WorldWideScience

Sample records for biosensors

  1. Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechnitz, Garry A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes theory and principles behind biosensors that incorporate biological components as part of a sensor or probe. Projects major applications in medicine and veterinary medicine, biotechnology, food and agriculture, environmental studies, and the military. Surveys current use of biosensors. (ML)

  2. Optical biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biose...

  3. Optical biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biosensors, as well as interferometric, ellipsometric and reflectometric interference spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. The optical biosensors discussed here allow the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes including viruses, toxins, drugs, antibodies, tumour biomarkers and tumour cells. PMID:27365039

  4. Plasmonic Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Ryan T.

    2014-01-01

    The unique optical properties of plasmon resonant nanostructures enable exploration of nanoscale environments using relatively simple optical characterization techniques. For this reason, the field of plasmonics continues to garner the attention of the biosensing community. Biosensors based on propagating surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) in films are the most well-recognized plasmonic biosensors, but there is great potential for the new, developing technologies to surpass the robustness and ...

  5. Biosensor nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Songjun; Li, He; Banerjee, Ipsita A

    2011-01-01

    Focusing on the materials suitable for biosensor applications, such as nanoparticles, quantum dots, meso- and nanoporous materials and nanotubes, this text enables the reader to prepare the respective nanomaterials for use in actual devices by appropriate functionalization, surface processing or directed self-assembly. The main detection methods used are electrochemical, optical, and mechanical, providing solutions to challenging tasks.The result is a reference for researchers and developers, disseminating first-hand information on which nanomaterial is best suited to a particular applicat

  6. Fundamental Aspects of Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    K.Sowjanya; Aruna Kumari Yadla

    2016-01-01

    A biosensor is an analytical device which converts a biological response into an electrical signal. The term 'biosensor' is often used to cover sensor devices used in order to determine the concentration of substances and other parameters of biological interest even where they do not utilize a biological system directly. This very broad definition is used by some scientific journals (e.g. Biosensors, Elsevier Applied Science) but will not be applied to the coverage here. The empha...

  7. Electrochemical Based Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Chung Chiun Liu

    2012-01-01

    This editorial summarizes the general approaches of the electrochemical based biosensors described in the manuscripts published in this Special Issue. Electrochemical based biosensors are scientifically and economically important for the detection and early diagnosis of many diseases, and they will be increasing used and developed in the coming years. The importance of the selection of recognition processes, fabrication techniques and biosensor materials will be introduced.

  8. Biosensors for Cell Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Son, Kyungjin; Liu, Ying; Revzin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors first appeared several decades ago to address the need for monitoring physiological parameters such as oxygen or glucose in biological fluids such as blood. More recently, a new wave of biosensors has emerged in order to provide more nuanced and granular information about the composition and function of living cells. Such biosensors exist at the confluence of technology and medicine and often strive to connect cell phenotype or function to physiological or pathophysiological processes. Our review aims to describe some of the key technological aspects of biosensors being developed for cell analysis. The technological aspects covered in our review include biorecognition elements used for biosensor construction, methods for integrating cells with biosensors, approaches to single-cell analysis, and the use of nanostructured biosensors for cell analysis. Our hope is that the spectrum of possibilities for cell analysis described in this review may pique the interest of biomedical scientists and engineers and may spur new collaborations in the area of using biosensors for cell analysis.

  9. Photoelectrochemical enzymatic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-06-15

    Enzymatic biosensors have been valuable bioanalytical devices for analysis of diverse targets in disease diagnosis, biological and biomedical research, etc. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) bioanalysis is a recently emerged method that promptly becoming a subject of new research interests due to its attractive potential for future bioanalysis with high sensitivity and specificity. PEC enzymatic biosensors integrate the inherent sensitivities of PEC bioanalysis and the selectivity of enzymes and thus share their both advantages. Currently, PEC enzymatic biosensors have become a hot topic of significant research and the recent impetus has grown rapidly as demonstrated by increased research papers. Given the pace of advances in this area, this review will make a thorough discussion and survey on the fundamentals, sensing strategies, applications and the state of the art in PEC enzymatic biosensors, followed by future prospects based on our own opinions. We hope this work could provide an accessible introduction to PEC enzymatic biosensors for any scientist.

  10. Fundamental Aspects of Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Sowjanya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor is an analytical device which converts a biological response into an electrical signal. The term 'biosensor' is often used to cover sensor devices used in order to determine the concentration of substances and other parameters of biological interest even where they do not utilize a biological system directly. This very broad definition is used by some scientific journals (e.g. Biosensors, Elsevier Applied Science but will not be applied to the coverage here. The emphasis of this Chapter concerns enzymes as the biologically responsive material, but it should be recognized that other biological systems may be utilized by biosensors, for example, whole cell metabolism, ligand binding and the antibody-antigen reaction. Biosensors represent a rapidly expanding field, at the present time, with an estimated 60% annual growth rate; the major impetus coming from the health-care industry (e.g. 6% of the western world are diabetic and would benefit from the availability of a rapid, accurate and simple biosensor for glucose but with some pressure from other areas, such as food quality appraisal and environmental monitoring. The estimated world analytical market is about 12,000,000,000 year- 1 of which 30% is in the health care area. There is clearly a vast market expansion potential as less than 0.1% of this market is currently using biosensors. Research and development in this field is wide and multidisciplinary, spanning biochemistry, bioreactor science, physical chemistry, electrochemistry, electronics and software engineering. Most of this current endeavour concerns potentiometric and amperometric biosensors and colorimetric paper enzyme strips. However, all the main transducer types are likely to be thoroughly examined, for use in biosensors, over the next few years.

