessen, D-35392 (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We propose a theoretical model for magnetic tunnel junction devices with rough interfaces based on a single-band tight-binding approximation. The high tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) for crystalline MgO barrier was observed at room temperature which is desirable for magnetic random access memory (MRAM) applications. In real junctions the Fe and MgO atoms are interdiffused at interfaces and the numbers of diffused Fe and MgO atoms are not the same. The interface disorder is modeled by considering replacement of MgO sites by Fe atoms with a probability of n>0.5. The non-equilibrium Green's function formalism is used to calculate transport in Fe/MgO/Fe junctions. We investigate the voltage dependencies of TMR and current densities for parallel and anti-parallel configurations for majority and minority spins. The results show that the roughness decreases the TMR. The current density for the parallel (antiparallel) orientations of magnetizations decreases (increases) by including roughness at the interface.

  12. Human influences on forest ecosystems: the southern wildland-urban interface assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward A. Macie; L. Annie Hermansen; [Editors

    2002-01-01

    This publication provides a review of critical wildland-urban interface issues, challenges, and needs for the Southern United States. Chapter topics include population and demographic trends; economic and tax issues; land use planning and policy; urban effects on forest ecosystems; challenges for forest resource management and conservation; social consequences of...

  13. Water movement in building walls: interfaces influence on the moisture flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, J. M. P. Q.; de Freitas, V. P.; Guimarães, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    Most building elements are a composite of different material layers; however the majority of the works presented in literature were developed for multi-layered elements with perfect contact interface, without resistance. Experimental results presented in literature showed that a considerable hydraulic resistance could be created by the imperfect contact between two porous building materials. Moisture transport in multi-layered building elements can deviate from the moisture transport found for the combination of the single material elements, so the assumption of perfect hydraulic contact could lead to significant errors in predicting the moisture transport. This work presents an experimental campaign and a critical analysis of water absorption in samples of two different building materials (clay brick and autoclaved aerated concrete) with and without joints at different positions (heights) and different contact configurations (natural contact and air space between layers). The results show that when the moisture reaches the interface there is a slowing of the wetting process due to the interfaces hygric resistance. The interfaces hygric resistance, in the AAC samples, is only observed for the joint located from a distance of 2 cm of the wetting plane. The penetration coefficient of the two building materials analysed is very different. Finally, the evolution of the distribution of liquid in the porous medium was analysed in terms of the Boltzmann transform method and anomalous diffusion equation.

  14. To what extent can charge localization influence electron injection efficiency at graphene-porphyrin interfaces?

    KAUST Repository

    Parida, Manas R.

    2015-04-28

    Controlling the electron transfer process at donor- acceptor interfaces is a research direction that has not yet seen much progress. Here, with careful control of the charge localization on the porphyrin macrocycle using β -Cyclodextrin as an external cage, we are able to improve the electron injection efficiency from cationic porphyrin to graphene carboxylate by 120% . The detailed reaction mechanism is also discussed.

  15. Influence of crystal–melt interface shape on self-seeding and single ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Many antimonide (Sb) crystals of 8 mm to 18 mm diameter were grown by optimized growth parameters. The forced convection and absence of conducting support to ampoule showed improvement in crystal quality of as grown ingots. Crystals showed preferred orientation and self-seeding. Results on interface shape and ...

  16. Educational Interface Agents as Social Models to Influence Learner Achievement, Attitude and Retention of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ramazan; Kilic-Cakmak, Ebru

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the impacts of educational interface agents with different attributes on achievement, attitude and retention of elementary school students in their science and technology courses. The study was implemented in four different eighth- grade classes (aged 13-14) of an elementary school. Four different types of educational software,…

  17. Influence of crystal–melt interface shape on self-seeding and single ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The growth of Sb-based crystals (InSb, GaSb etc) was undertaken using resistive heater furnace by vertical directional solidification (VDS) technique. Crystal–melt interface shape during the growth was shown to convert from concave to convex along the crystal axis of the ingots. Many antimonide (Sb) crystals of 8 ...

  18. Influence of copolymer architectures on adhesion and compatibilization of polymers at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lantao

    Adhesion and compatibilization of immiscible homopolymers by a variety of copolymer architectures were studied. The work is arranged into 5 chapters: In Chapter 1, an introduction to recent studies on improvement of adhesion and compatibilization of polymer blends using copolymers was made including the advantages and shortcomings of interfacial reinforcement by a diblock copolymer architecture. Emphasis is on the novel ways to improve adhesion at polymer interfaces by a variety of copolymer architectures, including physical entanglement and chemical modification and chemical bonding. In Chapter 2, a series of Polystyrene-Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-PMMA) graft copolymers were introduced to modify the PS and PMMA homopolymer interface and was found to increase the interfacial fracture toughness to a large extent, depending on the detailed architectural variables such as the graft number per chain, the lengths of the backbone and the grafts, and the total molecular weights of the graft copolymers. It was also found that there was an optimal number of grafts per chain which can be interpreted based on the graft length and inter-branch length of the backbone of the copolymer. Effect of in-situ grafting via a chemical reaction between Polystyrene-Poly(vinyl phenol) (PS-PSOH) and oxazoline containing Styrene-Acrylonitril (SAN) was also discussed compared with the physical grafting of a graft copolymer of different structural parameters. In Chapter 3, hydrogen bonding was utilized to toughen the interface between PS and PAA poly(acrylic acid)) or PMMA using a random copolymer architecture of Polystyrene-Poly(vinyl pyridine) (PS-PVP). It was shown that random copolymer architecture is not only economically feasible due to its low cost of producing but also very effective on adhesion because it not only overcomes the issue of micelle formation which is an unavoidable situation in the diblock and graft cases but the enhancement of adhesion is much higher utilizing a H

  19. The Influence of Loading Ratio on Fatigue Crack Propagation Through a Bi-material Interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náhlík, Luboš; Hutař, Pavel; Knésl, Zdeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 348-349, - (2007), s. 317-320 ISSN 1013-9826. [International Conference on Fracture and Damage Mechanics /6./. Funchal, Madeira, 17.07.2007-19.07.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/05/0320 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : bi-material interface * loading ratio * plasticity-induced crack closure * critical stress Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 0.224, year: 2005

  20. Solutal convection induced by dissolution. Influence on erosion dynamics and interface shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanu, Michael; Philippi, Julien; Cohen, Caroline; Derr, Julien; Courrech du Pont, Sylvain

    2017-04-01

    Rock fractures invaded by a water flow, are often subjected to dissolution, which let grow and evolve the initial fracture network, by evacuating the eroded minerals under a solute form. In the case of fast kinetic of dissolution, local erosion rate is set by the advection of the solute. The erosion velocity decreases indeed with the solute concentration at the interface and vanishes when this concentration reaches the saturation value. Even in absence of an imposed or external flow, advection can drive the dissolution, when buoyancy effects due to gravity induce a solutal convection flow, which controls the erosive dynamics and modifies the shape of the dissolving interface. Here, we investigate using model experiments with fast dissolving materials and numerical simulations in simplified situations, solutal convection induced by dissolution. Results are interpreted regarding a linear stability analysis of the corresponding solutal Rayleigh-Benard instability. A dissolving surface is suspended above a water height, initially at rest. In a first step, solute flux is transported through a growing diffusion layer. Then after an onset time, once the layer exceeds critical width, convection flow starts under the form of falling plumes. A dynamic equilibrium results in average from births and deaths of intermittent plumes, setting the size of the solute concentration boundary layer at the interface and thus the erosion velocity. Solutal convection can also induce a pattern on the dissolving interface. We show experimentally with suspended and inclined blocks of salt and sugar, that in a linear stage, the first wavelength of the dissolution pattern corresponds to the wavelength of the convection instability. Then pattern evolves to more complex shapes due to non-linear interactions between the flow and the eroded interface. More generally, we inquire what are the conditions to observe a such solutal convection instability in geological situations and if the properties of

  1. Influence of the vacuum interface on the charge distribution in V2O3 thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2009-09-22

    The electronic structure of V2O3 thin films is studied by means of the augmented spherical wave method as based on density functional theory and the local density approximation. We establish that the effects of charge redistribution, induced by the vacuum interface, in such films are restricted to a very narrow surface layer of ≈15 Å thickness. As a consequence, charge redistribution can be ruled out as a source of the extraordinary thickness dependence of the metal–insulator transition observed in V2O3 thin films of ~100–1000 Å thickness.

  2. Influence of interface layer on optical properties of sub-20 nm-thick TiO2 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yue-Jie; Zhang, Rong-Jun; Li, Da-Hai; Zhan, Yi-Qiang; Lu, Hong-Liang; Jiang, An-Quan; Chen, Xin; Liu, Juan; Zheng, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Song-You; Chen, Liang-Yao

    2018-02-01

    The sub-20 nm ultrathin titanium dioxide (TiO2) films with tunable thickness were deposited on Si substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The structural and optical properties were acquired by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Afterwards, a constructive and effective method of analyzing interfaces by applying two different optical models consisting of air/TiO2/Ti x Si y O2/Si and air/effective TiO2 layer/Si, respectively, was proposed to investigate the influence of interface layer (IL) on the analysis of optical constants and the determination of band gap of TiO2 ultrathin films. It was found that two factors including optical constants and changing components of the nonstoichiometric IL could contribute to the extent of the influence. Furthermore, the investigated TiO2 ultrathin films of 600 ALD cycles were selected and then annealed at the temperature range of 400-900 °C by rapid thermal annealing. Thicker IL and phase transition cause the variation of optical properties of TiO2 films after annealing and a shorter electron relaxation time reveals the strengthened electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions in the TiO2 ultrathin films at high temperature. The as-obtained results in this paper will play a role in other studies of high dielectric constants materials grown on Si substrates and in the applications of next generation metal-oxide-semiconductor devices.

  3. Influence of ions on two-dimensional and three-dimensional atomic force microscopy at fluorite-water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, K.; Watkins, M.; Shluger, A. L.; Fukuma, T.

    2017-06-01

    Recent advancement in liquid-environment atomic force microscopy (AFM) has enabled us to visualize three-dimensional (3D) hydration structures as well as two-dimensional (2D) surface structures with subnanometer-scale resolution at solid-water interfaces. However, the influence of ions present in solution on the 2D- and 3D-AFM measurements has not been well understood. In this study, we perform atomic-scale 2D- and 3D-AFM measurements at fluorite-water interfaces in pure water and a supersaturated solution of fluorite. The images obtained in these two environments are compared to understand the influence of the ions in solution on these measurements. In the 2D images, we found clear difference in the nanoscale structures but no significant difference in the atomic-scale contrasts. However, the 3D force images show clear difference in the subnanometer-scale contrasts. The force contrasts measured in pure water largely agree with those expected from the molecular dynamics simulation and the solvent tip approximation model. In the supersaturated solution, an additional force peak is observed over the negatively charged fluorine ion site. This location suggests that the observed force peak may originate from cations adsorbed on the fluorite surface. These results demonstrate that the ions can significantly alter the subnanometer-scale force contrasts in the 3D-AFM images.

  4. Influence of structural fluctuations on lifetimes of adsorbate states at hybrid organic-semiconductor interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M.; Sánchez-Portal, D.; Lin, H.; Fratesi, G.; Brivio, G. P.; Selloni, A.

    On the road towards a more realistic description of charge transfer processes at hybrid organic-semiconductor interfaces for photovoltaic applications we extend our first-principles scheme for the extraction of elastic linewidths to include the effects of structural fluctuations. Based on snapshots obtained from Car-Parinello molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature, we set up geometries in which dye molecules at interfaces are attached to a semi-infinite TiO2 substrate. The elastic linewidths are computed using a Green's function method. This effectively introduces the coupling to a continuum of states in the substrate. In particular we investigate catechol and isonicotinic acid on rutile(110) and anatase(101) at the level of semi-local density functional theory. We perform multiple calculations of linewidths and peak-positions associated with the adsorbate's frontier orbitals for different geometric configurations to obtain a time-averaged analysis of such physical properties. We compare the results from the considered systems to understand the effects of dynamics onto interfacial charge transfer and systematically assess the dependence of the extracted elastic lifetimes on the relative alignment between adsorbate and substrate states. This project has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme under Grant Agreement No. 607323 [THINFACE].

  5. Study of the influence of Nb buffer layer on the exchange coupling induced at the Co/IrMn interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino, I.L.C., E-mail: isabel5cas@gmail.com [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Figueiredo, L.C. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília 70910-900 (Brazil); Passamani, E.C.; Nascimento, V.P. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória 29075-910 (Brazil); Pelegrini, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia 74560-900 (Brazil); Baggio Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Nb buffer layer favors smooth/rough Co/IrMn interfaces, depending on its thickness. • Double and single-like hysteresis loop features depend on the Nb thickness. • Co uniaxial anisotropy induced exchange-bias in as-deposited sample. • Uniaxial and exchange-bias anisotropy directions depend on the Nb thickness. • Thicker Nb favors non-collinear anisotropies, while thinner Nb favors collinear. - Abstract: Hybrid Nb(t{sub Nb})/Co(10 nm)/IrMn(15 nm)/Nb(10 nm) heterostructured materials were prepared by DC Magnetron Sputtering and systematically studied by X-ray, magnetization and ferromagnetic resonance techniques. For thinner Nb buffer layer (≤10 nm), it was found that there is an inter-diffusion at Co/IrMn interface, which favors double-like hysteresis loop. For thicker Nb layers, however, a gradual transition from double to single-like hysteresis loops is observed and it is associated with the reduction of the Nb roughness, which also enhances the exchange coupling at the Co/IrMn interface. Nb grown on IrMn layer induces the formation of an NbIrMn alloy layer, while no evidence of inter-diffusion at the Co/Nb interface is observed. For rougher Nb buffer layers (t{sub Nb} < 50 nm), exchange bias and Co uniaxial anisotropies are pointing at the same direction (β∼zero), but for smoother Nb buffer layer (t{sub Nb} = 50 nm) a β angle of 150{sup o} is found. Exchange bias effect was measured in as-prepared and in field-cooled samples; being its presence, in as-prepared sample, attributed to the unidirectional anisotropy of the Co layer (its intensity is modified in case of sample with a CoIrMn alloy layer). Considering that the Si/Nb/Co/IrMn interfaces have different β values (t{sub Nb} = 35 and 50 nm), a study of the influence of magnetization direction, governed by exchange-biased layers, on superconducting properties of Nb films can be successfully done in this hybrid system.

  6. Influence of interface on the formation process of polymer coatings on metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Maksimova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is in development of the model that allows to investigate the conformations of macromolecules near the interface “dielectric-metal” depending on the conditions of formation of the polymer coating. In the modified model of “sticky tape”, one part of macromolecule is anchored to the metal surface while the other can be elongated due to effective mean (molecular field of dipolar type formed by free ends of other chains. The dynamic Monte-Carlo method for Langmuir’s model is used for calculation of adhesion force taking into account the interaction energy of monomers with the metal surface. It is shown that conformation of polymer chain is defined by temperature conditions of its formation. The obtained results are confirmed by the data of production tests on polymer coatings in JSC “Severstal”.

  7. Influence of Janus particle shape on their interfacial behavior at liquid-liquid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhland, Thomas M; Gröschel, André H; Ballard, Nicholas; Skelhon, Thomas S; Walther, Andreas; Müller, Axel H E; Bon, Stefan A F

    2013-02-05

    We investigate the self-assembly behavior of Janus particles with different geometries at a liquid-liquid interface. The Janus particles we focus on are characterized by a phase separation along their major axis into two hemicylinders of different wettability. We present a combination of experimental and simulation data together with detailed studies elucidating the mechanisms governing the adsorption process of Janus spheres, Janus cylinders, and Janus discs. Using the pendant drop technique, we monitor the assembly kinetics following changes in the interfacial tension of nanoparticle adsorption. According to the evolution of the interfacial tension and simulation data, we will specify the characteristics of early to late stages of the Janus particle adsorption and discuss the effect of Janus particle shape and geometry. The adsorption is characterized by three adsorption stages which are based on the different assembly kinetics and different adsorption mechanisms depending on the particle shape.

  8. The influence of bi-metal interfaces on deformation mechanisms in bulk nanolaminar composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mara, Nathan Allan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ledonne, Jon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wynn, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rollett, Anthony D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beyerlein, I. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-04

    In this presentation, we report on the plastic deformation mechanisms in Ag-Cu and Cu-Nb nanocomposites rolled to large reductions. Starting with an Ag-Cu alloy with eutectic lamellar bilayer thickness of 200 nm, we roll the as-cast rods from 9.5 mm diameter to sheets of final thickness varying from 2.4 mm to 500 {micro}m, corresponding to 75% to 95% nominal reduction in thickness. Cu(111) X-ray pole figures of the rolled nanocomposites indicate a measured texture similar to that of Ag but different from that expected during rolling of pure bulk Cu involving dislocation slip alone. Visco-Plastic Self Consistent (VPSC) polycrystal modeling indicate that both silver and copper deformed by slip and twinning and the twin fraction reached over 30%, depending on rolling reduction. Because pure Cu is not expected to twin under these processing conditions, we hypothesize that twinning in Cu is induced by twinning in Ag, aided by the presence of high Ag-Cu interfacial content. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are then carried out on perfect and defective Ag-Cu interfaces and the results support this hypothesis. In the Cu-Nb system, it has been found that at individual layer thicknesses of 40 nm and above, physical vapor deposited foils can be rolled to large strains. However, when the layer thickness decreases to {approx}5nm, shear instability during rolling limits ductility. In this work, we show the effects of cladding 5nm CuINb multilayers with 40 nm CuINb multilayers to limit the onset of geometric instability, thereby facilitating the deformation of 5nm Cu/Nb multi layers to large rolling strains. Results will be discussed in terms of the effects of the interface on deformation processes at diminishing length scales.

  9. Influence of interface preparation on minority carrier lifetime for low bandgap tandem solar cell materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, Nadine; Sagol, B. Erol; Seidel, Ulf; Schwarzburg, Klaus; Hannappel, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    III-V semiconductor compounds grown by MOVPE are implemented in todays state-of-the-art third generation multi-junction solar cells. The current record multi junction solar cell grown on germanium, having Ge, Ga(In)As and GaInP as subcells, reached a record efficiency of 41.6%. The efficiency of these multi junction solar cells could be significantly increased, if its low bandgap Ge subcell would be replaced by a more efficient tandem. For this purpose the low bandgap materials InGaAs and InGaAsP are suitable. The bandgap composition of these materials allows a better yield of the solar spectrum. Based on InGaAs/InGaAsP absorber materials we have developed a low bandgap tandem solar cell with optimized bandgaps. Results of time resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) for the IR-bandgap compounds InGaAsP (1.03 eV)/InGaAs (0.73 eV) are presented. The lifetime of minority carriers is one of the most important properties of solar cell absorber materials. We show on the example of the low band gap tandem cell how the choice of the materials, the quality of the bulk, the optimization of the band gap energies and the preparation of the critical interfaces are essential to build a high efficiency solar cell. The quality of the bulk and the preparation of the critical interfaces are essential for the growth of the double heterostructure (DHS).

  10. Influence of the positioning of a cementless glenoid prosthesis on its interface micromotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, D R; van der Linden, J C; Valstar, E R; Broomans, P; Poort, G; Rozing, P M; van Keulen, F

    2009-10-01

    The positioning of the glenoid component in total shoulder arthroplasty is complicated by the limited view during operation. Malalignment and/or motion of the glenoid component with respect to the bone can be a cause of, or contribute to, failure of the implant. The aim of this paper is to determine the effect of the positioning of a cementless glenoid component on the micromotions between the implant and the bone during normal loading after surgery. For this study a three-dimensional finite element model of a complete scapula with a cementless glenoid component was used. In total, eight positions of the upper arm in both abduction and anteflexion were chosen to represent the patient's arm movement postoperatively. A previously published musculoskeletal model was used to determine the joint and muscle forces on the scapula with implant in each arm position. Five different alignments of the glenoid component (neutral, anterior, inferior, posterior, and superior inclinations), two different implantation depths ('optimal' and 'deeper' implantations), and two bone qualities (healthy and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) bone) were considered. Inclinations of 10 degrees with respect to a neutral alignment did not affect the overall interface micromotions in the optimal implantation depth. However, when the implantation depth was 3 mm deeper, anterior and inferior inclinations were more favourable than a neutral alignment and other inclinations. Micromotions in RA bone were always larger than in healthy bone.

  11. The Influence of Social Networks on the Development of Recruitment Actions that Favor User Interface Design and Conversions in Mobile Applications Powered by Linked Data

    OpenAIRE

    Palos-Sanchez, Pedro R.; Saura, Jose Ramon; Debasa, Felipe

    2018-01-01

    This study analyzes the most important influence factors in the literature, which have the greatest influence on the conversions obtained in a mobile application powered by linked data. With the study of user interface design and a small user survey (n = 101,053), we studied the influence of social networks, advertising, and promotional and recruitment actions in conversions for mobile applications powered by linked data. The analysis of the users’ behavior and their application in the design...

  12. Challenges in quantifying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of nitrogen species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sutton, M.A.; Nemitz, E.; Erisman, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    Recent research in nitrogen exchange with the atmosphere has separated research communities according to N form. The integrated perspective needed to quantify the net effect of N on greenhouse-gas balance is being addressed by the NitroEurope Integrated Project (NEU). Recent advances have depende...

  13. Challenges in quantifying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of nitrogen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M.A. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh Research Station, Bush Estate, Penicuik, EH26 0QB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ms@ceh.ac.uk; Nemitz, E. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh Research Station, Bush Estate, Penicuik, EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Erisman, J.W. [ECN, Clean Fossil Fuels, PO Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Beier, C. [Riso National Laboratory, PO Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Bahl, K. Butterbach [Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research, Atmos. Environ. Research (IMK-IFU), Research Centre Karlsruhe GmbH, Kreuzeckbahnstr. 19, 82467 Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany); Cellier, P. [INRA Unite Mixte de Recherche, 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Vries, W. de [Alterra, Green World Research, PO Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Cotrufo, F. [Dip. Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Skiba, U.; Di Marco, C.; Jones, S. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh Research Station, Bush Estate, Penicuik, EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Laville, P.; Soussana, J.F.; Loubet, B. [INRA Unite Mixte de Recherche, 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Twigg, M.; Famulari, D. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh Research Station, Bush Estate, Penicuik, EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Whitehead, J.; Gallagher, M.W. [School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Williamson Building, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Neftel, A.; Flechard, C.R. [Agroscope FAL Reckenholz, Federal Research Station for Agroecology and Agriculture, PO Box, CH 8046 Zurich (Switzerland)] (and others)

    2007-11-15

    Recent research in nitrogen exchange with the atmosphere has separated research communities according to N form. The integrated perspective needed to quantify the net effect of N on greenhouse-gas balance is being addressed by the NitroEurope Integrated Project (NEU). Recent advances have depended on improved methodologies, while ongoing challenges include gas-aerosol interactions, organic nitrogen and N{sub 2} fluxes. The NEU strategy applies a 3-tier Flux Network together with a Manipulation Network of global-change experiments, linked by common protocols to facilitate model application. Substantial progress has been made in modelling N fluxes, especially for N{sub 2}O, NO and bi-directional NH{sub 3} exchange. Landscape analysis represents an emerging challenge to address the spatial interactions between farms, fields, ecosystems, catchments and air dispersion/deposition. European up-scaling of N fluxes is highly uncertain and a key priority is for better data on agricultural practices. Finally, attention is needed to develop N flux verification procedures to assess compliance with international protocols. - Current N research is separated by form; the challenge is to link N components, scales and issues.

  14. The influence of ventilation tube design on the magnitude of stress imposed at the implant/tympanic membrane interface.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vard, John P

    2008-03-01

    The design of ventilation tubes or grommets is thought to have a considerable influence on their performance. A computational model (finite element method) was used to investigate the significance of four design parameters of a commonly used design of ventilation tube. The design parameters were: the length of the shaft, the diameter of the flanges, the thickness of the flanges, and the material type. A statistical analysis technique, known as a factorial analysis of variance, was used to examine the importance of the four design parameters on the dynamical behaviour of the middle ear with the implant in situ and on the magnitude of stress induced at the implant\\/tympanic membrane interface. We predicted that the ventilation tube alters the frequency response of the middle ear; specifically the shaft length and the thickness of the flanges were found to have a significant effect upon the vibratory pattern at the umbo. A reduced length of tube and an increased size of flange were also found to be significant for minimising membrane stress (both with P<0.001). Thus, design parameters of critical influence on optimising performance were identified.

  15. Influence of ZnO nanostructures in liquid crystal interfaces for bistable switching applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Kaushik, E-mail: kaushikpal@whu.edu.cn [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, 8 East Lake South Road, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhan, Bihong, E-mail: bihong_zhan@whu.edu.cn [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, 8 East Lake South Road, Wuhan 430072 (China); Madhu Mohan, M.L.N. [Liquid Crystal Research Laboratory (LCRL), Bannari Amman Institute of Technology, Sathyamangalam 638 401 (India); Schirhagl, Romana [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of BioMedical Engineering, Ant. Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Wang, Guoping, E-mail: guopingwang@whu.edu.cn [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, 8 East Lake South Road, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • One step bench top novel synthesis and growth dynamics of ZnO structures are successfully performed. • Nanostructures dispersing liquid crystals (NDLC) is recently found to have significant influence on the nucleation and growth of many functional nanocrystals (NCs), and provide a fundamental approach to modify the crystallographic phase, size, morphology, and electronic configuration of nanomaterials. • Electro-optical switching application ensures the bright field droplet design marble pattern of smectic G phase, nematic and most significant twist nematic phase pattern are obtained. • Spontaneous polarization, rotational viscosity and response time study, exploring smart applications in LCD technology. - Abstract: The controlled fabrication of nanometer-scale objects is without doubt one of the central issues in current science and technology. In this article, we exhibit a simple, one-step bench top synthesis of zinc oxide nano-tetrapods and nano-spheres which were tailored by the facial growth of nano-wires (diameter ≈ 24 nm; length ≈ 118 nm) and nano-cubes (≈395 nm edge) to nano-sphere (diameter ≈ 585 nm) appeaded. The possibilities of inexpensive, simple solvo-chemical synthesis of nanostructures were considered. In this article, a successful attempt has been made that ZnO nano-structures dispersed on well aligned hydrogen bonded liquid crystals (HBLC) comprising azelaic acid (AC) with p-n-alkyloxy benzoic acid (nBAO) by varying the respective alkyloxy carbon number (n = 5). The dispersion of nanomaterials with HBLC is an effective route to enhance the existing functionalities. A series of these composite materials were analyzed by polarizing optical microscope's electro-optical switching. An interesting feature of AC + nBAO is the inducement of tilted smectic G phase with increasing carbon chain length. Phase diagrams of the above hybrid ZnO nanomaterial influenced LC complex and pure LC were

  16. Influence of the oxygen concentration of atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 films on the dielectric property and interface trap density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehoo; Cho, Moonju; Kim, Seong Keun; Park, Tae Joo; Lee, Suk Woo; Hong, Sug Hun; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2005-03-01

    The influence of the ozone concentration (160-370g/m3) during atomic layer deposition of HfO2-gate dielectrics on the dielectric performance of the films grown on Si was studied. Although ozone was effective in reducing the impurity concentration in the film compared to H2O, the higher concentration slightly deteriorated the dielectric performance. More importantly, the degradation in the interface trap property with increasing post-annealing temperature became more serious as the ozone concentration increased. Investigation of the interface states using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the excessive oxygen incorporated during the film growth made the interfacial sub-oxide species (SiO, Si2O3, and silicate) and SiO2 coordinate more with oxygen. This increased the interface trap density and degraded the interface properties.

  17. Influence of the interface corrugation on the subband dispersions and the optical properties of (113)-oriented GaAs/AlAs superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Lüerssen, D.; Kalt, H.

    1996-01-01

    We report on the influence of the interface corrugation in (113)-grown GaAs/AlAs superlattices on their band-edge optical properties both in theory and experiment. We calculate the subband dispersions and the optical anisotropies in a multiband k . p formalism. The dominating contribution...

  18. Interactions at the Dimer Interface Influence the Relative Efficiencies for Purine Nucleotide Synthesis and Pyrophosphorolysis in a Phosphoribosyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canyuk, Bhutorn; Medrano, Francisco J.; Wenck, MaryAnne; Focia, Pamela J.; Eakin, Ann E.; Craig III, Sydney P. (UNC); (Connecticut)

    2010-03-05

    Enzymes that salvage 6-oxopurines, including hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (HPRTs), are potential targets for drugs in the treatment of diseases caused by protozoan parasites. For this reason, a number of high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of the HPRTs from protozoa have been reported. Although these structures did not reveal why HPRTs need to form dimers for catalysis, they revealed the existence of potentially relevant interactions involving residues in a loop of amino acid residues adjacent to the dimer interface, but the contributions of these interactions to catalysis remained poorly understood. The loop, referred to as active-site loop I, contains an unusual non-proline cis-peptide and is composed of residues that are structurally analogous with Leu67, Lys68, and Gly69 in the human HPRT. Functional analyses of site-directed mutations (K68D, K68E, K68N, K68P, and K68R) in the HPRT from Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas disease, show that the side-chain at position 68 can differentially influence the K{sub m} values for all four substrates as well as the k{sub cat} values for both IMP formation and pyrophosphorolysis. Also, the results for the K68P mutant are inconsistent with a cis-trans peptide isomerization-assisted catalytic mechanism. These data, together with the results of structural studies of the K68R mutant, reveal that the side-chain of residue 68 does not participate directly in reaction chemistry, but it strongly influences the relative efficiencies for IMP formation and pyrophosphorolysis, and the prevalence of lysine at position 68 in the HPRT of the majority of eukaryotes is consistent with there being a biological role for nucleotide pyrophosphorolysis.

  19. Influence of heat input in electron beam process on microstructure and properties of duplex stainless steel welded interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang; Xu, Lianyong; Han, Yongdian; Zhao, Lei; Lv, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jianyang

    2018-03-01

    The influence of heat input in electron beam (EB) process on microstructure, mechanical properties, and pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel (DSS) welded interface was investigated. The rapid cooling in EB welding resulted in insufficient austenite formation. The austenite mainly consisted of grain boundary austenite and intragranular austenite, and there was abundant Cr2N precipitation in the ferrite. The Ni, Mo, and Si segregation indicated that the dendritic solidification was primarily ferrite in the weld. The weld exhibited higher hardness, lower toughness, and poorer pitting corrosion resistance than the base metal. The impact fractures of the welds were dominated by the transgranular cleavage failure of the ferrite. The ferrite was selectively attacked because of its lower pitting resistance equivalent number than that of austenite. The Cr2N precipitation accelerated the pitting corrosion. In summary, the optimised heat input slightly increased the austenite content, reduced the segregation degree and ferrite texture intensity, decreased the hardness, and improved the toughness and pitting corrosion resistance. However, the effects were limited. Furthermore, optimising the heat input could not suppress the Cr2N precipitation. Taking into full consideration the microstructure and properties, a heat input of 0.46 kJ/mm is recommended for the EB welding of DSS.

  20. The Influence of Social Networks on the Development of Recruitment Actions that Favor User Interface Design and Conversions in Mobile Applications Powered by Linked Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro R. Palos-Sanchez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the most important influence factors in the literature, which have the greatest influence on the conversions obtained in a mobile application powered by linked data. With the study of user interface design and a small user survey (n = 101,053, we studied the influence of social networks, advertising, and promotional and recruitment actions in conversions for mobile applications powered by linked data. The analysis of the users’ behavior and their application in the design of the actions to promote and capture constitutes an important part of the current theories of digital marketing. However, this study shows that its results may be contradictory and depend on other factors and circumstances when mobile applications powered by linked data are considered. The predictive value, reached by the developed model, may be useful for professionals and researchers in the field of digital marketing and the user interface design in mobile applications powered by linked data.

  1. The Influence of Gender Difference on the Information-Seeking Behaviors for the Graphical Interface of Children's Digital Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tsia-ying; Wu, Ko-chiu

    2015-01-01

    Children conducting searches using the interfaces of library websites often encounter obstacles due to typographical errors, digital divides, or a failure to grasp keywords. Satisfaction with a given interface may also vary according to the gender of the user, making it a variable in information seeking behavior. Children benefit more from…

  2. The influence of nickel coating on the interface of pressureless infiltrated with vibration Al-SiC composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahinejad, Setare; Sharifi, Hassan; Tayebi, Morteza; Rajaee, Ali

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nickel coatings on infiltration and interface of SiC reinforced Al-Mg composite. To this end, the pressureless infiltration procedure with vibration applied to produce composites with uncoated and nickel coated reinforcements at two temperatures of 650 °C and 850 °C. The microstructure of the infiltrated cross section was investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, linear and point analyses. Results indicated that coated ceramic preforms improved infiltration and strong interfaces in both temperatures were achieved. Also uncoated preform infiltrated at a temperature of 650 °C, was not proved to be appropriate and it did not form any interface. In this condition a small gap was found between aluminum matrix and ceramic reinforcement, and no bonding was established between the reinforcement and matrix, however the composite prepared in 850 °C had an acceptable interface and the presence of MgAl2O4 at the interface caused improvement in interface bonding. In addition, in the composite sample with coated reinforcement, the existence of Ni as coating prevented the SiC dissolution in the alloy and there was no sign of carbide formation at the interface. At the interface of produced composite, Al3Ni and Al3Ni2 compounds were formed in the matrix around the reinforcement.

  3. Influence of the interface on growth rates in AlN/GaN short period superlattices via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Korakakis, D.

    2011-11-01

    AlN/GaN short period superlattices are well suited for a number of applications including, but not limited to, digital alloys, intersubband devices, and emitters. In this work, AlN/GaN superlattices with periodicities ranging from 10 to 20 Å have been grown via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy in order to investigate the influence of the interface on the binary alloy growth rates. The GaN growth rate at the interface was observed to decrease with increasing GaN thickness while the AlN growth rate remained constant. This has been attributed to a decrease in the decomposition rate of GaN at the hetero-interface as seen in other III-V hetero-structures.

  4. Influence of boundary conditions on the response of multilayered plates with cohesive interfaces and delaminations using a homogenized approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Massabò

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Stress and displacement fields in multilayered composites with interfacial imperfections, such as imperfect bonding of the layers or delaminations, or where the plies are separated by thin interlayers allowing relative motion, have large variations in the thickness, with characteristic zigzag patterns and jumps at the layer interfaces. These effects are well captured by a model recently formulated by the author for multilayered plates with imperfect interfaces and affine interfacial traction laws (Massabò & Campi, Meccanica, 2014, in press; Compos Struct, 2014, 116, 311-324. The model defines a homogenized displacement field, which satisfies interfacial continuity, and uses a variational technique to derive equilibrium equations depending on only six generalized displacement functions, for any arbitrary numbers of layers and interfaces. The model accurately predicts stresses and displacements in simply supported, highly anisotropic, thick plates with continuous, sliding interfaces. In this paper the model is applied to wide plates with clamped edges and some inconsistencies, which have been noted in the literature for models based on similar approaches and have limited their utilization, are explained. A generalized transverse shear force is introduced as the gross stress resultant which is directly related to the bending moment in the equilibrium equations of multilayered structures with imperfect interfaces and substitutes for the shear force of single-layer theory. An application to a delaminated wide plate highlights the potential and limitations of the proposed model for the solution of fracture mechanics problems.

  5. The Influence of Hollow Imperfections of Adhesive on Performances of Interface of RC Beams Strengthened with HFRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongchang, Guo; Lijuan, Li; Jun, Deng; Genquan, Zhong

    2010-05-01

    The mechanical characteristics of the interface with hollow imperfections for reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with Carbon-Glass fiber sheet is discussed, which is a new hybrid strengthening method. By establishing the constitutive equations of different materials, three interfacial models including imperfection dimension, imperfection location and imperfection amount are simulated using nonlinear finite element method. The shear stress and normal stress of glue layer, the first principal stress of concrete at the end of the interface and the stress distributions of different strengthening modes are analyzed. The results show that the shear stress of glue layer is sensitive for imperfection dimension and significantly increases with the imperfection dimension. However, the first principal stress of the concrete at the end of the interface marginally decreases with the imperfection dimension.

  6. The study of The study of the influence of temperature on surfactants – polyethylene glycol layers The study of the influence of temperature on surfactants – polyethylene glycol layers on liquid-gas interface liquid-gas interfacethe influence of temperature on surfactants – polyethylene glycol layers on liquid-gas interfaceThe study of the influence of temperature on surfactants – polyethylene glycol layers on liquid-gas interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seryk Boloshaan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The surface tension of compositions consisting of nonionic polyethylene glycol and surface active substances of different nature and influence of temperatures on properties of their adsorption layers were studied. To be taken into account the basics of classical chemical thermodynamics and colloidal chemistry, the thermodynamic parameters were determined for the adsorption of glycol, cetyl pyridinium bromide, Tween- 80 and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Adsorption speed was valuated By Kinetic curves of a liquid /gas interfaces. As a surfactants were taken the anionic surfactant – sodium dodecylsulphate, cationic surfactant cetylpyridinium bromide and nonionic Tween-80. The reason of using nonionic polyethyleneglycol as polymer is that the polymer is not toxic, biodegradable and it has no harm to the human body. That is why they are largely used in food industry, pharmaceutics, cosmetics and household chemical products.

  7. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  8. Influences of the Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox/Ag interface and interfilamentary bridge connections on AC loss of composite wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhao-Fei; Xue, Feng; Gou, Xiao-Fan

    2018-04-01

    The microstructure of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi2212) filamentary composite round wires (RWs) changes to be extremely complicated after heat treatment, with the interface between Bi2212 filaments and Ag matrix being meandering and a lot of bridge connections (BCs) generating between filaments. The influence of such the unique microstructure on the electromagnetic behavior and especially the AC loss has not been far from completely understanding. In this paper, according to the H formulation and on the nonlinear E-J relationship, we developed a finite element model, and further on this model evaluated the current and AC loss of a Bi2212 multifilamentary wire with the rough Bi2212/Ag interface and several BCs between filaments under the alternating magnetic field (Hex(t) = H0sin2πft). Through the comparative study, we found that the penetration magnetic field Hp is a critical turning point and on this base the influences of such the complex microstructure are quite different when the amplitude of applied magnetic field H0 Hp. The rough interface impacts the current distribution and causes the local heat concentrated at the concave locations. For BCs between Bi2212 filaments, it is most significant that they can share the current and make the current redistribute between filaments. Further for the wire with various types of BCs, the current distribution and the AC loss relative to the wire without BCs (Q / QmagnoBCs) were comprehensively investigated.

  9. Influence of annealing on the interface-correlated mechanical properties of a Ti/STS clad sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Yu Mi; Lee, Kwang Seok; Lee, Young-Seon; Kang, Namhyun

    2014-01-01

    We investigated effects of annealing conditions on the interface-correlated microstructural evolution and subsequent mechanical properties of a Ti/STS439 clad sheet. The evolution of the interface microstructure was first analyzed with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The generation and growth of a diffusive layer consisted of μm-scale β- Ti adjacent to the parent Ti, and the nm-scale intermetallic compounds Fe 2 Ti and FeTi adjacent to STS phases were indexed. The thicknesses of β-Ti, Fe 2 Ti, and FeTi increased with annealing time and temperature. Mechanical properties were evaluated by peel, micro indentation and uniaxial tensile tests. Improvement of bonding strength between Ti and STS by feasible annealing below 650 ℃ seemed to be strongly related to the generation of considerable metallurgical bonding.

  10. Influence of granulometry in the Hurst exponent of air liquid interfaces formed during capillary rising in a granular media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gontijo Guilherme L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report results concerning the fractal dimension of a air/fluid interface formed during the capillary rising of a fluid into a dense granular media. The system consists in a modified Hele-Shaw cell filled with grains at different granulometries and confined in a narrow gap between the glass plates. The system is then placed onto a water reservoir, and the liquid penetrates the medium due to capillary forces. We measure the Hurst exponent of the liquid/air interface with help of image processing, and follow the temporal evolution of the profiles. We observe that the Hurst exponent can be related with the granulometry, but the range of values are odd to the predicted values from models or theory.

  11. Influence of surface chemistry on the structural organization of monomolecular protein layers adsorbed to functionalized aqueous interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Piepenstock, M.; Diederich, A.

    1993-01-01

    The molecular organization of streptavidin (SA) bound to aqueous surface monolayers of biotin-functionalized lipids and binary lipid mixtures has been investigated with neutron reflectivity and electron and fluorescence microscopy. The substitution of deuterons (2H) for protons (1H), both...... in subphase water molecules and in the alkyl chains of the lipid surface monolayer, was utilized to determine the interface structure on the molecular length scale. In all cases studied, the protein forms monomolecular layers underneath the interface with thickness values of apprx 40 ANG . A systematic...... dependence of the structural properties of such self-assembled SA monolayers on the surface chemistry was observed: the lateral protein density depends on the length of the spacer connecting the biotin moiety and its hydrophobic anchor. The hydration of the lipid head groups in the protein-bound state...

  12. Adhesion at Al-hydroxide-polymer interfaces: Influence of chemistry and evidence for microscopic self-pinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vellinga, W.P.; Eising, G.; Wit, F.M. de; Mol, J.M.C; Terryn, H.; Wit, J.H.W. de; De Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a combined chemical (auger electron spectroscopy) and microscopic (optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy) study of the work of adhesion and delamination mechanisms at interfaces between a glassy polymer (glycol-modified polyethylene terephthalate) and Al covered with different types of surface hydroxides. A clear correlation between the measured work of adhesion and the chemical nature of the Al surface, specifically the hydroxyl coverage and the iso-electric point is found. The magnitude of the work of adhesion points to important contributions from plastic deformation in the glassy polymer for some cases. Delamination is shown to be accompanied by the formation of microscopic shear bands at such interfaces. The non-monotonous stress-strain behaviour of the glassy polymer that gives rise to the shear bands is also shown to lead to peculiar pinning events at the crack front. Evidence indicates that the occurrence of protrusions in the crack front deriving for example from the presence of stress concentrators and crack initiation sites ahead of the front, combined with mode and rate dependence of the local energy release rate along the front may pin the front at positions adjacent to a protrusion. It is believed such microscopic mode-dependent pinning phenomena may be relevant for the adhesion on patterned interfaces.

  13. Electrode–electrolyte interface stability in solid state electrolyte systems: influence of coating thickness under varying residual stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claas Hüter

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a model of electrode–electrolyte interfacial growth which focuses on theeffect of thin coating layers on the interfacial stability in prestressed systems. We take into accounttransport resulting from deposition from the electrolyte, from capillarity driven surface diffusion, andfrom changes of the chemical potential due to the elastic energy associated with the interface profile.As model system, we use metallic lithium as electrode, LLZO as electrolyte and Al2O3 as a thin filminterlayer, which is a highly relevant interfacial system in state of the art all-solid-electrolyte batteries.We consider the stability of the electrode-coating-electrolyte interface depending on the thickness ofthe thin film interlayer and the magnitude of the elastic prestresses. Our central approach is a linearstability analysis based on the mass conservation at the planar interface, employing approximationswhich are appropriate for solid state electrolytes (SSEs like LLZ, a thin Li metal electrode and a thincoating layer with a thickness in the range of nanometres.

  14. Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} absorber thinning and the homo-interface model: Influence of Mo back contact and 3-stage process on device characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, E.; Arzel, L.; Tomassini, M.; Barreau, N., E-mail: nicolas.barreau@univ-nantes.fr [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN)-UMR 6502, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Zabierowski, P. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, PL 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Fuertes Marrón, D. [Instituto de Energía Solar–ETSIT, Technical University of Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s.n., 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-21

    Thinning the absorber layer is one of the possibilities envisaged to further decrease the production costs of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) thin films solar cell technology. In the present study, the electronic transport in submicron CIGSe-based devices has been investigated and compared to that of standard devices. It is observed that when the absorber is around 0.5 μm-thick, tunnelling enhanced interface recombination dominates, which harms cells energy conversion efficiency. It is also shown that by varying either the properties of the Mo back contact or the characteristics of 3-stage growth processing, one can shift the dominating recombination mechanism from interface to space charge region and thereby improve the cells efficiency. Discussions on these experimental facts led to the conclusions that 3-stage process implies the formation of a CIGSe/CIGSe homo-interface, whose location as well as properties rule the device operation; its influence is enhanced in submicron CIGSe based solar cells.

  15. Surface-subsurface turbulent interaction at the interface of a permeable bed: influence of the wall permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.; Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.

    2017-12-01

    Coarse-gravel river beds possess a high degree of permeability. Flow interactions between surface and subsurface flow across the bed interface is key to a number of natural processes occurring in the hyporheic zone. In fact, it is increasingly recognized that these interactions drive mass, momentum and energy transport across the interface, and consequently control biochemical processes as well as stability of sediments. The current study explores the role of the wall permeability in surface and subsurface flow interaction under controlled experimental conditions on a physical model of a gravel bed. The present wall model was constructed by five layers of cubically arranged spheres (d=25.4mm, where d is a diameter) providing 48% of porosity. Surface topography was removed by cutting half of a diameter on the top layer of spheres to render the flow surface smooth and highlight the impact of the permeability on the overlying flow. An impermeable smooth wall was also considered as a baseline of comparison for the permeable wall flow. To obtain basic flow statistics, low-frame-rate high-resolution PIV measurements were performed first in the streamwise-wall-normal (x-y) plane and refractive-index matching was employed to optically access the flow within the permeable wall. Time-resolved PIV experiments in the same facility were followed to investigate the flow interaction across the wall interface in sptaio-temporal domain. In this paper, a detailed analysis of the first and second order velocity statistics as well as the amplitude modulation for the flow overlying the permeable smooth wall will be presented.

