WorldWideScience

Sample records for biosolids technology fact

  1. Technological options for the management of biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Brown, Sally L; Magesan, Guna N; Slade, Alison H; Quintern, Michael; Clinton, Peter W; Payn, Tim W

    2008-06-01

    Large quantities of biosolids (sewage sludge), which are produced from municipal wastewater treatment, are ever-increasing because of the commissioning of new treatment plants and continuous upgrades of the existing facilities. A large proportion of biosolids are currently landfilled. With increasing pressure from regulators and the general public, landfilling of biosolids is being phased out in many countries because of potential secondary pollution caused by leachate and the emission of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Biosolids contain nutrients and energy that can be used beneficially. Significant efforts have been made recently to develop new technologies to manage biosolids and make useful products from them. In this paper, we provide a review of the technologies in biosolids management. A survey of literature was conducted. At present, the most common beneficial use of biosolids is agricultural land application because of inherent fertilizer values found in biosolids. Expansion of land application, however, may be limited in the future because of more stringent regulatory requirements and public concern about food chain contamination in some countries. Perceived as a green energy source, the combustion of biosolids has received renewed interest. Anaerobic digestion is generally a more effective method than incineration for energy recovery, and digested biosolids are suitable for further beneficial use through land application. Although conventional incineration systems for biosolid management generally consume more energy than they produce because of the high moisture content in the biosolids, it is expected that more combustion systems, either monocombustion or cocombustion, will be built to cope with the increasing quantity of biosolids. Under the increasingly popular low-carbon economy policy, biosolids may be recognized as a renewable fuel and be eligible for 'carbon credits'. Because ash can be used to manufacture construction materials, combustion can

  2. Technology to Market Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-02-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Technology to Market subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The SunShot Initiative’s Technology to Market subprogram builds on SunShot’s record of moving groundbreaking and early-stage technologies and business models through developmental phases to commercialization. Technology to Market targets two known funding gaps: those that occur at the prototype commercialization stage and those at the commercial scale-up stage.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Fact of the Week 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Williams, Susan E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moore, Sheila A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boundy, Robert Gary [Roltek, Inc., Clinton, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Each week the U.S. Department of Energy s Vehicle Technology Office (VTO) posts a Fact of the Week on their website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/ . These Facts provide statistical information, usually in the form of charts and tables, on vehicle sales, fuel economy, gasoline prices, and other transportation-related trends. Each Fact is a stand-alone page that includes a graph, text explaining the significance of the data, the supporting information on which the graph was based, and the source of the data. A link to the current week s Fact is available on the VTO homepage, but older Facts are archived and still available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/. This report is a compilation of the Facts that were posted during calendar year 2013. The Facts were written and prepared by staff in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Fact of the Week 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Stacy C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Diegel, Susan W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moore, Sheila A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boundy, Robert G. [Roltek, Inc., Clinton, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Each week the U.S. Department of Energy s Vehicle Technology Office (VTO) posts a Fact of the Week on their website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/ . These Facts provide statistical information, usually in the form of charts and tables, on vehicle sales, fuel economy, gasoline prices, and other transportation-related trends. Each Fact is a stand-alone page that includes a graph, text explaining the significance of the data, the supporting information on which the graph was based, and the source of the data. A link to the current week s Fact is available on the VTO homepage, but older Facts (back to 2009) are archived and still available at: http://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/current-and-past-years-facts-week. Each Fact of the Week website page includes a link to an Excel file. That file contains the data from the Supporting Information section of the page so that researchers can easily use data from the Fact of the Week in their work. Beginning in August of 2015, a subscription list is available on the DOE website so that those interested can sign up for an email to be sent each Monday which includes the text and graphic from the current week s Fact. This report is a compilation of the Facts that were posted during calendar year 2015. The Facts were created, written and prepared by staff in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis.

  5. Wall Insulation; BTS Technology Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southface Energy Institute; Tromly, K.

    2000-11-07

    Properly sealed, moisture-protected, and insulated walls help increase comfort, reduce noise, and save on energy costs. This fact sheet addresses these topics plus advanced framing techniques, insulation types, wall sheathings, and steps for effective wall construction and insulation.

  6. Vehicle Technologies' Fact of the Week 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Moore, Sheila A [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

    2013-02-01

    Each week the U.S. Department of Energy s Vehicle Technology Office (VTO) posts a Fact of the Week on their website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/ . These Facts provide statistical information, usually in the form of charts and tables, on vehicle sales, fuel economy, gasoline prices, and other transportation-related trends. Each Fact is a stand-alone page that includes a graph, text explaining the significance of the data, the supporting information on which the graph was based, and the source of the data. A link to the current week s Fact is available on the VTO homepage, but older Facts are archived and still available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/. This report is a compilation of the Facts that were posted during calendar year 2012. The Facts were written and prepared by staff in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis.

  7. Vehicle Technologies' Fact of the Week 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

    2012-04-01

    Each week the U.S. Department of Energy s Vehicle Technology Program (VTP) posts a Fact of the Week on their website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/. These Facts provide statistical information, usually in the form of charts and tables, on vehicle sales, fuel economy, gasoline prices, and other transportation-related trends. Each Fact is a stand-alone page that includes a graph, text explaining the significance of the data, the supporting information on which the graph was based, and the source of the data. A link to the current Fact is available Monday through Friday on the VTP homepage, but older Facts are archived and still available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/. This report is a compilation of the Facts that were posted during calendar year 2011. The Facts were written and prepared by staff in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis.

  8. Internet and information technologies: facts and fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Ronald D.

    2001-10-01

    Information technology advances are spawning visions of radically altered modus operandi for commerce, education, business, information storage and receival. Proponents of virtual technology domination offer a world of instant communications, information sharing, and binary commerce. Some express alarm to the electronic visionaries and see an expected world vacated of human interactions, which is populated by e-hermits. The reality is that access to the Internet is becoming pervasive worldwide and affords a virtual community and markets. Governments, education, markets, businesses and consumers are rushing to exploit and adjust to an electronic, virtual world. The exploitation and adjustment to this an 'ether-world' transcends boundaries is a challenge to stakeholders. Public policy, international agreements, education, businesses and consumers face monumental change in the way they live and conduct their lives. As with most paradigms shifts, pioneers rush forward and launch a myriad of new startups with many failing and some standing the test of time and utility. An example is the early pioneers in North America who headed westward to in search of a new vision of riches. They established towns, developed farms, dug mines and began new businesses. However, many of the pioneers moved from one venture to another. Some of their endeavors ended with ghost towns, abandoned farms and mines, and bankrupt businesses. In the end, however, a great nation was born. This author expects the ether-world to go through similar starts, fits, and adjustments before it emerges as a more stable part of the fabric of society.

  9. Facts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... it is a target to achieve but, rather, as a journey. Industry, government and academia coming together on policy innovation and standards development. Universities and R&D organizations collaboration for inventing technologies. Power grid and Smart grid is an corodinated effort. Any deficiency may give access to hackers..

  10. Training for Fluency and Generalization of Math Facts Using Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musti-Rao, Shobana; Lynch, Tom Liam; Plati, Erin

    2015-01-01

    As American students struggle with basic mathematical skills, the importance of math fact fluency has gained the attention of educators and researchers. Generalization of math fact fluency is also important for the transfer of skills to other settings and formats, assisting students in the completion of more varied and complicated math tasks. This…

  11. 2016 National Algal Biofuels Technology Review Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    Algae-based biofuels and bioproducts offer great promise in contributing to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO’s) vision of a thriving and sustainable bioeconomy fueled by innovative technologies. The state of technology for producing algal biofuels continues to mature with ongoing investment by DOE and the private sector, but additional research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) is needed to achieve widespread deployment of affordable, scalable, and sustainable algal biofuels.

  12. FY2000 Hanford Technology Deployment Accomplishments Fact Sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WIBLE, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Cleaning up the Hanford Site is one of the top priorities for the U. S. Department of Energy. The department is continually looking for ways to expedite cleanup and reduce costs. During Fiscal Year (FY) 2000. Hanford Site staff deployed 24 new technologies, which produced an estimated lifecycle cost savings of 479 million dollars. This is a clear indicator of the impacts new technology has had and will have on the cleanup efforts. The Hanford Site cleanup is focused on the following: Restoring the Columbia River Corridor; Building and operating the tank waste treatment complex to complete the cleanup of highly radioactive tank waste at Hanford; and Transitioning the Central Plateau. Applying innovative science and technology from national laboratories, universities, and private industry is critical to our complex cleanup mission. The 24 new technologies deployed in FY 2000 are significantly higher than our goal of 14 technological deployments. Eleven of these technologies supported restoring the Columbia River Corridor, and seven were involved with the remediation of radioactive tank waste. These deployments produced valuable information to determine the effectiveness of the new technologies in the field and the efficiencies gained over existing cleanup methods. In several cases, the technology deployed presented a solution to a problem where a clear path of remediation had not yet been determined. New and innovative technologies will play a significant role in the cleanup of the Hanford Site and enable remediation to be done more efficiently. Technology is being developed at a staggering pace. This requires excellent communication throughout the scientific and industry arenas. To effect this communication, we have implemented a technology needs process in conjunction with the multi-year work planning process. Through the combination of these two processes, technology developments and deployments address the near-term technology needs and enable us to plan for the

  13. Wind turbines - facts from 20 years of technological progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, L.H.; Dannemand Andersen, P. [Risoe Ntaional Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The first Danish commercial wind turbines were installed in the late 1970s. Over the last 20 years the Danish wind turbine market has been relatively stable concerning annual installations, and the wind turbine technology has been able to develop continuously. This gives a unique time track for technology analysts. The aim of this paper is to extract reliable information on this time track from existing archives and statistics. Seven generations of wind turbine technology have been identified mainly based on `characteristic` rotor diameters. The technological development of each generation is described using indicators such as: market share in Denmark, generator size, rotor diameter, hub height, electricity production and productivity. Economical indicators comprise: costs of turbine and standard foundation. (au)

  14. U.S. EPA Federal Technology Transfer Program Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA), enacted by Congress in 1986 and building on previous legislation, improves access to federal laboratories by non-federal organizations for research and development opportunities.

  15. Advanced Process Technology: Combi Materials Science and Atmospheric Processing (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Process Technology and Advanced Concepts -- High-Throughput Combi Material Science and Atmospheric Processing that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  16. Sustainable Biosolids/Renewable Energy Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Steven D. [City of St. Petersburg, FL (United States); Smith, Arenee Fanchon Teena [City of St. Petersburg, FL (United States)

    2016-09-01

    In keeping with its designation as being Florida’s first “Green City”, the City's primary purpose of this project is to process and dispose of biosolids and yard wastes in a manner that results in the production of thermal, electrical, gas, or some other form of energy. This project was completed in two budget periods. Budget period one of the project consisted of a feasibility evaluation to determine potential applicable technologies, budget period two consisted of project design.

  17. Influence of thermal hydrolysis-anaerobic digestion treatment of wastewater solids on concentrations of Triclosan, Triclocarban, and their transformation products in biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The growing concern worldwide regarding the presence of emerging contaminants in biosolids calls for a better understanding of how different treatment technologies at water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) can influence concentrations prior to biosolids land application. This study focuses on t...

  18. NREL Helps Apply Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technologies Worldwide (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) applies its technical expertise and capabilities to promote the use of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) technologies throughout the world. NREL's international work spans our full range of capabilities, which include three primary areas of expertise: 1. Analysis - NREL provides technology-neutral information, global and regional assessments and decision tools, and expert advice. 2. Research and Development - NREL conducts collaborative research and development (R&D) and shares methods and results with leading research institutions throughout the world. 3. Deployment/Commercialization - NREL teams with private industry, other countries, and international institutions to invest in RE and EE technologies. This fact sheet highlights NREL's international multilateral partnerships, bilateral partnerships, climate and environmental initiatives, and energy assessments and resources.

  19. Indicators for managing biosolids in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amajirionwu, Magnus; Connaughton, Noel; McCann, Brian; Moles, Richard; Bartlett, John; O'Regan, Bernadette

    2008-09-01

    Sustainable development indicators (SDIs) have emerged as a tool to measure progress towards sustainable development for a number of fields. However, no indicator initiative to date has been aimed at biosolids management at local authority, regional or national levels. This paper presents a study where stakeholders involved in the management of biosolids in Ireland participated in the development of SDIs for managing biosolids at the local/regional level. A significant 81% of participating stakeholders find SDIs either 'useful' or 'very useful' as a tool for managing biosolids. A suite of 22 indicators has been developed and arranged according to the driving force-pressure-state-impact-response (DPSIR) indicator framework. The indicators address all the domains of biosolids management namely, production, quality, cost, legislation/regulation, training/research and recycling/disposal. The stakeholder approach is recognition that no effective indicator set can be developed without the input of stakeholders.

  20. Soil Carbon Sequestration Resulting from Biosolids Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana I. Torri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon (C sequestration in soils through the increase of the soil organic carbon (SOC pool has generated broad interest to mitigate the effects of climate change. Biosolids soil application may represent a persistent increase in the SOC pool. While a vast literature is available on the value of biosolids as a soil conditioner or nutrient source in agricultural systems, there is still limited knowledge on soil sequestration mechanisms of biosolids-borne C or the main factors influencing this capacity. The emerging challenges posed by global environmental changes and the stringent needs to enhance C storage call for more research on the potential of soil biosolids incorporation as a sustainable C storage practice. This review addresses the potential of C sequestration of agricultural soils and opencast mines amended with biosolids and its biological regulation.

  1. Qualidade tecnológica da pluma do algodoeiro herbáceo cultivado com biossólidos Technological fiber quality of herbaceous cotton cultivated with biosolids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juarez P. Pedroza

    2006-09-01

    . Significant quadratic effects were obtained with solid sewage sludge doses on the studied variables. The regression analyses estimated the dose of biosolids between 220 to 335 kg N ha-1 for the maximum values of the variables of interest. For maximum fiber resistance value, which is used as base for commercialization of cotton, the dose of biosolid was equivalent to 292 kg ha-1 of N.

  2. Review of FACTS technologies and applications for power quality in smart grids with renewable energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandoman, Foad H.; Ahmadi, Abdollah; Sharaf, Adel M.

    2018-01-01

    In the last two decades, emerging use of renewable and distributed energy sources in electricity grid has created new challenges for the utility regarding the power quality, voltage stabilization and efficient energy utilization. Power electronic converters are extensively utilized to interface...... the power quality. Also, distributed FACTSs play an important role in improving the power factor, energy utilization, enhancing the power quality, and ensuring efficient energy utilization and energy management in smart grids with renewable energy sources. This paper presents a literature survey of FACTS...... technology tools and applications for power quality and efficient renewable energy system utilization....

  3. New technology for sulfide reductions and increased oil recovery: Petroleum project fact sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-14

    This Fact Sheet is written for the Inventions and Innovations Program about a new technology for sulfide reduction and increased oil recovery. The new technology, called Bio-Competitive Exclusion (BCX), results in greater oil production and prevents the production of corrosive hydrogen sulfide in oil and gas reservoirs. This BCX process is initiated and maintained by a new product, called Max-Well 2000, in which nutrients are custom designed to stimulate targeted beneficial microorganisms that live in every oil and gas reservoir. Rapid growth of these microorganisms excludes activity of harmful sulfide-producing bacteria and produces by-products that serve as effective tertiary oil recovery agents and as sulfide degradation agents. Oil and gas production is both increased and sweetened.

  4. Technologies for Distributed Energy Resources. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Technical Assistance Fact Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitchford, P.; Brown, T.

    2001-01-01

    This four-page fact sheet describes distributed energy resources for Federal facilities, which are being supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). Distributed energy resources include both existing and emerging energy technologies: advanced industrial turbines and microturbines; combined heat and power (CHP) systems; fuel cells; geothermal systems; natural gas reciprocating engines; photovoltaics and other solar systems; wind turbines; small, modular biopower; energy storage systems; and hybrid systems. DOE FEMP is investigating ways to use these alternative energy systems in government facilities to meet greater demand, to increase the reliability of the power-generation system, and to reduce the greenhouse gases associated with burning fossil fuels

  5. Protecting groundwater resources at biosolids recycling sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Michael J; Kumarasamy, Karthik; Brobst, Robert B; Hais, Alan; Schmitz, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    In developing the national biosolids recycling rule (Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulation Part 503 or Part 503), the USEPA conducted deterministic risk assessments whose results indicated that the probability of groundwater impairment associated with biosolids recycling was insignificant. Unfortunately, the computational capabilities available for performing risk assessments of pollutant fate and transport at that time were limited. Using recent advances in USEPA risk assessment methodology, the present study evaluates whether the current national biosolids pollutant limits remain protective of groundwater quality. To take advantage of new risk assessment approaches, a computer-based groundwater risk characterization screening tool (RCST) was developed using USEPA's Multimedia, Multi-pathway, Multi-receptor Exposure and Risk Assessment program. The RCST, which generates a noncarcinogenic human health risk estimate (i.e., hazard quotient [HQ] value), has the ability to conduct screening-level risk characterizations. The regulated heavy metals modeled in this study were As, Cd, Ni, Se, and Zn. Results from RCST application to biosolids recycling sites located in Yakima County, Washington, indicated that biosolids could be recycled at rates as high as 90 Mg ha, with no negative human health effects associated with groundwater consumption. Only under unrealistically high biosolids land application rates were public health risks characterized as significant (HQ ≥ 1.0). For example, by increasing the biosolids application rate and pollutant concentrations to 900 Mg ha and 10 times the regulatory limit, respectively, the HQ values varied from 1.4 (Zn) to 324.0 (Se). Since promulgation of Part 503, no verifiable cases of groundwater contamination by regulated biosolids pollutants have been reported. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. Chemical fractionation of phosphorus in stabilized biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; Chen, Yona; Shenker, Moshe

    2008-01-01

    Three chemicals-ferrous sulfate (FeSul), calcium oxide (CaO), and aluminum sulfate (alum)-were applied at different rates to stabilize P in fresh, anaerobically digested biosolids (FBS) obtained from an activated sewage treatment plant. A modified Hedley fractionation procedure was used to assess P forms in these sludge-borne materials and in a biosolids compost (BSC) prepared from the same FBS. Each biosolids material exhibited a unique pattern of P distribution among fractions. The most available P forms, namely: (i) water-soluble P (WSP); (ii) membrane-P; and (iii) NaHCO(3)-P, were stabilized by small rates of each of the chemicals; but the P transformation into more stable forms depended on the type of chemical added. The stabilized P forms were enhanced by high rates of CaO and FeSul, but were reduced by high rates of alum. The organic P (P(o)) in the first three fractions of the FeSul- and alum-stabilized biosolids was enhanced by the chemical addition, and P(o) transformation from NaOH-P(o) into NaHCO(3)-P(o) was found in calcium-stabilized biosolids. A positive relationship was found between NaHCO(3)-P(o) and the NaHCO(3)-extracted organic C in all chemically stabilized biosolids. One-step extraction by NaHCO(3) or NaOH underestimated P extraction compared to the stepwise extraction. The reported results are consistent with solid-state P speciation reported earlier and contribute important information for optimizing biosolids stabilization to reduce P loss after incorporation in soils and for maximizing soil capacity to safely store pre-stabilized biosolids.

  7. Wind erosion potential after land application of biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    PI, H.; Sharratt, B. S.; Schillinger, W. F.; Bary, A.; Cogger, C.

    2017-12-01

    The world population is currently 7.6 billion and, along with continued population growth, comes the challenge of disposing of wastewater and sewage sludge (biosolids). Applying biosolids to agricultural land to replace synthetic fertilizers represents a relatively safe method to recycle or sustainably use biosolids. While land application of biosolids is recognized as a sustainable management practice for enhancing soil health, no studies have determined the effects of biosolids on soil wind erosion. Wind erosion potential of a silt loam was assessed using a portable wind tunnel after applying synthetic and biosolid fertilizer to conventional and conservation tillage practices during the summer fallow phase of a winter wheat-summer fallow rotation in 2015 and 2016 in east-central Washington. Little difference in soil loss was observed between biosolid and synthetic fertilizer treatments, but this result appeared to be dependent on susceptibility of the soil to erosion. Regression analysis between soil loss from fertilizer or tillage treatments indicated that soil loss was lower from biosolid versus synthetic fertilizer and conservation versus conventional tillage at high erosion rates. This suggests that biosolids may reduce wind erosion under highly erodible conditions. Meanwhile, heavy metal concentrations in the windblown sediment were similar for the biosolid and synthetic fertilizer treatments whereas metal loss in windblown sediment was 10% lower from biosolid than synthetic fertilizer. Our results indicate that land application of biosolids did not accelerate the loss of metals or nutrients from soils during high winds. KeywordsLand application of biosolids; wind erosion; wind tunnel; sustainable agriculture

  8. Towards a comprehensive greenhouse gas emissions inventory for biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Gaitan, J P; Short, Michael D; Lundie, Sven; Stuetz, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Effective handling and treatment of the solids fraction from advanced wastewater treatment operations carries a substantial burden for water utilities relative to the total economic and environmental impacts from modern day wastewater treatment. While good process-level data for a range of wastewater treatment operations are becoming more readily available, there remains a dearth of high quality operational data for solids line processes in particular. This study seeks to address this data gap by presenting a suite of high quality, process-level life cycle inventory data covering a range of solids line wastewater treatment processes, extending from primary treatment through to biosolids reuse in agriculture. Within the study, the impacts of secondary treatment technology and key parameters such as sludge retention time, activated sludge age and primary-to-waste activated sludge ratio (PS:WAS) on the life cycle inventory data of solids processing trains for five model wastewater treatment plant configurations are presented. BioWin(®) models are calibrated with real operational plant data and estimated electricity consumption values were reconciled against overall plant energy consumption. The concept of "representative crop" is also introduced in order to reduce the uncertainty associated with nitrous oxide emissions and soil carbon sequestration offsets under biosolids land application scenarios. Results indicate that both the treatment plant biogas electricity offset and the soil carbon sequestration offset from land-applied biosolids, represent the main greenhouse gas mitigation opportunities. In contrast, fertiliser offsets are of relatively minor importance in terms of the overall life cycle emissions impacts. Results also show that fugitive methane emissions at the plant, as well as nitrous oxide emissions both at the plant and following agricultural application of biosolids, are significant contributors to the overall greenhouse gas balance and combined are

  9. Fate of triclosan and methyltriclosan in soil from biosolids application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biosolids contain synthetic chemicals that have the potential to alter soil microbial communities and disrupt endocrine functions if they move offsite. In this study, the persistence of triclosan (TCS), an antibacterial compound normally found in biosolids and in soils after biosolids applications ...

  10. Land Application of Biosolids in the USA: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Land application of biosolids has proven a cost-effective method of waste disposal by beneficially recycling organic matter and nutrients and improving soil quality; however, it may also pose potential threat to the environment and human health. The purpose of this paper is to provide information on recent research progresses and regulation efforts regarding land application of biosolids, including forms and types and nutrient values of biosolids, environmental and health concerns, and related best management practices (BMPs of biosolids application, with emphasis on its land application in agriculture. More research and regulations are expected to minimize potential risks of biosolids land application, especially its long-term impacts.

  11. Synthesis of a hybrid model of the VSC FACTS devices and HVDC technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovikov, Yu S.; Gusev, A. S.; Sulaymanov, A. O.; Ufa, R. A.

    2014-10-01

    The motivation of the presented research is based on the need for development of new methods and tools for adequate simulation of FACTS devices and HVDC systems as part of real electric power systems (EPS). The Research object: An alternative hybrid approach for synthesizing VSC-FACTS and -HVDC hybrid model is proposed. The results: the VSC- FACTS and -HVDC hybrid model is designed in accordance with the presented concepts of hybrid simulation. The developed model allows us to carry out adequate simulation in real time of all the processes in HVDC, FACTS devices and EPS as a whole without any decomposition and limitation on their duration, and also use the developed tool for effective solution of a design, operational and research tasks of EPS containing such devices.

  12. Synthesis of a hybrid model of the VSC FACTS devices and HVDC technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovikov, Yu S; Gusev, A S; Sulaymanov, A O; Ufa, R A

    2014-01-01

    The motivation of the presented research is based on the need for development of new methods and tools for adequate simulation of FACTS devices and HVDC systems as part of real electric power systems (EPS). The Research object: An alternative hybrid approach for synthesizing VSC-FACTS and -HVDC hybrid model is proposed. The results: the VSC- FACTS and -HVDC hybrid model is designed in accordance with the presented concepts of hybrid simulation. The developed model allows us to carry out adequate simulation in real time of all the processes in HVDC, FACTS devices and EPS as a whole without any decomposition and limitation on their duration, and also use the developed tool for effective solution of a design, operational and research tasks of EPS containing such devices

  13. Impact of Joule Heating and pH on Biosolids Electro-Dewatering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navab-Daneshmand, Tala; Beton, Raphaël; Hill, Reghan J; Frigon, Dominic

    2015-05-05

    Electro-dewatering (ED) is a novel technology to reduce the overall costs of residual biosolids processing, transport, and disposal. In this study, we investigated Joule heating and pH as parameters controlling the dewaterability limit, dewatering rate, and energy efficiency. Temperature-controlled electrodes revealed that Joule heating enhances water removal by increasing evaporation and electro-osmotic flow. High temperatures increased the dewatering rate, but had little impact on the dewaterability limit and energy efficiency. Analysis of horizontal layers after 15-min ED suggests electro-osmotic flow reversal, as evidenced by a shifting of the point of minimum moisture content from the anode toward the cathode. This flow reversal was also confirmed by the pH at the anode being below the isoelectric point, as ascertained by pH titration. The important role of pH on ED was further studied by adding acid/base solutions to biosolids prior to ED. An acidic pH reduced the biosolids charge while simultaneously increasing the dewatering efficiency. Thus, process optimization depends on trade-offs between speed and efficiency, according to physicochemical properties of the biosolids microstructure.

  14. Characteristics of sustainable bio-solid fuel produced from sewage sludge as a conventional fuel substitute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Bongjin; Nam, Wonjun; Lee, Na-Yeon; Kim, Kyung-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Safely final disposal of sewage sludge which is being increased every year has already become serious problems. As one of the promising technologies to solve this problem, thermal drying method has been attracting wide attention due to energy recovery from sewage sludge. This paper describes several characteristics of sustainable bio-solid fuel, as a conventional fuel substitute, produced from sewage sludge drying and granulation plant having the treatment capacity of 10 ton/ day. This plant has been successfully operated many times and is now designing for scale-up. Average moisture content of twelve kinds of bio-solid fuels produced from the plant normally less than 10 wt% and average shape of them is mainly composed of granular type having a diameter of 2-8 mm for easy handling and transportation to the final market destinations. Average higher heating value, which is one of the important properties to estimate the possibility of available energy, of bio-solid fuels is about 3800 kcal/ kg as dry basis. So they can be utilized to supply energy in the coal power plant and cement kiln etc. as a conventional fuel substitute for a beneficial reuse. Characteristics including proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, contents of heavy metals, wettability etc. of bio-solid fuels have been also analyzed for the environmentally safe re utilization. (author)

  15. Fate of triclocarban in agricultural soils after biosolid applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Nuria; Rice, Clifford P; Ramirez, Mark; Torrents, Alba

    2018-01-01

    Triclocarban [N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl) urea] (TCC) is an antimicrobial agent utilized in a variety of consumer products. It is commonly released into domestic wastewaters and upon treatment, it is known to accumulate in biosolids. This study examines the occurrence of TCC in biosolids and its long-term fate in biosolid-treated soils. TCC levels in the biosolids from a large waste water treatment plant (WWTP) over 2 years showed little variability at 18,800 ± 700 ng g -1 dry wt. (mean ± SEM). Surface soil samples (top 10 cm) were collected from 26 commercial farms located in northern VA, US that had received biosolid applications from the WWTP. Samples were grouped as farms receiving no biosolids, farms with a single biosolid application, and those receiving multiple biosolid applications from 1992 to 2006. Our results illustrate that TCC soil residues remained years after biosolid application. The two most important parameters controlling TCC topsoil concentrations were the biosolid application rate and the period since the last application. No TCC removal was observed in farms where the time since biosolid application was between 7 and 9 months. TCC concentration analyzed 7 and 8 years after biosolid applications were 45.8 ± 6.1 and 72.4 ± 15.3 ng g -1 dry wt., respectively, showing its persistence in soils and build-up upon multiple biosolid applications. A soil TCC half-life of 287.5 ± 45.5 days was estimated.

  16. Drug Facts

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  17. Biochar produced from biosolids using a single-mode microwave: Characterisation and its potential for phosphorus removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Elsa; Schumann, James; Brodie, Graham; Jacob, Mohan V; Schneider, Philip A

    2017-07-01

    The amount of biosolids increases every year, and social and environmental concerns are also rising due to heavy metals and pathogen contamination. Even though biosolids are considered as a waste material, they could be used as a precursor in several applications, especially in agriculture due to the presence of essential nutrients. Microwave assisted pyrolysis (MWAP) is a promising technology to safely manage biosolids, while producing value-added products, such as biochar, that can be used to improve soil fertility. This study examined the impact of pyrolysis temperature between 300 °C and 800 °C on the chemical and physical properties of biochar obtained from biosolids via MWAP. Preliminary phosphorus adsorption tests were carried out with the biochar produced from biosolids. This research demonstrated that pyrolysis temperature affects biochar specific surface area, ash and volatiles content, but does not impact heavily on the pH, chemical composition and crystalline phases of the resultant biochar. Biochar yield decreases as the pyrolysis temperature increases. Phosphorus adsorption capacity of biochar was approximately around 15 mg/g of biochar. Biochar resulting from MWAP is a potential candidate for land application with an important role in water and nutrient retention, due to the high surface area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Environmental technology applications: fact file on toxic contaminants in industrial waste process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newkirk, H.W.

    1977-05-11

    This report is a compendium of facts related to chemical materials present in industrial waste process streams which have already been declared or are being evaluated as hazardous under the Toxic Substances Control Act. Since some 400 chemicals are presently covered by consensus standards, the substances reviewed are only those considered to be a major threat to public health and welfare by Federal and State regulatory agencies. For each hazardous material cited, the facts relate, where possible, to an identification of the stationary industrial sources, the kind of waste stream impacted, proposed regulations and established effluent standards, the volume of emissions produced each year, the volume of emissions per unit of industrial product produced, present clean-up capabilities, limitations, and costs. These data should be helpful in providing information for the assessment of potential problems, should be of use to the manufacturers of pollution control equipment or of chemicals for pollution control, should be of use to the operators or potential operators of processes which produce pollutants, and should help to define industry-wide emission practices and magnitudes.

  19. Final Report: Conceptual Design of an Electron Accelerator for Bio-Solid Waste Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Charles [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-09-20

    Several studies have identified electron beam (EB) irradiation of municipal wastewater and bio-solids as an effective and promising approach to the environmental remediation of the enormous quantities of human waste created by a growing world-wide population and increased urbanization. However, despite the technical success of experimental and pilot programs over the last several decades, the technique is still not in commercial use anywhere in the world. In addition, the report also identifies the need for “Financial and infrastructure participation from a utility for demonstration project” and “Education and awareness of safety of utilizing electron beam technology” as two additional roadblocks preventing technology adoption of EB treatment for bio-solids. In this concept design, we begin to address these barriers by working with Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRD) and by the applying the latest accelerator technologies developed at Fermilab and within the DOE Office of Science laboratory complex.

  20. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Project fact sheets 2000, status as of June 30, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NONE

    2000-01-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program), a model of government and industry cooperation, responds to the Department of Energy's (DOE) mission to foster a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable. The CCT Program represents an investment of over$5.2 billion in advanced coal-based technology, with industry and state governments providing an unprecedented 66 percent of the funding. With 26 of the 38 active projects having completed operations, the CCT Program has yielded clean coal technologies (CCTs) that are capable of meeting existing and emerging environmental regulations and competing in a deregulated electric power marketplace. The CCT Program is providing a portfolio of technologies that will assure that U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 274 billion tons can continue to supply the nation's energy needs economically and in an environmentally sound manner. As the nation embarks on a new millennium, many of the clean coal technologies have realized commercial application. Industry stands ready to respond to the energy and environmental demands of the 21st century, both domestically and internationally, For existing power plants, there are cost-effective environmental control devices to control sulfur dioxide (S02), nitrogen oxides (NO,), and particulate matter (PM). Also ready is a new generation of technologies that can produce electricity and other commodities, such as steam and synthetic gas, and provide efficiencies and environmental performance responsive to global climate change concerns. The CCT Program took a pollution prevention approach as well, demonstrating technologies that remove pollutants or their precursors from coal-based fuels before combustion. Finally, new technologies were introduced into the major coal-based industries, such as steel production, to enhance environmental performance. Thanks in part to the CCT Program, coal-abundant, secure, and economical-can continue in its

  1. Energizing Government Decision-Makers with the Facts on Solar Technology, Policy, and Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    The Solar Technical Assistance Team (STAT) is a network of solar technology and implementation experts who provide timely, unbiased expertise to assist policymakers and regulators in making informed decisions about solar programs and policies. Government officials can submit requests directly to the STAT for technical assistance. STAT then partners with experts in solar policy, regulation, finance, technology, and other areas to deliver accurate, up-to-date information to state and local decision makers. The STAT responds to requests on a wide range of issues -- including, but not limited to, feed-in tariffs, renewable portfolio standards, rate design, program design, workforce and economic impacts of solar on jurisdictions, and project financing.

  2. Drug Facts

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  3. Drug Facts

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  10. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Project fact sheets 2000, status as of June 30, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program), a model of government and industry cooperation, responds to the Department of Energy's (DOE) mission to foster a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable. The CCT Program represents an investment of over $5.2 billion in advanced coal-based technology, with industry and state governments providing an unprecedented 66 percent of the funding. With 26 of the 38 active projects having completed operations, the CCT Program has yielded clean coal technologies (CCTs) that are capable of meeting existing and emerging environmental regulations and competing in a deregulated electric power marketplace. The CCT Program is providing a portfolio of technologies that will assure that U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 274 billion tons can continue to supply the nation's energy needs economically and in an environmentally sound manner. As the nation embarks on a new millennium, many of the clean coal technologies have realized commercial application. Industry stands ready to respond to the energy and environmental demands of the 21st century, both domestically and internationally, For existing power plants, there are cost-effective environmental control devices to control sulfur dioxide (S02), nitrogen oxides (NO,), and particulate matter (PM). Also ready is a new generation of technologies that can produce electricity and other commodities, such as steam and synthetic gas, and provide efficiencies and environmental performance responsive to global climate change concerns. The CCT Program took a pollution prevention approach as well, demonstrating technologies that remove pollutants or their precursors from coal-based fuels before combustion. Finally, new technologies were introduced into the major coal-based industries, such as steel production, to enhance environmental performance. Thanks in part to the CCT Program, coal--abundant, secure, and economical

  11. Brief: Information technology as an aid to productivity in petroleum exploration -- fact or fiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, M.; Iliffe, J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper considers the relationship between information technology investment, technical productivity, and business benefit. The effect of introducing IT to the industry and its impact on geoscience is described, along with a discussion of whether investment in IT has brought the expected benefits to other industries. The paper concludes with a consideration of the present business perceptions of IT and asks whether a company, by concentrating solely on such issues as technical productivity, will actually maximize the benefits of IT

  12. Energy Innovation Portal Brings DOE Technologies to the Market (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-10-01

    For venture capitalists, energy entrepreneurs, and industry veterans, finding the right renewable energy or energy efficiency solution used to be like looking for a needle in a haystack. Now, a searchable treasure trove of innovative U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) technologies is available. Created by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the online Energy Innovation Portal helps businesses and entrepreneurs access the intellectual property of DOE's 17 national laboratories and other research partners.

  13. Seeding effect on cocomposting wastewater biosolids with coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, M.; Wong, J.W.C. [Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong (China). Dept. of Biology

    2001-10-01

    The seeding effect on fly ash-amended biosolids composting was evaluated by inoculating a mixture of ash and biosolids with seeding materials before composting. These inocula included thermophilic bacteria (Bacillus. brevis, B. coagulans, and B. licheniformis) isolated from the ash-biosolids compost, a commercial decomposter, and recycled biosolids compost. Although the addition of these microbial additives to the ash-biosolids compost improved the population of thermophilic bacteria at the early stage of composting, the improvement was negligible after 4 days of composting. Inoculation with isolated bacterial culture, milk powder, or the decomposter, only, did not effectively improve the decomposition of organic matter compared with those receiving inoculation of both microbial additives and milk powder together. The isolated Bacillus species was as efficient as the commercial decomposter in accelerating the decomposition rate during ash-amended biosolids composting as indicated by the high amounts of carbon dioxide evolved and cumulative weight loss. Taking into consideration the lower operating cost and acceptable decomposition efficiency, recycled biosolids compost seemed to be a promising additive to ash-amended biosolids compost to improve composting efficiency.

  14. LAND REMEDIATION WITH BIOSOLIDS - SLUDGE MAGIC - TIME BOMB?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addition of biosolids to soils increases the environmental loading of toxic metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, etc.) and alters the chemistry and phytoavailability of these metals. This alteration in phytoavailability associated with biosolids amended soil was recognized and utilized by...

  15. Biosolids management strategies: an evaluation of energy production as an alternative to land application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Maureen

    2013-07-01

    Currently, more than half of the biosolids produced within the USA are land applied. Land application of biosolids introduces organic contaminants into the environment. There are potential ecological and human health risks associated with land application of biosolids. Biosolids may be used as a renewable energy source. Nutrients may be recovered from biosolids used for energy generation for use as fertilizer. The by-products of biosolids energy generation may be used beneficially in construction materials. It is recommended that energy generation replace land application as the leading biosolids management strategy.

  16. Select chemical and engineering properties of wastewater biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulrajah, A; Disfani, M M; Suthagaran, V; Imteaz, M

    2011-12-01

    The select chemical and engineering characteristics of biosolids produced at a wastewater treatment plant in Eastern Australia were investigated to assess its suitability as structural fill material in road embankments. Results of comprehensive set of geotechnical experimentation including compaction, consolidation, creep, hydraulic conductivity and shear strength tests implied that biosolids demonstrate behavior similar to highly organic clays with a higher potential for consolidation and settlement. Results of chemical study including heavy metals, dichloro diphenyl trichloroethane (and derivatives) and organochlorine pesticides, indicate that biosolids samples are within the acceptable limits which allows their usage under certain guidelines. Results of tests on pathogens (bacteria, viruses or parasites) also indicated that biosolids were within the safe acceptable limits. Technical and management suggestions have been provided to minimize the possible environmental risks of using biosolids in road embankment fills. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The social construction of facts and artefacts: or How the sociology of science and the sociology of technology might benefit each other

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinch, Trevor J.; Bijker, Wiebe E.

    1984-01-01

    The need for an integrated social constructivist approach towards the study of science and technology is outlined. Within such a programme both scientific facts and technological artefacts are to be understood as social constructs. Literature on the sociology of science, the science-technology

  18. Drug Facts

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  20. Drug Facts

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  1. Biosolids, Soil, Crop, Ground-Water, and Streambed-Sediment Data for A Biosolids-Application Area Near Deer Trail, Colorado, 2001

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yager, Tracy J; Smith, David B; Crock, James G

    2004-01-01

    .... Monitoring components were biosolids, soils, crops, ground water, and streambed sediment. The monitoring program addresses concerns from the public about chemical effects from applications of biosolids to farmland in the Deer Trail, Colorado, area...

  2. Leachate analysis of green and fired-clay bricks incorporated with biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukwatta, Aruna; Mohajerani, Abbas

    2017-08-01

    The substantial increase in biosolids production throughout the world requires sustainable routes for reuse. This study describes the leaching behaviour of potentially hazardous metals from the green and fired bricks incorporating four different biosolids samples from the Eastern treatment plant (ETP) and Western treatment plant (WTP) in Melbourne. The biosolids samples were characterized by XRD, XRF, TGA, particle size distribution, and organic content. The leaching of As, Ag, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Zn was evaluated for both the green and the fired bricks according to the Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and the Australian bottle leaching procedure (ABLP). The leaching of heavy metals from both the green and the fired bricks was compared to investigate the effect of firing on the leaching capability of bricks. The results showed that the leaching of heavy metals from fired bricks was significantly lower than that for the green bricks. The ABLP concentrations of heavy metals were higher than those found using the TCLP method, mainly due to the higher specific surface area of the particles used in the ABLP method. Moreover, bricks were evaluated by the technological properties, such as compressive strength, density and water absorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Metal uptake by corn grown on media treated with particle-size fractionated biosolids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weiping [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)], E-mail: chenweip@yahoo.com.cn; Chang, Andrew C.; Wu, Laosheng [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Zhang, Yongsong [School of Environmental and Natural Resources Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 31009 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Particle-size of biosolids may affect plant uptake of heavy metals when the biosolids are land applied. In this study, corn (Zea mays L.) was grown on sand media treated with biosolids to study how particle-size of biosolids affected the plant uptake of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). Two biosolids, the Nu-Earth biosolids and the Los Angeles biosolids, of dissimilar surface morphology were utilized. The former exhibited a porous and spongy structure and had considerably greater specific surface area than that of the latter, which was granular and blocky. The specific surface area of the Los Angeles biosolids was inversely proportional to its particle-size, while that of Nu-Earth biosolids did not change significantly with particle-size. For each biosolid, the metal concentrations were not affected by particle sizes. The biomass yields of plants grown on the treated media increased as the biosolid particle-size decreased, indicating that plant uptake of nutrients from biosolids was dependent on interactions at the root-biosolids interface. The effect of particle-size on a metal's availability to plants was element-specific. The uptake rate of Cd, Zn, Cu, and Ni was correlated with the surface area of the particles, i.e., smaller particles having higher specific area provided greater root-biosolids contact and resulted in enhanced uptake of Cd and Zn and slightly less increased uptake of Cu and Ni. The particle morphology of biosolids had limited influence on the plant tissue concentrations of Cr and Pb. For both types of biosolids, total metal uptake increased as biosolid particle-size decreased. Our research indicates that biosolid particle-size distribution plays a deciding role in plant uptake of heavy metals when they are land applied.

  4. A Perspective on Biosolids Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Apedaile

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater treatment has evolved into an important mechanism that used to protect public health from infectious disease. In the 1850s, water drawn from the Thames River below London's sewage outfall was found to be a source of a cholera outbreak (1. As a result, 'sewage farms' were established to treat and dispose of wastewater. Gradually, more effective technologies, which required less land, were developed to treat wastewater. The processes of primary and secondary biological treatment eventually eliminated the need for sewage farms in the early part of the past century.

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  6. Interactions in Natural Colloid Systems "Biosolids" - Soil and Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichenko, Kira V.; Nikovskaya, Galina N.; Ulberg, Zoya R.

    2016-04-01

    The "biosolids" are complex biocolloid system arising in huge amounts (mln tons per year) from biological municipal wastewater treatment. These contain clusters of nanoparticles of heavy metal compounds (in slightly soluble or unsoluble forms, such as phosphates, sulphates, carbonates, hydroxides, and etc.), cells, humic substances and so on, involved in exopolysaccharides (EPS) net matrix. One may consider that biosolids are the natural nanocomposite. Due to the presence of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and other macro- and microelements (heavy metals), vitamins, aminoacids, etc., the biosolids are a depot of bioelements for plant nutrition. Thus, it is generally recognized that most rationally to utilize them for land application. For this purpose the biocolloid process was developed in biosolids system by initiation of microbial vital ability followed by the synthesis of EPS, propagation of ecologically important microorganisms, loosening of the structure and weakening of the coagulation contacts between biosolids colloids, but the structure integrity maintaining [1,2]. It was demonstrated that the applying of biosolids with metabolizing microorganisms to soil provided the improving soil structure, namely the increasing of waterstable aggregates content (70% vs. 20%). It occurs due to flocculation ability of biosolids EPS. The experimental modelling of mutual interactions in systems of soils - biosolids (with metabolizing microorganisms) were realized and their colloid and chemical mechanisms were formulated [3]. As it is known, the most harmonious plant growth comes at a prolonged entering of nutrients under the action of plant roots exudates which include pool of organic acids and polysaccharides [4]. Special investigations showed that under the influence of exudates excreted by growing plants, the biosolids microelements can release gradually from immobilized state into environment and are able to absorb by plants. Thus, the biosolids can serve as an active

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  11. Evaluation of the potential for bioaerosols from land applied biosolids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, Benjamin; Brooks, John; Josephseon, Karen; Gerba, Charles; Pepper, Ian

    2003-07-01

    The overall objective of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively document the potential hazards of biological aerosols derived from land applied biosolids, and ultimately develop risk assessment models and land-management strategies for safe, effective use of biosolids. The specific objectives were: i) Quantify bacterial and viral microorganisms emitted as bioaerosols from point sources of biosolids, and area (land-applied) sources of biosolids; ii) Develop risk assessment models based on a) hazard identification, b) dose response, c) exposure assessment; d) risk characterization. Research has consisted of laboratory studies at the University of Arizona and field studies at several regional U.S. locations. Bioaerosol samples have been collected via ''Impingement'' using SKC biosamplers. The biologicals monitored for included: i) viruses: enteroviruses, calciviruses; ii) phage e.g, MS2; iii) E. coil; iv) Salmonella; v) total coliforms; vi) Clostridium perfringens; vii) Aspergillus spp.; viii) Endotoxin. Air samples were collected at discrete distances torn both biosolid piles (point sources), or land applied biosolids (area sources). (author)

  12. Emergy Analysis for the Sustainable Utilization of Biosolids Generated in a Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    This contribution describes the application of an emergy-based methodology for comparing two management alternatives of biosolids produced in a wastewater treatment plant. The current management practice of using biosolids as soil fertilizers was evaluated and compared to another...