  11. Introduction to biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Nikhil; Jolly, Pawan; Formisano, Nello

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors are nowadays ubiquitous in biomedical diagnosis as well as a wide range of other areas such as point-of-care monitoring of treatment and disease progression, environmental monitoring, food control, drug discovery, forensics and biomedical research. A wide range of techniques can be used for the development of biosensors. Their coupling with high-affinity biomolecules allows the sensitive and selective detection of a range of analytes. We give a general introduction to biosensors and biosensing technologies, including a brief historical overview, introducing key developments in the field and illustrating the breadth of biomolecular sensing strategies and the expansion of nanotechnological approaches that are now available. PMID:27365030

  12. Biosensors Incorporating Bimetallic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Rick

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a review of electrochemical bio-sensing for target analytes based on the use of electrocatalytic bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs, which can improve both the sensitivity and selectivity of biosensors. The review moves quickly from an introduction to the field of bio-sensing, to the importance of biosensors in today’s society, the nature of the electrochemical methods employed and the attendant problems encountered. The role of electrocatalysts is introduced with reference to the three generations of biosensors. The contributions made by previous workers using bimetallic constructs, grouped by target analyte, are then examined in detail; following which, the synthesis and characterization of the catalytic particles is examined prior to a summary of the current state of endeavor. Finally, some perspectives for the future of bimetallic NPs in biosensors are given.

  13. Triggered optical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuedong; Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-10-02

    An optical biosensor is provided for the detection of a multivalent target biomolecule, the biosensor including a substrate having a bilayer membrane thereon, a recognition molecule situated at the surface, the recognition molecule capable of binding with the multivalent target biomolecule, the recognition molecule further characterized as including a fluorescence label thereon and as being movable at the surface and a device for measuring a fluorescence change in response to binding between the recognition molecule and the multivalent target biomolecule.

  14. Biosensors: sense and sensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Anthony P F

    2013-04-21

    This review is based on the Theophilus Redwood Medal and Award lectures, delivered to Royal Society of Chemistry meetings in the UK and Ireland in 2012, and presents a personal overview of the field of biosensors. The biosensors industry is now worth billions of United States dollars, the topic attracts the attention of national initiatives across the world and tens of thousands of papers have been published in the area. This plethora of information is condensed into a concise account of the key achievements to date. The reasons for success are examined, some of the more exciting emerging technologies are highlighted and the author speculates on the importance of biosensors as a ubiquitous technology of the future for health and the maintenance of wellbeing.

  15. Biosensors in forensic sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederickx, C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor is a device that uses biological materials to detect and monitor the presence of specific chemicals in an area. Traditional methods of volatile detection used by law enforcement agencies and rescue teams typically consist of reliance on canine olfaction. This concept of using dogs to detect specific substances is quite old. However, dogs have some limitations such as cost of training and time of conditioning. Thus, the possibility of using other organisms as biosensors including rats, dolphins, honeybees, and parasitic wasps for detecting explosives, narcotics and cadavers has been developed. Insects have several advantages unshared by mammals. Insects are sensitive, cheap to produce and can be conditioned with impressive speed for a specific chemical-detection task. Moreover, insects might be a preferred sensing method in scenarios that are deemed too dangerous to use mammals. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the biosensors used in forensic sciences.

  16. Biosensor development in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetilov, Anatoly N

    2007-07-01

    The review summarizes the current Russian research in the field of biological sensors for detection of carbohydrates, alcohols, medicines, enzyme inhibitors, toxicants, heavy metal ions, as well as viruses and microbial cells. Some of the presented works describe the analytical parameters of biosensors; other publications provide a basis for their development. The review covers mainly publications that have appeared over the past 10 years. As a whole, the collected material gives an idea of the main tendencies of biosensor development in Russia. The review is not meant to be comprehensive but highlights the major trends in this field in the last decade.

  17. Surface stress-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Shengbo; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Wendong; Li, Pengwei; Hu, Jie; Li, Gang

    2014-01-15

    Surface stress-based biosensors, as one kind of label-free biosensors, have attracted lots of attention in the process of information gathering and measurement for the biological, chemical and medical application with the development of technology and society. This kind of biosensors offers many advantages such as short response time (less than milliseconds) and a typical sensitivity at nanogram, picoliter, femtojoule and attomolar level. Furthermore, it simplifies sample preparation and testing procedures. In this work, progress made towards the use of surface stress-based biosensors for achieving better performance is critically reviewed, including our recent achievement, the optimally circular membrane-based biosensors and biosensor array. The further scientific and technological challenges in this field are also summarized. Critical remark and future steps towards the ultimate surface stress-based biosensors are addressed.

  18. Electrochemical biosensors for hormone analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-06-15

    Electrochemical biosensors have a unique place in determination of hormones due to simplicity, sensitivity, portability and ease of operation. Unlike chromatographic techniques, electrochemical techniques used do not require pre-treatment. Electrochemical biosensors are based on amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric, and conductometric principle. Amperometric technique is a commonly used one. Although electrochemical biosensors offer a great selectivity and sensitivity for early clinical analysis, the poor reproducible results, difficult regeneration steps remain primary challenges to the commercialization of these biosensors. This review summarizes electrochemical (amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric and conductometric) biosensors for hormone detection for the first time in the literature. After a brief description of the hormones, the immobilization steps and analytical performance of these biosensors are summarized. Linear ranges, LODs, reproducibilities, regenerations of developed biosensors are compared. Future outlooks in this area are also discussed.

  19. The future of biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, P.

    1996-01-01

    Since the development of the glucose sensor by Clark and Lyons in 1962, generally recognized as the first biosensor, many types of sensors have been developed in which a physical or chemical transducer is provided with a layer containing a biological sensing element. The resulting device is called a

  20. Recent advances in phosphate biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Lata Sheo Bachan; Verma, Nishant

    2015-07-01

    A number of biosensors have been developed for phosphate analysis particularly, concerning its negative impact within the environmental and biological systems. Enzymatic biosensors comprising either a single or multiple enzymatic system have been extensively used for the direct and indirect analysis of phosphate ions. Furthermore, some non-enzymatic biosensors, such as affinity-based biosensors, provide an alternative analytical approach with a higher selectivity. This article reviews the recent advances in the field of biosensor developed for phosphate estimation in clinical and environmental samples, concerning the techniques involved, and the sensitivity toward phosphate ions. The biosensors have been classified and discussed on the basis of the number of enzymes used to develop the analytical system, and a comparative analysis has been performed.