  16. [Diurnal changes in greenhouse gases at water-air interface of Xiangxi River in autumn and their influencing factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Min; Zhu, Kong-Xian; Zhao, Wei; Yu, Bo-Shi; Yuan, Xi-Gong; Feng, Rui-Jie; Bi, Yong-Hong; Hu, Zheng-Yu

    2013-04-01

    With the closed chamber and gas chromatography method, a 24-hour continuous monitoring was carried out to understand the greenhouse gases fluxes across the water-air interface of the Xiangxi River Bay, the Three-Gorges Reservoir in Autumn. Results indicated that the fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O across the water-air interface showed an obvious diurnal variation. The absorption and emission process of CH4 showed strong diurnal variation during the experimental period, reaching the highest emission at 1 am, whereas CO2 and N2O were emitted all day. The fluxes of CO2 ranged from 20.1-97.5 mg x (m2 x h)(-1) at day and 32.7-42.5 mg x (m2 x h)(-1) at night, the fluxes of N2O ranged from 18.4-133.7 microg x (m2 x h)(-1) at day and 42.1-102.6 microg x (m2 x h)(-1) at night. The fluxes of CO2 had positive correlation with wind speed and negative correlation with pH. The fluxes of N2O had positive correlation with pH.

  17. Interface Consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interface Consistency is an important issue for the development of modular designs. Byproviding a precise specification of component interfaces it becomes possible to check that separately developedcomponents use a common interface in a coherent matter thus avoiding a very...... significant source of design errors. Awide range of interface specifications are possible, the simplest form is a syntactical check of parameter types.However, today it is possible to do more sophisticated forms involving semantic checks....

  18. Interface models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Anders P.; Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for specifying interfaces between concurrently executing modules of a computing system. The model does not prescribe a particular type of communication protocol and is aimed at describing interfaces between both software and hardware modules or a combination of the two....... The model describes both functional and timing properties of an interface...

  19. Influence of Substrate Moisture State and Roughness on Interface Microstructure and Bond Strength: Slant Shear vs. Pull-Off Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Dale P; De la Varga, Igor; Muñoz, Jose F; Spragg, Robert P; Graybeal, Benjamin A; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David L; Jones, Scott Z; LaManna, Jacob M

    2018-03-01

    There are conflicting views in the literature concerning the optimum moisture state for an existing substrate prior to the application of a repair material. Both saturated-surface-dry (SSD) and dry substrates have been found to be preferable in a variety of studies. One confounding factor is that some studies evaluate bonding of the repair material to the substrate via pull-off (direct tension) testing, while others have employed some form of shear specimens as their preferred testing configuration. Available evidence suggests that dry substrate specimens usually perform equivalently or better in shear testing, while SSD ones generally exhibit higher bond strengths when a pull-off test is performed, although exceptions to these trends have been observed. This paper applies a variety of microstructural characterization tools to investigate the interfacial microstructure that develops when a fresh repair material is applied to either a dry or SSD substrate. Simultaneous neutron and X-ray radiography are employed to observe the dynamic microstructural rearrangements that occur at this interface during the first 4 h of curing. Based on the differences in water movement and densification (particle compaction) that occur for the dry and SSD specimens, respectively, a hypothesis is formulated as to why different bond tests may favor one moisture state over the other, also dependent on their surface roughness. It is suggested that the compaction of particles at a dry substrate surface may increase the frictional resistance when tested under slant shear loading, but contribute relatively little to the bonding when the interface is submitted to pull-off forces. For maximizing bond performance, the fluidity of the repair material and the roughness and moisture state of the substrate must all be given adequate consideration.

  20. Influência da decorticação vertebral na neoformação dos tecidos da interface do enxerto ósseo Influence of vertebral decortication on tissue neoformation at bone graft interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Ricardo Tavares Canto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a influência da decorticação dos elementos posteriores da coluna vertebral na integração do enxerto ósseo, considerando a avaliação quantitativa e qualitativa dos tecidos (ósseo, cartilaginoso e fibroso da interface entre o leito receptor e o enxerto ósseo. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 24 ratos Wistar, divididos em dois grupos de acordo com a realização da decorticação do leito receptor do enxerto. Foi utilizado enxerto autólogo derivado dos processos espinhosos das duas primeiras vértebras lombares. A neoformação tecidual na interface entre o leito receptor e seu enxerto ósseo foi avaliada após três semanas por meio de análise histomorfométrica. RESULTADOS: No grupo de animais com o leito receptor decorticado a média da porcentagem de osso neoformado foi de 40%±6,1, e 7,7%± 3,5 no grupo não decorticado (p=0,0001. A média da porcentagem de formação do tecido cartilaginoso no grupo decorticado foi de 7,2%±3,5, no não decorticado de 10,9%±5,6 (p=0,1123. A formação de tecido fibroso no grupo decorticado apresentou média de 8,6%±3,9 e no não decorticado e 24%±10,1, (p=0,0002. CONCLUSÕES: A decorticação acelerou o processo histológico da integração do enxerto ósseo. Ocorrendo maior produção de tecido ósseo neoformado e predomínio da ossificação do tipo intramembranosa no grupo de animais nos quais a decorticação foi realizada.OBJECTIVE: To determine the influence of vertebral posterior elements decortication in bone graft integration, considering a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the (bone, cartilaginous, and fibrous tissues in the interface between the receptor bed and the bone graft. METHODS: Twenty-four Wistar rats were divided into two groups according to the decortication of the bone graft receptor bed. Autologous bone graft from the first and second lumbar vertebrae were used. The new tissue formation in the interface between the receptor bed and its bone graft

  1. Simulation of the degradation of a concrete/clay interface: influence of temperature, unsaturated conditions and porosity variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnol, A.; Dupros, F.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Gaucher, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    For long-lived intermediate-level radioactive waste, the use of concrete as engineering barrier and Callovian-Oxfordian clay as geological barrier at a depth of 500 m is considered in the French disposal concept (ANDRA, 2005). Upon emplacement, initially unsaturated concrete is expected to experience coupled processes involving heating, re-saturation with groundwater from the clay formation, gas exchanges and geochemical reactions. After an early period of re-saturation, solute transport is supposed to be diffusion-controlled because of the extremely low permeability of the two media. These coupled processes may lead to changes in the porosity of the concrete or clay barriers. In the present paper, a fully coupled Thermo-Hydro-Chemical (THC) response of a two-phase (gas and solution) mass-transfer model was evaluated and tested by a sensitivity analysis. This study is an extension of a previous model applied to an isothermal and fully saturated concrete/clay interface (Burnol et al., 2005); it investigated the coupled effect of temperature and unsaturated conditions assuming no production of H2(g). The system was simulated for a 2000-year period, which covers the most predominant thermal perturbation

  2. Simulation of the Electric Field Distribution Near a Topographically Nanostructured Titanium-Electrolyte Interface: Influence of the Passivation Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Körtge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in biomaterials research is the regulation of protein adsorption at metallic implant surfaces. Recently, a number of studies have shown that protein adsorption can be influenced by metallic nanotopographies, which are discussed to increase electric field strengths near sharp edges and spikes. Since many metallic biomaterials form a native passivation layer with semiconducting properties, we have analyzed the influence of this layer on the near-surface electric field distribution of a nanostructure using finite element simulations. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation was solved for a titanium nanostructure covered by a TiO2 passivation layer in contact with a physiological NaCl solution (bulk concentration 0.137 mol/L. In contrast to a purely metallic nanostructure, the electric field strengths near sharp edges and spikes can be lower than in planar regions if a passivation layer is considered. Our results demonstrate that the passivation layer has a significant influence on the near-surface electric field distribution and must be considered for theoretical treatments of protein adsorption on passivated metals like titanium.

  3. Influence of tubificid worms on nutrient fluxes across water-sediment interface in fish farm settling ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puigagut J.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of tubificid worms on nutrient translocation from water to fish farm sediments accumulating in settling ponds was addressed under laboratory conditions. Small microcosms of 0.5 L were filled up with 35 g of sludge from a fish farm settling pond and 0.15 L of filtered settling pond water. The experimental set up consisted of one control line (no worms added, a second experimental line with 1 mg of tubificid worms·g-1 fresh sediment (550 individuals·m-2 and a third experimental line with 40 mg of tubificid worms·g-1 fresh sediment (22 000 individuals·m-2. Nutrients translocation was determined by monitoring overlaying water concentration of ammonia, nitrate and phosphate for ten days. Results showed that abundances of 550 individuals·m-2 had no significant influence on the fluxes of nutrients here considered. However, the influence of higher abundances of tubificids (22 000 individuals·m-2 was of significant extent on the translocation of nitrate and phosphate. Accordingly, bioturbation of tubificids caused 55% lower nitrate uptake by the sediment when compared to control conditions. Phosphorus released by the sediments of the control condition was ca. 90% higher than that recorded under abundances of tubificids (22 000 individuals·m-2. Results obtained allowed us to estimate that fish farm settling ponds highly colonized by tubificid worms (22 000 individuals·m-2 may contribute to decrease phosphorus discharge (in terms of soluble phosphorus in ca. 5 g of P·ton-1 of fish produced.

  4. Organic interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelman, W.A.; Tempelman, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the consequences for product designers resulting from the replacement of traditional interfaces by responsive materials. Part 1 presents a theoretical framework regarding a new paradigm for man-machine interfacing. Part 2 provides an analysis of the opportunities offered by new

  5. Fluid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2001-01-01

    Fluid interaction, interaction by the user with the system that causes few breakdowns, is essential to many user interfaces. We present two concrete software systems that try to support fluid interaction for different work practices. Furthermore, we present specificity, generality, and minimality...... as design goals for fluid interfaces....

  6. Influence of elastomeric seal plate surface chemistry on interface integrity in biofouling-prone systems: Evaluation of a hydrophobic "easy-release" silicone-epoxy coating for maintaining water seal integrity of a sliding neoprene/steel interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolina, Vincent L.

    The scientific hypothesis of this work is that modulation of the properties of hard materials to exhibit abrasion-reducing and low-energy surfaces will extend the functional lifetimes of elastomeric seals pressed against them in abrasive underwater systems. The initial motivation of this work was to correct a problem noted in the leaking of seals at major hydropower generating facilities subject to fouling by abrasive zebra mussel shells and extensive corrosion. Similar biofouling-influenced problems can develop at seals in medical devices and appliances from regulators in anesthetic machines and SCUBA diving oxygen supply units to autoclave door seals, injection syringe gaskets, medical pumps, drug delivery components, and feeding devices, as well as in food handling equipment like pasteurizers and transfer lines. Maritime and many other heavy industrial seal interfaces could also benefit from this coating system. Little prior work has been done to elucidate the relationship of seal plate surface properties to the friction and wear of elastomeric seals during sliding contacts of these articulating materials, or to examine the secondary influence of mineralized debris within the contacting interfaces. This investigation utilized the seal materials relevant to the hydropower application---neoprene elastomer against carbon steel---with and without the application of a silicone-epoxy coating (WearlonRTM 2020.98) selected for its wear-resistance, hydrophobicity, and "easy-release" capabilities against biological fouling debris present in actual field use. Analytical techniques applied to these materials before and after wear-producing processes included comprehensive Contact Angle measurements for Critical Surface Tension (CA-CST) determination, Scanning Electron Microscopic inspections, together with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) measurements for determination of surface texture and inorganic composition, Multiple

  7. Biological and Rearing Mother Influences on Child ADHD Symptoms: Revisiting the Developmental Interface between Nature and Nurture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold, Gordon T.; Leve, Leslie D.; Barrett, Douglas; Elam, Kit; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Reiss, David; Thapar, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Background Families of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) report more negative family relationships than families of children without ADHD. Questions remain as to the role of genetic factors underlying associations between family relationships and children’s ADHD symptoms, and the role of children’s ADHD symptoms as an evocative influence on the quality of relationships experienced within such families. Utilizing the attributes of two genetically sensitive research designs, the present study examined associations between biologically related and non-biologically related maternal ADHD symptoms, parenting practices, child impulsivity/activation, and child ADHD symptoms. The combined attributes of the study designs permit assessment of associations while controlling for passive genotype-environment correlation and directly examining evocative genotype-environment correlation (rGE); two relatively under examined confounds of past research in this area. Methods A cross-sectional adoption-at-conception design (Cardiff IVF Study; C-IVF) and a longitudinal adoption-at-birth design (Early Growth and Development Study; EGDS) were used. The C-IVF sample included 160 mothers and children (age 5–8 years). The EGDS sample included 320 linked sets of adopted children (age 6 years), adoptive-, and biologically-related mothers. Questionnaires were used to assess maternal ADHD symptoms, parenting practices, child impulsivity/activation, and child ADHD symptoms. A cross-rater approach was used across measures of maternal behavior (mother reports) and child ADHD symptoms (father reports). Results Significant associations were revealed between rearing mother ADHD symptoms, hostile parenting behavior, and child ADHD symptoms in both samples. Because both samples consisted of genetically-unrelated mothers and children, passive rGE was removed as a possible explanatory factor underlying these associations. Further, path analysis revealed evidence for

  8. Influence of acetone extract from natural rubber on the structure and interface interaction in NR/silica composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tiwen; Jia, Zhixin; Wu, Lianghui; Chen, Yongjun; Luo, Yuanfang; Jia, Demin; Peng, Zheng

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that the coupling reagents as the additional modifiers were often used to improve the reinforcement effect of silica filled natural rubber. Actually, the commercial raw NR is a mixture consisting of polyisoprene and non-isoprene, where the latter one might have impact on the properties of NR/silica composites as an inartificial modifier inside. Thus, investigating the effect of non-isoprene compounds on the structure and properties of NR/silica composites is a novel approach to disclose the peculiarity of NR, which is meaningful to the assessment of NR quality. In this paper, the influences of acetone extract (AE) from natural rubber on the structure and mechanical properties of NR/silica composites were studied. Then the interfacial interactions between AE and silica were also illustrated through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetic analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results demonstrated the existence of hydrogen bond between silica and AE, also the covalent bond induced by esterification reaction between sbnd COOH and Sisbnd OH, which resulted in an increase of constrained regions around silica surface leading to the promotions on mechanical and dynamical properties of NR/silica composites significantly.

  9. Phases formed to high temperatures in the interface and its influence on the deformation of stainless steel superduplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Isabela Leao Amaral da; Bevitori, Alice Barreto; Terrones, Luis Augusto Hernandez

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In the present study it was observed the effects of aging in superduplex stainless steel 2507. For this, it was analyzed the microstructure and chemical composition of the steel before and after heat treatments. With this purpose heat treatments were performed at 650 deg C/8h, 850 deg C/24h and 1000 deg C/10h. For the analysis of changes occurring in the microstructure of the material it was used the following techniques: Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction. These changes have directly influenced the mechanical properties of the material, and were determined using tensile testing, hardness measurements and microhardness. The aging of the material contributed to the precipitation of various phases in the microstructure of the material. It was identified peaks of sigma phase at the temperature of 850 and 1000°C but it was not identified peaks of ferrite, which indicates partial dissolution of secondary phases. There was a decrease in toughness and ductility of the material when compared with the material in the as received condition. (author)

  10. Multicriteria Decision Analysis in Improving Quality of Design in Femoral Component of Knee Prostheses: Influence of Interface Geometry and Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jahan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Knee prostheses as medical products require careful application of quality and design tool to ensure the best performance. Therefore, quality function deployment (QFD was proposed as a quality tool to systematically integrate consumer’s expectation to perceived needs by medical and design team and to explicitly address the translation of customer needs into engineering characteristics. In this study, full factorial design of experiment (DOE method was accompanied by finite element analysis (FEA to evaluate the effect of inner contours of femoral component on mechanical stability of the implant and biomechanical stresses within the implant components and adjacent bone areas with preservation of the outer contours for standard Co-Cr alloy and a promising functionally graded material (FGM. The ANOVA revealed that the inner shape of femoral component influenced the performance measures in which the angle between the distal and anterior cuts and the angle between the distal and posterior cuts were greatly influential. In the final ranking of alternatives, using multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA, the designs with FGM was ranked first over the Co-Cr femoral component, but the original design with Co-Cr material was not the best choice femoral component, among the top ranked design with the same material.

  11. Influence of cell surface appendages on the bacterium-substratum interface measured real-time using QCM-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Adam L J; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Sharma, Prashant K

    2009-02-03

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) utilizes an oscillating quartz crystal to register adsorption of rigid masses through a decrease in its resonance frequency f. In addition, QCM-D has the ability to measure the dissipative nature of nonrigid masses adhering to the crystal surface in the form of oscillation amplitude decay time. Although QCM has been applied to register bacterial adhesion to the crystal surface, full interpretation of the frequency change and dissipation signal has hitherto been impossible due to the complex interactions within the distance of 250 nm between the substratum and the bacterial cell surface. Here, we study adhesion of a series of Streptococcus salivarius mutants, possessing various surface appendages of known lengths, as a function of time using QCM-D. In addition, the number of bacteria adhering to the crystal surface was determined. The results show that adhesion of a "bald" bacterium, completely devoid of surface appendages, is registered as a frequency decrease. Adhesion of bacteria possessing surface appendages yields either a much smaller decrease or an increase in frequency, despite the fact they adhere in higher numbers. Furthermore, the magnitude of frequency and dissipation shifts was found to be influenced by the distance at which the cell body was held from the sensor surface by its surface appendages.

  12. Characteristics of the influence of auxins on physicochemical properties of membrane phospholipids in monolayers at the air/aqueous solution interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasiński, Michał; Bartosik, Magdalena; Kowal, Sara; Broniatowski, Marcin; Wydro, Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Interactions between representatives of plant hormones and selected membrane lipids have been studied in monolayers at the air/aqueous solutions interface with π-A isotherm analysis, microscopic visualization and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction technique (GIXD). Four phytohormones: indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 2-naphthoxyacetic acid (BNOA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), belonging to the class of auxins differ as regards the chemical structure of the aromatic molecular fragment. The studied phospholipids have been chosen since they are omnipresent in the biological membranes of plant and animal kingdom. Our results revealed that both natural (IAA and IBA) and synthetic (2,4-D and BNOA) phytohormones modify the physicochemical characteristics of the investigated lipid monolayers. Auxins caused strong diminishing of the monolayer condensation, especially for DPPC and SOPE, which may be attributed to the phase transition in these monolayers. In the performed experiments the key step of auxins action occurs when the molecules interact with monolayers in the expanded state-when the space in the lipid head-group region is large enough to accommodate the molecules of water soluble auxins. The application of GIXD technique confirmed that auxin molecules are also present at the interface at higher surface pressure (30 mN/m). The obtained results showed that among the investigated auxins, the largest influence on the lipid monolayers occurred in the case of BNOA, which molecule possesses the largest aromatic fragment. In contrast, 2,4-D, having the smallest aryl group affects the studied lipid systems to the smallest extent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Microprocessor interfacing

    CERN Document Server

    Vears, R E

    2014-01-01

    Microprocessor Interfacing provides the coverage of the Business and Technician Education Council level NIII unit in Microprocessor Interfacing (syllabus U86/335). Composed of seven chapters, the book explains the foundation in microprocessor interfacing techniques in hardware and software that can be used for problem identification and solving. The book focuses on the 6502, Z80, and 6800/02 microprocessor families. The technique starts with signal conditioning, filtering, and cleaning before the signal can be processed. The signal conversion, from analog to digital or vice versa, is expl

  14. Interface Anywhere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current paradigms for crew interfaces to the systems that require control are constrained by decades old technologies which require the crew to be physically near an...

  15. Manufacturing Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houten, Frederikus J.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper identifies the changing needs and requirements with respect to the interfacing of manufacturing functions. It considers the manufacturing system, its components and their relationships from the technological and logistic point of view, against the background of concurrent engineering.

  16. The Role of Visual Noise in Influencing Mental Load and Fatigue in a Steady-State Motion Visual Evoked Potential-Based Brain-Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Luo, Ailing; Li, Min; Zhang, Sicong; Han, Chengcheng; Yan, Wenqiang

    2017-08-14

    As a spatial selective attention-based brain-computer interface (BCI) paradigm, steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) BCI has the advantages of high information transfer rate, high tolerance to artifacts, and robust performance across users. However, its benefits come at the cost of mental load and fatigue occurring in the concentration on the visual stimuli. Noise, as a ubiquitous random perturbation with the power of randomness, may be exploited by the human visual system to enhance higher-level brain functions. In this study, a novel steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP, i.e., one kind of SSVEP)-based BCI paradigm with spatiotemporal visual noise was used to investigate the influence of noise on the compensation of mental load and fatigue deterioration during prolonged attention tasks. Changes in α , θ , θ + α powers, θ / α ratio, and electroencephalography (EEG) properties of amplitude, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and online accuracy, were used to evaluate mental load and fatigue. We showed that presenting a moderate visual noise to participants could reliably alleviate the mental load and fatigue during online operation of visual BCI that places demands on the attentional processes. This demonstrated that noise could provide a superior solution to the implementation of visual attention controlling-based BCI applications.

  17. Influência do agente de união na resistência ao cisalhamento da interface titânio/polímero de vidro Bonding agent influence on shear bond strength of titanium/polyglass interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Kanashiro Oyafuso

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Há poucas informações em relação à efetividade da união entre compósitos e superfícies metálicas. Este estudo avaliou a influência de dois agentes de união na resistência ao cisalhamento da interface formada pelo titânio comercialmente puro (Ti cp e um compósito (Artglass/ Heraeus Kulzer. Vinte estruturas metálicas (4mm de diâmetro e 5mm de altura de titânio grau 1 foram fundidas, jateadas com partículas de óxido de alumínio (250ìm e separadas em dois grupos. Para cada grupo foi utilizado um agente de união (Sistema Siloc-Pre ou Retention Flow como procedimento anterior à aplicação do material opaco. Sobre este foram aplicados camadas do polímero referente à dentina com o auxílio de uma matriz de teflon. A manipulação e polimerização foram realizadas de acordo com as recomendações do fabricante. Os corpos-de-prova foram armazenados em água destilada por 24 horas à 37ºC e termociclados (5º e 55ºC/ 500ciclos. O teste de resistência ao cisalhamento foi realizado em uma máquina de ensaios universal (Instron com velocidade de 5mm/min. Os dados foram tratados estatisticamente pela Análise de Variância one-way (á=0,5. Os resultados indicaram que o sistema adesivo Retention Flow foi estatisticamente melhor do que o Siloc, com médias de 20,74MPa e 11,65MPa, respectivamente. Foi possível concluir que o sistema de união influenciou na adesão entre o titânio grau I e o polímero de vidro estudado.There is little information regarding bond strengths of polyglass to metal alloys. This study evaluated the influence of bonding system on shear bond strength of a composite resin (Artglass/Heraeus Kulzer to cast titanium (Ti. Twenty metallic structures (4mm in diameter, 5mm thick of titanium grade I were cast shaped and abraded with 250mm aluminum oxide and separated into two groups. For each group was applied one bonding system (Siloc or Retention Flow before opaque and dentin polymer superposition. This procedure

  18. Influence of Pastoralists' Sociocultural Activities on Tsetse-Trypanosome-Cattle Reservoir Interface: The Risk of Human African Trypanosomiasis in North-Central Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaji, N B; Kabir, J

    2016-06-01

    The study investigated socio-cultural characteristics of pastoralists that influenced on the tsetse-trypanosome-cattle reservoir interface thereby predisposing them to HAT in Niger State, North-central Nigeria. It was a cross-sectional survey of adult pastoral herders, aged 30 years and above, and conducted between October 2012 and February 2013. A face-to-face structured questionnaire was administered on the pastoralists nested in 96 cattle herds with questions focused on pastoralists' socio-cultural activities and behavioral practices related to HAT risk. Descriptive and analytic statistics were used to describe the obtained data. A total of 384 pastoralists participated, with mean age of 49.6  ± 10.76 SD years. Male respondents constituted 86.7% of gender, while pastoralists of age group 40-49 years constituted 35.4% of respondents. About 59.4% of the pastoralists had knowledge about HAT and its symptoms and only 33.9% of them believed that cattle served as reservoir of HAT trypanosome. Knowledge/belief levels of the pastoralists about African trypanosomiasis occurrence in humans and animals were statistically significant. Males were four times more likely to be exposed to HAT (OR = 3.67; 95% CI: 1.42, 9.52); age group 60-69 was also four times more likely to be exposed (OR = 3.59; 95% CI: 1.56, 8.28); and nomadic pastoralists were two times more likely to be exposed to HAT (OR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.37, 3.14). All cultural practices significantly influenced exposure to HAT with extensive husbandry system three times more likely to predisposed pastoralists to HAT (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.65, 6.24). Socio-cultural characteristics of pastoralists influenced exposure to HAT risk and, therefore, there is a need to sensitize them to bring changes to their socio-cultural practices and perceptions to achieve effective and long term sustainable HAT control. Elimination strategies of parasites in animals and vectors should be considered to avoid reintroduction

  19. Influence of strain on the electronic structure of the TbMnO3/SrTiO3 epitaxial interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venkatesan, S.; Doumlblinger, M.; Daumont, C.; Kooi, B.; Noheda, Beatriz; De Hosson, J. T. M.; Scheu, C.; Döblinger, M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the magnetotransport properties of epitaxial strained thin films requires knowledge of the chemistry at the interface. We report on the change in Mn electronic structure at the epitaxially strained TbMnO3/SrTiO3 interface. Scanning transmission electron microscopy shows an abrupt

  20. Designing Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tidwell, Jenifer

    2010-01-01

    Despite all of the UI toolkits available today, it's still not easy to design good application interfaces. This bestselling book is one of the few reliable sources to help you navigate through the maze of design options. By capturing UI best practices and reusable ideas as design patterns, Designing Interfaces provides solutions to common design problems that you can tailor to the situation at hand. This updated edition includes patterns for mobile apps and social media, as well as web applications and desktop software. Each pattern contains full-color examples and practical design advice th

  1. Interface Realisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pold, Søren

    2005-01-01

    to the development of illusionistic realism within computer graphics and games. The article compares the pragmatic realism of HCI with aesthetic notions of realism in the computer game Max Payne (illusionistic realism), the artist Jodi's game modifications (media realism), and Adrian Ward's software art work......This article argues for seeing the interface as an important representational and aesthetic form with implications for postmodern culture and digital aesthetics. The interface emphasizes realism due in part to the desire for transparency in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and partly...

  2. Interface unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyson, D.V.; Freudenthal, A.; De Hoogh, M.P.A.; Dekoven, E.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to an interface unit comprising at least a display unit for communication with a user, which is designed for being coupled with a control unit for at least one or more parameters in a living or working environment, such as the temperature setting in a house, which control unit

  3. Molecular dynamics investigation of the influence of anionic and zwitterionic interfaces on antimicrobial peptides' structure: implications for peptide toxicity and activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of three related helical antimicrobial peptides have been carried out in zwitterionic diphosphocholine (DPC) micelles and anionic sodiumdodecylsulfate (SDS) micelles. These systems can be considered as model mammalian and bacterial membrane interfaces, respectively...

  4. Bipolar resistive switching properties of Ti-CuO/(hexafluoro-hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene)-Cu hybrid interface device: Influence of electronic nature of organic layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Bharti; Mehta, B. R.; Varandani, Deepak; Govind; Narita, A.; Feng, X.; Müllen, K.

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the change in the structural and junction properties of Ti-CuO-Cu structure on incorporation of a 2-dimensional (2D) organic layer comprising of n-type hexafluoro-hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (6F-HBC). A bipolar resistive switching is observed in the device having interface between sputter deposited copper oxide (CuO) and vacuum sublimated 6F-HBC hybrid interface. The CuO/6F-HBC hybrid interface exhibits rectifying I-V characteristics in complete contrast to the ohmic and rectifying characteristics of junctions based on individual 6F-HBC and CuO layers. Large change in resistive switching property from unipolar resistive switching in CuO/HBC to bipolar resistive switching in CuO/6F-HBC interface was observed. At the CuO/6F-HBC interface, C1s peak corresponding to fluorinated carbon is shifted by 0.68 eV towards higher binding energy (BE) side and O1s peak due to non-lattice oxygen is shifted by 0.6 eV towards lower BE, confirming the interaction of O 2− ion in CuO with fluorinated carbon atoms in 6F-HBC at the hybrid interface. Correlation between conductive atomic force microscopy images and atomic force microscopy topography images, I-V characteristics in conducting, non-conducting, and pristine regions along with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results establishes the important role of hybrid interface to determining the resistive switching properties. This study demonstrates that the resistive switching and interface properties of a hybrid device based on inorganic and organic 2D materials can be modified by changing the electronic properties of organic layer by attaching suitable functional groups.

  5. Interface learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorhauge, Sally

    2014-01-01

    professionals experience as a result of their collaboration. The dissertation demonstrates how a given partnership’s collaboration affects the students’ learning experiences when they are doing the coursework. The dissertation presents findings that museum-school partnerships can use in order to develop......"Interface learning - New goals for museum and upper secondary school collaboration" investigates and analyzes the learning that takes place when museums and upper secondary schools in Denmark work together in local partnerships to develop and carry out school-related, museum-based coursework...... for students. The research focuses on the learning that the students experience in the interface of the two learning environments: The formal learning environment of the upper secondary school and the informal learning environment of the museum. Focus is also on the learning that the teachers and museum...

  6. Museets interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pold, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Søren Pold gør sig overvejelser med udgangspunkt i museumsprojekterne Kongedragter.dk og Stigombord.dk. Han argumenterer for, at udviklingen af internettets interfaces skaber nye måder at se, forstå og interagere med kulturen på. Brugerne får nye medievaner og perceptionsmønstre, der må medtænkes...

  7. Urban water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, M. O.; Hinkelmann, R.; Nützmann, G.; Jekel, M.; Singer, G.; Lewandowski, J.; Nehls, T.; Barjenbruch, M.

    2014-06-01

    Urban water systems consist of large-scale technical systems and both natural and man-made water bodies. The technical systems are essential components of urban infrastructure for water collection, treatment, storage and distribution, as well as for wastewater and runoff collection and subsequent treatment. Urban aquatic ecosystems are typically subject to strong human influences, which impair the quality of surface and ground waters, often with far-reaching impacts on downstream aquatic ecosystems and water users. The various surface and subsurface water bodies in urban environments can be viewed as interconnected compartments that are also extensively intertwined with a range of technical compartments of the urban water system. As a result, urban water systems are characterized by fluxes of water, solutes, gases and energy between contrasting compartments of a technical, natural or hybrid nature. Referred to as urban water interfaces, boundaries between and within these compartments are often specific to urban water systems. Urban water interfaces are generally characterized by steep physical and biogeochemical gradients, which promote high reaction rates. We hypothesize that they act as key sites of processes and fluxes with notable effects on overall system behaviour. By their very nature, urban water interfaces are heterogeneous and dynamic. Therefore, they increase spatial heterogeneity in urban areas and are also expected to contribute notably to the temporal dynamics of urban water systems, which often involve non-linear interactions and feedback mechanisms. Processes at and fluxes across urban water interfaces are complex and less well understood than within well-defined, homogeneous compartments, requiring both empirical investigations and new modelling approaches at both the process and system level. We advocate an integrative conceptual framework of the urban water system that considers interfaces as a key component to improve our fundamental

  8. Influence of disorder and interfaces on electronic and magnetic properties of Heusler systems; Einfluss von Unordnung und Grenzflaechen auf elektronische und magnetische Eigenschaften von Heusler-Systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumme, Bernhard

    2012-07-17

    A Moessbauer-spectroscopic investigation of Fe{sub 3} films on GaAs(100) and MgO(100) revealed a disordered growth mode of Fe{sub 3}Si on GaAs(100), which is caused by an interdiffusion of Ga/As atoms. Implementing a 3 nm thick MgO tunnelbarrier on the GaAs suface inhibits the interdiffusion and enables an epitaxial film growth of Fe{sub 3}Si. By comparing experimental X-ray absorption measurements with DFT calculations we are able to resolve the contribution of the different Fe sublattices to the XAS and XMCD signal. Taking into account atomic disorder arising from Ga/As atoms within DFT calculation yields a small reduction of the spin polarization of Fe{sub 3}Si, indicating that the system Fe{sub 3}Si/GaAs(100) still is an interesting candidate for spintronic applications. For the Heusler compounds Co{sub 2}MnSi and Co{sub 2}FeSi the influence of the 3d transition metals Mn/Fe on the hybridization was determined by X-ray absorption and DFT calculations. A depth-selective study of the electronic structure of Mn in Co{sub 2}MnSi at the vicinity to a MgO tunnelbarrier indicates an increased number of unoccupied d states referring a MnSi terminated interface. The electronic structure of Si-rich Co{sub 2}FeSi depends on the external magnetic field. This points to magnetostrictive effects in this compound. Furthermore, the Heusler compound Ni{sub 51.6}Mn{sub 32.9}Sn{sub 15.5} was studied in this work. The compound is a shape memory alloy exhibiting a large inverse magnetocaloric effect. In this work the focus was put on the element-specific magnetic properties of Ni and Mn. For Mn a strong increase of the ratio of orbital to spin magnetic moment m{sub l}/m{sub S} was observed. In the austenite phase this ratio accounts for 5 %, whereas in the martensite this value becomes 13.5 %. For Ni m{sub l}/m{sub S} is almost constant at 28 %. applying a magnetic field of 3 T in the martensite phase leads to a reduction of m{sub l}/m{sub S} for both elements, indicating a field

  9. Dynamics of Surfactant Clustering at Interfaces and Its Influence on the Interfacial Tension: Atomistic Simulation of a Sodium Hexadecane-Benzene Sulfonate-Tetradecane-Water System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Ricardo; Fariñas-Sánchez, Ana Isabel; Medina-Rodrı Guez, Bryan; Samaniego, Samantha; Aray, Yosslen; Álvarez, Luis Javier

    2018-03-06

    The process of equilibration of the tetradecane-water interface in the presence of sodium hexadecane-benzene sulfonate is studied using intensive atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Starting as an initial point with all of the surfactants at the interface, it is obtained that the equilibration time of the interface (several microseconds) is orders of magnitude higher than previously reported simulated times. There is strong evidence that this slow equilibration process is due to the aggregation of surfactants molecules on the interface. To determine this fact, temporal evolution of interfacial tension and interfacial formation energy are studied and their temporal variations are correlated with cluster formation. To study cluster evolution, the mean cluster size and the probability that a molecule of surfactant chosen at random is free are obtained as a function of time. Cluster size distribution is estimated, and it is observed that some of the molecules remain free, whereas the rest agglomerate. Additionally, the temporal evolution of the interfacial thickness and the structure of the surfactant molecules on the interface are studied. It is observed how this structure depends on whether the molecules agglomerate or not.

  10. Soft Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strzalkowski, Ireneusz

    1997-01-01

    This book presents an extended form of the 1994 Dirac Memorial Lecture delivered by Pierre Gilles de Gennes at Cambridge University. The main task of the presentation is to show the beauty and richness of structural forms and phenomena which are observed at soft interfaces between two media. They are much more complex than forms and phenomena existing in each phase separately. Problems are discussed including both traditional, classical techniques, such as the contact angle in static and dynamic partial wetting, as well as the latest research methodology, like 'environmental' scanning electron microscopes. The book is not a systematic lecture on phenomena but it can be considered as a compact set of essays on topics which particularly fascinate the author. The continuum theory widely used in the book is based on a deep molecular approach. The author is particularly interested in a broad-minded rheology of liquid systems at interfaces with specific emphasis on polymer melts. To study this, the author has developed a special methodology called anemometry near walls. The second main topic presented in the book is the problem of adhesion. Molecular processes, energy transformations and electrostatic interaction are included in an interesting discussion of the many aspects of the principles of adhesion. The third topic concerns welding between two polymer surfaces, such as A/A and A/B interfaces. Of great worth is the presentation of various unsolved, open problems. The kind of topics and brevity of description indicate that this book is intended for a well prepared reader. However, for any reader it will present an interesting picture of how many mysterious processes are acting in the surrounding world and how these phenomena are perceived by a Nobel Laureate, who won that prize mainly for his investigations in this field. (book review)

  11. Interface Screenings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bodil Marie Stavning

    2015-01-01

    In Wim Wenders' film Until the End of the World (1991), three different diagrams for the visual integration of bodies are presented: 1) GPS tracking and mapping in a landscape, 2) video recordings layered with the memory perception of these recordings, and 3) data-created images from dreams...... and memories. From a transvisual perspective, the question is whether or not these (by now realized) diagrammatic modes involving the body in ubiquitous global media can be analysed in terms of the affects and events created in concrete interfaces. The examples used are filmic as felt sensations...

  12. Molecular characterization of composite interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, H.

    1982-01-01

    The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy was applied to elucidate the molecular structures of the glass/matrix interface. The various interfaces and interphases were studied. It is found that the structure of the silane in a treating solution is important in determining the structure of the silane on glass fibers, influences the macroscopic properties of composites. The amount of silane on glass fibers, the state of hydrogen bonding, orientation, copolymerization of the organicfunctionality with the matrix, curing of the silane, and effect of water on the interface were investigated. It is shown that the molecular approach is useful to interpret and predict physicomechanical properties of composites

  13. Influence of charge compensation mechanisms on the sheet electron density at conducting LaAlO3/SrTiO3-interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunkel, F.; Brinks, Peter; Hoffmann-Eifert, S.; Dittmann, R.; Huijben, Mark; Kleibeuker, J.E.; Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    The equilibrium conductance of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO)-heterointerfaces was investigated at high temperatures (950¿K-1100¿K) as a function of ambient oxygen partial pressure (pO2). Metallic LAO/STO-interfaces were obtained for LAO grown on STO single crystals as well as on STO-buffered

  14. An Investigation of the Influence of Chain Length on the Interfacial Ordering of L-Lysine and L-Proline and Their Homopeptides at Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interfaces Studied by Sum Frequency Generation and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    York, R.L.; Holinga, G.J.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-02-23

    Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) are employed to study the interfacial structure and adsorbed amount of the amino acids l-lysine and l-proline and their corresponding homopeptides, poly-l-lysine and poly-l-proline, at two liquid-solid interfaces. SFG and QCM-D experiments of these molecules are carried out at the interface between phosphate buffered saline at pH 7.4 (PBS) and the hydrophobic deuterated polystyrene (d{sub 8}-PS) surface as well as the interface between PBS and hydrophilic fused silica (SiO{sub 2}). The SFG spectra of the amino acids studied here are qualitatively similar to their corresponding homopeptides; however, the SFG signal from amino acids at the solid/PBS interface is smaller in magnitude relative to their more massive homopeptides at the concentrations studied here. Substantial differences are observed in SFG spectra for each species between the hydrophobic d{sub 8}-PS and the hydrophilic SiO{sub 2} liquid-solid interfaces, suggesting surface-dependent interfacial ordering of the biomolecules. Over the range of concentrations used in this study, QCM-D measurements also indicate that on both surfaces poly-l-lysine adsorbs to a greater extent than its constituent amino acid l-lysine. The opposite trend is demonstrated by poly-l-proline which sticks to both surfaces less extensively than its corresponding amino acid, l-proline. Lastly, we find that the adsorption of the molecules studied here can have a strong influence on interfacial water structure as detected in the SFG spectra.

  15. Influence of interface combination of RGO-photosensitized SnO{sub 2}@RGO core-shell structures on their photocatalytic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Hao; Zhao, Xiaoru, E-mail: xrzhao@nwpu.edu.cn; Duan, Libing; Liu, Ruidi; Wu, Hongjing; Hou, Tian; Jiang, Xianwu; Gao, Haodi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • SnO{sub 2}@RGO core-shell structures are synthesized by two different strategies. • SG-C exhibit best photocatalytic activity. • The performance is due to the intimate interface combination between SnO{sub 2} and RGO. - Abstract: SnO{sub 2}@reduced graphene oxide (RGO) core-shell structures were successfully synthesized by two different strategies (electrostatic interaction method and direct chemical bonding reaction method). The investigation of morphologies and microstructures showed that RGO was wrapped tightly on the surface of SnO{sub 2} microspheres with different interface combinations, i.e., electrostatic interaction and chemical bonding. Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectra demonstrated that graphene as a photosensitizer could transfer photogenerated electrons to the conduction band (CB) of SnO{sub 2} and receive holes from the valence band (VB) of SnO{sub 2}, resulting in the separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. The photocatalytic activity of the synthesized composites was evaluated by the photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) under ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. It was found that SnO{sub 2}@RGO with chemical bonding interface combination exhibited higher photodegradation rate (k = 0.038 min{sup −1}) than those with electrostatic interaction interface combination (k = 0.021 min{sup −1}) and pure SnO{sub 2} (k = 0.010 min{sup −1}). The enhanced photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the photosensitization of RGO and the intimate interface combination between SnO{sub 2} and RGO.

  16. Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of volatile organic compounds over C4 biofuel crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graus, Martin; Eller, Allyson S. D.; Fall, Ray; Yuan, Bin; Qian, Yaling; Westra, Philip; de Gouw, Joost; Warneke, Carsten

    2013-02-01

    Significant amounts of ethanol are produced from biofuel crops such as corn and, in the future, likely switchgrass. The atmospheric effects of growing these plant species on a large scale are investigated here by measuring the plant-atmosphere exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Field grown corn and switchgrass emit VOCs at flux rates of 4.4 nmolC m-2 s-1 (10-9 mol carbon per square meter leaf area per second) and 2.4 nmolC m-2 s-1, respectively. Methanol contributes ˜60% to the molar flux but small emissions of carbonyls, aromatic compounds and terpenoids are relatively more important for potential air quality impacts. Switchgrass can act as a sink for carbonyls and aromatic compounds with compensation points of a few hundred pptv. In switchgrass moderate drought stress may induce enhanced emissions of monoterpenes, carbonyls and aromatics. Per liter of fuel ethanol produced, the estimated VOC emissions associated with the biomass growth of corn (7.8 g l-1) or switchgrass (6.2 g l-1) are in the same range as the VOC emissions from the use of one liter gasoline in vehicle engines. VOC emissions from the growing of biofuel crops can therefore be a significant contributor to the VOC emissions in the life cycle of biofuels. The VOC emissions from corn and switchgrass are small compared to those of tree species suggested as biofuel crops. Due to their reactivity with respect to OH the emissions from corn and switchgrass are not likely to have a significant impact on regional ozone formation.

  17. Monitoring and modelling of biosphere/atmosphere exchange of gases and aerosols in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erisman, Jan Willem [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)]. E-mail: erisman@ecn.nl; Vermeulen, Alex [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Hensen, Arjan [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Flechard, Chris [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Daemmgen, Ulrich [Federal Agricultural Research Centre, Institute of Agroecology, D-38116 Braunschweig, (Germany); Fowler, David [CEH, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Sutton, Mark [CEH, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Gruenhage, Ludger [Institute for Plant Ecology, Justus-Liebig-University, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka [Finnish Meteorological Institute, FIN-00810 Helsinki (Finland)

    2005-02-01

    Monitoring and modelling of deposition of air pollutants is essential to develop and evaluate policies to abate the effects related to air pollution and to determine the losses of pollutants from the atmosphere. Techniques for monitoring wet deposition fluxes are widely applied. A recent intercomparison experiment, however, showed that the uncertainty in wet deposition is relatively high, up to 40%, apart from the fact that most samplers are biased because of a dry deposition contribution. Wet deposition amounts to about 80% of the total deposition in Europe with a range of 10-90% and uncertainty should therefore be decreased. During recent years the monitoring of dry deposition has become possible. Three sites have been operational for 5 years. The data are useful for model development, but also for model evaluation and monitoring of progress in policy. Data show a decline in SO{sub 2} dry deposition, whereas nitrogen deposition remained constant. Furthermore, surface affinities for pollutants changed leading to changes in deposition. Deposition models have been further developed and tested with dry deposition measurements and total deposition measurements on forests as derived from throughfall data. The comparison is reasonable given the measurement uncertainties. Progress in ozone surface exchange modelling and monitoring shows that stomatal uptake can be quantified with reasonable accuracy, but external surface uptake yields highest uncertainty. - Monitoring and modelling of the deposition of sulphur and nitrogen components and the exposure of ozone has gained much progress through the research within BIATEX.