  13. Leaching of Phage from Class B Biosolids and Potential Transport through Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Chetochine, Alexandra S.; Brusseau, Mark L.; Gerba, Charles P.; Pepper, Ian L.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate leaching and transport of viruses, specifically those of an indigenous coliphage host specific to Escherichia coli ATTC 15597 (i.e., MS-2), from a biosolid-soil matrix. Serial extractions of 2% and 7% (solids) class B biosolid matrices were performed to determine the number of phage present in the biosolids and to evaluate their general leaching potential. Significant concentrations of coliphage were removed from the biosolids for each sequential...

  14. Triclosan and methyl-triclosan dissipation in soils after biosolid application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triclosan (TCS) is removed in waste water treatment plants (WWTP) primarily as biosolids (approx. 66%). Therefore, biosolids disposal as land applications represents a significant path for release to the environment. Biosolids collected over three years from a large WWTP had concentrations of TCS ...

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  18. Characterisation of Organomineral Fertilisers Derived from Nutrient-Enriched Biosolids Granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogenes L. Antille

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Organomineral fertilisers (OMFs were produced by coating biosolids granules with urea and potash. Two OMF formulations with N : P2O5 : K2O compositions: 10 : 4 : 4 (OMF10 and 15 : 4 : 4 (OMF15 were developed for application in grassland and arable crops. Routine fertiliser analyses were conducted on four batches of OMF and biosolids granules and compared with a sample of urea to determine key physical and chemical properties of the materials which affect handling and spreading, soil behaviour, and fertiliser value. Bulk and particle densities were in the range of 608 to 618 kg m−3, and 1297 to 1357 kg m−3, respectively. Compression tests showed that OMF particles undergo deformation followed by multiple failures without disintegration of the granules when vertical load was applied. Static particle strength was between 1.18 and 4.33 N mm−2 depending on the particle diameter. The use of a model for fertiliser particle distribution studies showed that OMF granules should be between 1.10 and 5.50 mm in diameter with about 80% of the particles in the range of 2.25 to 4.40 mm to enable application at 18 m tramline spacing. This research utilises novel technology to improve the fertiliser value of biosolids, reduce disposal costs, and deliver a range of environmental benefits associated with recycling.

  19. Assessing Nutrients Availability of Irradiated and Non-Irradiated Biosolids for the Agriculture Re-use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnavacca, Cecilia; Sanchez, Monica

    2003-07-01

    Irradiation provides a fast and reliable means to disinfect biosolids generated by municipal wastewater treatment processes. The chemical integrity of some substances may be altered thus change the availability of plant nutrients. Chemical analyses on the biosolids showed a release of mineral forms of Nitrogen while Phosphorus chemical forms were not altered. Higher amounts of mineralized N were indirectly demonstrated in soils with irradiated biosolids by a respiration experiment, and higher nitrate concentrations were measured in the irradiated biosolids amended soils at field experiments. Crop field experiments (lettuce and sugarcane) confirmed that irradiated biosolids have higher fertilizing capability than equal amounts of non-irradiated biosolids. Maximum dose rate had no additive effect but a depleted result, thus marking the importance of the use of moderate biosolids rates. (author)

  20. Increasing thermal drying temperature of biosolids reduced nitrogen mineralisation and soil N2O emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Case, Sean; Gomez Muñoz, Beatriz; Magid, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    . This will be of importance for the value of the biosolids when used to fertilise crops. We sourced AD biosolids from a Danish waste water treatment plant (WWTP) and dried it in the laboratory at 70, 130, 190 or 250 °C to >95 % dry matter content. Also, we sourced biosolids from the WWTP dried using its in-house thermal......Previous studies found that thermally dried biosolids contained more mineralisable organic nitrogen (N) than the raw or anaerobically digested (AD) biosolids they were derived from. However, the effect of thermal drying temperature on biosolid N availability is not well understood......) and N2O production was also the lowest in treatments of the highest drying temperature, suggesting that this material was more recalcitrant. Overall, thermal drying temperature had a significant influence on N availability from the AD biosolids, but drying did not improve the N availability...

  1. Carbon storage in a heavy clay soil landfill site after biosolid application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolan, N.S.; Kunhikrishnan, A.; Naidu, R.

    2013-01-01

    Applying organic amendments including biosolids and composts to agricultural land could increase carbon (C) storage in soils and contribute significantly to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Although a number of studies have examined the potential value of biosolids as a soil conditioner and nutrient source, there has been only limited work on the impact of biosolid application on C sequestration in soils. The objective of this study was to examine the potential value of biosolids in C sequestration in soils. Two types of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of biosolid application on C sequestration. In the first laboratory incubation experiment, the rate of decomposition of a range of biosolid samples was compared with other organic amendments including composts and biochars. In the second field experiment, the effect of biosolids on the growth of two bioenergy crops, Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) and Helianthus annuus (sunflower) on a landfill site was examined in relation to biomass production and C sequestration. The rate of decomposition varied amongst the organic amendments, and followed: composts > biosolids > biochar. There was a hundred fold difference in the rate of decomposition between biochar and other organic amendments. The rate of decomposition of biosolids decreased with increasing iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) contents of biosolids. Biosolid application increased the dry matter yield of both plant species (by 2–2.5 fold), thereby increasing the biomass C input to soils. The rate of net C sequestration resulting from biosolid application (Mg C ha −1 yr −1 Mg −1 biosolids) was higher for mustard (0.103) than sunflower (0.087). Biosolid application is likely to result in a higher level of C sequestration when compared to other management strategies including fertilizer application and conservation tillage, which is attributed to increased microbial biomass, and Fe and Al oxide-induced immobilization of C. - Graphical

  2. Carbon storage in a heavy clay soil landfill site after biosolid application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolan, N.S., E-mail: Nanthi.Bolan@unisa.edu.au [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contaminants Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Kunhikrishnan, A. [Chemical Safety Division, Department of Agro-Food Safety, National Academy of Agricultural Science, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 441-707 (Korea, Republic of); Naidu, R. [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contaminants Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2013-11-01

    Applying organic amendments including biosolids and composts to agricultural land could increase carbon (C) storage in soils and contribute significantly to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Although a number of studies have examined the potential value of biosolids as a soil conditioner and nutrient source, there has been only limited work on the impact of biosolid application on C sequestration in soils. The objective of this study was to examine the potential value of biosolids in C sequestration in soils. Two types of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of biosolid application on C sequestration. In the first laboratory incubation experiment, the rate of decomposition of a range of biosolid samples was compared with other organic amendments including composts and biochars. In the second field experiment, the effect of biosolids on the growth of two bioenergy crops, Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) and Helianthus annuus (sunflower) on a landfill site was examined in relation to biomass production and C sequestration. The rate of decomposition varied amongst the organic amendments, and followed: composts > biosolids > biochar. There was a hundred fold difference in the rate of decomposition between biochar and other organic amendments. The rate of decomposition of biosolids decreased with increasing iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) contents of biosolids. Biosolid application increased the dry matter yield of both plant species (by 2–2.5 fold), thereby increasing the biomass C input to soils. The rate of net C sequestration resulting from biosolid application (Mg C ha{sup −1} yr{sup −1} Mg{sup −1} biosolids) was higher for mustard (0.103) than sunflower (0.087). Biosolid application is likely to result in a higher level of C sequestration when compared to other management strategies including fertilizer application and conservation tillage, which is attributed to increased microbial biomass, and Fe and Al oxide-induced immobilization of C

  3. Technology-Enhanced Assessment of Math Fact Automaticity: Patterns of Performance for Low- and Typically Achieving Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickney, Eric M.; Sharp, Lindsay B.; Kenyon, Amanda S.

    2012-01-01

    Because math fact automaticity has been identified as a key barrier for students struggling with mathematics, we examined how initial math achievement levels influenced the path to automaticity (e.g., variation in number of attempts, speed of retrieval, and skill maintenance over time) and the relation between attainment of automaticity and gains…

  4. Using landfill gas as the primary fuel for a 200 WTPD thermal dryer[Held jointly with the 4. Canadian organic residuals and biosolids managment conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulmister, D. [Manattee County, Manatee, FL (United States). Wastewater Division; Monroe, A. [McKim and Creed, Cary, NC (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Although there is no evidence of health problems, there is a growing opposition to class B land application of biosolids in many localities in the United States, resulting in less sites available to dispose of class B biosolids. Manatee County, located on the West Coast of Florida, decided to implement thermal drying of its biosolids. This produced a class A pellet that could be used without restriction as a fertilizer or soil amendment. The dryer will be located at the county's southeast water reclamation facility, adjacent to the county's Lena Road landfill. The methane gas from the landfill will be used as the primary fuel for the dryer. This paper presented how Manatee County, Florida decided to meet its long term biosolids handling and disposal needs. The paper provided background information on Manatee County, Florida. It discussed the reasons for the dryer technology selection, location of the dryer, sizing criteria as well as listing the components of the dryer. The paper also discussed dryer procurement. Other topics that were presented included fuel requirements and an analysis of landfill gas. The County expects to save approximately two million dollars per year by selecting landfill gas from its Lena Road landfill as the primary fuel for the dryer. 5 tabs.

  5. Recurrence of fecal coliforms and Salmonella species in biosolids following thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranpour, Reza; Cox, Huub H J

    2006-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Part 503 Biosolids Rule requires the fecal coliform (indicator) or Salmonella species (pathogen) density requirements for Class A biosolids to be met at the last point of plant control (truck-loading facility and/or farm for land application). The three Southern Californian wastewater treatment plants in this study produced biosolids by thermophilic anaerobic digestion and all met the Class A limits for both fecal coliforms and Salmonella sp. in the digester outflow biosolids. At two plants, however, a recurrence of fecal coliforms was observed in postdigestion biosolids, which caused exceedance of the Class A limit for fecal coliforms at the truck-loading facility and farm for land application. Comparison of observations at the three plants and further laboratory tests indicated that the recurrence of fecal coliforms can possibly be related to the following combination of factors: (1) incomplete destruction of fecal coliforms during thermophilic anaerobic digestion, (2) contamination of Class A biosolids with fecal coliforms from external sources during postdigestion, (3) a large drop of the postdigestion biosolids temperature to below the maximum for fecal coliform growth, (4) an unknown effect of biosolids dewatering in centrifuges. At Hyperion Treatment Plant (City of Los Angeles, California), fecal coliform recurrence could be prevented by the following: (1) complete conversion to thermophilic operation to exclude contamination by mesophilically digested biosolids and (2) insulation and electrical heat-tracing of postdigestion train for maintaining a high biosolids temperature in postdigestion.

  6. Occurrence and fate of perfluorochemicals in soil following the land application of municipal biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulvado, Jennifer G; Blaine, Andrea C; Hundal, Lakhwinder S; Higgins, Christopher P

    2011-10-01

    The recent implementation of soil and drinking water screening guidance values for two perfluorochemicals (PFCs), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), reflects the growing concerns regarding the presence of these persistent and bioaccumulative chemicals in the natural environment. Previous work has established the potential risk to the environment from the land application of industrially contaminated biosolids, but studies focusing on environmental risk from land application of typical municipal biosolids are lacking. Thus, the present study investigated the occurrence and fate of PFCs from land-applied municipal biosolids by evaluating the levels, mass balance, desorption, and transport of PFCs in soils receiving application of municipal biosolids at various loading rates. This study is the first to report levels of PFCs in agricultural soils amended with typical municipal biosolids. PFOS was the dominant PFC in both biosolids (80-219 ng/g) and biosolids-amended soil (2-483 ng/g). Concentrations of all PFCs in soil increased linearly with increasing biosolids loading rate. These data were used to develop a model for predicting PFC soil concentrations in soils amended with typical municipal biosolids using cumulative biosolids loading rates. Mass balance calculations comparing PFCs applied vs those recovered in the surface soil interval indicated the potential transformation of PFC precursors. Laboratory desorption experiments indicated that the leaching potential of PFCs decreases with increasing chain length and that previously derived organic-carbon normalized partition coefficients may not be accurate predictors of the desorption of long-chain PFCs from biosolids-amended soils. Trace levels of PFCs were also detected in soil cores from biosolids-amended soils to depths of 120 cm, suggesting potential movement of these compounds within the soil profile over time and confirming the

  7. Impact of applying composted biosolids on wheat growth and yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact of applying composted biosolids on wheat growth and yield parameters on a calcimagnesic soil in a semi-arid region. ... Marchouch) growing on a calcimagnesic soil using compost applied at 42 T/ha during the three years of study, but in different ways: C1, C2 and C3. Over this period, the level of total Kjeldhal ...

  8. Fate of Triclosan and Methyltriclosan in soil from biosolids application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, Nuria; Rice, Clifford P.; Ramirez, Mark; Torrents, Alba

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the persistence of Triclosan (TCS), and its degradation product, Methyltriclosan (MeTCS), after land application of biosolids to an experimental agricultural plot under both till and no till. Surface soil samples (n = 40) were collected several times over a three years period and sieved to remove biosolids. Concentration of TCS in the soil gradually increased with maximum levels of 63.7 ± 14.1 ng g −1 dry wt., far below the predicted maximum concentration of 307.5 ng g −1 dry wt. TCS disappearance corresponded with MeTCS appearance, suggesting in situ formation. Our results suggest that soil incorporation and degradation processes are taking place simultaneously and that TCS background levels are achieved within two years. TCS half-life (t 0.5 ) was determined as 104 d and MeTCS t 0.5 , which was more persistent than TCS, was estimated at 443 d. - Highlights: ► Fate of Triclosan (TCS) is soils after a single biosolids application was studied. ► Soil TCS increased for 8 months after application. ► Background levels were reached in 2 years for TCS. ► Methyltriclosan was formed in situ and was much more persistent than TCS. ► Soil incorporation and degradation processes are taking place simultaneously. - This work presents the first long term study that quantifies Triclosan (TCS) removal and Methyltriclosan (MeTCS) formation in situ after biosolids application to an agricultural field.

  9. Transformation of Silver Nanoparticles in Fresh, Aged, and Incinerated Biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract The purpose of this research was to assess the chemical transformation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aged, fresh, and incinerated biosolids in order to provide information for AgNP life cycle analyses. Silver nanoparticles were introduced to the influent of a pilot...

  10. Effect of biosolids application on soil chemical properties and uptake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of biosolids application on soil chemical properties and uptake of some heavy metals by Cercis siliquastrum. ... and municipal solid waste compost (50% CM + 50% MC) at three levels of 0, 2.5 and 5 kg/shrub and three replicates in calcareous sandy loam soil at the botanical garden of Mobarekeh steel company.

  11. Biosolids and manure: Antibiotic resistant bacteria and endotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land application of manure and biosolids is a common approach for recapturing and recycling nutrients, moisture, and organic matter present in these residuals, and is currently the most feasible approach to their respective disposals. Although land application of these wastes is common, the presenc...

  12. Low Cost Remediation of Mining Sites with Biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Walter; Evanylo, Gregory; Stuczynski, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    This paper will present collective results of 25 years of research by the authors into the use of municipal biosolids (sewage sludge) and other residuals to reclaim sites disturbed by a range of mining and construction activities. Loading rate experiments and demonstrations have been conducted on areas drastically disturbed by coal mining, sand mining, heavy mineral mining, urbanization, airport construction and heavy metal processing. At all sites, the post-mining soils were devoid of organic matter, very low in nutrients and frequently quite acidic. At all sites, addition of biosolids at higher than agronomic rates resulted in complete stabilization of the resultant mine soils and vigorous stable vegetation that persisted for > 5 years and has allowed enhanced invasion of native herbaceous species. Application of higher rates is not compatible with establishment of certain native tree species (e.g. Pinus sp.), however, due to adverse effects of soluble salts, nutrient enrichment and enhanced competition by grasses. An underlying goal of this program has been to develop approaches that use higher than agronomic rates of biosolids while simultaneously minimizing losses of N and P to local ground- and surface-waters. In the early 1980's, working on USA coal mining spoils, we determined that that approximately 100 Mg/ha of secondary cake biosolids was optimal for revegetation with herbaceous species, but water quality monitoring was not a concern at that time. This finding raised concerns, however, that the large amounts of total N applied (> 2500 kg/ha) would lead to nitrate-N contamination of local waters. Subsequent work in the early 1990's indicated that similar rates of biosolids could be mixed with woodchips (high palatable C source) and land-applied to large (> 100 ha) coal mining sites with no losses of nitrate-N to surface or ground-water due to microbial immobilization of the applied N. Follow-up work at three sand mining (sand & gravel and mineral sands

  13. Acidic minespoil reclamation with alkaline biosolids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drill, C.; Lindsay, B.J.; Logan, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    The effectiveness of an alkaline stabilized biosolids product, N-Viro Soil (NVS), was studied at a wild animal preserve in Cumberland, OH. The preserve occupies land that was strip mined for high-sulfur coal. While most of the land has been conventionally reclaimed, several highly acidic hot spots remain. Two of these hot spots were studied through concurrent field, greenhouse, and laboratory projects. In April 1995, NVS was applied at rates ranging from 0--960 mt/ha (wet wt.) to plots at the two sites. The plots were seeded using a standard reclamation mix and soil samples were analyzed for chemical characteristics before and after application and also in 1996 and 1997. Soil pH increased from 3.5 to about 11 in the amended plots and soil EC values increased from 21.0 mmho/cm to a maximum of 6.0 mmho/cm in the amended plots immediately after application. Soil Cu and Zn concentrations also increased in the NVS amended plots, but this did not affect plant germination or growth. By the summer of 1996, soil pH values had decreased to 7.3--8.7 and EC values decreased to 0.34--1.36 mmho/cm to the amended plots. Soil samples were collected in September 1995 for physical analyses. N-Viro Soil improved the moisture retention and water conductivity properties of the spoil. The plots were monitored for growth during the summer of 1995 and plant biomass and soil samples were taken in 1996 and 1997 for trace element and nutrient analysis. NVS did not significantly increase trace element concentrations in the biomass. The addition of NVS to acid mine spoil improves the chemical and physical properties of the spoil material thus aiding vegetative establishment and growth. NVS improves the chemical nature of the spoil by increasing pH and providing micro and macronutrients and improves the physical properties of the spoil with the addition of organic matter

  14. Surface biosolids application: effects on infiltration, erosion, and soil organic carbon in Chihuahuan Desert grasslands and shrublands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffet, C A; Zartman, R E; Wester, D B; Sosebee, R E

    2005-01-01

    Land application of biosolids is a beneficial-use practice whose ecological effects depend in part on hydrological effects. Biosolids were surface-applied to square 0.5-m2 plots at four rates (0, 7, 34, and 90 dry Mg ha(-1)) on each of three soil-cover combinations in Chihuahuan Desert grassland and shrubland. Infiltration and erosion were measured during two seasons for three biosolids post-application ages. Infiltration was measured during eight periods of a 30-min simulated rain. Biosolids application affected infiltration rate, cumulative infiltration, and erosion. Infiltration increased with increasing biosolids application rate. Application of biosolids at 90 dry Mg ha(-1) increased steady-state infiltration rate by 1.9 to 7.9 cm h(-1). Most of the measured differences in runoff among biosolids application rates were too large to be the result of interception losses and/or increased hydraulic gradient due to increased roughness. Soil erosion was reduced by the application of biosolids; however, the extent of reduction in erosion depended on the initial erodibility of the site. Typically, the greatest marginal reductions in erosion were achieved at the lower biosolids application rates (7 and 34 dry Mg ha(-1)); the difference in erosion between 34 and 90 dry Mg ha(-1) biosolids application rates was not significant. Surface application of biosolids has important hydrological consequences on runoff and soil erosion in desert grasslands that depend on the rate of biosolids applied, and the site and biosolids characteristics.

  15. Survey of organic wastewater contaminants in biosolids destined for land application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, C.A.; Furlong, E.T.; Zaugg, S.D.; Burkhardt, M.R.; Werner, S.L.; Cahill, J.D.; Jorgensen, G.R.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the presence, composition, and concentrations of organic wastewater contaminants (OWCs) were determined in solid materials produced during wastewater treatment. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of these solids, collectively referred to as biosolids, as a source of OWCs to soil and water in contact with soil. Nine different biosolid products, produced by municipal wastewater treatment plants in seven different states, were analyzed for 87 different OWCs. Fifty-five of the OWCs were detected in at least one biosolid product. The 87 different OWCs represent a diverse cross section of emerging organic contaminants that enter wastewater treatment plants and may be discharged without being completely metabolized or degraded. A minimum of 30 and a maximum of 45 OWCs were detected in any one biosolid. The biosolids used in this study are produced by several production methods, and the plants they originate from have differing population demographics, yet the percent composition of total OWC content, and of the most common OWCs, typically did not vary greatly between the biosolids tested. The summed OWC content ranged from 64 to 1811 mg/kg dry weight. Six biosolids were collected twice, 3-18 months apart, and the total OWC content of each biosolid varied by less than a factor of 2. These results indicate that the biosolids investigated in this study have OWC compositions and concentrations that are more similar than different and that biosolids are highly enriched in OWCs (as mass-normalized concentrations) when compared to effluents or effluent-impacted water. These results demonstrate the need to better describe the composition and fate of OWCs in biosolids since about 50% of biosolids are land applied and thus become a potentially ubiquitous nonpoint source of OWCs into the environment. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  16. Persistence of Trace Organic Contaminants from a Commercial Biosolids-Based Fertilizer in Aerobic Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Banet, Travis A; Kim, Jihyun R; Mashtare, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Municipal biosolids are recycled as agricultural fertilizers. Recent studies have raised concerns due to the presence of emerging contaminants in municipal biosolids. Previous research suggests that these contaminants have the potential to reside in biosolids-based fertilizers that are commercially distributed. Use of these products in urban/suburban areas may provide a pathway for these contaminants to enter ecosystems and impact human and environmental health. Soils from Purdue University’s...

  17. Meta-analysis of biosolid effects on persistence of triclosan and triclocarban in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Qiuguo; Sanganyado, Edmond; Ye, Qingfu; Gan, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Biosolids are extensively used in agriculture as fertilizers while offering a practical solution for waste disposal. Many pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs), such as triclosan and triclocarban, are enriched in biosolids. Biosolid amendment changes soil physicochemical properties, which may in turn alter the persistence of PPCPs and hence the risk for secondary contamination such as plant uptake. To delineate the effect of biosolids on PPCPs persistence, triclosan and triclocarban were used as model compounds in this study and their sorption (K d ) and persistence (t 1/2 ) were determined in different soils before and after biosolid amendment. Biosolids consistently increased sorption of triclosan and triclocarban in soil. The K d of triclosan increased by 3.9–21 times following amendment of a sandy loam soil with biosolids at 2–10%. The persistence of both compounds was prolonged, with t 1/2 of triclosan increasing from 10 d in the unamended soil to 63 d after biosolid amendment at 10%. The relationship between t 1/2 and K d was further examined through a meta-analysis using data from this study and all relevant published studies. A significant linear relationship between t 1/2 and K d was observed for triclosan (r 2  = 0.69, p < 0.01) and triclocarban (r 2  = 0.38, p < 0.05) in biosolid-amended soils. On the average, when biosolid amendment increased by 1%, t 1/2 of triclosan was prolonged by 7.5 d, while t 1/2 of triclocarban was extended by 4.7 d. Therefore, biosolid amendment greatly enhances persistence of triclosan and triclocarban, likely due to enhanced sorption or decreased chemical bioavailability. This finding highlights the importance to consider the effect of biosolids when evaluating the environmental risks of these and other biosolid-borne PPCPs. - Highlights: • K d and t 1/2 of triclosan and triclocarban were determined in soil with or without biosolid amendment. • Correlation of K d and t 1/2 was tested using

  18. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout 50 years of weathering and ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donner, E.; Scheckel, K.; Sekine, R.; Popelka-Filcoff, R.S.; Bennett, J.W.; Brunetti, G.; Naidu, R.; McGrath, S.P.; Lombi, E.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that biosolids Ag concentrations have decreased significantly over recent decades. XANES revealed the importance of reduced-sulfur binding environments for Ag speciation in materials ranging from freshly produced sludge to biosolids weathered under ambient environmental conditions for more than 50 years. Isotopic dilution with 110m Ag showed that Ag was predominantly non-labile in both fresh and aged biosolids (13.7% mean lability), with E-values ranging from 0.3 to 60 mg/kg and 5 mM CaNO 3 extractable Ag from 1.2 to 609 μg/kg (0.002–3.4% of the total Ag). This study indicates that at the time of soil application, biosolids Ag will be predominantly Ag-sulfides and characterised by low isotopic lability. - Highlights: • Biosolids silver (Ag) concentrations appear to have decreased in recent decades. • Ag 2 S dominates Ag speciation in freshly produced sludge. • Ag 2 S is also the dominant species in aged biosolids. • Upon land application biosolids will mainly contain Ag-sulfides and have low isotopic lability. - Analysis of historic and contemporary biosolids from three continents indicated decreasing wastewater silver releases, and non-labile, extremely stable silver speciation

  19. Meta-analysis of biosolid effects on persistence of triclosan and triclocarban in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiuguo; Sanganyado, Edmond; Ye, Qingfu; Gan, Jay

    2016-03-01

    Biosolids are extensively used in agriculture as fertilizers while offering a practical solution for waste disposal. Many pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs), such as triclosan and triclocarban, are enriched in biosolids. Biosolid amendment changes soil physicochemical properties, which may in turn alter the persistence of PPCPs and hence the risk for secondary contamination such as plant uptake. To delineate the effect of biosolids on PPCPs persistence, triclosan and triclocarban were used as model compounds in this study and their sorption (Kd) and persistence (t1/2) were determined in different soils before and after biosolid amendment. Biosolids consistently increased sorption of triclosan and triclocarban in soil. The Kd of triclosan increased by 3.9-21 times following amendment of a sandy loam soil with biosolids at 2-10%. The persistence of both compounds was prolonged, with t1/2 of triclosan increasing from 10 d in the unamended soil to 63 d after biosolid amendment at 10%. The relationship between t1/2 and Kd was further examined through a meta-analysis using data from this study and all relevant published studies. A significant linear relationship between t1/2 and Kd was observed for triclosan (r(2) = 0.69, p triclosan was prolonged by 7.5 d, while t1/2 of triclocarban was extended by 4.7 d. Therefore, biosolid amendment greatly enhances persistence of triclosan and triclocarban, likely due to enhanced sorption or decreased chemical bioavailability. This finding highlights the importance to consider the effect of biosolids when evaluating the environmental risks of these and other biosolid-borne PPCPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of biosolids to enhance rangeland forage quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Michael J; Vasquez, Issaak Romero; Vutran, MaiAnh; Schmitz, Mark; Brobst, Robert B

    2010-05-01

    Biosolids land application was demonstrated to be a potentially cost-effective means for restoring forage productivity and enhancing soil-moisture-holding capacity on disturbed rangelands. By land-applying aerobically digested, anaerobically digested, composted, and lime-stabilized biosolids on rangeland test plots at rates of up to 20 times (20X) the estimated nitrogen-based agronomic rate, forage yields were found to increase from 132.8 kg/ha (118.2 lb/ac) (control plots) to 1182.3 kg/ha (1052.8 lb/ac). Despite the environmental benefits associated with increased forage yield (e.g., reduced soil erosion, improved drainage, and enhanced terrestrial carbon sequestration), the type of forage generated both before and after biosolids land application was found to be dominated by invasive weeds, all of which were characterized as having fair to poor nutritional value. Opportunistic and shallow rooting invasive weeds not only have marginal nutritional value, they also limit the establishment of native perennial grasses and thus biodiversity. Many of the identified invasive species (e.g., Cheatgrass) mature early, a characteristic that significantly increases the fuel loads that support the increased frequency and extent of western wildfires.

  1. Dewatered sewage biosolids provide a productive larval habitat for stable flies and house flies (Diptera: Muscidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species diversity and seasonal abundance of muscoid flies (Diptera: Muscidae) developing in biosolid cake (dewatered biosolids) stored at a wastewater treatment facility in northeastern Kansas was evaluated. Emergence traps were deployed 19 May-20 Oct 2009 (22 wk) and 27 May-18 Nov 2010 (25 wk). A t...

  2. INTERLABORATORY VALIDATION OF USEPA METHOD 1680: FECAL COLIFORMS IN BIOSOLIDS BY MULTIPLE-TUBE FERMENTATION PROCEDURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the US, the use and disposal of biosolids (including domestic septage) are regulated under 40 CFR Part 503. Subpart D of this regulation protects public health and the environment through requirements designed to reduce the potential for contact with pathogens in biosolids app...

  3. Wind erosion potential of a winter wheat–summer fallow rotation after land application of biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    While land application of biosolids is recognized as a sustainable management practice for enhancing soil health, no studies have determined the effects of biosolids on soil wind erosion. Wind erosion potential of a silt loam was assessed using a portable wind tunnel after applying synthetic and bio...

  4. Chemical composition of windblown dust emitted from agricultural soils amended with biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biosolids are increasingly being applied to agricultural lands in dry environments, but wind erosion of these lands might transport biosolid particulates offsite and impact environmental quality. Our objective was to use a wind tunnel to measure soil and windblown sediment concentrations of EPA-regu...

  5. LIMITED PHYTO- AND BIO-AVAILABILITY PREVENT RISK FROM CADMIUM IN REGULATED BIOSOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biosolids are a complex mixture which usually contain 100-times more Zn than Cd, and both inorganic and organic Cd adsorbents. Experiments were conducted to test the effect of persistent inorganic adsorbents in biosolids on phytoavailability of soil Cd to lettuce, and the role of...

  6. LIMITED PHYTO-AND BIO-AVAILABILITY PREVENT RISK FROM CADMIUM IN REGULATED BIOSOLIDS (ABSTRACT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biosolids are a complex mixture which usually contain 100-times more Zn than Cd, and both inorganic and organic Cd adsorbents. Experiments were conducted to test the effect of persistent inorganic adsorbents in biosolids on phytoavailability of soil Cd to lettuce, and the role of...

  7. VALIDATION OF EPA METHOD 1682: SALMONELLA IN BIOSOLIDS BY MODIFIED, SEMISOLID RAPPAPORT-VASSILIADIS (MSRV) MEDIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treated biosolids may be applied to land as a crop nutrient and soil conditioner. However, land application of biosolids may pose the risk of releasing pathogens into the environment if disinfection and use criteria established by EPA at 40 CFR part 503 are not met. Among these c...

  8. Nitric oxide emissions from soils amended with municipal waste biosolids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelle, P.A.; Aneja, V.P.

    2002-01-01

    Land spreading nitrogen-rich municipal waste biosolids (NO 3 - -N -1 dry weight, NH 3 -N∼23,080mg Nkg -1 dry weight, Total Kjeldahl N∼41,700mg Nkg -1 dry weight) to human food and non-food chain land is a practice followed throughout the US. This practice may lead to the recovery and utilization of the nitrogen by vegetation, but it may also lead to emissions of biogenic nitric oxide (NO), which may enhance ozone pollution in the lower levels of the troposphere. Recent global estimates of biogenic NO emissions from soils are cited in the literature, which are based on field measurements of NO emissions from various agricultural and non-agricultural fields. However, biogenic emissions of NO from soils amended with biosolids are lacking. Utilizing a state-of-the-art mobile laboratory and a dynamic flow-through chamber system, in-situ concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) were measured during the spring/summer of 1999 and winter/spring of 2000 from an agricultural soil which is routinely amended with municipal waste biosolids. The average NO flux for the late spring/summer time period (10 June 1999-5 August 1999) was 69.4±34.9ngNm -2 s -1 . Biosolids were applied during September 1999 and the field site was sampled again during winter/spring 2000 (28 February 2000-9 March 2000), during which the average flux was 3.6±l.7ngNm -2 s -1 . The same field site was sampled again in late spring (2-9 June 2000) and the average flux was 64.8±41.0ng Nm -2 s -1 . An observationally based model, developed as part of this study, found that summer accounted for 60% of the yearly emission while fall, winter and spring accounted for 20%, 4% and 16% respectively. Field experiments were conducted which indicated that the application of biosolids increases the emissions of NO and that techniques to estimate biogenic NO emissions would, on a yearly average, underestimate the NO flux from this field by a factor of 26. Soil temperature and % water filled pore space (%WFPS) were observed

  9. Ecological impacts of long-term application of biosolids to a radiata pine plantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Jianming, E-mail: jianming.xue@scionresearch.com [Scion, Private Bag 29237, Christchurch (New Zealand); Kimberley, Mark O., E-mail: mark.kimberley@scionresearch.com [Scion, Private Bag 3020, Rotorua (New Zealand); Ross, Craig, E-mail: rossc@landcareresearch.co.nz [Landcare, Private Bag 11052, Palmerston North (New Zealand); Gielen, Gerty, E-mail: gerty.gielen@scionresearch.com [Scion, Private Bag 3020, Rotorua (New Zealand); Tremblay, Louis A., E-mail: louis.tremblay@cawthron.org.nz [Cawthron Institute, Private Bag 2, Nelson (New Zealand); School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, PO Box 92019, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Champeau, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.champeau@cawthron.org.nz [Cawthron Institute, Private Bag 2, Nelson (New Zealand); Horswell, Jacqui, E-mail: jacqui.horswell@esr.cri.nz [ESR, P O Box 50-348, Porirua (New Zealand); Wang, Hailong, E-mail: hailong@zafu.edu.cn [Scion, Private Bag 3020, Rotorua (New Zealand); Key Laboratory of Soil Contamination Bioremediation of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang Agricultural and Forestry University, Lin' an, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province 311300 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Assessment of the ecological impact of applying biosolids is important for determining both the risks and benefits. This study investigated the impact on soil physical, chemical and biological properties, tree nutrition and growth of long-term biosolids applications to a radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) plantation growing on a Sandy Raw Soil in New Zealand. Biosolids were applied to the trial site every 3 years from tree age 6 to 19 years at three application rates: 0 (Control), 300 (Standard) and 600 (High) kg nitrogen (N) ha{sup −1}, equivalent to 0, 3 and 6 Mg ha{sup −1} of dry biosolids, respectively. Tree nutrition status and growth have been monitored annually. Soil samples were collected 13 years after the first biosolids application to assess the soil properties and functioning. Both the Standard and High biosolids treatments significantly increased soil (0–50 cm depth) total carbon (C), N, and phosphorus (P), Olsen P and cation exchange capacity (CEC), reduced soil pH, but had no significant effects on soil (0–20 cm depth) physical properties including bulk density, total porosity and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The High biosolids treatment also increased concentrations of soil total cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) at 25–50 cm depth, but these concentrations were still considered very low for a soil. Ecotoxicological assessment showed no significant adverse effects of biosolids application on either the reproduction of springtails (Folsomia candida) or substrate utilisation ability of the soil microbial community, indicating no negative ecological impact of bisolids-derived heavy metals or triclosan. This study demonstrated that repeated application of biosolids to a plantation forest on a poor sandy soil could significantly improve soil fertility, tree nutrition and pine productivity. However, the long-term fate of biosolids-derived N, P and litter-retained heavy metals needs to be further monitored in the

  10. Ecological impacts of long-term application of biosolids to a radiata pine plantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Jianming; Kimberley, Mark O.; Ross, Craig; Gielen, Gerty; Tremblay, Louis A.; Champeau, Olivier; Horswell, Jacqui; Wang, Hailong

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the ecological impact of applying biosolids is important for determining both the risks and benefits. This study investigated the impact on soil physical, chemical and biological properties, tree nutrition and growth of long-term biosolids applications to a radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) plantation growing on a Sandy Raw Soil in New Zealand. Biosolids were applied to the trial site every 3 years from tree age 6 to 19 years at three application rates: 0 (Control), 300 (Standard) and 600 (High) kg nitrogen (N) ha −1 , equivalent to 0, 3 and 6 Mg ha −1 of dry biosolids, respectively. Tree nutrition status and growth have been monitored annually. Soil samples were collected 13 years after the first biosolids application to assess the soil properties and functioning. Both the Standard and High biosolids treatments significantly increased soil (0–50 cm depth) total carbon (C), N, and phosphorus (P), Olsen P and cation exchange capacity (CEC), reduced soil pH, but had no significant effects on soil (0–20 cm depth) physical properties including bulk density, total porosity and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The High biosolids treatment also increased concentrations of soil total cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) at 25–50 cm depth, but these concentrations were still considered very low for a soil. Ecotoxicological assessment showed no significant adverse effects of biosolids application on either the reproduction of springtails (Folsomia candida) or substrate utilisation ability of the soil microbial community, indicating no negative ecological impact of bisolids-derived heavy metals or triclosan. This study demonstrated that repeated application of biosolids to a plantation forest on a poor sandy soil could significantly improve soil fertility, tree nutrition and pine productivity. However, the long-term fate of biosolids-derived N, P and litter-retained heavy metals needs to be further monitored in the receiving

  11. Blood Facts and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Learn About Blood > Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Facts and Statistics Facts about blood needs Facts ... about American Red Cross Blood Services Facts about blood needs Every two seconds someone in the U.S. ...

  12. BPA Facts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-03-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration is a federal nonprofit power marketing administration based in the Pacific Northwest . Although BPA is part of the U .S . Department of Energy, it is self-funding and covers its costs by selling its products and services . BPA markets wholesale electrical power from 31 federal hydro projects in the Columbia River Basin, one nonfederal nuclear plant and several small nonfederal power plants . The dams are operated by the U .S . Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation . About 30 percent of the electric power used in the Northwest comes from BPA . BPA’s resources — primarily hydroelectric — make its power nearly carbon free . BPA also operates and maintains about three- fourths of the high-voltage transmission in its service territory . BPA’s service territory includes Idaho, Oregon, Washington, western Montana and small parts of eastern Montana, California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming . BPA promotes energy efficiency, renewable resources and new technologies that improve its ability to deliver on its mission . BPA also funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin . BPA is committed to public service and seeks to make its decisions in a manner that provides opportunities for input from stakeholders . In its vision statement, BPA dedicates itself to providing high system reliability, low rates consistent with sound business principles, environmental stewardship and accountability

  13. Effects of Biosolids at Varying Rates on Earthworms (Eisenia fetida and Springtails (Folsomia candida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Artuso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Land spreading is a major option internationally for the disposal/use of treated sewage sludge (biosolids, but effects of this practice on soil organisms are largely unknown. This study investigated the effects of biosolids on two soil invertebrate species, earthworms (Eisenia fetida and Collembola (Folsomia candida, in laboratory tests. Five biosolids from different sewage works were assessed at rates equivalent to 0, 2, 5, 10, and 20 t ha−1. Biosolids applied at 2 and 5 t ha−1 did not cause mortality of adult earthworms but did at 10 and 20 t ha−1. At 5, 10 and 20 t ha−1, all biosolids had significantly fewer juvenile worms relative to controls. Increasing the rates from 2 to 10 t ha−1 did not impact on the number of adult Collembola, but at 20 t ha−1 there were significantly fewer adults. There were significantly fewer juvenile Collembola recorded for biosolids applied at the 2 t ha−1 when compared with controls, and also when biosolids were applied at 5, 10, and 20 t ha−1 relative to 2 t ha−1. Some significant difference between biosolids were observed, but generally, negative effects were not related to heavy metal concentrations in biosolids. It is recommended that possible detrimental mechanisms (e.g., ammonia production, lack of oxygen be investigated in future work. It is concluded that biosolids, applied at legal, low rates (about 2 t ha−1 are unlikely to be detrimental to earthworms or adult Collembola but can be detrimental to Collembola reproduction.

  14. Fractionation and mobility of phosphorus in a sandy forest soil amended with biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jingjun; Wang, Hailong; Kimberley, Mark O; Beecroft, Katie; Magesan, Guna N; Hu, Chengxiao

    2007-11-01

    Biosolids, i.e., treated sewage sludge, are commonly used as a fertilizer and amendment to improve soil productivity. Application of biosolids to meet the nitrogen (N) requirements of crops can lead to accumulation of phosphorus (P) in soils, which may result in P loss to water bodies. Since 1996, biosolids have been applied to a Pinus radiata D. Don plantation near Nelson City, New Zealand, in an N-deficient sandy soil. To investigate sustainability of the biosolids application programme, a long-term research trial was established in 1997, and biosolids were applied every three years, at three application rates, including control (no biosolids), standard and high treatments, based on total N loading. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of repeated application of biosolids on P mobility in the sandy soil. Soil samples were collected in August 2004 from the trial site at depths of 0-10, 10-25, 25-50, 50-75, and 75-100 cm. The soil samples were analysed for total P (TP), plant-available P (Olsen P and Mehlich 3 P), and various P fractions (water-soluble, bioavailable, Fe and Al-bound, Ca-bound, and residual) using a sequential P fractionation procedure. Soil TP and Olsen P in the high biosolids treatment (equivalent to 600 kg N ha(-1) applied every three years) had increased significantly (Psoil of the high treatment had increased significantly only at 0-10 cm. Olsen P appeared to be more sensitive than Mehlich 3 P as an indicator of P movement in a soil profile. Phosphorus fractionation revealed that inorganic P (Al/Fe-bound P and Ca-bound P) and residual P were the main P pools in soil, whereas water-soluble P accounted for approximately 70% of TP in biosolids. Little organic P was found in either the soil or biosolids. Concentrations of water-soluble P, bioavailable inorganic P (NaHCO3 Pi) and potentially bioavailable inorganic P (NaOH Pi) in both 0-10 and 10-25 cm depths were significantly higher in the high biosolids treatment than in the

  15. Dewatered sewage biosolids provide a productive larval habitat for stable flies and house flies (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doud, C W; Taylor, D B; Zurek, L

    2012-03-01

    Species diversity and seasonal abundance of muscoid flies (Diptera: Muscidae) developing in biosolid cake (dewatered biosolids) stored at a wastewater treatment facility in northeastern Kansas were evaluated. Emergence traps were deployed 19 May through 20 October 2009 (22 wk) and 27 May through 18 November 2010 (25 wk). In total, 11,349 muscoid flies were collected emerging from the biosolid cake. Stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans (L.)) and house flies (Musca domestica (L.)), represented 80 and 18% of the muscoid flies, respectively. An estimated 550 stable flies and 220 house flies per square-meter of surface area developed in the biosolid cake annually producing 450,000 stable flies and 175,000 house flies. Stable fly emergence was seasonally bimodal with a primary peak in mid-July and a secondary peak in late August. House fly emergence peaked with the first stable fly emergence peak and then declined gradually for the remainder of the year. House flies tended to emerge from the biosolid cake sooner after its deposition than did stable flies. In addition, house fly emergence was concentrated around midsummer whereas stable fly emergence began earlier in the spring and continued later into the fall. Biosolid age and temperature were the most important parameters affecting emergence for house flies and stable flies, whereas precipitation was not important for either species. This study highlights the importance of biosolid cake as a larval developmental habitat for stable flies and house flies.

  16. Evaluating the effects of triclosan on 3 field crops grown in 4 formulations of biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmohamadloo, René S; Lissemore, Linda; Prosser, Ryan S; Sibley, Paul K

    2017-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that amending soil with biosolids can be an integral component of sustainable agriculture. Despite strong evidence supporting its beneficial use in agriculture, there are concerns that chemicals, such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products, could present a risk to terrestrial ecosystems and human health. Triclosan is one of the most commonly detected compounds in biosolids. To date, laboratory studies indicate that triclosan likely poses a de minimis risk to field crops; however, these studies were either conducted under unrealistic exposure conditions or only assessed 1 or 2 formulations of biosolids. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the effects of triclosan on field crops in soils amended with 4 different formulations of biosolids (liquid, dewatered, compost, and alkaline-hydrolyzed), containing both background and spiked triclosan concentrations, following best management practices used in the province of Ontario. Three crop species (corn, soybean, and spring wheat) were evaluated using several plant growth endpoints (e.g., root wet mass, shoot length, shoot wet/dry mass) in 70-d to 90-d potted soil tests. The results indicated no adverse impact of triclosan on any crop-biosolids combination. Conversely, amending soil with biosolids either enhanced or had no negative effect, on the growth of plants. Results of the present study suggest little risk of triclosan to crops in agricultural fields amended with biosolids. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1896-1908. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  17. Dewaterability of thermophilically digested biosolids: effects of temperature and cellular polymeric substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, J.; Mavinic, D.S.; Kelly, H.G.; Ramey, W.D.