  1. Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Biosensors and Bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong; Mao, Xun; Gurung, Anant; Baloda, Meenu; Lin, Yuehe; He, Yuqing

    2010-08-31

    This book chapter summarizes the recent advance in nanomaterials for electrochemical biosensors and bioassays. Biofunctionalization of nanomaterials for biosensors fabrication and their biomedical applications are discussed.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  3. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  4. Graphene-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, A. A.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Novikov, S. N.; Litvin, D. P.; Makarov, Yu. N.; Klimovich, V. B.; Samoilovich, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    Results of developing and testing graphene-based sensors capable of detecting protein molecules are presented. The biosensor operation was checked using an immunochemical system comprising fluorescein dye and monoclonal antifluorescein antibodies. The sensor detects fluorescein concentration on a level of 1-10 ng/mL and bovine serum albumin-fluorescein conjugate on a level of 1-5 ng/mL. The proposed device has good prospects for use for early diagnostics of various diseases.

  5. Aptamers for biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Bini, A

    2009-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded DNA or RNA molecules isolated in vitro by a selection and amplification method. Aptamers bind with high specificity and affinity to a wide range of target molecules, with dissociation constant comparable to antibodies. In this work aptamers were employed as a new kind of bio-recognition element in affinity biosensors for the detection of clinically relevant proteins in heterogeneous assay, using Piezoelectric Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Surface ...

  6. Protein Detection with Aptamer Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Stoltenburg

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers have been developed for different applications. Their use as new biological recognition elements in biosensors promises progress for fast and easy detection of proteins. This new generation of biosensor (aptasensors will be more stable and well adapted to the conditions of real samples because of the specific properties of aptamers.

  7. A conductometric biosensor for biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad-Tahir, Zarini; Alocilja, Evangelyn C

    2003-05-01

    The paper describes the development of a conductometric biosensor for detecting foodborne pathogens. The biosensor consists of two components: an immunosensor that is based on electrochemical sandwich immunoassay, and a reader for signal measurement. The architecture of the immunosensor utilizes a lateral flow system that allows the liquid sample to move from one pad to another. The biosensor provides a specific, sensitive, low volume, and near real-time detection mechanism. Results are presented to highlight the performance of the biosensor for enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp., which are of concern to biosecurity. The lower limit of detection is approximately 7.9 x 10(1) colony forming units per milliliter within a 10-min process. The ability to change the specificity of the antibodies will enable the biosensor to be used as a detection device for other types of foodborne pathogens.

  8. [Nanobiotechnology and biosensor research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetilov, A N; Bezborodov, A M

    2008-01-01

    Nanobiotechnology is defined as an interdisciplinary field of science that studies the application of fine-sized biological objects (of nanoscale, 1-100 nm) to design the devices and systems of the same size that utilize for new purposes the unusual, known, or previously unknown effects. Analysis demonstrates that the final goals, approaches, solution methods, and applications of nanostructures and biological sensors have much in common. This brief review attempts to systematize a number of the available data and pick out an organic connection of the new research direction with the field of biosensor technology, which have reached the level of sustainable development.

  9. Microbial biosensors for environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David VOGRINC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biosensors are analytical devices capable of sensing substances in the environment due to the specific biological reaction of the microorganism or its parts. Construction of a microbial biosensor requires knowledge of microbial response to the specific analyte. Linking this response with the quantitative data, using a transducer, is the crucial step in the construction of a biosensor. Regarding the transducer type, biosensors are divided into electrochemical, optical biosensors and microbial fuel cells. The use of the proper configuration depends on the selection of the biosensing element. With the use of transgenic E. coli strains, bioluminescence or fluorescence based biosensors were developed. Microbial fuel cells enable the use of the heterogeneous microbial populations, isolated from wastewater. Different microorganisms are used for different pollutants – pesticides, heavy metals, phenolic compounds, organic waste, etc. Biosensing enables measurement of their concentration and their toxic or genotoxic effects on the microbes. Increasing environmental awareness has contributed to the increase of interest for biomonitoring. Although technologies, such as bioinformatics and genetic engineering, allow us to design complex and efficient microbial biosensors for environmental pollutants, the transfer of the laboratory work to the field still remains a problem to solve.

  10. Biosensors based on cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Mar; Carrascosa, Laura G; Zinoviev, Kiril; Plaza, Jose A; Lechuga, Laura M

    2009-01-01

    Microcantilevers based-biosensors are a new label-free technique that allows the direct detection of biomolecular interactions in a label-less way and with great accuracy by translating the biointeraction into a nanomechanical motion. Low cost and reliable standard silicon technologies are widely used for the fabrication of cantilevers with well-controlled mechanical properties. Over the last years, the number of applications of these sensors has shown a fast growth in diverse fields, such as genomic or proteomic, because of the biosensor flexibility, the low sample consumption, and the non-pretreated samples required. In this chapter, we report a dedicated design and a fabrication process of highly sensitive microcantilever silicon sensors. We will describe as well an application of the device in the environmental field showing the immunodetection of an organic toxic pesticide as an example. The cantilever biofunctionalization process and the subsequent pesticide determination are detected in real time by monitoring the nanometer-scale bending of the microcantilever due to a differential surface stress generated between both surfaces of the device.

  11. Electrochemical biosensors and nanobiosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Jules L; Formisano, Nello; Estrela, Pedro; Carrara, Sandro; Tkac, Jan

    2016-06-30

    Electrochemical techniques have great promise for low-cost miniaturised easy-to-use portable devices for a wide range of applications-in particular, medical diagnosis and environmental monitoring. Different techniques can be used for biosensing, with amperometric devices taking the central role due to their widespread application in glucose monitoring. In fact, glucose biosensing takes an approximately 70% share of the biosensor market due to the need for diabetic patients to monitor their sugar levels several times a day, making it an appealing commercial market.In this review, we present the basic principles of electrochemical biosensor devices. A description of the different generations of glucose sensors is used to describe in some detail the operation of amperometric sensors and how the introduction of mediators can enhance the performance of the sensors. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is a technique being increasingly used in devices due to its ability to detect variations in resistance and capacitance upon binding events. Novel advances in electrochemical sensors, due to the use of nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene, are presented as well as future directions that the field is taking.