  18. Advances in understanding, models and parameterisations of biosphere-atmosphere ammonia exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flechard, C. R.; Massad, R.-S.; Loubet, B.; Personne, E.; Simpson, D.; Bash, J. O.; Cooter, E. J.; Nemitz, E.; Sutton, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) dominates global emissions of total reactive nitrogen (Nr), while emissions from agricultural production systems contribute about two thirds of global NH3 emissions; the remaining third emanates from oceans, natural vegetation, humans, wild animals and biomass burning. On land, NH3 emitted from the various sources eventually returns to the biosphere by dry deposition to sink areas, predominantly semi-natural vegetation, and by wet and dry deposition as ammonium (NH4+) to all surfaces. However, the land/atmosphere exchange of gaseous NH3 is in fact bi-directional over unfertilized as well as fertilized ecosystems, with periods and areas of emission and deposition alternating in time (diurnal, seasonal) and space (patchwork landscapes). The exchange is controlled by a range of environmental factors, including meteorology, surface layer turbulence, thermodynamics, air and surface heterogeneous-phase chemistry, canopy geometry, plant development stage, leaf age, organic matter decomposition, soil microbial turnover, and, in agricultural systems, by fertilizer application rate, fertilizer type, soil type, crop type, and agricultural management practices. We review the range of processes controlling NH3 emission and uptake in the different parts of the soil-canopy-atmosphere continuum, with NH3 emission potentials defined at the substrate and leaf levels by different [NH4+] / [H+] ratios (Γ). Surface/atmosphere exchange models for NH3 are necessary to compute the temporal and spatial patterns of emissions and deposition at the soil, plant, field, landscape, regional and global scales, in order to assess the multiple environmental impacts of air-borne and deposited NH3 and NH4+. Models of soil/vegetation/atmosphereem NH3 exchange are reviewed from the substrate and leaf scales to the global scale. They range from simple steady-state, "big leaf" canopy resistance models, to dynamic, multi-layer, multi-process, multi-chemical species schemes. Their level of complexity depends on their purpose, the spatial scale at which they are applied, the current level of parameterisation, and the availability of the input data they require. State-of-the-art solutions for determining the emission/sink Γ potentials through the soil/canopy system include coupled, interactive chemical transport models (CTM) and soil/ecosystem modelling at the regional scale. However, it remains a matter for debate to what extent realistic options for future regional and global models should be based on process-based mechanistic versus empirical and regression-type models. Further discussion is needed on the extent and timescale by which new approaches can be used, such as integration with ecosystem models and satellite observations.

  19. Advances in understanding, models and parameterizations of biosphere-atmosphere ammonia exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flechard, C. R.; Massad, R.-S.; Loubet, B.; Personne, E.; Simpson, D.; Bash, J. O.; Cooter, E. J.; Nemitz, E.; Sutton, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) dominates global emissions of total reactive nitrogen (Nr), while emissions from agricultural production systems contribute about two-thirds of global NH3 emissions; the remaining third emanates from oceans, natural vegetation, humans, wild animals and biomass burning. On land, NH3 emitted from the various sources eventually returns to the biosphere by dry deposition to sink areas, predominantly semi-natural vegetation, and by wet and dry deposition as ammonium (NH4+) to all surfaces. However, the land/atmosphere exchange of gaseous NH3 is in fact bi-directional over unfertilized as well as fertilized ecosystems, with periods and areas of emission and deposition alternating in time (diurnal, seasonal) and space (patchwork landscapes). The exchange is controlled by a range of environmental factors, including meteorology, surface layer turbulence, thermodynamics, air and surface heterogeneous-phase chemistry, canopy geometry, plant development stage, leaf age, organic matter decomposition, soil microbial turnover, and, in agricultural systems, by fertilizer application rate, fertilizer type, soil type, crop type, and agricultural management practices. We review the range of processes controlling NH3 emission and uptake in the different parts of the soil-canopy-atmosphere continuum, with NH3 emission potentials defined at the substrate and leaf levels by different [NH4+] / [H+] ratios (Γ). Surface/atmosphere exchange models for NH3 are necessary to compute the temporal and spatial patterns of emissions and deposition at the soil, plant, field, landscape, regional and global scales, in order to assess the multiple environmental impacts of airborne and deposited NH3 and NH4+. Models of soil/vegetation/atmosphere NH3 exchange are reviewed from the substrate and leaf scales to the global scale. They range from simple steady-state, "big leaf" canopy resistance models, to dynamic, multi-layer, multi-process, multi-chemical species schemes. Their level of complexity depends on their purpose, the spatial scale at which they are applied, the current level of parameterization, and the availability of the input data they require. State-of-the-art solutions for determining the emission/sink Γ potentials through the soil/canopy system include coupled, interactive chemical transport models (CTM) and soil/ecosystem modelling at the regional scale. However, it remains a matter for debate to what extent realistic options for future regional and global models should be based on process-based mechanistic versus empirical and regression-type models. Further discussion is needed on the extent and timescale by which new approaches can be used, such as integration with ecosystem models and satellite observations.

  20. Advances in understanding, models and parameterizations of biosphere-atmosphere ammonia exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Flechard

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric ammonia (NH3 dominates global emissions of total reactive nitrogen (Nr, while emissions from agricultural production systems contribute about two-thirds of global NH3 emissions; the remaining third emanates from oceans, natural vegetation, humans, wild animals and biomass burning. On land, NH3 emitted from the various sources eventually returns to the biosphere by dry deposition to sink areas, predominantly semi-natural vegetation, and by wet and dry deposition as ammonium (NH4+ to all surfaces. However, the land/atmosphere exchange of gaseous NH3 is in fact bi-directional over unfertilized as well as fertilized ecosystems, with periods and areas of emission and deposition alternating in time (diurnal, seasonal and space (patchwork landscapes. The exchange is controlled by a range of environmental factors, including meteorology, surface layer turbulence, thermodynamics, air and surface heterogeneous-phase chemistry, canopy geometry, plant development stage, leaf age, organic matter decomposition, soil microbial turnover, and, in agricultural systems, by fertilizer application rate, fertilizer type, soil type, crop type, and agricultural management practices. We review the range of processes controlling NH3 emission and uptake in the different parts of the soil-canopy-atmosphere continuum, with NH3 emission potentials defined at the substrate and leaf levels by different [NH4+] / [H+] ratios (Γ. Surface/atmosphere exchange models for NH3 are necessary to compute the temporal and spatial patterns of emissions and deposition at the soil, plant, field, landscape, regional and global scales, in order to assess the multiple environmental impacts of airborne and deposited NH3 and NH4+. Models of soil/vegetation/atmosphere NH3 exchange are reviewed from the substrate and leaf scales to the global scale. They range from simple steady-state, "big leaf" canopy resistance models, to dynamic, multi-layer, multi-process, multi-chemical species schemes. Their level of complexity depends on their purpose, the spatial scale at which they are applied, the current level of parameterization, and the availability of the input data they require. State-of-the-art solutions for determining the emission/sink Γ potentials through the soil/canopy system include coupled, interactive chemical transport models (CTM and soil/ecosystem modelling at the regional scale. However, it remains a matter for debate to what extent realistic options for future regional and global models should be based on process-based mechanistic versus empirical and regression-type models. Further discussion is needed on the extent and timescale by which new approaches can be used, such as integration with ecosystem models and satellite observations.

  1. Biosphere-Atmosphere Exchange of NOx and O3 in Central Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, K. T.; Swofsy, S. C.; Munger, J. W.; Saleska, S. R.; Rizzo, L. V.; Silva Campos, K.

    2017-12-01

    The primary source of atmospheric OH is the photolysis of O3 in the presence of water vapor. NOx gases are the main precursors of O3 and OH. In NOx-rich environments that have both high humidity and high solar radiation, OH concentrations are enhanced, making tropical forests dominant in global oxidation of long lived gases. The Amazon rain forest has a unique combination of vegetation with diverse characteristics, climate, and a dynamic land use, factors that altogether govern the emission and fate of trace gases, particle formation and atmospheric chemistry. Understanding the interactions among the mechanisms that govern local precursor emissions will lead to a better description of the local atmospheric chemistry and its global impacts. As part of the GoAmazon project, an array of complementary measurements was conducted in a research site in central Amazon, near Santarem (PA, Brazil), inside the Tapajos National Forest. The research site is surrounded by intact rain forest in a 6km radius, and a 45m canopy. The 67m tower was assembled in the site in 2001 for flux measurements (CO2 and H2O). In mid 2014 additional instrumentation were added, measuring NOx, O3, CH4, and SO2 fluxes and profiles. The low concentrations of SO2 (up to 0.1ppb during the peak of the dry season), and a small vertical gradient, suggest the predominance of biogenic sources. O3 show no significant seasonality between the daytime and nighttime vertical profiles, but occasional nighttime high concentrations for levels below canopy were observed. Hourly ozone fluxes suggest a production of O3 under canopy. NO soil emissions are indicated by concentrations in the ppb range for lower profile levels, decreasing to a few hundreds ppt above the canopy, and emission rates of NO from Amazonian soils may be higher than expected from earlier measurements. Daytime data indicate that not all of this NOx escapes to the atmosphere, however. Fluxes of NO average 133x109 molec cm-2 s-1, a factor of 4 higher than previously observed in white sand soils in the Amazon[1], and a factor of 3 to 14 higher than fluxes observed for yellow clay soils[2], while Fluxes of NO2 average 0.84x109 molec cm-2 s-1.[1] Kaplan, W.A., Wofsy, S.C., Keller, M., and da Costa, J.M. J of Geophys Res, Vol 93, D2, 1389, 1988. [2] Bakwin, P.S., Wofsy, S.C., and Fan, S.M. J. of Geophys Res, Vol 95, D10, 16765, 1990.

  2. Evidence for chlorine recycling - Hydrosphere, biosphere, atmosphere - In a forested wet zone on the Canadian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, G.M.; Milton, J.C.D.; Schiff, S.; Cook, P.; Kotzer, T.G.; Cecil, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    The ability to measure environmental levels of 36Cl by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and 3H by 3He-ingrowth Mass Spectrometry has made it possible to use the pulses of these two isotopes released into the atmosphere during nuclear weapons testing as tracers of Cl and water movement in soils and groundwater. The authors have investigated the movement of these tracers below a forested wet zone, and have found that both are retarded to a differing extent in the near surface because of vegetative uptake and recycling. Adsorption by clay particles, followed by slow release to the groundwater, may also be significant. The data accumulated in this region of near vertical recharge have gone a considerable distance towards explaining the anomalously low concentrations of 36Cl measured in the 5 Laurentian Great Lakes, as well as indicating possible mechanisms for large scale Cl- recycling in the atmosphere and biosphere. Identification of the near-term non-conservative behaviour of the Cl- is significant, since such a phenomenon could introduce errors in many watershed calculations, e.g. water residence times, evaporation rates, and mixing calculations. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  3. Normal Stresses and Interface Displacement: Influence of Viscoelasticity on Enhanced Oil Recovery Efficiency Contraintes normales et déplacement d’interface : influence de la viscoélasticité sur l’efficacité de la récupération assistée

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avendano J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR methods consists in injecting aqueous solutions of polymers into the reservoir in order to improve mobility ratio between the injected fluid and the remaining oil. This “polymer flooding” process is usually only characterized with the low shear viscosity of the injected fluid, even if these aqueous solutions are strongly shear thinning and may show high elastic properties evidenced by normal stresses appearance. In order to study the mechanisms at the interface level, we develop simple model experimentations with the goal of quantifying the influence of viscoelastic properties on fluid displacement in a simple geometry. For this purpose, we propose and characterize a model fluid formulation, for which elastic and viscous effects can be tuned systematically. We study then the displacement of a viscous oil by a Newtonian non elastic, a viscoelastic or a purely shear thinning fluid in a two dimensional flow cell. Observing the shape of the interface between aqueous fluids and displaced oil permits to appreciate viscoelasticity effects on the displacement. Using model geometries and controlled rheology fluids, we show that viscoelastic fluids tend to better displace immiscible liquids than Newtonian fluids and that those effects are closely related to the apparitions of normal stresses independently of shear thinning property or variation of interfacial tension as soon as viscous effects govern the flow. Une des méthodes de récupération assistée du pétrole (EOR - Enhanced Oil Recovery consiste à injecter dans les puits des solutions aqueuses de polymère pour améliorer le rapport de mobilité entre le fluide injecté et le pétrole qui reste dans le puits. Ce procédé de “polymer flooding” est communément caractérisé par la seule valeur de la viscosité à faible gradient de vitesse du fluide injecté, bien que les solutions employées présentent une forte rhéofluidification et

  4. Study on influence of growth conditions on position and shape of crystal/melt interface of alkali lead halide crystals at Bridgman growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 360, S1 (2012), s. 162-166 ISSN 0022-0248. [5th International Workshop on Crystal Growth Technology (IWCGT). Berlin, 26.06.2011-30.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB200100901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Interfaces * morphological stability * segregation * Bridgman technique * halides Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.552, year: 2012

  5. Influence of annealing environment on the ALD-Al2O3/4H-SiC interface studied through XPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad; Saveda Suvanam, Sethu; Hallén, Anders

    2018-03-01

    The instability of Al2O3/4H-SiC interface at various process temperatures and ambient is investigated by the annealing of Al2O3/4H-SiC in low vacuum conditions as well as in N2 environments. Atomic layer deposited Al2O3 on a 4H-SiC substrate with 3, 6 and 10 nm of thicknesses is treated at 300, 500, 700 and 900 °C under the vacuum level of 10‑1 torr. The as-deposited and annealed structures are analyzed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is hypothesized that the minute quantity of oxygen present in low vacuum conditions diffuses through thin layers of Al2O3 and helps in forming SiO2 at the interface even at low temperatures (i.e. 300 °C), which plays a pivotal role in determining the electrical properties of the interface. It is also proved that the absence of oxygen in the ambient prevents the formation of SiO2 at low temperatures. Additionally, it is observed that Al–OH is present in as-deposited layers, which gradually reduces after annealing. However, at around 700 °C, the concentration of oxygen in the whole structure increases to maximum and reduces at 900 °C.

  6. Interface influence on the properties of Co{sub 90}Fe{sub 10} films on soft magnetic underlayers – Magnetostrictive and Mössbauer spectrometry studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szumiata, Tadeusz, E-mail: t.szumiata@uthrad.pl [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Technology and Humanities in Radom, 54 Krasickiego Street, 26-600 Radom (Poland); Gzik-Szumiata, Małgorzata; Brzózka, Katarzyna; Górka, Bogumił; Gawroński, Michał [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Technology and Humanities in Radom, 54 Krasickiego Street, 26-600 Radom (Poland); Caruana Finkel, Anastasia; Reeves-McLaren, Nik; Morley, Nicola A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-01

    The main aim of the work was to show the correlation between magnetostrictive properties and microstructure of 25 nm thick Co{sub 90}Fe{sub 10} films deposited on soft magnetic underlayers. A special attention was paid to the role of the interface region. In the case of Co{sub 90}Fe{sub 10} on 25 nm and 35 nm thick METGLAS underlayers one can resolve in conversion electron Mössbauer spectra two hyperfine field distributions (high-field and medium-field ones) corresponding to both constituents of bilayers. Analogical distributions describe the spectra of Co{sub 90}Fe{sub 10} on 25 nm and 35 nm thick Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} underlayers, however an additional low-field, smeared component has been observed. It has been attributed to the interface layer (of partially disordered structure) between magnetostrictive layer and soft magnetic layer. Such interpretation is backed up by the obtained strong correlation between mean hyperfine field value and magnetostriction constant of the films. The investigated bilayers are good candidates for MRAM devices. - Highlights: • We investigate Co–Fe thin films on the soft magnetic underlayers. • We measured magnetostriction and collected conversion electron Mössbauer spectra. • In the case of Permalloy underlayer a rapid drop of magnetostriction was observed. • Strong correlation between magnetostriction and hyperfine fields was shown. • Our results point to the essential role of the Co–Fe/underlayer interface.

  7. Dissimilar friction stir welding of Ti–6Al–4V alloy and aluminum alloy employing a modified butt joint configuration: Influences of process variables on the weld interfaces and tensile properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Zhenhua; Shen, Yifu; Hu, Weiye; Luo, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) technique is considered to offer advantages over fusion welding in terms of dissimilar jointing. However, some challenges still exist in the butt FSW of dissimilar Ti and Al metals. The present research employed a modified butt joint configuration into the FSW of Ti–6Al–4V alloy to Al–6Mg alloy with a special pin plunge setup, aiming to obtain a high-quality Ti-to-Al joint, avoid butt flaw or Al melting, and reduce the tool shoulder attrition. Under different FSW process conditions, the examinations and analyses of macro/micro-structures, mechanical tensile properties and fractographies of the dissimilar joints were conducted. The joint mechanical tensile strength can reach more than 92% of the parent Al alloy strength, with a tensile fracture path within the Al alloy butt side. The characteristics and formation mechanisms of the diffusion typed and reaction typed Ti–Al butt-welded interface structures were detailed. The bulky intermetallic compounds (IMC) interlayer at the butt-welded interface had a negative effect on the joint tensile strength, comparing with the Ti–Al diffusion bonding interlayer of ∼2 μm in thickness, which was produced via lower tool rotating speed and lower pin-offset value towards Ti alloy butt side. - Highlights: • Modified joint configuration is employed into Ti-to-Al FSW for a low tool attrition. • Defect-free joint is achieved with 92% tensile strength of parent Al alloy. • Influences of processing variables on weld interface microstructure are addressed. • Formation mechanisms of different typed Ti-to-Al weld interfaces are elucidated

  8. Influence of phosphoproteins' biomimetic analogs on remineralization of mineral-depleted resin-dentin interfaces created with ion-releasing resin-based systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Salvatore; Osorio, Raquel; Watson, Timothy F; Toledano, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    The study aimed at evaluating the remineralization of acid-etched dentin pre-treated with primers containing biomimetic analogs and bonded using an ion-releasing light-curable resin-based material. An experimental etch-and-rinse adhesive system filled with Ca(2+), PO4(3-)-releasing Ca-Silicate micro-fillers was created along with two experimental primers containing biomimetic analogs such as sodium trimetaphosphate (TMP) and/or polyaspartic acid (PLA). Dentin specimens etched with 37% H3PO4 were pre-treated with two different aqueous primers containing the polyanionic biomimetic analogs or deionized water and subsequently bonded using the experimental resin-based materials. The specimens were sectioned and analyzed by AFM/nanoindentation to evaluate changes in the modulus of elasticity (Ei) across the resin-dentin interface at different AS storage periods (up to 90 days). Raman cluster analysis was also performed to evaluate the chemical changes along the interface. The phosphate uptake by the acid-etched dentin was evaluated using the ATR-FTIR. Additional resin-dentin specimens were tested for microtensile bond strength. SEM examination was performed after de-bonding, while confocal laser microscopy was used to evaluate the interfaces ultramorphology and micropermeability. Both biomimetic primers induced phosphate uptake by acid-etched dentin. Specimens created with the ion-releasing resin in combination with the pre-treatment primers containing either PLA and TMA showed the greatest recovery of the Ei of the hybrid layer, with no decrease in μTBS (p>0.05) after 3-month AS storage. The ion-releasing resin applied after use of the biomimetic primers showed the greatest reduction in micropermeability due to mineral precipitation; these results were confirmed using SEM. The use of the ion-releasing resin-based system applied to acid-etched dentin pre-treated with biomimetic primers containing analogs of phosphoproteins such as poly-l-aspartic acid and/or sodium

  9. Influence of microstructure on hardness of plasma sprayed Al2O3–TiO2–MgO coatings with interface diffusion by heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kunlun; Song, Peng; Li, Chao; Lu, Jiansheng

    2017-12-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Al2O3–TiO2 coatings doped with 5 wt% MgO was investigated in this paper. The composite coatings were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) and heat treated at 1000 °C for 24 h in Ar. The coatings were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy with electron probe x-ray microanalysis and x-ray diffraction. The hardness was determined using a Vickers hardness test on the as-sprayed coatings and after heat treatment. The results showed that the interface diffusion between the Al-rich and Ti-rich layers resulted in mutual pinning within the coating during the heat treatment. The newly formed MgAl2O4 phase promoted cracking-healing behavior within the coating. We conclude that increase of the hardness of the coatings was mainly caused by the mutual pinning interface and crack healing.

  10. Interface influence on the properties of Co90Fe10 films on soft magnetic underlayers - Magnetostrictive and Mössbauer spectrometry studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumiata, Tadeusz; Gzik-Szumiata, Małgorzata; Brzózka, Katarzyna; Górka, Bogumił; Gawroński, Michał; Caruana Finkel, Anastasia; Reeves-McLaren, Nik; Morley, Nicola A.

    2016-03-01

    The main aim of the work was to show the correlation between magnetostrictive properties and microstructure of 25 nm thick Co90Fe10 films deposited on soft magnetic underlayers. A special attention was paid to the role of the interface region. In the case of Co90Fe10 on 25 nm and 35 nm thick METGLAS underlayers one can resolve in conversion electron Mössbauer spectra two hyperfine field distributions (high-field and medium-field ones) corresponding to both constituents of bilayers. Analogical distributions describe the spectra of Co90Fe10 on 25 nm and 35 nm thick Ni81Fe19 underlayers, however an additional low-field, smeared component has been observed. It has been attributed to the interface layer (of partially disordered structure) between magnetostrictive layer and soft magnetic layer. Such interpretation is backed up by the obtained strong correlation between mean hyperfine field value and magnetostriction constant of the films. The investigated bilayers are good candidates for MRAM devices.

  11. Interface-Based Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Alfaro, Luca; Henzinger, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    .... Interface automata support incremental design and independent implementability. Incremental design means that the compatibility checking of interfaces can proceed for partial system descriptions, without knowing the interfaces of all components...

  12. The steel–concrete interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angst, Ueli M.; Geiker, Mette Rica; Michel, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Although the steel–concrete interface (SCI) is widely recognized to influence the durability of reinforced concrete, a systematic overview and detailed documentation of the various aspects of the SCI are lacking. In this paper, we compiled a comprehensive list of possible local characteristics...

  13. Influencing governance of a public-private partnership in plant genomics: The societal interface group as a new instrument for public involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Lucien; Gremmen, Bart

    2013-08-01

    The Centre for BioSystems Genomics (CBSG) is a Dutch public-private partnership in plant genomics active in potato and tomato research and exploitation. Its Societal Interface Group (SIG) has been developed to inform its communication strategy and governance practice. This new instrument identifies and discusses early signals from society by bringing together people from different societal backgrounds with members of CBSG management. This interactive learning process facilitates the inclusion of public concerns and needs in scientific developments in the field of plant genomics, and simultaneously enables genomics scientists to search for more societal aims, meanings, and starting points for their research agenda. Analysis of the SIG sessions revealed that the input of public expertise is not threatening or irrational, but provides the opportunity to harness the creative potential of future users highly relevant for the development of societal practices in which plant genomics plays a role.

  14. Influence of an aerobic sediment-water interface in relation to reduced risk of phosphorus leaching from re-established wetlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsmann, Ditte M.; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    water passes through the wetland sediment and carry soluble iron and phosphorus by convection to the sediment-water interface. During surface water flooding phosphorus fluxes from the sediment will be dominated by diffuse fluxes. The eventual loss of phosphorus mobilized within the anaerobic sediment......Re-establishing of wetlands on former drained lowland areas used for agriculture has come into focus as a measure to reduce nutrient losses to the aquatic environment. However, new results have documented significant accumulations of iron bound phosphorus in Danish lowland soils (Kjaergaard et al......., 2007). Thus, re-establishment of wetlands might constitute a risk of excess phosphorus loss to the aquatic environment, as changes in redox conditions may lead to reductive dissolution of iron(III) oxides and consequently release of iron bound phosphorus (Hoffmann et al., 2009). Groundwater and surface...

  15. Influence des états d'interface et de la température sur l'inefficacité de transfert des dispositifs à transfert de charge en surface ll SCCD gg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhdada, A.; Touhami, A.

    1994-11-01

    Two phenomena are on the degradation base of the charge transfer inefficiency in the C.C.D. devices : the incomplet transfer of the free charges because of the insuffisance of the transfer time and the charge trapping by the interface state, whose effect is negligible at high frequencies. The aim of this paper is the transfer inefficiency analyze on the absence and presence of interface states. The charges transfer from a potential well to another, is described by a nonlinear differential equation, that introduces all the transfer major mechanisms : self-induced drift E_s (x, t ), fringing field drift E_ff, the thermal diffusion and the recombination-generation phenomenon at the interface described by Shockley-Read-Hall. The numerical method proposed for this equation resolution is based on the implicit fined difference method, which leads to a discretized system of equations, which we solve by using the algorithm Gauss by elimination. In the last stage, we shall discuss the temperature influence on the transfer inefficiency, while introducing in the differential equation all the parameter expressions dependent on the temperature (captor cross section σ_n, thermal velocity V_th, acceptor density N_A, conduction band density of states N_c and the surface mobility of electrons μ_n). La dégradation de l'inefficacité de transfert dans les dispositifs à transfert de charge " CCD " est liée principalement à l'insuffisance du temps de transfert, et au piégeage de charges par les états d'interface dont l'effet est négligeable en hautes fréquences. Le but de cet article est de montrer l'influence des états d'interface et de la température sur l'inefficacité de transfert. Pour cela nous avons résolu l'équation différentielle non linéaire qui décrit le transfert de charge d'un puits à un autre en introduisant le champ self-induit, le champ de bord, la diffusion thermique et le phénomène de recombinaison-génération au niveau de la surface décrit par

  16. Possible influence of the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interface on the effective critical behavior of bilayers based on La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Álvarez Miño, Lucero, E-mail: lalvarezm@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Cra. 27 #64-60, Manizales (Colombia); Grupo de Superconductividad y Nuevos Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Bogotá, Avenida Carrera 30 #45, Bogotá (Colombia); Mulcué-Nieto, Luis Fernando, E-mail: lfmulcuen@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Magnetismo y Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Cra. 27 #64-60, Manizales (Colombia)

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the effective critical exponent of the spontaneous magnetization, β, and the transition temperature, T{sub C}, were calculated from magnetization measurements of three bilayers based on La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO). The bilayers structure is a ferromagnetic (FM) LSMO film grown on top of an antiferromagnetic (AF) LSMO film. The value of the antiferromagnetic film thickness was kept the same for the three samples, while the ferromagnetic film had different thickness for each bilayer. Applying a method of calculation based on a linear superposition of the magnetization close to the critical temperature, a β value corresponding to the 3D Ising model was found for the bilayer with the thinnest ferromagnetic film. This result, and the other obtained values are explained taking into account the possible influence of the FM/AF interface on the magnetic and crystal orderings. - Highlights: • The critical exponent β of three LSMO bilayers was determined. • Two bilayers with the thinner FM layer have very similar transition temperature. • Two bilayers with the thinner FM layer have very similar width values. • We have found values of β of the 3D Ising model. • Interface also seems to be responsible for some structural disorder.

  17. Theoretical study of the acid-base properties of the montmorillonite/electrolyte interface: influence of the surface heterogeneity and ionic strength on the potentiometric titration curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzycki, Piotr; Thomas, Fabien

    2006-10-15

    The parallel shape of the potentiometric titration curves for montmorillonite suspension is explained using the surface complexation model and taking into account the surface heterogeneity. The homogeneous models give accurate predictions only if they assume unphysically large values of the equilibrium constants for the exchange process occurring on the basal plane. However, the assumption that the basal plane is energetically heterogeneous allows to fit the experimental data (reported by Avena and De Pauli [M. Avena, C.P. De Pauli, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 202 (1998) 195-204]) for reasonable values of exchange equilibrium constant equal to 1.26 (suggested by Fletcher and Sposito [P. Fletcher, G. Sposito, Clay Miner. 24 (1989) 375-391]). Moreover, we observed the typical behavior of point of zero net proton charge (pznpc) as a function of logarithm of the electrolyte concentration (log[C]). We showed that the slope of the linear dependence, pznpc=f(log[C]), is proportional to the number of isomorphic substitutions in the crystal phase, which was also observed in the experimental studies.

  18. Zn2+ and Sr2+ Adsorption at the TiO2 (110)-Electrolyte Interface: Influence of Ionic Strength, Coverage, and Anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Fenter, P.; Cheng, L.; Sturchio, N.; Bedzyk, M.; Machesky, M.; Anovitz, L.; Wesolowski, D.

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray standing wave technique was used to probe the sensitivity of Zn 2+ and Sr 2+ ion adsorption to changes in both the adsorbed ion coverage and the background electrolyte species and concentrations at the rutile (α-TiO 2 ) (110)-aqueous interface. Measurements were made with various background electrolytes (NaCl, NaTr, RbCl, NaBr) at concentrations as high as 1 m. The results demonstrate that Zn 2+ and Sr 2+ reside primarily in the condensed layer and that the ion heights above the Ti-O surface plane are insensitive to ionic strength and the choice of background electrolyte (with - , coupled with the insensitivity of Zn 2+ and Sr 2+ cation heights to changes in the background electrolyte, implies that anions do not play a significant role in the adsorption of these divalent metal ions to the rutile (110) surface. Absolute ion coverage measurements for Zn 2+ and Sr 2+ show a maximum Stern-layer coverage of ∼0.5 monolayer, with no significant variation in height as a function of Stern-layer coverage. These observations are discussed in the context of Gouy-Chapman-Stern models of the electrical double layer developed from macroscopic sorption and pH-titration studies of rutile powder suspensions. Direct comparison between these experimental observations and the MUltiSIte Complexation (MUSIC) model predictions of cation surface coverage as a function of ionic strength revealed good agreement between measured and predicted surface coverages with no adjustable parameters

  19. Microbial colonization at the implant-abutment interface and its possible influence on periimplantitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarico, Marco; Canullo, Luigi; Caneva, Martina; Özcan, Mutlu

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the microbial colonization at the implant-abutment interfaces (IAI) on bone-level implants and to identify possible association with peri-implant conditions. The focus question aimed to answer whether two-piece osseointegrated implants, in function for at least 1 year, in human, relate to higher bacterial count and the onset of periimplantitis, compared to healthy peri-implant conditions. Search strategy encompassed the on-line (MedLine, Google scholar, Cochrane library) literature from 1990 up to March 2015 published in English using combinations of MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and search terms. Quality assessment of selected full-text articles was performed according to the ARRIVE and CONSORT statement guidelines. For data analysis, the total bacterial count of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Prevotella intermedia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum was calculated and compared to IAI with or without peri-implant pathology. A total of 14 articles, reporting data from 1126 implants, fulfilled the inclusion criteria and subjected to quality assessment. The selected studies revealed contamination of the IAI, in patients who received two-piece implant systems. Meta-analysis indicated significant difference in total bacterial count between implants affected by periimplantitis versus healthy peri-implant tissues (0.387±0.055; 95% CI 0.279-0.496). Less bacterial counts were identified in the healthy IAI for all the investigated gram-negative bacteria except for T. forsythia. Significantly higher bacterial counts were found for periodontal pathogenic bacteria within the IAI of implants in patients with periimplantitis compared to those implants surrounded by healthy peri-implant tissues. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Interface Simulation Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Černý

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical (boolean notion of refinement for behavioral interfaces of system components is the alternating refinement preorder. In this paper, we define a distance for interfaces, called interface simulation distance. It makes the alternating refinement preorder quantitative by, intuitively, tolerating errors (while counting them in the alternating simulation game. We show that the interface simulation distance satisfies the triangle inequality, that the distance between two interfaces does not increase under parallel composition with a third interface, and that the distance between two interfaces can be bounded from above and below by distances between abstractions of the two interfaces. We illustrate the framework, and the properties of the distances under composition of interfaces, with two case studies.

  1. Shape-changing interfaces:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegård; Pedersen, Esben Warming; Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2015-01-01

    Shape change is increasingly used in physical user interfaces, both as input and output. Yet, the progress made and the key research questions for shape-changing interfaces are rarely analyzed systematically. We review a sample of existing work on shape-changing interfaces to address these shortc......Shape change is increasingly used in physical user interfaces, both as input and output. Yet, the progress made and the key research questions for shape-changing interfaces are rarely analyzed systematically. We review a sample of existing work on shape-changing interfaces to address...... shape-changing interfaces be used for, (b) which parts of the design space are not well understood, and (c) why studying user experience with shape-changing interfaces is important....

  2. Microcomputer interfacing and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, M A

    1990-01-01

    This is the applications guide to interfacing microcomputers. It offers practical non-mathematical solutions to interfacing problems in many applications including data acquisition and control. Emphasis is given to the definition of the objectives of the interface, then comparing possible solutions and producing the best interface for every situation. Dr Mustafa A Mustafa is a senior designer of control equipment and has written many technical articles and papers on the subject of computers and their application to control engineering.

  3. Garbage collector interface

    OpenAIRE

    Ive, Anders; Blomdell, Anders; Ekman, Torbjörn; Henriksson, Roger; Nilsson, Anders; Nilsson, Klas; Robertz, Sven

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the presented garbage collector interface is to provide a universal interface for many different implementations of garbage collectors. This is to simplify the integration and exchange of garbage collectors, but also to support incremental, non-conservative, and thread safe implementations. Due to the complexity of the interface, it is aimed at code generators and preprocessors. Experiences from ongoing implementations indicate that the garbage collector interface successfully ...

  4. Water at Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björneholm, Olle; Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Hodgson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The interfaces of neat water and aqueous solutions play a prominent role in many technological processes and in the environment. Examples of aqueous interfaces are ultrathin water films that cover most hydrophilic surfaces under ambient relative humidities, the liquid/solid interface which drives...

  5. User Interface History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms; Myers, Brad A

    2008-01-01

    User Interfaces have been around as long as computers have existed, even well before the field of Human-Computer Interaction was established. Over the years, some papers on the history of Human-Computer Interaction and User Interfaces have appeared, primarily focusing on the graphical interface era...

  6. PREFACE: Water at interfaces Water at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, P.; Rovere, M.

    2010-07-01

    scales. Silicalite and tobermorite, a layered calcio-silicate model of cement and Vycor are analyzed. Gordillo and Martí consider structural and dynamical properties of water confined or close to carbon nanotubes or inside a slit pore of a single graphene sheet. Jedlovszky et al introduce a new method to determine the molecules located right at the boundary of two phases in a computer simulation. The new method is applied to the analysis of the interface of water with different apolar phases. Melchionna et al consider phenomena related to water in contact with thermophilic protein interfaces. In particular, they discuss the role of water in stabilizing these proteins. Rotenberg et al report results on the structure and dynamics of water at a clay surface. They analyze, in particular, the influence on the H-bond network of the surface oxygens and ions and investigate the surface H-bond formation and dissociation dynamics. Smirnov and Bougeard present examples of the spatial organization of molecules and of the short- and long-time dynamical behaviour of water confined in the pores of crystalline aluminosilicates, such as zeolites and clays, and in nanostructured materials. The last group opens with Sulpizi and Sprik who present density functional calculations of the dissociation constant of liquid water, implemented with a proton insertion/removal method. Jung and Marcus consider, more specifically, the properties of water in organic catalysis and discuss theoretical models and results obtained with quantum mechanical calculations. As organizers of the CECAM workshop 'Modeling and Simulation of Water at Interfaces from Ambient to Supercooled Conditions' we would like to thank CECAM, ESF-Simbioma, Wanda Andreoni, Emilie Bernard and Jordi Brusa. As guest editors of this special issue we would like to thank Gerhard Kahl and Philip Semple.

  7. Influência das energias de superfícies e interfaces na densificação durante a sinterização: um modelo geométrico The influence of surface and interface energies during sintering: a geometric approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gouvêa

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Devido a grande importância dada aos processos difusionais na sinterização, ou seja, a fatores cinéticos, pouco tem evoluído o conhecimento da sinterização no estado sólido do ponto de vista da energia do sistema de partículas. Alguns pesquisadores têm se esforçado em compreender a importância das energias da superfície dos poros e da interface do contorno de grão no processo de densificação e sua relação com os processos difusionais e a termodinâmica da sinterização. Contudo, pouco avanço tem sido obtido nesse sentido. O presente trabalho foi desenvolvido sobre um modelo geométrico simples de empacotamento de esferas sobre o qual foram realizados cálculos para se avaliar as variações de densidade, área específica dos poros e dos contornos de grão durante três situações: densificação sem crescimento de grãos, crescimento de grãos sem densificação e crescimento de grãos e densificação. Os resultados sugerem existir uma relação entre a evolução da microestrutura para a densificação ou não de um sistema de partículas em função da razão entre as energias do contorno de grão e da superfície dos poros.Sintering is a diffusional process and the mechanism of mass transport is assumed to control the phenomenon. Minor attention has been paid on the influence of surface and interface energies during sintering. Even if some works have tried to understand the influence of the modifications of the pore and grain boundary surfaces in the densification during sintering and their relationships with the difusional process, modest progresses have been reached. This work was developed from a simple model of packing spheres, allowing for calculating simultaneously the variation of pore, grain boundary and density for three situations: densification without grain growth, grain growth without densification and grain growth with densification. The results suggest a relationship between the microestrutural evolution

  8. Quantization of interface currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotani, Motoko [AIMR, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Schulz-Baldes, Hermann [Department Mathematik, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Villegas-Blas, Carlos [Instituto de Matematicas, Cuernavaca, UNAM, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    At the interface of two two-dimensional quantum systems, there may exist interface currents similar to edge currents in quantum Hall systems. It is proved that these interface currents are macroscopically quantized by an integer that is given by the difference of the Chern numbers of the two systems. It is also argued that at the interface between two time-reversal invariant systems with half-integer spin, one of which is trivial and the other non-trivial, there are dissipationless spin-polarized interface currents.

  9. Tailoring Sandwich Face/Core Interfaces for Improved Damage Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard-Larsen, Christian; Berggreen, Christian; Carlsson, Leif A.

    2010-01-01

    A face/core debond in a sandwich structure may propagate in the interface or kink into either the face or core. It is found that certain modifications of the face/core interface region influence the kinking behavior, which is studied experimentally in the present paper. A sandwich double cantilever....... The transition points where the crack kinks are identified and the influence of four various interface design modifications on the propagation path and fracture resistance are investigated....

  10. User acquaintance with mobile interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrler, Frederic; Walesa, Magali; Sarrey, Evelyne; Wipfli, Rolf; Lovis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Handheld technology finds slowly its place in the healthcare world. Some clinicians already use intensively dedicated mobile applications to consult clinical references. However, handheld technology hasn't still broadly embraced to the core of the healthcare business, the hospitals. The weak penetration of handheld technology in the hospitals can be partly explained by the caution of stakeholders that must be convinced about the efficiency of these tools before going forward. In a domain where temporal constraints are increasingly strong, caregivers cannot loose time on playing with gadgets. All users are not comfortable with tactile manipulations and the lack of dedicated peripheral complicates entering data for novices. Stakeholders must be convinced that caregivers will be able to master handheld devices. In this paper, we make the assumption that the proper design of an interface may influence users' performances to record information. We are also interested to find out whether users increase their efficiency when using handheld tools repeatedly. To answer these questions, we have set up a field study to compare users' performances on three different user interfaces while recording vital signs. Some user interfaces were familiar to users, and others were totally innovative. Results showed that users' familiarity with smartphone influences their performances and that users improve their performances by repeating a task.

  11. Structure and properties of interfaces in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnell, D.; Ruehle, M.; Chowdhry, U.

    1995-01-01

    The motivation for the symposium was the observation that interfaces in crystallographically and compositionally complex systems often dictate the performance and reliability of devices that utilize functional ceramics. The current level of understanding of interface-property relations in silicon-based devices required over 30 years of intensive research. Similar issues influence the relationship between atomic bonding at interfaces and properties in functional ceramic systems. The current understanding of these complex interfaces does not allow correlation between atomic structure and interface properties, in spite of their importance to a number of emerging technologies (wireless communications, radar-based positioning systems, sensors, etc.). The objective of this symposium was to focus attention on these fundamental issues by featuring recent theoretical and experimental work from various disciplines that impact the understanding of interface chemistry, structure, and properties. The emphasis was on relating properties of surfaces and interfaces to structure through an understanding of atomic level phenomena. Interfaces of interest include metal/ceramic, ceramic/ceramic, ceramic/vapor, etc., in electronic, magnetic, optical, ferroelectric, piezoelectric, and dielectric applications. Sixty one papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  12. Microconical interface fitting and interface grasping tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernhardt, Michael L. (Inventor); Wightman, William D. (Inventor); Johnston, Alistair P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A small and light weight microconical interface fitting may be attached to the surface of a space vehicle or equipment to provide an attachment device for an astronaut or robot to capture the space vehicle or equipment. The microconical interface fitting of the present invention has an axisymmetrical conical body having a base portion with a torque reaction surface for preventing rotation of the interface grasping tool; a cavitated, sunken or hollowed out intermediate locking portion which has a cavity shaped for receiving the latches of the grasping tool and an upper guiding portion for guiding the grasping tool into axial alignment with the microconical interface fitting. The capture is accomplished with an interface grasping tool. The grasping tool comprises an outer sleeve with a handle attached, an inner sleeve which may be raised and lowered within the outer sleeve with a plurality of latches supported at the lower end and a cam to raise and lower the inner sleeve. When the inner sleeve is at its lowest position, the latches form the largest diameter opening for surrounding the microconical fitting and the latches form the smallest diameter or a locking, grasping position when raised to the highest position within the outer sleeve. The inner sleeve may be at an intermediate, capture position which permits the latches to be biased outwardly when contacting the microconical fitting under very low forces to grasp the fitting and permits capture (soft docking) without exact alignment of the fitting and the tool.

  13. Universal computer interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dheere, RFBM

    1988-01-01

    Presents a survey of the latest developments in the field of the universal computer interface, resulting from a study of the world patent literature. Illustrating the state of the art today, the book ranges from basic interface structure, through parameters and common characteristics, to the most important industrial bus realizations. Recent technical enhancements are also included, with special emphasis devoted to the universal interface adapter circuit. Comprehensively indexed.

  14. Electromagnetic Interface Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electromagnetic Interface Testing facilitysupports such testing asEmissions, Field Strength, Mode Stirring, EMP Pulser, 4 Probe Monitoring/Leveling System, and...

  15. Solar wind stream interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosling, J.T.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements aboard Imp 6, 7, and 8 reveal that approximately one third of all high-speed solar wind streams observed at 1 AU contain a sharp boundary (of thickness less than approx.4 x 10 4 km) near their leading edge, called a stream interface, which separates plasma of distinctly different properties and origins. Identified as discontinuities across which the density drops abruptly, the proton temperature increases abruptly, and the speed rises, stream interfaces are remarkably similar in character from one stream to the next. A superposed epoch analysis of plasma data has been performed for 23 discontinuous stream interfaces observed during the interval March 1971 through August 1974. Among the results of this analysis are the following: (1) a stream interface separates what was originally thick (i.e., dense) slow gas from what was originally thin (i.e., rare) fast gas; (2) the interface is the site of a discontinuous shear in the solar wind flow in a frame of reference corotating with the sun; (3) stream interfaces occur at speeds less than 450 km s - 1 and close to or at the maximum of the pressure ridge at the leading edges of high-speed streams; (4) a discontinuous rise by approx.40% in electron temperature occurs at the interface; and (5) discontinuous changes (usually rises) in alpha particle abundance and flow speed relative to the protons occur at the interface. Stream interfaces do not generally recur on successive solar rotations, even though the streams in which they are embedded often do. At distances beyond several astronomical units, stream interfaces should be bounded by forward-reverse shock pairs; three of four reverse shocks observed at 1 AU during 1971--1974 were preceded within approx.1 day by stream interfaces. Our observations suggest that many streams close to the sun are bounded on all sides by large radial velocity shears separating rapidly expanding plasma from more slowly expanding plasma

  16. Icinga Monitoring System Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Neculae, Alina Georgiana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a web interface that would be used by the Icinga monitoring system to manage the CMS online cluster, in the experimental site. The interface would allow users to visualize the information in a compressed and intuitive way, as well as modify the information of each individual object and edit the relationships between classes.

  17. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  18. Interface, a dispersed architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    Past and current specification techniques use timing diagrams and written text to describe the phenomenology of an interface. This paper treats an interface as the architecture of a number of processes, which are dispersed over the related system parts and the message path. This approach yields a

  19. Verden som interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    Oversættelse af Peter Weibels tekst "The World as Interface" i Passepartout # 27. Interfacekulturens æstetik. Udgivelsesdato: 28.04.07......Oversættelse af Peter Weibels tekst "The World as Interface" i Passepartout # 27. Interfacekulturens æstetik. Udgivelsesdato: 28.04.07...

  20. Interface or Interlace?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed; Wamberg, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    Departing from an analysis of the computer's indeterminate location between medium and machine, this paper problematises the idea of a clear-cut interface in complex computing, especially Augmented Reality. The idea and pratice of the interface is derived from the medium as a representational...

  1. Interfaces in evolutionary games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotev, Sergei; Malyutin, Aleksandr; Burovski, Evgeni; Shchur, Lev

    2018-01-01

    We investigate geometrical aspects of a spatial evolutionary game. The game is based on the Prisoner’s dilemma. We analyze the geometrical structure of the space distribution of cooperators and defectors in the steady-state regime of evolution. We develop algorithm for the identification of the interfaces between clusters of cooperators and defectors, and measure fractal properties of the interfaces.

  2. Influence of C4 Vegetation on 13CO2 Discrimination and Isoforcing in the Upper Midwest, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Griffis, T. J.; Baker, J. M.; Erickson, M.; Corcoran, J.; Billmark, K.; Sargent, S.