    2002-01-01

    Thermophilic processes digest sludge at high temperatures to produce Class A biosolids.Recent research work revealed that digestion temperature is the predominant factor affecting dewaterability of thermophilic biosolids. This paper presents findings of a laboratory study that investigated how various digestion temperatures affect dewaterability of digested biosolids, studied the phase partition of the substances affecting dewaterability in digested biosolids, and tested the role of cellular polymeric substances in affecting dewaterability.Secondary sludges were digested at 40-70 o C or 22 o C for up to 12 days. Centrate from thermophilically digested biosolids were treated with protease and boiling. This study found that, during the first few hours of digestion, higher temperatures resulted in more rapid and more significant deterioration in dewaterability than lower digestion temperatures. Continued digestion resulted in either improved (60 o C or 70 o C), or unchanged (40 o C or 50 o C), or gradually deteriorated dewaterability (22 o C). The substances affecting dewaterability were primarily located in the liquid phase of thermophilically digested biosolids. Boiling treatment did not result in significant changes in dewaterability. Protease treatment of the liquid phase of thermophilic biosolids improved dewaterability by 13-19%. Such an improvement confirmed the role of proteins in affecting dewaterability. (author)

  18. Dissipation of antibiotics in three different agricultural soils after repeated application of biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Wuxing; Huang, Yujuan; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Application of biosolids to agricultural soils is one of the pathways by which antibiotics can be introduced into agricultural ecosystems. A pot experiment was conducted with repeated soil amendment with biosolids to examine the concentrations of four classes of antibiotics (tetracyclines, sulfonamides, fluoroquinolones, and macrolides) and their dissipation in three different soil types in wheat-rice rotations. Antibiotics accumulate in the soils after repeated application of biosolids. Fluoroquinolones showed stronger accumulation and persistence in the test soils than the other three classes of antibiotics. The maximum residual antibiotic concentration was that of norfloxacin at 155 ± 16 μg kg -1 in the Typic Hapli-Stagnic Anthrosols (paddy soil). Predicted half-lives were up to 3.69 years, a much longer period than that between biosolid applications (twice each year on average). Antibiotic accumulation followed the rough order fluoroquinolones > tetracyclines > macrolides > sulfonamides, and the sulfonamides were seldom encountered. When biosolid application was suspended, the dissipation rate accelerated. Antibiotic dissipation was slightly slower when biosolids with high heavy metal concentrations were applied and microbial degradation may have been the main mechanism of dissipation. Norfloxacin persistence was positively correlated with its soil adsorption capacity. Cation exchange capacity and soil organic matter content may have vital roles in the soil adsorption of fluoroquinolones. Because of their persistence, the fluoroquinolones must be taken into account in the planning of biosolid applications in agricultural practice.

  19. Elevation of antibiotic resistance genes at cold temperatures: implications for winter storage of sludge and biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J H; Novak, J T; Knocke, W R; Pruden, A

    2014-12-01

    Prior research suggests that cold temperatures may stimulate the proliferation of certain antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and gene transfer elements during storage of biosolids. This could have important implications on cold weather storage of biosolids, as often required in northern climates until a time suitable for land application. In this study, levels of an integron-associated gene (intI1) and an ARG (sul1) were monitored in biosolids subject to storage at 4, 10 and 20°C. Both intI1 and sul1 were observed to increase during short-term storage (gene transfer of integron-associated ARGs and that biosolids storage conditions should be considered prior to land application. Wastewater treatment plants have been identified as the hot spots for the proliferation and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) to the environment through discharge of treated effluent to water bodies as well as application of biosolids to land. Identifying critical control points within the treatment process may aid in the development of solutions for the reduction of ARGs and ARB and curbing the spread of antibiotic resistance. This study found increases in ARGs during biosolids storage and identifies changes in operational protocols that could help reduce ARG loading to the environment when biosolids are land-applied. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Sludge, biosolids, and the propaganda model of communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampton, Sheldon

    2002-01-01

    The Water Environment Federation's elaborate effort to rename sewage sludge as "biosolids" is an example in practice of the "propaganda model" of communications, which sees its task as indoctrinating target audiences with ideas favorable to the interests of the communicators. The propaganda model assumes that members of the public are irrational and focuses therefore on symbolic and emotional aspects of communication. This approach to communicating arouses public resentment rather than trust. In place of a "propaganda model," public officials should adopt a "democratic model," which assumes that audiences are rational and intellectually capable of meaningful participation in decision-making.

  1. Investigation of the factors affecting adult fly production in biosolid cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadour, Ian R; Voss, Sasha C

    2009-06-01

    The seasonal pattern of adult fly production in both fresh and aged biosolid cake was established by the exposure of biosolid cake to natural conditions in the central coastal region of Perth, Western Australia, over the course of a year. Relationships between fly emergence and six factors (weeks exposed, pH, NH(4), rainfall, temperature, and moisture) suspected of facilitating the attraction of adult flies to biosolid cake were measured. The aim was to study the production of adult flies with regard to weeks exposed in different seasons to establish a "best practice" storage procedure for aged biosolid cake. Four fly species were collected during the study; Musca domestica L. (house fly), Stomoxys calcitrans L. (stable fly), Fannia canicularis L. (lesser house fly), and Muscina stabulans (Fallén) (false stable fly). Of the 5,303 flies identified, >97% of these were either M. domestica or S. calcitrans. Adult flies emerged from biosolid cake all year round with a sharp decline in winter. The number of emerged flies peaked in summer (3,163 flies) and declined during autumn (1,545 flies) and spring (532 flies). Significant positive relationships were observed between the number of adult flies emerging from biosolid cake and ambient temperature, NH(4) content, and weeks exposed. Higher ambient temperatures and a higher NH(4) content of the biosolid cake were associated with increased number of adult flies emerging from the biosolid cake. Similarly, the majority of flies emerged from biosolid cake in the first 10 wk of exposure to fly activity.

  2. The phytoavailability of cadmium to lettuce in long-term biosolids-amended soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S.L.; Chaney, R.L. [Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD (United States); Angle, J.S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Agronomy; Ryan, J.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). National Risk Management Research Lab.

    1998-09-01

    A field study was conducted to assess the phytoavailability of Cd in long-term biosolids-amended plots managed at high and low pH. The experiment, established 13 to 15 yr prior to the present cropping, on a Christiana fine sandy loam soil used a variety of biosolids. Two of the biosolids had total Cd concentrations of 13.4 and 210 mg kg{sup {minus}1}. A Cd salt treatment, with Cd added to soil at a rate equivalent to the Cd added by the higher Cd biosolids applied at 100 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}, was also included. The lettuce (Lactuca sativa var. longifolia) cultivar (Paris Island Cos) used in the initial study was also used in the current study. Lettuce Cd was compared between treatments, and in relation to the soil Cd/soil organic C (OC) ratio. There has been no significant increase in plant Cd since the initial cropping. With 16% of the biosolids added OC remaining, lettuce grown on the soil amended with the more contaminated biosolids was not different than that of the initial cropping. Further, significantly less Cd was taken up by lettuce grown on biosolids-amended soil than lettuce grown on soil amended with equivalent rates of Cd salt. The Cd concentration in lettuce grown in the low Cd biosolids treatment was not different from the control. These results indicate that the potential hazards associated with food chain transfer of biosolids-applied Cd are substantially lower than equivalent Cd salt treatments, and that the hazards do not increase over time.

  3. Metal stress and decreased tree growth in response to biosolids application in greenhouse seedlings and in situ Douglas-fir stands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, Erica T.; Nguyen, Quyen T.N.; Rollins, Lucy; Gawel, James E.

    2012-01-01

    To assess physiological impacts of biosolids on trees, metal contaminants and phytochelatins were measured in Douglas-fir stands amended with biosolids in 1982. A subsequent greenhouse study compared these same soils to soils amended with fresh wastewater treatment plant biosolids. Biosolids-amended field soils had significantly higher organic matter, lower pH, and elevated metals even after 25 years. In the field study, no beneficial growth effects were detected in biosolids-amended stands and in the greenhouse study both fresh and historic biosolids amendments resulted in lower seedling growth rates. Phytochelatins – bioindicators of intracellular metal stress – were elevated in foliage of biosolids-amended stands, and significantly higher in roots of seedlings grown with fresh biosolids. These results demonstrate that biosolids amendments have short- and long-term negative effects that may counteract the expected tree growth benefits. - Highlights: ► Biosolids amendment increases soil metals over 25 years later. ► Douglas-fir growth benefits fail to materialize from biosolids amendments. ► Phytochelatins are elevated in foliage of trees and roots of greenhouse seedlings after new biosolids are added to soil. ► Biosolids connected to metal stress in Douglas-fir. - Biosolids applications increase bioindicators of intracellular metal stress and may counteract tree growth benefits.

  4. Photovoltaics Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-02-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Photovoltaics (PV) subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Solar Energy Technologies Office works with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies to advance solar PV, which is the direct conversion of sunlight into electricity by a semiconductor, in support of the goals of the SunShot Initiative. SunShot supports research and development to aggressively advance PV technology by improving efficiency and reliability and lowering manufacturing costs. SunShot’s PV portfolio spans work from early-stage solar cell research through technology commercialization, including work on materials, processes, and device structure and characterization techniques.

  5. Composting municipal biosolids in polyethylene sleeves with forced aeration: Process control, air emissions, sanitary and agronomic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avidov, R; Saadi, I; Krassnovsky, A; Hanan, A; Medina, Sh; Raviv, M; Chen, Y; Laor, Y

    2017-09-01

    Composting in polyethylene sleeves with forced aeration may minimize odor emissions, vectors attraction and leachates associated with open windrows. A disadvantage of this technology is the lack of mixing during composting, potentially leading to non-uniform products. In two pilot experiments using biosolids and green waste (1:1; v:v), thermophilic conditions (>45°C) were maintained for two months, with successful control of oxygen levels and sufficient moisture. Emitted odors declined from 1.5-3.8×10 5 to 5.9×10 3 -2.3×10 4 odor units m -3 -air in the first 3weeks of the process, emphasizing the need of odor control primarily during this period. Therefore, composting might be managed in two phases: (i) a closed sleeve for 6-8weeks during which the odor is treated; (ii) an open pile (odor control is not necessary). Reduction of salmonella, E. coli and coliforms was effective initially, meeting the standards of "Class A" biosolids; however, total and fecal coliforms density increased after opening the second sleeve and exceeded the standard of 1000 most probable number (MPN) per g dry matter. Compost maturity was achieved in the open piles following the two sleeves and the final compost was non-phytotoxic and beneficial as a soil additive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Occurrence and fate of Ascaris lumbricoides ova in biosolids in Victoria, Australia: a human health risk assessment of biosolids storage periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Nicholas A; Surapaneni, Aravind; Smith, David; Stevens, Daryl

    2017-09-01

    Reuse of sewage biosolids in Victoria, Australia, typically involves mesophilic anaerobic digestion followed by air-drying and long-term storage to ensure removal of ova of soil-transmitted helminths (STH) such as Ascaris lumbricoides. Long-term storage degrades the biosolids' agronomic quality due to the loss of key plant nutrients and takes up large areas of storage space. The impact of varying biosolids holding times and other processes on STH using Ascaris as the reference STH pathogen was examined in this study using a quantitative risk analysis approach. Risk modelling of the potential human health impacts from the presence of Ascaris ova in biosolids was undertaken for discrete holding periods of 1, 2 and 3 years. Modelling showed that to meet the WHO 1 μDALY·person -1 ·year -1 disease burdens guideline for limiting exposure category, a biosolids storage period of 1.24 years or 2.1 years would be required, depending on the data source of ova shedding rates per worm (Bangladesh or Nigeria, respectively). The soil exposure and salad/root vegetable consumption models included a number of variables with moderate to high degrees of uncertainty. Monte Carlo simulation was used to assess the effect of uncertainty in model input variables and to assist in highlighting areas for further research.

  7. IMPLICATIONS OF BIOSOLIDS/COMPOST UTILIZATION ON THE RISK OF SOIL METALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation summarizes the current work on the fundamental changes in soil mineralogical accomplished by additions of biosolids and P to the system which results in changes in phytoavailability/bioavailability. The concepts of phytoavailability/bioavailability are rather s...

  8. Multimedia Sampling During the Application of Biosolids on a Land Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project integrated research from several disciplines to evaluate the effects of land application of biosolids on air and volatile emissions and soil microbial characteristics. Measurements included chemical, physical, and microbiological analytes.

  9. STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF METHODS FOR ENUMERATION OF FECAL COLIFORM AND SALMONELLA IN BIOSOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current federal regulations require monitoring for fecal coliforms or Salmonella in biosolids destined for land application. Methods used for analysis of fecal coliforms and Salmonella were reviewed and a standard protocol was developed. The protocols were then evaluated by testi...

  10. Synthetic organic chemicals in earthworms from agriculture soil amended with municipal biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Biosolids resulting from municipal wastewater treatment are known to contain residues of pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs) and other synthetic organic compounds. Many of these are contaminants of emerging concern for their potential endocrine disruption of fish and wildli...

  11. Production of class a biosolids with anoxic low dose alkaline treatment and odor management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Orf, M.M.; Brewster, J.; Oleszkiewicz, J.; Reimers, R.S.; Lagasse, P.; Amy, B.; Glindemann, D.

    2003-07-01

    The feasibility of full-scale anoxic disinfection of dewatered and digested sludge from Winnipeg, Manitoba with low lime doses and lagoon fly ash was investigated to determine if a class A product could be produced. Lime doses of 50g, 100g, and 200g per kg of biosolids (dry) were used along with fly ash doses of 500g. 1000g. and 1500g per kg of biosolids (dry). The mixed product was buried in eight-10 cubic meter trenches at the West End Water Pollution Control Center In Winnipeg. The trenches were backfilled with dirt and trapped to simulate anoxic conditions. Sampling cages were packed with the mixed product and pathogens non-indigenous to Winnipeg's biosolids. The cages were buried amongst the mixed biosolids in the trench. The non-indigenous pathogens spiked in the laboratory were the helminth Ascaris suum and the enteric virus reovirus. Samples were removed at days 12, 40, 69, 291, and 356 and were tested for the presence of fecal Coliform, Clostridium perfringens spores, Ascaris suum eggs, and reovirus. The pH, total solids, and free ammonia content of the mixed product were also determined for each sample. Odor was quantified for samples at both 291 and 356 days. Fecal Coliform bacteria and reovirus were completely inactivated for doses as low as 100g lime per kg biosolids (dry) and 50g lime + 500g fly ash per kg biosolids (dry). Spores of the bacteria C. perfringens experienced a 4-log reduction when treated with 100g lime per kg biosolids and a 5-log reduction when treated with doses as low as 50g lime + 500g fly ash per kg biosolids (dry) after 69 days. Ascaris eggs were completely inactivated in 5 gram packets for all treatments involving 100g lime per kg biosolids (dry) after 69 days. Class A pathogen requirements were met for all treatments involving a lime dose of at least 100g per kg biosolids. The odor potential from the produced biosolids is also assessed. (author)

  12. Sorption of Pharmaceuticals, Heavy Metals, and Herbicides to Biochar in the Presence of Biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Daniel A; Mukome, Fungai N D; Popova, Inna E; Ogunyoku, Temitope A; Jefferson, Allie; Wang, Daoyuan; Hafner, Sarah C; Young, Thomas M; Parikh, Sanjai J

    2016-11-01

    Agricultural practices are increasingly incorporating recycled waste materials, such as biosolids, to provide plant nutrients and enhance soil functions. Although biosolids provide benefits to soil, municipal wastewater treatment plants receive pharmaceuticals and heavy metals that can accumulate in biosolids, and land application of biosolids can transfer these contaminants to the soil. Environmental exposure of these contaminants may adversely affect wildlife, disrupt microbial communities, detrimentally affect human health through long-term exposure, and cause the proliferation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This study considers the use of biochar co-amendments as sorbents for contaminants from biosolids. The sorption of pharmaceuticals (ciprofloxacin, triclocarban, triclosan), and heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Ni, Pb) to biochars and biochar-biosolids-soil mixtures was examined. Phenylurea herbicide (monuron, diuron, linuron) sorption was also studied to determine the potential effect of biochar on soil-applied herbicides. A softwood (SW) biochar (510°C) and a walnut shell (WN) biochar (900°C) were used as contrasting biochars to highlight potential differences in biochar reactivity. Kaolinite and activated carbon served as mineral and organic controls. Greater sorption for almost all contaminants was observed with WN biochar over SW biochar. The addition of biosolids decreased sorption of herbicides to SW biochar, whereas there was no observable change with WN biochar. The WN biochar showed potential for reducing agrochemical and contaminant transport but may inhibit the efficacy of soil-applied herbicides. This study provides support for minimizing contaminant mobility from biosolids using biochar as a co-amendment and highlights the importance of tailoring biochars for specific characteristics through feedstock selection and pyrolysis-gasification conditions. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science

  13. Multivariate optimization of pressurized solvent extraction of alkylphenols and alkylphenol ethoxylates from biosolids

    OpenAIRE

    Maricán,Adolfo; Ahumada,Inés; Richter,Pablo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a methodology for pressurized solvent extraction of alkylphenols (APs) and alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEOs) from biosolids was optimized by utilizing a biosolid natively containing these compounds at a high concentration level. Optimization of the extraction was carried out through a multivariate analysis experimental design with a central composite design (CCD) producing the following optimum values for the variables: temperature of 129 ºC, extraction time per cycle of 34 min i...

  14. Wastewater Biosolid Composting Optimization Based on UV-VNIR Spectroscopy Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Temporal-Lara, Beatriz; Melendez-Pastor, Ignacio; G?mez, Ignacio; Navarro-Pedre?o, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Conventional wastewater treatment generates large amounts of organic matter–rich sludge that requires adequate treatment to avoid public health and environmental problems. The mixture of wastewater sludge and some bulking agents produces a biosolid to be composted at adequate composting facilities. The composting process is chemically and microbiologically complex and requires an adequate aeration of the biosolid (e.g., with a turner machine) for proper maturation of the compost. Adequate (ne...

  15. A review on sewage sludge (Biosolids) a resource for sustainable agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, V., Chopra, A.K. and Kumar, A.

    2017-01-01

    Sewage sludge (Biosolids) generation is fastly increasing resulting from the regular increase of population, urban planning and industrial developments worldwide. The sludge needs to be adequately treated and environmentally managed to reduce the negative impacts of its application or disposal. The present review deals with the different applications of sewage sludge for sustainable agriculture. The scattered literature is harnessed to critically review the uses of biosolids to promote sustai...

  16. Persistence of triclocarban and triclosan in soils after land application of biosolids and bioaccumulation in Eisenia foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Christopher P; Paesani, Zachary J; Chalew, Talia E Abbott; Halden, Rolf U; Hundal, Lakhwinder S

    2011-03-01

    The presence of the antimicrobial chemicals triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan (TCS) in municipal biosolids has raised concerns about the potential impacts of these chemicals on soil ecosystems following land application of municipal biosolids. The relative persistence of TCC and TCS in agricultural fields receiving yearly applications of biosolids at six different loading rates over a three-year period was investigated. Soil and biosolids samples were collected, extracted, and analyzed for TCC and TCS using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, the potential for bioaccumulation of TCC and TCS from the biosolids-amended soils was assessed over 28 d in the earthworm Eisenia foetida. Standard 28-d bioaccumulation tests were conducted for three biosolids loading rates from two sites, representing agronomic and twice the agronomic rates of biosolids application plots as well as control plots receiving no applications of biosolids. Additional bioaccumulation kinetic data were collected for the soils receiving the high biosolids loadings to ensure attainment of quasi steady-state conditions. The results indicate that TCC is relatively more persistent in biosolids-amended soil than TCS. In addition, TCC bioaccumulated in E. foetida, reaching body burdens of 25 ± 4 and 133 ± 17 ng/g(ww) in worms exposed for 28 d to the two soils amended with biosolids at agronomic rates. The 28-d organic carbon and lipid-normalized biota soil accumulation factors (BSAFs) were calculated for TCC and ranged from 0.22 ± 0.12 to 0.71 ± 0.13. These findings suggest that TCC bioaccumulation is somewhat consistent with the traditional hydrophobic organic contaminant (HOC) partitioning paradigm. However, these data also suggest substantially reduced bioavailability of TCC in biosolids-amended soils compared with HOC partitioning theory. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  17. In Situ Generated Colloid Transport of Cu and Zn in Reclaimed Mine Soil Profiles Associated with Biosolids Application

    OpenAIRE

    Jarrod O. Miller; Anastasios D. Karathanasis; Christopher J. Matocha

    2011-01-01

    Areas reclaimed for agricultural uses following coal mining often receive biosolids applications to increase organic matter and fertility. Transport of heavy metals within these soils may be enhanced by the additional presence of biosolids colloids. Intact monoliths from reclaimed and undisturbed soils in Virginia and Kentucky were leached to observe Cu and Zn mobility with and without biosolids application. Transport of Cu and Zn was observed in both solution and colloid associated phases in...

  18. Comparison of degradation between indigenous and spiked bisphenol A and triclosan in a biosolids amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Kate A; Warne, Michael Stj; Smernik, Ronald J; Shareef, Ali; Kookana, Rai S

    2013-03-01

    This study compared the degradation of indigenous bisphenol A (BPA) and triclosan (TCS) in a biosolids-amended soil, to the degradation of spiked labelled surrogates of the same compounds (BPA-d16 and TCS-(13)C12). The aim was to determine if spiking experiments accurately predict the degradation of compounds in biosolids-amended soils using two different types of biosolids, a centrifuge dried biosolids (CDB) and a lagoon dried biosolids (LDB). The rate of degradation of the compounds was examined and the results indicated that there were considerable differences between the indigenous and spiked compounds. These differences were more marked for BPA, for which the indigenous compound was detectable throughout the study, whereas the spiked compound decreased to below the detection limit prior to the study completion. The rate of degradation for the indigenous BPA was approximately 5-times slower than that of the spiked BPA-d16. The indigenous and spiked TCS were both detectable throughout the study, however, the shape of the degradation curves varied considerably, particularly in the CDB treatment. These findings show that spiking experiments may not be suitable to predict the degradation and persistence of organic compounds following land application of biosolids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Measured physicochemical characteristics and biosolids-borne concentrations of the antimicrobial Triclocarban (TCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges; O'Connor, George A; McAvoy, Drew C

    2010-06-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is an active ingredient in antibacterial bar soaps, a common constituent of domestic wastewater, and the subject of recent criticism by consumer advocate groups and academic researchers alike. Activated sludge treatment readily removes TCC from the liquid waste stream and concentrates the antimicrobial in the solid fraction, which is often processed to produce biosolids intended for land application. Greater than half of the biosolids generated in the US are land-applied, resulting in a systematic release of biosolids-borne TCC into the terrestrial and, potentially, the aquatic environment. Multiple data gaps in the TCC literature (including basic physicochemical properties and biosolids concentrations) prevent an accurate, quantitative risk assessment of biosolids-borne TCC. We utilized the USEPA Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) harmonized test guidelines to measure TCC solubility and log K(ow) values as 0.045 mg L(-1) and 3.5, respectively. The measured physicochemical 2 properties differed from computer model predictions. The mean concentration of TCC in 23 biosolids representative of multiple sludge processing methods was 19+/-11 mg kg(-1). Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Accumulation and partitioning of biomass, nutrients, and trace elements in switchgrass for phytoremediation of municipal biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeke, Nicholson N; Zvomuya, Francis; Ross, Lisette

    2016-09-01

    In situ phytoremediation of municipal biosolids is a promising alternative to the land spreading and landfilling of biosolids from end-of-life municipal lagoons. Accumulation and partitioning of dry matter, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and trace elements were determined in aboveground biomass (AGB) and belowground biomass (BGB) of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) to determine the harvest stage that maximizes phytoextraction of contaminants from municipal biosolids. Seedlings were transplanted into 15-L plastic pails containing 3.9 kg (dry wt.) biosolids. Biomass yield components and contaminant concentrations were assessed every 14 days for up to 161 days. Logistic model fits to biomass yield data indicated no significant differences in asymptotic yield between AGB and BGB. Switchgrass partitioned significantly more N and P to AGB than to BGB. Maximum uptake occurred 86 days after transplanting (DAT) for N and 102 DAT for P. Harvesting at peak aboveground element accumulation removed 5% of N, 1.6% of P, 0.2% of Zn, 0.05% of Cd, and 0.1% of Cr initially present in the biosolids. These results will contribute toward identification of the harvest stage that will optimize contaminant uptake and enhance in situ phytoremediation of biosolids using switchgrass.

  1. State Health Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State Health Facts Home State Health Facts Search State Health Facts: Choose Category - or - Choose Location Demographics ... Health Care Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs) Featured State Data Resources Custom State Reports Compile data from ...

  2. Cholera Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Cholera Fact sheet Updated December 2017 Key facts Cholera ... behaviour and to the control of cholera. Oral cholera vaccines Currently there are three WHO pre-qualified ...

  3. Biosolid stockpiles are a significant point source for greenhouse gas emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Ramaprasad; Livesley, Stephen J; Gregory, David; Arndt, Stefan K

    2014-10-01

    The wastewater treatment process generates large amounts of sewage sludge that are dried and then often stored in biosolid stockpiles in treatment plants. Because the biosolids are rich in decomposable organic matter they could be a significant source for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, yet there are no direct measurements of GHG from stockpiles. We therefore measured the direct emissions of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) on a monthly basis from three different age classes of biosolid stockpiles at the Western Treatment Plant (WTP), Melbourne, Australia, from December 2009 to November 2011 using manual static chambers. All biosolid stockpiles were a significant point source for CH4 and N2O emissions. The youngest biosolids (<1 year old) had the greatest CH4 and N2O emissions of 60.2 kg of CO2-e per Mg of biosolid per year. Stockpiles that were between 1 and 3 years old emitted less overall GHG (∼29 kg CO2-e Mg(-1) yr(-1)) and the oldest stockpiles emitted the least GHG (∼10 kg CO2-e Mg(-1) yr(-1)). Methane emissions were negligible in all stockpiles but the relative contribution of N2O and CO2 changed with stockpile age. The youngest stockpile emitted two thirds of the GHG emission as N2O, while the 1-3 year old stockpile emitted an equal amount of N2O and CO2 and in the oldest stockpile CO2 emissions dominated. We did not detect any seasonal variability of GHG emissions and did not observe a correlation between GHG flux and environmental variables such as biosolid temperature, moisture content or nitrate and ammonium concentration. We also modeled CH4 emissions based on a first order decay model and the model based estimated annual CH4 emissions were higher as compared to the direct field based estimated annual CH4 emissions. Our results indicate that labile organic material in stockpiles is decomposed over time and that nitrogen decomposition processes lead to significant N2O emissions. Carbon decomposition favors CO2 over

  4. Comparison of degradation between indigenous and spiked bisphenol A and triclosan in a biosolids amended soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langdon, Kate A.; Warne, Michael StJ.; Smernik, Ronald J.; Shareef, Ali; Kookana, Rai S.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the degradation of indigenous bisphenol A (BPA) and triclosan (TCS) in a biosolids-amended soil, to the degradation of spiked labelled surrogates of the same compounds (BPA-d 16 and TCS- 13 C 12 ). The aim was to determine if spiking experiments accurately predict the degradation of compounds in biosolids-amended soils using two different types of biosolids, a centrifuge dried biosolids (CDB) and a lagoon dried biosolids (LDB). The rate of degradation of the compounds was examined and the results indicated that there were considerable differences between the indigenous and spiked compounds. These differences were more marked for BPA, for which the indigenous compound was detectable throughout the study, whereas the spiked compound decreased to below the detection limit prior to the study completion. The rate of degradation for the indigenous BPA was approximately 5-times slower than that of the spiked BPA-d 16 . The indigenous and spiked TCS were both detectable throughout the study, however, the shape of the degradation curves varied considerably, particularly in the CDB treatment. These findings show that spiking experiments may not be suitable to predict the degradation and persistence of organic compounds following land application of biosolids. - Highlights: ► Degradation of indigenous and spiked compounds from biosolids were compared. ► Differences were observed for both the rate and pattern of degradation. ► Spiked bisphenol A entirely degraded however the indigenous compound remained. ► TCS was detectable during the experiment however the degradation patterns varied. ► Spiking experiments may not be suitable to predict degradation of organic compounds

  5. Comparison of degradation between indigenous and spiked bisphenol A and triclosan in a biosolids amended soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langdon, Kate A., E-mail: Kate.Langdon@csiro.au [School of Agriculture, Food and Wine and Waite Research Institute, University of Adelaide, South Australia, 5005, Adelaide (Australia); Water for a Healthy Country Research Flagship, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), PMB 2, Glen Osmond, South Australia, 5064, Adelaide (Australia); Warne, Michael StJ. [Water for a Healthy Country Research Flagship, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), PMB 2, Glen Osmond, South Australia, 5064, Adelaide (Australia); Smernik, Ronald J. [School of Agriculture, Food and Wine and Waite Research Institute, University of Adelaide, South Australia, 5005, Adelaide (Australia); Shareef, Ali; Kookana, Rai S. [Water for a Healthy Country Research Flagship, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), PMB 2, Glen Osmond, South Australia, 5064, Adelaide (Australia)

    2013-03-01

    This study compared the degradation of indigenous bisphenol A (BPA) and triclosan (TCS) in a biosolids-amended soil, to the degradation of spiked labelled surrogates of the same compounds (BPA-d{sub 16} and TCS-{sup 13}C{sub 12}). The aim was to determine if spiking experiments accurately predict the degradation of compounds in biosolids-amended soils using two different types of biosolids, a centrifuge dried biosolids (CDB) and a lagoon dried biosolids (LDB). The rate of degradation of the compounds was examined and the results indicated that there were considerable differences between the indigenous and spiked compounds. These differences were more marked for BPA, for which the indigenous compound was detectable throughout the study, whereas the spiked compound decreased to below the detection limit prior to the study completion. The rate of degradation for the indigenous BPA was approximately 5-times slower than that of the spiked BPA-d{sub 16}. The indigenous and spiked TCS were both detectable throughout the study, however, the shape of the degradation curves varied considerably, particularly in the CDB treatment. These findings show that spiking experiments may not be suitable to predict the degradation and persistence of organic compounds following land application of biosolids. - Highlights: ► Degradation of indigenous and spiked compounds from biosolids were compared. ► Differences were observed for both the rate and pattern of degradation. ► Spiked bisphenol A entirely degraded however the indigenous compound remained. ► TCS was detectable during the experiment however the degradation patterns varied. ► Spiking experiments may not be suitable to predict degradation of organic compounds.

  6. Amelioration of iron mine soils with biosolids: Effects on plant tissue metal content and earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cele, Emmanuel Nkosinathi; Maboeta, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The achievement of environmentally sound and economically feasible disposal strategies for biosolids is a major issue in the wastewater treatment industry around the world, including Swaziland. Currently, an iron ore mine site, which is located within a wildlife sanctuary, is being considered as a suitable place where controlled disposal of biosolids may be practiced. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of urban biosolids on iron mine soils with regard to plant metal content and ecotoxicological effects on earthworms. This was done through chemical analysis of plants grown in biosolid-amended mine soil. Earthworm behaviour, reproduction and bioaccumulation tests were also conducted on biosolid-amended mine soil. According to the results obtained, the use of biosolids led to creation of soil conditions that were generally favourable to earthworms. However, plants were found to have accumulated Zn up to 346 mg kg -1 (in shoots) and 462 mg kg -1 (in roots). This was more than double the normal Zn content of plants. It was concluded that while biosolids can be beneficial to mine soils and earthworms, they can also lead to elevated metal content in plant tissues, which might be a concern to plant-dependant wildlife species. Nonetheless, it was not possible to satisfactorily estimate risks to forage quality since animal feeding tests with hyperaccumulator plants have not been reported. Quite possibly, there may be no cause for alarm since the uptake of metals from soil is greater in plants grown in pots in the greenhouse than from the same soil in the field since pot studies fail to mimic field conditions where the soil is heterogeneous and where the root system possesses a complex topology. It was thought that further field trials might assist in arriving at more satisfactory conclusions.

  7. Systems Integration Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Systems Integration subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The Systems Integration subprogram enables the widespread deployment of safe, reliable, and cost-effective solar energy technologies by addressing the associated technical and non-technical challenges. These include timely and cost-effective interconnection procedures, optimal system planning, accurate prediction of solar resources, monitoring and control of solar power, maintaining grid reliability and stability, and many more. To address the challenges associated with interconnecting and integrating hundreds of gigawatts of solar power onto the electricity grid, the Systems Integration program funds research, development, and demonstration projects in four broad, interrelated focus areas: grid performance and reliability, dispatchability, power electronics, and communications.

  8. Growth and cadmium uptake of Swiss chard, Thlaspi caerulescens and corn in pH adjusted biosolids amended soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before regulations were established, some biosolids applications added higher Cd levels than presently permitted. Cadmium phytoextraction from such soils would alleviate constraints on land use. Unamended farm soil, and biosolids amended farm soil and mine soil were obtained from Fulton County, Il...

  9. Copper and zinc fractionation in biosolid cultivated with Pennisetum purpureum in different periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ely S. A. de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In order to reduce the effect of heavy metals on the biosolid, it is necessary to promote its phytoremediation. It is important to know the total content and chemical forms of these elements in the residue for analyzing its behavior and potential toxicity. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the fractionation and behavior of Cu and Zn in biosolid cultivated with Pennisetum purpureum in different periods. The experiment was carried out using a randomized complete block design. The treatments, with five replicates, corresponded to Pennisetum purpureum cultivation in biosolid for 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 days after planting. The total contents of Cu and Zn in the biosolid remained below the critical limits established by the CONAMA Resolution 357, and there was a reduction in these values with Pennisetum purpureum cultivation. Furthermore, the increment in the grass cultivation period caused intense reduction of Zn contents bound to organic matter, but there was an increase in soluble Zn and residual Zn. Additionally, there was an intense reduction in the content of Cu bound to sulfides. Therefore, for biosolid phytoremediation purposes, the grass should be cultivated for 150 days.

  10. Field dissipation of four personal care products in biosolids-amended soils in North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Ying, Guang-Guo; Ma, Yi-Bing; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Lai, Hua-Jie

    2014-11-01

    The present study investigated the dissipation behaviors of 4 typical personal care products (PCPs)-triclocarban (TCC), triclosan (TCS), tonalide (AHTN), and galaxolide (HHCB)- in soils amended with biosolids under field conditions in North China. The results showed that the 4 target compounds were detected in all biosolids-amended soils at levels of a few nanograms per gram to thousands of nanograms per gram (dry wt). The residual concentrations of the 4 PCPs were found in the following order: TCC > TCS > AHTN > HHCB. Significant dissipation of the 4 PCPs was observed in the biosolids-amended soils, with half-lives ranging from 26 d to 133 d. Furthermore, repeated biosolids applications and a higher biosolids application rate could lead to higher accumulation of the 4 PCPs in the agricultural soils. Based on the detected concentrations in the field trial and limited ecotoxicity data, high risks to soil organisms are expected for TCC, whereas low to medium risks are expected in most cases for AHTN, HHCB, and TCS. © 2014 SETAC.

  11. Establishment of Native Grasses with Biosolids on Abandoned Croplands in Chihuahua, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Jurado-Guerra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the work was to evaluate establishment and forage production of native grasses with application of biosolids, a byproduct of waste-water treatment, at an abandoned field, in Ejido Nuevo Delicias, Chihuahua, Mexico. Four biosolids rates from 0 (control to 30 dry Mg ha−1 and two methods of application, surface applied (BioSur and soil incorporated (BioInc, were evaluated. Seedbed preparation included plowing and harrowing before rainfall. Field plots of 5 × 5 m were manually sown with a mix of blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis (50% and green sprangletop (Leptochloa dubia (50% in early August 2005. Experimental design was a randomized block with a split plot arrangement. Grass density, height, and forage production were estimated for three years. Data were analyzed with mixed linear models and repeated measures. Green sprangletop density increased under all biosolids rates regardless of method of application, while blue grama density slightly decreased. Biosolids were more beneficial for green sprangletop height than for blue grama height. Blue grama forage production slightly increased, while green sprangletop forage production increased the most at 10 Mg ha−1 biosolids rate under BioSur method. It was concluded that BioSur application at 10 and 20 Mg ha−1 rates had positive effects on the establishment and forage production of native grasses, especially green sprangletop.

  12. Steroid hormone runoff from agricultural test plots applied with municipal biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Ya; Gray, James L.; Furlong, Edward T.; Davis, Jessica G.; ReVollo, Rhiannon C.; Borch, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The potential presence of steroid hormones in runoff from sites where biosolids have been used as agricultural fertilizers is an environmental concern. A study was conducted to assess the potential for runoff of seventeen different hormones and two sterols, including androgens, estrogens, and progestogens from agricultural test plots. The field containing the test plots had been applied with biosolids for the first time immediately prior to this study. Target compounds were isolated by solid-phase extraction (water samples) and pressurized solvent extraction (solid samples), derivatized, and analyzed by gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Runoff samples collected prior to biosolids application had low concentrations of two hormones (estrone -1 and androstenedione -1) and cholesterol (22.5 ± 3.8 μg L-1). In contrast, significantly higher concentrations of multiple estrogens (-1), androgens (-1), and progesterone (-1) were observed in runoff samples taken 1, 8, and 35 days after biosolids application. A significant positive correlation was observed between antecedent rainfall amount and hormone mass loads (runoff). Hormones in runoff were primarily present in the dissolved phase (hormones from biosolids-amended agricultural fields, directly to surface waters or redistributed to terrestrial sites away from the point of application via runoff. Although concentrations decrease over time, 35 days is insufficient for complete degradation of hormones in soil at this site.

  13. Integrated, long term, sustainable, cost effective biosolids management at a large Canadian wastewater treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, R J; Allain, C J; Laughton, P J; Henry, J G

    2004-01-01

    The Greater Moncton Sewerage Commission's 115,000 m3/d advanced, chemically assisted primary wastewater treatment facility located in New Brunswick, Canada, has developed an integrated, long term, sustainable, cost effective programme for the management and beneficial utilization of biosolids from lime stabilized raw sludge. The paper overviews biosolids production, lime stabilization, conveyance, and odour control followed by an indepth discussion of the wastewater sludge as a resource programme, namely: composting, mine site reclamation, landfill cover, land application for agricultural use, tree farming, sod farm base as a soil enrichment, topsoil manufacturing. The paper also addresses the issues of metals, pathogens, organic compounds, the quality control program along with the regulatory requirements. Biosolids capital and operating costs are presented. Research results on removal of metals from primary sludge using a unique biological process known as BIOSOL as developed by the University of Toronto, Canada to remove metals and destroy pathogens are presented. The paper also discusses an ongoing cooperative research project with the Université de Moncton where various mixtures of plant biosolids are composted with low quality soil. Integration, approach to sustainability and "cumulative effects" as part of the overall biosolids management strategy are also discussed.

  14. Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Listen ©istock.com/ Bestfotostudio Heroin ... 301.56 KB) (301.56 KB) "I needed heroin just to get by." ©istock.com/ pixelheadphoto Deon ...

  15. Facts about Benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Poisoning Methyl isocyanate Case Definition: Methyl Isocyanate Poisoning Mustard gas (H) (sulfur mustard) Facts About Sulfur Mustard Case ... About Strychnine Case Definition: Strychnine Sulfur mustard (H) (mustard gas) Facts About Sulfur Mustard Case Definition: Vesicant (Mustards, ...

  16. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

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    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... 69 KB) "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." ©istock.com/ Marjot Stacey is ...

  17. Marijuana: Facts for Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications » Marijuana: Facts for Teens » Letter to Teens Marijuana: Facts for Teens Email Facebook Twitter Letter to ... they once were. Did you know that teen marijuana use has dropped dramatically since the late 1990s? ...

  18. Homosexuality: Facts for Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Virginity Home Family Health Kids and Teens Homosexuality: Facts for Teens Homosexuality: Facts for Teens Share Print What is sexuality? ... no wrong type of orientation. You may be homosexual if you are attracted to people of the ...

  19. High Blood Pressure Facts

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    ... Stroke Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN High Blood Pressure Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... Top of Page CDC Fact Sheets Related to High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Pulmonary Hypertension Heart Disease Signs ...

  20. Meningitis Myths and Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Infographic Prevention and Control of Meningococcal Disease Meningitis Myths and Facts Myth: Meningococcal disease is easy ... infected person, such as shaking hands. Fact: Meningococcal meningitis is spread through air droplets and direct contact ...

  1. Facts About Pink Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conjunctivitis) >> Facts About Pink Eye Listen Facts About Pink Eye Pink eye is one of the most ... treatment depends on the underlying cause. What is pink eye? Pink eye, also known as conjunctivitis, involves ...

  2. Vehicle Technologies’ Fact of the Week 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Diegel, Susan W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moore, Sheila A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boundy, Robert Gary [Roltek, Inc., Clinton, TN (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Each week the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technology Office (VTO) posts a Fact of the Week on their website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/ . These Facts provide statistical information, usually in the form of charts and tables, on vehicle sales, fuel economy, gasoline prices, and other transportation-related trends. Each Fact is a stand-alone page that includes a graph, text explaining the significance of the data, the supporting information on which the graph was based, and the source of the data. A link to the current week’s Fact is available on the VTO homepage, but older Facts are archived and still available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/. This report is a compilation of the Facts that were posted during calendar year 2013. The Facts were written and prepared by staff in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis.

  3. Meat and bone meal and biosolids as slow-release phosphorus fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bøen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biosolids and meat and bone meal (MBM are commonly used as fertilizers in agriculture, often at application rates where total phosphorus (P far exceeds the annual demand. In a pot experiment, three biosolids and two types of MBM were tested at two commonly used application rates. Their contributions to P uptake in ryegrass (second and third season were compared with annual mineral P fertilization. The soil was analysed for extractable P (PAL and POlsen. Only soil amended with digested, limed biosolids provided a P uptake in ryegrass the third season comparable to annual NPK fertilization. Bone-rich MBM had considerable contributions to third season P uptake in soil with pH < 6. The product application rates did not influence P uptake significantly for any of the products. POlsen was found suitable to describe residual effects on soil P solubility, whereas the PAL-method was not applicable for MBM fertilized soils.

  4. DIAGNOSIS OF BIOSOLID MATERIALS USING A LOW-COST DIFFERENTIAL RESPIROMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Rahman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study justifies the applicability of a simple respirometric technique to diagnose the biosolid materials collected from municipal sewer lines. Samples of active settled sludge were collected from three different sewer lines of Sylhet city area (Bangladesh enriched with residential, commercial and industrial discharge respectively. Reaction vessel of the respirometer, partially filled with biosolid samples has been integrated with a compensation vessel to neutralize the temperature-pressure effect on the manometer readings. Results deduced from the systematic analysis of respirograms show that the biosolids from residential source could be used effectively as soil conditioner due to its high content of biodegradable materials while industrial sample exhibited toxic inhibitory effects on microbial degradation process.