  12. Biosensors and their Medical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Kokbas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are sensor systems that are combined with biological systems. They consist of two main parts; one of them is biological recognition element and the other one is physicochemical transducer. Biological recognition element can be biocatalysts (enzyme, microorganism, tissue materials or bioligands (antibodies, nucleic acids, lectins that interact selectively with the target analyte. Transducer converts the physical response resulting from the interaction between the target analyte and biological recognition element into a measurable signal. Biosensors which provide monitoring biological and synthetic processes can be used besides medical measuring and analyzing, for environmental observations and controls, defense industry, agriculture, food and pharmaceutical industry. Thus, they have an important role in daily life. In this review, characteristics of biosensors that are used in medical measuring and analyzing have been determined and classifications of biosensors according different features that are found in literature are presented. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(4.000: 499-513

  13. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E.; Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale. PMID:27624590

  14. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E.; Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale.

  15. Glycan and lectin biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  16. DNA nanotechnology-enabled biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Yinan; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors employ biological molecules to recognize the target and utilize output elements which can translate the biorecognition event into electrical, optical or mass-sensitive signals to determine the quantities of the target. DNA-based biosensors, as a sub-field to biosensor, utilize DNA strands with short oligonucleotides as probes for target recognition. Although DNA-based biosensors have offered a promising alternative for fast, simple and cheap detection of target molecules, there still exist key challenges including poor stability and reproducibility that hinder their competition with the current gold standard for DNA assays. By exploiting the self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, researchers have dedicated to make versatile DNA nanostructures in a highly rigid, controllable and functionalized manner, which offers unprecedented opportunities for developing DNA-based biosensors. In this review, we will briefly introduce the recent advances on design and fabrication of static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and summarize their applications for fabrication and functionalization of DNA-based biosensors.

  17. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  18. Biosensor for metal analysis and speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Abigail M.; Peyton, Brent M.; Apel, William A.; Petersen, James N.

    2007-01-30

    A biosensor for metal analysis and speciation is disclosed. The biosensor comprises an electron carrier immobilized to a surface of an electrode and a layer of an immobilized enzyme adjacent to the electrode. The immobilized enzyme comprises an enzyme having biological activity inhibited by a metal to be detected by the biosensor.

  19. Impedimetric Biosensors and Immunosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamas I. Prodromidis

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of methods targeting the direct monitoring of antibody-antigen interactions is particularly attractive. The design of label-free affinity-based probing concepts is the objective of much current research, at both academic and industrial levels, towards establishing alternative methods to the already existing ELISA-based immunoassays. Among these, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS represents one of the most powerful methods, due to the ability of EIS-based sensors to be more easily integrated into multi-array or microprocessor- controlled diagnostic tools. During the last decade, EIS and the concept of biochemical capacitors have been widely used for probing various types of biomolecular interactions (immunosensors, DNA hybridization, protein-protein interactions. So far, impedimetric or capacitive immunosensors have been successfully applied at the academic level. However, no prototypes have been released into the market, since major fundamental issues still exist. Even though this fact has brought the reliability of impedimetric immunosensors into question, features associated with electrochemical approaches, namely the ability to be miniaturized, remote control of implanted sensors, low cost of electrode mass production, and cost effective instrumentation (without need of high-energy sources keep impedimetric sensors particularly attractive as compared to other approaches based on microbalances, surface plasmon resonance or ellipsometry. This lecture outlines the theoretical background of impedimetric immunosensors and presents different types of impedimetric biosensors as well as the instrumental approaches that have been so far proposed in the literature.

  20. Biosensors for termite control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkhanda, M.

    2013-12-01

    Termites are major urban pests in Pakistan and cause damage to wooden structures and buildings. Termite management has two parts: prevention and control. The most difficult part of termite control is termite detection as most of them are subterranean in Pakistan and have tunneling habit.Throughout the world, chemical termiticides are going to be replaced by baits, microwave and sensor technology. Termite species are distinct biologically and have specific foraging behaviors. Termite Detection Radar, Moisture meter and Remote Thermal Sensor with Laser are available throughout the world. These can detect termites underground and use fewer chemicals than traditional methods. For wooden buildings, a termite sensor and an intrusion detection system for detecting termites are designed. A pair of electrodes is disposed inside the container. A pair of terminals is connected to these electrodes, these extend outside the container. Termites are detected by a change of conductivity between the electrodes, when termites are detected a warning device generates a warning signal. In Pakistan, there is dire need to develop such biosensoring devices locally, then apply control methods that would save money and protect the environment.

  1. A review on impedimetric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is a sensitive technique for the analysis of the interfacial properties related to biorecognition events such as reactions catalyzed by enzymes, biomolecular recognition events of specific binding proteins, lectins, receptors, nucleic acids, whole cells, antibodies or antibody-related substances, occurring at the modified surface. Many studies on impedimetric biosensors are focused on immunosensors and aptasensors. In impedimetric immunosensors, antibodies and antigens are bound each other and thus immunocomplex is formed and the electrode is coated with a blocking layer. As a result of that electron transfer resistance increases. In impedimetric aptasensors, impedance changes following the binding of target sequences, conformational changes, or DNA damages. Impedimetric biosensors allow direct detection of biomolecular recognition events without using enzyme labels. In this paper, impedimetric biosensors are reviewed and the most interesting ones are discussed.

  2. Application and Development of Biosensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yuelin; LI Jichang; HUO Guicheng; LIU Libo

    2008-01-01

    As a new kind of analytical instrument, the principles, types and characters of biosensors were discussed in this paper. A biosensor is usually composed of a recognition element of biological origin and a physicochemical transducer. The biological element is capable of sensing the presence, activity or concentration of a chemical analyse in solution. The sensing takes place either as a binding event or a biocatalyticai event. These into'actions produce a measurable change in a solution property, in which the transducer is converted into a quantifiable electrical signal. The principles, types and applications of biosensors in environmental inspection, food production, clinical medicine and military defense were reviewed, and the trends in research were predicated. Furthermore, an attempt had been made to describe the future development directions and prospects.