    2009-12-01

    Agricultural crops with a C4 photosynthetic pathway rapidly expanded across North America as early as 800 A.D. Their distribution continues to expand globally as demands for food and biofuel production increase. These systems are highly productive, having a significant impact on carbon and water exchange between the land and atmosphere. Here, we investigate the relative impact of agricultural C4 vegetation on the local and regional CO2 biosphere-atmosphere discrimination and atmospheric isotopic forcing in the Upper Midwest, United States. We address three questions: 1. What is the relative importance of C3 and C4 species to the regional CO2 budget? How do these different photosynthetic pathways influence the regional biosphere atmosphere isotope discrimination? 3. To what extent do changes in C4 vegetation impact atmospheric isotopic forcing and the isotopic signature of the atmosphere? These questions are addressed using measurements obtained from the University of Minnesota tall tower (244 m) trace gas observatory (TGO) over the period 2007 to 2008 and are supported with scaled-up values of isotopic forcing based on ecosystem-scale eddy flux observations; high resolution land use data; and a land surface model (Community Land Model, CLM). We modified CLM to simulate dynamic C4 isotopic discrimination and accounted explicitly for canopy kinetic fractionation. A high resolution 59-yr (1948~2006) 3-hourly meteorological driving field (Sheffield) was used to spin up the model until it reached steady state. The locally measured half-hourly meteorological data were then used to drive the model from year 2007 to 2008.Our analyses indicate that local and regional C4 production was higher by 10% in 2007 due to increased demand for biofuel. Isotopic flux measurements from the tall tower and modeling confirm that this increase had a significant impact on the growing season 13CO2 photosynthetic discrimination, which ranged from 9.7 to 13.2‰ in 2007 and 11.2 to 14.8‰ in

  3. User Interface History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms; Myers, Brad A

    2008-01-01

    User Interfaces have been around as long as computers have existed, even well before the field of Human-Computer Interaction was established. Over the years, some papers on the history of Human-Computer Interaction and User Interfaces have appeared, primarily focusing on the graphical interface era...... and early visionaries such as Bush, Engelbart and Kay. With the User Interface being a decisive factor in the proliferation of computers in society and since it has become a cultural phenomenon, it is time to paint a more comprehensive picture of its history. This SIG will investigate the possibilities...... of  launching a concerted effort towards creating a History of User Interfaces. ...

  4. Processes influencing rainfall features in the Amazonian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, T.; Chamecki, M.; Fuentes, J. D.; Katul, G. G.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.; Manzi, A. O.; Nascimento dos Santos, R. M.; von Randow, C.; Stoy, P. C.; Tota, J.; Trowbridge, A.; Schumacher, C.; Machado, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Amazon is globally unique as it experiences the deepest atmospheric convection with important teleconnections to other parts of the Earth's climate system. In the Amazon Basin a large fraction of the local evapotranspiration is recycled through the formation of deep convective precipitating storms. Deep convection occurs due to moist thermodynamic conditions associated with elevated amounts of convective available potential energy. Aerosols invigorate the formation of convective storms in the Amazon via their unique concentrations, physical size, and chemical composition to activate into cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), but important aspects of aerosol/precipitation feedbacks remain unresolved. During the wet season, low atmospheric aerosol concentrations prevail in the pristine tropical air masses. These conditions have led to the Green Ocean hypothesis, which compares the clean tropical air to maritime air-masses and emphasizes biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks, to explain the features of the convective-type rainfall events in the Amazon. Field studies have been designed to investigate these relationships and the development of mesoscale convective systems through the Green Ocean Amazon project and the GOAmazon Boundary Layer Experiment. From March to October 2014 a field experiment was conducted at the Cuieiras Biological Reserve (2°51' S, 54°58' W), 80 km north of the city of Manaus, Brazil. This investigation spans the biological, chemical, and physical conditions influencing emissions and reactions of precursors (biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds, VOCs), formation of aerosols and CCNs and transport out of the ABL, and their role in cloud formation and precipitation triggers. In this presentation we will show results on the magnitude turbulent fluxes of latent and sensible heat, CCN concentrations, and rain droplet size distribution for both the wet and dry season. Such influencing factors on precipitation, will be contrasted with the

  5. Soft particles at a fluid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Hadi; Harting, Jens; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2015-11-01

    Particles added to a fluid interface can be used as a surface stabilizer in the food, oil and cosmetic industries. As an alternative to rigid particles, it is promising to consider highly deformable particles that can adapt their conformation at the interface. In this study, we compute the shapes of soft elastic particles using molecular dynamics simulations of a cross-linked polymer gel, complemented by continuum calculations based on the linear elasticity. It is shown that the particle shape is not only affected by the Young's modulus of the particle, but also strongly depends on whether the gel is partially or completely wetting the fluid interface. We find that the molecular simulations for the partially wetting case are very accurately described by the continuum theory. By contrast, when the gel is completely wetting the fluid interface the linear theory breaks down and we reveal that molecular details have a strong influence on the equilibrium shape.

  6. Ionic Structure at Dielectric Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yufei

    interfaces using molecular dynamics(MD) simulations and compared it with liquid state theory result. We explore the effects of high electrolyte concentrations, multivalent ions, and dielectric contrasts on the ionic distributions. We observe the presence of non-monotonous ionic density profiles leading to structure deformation in the fluid which is attributed to the competition between electrostatic and steric (entropic) interactions. We find that thermal forces that arise from symmetry breaking at the interfaces can have a profound effect on the ionic structure and can oftentimes overwhelm the influence of dielectric discontinuity. The combined effect of ionic correlations and inhomogeneous dielectric permittivity significantly changes the character of effective interaction between two interfaces. We show that, in concentrated electrolytes with confinement, it is imperative to take into account the finite-size of the ions as well as proper description of electrostatic interactions in heterogeneous media, which is not fully fulfilled by Poisson-Boltzmann based approaches. The effect of electric field at interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions is studied as well. The classical Poisson-Boltzmann theory has been widely used to describe the corresponding ionic distribution, even though it neglects the polarization and ion correlations typical of these charged systems. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we provide an enhanced description of an oil-water interface in the presence of an electric field without needing any adjustable parameter, including realistic ionic sizes, ion correlations, and image charges. Our data agree with experimental measurements of excess surface tension for a wide range of electrolyte concentrations of LiCl and TBATPB (tetrabutylammonium-tetraphenylborate), contrasting with the result of the classical non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann theory. More importantly, we show that the size-asymmetry between small Li+ and large Cl- ions can significantly

  7. The Java Legacy Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    The Java Legacy Interface is designed to use Java for encapsulating native legacy code on small embedded platforms. We discuss why existing technologies for encapsulating legacy code (JNI) is not sufficient for an important range of small embedded platforms, and we show how the Java Legacy...... Interface offers this previously missing functionality. We describe an implementation of the Java Legacy Interface for a particular virtual machine, and how we have used this virtual machine to integrate Java with an existing, commercial, soft real-time, C/C++ legacy platform....

  8. The computer graphics interface

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbrugge Chauveau, Karla; Niles Reed, Theodore; Shepherd, B

    2014-01-01

    The Computer Graphics Interface provides a concise discussion of computer graphics interface (CGI) standards. The title is comprised of seven chapters that cover the concepts of the CGI standard. Figures and examples are also included. The first chapter provides a general overview of CGI; this chapter covers graphics standards, functional specifications, and syntactic interfaces. Next, the book discusses the basic concepts of CGI, such as inquiry, profiles, and registration. The third chapter covers the CGI concepts and functions, while the fourth chapter deals with the concept of graphic obje

  9. The interface effect

    CERN Document Server

    Galloway, Alexander R

    2013-01-01

    Interfaces are back, or perhaps they never left. The familiar Socratic conceit from the Phaedrus, of communication as the process of writing directly on the soul of the other, has returned to center stage in today's discussions of culture and media. Indeed Western thought has long construed media as a grand choice between two kinds of interfaces. Following the optimistic path, media seamlessly interface self and other in a transparent and immediate connection. But, following the pessimistic path, media are the obstacles to direct communion, disintegrating self and other into misunderstanding

  10. Scalable coherent interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnaes, K.; Kristiansen, E.H.; Gustavson, D.B.; James, D.V.

    1990-01-01

    The Scalable Coherent Interface (IEEE P1596) is establishing an interface standard for very high performance multiprocessors, supporting a cache-coherent-memory model scalable to systems with up to 64K nodes. This Scalable Coherent Interface (SCI) will supply a peak bandwidth per node of 1 GigaByte/second. The SCI standard should facilitate assembly of processor, memory, I/O and bus bridge cards from multiple vendors into massively parallel systems with throughput far above what is possible today. The SCI standard encompasses two levels of interface, a physical level and a logical level. The physical level specifies electrical, mechanical and thermal characteristics of connectors and cards that meet the standard. The logical level describes the address space, data transfer protocols, cache coherence mechanisms, synchronization primitives and error recovery. In this paper we address logical level issues such as packet formats, packet transmission, transaction handshake, flow control, and cache coherence. 11 refs., 10 figs

  11. Natural gesture interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubtsev, Illya

    2017-09-01

    The paper describes the implementation of the system of interaction with virtual objects based on gestures. The paper describes the common problems of interaction with virtual objects, specific requirements for the interfaces for virtual and augmented reality.

  12. Pattern formation at interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Giulio; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Applying modern nonlinear stability theory to problems of continuous media mechanics in the presence of interfaces, this text is relevant to materials science, chemical engineering, and heat transfer technologies, as well as to reaction-diffusion systems.

  13. Interface Anywhere Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To illustrate the viability of this technology, a prototype Natural User Interface (NUI) was developed as a proof-of-concept for system control.  Gesture and...

  14. Complex Interfaces Under Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosbjerg, Dan

    The hydrosphere is dynamic across the major compartments of the Earth system: the atmosphere, the oceans and seas, the land surface water, and the groundwater within the strata below the two last compartments. The global geography of the hydrosphere essentially depends on thermodynamic and mechan...... these interfaces and interfaced compartments and processes. Climate, sea-level, oceanographic currents and hydrological processes are all affected, while anthropogenic changes are often intense in the geographic settings corresponding to such interfaces.......The hydrosphere is dynamic across the major compartments of the Earth system: the atmosphere, the oceans and seas, the land surface water, and the groundwater within the strata below the two last compartments. The global geography of the hydrosphere essentially depends on thermodynamic...... and mechanical processes that develop within this structure. Water-related processes at the interfaces between the compartments are complex, depending both on the interface itself, and on the characteristics of the interfaced compartments. Various aspects of global change directly or indirectly impact...

  15. Lectures on random interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Funaki, Tadahisa

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces are created to separate two distinct phases in a situation in which phase coexistence occurs. This book discusses randomly fluctuating interfaces in several different settings and from several points of view: discrete/continuum, microscopic/macroscopic, and static/dynamic theories. The following four topics in particular are dealt with in the book. Assuming that the interface is represented as a height function measured from a fixed-reference discretized hyperplane, the system is governed by the Hamiltonian of gradient of the height functions. This is a kind of effective interface model called ∇φ-interface model. The scaling limits are studied for Gaussian (or non-Gaussian) random fields with a pinning effect under a situation in which the rate functional of the corresponding large deviation principle has non-unique minimizers. Young diagrams determine decreasing interfaces, and their dynamics are introduced. The large-scale behavior of such dynamics is studied from the points of view of the hyd...

  16. SiB3 Modeled Global 1-degree Hourly Biosphere-Atmosphere Carbon Flux, 1998-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Simple Biosphere Model, Version 3 (SiB3) was used to produce a global data set of hourly carbon fluxes between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere for...

  17. SiB3 Modeled Global 1-degree Hourly Biosphere-Atmosphere Carbon Flux, 1998-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Simple Biosphere Model, Version 3 (SiB3) was used to produce a global data set of hourly carbon fluxes between the atmosphere and the terrestrial...

  18. Machine Learning in Proof General: Interfacing Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Komendantskaya, Ekaterina; Heras, Jónathan; Grov, Gudmund

    2012-01-01

    We present ML4PG - a machine learning extension for Proof General. It allows users to gather proof statistics related to shapes of goals, sequences of applied tactics, and proof tree structures from the libraries of interactive higher-order proofs written in Coq and SSReflect. The gathered data is clustered using the state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms available in MATLAB and Weka. ML4PG provides automated interfacing between Proof General and MATLAB/Weka. The results of clustering a...

  19. Machine Learning in Proof General: Interfacing Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Komendantskaya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present ML4PG - a machine learning extension for Proof General. It allows users to gather proof statistics related to shapes of goals, sequences of applied tactics, and proof tree structures from the libraries of interactive higher-order proofs written in Coq and SSReflect. The gathered data is clustered using the state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms available in MATLAB and Weka. ML4PG provides automated interfacing between Proof General and MATLAB/Weka. The results of clustering are used by ML4PG to provide proof hints in the process of interactive proof development.

  20. Focusing on the Interfaces, Estuaries and Redox Transition Zones, for Understanding the Microbial Processes and Biogeochemical Cycling of Carbon under the Looming Influence of Global Warming and Anthropogenic Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, H.; Jiao, N.

    2013-12-01

    Estuaries are the natural interface between terrestrial and marine ecosystems. These are also the zones where human activities exert the strongest impact on the earth and ocean environments. Due to high pressure from the effects of global warming and anthropogenic activities, many estuaries are deteriorating and experiencing significant change of the ecological processes and environmental functions. Certain fundamental microbial processes, including carbon fixation and respiration, have been changing as responses to and consequences of the altered estuarine environment and geochemistry. Increased inputs of terrigenous and anthropogenic organic materials and nutrients and elevated temperature make estuaries easy to be subjected to harmful algal blooms and hypoxic and even anoxic events. The change of the redox status of the estuarine and coastal waters and the increased nutrient loads such as that from terrestrial nitrate stimulate anaerobic respiration processes, such as nitrate reduction and denitrification. This may have strong negative impact on the marine environment, ecosystem and even climate, such as those caused by greenhouse gas production (N2O, CH4) by anaerobic microbial processes. In addition, some nutrients may be consumed by anaerobically respiring heterotrophic microorganisms, instead of being utilized by phytoplankton for carbon fixation. In this regard, the ecological function of the estuarine ecosystem may be altered and the ecological efficiency may be lowered, as less energy is produced by the microbial respiration process and less carbon is fixed by phytoplankton. However, on the other side, in hypoxic and anoxic waters, inorganic carbon fixation by anaerobic microorganisms may happen, such as those via the chemolithoautotrophic denitrifying sulfur oxidizing process and the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process. Global warming and anthropogenic perturbations may have lowered the diversity, complexity, stability and sustainability of

  1. Dispersive transport across interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Adler, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Experiments demonstrating asymmetrical dispersive transport of a conservative tracer across interfaces between different porous materials have recently been performed. Here, this phenomenon is studied numerically on the pore scale. The flow field is derived by solving the Stokes equation. The dispersive transport is simulated by a large number of particles undergoing random walks under the simultaneous action of convection and diffusion. Two main two-dimensional configurations are studied; each consists of two segments (called coarse and fine) with the same structure, porosity, and length along the main flow, but different characteristic solid/pore sizes. One structure consists of two channels containing cavities of different sizes, and the second of square "grains" of different sizes. At time t=0, a large number of particles is injected (as a pulse) around a given cross-section. The corresponding breakthrough curves (BTCs) are registered as functions of time at six different cross sections. Calculations are made twice; in the first case (CtoF), particles are injected in the coarse side and are transported towards the fine one; in the second one (FtoC), the opposite case is studied. These calculations are performed for various Péclet numbers (Pe). Comparison of the resulting BTCs shows features that are similar to experimental observations, but with qualitative and quantitative differences. The influences of the medium, of the injection and observation planes, and of Pe are detailed and discussed. A BTC for pulse injection can be characterized by its maximum M(t_M) and the time tM at which it occurs. The observed differences for channels bounded by cavities are very small. However for the granular structures, M(t_M) is always larger for FtoC than for CtoF ; tM depends on all the parameters, namely Pe, the size ratio between the large and small grains, the injection and the observation planes. The numerical results are systematically compared with solutions of one

  2. Environmental materials and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    A workshop that explored materials and interfaces research needs relevant to national environmental concerns was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purposes of the workshop were to refine the scientific research directions being planned for the Materials and Interface Program in the Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC) and further define the research and user equipment to the included as part of the proposed Environmental and Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL). Three plenary information sessions served to outline the background, objectives, and status of the MSRC and EMSL initiatives; selected specific areas with environmentally related materials; and the status of capabilities and facilities planned for the EMSL. Attention was directed to four areas where materials and interface science can have a significant impact on prevention and remediation of environmental problems: in situ detection and characterization of hazardous wastes (sensors), minimization of hazardous waste (separation membranes, ion exchange materials, catalysts), waste containment (encapsulation and barrier materials), and fundamental understanding of contaminant transport mechanisms. During all other sessions, the participants were divided into three working groups for detailed discussion and the preparation of a written report. The working groups focused on the areas of interface structure and chemistry, materials and interface stability, and materials synthesis. These recommendations and suggestions for needed research will be useful for other researchers in proposing projects and for suggesting collaborative work with MSRC researchers. 1 fig

  3. Interfacing Sensors To Micro Controllers

    KAUST Repository

    Norain, Mohamed

    2018-01-15

    This lecture will cover the most common interface and interface techniques between sensors and microcontrollers. The presentation will introduce the pros and cons of each interface type including analogue, digital and serial output sensors. It will also cover the basic required electronics knowledge to help you in selecting and designing your next sensor to microcontroller interface.

  4. Contact stress and coefficient of friction effects on ceramic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richerson, D.W.; Carruthers, W.D.; Lindberg, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    High-temperaure, structural application of ceramics often involves ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic interfaces. Chipping and cracking often occur in such applications as heat engines at interfaces where aerodynamic loads and differential thermal movement produce simultaneous normal and tangential forces. A hypothesis of the chipping mechanism will be presented, as will experimental results from a test apparatus designed to evaluate interface compatibility. Results include the influence of contact geometry, temperature, load, dwell time at temperature, lubricants, and interface layers on the static and dynamic coefficient of friction and on material strength

  5. High-bandwidth memory interface

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chulwoo; Song, Junyoung

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an overview of recent advances in memory interface design at both the architecture and circuit levels. Coverage includes signal integrity and testing, TSV interface, high-speed serial interface including equalization, ODT, pre-emphasis, wide I/O interface including crosstalk, skew cancellation, and clock generation and distribution. Trends for further bandwidth enhancement are also covered.   • Enables readers with minimal background in memory design to understand the basics of high-bandwidth memory interface design; • Presents state-of-the-art techniques for memory interface design; • Covers memory interface design at both the circuit level and system architecture level.

  6. Portraying User Interface History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms

    2008-01-01

    The user interface is coming of age. Papers adressing UI history have appeared in fair amounts in the last 25 years. Most of them address particular aspects such as an in­novative interface paradigm or the contribution of a visionary or a research lab. Contrasting this, papers addres­sing UI...... history at large have been sparse. However, a small spate of publications appeared recently, so a reasonable number of papers are available. Hence this work-in-progress paints a portrait of the current history of user interfaces at large. The paper first describes a theoretical framework recruited from...... history. Next the paper analyses a selected sample of papers on UI history at large. The analysis shows that the current state-of-art is featured by three aspects: Firstly internalism, in that the papers adress the tech­nologies in their own right with little con­text­ualization, secondly whiggism...

  7. Complex Interfaces Under Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosbjerg, Dan

    The hydrosphere is dynamic across the major compartments of the Earth system: the atmosphere, the oceans and seas, the land surface water, and the groundwater within the strata below the two last compartments. The global geography of the hydrosphere essentially depends on thermodynamic and mechan......The hydrosphere is dynamic across the major compartments of the Earth system: the atmosphere, the oceans and seas, the land surface water, and the groundwater within the strata below the two last compartments. The global geography of the hydrosphere essentially depends on thermodynamic...... these interfaces and interfaced compartments and processes. Climate, sea-level, oceanographic currents and hydrological processes are all affected, while anthropogenic changes are often intense in the geographic settings corresponding to such interfaces....

  8. Catalytic interface erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, H.; Cohen, E.G.D.

    1995-01-01

    We study interface erosion processes: catalytic erosions. We present two cases. (1) The erosion of a completely occupied lattice by one single moving particle starting from somewhere inside the lattice, considering deterministic as well as probabilistic erosion rules. In the latter case, the eroded regions appear to have interfaces with continuously tunable fractal dimensions. (2) The kinetic roughening of an initially flat surface, where ballistic or diffusion-limited particles, which remain intact themselves, erode the surface coming from the outside, using the same erosion rules as in (1). Many features resembling realistic interfaces, for example, islands and inlets, are generated. The dependence of the surface width on the system size is due to both the erosion mechanism and the way particles move before reaching the surface

  9. Ecological Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicente, Kim J.; Rasmussen, Jens

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical framework for designing interfaces for complex human-machine systems is proposed. The framework, called ecological interface design (EID), is based on the skills, rules, knowledge taxonomy of cognitive control. The basic goal of EID is twofold: first, not to force processing....... Three prescriptive design principles are suggested to achieve this objective, each directed at supporting a particular level of cognitive control. Theoretical foundations of the framework are laid out. Particular attention is paid to presenting a coherent deductive argument justifying the principles...... of other approaches to interface design indicates that EID has a unique and significant contribution to make. Third, the results of an initial empirical evaluation also provide some preliminary support for the EID framework. Some issues for future research are outlined....

  10. User interface design considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Engedal; Jakobsen, Arne; Rasmussen, Bjarne D.

    1999-01-01

    When designing a user interface for a simulation model there are several important issues to consider: Who is the target user group, and which a priori information can be expected. What questions do the users want answers to and what questions are answered using a specific model?When developing...... and output variables. This feature requires special attention when designing the user interface and a special approach for controlling the user selection of input and output variables are developed. To obtain a consistent system description the different input variables are grouped corresponding...... the user interface of EESCoolTools these issues led to a series of simulation tools each with a specific purpose and a carefully selected set of input and output variables. To allow a more wide range of questions to be answered by the same model, the user can change between different sets of input...

  11. Refinement by interface instantiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallerstede, Stefan; Hoang, Thai Son

    2012-01-01

    Decomposition is a technique to separate the design of a complex system into smaller sub-models, which improves scalability and team development. In the shared-variable decomposition approach for Event-B sub-models share external variables and communicate through external events which cannot...... be easily refined. Our first contribution hence is a proposal for a new construct called interface that encapsulates the external variables, along with a mechanism for interface instantiation. Using the new construct and mechanism, external variables can be refined consistently. Our second contribution...... is an approach for verifying the correctness of Event-B extensions using the supporting Rodin tool. We illustrate our approach by proving the correctness of interface instantiation....

  12. After Rigid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troiano, Giovanni Maria

    (1) a user study with a prototype of an elastic, deformable display, and (2) a user study of deformable interfaces for performing music. The first study reports a guessability study with an elastic, deformable display where 17 participants suggested fitting gestures for 29 tasks, including navigation...... use deformable interfaces to perform electronic music. First, we invited musicians with different backgrounds (e.g., performers, DJs, instrument builders) to three workshops, where we made them explore 10 deformable objects and generate ideas on how to use those to perform music. Then, we implemented...... sensors in the five preferred objects and programmed them for controlling sounds with computer software. Finally, we ran a performance study where six musicians performed music with deformable interfaces at their studios. Results from the performance study show that musicians systematically map...

  13. Workshop on Interface Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the first Workshop on Interface Phenomena, organized jointly by the surface science groups at Dalhousie University and the University of Maine. It was our intention to concentrate on just three topics related to the kinetics of interface reactions which, in our opinion, were frequently obscured unnecessarily in the literature and whose fundamental nature warranted an extensive discussion to help clarify the issues, very much in the spirit of the Discussions of the Faraday Society. Each session (day) saw two principal speakers expounding the different views; the session chairmen were asked to summarize the ensuing discussions. To understand the complexity of interface reactions, paradigms must be formulated to provide a framework for the interpretation of experimen­ tal data and for the construction of theoretical models. Phenomenological approaches have been based on a small number of rate equations for the concentrations or mole numbers of the various species involved i...

  14. Refraction interface radiography; Refraktions-Interface-Radiographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hentschel, Manfred P.; Kupsch, Andreas; Lange, Axel; Mueller, Bernd R. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany). Fachbereich 8.5. ' Mikro-ZfP'

    2013-07-01

    Nano-scale structures and interfaces are more and more coming to determine the function of modern materials and components. This calls for methods for their nondestructive characterisation with adapted spatial resolution, a task for which x-ray refraction techniques are well suited on account of their wavelength range. The resulting small-angle scattering causes high local intensity levels which can exceed that of the primary radiation as a result of shift and focussing effects. The predominance of refraction intensity over that of total reflection can be demonstrated using monochromatic synchrotron radiation on homogeneous samples of simple geometry (plates or cylinders). The refraction effect can be used with incidence angles up to a few degrees. Scattering angles are typically in the range of arc seconds to arc minutes.

  15. Interfacing to accelerator instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shea, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    As the sensory system for an accelerator, the beam instrumentation provides a tremendous amount of diagnostic information. Access to this information can vary from periodic spot checks by operators to high bandwidth data acquisition during studies. In this paper, example applications will illustrate the requirements on interfaces between the control system and the instrumentation hardware. A survey of the major accelerator facilities will identify the most popular interface standards. The impact of developments such as isochronous protocols and embedded digital signal processing will also be discussed

  16. Nonlinear optics at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.K.

    1980-12-01

    Two aspects of surface nonlinear optics are explored in this thesis. The first part is a theoretical and experimental study of nonlinear intraction of surface plasmons and bulk photons at metal-dielectric interfaces. The second part is a demonstration and study of surface enhanced second harmonic generation at rough metal surfaces. A general formulation for nonlinear interaction of surface plasmons at metal-dielectric interfaces is presented and applied to both second and third order nonlinear processes. Experimental results for coherent second and third harmonic generation by surface plasmons and surface coherent antiStokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) are shown to be in good agreement with the theory

  17. Slow rupture of frictional interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar Sinai, Yohai; Brener, Efim A.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2012-02-01

    The failure of frictional interfaces and the spatiotemporal structures that accompany it are central to a wide range of geophysical, physical and engineering systems. Recent geophysical and laboratory observations indicated that interfacial failure can be mediated by slow slip rupture phenomena which are distinct from ordinary, earthquake-like, fast rupture. These discoveries have influenced the way we think about frictional motion, yet the nature and properties of slow rupture are not completely understood. We show that slow rupture is an intrinsic and robust property of simple non-monotonic rate-and-state friction laws. It is associated with a new velocity scale cmin, determined by the friction law, below which steady state rupture cannot propagate. We further show that rupture can occur in a continuum of states, spanning a wide range of velocities from cmin to elastic wave-speeds, and predict different properties for slow rupture and ordinary fast rupture. Our results are qualitatively consistent with recent high-resolution laboratory experiments and may provide a theoretical framework for understanding slow rupture phenomena along frictional interfaces.

  18. Experimental and Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of Specific Ion Effect on the Graphene Oxide Surface and Investigation of the Influence on Reactive Extraction of Model Dye Molecule at Water-Organic Interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borthakur, P.; Boruah, P.K.; Hussain, N.; Sharma, B.; Das, M. R.; Matić, S.; Řeha, David; Minofar, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 26 (2016), s. 14088-14100 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-21053S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015055 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : AIR/WATER INTERFACE * AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS * INITIAL CONFIGURATIONS Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.536, year: 2016

  19. Cooperative strings and glassy interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salez, Thomas; Salez, Justin; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Raphaël, Elie; Forrest, James A

    2015-07-07

    We introduce a minimal theory of glass formation based on the ideas of molecular crowding and resultant string-like cooperative rearrangement, and address the effects of free interfaces. In the bulk case, we obtain a scaling expression for the number of particles taking part in cooperative strings, and we recover the Adam-Gibbs description of glassy dynamics. Then, by including thermal dilatation, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation is derived. Moreover, the random and string-like characters of the cooperative rearrangement allow us to predict a temperature-dependent expression for the cooperative length ξ of bulk relaxation. Finally, we explore the influence of sample boundaries when the system size becomes comparable to ξ. The theory is in agreement with measurements of the glass-transition temperature of thin polymer films, and allows quantification of the temperature-dependent thickness hm of the interfacial mobile layer.

  20. Photochemistry at Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenthal, Kenneth B [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-02-24

    We have advanced our capabilities to investigate ultrafast excited state dynamics at a liquid interface using a pump to excite molecules to higher electronic states and then probe the subsequent time evolution of the interfacial molecules with femtosecond time delayed vibrational SFG.

  1. The Liquid Vapour Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1985-01-01

    In this short review we are concerned with the density variation across the liquid-vapour interface, i.e. from the bulk density of the liquid to the essentially zero density of the vapour phase. This density variation can in principle be determined from the deviation of the reflectivity from...

  2. Source interface for ALICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    This interface is part of the ALICE detector data link (DDL), which transmits data at 100 Mbytes/sec from the detectors to a host computer. A total of 400 DDLs will be installed on ALICE. These silicon devices have been developed especially for use in the high radiation levels produced in detector environments.

  3. Interface transfer of equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashton, I.J.

    1989-04-01

    This article details the interface transfer of heavy-duty face equipment from 5's to 6's face in the Great Row Seam at Silverdale Colliery, British Coal, Western Area. The salvaged face was roofbolted using leg-mounted Wombat drilling rigs. All heavy-duty equipment was transported by FSV's. 5 figs.

  4. Quantitative AES at Interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lejček, Pavel; Hofmann, S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 3 (2011), s. 241-246 ISSN 1341-1756 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/08/0369 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : quantitative AES * interfaces * grain boundaries * fracture surfaces Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  5. SOFC interface studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse; West, Keld

    come from channels formed along the interface, i.e. an elongation of the triple phase boundary. Based on the assumption of a formation of interfacial reaction zones (i.e. pores) which are only stable in the presence of a local current, a model describing the hysteresis observed is developed. Fig...

  6. Workflow User Interfaces Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Vanderdonckt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta una colección de patrones de diseño de interfaces de usuario para sistemas de información para el flujo de trabajo; la colección incluye cuarenta y tres patrones clasificados en siete categorías identificados a partir de la lógica del ciclo de vida de la tarea sobre la base de la oferta y la asignación de tareas a los responsables de realizarlas (i. e. recursos humanos durante el flujo de trabajo. Cada patrón de la interfaz de usuario de flujo de trabajo (WUIP, por sus siglas en inglés se caracteriza por las propiedades expresadas en el lenguaje PLML para expresar patrones y complementado por otros atributos y modelos que se adjuntan a dicho modelo: la interfaz de usuario abstracta y el modelo de tareas correspondiente. Estos modelos se especifican en un lenguaje de descripción de interfaces de usuario. Todos los WUIPs se almacenan en una biblioteca y se pueden recuperar a través de un editor de flujo de trabajo que vincula a cada patrón de asignación de trabajo a su WUIP correspondiente.A collection of user interface design patterns for workflow information systems is presented that contains forty three resource patterns classified in seven categories. These categories and their corresponding patterns have been logically identified from the task life cycle based on offering and allocation operations. Each Workflow User Interface Pattern (WUIP is characterized by properties expressed in the PLML markup language for expressing patterns and augmented by additional attributes and models attached to the pattern: the abstract user interface and the corresponding task model. These models are specified in a User Interface Description Language. All WUIPs are stored in a library and can be retrieved within a workflow editor that links each workflow pattern to its corresponding WUIP, thus giving rise to a user interface for each workflow pattern.

  7. Simulation of Magnetic Phenomena at Realistic Interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Grytsyuk, Sergiy

    2016-02-04

    splitting at non-magnetic 5d(4d) and ferromagnetic 3d-metal interfaces and their dependences on aspects such as interdiffusion, surface oxidation, thin film thickness and lattice mismatch. We find that changes of structural details strongly alter the electronic states, which in turn influences the magnetic properties and phenomena related to spin-orbit coupling. Since the interfaces studied in this work have complex electronic structures, a computational approach has been developed in order to estimate the strength of the Rashba band splitting below and at the Fermi level. We apply this approach to the interfaces between a Co monolayer and 4d (Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, and Ag) or 5d (Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au) transition metals and find a clear correlation between the overall size of the band splitting and the charge transfer between the d-orbitals at the interface. Furthermore, we show that the spin splitting at the Fermi surface scales with the induced orbital moment weighted by the strength of the spin-orbit coupling.

  8. Easy-to-use interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattner, D O; Blattner, M M; Tong, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Easy-to-use interfaces are a class of interfaces that fall between public access interfaces and graphical user interfaces in usability and cognitive difficulty. We describe characteristics of easy-to-use interfaces by the properties of four dimensions: selection, navigation, direct manipulation, and contextual metaphors. Another constraint we introduced was to include as little text as possible, and what text we have will be in at least four languages. Formative evaluations were conducted to identify and isolate these characteristics. Our application is a visual interface for a home automation system intended for a diverse set of users. The design will be expanded to accommodate the visually disabled in the near future

  9. Software Interfaces: On The Impact of Interface Design Anomalies

    OpenAIRE

    Abdeen, Hani; Shata, Osama; Erradi, Abdelkarim

    2013-01-01

    Interfaces are recognized as an important mechanism to define contracts governing interactions between semi-independent software modules. Well-designed interfaces significantly reduce software complexity and ease maintainability by fostering modularization, hiding implementation details and minimizing the impact caused by changes in the software implementation. However, designing good interfaces is not a trivial task. The presence of interface design defects often yield increased development ...

  10. An Investigation on the Use of a Laser Ablation Treatment on Metallic Surfaces and the Influence of Temperature on Fracture Toughness of Hybrid Co-Cured Metal-PMC Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John; Palmieri, Frank; Truong, Hieu; Ochoa, Ozden; Lagoudas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid composite laminates that contain alternating layers of titanium alloys and carbon fabric reinforced polyimide matrix composites (PMC) are excellent candidates for light-weight, high-temperature structural materials for high-speed aerospace vehicles. The delamination resistance of the hybrid titanium-PMC interface is of crucial consideration for structural integrity during service. Here, we report the first investigations on the use of laser ablation in combination with sol-gel treatment technique on Ti/NiTi foil surfaces in co-cured hybrid polyimide matrix composite laminates. Mode-I and mode-II fracture toughness of the hybrid Ti/NiTi-PMC interface as a function of temperature were determined via experimental testing and finite element analysis.

  11. Interface between breast cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment using platelet-rich plasma to promote tumor angiogenesis - influence of platelets and fibrin bundles on the behavior of breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Sheila Siqueira; Sumikawa, Joana Tomomi; Castro, Eloísa Dognani; Batista, Fabricio Pereira; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar; Oliveira, Lilian Carolina; Guerra, Izabel Monastério; Peres, Giovani Bravin; Cavalheiro, Renan Pelluzzi; Juliano, Luiz; Nazário, Afonso Pinto; Facina, Gil; Tsai, Siu Mui; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello

    2017-03-07

    Cancer progression is associated with an evolving tissue interface of direct epithelial-tumor microenvironment interactions. In biopsies of human breast tumors, extensive alterations in molecular pathways are correlated with cancer staging on both sides of the tumor-stroma interface. These interactions provide a pivotal paracrine signaling to induce malignant phenotype transition, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We explored how the direct contact between platelets-fibrin bundles primes metastasis using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as a source of growth factors and mimics the provisional fibrin matrix between actively growing breast cancer cells and the tumor stroma. We have demonstrated PRP functions, modulating cell proliferation that is tumor-subtype and cancer cell-type-specific. Epithelial and stromal primary cells were prepared from breast cancer biopsies from 21 women with different cancer subtypes. Cells supplemented with PRP were immunoblotted with anti-phospho and total Src-Tyr-416, FAK-Try-925, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, TGF-β, Smad2, and Snail monoclonal antibodies. Breast tumor cells from luminal B and HER2 subtypes showed the most malignant profiles and the expression of thrombin and other classes of proteases at levels that were detectable through FRET peptide libraries. The angiogenesis process was investigated in the interface obtained between platelet-fibrin-breast tumor cells co-cultured with HUVEC cells. Luminal B and HER2 cells showed robust endothelial cell capillary-like tubes ex vivo. The studied interface contributes to the attachment of endothelial cells, provides a source of growth factors, and is a solid substrate. Thus, replacement of FBS supplementation with PRP supplementation represents an efficient and simple approach for mimicking the real multifactorial tumor microenvironment.

  12. Space as interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    to conceptualize space as more than the physical container for human activity. I do this by investigating space as interface. Based on a theory of space and place set forth by Tuan (Tuan, 1977), and informed by an explorative research approach, I make the distinction between space and place as a Euclidian space...... with actual use (Hallnäs et al. 2006). The challenge thus becomes understanding space as the interface, and further how intentions can be induced into the design of space in ways that point towards the dimensions of place, when interpreted in actual use situations. By designing and exploring a range......This Ph.D. dissertation takes its offset in the migration of technology and computing power into our physical environment. The consequence of this movement, termed ubiquitous computing (Wieser, 1991), is a new relationship between humans, technology and spaces. In this new context, I seek...

  13. Study of metallic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Job, Bernard

    1973-01-01

    In the first part, the diffusion of the radiotracer 59 Fe along the artificially silver-iron interface has been investigated for 500 4 exp - 41200/RT. These values are compared with the values of surface and grain boundary diffusion of silver and iron. In the second part we have extended mass-transport methods (scratch smoothing and grain boundary grooving) to solid-solid interface. These methods lead to a value of Di* δ γi (Di* δ is the effective diffusion parameter and γi the interfacial energy). Knowing the value of γi = 4000 ergs /cm 2 from the equilibrium angle method we have deducted the value of Di*δ. (author) [fr

  14. Politics at the interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannabiran, Gobinaath; Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2010-01-01

    At the birth of participatory design, there was a strong political consciousness surrounding the design of new technology, the design process in particular, establishing a rich set of methods and tools for user-centered design. Today, the term design has extended its scope of concern beyond...... the process of design and into how users interact with the designed product on a day-to-day basis. This paper is an attempt to call to attention the need for a new set of methods, attitudes and approaches, along with the existing, to discuss, analyze and reflect upon the politics at the interface....... By presenting a critical analysis of two design cases, we elicit the importance of such an agenda and the implications for design in doing so. We use the Foucauldian notion of power to analyze the power relationships in these two cases and to articulate the politics at the interface. We conclude by emphasizing...

  15. Urban Sound Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Morten

    2012-01-01

    This paper draws on the theories of Michel de Certeau and Gaston Bachelard to discuss how media architecture, in the form of urban sound interfaces, can help us perceive the complexity of the spaces we inhabit, by exploring the history and the narratives of the places in which we live. In this pa......This paper draws on the theories of Michel de Certeau and Gaston Bachelard to discuss how media architecture, in the form of urban sound interfaces, can help us perceive the complexity of the spaces we inhabit, by exploring the history and the narratives of the places in which we live....... In this paper, three sound works are discussed in relation to the iPod, which is considered as a more private way to explore urban environments, and as a way to control the individual perception of urban spaces....

  16. At the Knowledge Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Kristine; Buono, Anthony; Poulfelt, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    researchers. The paper addresses this challenge in terms of moving across this interface, developing the abilities and proficiency for co-creating research that meets the needs of academics and practitioners. The competency drivers behind strengthening research-practice impact are examined within the context......-produced research projects. Based on this analysis, the implications for research-oriented consulting and our interventions with a view to developing co-created academic- and practice-oriented impact are discussed...

  17. Microsystem Interfaces for Space

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    Microsystem interfaces to the macroscopic surroundings and within the microsystems themselves are formidable challenges that this thesis makes an effort to overcome, specifically for enabling a spacecraft based entirely on microsystems. The NanoSpace-1 nanospacecraft is a full-fledged satellite design with mass below 10 kg. The high performance with respect to mass is enabled by a massive implementation of microsystem technology – the entire spacecraft structure is built from square silicon p...

  18. An Approach to Interface Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan; Hald, Bjarne

    1995-01-01

    Presents a novel interface synthesis approach based on a one-sided interface description. Whereas most other approaches consider interface synthesis as optimizing a channel to existing client/server modules, we consider the interface synthesis as part of the client/server module synthesis (which...... may contain the re-use of existing modules). The interface synthesis approach describes the basic transformations needed to transform the server interface description into an interface description on the client side of the communication medium. The synthesis approach is illustrated through a point......-to-point communication, but is applicable to synthesis of a multiple client/server environment. The interface description is based on a formalization of communication events....

  19. Interface Input/Output Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Nyman, Ulrik; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Building on the theory of interface automata by de Alfaro and Henzinger we design an interface language for Lynch’s I/O, a popular formalism used in the development of distributed asynchronous systems, not addressed by previous interface research. We introduce an explicit separation of assumptions...... a method for solving systems of relativized behavioral inequalities as used in our setup and draw a formal correspondence between our work and interface automata....

  20. Progress report (interface segment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukahori, T.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: 1. Presentations and status reports. T. Fukahori (JAEA) reported on the plans for the www interface layout. Discussions included which functions were needed for new RIPL-3 web pages. The results are summarized in next section. 2. Layout of the interfaces and retrieval tools and web. RIPL-3 home page will include some description about RIPL-3 and link to the Technical report in pdf-format. The web page for 'mass' segment contains same contents as RIPL-2 except the removal of the information about ground state deformation. The abundance data will be replaced by data from the new BNL wallet card (2005 version). The Q-value calculation tool will be also improved. The 'Nuclear Matter Density' will be renamed 'Nucleon Density Distribution'. 'Levels' segment will be same as before, and the deformation parameters for excited levels will be moved from 'optical' segment and given the name 'deformation'. 'Resonances' segment will be same as before - may be replaced with the new Mughabghab tables. 'Optical' segment will be same as before, and the deformation parameters for excited levels will be moved to 'optical' segment and given the name 'deformation'. The optical model calculation with ECIS and OPTMAN will be considered and double-folding calculation tool will possibly be provided. 'Densities' segment will be same as before, and the plotting programs will be checked. The 3-7 sets of combination of GC, BSFG, GSFM with/without enhancement factors will be given. 'Gamma' segment will be same as before, with addition of MLO and theoretical GDR calculation. 'Fission' segment will be same as before, and 'Exp.' will be renamed. New barrier evaluations will be added, for example, transition (2+) states. The fission spectrum calculation tool (codes and inputs) may be added. The fundamental format will be kept as before. For new items such as deformed 'nucleon density distribution', double-folding potential, evaluated fission barrier (extension into 3 or more) and fission

  1. Cooperative Microsystems and Neural Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-04

    Syst Rehab Engin 16: 453-472 (2008) Targeted Reinnervation FINE Approved For Public Release, Distribution Unlimited Peripheral Nerve Microsystems...Outline • Signaling in the Nervous System - Signal sources of cortex and peripheral nerve • Clinically Useful Neural Interfaces • Cortical Recording...Arrays • Peripheral Nerve Interfaces • Challenges and Opportunities for Microsystems in New Neural Interfaces Approved For Public Release

  2. Parameters Identification of Interface Friction Model for Ceramic Matrix Composites Based on Stress-Strain Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Gao, Xiguang; Song, Yingdong

    2017-10-01

    An approach to identify parameters of interface friction model for Ceramic Matrix composites based on stress-strain response was developed. The stress distribution of fibers in the interface slip region and intact region of the damaged composite was determined by adopting the interface friction model. The relation between maximum strain, secant moduli of hysteresis loop and interface shear stress, interface de-bonding stress was established respectively with the method of symbolic-graphic combination. By comparing the experimental strain, secant moduli of hysteresis loop with computation values, the interface shear stress and interface de-bonding stress corresponding to first cycle were identified. Substituting the identification of parameters into interface friction model, the stress-strain curves were predicted and the predicted results fit experiments well. Besides, the influence of number of data points on identifying the value of interface parameters was discussed. And the approach was compared with the method based on the area of hysteresis loop.

  3. The distribution of nanoclay particles at the interface and their influence on the microstructure development and rheological properties of reactively processed biodegradable polylactide/poly(butylene succinate) blend nanocomposites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salehiyan, Reza

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available that hydrophobic nanoparticles (C20A; Cloisite®10A, C10A; fumed silica R202; SIPERNAT silica D17) trapped at the interface induce finer morphologies (stronger nonlinearity), while relatively hydrophilic nanoparticles (C30B; pristine Cloisite®Na+, CNa; fumed silica... equivalent weight 285 g/mol Figure 1. Chemical structure of (a) Joncryl® ADR 4368, where x, y and z are between 1 and 20 R1, R2, R3, R4 and R5 are H, CH3, a higher alkyl group, or a combination of them; R6 is an alkyl group [5], (b) dimethyl...

  4. Transport processes at fluidic interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Reusken, Arnold

    2017-01-01

    There are several physico-chemical processes that determine the behavior of multiphase fluid systems – e.g., the fluid dynamics in the different phases and the dynamics of the interface(s), mass transport between the fluids, adsorption effects at the interface, and transport of surfactants on the interface – and result in heterogeneous interface properties. In general, these processes are strongly coupled and local properties of the interface play a crucial role. A thorough understanding of the behavior of such complex flow problems must be based on physically sound mathematical models, which especially account for the local processes at the interface. This book presents recent findings on the rigorous derivation and mathematical analysis of such models and on the development of numerical methods for direct numerical simulations. Validation results are based on specifically designed experiments using high-resolution experimental techniques. A special feature of this book is its focus on an interdisciplina...

  5. Interfacing with the Night

    OpenAIRE

    Mclean, Alex; Parkinson, Adam

    2014-01-01

    In  this  paper,  the  authors  consider  the  interfaces  between academia and dance music. Dance music and club culture are, we argue, important to computer music and the live performance of electronic music, but there are many different difficulties encountered when trying to present electronic dance music within academic contexts. The authors draw upon their experiences as promoters, performers, researchers and audience members to discuss these difficulties and how and why we might negoti...