  5. Rainfall-runoff of anthropogenic waste indicators from agricultural fields applied with municipal biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, James L.; Borch, Thomas; Furlong, Edward T.; Davis, Jessica; Yager, Tracy; Yang, Yun-Ya; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2017-01-01

    The presence of anthropogenic contaminants such as antimicrobials, flame-retardants, and plasticizers in runoff from agricultural fields applied with municipal biosolids may pose a potential threat to the environment. This study assesses the potential for rainfall-induced runoff of 69 anthropogenic waste indicators (AWIs), widely found in household and industrial products, from biosolids amended field plots. The agricultural field containing the test plots was treated with biosolids for the first time immediately prior to this study. AWIs present in soil and biosolids were isolated by continuous liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed by full-scan gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results for 18 AWIs were not evaluated due to their presence in field blank QC samples, and another 34 did not have sufficient detection frequency in samples to analyze trends in data. A total of 17 AWIs, including 4-nonylphenol, triclosan, and tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate, were present in runoff with acceptable data quality and frequency for subsequent interpretation. Runoff samples were collected 5 days prior to and 1, 9, and 35 days after biosolids application. Of the 17 AWIs considered, 14 were not detected in pre-application samples, or their concentrations were much smaller than in the sample collected one day after application. A range of trends was observed for individual AWI concentrations (typically from 0.1 to 10 μg/L) over the course of the study, depending on the combination of partitioning and degradation mechanisms affecting each compound most strongly. Overall, these results indicate that rainfall can mobilize anthropogenic contaminants from biosolids-amended agricultural fields, directly to surface waters and redistribute them to terrestrial sites away from the point of application via runoff. For 14 of 17 compounds examined, the potential for runoff remobilization during rainstorms persists even after three 100-year rainstorm-equivalent simulations and the

  6. Risk assessment of land-applied biosolids-borne triclocarban (TCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges; O'Connor, George A

    2013-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is monitored under the USEPA High Production Volume (HPV) chemical program and is predominantly used as the active ingredient in select antibacterial bar soaps and other personal care products. The compound commonly occurs at parts-per-million concentrations in processed wastewater treatment residuals (i.e. biosolids), which are frequently land-applied as fertilizers and soil conditioners. Human and ecological risk assessment parameters measured by the authors in previous studies were integrated with existing data to perform a two-tiered human health and ecological risk assessment of land-applied biosolids-borne TCC. The 14 exposure pathways identified in the Part 503 Biosolids Rule were expanded, and conservative screening-level hazard quotients (HQ values) were first calculated to estimate risk to humans and a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms (Tier 1). The majority of biosolids-borne TCC exposure pathways resulted in no screening-level HQ values indicative of significant risks to exposed organisms (including humans), even under worst-case land application scenarios. The two pathways for which the conservative screening-level HQ values exceeded one (i.e. Pathway 10: biosolids➔soil➔soil organism➔predator, and Pathway 16: biosolids➔soil➔surface water➔aquatic organism) were then reexamined using modified parameters and scenarios (Tier 2). Adjusted HQ values remained greater than one for Exposure Pathway 10, with the exception of the final adjusted HQ values under a one-time 5 Mg ha(-1) (agronomic) biosolids loading rate scenario for the American woodcock (Scolopax minor) and short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda). Results were used to prioritize recommendations for future biosolids-borne TCC research, which include additional measurements of toxicological effects and TCC concentrations in environmental matrices at the field level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Odorants and malodors associated with land application of biosolids stabilized with lime and coal fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laor, Yael; Naor, Moshe; Ravid, Uzi; Fine, Pinchas; Halachmi, Ilan; Chen, Yona; Baybikov, Rima

    2011-01-01

    Malodor emissions limit public acceptance of using municipal biosolids as natural organic resources in agricultural production. We aimed to identify major odorants and to evaluate odor concentrations associated with land application of anaerobically digested sewage sludges (Class B) and their alkaline (lime and coal fly ash)-stabilized products (Class A). These two types of biosolids were applied at 12.6 tonnes ha(-1) (dry weight) to microplots of very fine clayey Vertisol in the Jezreel Valley, northern Israel. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from the biosolids before and during alkaline stabilization and after incorporation into the soil were analyzed by headspace solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Odor concentrations at the plots were evaluated on site with a Nasal Ranger field olfactometer that sniffed over a defined land surface area through a static chamber. The odors emitted by anaerobically digested sewage sludges from three activated sludge water treatment plants had one characteristic chemical fingerprint. Alkaline stabilization emitted substantial odors associated with high concentrations of ammonia and release of nitrogen-containing VOCs and did not effectively reduce the potential odor annoyance. Odorous VOCs could be generated within the soil after biosolids incorporation, presumably because of anaerobic conditions within soil-biosolids aggregates. We propose that dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, which seem to be most related to the odor concentrations of biosolids-treated soil, be used as potential chemical markers for the odor annoyance associated with incorporation of anaerobically digested sewage sludges. by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  8. Leaching and ponding of viral contaminants following land application of biosolids on sandy-loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kelvin; Harrigan, Tim; Xagoraraki, Irene

    2012-12-15

    Much of the land available for application of biosolids is cropland near urban areas. Biosolids are often applied on hay or grassland during the growing season or on corn ground before planting or after harvest in the fall. In this study, mesophilic anaerobic digested (MAD) biosolids were applied at 56,000 L/ha on a sandy-loam soil over large containment lysimeters seeded to perennial covers of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), or planted annually to maize (Zea mays L.). Portable rainfall simulators were to maintain the lysimeters under a nearly saturated (90%, volumetric basis) conditions. Lysimeter leachate and surface ponded water samples were collected and analyzed for somatic phage, adenoviruses, and anionic (chloride) and microbial (P-22 bacteriophage) tracers. Neither adenovirus nor somatic phage was recovered from the leachate samples. P-22 bacteriophage was found in the leachate of three lysimeters (removal rates ranged from 1.8 to 3.2 log(10)/m). Although the peak of the anionic tracer breakthrough occurred at a similar pore volume in each lysimeter (around 0.3 pore volume) the peak of P-22 breakthrough varied between lysimeters (worm holes or other natural phenomena. The concentration of viral contaminants collected in ponded surface water ranged from 1 to 10% of the initial concentration in the applied biosolids. The die off of somatic phage and P-22 in the surface water was fit to a first order decay model and somatic phage reached background level at about day ten. In conclusion, sandy-loam soils can effectively remove/adsorb the indigenous viruses leached from the land-applied biosolids, but there is a potential of viral pollution from runoff following significant rainfall events when biosolids remain on the soil surface. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of Phosphorus Species in Biosolids and Manures Using XANES Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shober,A.; Hesterberg, D.; Sims, J.; Gardner, S.

    2006-01-01

    Received for publication March 10, 2006. Identification of the chemical P species in biosolids or manures will improve our understanding of the long-term potential for P loss when these materials are land applied. The objectives of this study were to determine the P species in dairy manures, poultry litters, and biosolids using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and to determine if chemical fractionation techniques can provide useful information when interpreted based on the results of more definitive P speciation studies. Our XANES fitting results indicated that the predominant forms of P in organic P sources included hydroxylapatite, PO{sub 4} sorbed to Al hydroxides, and phytic acid in lime-stabilized biosolids and manures; hydroxylapatite, PO{sub 4} sorbed on ferrihydrite, and phytic acid in lime- and Fe-treated biosolids; and PO{sub 4} sorbed on ferrihydrite, hydroxylapatite, {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP), and often PO{sub 4} sorbed to Al hydroxides in Fe-treated and digested biosolids. Strong relationships existed between the proportions of XANES PO{sub 4} sorbed to Al hydroxides and NH{sub 4}Cl- + NH{sub 4}F-extractable P, XANES PO{sub 4} sorbed to ferrihydrite + phytic acid and NaOH-extractable P, and XANES hydroxylapatite + {beta}-TCP and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB)- + H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-extractable P ({gamma}{sup 2} = 0.67 [P = 0.01], 0.78 [P = 0.01], and 0.89 [P = 0.001], respectively). Our XANES fitting results can be used to make predictions about long-term solubility of P when biosolids and manures are land applied. Fractionation techniques indicate that there are differences in the forms of P in these materials but should be interpreted based on P speciation data obtained using more advanced analytical tools.

  10. Phosphorus runoff from waste water treatment biosolids and poultry litter applied to agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John W; Coale, Frank J; Sims, J Thomas; Shober, Amy L

    2010-01-01

    Differences in the properties of organic phosphorus (P) sources, particularly those that undergo treatment to reduce soluble P, can affect soil P solubility and P transport in surface runoff. This 2-yr field study investigated soil P solubility and runoff P losses from two agricultural soils in the Mid-Atlantic region after land application of biosolids derived from different waste water treatment processes and poultry litter. Phosphorus speciation in the biosolids and poultry litter differed due to treatment processes and significantly altered soil P solubility and dissolved reactive P (DRP) and bioavailable P (FeO-P) concentrations in surface runoff. Runoff total P (TP) concentrations were closely related to sediment transport. Initial runoff DRP and FeO-P concentrations varied among the different biosolids and poultry litter applied. Over time, as sediment transport declined and DRP concentrations became an increasingly important component of runoff FeO-P and TP, total runoff P was more strongly influenced by the type of biosolids applied. Throughout the study, application of lime-stabilized biosolids and poultry litter increased concentrations of soil-soluble P, readily desorbable P, and soil P saturation, resulting in increased DRP and FeO-P concentrations in runoff. Land application of biosolids generated from waste water treatment processes that used amendments to reduce P solubility (e.g., FeCl(3)) did not increase soil P saturation and reduced the potential for DRP and FeO-P transport in surface runoff. These results illustrate the importance of waste water treatment plant process and determination of specific P source coefficients to account for differential P availability among organic P sources.

  11. Evaluation of the potential for biosolids obtained from wastewater treatment for agricultural use and their effect on cultivation of red radish (Raphanus sativus L)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Pisco, Ramiro; Perez Arenas, Martha Ines

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted in waste water treatment plant The Salitre, in Bogota, to evaluate the potential of the waste water treatment subproduct biosolids for application in agriculture by means of quantifying growth, development and production of cultivation of red radish, and to establish a possible alternative to the problem of final disposition of 3900 tons of this material generated monthly in the waste water treatment plant. The experimental design employed was a random blocks design, with five treatments and three replications, arranged in 2 m x 2 m plots. the treatments corresponded to mixtures of biosolids with soil in the following proportions: 100 % biosolid (equivalent to 294 ton ha-1), 75 % biosolid (220 ton ha-1), 50 % biosolid (147 ton ha-1), 25 % biosolid (73 ton ha-1) and. 100 % soil. Red radish raphanus sativus l. was planted. the variables evaluated were: germination percentage, dry weight of leaves and. roots, plant length, foliar area and production. Also, the accumulation of trace was measured in the harvested radishes, to determine risks of consumption. The results showed that the 50 % biosolid and 25 % biosolid, treatments were those that most favored growth, development and. production of cultivation radish, while the 75 % biosolid and 100 % biosolid treatments, showed lower development growth and production of the cultivar. The 100 % biosolid treatment resulted in low germination and also did not show root accumulation, that is the harvested product. The levels of accumulation of heavy metals surpassed the maximum levels with the 75 % biosolid and 100 % biosolid treatment. It was shown that the use of the biosolids in agriculture can produce a great risk, because despite having high nutrient (C,N, P, Ca, Na, Fe y Zn) and organic matter content, it also may slow growth and production of radish plants

  12. Knowledge and Technology Transfer (KTT) Activities Between Universities and Firms in Switzerland: The Main Facts: an empirical analysis based on firm-level data

    OpenAIRE

    Arvanitis, Spyridon; Kubli, Ursina; Sydow, Nora; Wörter, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This study is part of a large project aiming at the investigation of a) extent and b) economic relevance of knowledge and technology transfer (KTT) between science institutions (universities, universities of a pplied science and other public re search institutions) and private corporations. Under knowledge and technology transfer we understand very broadly any activities targeted at transferring knowledge an d technology that may help a company or a research institution – depending on the dir...

  13. Response of Pinus halepensis Mill. seedlings to biosolids enriched with Cu, Ni and Zn in three Mediterranean forest soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, David [Fundacion CEAM, Universidad de Alicante, Ap 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain)]. E-mail: david.fuentes@ua.es; Disante, Karen B. [Dept. d' Ecologia, Universitat d' Alacant, Ap 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain)]. E-mail: kb.disante@ua.es; Valdecantos, Alejandro [Fundacion CEAM, Universidad de Alicante, Ap 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain) and Dept. Ecosistemas Agroforestales (EPS Gandia), Universidad Politecnica de Valencia. Ctra. Nazaret-Oliva s/n. 46730 Gandia, Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: a.valdecantos@ua.es; Cortina, Jordi [Dept. d' Ecologia, Universitat d' Alacant, Ap 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain)]. E-mail: jordi@ua.es; Ramon Vallejo, V. [Fundacion CEAM, Universidad de Alicante, Ap 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain)]. E-mail: ramonv@ceam.es

    2007-01-15

    We investigated the response of Pinus halepensis seedlings to the application of biosolids enriched with Cu, Ni and Zn on three Mediterranean forest soils under semiarid conditions. One-year-old seedlings were planted in lysimeters on soils developed from marl, limestone and sandstone which were left unamended, amended with biosolids, or amended with biosolids enriched in Cu, Ni and Zn. Enriched biosolids increased plant heavy metal concentration, but always below phytotoxic levels. Seedlings receiving unenriched biosolids showed a weak reduction in Cu and Zn concentration in needles, negatively affecting physiological status during drought. This effect was alleviated by the application of enriched sludge. Sewage sludge with relatively high levels of Cu, Zn and Ni had minor effects on plant performance on our experimental conditions. Results suggest that micronutrient limitations in these soils may be alleviated by the application of biosolids with a higher Cu, Zn and Ni content than those established by current regulations. - Biosolid-borne Cu, Ni and Zn did not show negative effects on Pinus halepensis seedlings performance after application on three Mediterranean forest soils.

  14. Response of Pinus halepensis Mill. seedlings to biosolids enriched with Cu, Ni and Zn in three Mediterranean forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, David; Disante, Karen B.; Valdecantos, Alejandro; Cortina, Jordi; Ramon Vallejo, V.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the response of Pinus halepensis seedlings to the application of biosolids enriched with Cu, Ni and Zn on three Mediterranean forest soils under semiarid conditions. One-year-old seedlings were planted in lysimeters on soils developed from marl, limestone and sandstone which were left unamended, amended with biosolids, or amended with biosolids enriched in Cu, Ni and Zn. Enriched biosolids increased plant heavy metal concentration, but always below phytotoxic levels. Seedlings receiving unenriched biosolids showed a weak reduction in Cu and Zn concentration in needles, negatively affecting physiological status during drought. This effect was alleviated by the application of enriched sludge. Sewage sludge with relatively high levels of Cu, Zn and Ni had minor effects on plant performance on our experimental conditions. Results suggest that micronutrient limitations in these soils may be alleviated by the application of biosolids with a higher Cu, Zn and Ni content than those established by current regulations. - Biosolid-borne Cu, Ni and Zn did not show negative effects on Pinus halepensis seedlings performance after application on three Mediterranean forest soils

  15. OIT Tools Can Help You Improve Productivity: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Industries of the Future BestPractices Tools and Information Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy

    2001-08-22

    This case study is the latest in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. The case studies document the activities, savings, and lessons learned on these projects.

  16. A critical review of nitrogen mineralization in biosolids-amended soil, the associated fertilizer value for crop production and potential for emissions to the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Hannah; Clarke, Bradley O; Pritchard, Deborah L; Meehan, Barry; Beshah, Firew; Smith, Stephen R; Porter, Nichola A

    2016-01-15

    International controls for biosolids application to agricultural land ensure the protection of human health and the environment, that it is performed in accordance with good agricultural practice and that nitrogen (N) inputs do not exceed crop requirements. Data from the scientific literature on the total, mineral and mineralizable N contents of biosolids applied to agricultural land under a wide range of climatic and experimental conditions were collated. The mean concentrations of total N (TN) in the dry solids (DS) of different biosolids types ranged from 1.5% (air-dried lime-treated (LT) biosolids) to 7.5% (liquid mesophilic anaerobic digestion (LMAD) biosolids). The overall mean values of mineralizable N, as a proportion of the organic N content, were 47% for aerobic digestion (AeD) biosolids, 40% for thermally dried (TD) biosolids, 34% for LT biosolids, 30% for mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD) biosolids, and 7% for composted (Com) biosolids. Biosolids air-dried or stored for extended periods had smaller total and mineralizable N values compared to mechanically dewatered types. For example, for biosolids treated by MAD, the mean TN (% DS) and mineralizable N (% organic N) contents of air-dried materials were 3% and 20%, respectively, compared to 5% and 30% with mechanical dewatering. Thus, mineralizable N declined with the extent of biological stabilization during sewage sludge treatment; nevertheless, overall plant available N (PAN=readily available inorganic N plus mineralizable N) was broadly consistent across several major biosolids categories within climatic regions. However, mineralizable N often varied significantly between climatic regions for similar biosolids types, influencing the overall PAN. This may be partly attributed to the increased rate, and also the greater extent of soil microbial mineralization of more stable, residual organic N fractions in biosolids applied to soil in warmer climatic zones, which also raised the overall PAN

  17. The feasibility study of using non-woven MBR for reduction of hydrolysed biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, R Y; Shao, H; Chang, W K; Chang, M C

    2006-01-01

    In this study, non-woven MBR was used to treat hydrolysed biosolids wasted from a biological treatment plant. The concentration of SS of hydrolysed biosolids in influent was 10,000 mg/L and the concentration of SS in effluent was less than 200 mg/L with/without discharging wasted sludge depending on different HRTs, i.e. 20, 15 and 10 d. The results indicated that the percentage of biosolids reduction in terms of SS removal efficiency in non-woven MBR was around 65, 60 and 35%, respectively, depending on different HRTs. Meanwhile, the ratio of VSS/SS was decreased from 0.78 to 0.50 and the number of smaller inorganic particle sizes increased due to extended SRT. The initial flux in the non-woven MBR was set at 0.02, 0.04 and 0.06 m3/m2/day and trans-membrane pressure (TMP) was less than 10 kPa. The permeate flux could be maintained quite stably due to lower TMP. The proposed non-woven MBR could be used to achieve the reduction of biosolids in the wastewater treatment plant.

  18. Influence of long-term land application of class B biosolids on soil bacterial diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project evaluated the influence of annual land applications of Class B biosolids on soil bacterial diversity monitored over a 20 year period. Each annual land application was followed by a cotton crop. The study was initiated in 1986 at the University of Arizona Marana Agricultural Center, 21 m...

  19. Manure- and Biosolids-Resident Murine Norovirus 1 Attachment to and Internalization by Romaine Lettuce▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Jin, Yan; Sims, Tom; Kniel, Kalmia E.

    2010-01-01

    The attachment of murine norovirus 1 (MNV) in biosolids, swine manure, and dairy manure to Romaine lettuce and internalization of this virus were evaluated. The MNV in animal manures had behavior similar to that of pure MNV; however, MNV in biosolids had significantly higher levels of attachment and internalization than pure MNV or MNV in manures. The incubation time did not affect the attachment of MNV in biosolids or manure. Confocal microscopy was used to observe MNV on lettuce after SYBR gold-labeled MNV was added directly to lettuce or after lettuce was submersed in labeled virus. MNV was observed on the lettuce surface, inside open cuts, and occasionally within stomata. In general, lettuce pieces with a long cut on the edge and short cuts on the stem was more likely to contain internalized MNV than intact lettuce pieces, as observed by confocal microscopy; however, while the difference was visible, it was not statistically significant. This study showed that the presence of MNV in biosolids may increase the risk of fresh produce contamination and that the MNV in open cuts and stomata is likely to be protected from sanitization. PMID:19933344

  20. Perfluoroalkyl acid distribution in various plant compartments of edible crops grown in biosolids-amended soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop uptake of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) from biosolids-amended soil has been identified as a potential pathway for PFAA entry into the terrestrial food chain. This study compared the uptake of PFAAs in greenhouse-grown radish (Raphanus sativus), celery (Apium graveolens var.d...

  1. Uptake of perfluoroalkyl acids into edible crops via land applied biosolids: Field and greenhouse studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in biosolids destined for use in agriculture has raised concerns about their potential to enter the terrestrial food chain via bioaccumulation in edible plants. Uptake of PFAAs by greenhouse lettuce ( Lactuca sativa) and tomato (Lycope...

  2. Inactivation of microorganisms in treated municipal wastewater and biosolids by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Increasing growth of the world's population, waste minimization policies and agricultural needs make the recycling of domestic wastewater quite a desirable practice. Factors like environmental and public health risks must be taken into account when considering treated wastewater for field irrigation and biosolids for land application. Pathogens present in wastewater and biosolids may remain active after treatment and there is always a great risk of transmission of infections via consuming crop and vegetables. Therefore it is very important to treat domestic wastewater properly before using it as an irrigation water and as a fertilizer. The work reported herein represents an evaluation of the variations in the population densities of below indicated pathogens monitored during a one year study in Ankara Central Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant, and the efficiency of gamma irradiation for the inactivation of these important waterborne pathogens. Parasitological investigation Treated wastewater and biosolids - Cryptosporidium sp. - Giardia lamblia - Entamoeba histolytica - Cyclospora cayetanensis - Helminth ova Bacteriological investigation Treated wastewater - Total coliforms - Salmonella sp. - Fecal streptococci - Enterococcus sp. Biosolids - Fecal coliforms - Salmonella sp. (Includes 12 tables, 16 figures)

  3. Determination of heavy metals in Eucalyptus grandis, manured with biosolid, by neutrons activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateus, Natalina de Fatima; Yamashita, Marcelo Takeshi; Madi Filho, Tufic

    2007-01-01

    The biosolid is a mud resulting from the biological treatment of wasted liquids. It is considered as a profitable alternative and important to minimize the environmental impact generated by the sewage thrown in the sanitary lands. The utilization of biosolid in forest cultures, as the Eucalyptus grandis, is of great economic and scientific interest, because it promotes not only the use of sewage residues, but also a fertilization prices reduction. The objective of this work was to detect the presence of heavy metals in Eucalyptus grandis sample fertilized with different quantities of biosolid. For the experiment, we used the plantation of Estacao Experimental de Ciencias Florestais of Itatinga, linked to ESALQ of Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP. The eucalyptus were planted in March of 1998 and collect with five years old. The used biosolid was produced by ETE of Barueri - SP, classified as kind B. The samples were prepared in Universidade Estadual Paulista of Itapeva. For the determination of heavy metals presence in eucalyptus samples, an analysis technique by neutronic activation (NAA) was used followed by gamma rays spectroscopy. The samples were irradiated in the Nuclear Reactor IEA-R1 of IPEN-SP, followed by the measure of induced gamma rays activity, using a Detector HPGe. The presence, mainly of Br, Mn, Na and K, was detected in all analyzed samples. (author)

  4. Characterization of fluoroquinolone resistance and qnr diversity in Enterobacteriaceae from municipal biosolids.

    OpenAIRE

    Ella eKaplan; Ella eKaplan; Maya eOffek; Maya eOffek; Edouard eJurkevitch; Eddie eCytryn

    2013-01-01

    Municipal biosolids produced during activated sludge treatment applied in waste water treatment plants, are significant reservoirs of antibiotic resistance, since they assemble both natural and fecal microbiota, as well as residual concentrations of antibiotic compounds. This raises major concerns regarding the environmental and epidemiological consequences of using them as fertilizers for crops. The second generation fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin is probably the most abundant antibiotic comp...

  5. THE PHYTOAVAILABILITY OF CADMIUM TO LETTUCE IN LONG-TERM BIOSOLIDS-AMENDED SOILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field study was conducted to assess the phytoavailability of Cd in long-term biosolids-amended field plots managed at high and low pH. The experiment, established 13-15 yr prior to the present cropping, on a Christiana fine sandy loam soil (a clayey, kaolinitic, mesic Typic Pa...

  6. Characterization of fluoroquinolone resistance and qnr diversity in Enterobacteriaceae from municipal biosolids

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Ella; Ofek, Maya; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Cytryn, Eddie

    2013-01-01

    Municipal biosolids produced during activated sludge treatment applied in wastewater treatment plants, are significant reservoirs of antibiotic resistance, since they assemble both natural and fecal microbiota, as well as residual concentrations of antibiotic compounds. This raises major concerns regarding the environmental and epidemiological consequences of using them as fertilizers for crops. The second generation fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin is probably the most abundant antibiotic compo...

  7. Measurement of biosolids compost odor emissions from a windrow, static pile, and biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Paul; Grey, Mark; Sellew, Paul

    2004-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted to compare odor emissions from a windrow process and an aerated static pile and to determine the odor reduction efficiency of a pilot two-phase biofilter for odor control of biosolids composting. Chemical compounds identified as responsible for odors from biosolids composting include ammonia, dimethyl disulfide, carbon disulfide, formic acid, acetic acid, and sulfur dioxide (or carbonyl sulfide). Aeration was found to reduce the concentration of ammonia, formic acid, and acetic acid by 72, 57, and 11%, respectively, compared with a nearby windrow, while dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and sulfur dioxide (or carbonyl sulfide) concentrations were below detection limits. Using dilution-to-threshold olfactometry, aeration followed by biofiltration was found to reduce the odor from biosolids composting by 98%. Biofiltration also altered the character of odor emissions from biosolids composting, producing a less offensive odor with an earthy character. Biofiltration was found to reduce the concentration of ammonia, dimethyl disulfide, carbon disulfide, formic acid, acetic acid, and sulfur dioxide (or carbonyl sulfide) by 99, 90, 32, 100, 34, and 100%, respectively. The concentrations of those odorants were estimated to be 3700, 110000, 26,37,5, and 1.2 times reported human detection limits before the two-phase biofilter, respectively, and 42,9600,18,0,3, and 0 times human detection limits after the biofilter, respectively.

  8. Earthworms (Oligochaeta: Acanthodrilidae and Lumbricidae) associated with Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant, Travis County, Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earthworm populations were surveyed in soils from a variety of habitats associated with the Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant, Austin, Texas, from November 2009 through March 2010. Seven species of terrestrial Oligochaeta, including one species new to science, are reported from two families, ...

  9. The Fabulous Fact Fan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Jene P.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the use and construction of "fact fans," fun and easy-to-make manipulatives that provide elementary school students with the opportunity to explore mathematics operations being studied in the classroom and to practice addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts. (BB)

  10. Cd, Ni, Cr and Pb distribution in biosolid pellets used as soil amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordán, Manuel M.; Rincón-Mora, Beatriz; Belén Almendro-Candel, María; Navarro Pedreño, Jose; Gómez Lucas, Ignacio; Bech, Jaume; Roca, Nuria; Pardo, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The application of biosolids to a soil is a method that offers important benefits (Navarro et al. 2003). The transport and application costs are quite low (mostly if they are dehydrated biosolids or pellets) if soils are located near a wastewater treatment plant. It is possible to recycle nutrients (N, P, and K) and organic matter by improving the physical and chemical characteristics of the soil and by reducing the fertilizer costs. However, the use of biosolids may also has several problems, such as the presence of quantities of metals that could be toxic for plants or could contaminate ground-waters after being leached. Heavy metals are one of the most serious environmental pollutants because of its high toxicity, abundance and easy accumulation by plant (Soriano-Disla et al. 2014; Rosen and Chen 2014). Contamination of soils by potentially toxic elements (e.g. Cd, Ni, Cr, Pb) from amendments of biosolids is subject to rigorous controls within the European Union. The present study was designed to examine the partition of selected heavy metals in biosolid pellets, and also to relate the distribution patterns of these metals. Samples were collected from the treatment of urban wastewater at the drying grounds of a wastewater processing plant. The samples correspond to biosolids with humidities below 20% and are representative of the three horizons within the pile: the isolation surface (H1), the mesophilous area (H2), and the thermophilous area (H3). Biosolid aggregates were placed in a pellet press and then compacted. Total content of metals was determined following microwave digestion and analysed by ICP/MS. Triplicate samples were weighed in polycarbonate centrifuge tubes and sequentially extracted. The distribution of chemical forms of Cd, Ni, Cr, and Pb in the biosolids was studied using a sequential extraction procedure that fractionates the metal into soluble-exchangeable, specifically sorbed-carbonate bound, oxidizable, reducible, and residual forms. The

  11. Nanotechnology for Site Remediation: Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet presents a snapshot of nanotechnology and its current uses in remediation. It presents information to help site project managers understand the potential applications of this group of technologies at their sites.

  12. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of biosolids-borne triclocarban (TCC) in terrestrial organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges; O'Connor, George A; McAvoy, Drew C

    2011-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) toxicity and bioaccumulation data are primarily limited to direct human and animal dermal exposures, animal ingestion exposures to neat and feed-spiked TCC, and/or aquatic organism exposures. Three non-human, terrestrial organism groups anticipated to be the most highly exposed to land-applied, biosolids-borne TCC are soil microbes, earthworms, and plants. The three ecological receptors are expected to be at particular risk due to unique modes of exposure (e.g. constant, direct contact with soil; uptake of amended soil and pore water), inherently greater sensitivity to environmental contaminants (e.g. increased body burdens, permeable membranes), and susceptibility to minute changes in the soil environment. The toxicities of biosolids-borne TCC to Eisenia fetida earthworms and soil microbial communities were characterized using adaptations of the USEPA Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) Guidelines 850.6200 (Earthworm Subchronic Toxicity Test) and 850.5100 (Soil Microbial Community Toxicity Test), respectively. The resultant calculated TCC LC50 value for E. fetida was 40 mg TCC kg amended fine sand(-1). Biosolids-borne TCC in an amended fine sand had no significant effect on soil microbial community respiration, ammonification, or nitrification. Bioaccumulation of biosolids-borne TCC by E. fetida and Paspulum notatum was measured to characterize potential biosolids-borne TCC movement through the food chain. Dry-weight TCC bioaccumulation factor (BAF) values in E. fetida and P. notatum ranged from 5.2-18 and 0.00041-0.007 (gsoil gtissue(-1)), respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In Situ Generated Colloid Transport of Cu and Zn in Reclaimed Mine Soil Profiles Associated with Biosolids Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrod O. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Areas reclaimed for agricultural uses following coal mining often receive biosolids applications to increase organic matter and fertility. Transport of heavy metals within these soils may be enhanced by the additional presence of biosolids colloids. Intact monoliths from reclaimed and undisturbed soils in Virginia and Kentucky were leached to observe Cu and Zn mobility with and without biosolids application. Transport of Cu and Zn was observed in both solution and colloid associated phases in reclaimed and undisturbed forest soils, where the presence of unweathered spoil material and biosolids amendments contributed to higher metal release in solution fractions. Up to 81% of mobile Cu was associated with the colloid fraction, particularly when gibbsite was present, while only up to 18% of mobile Zn was associated with the colloid fraction. The colloid bound Cu was exchangeable by ammonium acetate, suggesting that it will release into groundwater resources.

  14. Modeling Uptake of Selected Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products into Food Crops from Biosolids-Amended Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosser, Ryan S.; Trapp, Stefan; Sibley, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    Biosolids contain a variety of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Studies have observed the uptake of PPCPs into plants grown in biosolids-amended soils. This study examined the ability of Dynamic Plant Uptake (DPU) model and Biosolids-amended Soil Level IV (BASL4) model to predict...... the concentration of eight PPCPs in the tissue of plants grown in biosolids-amended soil under a number of exposure scenarios. Concentrations in edible tissue predicted by the models were compared to concentrations reported in the literature by calculating estimated human daily intake values for both sets of data...... and comparing them to an acceptable daily intake value. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) portion of BASL4 overpredicted the concentrations of triclosan, triclocarban, and miconazole in root and shoot tissue by two to three orders of magnitude, while the dynamic carrot root (DCR) portion overpredicted...

  15. Proceedings of the 1999 international joint power generation conference (FACT-vol. 23). Volume 1: Fuels and combustion technologies; Gas turbines; and Nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfield, S.R. Jr.; Moussa, N.A.

    1999-01-01

    Papers are arranged under the following topical sections: Gas turbine combustion; Advanced energy conversion; Low NOx solutions; Burner developments; Alternative fuels combustion; Advanced energy conversion technologies; Numerical modeling of combustion; Fluidized bed combustion; Coal combustion; Combustion research; Gasification systems; Mercury emissions; Highly preheated air combustion; Selective catalytic reduction; Special topics in combustion research; Gas turbines and advanced energy; and How can the nuclear industry become more efficient? Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the database

  16. Health risk assessment of heavy metals through the consumption of food crops fertilized by biosolids: A probabilistic-based analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini Koupaie, E., E-mail: ehssan.hosseini.k@gmail.com; Eskicioglu, C., E-mail: cigdem.eskicioglu@ubc.ca

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • No potential health risk of land application of the regional biosolids. • More realistic risk assessment via probabilistic approach than that of deterministic. • Increasing the total hazard index with increasing fertilizer land application rate. • Significant effect of long-term biosolids land application of hazard index. • Greater contribution of rice ingestion than vegetable ingestion on hazard index. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to perform a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) to assess the health risk of Cadmium (Cd), Copper (Cu), and Zinc (Zn) through the consumption of food crops grown on farm lands fertilized by biosolids. The risk analysis was conducted using 8 years of historical heavy metal data (2005–2013) of the municipal biosolids generated by a nearby treatment facility considering one-time and long-term biosolids land application scenarios for a range of 5–100 t/ha fertilizer application rate. The 95th percentile of the hazard index (HI) increased from 0.124 to 0.179 when the rate of fertilizer application increased from 5 to 100 t/ha at one-time biosolids land application. The HI at long-term biosolids land application was also found 1.3 and 1.9 times greater than that of one-time land application at fertilizer application rates of 5 and 100 t/ha, respectively. Rice ingestion had more contribution to the HI than vegetable ingestion. Cd and Cu were also found to have more contribution to the health risk associated to vegetable and rice ingestion, respectively. Results indicated no potential risk to the human health even at long-term biosolids land application scenario at 100 t/ha fertilizer application rate.

  17. Health risk assessment of heavy metals through the consumption of food crops fertilized by biosolids: A probabilistic-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini Koupaie, E.; Eskicioglu, C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • No potential health risk of land application of the regional biosolids. • More realistic risk assessment via probabilistic approach than that of deterministic. • Increasing the total hazard index with increasing fertilizer land application rate. • Significant effect of long-term biosolids land application of hazard index. • Greater contribution of rice ingestion than vegetable ingestion on hazard index. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to perform a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) to assess the health risk of Cadmium (Cd), Copper (Cu), and Zinc (Zn) through the consumption of food crops grown on farm lands fertilized by biosolids. The risk analysis was conducted using 8 years of historical heavy metal data (2005–2013) of the municipal biosolids generated by a nearby treatment facility considering one-time and long-term biosolids land application scenarios for a range of 5–100 t/ha fertilizer application rate. The 95th percentile of the hazard index (HI) increased from 0.124 to 0.179 when the rate of fertilizer application increased from 5 to 100 t/ha at one-time biosolids land application. The HI at long-term biosolids land application was also found 1.3 and 1.9 times greater than that of one-time land application at fertilizer application rates of 5 and 100 t/ha, respectively. Rice ingestion had more contribution to the HI than vegetable ingestion. Cd and Cu were also found to have more contribution to the health risk associated to vegetable and rice ingestion, respectively. Results indicated no potential risk to the human health even at long-term biosolids land application scenario at 100 t/ha fertilizer application rate.

  18. Anesthesia Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education About NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Anesthesia Anesthesia Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area En español ... Version (464 KB) Other Fact Sheets What is anesthesia? Anesthesia is a medical treatment that prevents patients ...

  19. Facts and Values

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drozenová, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2006), s. 111-121 ISSN 1210-0250 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90090514 Keywords : Facts * values * meaning of being * D. Hume * G .E. Moore Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  20. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In Honor Become a Member En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community Meal Planning ... Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes Challenge Type 1 Type 2 Facts About Type 2 Enroll in ...

  1. Facts about Pulmonary Atresia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Websites Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Pulmonary Atresia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Click ... pick up oxygen for the body. What is Pulmonary Atresia? Pulmonary atresia is a birth defect of ...

  2. Cholesterol Facts and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program High Cholesterol Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Find ... about high cholesterol in the United States. High Cholesterol in the United States In 2011–2012, 78 ...

  3. Tinnitus: Understanding the Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Tinnitus Association Donate Become A Member Member Login Find A Provider Search form Search Menu Close Understanding The Facts Managing Your Tinnitus Research Toward A Cure About Us Initiatives News & ...

  4. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes Challenge Type 1 Type 2 Facts About Type 2 ... as well as the aged population. Patient Education Materials — Taking Care of Type 2 Diabetes This two- ...

  5. CMS Fast Facts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS has developed a new quick reference statistical summary on annual CMS program and financial data. CMS Fast Facts includes summary information on total program...

  6. Facts about Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... of the baby’s brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  7. Facts about Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Facts about Physical Activity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Some ... Activity Guideline for aerobic activity than older adults. Physical activity and socioeconomic status Adults with more education ...

  8. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes Challenge Type 1 Type 2 Facts About Type 2 ... eating and being active. But, your doctor may need to also prescribe oral medications or insulin to ...

  9. Sepsis Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education About NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Sepsis Sepsis Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area PDF Version ( ... KB) En español Other Fact Sheets What is sepsis? Sepsis is a serious medical condition. It is ...

  10. Respirator Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to protect myself, my family, and/or my employees? If available and used correctly, a respirator can ... Respirator Fact Sheet [PDF - 706 KB] Follow NIOSH Facebook Flickr Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A- ...

  11. Facts and Figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saves Lives Facts & Figures My Blood, Your Blood Blood Donation Types Did you know there is more than one type of blood donation? Learn more about blood donation types here. Blood Safety and Testing The blood supply ...

  12. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Share the facts: Quick Facts Prevalence Mortality Caregivers Cost Special Report Alzheimer's in each state Quick Facts Share the facts: Prevalence The number of Americans living with Alzheimer's is growing — and growing fast. An ...

  13. Electric power supply 3. Dynamics, control and stabililty, quality of supply, grid planning, operational planning and control, control and information technology, FACTS, high-speed transmission. 3. rev. ed.; Elektrische Energieversorgung 3. Dynamik, Regelung und Stabilitaet, Versorgungsqualitaet, Netzplanung, Betriebsplanung und -fuehrung, Leit- und Informationstechnik, FACTS, HGUe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westermann, Dirk [Technische Univ. Ilmenau (Germany). Inst. fuer elektrische Energie- und Steuerungstechnik; Crastan, Valentin

    2012-07-01

    In view of the large quantity of information, Vol. 2 was divided up into two volumes in the third edition. All three volumes combine theory with practical applicability and present exercises, examples and simulations. The authors have long experience in electric power supply and also teaching experience as university professors. Volume 3, which is published for the first time in the third edition, discusses the following subjects: Control and stability of the power transmission grid, grid planning, operational planning and control, grid control technology, flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS), and high-speed DC transmission systems. [German] Der zweite Band dieses umfassenden Lehr- und Nachschlagewerkes fuer Studenten und Ingenieure in der elektrischen Energietechnik wurde wegen der vielen Erweiterungen in zwei Teile aufgespalten, die fortan als Band 2 und 3 erscheinen. Die drei Baende der ''elektrischen Energieversorgung'' zeichnen sich durch die Synthese von theoretischer Fundierung und unmittelbarem Praxisbezug aus und unterstuetzen das Verstaendnis und den Lernerfolg mit Uebungsaufgaben, Modellbeispielen und Simulationen. Die Autoren schoepfen inhaltlich aus ihrer langjaehrigen Erfahrung auf dem Gebiet der Energieversorgung sowie didaktisch aus ihrer Lehrtaetigkeit als Professoren. Der erstmalig vorliegende dritte Band behandelt die Themen Regelung und Stabilitaet des Energieversorgungnetzes, Netzplanung, Betriebsplanung und -fuehrung, Netzleittechnik sowie Leistungselektronische Netzsteuerung (FACTS) und Hochpannungsgleichstromuebertragung. (orig.)

  14. [Suicide, a social fact].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudelot, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Treating suicide as a social fact means disregarding its individual and dramatic dimensions. Sociologists do not reason on the basis of specific cases but by studying the variations, in space and time, of suicide rates. Their contribution relates essentially to a renewed perspective on society: suicide is in fact a very accurate indicator of the intensity and quality of the bonds which unite or isolate individuals in a society. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of plant availability and environmental risk of biosolids-phosphorus in a U.S. Midwest Corn-Belt Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, G; Cox, A E; Kumar, K; Granato, T C; O'Connor, G A; Elliott, H A

    2016-05-01

    A field experiment was conducted from 2005 to 2008 in Fulton County, Western Illinois with biosolids from conventional wastewater treatment applied as corn fertilizer in a series of P rates (0, 163, 325, 488, 650 kg P ha(-1)) along with commercial P fertilizer - triple superphosphate P (TSP) as reference to assess biosolids-P plant availability and potential loss to waterbodies through runoff. Air-dried biosolids and TSP were incorporated into surface soil at end of 2005, and corn (Zea mays) was planted for three consecutive years (2006-2008). Concentrations of soil extractable P except for Mehlich-3 P were always lower in the biosolids than TSP treatments at the same P rates. The soil potentially available P in water extractable P (WEP) and Olsen P derived from biosolids-P estimated by the exponential depletion model was 2-4% and 15-24% of total P in the applied biosolids, respectively. The residence time of biosolids-induced WEP and Olsen P in Midwest soil under annual corn cropping was 5 and 2 years, respectively. Corn tissue analysis showed lower increase in P concentration by biosolids-P than TSP. The elevation rate of soluble reactive P (SRP) concentration in simulated runoff was less by biosolids than TSP. Based on the data in this study, the plant availability and environmental risk of biosolids-P are lower than those of TSP in the Midwest soil, thus use of biosolids as P nutrient for corn would not cause a major impairment to water sources even P applied through biosolids was not completely used by annual crop. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. National inventory of perfluoroalkyl substances in archived U.S. biosolids from the 2001 EPA National Sewage Sludge Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Arjun K.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2013-01-01

    Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we determined the first nationwide inventories of 13 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in U.S. biosolids via analysis of samples collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the 2001 National Sewage Sludge Survey. Perfluorooctane sulfonate [PFOS; 403 ± 127 ng/g dry weight (dw)] was the most abundant PFAS detected in biosolids composites representing 32 U.S. states and the District of Columbia, followed by perfluorooctanoate [PFOA; 34 ± 22 ng/g dw] and perfluorodecanoate [PFDA; 26 ± 20 ng/g dw]. Mean concentrations in U.S. biosolids of the remaining ten PFASs ranged between 2 and 21 ng/g dw. Interestingly, concentrations of PFOS determined here in biosolids collected prior to the phase-out period (2002) were similar to levels reported in the literature for recent years. The mean load of ΣPFASs in U.S. biosolids was estimated at 2749–3450 kg/year, of which about 1375–2070 kg is applied on agricultural land and 467–587 kg goes to landfills as an alternative disposal route. This study informs the risk assessment of PFASs by furnishing national inventories of PFASs occurrence and environmental release via biosolids application on land. PMID:23562984

  17. Co-gasification of biosolids with biomass: Thermogravimetric analysis and pilot scale study in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ming Ming; Masnadi, Mohammad S; Grace, John R; Bi, Xiaotao T; Lim, C Jim; Li, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    This work studied the feasibility of co-gasification of biosolids with biomass as a means of disposal with energy recovery. The kinetics study at 800°C showed that biomass, such as switchgrass, could catalyze the reactions because switchgrass ash contained a high proportion of potassium, an excellent catalyst for gasification. However, biosolids could also inhibit gasification due to interaction between biomass alkali/alkaline earth metals and biosolids clay minerals. In the pilot scale experiments, increasing the proportion of biosolids in the feedstock affected gasification performance negatively. Syngas yield and char conversion decreased from 1.38 to 0.47m(3)/kg and 82-36% respectively as the biosolids proportion in the fuel increased from 0% to 100%. Over the same range, the tar content increased from 10.3 to 200g/m(3), while the ammonia concentration increased from 1660 to 19,200ppmv. No more than 25% biosolids in the fuel feed is recommended to maintain a reasonable gasification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of land-applied biosolids on surface-water nutrient yields and groundwater quality in Orange County, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Chad R.; Fitzgerald, Sharon A.; McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Harden, Stephen L.; Gurley, Laura N.; Rogers, Shane W.

    2015-01-01

    Land application of municipal wastewater biosolids is the most common method of biosolids management used in North Carolina and the United States. Biosolids have characteristics that may be beneficial to soil and plants. Land application can take advantage of these beneficial qualities, whereas disposal in landfills or incineration poses no beneficial use of the waste. Some independent studies and laboratory analysis, however, have shown that land-applied biosolids can pose a threat to human health and surface-water and groundwater quality. The effect of municipal biosolids applied to agriculture fields is largely unknown in relation to the delivery of nutrients, bacteria, metals, and contaminants of emerging concern to surface-water and groundwater resources. Therefore, the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (NCDENR) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) through the 319 Nonpoint Source Program to better understand the transport of nutrients and bacteria from biosolids application fields to groundwater and surface water and to provide a scientific basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the current regulations.