  3. Cell-Based Biosensors Principles and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ping

    2009-01-01

    Written by recognized experts the field, this leading-edge resource is the first book to systematically introduce the concept, technology, and development of cell-based biosensors. You find details on the latest cell-based biosensor models and novel micro-structure biosensor techniques. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this unique volume presents the latest innovative applications of cell-based biosensors in a variety of biomedical fields. The book also explores future trends of cell-based biosensors, including integrated chips, nanotechnology and microfluidics. Over 140 illustrations hel

  4. ENZYME CONDUCTOMETRIC BIOSENSOR FOR FRUCTOSE DETERMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Dudchenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The conductometric biosensor for fructose determination based on fructose dehydrogenase and potassium ferricyanide mediator as electron acceptor has been developed. The enzyme was immobilized on a surface of the conductometric transducer together with bovine serum albumin using crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Working conditions of the discribed fructose biosensor were optimized. The results concerning influence of the buffer solution concentration and potassium ferricyanide concentration on the biosensor performance are given. The fructose biosensor is characterized by high signal reproducibility and selectivity to fructose. The developed conductometric biosensor can be successfully used for fructose monitoring in the procedures of food and clinical diagnostic.

  5. Micro-and nanoelectromechanical biosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Nicu, Liviu

    2014-01-01

    Most books dedicated to the issues of bio-sensing are organized by the well-known scheme of a biosensor. In this book, the authors have deliberately decided to break away from the conventional way of treating biosensing research by uniquely addressing biomolecule immobilization methods on a solid surface, fluidics issues and biosensing-related transduction techniques, rather than focusing simply on the biosensor. The aim is to provide a contemporary snapshot of the biosensing landscape without neglecting the seminal references or products where needed, following the downscaling (from the micr

  6. Enzyme conductometric biosensor for maltose determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzyadevych S. V.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To develop enzyme conductometric biosensor for maltose determination. Methods. A conductometric transducer consisting of two gold pairs of electrodes was applied. Three-enzyme membrane (glucose oxidase, mutarotase, -glucosidase immobilized on the surface of the conductometric transducer was used as a bioselective element. Results. A linear range of maltose conductometric biosensor was from 0,002 mM to 1 mM for glucose and maltose detection. The time of maltose analysis in solution was 1–2 minutes. The dependence of biosensor responses to substrate on pH, ionic strength, and buffer capacity of work solution was studied. The data of biosensor selectivity are presented. The developed conductometric biosensor is characterized by high operational stability and signal reproducibility. Conclusion. The enzyme conductometric biosensor for maltose determination has been developed. The analytical characteristics of the maltose biosensor were investigated. The proposed method could be used in food industry to control and optimize production.

  7. Biosensors in Clinical Practice: Focus on Oncohematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Cortelezzi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are devices that are capable of detecting specific biological analytes and converting their presence or concentration into some electrical, thermal, optical or other signal that can be easily analysed. The first biosensor was designed by Clark and Lyons in 1962 as a means of measuring glucose. Since then, much progress has been made and the applications of biosensors are today potentially boundless. This review is limited to their clinical applications, particularly in the field of oncohematology. Biosensors have recently been developed in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by hematological malignancies, such as the biosensor for assessing the in vitro pre-treatment efficacy of cytarabine in acute myeloid leukemia, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor for assessing the efficacy of imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. The review also considers the challenges and future perspectives of biosensors in clinical practice.

  8. Biosensors and their applications – A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Parikha

    2016-01-01

    The various types of biosensors such as enzyme-based, tissue-based, immunosensors, DNA biosensors, thermal and piezoelectric biosensors have been deliberated here to highlight their indispensable applications in multitudinous fields. Some of the popular fields implementing the use of biosensors are food industry to keep a check on its quality and safety, to help distinguish between the natural and artificial; in the fermentation industry and in the saccharification process to detect precise glucose concentrations; in metabolic engineering to enable in vivo monitoring of cellular metabolism. Biosensors and their role in medical science including early stage detection of human interleukin-10 causing heart diseases, rapid detection of human papilloma virus, etc. are important aspects. Fluorescent biosensors play a vital role in drug discovery and in cancer. Biosensor applications are prevalent in the plant biology sector to find out the missing links required in metabolic processes. Other applications are involved in defence, clinical sector, and for marine applications. PMID:27195214

  9. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  10. Improved Ion-Channel Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jay; White, Victor; Dougherty, Dennis; Maurer, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    An effort is underway to develop improved biosensors of a type based on ion channels in biomimetic membranes. These sensors are microfabricated from silicon and other materials compatible with silicon. As described, these sensors offer a number of advantages over prior sensors of this type.

  11. Biosensors and multiple mycotoxin analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaag, B. van der; Spath, S.; Dietrich, H.; Stigter, E.; Boonzaaijer, G.; Osenbruggen, T. van; Koopal, K.

    2003-01-01

    An immunochemical biosensor assay for the detection of multiple mycotoxins in a sample is described.The inhibition assay is designed to measure four different mycotoxins in a single measurement, following extraction, sample clean-up and incubation with an appropriate cocktail of anti-mycotoxin antib

  12. DESIGN OF INTEGRATING WAVEGUIDE BIOSENSOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Integrating Waveguide Biosensor allows for rapid and sensitive detection of pathogenic agents, cells and proteins via immunoassay or PCR products. The analytes are captured on the surface of the waveguide and then tagged with fluorescent labels. The waveguides are illuminated by excitation light...

  13. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  14. A High-Content Assay for Biosensor Validation and for Examining Stimuli that Affect Biosensor Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Scott D; Hahn, Klaus M

    2014-12-01

    Biosensors are valuable tools used to monitor many different protein behaviors in vivo. Demand for new biosensors is high, but their development and characterization can be difficult. During biosensor design, it is necessary to evaluate the effects of different biosensor structures on specificity, brightness, and fluorescence responses. By co-expressing the biosensor with upstream proteins that either stimulate or inhibit the activity reported by the biosensor, one can determine the difference between the biosensor's maximally activated and inactivated state, and examine response to specific proteins. We describe here a method for biosensor validation in a 96-well plate format using an automated microscope. This protocol produces dose-response curves, enables efficient examination of many parameters, and unlike cell suspension assays, allows visual inspection (e.g., for cell health and biosensor or regulator localization). Optimization of single-chain and dual-chain Rho GTPase biosensors is addressed, but the assay is applicable to any biosensor that can be expressed or otherwise loaded in adherent cells. The assay can also be used for purposes other than biosensor validation, using a well-characterized biosensor as a readout for effects of upstream molecules.