  6. NESSUS/NASTRAN Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millwater, Harry; Riha, David

    1996-01-01

    The NESSUS and NASTRAN computer codes were successfully integrated. The enhanced NESSUS code will use NASTRAN for the structural Analysis and NESSUS for the probabilistic analysis. Any quantities in the NASTRAN bulk data input can be random variables. Any NASTRAN result that is written to the output2 file can be returned to NESSUS as the finite element result. The interfacing between NESSUS and NASTRAN is handled automatically by NESSUS. NESSUS and NASTRAN can be run on different machines using the remote host option.

  7. Bubble and drop interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miller

    2011-01-01

    The book aims at describing the most important experimental methods for characterizing liquid interfaces, such as drop profile analysis, bubble pressure and drop volume tensiometry, capillary pressure technique, and oscillating drops and bubbles. Besides the details of experimental set ups, also the underlying theoretical basis is presented in detail. In addition, a number of applications based on drops and bubbles is discussed, such as rising bubbles and the very complex process of flotation. Also wetting, characterized by the dynamics of advancing contact angles is discussed critically. Spec

  8. Superconductivity at disordered interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanek, E.

    1979-01-01

    The increase of the superconducting transition temperature Tsub(c) due to the tunneling of conduction electrons into negative-u centers at a disordered metal-semiconductor interface is calculated. The strong dependence of the experimental increase of Tsub(c) on the Fermi energy of the metal is accounted for by the polaronic reduction of the tunneling matrix elements. The latter reduction is dynamically suppressed by the decreasing lifetime of the localized state as Esub(F) increases. The theoretical enhancement is sufficiently strong to explain the increase of Tsub(c) observed in eutectic alloys. (author)

  9. Brain-computer interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A computer-implemented method of providing an interface between a user and a processing unit, the method comprising : presenting one or more stimuli to a user, each stimulus varying at a respective stimulation frequency, each stimulation frequency being associated with a respective user......-selectable input; receiving at least one signal indicative of brain activity of the user; and determining, from the received signal, which of the one or more stimuli the user attends to and selecting the user-selectable input associated with the stimulation frequency of the determined stimuli as being a user...

  10. EXPERIMENTAL LEVELLING AT THE INTERFACE OF OPTICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Sirůčková

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the problems of refraction and its impact on levelling at the interface of optical environments. It describes the influence of a vertical refraction and shows the results of investigating the effect of the refraction in the course of levelling at the interface of optical environments.The results of the experiment were obtained by levelling through the building of the National Technical Library in Prague Dejvice.

  11. Portraying User Interface History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms

    2008-01-01

    history. Next the paper analyses a selected sample of papers on UI history at large. The analysis shows that the current state-of-art is featured by three aspects: Firstly internalism, in that the papers adress the tech­nologies in their own right with little con­text­ualization, secondly whiggism...... in that they largely address prevailing UI techno­logies, and thirdly history from above in that they focus on the great deeds of the visionaries. The paper then compares this state-of-art in UI history to the much more mature fields history of computing and history of technology. Based hereon, some speculations......The user interface is coming of age. Papers adressing UI history have appeared in fair amounts in the last 25 years. Most of them address particular aspects such as an in­novative interface paradigm or the contribution of a visionary or a research lab. Contrasting this, papers addres­sing UI...

  12. Modeling of interface roughness in thermoelectric composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gather, F; Heiliger, C; Klar, P J

    2011-01-01

    We use a network model to calculate the influence of the mesoscopic interface structure on the thermoelectric properties of superlattice structures consisting of alternating layers of materials A and B. The thermoelectric figure of merit of such a composite material depends on the layer thickness, if interface resistances are accounted for, and can be increased by proper interface design. In general, interface roughness reduces the figure of merit, again compared to the case of ideal interfaces. However, the strength of this reduction depends strongly on the type of interface roughness. Smooth atomic surface diffusion leading to alloying of materials A and B causes the largest reduction of the figure of merit. Consequently, in real structures, it is important not only to minimize interface roughness, but also to control the type of roughness. Although the microscopic effects of interfaces are only empirically accounted for, using a network model can yield useful information about the dependence of the macroscopic transport coefficients on the mesoscopic disorder in structured thermoelectric materials.

  13. Human-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2004-12-21

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing. Force feedback allows intuitive navigation and control near a boundary between regions in a computer-represented space. For example, the method allows a user to interact with a virtual craft, then push through the windshield of the craft to interact with the virtual world surrounding the craft. As another example, the method allows a user to feel transitions between different control domains of a computer representation of a space. The method can provide for force feedback that increases as a user's locus of interaction moves near a boundary, then perceptibly changes (e.g., abruptly drops or changes direction) when the boundary is traversed.

  14. Space as interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    This Ph.D. dissertation takes its offset in the migration of technology and computing power into our physical environment. The consequence of this movement, termed ubiquitous computing (Wieser, 1991), is a new relationship between humans, technology and spaces. In this new context, I seek...... to conceptualize space as more than the physical container for human activity. I do this by investigating space as interface. Based on a theory of space and place set forth by Tuan (Tuan, 1977), and informed by an explorative research approach, I make the distinction between space and place as a Euclidian space...... and a Phenomenological experienced place. In this perspective, place is created by humans as they appropriate space in investing it with emotions and memories and hereby making it meaningful. Space consists of formable physical and digital space, whereas place is made up by four dimensions relating to personal, physical...

  15. Embodiment and Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Andreas Lindegaard; Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2008-01-01

    The article discusses – based on neurological and phenomenological theory - how the human embodiment supports and constrains the interaction between players and video games. It analyses embodied interaction with the specific hardware/software configuration of the Nintendo Wii and Wii Tennis as well...... as other game system configurations. The article argues that playing video games may provide experiences of extended embodiment where players may experience ownership of both actions and virtual bodies related to the represented game world. The article shows how ownership may be related to differences...... of the player as patient, i.e. being the object of another agent’s actions.  Keywords: Video games, embodiment, interface, agency, action, control, cognition  ...

  16. Curriculum at the Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This Symposium presents curriculum design and content issues in a Scandinavian business school at its Centenary. The aim is an exploration of an educational institution at the interface of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) within the historical trends of the European Union. We hope...... this step will empirically document how the goals of the European Higher Education Area are functionally linked with the entrepreneurial sensibilities of administration, faculty, and administrative staff during the concrete operations of work. The series of presentations are framed between trans......-cultural epistemological foundations in insight-based critical realism and inquiry into how the institutional entrepreneurs – the program directors – negotiate opportunities, risks, and tensions in curriculum and program implementation. Detailed case presentations take up curriculum effort to successfully engage issues...

  17. Influência do macheamento na interface do parafuso e do tecido ósseo na fase imediata pós-implante Influencia del taladramiento en la interfase del tornillo y del tejido óseo durante la fase inmediata post implante The influence of tapping techniques on the interface bone screw/bone tissue in immediate postoperative period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Pinheiro de Lemos Masson

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar experimentalmente as alterações agudas da interface entre o osso e o implante nas vértebras cervicais após a realização do macheamento do orifício piloto. MÉTODOS: foram utilizados cinco carneiros da raça Santa Inês deslanados. Na terceira vértebra cervical, foram feitos orifícios de 2,5 mm, de ambos os lados, na parte proximal e distal. No orifício proximal direito, foi realizado o macheamento antes da inserção do parafuso cortical de 3,5 mm (Grupo A; no orifício proximal esquerdo, o parafuso foi inserido sem macheamento (Grupo B; os outros dois orifícios distais foram utilizados como controle (Grupo C. As alterações da interface entre o osso e o implante foram analisadas por meio de estudo histomorfométrico, considerando o número de trabéculas fraturadas entre os filetes de rosca; a maior distância da fratura trabecular transversal provocada pela inserção do parafuso; a maior extensão da fratura trabecular longitudinal provocada pela inserção do parafuso e a linha de contato na interface osso-parafuso. RESULTADOS: o macheamento do orifício piloto provocou alterações da microestrutura do tecido ósseo ao redor do implante quando comparado às alterações produzidas pela inserção do parafuso sem o macheamento ou orifício piloto. A avaliação do contato entre o osso e o implante foi o parâmetro que apresentou diferença estatística na comparação entre a colocação do implante com e sem machemanto. CONCLUSÃO: na comparação com o orifício piloto, todos os parâmetros analisados apresentaram diferença estatística.OBJETIVO: analizar experimentalmente las alteraciones agudas de la interfase entre el hueso y el implante en las vértebras cervicales, después de taladrar el orificio piloto. MÉTODOS: fueron utilizados cinco carneros de la raza Santa Inés sin lana. En la tercera vértebra cervical, fueron realizados en ambos lados unos orificios de 2.5 mm en la parte proximal y distal. En

  18. APST interfaces in LINCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, J.G.

    1995-07-01

    APST is an acronym for the four highest of the seven layers of the LINCS hierarchy of communication protocols: (from high to low) Application, Presentation, Session, and Transport. Routines in each but the lowest of these APST layers can utilize the facilities of any lower APST layer (normally, but not necessarily, the immediately next lower layer) by invoking various primitives (macros that in most cases are subroutine calls) defining the upper interface of the lower layer. So there are three APST interfaces: Presentation layer, used by the Application layer; Session layer, normally used by the Presentation layer; and Transport layer, normally used by the Session layer. Logically, each end of a stream (unidirectional sequence of transmitted information) is handled by three modules, one module each for the Presentation, Session, and Transport layers, and each of these modules deals with only that one end of that one stream. The internal workings of the layers, particularly the Transport layer, do not necessarily exhibit this same modularization; for example, the two oppositely directed streams between the same two ends (constituting an association) may interact within a layer. However, such interaction is an implementational detail of no direct interest to those utilizing the layer. The present document does not describe implementation, nor does it discuss in any detail how the modules employ packet headings and data formats to communicate with their partner modules at the other end of a stream. There being one logical module per end of stream is a characteristic only of the Presentation, Session, and Transport layers. An Application layer module usually manages several streams, orchestrating them to achieve some desired purpose. The modules of the layers (Network, Link, and Physical) below the APST layers each handle many streams, multiplexing them through the nodes and channels of the network to transmit them from their origins to their destinations.

  19. Acid chat: gestural interface design

    OpenAIRE

    Gökhan, Ali Oytun; Gokhan, Ali Oytun

    2005-01-01

    AcidChat is an experimental design project that aims to create an innovative computer software interface for Internet chat software using today's well known technologies; Adobe Photoshop, Macromedia Freehand and digital photography. The aim of the project is to create new understandings of interface and it's usage, by adding new conceptions to chat based interfaces which creates a totally new look at the computer software and application. One of the key features is to add a gestural approach ...

  20. Playful User Interfaces. Interfaces that Invite Social and Physical Interaction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Unknown, [Unknown

    2014-01-01

    This book is about user interfaces to applications that can be considered as ‘playful’. The interfaces to such applications should be ‘playful’ as well. The application should be fun, and interacting with such an application should, of course, be fun as well. Maybe more. Why not expect that the

  1. Multimodal human-machine interface based on a brain-computer interface and an electrooculography interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iáñez, Eduardo; Ùbeda, Andrés; Azorín, José M

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a multimodal interface that combines a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) with an electrooculography (EOG) interface. The non-invasive spontaneous BCI registers the electrical brain activity through surface electrodes. The EOG interface detects the eye movements through electrodes placed on the face around the eyes. Both kind of signals are registered together and processed to obtain the mental task that the user is thinking and the eye movement performed by the user. Both commands (mental task and eye movement) are combined in order to move a dot in a graphic user interface (GUI). Several experimental tests have been made where the users perform a trajectory to get closer to some targets. To perform the trajectory the user moves the dot in a plane with the EOG interface and using the BCI the dot changes its height.

  2. Sulfur-H{sub z}(CH{sub x}){sub y}(z = 0,1) functionalized metal oxide nanostructure decorated interfaces: Evidence of Lewis base and Brönsted acid sites – Influence on chemical sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laminack, William; Baker, Caitlin [Department of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Gole, James, E-mail: james.gole@physics.gatech.edu [Department of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nanostructure metal oxide decorated n-type extrinsic porous silicon (PS) semiconductor interfaces are modified through in-situ interaction with acidic ethane and butane thiols (EtSH, BuSH) and basic diethyl sulfide (Et{sub 2}S). Highly sensitive conductometric sensor evaluations and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy demonstrate the effect of sulfur group functionalization modifying the acidity of the metal oxides and their interaction with NH{sub 3}. SEM micrographs demonstrate that the sulfur treated particles are less than 30 nm in size. EDAX studies confirm the chemical composition of the modified nanoparticles and suggest the surface interaction of the sulfides and thiols. The acidic thiols can form Brönsted acidic sites enhancing the acidity of the metal oxides, thus broadening the initial metal oxide acidity range. The sulfides interact to lower the Lewis acidity of nanostructured metal oxide sites. Conductometric response matrices with NH{sub 3} at room temperature, corresponding to the thiol and sulfide treated nanostructures of the metal oxides TiO{sub 2}, SnO{sub x}, Ni{sub x}O, Cu{sub x}O, and Au{sub x}O (x >> 1) are evaluated for a dominant electron transduction process forming the basis for reversible chemical sensing in the absence of chemical bond formation. Treatment with the acidic thiols enhances the metal center acidity. It is suggested that the thiols can interact to increase the Brönsted acidity of the doped metal oxide surface if they maintain SH bonds. This process may account for the shift in Lewis acidity as the Brönsted acid sites counter the decrease in Lewis acidity resulting from the interaction of S-(CH{sub x}){sub y} groups. In contrast, treatment with basic Et{sub 2}S decreases the Lewis acidity of the metal oxide sites, enhancing the basicity of the decorated interface. XPS measurements indicate a change in binding energy (BE) of the metal and oxygen centers. The observed changes in conductometric response do not represent a

  3. Phase field approach with anisotropic interface energy and interface stresses: Large strain formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitas, Valery I.; Warren, James A.

    2016-06-01

    studies of cubic crystals. In order to consider a fully specified system, a typical sixth order polynomial phase field model is considered. Analytical solutions for the propagating interface and critical nucleus are found, accounting for the influence of the anisotropic gradient energy and elucidating the distribution of components of interface stresses. The orientation-dependence of the nonequilibrium interface energy is first suitably defined and explicitly determined analytically, and the associated width is also found. The developed formalism is applicable to melting/solidification and crystal-amorphous transformation and can be generalized for martensitic and diffusive phase transformations, twinning, fracture, and grain growth, for which interface energy depends on interface orientation of crystals from either side.

  4. The influence of interfaces and intra-band transitions on the band gap of CdS/HgS and GaN/X (X=InN, In0.33Ga0.67N) core/shell/shell quantum dot quantum well - A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, P.; Senthilkumar, L.

    2015-11-01

    A theoretical model is presented to calculate the 1s-1s transition energy of an exciton in spherically layered semiconductor quantum-dot quantum-well (QDQW), based on the LCAO variational method using effective mass approximation. The confinement energies of electron and hole and the Coulombic interaction energy between them are calculated for CdS/HgS/CdS, GaN/X/GaN (X=InN, In0.33Ga0.67N) (QDQW) with core/shell/shell structures. The results of the proposed model effectively accommodates the polarization effects at the interfaces of different semiconductor materials in a core/shell/shell structure and elucidates the significant influence of interfaces on the band gap with consistency among previous theoretical and experimental results. The wave function of exciton studied shows significant differences with other theory. The change in the band gap of QDQW is attributed to the exciton excitations by thermal occupation of the lowest dark exciton states at different temperatures. In addition, based on Quantum Confined Stark Effect (QCSE) the effect of high electric field on the charge carriers and the corresponding changes in the band gap has been investigated. The applied electric field provides strong overlap between the electron and hole wave functions as well as increases the binding energy of the exciton, which eventually decreases the band gap.

  5. Playful Interfaces: Introduction and History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Nijholt, Antinus; Nijholt, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this short survey we have some historical notes about human-computer interface development with an emphasis on interface technology that has allowed us to design playful interactions with applications. The applications do not necessarily have to be entertainment applications. We can have playful

  6. Det æstetiske interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    Afhandlingen undersøger computerspillet historisk, teoretisk og analytisk i relation til en interfaceproblematik. Computerspil ses som et fremtrædende eksempel på det æstetiske interface – et interface baseret på sanseoplevelse i stedet for pragmatisk anvendelse. Afhandlingen består af to indbyrd...

  7. GRAPHIC INTERFACES FOR ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion PANA,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Using effective the method of calculating Fitness for Service requires the achievement of graphical interfaces. This paper presents an example of such interfaces, made with Visual Basic program and used in the evaluation of pipelines in a research contract [4

  8. Modeling soft interface dominated systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    The two main continuum frameworks used for modeling the dynamics of soft multiphase systems are the Gibbs dividing surface model, and the diffuse interface model. In the former the interface is modeled as a two dimensional surface, and excess properties such as a surface density, or surface energy

  9. Human-machine interface upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.; Matejka, K.; Sklenka, L.; Chab, V.

    2002-01-01

    The article describes a new human-machine interface that was installed at the VR-1 training reactor. The human-machine interface upgrade was completed in the summer 2001. The interface was designed with respect to functional, ergonomic and aesthetic requirements. The interface is based on a personal computer equipped with two displays. One display enables alphanumeric communication between the reactor operator and the nuclear reactor I and C. The second display is a graphical one. It presents the status of the reactor, principal parameters (as power, period), control rods positions, course of the reactor power. Furthermore, it is possible to set parameters, to show the active core configuration, to perform reactivity calculations, etc. The software for the new human-machine interface was produced with the InTouch developing tool of the Wonder-Ware Company. It is possible to switch the language of the interface between Czech and English because of many foreign students and visitors to the reactor. Microcomputer based communication units with proper software were developed to connect the new human-machine interface with the present reactor I and C. The new human-machine interface at the VR-1 training reactor improves the comfort and safety of the reactor utilisation, facilitates experiments and training, and provides better support for foreign visitors. (orig.)

  10. Preface (to Playful User Interfaces)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Nijholt, A.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2014-01-01

    This book is about user interfaces to applications that can be considered as ‘playful’. The interfaces to such applications should be ‘playful’ as well. The application should be fun, and interacting with such an application should, of course, be fun as well. Maybe more. Why not expect that the

  11. New DOMS interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigeki; Niwa, Kimio

    1984-01-01

    In Nagoya University, the computerized on-line microscope for emulsion analysis for cosmic ray research has been developed since 1973. In the past, the emulsion analysis with microscopes was based on specifically trained observation capability. However, it is indispensable to improve the analysis speed and objectivity by the automation with a computer. The emulsion analysis system in Nagoya University completed in 1978 is composed of more than one DOMS (digitized on-line microscope) which is a Chiyoda microscope with a DC motor and a linear encoder and large and medium size precise stages produced by Mitaka Koki Co. The system is linked with a host computer through controllers. Each measuring terminal operates as an intelligent terminal connected with a serial line. A new DOMS interface is newly designed by standardizing the above controllers, and intended to make the same programs easy to use for the purpose of equalizing the quality of data. Design work premised on the assumption that users can set up systems by combining necessary modules depending on their purposes by packing hardware into modules for every function, following the CAMAC concept. In this report, the total system configuration, crate controller, motor drive, position counter, display, graphic video RAM and ROM writer are described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  12. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  13. A generalized mechanical model for suture interfaces of arbitrary geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaning; Ortiz, Christine; Boyce, Mary C.

    2013-04-01

    Suture interfaces with a triangular wave form commonly found in nature have recently been shown to exhibit exceptional mechanical behavior, where geometric parameters such as amplitude, frequency, and hierarchy can be used to nonlinearly tailor and amplify mechanical properties. In this study, using the principle of complementary virtual work, we formulate a generalized, composite mechanical model for arbitrarily-shaped interdigitating suture interfaces in order to more broadly investigate the influence of wave-form geometry on load transmission, deformation mechanisms, anisotropy, and stiffness, strength, and toughness of the suture interface for tensile and shear loading conditions. The application of this suture interface model is exemplified for the case of the general trapezoidal wave-form. Expressions for the in-plane stiffness, strength and fracture toughness and failure mechanisms are derived as nonlinear functions of shape factor β (which characterizes the general trapezoidal shape as triangular, trapezoidal, rectangular or anti-trapezoidal), the wavelength/amplitude ratio, the interface width/wavelength ratio, and the stiffness and strength ratios of the skeletal/interfacial phases. These results provide guidelines for choosing and tailoring interface geometry to optimize the mechanical performance in resisting different loads. The presented model provides insights into the relation between the mechanical function and the morphological diversity of suture interface geometries observed in natural systems.

  14. Micromechanics of the Interface in Fibre-Reinforced Cement Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik; Shah, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    In fibre reinforced brittle matrix composites the mechanicalbehaviour of the interface between the fibres and the matrix has avery significant influence on the overall mechanical behaviour ofthe composite material. Since brittle matrix composites are designed primarilywith the aim of improving...... the strength and ductility of the brittlematrix material rather than changing the overall stiffness,the ability of the fibres to interact with cracking processes in thematrix material is essential. Furthermore, since matrix cracking in afibre reinforced material can only take place with simultaneousinterfacial...... debonding of the fibre-matrix interface, it is clear thatspecial emphasis should be put on the mechanical and strengthproperties of the interface. The present paper gives an overview of the different modelsapplied in the literature in the description of interfaces incementitious composite materials...

  15. Tunable nanoparticle arrays at charged interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sunita; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Fukuto, Masafumi; Gang, Oleg

    2014-10-28

    Structurally tunable two-dimensional (2D) arrays of nanoscale objects are important for modulating functional responses of thin films. We demonstrate that such tunable and ordered nanoparticles (NP) arrays can be assembled at charged air-water interfaces from nanoparticles coated with polyelectrolyte chains, DNA. The electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged nonhybridizing DNA-coated gold NPs and a positively charged lipid layer at the interface facilitates the formation of a 2D hexagonally closed packed (HCP) nanoparticle lattice. We observed about 4-fold change of the monolayer nanoparticle density by varying the ionic strength of the subphase. The tunable NP arrays retain their structure reasonably well when transferred to a solid support. The influence of particle's DNA corona and lipid layer composition on the salt-induced in-plane and normal structural evolution of NP arrays was studied in detail using a combination of synchrotron-based in situ surface scattering methods, grazing incidence X-ray scattering (GISAXS), and X-ray reflectivity (XRR). Comparative analysis of the interparticle distances as a function of ionic strength reveals the difference between the studied 2D nanoparticle arrays and analogous bulk polyelectrolyte star polymers systems, typically described by Daoud-Cotton model and power law scaling. The observed behavior of the 2D nanoparticle array manifests a nonuniform deformation of the nanoparticle DNA corona due to its electrostatically induced confinement at the lipid interface. The present study provides insight on the interfacial properties of the NPs coated with charged soft shells.

  16. Human factors and operator interface design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchle, D. [Emerson Process Management, AB (Canada); Errington, J. [Human Centered Solutions, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This paper described how a human factors approach to computer design can lead to improved performance and safety in oil sand processing plants. In particular, knowledge of human factors can be used to influence the design of the operator interface. The use of colour, display navigation and the integration of process trend information to support the interaction requirements of the operators was discussed. A comparison of a traditional design approach versus a more integrated approach was presented along with the results of a case study demonstrating the performance impact of the design approach. Two groups of professional operators were used in the case study to solve the same simulated plant problems. This study produced an economic business case that demonstrated how a human factors design approach is being applied in an Emerson DeltaV control system at a major oil sands facility. The integrated operator interface uses a synchronized multi-window display system and innovative greyscale colour scheme. The use of tabbed navigation and embedded trends and controls were shown to increase the situational awareness of the operators, thereby resulting in improved plant performance and safety. In addition, the operator interface offers online context sensitive access to an alarm database and relevant plant information.

  17. Structural and optical characterization of InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices: Influence of the change in InAs and GaSb layer thicknesses for fixed InSb-like interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arikan, Bulent, E-mail: bulentarikanx@gmail.com; Korkmaz, Melih; Aslan, Bulent; Serincan, Uğur

    2015-08-31

    In this article, we report on the molecular beam epitaxy growth and characterization of a 140 period InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice structure designed for mid infrared detection. Thickness of a period was systematically altered in each sample by changing the thickness of InAs (GaSb) layers from 9 to 7 monolayers (ML) for a fixed GaSb (InAs) layer at 9 ML (7 ML). The same InSb-like strain compensation interface was used for all samples. High resolution X-ray diffraction analysis, spectral responsivity and external quantum efficiency (QE) measurements were performed to express the effects of layer thickness variations on both structural and photodetector features. The decrease in the InAs thickness resulted in the increased mismatch from 0 to + 1626 ppm and the blue shift in the 50% cut-off wavelength (λ{sub c}) from 5.41 to 4.36 μm at 77 K. The additional decrease in GaSb thickness caused further increase in the mismatch up to + 1791 ppm. The steepness of the photoresponse at the absorption band edge was quantified and presented comparatively with different photodetector parameters and material properties for a complete picture. The highest optical response was obtained from sample having 8 ML InAs and 9 ML GaSb with λ{sub c} = 4.76 μm and QE = 23.7% at 4 μm. - Highlights: • Detailed growth conditions for InAs/GaSb SLs designed for infrared detection • Precisely engineering the λ{sub c} and the ∆a{sub ⊥}/a by controlling the SL layer thicknesses • InAs layer thickness changes are more effective than the GaSb on the λ{sub c} and ∆a{sub ⊥}/a.

  18. Polymers at Surfaces and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsige, Mesfin

    2015-03-01

    Interfaces between solids, liquids, and gases play an important role in a wide range of practical applications and have been a subject of scientific interest since Poisson showed in 1831 that the order parameter of liquids near interfaces must deviate considerably from its bulk value. In particular, polymers at surfaces and interfaces have been a subject of extensive theoretical, experimental and computational studies for a long time due to their use in many diverse applications ranging from antifouling coatings to flexible electronic devices. Understanding the structure and thermodynamic properties of polymers at surfaces and interfaces is thus an area of fundamental and current technological interest. Although encouraging experimental progress has been made over the years in understanding the molecular structure of polymers in contact with various environments, selectively probing their structure and dynamics at surfaces and interfaces has been extremely difficult. Computer simulations, especially molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have proven over the years to be an invaluable tool in providing molecular details at interfaces that are usually lacking in the experimental data. In this talk, I'll give an overview of some previous simulation efforts to understand the structure and dynamics of polymers at surfaces and buried interfaces. I will conclude by presenting our current and ongoing work on combining ab initio calculations and MD simulations with Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) Spectroscopy to study polymer surfaces. This approach demonstrates the future role of MD in surface science. Work supported by NSF (DMR0847580 and DMR1410290) and Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society.

  19. Nanoparticle Assemblies at Fluid Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Thomas P. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering

    2015-03-10

    A systematic study of the structure and dynamics of nanoparticles (NP) and NP-surfactants was performed. The ligands attached to both the NPs and NP-surfactants dictate the manner in which the nanoscopic materials assemble at fluid interfaces. Studies have shown that a single layer of the nanoscpic materials form at the interface to reduce the interactions between the two immiscible fluids. The shape of the NP is, also, important, where for spherical particles, a disordered, liquid-like monolayer forms, and, for nanorods, ordered domains at the interface is found and, if the monolayers are compressed, the orientation of the nanorods with respect to the interface can change. By associating end-functionalized polymers to the NPs assembled at the interface, NP-surfactants are formed that increase the energetic gain in segregating each NP at the interface which allows the NP-surfactants to jam at the interface when compressed. This has opened the possibility of structuring the two liquids by freezing in shape changes of the liquids.

  20. Through the Interface - a human activity approach to user interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne

    In providing a theoretical framework for understanding human- computer interaction as well as design of user interfaces, this book combines elements of anthropology, psychology, cognitive science, software engineering, and computer science. The framework examines the everyday work practices of us...

  1. Playful user interfaces interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The book is about user interfaces to applications that have been designed for social and physical interaction. The interfaces are ‘playful’, that is, users feel challenged to engage in social and physical interaction because that will be fun. The topics that will be present in this book are interactive playgrounds, urban games using mobiles, sensor-equipped environments for playing, child-computer interaction, tangible game interfaces, interactive tabletop technology and applications, full-body interaction, exertion games, persuasion, engagement, evaluation, and user experience. Readers of the book will not only get a survey of state-of-the-art research in these areas, but the chapters in this book will also provide a vision of the future where playful interfaces will be ubiquitous, that is, present and integrated in home, office, recreational, sports and urban environments, emphasizing that in the future in these environments game elements will be integrated and welcomed.

  2. Interface effect of nanoscaled adhesive interlayer on force transfer in biological microjoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Yuan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The interface effect of nanoscale adhesive interlayer plays a significant role in force transfer in biological microjoint. In this letter, the authors adopted shear lag theory and Gurtin–Murdoch model to investigate the influence of two typical residual interface shears on stress distribution. The dominant governing equations of global interfacial shear stress are established using the stress jump across the interface and the continuity condition of interlayers. The transferred force is evidently reduced by the parabolic residual interface shear, and linear residual interface shear exerts no influence on the axial force of hard layer. This study might be helpful for the parametric investigation on stress transfer in a complicated microjoint and the interface design of nanocomposite.

  3. The molecule-metal interface

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Norbert; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2013-01-01

    Reviewing recent progress in the fundamental understanding of the molecule-metal interface, this useful addition to the literature focuses on experimental studies and introduces the latest analytical techniques as applied to this interface.The first part covers basic theory and initial principle studies, while the second part introduces readers to photoemission, STM, and synchrotron techniques to examine the atomic structure of the interfaces. The third part presents photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution UV photoelectron spectroscopy and electron spin resonance to study the electroni

  4. Search-User Interface Design

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Max

    2011-01-01

    Search User Interfaces (SUIs) represent the gateway between people who have a task to complete, and the repositories of information and data stored around the world. Not surprisingly, therefore, there are many communities who have a vested interest in the way SUIs are designed. There are people who study how humans search for information, and people who study how humans use computers. There are people who study good user interface design, and people who design aesthetically pleasing user interfaces. There are also people who curate and manage valuable information resources, and people who desi

  5. Interfaces and thin films physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equer, B.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Interfaces and Thin Film Physics laboratory (Polytechnic School France) is presented. The research program is focused on the thin films and on the interfaces of the amorphous semiconductor materials: silicon and silicon germanium, silicon-carbon and silicon-nitrogen alloys. In particular, the following topics are discussed: the basic processes and the kinetics of the reactive gas deposition, the amorphous materials manufacturing, the physico-chemical characterization of thin films and interfaces and the electron transport in amorphous semiconductors. The construction and optimization of experimental devices, as well as the activities concerning instrumentation, are also described [fr

  6. Designing end-user interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Heaton, N

    1988-01-01

    Designing End-User Interfaces: State of the Art Report focuses on the field of human/computer interaction (HCI) that reviews the design of end-user interfaces.This compilation is divided into two parts. Part I examines specific aspects of the problem in HCI that range from basic definitions of the problem, evaluation of how to look at the problem domain, and fundamental work aimed at introducing human factors into all aspects of the design cycle. Part II consists of six main topics-definition of the problem, psychological and social factors, principles of interface design, computer intelligenc

  7. Practical speech user interface design

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, James R

    2010-01-01

    Although speech is the most natural form of communication between humans, most people find using speech to communicate with machines anything but natural. Drawing from psychology, human-computer interaction, linguistics, and communication theory, Practical Speech User Interface Design provides a comprehensive yet concise survey of practical speech user interface (SUI) design. It offers practice-based and research-based guidance on how to design effective, efficient, and pleasant speech applications that people can really use. Focusing on the design of speech user interfaces for IVR application

  8. Development of a User Interface for a Regression Analysis Software Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Norbert Manfred; Volden, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    An easy-to -use user interface was implemented in a highly automated regression analysis tool. The user interface was developed from the start to run on computers that use the Windows, Macintosh, Linux, or UNIX operating system. Many user interface features were specifically designed such that a novice or inexperienced user can apply the regression analysis tool with confidence. Therefore, the user interface s design minimizes interactive input from the user. In addition, reasonable default combinations are assigned to those analysis settings that influence the outcome of the regression analysis. These default combinations will lead to a successful regression analysis result for most experimental data sets. The user interface comes in two versions. The text user interface version is used for the ongoing development of the regression analysis tool. The official release of the regression analysis tool, on the other hand, has a graphical user interface that is more efficient to use. This graphical user interface displays all input file names, output file names, and analysis settings for a specific software application mode on a single screen which makes it easier to generate reliable analysis results and to perform input parameter studies. An object-oriented approach was used for the development of the graphical user interface. This choice keeps future software maintenance costs to a reasonable limit. Examples of both the text user interface and graphical user interface are discussed in order to illustrate the user interface s overall design approach.

  9. Regenerative scaffold electrodes for peripheral nerve interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Isaac P; Mukhatyar, Vivek J; Srinivasan, Akhil; Bentley, John T; Andreasen, Dinal S; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2013-07-01

    Advances in neural interfacing technology are required to enable natural, thought-driven control of a prosthetic limb. Here, we describe a regenerative electrode design in which a polymer-based thin-film electrode array is integrated within a thin-film sheet of aligned nanofibers, such that axons regenerating from a transected peripheral nerve are topographically guided across the electrode recording sites. Cultures of dorsal root ganglia were used to explore design parameters leading to cellular migration and neurite extension across the nanofiber/electrode array boundary. Regenerative scaffold electrodes (RSEs) were subsequently fabricated and implanted across rat tibial nerve gaps to evaluate device recording capabilities and influence on nerve regeneration. In 20 of these animals, regeneration was compared between a conventional nerve gap model and an amputation model. Characteristic shaping of regenerated nerve morphology around the embedded electrode array was observed in both groups, and regenerated axon profile counts were similar at the eight week end point. Implanted RSEs recorded evoked neural activity in all of these cases, and also in separate implantations lasting up to five months. These results demonstrate that nanofiber-based topographic cues within a regenerative electrode can influence nerve regeneration, to the potential benefit of a peripheral nerve interface suitable for limb amputees.

  10. Tailoring the interface layer of the bipolar membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balster, J.H.; Srinkantharajah, S.; Sumbharaju, R.; Punt, Ineke G.M.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates various parameters affecting the water splitting of bipolar ion-exchange membranes. We show that the amount of functional groups and the water content of the interface layer have a strong influence on the bipolar membrane resistance. Use of anion exchange layers containing

  11. Optoelectronics Interfaces for Power Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Neamtu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The most important issue interface is galvanicseparation between the signal part and the power board.Standards in the field have increased continuouslyelectro-security requirements on the rigidity of thedielectric and insulation resistance. Recommendations forclassical solutions require the use of galvanic separationoptoelectronics devices. Interfacing with a PC or DSP -controller is a target of interposition optical signals viathe power hardware commands.

  12. Fluid mechanics of environmental interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Fluid Mechanics of Environmental Interfaces describes the concept of the environmental interface, defined as a surface between two either abiotic or biotic systems. These are in relative motion and exchange mass, heat and momentum through biophysical and/or chemical processes. These processes are fluctuating temporally and spatially.The book will be of interest to graduate students, PhD students as well as researchers in environmental sciences, civil engineering and environmental engineering, (geo)physics and applied mathematics.

  13. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, F.

    1983-01-01

    The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered. (Author) [pt

  14. Active matter clusters at interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eCopenhagen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development, cancerous cells during tumor formation and metastasis, colonies of bacteria in a biofilm, or even flocks of birds and schools of fish at the macro-scale. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit that moves in two dimensions by exerting a force/torque per unit area whose magnitude depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed (overdamped clusters encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds (underdamped, where inertia dominates, the clusters show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection for the low velocity clusters. We then present an extreme limit of the model in the absence of rotational damping where clusters can become stuck spiraling along the interface or move in large circular trajectories after leaving the interface. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  15. Science at the interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knorr Cetina, K.

    2004-01-01

    the stakes against those who might want to enter. Laboratory sciences interface nature in a peculiar way: by barring real natural objects from entering the lab and by substituting for them reconfigured versions of these objects to work with in research. These supplemental versions of natural objects do refer back to natural processes or conditions, but at the same time they are also autonomous new objects and processes with differential qualities and reproductive powers within laboratory contexts. Laboratory sciences have the disadvantage that their products must be freshly contextualized when they leave the lab to reenter natural environments. In the natural sciences, re-contextualization is often accomplished by transferring some of the conditions that obtained in the lab onto the natural environment. Re-contextualization in the natural sciences may also just be a metaphor for a long chain of processes, involving specialized disciplines, by which some natural scientific results are used to create technologies which are then used in practice - a process that often fails, involves political strategies of persuasion and other complications. Contextualization involves adaptation not only to new laboratory external physical environments but also to the social world. One direction of social science research maintains that a form of (re) contextualization of a much larger scope and impact is evident today in contemporary societies, affecting in tendency all sciences and technological fields. This assessment is encapsulated in the idea that we have progressed from Mode 1 science and technology to a Mode 2 situation where knowledge is generated in the context of application and implication. (author)

  16. Feedback of Interface Agents on Student Perception: Level, Dialogue, and Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Hong; Chou, Chih-Yueh; Tseng, Shu-Fen; Su, Ying-Chu

    2018-01-01

    Although feedback from interface agents has recently attracted increasing research attention, most studies emphasize the cognitive influences. Thus, the effect of each feedback type on student perception remains unclear. This study focuses on three types of feedback from interface agents to clarify student perception of single feedback and…

  17. The Moving Edge: Perspectives on the Southern Wildland-Urban Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha C. Monroe; Alison W. Bowers; L. Annie Hermansen

    2003-01-01

    To better understand the wildland-urban interface across the 13 Southern States and to identify issues to be covered in the USDA Forest Service report, "Human Influences on Forest Ecosystems: The Southern Wildland-Urban Interface Assessment," 12 focus groups were conducted in 6 of the Southern States in May and June 2000. The groups were guided through a...

  18. Molecular Design of Branched and Binary Molecules at Ordered Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genson, Kirsten Larson [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This study examined five different branched molecular architectures to discern the effect of design on the ability of molecules to form ordered structures at interfaces. Photochromic monodendrons formed kinked packing structures at the air-water interface due to the cross-sectional area mismatch created by varying number of alkyl tails and the hydrophilic polar head group. The lower generations formed orthorhombic unit cell with long range ordering despite the alkyl tails tilted to a large degree. Favorable interactions between liquid crystalline terminal groups and the underlying substrate were observed to compel a flexible carbosilane dendrimer core to form a compressed elliptical conformation which packed stagger within lamellae domains with limited short range ordering. A twelve arm binary star polymer was observed to form two dimensional micelles at the air-water interface attributed to the higher polystyrene block composition. Linear rod-coil molecules formed a multitude of packing structures at the air-water interface due to the varying composition. Tree-like rod-coil molecules demonstrated the ability to form one-dimensional structures at the air-water interface and at the air-solvent interface caused by the preferential ordering of the rigid rod cores. The role of molecular architecture and composition was examined and the influence chemically competing fragments was shown to exert on the packing structure. The amphiphilic balance of the different molecular series exhibited control on the ordering behavior at the air-water interface and within bulk structures. The shell nature and tail type was determined to dictate the preferential ordering structure and molecular reorganization at interfaces with the core nature effect secondary.

  19. DIRAC: Secure web user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casajus Ramo, A; Sapunov, M

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally the interaction between users and the Grid is done with command line tools. However, these tools are difficult to use by non-expert users providing minimal help and generating outputs not always easy to understand especially in case of errors. Graphical User Interfaces are typically limited to providing access to the monitoring or accounting information and concentrate on some particular aspects failing to cover the full spectrum of grid control tasks. To make the Grid more user friendly more complete graphical interfaces are needed. Within the DIRAC project we have attempted to construct a Web based User Interface that provides means not only for monitoring the system behavior but also allows to steer the main user activities on the grid. Using DIRAC's web interface a user can easily track jobs and data. It provides access to job information and allows performing actions on jobs such as killing or deleting. Data managers can define and monitor file transfer activity as well as check requests set by jobs. Production managers can define and follow large data productions and react if necessary by stopping or starting them. The Web Portal is build following all the grid security standards and using modern Web 2.0 technologies which allow to achieve the user experience similar to the desktop applications. Details of the DIRAC Web Portal architecture and User Interface will be presented and discussed.

  20. XML Translator for Interface Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroson, Elizabeth R.

    2009-01-01

    A computer program defines an XML schema for specifying the interface to a generic FPGA from the perspective of software that will interact with the device. This XML interface description is then translated into header files for C, Verilog, and VHDL. User interface definition input is checked via both the provided XML schema and the translator module to ensure consistency and accuracy. Currently, programming used on both sides of an interface is inconsistent. This makes it hard to find and fix errors. By using a common schema, both sides are forced to use the same structure by using the same framework and toolset. This makes for easy identification of problems, which leads to the ability to formulate a solution. The toolset contains constants that allow a programmer to use each register, and to access each field in the register. Once programming is complete, the translator is run as part of the make process, which ensures that whenever an interface is changed, all of the code that uses the header files describing it is recompiled.

  1. Repartition of ultrasonic energies at the interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleuze, M.; Bourdarios, M.; Lepoutre, M.

    1983-06-01

    Energy repartition of ultrasonic waves at the interfaces is studied as a function of incidence angle of the acoustic beam in immersion testing. For each interface type mathematical relations give the ratio of incident energy and energy of the wave reemitted by the interface. As an example curves for the interfaces water-uranium are given [fr

  2. Control by personal computer and Interface 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book consists of three chapters. The first chapter deals with basic knowledge of micro computer control which are computer system, micro computer system, control of the micro computer and control system for calculator. The second chapter describes Interface about basic knowledge such as 8255 parallel interface, 6821 parallel interface, parallel interface of personal computer, reading BCD code in parallel interface, IEEE-488 interface, RS-232C interface and transmit data in personal computer and a measuring instrument. The third chapter includes control experiment by micro computer, experiment by eight bit computer and control experiment by machine code and BASIC.

  3. Multi-robot control interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Walton, Miles C [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-06

    Methods and systems for controlling a plurality of robots through a single user interface include at least one robot display window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot display window illustrating one or more conditions of a respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes at least one robot control window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot control window configured to receive one or more commands for sending to the respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes a multi-robot common window comprised of information received from each of the plurality of robots.

  4. PinBus Interface Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Adgerson, Jewel D.; Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Richard M.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2009-12-30

    On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL has explored and expanded upon a simple control interface that might have merit for the inexpensive communication of smart grid operational objectives (demand response, for example) to small electric end-use devices and appliances. The approach relies on bi-directional communication via the electrical voltage states of from one to eight shared interconnection pins. The name PinBus has been suggested and adopted for the proposed interface protocol. The protocol is defined through the presentation of state diagrams and the pins’ functional definitions. Both simulations and laboratory demonstrations are being conducted to demonstrate the elegance and power of the suggested approach. PinBus supports a very high degree of interoperability across its interfaces, allowing innumerable pairings of devices and communication protocols and supporting the practice of practically any smart grid use case.

  5. Physics of Surfaces and Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ibach, Harald

    2006-01-01

    This graduate-level textbook covers the major developments in surface sciences of recent decades, from experimental tricks and basic techniques to the latest experimental methods and theoretical understanding. It is unique in its attempt to treat the physics of surfaces, thin films and interfaces, surface chemistry, thermodynamics, statistical physics and the physics of the solid/electrolyte interface in an integral manner, rather than in separate compartments. The Physics of Surfaces and Interfaces is designed as a handbook for the researcher as well as a study-text for graduate students in physics or chemistry with special interest in the surface sciences, material science, or the nanosciences. The experienced researcher, professional or academic teacher will appreciate the opportunity to share many insights and ideas that have grown out of the author's long experience. Readers will likewise appreciate the wide range of topics treated, each supported by extensive references. Graduate students will benefit f...

  6. Proteins at the Biomaterial Electrolyte Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengvall, Pentti

    2005-03-01

    Proteins adsorb rapidly onto solid and polymeric surfaces because the association process is in the vast majority of cases energetically favourable, i.e. exothermic. The most common exceptions to this rule are hydrophilic interfaces with low net charge and high mobility, e.g. immobilized PEGs. Current research in the research area tries to understand and control unwanted and wanted adsorption by studying the adsorption kinetics, protein surface binding specificity, protein exchange at interfaces, and surface protein repulsion mechanisms. In blood plasma model systems humoral cascade reactions such as surface mediated coagulation and immune complement raise considerable interest due to the immediate association to blood compatibility, and in tissue applications the binding between surfaces and membrane receptors in cells and tissues. Thus, the understanding of interfacial events at the protein level is of large importance in applications such as blood and tissue contacting biomaterials, in vitro medical and biological diagnostics, food industry and in marine anti-fouling technology. Well described consequences of adsorption are a lowered system energy, increased system entropy, irreversible binding, conformational changes, specific surface/protein interactions, and in biomedical materials applications surface opsonization followed by cell-surface interactions and a host tissue response. This lecture will deal with some mechanisms known to be of importance for the adsorption processes, such as the influence of surface chemistry and surface energy, the composition of the protein solution, the Vroman effect, and residence time. Examples will be shown from ellipsometric experiments using different model surfaces in single/few protein solutions, and specific attention be given to blood serum and plasma experiments on coagulation and immune complement at interfaces.