  19. Wetland-based phytoremediation of biosolids from an end-of-life municipal lagoon: A microcosm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarakoon, Inoka; Hassan, Adenike O; Zvomuya, Francis

    2018-01-28

    This study examined the effectiveness of a wetland system for phytoremediation of biosolids from an end-of-life municipal lagoon. The microcosm experiment tested the effects of one vs. two harvests of cattail per growth cycle in biosolids without (PB) or with (PBS) the addition of soil on phytoremediation. Cattail (Typha latifolia) seedlings were transplanted into pots containing 4.5 kg (dry wt.) of biosolids, above which a 10-cm deep water column was maintained. Results showed that two harvests per growth cycle significantly increased N and P phytoextraction relative to a single harvest. Overall, the three cycles of cattail removed ∼3.7% of N which was originally present in the biosolids and ∼2% of the total P content. Phytoextraction rates are expected to be higher under field conditions where biomass yields are much higher than those obtained under growth room conditions in this study. These results indicate that wetland-based phytoremediation can effectively clean up nutrients from biosolids, and therefore presents a potential alternative to the spreading of biosolids on agricultural land, which may not be readily available in some communities. Phytoextraction rates of trace elements, however, were much lower (0.02-0.17%). Nonetheless, trace element concentrations were not high enough to be of significant concern.

  20. Health risk assessment of heavy metals through the consumption of food crops fertilized by biosolids: A probabilistic-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Koupaie, E; Eskicioglu, C

    2015-12-30

    The objective of this study was to perform a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) to assess the health risk of Cadmium (Cd), Copper (Cu), and Zinc (Zn) through the consumption of food crops grown on farm lands fertilized by biosolids. The risk analysis was conducted using 8 years of historical heavy metal data (2005-2013) of the municipal biosolids generated by a nearby treatment facility considering one-time and long-term biosolids land application scenarios for a range of 5-100 t/ha fertilizer application rate. The 95th percentile of the hazard index (HI) increased from 0.124 to 0.179 when the rate of fertilizer application increased from 5 to 100 t/ha at one-time biosolids land application. The HI at long-term biosolids land application was also found 1.3 and 1.9 times greater than that of one-time land application at fertilizer application rates of 5 and 100 t/ha, respectively. Rice ingestion had more contribution to the HI than vegetable ingestion. Cd and Cu were also found to have more contribution to the health risk associated to vegetable and rice ingestion, respectively. Results indicated no potential risk to the human health even at long-term biosolids land application scenario at 100 t/ha fertilizer application rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dispersion Modeling and Characterization of Particulates from Land Application of Class B Biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Abhishek S.

    This study presents a comprehensive approach to understand the particle characteristics, identify the source profile, develop new equations for emission rates, analyze the source-receptor relationship, and develop and evaluate a numerical model for the dispersion and transport of particles released during the injection of biosolids. Two field studies were conducted in the summer of 2008 and 2009 to collect airborne particulate matter emitted during the injection application of class B biosolids. The sampling was carried out before (pre-application), during (application), and after (post-application) the application. The research work characterized the particulate emissions deposited on the aerosols spectrometer. The mass concentrations of fine (PM2.5) and ultrafine (PM 1.0) particles were highest during the pre-application. The mass concentration of thoracic fraction (PM2.5-10) increased significantly during the application. A bimodal size distribution was observed throughout the sampling. Nuclei mode formation was predominant during the pre-application and the post-application, whereas the accumulation mode was distinctive during the application. Airborne particles were collected on filter papers during the biosolids application process using an aerosol spectrometer. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) tool was used to analyze particles collected before, during, and after injection of biosolids. The major emphasis of the analysis was on providing in depth information on particle count, size, shape, morphology, and chemical composition. The particle count was significantly sensitive towards the different activities surrounding the application. The combination of SEM, particle analysis software, and EDS technique was capable of revealing detailed information on the size, shape, morphology, and chemical composition of individual particles. These techniques proved to be an effective non-destructive method for the

  2. Determination of lindane leachability in soil-biosolid systems and its bioavailability in wheat plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Pamela; Schröder, Andrea; Ulrich, Nadin; Schröter, Uwe; Paschke, Albrecht; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Ahumada, Inés; Richter, Pablo

    2011-07-01

    The leachability of lindane from different biosolid amended soils was determined and compared to its bioavailability. Sand, soil, and a mixture of soil-sand (1:1 w/w) were spiked with lindane, blended with different amounts of biosolids, and subjected to a leaching process with water that lasted for 1-28 d. This procedure is in accordance with ISO/TS 21268-1: 2007. After these batch tests, lindane was extracted from the leachates using three different solvent-free microextraction techniques, including solid phase microextraction (SPME), stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), and silicone rod extraction (SRE). The amount of lindane was determined with thermal desorption and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The efficiencies of the three microextraction techniques were statistically different, and the efficiency could be related to the amount of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) in each extraction device. However, all of the techniques provide data that shows that the leachability of lindane is dependent on the amount of organic matter contained in the matrix. The results of the lindane leachability assay were compared to the bioavailability of lindane, which was determined by measuring the amount of lindane that accumulated in the roots of wheat plants grown in similar soil-biosolid systems. It was confirmed that the amount of organic matter in the matrix is a determining factor for lindane immobilization. The presence of biosolids decreases the mobility of lindane in all of the systems under study. Similarly, increasing biosolid concentrations in the soil significantly decreased the bioavailability of lindane and, consequently, plant absorption. The good correlation (R(2)=0.997) between the leachability of lindane from the matrix and plant absorption of lindane indicates that the proposed biomimetic methodology can predict the bioavailability of lindane in a time period as short as 7d. The results of this work confirm that amending contaminated soils

  3. Food irradiation: Facts or fiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaharanu, P.

    1990-01-01

    Food irradiation is at a political crossroad. In one direction, it is moving forward supported by overwhelming scientific evidence of its safety and benefits to economy and health. In the opposite direction, it threatens to be derailed by misleading claims about its safety and usefulness. Whether people will ultimately benefit from the use of irradiation to help fight serious food problems, or whether they will allow the technology to go to waste, will be determined by how successful people are in separating the facts from the fiction of food irradiation

  4. Toward the conceptual and quantitative understanding of biosolids conditioning: the gel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Derya; Dentel, Steven K

    2009-01-01

    Proper chemical conditioning of wastewater solids is crucial for both operational and economic reasons, but the process has defied satisfactory description to date, in either conceptual or quantitative terms. In this research, a new conceptual model of biosolids structure--likening it to a colloidal gel--was assessed as a means of interpreting conditioning mechanisms. The basis of the gel approach lies in the colligative properties that are altered by lowering of the solvent chemical potential by introducing a solute. Results indicate that inorganic conditioners form precipitates and complexes thus collapsing the gel network and forming particulates, whereas organic polymers lead to heterogeneous collapse with limited diffusion inside the gel. A gel model, based on the osmotic pressure, was found reasonably successful in defining the conditioning efficacy of biosolids. Beyond the model's fundamental value, these results validate a new way of understanding how conditioning and dewatering operate, which should help to improve the selection and optimization of these processes.

  5. NASA Facts, Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The design and function of solar cells as a source of electrical power for unmanned space vehicles is described in this pamphlet written for high school physical science students. The pamphlet is one of the NASA Facts Science Series (each of which consists of four pages) and is designed to fit in the standard size three-ring notebook. Review…

  6. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes Challenge Type 1 Type 2 Facts About Type 2 Enroll in ... Do I Begin With Type2? Living With Type 1 Diabetes Enroll in the Living WIth Type 2 Diabetes ...

  7. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A A A Listen En Español Facts About Type 2 Type 2 diabetes is the most common ... 5% back to the Association. Shopdiabetes.org: Your Stress-Free System for Family Dinners! - 2017-03-book- ...

  8. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A A Listen En Español Facts About Type 2 Type 2 diabetes is the most common form ... program will help you live well. More from diabetes.org Healthy Recipes: Delicious Recipe Kits Delivered - 2017- ...

  9. Trauma Facts for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers facts which can help educators deal with children undergoing trauma. These include: (1) One out of every 4 children attending school has been exposed to a traumatic event that can affect learning and/or behavior; (2) Trauma can impact school performance; (3) Trauma can impair learning; (4) Traumatized children may experience…

  10. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes Challenge Type 1 Type 2 Facts About Type 2 Enroll in ... Where Do I Begin With Type2? Living With Type 1 Diabetes Enroll in the Living WIth Type 2 Diabetes ...

  11. Main facts 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report presents the main facts of the studies carried out by the Direction des Etudes et Recherches (DER) of Electricite de France: new applications of electricity, classical and nuclear thermal power plants, electrical equipment, environment protection, monitoring and plants operations

  12. Main facts 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the main facts of the studies carried out by the Direction des Etudes et Recherches (DER) of Electricite de France: new applications of electricity, classical and nuclear thermal power plants, electrical equipment, environment protection, network analysis, information and informatic equipment

  13. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Diabetes Forecast® magazine: lp-type-2, . In this section Diabetes Basics Type 2 Facts About Type ... Your Stress-Free System for Family Dinners! A year of delicious meals to help prevent and manage ...

  14. Pseudomonas - Fact Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2012-01-01

    Fact sheet on Pseudomonas, including:What is Pseudomonas?What infections does it cause?Who is susceptible to pseudomonas infection?How will I know if I have pseudomonas infection?How can Pseudomonas be prevented from spreading?How can I protect myself from Pseudomonas?How is Pseudomonas infection treated?

  15. Nuclear fact book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, O. F.; Platt, A. M.; Robinson, J. V. [comps

    1983-05-01

    This reference provides significant highlights and summary facts in the following areas: general energy; nuclear energy; nuclear fuel cycle; uranium supply and enrichment; nuclear reactors; spent fuel and advanced repacking concepts; reprocessing; high-level waste; gaseous waste; transuranic waste; low-level waste; remedial action; transportation; disposal; radiation information; environment; legislation; socio-political aspects; conversion factors; and a glossary. (GHT)

  16. Gun Sales. Firearm Facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duker, Laurie, Ed.

    Minimal federal regulations on firearm sales have facilitated the proliferation of guns, gun owners, and gun dealers in the United States. This fact sheet offers data on the growing number of firearm dealers, the relative ease of obtaining and keeping a license to sell guns from the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, the lack of…

  17. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A A Listen En Español Facts About Type 2 Type 2 diabetes is the most common form ... Your Stress-Free System for Family Dinners! A year of delicious meals to help prevent and manage ...

  18. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  19. DER 86: main facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report presents the important facts among the studies carried out by the Direction des Etudes et Recherches (E.D.F.): new applications of electric power for customers, protection of environment, classical equipments for power plants and nuclear equipments, monitoring and control of power plants, electrical equipments, development and operation of electrical networks, informatics and office automation [fr

  20. Land application of manure and Class B biosolids: an occupational and public quantitative microbial risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, John P; McLaughlin, Michael R; Gerba, Charles P; Pepper, Ian L

    2012-01-01

    Land application is a practical use of municipal Class B biosolids and manure that also promotes soil fertility and productivity. To date, no study exists comparing biosolids to manure microbial risks. This study used quantitative microbial risk assessment to estimate pathogen risks from occupational and public exposures during scenarios involving fomite, soil, crop, and aerosol exposures. Greatest one-time risks were from direct consumption of contaminated soil or exposure to fomites, with one-time risks greater than 10. Recent contamination and high exposures doses increased most risks. and enteric viruses provided the greatest single risks for most scenarios, particularly in the short term. All pathogen risks were decreased with time, 1 d to14 mo between land application and exposure; decreases in risk were typically over six orders of magnitude beyond 30 d. Nearly all risks were reduced to below 10 when using a 4-mo harvest delay for crop consumption. Occupational, more direct risks were greater than indirect public risks, which often occur after time and dilution have reduced pathogen loads to tolerable levels. Comparison of risks by pathogen group confirmed greater bacterial risks from manure, whereas viral risks were exclusive to biosolids. A direct comparison of the two residual types showed that biosolids use had greater risk because of the high infectivity of viruses, whereas the presence of environmentally recalcitrant pathogens such as and maintained manure risk. Direct comparisons of shared pathogens resulted in greater manure risks. Overall, it appears that in the short term, risks were high for both types of residuals, but given treatment, attenuation, and dilution, risks can be reduced to near-insignificant levels. That being said, limited data sets, dose exposures, site-specific inactivation rates, pathogen spikes, environmental change, regrowth, and wildlife will increase risk and uncertainty and remain areas poorly understood. Copyright © by the

  1. Biosolids recycling : a proposed methodology for the assessment of the impact on groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Robins, N.S.

    2005-01-01

    A groundwater risk assessment protocol is needed for land restoration schemes using recycled biosolids. A hydrogeological risk assessment for the Darnconner site in East Ayrshire [NS5723 to NS5823] has been used as a case study to develop the protocol. The proposed outline for developing the protocol included the following components: 1. Gather available geological information for the site and environs from 1: 50 000 scale geological maps and more detailed information where ava...

  2. Transport and Fate of Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen from Biosolids leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilani, Talli; Trifonov, Pavel; Arye, Gilboa

    2014-05-01

    The use of biosolids as a means to ameliorate soil becomes prevalent in the last few years. In agricultural fields, the application of biosolids will be followed by irrigation; resulting in excessive leaching of the dissolved fraction of the organic matter. The dissolved organic matter (DOM) is one of the major players in the chemical, physical and biological processes in soils. The DOM mainly composed of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and lower proportions of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and phosphate (DOP). The DON is considered to be the primary source of mineralisable nitrogen in the soil and can be used as an estimate of the nitrogen supplying capacity of the organic matter. Most of the researches which are dealing with nitrogen fate in terrestrial environments focused on its inorganic fractions (mainly nitrate and ammonium) and their transport toward the dipper soil layers. Since DON can be the source of the inorganic nitrogen (by providing nutrients and energy to nitrifying microbes, which in turn increases the nitrogen source for plants as nitrate), knowledge about the nature of its transport characteristics in the soil is important in the case of biosolids amendment. In addition, irrigation water quality (e.g. fresh water, wastewater or desalinized water) may significantly affect the transport and fate of the various nitrogen forms. The main objective of this study is to examine the fate and co-transport of organic and inorganics nitrogen, originating from biosolids leachates in the subsoil. The effect of water quality and flow rate under saturated steady-state flow is examined by a series of flow-through soil column experiments. The established breakthrough curves of the co-transport of total nitrogen, organic nitrogen (will be calculated from the differences between the total nitrogen measurements and the inorganic nitrogen measurements), nitrate, ammonium, dissolved organic carbon and chloride is presented and discussed.

  3. Effectiveness of Five Biosolids as Nitrogen Sources to Produce Single and Cumulative Ryegrass Harvests in Two Australian Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Studart Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Biosolids have been produced by various stabilization processes of sewage sludge, but little attention has been given to the effects of such treatments on their effectiveness to supply nitrogen for plant growth. Here, we investigated these effects by cultivating Lolium perenne (ryegrass in two Australian soils, a sandy Spodosol and a clayey Oxisol. Biosolids stabilized by either aerobic digestion, composting, CaO-liming, 250 oC heat-drying or solar irradiation of domestic sewage sludge were applied to soils at 10 increasing rates (0.25-8.0 dry Mg ha-1, and chemically fertilized soils were used as reference. Results showed that the stabilization processes affected biosolids-N agronomic rates and effectiveness to yield plant biomass, which was a function of organic-N contents mineralized in soils. In the short term, biosolids were from 1/5 (digested biosolids in Oxisol to over twice (solar-irradiated biosolids in Spodosol as effective as chemical fertilizer to produce a first single harvest. As long-term N-sources, they significantly increased the effectiveness to produce plant biomass, being from 2.0 to 4.1 times more effective than chemical fertilizer in Spodosol and 1.5-2.4 times in Oxisol. Biosolids could substitute for N fertilizer with similar or higher effectiveness to yield plant biomass, depending on the sewage sludge stabilization process, soil type and cultivation term considered. Therefore, the sound management of sewage products as N sources for crop production should consider the interaction among these factors rather than solely their N content.

  4. Occurrence of estrogen hormones in biosolids, animal manure and mushroom compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andaluri, Gangadhar; Suri, Rominder P S; Kumar, Kuldip

    2012-01-01

    The presence of natural estrogen hormones as trace concentrations in the environment has been reported by many researchers and is of growing concern due to its possible adverse effects on the ecosystem. In this study, municipal biosolids, poultry manure (PM) and cow manure (CM), and spent mushroom compost (SMC) were analyzed for the presence of seven estrogen hormones. 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, 17α-dihydroequilin, and estrone were detected in the sampled biosolids and manures at concentrations ranging from 6 to 462 ng/g of dry solids. 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, and estrone were also detected in SMC at concentrations ranging from 4 to 28 ng/g of dry solids. Desorption experiments were simulated in the laboratory using deionized water (milli-Q), and the aqueous phase was examined for the presence of estrogen hormones to determine their desorption potential. Very low desorption of 0.4% and 0.2% estrogen hormones was observed from municipal biosolids and SMC, respectively. An estimate of total estrogen contribution from different solid waste sources is reported. Animal manures (PM and CM) contribute to a significant load of estrogen hormones in the natural environment.

  5. Silver removal from aqueous solution by biochar produced from biosolids via microwave pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Elsa; Jacob, Mohan V; Brodie, Graham; Schneider, Philip A

    2017-12-01

    The contamination of water with silver has increased due to the widespread applications of products with silver employed as antimicrobial agent. Adsorption is a cost-effective method for silver removal from aqueous solution. In this study biochar, produced from the microwave assisted pyrolysis of biosolids, was used for silver removal from an aqueous solution. The adsorption kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamics were investigated to better understand the silver removal process by biochar. X-ray diffraction results demonstrated that silver removal was a combination two consecutive mechanisms, reduction and physical adsorption. The Langmuir model fitted the experimental data well, showing that silver removal was predominantly a surface mechanism. The thermodynamic investigation demonstrated that silver removal by biochar was an exothermic process. The final nanocomposite Ag-biochar (biochar plus silver) was used for methylene blue adsorption and photodegradation. This study showed the potential of using biochar produced from biosolids for silver removal as a promising solution to mitigate water pollution and an environmentally sustainable approach for biosolids management and re-use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Beneficial reuse of precast concrete industry sludge to produce alkaline stabilized biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, C; Seth, R; Biswas, N

    2008-01-01

    The precast concrete industry generates waste called concrete sludge during routine mixer tank washing. It is highly alkaline and hazardous, and typically disposed of by landfilling. This study examined the stabilization of municipal sewage sludge using concrete sludge as an alkaline agent. Sewage sludge was amended with 10 to 40% of concrete sludge by wet weight, and 10 and 20% of lime by dry weight of the sludge mix. Mixes containing 30 and 40% of concrete sludge with 20% lime fulfilled the primary requirements of Category 1 and 2 (Canada) biosolids of maintaining a pH of 12 for at least 72 hours. The heavy metals were below Category 1 regulatory limits. The 40% concrete sludge mix was incubated at 52 degrees C for 12 of the 72 hours to achieve the Category 1 and 2 regulations of less than 1000 fecal coliform/g solids. The nutrient content of the biosolids was 8.2, 10 and 0.6 g/kg of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium respectively. It can be used as a top soil or augmented with potassium for use as fertilizer. The study demonstrates that concrete sludge waste can be beneficially reused to produce biosolids, providing a long-term sustainable waste management solution for the concrete industry.

  7. Steroid hormones in biosolids and poultry litter: a comparison of potential environmental inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevacqua, Christine E; Rice, Clifford P; Torrents, Alba; Ramirez, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Steroid hormones can act as potent endocrine disruptors when released into the environment. The main sources of these chemicals are thought to be wastewater treatment plant discharges and waste from animal feeding operations. While these compounds have frequently been found in wastewater effluents, few studies have investigated biosolids or manure, which are routinely land applied, as potential sources. This study assessed the potential environmental contribution of steroid hormones from biosolids and chicken litter. Hormone concentrations in samples of limed biosolids collected at a waste treatment plant over a four year period ranged from farms had averages of 41.4ng/g dry weight E1, 63.4ng/g dry weight progesterone, and 19.2ng/g dry weight E1-sulfate (E1-S). Other analytes studied were 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), testosterone, E2-3-sulfate (E2-3-S), and E2-17-sulfate (E2-17-3). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Relationship between Mineral Soil Surface Area and the Biological Degradation of Biosolids Added to Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqi Wen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical and biological processes that operate in the soil matrix and on the soil surface are important to the degradation of biosolids in soil. Due to the large surface area of soils it is assumed that the microbial ecology is associated with mineral soil surface area. The total mineral surface areas were determined for soils from eight different fields selected from a long term study (1972–2006 of annual biosolids application to 41 fields in central Illinois varying in size from 3.6 to 66 ha. The surface areas for the soils varied from 1 to 9 m2/g of soil. The biological degradation rates for the eight soils were determined using a biological degradation rate model (DRM and varied from 0.02 to 0.20/year−1. Regression analysis revealed that the degradation rate was positively associated with mineral soil surface area (1 m2/g produces 0.018 year−1 increase in the degradation rate. The annual soil sequestration rate was calculated to increase from 1% to 6% when the soil total surface area increased from 1 to 9 m2/g of soil. Therefore, land application of biosolids is an effective way to enhance carbon sequestration in soils and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  9. Quantitative determination of antidepressants and their select degradates by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in biosolids destined for land application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Lydia M; Stencel, Katherine A; Murphy, Madigan J; Schultz, Melissa M

    2013-08-06

    Antidepressants are one of the most widely dispensed classes of pharmaceuticals in the United States. As wastewater treatment plants are a primary source of pharmaceuticals in the environment, the use of biosolids as fertilizer is a potential route for antidepressants to enter the terrestrial environment. A microsolvent extraction method, utilizing green chemistry, was developed for extraction of the target antidepressants and degradation products from biosolids, or more specifically lagoon biosolids. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used for quantitative determination of antidepressants in the lagoon biosolid extracts. Recoveries from matrix spiking experiments for the individual antidepressants had an average of 96%. The limits of detection for antidepressant pharmaceuticals and degradates ranged from 0.36 to 8.0 ng/kg wet weight. The method was applied to biosolids destined for land application. A suite of antidepressants was consistently detected in the lagoon biosolid samples, and thus antidepressants are being introduced to terrestrial environments through the land application of these biosolids. Sertraline and norsertraline were the most abundant antidepressant and degradation product detected in the biosolid samples. Detected, individual antidepressant concentrations ranged from 8.5 ng/kg (norfluoxetine) to 420 ng/kg wet weight (norsertraline).

  10. Recycling biosolids and lake-dredged materials to pasture-based animal agriculture: Alternative nutrient sources for forage productivity and sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domestic sewage sludge or biosolids and lake-dredged materials are examples of materials that can be used to cut fertilizer costs in pasture-based animal agriculture. Sustainable biosolids and lake-dredged materials management is based upon controlling and influencing the quantity, quality and chara...

  11. Faith, Fact, and Behaviorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staddon, J E R

    2013-01-01

    David Hume argued that ought cannot be derived from is . That is, no set of facts, no amount of scientific knowledge, is by itself sufficient to urge us to action. Yet generations of well-meaning scientists (more and more as secular influences grow in the West) seem to have forgotten Hume's words of wisdom. All motivated action depends ultimately on beliefs that cannot be proved by the methods of science, that is, on faith.

  12. NRL Fact Book 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    communications Meteorological effects on weapons, sensors, and platform performance Air quality in confined spaces Electromagnetic background in space...requirements, liaison with other military activities, and the general supervision of the quality , timeliness, and effectiveness of the technical work and of...2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NRL Fact Book 2010 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  13. Biomolecular Science (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-04-01

    A brief fact sheet about NREL Photobiology and Biomolecular Science. The research goal of NREL's Biomolecular Science is to enable cost-competitive advanced lignocellulosic biofuels production by understanding the science critical for overcoming biomass recalcitrance and developing new product and product intermediate pathways. NREL's Photobiology focuses on understanding the capture of solar energy in photosynthetic systems and its use in converting carbon dioxide and water directly into hydrogen and advanced biofuels.

  14. Field-Scale Evaluation of Biosolids-Derived Organomineral Fertilisers Applied to Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogenes L. Antille

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A field-scale experiment was conducted to compare the suitability of two organomineral fertiliser (OMF formulations (OMF10—10 : 4 : 4 and OMF15—15 : 4 : 4 with urea and biosolids granules applied to perennial ryegrass. Results showed a 25% to 30% increase in dry matter yield (DMY with application of OMF compared with biosolids granules but about 5% lower than urea. For OMF, an average input of yielded which was similar to that of urea; whereas, for biosolids, a yield of required an input of but DMY was lower (. Agronomic efficiencies with OMF were in the range of 26 to 35 kg , approximately double those of biosolids but about 5% to 10% lower than urea. Soil extractable P levels remained close to constant; therefore, soil P Index was not affected by OMF application. This result supported the reasons for the proposed OMF formulations and demonstrated the advantage of the products compared with biosolids which induced an increase (, in soil extractable P. The application of OMF at rates which do not exceed the optimum N rate for the grass crop should not induce significant changes in soil P Index including application to soils with satisfactory P levels. OMF application strategies are discussed which will enable minimising environmental concerns and maximising fertiliser use efficiency.

  15. The potential of public engagement in sustainable waste management: designing the future for biosolids in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goven, Joanna; Lisa Langer, E R

    2009-02-01

    Strategies for beneficial use of biosolids in New Zealand and elsewhere are currently focused primarily on land application. The long-term success of these and other strategies is dependent not only on technical factors, but also on their environmental, economic, social and cultural sustainability. This paper briefly reviews the situation with respect to biosolids management in New Zealand, where land application is not yet widespread; the rise in public opposition to land application in the United States; and the biosolids industry's approach to public engagement. We argue that, at least until recently, the industry has misinterpreted the nature and meaning of public opposition and thus substituted public relations for public engagement. We argue that genuine public engagement is necessary and that its purpose cannot be to gain public acceptance for an already-decided-upon strategy. It therefore calls for humility among biosolids managers, including a willingness to open up the framing of 'the problem', to acknowledge areas of uncertainty, and to recognise the role of values in 'technical' decision-making. We then present and analyse an example of the use of the scenario workshop process for public participation in biosolids management policy in Christchurch, New Zealand, and conclude that scenario workshops and related methods represent an opportunity to enhance sustainable waste management when certain conditions are met.

  16. Effect of biosolids-derived triclosan and triclocarban on the colonization of plant roots by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, R S; Lissemore, L; Shahmohamadloo, R S; Sibley, P K

    2015-03-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form a symbiotic relationship with the majority of crop plants. AMF provide plants with nutrients (e.g., P), modulate the effect of metal and pathogen exposure, and increase tolerance to moisture stress. The benefits of AMF to plant growth make them important to the development of sustainable agriculture. The land application of biosolids is becoming an increasingly common practice in sustainable agriculture, as a source of nutrients. However, biosolids have been found to contain numerous pharmaceutical and personal care products including antimicrobial chemicals such as triclosan and triclocarban. The potential risks that these two compounds may pose to plant-AMF interactions are poorly understood. The current study investigated whether biosolids-derived triclosan and triclocarban affect the colonization of the roots of lettuce and corn plants by AMF. Plants were grown in soil amended with biosolids that contained increasing concentrations of triclosan (0 to 307 μg/g dw) or triclocarban (0 to 304 μg/g dw). A relationship between the concentration of triclosan or triclocarban and colonization of plants roots by AMF was not observed. The presence of biosolids did not have a significant (p>0.05) effect on percent colonization of corn roots but had a significant, positive effect (pcolonization of crop plant roots by AMF. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Effects of surface applications of biosolids on groundwater quality and trace-element concentrations in crops near Deer Trail, Colorado, 2004-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Tracy J.B.; Crock, James G.; Smith, David B.; Furlong, Edward T.; Hageman, Philip L.; Foreman, William T.; Gray, James L.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Metro Wastewater Reclamation District (Metro District), studied biosolids composition and the effects of biosolids applications on groundwater quality and trace-element concentrations in crops of the Metro District properties near Deer Trail, Colorado, during 2004 through 2010. Priority parameters for each monitoring component included the nine trace elements regulated by Colorado for biosolids (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc); other constituents also were analyzed. All concentrations for the priority parameters in monthly biosolids samples were less than Colorado regulatory limits, and the concentrations were relatively consistent. Biosolids likely were the largest source of nitrogen and phosphorus on the Metro District properties. Plutonium isotopes were not detected in the biosolids, but many organic wastewater compounds (organic wastewater compounds: wastewater indicators, pharmaceuticals, and hormones) were detected in substantial concentrations relative to minimum reporting levels and various surface-water concentrations. Bismuth, copper, mercury, nitrogen, phosphorus, silver, biogenic sterols, detergent degradates, disinfectants, fire retardants, fragrances, pharmaceuticals, and plasticizers would be the most likely biosolids signature to indicate the presence of Metro District biosolids in soil or streambed sediment from the study area. Antimony, cadmium, cobalt, copper, molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen, phosphorus, selenium, tungsten, vanadium, zinc, detergent degradates, disinfectants, fire retardants, fragrances, pharmaceuticals or their degradates, and plasticizers would be the most likely biosolids signature for groundwater and surface water in the study area. More biosolids-signature components detected and larger concentration differences from untreated materials, baseline, and blank samples indicate more evidence of biosolids presence or effects

  18. Wind energy - The facts. Vol. 1: Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, P.; Garrad, A.; Jamieson, P.; Snodin, H.; Tindal, A. (comps.) [Gerrad Hassan and partners (United Kingdom)

    2004-02-01

    The politics and economics of wind energy have played an important role in the development of the industry and contributed to its present success. Engineering is, however, pivotal. As the wind industry has become better established, the central place of engineering has become overshadowed by other issues. This is a tribute to the success of the engineers and their turbines. This volume addresses the key engineering Issues: 1) The turbines - their past achievements and future challenges - a remarkable tale of technical endeavour and entrepreneurship. 2) The wind - its characteristics and reliability - how can it be measured, quantified and harnessed? 3) The wind farms - an assembly of individual turbines into wind power stations or wind farms - their optimisation and development. 4) The grid - transporting the energy from remote locations with plentiful wind energy to the loads - the key technical and strategic challenges. This volume provides an historical overview of turbine development, describes the present status and considers future challenges. This is a remarkable story starting in the nineteenth century and then accelerating through the last two decades of the twentieth century on a course very similar to the early days of aeronautics. The story is far from finished but it has certainly started with a vengeance. Wind must be treated with great respect. The speed of the wind on a site has a very powerful effect on the economics of a wind farm; it provides both the fuel to generate electricity and the loads to destroy the turbine. This volume describes how it can be quantified, harnessed and put to work in an economic and predictable manner. The long-term behaviour of the wind is described as well as its short-term behaviour. The latter can be successfully forecast to allow wind energy to participate in electricity markets. In order for wind to live up to its raw potential promise, individual turbines must be assembled into wind farms or wind power stations. The design and operation of the different types of wind farms are discussed and examples provided. Finally, the key strategic issue for the future is addressed: How can the windy parts of Europe, both onshore and offshore, deliver power for the industrial loads and population centres. This goal is achieved through the local, national and international grids. The way in which the grid is used and constrained is a key political and technical issue. The technical and regulatory constraints are described and some challenges for the future are raised. This volume explores how this new, vibrant and rapidly expanding industry exploits one of nature's most copious sources of energy - the wind. (au)

  19. Chernobyl: the facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanbridge, R.; Dept. of Journalism, Media and Communication Studies)

    1993-01-01

    In these Search Strategies, searchers from different countries and professions are given a question to answer, a budget of Pounds 50 and a time in which to produce their report. We hope that these blow-by-blow accounts, together with the hints and tips picked up along the way, will help readers to develop their own search strategies. Journalists are more and more coming to use online services and here the author gives a journalist's account of tracking down the elusive facts surrounding the Chernobyl disaster. (author)

  20. Water: Facts without Myths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Henry

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Among all the chemical substances available in the universe, water, with its deceptively simple formula H2O, is the most discussed subject either in science or in philosophy [1]. If you are not convinced by this affirmation, a little experiment at no cost may help you change your mind. Just open your favorite web browser and type the word “water” in any search engine. When I have done that using Google, the number of hits was about 682,000,000 (please do not try to read all the pages. In fact, the only words that seem to beat water at this little game are “air” (770,000,000 hits with Google and 3,120,000,000 with Yahoo, and “food” (689,000,000 hits with Google and 3,820,000,000 with Yahoo. Of course this should not be a surprise, as breathing, eating, drinking just mean that you are a living entity. In fact extending the water search to “eau” (French, “wasser” (German, “agua” (Spanish, Portuguese and “acqua” (Italian leads to 978,900,000 hits under Google and 3,426,000,000 hits under Yahoo, showing now that water is about as important as food. After all, as everybody knows, “water is life”, and do we really have to read about one billion documents to know at least what water really is? [...

  1. Earthworm bioassays and seedling emergence for monitoring toxicity, aging and bioaccumulation of anthropogenic waste indicator compounds in biosolids-amended soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Chad A.; Campbell, Bryan R.; Thompson, Regina; Furlong, Edward T.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Burkhardt, Mark R.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Werner, Stephen L.; Hay, Anthony G.

    2012-01-01

    Land application of biosolids (treated sewage sludge) can be an important route for introducing xenobiotic compounds into terrestrial environments. There is a paucity of available information on the effects of biosolids amendment on terrestrial organisms. In this study, the influence of biosolids and biosolids aging on earthworm (Eisenia fetida) reproduction and survival and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seedling emergence was investigated. Earthworms were exposed to soils amended with varying quantities of biosolids (0, 1, 2, 3, or 4% dry mass). To investigate the influence of biosolids aging, the biosolids used in the study were aged for differing lengths of time (2 or 8 weeks) prior to exposure. All of the adult earthworms survived in the biosolids–amended soils at all concentrations that were aged for 2 weeks; however, only 20% of the adults survived in the soil amended with the highest concentration of biosolids and aged for 8 weeks. Reproduction as measured by mean number of juveniles and unhatched cocoons produced per treatment correlated inversely with biosolids concentration, although the effects were generally more pronounced in the 8-week aged biosolids–soil samples. Latent seedling emergence and reduced seedling fitness correlated inversely with biosolids concentration, but these effects were tempered in the 8-week aged versus the 2-week aged soil–biosolids mixtures. Anthropogenic waste indicator compounds (AWIs) were measured in the biosolids, biosolids–soil mixtures, and earthworm samples. Where possible, bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were calculated or estimated. A wide variety of AWIs were detected in the biosolids (51 AWIs) and earthworm samples (≤ 19 AWI). The earthworms exposed to the 8-week aged biosolids–soil mixtures tended to accumulate greater quantities of AWIs compared to the 2-week aged mixture, suggesting that the bioavailability of some AWIs was enhanced with aging. The BAFs for a given AWI varied with treatment. Notably large

  2. Soft Costs Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-05-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the systems integration subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. Soft costs can vary significantly as a result of a fragmented energy marketplace. In the U.S., there are 18,000 jurisdictions and 3,000 utilities with different rules and regulations for how to go solar. The same solar equipment may vary widely in its final installation price due to process and market variations across jurisdictions, creating barriers to rapid industry growth. SunShot supports the development of innovative solutions that enable communities to build their local economies and establish clean energy initiatives that meet their needs, while at the same time creating sustainable solar market conditions.

  3. Psychoacoustics Facts and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Fastl, Hugo

    2007-01-01

    Psychoacoustics – Facts and Models offers a unique, comprehensive summary of information describing the processing of sound by the human hearing system. It includes quantitative relations between sound stimuli and auditory perception in terms of hearing sensations, for which quantitative models are given, as well as an unequalled collection of data on the human hearing system as a receiver of acoustic information. In addition, many examples of the practical application of the results of basic research in fields such as noise control, audiology, or sound quality engineering are detailed. The third edition includes an additional chapter on audio-visual interactions and applications, plus more on applications throughout. Reviews of previous editions have characterized it as "an essential source of psychoacoustic knowledge," "a major landmark ," and a book that "without doubt will have a long-lasting effect on the standing and future evolution of this scientific domain."

  4. Solar Technical Assistance Team (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-07-01

    The Solar Technical Assistance Team (STAT) is a team of solar technology and deployment experts who ensure that the best information on policies, regulations, financing, and other issues is getting into the hands of state government decision makers whey they need it. This fact sheet provides information about STAT and the STAT webinar series for the summer of 2012.

  5. EU AND GLOBALIZATION: SOME STYLIZED FACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scamuffa Domenico

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of the people all over the world claim that globalization is a result of dynamic interactions between economic, technological, social and political factors. The aim of this paper is to document some stylized facts on this phenomenon in order to take

  6. EVALUATION OF THE BIOSOLIDS COMPOST MATURITY IN SOUTH ISFAHAN WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Alidadi, A. R. Parvaresh, M. R. Shahmansouri, H. Pourmoghadas

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The composting process is a useful method of producing a stabilized material that can be used as a source of nutrients and soil conditioner. Maturity of compost is essential for its optimal use as a soil amendment and a source of plant nutrients as well. Immature composts pose problems of malodors and flies and phytotoxicity and pollution during use. Stability and maturity both are required for compost quality control. Compost maturity tests can be classified into physical, chemical, plant, and microbial activity assays. In this study, several methods of evaluating the stability and maturity of composted biosolids were compared based on chemical and biological properties. The sludge used of windrow composting was obtained from the drying beds of South Isfahan wastewater treatment plant. The results showed that, C/N ratio after 100 days of composting reached to 15/1; NH4/NO3 ratio decreased with increase of the time dewatered sludge compost, which this loss is 57.3%. The content of volatile solids, 28.8% decreased with composting time. The number of fecal coliforms in the initial sewage sludge compost was 17.9´106 and at the end of composting was 898MPN/g of total solids and the compost process provided class A pathogen criteria. Use of chemical and biological parameters exhibited three phases: rapid decomposition (day 40, stabilization (day 80 and maturation (day 100 in biosolids compost. Thus, the biosolid compost was mature and ready for use as an agricultural substrate after about 100 days of composting.

  7. Factors Affecting Distribution of Estrogenicity in the Influents, Effluents, and Biosolids of Canadian Wastewater Treatment Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Ben H H; Louie, Alvin; Law, Francis C P

    2016-05-01

    Canadian wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) release significant amounts of estrogenic chemicals to nearby surface waters. Environmental estrogens have been implicated as the causative agents of many developmental and reproductive problems in animals, including fish. The goals of this study were to assess the estrogenic activity in the influents, effluents, and biosolids of thirteen Canadian WWTPs using the yeast estrogen screen (YES) bioassay and to investigate whether factors, such as wastewater treatment method, sample storage, extraction efficiency, population, and summer/winter temperature had any effects on the distribution of estrogenicity in the WWTPs. Results of the study showed that estrogenicity from the influent to the effluent decreased in seven WWTPs, increased in two WWTPs, and did not change in four WWTPs during the winter. Estrogenic concentrations generally decreased in the order of biosolids > influents > effluents and ranged from 1.57 to 24.6, 1.25E-02 to 3.84E-01, and 9.46E-03 to 3.90E-01 ng estradiol equivalents/g or ml, respectively. The estrogenicity in the final effluents, but not those in the influents and biosolids, was significantly higher in the summer than the winter. Among the WWTP treatment methods, advanced, biological nutrient removal appeared to be the most effective method to remove estrogenic chemicals from wastewaters in Canada. Our studies help to identify factors or mechanisms that affect the distribution of estrogenicity in WWTPs, providing a better understanding on the discharges of estrogenic chemicals from WWTPs.

  8. Released fraction of polychlorinated biphenyls from soil-biosolid system using a leaching procedure and its comparison with bioavailable fraction determined by wheat plant uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachero, Lourdes; Leiva, Claudio; Ahumada, Inés; Richter, Pablo

    2017-11-01

    The bioavailability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soils amended with biosolids was estimated using an aqueous leaching process of the compounds combined with rotating disk sorptive extraction (RDSE), and compared with bioavailability determined through of PCB absorption in wheat plants growing in the same soil-biosolid matrix. The matrices consisted of soil amended with biosolids at doses of 30, 90, and 200 Mg/ha, which increase concomitantly the organic matter content of the matrix. Considering that PCBs were natively absent in both the biosolids and soil used, the compounds were spiked in the biosolids and aged for 10 days. For each biosolid dose, the aqueous leaching profile was studied and equilibrium time was calculated to be 33 h. The leaching fractions determined by RDSE, considering total PCBs studied, were 12, 7, and 6% and the bioavailable fractions absorbed by the wheat root were found to be 0.5, 0.3, and 0.2% for 30, 90, and 200 Mg/ha doses, respectively. Both fractions leachable and bioavailable decrease with both increasing hydrophobicity of the compound (Kow) and increasing in the biosolid dose. It was found that both fractions (leaching and bioavailable) correlated according to the bivariate least squares regression, represented by a coefficient of correlation of 0.86. Therefore, the application of the chemical method involving a leaching procedure is an alternative to estimate the bioavailable fraction of PCBs in wheat plants in a simpler and in a shorter time.

  9. Effects of biosolids application on nitrogen dynamics and microbial structure in a saline-sodic soil of the former Lake Texcoco (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Oropeza, M; Dendooven, L; Garza-Avendaño, L; Souza, V; Philippot, L; Cabirol, N

    2010-04-01

    The saline-sodic soil of the former Lake Texcoco, a large area exposed to desertification, is a unique environment, but little is known about its microbial ecology. The objective of this study was to examine bacterial community structure, activity, and function when biosolids were added to microcosms. The application rates were such that 0, 66, 132, or 265 mg total Nk g(-1) were added with the biosolids (total C and N content 158 and 11.5 g kg(-1) dry biosolids, respectively). Approximately 60% of the biosolids were mineralized within 90 days. Microbial respiration and to a lesser extent ammonification and nitrification, increased after biosolids application. The rRNA intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) patterns for the biosolids and unamended soil bacterial communities were different, indicating that the microorganisms in the biosolids were distinct from the native population. It appears that the survival of the allochthonous microorganisms was short, presumably due to the adverse soil conditions. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Marketing Transformation (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2011-10-13

    Through the SunShot Initiative, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) works with manufacturers, communities, states, utilities, and other partners to enable the solar market by reducing non-hardware balance-of-system (BOS) costs, developing a skilled workforce, and eliminating market barriers to widespread adoption of solar technologies.

  11. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... THE 10 SIGNS Alzheimer's Disease Facts in Each State The 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report ... on the impact of this disease in every state across the nation. Click below to see the ...

  12. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... irrevocable disability occurs. LEARN ABOUT OUR COMMITMENT TO RESEARCH. Read More Alzheimer's Disease Facts in Each State The 2017 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report contains data on the impact of this disease in every ...

  13. Rubella - Fact Sheet for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and 4 through 6 years Fact Sheet for Parents Color [2 pages] Español: Rubéola The best way ... according to the recommended schedule. Fact Sheets for Parents Diseases and the Vaccines that Prevent Them Chickenpox ...

  14. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dementia >> Home Text size: A A A 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures Download the full report: Download ... worried about memory loss? KNOW THE 10 SIGNS Alzheimer's Disease Facts in Each State The 2018 Alzheimer's Disease ...

  15. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RESEARCH. Read More Alzheimer's Disease Facts in Each State The 2017 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report ... on the impact of this disease in every state across the nation. Click below to see the ...

  16. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Text size: A A A 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures Download the full report: Download ... about memory loss? KNOW THE 10 SIGNS Alzheimer's Disease Facts in Each State The 2018 Alzheimer's Disease ...

  17. Facts, values, and journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Susan

    2017-03-01

    At a time of fake news, hacks, leaks, and unverified reports, many people are unsure whom to believe. How can we communicate in ways that make individuals question their assumptions and learn? My colleagues at The Hastings Center and many journalists and scientists are grappling with this question and have, independently, reached the same first step: recognize that facts can't be fully understood without probing their connection to values. "Explaining the basics is important, of course, but we also need to diversify our approach to the coverage of science-particularly as it intersects with the matrix of cultural, religious, social, and political values of our readers," said an article in Undark, an online magazine of science journalism. An editorial in Nature called for scientists to engage directly with citizens in debates over climate change and genome editing, noting that "the ethical issues can be critically dependent on the science, for example, in understanding where the boundaries between non-heritable and heritable genome modifications might be." We're here to help. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  18. Characteristics of biosolids from sludge treatment wetlands for agricultural reuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uggetti, Enrica; Ferrer, Ivet; Nielsen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Sludge treatment wetlands (STW) consist of constructed wetlands systems specifically developed for sludge treatment over the last decades. Sludge dewatering and stabilisation are the main features of this technology, leading to a final product which may be recycled as an organic fertiliser or soil...