  15. Polystyrene Based SPR Biosensor Chip for Use in Immunoassay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Biosensors are widely used in immunoassay.The biosensor chip carries a receptor which is used in immunoassay and the chip properties have an important influence on the detecting sensitivity of the biosensor.This paper describes a polystyrene-based biosensor chip developed and used as part of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor.The SPR biosensor has a much higher detecting sensitivity than enzyme-linked immunoserbent assay (ELISA).

  16. Tiny Medicine: Nanomaterial-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Watts

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Tiny medicine refers to the development of small easy to use devices that can help in the early diagnosis and treatment of disease. Early diagnosis is the key to successfully treating many diseases. Nanomaterial-based biosensors utilize the unique properties of biological and physical nanomaterials to recognize a target molecule and effect transduction of an electronic signal. In general, the advantages of nanomaterial-based biosensors are fast response, small size, high sensitivity, and portability compared to existing large electrodes and sensors. Systems integration is the core technology that enables tiny medicine. Integration of nanomaterials, microfluidics, automatic samplers, and transduction devices on a single chip provides many advantages for point of care devices such as biosensors. Biosensors are also being used as new analytical tools to study medicine. Thus this paper reviews how nanomaterials can be used to build biosensors and how these biosensors can help now and in the future to detect disease and monitor therapies.

  17. Recent Development in Optical Fiber Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Bosch Ojeda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable developments can be seen in the field of optical fibre biosensors in the last decade. More sensors for specific analytes have been reported, novel sensing chemistries or transduction principles have been introduced, and applications in various analytical fields have been realised. This review consists of papers mainly reported in the last decade and presents about applications of optical fiber biosensors. Discussions on the trends in optical fiber biosensor applications in real samples are enumerated.

  18. Zinc Oxide Nanostructured Biosensor for Glucose Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X. W.Sun; J.X. Wang; A. Wei

    2008-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocombs were fabricated by vapor phase transport, and nanorods and hierarchical nanodisk structures by aqueous thermal decomposition. Glucose biosensors were constructed using these ZnO nanostructures as supporting materials for glucose oxidase (GOx) loading. These ZnO glucose biosensors showed a high sensitivity for glucose detection and high affinity of GOx to glucose as well as the low detection limit. The results demonstrate that ZnO nanostructures have potential applications in biosensors.

  19. Biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanodevices

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Biosensors Based on Nanomaterials and Nanodevices links interdisciplinary research from leading experts to provide graduate students, academics, researchers, and industry professionals alike with a comprehensive source for key advancements and future trends in nanostructured biosensor development. It describes the concepts, principles, materials, device fabrications, functions, system integrations, and applications of various types of biosensors based on signal transduction mechanisms, including fluorescence, photonic crystal, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, electrochemistry, electro-lumine

  20. Zinc oxide interdigitated electrode for biosensor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin L., L.; Arshad, M. K. Md.; Fathil, M. F. M.; Adzhri, R.; M. Nuzaihan M., N.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Hashim, U.

    2016-07-01

    In biosensors, zinc oxide (ZnO) thin film plays a crucial role in term of stability, sensitivity, biocompatibility and low cost. Interdigitated electrode (IDE) design is one of the device architecture in biosensor for label free, stability and sensitivity. In this paper, we discuss the fabrication of zinc oxide deposited on the IDE as a transducer for sensing of biomolecule. The formation of APTES had increase the performance of the surface functionalization..Furthermore we extend the discuss on the surface functionalization process which is utilized for probe attachment onto the surface of biosensor through surface immobilization process, thus enables the sensing of biomolecules for biosensor application.

  1. Label-Free Biosensors for Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Fang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Label-free biosensors for studying cell biology have finally come of age. Recent developments have advanced the biosensors from low throughput and high maintenance research tools to high throughput and low maintenance screening platforms. In parallel, the biosensors have evolved from an analytical tool solely for molecular interaction analysis to powerful platforms for studying cell biology at the whole cell level. This paper presents historical development, detection principles, and applications in cell biology of label-free biosensors. Future perspectives are also discussed.

  2. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  3. Optical biosensors for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiya, Eiichi

    1996-11-01

    Environmental assessment is important to evaluate the overall health and ecological impact of domestic and industrial wastes. Biosensors are kinds of analytical devices which consist of biomaterials and transducers. Photoluminescence of recombinant E.coli containing lux related genes were used as indicators of environmental pollutions. This paper deals with sensitive and rapid optical sensing systems for monitoring BOD (Biochemical Oxygen Demand), toxic compounds and mutagens.

  4. Biosensor of endotoxin and sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yang; Wang, Xiang; Wu, Xi; Gao, Wei; He, Qing-hua; Cai, Shaoxi

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the relation between biosensor of endotoxin and endotoxin of plasma in sepsis. Method: biosensor of endotoxin was designed with technology of quartz crystal microbalance bioaffinity sensor ligand of endotoxin were immobilized by protein A conjugate. When a sample soliton of plasma containing endotoxin 0.01, 0.03, 0.06, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0Eu, treated with perchloric acid and injected into slot of quartz crystal surface respectively, the ligand was released from the surface of quartz crystal to form a more stable complex with endotoxin in solution. The endotoxin concentration corresponded to the weight change on the crystal surface, and caused change of frequency that occurred when desorbed. The result was biosensor of endotoxin might detect endotoxin of plasma in sepsis, measurements range between 0.05Eu and 0.5Eu in the stop flow mode, measurement range between 0.1Eu and 1Eu in the flow mode. The sensor of endotoxin could detect the endotoxin of plasm rapidly, and use for detection sepsis in clinically.

  5. Alginate cryogel based glucose biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatoni, Amin; Windy Dwiasi, Dian; Hermawan, Dadan

    2016-02-01

    Cryogel is macroporous structure provides a large surface area for biomolecule immobilization. In this work, an alginate cryogel based biosensor was developed to detect glucose. The cryogel was prepared using alginate cross-linked by calcium chloride under sub-zero temperature. This porous structure was growth in a 100 μL micropipette tip with a glucose oxidase enzyme entrapped inside the cryogel. The glucose detection was based on the colour change of redox indicator, potassium permanganate, by the hydrogen peroxide resulted from the conversion of glucose. The result showed a porous structure of alginate cryogel with pores diameter of 20-50 μm. The developed glucose biosensor was showed a linear response in the glucose detection from 1.0 to 5.0 mM with a regression of y = 0.01x+0.02 and R2 of 0.994. Furthermore, the glucose biosensor was showed a high operational stability up to 10 times of uninterrupted glucose detections.