  7. Interface control scheme for computer high-speed interface unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, B. K.

    1975-01-01

    Control scheme is general and performs for multiplexed and dedicated channels as well as for data-bus interfaces. Control comprises two 64-pin, dual in-line packages, each of which holds custom large-scale integrated array built with silicon-on-sapphire complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology.

  8. Interface language for diagnostic control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matone, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    The neutron multichannel collimator diagnostic on TFTR is run with the help of a keyboard-entered interface language. The language allows the user to interact with the real-time control and data analysis systems in a consistent and efficient manner. It uses a vocabulary that can be abbreviated into one character commands which the proficient user may concatenate into command words. This allows the user to progress quickly from a novice to an expert operating mode. A similar type interface language could be applied to many interactive applications accepting keyboard inputs

  9. Polymers and biopolymers at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A. R.; Geoghegan, M.

    2018-03-01

    This review updates recent progress in the understanding of the behaviour of polymers at surfaces and interfaces, highlighting examples in the areas of wetting, dewetting, crystallization, and ‘smart’ materials. Recent developments in analysis tools have yielded a large increase in the study of biological systems, and some of these will also be discussed, focussing on areas where surfaces are important. These areas include molecular binding events and protein adsorption as well as the mapping of the surfaces of cells. Important techniques commonly used for the analysis of surfaces and interfaces are discussed separately to aid the understanding of their application.

  10. Coordinating user interfaces for consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Jakob

    2001-01-01

    In the years since Jakob Nielsen's classic collection on interface consistency first appeared, much has changed, and much has stayed the same. On the one hand, there's been exponential growth in the opportunities for following or disregarding the principles of interface consistency-more computers, more applications, more users, and of course the vast expanse of the Web. On the other, there are the principles themselves, as persistent and as valuable as ever. In these contributed chapters, you'll find details on many methods for seeking and enforcing consistency, along with bottom-line analys

  11. The interface at the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2011-01-01

    In the development of and discourses around interfaces there has always been a strong urge to bypass representation and ‘jack’ directly in to the human brain, consciousness, perceptions and feelings. In her article ”The interface at the skin” Lone Koefoed Hansen looks at how two contemporary...... computing is the newest example of a technological development implicitly or explicitly aiming at manifesting two utopian parameters of communication: immediacy and instantaneity. Though utopian, this manifestation has served as a way to brand Philips “as a highly innovative and remarkable company”....

  12. Interfacing robotics with plutonium fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, W.W.; Moore, F.W.

    1986-01-01

    Interfacing robotic systems with nuclear fuel fabrication processes resulted in a number of interfacing challenges. The system not only interfaces with the fuel process, but must also interface with nuclear containment, radiation control boundaries, criticality control restrictions, and numerous other safety systems required in a fuel fabrication plant. The robotic system must be designed to allow operator interface during maintenance and recovery from an upset as well as normal operations

  13. Working with Elthar; AN Intelligent Music Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garton, Bradford Glenn

    Elthar is a computer music interface designed to function with incomplete or inexact specifications of parameters. Elthar's natural language interpreter translates user requests into a command format for the activation of various signal processing algorithms in the CMIX digital synthesis environment. If the user does not supply all of the required parameters for a given algorithm, Elthar consults a large probabilistic knowledge-base for the needed values. This knowledge-base is compiled and maintained by the Elthar program through observations of how the algorithms are employed by the user. Elthar is also capable of learning descriptive attributes and creating new data through a unique analogy mechanism. The choice of input influences Elthar's selection of signal-processing parameters, allowing Elthar to draw upon different operational features for different types of sounds. The goal of this effort was to create an interface that could model musical "collaborations". This paper discusses the structure of the Elthar program and the author's experience in working with Elthar to create the piece There's no place like Home.

  14. Effects of furnace temperature profile on the interface shape during Bridgman crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, K.; Duval, W. M. B.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of asymmetry in furnace temperature profile and pulling velocity on the crystal interface shape are demonstrated while neglecting the latent heat of solidification. It is concluded that the furnace temperature profile may be varied in order to influence the interface shape of the crystal. An exact thermal analysis is performed on the Bridgman technique by including the latent heat of solidification as a source term. The exact temperature field is obtained for the case of a flat melt-crystal interface. The earlier observation regarding the influence of furnace temperature profile on the crystal interface shape is confirmed and a criterion for a flat crystal interface is obtained. Various furnace temperature profiles are selected and their corresponding results are presented.

  15. Bionic intrafascicular interfaces for recording and stimulating peripheral nerve fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ranu; Abbas, James J; Kuntaegowdanahalli, Sathyakumar; Thota, Anil K

    2018-01-01

    The network of peripheral nerves presents extraordinary potential for modulating and/or monitoring the functioning of internal organs or the brain. The degree to which these pathways can be used to influence or observe neural activity patterns will depend greatly on the quality and specificity of the bionic interface. The anatomical organization, which consists of multiple nerve fibers clustered into fascicles within a nerve bundle, presents opportunities and challenges that may necessitate insertion of electrodes into individual fascicles to achieve the specificity that may be required for many clinical applications. This manuscript reviews the current state-of-the-art in bionic intrafascicular interfaces, presents specific concerns for stimulation and recording, describes key implementation considerations and discusses challenges for future designs of bionic intrafascicular interfaces.

  16. Interfaces modify the undulation spectrum of bicontinuous microemulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holderer O.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the structure and dynamics of microemulsions adjacent to a planar hydrophilic wall have been characterized using grazing incidence small angle neutron scattering (GISANS and grazing incidence neutron spin echo (GINSES spectroscopy, respectively. It has been found that a bicontinuous microemulsion develops a lamellar structure, and that the relaxation rate is faster for a membrane close to the interface compared to the bulk. A model developed by Seifert was employed to explain the discovered acceleration for the near-surface lamellar ordered membranes. In this contribution we present how confinement of a flat interface influences the elastic properties of surfactant membranes and discuss the effect of locally introduced flat interfaces by clay platelets. This analysis sheds light onto the undulation mode spectrum of the surfactant membrane.

  17. The Operator Guide: An Ambient Persuasive Interface in the Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschtscherjakov, Alexander; Reitberger, Wolfgang; Pöhr, Florian; Tscheligi, Manfred

    In this paper we introduce the context of a semiconductor factory as a promising area for the application of innovative interaction approaches. In order to increase efficiency ambient persuasive interfaces, which influence the operators' behaviour to perform in an optimized way, could constitute a potential strategy. We present insights gained from qualitative studies conducted in a specific semiconductor factory and provide a description of typical work processes and already deployed interfaces in this context. These findings informed the design of a prototype of an ambient persuasive interface within this realm - the "Operator Guide". Its overall aim is to improve work efficiency, while still maintaining a minimal error rate. We provide a detailed description of the Operator Guide along with an outlook of the next steps within a user-centered design approach.

  18. Model-to-model interface for multiscale materials modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonelli, Perry Edward [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-12-17

    A low-level model-to-model interface is presented that will enable independent models to be linked into an integrated system of models. The interface is based on a standard set of functions that contain appropriate export and import schemas that enable models to be linked with no changes to the models themselves. These ideas are presented in the context of a specific multiscale material problem that couples atomistic-based molecular dynamics calculations to continuum calculations of fluid ow. These simulations will be used to examine the influence of interactions of the fluid with an adjacent solid on the fluid ow. The interface will also be examined by adding it to an already existing modeling code, Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) and comparing it with our own molecular dynamics code.

  19. Interaction energy of interface dislocation loops in piezoelectric bi-crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghong Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Interface dislocations may dramatically change the electric properties, such as polarization, of the piezoelectric crystals. In this paper, we study the linear interactions of two interface dislocation loops with arbitrary shape in generally anisotropic piezoelectric bi-crystals. A simple formula for calculating the interaction energy of the interface dislocation loops is derived and given by a double line integral along two closed dislocation curves. Particularly, interactions between two straight segments of the interface dislocations are solved analytically, which can be applied to approximate any curved loop so that an analytical solution can be also achieved. Numerical results show the influence of the bi-crystal interface as well as the material orientation on the interaction of interface dislocation loops.

  20. On the role of weak interface in crack blunting process in nanoscale layered composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zhou, Qing; Zhang, Shuang; Huang, Ping; Xu, Kewei; Wang, Fei; Lu, Tianjian

    2018-03-01

    Heterointerface in a nanoscale metallic layered composite could improve its crack resistance. However, the influence of metallic interface structures on crack propagation has not been well understood at atomic scale. By using the method of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, the crack propagation behavior in Cu-Nb bilayer is compared with that in Cu-Ni bilayer. We find that the weak Cu-Nb interface plays an important role in hindering crack propagation in two ways: (i) dislocation nucleation at the interface releases stress concentration for the crack to propagate; (ii) the easily sheared weak incoherent interface blunts the crack tip. The results are helpful for understanding the interface structure dependent crack resistance of nanoscale bicrystal interfaces.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE TOOL-CHIP INTERFACE TMPERATURES ON UNCOATED CEMENTIDE CARBIDE CUTTING TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasım HABALI

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the temperature as the result of the heat developed during machining at the tool-chip interface has an influence on the tool life and workpiece surface guality and the methods for measuring this temperature are constantly under investigation. In this study, the measurement of tool-chip interface temperature using toolworkpiece termocouple method was investigated. The test were carried out on a AISI 1040 steel and the toolchip interface temperature variation was examined depending on the cutting speed and feed rate. The obtained groups show that cutting speed has more influence on the temperature than feedrate has.

  2. Avaliação in vitro da microinfiltração na interface selante/esmalte sob a influência de contaminação, emprego de "primer" e tipo de selante In vitro evaluation of sealant microleakage under the influence of contamination, use of primer and type of sealant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lídia CIAMPONI

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo avaliou, in vitro, a microinfiltração na interface selante/esmalte sob a influência de contaminação do meio (saliva, emprego de "primer" (Tenure - Den-Mat e tipo de selante (Concise Light Cured White Sealant - 3M; Fluroshield - Caulk/Dentsply. Os resultados foram obtidos a partir de medidas lineares, utilizando um sistema computadorizado de imagens digitalizadas (IMAGE PLUS. Pôde-se concluir que a contaminação salivar e a utilização de "primer" atuaram de maneira diversa nas diferentes etapas do procedimento clínico; os selantes comportaram-se de maneira semelhante quando submetidos às mesmas condições; o emprego do "primer" favoreceu o escoamento do selante Fluroshield (Caulk/Dentsply nos sulcos e pôde ser observado maior número de bolhas com esse material.This in vitro study investigated the effect of different types of sealants (Concise Light Cured White Sealant - 3M; Fluroshield - Caulk/Dentsply and the use of primer (Tenure - Den-Mat on the microleakage of saliva-contaminated enamel. Sealants were placed on 360 surfaces (occlusal, buccal and lingual of extracted teeth free of caries. After being prepared according to each experimental group, they were thermocycled (5 and 55ºC for 500 and 2.000 cycles. Then they were immersed in a silver nitrate solution (50% and cut in longitudinal slices. The results were described in linear measurements (mm by means of a digital-image analysis system. Contamination and use of primer had different influences when subjected to the different experimental conditions. Both sealants had the same influence on microleakage. Flow of Fluroshield into pit and fissures was improved by use of the primer, and a greater amount of bubbles could be observed in this material.

  3. Monoclonal Antibody Interfaces: Dilatation Mechanics and Bubble Coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Aadithya; Shieh, Ian C; Leiske, Danielle L; Fuller, Gerald G

    2018-01-16

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are proteins that uniquely identify targets within the body, making them well-suited for therapeutic applications. However, these amphiphilic molecules readily adsorb onto air-solution interfaces where they tend to aggregate. We investigated two mAbs with different propensities to aggregate at air-solution interfaces. The understanding of the interfacial rheological behavior of the two mAbs is crucial in determining their aggregation tendency. In this work, we performed interfacial stress relaxation studies under compressive step strain using a custom-built dilatational rheometer. The dilatational relaxation modulus was determined for these viscoelastic interfaces. The initial value and the equilibrated value of relaxation modulus were larger in magnitude for the mAb with a higher tendency to aggregate in response to interfacial stress. We also performed single-bubble coalescence experiments using a custom-built dynamic fluid-film interferometer (DFI). The bubble coalescence times also correlated to the mAbs aggregation propensity and interfacial viscoelasticity. To study the influence of surfactants in mAb formulations, polyethylene glycol (PEG) was chosen as a model surfactant. In the mixed mAb/PEG system, we observed that the higher aggregating mAb coadsorbed with PEG and formed domains at the interface. In contrast, for the other mAb, PEG entirely covered the interface at the concentrations studied. We studied the mobility of the interfaces, which was manifested by the presence or the lack of Marangoni stresses. These dynamics were strongly correlated with the interfacial viscoelasticity of the mAbs. The influence of competitive destabilization in affecting the bubble coalescence times for the mixed mAb/PEG systems was also studied.

  4. BASIN: Beowulf Analysis Symbolic INterface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesperini, Enrico; Goldberg, David M.; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Dura, James; Jones, Douglas

    2013-08-01

    BASIN (Beowulf Analysis Symbolic INterface) is a flexible, integrated suite of tools for multiuser parallel data analysis and visualization that allows researchers to harness the power of Beowulf PC clusters and multi-processor machines without necessarily being experts in parallel programming. It also includes general tools for data distribution and parallel operations on distributed data for developing libraries for specific tasks.

  5. Embodied agents in de interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, M.J.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2001-01-01

    Steeds meer zien we het gebruik van mensachtige, geanimeerde figuren in interfaces en andere software applicaties, niet alleen in onderzoeksprojecten maar ook in commerciële software. Een voorbeeld dat bijna iedereen wel kent (en waar velen wel wat op aan te merken hebben) is de ‘office assistant’

  6. Control system oriented human interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barale, P.; Jacobson, V.; Kilgore, R.; Rondeau, D.

    1976-11-01

    The on-line control system interface for magnet beam steering and focusing in the Bevalac is described. An Aydin model 5205B display generator was chosen. This display generator will allow the computer to completely rewrite a monitor screen in less than 50 ms and is also capable of controlling a color monitor

  7. Interface engineering for organic electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Hong; Yip, Hin-Lap; Jen, Alex K.Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Huang, Fei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Institute of Polymer Optoelectronic Materials and Devices College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology Guangzhou (China)

    2010-05-10

    The field of organic electronics has been developed vastly in the past two decades due to its promise for low cost, lightweight, mechanical flexibility, versatility of chemical design and synthesis, and ease of processing. The performance and lifetime of these devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaics (OPVs), and field-effect transistors (OFETs), are critically dependent on the properties of both active materials and their interfaces. Interfacial properties can be controlled ranging from simple wettability or adhesion between different materials to direct modifications of the electronic structure of the materials. In this Feature Article, the strategies of utilizing surfactant-modified cathodes, hole-transporting buffer layers, and self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-modified anodes are highlighted. In addition to enabling the production of high-efficiency OLEDs, control of interfaces in both conventional and inverted polymer solar cells is shown to enhance their efficiency and stability; and the tailoring of source-drain electrode-semiconductor interfaces, dielectric-semiconductor interfaces, and ultrathin dielectrics is shown to allow for high-performance OFETs. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Spelling Correction in User Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-20

    we have concluded that there are considerable benefits and few obstacles to providing a spelling corrector in almost any interactie user interface. Key...the ACAI 23, 12 (December 1980), 676-687. 8. John F. Reiser (ed.). SAIL Manual. Stanford University Computer Science Department, 1976. 9. Warren

  9. A Portable Natural Language Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    and that would integrate graphics, mouse deixis , and natural language. Although the project was originally intended to last several years, it has been...planning program, an expert system used to plan air attack missions for the Air Force. This interface combined English with graphics and mouse deixis

  10. Adhesive forces at bimetallic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, M.P.; Nafari, N.; Ziesche, P.; Kaschner, H.R.

    1987-03-01

    Force concepts in condensed systems have progressed significantly in recent years. In the context of bimetallic interfaces we consider the Pauli-Hellman-Feynman theorem, use it to check the variational calculations of interfacial energies and estimate the force constants. (author). 13 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  11. Web OPAC Interfaces: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, B. Ramesh; O'Brien, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of Web-based online public access catalogs (OPACs) focuses on a review of six Web OPAC interfaces in use in academic libraries in the United Kingdom. Presents a checklist and guidelines of important features and functions that are currently available, including search strategies, access points, display, links, and layout. (Author/LRW)

  12. Interface design for digital courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, Huib; Kester, Liesbeth; Hummel, Hans; Nadolski, Rob

    2005-01-01

    This text should be referred to as: Tabbers, H., Kester, L., Hummel, H. G. K., & Nadolski, R. J. (2003). Interface design for digital courses. In W. Jochems, J. van Merriënboer, & R. Koper (Eds). Integrated e-learning: implications for pedagogy, technology & organisation (pp. 100-111). London:

  13. Usability of Nomadic User Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dees, W.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, a number of research activities have been performed to enable user interfaces and the underlying user activities to be migrated from one device to another. We call this “Nomadic User Interfaces”. The primary goal of these research activities has been to develop the

  14. Wheel/rail interface optimisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shevtsov, I.Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, wheel/rail interface optimisation, and particularly the problems of wheel and rail profile design are considered. The research task pursued by this thesis engenders investigation of a range of problems. First, geometric properties of contact between wheel and rail are investigated.

  15. An Object -Based VRML Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Shinji; Suzaki, Kenichi; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    This paper proposes an object-based VRML interface that can reduce the burden of both users and developers. In order to automatically generate the object menu, a new VRML node type that defines the names of objects in a scene graph is introduced together with the methods for real-time control of an active viewpoint node.

  16. Emotional Brain-Computer Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Molina, G.; Nijholt, A.; Nijholt, Antinus; Tsoneva, T.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Heylen, D.K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Research in brain-computer interface (BCI) has significantly increased during the last few years. Additionally to their initial role as assisting devices for the physically challenged, BCIs are now proposed for a wider range of applications. As any human-machine interaction system, BCIs can benefit

  17. Robust Brain-Computer Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuderink, B.

    2011-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) enables direct communication from the brain to devices, bypassing the traditional pathway of peripheral nerves and muscles. Current BCIs aimed at patients require that the user invests weeks, or even months, to learn the skill to intentionally modify their brain

  18. Human-computer interface design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowser, S.E.

    1995-04-01

    Modern military forces assume that computer-based information is reliable, timely, available, usable, and shared. The importance of computer-based information is based on the assumption that {open_quotes}shared situation awareness, coupled with the ability to conduct continuous operations, will allow information age armies to observe, decide, and act faster, more correctly and more precisely than their enemies.{close_quotes} (Sullivan and Dubik 1994). Human-Computer Interface (HCI) design standardization is critical to the realization of the previously stated assumptions. Given that a key factor of a high-performance, high-reliability system is an easy-to-use, effective design of the interface between the hardware, software, and the user, it follows logically that the interface between the computer and the military user is critical to the success of the information-age military. The proliferation of computer technology has resulted in the development of an extensive variety of computer-based systems and the implementation of varying HCI styles on these systems. To accommodate the continued growth in computer-based systems, minimize HCI diversity, and improve system performance and reliability, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) is continuing to adopt interface standards for developing computer-based systems.

  19. Modelling biological invasions: Individual to population scales at interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Belmonte-Beitia, J.

    2013-10-01

    Extracting the population level behaviour of biological systems from that of the individual is critical in understanding dynamics across multiple scales and thus has been the subject of numerous investigations. Here, the influence of spatial heterogeneity in such contexts is explored for interfaces with a separation of the length scales characterising the individual and the interface, a situation that can arise in applications involving cellular modelling. As an illustrative example, we consider cell movement between white and grey matter in the brain which may be relevant in considering the invasive dynamics of glioma. We show that while one can safely neglect intrinsic noise, at least when considering glioma cell invasion, profound differences in population behaviours emerge in the presence of interfaces with only subtle alterations in the dynamics at the individual level. Transport driven by local cell sensing generates predictions of cell accumulations along interfaces where cell motility changes. This behaviour is not predicted with the commonly used Fickian diffusion transport model, but can be extracted from preliminary observations of specific cell lines in recent, novel, cryo-imaging. Consequently, these findings suggest a need to consider the impact of individual behaviour, spatial heterogeneity and especially interfaces in experimental and modelling frameworks of cellular dynamics, for instance in the characterisation of glioma cell motility. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Shear strength behavior of geotextile/geomembrane interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén M. Bacas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the shear interaction mechanism of one of the critical geosynthetic interfaces, the geotextile/geomembrane, typically used for lined containment facilities such as landfills. A large direct shear machine is used to carry out 90 geosynthetic interface tests. The test results show a strain softening behavior with a very small dilatancy (<0.5 mm and nonlinear failure envelopes at a normal stress range of 25–450 kPa. The influences of the micro-level structure of these geosynthetics on the macro-level interface shear behavior are discussed in detail. This study has generated several practical recommendations to help professionals to choose what materials are more adequate. From the three geotextiles tested, the thermally bonded monofilament exhibits the best interface shear strength under high normal stress. For low normal stress, however, needle-punched monofilaments are recommended. For the regular textured geomembranes tested, the space between the asperities is an important factor. The closer these asperities are, the better the result achieves. For the irregular textured geomembranes tested, the nonwoven geotextiles made of monofilaments produce the largest interface shear strength.

  1. MIB Galerkin method for elliptic interface problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kelin; Zhan, Meng; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-12-15

    Material interfaces are omnipresent in the real-world structures and devices. Mathematical modeling of material interfaces often leads to elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) with discontinuous coefficients and singular sources, which are commonly called elliptic interface problems. The development of high-order numerical schemes for elliptic interface problems has become a well defined field in applied and computational mathematics and attracted much attention in the past decades. Despite of significant advances, challenges remain in the construction of high-order schemes for nonsmooth interfaces, i.e., interfaces with geometric singularities, such as tips, cusps and sharp edges. The challenge of geometric singularities is amplified when they are associated with low solution regularities, e.g., tip-geometry effects in many fields. The present work introduces a matched interface and boundary (MIB) Galerkin method for solving two-dimensional (2D) elliptic PDEs with complex interfaces, geometric singularities and low solution regularities. The Cartesian grid based triangular elements are employed to avoid the time consuming mesh generation procedure. Consequently, the interface cuts through elements. To ensure the continuity of classic basis functions across the interface, two sets of overlapping elements, called MIB elements, are defined near the interface. As a result, differentiation can be computed near the interface as if there is no interface. Interpolation functions are constructed on MIB element spaces to smoothly extend function values across the interface. A set of lowest order interface jump conditions is enforced on the interface, which in turn, determines the interpolation functions. The performance of the proposed MIB Galerkin finite element method is validated by numerical experiments with a wide range of interface geometries, geometric singularities, low regularity solutions and grid resolutions. Extensive numerical studies confirm the

  2. UNIVERSAL INTERFACE TO MULTIPLE OPERATIONS SYSTEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1986-01-01

    Alternative ways to provide access to operations systems that maintain, test, and configure complex telephone networks are being explored. It is suggested that a universal interface that provides simultaneous access to multiple operations systems that execute in different hardware and software...... environments, can be provided by an architecture that is based on the separation of presentation issues from application issues and on a modular interface management system that consists of a virtual user interface, physical user interface, and interface agent. The interface functionality that is needed...

  3. Continuous Modeling Technique of Fiber Pullout from a Cement Matrix with Different Interface Mechanical Properties Using Finite Element Program

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich, Leandro Ferreira; Wang, Chong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fiber-matrix interface performance has a great influence on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composite. This influence is mainly presented during fiber pullout from the matrix. As fiber pullout process consists of fiber debonding stage and pullout stage which involve complex contact problem, numerical modeling is a best way to investigate the interface influence. Although many numerical research works have been conducted, practical and effective technique suitable for co...

  4. ACPYPE - AnteChamber PYthon Parser interfacE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa da Silva Alan W

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ACPYPE (or AnteChamber PYthon Parser interfacE is a wrapper script around the ANTECHAMBER software that simplifies the generation of small molecule topologies and parameters for a variety of molecular dynamics programmes like GROMACS, CHARMM and CNS. It is written in the Python programming language and was developed as a tool for interfacing with other Python based applications such as the CCPN software suite (for NMR data analysis and ARIA (for structure calculations from NMR data. ACPYPE is open source code, under GNU GPL v3, and is available as a stand-alone application at http://www.ccpn.ac.uk/acpype and as a web portal application at http://webapps.ccpn.ac.uk/acpype. Findings We verified the topologies generated by ACPYPE in three ways: by comparing with default AMBER topologies for standard amino acids; by generating and verifying topologies for a large set of ligands from the PDB; and by recalculating the structures for 5 protein–ligand complexes from the PDB. Conclusions ACPYPE is a tool that simplifies the automatic generation of topology and parameters in different formats for different molecular mechanics programmes, including calculation of partial charges, while being object oriented for integration with other applications.

  5. ACPYPE - AnteChamber PYthon Parser interfacE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa da Silva, Alan W; Vranken, Wim F

    2012-07-23

    ACPYPE (or AnteChamber PYthon Parser interfacE) is a wrapper script around the ANTECHAMBER software that simplifies the generation of small molecule topologies and parameters for a variety of molecular dynamics programmes like GROMACS, CHARMM and CNS. It is written in the Python programming language and was developed as a tool for interfacing with other Python based applications such as the CCPN software suite (for NMR data analysis) and ARIA (for structure calculations from NMR data). ACPYPE is open source code, under GNU GPL v3, and is available as a stand-alone application at http://www.ccpn.ac.uk/acpype and as a web portal application at http://webapps.ccpn.ac.uk/acpype. We verified the topologies generated by ACPYPE in three ways: by comparing with default AMBER topologies for standard amino acids; by generating and verifying topologies for a large set of ligands from the PDB; and by recalculating the structures for 5 protein-ligand complexes from the PDB. ACPYPE is a tool that simplifies the automatic generation of topology and parameters in different formats for different molecular mechanics programmes, including calculation of partial charges, while being object oriented for integration with other applications.

  6. Influence of interface properties on fracture behaviour of concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras,. Chennai 600 036 .... 4.1 Materials. An ordinary Portland cement with 10% silica fume replacement by weight of cement was used. The chemical properties of cement and silica fume are shown in tables 1 and 2 respectively. The natural river sand ...

  7. Command Interface ASIC - Analog Interface ASIC Chip Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Baldes; Jaffe, Burton; Burke, Gary; Lung, Gerald; Pixler, Gregory; Plummer, Joe; Katanyoutanant,, Sunant; Whitaker, William

    2003-01-01

    A command interface application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and an analog interface ASIC have been developed as a chip set for remote actuation and monitoring of a collection of switches, which can be used to control generic loads, pyrotechnic devices, and valves in a high-radiation environment. The command interface ASIC (CIA) can be used alone or in combination with the analog interface ASIC (AIA). Designed primarily for incorporation into spacecraft control systems, they are also suitable for use in high-radiation terrestrial environments (e.g., in nuclear power plants and facilities that process radioactive materials). The primary role of the CIA within a spacecraft or other power system is to provide a reconfigurable means of regulating the power bus, actuating all valves, firing all pyrotechnic devices, and controlling the switching of power to all switchable loads. The CIA is a mixed-signal (analog and digital) ASIC that includes an embedded microcontroller with supporting fault-tolerant switch control and monitoring circuitry that is capable of connecting to a redundant set of interintegrated circuit (I(sup 2)C) buses. Commands and telemetry requests are communicated to the CIA. Adherence to the I(sup 2)C bus standard helps to reduce development costs by facilitating the use of previously developed, commercially available components. The AIA is a mixed-signal ASIC that includes the analog circuitry needed to connect the CIA to a custom higher powered version of the I(sup 2)C bus. The higher-powered version is designed to enable operation with bus cables longer than those contemplated in the I(sup 2)C standard. If there are multiple higher-power I(sup 2)C-like buses, then there must an AIA between the CIA and each such bus. The AIA includes two identical interface blocks: one for the side-A I(sup 2)C clock and data buses and the other for the side B buses. All the AIAs on each side are powered from a common power converter module (PCM). Sides A and B

  8. Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    kulturhistoriske udviklingsfaser. Den tegner også et billede af, hvordan interfacet forandrer vores musikkultur, og hvordan de digitale kunstværker udfordrer vores økonomi og jura. Interfacet er vor tids drøm om gennemsigtighed, om at nå ind bag formidlingen. Det er dog også andet og mere end funktionel teknologi...

  9. Is structural interface standardization beneficial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombert, W. E.

    1983-11-01

    Factors applicable to fixed angle, large field and fixed angle, large building flat plate photovoltaic (PV) generator arrays are discussed in the context of standardization. It is concluded that structural interface standardization may be highly desirable in any one major project, but not at this time in the overall PV industry. Attempts to mandate such standardization will act as a deterrent to long-range improvements. In specific projects, structural standardization should be defined at the largest practical interface, leaving the maximum possible freedom to the module and array manufacturer. There is a corollary area, however, where detailed standards would benefit the industry; the matter of Standard Practices. Work being done towards definition of acceptable/desirable practices in materials, finishes, fastening and locking methods, grounding techniques, lightning protection, etc., and in handling the environmental ranges, should be continued.

  10. Ultrafast Thermal Transport at Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, David [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Murphy, Catherine [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Martin, Lane [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-10-21

    Our research program on Ultrafast Thermal Transport at Interfaces advanced understanding of the mesoscale science of heat conduction. At the length and time scales of atoms and atomic motions, energy is transported by interactions between single-particle and collective excitations. At macroscopic scales, entropy, temperature, and heat are the governing concepts. Key gaps in fundamental knowledge appear at the transitions between these two regimes. The transport of thermal energy at interfaces plays a pivotal role in these scientific issues. Measurements of heat transport with ultrafast time resolution are needed because picoseconds are the fundamental scales where the lack of equilibrium between various thermal excitations becomes a important factor in the transport physics. A critical aspect of our work has been the development of experimental methods and model systems that enabled more precise and sensitive investigations of nanoscale thermal transport.

  11. Brookhaven fastbus/unibus interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benenson, G.; Bauernfeind, J.; Larsen, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    A typical high energy physics experiment requires both a high speed data acquisition and processing system, for data collection and reduction; and a general purpose computer to handle further reduction, bookkeeping and mass storage. Broad differences in architecture, format or technology, will often exist between these two systems, and interface design can become a formidable task. The PDP-11 series minicomputer is widely used in physics research, and the Brookhaven FASTBUS is the only standard high speed data acquisition system which is fully implemented in a current high energy physics experiment. This paper will describe the design and operation of an interface between these two systems. The major issues are elucidated by a preliminary discussion on the basic principles of Bus Systems, and their application to Brookhaven FASTBUS and UNIBUS

  12. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of an interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Marco; Öttinger, Hans Christian; Savin, Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Interfacial thermodynamics has deep ramifications in understanding the boundary conditions of transport theories. We present a formulation of local equilibrium for interfaces that extends the thermodynamics of the "dividing surface," as introduced by Gibbs, to nonequilibrium settings such as evaporation or condensation. By identifying the precise position of the dividing surface in the interfacial region with a gauge degree of freedom, we exploit gauge-invariance requirements to consistently define the intensive variables for the interface. The model is verified under stringent conditions by employing high-precision nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of a coexisting vapor-liquid Lennard-Jones fluid. We conclude that the interfacial temperature is determined using the surface tension as a "thermometer," and it can be significantly different from the temperatures of the adjacent phases. Our findings lay foundations for nonequilibrium interfacial thermodynamics.

  13. Interfaces in ceramic nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    Internal interfaces in all-ceramic dispersion fuels (such as these for HTGRs) are discussed for two classes: BeO-based dispersions, and coated particles for graphite-based fuels. The following points are made: (1) The strength of a two-phase dispersion is controlled by the weaker dispersed phase bonded to the matrix. (2) Differential expansion between two phases can be controlled by an intermediate buffer zone of low density. (3) A thin ceramic coating should be in compression. (4) Chemical reaction between coating and substrate and mass transfer in service should be minimized. The problems of the nuclear fuel designer are to develop coatings for fission product retention, and to produce radiation-resistant interfaces. 44 references, 18 figures

  14. Soft matter at aqueous interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the science of interfaces between an aqueous phase and a solid, another liquid or a gaseous phase, starting from the basic physical chemistry all the way to state-of-the-art research developments. Both experimental and theoretical methods are treated thanks to the contributions of a distinguished list of authors who are all active researchers in their respective fields. The properties of these interfaces are crucial for a wide variety of processes, products and biological systems and functions, such as the formulation of personal care and food products, paints and coatings, microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip applications, cell membranes, and lung surfactants. Accordingly, research and expertise on the subject are spread over a broad range of academic disciplines and industrial laboratories. This book brings together knowledge from these different places with the aim of fostering education, collaborations and research progress.

  15. The Ni-YSZ interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karin Vels

    content (99.8% Ni and 99.995% Ni) were used to examine the impact of impurities on the polarisation resistance and contact area morphology. The electropolished nickel wires were pressed against a polished 8 mol% YSZ surface. Extensive structural changes from a flat interface to a hill and valley structure...... between polarised and non-polarised samples. With pure nickel wires, however, the microstructures depended on the polarisation/non-polarisation conditions. At non-polarised conditions a hill and valley type structure was found. Anodic polarisation produced an up to 1 μm thick interface layer consisting...... of nano-sized YSZ particles with some Ni present. At cathodic polarisation both a granulated structure and a hill and valley structure resembling the structure of non-polarised samples were found. Small impurity ridges were surrounding the contact areas on non-polarised and cathodically polarised samples...

  16. Towards personalized adaptive user interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostov, Vlaho; Fukuda, Shuchi; Yanagisawa, Hideyoshi

    2002-01-01

    An approach towards standardization of the general rules for synthesis and design of man machine interfaces that include dynamic adaptive behavior is presented. The link between the personality type (Myers-Briggs or Kersey Temperament sorter) and the personal preferences of the users (Kansei) for the purpose of building Graphical User Interface (GU]) was investigated. The rules for a personalized el-notional GUI based on the subjective preferences of the users were defined. The results were tested on a modified TETRIS game that displayed background characters capable of emotional response. When the system responded to a user in a manner that is customized to his or her preferences, the reaction time was smaller and the information transfer was faster. Usability testing methods were used and it was shown that development of pleasant cartoon face GUI based on the users inborn personality tendencies was feasible. (Author)

  17. Low latency asynchronous interface circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Greg

    2017-06-20

    In one form, a logic circuit includes an asynchronous logic circuit, a synchronous logic circuit, and an interface circuit coupled between the asynchronous logic circuit and the synchronous logic circuit. The asynchronous logic circuit has a plurality of asynchronous outputs for providing a corresponding plurality of asynchronous signals. The synchronous logic circuit has a plurality of synchronous inputs corresponding to the plurality of asynchronous outputs, a stretch input for receiving a stretch signal, and a clock output for providing a clock signal. The synchronous logic circuit provides the clock signal as a periodic signal but prolongs a predetermined state of the clock signal while the stretch signal is active. The asynchronous interface detects whether metastability could occur when latching any of the plurality of the asynchronous outputs of the asynchronous logic circuit using said clock signal, and activates the stretch signal while the metastability could occur.

  18. Study of solute segregation at interfaces using Auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Interfacial segregation, often confined to within a few atomic distances of the interface, can strongly influence the processing and properties of metals and ceramics. The thinness of such solute-enriched regions can cause them to be particularly suitable for study using surface sensitive microanalytical techniques such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The application of AES to studies of interfacial segregation in metals and ceramics is briefly reviewed, and several examples are presented. 43 references, 14 figures

  19. Effect of mindfulness meditation on brain–computer interface performance

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Lee-Fan; Dienes, Zoltan; Jansari, Ashok S.; Goh, Sing-Yau

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalogram based Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) enable stroke and motor\\ud neuron disease patients to communicate and control devices. Mindfulness meditation has\\ud been claimed to enhance metacognitive regulation. The current study explores whether\\ud mindfulness meditation training can thus improve the performance of BCI users. To eliminate\\ud the possibility of expectation of improvement influencing the results, we introduced a music\\ud training condition. A norming study found...

  20. Effect of Mindfulness Meditation on Brain-Computer Interface Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Lee-Fan; Dienes, Zoltan; Jansari, Ashok S.

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalogram based Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) enable stroke and motor\\ud neuron disease patients to communicate and control devices. Mindfulness meditation has\\ud been claimed to enhance metacognitive regulation. The current study explores whether\\ud mindfulness meditation training can thus improve the performance of BCI users. To eliminate\\ud the possibility of expectation of improvement influencing the results, we introduced a music\\ud training condition. A norming study found...

  1. Tightness of voter model interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sturm, A.; Swart, Jan M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 13, - (2008), s. 165-174 ISSN 1083-589X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/06/1323; GA ČR GA201/07/0237 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : long range voter model * swapping voter model * interface tightness * exclusion process Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 0.392, year: 2008 http://www.emis.de/journals/EJP-ECP/_ejpecp/index.html

  2. The Interface Theory of Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Donald D; Singh, Manish; Prakash, Chetan

    2015-12-01

    Perception is a product of evolution. Our perceptual systems, like our limbs and livers, have been shaped by natural selection. The effects of selection on perception can be studied using evolutionary games and genetic algorithms. To this end, we define and classify perceptual strategies and allow them to compete in evolutionary games in a variety of worlds with a variety of fitness functions. We find that veridical perceptions--strategies tuned to the true structure of the world--are routinely dominated by nonveridical strategies tuned to fitness. Veridical perceptions escape extinction only if fitness varies monotonically with truth. Thus, a perceptual strategy favored by selection is best thought of not as a window on truth but as akin to a windows interface of a PC. Just as the color and shape of an icon for a text file do not entail that the text file itself has a color or shape, so also our perceptions of space-time and objects do not entail (by the Invention of Space-Time Theorem) that objective reality has the structure of space-time and objects. An interface serves to guide useful actions, not to resemble truth. Indeed, an interface hides the truth; for someone editing a paper or photo, seeing transistors and firmware is an irrelevant hindrance. For the perceptions of H. sapiens, space-time is the desktop and physical objects are the icons. Our perceptions of space-time and objects have been shaped by natural selection to hide the truth and guide adaptive behaviors. Perception is an adaptive interface.

  3. Field interface module software description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtier, H.

    1982-01-01

    The software for the field interface module (FIM) is designed to fully optimize the hardware capabilities of the FIM. Software routines exist which enable the FIM to monitor data, control components, communicate with an uplink computer, and perform real-time and local self-diagnostics. The FIM program is not dependent upon any particular uplink computer and is adaptable to various applications with a miniumum of modifications.

  4. Surface Waves on Metamaterials Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Panah, Mohammad Esmail Aryaee

    2016-01-01

    We analyze surface electromagnetic waves supported at the interface between isotropic medium and effective anisotropic material that can be realized by alternating conductive and dielectrics layers. This configuration can host various types of surface waves and therefore can serve as a rich...... platform for applications of surface photonics. Most of these surface waves are directional and as such their propagation can be effectively controlled by changing wavelength or material parameters tuning....

  5. Formal specification of human-computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auernheimer, Brent

    1990-01-01

    A high-level formal specification of a human computer interface is described. Previous work is reviewed and the ASLAN specification language is described. Top-level specifications written in ASLAN for a library and a multiwindow interface are discussed.

  6. MEDIA : MEDoc Interface for AIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alingery, P.; Soubrié, E.; Auchère, F.; Bocchialini, K.; Boignard, J. P.; Buchlin, E.; Malappert, J. C.; Parenti, S.

    2013-03-01

    MEDOC, the space solar data center at Orsay (http://www.ias.u-psud.fr/medoc) is now providing a new web access to the AIA/SDO level 1 images. This interface has the advantage of being simple, intuitive, very stable and fast. The full resolution 4k x 4k AIA level 1 images archived at MEDOC are downloaded from upstream DRMS nodes with a 1 minute cadence at all wavelengths. The dataset will be kept online on a redundant archive for the whole SDO mission duration. The FITS files are accessible via an user friendly web interface (http://medoc-sdo.ias.u-psud.fr) that allows users to request data by selecting a date range, the desired wavelengths and a sampling rate (choosing a cadence from 1 minute to 1 day). For each file, users can preview the image (using the Helioviewer tool) or display the header information before downloading the FITS files (with or without Rice-compression). This web interface was built using Sitools2, a tool developed by CNES, the French space agency, and supports most browsers. For more advanced users, a Search/Get Python module is also available at http://sdo.ias.u-psud.fr/python. The users can use it to build more complex yet more powerful queries. We encourage everyone in Europe and beyond to use these new services!

  7. Fluid mechanics of environmental interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Preface Preface of the first editionBiographies of the authors Part one - Preliminaries1. Environmental fluid mechanics: Current issues and future outlook B. Cushman-Roisin, C. Gualtieri & D.T. MihailovicPart two - Processes at atmospheric interfaces2. Point source atmospheric diffusionB. Rajkovic, I. Arsenic & Z. Grsic3. Air-sea interaction V. Djurdjevic & B. Rajkovic4. Modelling of flux exchanges between heterogeneous surfaces and atmosphere D.T. Mihailovic & D. Kapor5. Desert dust uptake-transport and deposition mechanisms - impacts of dust on radiation, clouds and precipitation G. Kallos, P. Katsafados & C. SpyrouPart three - Processes at water interfaces6. Gas-transfer at unsheared free-surfaces C. Gualtieri & G. Pulci Doria7. Advective diffusion of air bubbles in turbulent water flows H. Chanson8. Exchanges at the bed sediments-water column interface F.A. Bombardelli & P.A. Moreno9. Surface water and streambed sediment interaction: The hyporheic exchange D. Tonina10. Environm...

  8. Interface high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-12-01

    Cuprate high-temperature superconductors consist of two quasi-two-dimensional (2D) substructures: CuO2 superconducting layers and charge reservoir layers. The superconductivity is realized by charge transfer from the charge reservoir layers into the superconducting layers without chemical dopants and defects being introduced into the latter, similar to modulation-doping in the semiconductor superlattices of AlGaAs/GaAs. Inspired by this scheme, we have been searching for high-temperature superconductivity in ultra-thin films of superconductors epitaxially grown on semiconductor/oxide substrates since 2008. We have observed interface-enhanced superconductivity in both conventional and unconventional superconducting films, including single atomic layer films of Pb and In on Si substrates and single unit cell (UC) films of FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with a superconducting gap of ∼20 meV in 1UC-FeSe/STO has stimulated tremendous interest in the superconductivity community, for it opens a new avenue for both raising superconducting transition temperature and understanding the pairing mechanism of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we review mainly the experimental progress on interface-enhanced superconductivity in the three systems mentioned above with emphasis on 1UC-FeSe/STO, studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and transport experiments. We discuss the roles of interfaces and a possible pairing mechanism inferred from these studies.

  9. Bubble bursting at an interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Varun; Sajjad, Kumayl; Anand, Sushant; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2017-11-01

    Bubble bursting is crucial to understanding the life span of bubbles at an interface and more importantly the nature of interaction between the bulk liquid and the outside environment from the point of view of chemical and biological material transport. The dynamics of the bubble as it rises from inside the liquid bulk to its disappearance on the interface after bursting is an intriguing process, many aspects of which are still being explored. In our study, we make detailed high speed imaging measurements to examine carefully the hole initiation and growth in bursting bubbles that unearth some interesting features of the process. Previous analyses available in literature are revisited based on our novel experimental visualizations. Using a combination of experiments and theory we investigate the role of various forces during the rupturing process. This work aims to further our current knowledge of bubble dynamics at an interface with an aim of predicting better the bubble evolution from its growth to its eventual integration with the liquid bulk.

  10. Factors associated with interest in novel interfaces for upper limb prosthesis control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah M Engdahl

    Full Text Available Surgically invasive interfaces for upper limb prosthesis control may allow users to operate advanced, multi-articulated devices. Given the potential medical risks of these invasive interfaces, it is important to understand what factors influence an individual's decision to try one.We conducted an anonymous online survey of individuals with upper limb loss. A total of 232 participants provided personal information (such as age, amputation level, etc. and rated how likely they would be to try noninvasive (myoelectric and invasive (targeted muscle reinnervation, peripheral nerve interfaces, cortical interfaces interfaces for prosthesis control. Bivariate relationships between interest in each interface and 16 personal descriptors were examined. Significant variables from the bivariate analyses were then entered into multiple logistic regression models to predict interest in each interface.While many of the bivariate relationships were significant, only a few variables remained significant in the regression models. The regression models showed that participants were more likely to be interested in all interfaces if they had unilateral limb loss (p ≤ 0.001, odds ratio ≥ 2.799. Participants were more likely to be interested in the three invasive interfaces if they were younger (p < 0.001, odds ratio ≤ 0.959 and had acquired limb loss (p ≤ 0.012, odds ratio ≥ 3.287. Participants who used a myoelectric device were more likely to be interested in myoelectric control than those who did not (p = 0.003, odds ratio = 24.958.Novel prosthesis control interfaces may be accepted most readily by individuals who are young, have unilateral limb loss, and/or have acquired limb loss However, this analysis did not include all possible factors that may have influenced participant's opinions on the interfaces, so additional exploration is warranted.