  19. Pinellas Plant facts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-11-01

    The Pinellas Plant, near St. Petersburg, Florida, is wholly owned by the United States Government. It is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by GE Aerospace, Neutron Devices (GEND). This plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators built at Neutron Devices consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. Production of these devices has necessitated the development of several uniquely specialized areas of competence and supporting facilities. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology; hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials; plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at Neutron Devices has led directly to the assignment of other weapon application products: the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Other product assignments such as active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator evolved from the plant`s materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life.

  20. Pinellas Plant facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    This plant was built in 1956 in response to a need for the manufacture of neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology: hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials: plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at the Pinellas Plant has led directly to the assignment of the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator draw on the materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life. A product development and production capability in alumina ceramics, cermet (electrical) feedthroughs, and glass ceramics has become a specialty of the plant; the laboratories monitor the materials and processes used by the plant's commercial suppliers of ferroelectric ceramics. In addition to the manufacturing facility, a production development capability is maintained at the Pinellas Plant

  1. John Searle on Institutional Facts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    m Abdullahi

    2010-09-01

    Here we argue that the essence of institutional facts is status functions. Humans recognize these functions which contain a set of deontic powers through collective intentionality. Therefore, institutional facts are ontologically subjective and epistemologically objective. Nevertheless, objectivity of institutional facts totally depends on language which itself is a fundamental institution for other institutions.

  2. The effect of lignite on nitrogen mobility in a low-fertility soil amended with biosolids and urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramashivam, Dharini; Clough, Tim J; Carlton, Anna; Gough, Kelsi; Dickinson, Nicholas; Horswell, Jacqui; Sherlock, Robert R; Clucas, Lynne; Robinson, Brett H

    2016-02-01

    Lignite has been proposed as a soil amendment that reduces nitrate (NO3(-)) leaching from soil. Our objective was to determine the effect of lignite on nitrogen (N) fluxes from soil amended with biosolids or urea. The effect of lignite on plant yield and elemental composition was also determined. Batch sorption and column leaching experiments were followed by a lysimeter trial where a low fertility soil was amended with biosolids (400 kg N/ha equivalent) and urea (200 kg N/ha equivalent). Treatments were replicated three times, with and without lignite addition (20 t/ha equivalent). Lignite did not reduce NO3(-) leaching from soils amended with either biosolids or urea. While lignite decreased NO3(-) leaching from an unamended soil, the magnitude of this effect was not significant in an agricultural context. Furthermore, lignite increased cumulative N2O production from soils receiving urea by 90%. Lignite lessened the beneficial growth effects of adding biosolids or urea to soil. Further work could investigate whether coating urea granules with lignite may produce meaningful environmental benefits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of lime stabilized biosolids and inorganic fertilizer applications on a thinned longleaf stand - ten year results

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. David Dickens; Bryan C. McElvany; David J. Moorhead

    2010-01-01

    This project was initiated on the Sand Hills State Forest in Chesterfield County, SC in May 1995 to determine the benefits of inorganic fertilizer (NPK) and lime stabilized biosolids applications in a twice-thinned longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) stand planted in 1963 on an excessively well drained deep sand (Alpin soil series). Major...

  4. Acoustic Evaluation of Thinning and Biosolid Fertilization Effects on Wood Quality of a Douglas-fir stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Robert J. Ross; Steve Verrill; Eini Lowell; Jamie Barbour

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the potential of using a time-of-flight (TOF) acoustic wave method to evaluate thinning and biosolid fertilization effects on acoustic velocity of trees and modulus of elasticity (MOE) of structural lumber in a 76-year-old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii, (Mirb., Franco)) experimental stand. The stand consisted of four...

  5. Mobilization of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and estrogenic activity in simulated rainfall runoff from land-applied biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Ben D; Young, Thomas M

    2011-10-01

    Municipal biosolids are commonly applied to land as soil amendment or fertilizer as a form of beneficial reuse of what could otherwise be viewed as waste. Balanced against this benefit are potential risks to groundwater and surface water quality from constituents that may be mobilized during storm events. The objective of the present study was to characterize the mobilization of selected endocrine-disrupting compounds, heavy metals, and total estrogenic activity in rainfall runoff from land-applied biosolids. Rainfall simulations were conducted on soil plots amended with biosolids. Surface runoff and leachate was collected and analyzed for the endocrine-disrupting compounds bisphenol A, 17α-ethynylestradiol, triclocarban, triclosan, octylphenol, and nonylphenol; a suite of 16 metals; and estrogenic activity via the estrogen receptor-mediated chemical activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) bioassay. Triclocarban (2.3-17.3 ng/L), triclosan (background levels. Triclosan, Ni, and Cu were detected at levels that might pose some risk to aquatic life, though levels of metals in the biosolids were well below the maximum allowable regulatory limits. The ER-CALUX results were mostly explained by background bisphenol A contamination and octylphenol in runoff, although unknown contributors or matrix effects were also found. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  6. MOBILIZATION OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS AND ESTROGENIC ACTIVITY IN SIMULATED RAINFALL RUNOFF FROM LAND-APPLIED BIOSOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Ben D.; Young, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Municipal biosolids are commonly applied to land as soil amendment or fertilizer as a form of beneficial reuse of what could otherwise be viewed as waste. Balanced against this benefit are potential risks to groundwater and surface water quality from constituents that may be mobilized during storm events. The objective of the present study was to characterize the mobilization of selected endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), heavy metals, and total estrogenic activity in rainfall runoff from land-applied biosolids. Rainfall simulations were conducted on soil plots amended with biosolids. Surface runoff and leachate was collected and analyzed for the EDCs bisphenol A, 17α-ethynylestradiol, triclocarban, triclosan, octylphenol, and nonylphenol; a suite of sixteen metals; and estrogenic activity via the ER-CALUX bioassay. Triclocarban (2.3–17.3 ng/L), triclosan (background levels. Triclosan, nickel, and copper were detected at levels that might pose some risk to aquatic life, though levels of metals in the biosolids were well below maximum allowable regulatory limits. ER-CALUX results were mostly explained by background bisphenol A contamination and octylphenol in runoff, though unknown contributors and/or matrix effects were also found. PMID:21786314

  7. Soil fertilization with wastewater biosolids - monitoring changes in the 'soil-fertilizer-plant' system and phosphorus recovery options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathijotes, Nicholas; Zlatareva, Elena; Marinova, Svetla; Petrova, Vera

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to establish changes that may occur after a prolonged application of wastewater sludge treated to biosolids, in the 'soil-fertilizer-plant' system. Thirteen experimental plots with different soil types planted with experimental crops were investigated in order to evaluate the suitability of these biosolids as soil conditioners and fertilizers. The biosolids were incorporated in soil starting in 2006 in different quantities (from 6 tons per ha) for various arrays. The rate of application was calculated on the basis of imported nitrogen and was consistent with the characteristics of the sludge, soil diversity, growing crop requirements, and other factors. In 2013 (after 7 years of land use) average soil samples from the same arrays were taken and analyzed. No chemical fertilizer was applied during the experimental period. The results show that the use of sewage biosolids as a soil improver in accordance with local legislation does not pose any serious environmental risks but can maintain and improve soil fertility and crop yield. A slight increase in Cu and Zn in plants was detected, however the content of heavy metals in all soil samples was below maximum allowable limits and no signs of phytotoxicity were observed.

  8. Membrane biological reactors to remove nitrate, digest biosolids, and eliminate water flushing requirements within replicated recirculation systems culturing rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrients, particularly nitrate (NO3), can accumulate to very high levels within low exchange recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS) and negatively impact a number of cultured species. To prevent the harmful effects of nitrate accumulation and to dispose of concentrated waste biosolids, many RAS ar...

  9. Rapid determination of natural and synthetic hormones in biosolids and poultry manure by isotope dilution GC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albero, Beatriz; Sánchez-Brunete, Consuelo; Miguel, Esther; Aznar, Ramón; Tadeo, José L

    2014-04-01

    The release of hormones into the environment due to land application of biosolids and manure is a cause of concern for their potential impacts. This paper presents the development of a rapid and sensitive method, based on extraction, for the analysis of 13 hormones in biosolids and poultry manure. A simultaneous derivatization of hydroxyl and ketone groups was carried out for the determination of hormones by GC–MS/MS. The method was validated in three matrices (sewage sludge, manure, and broiler litter). Recoveries from spiked samples at three concentration levels (50, 25, and 10 ng/g) ranged from 76 to 124% with relative SDs ≤ 16%. Method detection limits for the three matrices were in the range of 0.5–3.0 ng/g dry weight. The optimized method was applied to biosolid and poultry manure samples collected in Spain. Only seven of the 13 studied hormones were detected in the different samples. trans-Androsterone was detected at high levels (up to 3.1 μg/g in biosolid samples). Estrone and estradiol were the two hormones detected at higher levels in layer manure, whereas estrone and 4-androstene-3,17-dione presented the highest levels in broiler litter.

  10. Facts About XLDB-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becla, Jacek; Lim, Kian-Tat; Wang, Daniel L.; /SLAC

    2012-02-22

    This note provides details of the 5th Extremely Large Databases Conference and Invitational Workshop that were held in 2011 on 18-19 October and 20 October, respectively, at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California. The main goals of the conference were: (1) Encourage and accelerate the exchange of ideas between users trying to build extremely large databases worldwide and database solution providers; (2) Share lessons, trends, innovations, and challenges related to building extremely large databases; (3) Facilitate the development and growth of practical technologies for extremely large databases; and (4) Strengthen, expand, and engage the XLDB community.

  11. Determination of inorganic and organic priority pollutants in biosolids from meat processing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sena, Rennio F; Tambosi, José L; Floriani, Silvia L; Virmond, Elaine; Schröder, Horst Fr; Moreira, Regina F P M; José, Humberto J

    2009-09-01

    The biosolids (BS) generated in the wastewater treatment process of a meat processing plant were monitored and the priority pollutant content was characterized. The trace metal and organic pollutant content--polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF)--were determined quantitatively and compared to guideline limits established by the US EPA and EU. PCBs were not detected in the solid samples, while trace metals, PAHs and PCDD/PCDF were detected in concentrations below the limits established by international standards. Toxic equivalent factors were evaluated for the biosolids, and the results proved that these wastes can be safely deposited on land or used in combustion/incineration plants. Since no previous data were found for meat processing waste, comparisons were made using municipal sewage sludge data reported in the literature. Since, this report monitored part of the priority pollutants established by the US EPA for meat and poultry processing wastewater and sludge, the results verified that low pollution loads are generated by the meat processing plant located in the southern part of Brazil. However, the BS generated in the treatment processes are in accordance with the limits established for waste disposal and even for soil fertilizer.

  12. Diptera of sanitary importance associated with composting of biosolids in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Alejandra Labud

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Odorous compounds produced at the biosolids composting plant in Bariloche (NW Patagonia attract a variety of insects, mainly belonging to the order Diptera. In order to characterize these flies, collected specimens were taxonomically identified, their community characteristics were described and their sanitary and synanthropic importance and autochthonous or introduced character were determined. METHODS: Sampling was performed from October 1999 until March 2000. Adults were collected using an entomological net, and larvae and puparia were obtained from the composting material and incubated to obtain adults. Richness, abundance and sex ratio were calculated. RESULTS: A total of 9 taxa of Diptera were identified: Sarconesia chlorogaster, Phaenicia sericata, Calliphora vicina, Cochliomya macellaria, Ophyra sp, Muscina stabulans, Musca domestica, Sarcophaga sp and Fannia sp. Specimens of Anthomyiidae, Acaliptratae and one larva of Eristalis tenax were also found. Ophyra sp. was the most abundant taxa. All the captured Diptera belonged to introduced taxa. Most of them are considered to be eusynanthropic and/or hemisynanthropic and have sanitary importance as they may cause myiasis and pseudomyiasis. The high number of females registered and the finding of immature stages indicated that flies can develop their complete life cycle on biosolid composting windrows. CONCLUSIONS: The characterization of flies obtained in this study may be useful for defining locations of urban or semi-urban composting facilities. It also highlights the importance of sanitary precautions at such plants.

  13. Characterization of Environmental Nano- and Macrocolloid Particles Extracted from Selected Soils and Biosolids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Ghezzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental nanoparticles found in soil systems and biosolids may pose a considerable risk to groundwater quality as contaminant carriers. Little effort has been invested in the characterization of natural nanocolloids compared to corresponding macrocolloids. This study involved physicochemical, mineralogical, and morphological characterizations of nanocolloids and macrocolloids fractionated from three Kentucky soils and one biosolid. Particle size and morphology were investigated using scanning/transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Mineralogical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analyses. Zeta potentials and cation exchange capacities assessed surface charge and chemical reactivity. The estimated average hydrodynamic diameter of nanoparticles was nearly twice the ideal 100 nm range, apparently due to irregular particle shapes and partial aggregation. Nanoparticles were also found attached to surfaces of macrocolloids, forming macro-nano aggregates and obscuring some of their physical and chemical characteristics. However, nanocolloids exhibited greater surface reactivity, likely due to their smaller size, poor crystallinity, and morphological shape distortions. In spite of some behavior modification due to nanoaggregation phenomena, nanocolloids appeared to be much more potent vectors of contaminant transport in subsurface environments than their macrosize fractions. Nevertheless, their heterogeneous nature brings to light important considerations in addressing pollution prevention and remediation challenges.

  14. Determination of inorganic and organic priority pollutants in biosolids from meat processing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sena, Rennio F. de; Tambosi, Jose L.; Floriani, Silvia L.; Virmond, Elaine; Schroeder, Horst Fr.; Moreira, Regina F.P.M.; Jose, Humberto J.

    2009-01-01

    The biosolids (BS) generated in the wastewater treatment process of a meat processing plant were monitored and the priority pollutant content was characterized. The trace metal and organic pollutant content - polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF) - were determined quantitatively and compared to guideline limits established by the US EPA and EU. PCBs were not detected in the solid samples, while trace metals, PAHs and PCDD/PCDF were detected in concentrations below the limits established by international standards. Toxic equivalent factors were evaluated for the biosolids, and the results proved that these wastes can be safely deposited on land or used in combustion/incineration plants. Since no previous data were found for meat processing waste, comparisons were made using municipal sewage sludge data reported in the literature. Since, this report monitored part of the priority pollutants established by the US EPA for meat and poultry processing wastewater and sludge, the results verified that low pollution loads are generated by the meat processing plant located in the southern part of Brazil. However, the BS generated in the treatment processes are in accordance with the limits established for waste disposal and even for soil fertilizer.

  15. Strain: Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronner, Renée

    2017-04-01

    2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of John Ramsay's well known textbook "Folding and Fracturing of Rocks" - ... and the 30th anniversary of the rejection of a rather less well known paper entitled "Strain: Fact or Fiction?" submitted by Renée Panozzo to the Journal of Structural Geology. The gist of the paper was simple and straight forward: it was argued that not every fabric that can be observed in deformed rocks is necessarily a measure of the amount of strain the rock incurred. A distinction was made between a general "fabric", i.e., the traceable geometry of grain boundaries, for example, and a so-called "strain fabric", i.e., the model geometry that would result from homogeneously straining an initially isotropic fabric and that would exhibit at least orthorhombic symmetry. To verify if a given fabric was indeed a strain fabric it was therefore suggested to use the SURFOR method (published by Panozzo) and to carry out a so-called strain test, i.e., a check of symmetry, before interpreting the results of a fabric analysis in terms of strain. The problem with the paper was that it was very obviously written out of frustration. The frustration came form having reviewed a number of manuscripts which tried to use the then novel SURFOR method for strain analysis without first checking if the the fabric was a indeed a "strain fabric" or not, and then blaming the SURFOR method for producing ambiguous results. As a result, the paper was not exactly well balanced and carefully thought out. It was considered "interesting but not scholarly" by one of the reviewers and down-right offensive by the second. To tell the truth, however, the paper was not formally rejected. The editor Sue Treagus strongly encouraged Panozzo to revise the paper, ... and 30 years later, I will follow her advise and offer a revised paper as a tribute to John Ramsay. To quote from the original manuscript: "We should be a little more impressed that strain works so well, and less

  16. Use of nuclear receptor luciferase-based bioassays to detect endocrine active chemicals in a biosolids-biochar amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carolyn G; Joshi, Geetika; Bair, Daniel A; Oriol, Charlotte; He, Guochun; Parikh, Sanjai J; Denison, Michael S; Scow, Kate M

    2017-08-01

    Biosolids are a potentially valuable source of carbon and nutrients for agricultural soils; however, potential unintended impacts on human health and the environment must be considered. Virtually all biosolids contain trace amounts endocrine-disrupting chemicals derived from human use of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). One potential way to reduce the bioavailability of PPCPs is to co-apply biosolids with biochar to soil, because biochar's chemical (e.g., aromaticity) and physical properties (e.g., surface area) give it a high affinity to bind many organic chemicals in the environment. We developed a soil-specific extraction method and utilized a luciferase-based bioassay (CALUX) to detect endocrine active chemicals in a biosolids-biochar co-amendment soil greenhouse study. Both biochar (walnut shell, 900 °C) and biosolids had positive impacts on carrot and lettuce biomass accumulation over our study period. However, the walnut shell biochar stimulated aryl hydrocarbon receptor activity, suggesting the presence of potential endocrine active chemicals in the biochar. Since the biochar rate tested (100 t ha -1 ) is above the average agronomic rate (10-20 t ha -1 ), endocrine effects would not be expected in most environmental applications. The effect of high temperature biochars on endocrine system pathways must be explored further, using both quantitative analytical tools to identify potential endocrine active chemicals and highly sensitive bioanalytical assays such as CALUX to measure the resulting biological activity of such compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The toxicity of silver to soil organisms exposed to silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate in biosolids-amended field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesmer, Alexander H; Velicogna, Jessica R; Schwertfeger, Dina M; Scroggins, Richard P; Princz, Juliska I

    2017-10-01

    The use of engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is widespread, with expected release to the terrestrial environment through the application of biosolids onto agricultural lands. The toxicity of AgNPs and silver nitrate (AgNO 3 ; as ionic Ag + ) to plant (Elymus lanceolatus and Trifolium pratense) and soil invertebrate (Eisenia andrei and Folsomia candida) species was assessed using Ag-amended biosolids applied to a natural sandy loam soil. Bioavailable Ag + in soil samples was estimated using an ion-exchange technique applied to KNO 3 soil extracts, whereas exposure to dispersible AgNPs was verified by single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. Greater toxicity to plant growth and earthworm reproduction was observed in AgNP exposures relative to those of AgNO 3 , whereas no difference in toxicity was observed for F. candida reproduction. Transformation products in the AgNP-biosolids exposures resulted in larger pools of extractable Ag + than those from AgNO 3 -biosolids exposures, at similar total Ag soil concentrations. The results of the present study reveal intrinsic differences in the behavior and bioavailability of the 2 different forms of Ag within the biosolids-soils pathway. The present study demonstrates how analytical methods that target biologically relevant fractions can be used to advance the understanding of AgNP behavior and toxicity in terrestrial environments. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2756-2765. © 2017 Crown in the Right of Canada. Published Wiley Periodicals Inc., on behalf of SETAC. © 2017 Crown in the Right of Canada. Published Wiley Periodicals Inc., on behalf of SETAC.

  18. Biomass, Nutrient, and Trace Element Accumulation and Partitioning in Cattail ( L.) during Wetland Phytoremediation of Municipal Biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeke, Nicholson N; Zvomuya, Francis; Cicek, Nazim; Ross, Lisette; Badiou, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Biomass and contaminant accumulation and partitioning in plants determine the harvest stage for optimum contaminant uptake during phytoremediation of municipal biosolids. This wetland microcosm bioassay characterized accumulation and partitioning of biomass, nutrients (N and P), and trace elements (Zn, Cu, Cr, and Cd) in cattail ( L.) in a growth room. Four cattail seedlings were transplanted into each 20-L plastic pail containing 3.9 kg (dry wt.) biosolids from an end-of-life municipal lagoon. A 10-cm-deep water column was maintained above the 12-cm-thick biosolids layer. Plants were harvested every 14 d over a period of 126 d for determination of aboveground biomass (AGB) and belowground biomass (BGB) yields, along with contaminant concentrations in these plant tissues. Logistic model fits to biomass yield data indicated no significant difference in asymptotic yield between AGB and BGB. Aboveground biomass accumulated significantly greater amounts of N and P and lower amounts of trace elements than BGB. Maximum N accumulation in AGB occurred 83 d after transplanting (DAT), and peak P uptake occurred at 86 DAT. Harvesting at maximum aboveground accumulation removed (percent of the initial element concentration in the biosolids) 4% N, 3% P, 0.05% Zn, 0.6% Cu, 0.1% Cd, and 0.2% Cr. Therefore, under the conditions of this study, phytoremediation would be most effective if cattail is harvested at 86 DAT. These results contribute toward the identification of the harvest stage that will optimize contaminant uptake and enhance in situ phytoremediation of biosolids using cattail. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  19. Effects of surface applications of biosolids on soil, crops, ground water, and streambed sediment near Deer Trail, Colorado, 1999-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Tracy J.B.; Smith, David B.; Crock, James G.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Metro Wastewater Reclamation District and North Kiowa Bijou Groundwater Management District, studied natural geochemical effects and the effects of biosolids applications to the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District properties near Deer Trail, Colorado, during 1999 through 2003 because of public concern about potential contamination of soil, crops, ground water, and surface water from biosolids applications. Parameters analyzed for each monitoring component included arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc (the nine trace elements regulated by Colorado for biosolids), gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity, and plutonium, as well as other parameters. Concentrations of the nine regulated trace elements in biosolids were relatively uniform and did not exceed applicable regulatory standards. All plutonium concentrations in biosolids were below the minimum detectable level and were near zero. The most soluble elements in biosolids were arsenic, molybdenum, nickel, phosphorus, and selenium. Elevated concentrations of bismuth, mercury, phosphorus, and silver would be the most likely inorganic biosolids signature to indicate that soil or streambed sediment has been affected by biosolids. Molybdenum and tungsten, and to a lesser degree antimony, cadmium, cobalt, copper, mercury, nickel, phosphorus, and selenium, would be the most likely inorganic 'biosolids signature' to indicate ground water or surface water has been affected by biosolids. Soil data indicate that biosolids have had no measurable effect on the concentration of the constituents monitored. Arsenic concentrations in soil of both Arapahoe and Elbert County monitoring sites (like soil from all parts of Colorado) exceed the Colorado soil remediation objectives and soil cleanup standards, which were determined by back-calculating a soil concentration equivalent to a one-in-a-million cumulative cancer risk. Lead concentrations

  20. Facts and figures 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This report provides an outline of the development of research policy since 1988 - and, in addition, provides comprehensive information on the resources for science, research and development and on the major research organizations. It highlights further positive developments in the research policy of the Federal Government: With the proportion of the gross domestic product spent on R and D having risen to 2.9%, the Federal Republic of Germany belongs to the leading countries - together with Japan and the USA. Modern key technologies have continued to gain in importance. In particular the growth of the contribution of industry to the total research and development budget of the Federal Republic of Germany from 55% in 1981 to 64% today reflects both the increased dynamism of industry and the importance of R and D for maintaining industrial competitiveness. Government provision for the future has gained more weight through intensified environmental, climate, health and geriatric research. Transfrontier cooperation in R and D has continued to gain in significance within the European Community and the EUREKA initiative; it has become especially important due to the new developments in Eastern Europe. (orig./HSCH)

  1. Dissipation of triclosan, triclocarban, carbamazepine and naproxen in agricultural soil following surface or sub-surface application of dewatered municipal biosolids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Sabourin, Lyne [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON N5V 4T3 (Canada); Lapen, David R. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0C6 (Canada); Topp, Edward, E-mail: ed.topp@agr.gc.ca [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON N5V 4T3 (Canada); Department of Biology, Western University, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    In many jurisdictions land application of municipal biosolids is a valued source of nutrients for crop production. The practice must be managed to ensure that crops and adjacent water are not subject to contamination by pharmaceuticals or other organic contaminants. The broad spectrum antimicrobial agents triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC), the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ), and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug naproxen (NAP) are widely used and are carried in biosolids. In the present study, the effect of biosolids and depth of placement in the soil profile on the rates of TCS, TCC, CBZ, and NAP dissipation were evaluated under semi-field conditions. Aggregates of dewatered municipal biosolids (DMBs) supplemented with {sup 14}C-labeled residues were applied either on the soil surface or in the subsurface of the soil profile, and incubated over several months under ambient outdoor conditions. The dissipation of TCS, TCC and NAP was significantly faster in sub-surface than surface applied biosolid aggregates. In contrast the dissipation rate for CBZ was the same in surface applied and incorporated aggregates. Overall, the present study has determined a significant effect of depth of placement on the dissipation rate of biodegradable molecules. - Highlights: • We characterized the soil fate of four organic contaminants carried in biosolids. • Biosolids were placed on the soil surface or incorporated within the soil profile. • Naproxen, triclosan and triclocarban were dissipated more rapidly when incorporated. • Depth of placement did not influence the rate of carbamazepine dissipation. • Soil incorporation of biosolids will result in more rapid dissipation of contaminants.

  2. Groups of Fact in Computer Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Cereser Pezzella

    2015-12-01

    groups and the fact groups, presenting these as subjects, although without constituting a society. Technological changes led to the formation of so-called cyberspace, which enabled a change in the own way of understanding the reality through faster diffusion of the most varied content information, thus allowing not only a quicker movement of goods and messages, as well as the modification of habits and even the conversion of practically any cultural product in assets to be profitable exploitation, aimed at consumption.

  3. Facts controllers in power transmission and distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Padiyar, KR

    2007-01-01

    About the Book: The emerging technology of Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) enables planning and operation of power systems at minimum costs, without compromising security. This is based on modern high power electronic systems that provide fast controllability to ensure ''flexible'' operation under changing system conditions. This book presents a comprehensive treatment of the subject by discussing the operating principles, mathematical models, control design and issues that affect the applications. The concepts are explained often with illustrative examples and case studies. In partic

  4. Pharmaceutical and personal care products in tile drainage following land application of municipal biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapen, D R; Topp, E; Metcalfe, C D; Li, H; Edwards, M; Gottschall, N; Bolton, P; Curnoe, W; Payne, M; Beck, A

    2008-07-25

    Land application of municipal biosolids (sewage) is a common farming practice in many parts of the world. There is potential for transport of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) from agricultural fields to adjacent surface waters via tile drainage systems. In this study, liquid municipal biosolids (LMB) (total solids=11,933 mg L(-1)), supplemented with selected PPCPs and the fluorescent dye tracer rhodamine WT (RWT), were applied to tile drained fields using two land application approaches. Objectives included evaluating the relative benefits of land application practices with respect to reducing PPCP loadings to tile drains, evaluating PPCP persistence in tile water, and determining whether rhodamine WT can be used to estimate PPCP mass loads in tile. The PPCPs examined included an antibacterial agent used in personal care products (triclosan), a metabolite of nicotine (cotinine), and a variety of drugs including two sulfonamide antimicrobials (sulfapyridine, sulfamethoxazole), a beta-blocker (atenolol), an anti-epileptic (carbamazepine), an antidepressant (fluoxetine), analgesic/anti-inflammatories (acetaminophen, naproxen, ibuprofen), and a lipid-regulator (gemfibrozil). Maximum observed PPCP concentrations in the spiked LMB were about 10(3) ng g(-1) dry weight. PPCPs were shown to move rapidly via soil macropores to tile drains within minutes of the land application. Maximum observed PPCP concentrations in tile effluent associated with the LMB application-induced tile flow event were approximately 10(1) to 10(3) ng L(-1). PPCP mass loads, for the application-induced tile-hydrograph event, were significantly (ptile water during several precipitation-induced tile flow events that occurred post-application, included: triclosan (max. approximately 1.5 x 10(2) ng L(-1)), carbamazepine (max. approximately 7 x 10(1) ng L(-1)), atenolol (max approximately 4 x 10(1) ng L(-1)), and cotinine (max approximately 2 x 10(1) ng L(-1)). In spite of their presence

  5. Release dynamics of dissolved organic matter in soil amended with biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Pavel; Ilani, Talli; Arye, Gilboa

    2014-05-01

    Among the soil organic matter (SOM) components, dissolved organic matter (DOM) is the link between the solid phase and the soil solution. Previous studies emphasize the turnover of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) in soils as major pathways of element cycling. In addition to DOM contribution to carbon, nitrogen and other nutrient budgets, it also influence soil biological activity, reduces metal-ion toxicity, increase the transport of some compounds and contribute to the mineral weathering. Amending soils with biosolids originated from sludge have become very popular in the recent years. Those additions significantly affect the quantity and the composition of the DOM in agricultural soils. It should be noted that under most irrigation habitants, the soil is subjected to drying and re-wetting cycles, inducing a complex changes of soil structure, aggregation, SOM quality and micro-flora. However, most studies that addressed the above issues (directly or indirectly) are engaged with soils under cover of naturally occurring forests of relatively humid areas rather than agricultural soils in arid areas. In the current study we examined the DOC and DON release dynamic of sand and loess soils sampled from the Negev Desert of Israel. Each one of the soils were mixing with 5% (w/w) of one of the biosolids and packed into a Plexiglass column (I.d. 5.2 cm, L=20 cm). The flow-through experiments were conducted under low (1 ml/min) or high (10 ml/min) flow rates in a continuous or interrupted manner. The leachates were collected in time intervals equivalent to about 0.12 pore volume of a given soil-biosolids mixture. The established leaching curves of DOC, DON, NO3-, NH4+ and Cl- are analyzed by water flow and solute transport model for saturate (continuous runs) or variably saturate water flow conditions (interrupted runs). The chemical equilibrium or non-equilibrium (i.e. equilibrium and/or kinetics adsorption/desorption) versions of the convection dispersion

  6. Genomic and functional characterization of qnr-encoding plasmids from municipal wastewater biosolid Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella eKaplan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Municipal wastewater treatment facilities are considered to be hotspots for antibiotic resistance since they conjoin high densities of environmental and fecal bacteria with selective pressure in the form of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics. Discharged effluents and biosolids from these facilities can disseminate antibiotic resistant genes to terrestrial and aquatic environments, potentially contributing to the increasing global trend in antibiotic resistance. This phenomenon is especially pertinent when resistance genes are associated with mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids, which can be transferred between bacterial phyla. Fluoroquinolones are among the most abundant antibiotic compounds detected in wastewater treatment facilities, especially in biosolids, where due to their hydrophobic properties they accumulate to concentrations that may exceed 40 mg/L. Although fluoroquinolone resistance is traditionally associated with mutations in the gyrA/topoisomerase IV genes, there is increasing evidence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance, which is primarily encoded on qnr genes. In this study, we sequenced seven qnr-harboring plasmids from a diverse collection of Klebsiella strains, isolated from dewatered biosolids from a large wastewater treatment facility in Israel. One of the plasmids, termed pKPSH-11XL was a large (185.4 kbp, multi-drug resistance, IncF-type plasmid that harbored qnrB and 10 additional antibiotic resistance genes that conferred resistance to 5 different antibiotic families. It was highly similar to the pKPN3-like plasmid family that has been detected in multidrug resistant clinical Klebsiella isolates. In contrast, the six additional plasmids were much smaller (7-9Kbp and harbored a qnrS -type gene. These plasmids were highly similar to each other and closely resembled pGNB2, a plasmid isolated from a German wastewater treatment facility. Comparative genome analyses of pKPSH-11XL and other p

  7. Math Fact Strategies Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boso, Annie

    2011-01-01

    An action research project was conducted in order to determine effective math fact strategies for first graders. The traditional way of teaching math facts included using timed tests and flashcards, with most students counting on their fingers or a number line. Six new research-based strategies were taught and analyzed to decide which methods…

  8. New mechanistically based model for predicting reduction of biosolids waste by ozonation of return activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isazadeh, Siavash; Feng, Min; Urbina Rivas, Luis Enrique; Frigon, Dominic

    2014-04-15

    Two pilot-scale activated sludge reactors were operated for 98 days to provide the necessary data to develop and validate a new mathematical model predicting the reduction of biosolids production by ozonation of the return activated sludge (RAS). Three ozone doses were tested during the study. In addition to the pilot-scale study, laboratory-scale experiments were conducted with mixed liquor suspended solids and with pure cultures to parameterize the biomass inactivation process during exposure to ozone. The experiments revealed that biomass inactivation occurred even at the lowest doses, but that it was not associated with extensive COD solubilization. For validation, the model was used to simulate the temporal dynamics of the pilot-scale operational data. Increasing the description accuracy of the inactivation process improved the precision of the model in predicting the operational data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Factors related to the attraction of flies at a biosolids composting facility (Bariloche, Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laos, F.; Semenas, L.; Labud, V.

    2004-01-01

    The composting process is used to treat biosolids from the Wastewater Treatment Plant of Bariloche (NW Patagonia, Argentina). Since 1998, an odourless, innocuous and stable organic amendment has been produced at the Biosolids Composting Plant of Bariloche. However, volatile compounds produced during this process, attract different vectors, mainly insects belonging to the Order Diptera, particularly in summer. To evaluate factors associated with the attraction of Diptera to composting windrows, volatile compounds, wind velocity, ambient and windrow temperatures were measured and their relationships with the taxa of flies found were determined. Sampling was conducted several months on newly formed windrows during 3 weeks of the thermophilic composting period. Composite samples from each windrow were taken on the first day of each sampling week, from November 1999 to March 2000 to analyze volatile compounds using an 'electronic nose'. Windrow and ambient temperatures and wind velocity were recorded on three consecutive days of each week, from January to March 2000; also the capture of flies was performed in this period. A weekly mean value was calculated for each environmental variable. Canonical Correspondence Analysis was employed to determine relationships between taxa of flies and the studied factors. The electronic nose discriminated among odours emitted, differentiating windrows by the bulking agent employed and by week of the thermophilic composting period. Ambient temperatures increased slightly during the sampling weeks; the highest values of wind velocity were registered during the second sampling week while windrow temperatures were sustained approximately 60 degree sign C. Canonical Correspondence Analysis showed that attraction of flies to composting windrows was related to minimum and maximum ambient temperatures and volatile compounds for Muscina stabulans, Fannia sp. and Acaliptratae and to wind velocity for Ophyra sp., Sarcophaga sp., Cochliomyia

  10. Characterization of fluoroquinolone resistance and qnr diversity in Enterobacteriaceae from municipal biosolids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella eKaplan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Municipal biosolids produced during activated sludge treatment applied in waste water treatment plants, are significant reservoirs of antibiotic resistance, since they assemble both natural and fecal microbiota, as well as residual concentrations of antibiotic compounds. This raises major concerns regarding the environmental and epidemiological consequences of using them as fertilizers for crops. The second generation fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin is probably the most abundant antibiotic compound detected in municipal biosolids due to its widespread use and sorption properties. Although fluoroquinolone resistance was originally thought to result from mutations in bacterial gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes, it is becoming apparent that it is also attributed to plasmid-associated resistance factors, which may propagate environmental antibiotic resistance. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of the activated sludge process on fluoroquinolone resistance. The scope of resistances and mobile genetic mechanisms associated with fluoroquinolone resistance were evaluated by screening large collections of ciprofloxacin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae strains from sludge (n=112 and from raw sewage (n=89. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants (qnrA, B and S were readily detected in isolates from both environments, the most dominant being qnrS. Interestingly, all qnr variants were significantly more abundant in sludge isolates than in the isolates from raw sewage. Almost all of ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotic compounds. The sludge isolates were on the whole resistant to a broader range of antibiotic compounds than the raw sewage isolates; however this difference was not statistically significant. Collectively, this study indicates that the activated sludge selects for multiresistant bacterial strains, and that mobile quinolone-resistance elements may have a selective advantage in the activated

  11. Wastewater Biosolid Composting Optimization Based on UV-VNIR Spectroscopy Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temporal-Lara, Beatriz; Melendez-Pastor, Ignacio; Gómez, Ignacio; Navarro-Pedreño, Jose

    2016-11-15

    Conventional wastewater treatment generates large amounts of organic matter-rich sludge that requires adequate treatment to avoid public health and environmental problems. The mixture of wastewater sludge and some bulking agents produces a biosolid to be composted at adequate composting facilities. The composting process is chemically and microbiologically complex and requires an adequate aeration of the biosolid (e.g., with a turner machine) for proper maturation of the compost. Adequate (near) real-time monitoring of the compost maturity process is highly difficult and the operation of composting facilities is not as automatized as other industrial processes. Spectroscopic analysis of compost samples has been successfully employed for compost maturity assessment but the preparation of the solid compost samples is difficult and time-consuming. This manuscript presents a methodology based on a combination of a less time-consuming compost sample preparation and ultraviolet, visible and short-wave near-infrared spectroscopy. Spectroscopic measurements were performed with liquid compost extract instead of solid compost samples. Partial least square (PLS) models were developed to quantify chemical fractions commonly employed for compost maturity assessment. Effective regression models were obtained for total organic matter (residual predictive deviation-RPD = 2.68), humification ratio (RPD = 2.23), total exchangeable carbon (RPD = 2.07) and total organic carbon (RPD = 1.66) with a modular and cost-effective visible and near infrared (VNIR) spectroradiometer. This combination of a less time-consuming compost sample preparation with a versatile sensor system provides an easy-to-implement, efficient and cost-effective protocol for compost maturity assessment and near-real-time monitoring.

  12. Wastewater Biosolid Composting Optimization Based on UV-VNIR Spectroscopy Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Temporal-Lara

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional wastewater treatment generates large amounts of organic matter–rich sludge that requires adequate treatment to avoid public health and environmental problems. The mixture of wastewater sludge and some bulking agents produces a biosolid to be composted at adequate composting facilities. The composting process is chemically and microbiologically complex and requires an adequate aeration of the biosolid (e.g., with a turner machine for proper maturation of the compost. Adequate (near real-time monitoring of the compost maturity process is highly difficult and the operation of composting facilities is not as automatized as other industrial processes. Spectroscopic analysis of compost samples has been successfully employed for compost maturity assessment but the preparation of the solid compost samples is difficult and time-consuming. This manuscript presents a methodology based on a combination of a less time-consuming compost sample preparation and ultraviolet, visible and short-wave near-infrared spectroscopy. Spectroscopic measurements were performed with liquid compost extract instead of solid compost samples. Partial least square (PLS models were developed to quantify chemical fractions commonly employed for compost maturity assessment. Effective regression models were obtained for total organic matter (residual predictive deviation—RPD = 2.68, humification ratio (RPD = 2.23, total exchangeable carbon (RPD = 2.07 and total organic carbon (RPD = 1.66 with a modular and cost-effective visible and near infrared (VNIR spectroradiometer. This combination of a less time-consuming compost sample preparation with a versatile sensor system provides an easy-to-implement, efficient and cost-effective protocol for compost maturity assessment and near-real-time monitoring.

  13. Application of phytotoxicity data to a new Australian soil quality guideline framework for biosolids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heemsbergen, Diane A.; Warne, Michael St.J.; Broos, Kris; Bell, Mike; Nash, David; McLaughlin, Mike; Whatmuff, Mark; Barry, Glenn; Pritchard, Deb; Penney, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    To protect terrestrial ecosystems and humans from contaminants many countries and jurisdictions have developed soil quality guidelines (SQGs). This study proposes a new framework to derive SQGs and guidelines for amended soils and uses a case study based on phytotoxicity data of copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) from field studies to illustrate how the framework could be applied. The proposed framework uses normalisation relationships to account for the effects of soil properties on toxicity data followed by a species sensitivity distribution (SSD) method to calculate a soil added contaminant limit (soil ACL) for a standard soil. The normalisation equations are then used to calculate soil ACLs for other soils. A soil amendment availability factor (SAAF) is then calculated as the toxicity and bioavailability of pure contaminants and contaminants in amendments can be different. The SAAF is used to modify soil ACLs to ACLs for amended soils. The framework was then used to calculate soil ACLs for copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn). For soils with pH of 4-8 and OC content of 1-6%, the ACLs range from 8 mg/kg to 970 mg/kg added Cu. The SAAF for Cu was pH dependant and varied from 1.44 at pH 4 to 2.15 at pH 8. For soils with pH of 4-8 and OC content of 1-6%, the ACLs for amended soils range from 11 mg/kg to 2080 mg/kg added Cu. For soils with pH of 4-8 and a CEC from 5-60, the ACLs for Zn ranged from 21 to 1470 mg/kg added Zn. A SAAF of one was used for Zn as it concentrations in plant tissue and soil to water partitioning showed no difference between biosolids and soluble Zn salt treatments, indicating that Zn from biosolids and Zn salts are equally bioavailable to plants

  14. Characterization of fluoroquinolone resistance and qnr diversity in Enterobacteriaceae from municipal biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ella; Ofek, Maya; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Cytryn, Eddie

    2013-01-01

    Municipal biosolids produced during activated sludge treatment applied in wastewater treatment plants, are significant reservoirs of antibiotic resistance, since they assemble both natural and fecal microbiota, as well as residual concentrations of antibiotic compounds. This raises major concerns regarding the environmental and epidemiological consequences of using them as fertilizers for crops. The second generation fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin is probably the most abundant antibiotic compound detected in municipal biosolids due to its widespread use and sorption properties. Although fluoroquinolone resistance was originally thought to result from mutations in bacterial gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes, it is becoming apparent that it is also attributed to plasmid-associated resistance factors, which may propagate environmental antibiotic resistance. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of the activated sludge process on fluoroquinolone resistance. The scope of resistances and mobile genetic mechanisms associated with fluoroquinolone resistance were evaluated by screening large collections of ciprofloxacin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae strains from sludge (n = 112) and from raw sewage (n = 89). Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants (qnrA, B, and S) were readily detected in isolates from both environments, the most dominant being qnrS. Interestingly, all qnr variants were significantly more abundant in sludge isolates than in the isolates from raw sewage. Almost all ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotic compounds. The sludge isolates were on the whole resistant to a broader range of antibiotic compounds than the raw sewage isolates; however, this difference was not statistically significant. Collectively, this study indicates that the activated sludge harbors multi-resistant bacterial strains, and that mobile quinolone-resistance elements may have a selective advantage in the activated sludge.

  15. Quantitative risk assessment of antimicrobials in biosolids applied on agricultural land and potential translocation into food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Rachel; Healy, Mark G; Fenton, Owen; Cummins, Enda

    2018-04-01

    The use of biosolids as a fertiliser may be an indirect route for contaminants into the food chain. One of the main concerns regarding the spreading of biosolids on agricultural land is the potential uptake of contaminants into plants which may bio-transfer into grazing animals that supply the food chain directly (e.g. meat and milk) and hence are subsequently consumed. The aim of this project was to create a quantitative risk assessment model to estimate the fate and translocation of triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) into the feed (grass) and food chain with subsequent human exposure. The model's results indicate that TCS and TCC have low potential to transfer into milk and beef following the ingestion of contaminated grass by dairy cows. Mean estimated TCS and TCC residues in milk and beef show that TCC had the greatest concentration (mean values of 7.77×10 -6 mgkg -1 in milk and 1.36×10 -4 mgkg -1 in beef). Human exposure results show that TCC was greater for milk consumption in infants (1-4years) (mean value 1.14×10 -7 mgkg -1 bwd -1 ) and for beef consumption by teens (12-17years) (mean value 6.87×10 -8 mgkg -1 bwd -1 ). Concentrations of TCS and TCC were well below the estimated acceptable daily intake (ADI). Human health risk was estimated by evaluation of the hazard quotient (HQ), which used the NOAEL as a toxicity endpoint, combined with milk and beef human exposure estimates. HQ results show that all values were model is a valuable tool in which to ascertain the potential transfer of contaminants in the environment into animal forage with knock on consequences for exposure through the human food chain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Filtering Dialysis Myths from Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to work. Fact: Many dialysis patients continue to work, go to school, or volunteer . Some take time off when they first start dialysis treatment and back to work or school after they have gotten used to ...

  17. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pocket spending. Take action. Become an advocate SPECIAL REPORT — ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE: THE NEXT FRONTIER In the history ... State The 2017 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report contains data on the impact of this disease ...

  18. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... Facts and Figures report contains data on the impact of this disease in every state across the nation. Click below to see the effect that Alzheimer's is having in your state. Read ...

  19. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  20. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  1. 2007 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  2. 2006 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  3. 2009 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  4. 2008 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  5. 2010 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  6. 2012 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  7. 2010 public transportation fact book

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    The Public Transportation Fact Book, published annually, contains national aggregate statistical data covering all aspects of the transit industry in the United States and Canada. Two appendices, also available, provide additional in-depth informatio...

  8. 2008 public transportation fact book

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    This Public Transportation Fact Book presents statistics describing the entire United States transit industry for 1995 : through 2006 with additional detail and overview presentations for 2006. Also included are definitions of reported data : items.