  6. ENZYME CONDUCTOMETRIC BIOSENSOR FOR FRUCTOSE DETERMINATION

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The conductometric biosensor for fructose determination based on fructose dehydrogenase and potassium ferricyanide mediator as electron acceptor has been developed. The enzyme was immobilized on a surface of the conductometric transducer together with bovine serum albumin using crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Working conditions of the discribed fructose biosensor were optimized. The results concerning influence of the buffer solution concentration and potassium ferricyanide concentration on...

  7. Polyaniline synthesis and its biosensor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Zarini Muhammad; Alocilja, Evangelyn C; Grooms, Daniel L

    2005-02-15

    In this study, five polyaniline compounds were synthesized using different protonic acids and incorporated into a conductometric biosensor used for bovine viral diarrhea virus detection. The biosensor was developed and evaluated by the authors for bacterial pathogen detection in previous studies. The biosensor consisted of two parts: the immunosensor and the electronic data collection system. Liquid sample moved through the immunosensor surface by capillary action. The specificity of the biosensor was based on the unique binding characteristics of the polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies immobilized on the immunosensor. Polyaniline was used in the biosensor architecture as the transducer due to its electronic and bio-molecular properties. Results showed that the biosensor was sensitive at a concentration of 10(3) cell culture infective dose per milliliter (CCID/ml) of BVDV antigens. The promising results on the BVDV detection demonstrated that the conductometric biosensor was interchangeable for different target molecules of detection. Further modification could be implemented to evaluate the biosensor as a rapid diagnostic device to detect other infectious disease outbreaks in livestock population.

  8. Functionalized Palladium Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Baccar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison between two biosensors for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 detection. The first biosensor was developed by the immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP enzyme on thiol-modified gold electrode. The second biosensor was developed by the immobilization of cysteamine functionalizing palladium nanoparticles on modified gold surface. The amino groups can be activated with glutaraldehyde for horseradish peroxidase immobilization. The detection of hydrogen peroxide was successfully observed in PBS for both biosensors using the cyclic voltammetry and the chronoamperometry techniques. The results show that the limit detection depends on the large surface-to-volume ratio attained with palladium nanoparticles. The second biosensor presents a better detection limit of 7.5 μM in comparison with the first one which is equal to 75 μM.

  9. Microfabricated silicon biosensors for microphysiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousse, L. J.; Libby, J. M.; Parce, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Microphysiometers are biosensor devices that measure the metabolic rate of living cells by detecting the rate of extracellular acidification caused by a small number of cells. The cells are entrapped in a microvolume chamber, whose bottom surface is a silicon sensor chip. In a further miniaturization step, we have recently fabricated multichannel flow-through chips that will allow greater throughput and multiplicity. Microphysiometer technology can be applied to the detection of microorganisms. We describe the sensitive detection of bacteria and yeast. Further applications of microphysiometry to the characterization of microorganisms can be anticipated.

  10. Glucose biosensor enhanced by nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Glucose biosensors have been formed with glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilized in composite immobilization membrane matrix, which is composed of hydrophobic gold, or hydrophilic gold, or hydrophobic silica nanoparticles, or the combination of gold and silica nanoparticles, and polyvinyl butyral (PVB) by a sol-gel method. The experiments show that nanoparticles can significantly enhance the catalytic activity of the immobilization enzyme. The current response can be increased from tens of nanoamperometer (nA) to thousands of nanoamperometer to the same glucose concentration, and the electrodes respond very quickly, to about 1 min. The function of nanoparticles effect on immobilization enzyme has been discussed.

  11. Glucose biosensor enhanced by nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐芳琼; 孟宪伟; 陈东; 冉均国; 郑昌琼

    2000-01-01

    Glucose biosensors have been formed with glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilized in composite immobilization membrane matrix, which is composed of hydrophobic gold, or hydro-philic gold, or hydrophobic silica nanoparticles, or the combination of gold and silica nanoparticles, and polyvinyl butyral (PVB) by a sol-gel method. The experiments show that nanoparticles can significantly enhance the catalytic activity of the immobilization enzyme. The current response can be increased from tens of nanoamperometer (nA) to thousands of nanoamperometer to the same glucose concentration, and the electrodes respond very quickly, to about 1 min. The function of nanoparticles effect on immobilization enzyme has been discussed.

  12. Biosensors: the new wave in cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Bohunicky

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Brian Bohunicky1, Shaker A Mousa1,21The Pharmaceutical Research Institute at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Rensselaer, NY, USA; 2College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: The earlier cancer can be detected, the better the chance of a cure. Currently, many cancers are diagnosed only after they have metastasized throughout the body. Effective, accurate methods of cancer detection and clinical diagnosis are urgently needed. Biosensors are devices that are designed to detect a specific biological analyte by essentially converting a biological entity (ie, protein, DNA, RNA into an electrical signal that can be detected and analyzed. The use of biosensors in cancer detection and monitoring holds vast potential. Biosensors can be designed to detect emerging cancer biomarkers and to determine drug effectiveness at various target sites. Biosensor technology has the potential to provide fast and accurate detection, reliable imaging of cancer cells, and monitoring of angiogenesis and cancer metastasis, and the ability to determine the effectiveness of anticancer chemotherapy agents. This review will briefly summarize the current obstacles to early detection of cancer and the expanding use of biosensors as a diagnostic tool, as well as some future applications of biosensor technology.Keywords: biosensor, oncogene, nanotechnology, biotechnology, cancer detection, diagnosis, point-of-care

  13. A transparent nanostructured optical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Li, Xiang; Que, Long

    2014-05-01

    Herein we report a new transparent nanostructured Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) device. The unique features of the nanostructured optical device can be summarized as the following: (i) optically transparent nanostructured optical device; (ii) simple and inexpensive for fabrication; (iii) easy to be fabricated and scaled up as an arrayed format. These features overcome the existing barriers for the current nanopore-based interferometric optical biosensors by measuring the transmitted optical signals rather than the reflected optical signals, thereby facilitating the optical testing significantly for the arrayed biosensors and thus paving the way for their potential for high throughput biodetection applications. The optically transparent nanostructures (i.e., anodic aluminum oxide nanopores) inside the FPI devices are fabricated from 2.2 microm thick lithographically patterned Al thin film on an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate using a two-step anodization process. Utilizing the binding between Protein A and porcine immunoglobulin G (IgG) as a model, the detection of the bioreaction between biomolecules has been demonstrated successfully. Experiments found that the lowest detection concentration of proteins is in the range of picomolar level using current devices, which can be easily tuned into the range of femtomolar level by optimizing the performance of devices.