  11. Effects of interface pressure distribution on human sleep quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyong Chen

    Full Text Available High sleep quality promotes efficient performance in the following day. Sleep quality is influenced by environmental factors, such as temperature, light, sound and smell. Here, we investigated whether differences in the interface pressure distribution on healthy individuals during sleep influenced sleep quality. We defined four types of pressure models by differences in the area distribution and the subjective feelings that occurred when participants slept on the mattresses. One type of model was showed "over-concentrated" distribution of pressure; one was displayed "over-evenly" distributed interface pressure while the other two models were displayed intermediate distribution of pressure. A polysomnography analysis demonstrated an increase in duration and proportion of non-rapid-eye-movement sleep stages 3 and 4, as well as decreased number of micro-arousals, in subjects sleeping on models with pressure intermediately distributed compared to models with over-concentrated or over-even distribution of pressure. Similarly, higher scores of self-reported sleep quality were obtained in subjects sleeping on the two models with intermediate pressure distribution. Thus, pressure distribution, at least to some degree, influences sleep quality and self-reported feelings of sleep-related events, though the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The regulation of pressure models imposed by external sleep environment may be a new direction for improving sleep quality. Only an appropriate interface pressure distribution is beneficial for improving sleep quality, over-concentrated or -even distribution of pressure do not help for good sleep.

  12. Refactoring Fat Interfaces Using a Genetic Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, D.; Raemaekers, S.; Pinzger, M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the violation of the Interface Segregation Principle (ISP) is critical for maintaining and evolving software systems. Fat interfaces (i.e., interfaces violating the ISP) change more frequently and degrade the quality of the components coupled to them. According to the

  13. Novel transport phenomena at complex oxide interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgenkamp, H.

    2013-01-01

    Novel electronic and magnetic phases are being observed at interfaces between insulating, non-magnetic oxide compounds, with the most notable example being the interface between SrTiO3 and LaAlO3. The basic properties of these interfaces will be discussed, as well as prospects for applications and

  14. An Automation Interface for Kappa PC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvig, Susanne C

    1999-01-01

    The reports documents an automation interface for Kappa PC. The automation interface can be used to embed Kappa applications in 32-bit Windowsapplications.The interface includes functions for initialising Kappa, for loading an application, for settingvalues, for getting values, and for stopping...

  15. Topology Optimization using an Explicit Interface Representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Asger Nyman; Nobel-Jørgensen, Morten; Bærentzen, J. Andreas

    Current methods for topology optimization primarily represent the interface between solid and void implicitly on fixed grids. In contrast, shape optimization methods represent the interface explicitly, but do not allow for any topological changes to the structure. Using an explicit interface repr...

  16. Interface engineering: an effective approach toward high-performance organic field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Chong-an; Liu, Yunqi; Yu, Gui; Zhu, Daoben

    2009-10-20

    By virtue of their excellent solution processibility and flexibility, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are considered outstanding candidates for application in low-cost, flexible electronics. Not only does the performance of OFETs depend on the molecular properties of the organic semiconductors involved, but it is also dramatically affected by the nature of the interfaces present. Therefore, interface engineering, a novel approach towards high-performance OFETs, has attracted considerable attention. In this Account, we focus on recent advances in the study of OFET interfaces--including electrode/organic layer interfaces, dielectric/organic layer interfaces, and organic/organic layer interfaces--that have resulted in improved device performance, enhanced stability, and the realization of organic light-emitting transistors. The electrode/organic layer interface, one of the most important interfaces in OFETs, usually determines the carrier injection characteristics. Focusing on OFETs with copper and silver electrodes, we describe effective modification approaches of the electrode/organic layer interfaces. Furthermore, the influence of electrode morphology on device performance is demonstrated. These results provide novel approaches towards high-performance, low-cost OFETs. The dielectric/organic layer interface is a vital interface that dominates carrier transport; modification of this interface therefore offers a general way to improve carrier transport accordingly. The dielectric layer also affects the device stability of OFETs. For example, high-performance pentacene OFETs with excellent stability are obtained by the selection of a dielectric layer with an appropriate surface energy. The organic/organic layer interface is a newly investigated topic in OFETs. Introduction of organic/organic layer interfaces, such as heterojunctions, can improve device performance and afford ambipolar OFETs. By designing laterally arranged heterojunctions made of organic

  17. Surface and interface effects in VLSI

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G

    1985-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 10: Surface and Interface Effects in VLSI provides the advances made in the science of semiconductor surface and interface as they relate to electronics. This volume aims to provide a better understanding and control of surface and interface related properties. The book begins with an introductory chapter on the intimate link between interfaces and devices. The book is then divided into two parts. The first part covers the chemical and geometric structures of prototypical VLSI interfaces. Subjects detailed include, the technologically most import

  18. Homogenized Finite Element Analysis on Effective Elastoplastic Mechanical Behaviors of Composite with Imperfect Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Gui Jiang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional (3D representative volume element (RVE model was developed for analyzing effective mechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with imperfect interfaces. In the model, the fiber is assumed to be perfectly elastic until its tensile strength, and the ceramic material is modeled by an elasto-plastic Drucker-Prager constitutive law. The RVE model is then used to study the elastic properties and the tensile strength of composites with imperfect interfaces and validated through experiments. The imperfect interfaces between the fiber and the matrix are taken into account by introducing some cohesive contact surfaces. The influences of the interface on the elastic constants and the tensile strengths are examined through these interface models.

  19. Polar catastrophe at the MgO(100)/SnO2(110) interface

    KAUST Repository

    Albar, Arwa

    2016-11-14

    First principles calculations, based on density functional theory, are used to investigate the structural and electronic properties of the epitaxial MgO(100)/SnO2(110) interface of wide band gap insulators. Depending on the interface termination, nonmagnetic metallic and half-metallic interface states are observed. The formation of these states is explained by a polar catastrophe model for nonpolar-polar interfaces. Strong lattice distortions and buckling develop in SnO2, which influence the interface properties as the charge discontinuity is partially screened. Already a single unit cell of SnO2 is sufficient to drive the polar catastrophe scenario. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. Surface rheology and interface stability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D. (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk

  1. The conversational interface talking to smart devices

    CERN Document Server

    McTear, Michael; Griol, David

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the conversational interface, which is becoming the main mode of interaction with virtual personal assistants, smart devices, various types of wearables, and social robots. The book consists of four parts: Part I presents the background to conversational interfaces, examining past and present work on spoken language interaction with computers; Part II covers the various technologies that are required to build a conversational interface along with practical chapters and exercises using open source tools; Part III looks at interactions with smart devices, wearables, and robots, and then goes on to discusses the role of emotion and personality in the conversational interface; Part IV examines methods for evaluating conversational interfaces and discusses future directions. · Presents a comprehensive overview of the various technologies that underlie conversational user interfaces; · Combines descriptions of conversational user interface technologies with a gui...

  2. Interface losses in multimaterial resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, L.G.; Amato, B.; Larsen, Tom

    2014-01-01

    vibrational modes to achieve a total of more than 3000 experimental points that allow us to quantify the contribution of surface and volume intrinsic (material related) losses in MEMS resonators. We conclude that the losses in the interface between silicon nitride and aluminum is a very important contributor......We present an extensive study shedding light on the role of surface and bulk losses in micromechanical resonators. We fabricate thin silicon nitride membranes of different sizes and we coat them with different thicknesses of metal. We later characterize the 81 lowest out-of-plane flexural...

  3. Some Economics of User Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Hal R. Varian

    1994-01-01

    I examine the incentives for software providers to design appropriate user interfaces. There are two sorts of costs involved when one uses software: the fixed cost of learning to use a piece of software and the the variable cost of operating the software. For example menu driven software is easy to learn, but tedious to operate. I show that a monopoly provider of software generally invests the ``right'' amount of resources in making the software easy to learn, but too little in making it easy...

  4. Interface between Context and Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Cong; Wang, Daojuan; Zhang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we explores how to consider contextual factors in the development of paradigm theory by focusing on the application and development of agency theory in a cross context. Specifically, the interface between agency theory and context is established from two aspects. On one hand......, the application and development of agency theory in both developed and emerging economies are examined from the perspectives of principal-agent conflicts (PAC) and principal-principal conflicts (PPC), respectively. On the other hand, a model of contextualization theory is created from the perspectives of PAC...

  5. Avalanche dynamics of elastic interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Slowly driven elastic interfaces, such as domain walls in dirty magnets, contact lines wetting a nonhomogeneous substrate, or cracks in brittle disordered material proceed via intermittent motion, called avalanches. Here we develop a field-theoretic treatment to calculate, from first principles, the space-time statistics of instantaneous velocities within an avalanche. For elastic interfaces at (or above) their (internal) upper critical dimension d≥d(uc) (d(uc)=2,4 respectively for long-ranged and short-ranged elasticity) we show that the field theory for the center of mass reduces to the motion of a point particle in a random-force landscape, which is itself a random walk [Alessandro, Beatrice, Bertotti, and Montorsi (ABBM) model]. Furthermore, the full spatial dependence of the velocity correlations is described by the Brownian-force model (BFM) where each point of the interface sees an independent Brownian-force landscape. Both ABBM and BFM can be solved exactly in any dimension d (for monotonous driving) by summing tree graphs, equivalent to solving a (nonlinear) instanton equation. We focus on the limit of slow uniform driving. This tree approximation is the mean-field theory (MFT) for realistic interfaces in short-ranged disorder, up to the renormalization of two parameters at d=d(uc). We calculate a number of observables of direct experimental interest: Both for the center of mass, and for a given Fourier mode q, we obtain various correlations and probability distribution functions (PDF's) of the velocity inside an avalanche, as well as the avalanche shape and its fluctuations (second shape). Within MFT we find that velocity correlations at nonzero q are asymmetric under time reversal. Next we calculate, beyond MFT, i.e., including loop corrections, the one-time PDF of the center-of-mass velocity u[over ·] for dimension delasticity) and a=1-4/9(2-d)+... (long-ranged elasticity). We show how the dynamical theory recovers the avalanche-size distribution

  6. Metawidgets in the multimodal interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattner, M.M. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States) Anderson (M.D.) Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)); Glinert, E.P.; Jorge, J.A.; Ormsby, G.R. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    We analyze two intertwined and fundamental issues concerning computer-to-human communication in the multimodal interfaces: the interplay between sound and graphics, and the role of object persistence. Our observations lead us to introduce metawidgets as abstract entities capable of manifesting themselves to users as image, as sound, or as various combinations and/or sequences of the two media. We show examples of metawidgets in action, and discuss mechanisms for choosing among alternative media for metawidget instantiation. Finally, we describe a couple of experimental microworlds we have implemented to test out some of our ideas. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Praxis input/output interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, R.E.; Evans, A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    This document is intended as an introduction to the use of RMS facilities via Praxis (this interface hereafter called Praxis-RMS). It is presumed that the reader is familiar with Praxis conventions as well as with RMS use (at the MACRO level). Since Praxis-RMS was designed to be functionally equivalent to MACRO-RMS, the explanations follow the pattern of the DEC MACRO-RMS documentation (particularly the programmer's reference manual). A complete list of the procedures that make up Praxis-RMS appears at the end of this document (with parameters), along with the constants (grouped by type) that can be used as actual parameters

  8. Interface-læring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorhauge, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Interface-læring er den læringsoplevelse, der kan opstå i grænsefladen mellem to væsensforskellige læringsmiljøer, når de mødes og griber ind i hinanden. Et gymnasium og et museum er eksempler på to sådanne læringsmiljøer. Artiklen præsenterer nogle af de væsentligste resultater fra min ph.d. afh...

  9. The relationship between perceived usability of a beautiful interface and of an ugly interface

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Naitullah; Syed.Mohammed, Mahamood Ur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between the perceived usability of a beautiful interface and of an ugly interface is analyzed in this study. This study correlates the visual aesthetics of the website with perceived usability. This research is performed to know the significance of visual aesthetics on perceived usability. A website is designed with two interfaces. One interface is designed by following design guidelines with respect to usability and the other interface is designed without following guideline...

  10. Brain Computer Interfaces, a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Nicolas-Alonso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A brain-computer interface (BCI is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or ‘locked in’ by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices.

  11. The blanket interface to TSTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Grimm, T.L.; Sze, D.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Bartlit, J.R.; Naruse, Y.; Yoshida, H.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements of tritium technology are centered in three main areas, (1) fuel processing, (2) breeder tritium extraction, and (3) tritium containment. The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) now in operation at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is dedicated to developing and demonstrating the tritium technology for fuel processing and containment. TSTA is the only fusion fuel processing facility that can operate in a continuous closed-loop mode. The tritium throughput of TSTA is 1000 g/d. However, TSTA does not have a blanket interface system. The authors have initiated a study to define a Breeder Blanket Interface (BBIO) for TSTA. The first step of the work is to define the condition of the gaseous tritium stream from the blanket tritium recovery system. This report summarizes this part of the work for one particular blanket concept, i.e., a self-cooled lithium blanket. The total gas throughput, the hydrogen to tritium ratio, the corrosive chemicals, and the radionuclides are defined. Various methods of tritium recovery from liquid lithium were assessed: yttrium gettering, permeation windows, and molten salt extraction. The authors' evaluation concluded that the best method was molten salt extraction

  12. Interface-based software testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Ahmad Rais

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Software quality is determined by assessing the characteristics that specify how it should work, which are verified through testing. If it were possible to touch, see, or measure software, it would be easier to analyze and prove its quality. Unfortunately, software is an intangible asset, which makes testing complex. This is especially true when software quality is not a question of particular functions that can be tested through a graphical user interface. The primary objective of software architecture is to design quality of software through modeling and visualization. There are many methods and standards that define how to control and manage quality. However, many IT software development projects still fail due to the difficulties involved in measuring, controlling, and managing software quality. Software quality failure factors are numerous. Examples include beginning to test software too late in the development process, or failing properly to understand, or design, the software architecture and the software component structure. The goal of this article is to provide an interface-based software testing technique that better measures software quality, automates software quality testing, encourages early testing, and increases the software’s overall testability

  13. Graphical User Interface in Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwilt, Ian

    This essay discusses the use of the Graphical User Interface (GUI) as a site of creative practice. By creatively repositioning the GUI as a work of art it is possible to challenge our understanding and expectations of the conventional computer interface wherein the icons and navigational architecture of the GUI no longer function as a technological tool. These artistic recontextualizations are often used to question our engagement with technology and to highlight the pivotal place that the domestic computer has taken in our everyday social, cultural and (increasingly), creative domains. Through these works the media specificity of the screen-based GUI can broken by dramatic changes in scale, form and configuration. This can be seen through the work of new media artists who have re-imagined the GUI in a number of creative forms both, within the digital, as image, animation, net and interactive art, and in the analogue, as print, painting, sculpture, installation and performative event. Furthermore as a creative work, the GUI can also be utilized as a visual way-finder to explore the relationship between the dynamic potentials of the digital and the concretized qualities of the material artifact.

  14. Room temperature cryogenic test interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, S. M.; Davidson, A.; Moskowitz, P. A.; Sai-Halasz, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    This interface permits the testing of high speed semiconductor devices (room-temperature chips) by a Josephson junction sampling device (cryogenic chip) without intolerable loss of resolution. The interface comprises a quartz pass-through plug which includes a planar transmission line interconnecting a first chip station, where the cryogenic chip is mounted, and a second chip station, where the semiconductor chip to be tested is temporarily mounted. The pass-through plug has a cemented long half-cylindrical portion and short half-cylindrical portion. The long portion carries the planar transmission line, the ends of which form the first and second chip mounting stations. The short portion completes the cylinder with the long portion for part of its length, where a seal can be achieved, but does not extend over the chip mounting stations. Sealing is by epoxy cement. The pass-through plug is sealed in place in a flange mounted to the chamber wall. The first chip station, with the cryogenic chip attached, extends into the liquid helium reservoir. The second chip station is in the room temperature environment required for semiconductor operation. Proper semiconductor operating temperature is achieved by a heater wire and control thermocouple in the vicinity of each other and the second chip mounting station. Thermal isolation is maintained by vacuum and seals. Connections for power and control, for test result signals, for temperature control and heating, and for vacuum complete the test apparatus

  15. Interface-based software integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Ahmad Rais

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Enterprise architecture frameworks define the goals of enterprise architecture in order to make business processes and IT operations more effective, and to reduce the risk of future investments. These enterprise architecture frameworks offer different architecture development methods that help in building enterprise architecture. In practice, the larger organizations become, the larger their enterprise architecture and IT become. This leads to an increasingly complex system of enterprise architecture development and maintenance. Application software architecture is one type of architecture that, along with business architecture, data architecture and technology architecture, composes enterprise architecture. From the perspective of integration, enterprise architecture can be considered a system of interaction between multiple examples of application software. Therefore, effective software integration is a very important basis for the future success of the enterprise architecture in question. This article will provide interface-based integration practice in order to help simplify the process of building such a software integration system. The main goal of interface-based software integration is to solve problems that may arise with software integration requirements and developing software integration architecture.

  16. Interface Segregation and Nitrogen Measurement in Fe-Mn-N Steel by Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelier, Brian; Van Landeghem, Hugo P; Botton, Gianluigi A; Zurob, Hatem S

    2017-04-01

    Improved understanding of the interactions between solutes and the austenite/ferrite interface can benefit modeling of ferrite growth during austenite decomposition, as the transformation kinetic is significantly affected by solutes that influence interface mobility. Solute-interface interactions dominate solute segregation at the interface in binary systems, but in multi-component alloys, solute-solute interactions may also affect segregation. In this study, interface segregation in Fe-Mn-N is examined and compared with Fe-Mn-C, to reveal the extent to which C affects the segregation of Mn. Atom probe tomography (APT) is well-suited to analyze solute concentrations across the interface, as this technique combines high spatial resolution and compositional sensitivity. Measurements of Mn show that segregation is only observed for Fe-Mn-C. This demonstrates that Mn segregation is primarily driven by an affinity for C, which also segregates to the interface. However, the measurement of N in steels by APT may be affected by a variety of experimental factors. Therefore, in verifying the Fe-Mn-N result, systematic examination is conducted on the influence of pulsing method (voltage versus laser), sample preparation (ion milling versus electropolishing), and vacuum storage on the measured N concentration. Both laser pulsing and focused ion beam sample preparation are observed to decrease the apparent N concentration.

  17. A user experience case study: two embodied cognition user interface solutions for a math learning game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antero Lindstedt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Game-based learning solutions provide possibilities to teach conceptual number knowledge in engaging ways. The evaluation of user experience and error-proneness of the user interface are crucial in the educational game development process and game-based assessment. In the present study, we investigated how two different user interfaces of the rational number game, Semideus, influenced the game character controlling accuracy and user experience. Two user interfaces varying in the intensity of physical activities needed for controlling the game character were compared. Thirty-six university students played both Semideus game versions for 20 minutes in randomized order.  In order to compare the tilting (low physical intensity and walking (high physical intensity user interfaces we used stealth assessment as an objective measure of controlling accuracy as well as flow experience and playability questionnaires as subjective measures of user experience. The results revealed that there was no significant difference in game controlling accuracy between the user interface solutions, suggesting that the intensity of the physical activities did not influence the error-proneness. However, the subjective measures indicated that students appreciated the tilting user interface significantly more than the walking user interface. Implications of the findings for future research and further development of the Semideus game are discussed.

  18. Clinical use of interface pressure to predict pressure ulcer development: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reenalda, Jasper; Jannink, Michiel; Nederhand, Marc; IJzerman, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a large problem in subjects who use a wheelchair for their mobility. These ulcers originate beneath the bony prominences of the pelvis and progress outward as a consequence of prolonged pressure. Interface pressure is used clinically to predict and prevent pressure ulcers. However, the relation between interface pressure and the development of pressure ulcers is not clear. A systematic review was performed to address the research question of whether interface pressure can be used to predict the development of pressure ulcers or to determine the prognosis of an ulcer once developed. Seven studies were identified that measured interface pressure and used the development or healing of pressure ulcers as an outcome measure. There appears to be a weak qualitative relation between interface pressure and the development of pressure ulcers. However, no conclusive clinical threshold for the interface pressure can be given. This, combined with the influence of individual characteristics, the low internal validity of interface pressure measurement for the prediction of pressure ulcers, and an incongruent relation between pressure magnitude and duration, results in the fact that no quantification of the predictive or prognostic value of interface pressure can be given.

  19. Survey of the problems posed by the man-machine interface, as seen from the angle of facility operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinbuch, R.

    1995-01-01

    The man-machine interface in nuclear power plants is an area very much influenced by the vigorous progress in computer technology. The paper describes the causes underlying the innovative power in this field and its impacts on the man-machine interface in nuclear power plants. The benefits brought by the advanced computer systems in the design of the man-machine interface as well as the problems posed through application in practice to safety-relevant plant systems are discussed, and examples are given showing the experience accumulated so far, and the significant changes effected in the man-machine interface. (orig.) [de

  20. Theory of the Spin Galvanic Effect at Oxide Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibold, Götz; Caprara, Sergio; Grilli, Marco; Raimondi, Roberto

    2017-12-01

    The spin galvanic effect (SGE) describes the conversion of a nonequilibrium spin polarization into a transverse charge current. Recent experiments have demonstrated a large conversion efficiency for the two-dimensional electron gas formed at the interface between two insulating oxides, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 . Here, we analyze the SGE for oxide interfaces within a three-band model for the Ti t2 g orbitals which displays an interesting variety of effective spin-orbit couplings in the individual bands that contribute differently to the spin-charge conversion. Our analytical approach is supplemented by a numerical treatment where we also investigate the influence of disorder and temperature, which turns out to be crucial to providing an appropriate description of the experimental data.

  1. Interactive displays natural human-interface technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Achintya K

    2014-01-01

    One of the first books to provide an in-depth discussion of the technologies, applications and trends in the rapidly emerging field of interactive displays (touch, gesture & voice) The book will cover the technologies, applications and trends in the field of interactive displays, namely interfaces based on touch, gesture and voice and those using a combination of these technologies. The book will be split into 4 main parts with each being dedicated to a specific user interface. Part 1 ''Touch Interfaces'' will provide a review of the currently deployed touch-screen technologies and applications. It will also cover the recent developments towards achieving thinner, lightweight and cost-reduced touch screen panels in the future via integration of touch functionalities. Part 2 ''Gesture Interfaces'' will examine techniques and applications in stereoscopic 3D computer vision, structured-light 3D computer vision and time-of-flight 3D computer vision in gesture interfaces. Part 3 ''Voice Interfaces'' will revie...

  2. Kinetics of protein unfolding at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Yohko F

    2012-01-01

    The conformation of protein molecules is determined by a balance of various forces, including van der Waals attraction, electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding, and conformational entropy. When protein molecules encounter an interface, they are often adsorbed on the interface. The conformation of an adsorbed protein molecule strongly depends on the interaction between the protein and the interface. Recent time-resolved investigations have revealed that protein conformation changes during the adsorption process due to the protein-protein interaction increasing with increasing interface coverage. External conditions also affect the protein conformation. This review considers recent dynamic observations of protein adsorption at various interfaces and their implications for the kinetics of protein unfolding at interfaces. (topical review)

  3. Reliability of thermal interface materials: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due, Jens; Robinson, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal interface materials (TIMs) are used extensively to improve thermal conduction across two mating parts. They are particularly crucial in electronics thermal management since excessive junction-to-ambient thermal resistances can cause elevated temperatures which can negatively influence device performance and reliability. Of particular interest to electronic package designers is the thermal resistance of the TIM layer at the end of its design life. Estimations of this allow the package to be designed to perform adequately over its entire useful life. To this end, TIM reliability studies have been performed using accelerated stress tests. This paper reviews the body of work which has been performed on TIM reliability. It focuses on the various test methodologies with commentary on the results which have been obtained for the different TIM materials. Based on the information available in the open literature, a test procedure is proposed for TIM selection based on beginning and end of life performance. - Highlights: ► This paper reviews the body of work which has been performed on TIM reliability. ► Test methodologies for reliability testing are outlined. ► Reliability results for the different TIM materials are discussed. ► A test procedure is proposed for TIM selection BOLife and EOLife performance.

  4. A topological quantum optics interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Sabyasachi; Karasahin, Aziz; Flower, Christopher; Cai, Tao; Miyake, Hirokazu; DeGottardi, Wade; Hafezi, Mohammad; Waks, Edo

    2018-02-09

    The application of topology in optics has led to a new paradigm in developing photonic devices with robust properties against disorder. Although considerable progress on topological phenomena has been achieved in the classical domain, the realization of strong light-matter coupling in the quantum domain remains unexplored. We demonstrate a strong interface between single quantum emitters and topological photonic states. Our approach creates robust counterpropagating edge states at the boundary of two distinct topological photonic crystals. We demonstrate the chiral emission of a quantum emitter into these modes and establish their robustness against sharp bends. This approach may enable the development of quantum optics devices with built-in protection, with potential applications in quantum simulation and sensing. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  5. Electronic Interfacing with Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James T.

    The direct interfacing of living cells with inorganic electronic materials, components or systems has led to the development of two broad categories of devices that can (1) transduce biochemical signals generated by biological components into electrical signals and (2) transduce electronically generated signals into biochemical signals. The first category of devices permits the monitoring of living cells, the second, enables control of cellular processes. This review will survey this exciting area with emphasis on the fundamental issues and obstacles faced by researchers. Devices and applications that use both prokaryotic (microbial) and eukaryotic (mammalian) cells will be covered. Individual devices described include microbial biofuel cells that produce electricity, bioelectrical reactors that enable electronic control of cellular metabolism, living cell biosensors for the detection of chemicals and devices that permit monitoring and control of mammalian physiology.

  6. Coulombic Fluids Bulk and Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Freyland, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Ionic liquids have attracted considerable interest in recent years. In this book the bulk and interfacial physico-chemical characteristics of various fluid systems dominated by Coulomb interactions are treated which includes molten salts, ionic liquids as well as metal-molten salt mixtures and expanded fluid metals. Of particular interest is the comparison of the different systems. Topics in the bulk phase concern the microscopic structure, the phase behaviour and critical phenomena, and the metal-nonmetal transition. Interfacial phenomena include wetting transitions, electrowetting, surface freezing, and the electrified ionic liquid/ electrode interface. With regard to the latter 2D and 3D electrochemical phase formation of metals and semi-conductors on the nanometer scale is described for a number of selected examples. The basic concepts and various experimental methods are introduced making the book suitable for both graduate students and researchers interested in Coulombic fluids.

  7. [Pathology of the vitreomacular interface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Monica; Gheorghe, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Vitreous role in the pathophysiology of retinal diseases has increased importantly over the recent years. This was possible using Optical Coherence Tomography which reviewed the way the vitreoretinal interface should be looked at and defined and classified new pathologies such as Vitreoretinal Traction Syndrome. Vitreous is not an empty space but an important anatomical structure with role in ocular physiology. With age biochemical changes occur so that vitreous starts to liquefy. Once the vitreous is liquefied (sinchisis) it collapses and passes in the retrohialoid space (sineresis). In complete PVD besides sinchisis there is a weakness of the adherence between the posterior cortex and ILM with total detachment of posterior cortex. Abnormal adhesions are associated with incomplete PVD. The definition and understanting of vitreoretinal pathology is an active and continuous process, PVD being the trigger of a lot of retinal pathologies: epiretinal membrane, macular hole, tractional macular oedema, VMTS, myopic traction maculopathy, exacerbations of exudative ARMD.

  8. Flexible feature interface for multimedia sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffland, Douglas R [Livermore, CA

    2009-06-09

    A flexible feature interface for multimedia sources system that includes a single interface for the addition of features and functions to multimedia sources and for accessing those features and functions from remote hosts. The interface utilizes the export statement: export "C" D11Export void FunctionName(int argc, char ** argv,char * result, SecureSession *ctrl) or the binary equivalent of the export statement.

  9. Surfaces and interfaces of electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Brillson, Leonard J

    2012-01-01

    An advanced level textbook covering geometric, chemical, and electronic structure of electronic materials, and their applications to devices based on semiconductor surfaces, metal-semiconductor interfaces, and semiconductor heterojunctions. Starting with the fundamentals of electrical measurements on semiconductor interfaces, it then describes the importance of controlling macroscopic electrical properties by atomic-scale techniques. Subsequent chapters present the wide range of surface and interface techniques available to characterize electronic, optical, chemical, and structural propertie

  10. On the Nonequilibrium Interface Kinetics of Rapid Coupled Eutectic Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, H.; Chen, Y. Z.; Shan, G. B.; Zhang, Z. R.; Liu, F.

    2017-08-01

    Nonequilibrium interface kinetics (NEIK) is expected to play an important role in coupled growth of eutectic alloys, when solidification velocity is high and intermetallic compound or topologically complex phases form in the crystallized product. In order to quantitatively evaluate the effect of NEIK on the rapid coupled eutectic growth, in this work, two nonequilibrium interface kinetic effects, i.e., atom attachment and solute trapping at the solid-liquid interface, were incorporated into the analyses of the coupled eutectic growth under the rapid solidification condition. First, a coupled growth model incorporating the preceding two nonequilibrium kinetic effects was derived. On this basis, an expression of kinetic undercooling (Δ T k), which is used to characterize the NEIK, was defined. The calculations based on the as-derived couple growth model show good agreement with the reported experimental results achieved in rapidly solidified eutectic Al-Sm alloys consisting of a solid solution phase ( α-Al) and an intermetallic compound phase (Al11Sm3). In terms of the definition of Δ T k defined in this work, the role of NEIK in the coupled growth of the Al-Sm eutectic system was analyzed. The results show that with increasing the coupled growth velocity, Δ T k increases continuously, and its ratio to the total undercooling reaches 0.32 at the maximum growth velocity for coupled eutectic growth. Parametric analyses on two key alloy parameters that influence Δ T k, i.e., interface kinetic parameter ( μ i ) and solute distribution coefficient ( k e ), indicate that both μ i and k e influence the NEIK significantly and the decrease of either these two parameters enhances the NEIK effect.

  11. Elastoplastical Analysis of the Interface between Clay and Concrete Incorporating the Effect of the Normal Stress History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of the soil-structure interface is crucial to the design of a pile foundation. Radial unloading occurs during the process of hole boring and concrete curing, which will affect the load transfer rule of the pile-soil interface. Through large shear tests on the interface between clay and concrete, it can be concluded that the normal stress history significantly influences the shear behaviour of the interface. The numerical simulation of the bored shaft-soil interaction problem requires proper modelling of the interface. By taking the energy accumulated on the interface as a hardening parameter and viewing the shearing process of the interface as the process of the energy dissipated to do work, considering the influence of the normal stress history on the shearing rigidity, a mechanical model of the interface between clay and concrete is proposed. The methods to define the model parameters are also introduced. The model is based on a legible mathematical theory, and all its parameters have definite physical meaning. The model was validated using data from a direct shear test; the validation results indicated that the model can reproduce and predict the mechanical behaviour of the interface between clay and concrete under an arbitrary stress history.

  12. Tengi Interfaces for Tracing between Heterogeneous Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Rolf-Helge; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    , typically general programming languages, provide an interface description mechanism able to specify software com- ponent boundaries. Unfortunately, these interface mechanisms can not express relations for components containing heterogeneous artifacts. We introduce Tengi, a tool that allows...... for the definition of software components containing heterogeneous artifacts. Tengi interfaces link components containing different textual and visual software development artifacts ranging from high-level specification documents to low-level implementation documents. We formally define and implement Tengi...... interfaces, a component algebra and operations on them and present a case study demonstrating Tengi’s capabilities....

  13. A Theoretical Framework for Ecological Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicente, Kim J.; Rasmussen, Jens

    1988-01-01

    of the task require. The EID approach extends the concept of direct manipulation inter-faces by taking into account the added complications introduced by complex systems. In this paper, we describe the development of the framework, its theoretical foundations, and examples of its application to various work......A theoretical framework for designing interfaces for complex systems is de-scribed. The framework, called ecological interface design (EID), suggests a set of principles for designing interfaces in a way that supports the funda-mental properties of human cognition. The basis of EID is the skills...

  14. Polymer surfaces, interfaces and thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamm, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Mainz (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Neutron reflectometry can be used in various ways to investigate surfaces, interfaces and thin films of polymers. Its potential comes mostly from the possibilities offered by selective deuteration, where a particular component can be made visible with respect to its activity at the interface. In addition the depth resolution is much better than with most other direct techniques, and details of the profiles may be resolved. Several examples will be discussed including the segment diffusion at the interface between two polymer films, the determination of the narrow interfaces between incompatible polymer blends and the development of order in thin diblock copolymer films. (author) 10 figs., 2 tabs., 38 refs.

  15. Polymer surfaces, interfaces and thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamm, M.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron reflectometry can be used in various ways to investigate surfaces, interfaces and thin films of polymers. Its potential comes mostly from the possibilities offered by selective deuteration, where a particular component can be made visible with respect to its activity at the interface. In addition the depth resolution is much better than with most other direct techniques, and details of the profiles may be resolved. Several examples will be discussed including the segment diffusion at the interface between two polymer films, the determination of the narrow interfaces between incompatible polymer blends and the development of order in thin diblock copolymer films. (author) 10 figs., 2 tabs., 38 refs

  16. On Building a Search Interface Discovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestakov, Denis

    A huge portion of the Web known as the deep Web is accessible via search interfaces to myriads of databases on the Web. While relatively good approaches for querying the contents of web databases have been recently proposed, one cannot fully utilize them having most search interfaces unlocated. Thus, the automatic recognition of search interfaces to online databases is crucial for any application accessing the deep Web. This paper describes the architecture of the I-Crawler, a system for finding and classifying search interfaces. The I-Crawler is intentionally designed to be used in the deep web characterization surveys and for constructing directories of deep web resources.

  17. An interface energy density-based theory considering the coherent interface effect in nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yin; Chen, Shaohua; Fang, Daining

    2017-02-01

    To characterize the coherent interface effect conveniently and feasibly in nanomaterials, a continuum theory is proposed that is based on the concept of the interface free energy density, which is a dominant factor affecting the mechanical properties of the coherent interface in materials of all scales. The effect of the residual strain caused by self-relaxation and the lattice misfit of nanomaterials, as well as that due to the interface deformation induced by an external load on the interface free energy density is considered. In contrast to the existing theories, the stress discontinuity at the interface is characterized by the interface free energy density through an interface-induced traction. As a result, the interface elastic constant introduced in previous theories, which is not easy to determine precisely, is avoided in the present theory. Only the surface energy density of the bulk materials forming the interface, the relaxation parameter induced by surface relaxation, and the mismatch parameter for forming a coherent interface between the two surfaces are involved. All the related parameters are far easier to determine than the interface elastic constants. The effective bulk and shear moduli of a nanoparticle-reinforced nanocomposite are predicted using the proposed theory. Closed-form solutions are achieved, demonstrating the feasibility and convenience of the proposed model for predicting the interface effect in nanomaterials.

  18. Interface Everywhere: Further Development of a Gesture and Voice Commanding Interface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Natural User Interface (NUI) is a term used to describe a number of technologies such as speech recognition, multi-touch, and kinetic interfaces. Gesture and voice...

  19. Can we totally ignore the effects interface scattering of seismic wave field during inversion processes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasiu, M.

    2003-01-01

    Interface scattering of seismic wavefield is an important phenomenon which affects the phase and/or amplitude of seismic signal and hence the quality of final seismic image. Irregular interface which causes interface scattering are widespread in nature. Practical examples of such are the interfaces between under-compacted mobile shale and sand, salt body and sand, basalt flows etc. This has been known constitute major imagery problem in the past. The weathered zone is a well known scatterer in land seismic data, and it is known to be highly spatially irregular. To be able to understand this phenomenon better, seismic wavefield scattering from a statistically random rough interface in a multi-layered homogeneous medium is studied in 3-D. The influence of surface roughness on the incident wavefield is analyzed numerically by employing a finite difference operator in the acoustic domain. Since interface scattering in real practical sense is a 3-D phenomenon, we showed that the scattering response of a random rough interface is not the same in 3-D situations as compared with 2-D case as described in most earlier works. For a given interface roughness height in 3-D, it requires an interface of at least about three times higher to produce an equivalent phase scattering effect in 2-D situation. We also showed that the phase scattering is not negligible in 3-D when the scale of the surface roughness to the incident wavefield is 1/1 0 as is generally assumed. Based on observation from spectral analysis of synthetic and real seismic data, we showed that interface scattering principally results in de-phasing and frequency band-limiting of the incident wavefield, the frequency band-limiting properties being comparable to cases reported in the literature for absorption and thin layer filtering. This phenomenon should be critically considered when using amplitude and phase information of seismic signal during inversion process

  20. Interfacing superconducting qubits and single optical photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Sumanta; Faez, Sanli; Sørensen, Anders S.

    2016-01-01

    We propose an efficient light-matter interface at optical frequencies between a superconducting qubit and a single photon. The desired interface is based on a hybrid architecture composed of an organic molecule embedded inside an optical waveguide and electrically coupled to a superconducting qubit

  1. An introduction to the COLIN optimization interface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, William Eugene

    2003-03-01

    We describe COLIN, a Common Optimization Library INterface for C++. COLIN provides C++ template classes that define a generic interface for both optimization problems and optimization solvers. COLIN is specifically designed to facilitate the development of hybrid optimizers, for which one optimizer calls another to solve an optimization subproblem. We illustrate the capabilities of COLIN with an example of a memetic genetic programming solver.

  2. Learning Analytics for Natural User Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Maldonado, Roberto; Shum, Simon Buckingham; Schneider, Bertrand; Charleer, Sven; Klerkx, Joris; Duval, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The continuous advancement of natural user interfaces (NUIs) allows for the development\tof novel and creative ways to support collocated collaborative work in a wide range of areas, including teaching and learning. The use of NUIs, such as those based on interactive multi-touch surfaces and tangible user interfaces (TUIs), can offer unique…

  3. Gestures in an Intelligent User Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkert, F.W.; van der Vet, P.E.; Nijholt, Antinus; Shao, Ling; Shan, Caifeng; Luo, Jiebo; Etoh, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter we investigated which hand gestures are intuitive to control a large display multimedia interface from a user’s perspective. Over the course of two sequential user evaluations we defined a simple gesture set that allows users to fully control a large display multimedia interface,

  4. A Smart Material Interfaces Learning Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minuto, A.; Pittarello, Fabio; Nijholt, Antinus

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a learning experience held with a class of primary school children who were introduced to a novel class of resources, named smart materials, and the interfaces built with them (Smart Material Interfaces). The pupils were guided along a multidisciplinary educational path in which

  5. Modeling the electrified solid-liquid interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Skulason, Egill; Björketun, Mårten

    2008-01-01

    A detailed atomistic model based on density functional theory calculations is presented of the charged solid-electrolyte interface. Having protons solvated in a water bilayer outside a Pt(111) slab with excess electrons, we show how the interface capacitance is well described and how the work...

  6. Core-shell particles at fluid interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchcic, C.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of particles as stabilizers for foams and emulsions. Applying hard particles for stabilization of fluid interface is referred to as Pickering stabilization. By using hard particles instead of surfactants and polymers, fluid interfaces can be effectively

  7. Photonics surface waves on metamaterials interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Bogdanov, Andrey; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2017-01-01

    A surface wave (SW) in optics is a light wave, which is supported at an interface of two dissimilar media and propagates along the interface with its field amplitude exponentially decaying away from the boundary. The research on surface waves has been flourishing in last few decades thanks to the...

  8. Coded Schemes for Asymmetric Wireless Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, André; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2015-01-01

    system with full duplex interfaces. Our second goal is to understand the practical implications of these results by designing a protocol for file transmissions, implement it in Android smart phones, and measure its performance when combining various interfaces, including, Bluetooth, WiFi, and 3G cellular...

  9. A Systems Design Course Emphasizing Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental course where students develop a (small) system focusing on the interfaces between different components of the system. The components are developed independently of each other using web based documentation and focusing on techniques for modeling and analysis...... of interfaces. These techniques are supported by prototype tools...

  10. Graphic Interface for LCP2 Optimization Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolae, Taropa Laurentiu; Gaunholt, Hans

    1998-01-01

    This report provides information about the software interface that is programmed for the Optimization Program LCP2. The first part is about the general description of the program followed by a guide for using the interface. The last chapters contain a discussion about problems or futute extensions...

  11. Spent Nuclear Fuel project interface control plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    This implementation process philosophy is in keeping with the ongoing reengineering of the WHC Controlled Manuals to achieve interface control within the SNF Project. This plan applies to all SNF Project sub-project to sub-project, and sub-project to exteranl (both on and off the Hanford Site) interfaces

  12. User Interface Design for Dynamic Geometry Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, Ulrich; Dohrmann, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In this article we describe long-standing user interface issues with Dynamic Geometry Software and common approaches to address them. We describe first prototypes of multi-touch-capable DGS. We also give some hints on the educational benefits of proper user interface design.

  13. An Architectural Experience for Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Susan P.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of human-computer interface design was brought to the foreground with the emergence of the personal computer, the increasing complexity of electronic systems, and the need to accommodate the human operator in these systems. With each new technological generation discovering the interface design problems of its own technologies, initial…

  14. Advanced Stellar Compass, CHAMP, Interface Control Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Betto, Maurizio

    1999-01-01

    The German government research establishment "GeoForschungsZentrum" developed under a contract to the German government a microsatellite named "Champ". The Space Instrumentation Group has made a Interface Control Document for the CHAMP, witch describes the Star Imager, the electrical interface...

  15. Peptide segments in protein-protein interfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2006-09-06

    Sep 6, 2006 ... a living organism – namely, in cellular architecture, signal transduction, biosynthetic and degradation pathways and their regulations, immune response etc. ..... a linear classification scheme. 80% of the homodimeric interfaces lie above the line shown in figure 7 and 91% of the crystal interfaces lie below it.

  16. Characterisation of interfaces in nanocrystalline palladium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Characterisation of interfaces in nanocrystalline palladium. 49. Interface structures in nanocrystalline materials have been the subject of research from the very beginning. The first indication that the structure of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline materials was different was from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of Zhu et al ...

  17. A phase transition for competition interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, P.A.; Martin, J.B.; Pimentel, L.P.R.

    2009-01-01

    We study the competition interface between two growing clusters in a growth model associated to last-passage percolation. When the initial unoccupied set is approximately a cone, we show that this interface has an asymptotic direction with probability 1. The behavior of this direction depends on the

  18. Interface failure by cavity growth to coalescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    For a thin metal layer between ceramics ductile failure by the growth of voids along one of the interfaces is studied numerically. An axisymmetric cell model is used to represent an array of uniformly distributed hemispherical interface voids. The bonding to the ceramics gives rise to highly...

  19. Interface Yang-Mills, supersymmetry, and Janus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Hoker, Eric [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Estes, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gutperle, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)]. E-mail: gutperle@physics.ucla.edu

    2006-10-02

    We consider theories consisting of a planar interface with N=4 super-Yang-Mills on either side and varying gauge coupling across the interface. The interface does not carry any independent degrees of freedom, but is allowed to support local gauge invariant operators, included with independent interface couplings. In general, both conformal symmetry and supersymmetry will be broken, but for special arrangements of the interface couplings, these symmetries may be restored. We provide a systematic classification of all allowed interface supersymmetries. We find new theories preserving eight and four Poincare supersymmetries, which get extended to sixteen and eight supersymmetries in the conformal limit, respectively with SU(2)xSU(2), SO(2)xSU(2) internal symmetry. The Lagrangians for these theories are explicitly constructed. We also recover the theory with two Poincare supersymmetries and SU(3) internal symmetry proposed earlier as a candidate CFT dual to super-Janus. Since our new interface theories have only operators from the supergravity multiplet turned on, dual supergravity solutions are expected to exist. We speculate on the possible relation between the interface theory with maximal supersymmetry and the near-horizon limit of the D3-D5 system.

  20. XML Interfaces to the Internet of Things

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Pemberton (Steven); C Foster

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractThe internet of things is predicated on tiny, cheap, lower power computers being embedded in devices everywhere. However such tiny devices by definition have very little memory and computing power available to support user interfaces or extended servers, and so the user interface

  1. Two-wire Interface for Digital Microphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothedde, Wouter; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram; Eschauzier, Rudolphe Gustave Hubertus; van Rijn, Nico

    2003-01-01

    A two-wire interface for a digital microphone circuit includes a power line and a ground line. The interface utilizes the ground line as a "voltage active line" to transmit both clock and data signals between the digital microphone circuit and a receiving circuit. The digital microphone circuit

  2. Two-Wire interface for digital microphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothedde, Wouter; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram; Eschauzier, Rudolphe Gustave Hubertus; van Rijn, Nico

    2005-01-01

    A two-wire interface for a digital microphone circuit includes a power line and a ground line. The interface utilizes the ground line as a "voltage active line" to transmit both clock and data signals between the digital microphone circuit and a receiving circuit. The digital microphone circuit

  3. A Study of Failure Strength for Fiber-Reinforced Composite Laminates with Consideration of Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite laminates can exhibit the nonlinear properties due to the fiber/matrix interface debonding and matrix plastic deformation. In this paper, by incorporating the interface stress-displacement relations between fibers and matrix, as well as the viscoplastic constitutive model for describing plastic behaviors of matrix materials, a micromechanical model is used to investigate the failure strength of the composites with imperfect interface bonding. Meanwhile, the classic laminate theory, which provides the relation between micro- and macroscale responses for composite laminates, is employed. Theory results show good consistency with the experimental data under unidirectional tensile conditions at both 23°C and 650°C. On this basis, the interface debonding influences on the failure strength of the [0/90]s and [0/±45/90]s composite laminates are studied. The numerical results show that all of the unidirectional (UD laminates with imperfect interface bonding provide a sharp decrease in failure strength in the σxx-σyy plane at 23°C. However, the decreasing is restricted in some specific region. In addition, for [0/90]s and [0/±45/90]s composite laminates, the debonding interface influences on the failure envelope can be ignored when the working temperature is increased to 650°C.