  9. NJ transportation fact book, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The New Jersey Transportation Fact Book 2006-07 presents information about the New Jersey Department of Transportation : and other agencies that provide transportation services in New Jersey. We hope it will prove helpful.

  10. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... advocate SPECIAL REPORT: FINANCIAL AND PERSONAL BENEFITS OF EARLY DIAGNOSIS Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's provides a number ... a researcher Message boards Get the facts 10 warning signs & symptoms What is dementia What is Alzheimer's ...

  11. Facts about Jaundice and Kernicterus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Jaundice & Kernicterus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Websites Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Jaundice and Kernicterus Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  12. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... home care. Take action. Become an advocate SPECIAL REPORT: FINANCIAL AND PERSONAL BENEFITS OF EARLY DIAGNOSIS Early ... State The 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report contains data on the impact of this disease ...

  13. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... health and long-term care costs. worried about memory loss? KNOW THE 10 SIGNS Alzheimer's Disease Facts ... Copyright © 2018 Alzheimer's Association ® . All rights reserved. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's Formed in 1980, ...

  14. Holiday Suicides: Fact or Myth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Press Room Social Media Publications Injury Center Holiday Suicides: Fact or Myth? Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Developing and evaluating prevention programs. Learn More About Suicide CDC’s Overview of Suicide CDC’s Strategic Direction for ...

  15. Chemical Agents: Facts about Evacuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Chemical Agents: Facts About Evacuation Format: Select one PDF [ ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Some kinds of chemical accidents or attacks, such as a train derailment ...

  16. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... disease are no longer consistent with the scientific evidence, and no longer serve our health care needs. ... irrevocable disability occurs. LEARN ABOUT OUR COMMITMENT TO RESEARCH. Read More Alzheimer's Disease Facts in Each State ...

  17. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... irrevocable disability occurs. LEARN ABOUT OUR COMMITMENT TO RESEARCH. Read More Alzheimer's Disease Facts in Each State ... news and advances in Alzheimer's treatments, care and research. Get tips for living with Alzheimer's as well ...

  18. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... is having in your state. Read past editions . Sign up for our e-newsletter Stay up-to- ... researcher Message boards Get the facts 10 warning signs & symptoms What is dementia What is Alzheimer's 7 ...

  19. Definition and Facts for Constipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Definition & Facts for Constipation What is Constipation? Constipation is a condition in which you typically ... to prevent or relieve constipation. How common is constipation? Constipation is one of the most common gastrointestinal ( ...

  20. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... same category as other chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease or diabetes, which can be ... Disease Facts and Figures report contains data on the impact of this disease ...

  1. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alzheimer's & Dementia >> Home Text size: A A A 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures Download the full ... all ages are living with Alzheimer's dementia in 2018. This number includes an estimated 5.5 million ...

  2. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... Alzheimer's >> Home Text size: A A A 2017 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures Download the Full Report: ... twice as high. Invest in a world without Alzheimer's. Donate Caregivers In 2016, 15.9 million family ...

  3. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... Alzheimer's >> Home Text size: A A A 2017 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures Download the Full Report: Download ... spending. Take action. Become an advocate SPECIAL REPORT — ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE: THE NEXT FRONTIER In the history of medicine, ...

  4. State Fact Sheets on COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Search The CDC Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . COPD Homepage Data and Statistics Fact Sheets Publications Publications ...

  5. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... Association (NIA-AA) 2011 workgroup and the International Work Group (IWG) have proposed guidelines that use detectable ... boards Get the facts 10 warning signs & symptoms What is dementia What is Alzheimer's 7 stages of ...

  6. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... Dementia >> Home Text size: A A A 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures Download the full report: ... twice as high. Invest in a world without Alzheimer's. Donate Caregivers Eighty-three percent of the help ...

  7. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dementia >> Home Text size: A A A 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures Download the full report: ... twice as high. Invest in a world without Alzheimer's. Donate Caregivers Eighty-three percent of the help ...

  8. Brominated flame retardants in U.S. biosolids from the EPA national sewage sludge survey and chemical persistence in outdoor soil mesocosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Arjun K.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2014-01-01

    We determined national baseline levels and release inventories of 77 traditional and novel brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in biosolids composites (prepared from 110 samples) from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2001 national sewage sludge survey (NSSS). Additionally, analyses were performed on archived samples from a 3-year outdoor mesocosm study to determine the environmental persistence of BFRs in biosolids-amended soil. The total polybrominated diphenylether (PBDE) concentration detected in biosolids composites was 9,400±960 μg/kg dry weight, of which deca-BDE constituted 57% followed by nona- and penta-BDE at 18 and 13%, respectively. The annual mean loading rate estimated from the detected concentrations and approximate annual biosolids production and disposal numbers in the U.S., of the sum of PBDEs and non-BDE BFRs was calculated to be 47,900–60,100 and 12,900–16,200 kg/year, of which 24,000–36,000 and 6,400–9,700 kg/year are applied on land, respectively. Mean concentration of PBDEs were higher in the 2001 samples compared to levels reported in EPA’s 2006/7 Targeted NSSS, reflecting on-going efforts in phasing-out PBDEs in the U.S. In outdoor soil mesocosms, >99% of the initial BFRs mass in the biosolids/soil mixtures (1:2) persisted over the monitoring duration of three years. Estimates of environmental releases may be refined in the future by analyzing individual rather than composited samples, and by integrating currently unavailable data on disposal of biosolids on a plant-specific basis. This study informs the risk assessment of BFRs by furnishing national inventories of BFR occurrence and environmental release via biosolids application on land. PMID:24607311

  9. Development of a chemical kinetic model for a biosolids fluidized-bed gasifier and the effects of operating parameters on syngas quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Wyatt M; Cooper, C David; Mackie, Kevin R; Cairney, Paul

    2014-02-01

    In an effort to decrease the land disposal of sewage sludge biosolids and to recover energy, gasification has become a viable option for the treatment of waste biosolids. The process of gasification involves the drying and devolatilization and partial oxidation of biosolids, followed closely by the reduction of the organic gases and char in a single vessel. The products of gasification include a gaseous fuel composed largely of N2, H2O, CO2, CO, H2, CH4, and tars, as well as ash and unburned solid carbon. A mathematical model was developed using published devolatilization, oxidation, and reduction reactions, and calibrated using data from three different experimental studies of laboratory-scale fluidized-bed sewage sludge gasifiers reported in the literature. The model predicts syngas production rate, composition, and temperature as functions of the biosolids composition and feed rate, the air input rate, and gasifier bottom temperature. Several data sets from the three independent literature sources were reserved for model validation, with a focus placed on five species of interest (CO, CO2, H2, CH4, and C6H6). The syngas composition predictions from the model compared well with experimental results from the literature. A sensitivity analysis on the most important operating parameters of a gasifier (bed temperature and equivalence ratio) was performed as well, with the results of the analysis offering insight into the operations of a biosolids gasifier.

  10. Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) accumulation by earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to biosolids-, polyurethane foam microparticle-, and Penta-BDE-amended soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylor, Michael O; Harvey, Ellen; Hale, Robert C

    2013-12-03

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants have been used in consumer polymers at up to percent levels. While long viewed as biologically inaccessible therein, PBDEs may become bioaccessible following volatilization or polymer deterioration. PBDEs may then enter soils via polymer fragmentation or following land application of sewage sludge-derived biosolids. Studies of direct PBDE uptake from these materials by soil organisms are scarce. We thus exposed earthworms ( Eisenia fetida ) to artificial soil amended with a Class B anaerobically digested biosolid (ADB), an exceptional quality composted biosolid (CB), PBDE-containing polyurethane foam (PUF) microparticles, and Penta-BDE-spiked artificial soil (SAS). Worms accumulated mg/kg (lipid) ∑Penta-PBDE burdens from all substrates. Biota-soil accumulation factors (BSAFs) for worms exposed to ADB- and CB-amended soils were comparable after 28 d. BSAFs generally decreased with increasing congener KOW and substrate dosage. Biosolids-associated PBDE bioavailability was lower than spiked PBDEs. BSAFs for worms exposed to PUF microparticles ranged from 3.9 to 33.4, with ∑Penta-PBDE tissue burdens reaching 3740 mg/kg lipid. Congener accumulation patterns were similar in worms and polyethylene passive sampling devices immersed in ADB-amended soil coincident with exposed worms. However, passive sampler accumulation factors were lower than BSAFs. Our results demonstrate that PBDEs may accumulate in organisms ingesting soils containing biosolids or waste plastics. Such organisms may then transfer their burdens to predators or translocate them from the site of application/disposal.

  11. Non-destructive testing: significant facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espejo, Hector; Ruch, Marta C.

    2006-01-01

    In the last fifty years different organisations, both public and private, have been assigned to the mission of introducing into the country the most relevant aspects of the modern technological discipline 'Non Destructive Testing' (NDT) through a manifold of activities, such as training and education, research, development, technical assistance and services, personnel qualification/certification and standardisation. A review is given of the significant facts in this process, in which the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission, CNEA, played a leading part, a balance of the accomplishments is made and a forecast of the future of the activity is sketched. (author) [es

  12. Application of municipal biosolids to dry-land wheat fields - A monitoring program near Deer Trail, Colorado (USA). A presentation for an international conference: "The Future of Agriculture: Science, Stewardship, and Sustainability", August 7-9, 2006, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crock, James G.; Smith, David B.; Yager, Tracy J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Since late 1993, Metro Wastewater Reclamation District of Denver (Metro District), a large wastewater treatment plant in Denver, Colorado, has applied Grade I, Class B biosolids to about 52,000 acres of non-irrigated farmland and rangeland near Deer Trail, Colorado. In cooperation with the Metro District in 1993, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began monitoring ground water at part of this site. In 1999, the USGS began a more comprehensive study of the entire site to address stakeholder concerns about the chemical effects of biosolids applications. This more comprehensive monitoring program has recently been extended through 2010. Monitoring components of the more comprehensive study included biosolids collected at the wastewater treatment plant, soil, crops, dust, alluvial and bedrock ground water, and stream bed sediment. Streams at the site are dry most of the year, so samples of stream bed sediment deposited after rain were used to indicate surface-water effects. This presentation will only address biosolids, soil, and crops. More information about these and the other monitoring components are presented in the literature (e.g., Yager and others, 2004a, b, c, d) and at the USGS Web site for the Deer Trail area studies at http://co.water.usgs.gov/projects/CO406/CO406.html. Priority parameters identified by the stakeholders for all monitoring components, included the total concentrations of nine trace elements (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc), plutonium isotopes, and gross alpha and beta activity, regulated by Colorado for biosolids to be used as an agricultural soil amendment. Nitrogen and chromium also were priority parameters for ground water and sediment components. In general, the objective of each component of the study was to determine whether concentrations of priority parameters (1) were higher than regulatory limits, (2) were increasing with time, or (3) were significantly higher in biosolids

  13. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... irrevocable disability occurs. LEARN ABOUT OUR COMMITMENT TO RESEARCH. Read More Alzheimer's Disease Facts in Each State The 2017 Alzheimer's ... date on the latest news and advances in Alzheimer's treatments, care and research. Get tips for living with Alzheimer's as well ...

  14. Facts about Tetralogy of Fallot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Websites Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Tetralogy of Fallot Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... in the mother’s womb during pregnancy. What is Tetralogy of Fallot? Tetralogy of Fallot is made up of the ...

  15. Public Education: Fingertip Facts 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Patti

    2005-01-01

    This paper offers facts and figures on Utah's state of education for 2005. This paper contains the following: (1) Education Contacts; (2) Utah State Board of Education members; (3) Value of Weighted Pupil Unit (WPU) for the 2004-05 school year; (4) Per Pupil Spending in Perspective (2002); (5) Public School Enrollment per district (October…

  16. Public Education: Fingertip Facts 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Patti

    2006-01-01

    This paper offers facts and figures on Utah's state of education for 2006. This paper contains the following: (1) Education Contacts; (2) Utah State Board of Education members; (3) Value of Weighted Pupil Unit (WPU) for the 2005-06 school year; (4) Per Pupil Spending in Perspective (2003); (5) Public School Enrollment per district (October…

  17. Higher Education Act. Fact Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on Disability, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights the challenges for students with disabilities in the nation's university system and recommends solutions that would result in better support systems for postsecondary students with disabilities. This document discusses several interrelated issues that impact student preparation and access to postsecondary education. The…

  18. Fact Sheet: Vulnerable Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Evelyn, Comp.; Goode, Sue, Comp.

    2008-01-01

    This fact sheet provides data on infants, toddlers and young children who are experiencing high stress as a result of a number of risk factors specifically identified in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), including substantiated abuse or neglect, foster care placement, homelessness, exposure to family…

  19. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  20. Women and Guns. Firearm Facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duker, Laurie, Ed.

    Many gun manufacturers market guns to women claiming a gun can provide protection. Statistics provided in this fact sheet indicate gun ownership may provide a false sense of security that can be fatal, since the greatest threat to a woman comes from the people and guns within her own home. Contrary to "typical" scenarios created by advertisers,…

  1. Effects of substrates composed of biosolids on the production of Eucalyptus viminalis, Schinus terebinthifolius and Mimosa scabrella seedlings and on the nutritional status of Schinus terebinthifolius seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, B R P; Wisniewsk, C; Reissmann, C B; Nogueira, A C; Andreoli, C V; Barbieri, S J

    2002-01-01

    Six substrates made up with heated and composted anaerobic biosolid were tested for the production of Eucalyptus viminalis, Schinus terebinthifolius and Mimosa scabrella forest seedlings in a nursery in Southern Brazil. The produced seedlings were statistically evaluated in relation to height, stem diameter, height/stem diameter ratio, aerial and root dry biomass, survival, and also for nutritional status on S. terebinthifolius seedlings. As a function of their high pH, heated biosolids turned out to be viable only in low composition percentages. Composted biosolids turned out to be sufficiently suitable in percentages between 30% and 60% of the substratum--whose Mn and Zn concentrations relate the nutrient contents in theseedlings -with use viability up to 100% in substratum composition.

  2. Heterotrophic Microbial Stimulation through Biosolids Addition for Enhanced Acid Mine Drainage Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omy T. Ogbughalu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The effective control and treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD from sulfide-containing mine wastes is of fundamental importance for current and future long-term sustainable and cost-effective mining industry operations, and for sustainable management of legacy AMD sites. Historically, AMD management has focused on the use of expensive neutralising chemicals to treat toxic leachates. Accordingly, there is a need to develop more cost-effective and efficient methods to prevent AMD at source. Laboratory kinetic leach column experiments, designed to mimic a sulfide-containing waste rock dump, were conducted to assess the potential of organic waste carbon supplements to stimulate heterotrophic microbial growth, and supress pyrite oxidation and AMD production. Microbiological results showed that the addition of biosolids was effective at maintaining high microbial heterotroph populations and preventing AMD generation over a period of 80 weeks, as verified by leachate chemistry and electron microscopy analyses. This research contributes to the ongoing development of a cost effective, multi-barrier geochemical-microbial control strategy for reduced mineral sulfide oxidation rates at source.

  3. Brominated diphenyl ether levels. A comparison of tributary sediments versus biosolid material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolic, T.M.; MacPherson, K.A.; Reiner, E.J. [Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Laboratory Services Branch, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ho, T.; Kleywegt, S. [Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Standards Development Branch, Toronto, ON (Canada); Dove, A.; Marvin, C. [Environment Canada, Burlington, ON (Canada)

    2004-09-15

    PBDEs are persistent in the environment, have low water solubility and are known to have a tendency to bioaccumulate in wildlife and humans. There are 209 possible PBDE congeners. There has been concern over the bioaccumulation of these compounds since they have been found in mother's milk. Some of the brominated diphenyl ethers are known to metabolize into hydroxylated compounds and these metabolites are known to compete with and reduce thyroxine (T4) from binding to the thyroxine binding protein, transthyretin. This disrupts the thyroid hormone system interaction that has recently been notable amongst women in the form of hypothyroidism that can affect the fetus development in the form of neurodevelopmental deficits. There have been reports of estrogenic activities regarding PBDEs and their hydroxylated counterparts. Information such as this is indicative that PBDEs are endocrine disruptors. Due to their lipophilic nature, PBDEs have a high binding affinity to particulates and accumulate in sediments. Various reports on sediments and sludge type matrices have been reported in Austria, Switzerland, Netherlands and Canada. The following paper is a presentation of levels of PBDEs found in Tributary sediments and their comparison of levels to nearby biosolid sampling locations along Lake Ontario.

  4. Integrating composting and vermicomposting in the treatment and bioconversion of biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndegwa, P M; Thompson, S A

    2001-01-01

    Traditional thermophilic composting is commonly adopted for treatment of organic wastes or for production of organic/natural fertilizers. A related technique, called vermicomposting (using earthworms to breakdown the organic wastes) is also becoming popular. These two techniques have their inherent advantages and disadvantages. The integrated approach suggested in this study borrows pertinent attributes from each of these two processes and combines them to enhance the overall process and improve the products qualities. Two approaches investigated in this study are: (1) pre-composting followed by vermicomposting, and (2) pre-vermicomposting followed by composting. The substrate was biosolids (activated sewage sludge) with mixed paper-mulch as the carbon base. Eisenia fetida (red wigglers) was the species of earthworms used in the vermicomposting processes. The results indicate that, a system that combines the two processes not only shortens stabilization time, but also improves the products quality. Combining the two systems resulted in a product that was more stable and consistent (homogenous), had less potential impact on the environment and for compost-vermicomposting (CV) system, the product met the pathogen reduction requirements.

  5. Oral Health in the US: Key Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Policy Oral Health in the U.S.: Key Facts Oral Health in the U.S.: Key Facts Published: Jun 01, ... Email Print This fact sheet provides data on oral health care coverage and access for children, nonelderly adults ...

  6. Marijuana: Facts Parents Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents Need to Know » A Letter to Parents Marijuana: Facts Parents Need to Know Email Facebook Twitter ... their children to review the scientific facts about marijuana: (1) Marijuana: Facts Parents Need to Know and ( ...

  7. Effect of biosolids application on the growth of Jacaranda mimosifolia (Gualanday) and under physical and chemical conditions of a degraded soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, R; Velasquez, D C; Acosta, E

    2007-01-01

    The biosolids are organic materials, derived from wastewater treatment of domestic and industrial sewage. one of the main problems of wastewater treatment plants is the final destination of the biosolids, their deposit in sanitary fillers, the incineration and land application are the main methods of dispose; the first two methods are expensive, while the last one, is gaining acceptance, because the biosolids are a resource that can be used as supplementary organic fertilizer. furthermore, land application of biosolids can help to improve declined soil fertility in degraded soils, but it can be generated contamination problems. the aims of this study were to investigate the effect of biosolids application on the growth of Jacaranda mimosifolia (Gualanday) and the changes on physical and chemical conditions of a degraded soil. this arboreal specie was planted in a degraded soil amended with biosolids, and was grown in a greenhouse. the treatments corresponded to contents of organic matter in the mixture (soil-biosolid) of 0 %, 2 %, 4 % and 8 %, in a completely randomized design with four treatments and ten replications. monthly samplings were realized to get information about the variables: survival height and diameter of stem, and number of leaves. the dry biomass was evaluated at the end of the study. the physical and chemical analyses were made at the beginning of the experiment and three months later. the chemical analyses included ph, oxidable organic carbon, Al, Ca, Mg, K, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, P, S, B, N0 3 , NH 4 + , and the physical analyses included aggregate stability, bulk density, real water retention. the statistical analysis between treatments was realized every month, by analysis of variance and Duncan's multiple range test, using a 95 % confidence level. the treatment with a 2 % of organic matter was not affected the plant growth and was similar with the untreated control. The treatments with a 4 % and 8 % of organic matter caused a lower survival a lower

  8. Five Indisputable Facts on Modern Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Aaron P [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brinkman, Gregory L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lopez, Anthony J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Holttinen, Hannele [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland; Helman, Udi [Helman Analytics; Summers, Kate [Pacific Hydro; Bakke, Jordan [Midcontinent Independent System Operator

    2017-08-01

    This presentation overviews five indisputable facts about modern power systems: Fact one: The grid can handle more renewable generation than previously thought. Fact two: Geographic and resource diversity provide additional reliability to the system. Fact three: Wind and solar forecasting provide significant value. Fact four: Our electric power markets were not originally designed for variable renewables -- but they could be adapted. Fact five: Modern power electronics are creating new sources of essential reliability services.

  9. International waste management fact book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya, J P; LaMarche, M N; Upton, J F

    1997-10-01

    Many countries around the world are faced with nuclear and environmental management problems similar to those being addressed by the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this Fact Book is to provide the latest information on US and international organizations, programs, activities and key personnel to promote mutual cooperation to solve these problems. Areas addressed include all aspects of closing the commercial and nuclear fuel cycle and managing the wastes and sites from defense-related, nuclear materials production programs.

  10. International waste management fact book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaya, J.P.; LaMarche, M.N.; Upton, J.F.

    1997-10-01

    Many countries around the world are faced with nuclear and environmental management problems similar to those being addressed by the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this Fact Book is to provide the latest information on US and international organizations, programs, activities and key personnel to promote mutual cooperation to solve these problems. Areas addressed include all aspects of closing the commercial and nuclear fuel cycle and managing the wastes and sites from defense-related, nuclear materials production programs

  11. Nuclear economics: Issues and facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear economics has become on the more prominent topics related to nuclear power. Beyond the subjects of nuclear safety and waste disposal, questions and concerns of nuclear power economics have emerged with growing frequency in utility board rooms, in state and federal regulatory proceedings, and in the media. What has caused nuclear power economics to become such a popular topic? This paper addresses issues and facts related to historical nuclear plant costs, new nuclear plant projections, and warning signals for future plants

  12. Inactivation of Adenovirus Type 5, Rotavirus WA and Male Specific Coliphage (MS2 in Biosolids by Lime Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron B. Margolin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of lime to reduce or eliminate pathogen content is a cost-effective treatment currently employed in many Class B biosolids production plants in the United States. A bench scale model of lime stabilization was designed to evaluate the survival of adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa, and the male specific bacteriophage, MS2, in various matrices. Each virus was initially evaluated independently in a reverse osmosis treated water matrix limed with an aqueous solution of calcium hydroxide for 24-hr at 22 ± 5°C. In all R/O water trials, adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa and MS2 were below detectable levels (<100.5 TCID50/mL and <1 PFU/mL respectively following 0.1-hr of liming. Adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa, and MS2, were inoculated into composted, raw and previously limed matrices, representative of sludge and biosolids, to achieve a final concentration of approximately 104 PFU or TCID50/mL. Each matrix was limed for 24-hr at 22 ± 5°C and 4 ± 2°C. In all trials virus was below detectable levels following a 24-hr incubation. The time required for viral inactivation varied depending on the temperature and sample matrix. This research demonstrates reduction of adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa, and male-specific bacteriophage, in water, sludge and biosolids matrices following addition of an 8% calcium hydroxide slurry to achieve a pH of 12 for 2-hr reduced to 11.5 for 22-hr by addition of 0.1 N HCl. In these trials, MS2 was a conservative indicator of the efficacy of lime stabilization of adenovirus Type 5 and rotavirus Wa and therefore is proposed as a useful indicator organism.

  13. Fate of synthetic musks in a domestic wastewater treatment plant and in an agricultural field amended with biosolids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.-J.; Metcalfe, Chris D.

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic musks are widely used as fragrance ingredients in personal care products, and they enter domestic wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) through discharges into municipal sewage systems. Samples of aqueous sewage and biosolids collected from the Peterborough Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP), Ontario, Canada were analyzed for 11 synthetic musk compounds using GC/MS. The results showed that 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethyl-cyclopenta[g]-2-benzopyrane (HHCB, 173.1 ± 43.4 ng/L) and 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-tetrahydronaphthalene (AHTN, 41.6 ± 15.8 ng/L) were the dominant fragrances in sewage, but other polycyclic musks and nitro musks were present at lower concentrations. The concentrations of HHCB and AHTN in the aqueous phase of the sewage were highly correlated with both BOD 5 and TOC. The overall removal efficiency of synthetic musks from the aqueous sewage in the WWTP ranged from 43.3% to 56.9%, but removal occurred mainly by partitioning into the biosolids. Based on a mass balance model, the daily input and output of HHCB and AHTN in the Peterborough WWTP were 47 g and 46 g, respectively. In an agricultural field amended with biosolids from the Peterborough WWTP, HHCB and AHTN were detected in soil immediately after application at mean concentrations of 1.0 and 1.3 μg/kg, respectively, but concentrations declined relatively rapidly over the next 6 weeks, post-application

  14. Impact of biosolids on the persistence and dissipation pathways of triclosan and triclocarban in an agricultural soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Sabourin, Lyne; Scott, Andrew; Lapen, David R.; Topp, Edward

    2009-01-01

    The broad spectrum antimicrobial agents triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) are widely used in many personal care products. Knowledge concerning the fate of these two compounds in different environmental matrices is scarce. In this study, the fate of TCS and TCC in soil following direct addition, or when residues were applied via either liquid municipal biosolids (LMB) or dewatered municipal biosolids (DMB) was investigated in laboratory dissipation experiments and under outdoor conditions using radioisotope methods. In laboratory incubations, 14 C-TCC or 14 C-TCS was added to microcosms containing a loam soil and the rate of 14 CO 2 accumulation and loss of solvent-extractable 14 C were determined during incubation at 30 o C. Compared to when TCC or TCS was added directly to soil, both chemicals were mineralized more rapidly when applied in LMB, and both were mineralized more slowly when applied in DMB. The application matrix had no effect on the rate of removal of extractable residues. In field experiments, parent compounds were incorporated directly in soil, incorporated via LMB, or a single aggregate of amended DMB was applied to the soil surface. During the experiment soil temperatures ranged from 20 o C to 10 o C. Dissipation was much slower in the field than in the laboratory experiments. Removal of non-extractable residues was faster in the presence of LMB than the other treatments. Recovery of extractable and non-extractable residues suggested that there was little atmospheric loss of 14 C. Triclocarban readily formed non-extractable residues with DMB whereas TCS did not. Overall, this study has identified that both the pathways and the kinetics of TCS and TCC dissipation in soil are different when the chemicals are carried in biosolids compared to when these chemicals are added directly to the soil.

  15. Impact of biosolids on the persistence and dissipation pathways of triclosan and triclocarban in an agricultural soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Sabourin, Lyne; Scott, Andrew [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, Canada N5V 4T3 (Canada); Lapen, David R. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0C6 (Canada); Topp, Edward, E-mail: ed.topp@agr.gc.ca [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, Canada N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2009-11-15

    The broad spectrum antimicrobial agents triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) are widely used in many personal care products. Knowledge concerning the fate of these two compounds in different environmental matrices is scarce. In this study, the fate of TCS and TCC in soil following direct addition, or when residues were applied via either liquid municipal biosolids (LMB) or dewatered municipal biosolids (DMB) was investigated in laboratory dissipation experiments and under outdoor conditions using radioisotope methods. In laboratory incubations, {sup 14}C-TCC or {sup 14}C-TCS was added to microcosms containing a loam soil and the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} accumulation and loss of solvent-extractable {sup 14}C were determined during incubation at 30 {sup o}C. Compared to when TCC or TCS was added directly to soil, both chemicals were mineralized more rapidly when applied in LMB, and both were mineralized more slowly when applied in DMB. The application matrix had no effect on the rate of removal of extractable residues. In field experiments, parent compounds were incorporated directly in soil, incorporated via LMB, or a single aggregate of amended DMB was applied to the soil surface. During the experiment soil temperatures ranged from 20 {sup o}C to 10 {sup o}C. Dissipation was much slower in the field than in the laboratory experiments. Removal of non-extractable residues was faster in the presence of LMB than the other treatments. Recovery of extractable and non-extractable residues suggested that there was little atmospheric loss of {sup 14}C. Triclocarban readily formed non-extractable residues with DMB whereas TCS did not. Overall, this study has identified that both the pathways and the kinetics of TCS and TCC dissipation in soil are different when the chemicals are carried in biosolids compared to when these chemicals are added directly to the soil.

  16. Holy sludge : Toronto's new bylaw and disposal strategy for biosolids impacts industry and sets a national precedent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crittenden, G. [ed.

    2001-01-01

    Toronto, Ontario has implemented a new approach to the management of sewage sludge also known as biosolids. The decision was made to shut down its multi-hearth incinerator at the Ash bridges Bay Treatment Plant and increase the beneficial use, also called land application of biosolids, to 100 per cent in the near future. In addition, the disposal of dangerous chemicals, agricultural waste, and other wastes in municipal drains and sewers is being clamped down. It was determined that preventing pollutants from entering municipal wastewater would greatly increase public acceptance of the application of biosolids on agricultural land. All human activities will feel the impact, from organic waste in grocery stores to dental amalgams, from waste oil and solvents at auto repair shops to harsh chemical used in the metal plating industry. The new bylaw adopted by the City of Toronto prevents any individual from discharging or depositing into a storm sewer or watercourse (or a municipal or private sewer connecting with a storm sewer): hazardous waste chemicals, blowdown water, combustible liquids, floating debris, fuel, hauled sewage, hauled waste, hazardous industrial waste or chemicals, as well as an array of other substances. A plan must be submitted by any sector or industry discharging pollutants, and the plan must detail the processes generating the pollutants, as well as the measures required to eliminate the discharges over three and six years. An Industrial Waste Surcharge Agreement or a Sanitary Discharge Agreement might be obtained from the city covering the additional costs involved in treating the discharges. The only substances covered by those agreements are: biochemical oxygen demand, phenolics, total phosphorus and total suspended solids. Water originating from a source other than the city's water supply is covered under the sanitary agreement. Requirements for spills reporting, grease interceptors, motor oil interceptors, lubricating grease and

  17. MIT Lincoln Laboratory 2011 Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Awareness system for the National Capital Region, the assessment of technologies for border and maritime security, and the development of architectures...work initially focused on aircraft surveillance and weather sensing, colli - sion avoidance, and air-ground data link communication. Today, the...Series provides the latest technological developments in homeland air defense, border security, critical infrastructure protection, disaster

  18. Historical Review of the Transportation Analysis Fact of the Week, 1996-2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohlke, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davis, Stacy Cagle [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-10-01

    The Vehicle Technologies Office in the United States Department of Energy hosts a transportation analysis fact of the week on its webpage. As of October 2017, one thousand facts have been published since 1996. Examining the themes of published facts allows one to trace analytical trends determined to be of interest to the public over this time. The most popular themes addressed in the Fact of the Week were vehicle fuel economy, petroleum use and production, vehicle sales, and traveler behavior. Facts on vehicle electrification and advanced combustion technologies have been more popular in the last few years, showing their relevance to the Department of Energy mission.

  19. Helicobacter pylori: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, M G

    1990-01-01

    The recent isolation and classification of the spiral gastric bacteria Helicobacter pylori has led to an explosion of worldwide research. The data strongly suggest that H. pylori is the causative agent for type-B active chronic gastritis. The role of H. pylori in duodenal ulcer awaits clarification, and, more importantly, potential treatment regimens need clear documentation and further detailed research. The past decade has revealed many intriguing facts about H. pylori infection. If, during the 1990s, eradication of H. pylori by means of appropriate and safe medication can lead to the control and prevention of gastroduodenal disease, then major clinical and economic benefits can be anticipated.

  20. Vietnamese Hurricane Response Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Các tờ dữ kiện được cung cấp nơi đây mô tả vai trò của EPA trong việc đáp ứng với bão và cách các chương trình cụ thể cung cấp sự hỗ trợ. The Vietnamese fact sheets provided here describe EPA's role in a hurricane response.

  1. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Vision Facts and Myths How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) KidsHealth > For Parents > How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) Print A A A en ... nutricionales (video) Most packaged foods come with a Nutrition Facts label. These labels have a lot of ...

  2. MIT Lincoln Laboratory Facts 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Regional Situation Awareness system for the National Capital Region, the assessment of technologies for border and maritime security, and the development... colli - sion avoidance, and air-ground data-link communication. Today, the program has evolved to include a rich set of safety applications, decision...Protection Workshop Series provides the latest technological developments in homeland air defense, border security, critical infrastructure protec- tion

  3. Advanced Algal Systems Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    Research and development (R&D) on advanced algal biofuels and bioproducts presents an opportunity to sustainably expand biomass resource potential in the United States. The Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO’s) Advanced Algal Systems Program is carrying out a long-term, applied R&D strategy to lower the costs of algal biofuel production by working with partners to develop revolutionary technologies and conduct crosscutting analyses to better understand the potential

  4. Effects of phytoextraction on heavy metal concentrations and pH of pore-water of biosolids determined using an in situ sampling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huynh, T.T.; Laidlaw, W.S.; Singh, B.; Gregory, D.; Baker, A.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal concentrations and pH of pore-water in contaminated substrates are important factors in controlling metal uptake by plants. We investigated the effects of phytoextraction on these properties in the solution phase of biosolids and diluted biosolids in a 12-month phytoextraction column experiment. Phytoextraction using Salix and Populus spp. temporarily decreased pore-water pH of the substrates over the experimental period followed by a return to initial pH conditions. Salix x reichardtii and Populus balsamifera effectively extracted Ni, Zn and Cd and actively mobilized these metals from the solid to the solution phase. S. x reichardtii had the stronger effect on mobilization of metals due to its larger root system. Phytoextraction did not affect Cu in the solution phase of the biosolids. Heavy metals were leached down to lower depths of the columns during the phytoextraction process. - Salix x reichardtii and Populus balsamifera extracted Ni, Zn and Cd and mobilized these metals in biosolids during phytoextraction

  5. Sediment, Nutrient, and Bacterial Runoff from Biosolids and Mineral Fertilizer Applied to a Mixed Cool- and Native Warm-Season Grassland in the Ozark Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody B. Wallace

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall simulations were conducted within mixed (cool- and native warm-season grasslands in the sloping, rocky soils typical of the Ozark Mountains region to estimate nutrient and bacteria levels in runoff from biosolids and mineral fertilizer (MF. The ability of narrow (1 m vegetated filter strips (VFS to reduce losses was evaluated. Experiment 1 included an untreated control (C; 37 kg plant available nitrogen (PAN ha−1 from biosolids applied to the upslope half of the plot with the downslope half serving as a VFS (LBF; 74 kg PAN ha−1 from biosolids, with VFS (HBF; and a uniform biosolids application at the lower rate and no VFS (LBU. Experiment 2 examined runoff from MF applied at 89 kg ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4-N ha−1 and 147 kg phosphorous (P ha−1 over the whole plot (MFW or only on the upslope half (with VFS (MFF. No significant differences were detected among mean fecal coliform levels despite large differences in magnitude. Losses of NH4-N and P were greater for LBU than for LBF. Although only marginally significant (P=0.058, total phosphorous contained in runoff was nearly three times higher in MFW than in MFF. Results of this study suggest that even a small VFS can potentially reduce nutrient levels in runoff.

  6. Katyn Massacre – Basic Facts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Komaniecka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Katyn is a symbol of the criminal policy of the Soviet system against the Polish nation. The present study aims to demonstrate the basic facts of Katyn massacre – the execution of almost 22,000 people: Polish prisoners of war in Katyn, Kharkov, Kalinin (Tver and also other Polish prisoners (soldiers and civilians, which took place in the spring of 1940 in different places of the Soviet Ukraine and Belarus republics based on the decision of the Soviet authorities, that is the Political Bureau of All-Union Communist Party (Bolsheviks of March 5, 1940. This article refers not only to the massacre itself, but also its origin, historical processes and the lies accompanying Katyn massacre.

  7. Facts and figures in 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavergne, R.; Meuric, L.; Scherrer, S.; Paquel, V.; Louati, S.; Thienard, H.

    2005-01-01

    This document gathers a series of articles dedicated to the situation of the energy sector in France at the end of 2004: -) the energy balance sheet, -) the trend concerning energy consumption since 1973, -) the energy bill, -) figures about electrical power, -) figures about natural gas, -) figures about solid fossil fuels, -) figures about oil, and -) figures about renewable energies. The important fact to note is that the energy bill has soared by 24.1% to reach 28.35 milliard euros which represents 1.75% of the gross national product (PIB). The evolution over the year 2004 of the factors that contribute to the level of the energy bill is: - the import-export energy quantity differential: +7.5%, - the import-export energy cost differential (in Usa dollar): +27.1%, and - the fall of the dollar: -9.1%. (A.C.)

  8. Production of clean energy by anaerobic digestion of phytomass - New prospects for a global warming amelioration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S.A. [Centre for Pollution Control and Energy Technology, Pondicherry University, Chinakalapet, Puducherry 605014 (India)

    2010-08-15

    Anaerobic digestion of animal dung generated combustible gas - this fact has been known since over 130 years and has been gainfully utilized in generating clean energy in the form of methane-rich 'biogas'. During 1970s it was found that aquatic weeds and other phytomass, if anaerobically digested, also produced similarly combustible 'bio' gas. It raised great hopes that anaerobic digestion of phytomass will also enable generation of biogas that too on a much larger scale than is possible with animal manure. This, it was hoped, would also provide a means for utilizing weeds, crop wastes, and biodegradable municipal solid waste which otherwise cause environmental pollution. It appeared to be a 'no lose' possibility; it was hoped that soon the problems of weeds (and other biosolid wastes) as well as energy shortage, would vanish. At that time there was little realization of the global warming (GW) potential of methane nor of the fact that natural degradation of phytomass in the environment is causing massive quantities of GW gas emission. Hence, at that time, the potential benefits from anaerobic digestion of phytomass were perceived only in terms of pollution control and energy generation. But four decades have since elapsed and there is still no economically viable technology with which weeds and phytowastes can be gainfully converted to energy. This paper takes a look at what has happened and why. It also points towards the possibility of success finally emerging on the horizon. It would, hopefully, give a fresh impetus to the entire field of biomethanation R and D because all 'methane capture' technologies also indirectly contribute to very significant reduction in global warming. (author)

  9. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  10. Predicting the concentration range of unmonitored chemicals in wastewater-dominated streams and in run-off from biosolids-amended soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Bipin P.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2012-01-01

    Organic compounds such as sterols and hormones have been detected in surface waters at ecologically relevant concentrations with sources including effluent discharged from publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) as well as leachate and runoff from land amended with municipal sludge (biosolids). Greater than 20% of regulated effluents discharged into U.S. surface waters experience in-stream dilution of <10 fold and potential impacts are particularly likely in receiving waters dominated by POTW effluents. The increasing use of biosolids on agricultural land exerts additional stress, thereby necessitating environmental monitoring for ecological and human health. Alternatively or in addition to monitoring efforts, screening for potentially hazardous chemicals can be performed using empirical models that are scalable and can deliver results rapidly. The present study makes use of data from U.S. EPA's Targeted National Sewage Sludge Survey (TNSSS) to predict the aqueous-phase concentrations and removal efficiencies of 10 sterols (campesterol, β-sitosterol, stigmasterol, β-stigmastanol, cholesterol, desmosterol, cholestanol, coprostanol, epicoprostanol, ergosterol) as well as the putative toxicity posed by four specific hormones based on their reported biosolids concentrations using published empirical models. Model predictions indicated that removal efficiencies for sterols are uniformly high (∼sim;99%) and closely match removal rates calculated from chemical monitoring at POTWs (paired t-test; p = 0.01). Results from toxicity modeling indicated that the hormones estrone, estradiol and estriol had the highest leaching potentials amongst the compounds considered here and that 17 β-ethinylestradiol was found to pose a potentially significant threat to fathead minnows (P. promelas) via run-off or leaching from biosolids-amended fields. This study exemplifies the use of in silico analysis to (i) identify potentially problematic organic compounds in biosolids, (ii

  11. Effects of applying biosolids to soils on the adsorption and bioavailability of 17α-ethinylestradiol and triclosan in wheat plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, Romina; Richter, Pablo; Brown, Sally; Ascar, Loreto; Ahumada, Inés

    2017-05-01

    Biosolids contain inorganic and organic contaminants, including pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) that have accounted for a series of emerging contaminants, such as triclosan (TCS) and the hormone 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2). The general aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of biosolid application on EE2 and TCS adsorption and bioavailability in soils through testing with wheat plants. For the bioavailability study, sand and two soils, Lampa and Lo Prado, were used. The sand and soils were treated using two biosolid application rates (0 and 90 mg ha -1 ), and the EE2 and TCS concentrations in the biosolids were determined as 0.54 ± 0.06 and 8.31 ± 0.19 mg kg -1 , respectively. The concentration observed in wheat plants indicated that EE2 and TCS are mainly concentrated in the roots rather than in the shoots. Furthermore, the bioavailability of the compounds in plants depends on the properties of the contaminants and the soil. Adsorption studies showed that increasing the soil organic matter content increases the adsorption of TCS and EE2 on these substrates and that both compounds follow the Freundlich adsorption model. The desorption procedure indicated that availability for both TCS and EE2 depended on the soil type because TCS and EE2 were small in the Lampa soil with and without biosolid application and TCS increased by nearly 50% in the Lo Prado soil. The Lo Prado soil had an acidic pH (5.9) and the Lampa soil had a neutral pH of 7.3, and the organic carbon content was smaller.

  12. Comparison of Methods to Identify Pathogens and Associated Virulence Functional Genes in Biosolids from Two Different Wastewater Treatment Facilities in Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Yergeau

    Full Text Available The use of treated municipal wastewater residues (biosolids as fertilizers is an attractive, inexpensive option for growers and farmers. Various regulatory bodies typically employ indicator organisms (fecal coliforms, E. coli and Salmonella to assess the adequacy and efficiency of the wastewater treatment process in reducing pathogen loads in the final product. Molecular detection approaches can offer some advantages over culture-based methods as they can simultaneously detect a wider microbial species range, including non-cultivable microorganisms. However, they cannot directly assess the viability of the pathogens. Here, we used bacterial enumeration methods together with molecular methods including qPCR, 16S rRNA and cpn60 gene amplicon sequencing and shotgun metagenomic sequencing to compare pre- and post-treatment biosolids from two Canadian wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs. Our results show that an anaerobic digestion WWTP was unsuccessful at reducing the live indicator organism load (coliforms, generic E. coli and Salmonella below acceptable regulatory criteria, while biosolids from a dewatering/pelletization WWTP met these criteria. DNA from other pathogens was detected by the molecular methods, but these species were considered less abundant. Clostridium DNA increased significantly following anaerobic digestion treatments. In addition to pathogen DNA, genes related to virulence and antibiotic resistance were identified in treated biosolids. Shotgun metagenomics revealed the widest range of pathogen DNA and, among the approaches used here, was the only approach that could access functional gene information in treated biosolids. Overall, our results highlight the potential usefulness of amplicon sequencing and shotgun metagenomics as complementary screening methods that could be used in parallel with culture-based methods, although more detailed comparisons across a wider range of sites would be needed.

  13. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Arabic Translation) (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-06-01

    This is the Arabic translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center Services fact sheet. The Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

  14. HydroNEXT Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2015-02-01

    Through its HydroNEXT initiative, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) invests in the development of innovative technologies that dramatically change the way we think about hydropower by lowering cost, improving performance, and promoting environmental stewardship of hydropower development. HydroNEXT is pursuing a comprehensive technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment strategy across three resource classes to increase the contribution of clean, renewable hydropower to the nation’s energy mix: existing water infrastructure, undeveloped streams, and pumped-storage hydropower.

  15. Geothermal Technologies Program: Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-02-01

    This fact sheets provides a summary of geothermal potential, issues, and current development in Alaska. This fact sheet was developed as part of DOE's GeoPowering the West initiative, part of the Geothermal Technologies Program.

  16. Immigration Facts on Foreign Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Neil G.

    2013-01-01

    U.S. policymakers have put forth various immigration reform proposals to improve retention of foreign students obtaining advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) from American universities. These students are considered particularly desirable because they, like their American counterparts, offer the types of…

  17. Transgene flow: Facts, speculations and possible countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryffel, Gerhart U

    2014-01-01

    Convincing evidence has accumulated that unintended transgene escape occurs in oilseed rape, maize, cotton and creeping bentgrass. The escaped transgenes are found in variant cultivars, in wild type plants as well as in hybrids of sexually compatible species. The fact that in some cases stacked events are present that have not been planted commercially, implies unintended recombination of transgenic traits. As the consequences of this continuous transgene escape for the ecosystem cannot be reliably predicted, I propose to use more sophisticated approaches of gene technology in future. If possible GM plants should be constructed using either site-directed mutagenesis or cisgenic strategies to avoid the problem of transgene escape. In cases where a transgenic trait is needed, efficient containment should be the standard approach. Various strategies available or in development are discussed. Such a cautious approach in developing novel types of GM crops will enhance the sustainable potential of GM crops and thus increase the public trust in green gene technology. PMID:25523171

  18. Whooping Cough (Pertussis) - Fact Sheet for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... months 4 through 6 years Fact Sheet for Parents Color [2 pages] Español: Tosferina (pertussis) The best ... according to the recommended schedule. Fact Sheets for Parents Diseases and the Vaccines that Prevent Them Chickenpox ...

  19. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) KidsHealth / For Parents / How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) Print ...

  20. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Key Facts Infographic

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Explore the Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Key Facts Infographic which outlines key facts related to electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), including...

  1. Photobiology Research Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-06-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Photobiology Research Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL. The photobiology group's research is in four main areas: (1) Comprehensive studies of fuel-producing photosynthetic, fermentative, and chemolithotrophic model microorganisms; (2) Characterization and engineering of redox enzymes and proteins for fuel production; (3) Genetic and pathway engineering of model organisms to improve production of hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels; and (4) Studies of nanosystems using biological and non-biological materials in hybrid generation. NREL's photobiology research capabilities include: (1) Controlled and automated photobioreactors and fermenters for growing microorganisms under a variety of environmental conditions; (2) High-and medium-throughput screening of H{sub 2}-producing organisms; (3) Homologous and heterologous expression, purification, and biochemical/biophysical characterization of redox enzymes and proteins; (4) Qualitative and quantitative analyses of gases, metabolites, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins; (5) Genetic and pathway engineering and development of novel genetic toolboxes; and (6) Design and spectroscopic characterization of enzyme-based biofuel cells and energy conversion nanodevices.

  2. Transgenic Mosquitoes - Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, André B B; Beier, John C; Benelli, Giovanni

    2018-03-08

    Technologies for controlling mosquito vectors based on genetic manipulation and the release of genetically modified mosquitoes (GMMs) are gaining ground. However, concrete epidemiological evidence of their effectiveness, sustainability, and impact on the environment and nontarget species is lacking; no reliable ecological evidence on the potential interactions among GMMs, target populations, and other mosquito species populations exists; and no GMM technology has yet been approved by the WHO Vector Control Advisory Group. Our opinion is that, although GMMs may be considered a promising control tool, more studies are needed to assess their true effectiveness, risks, and benefits. Overall, several lines of evidence must be provided before GMM-based control strategies can be used under the integrated vector management framework. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Accelerating Geothermal Research (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-05-01

    Geothermal research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is advancing geothermal technologies to increase renewable power production. Continuous and not dependent on weather, the geothermal resource has the potential to jump to more than 500 gigawatts in electricity production, which is equivalent to roughly half of the current U.S. capacity. Enhanced geothermal systems have a broad regional distribution in the United States, allowing the potential for development in many locations across the country.

  4. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  5. Clinical Facts, Turning Points and Complexity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lush, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I explore how we might link ideas about clinical facts to current issues in child psychotherapy research. I consider what our understanding of clinical facts might contribute to our research methods and how our research methods might better represent the clinical facts. The paper introduces a selection of psychoanalytic writers'…

  6. Status of JSFR development in phase I FaCT project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoto, Kazumi; Chikazawa, Yoshitaka; Kotake, Shoji; Ito, Takaya

    2011-01-01

    The Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development (FaCT) project is pursuing commercialization of fast reactor cycle system around 2050 under cooperation of MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology), METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry), utilities, venders and JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). As results of the FaCT Phase I, the key technologies for Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) has been evaluated. (author)

  7. Effect of plants on the bioavailability of metals and other chemical properties of biosolids in a column study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Trang T; Laidlaw, W Scott; Singh, Balwant; Zhang, Hao; Baker, Alan J M

    2012-10-01

    The effects of metal-accumulating plants (Salix x reichardtii and Populus balsamifera) on the chemical properties and dynamics of metals in biosolids were investigated using different techniques including diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT), sequential extraction procedures and partitioning coefficient (K(d)). Plants could effectively extract Cd, Ni, and Zn and decreased dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The presence of plants increased the potential bioavailability of these metals, as assessed by an increase in the ratio of metal measured by DGT and metals in the solution. The plants affected the Cd, Ni, and Zn pools (soluble/exchangeable; Fe/Mn oxide and organic matter bound) characterised by sequential extraction and K(d) but did not reduce the total metals in either substrate. However, plants had no effect on Cu, presumably because of the effective buffering of available Cu by organic matter in both solution and solid phases. A high density of plant roots was associated with increased leaching of metals.

  8. Fact sheet on nuclear power plant instrumentation and control technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear power plants (NPPs) are facing challenges in several instrumentation and control (I and C) areas with ageing and obsolete components and equipment. With license renewals and power uprates, the long-term operation and maintenance of obsolete I and C systems may not be a cost-effective and reliable option. The effort needed to maintain or increase the reliability and useful life of existing I and C systems may be greater in the long run than modernizing I and C systems or replacing them completely with new digital systems. The increased functionality of the new I and C systems can also open up new possibilities to better support the operation and maintenance activities in the plant. The IAEA recognizes the importance of the profound role the I and C systems play in the reliable, safe, efficient, and cost-effective operations of NPPs by supporting the activities of the Department of Nuclear Energy's Technical Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (TWG-NPPCI). The group was established in March 1970. Its membership currently includes thirty Member States and three international organizations. The most recent meeting of the TWG-NPPCI was held in May 2005 in Vienna. The meeting report is available at http://www.iaea.org/OurWork/ST/NE/NENP/twg_nppc.html. The next meeting of the TWGNPPCI will be the 21st meeting of the advisory body, and it will be held in May 2007

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of the transformation and removal of Ag, TiO2, and ZnO nanoparticles in wastewater treatment and land application of biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Lauren E; Auffan, Melanie; Durenkamp, Mark; McGrath, Steve; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-04-01

    The use of nano-enabled materials in industry and consumer products is increasing rapidly and with it, the more imperative it becomes to understand the consequences of such materials entering the environment during production, use or disposal. The novel properties of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) that make them desirable for commercial applications also present the possibility of impacting aquatic and terrestrial environments in ways that may differ from materials in bulk format. Modeling techniques are needed to proactively predict the environmental fate and transport of nanomaterials. A model for nanoparticle (NP) separation and transformation in water treatment was parameterized for three metal and metal-oxide NPs. Functional assays to determine NP specific distribution and transformation were used to parameterize the model and obtain environmentally relevant concentrations of NPs and transformation byproducts leaving WWTPs in effluent and biosolids. All three NPs were predicted to associate >90% with the solid phase indicating significant accumulation in the biosolids. High rates of transformation for ZnO and Ag NPs resulted in ~97% transformation of the NPs that enter the plant despite differences in transformation rate in aerobic versus anaerobic environments. Due to high insolubility and negligible redox transformation, the only process predicted to impact TiO2 NP fate and transport in WWTPs was distribution between the solid and liquid phases. Subsequent investigation of ZnO NP species fate and transport when land applied in biosolids indicated that steady state concentrations of ZnO phases would likely be achieved after approximately 150days under loading conditions of biosolids typical in current practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A quantitative microbial risk assessment model for total coliforms and E. coli in surface runoff following application of biosolids to grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Rachel; Peyton, Dara; Healy, Mark G; Fenton, Owen; Cummins, Enda

    2017-05-01

    In Ireland, the land application of biosolids is the preferred option of disposing of municipal sewage waste. Biosolids provide nutrients in the form of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and increases organic matter. It is also an economic way for a country to dispose of its municipal waste. However, biosolids may potentially contain a wide range of pathogens, and following rainfall events, may be transported in surface runoff and pose a potential risk to human health. Thus, a quantitative risk assessment model was developed to estimate potential pathogens in surface water and the environmental fate of the pathogens following dilution, residence time in a stream, die-off rate, drinking water treatment and human exposure. Surface runoff water quality data was provided by project partners. Three types of biosolids, anaerobically digested (AD), lime stabilised (LS), and thermally dried (TD)) were applied on micro plots. Rainfall was simulated at three time intervals (24, 48 and 360 h) following land application. It was assumed that this water entered a nearby stream and was directly abstracted for drinking water. Consumption data for drinking water and body weight was obtained from an Irish study and assigned distributions. Two dose response models for probability of illness were considered for total and faecal coliform exposure incorporating two different exposure scenarios (healthy populations and immuno-compromised populations). The simulated annual risk of illness for healthy populations was below the US EPA and World Health Organisation tolerable level of risk (10 -4 and 10 -6 , respectively). However, immuno-compromised populations may still be at risk as levels were greater than the tolerable level of risk for that subpopulation. The sensitivity analysis highlighted the importance of residence time in a stream on the bacterial die-off rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Definition and Facts for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Health Professionals Diabetes Discoveries & Practice Blog Health Communication Programs FAQs ... Syndrome (IBS) Definition & Facts Related Topics Section Navigation Irritable Bowel Syndrome ( ...

  12. Contribution of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) to the toxic equivalency of dioxin-like compounds in archived biosolids from the U.S. EPA's 2001 national sewage sludge survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Arjun K; Halden, Rolf U

    2014-09-16

    The World Health Organization recently proposed the inclusion of brominated congeners in addition to chlorinated congeners when computing the toxic equivalency (TEQ) of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) in assessments of human health risks. In the present study, 12 polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PBDD/Fs) were analyzed by gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry in the composited, archived biosolids that were collected in 32 U.S. states and the District of Columbia from 94 wastewater treatment plants by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in its 2001 national sewage sludge survey. Two PBDDs and five PBDFs were detected in the biosolids composites at varying frequencies (40-100%) with a total mean concentration of 10,000 ng/kg dry weight (range: 630-42,800), of which 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-hepta-BDF constituted about 95% by mass. Relative to commercial polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) formulations, the ratio of PBDD/Fs to PBDEs in biosolids was 55-times higher (∼ 0.002% vs ∼ 0.11%), which indicates potential PBDE transformation or possibly additional sources of PBDD/Fs in the environment. The TEQ contribution of PBDD/Fs was estimated at 162 ng/kg 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (range: 15-672), which is equivalent to 75% (range: 12-96%) of the total TEQ in biosolids. The TEQ of DLCs released annually to U.S. soils as a result of the land application of biosolids was estimated at 720 g (range: 530-1600 g). Among all known DLCs determined in biosolids, brominated analogs contributed 370% more TEQ than did chlorinated congeners, which indicates the need to include brominated DLCs in the exposure and risk assessment of land-applied biosolids.

  13. Contribution of Polybrominated Dibenzo-p-dioxins and Dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) to the Toxic Equivalency of Dioxin-like Compounds in Archived Biosolids from the U.S. EPA’s 2001 National Sewage Sludge Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization recently proposed the inclusion of brominated congeners in addition to chlorinated congeners when computing the toxic equivalency (TEQ) of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) in assessments of human health risks. In the present study, 12 polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PBDD/Fs) were analyzed by gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry in the composited, archived biosolids that were collected in 32 U.S. states and the District of Columbia from 94 wastewater treatment plants by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in its 2001 national sewage sludge survey. Two PBDDs and five PBDFs were detected in the biosolids composites at varying frequencies (40–100%) with a total mean concentration of 10,000 ng/kg dry weight (range: 630–42,800), of which 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-hepta-BDF constituted about 95% by mass. Relative to commercial polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) formulations, the ratio of PBDD/Fs to PBDEs in biosolids was 55-times higher (∼0.002% vs ∼0.11%), which indicates potential PBDE transformation or possibly additional sources of PBDD/Fs in the environment. The TEQ contribution of PBDD/Fs was estimated at 162 ng/kg 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (range: 15–672), which is equivalent to 75% (range: 12–96%) of the total TEQ in biosolids. The TEQ of DLCs released annually to U.S. soils as a result of the land application of biosolids was estimated at 720 g (range: 530–1600 g). Among all known DLCs determined in biosolids, brominated analogs contributed 370% more TEQ than did chlorinated congeners, which indicates the need to include brominated DLCs in the exposure and risk assessment of land-applied biosolids. PMID:25157505

  14. Electron Beam Processing of Polymers: Facts and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gielenz, G.

    2006-01-01

    Electron Beam (EB) processing of polymers is a well established and mature technology in a multitude of industrial polymer applications for more than 40 years. Constant research effort in combination with emerging tailored EB process technologies, have led to numerous new (niche) applications and products within the past decade. Nonetheless, and despite the fact, that nowadays a large variety of EB and related process equipment is readily available for use by the respective industries, EB processing of polymers still takes up only a small niche in comparison to the overall polymer business. In this lecture the author attempts to present a short overview on the current industrial established and emerging radiation processing applications and the related EB equipment suppliers. Then some selected plastics business facts and figures with a forecast of the global plastics consumption situation up to 2010 will be shown. As a conclusion from these facts, some comments will be deduced, regarding the future potential, attractiveness and economical relevance of irradiation processing technologies in present day competitive global markets

  15. Advanced solutions in power systems HVDC, facts, and artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chen-Ching; Edris, Abdel-Aty

    2016-01-01

    Provides insight on both classical means and new trends in the application of power electronic and artificial intelligence techniques in power system operation and control This book presents advanced solutions for power system controllability improvement, transmission capability enhancement and operation planning. The book is organized into three parts. The first part describes the CSC-HVDC and VSC-HVDC technologies, the second part presents the FACTS devices, and the third part refers to the artificial intelligence techniques. All technologies and tools approached in this book are essential for power system development to comply with the smart grid requirements.

  16. Facts about food irradiation: Controlling the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This fact sheet briefly reviews the procedures that exist to control the process of food irradiation. It also summarizes the difficulties in identifying irradiated food, which stem from the fact that irradiation does not physically change the food or cause significant chemical changes in foods. 4 refs

  17. Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts You Can Prevent TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination TB Facts: You Can Prevent TB What ...

  18. Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB Can Be Treated What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Page 1 of 2 TB Facts: TB ...

  19. Computational Fact Checking by Mining Knowledge Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiralkar, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    Misinformation and rumors have become rampant on online social platforms with adverse consequences for the real world. Fact-checking efforts are needed to mitigate the risks associated with the spread of digital misinformation. However, the pace at which information is generated online limits the capacity to fact-check claims at the same rate…

  20. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Educators Search English Español How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) KidsHealth / For Parents / How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) Print en español Cómo leer ...

  1. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) ... Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) Print en español Cómo leer las etiquetas de datos nutricionales (video) ...

  2. HIPPOCRATES: FACTS AND FICTION 1. INTRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIPPOCRATES: FACTS AND FICTION. ABSTRACT. Hippocrates, the Father of Medicine, is reviewed as a historical person and in terms of his contribution to medicine in order to distinguish fact from fiction. Contem- porary and later sources reveal that many (possibly untrue) legends accumulated around this enigmatic ...

  3. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Educators Search English Español How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) KidsHealth / For Parents / How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) Print en español Cómo ...

  4. Snapple[R] Real Facts Watercolors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    Did you know that a hummingbird weighs less than a penny? Or that an elephant swims twenty miles a day? These are just two of the many facts that Snapple prints on the lids of their drink bottles. When Snapple first introduced the Snapple Real Facts the author was excited to see that something so trivial was also educational. She asked herself if…

  5. Three Steps to Mastering Multiplication Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Gina; Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    "That was the day I decided I was bad at math." Countless times, preservice and in-service teachers make statements such as this after sharing vivid memories of learning multiplication facts. Timed tests; public competitive games, such as Around the World; and visible displays of who has and has not mastered groups of facts still…

  6. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) KidsHealth / For Parents / How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) ...

  7. Status and prospects of the FaCT project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoki, Yoshihiro; Kikuchi, Shin; Ichimiya, Masakazu

    2008-01-01

    'Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development (FaCT)' project has been conducted since 2006. In this project, design study and research and development (R and D) on innovative technologies for fast reactor (FR) cycle system are implemented in order to present the conceptual designs of commercial and demonstration facilities by 2015 and start operating demonstration fast reactor in 2025. The R and Ds has been stepped forward into the development stage to establish the realization of innovative technologies which bring excellent performance to fast reactor cycle system. The purpose of R and D by 2010 is to decide whether innovative technologies shall be adopted. So promoting R and D of FR, the project governance was organized. Furthermore, several possible R and D have been effectively carried out within the frameworks of international cooperation, such as Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), Generation IV International Forum (GIF), and International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). (author)

  8. Energy-Saving Opportunities for Manufacturing Companies, International Fact Sheet (Spanish)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-08-01

    This English/Spanish fact sheet describes the Industrial Technologies Program Save Energy Now model and provides information on tools and resources to help manufacturing facilities reduce industrial energy intensity.

  9. Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels, NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-10-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility and its availability to biofuels' industry partners who want to operate, test, and develop biorefining technology and equipment.

  10. Ecological impacts of the N-viro biosolids land-application for wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium. Ait) production in Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, Aitazaz A; Zaman, Qamar U; Madani, Ali; Abbas, Farhat; Percival, David C; Esau, Travis J

    2011-01-01

    Land application of biosolids from processed sewage sludge may deteriorate soil, water, and plants. We investigated the impact of the N-Viro biosolids land-application on the quality of the soil water that moved through Orthic Humo-Ferric Podzols soil of Nova Scotia (NS) at the Wild Blueberry Research Institute, Debert, NS Canada. In addition, the response of major soilproperties and crop yield was also studied. Wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium. Ait) was grown under irrigated and rainfed conditions in 2008 and 2009. Four experimental treatments including (i) NI: N-Viro irrigated, (ii) NR: N-Viro rainfed, (iii) FI: inorganic fertilizer irrigated, and (iv) FR: inorganic fertilizer rainfed (control) were replicated 4 times under randomized complete block design. Soil samples were collected at the end of each year and analyzed for changes in cation exchange capacity (CEC), soil organic matter (SOM), and pH.Soil water samples were collected four times during the study period from the suction cup lysimeters installed within and below crop root zone at 20 and 40 cm depths, respectively. The samples were analyzed for a range of water quality parameters including conductance, hardness, pH, macro- and micronutrients, and the infectious pathogens Escherichia coli (E. coli) and salmonella. Berries were harvested for fruit yield estimates. Irrigation significantly increased CEC during 2008 and the soil pH decreased from 4.93 (2008) to 4.79 (2009). There were significant influences of irrigation, fertilizer, and their interaction, in some cases, on most of the soil water quality parameters except on the infectious bacteria. No presence of E. coli or salmonella were observed in soil and water samples, reflecting the absence of these bacteria in biosolids used in this experiment. Nutrient concentration in the soil water samples collected from the four treatments were higher in the sequence NI > NR > FI > FR. The irrigation treatment had significant effect on the unripe

  11. Fate of Organohalogens in U.S. Wastewater Treatment Plants and Estimated Chemical Releases to Soils Nationwide from Biosolids Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidler, Jochen; Halden, Rolf U.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the occurrence in wastewater of 11 aromatic biocides, pesticides and degradates, and their fate during passage through U.S. treatment plants, as well as the chemical mass contained in sewage sludge (biosolids) destined for land application. Analyte concentrations in wastewater influent, effluent and sludge from 25 facilities in 18 U.S. states were determined by liquid chromatography electrospray (tandem) mass spectrometry. Dichlorocarbanilide, fipronil, triclocarban, and triclosan were found consistently in all sample types. Dichlorophene, hexachlorophene, and tetrachlorocarbanilide were detected infrequently only, and concentrations of the phenyl urea pesticides diflubenzuron, hexaflumuron, and linuron were below the limit of detection in all matrixes. Median concentrations (± 95% confidence interval) of quantifiable compounds in influent ranged from 4.2 ± 0.8 µg L−1 for triclocarban to 0.03 ± 0.01 µg L−1 for fipronil. Median concentrations in effluent were highest for triclocarban and triclosan (0.23 ± 0.08 and 0.07 ± 0.04 µg L−1, respectively). Median aqueous-phase removal efficiencies (± 95% CI) of activated sludge treatment plants decreased in the order of: triclosan (96 ± 2%) > triclocarban (87 ± 7%) > dichlorocarbanilide (55 ± 20%) > fipronil (18 ± 22%). Median concentrations of organohalogens were typically higher in anaerobically than in aerobically digested sludges, and peaked at 27,600 ± 9,600 and 15,800 ± 8,200 µg kg−1 for triclocarban and triclosan, respectively. Mass balances obtained for three primary pesticides in six activated sludge treatment plants employing anaerobic digestion suggested a decreasing overall persistence from fipronil (97 ± 70%) to triclocarban (87 ± 29%) to triclosan (28 ± 30%). Nationwide release of the investigated organohalogens to agricultural land via municipal sludge recycling and into surface waters is estimated to total 258,000 ± 110,00 kg yr−1 (mean ± 95% confidence

  12. Energy in Sweden. Facts and figures 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-12-01

    Energy in Sweden. Facts and Figures 2005 contains the tabular data for most of the diagrams in the main publication. These data consist primarily of the results of the Agency's processing of basic data from Statistics Sweden. Facts and Figures is available at www.stem.se in pdf- and excel file formats. With effect from the 2001 edition, statistics are of preliminary character for the two preceding years (2003 and 2004). Breakdowns into certain types of fuels vary somewhat depending on whether preliminary or final data has been used. Further information about the statistics can be found in Energy in Sweden, chapter 8 Energy Facts

  13. Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Research (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help advance innovation in concentrating solar power (CSP). This fact sheet summarizes how NREL is advancing CSP research.

  14. Western Abandoned Uranium Mine Region Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact sheets related to Western Abandoned Uranium Mine (AUM) Region, more than 100 abandoned uranium mine claims located along the Little Colorado River and Highway 89, ain the Cameron, Coalmine Canyon, Bodaway/Gap, and Leupp Chapters in Northern Arizona.

  15. Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Coliform Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mesner, Nancy; Daniels, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet provides information about coliform bacteria. Including sections about what coliform bacteria is, how it enters drinking water, health concerns from exposure, drinking water standards, and how to treat drinking water that contains coliforms.

  16. Fact sheet : efforts on climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    The Oregon Department of Transportation recognizes that the transportation sector in : Oregon generates significant greenhouse gases. In fact, transportation sources are responsible for over a third of emissions in the state roughly the same shar...

  17. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  18. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Overview Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV/ ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Last Reviewed: August 25, 2017 ...

  19. HIV and AIDS: Know the Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Issues Subscribe June 2015 Print this issue HIV and AIDS: Know the Facts Treatments Work, but ... Biological Blueprints Wise Choices Should You Get an HIV Test? HIV tests involve a simple cheek swab, ...

  20. Proctor Creek Boone Boulevard Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the Proctor Creek watershed and community, green infrastructure, the Boone Boulevard Green Street Project Conceptual Design, and the added value and application of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) to the project.

  1. Clean Cities Program Contacts (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides contact information for program staff of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program, as well as contact information for the nearly 100 local Clean Cities coalitions across the country.

  2. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators ... packaged foods come with a Nutrition Facts label. These labels have a lot of important information — on fat and calories, serving sizes, sodium content, ...

  3. 2009 Nevada transportation facts and figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Every two years NDOT produces a helpful and informative Fact Book to provide the Legislature and the public historical and current statistical information describing the department's operations and factors that drive Nevada's multimodal transportatio...

  4. Large truck and bus crash facts, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This annual edition of Large Truck and Bus Crash Facts contains descriptive statistics about fatal, injury, and : property damage only crashes involving large trucks and buses in 2010. Selected crash statistics on passenger : vehicles are also presen...

  5. Large truck and bus crash facts, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This annual edition of Large Truck and Bus Crash Facts contains descriptive statistics about fatal, injury, and property damage only crashes involving large trucks and buses in 2012. Selected crash statistics on passenger vehicles are also presented ...

  6. Large truck and bus crash facts, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This annual edition of Large Truck and Bus Crash Facts contains descriptive statistics about fatal, injury, and property damage only crashes involving large trucks and buses in 2013. Selected crash statistics on passenger vehicles are also presented ...

  7. Large truck and bus crash facts, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    This annual edition of Large Truck and Bus Crash Facts contains descriptive statistics about fatal, injury, and : property damage only crashes involving large trucks and buses in 2009. Selected crash statistics on passenger : vehicles are also presen...

  8. Large truck and bus crash facts, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This annual edition of Large Truck and Bus Crash Facts contains descriptive statistics about fatal, injury, and : property damage only crashes involving large trucks and buses in 2011. Selected crash statistics on passenger : vehicles are also presen...

  9. Clean Air Markets - Quick Facts and Trends

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Quick Facts and Trends module is part of a suite of Clean Air Markets-related tools that are accessible at http://camddataandmaps.epa.gov/gdm/index.cfm. The...

  10. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label ( ...

  11. Coordinated Specialty Care Fact Sheet and Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Checklist Share Coordinated Specialty Care Fact Sheet and Checklist Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... webpage: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/raise . CSC Checklist If you are interested in a CSC program, ...

  12. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this section Home A-Z Health Topics Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome > A-Z Health Topics Polycystic ovary syndrome fact sheet (PDF, 126 KB) Normal ovary and polycystic ovary The javascript used in this widget is ...

  13. CERN Quick Facts 2016 (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070305

    2016-01-01

    Facts about CERN, the contributions of its Member States, its machines and experiments, the number of its employees and users, management structure, etc. Previously called "CERN General Information Sheet"

  14. CERN Quick Facts 2017 (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Mobs, Esma

    2017-01-01

    Facts about CERN, the contributions of its Member States, its machines and experiments, the number of its employees and users, management structure, etc. Previously called "CERN General Information Sheet"

  15. Fact Sheet: Early Warning Signs of Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... items) Share Fact Sheet: Early Warning Signs of Psychosis Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... show changes in his or her behaviors before psychosis develops. The list below includes several warning signs ...

  16. CERN Quick Facts 2016 (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070305

    2016-01-01

    Facts about CERN, the contributions of its Member States, its machines and experiments, the number of its employees and users, management structure, etc. Previously called "CERN General Information Sheet"

  17. CERN Quick Facts 2017 (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Mobs, Esma

    2017-01-01

    Facts about CERN, the contributions of its Member States, its machines and experiments, the number of its employees and users, management structure, etc. Previously called "CERN General Information Sheet"

  18. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs ... las etiquetas de datos nutricionales (video) Most packaged foods come with a Nutrition Facts label. These labels ...

  19. Facts and Statistics about Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts and Statistics with References What Is a Food Allergy? A food allergy is a medical condition in ... is an emerging concern. How Many People Have Food Allergies? Researchers estimate that up to 15 million Americans ...

  20. Facts about food irradiation. A series of fact sheets from the International Consultative Group on Food Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The safety and benefits of foods processed by ionizing radiation are well documented. In an effort to provide governments, especially those of developing countries, with scientifically accurate information on issues of general interest to the public, the International Consultative Group on Food Irradiation (ICGFI), which was established under the aegis of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the IAEA, decided at its 7th Annual Meeting in Rome, Italy, on October 1990, to issue a series of ''Fact Sheets'' on the subject. ICGFI, an inter-governmental body with a membership of 37 governments, has as one of its mandates the function to provide information to Member States of the FAO, WHO, and IAEA and to the three organizations themselves on the safe and proper use of food irradiation technology. The Fact Sheets included here cover issues relating to: status and trends; scientific and technical terms; food irradiation and radioactivity; chemical changes in irradiated food; nutritional quality of irradiated foods; genetic studies; microbiological safety of irradiated food; irradiation and food safety; irradiation and food additives and residues; packaging of irradiated foods; safety of irradiation facilities; controlling the process; food irradiation costs; and irradiated foods and the consumer. The Fact Sheets have been separately indexed and included in the INIS Database under Reference Numbers 23011206-23011217, 23011319 and 23012743. The Fact Sheets were first issued by the ICGFI Secretariat (Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Vienna, Austria) in May 1991

  1. International Nuclear Waste Management Fact Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1994-05-01

    International Nuclear Waste Management Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R ampersand D programs, and key personnel in 24 countries, including the US, four multinational agencies and 21 nuclear societies. This publication succeeds the previously issued International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book (PNL-3594), which appeared annually for 13 years. While the title is different, there are no substantial changes in the content

  2. Facts on Kids in South Dakota, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Pat, Ed.; Blad, Amy, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This Kids Count report consists of four issues in a series of fact sheets that examine specific indicators of the well-being of children in South Dakota. Issue one focuses on teens and motor vehicle crashes. The fact sheet notes that teen death rates from car crashes have been higher than the national rate for 4 of the 5 years between 1992-1996.…

  3. Effects of silver sulfide nanomaterials on mycorrhizal colonization of tomato plants and soil microbial communities in biosolid-amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Jonathan D; Kirby, Jason K; Creamer, Courtney; McLaughlin, Mike J; Fiebiger, Cathy; Wright, Claire; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Bertsch, Paul M

    2015-11-01

    We investigated effects of Ag2S engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated Ag ENMs (PVP-Ag), and Ag(+) on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), their colonization of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and overall microbial community structure in biosolids-amended soil. Concentration-dependent uptake was measured in all treatments. Plants exposed to 100 mg kg(-1) PVP-Ag ENMs and 100 mg kg(-1) Ag(+) exhibited reduced biomass and greatly reduced mycorrhizal colonization. Bacteria, actinomycetes and fungi were inhibited by all treatment classes, with the largest reductions measured in 100 mg kg(-1) PVP-Ag ENMs and 100 mg kg(-1) Ag(+). Overall, Ag2S ENMs were less toxic to plants, less disruptive to plant-mycorrhizal symbiosis, and less inhibitory to the soil microbial community than PVP-Ag ENMs or Ag(+). However, significant effects were observed at 1 mg kg(-1) Ag2S ENMs, suggesting that the potential exists for microbial communities and the ecosystem services they provide to be disrupted by environmentally relevant concentrations of Ag2S ENMs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Facing the Facts and Living our Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, R.

    2009-05-01

    One of the major challenges for the 21st Century is to establish an energy system that is safe, affordable, sustainable, and environmentally responsible. With current reserves in coal and nonconventional oil, we will not run out of energy in the coming century, but we may pay a price with a climate that heats up with an unprecedented rate of change. Even with current technology, there is a wealth of information and solutions available, and we could benefit much by using this knowledge more effectively than we do now. An example is the McKinsey report on the cost of avoiding CO2 emissions (http://mckinsey.com/clientservice/ccsi/greenhousegas.asp). According to this analysis, the USA can avoid about 40% of its CO2 emissions at zero total cost. About 20% of those emissions can be saved by taking steps that save money and reduce energy consumption. In the process of working on these steps for reducing CO2 emissions, many jobs are created. The energy and climate challenge thus comes with new opportunities. Geoscientists can make a difference by talking about energy and climate, and by helping create awareness for the energy challenge and the associated opportunities. Scientists and engineers are, in general, loath to discuss the issue of values. Yet, despite the logical basis of science, our science and the personal views of scientists can help shape our societal values. This can happen, however, only when scientists articulate their values and stimulate their students and the public to make conscious choices what their values are. Education, whether it is in the classroom, at a community center, church, or service club, can play an important role in making the public aware of the facts that are important for the choices that we need to make at a personal and societal level for our energy use. In order to facilitate this type of communication I have created a public lecture that is available online (http://www.mines.edu/˜rsnieder/Global_Energy.html). As a geoscientist

  5. Interactions of triclosan, gemfibrozil and galaxolide with biosolid-amended soils: Effects of the level and nature of soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usyskin, Alla; Bukhanovsky, Nadezhda; Borisover, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    Triclosan, gemfibrozil and galaxolide, representing acidic and non-ionized hydrophobic organic compounds, are biologically active and can be accumulated during wastewater treatment in sewage sludge. The interactions of these substances with the soils amended by sewage sludge-originating biosolids may control their environmental fate. Therefore, the sorption of three organic compounds was studied in dune sand, loess soil, clay soil and mixtures of these media with three different sewage sludge-originating biosolids that were incubated under aerobic conditions for 6 months. For each compound, 15 sorption isotherms were produced at pH 7.8-8.0. The sorption of triclosan and gemfibrozil on sand-containing sorbents was examined also under acidic conditions. In some soil series, the compound's Freundlich constants (KF) are linearly related to the soil organic carbon (OC) content. Notably, for a given OC content, the sand-containing sorbents tend to demonstrate enhanced interactions with triclosan and galaxolide. This may be related with more hydrophobic and/or less rigid soil organic matter (SOM) as compared with the clay-containing soils, implying indirect effects of minerals. Generally the OC-normalized KF vary among different soil-biosolid combinations which is explained by the differences in the composition and properties of SOM, and is also contributed by the non-zero intercepts of the linear KF upon soil OC dependencies. The negative intercepts suggest that below a certain OC level no considerable organic compound-soil interactions would occur. Interactions of molecular and anionic forms of triclosan with a sand-containing sorbent may be comparable, but interactions involving gemfibrozil molecules could be stronger than interactions involving its anion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R ampersand D programs and key personnel on 23 countries, including the US, four multi-national agencies, and 21 nuclear societies. The Fact Book is organized as follows: National summaries-a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships, and provides addresses and names of key personnel and information on facilities. International agencies-a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement and a listing of nuclear societies. Glossary-a list of abbreviations/acronyms of organizations, facilities, technical and other terms. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country as well as some general information. The latter presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the United States

  7. Energy in Sweden. Facts and figures 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-12-01

    Energy in Sweden 2004: Facts and Figures contains the tabular data for most of the diagrams in the main publication. These data consist primarily of the results of the Agency's processing of basic data from Statistics Sweden. Facts and Figures is available at www.stem.se in pdf- and excel file formats. Since the year 2001 statistics for the period 1983-1998 are revised compared to data for previous editions. With effect from the 2001 edition, statistics are of preliminary character for the two preceding years. Breakdowns into certain types of fuels vary somewhat depending on whether preliminary or final data has been used. Further information about the statistics can be found in Energy in Sweden, chapter 8 Energy Facts.

  8. International nuclear cycle fact book: Revision 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1989-01-01

    The International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs and key personnel. The Fact Book contains: national summaries in which a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; and international agencies in which a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement, and a listing of nuclear societies. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country as well as some general information. The latter is presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the United States

  9. Wind energy: the facts - and how is it in Switzerland?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suter, J.-M.

    2009-01-01

    This article takes a look at European developments in the wind energy sector. Facts presented at a European Wind Energy Conference in Marseille, France, are briefly noted and figures on the development of wind power in Europe are presented. The position of Switzerland in the European context of wind energy use is discussed. Combined with hydropower installations and their pump-storage systems, European wind energy is quoted as having good economic possibilities. The augmentation of transport lines necessary in this respect is noted. Also, the introduction of new control technology in this area is mentioned. Nearing price-parity for wind-generated electricity is noted

  10. Eliminación de patógenos en biosólidos por estabilización alcalina Eliminating pathogens in biosolids by alkaline stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Torres Lozada

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available La Planta de Tratamiento de Aguas Residuales de Cañaveralejo -PTAR-C de Cali- Colombia, produce alrededor de 100 t/día de biosólidos que, aunque no tienen restricción por metales pesados, son clase B por el nivel de microorganismos patógenos y parásitos. En un diseño completamente al azar, conformado por seis tratamientos con su respectivo duplicado, se evaluó la estabilización alcalina con dosis del 9% peso a peso de cal viva e hidratada, aplicada a pilas de 0.5 t de biosólidos húmedos (66.5% y secos a temperatura ambiente (25 - 31°C durante 72 h (humedad 50.1%. Con la estabilización alcalina el pH aumentó a valores superiores a 12 unidades durante el tiempo suficiente para garantizar la reducción de patógenos y parásitos, alcanzando un material clase A; sin embargo, el biosólido seco facilitó la formación de grumos que dificultaron las labores de homogenización del sustrato con los alcalinizantes, factor indeseable para la eficiente reducción de patógenos.The Cañaveralejo wastewater treatment plant (PTAR-C based in Cali-Colombia, produces almost 100 t-day-1 of biosolids. Although do not have heavy metals restrictions, it is class B for high contents of pathogens microorganisms and parasites. The alkali stabilization was done with a 9% of dose (w/w of quicklime and hydrated lime applied to different 0.5 ton piles of wet biosolids (66.5% humidity and dry biosolids an environmental temperature (25-31°C for 72 hours (50.1% humidity. The experiment had a completely randomized design and it was composed by 6 treatments with their respective duplicated. With the alkali stabilization, the pH increments above 12 units during enough time to assure pathogens and parasites reduction in order to achieve a class A material level. On the other hand, the dry biosolids facilitate the conditions for lumps formation that reduce the homogenization of the substrate with the alkali material, which it is and undesirable factor for pathogen

  11. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I.W.; Patridge, M.D.

    1991-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECN/NEA activities reports; not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  12. Teaching Science Fact with Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raham, R. Gary

    2004-01-01

    The literature of science fiction packs up the facts and discoveries of science and runs off to futures filled with both wonders and warnings. Kids love to take the journeys it offers for the thrill of the ride, but they can learn as they travel, too. This book will provide the reader with: (1) an overview of the past 500 years of scientific…

  13. Theoretical Frameworks for Math Fact Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Recent education statistics indicate persistent low math scores for our nation's students. This drop in math proficiency includes deficits in basic number sense and automaticity of math facts. The decrease has been recorded across all grade levels with the elementary levels showing the greatest loss (National Center for Education Statistics,…

  14. Facts about food irradiation: Food irradiation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This fact sheet gives the cost of a typical food irradiation facility (US $1 million to US $3 million) and of the food irradiation process (US $10-15 per tonne for low-dose applications; US $100-250 per tonne for high-dose applications). These treatments also bring consumer benefits in terms of availability, storage life and improved hygiene. 2 refs

  15. TSCA Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet provides guidance on classifying articles under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and determining the applicability of EPA’s articles exclusion policy for purposes of the Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule. The primary goal of this document is to help the regulated community comply with the requirements of the CDR rule.

  16. D.E.R. 85: main facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report presents the important facts among the studies carried out by the ''Direction des Etudes et Recherches'' (E.D.F.): new applications of electric power for customers, protection of environment, classical equipments for power plants and nuclear equipments, monitoring and control of power plants, electrical equipments, development and operation of electrical networks, informatics and office automation [fr

  17. Fact Sheets on Pesticides in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Coalition against the Misuse of Pesticides, Washington, DC.

    This document consists of a collection of fact sheets about the use of pesticides in schools and how to reduce it. The sheets are: (1) "Alternatives to Using Pesticides in Schools: What Is Integrated Pest Management?"; (2) "Health Effects of 48 Commonly Used Pesticides in Schools"; (3) "The Schooling of State Pesticide…

  18. Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information on the Tribes selected to receive assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy 2013 Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, which provides technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects on tribal lands.

  19. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol ... to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) Print en español Cómo leer las etiquetas de datos nutricionales ( ...

  20. Main facts 1995; Faits marquants 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This report presents the main facts of the studies carried out by the Direction des Etudes et Recherches (DER) of Electricite de France: new applications of electricity, classical and nuclear thermal power plants, electrical equipment, environment protection, monitoring and plants operations.

  1. The Manager's Job: Folklore and Fact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzberg, Henry

    1975-01-01

    Contrasts popular myths about managers' duties with the facts, as indicated by various studies of managers and how they function. The author argues that managers often have distorted views of their role, and that they must first recognize what their job really involves in order to perform it effectively. (JG)

  2. Emotional Disturbance. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #5

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The mental health of our children is a natural and important concern for us all. The fact is, many mental disorders have their beginnings in childhood or adolescence, yet may go undiagnosed and untreated for years. "Umbrella" terms such as emotional disturbance, behavioral disorders, or mental illness are used to refer to mental…

  3. World War II Informational Fact Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This commemorative book provides numerous fact sheets on various aspects of World War II, both on the fighting front and the homefront. Replicas of posters of the war era, descriptions of battles with maps, contributions of women and minorities to the war effort, even music of the wartime era, add to this collection of resource materials useful to…

  4. D.E.R. 92 - Main facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the main facts of the studies carried out by the Direction des Etudes et Recherches (DER) of Electricite de France: new applications of electricity, classical and nuclear thermal power plants, electrical equipment, environment protection, network analysis, information and informatic equipment

  5. Frayn's "Heisenberg": Fact or Fiction? 9 -O ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2002-03-02

    Mar 2, 2002 ... The brashness of the young protagonist on skis and in the presto musical performance was not his. In fact, he won my mother's affection in the slow movement of the Beethoven. G-major piano trio, not the presto, a story often recounted at home. If he was fast, it was in his thinking. Actually it was frustrating to ...

  6. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators ... español Cómo leer las etiquetas de datos nutricionales (video) Most packaged foods come with a Nutrition Facts label. These labels ...

  7. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Talk to Your Child About the News Gun Safety Too Late for the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias ... español Cómo leer las etiquetas de datos nutricionales (video) Most packaged foods come with a Nutrition Facts label. These labels ...

  8. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) KidsHealth / For Parents / How to ...

  9. International nuclear waste management fact book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahms, C W; Patridge, M D; Widrig, J E

    1995-11-01

    The International Nuclear Waste Management Fact Book has been compiled to provide current data on fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in 24 countries, including the US; four multinational agencies; and 20 nuclear societies. This document, which is in its second year of publication supersedes the previously issued International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book (PNL-3594), which appeared annually for 12 years. The content has been updated to reflect current information. The Fact Book is organized as follows: National summaries--a section for each country that summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships, and provides addresses and names of key personnel and information on facilities. International agencies--a section for each of the international agencies that has significant fuel cycle involvement and a list of nuclear societies. Glossary--a list of abbreviations/acronyms of organizations, facilities, and technical and other terms. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country and some general information that is presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the US.

  10. Youth Suicide and Guns. Firearm Facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duker, Laurie, Ed.

    Whether or not a suicide attempt results in death depends in large part on the method chosen. If a teenager attempts suicide with a gun, his or her death is nearly guaranteed. This brief fact sheet presents data on firearms and suicide, the third leading cause of death for adolescents and young adults in the United States. Any number of societal…

  11. International nuclear waste management fact book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahms, C.W.; Patridge, M.D.; Widrig, J.E.

    1995-11-01

    The International Nuclear Waste Management Fact Book has been compiled to provide current data on fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in 24 countries, including the US; four multinational agencies; and 20 nuclear societies. This document, which is in its second year of publication supersedes the previously issued International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book (PNL-3594), which appeared annually for 12 years. The content has been updated to reflect current information. The Fact Book is organized as follows: National summaries--a section for each country that summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships, and provides addresses and names of key personnel and information on facilities. International agencies--a section for each of the international agencies that has significant fuel cycle involvement and a list of nuclear societies. Glossary--a list of abbreviations/acronyms of organizations, facilities, and technical and other terms. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country and some general information that is presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the US

  12. Oral Insulin-Fact or Fiction?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 5. Oral Insulin – Fact or Fiction? - Possibilities of Achieving Oral Delivery of Insulin. K Gowthamarajan Giriraj T Kulkarni. General Article Volume 8 Issue 5 May 2003 pp 38-46 ...

  13. Unintentional Gun Deaths among Children. Firearm Facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duker, Laurie, Ed.

    Children are at risk of being killed or injured by a gun if their parents own a gun because many guns obtained for self-defense are kept loaded and within reach of children. This brief fact sheet presents statistical information relating to accidental deaths involving young people and firearms. Safety measures are suggested for preventing…

  14. Facts about food irradiation: Status and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This fact sheet introduces the concept of irradiating food to reduce post-harvest losses from infestation, contamination and spoilage, to lower the incidence of foodborne diseases and to assist international trade in food products by offering an alternative to fumigation or some other treatments that may not be acceptable to the importing countries

  15. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) - CDC Fact Sheet Language: English (US) Español ( ...

  16. Hippocrates: facts and fiction | Retief | Acta Theologica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hippocrates, the Father of Medicine, is reviewed as a historical person and in terms of his contribution to medicine in order to distinguish fact from fiction. Contemporary and later sources reveal that many (possibly untrue) legends accumulated around this enigmatic figure. The textual tradition and the composition of the ...

  17. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para ... nutricionales (video) Most packaged foods come with a Nutrition Facts label. These labels have a lot of important ... Policy Permissions Guidelines Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Notice ...

  18. D.E.R. 91 main facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, N.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents the main facts of the studies carried out by the Direction des Etudes et Recherches (DER) of Electricite de France: New applications of electricity, classical and nuclear thermal power plants, electrical equipment, environment protection, network analysis, information and informatic equipment

  19. Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Basic Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA collects information on the types and quantities of chemicals produced in the U.S under the Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) requirements. This fact sheet outlines key information about CDR, including what data are collected and how the data are used.

  20. Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Chemicals Snapshot

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet provides a brief overview of the chemical manufacturing, processing, and use information collected for the 2012 Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule. Users do not have access to the complete CDR data set and should draw conclusions with care.