  4. Design and Realization of Universal Data Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Woo Kim

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available KARI studied data interface of Space Applications for developing Space Experimental Instrument in International Space Station, designed, and manufactured the UDIS (International Sapce Station Universal Data Interface simulator according to requirements of the data interface. This paper explains the design and implementation of UDIS for space application. UDIS is the instrument which simulate to interface the data from ISS to experiment module, payload and habitation module and use the development of a experiment system in the space. This simulator will be used to the GSE (Ground Support Equipment for test of experiment system. By realization of the simulator, we ensure data interface skills for a manned-space data communication system.

  5. [Interfaces in outpatient and inpatient rheumatological treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, E

    2014-08-01

    In healthcare the term interface describes the communication and the sharing of responsibilities between different aspects of medical care und the different professional groups in medicine. It enables cooperation without conflicts and can contribute to an improvement of healthcare and reduce healthcare costs. The postgraduate professional education, medical guidelines and therapy recommendations are an important basis for the definition of interfaces. The definition of such an interface between different healthcare groups is essential for the implementation of selective contracts with health insurance companies. An appropriate health care interface between general practitioners and rheumatologists has been defined as well as between hospital and ambulant rheumatology treatment. The division of responsibilities between orthopedists and rheumatologists is still under discussion. A proposal for such an interface from the point of view of rheumatology is presented.

  6. Integrating interface slicing into software engineering processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jon

    1993-01-01

    Interface slicing is a tool which was developed to facilitate software engineering. As previously presented, it was described in terms of its techniques and mechanisms. The integration of interface slicing into specific software engineering activities is considered by discussing a number of potential applications of interface slicing. The applications discussed specifically address the problems, issues, or concerns raised in a previous project. Because a complete interface slicer is still under development, these applications must be phrased in future tenses. Nonetheless, the interface slicing techniques which were presented can be implemented using current compiler and static analysis technology. Whether implemented as a standalone tool or as a module in an integrated development or reverse engineering environment, they require analysis no more complex than that required for current system development environments. By contrast, conventional slicing is a methodology which, while showing much promise and intuitive appeal, has yet to be fully implemented in a production language environment despite 12 years of development.

  7. Potential Interface Issues in Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-10-01

    This publication is an output of a series of meetings to identify and evaluate issues and opportunities associated with interfaces in the back end of the fuel cycle (BEFC) and to describe effective management approaches based on the experience of Member States. During the meetings, participants from Member States and other international organizations shared and evaluated the main interfaces and potential interface issues among the spent fuel storage, transport, reprocessing and disposal of the BEFC, and also reviewed the national approaches to addressing these issues. The aim of this publication is to provide an approach to identify the interfaces in the BEFC as well as the potential issues that should be addressed. It also aims at responding to the solutions Member States most often find to be effective and, in some cases, were adjusted or revisited to reach the fixed target. Most of the interfaces and issues are country specific, as evidenced by the variety and diversity of examples provided in this publication

  8. Analysis of the interface tracking errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerne, G.; Tiselj, I.; Petelin, S.

    2001-01-01

    An important limitation of the interface-tracking algorithm is the grid density, which determines the space scale of the surface tracking. In this paper the analysis of the interface tracking errors, which occur in a dispersed flow, is performed for the VOF interface tracking method. A few simple two-fluid tests are proposed for the investigation of the interface tracking errors and their grid dependence. When the grid density becomes too coarse to follow the interface changes, the errors can be reduced either by using denser nodalization or by switching to the two-fluid model during the simulation. Both solutions are analyzed and compared on a simple vortex-flow test.(author)

  9. Interface properties of superlattices with artificially broken symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lottermoser, Th.; Yamada, H.; Matsuno, J.; Arima, T.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We have used superlattices made of thin layers of transition metal oxides to design the so-called multiferroics, i.e. materials possessing simultaneously an electric polarization and a magnetic ordering. The polarization originates from the asymmetric stacking order accompanied by charge transfer effects, while the latter one also influences the magnetic properties of the interfaces. Due to the breaking of space and time-reversal symmetry by multiple ordering mechanism magnetic second harmonic generation is proven to be an ideal method to investigate the electric and magnetic properties of the superlattices

  10. Impact of mental representational systems on design interface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S. A.

    1998-02-25

    The purpose of the studies conducted at Argonne National Laboratory is to understand the impact mental representational systems have in identifying how user comfort parameters influence how information is to best be presented. By understanding how each individual perceives information based on the three representational systems (visual, auditory and kinesthetic modalities), it has been found that a different approach must be taken in the design of interfaces resulting in an outcome that is much more effective and representative of the users mental model. This paper will present current findings and future theories to be explored.

  11. Exploring Interface Problems in Taiwan’s Construction Projects Using Structural Equation Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Liang Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Construction projects are complex systems that inherently contain complex interface problems. This study explored the root causes of interface problems in construction projects using structural equation modeling. This technique is a systematic approach that combines factor analysis and path analysis to investigate the causal relationships among multidimensional factors. The literature on construction interface problems was reviewed, and a questionnaire survey was conducted in Taiwan to identify 27 initial factors that cause interface problems in three dimensions: owner, design, and construction. Then, a series of structural equation models (SEMs was developed to further explore the root causes of the interface problems and their causal relationships. This study has three main findings: (1 poor design causes interface problems; (2 ineffective communication and coordination among the owner, design, and construction dimensions are the main factors that cause construction interface problems; and (3 a lack of communication and coordination has a greater influence on the construction dimension than on the owner and design dimensions. The above findings can be used as important references and sustainable management strategies for academia and decision-makers in the construction industry.

  12. Interface width effect on the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the weakly nonlinear regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Li, Y. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the interface width effects (i.e., the density gradient effects or the density transition layer effects) on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in the weakly nonlinear (WN) regime are investigated by numerical simulation (NS). It is found that the interface width effects dramatically influence the linear growth rate in the linear growth regime and the mode coupling process in the WN growth regime. First, the interface width effects decrease the linear growth rate of the RTI, particularly for the short perturbation wavelengths. Second, the interface width effects suppress (reduce) the third-order feedback to the fundamental mode, which induces the nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) to exceed the classical prediction, 0.1λ. The wider the density transition layer is, the larger the NSA is. The NSA in our NS can reach a half of its perturbation wavelength. Finally, the interface width effects suppress the generation and the growth of the second and the third harmonics. The ability to suppress the harmonics' growth increases with the interface width but decreases with the perturbation wavelength. On the whole, in the WN regime, the interface width effects stabilize the RTI, except for an enhancement of the NSA, which is expected to improve the understanding of the formation mechanism for the astrophysical jets, and for the jetlike long spikes in the high energy density physics.

  13. Participatory Heuristic Evaluation of the Second Iteration of the eWALL Interface Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangaard, Stine; Schaarup, Clara; Hejlesen, Ole K

    2016-01-01

    The number of people having a chronic disease is increasing. Telehealth may provide an alternative to traditional medicine as telehealth solutions have shown to have a positive influence on quality of live and to decrease the number of hospital visits. A new telehealth solution is the eWALL system. Previously, the eWALL interface application has been evaluated using participatory heuristic evaluation (PHE). The previous round of PHE lead to drastic changes of the eWALL interface application. Consequently, a second round of PHE was performed. Five usability experts and two work-domain professionals inspected the eWALL interface application and identified usability problems (n = 384). The work domain professionals had a tendency to use other heuristics than the usability experts highlighting the relevance of using PHE in an interface development process.

  14. An immersed interface method for the Vortex-In-Cell algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgenthal, G.; Walther, Jens Honore

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents a two-dimensional immersed interface for the Vortex-In-Cell (VIC) method for simulation of flows past bodies of complex geometry. The particle-mesh VIC algorithm is augmented by a local particle correction term in a Particle-Particle Particle-Mesh (P3M) context to resolve sub......-grid scales incurred by the presence of the immersed interface. The particle-particle correction furthermore allows to disjoin mesh and particle resolution by explicitly resolving sub-grid scales on the paticle. This P3M algorithm uses an influence matrix technique to annihilate the anisotropic sub...... sufficiently distant from the emmersed interfaces, thus maintaining a sufficient spatial representation of the vorticity field. Convergence of the present P3M algorithm is demonstrated for a circulat patch of vorticity. The immersed interface tchnique is applied to the flow past a circular cylinder...

  15. Characteristic features of heterophase polymerisation of styrene with simultaneous formation of surfactants at the interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokopov, Nikolai I; Gritskova, Inessa A

    2001-01-01

    Data on the heterophase polymerisation of styrene under conditions of surfactant formation at the monomer-water interface are generalised. A new, in principle, approach is proposed the essence of which is to obtain a monomer emulsion simultaneously with the synthesis of an emulsifier at the monomer-water interface and with initiation of the polymerisation in the interfacial layer. The preparation of surfactants at the interface allows one to control efficiently the degree of dispersion and the stability of the emulsions formed. By varying the nature of the acid and the metal counter-ion used in the surfactant synthesis at the interface, it is possible to change the interfacial tension, to influence the microemulsification, disintegration of the monomer, and the formation of structure of interfacial adsorption layers. The mechanism of formation of polymer-monomeric particles as well as their diameter and size distribution depend substantially on the solubility of the resulting surfactants in water. The bibliography includes 47 references.

  16. Characteristic features of heterophase polymerisation of styrene with simultaneous formation of surfactants at the interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopov, Nikolai I; Gritskova, Inessa A [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State Academy of Fine Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-09-30

    Data on the heterophase polymerisation of styrene under conditions of surfactant formation at the monomer-water interface are generalised. A new, in principle, approach is proposed the essence of which is to obtain a monomer emulsion simultaneously with the synthesis of an emulsifier at the monomer-water interface and with initiation of the polymerisation in the interfacial layer. The preparation of surfactants at the interface allows one to control efficiently the degree of dispersion and the stability of the emulsions formed. By varying the nature of the acid and the metal counter-ion used in the surfactant synthesis at the interface, it is possible to change the interfacial tension, to influence the microemulsification, disintegration of the monomer, and the formation of structure of interfacial adsorption layers. The mechanism of formation of polymer-monomeric particles as well as their diameter and size distribution depend substantially on the solubility of the resulting surfactants in water. The bibliography includes 47 references.

  17. Water-mediated energy transport and structure across a protein-protein interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, David

    2010-03-01

    Water molecules embedded within proteins or at the interface between globules play a central role in folding and function. We discuss the influence of interfacial water molecules on energy transport and structure, specifically the role of water at the interface between the two globules of the homodimeric hemoglobin from Scapharca inaequivalvis, which binds oxygen cooperatively. We have studied the water-mediated energy transport in this protein with communication maps and nonequilibrium molecular simulations of energy flow, which reveal the disproportionate amount of energy carried by the water molecules, particularly across the interface, i.e., a larger thermal conductivity of the interfacial waters compared with other parts of the protein, promoting hydrogen bond rearrangements at the interface.

  18. Discrete Kalman Filter based Sensor Fusion for Robust Accessibility Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghersi, I; Miralles, M T; Mariño, M

    2016-01-01

    Human-machine interfaces have evolved, benefiting from the growing access to devices with superior, embedded signal-processing capabilities, as well as through new sensors that allow the estimation of movements and gestures, resulting in increasingly intuitive interfaces. In this context, sensor fusion for the estimation of the spatial orientation of body segments allows to achieve more robust solutions, overcoming specific disadvantages derived from the use of isolated sensors, such as the sensitivity of magnetic-field sensors to external influences, when used in uncontrolled environments. In this work, a method for the combination of image-processing data and angular-velocity registers from a 3D MEMS gyroscope, through a Discrete-time Kalman Filter, is proposed and deployed as an alternate user interface for mobile devices, in which an on-screen pointer is controlled with head movements. Results concerning general performance of the method are presented, as well as a comparative analysis, under a dedicated test application, with results from a previous version of this system, in which the relative-orientation information was acquired directly from MEMS sensors (3D magnetometer-accelerometer). These results show an improved response for this new version of the pointer, both in terms of precision and response time, while keeping many of the benefits that were highlighted for its predecessor, giving place to a complementary method for signal acquisition that can be used as an alternative-input device, as well as for accessibility solutions. (paper)

  19. Dynamic Stabilization of Metal Oxide–Water Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBriarty, Martin E.; von Rudorff, Guido Falk; Stubbs, Joanne; Eng, Peter; Blumberger, Jochen; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2017-02-08

    Metal oxide growth, dissolution, and redox reactivity depend on the structure and dynamics at the interface with aqueous solution. We present the most definitive analysis to date of the hydrated naturally abundant r-cut (11$\\bar{0}$2) termination of the iron oxide hematite (α-Fe2O3). In situ synchrotron X-ray scattering analysis reveals a ridged lateral arrangement of adsorbed water molecules hydrogen bonded to terminal aquo groups. Large-scale hybrid-functional density functional theory-based molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations show how this structure is dynamically stabilized by picosecond exchange between aquo groups and adsorbed water, even under nominally dry conditions. Surface pKa prediction based on bond valence analysis suggests that water exchange may influence the proton transfer reactions associated with acid/base reactivity at the interface. Our findings rectify inconsistencies between existing models and may be extended to resolving more complex electrochemical phenomena at metal oxide-water interfaces.

  20. Thermal coupling at aqueous and biomolecular interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenogina, Natalia B.

    Heat flow in the materials with nanoscopic features is dominated by thermal properties of the interfaces. While thermal properties of the solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces are well studied, research of the thermal transport properties across soft (liquid-liquid) interfaces is very limited. Such interfaces are, however, plentiful in biological systems. In such systems the temperature control is of a great importance, because biochemical reactions, conformation of biomolecules as well as processes in biological cells and membranes have strong temperature sensitivity. The critical ingredient to temperature control in biological systems is the understanding of heat flow and thermal coupling across soft interfaces. To investigate heat transfer across biological and aqueous interfaces we chose to study a number of soft interfacial systems by means of molecular dynamic simulations. One of the interfaces under our investigation is the interface between protein (specifically green fluorescent protein) and water. Using this model we concentrated on the importance of vibrational frequency on coupling between water and proteins, and on significant differences between the roles of low and high frequency vibrations. Our thermal interfacial analysis allowed us to shed new light on to the issue of protein to water slaving, i.e., the concept of water controlling protein dynamics. Considering that the surface of the protein is composed of a complicated mixture of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains, to systematically explore the role of interfacial interactions we studied less complicated models with homogenous interfaces whith interfacial chemistry that could be changed in a controlled manner. We demonstrated that thermal transport measurements can be used to probe interfacial environments and to quantify interfacial bonding strength. Such ability provides a unique opportunity to characterize a variety of interfaces, which can be difficult to achieve with more direct

  1. Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, H.Y.

    2012-02-16

    spin operator changes sign with T-operation. (iii) Gauge symmetry (G), which is associated with a change in the phase of the wave-function as {Psi} {yields} e{sup i{theta}}{Psi}. Gauge symmetry is connected to the law of charge conservation, and broken G-symmetry corresponds to superconductivity/superfluidity. To summarize, the interplay among these electronic degrees of freedom produces various forms of symmetry breaking patterns of I, T, and G, leading to novel emergent phenomena, which can appear only by the collective behavior of electrons and cannot be expected from individual electrons. Figure 1 shows this schematically by means of several representative phenomena. From this viewpoint, the interfaces of TMOs offer a unique and important laboratory because I is already broken by the structure itself, and the detailed form of broken I-symmetry can often be designed. Also, two-dimensionality usually enhances the effects of electron correlations by reducing their kinetic energy. These two features of oxide interfaces produce many novel effects and functions that cannot be attained in bulk form. Given that the electromagnetic responses are a major source of the physical properties of solids, and new gauge structures often appear in correlated electronic systems, we put 'emergent electromagnetism' at the center of Fig. 1.

  2. High Integrity Can Design Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaber, E.L.

    1998-01-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is chartered with facilitating the disposition of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel to allow disposal at a geologic repository. This is done through coordination with the repository program and by assisting DOE Site owners of SNF with needed information, standardized requirements, packaging approaches, etc. The High Integrity Can (HIC) will be manufactured to provide a substitute or barrier enhancement for normal fuel geometry and cladding. The can would be nested inside the DOE standardized canister which is designed to interface with the repository waste package. The HIC approach may provide the following benefits over typical canning approaches for DOE SNF. (a) It allows ready calculation and management of criticality issues for miscellaneous. (b) It segments and further isolates damaged or otherwise problem materials from normal SNF in the repository package. (c) It provides a very long term corrosion barrier. (d) It provides an extra internal pressure barrier for particulates, gaseous fission products, hydrogen, and water vapor. (e) It delays any potential release of fission products to the repository environment. (f) It maintains an additional level of fuel geometry control during design basis accidents, rock-fall, and seismic events. (g) When seal welded, it could provide the additional containment required for shipments involving plutonium content in excess of 20 Ci. (10 CFR 71.63.b) if integrated with an appropriate cask design. Long term corrosion protection is central to the HIC concept. The material selected for the HIC (Hastelloy C-22) has undergone extensive testing for repository service. The most severe theoretical interactions between iron, repository water containing chlorides and other repository construction materials have been tested. These expected chemical species have not been shown capable of corroding the selected HIC material. Therefore, the HIC should provide a significant barrier to DOE SNF dispersal

  3. Apple cuticle: the perfect interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Eric; Arey, Bruce

    2010-06-01

    The domestic apple might well be called an 'extreme' fruit. In the arid Northwest United States, the fruit often tolerates surface temperatures ranging from -2 °C in the early spring to 50 °C in the heat of summer, and again to -2 °C during controlled postharvest storage for up to 12 months. During its 18-month existence, the apple maintains a cuticle that is dynamic and environmentally responsive to protect against 1) cellular water loss during desiccation stress and 2) excessive uptake of standing surface moisture. Physiological disorders of the peel such as russeting, cracking, splitting, flecking and lenticel marking, develop as epidermal cells respond to rapid changes in ambient conditions at specific developmental stages during the growing season. Resultant market losses underlie research investigating the nature of apple cuticle growth and development. Ultrastructural analysis of the pro-cuticle using scanning electron microscopy indicates an overlapping network of lipid-based distally-elongating microtubules--produced by and connected to epidermal cells--which co-polymerize to form an organic solvent-insoluble semi-permeable cutin matrix. Microtubule elongation, aggregation, and polymerization function together as long as the fruit continues to enlarge. The nature of lipid transport from the epidermal cells through the cell wall to become part of the cuticular matrix was explored using an FEI Helios NanoLabTM DualBeamTM focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope on chemically- and cryo-fixed peel tissue from mature or freshly harvested apples. Based on microtubule dimensions, regular projections found at the cell/cuticle interface suggest an array of microtubule-like structures associated with the epidermal cell.

  4. Chandra Source Catalog: User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Nina; Evans, Ian N.; Rots, Arnold H.; Tibbetts, Michael S.; van Stone, David W.; Zografou, Panagoula; Primini, Francis A.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Anderson, Craig S.; Chen, Judy C.; Davis, John E.; Doe, Stephen M.; Evans, Janet D.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G., II; Grier, John D.; Hain, Roger; Hall, Diane M.; Harbo, Peter N.; He, Helen; Houck, John C.; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L.; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Miller, Joseph B.; Mitschang, Arik W.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Mossman, Amy E.; Nichols, Joy S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Plummer, David A.; Refsdal, Brian L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta L.; Sundheim, Beth A.; Winkelman, Sherry L.

    2009-09-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is intended to be the definitive catalog of all X-ray sources detected by Chandra. For each source, the CSC provides positions and multi-band fluxes, as well as derived spatial, spectral, and temporal source properties. Full-field and source region data products are also available, including images, photon event lists, light curves, and spectra. The Chandra X-ray Center CSC website (http://cxc.harvard.edu/csc/) is the place to visit for high-level descriptions of each source property and data product included in the catalog, along with other useful information, such as step-by-step catalog tutorials, answers to FAQs, and a thorough summary of the catalog statistical characterization. Eight categories of detailed catalog documents may be accessed from the navigation bar on most of the 50+ CSC pages; these categories are: About the Catalog, Creating the Catalog, Using the Catalog, Catalog Columns, Column Descriptions, Documents, Conferences, and Useful Links. There are also prominent links to CSCview, the CSC data access GUI, and related help documentation, as well as a tutorial for using the new CSC/Google Earth interface. Catalog source properties are presented in seven scientific categories, within two table views: the Master Source and Source Observations tables. Each X-ray source has one ``master source'' entry and one or more ``source observation'' entries, the details of which are documented on the CSC ``Catalog Columns'' pages. The master source properties represent the best estimates of the properties of a source; these are extensively described on the following pages of the website: Position and Position Errors, Source Flags, Source Extent and Errors, Source Fluxes, Source Significance, Spectral Properties, and Source Variability. The eight tutorials (``threads'') available on the website serve as a collective guide for accessing, understanding, and manipulating the source properties and data products provided by the catalog.

  5. Innovative interfaces for Serious Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marco

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The tangible interaction approach has, in recent years, become a promising alternative to tactile interaction for very young children. Children playing with Tangible User Interfaces (TUI are motivated by the novel and digital environment and benefit from the same values as conventional physical playing. Young children build their mental image of the world through action and motor responses and, with physical handling, they become conscious of reality. Within TUIs, digitally augmented surfaces (interactive blackboards and tabletops are becoming popular in educative environments. Tabletop devices are horizontal surfaces capable of supporting interaction and image feedback on their surface, and are especially interesting for reinforcing face-to-face social relations and group activities. However, most of current children-oriented applications for tabletops are based on tactile interaction, thus losing the benefits of physical playing. The paper describes our experiences building tangible tabletops, and designing tangible games and toys. In particular, we present NIKVision, a tabletop device intended to give leisure and fun while reinforcing physical manipulation and colocated gaming for 3-6 year old children. Several hybrid (physical/digital games based on the manipulation of passive and active toys have been developed for NIKVision. From our experience several useful lessons can be extracted. Among them, the necessity of bridging the gap between designers and developers making it easier the prototyping of tabletop games stands out. To tackle this difficulty a toolkit for the prototyping of tabletop games called ToyVision has been created. The toolkit supports designers to fully explore the physical feasibilities of the manipulation of physical playing pieces, while minimizing the technical difficulties of implementing tabletop games based on physical manipulation. This way, NIKVision and ToyVision are becoming powerful tools to develop innovative

  6. High Integrity Can Design Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaber, E.L.

    1998-08-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is chartered with facilitating the disposition of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel to allow disposal at a geologic repository. This is done through coordination with the repository program and by assisting DOE Site owners of SNF with needed information, standardized requirements, packaging approaches, etc. The High Integrity Can (HIC) will be manufactured to provide a substitute or barrier enhancement for normal fuel geometry and cladding. The can would be nested inside the DOE standardized canister which is designed to interface with the repository waste package. The HIC approach may provide the following benefits over typical canning approaches for DOE SNF. (a) It allows ready calculation and management of criticality issues for miscellaneous. (b) It segments and further isolates damaged or otherwise problem materials from normal SNF in the repository package. (c) It provides a very long term corrosion barrier. (d) It provides an extra internal pressure barrier for particulates, gaseous fission products, hydrogen, and water vapor. (e) It delays any potential release of fission products to the repository environment. (f) It maintains an additional level of fuel geometry control during design basis accidents, rock-fall, and seismic events. (g) When seal welded, it could provide the additional containment required for shipments involving plutonium content in excess of 20 Ci. (10 CFR 71.63.b) if integrated with an appropriate cask design. Long term corrosion protection is central to the HIC concept. The material selected for the HIC (Hastelloy C-22) has undergone extensive testing for repository service. The most severe theoretical interactions between iron, repository water containing chlorides and other repository construction materials have been tested. These expected chemical species have not been shown capable of corroding the selected HIC material. Therefore, the HIC should provide a significant barrier to DOE SNF dispersal

  7. Role of wall-attached structures in the interface of the quiescent core region in turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jongmin; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2017-11-01

    The effects of low- and high-speed structures on the interface of the quiescent core region are explored using direct numerical simulation data of turbulent pipe flow. The quiescent core region is a uniform momentum zone located at the center of the pipe flow, which contains the highest streamwise momentum with a low level of turbulence. The interface of the quiescent core region can be identified from the probability density function of the streamwise modal velocity. In the vicinity of the interface of the quiescent core region, the streamwise velocity changes abruptly. The abrupt jump in velocity causes an increase of the velocity gradient. The interface of the quiescent core region is similar to the laminar superlayer in turbulent/non-turbulent interface. The interface of the quiescent core region contains the low- and high-speed structures. They can be classified into wall-attached and detached structures depending on the distance between the structures and the wall. The influence of the detached structures accounted for most of the number of detected structures is negligible due to its small volume. Conversely, the wall-attached structures adjacent to the interface have a huge influence on the statistical amount of the interface, such as entrainment characteristics. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2017-013369) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  8. The effect of interface anisotropy on demagnetization progress in perpendicularly oriented hard/soft exchange-coupled multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Chen, Jun; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Guoping; Ma, Qiang

    2017-06-27

    The demagnetization progress of various hard/soft multilayers with perpendicular crystalline anisotropy has been studied by a micromagnetic model, incorporating the effect of the interface anisotropy, which is evident on the nucleation field when the soft layer thickness is small. Both microscopic and macroscopic hysteresis loops as well as angular distributions for the magnetizations in the thickness direction have been calculated, taking into account of realistic values of the interface anisotropy. The formula for the nucleation field has been derived analytically, where the nucleation field increases linearly with the interface anisotropy for a wide thickness region. While the nucleation field could change by more than 90% due to the influence of the interface anisotropy, the interface anisotropy has no effect on the pinning field or the coercivity, but it has some slight influence on the angular distributions. On the other hand, positive interface anisotropy enhances the remanence and the energy products, whereas negative interface anisotropy deteriorates both of them. Comparison with the experimental data justifies our calculation, indicating that negative interface anisotropy should be avoided in the experiment.

  9. Invasive Intraneural Interfaces: Foreign Body Reaction Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorenza Lotti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Intraneural interfaces are stimulation/registration devices designed to couple the peripheral nervous system (PNS with the environment. Over the last years, their use has increased in a wide range of applications, such as the control of a new generation of neural-interfaced prostheses. At present, the success of this technology is limited by an electrical impedance increase, due to an inflammatory response called foreign body reaction (FBR, which leads to the formation of a fibrotic tissue around the interface, eventually causing an inefficient transduction of the electrical signal. Based on recent developments in biomaterials and inflammatory/fibrotic pathologies, we explore and select the biological solutions that might be adopted in the neural interfaces FBR context: modifications of the interface surface, such as organic and synthetic coatings; the use of specific drugs or molecular biology tools to target the microenvironment around the interface; the development of bio-engineered-scaffold to reduce immune response and promote interface-tissue integration. By linking what we believe are the major crucial steps of the FBR process with related solutions, we point out the main issues that future research has to focus on: biocompatibility without losing signal conduction properties, good reproducible in vitro/in vivo models, drugs exhaustion and undesired side effects. The underlined pros and cons of proposed solutions show clearly the importance of a better understanding of all the molecular and cellular pathways involved and the need of a multi-target action based on a bio-engineered combination approach.

  10. The utility perspective on the transportation interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Describing interface between the transportation system and the operating plants, the author thinks there are really three, interrelated dimensions to the interface; the technical; physical interface; the business (i.e. economic) interface; and the institutional interface. A principal mission of the Nuclear Transportation Group is to help assure that these interfaces are smoothly bridged and that the resources of the utility industry are brought to bear to achieve this result. The physical interface is the most readily understood. The analysis must also consider the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) radiation exposure evaluation of the waste system design and operation. ALARA evaluations of the waste system design and operation. ALARA evaluations must be done on a systems basis to ensure that the effects of particular designs that may be beneficial in some aspects of the system do not adversely impact nuclear power plant workers or operations. Regardless of one's political persuasion or technical training, the author doesn't think there is any question that spent fuel must be moved, sooner or later, somewhere. It's in the best interests of all that those shipments be made safely, and economically, with the proper attention to doing it right and not needlessly wasting resources, including money

  11. Continuous Modeling Technique of Fiber Pullout from a Cement Matrix with Different Interface Mechanical Properties Using Finite Element Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Ferreira Friedrich

    Full Text Available Abstract Fiber-matrix interface performance has a great influence on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composite. This influence is mainly presented during fiber pullout from the matrix. As fiber pullout process consists of fiber debonding stage and pullout stage which involve complex contact problem, numerical modeling is a best way to investigate the interface influence. Although many numerical research works have been conducted, practical and effective technique suitable for continuous modeling of fiber pullout process is still scarce. The reason is in that numerical divergence frequently happens, leading to the modeling interruption. By interacting the popular finite element program ANSYS with the MATLAB, we proposed continuous modeling technique and realized modeling of fiber pullout from cement matrix with desired interface mechanical performance. For debonding process, we used interface elements with cohesive surface traction and exponential failure behavior. For pullout process, we switched interface elements to spring elements with variable stiffness, which is related to the interface shear stress as a function of the interface slip displacement. For both processes, the results obtained are very good in comparison with other numerical or analytical models and experimental tests. We suggest using the present technique to model toughening achieved by randomly distributed fibers.

  12. Risk-informed, performance-based safety-security interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrowca, B.; Eltawila, F.

    2012-01-01

    Safety-security interface is a term that is used as part of the commercial nuclear power security framework to promote coordination of the many potentially adverse interactions between plant security and plant safety. Its object is to prevent the compromise of either. It is also used to describe the concept of building security into a plant's design similar to the long standing practices used for safety therefore reducing the complexity of the operational security while maintaining or enhancing overall security. With this in mind, the concept of safety-security interface, when fully implemented, can influence a plant's design, operation and maintenance. It brings the approach use for plant security to one that is similar to that used for safety. Also, as with safety, the application of risk-informed techniques to fully implement and integrate safety and security is important. Just as designers and operators have applied these techniques to enhance and focus safety, these same techniques can be applied to security to not only enhance and focus the security but also to aid in the implementation of effective techniques to address the safety-security interfaces. Implementing this safety-security concept early within the design process can prevent or reduce security vulnerabilities through low cost solutions that often become difficult and expensive to retrofit later in the design and/or post construction period. These security considerations address many of the same issues as safety in ensuring that the response of equipment and plant personnel are adequate. That is, both safety and security are focused on reaching safe shutdown and preventing radiological release. However, the initiation of challenges and the progression of actions in response these challenges and even the definitions of safe shutdown can be considerably different. This paper explores the techniques and limitations that are employed to fully implement a risk-informed, safety

  13. Radiation Effects in Interfaces and Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairov, Alexander

    One of the key approaches to developing materials with greater radiation damage resistance is to introduce a large fraction of internal interfaces. Interfaces act as sinks for recombination of radiation-induced defects and as sites for accumulation of helium bubbles, thereby diverting them away from grain boundaries, where they can induce embrittlement. The beneficial role of interfaces in mitigating radiation damage has been demonstrated in nanoscale multilayered structures and in nanograined materials. Another more common example is oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) where a fine distribution of particles (clusters) of varying stoichiometries (e.g., Y2Ti2O7, Y2TiO 5, Y2O3, TiO2 and Y-Ti-O non-stoichiometric oxides) not only confer high creep strength, but also high radiation damage tolerance due to the large area of metal/oxide interfaces. However, the efficacy of these interfaces to act as defect sinks depends on their compositional and physical stability under radiation. With this background, this work focused on the stability of interfaces between Ti, TiO2, and Y2O 3 thin film deposited on Fe-12%Cr substrates after irradiation with 5MeV Ni+2 ions at various temperatures. TEM and STEM-EDS methods were used to understand the compositional changes at the interfaces. Additionally, accumulation of implanted helium at epitaxial and non-epitaxial Fe/Y 2O3 interfaces was also studied. Finally, the study was extended to study irradiation effects (up to 150 dpa) in novel Al2O 3 nanoceramic films with immediate potential applications as coatings for corrosion protection in the harsh high temperature environments of Gen IV reactors. This research is expected to have implications in the development of radiation damage tolerant nanostructured alloys for nuclear reactors while also expanding the scientific knowledge-base in the area of radiation stability of interfaces in solids and protective coatings.

  14. Mixed mode fracture of dental interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahbar, Nima; Yang, Yong; Soboyejo, Winston

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined experimental and computational study of mixed mode fracture in glass/cement and zirconia/cement interfaces that are relevant to dental restorations. The interfacial fracture is investigated using Brazil-nut specimens. The kinking in-and-out of the interface that occurs between glass/cement and zirconia/cement interfaces, is also shown to be consistent with predictions from a microstructure-based finite element model. The predictions later verified using focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy images

  15. 200 Area TEDF interface control document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.J.; Hildebrand, R.A.

    1994-11-15

    Because the TEDF does not have any treatment or retention capacity, strict control at the generator interface is essential to operate the TEDF in compliance with good engineering practices, Hanford site requirements, and the 216 Discharge Permit. The information in the Interface Control Document (ICD) forms the basis of understanding between all parties involved in the TEDF; DOE, WHC, and the generating facilities. The ICD defines the controlling document hierarchy; LEF, and generator responsibilities; monitoring and sampling requirements; and specifies the TEDF/Generator Interface points.

  16. Diffuse-Interface Methods in Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. M.; McFadden, G. B.; Wheeler, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    The authors review the development of diffuse-interface models of hydrodynamics and their application to a wide variety of interfacial phenomena. The authors discuss the issues involved in formulating diffuse-interface models for single-component and binary fluids. Recent applications and computations using these models are discussed in each case. Further, the authors address issues including sharp-interface analyses that relate these models to the classical free-boundary problem, related computational approaches to describe interfacial phenomena, and related approaches describing fully-miscible fluids.

  17. PFP Interface identification and management planning guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SINCLAIR, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of-this planning guide is to present the process used to identify, document, and control PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project interfaces. Revisions to this document will include, as attachments, the most recent version of the Project Interface Management List. A preliminary Interface Management List is included in Appendix A. This document is intended be a Project owned management tool. As such, this document will periodically require revisions resulting from improvements of the information, processes, and techniques as now described. For most revisions that suggest improved processes, PFP management approval is all that will be required

  18. Mixed mode fracture of dental interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahbar, Nima [Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM) and Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Princeton University (United States); Yang, Yong [Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM) and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Princeton University (United States); Soboyejo, Winston [Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM) and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Princeton University (United States)], E-mail: soboyejo@princeton.edu

    2008-08-15

    This paper presents the results of a combined experimental and computational study of mixed mode fracture in glass/cement and zirconia/cement interfaces that are relevant to dental restorations. The interfacial fracture is investigated using Brazil-nut specimens. The kinking in-and-out of the interface that occurs between glass/cement and zirconia/cement interfaces, is also shown to be consistent with predictions from a microstructure-based finite element model. The predictions later verified using focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy images.

  19. Concept of software interface for BCI systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svejda, Jaromir; Zak, Roman; Jasek, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) technology is intended to control external system by brain activity. One of main part of such system is software interface, which carries about clear communication between brain and either computer or additional devices connected to computer. This paper is organized as follows. Firstly, current knowledge about human brain is briefly summarized to points out its complexity. Secondly, there is described a concept of BCI system, which is then used to build an architecture of proposed software interface. Finally, there are mentioned disadvantages of sensing technology discovered during sensing part of our research.

  20. Skin interface pressure on the NATO litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Elizabeth J; Schmelz, Joseph O; Mazer, Stephen

    2003-04-01

    The NATO litter serves as a transport device and hospital bed during all types of operations. Little is known about the skin interface pressure on this litter. The purpose of this study was to determine whether various types of padding on the litter and body position affect the peak skin interface pressure and the total body area exposed to interface pressures above 30 mm Hg at different body areas. Thirty-two subjects participated. A repeated measures design was used. The surface effect was statistically significant for all peak pressure and surface area analyses (repeated-measures analysis of variance, p patients if feasible. Preventive measures (turning, elevating the heels) are still required.

  1. iPhone User Interface Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Banga, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Written in a cookbook style, this book offers solutions using a recipe based approach. Each recipe contains step-by-step instructions followed by an analysis of what was done in each task and other useful information. The cookbook approach means you can dive into whatever recipes you want in no particular order. The iPhone Interface Cookbook is written from the ground up for people who are new to iOS or application interface design in general. Each chapter discusses the reasoning and design strategy behind critical interface components, as well as how to best integrate each into any iPhone or

  2. A human activity approach to User Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne

    1989-01-01

    How can we understand why a bank teller has different needs for a user interface than those of casual users of a machine teller, or why a graphic designer needs a different user interface than a secretary? This article presents a framework for the design of user interfaces that originates from...... organized practice of the users and the material conditions for the activity, including the object of the activity). The standard view in these situations is to deduce an ultimate set of operations from an abstract use activity and apply these to design and analysis. This article argues that the user...

  3. Development of INFRA graphic user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y. S.; Lee, C. B.; Kim, Y. M.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, S. K.

    2004-01-01

    GUI(Graphic User Interface) has been developed for high burnup fuel performance code INFRA. Based upon FORTRAN program language, INFRA was developed by COMPAQ Visual FORTRAN 6.5. Graphic user input and output interface have been developed by using Visual Basic and MDB which are the most widely used program language and database for windows application development. Various input parameters, which are required for INFRA calculation, can be input more conveniently by newly developed input interface. Without any additional data handling, INFRA calculation results can be investigated intuitively by 2D or 3D graphs on screen and animation function

  4. Nanopore-CMOS Interfaces for DNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magierowski, Sebastian; Huang, Yiyun; Wang, Chengjie; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-08-06

    DNA sequencers based on nanopore sensors present an opportunity for a significant break from the template-based incumbents of the last forty years. Key advantages ushered by nanopore technology include a simplified chemistry and the ability to interface to CMOS technology. The latter opportunity offers substantial promise for improvement in sequencing speed, size and cost. This paper reviews existing and emerging means of interfacing nanopores to CMOS technology with an emphasis on massively-arrayed structures. It presents this in the context of incumbent DNA sequencing techniques, reviews and quantifies nanopore characteristics and models and presents CMOS circuit methods for the amplification of low-current nanopore signals in such interfaces.

  5. Micro- and Nanotechnologies for Optical Neural Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanello, Ferruccio; Sileo, Leonardo; De Vittorio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    In last decade, the possibility to optically interface with the mammalian brain in vivo has allowed unprecedented investigation of functional connectivity of neural circuitry. Together with new genetic and molecular techniques to optically trigger and monitor neural activity, a new generation of optical neural interfaces is being developed, mainly thanks to the exploitation of both bottom-up and top-down nanofabrication approaches. This review highlights the role of nanotechnologies for optical neural interfaces, with particular emphasis on new devices and methodologies for optogenetic control of neural activity and unconventional methods for detection and triggering of action potentials using optically-active colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:27013939

  6. LTE-advanced air interface technology

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xincheng

    2012-01-01

    Opportunities are at hand for professionals eager to learn and apply the latest theories and practices in air interface technologies. Written by experienced researchers and professionals, LTE-Advanced Air Interface Technology thoroughly covers the performance targets and technology components studied by 3GPP for LTE-Advanced. Besides being an explanatory text about LTE-Advanced air interface technology, this book exploits the technical details in the 3GPP specification, and explains the motivation and implication behind the specifications.After a general description of wireless cellular techno

  7. Quantitative interface models for simulating microstructure evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.Z.; Wang, T.; Zhou, S.H.; Liu, Z.K.; Chen, L.Q.

    2004-01-01

    To quantitatively simulate microstructural evolution in real systems, we investigated three different interface models: a sharp-interface model implemented by the software DICTRA and two diffuse-interface models which use either physical order parameters or artificial order parameters. A particular example is considered, the diffusion-controlled growth of a γ ' precipitate in a supersaturated γ matrix in Ni-Al binary alloys. All three models use the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters from the same databases. The temporal evolution profiles of composition from different models are shown to agree with each other. The focus is on examining the advantages and disadvantages of each model as applied to microstructure evolution in alloys

  8. Metastable He deexcitation at semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquali, L.; Nannarone, S.

    2005-01-01

    A review is given of the application of metastable deexcitation spectroscopy (MDS) to the study of the interface formation between semiconductors and different materials. In particular we present an overview of the results obtained on nanostructured interfaces, where strain and reaction between the substrate and the overlayer atoms drive the growth mode and the morphology of the system. As prototypical examples we discuss the growth of CaF 2 on silicon and rare earths (Yb, Er) on silicon and gallium arsenide. The mechanisms and chemical reactions which bring to interface formation are examined on the basis of MDS results and their comparison with photoemission

  9. Dynamic Model of Contact Interface between Stator and Rotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZengHui Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the equivalent principle, a linear spring contact model was established for the friction layer between stator and rotor. Different contact conditions were described by a distance index δ. Detailed analysis of the nonlinear contact behavior especially the static and dynamic slipping was carried on using a space-time equation. A contact deflection angle was proposed to quantitatively express the influence of friction force on the output performance. A more precision simulation model was established based on the theoretical analysis, and influences of different preload pressures and elastic modulus Em of friction layer on output performance were analyzed. The results showed the simulation results had very good consistency with experimental results, and the model could well reflect the output characteristics of contact interface.

  10. Effect of surface stress and irregularity of the interface on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MS received 27 May 2007; revised 4 March 2009. Abstract. The object of the present paper is to investigate plane SH waves through a magneto-elastic crustal layer based over an elastic, solid semi space under the influence of surface stress on the free surface of the crustal layer and irregularity of the interface. Two types of ...

  11. Propagation of fractures from an interface in a Brazilian test specimen

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malan, DF

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of an interface on the initiation and propagation of fractures was investigated using the Brazilian tensile test (diametral compression of a disc). Failure in the Brazilian test takes the form of an extension fracture in the loaded...

  12. Touch in Computer-Mediated Environments: An Analysis of Online Shoppers' Touch-Interface User Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sorim

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, one of the most fundamental changes in current computer-mediated environments has been input devices, moving from mouse devices to touch interfaces. However, most studies of online retailing have not considered device environments as retail cues that could influence users' shopping behavior. In this research, I examine the…

  13. Spatially-dispersive surface modes on interfaces of layered hyperbolic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popov, Vladislav; Novitsky, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present the study of influence of spatial dispersion on the existence of surface modes on the interfaces with multilayered hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs). To that end we employ operator effective medium approximation correcting the Maxwell Garnett approximation. We find out...

  14. Using structure locations as a basis for mapping the wildland urban interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avi Bar-Massada; Susan I. Stewart; Roger B. Hammer; Miranda H. Mockrin; Volker C. Radeloff

    2013-01-01

    The wildland urban interface (WUI) delineates the areas where wildland fire hazard most directly impacts human communities and threatens lives and property, and where houses exert the strongest influence on the natural environment. Housing data are a major problem for WUI mapping. When housing data are zonal, the concept of a WUI neighborhood can be captured easily in...

  15. The Interface between Iranian EFL Instructors' Personality and Their Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Ali; Saberi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, teachers' self-efficacy has demonstrated a profound influence on the daily lives of teachers and their students. However, little is known about the relationship between teachers' personality traits and their self-efficacy. To gain more insight into this area, this study sought to explore the interface between 100 male and female…

  16. Bilingual First Language Acquisition at the Interface between Syntax and Pragmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulk, Aafke; Muller, Natascha

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that in acquiring two languages from birth, bilingual children separate their grammars from very early on. Focuses on the acquisition of syntax in a generative framework. Argues that cross-linguistic influence can occur if an interface level between two modules of grammar is involved, and the two languages overlap at the surface level…

  17. An x-ray diffraction study of interface roughness and diffusion in Ag/Pd superlattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temst, K.; van Bael, M.J.; van Haesendonck, Ch.; Bruynseraede, Y.; de Groot, D.G.; Koeman, N.J.; Griessen, R.P.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of thermal annealing on the surface and interface roughness of epitaxial Ag/Pd superlattices has been quantitatively characterized by high-angle X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Although Ag and Pd form a continuous series of solid solutions, it is shown that thermal

  18. Farm Persistence and Adaptation at the Rural-Urban Interface: Succession and Farm Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inwood, Shoshanah M.; Sharp, Jeff S.

    2012-01-01

    Despite assumptions that agriculture will automatically go into a mode of decline at the Rural Urban Interface (RUI), official statistics suggest that agriculture as a whole remains a strong (and in some cases a growing) industry in many U.S. RUI counties. RUI scholars have acknowledged internal family dynamics can significantly influence farm…

  19. TMACS Test Procedure TP011: Panalarm Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seghers, R.; Washburn, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    The TMACS Software Test Procedures translate the project's acceptance criteria into test steps. The TMACS Test Plan (WHC-SD-WM-TP-148) is fulfilled when all Test Cases are approved. This Test Procedure tests the TMACS Panalarm Interface functions

  20. Navigation with a passive brain based interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Werkhoven, P.J.; Thurlings, M.E.; Brouwer, A.-M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a Brain Computer Interface (BCI) for navigation. The system is based on detecting brain signals that are elicited by tactile stimulation on the torso indicating the desired direction.