  14. Improved biosensor-based detection system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Described is a new biosensor-based detection system for effector compounds, useful for in vivo applications in e.g. screening and selecting of cells which produce a small molecule effector compound or which take up a small molecule effector compound from its environment. The detection system...... comprises a protein or RNA-based biosensor for the effector compound which indirectly regulates the expression of a reporter gene via two hybrid proteins, providing for fewer false signals or less 'noise', tuning of sensitivity or other advantages over conventional systems where the biosensor directly...

  15. Optical grating coupler biosensor and biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Diéguez Moure, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    Esta tesis consiste en el diseño, fabricación y test de un Biosensor Óptico basado en redes de difracción y sus aplicaciones en biomedicina. Los biosensores ópticos son dispositivos que detectan interacciones biomoleculares específicas mediante un transductor óptico. Exhiben alta sensibilidad, alta estabilidad mecánica, son inmunes a las interferencias electromagnéticas y permiten medidas no destructivas. En los Biosensores Ópticos por Onda Evanescente un modo guiado se propaga a lo larg...

  16. Polymer Based Biosensors for Medical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherré, Solène; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to give an overview about the newest developments in biosensors made of polymers for medical applications. Biosensors are devices that can recognize and detect a target with high selectivity. They are widely used in many fields such as medical diagnostic......, environmental monitoring and food safety. The detected element varies from a single molecule (such as glucose), a biopolymer (such as DNA or a protein) to a whole organism (such as bacteria). Due to their easy use and possible miniaturization, biosensors have a high potential to come out of the lab...... and be available for use by everybody. To fulfil these purposes, polymers represent very appropriate materials. Many nano- and microfabrication methods for polymers are available, allowing a fast and cheap production of devices. This chapter will present the general concept of a biosensor in a first part...

  17. Surface plasmon resonance biosensors: advances and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homola, Jirí

    2009-10-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors represent the most advanced label-free optical affinity biosensor technology. In the last decade numerous SPR sensor platforms have been developed and applied in the life sciences and bioanalytics. This contribution reviews the state of the art in the development of SPR (bio)sensor technology and presents selected results of research into SPR biosensors at the Institute of Photonics and Electronics, Prague. The developments discussed in detail include a miniature fiber optic SPR sensor for localized measurements, a compact SPR sensor for field use and a multichannel SPR sensor for high-throughput screening. Examples of applications for the detection of analytes related to medical diagnostics (biomarkers, hormones, antibodies), environmental monitoring (endocrine disrupting compounds), and food safety (pathogens and toxins) are given.

  18. Recent Advances in Nanotechnology Applied to Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daxiang Cui

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been great progress the application of nanomaterials in biosensors. The importance of these to the fundamental development of biosensors has been recognized. In particular, nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, magnetic nanoparticles and quantum dots have been being actively investigated for their applications in biosensors, which have become a new interdisciplinary frontier between biological detection and material science. Here we review some of the main advances in this field over the past few years, explore the application prospects, and discuss the issues, approaches, and challenges, with the aim of stimulating a broader interest in developing nanomaterial-based biosensors and improving their applications in disease diagnosis and food safety examination.

  19. Non-antibody protein-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors that depend on a physical or chemical measurement can be adversely affected by non-specific interactions. For example, a biosensor designed to measure specifically the levels of a rare analyte can give false positive results if there is even a small amount of interaction with a highly abundant but irrelevant molecule. To overcome this limitation, the biosensor community has frequently turned to antibody molecules as recognition elements because they are renowned for their exquisite specificity. Unfortunately antibodies can often fail when immobilised on inorganic surfaces, and alternative biological recognition elements are needed. This article reviews the available non-antibody-binding proteins that have been successfully used in electrical and micro-mechanical biosensor platforms. PMID:27365032

  20. Biosensors for Inorganic and Organic Arsenicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed and is strongly associated with human health problems, including cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. To date, a number of biosensors for the detection of arsenic involving the coupling of biological engineering and electrochemical techniques has been developed. The properties of whole-cell bacterial or cell-free biosensors are summarized in the present review with emphasis on their sensitivity and selectivity. Their limitations and future challenges are highlighted. PMID:25587436

  1. Nanostructured Metal Oxides Based Enzymatic Electrochemical Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Anees A.; Alhoshan, M.; M. S. AlSalhi; Aldwayyan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The unique electrocatalytic properties of the metal oxides and the ease of metal oxide nanostructured fabrication make them extremely interesting materials for electrochemical enzymatic biosensor applications. The application of nanostructured metal oxides in such sensing devices has taken off rapidly and will surely continue to expand. This article provides a review on current research status of electrochemical enzymatic biosensors based on various new types of nanostructured metal oxides su...

  2. Enzyme conductometric biosensor for maltose determination

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Aim. To develop enzyme conductometric biosensor for maltose determination. Methods. A conductometric transducer consisting of two gold pairs of electrodes was applied. Three-enzyme membrane (glucose oxidase, mutarotase, -glucosidase) immobilized on the surface of the conductometric transducer was used as a bioselective element. Results. A linear range of maltose conductometric biosensor was from 0,002 mM to 1 mM for glucose and maltose detection. The time of maltose analysis in solution was 1...

  3. Integrated optical biosensor system (IOBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Karen M.; Sweet, Martin R.; Goeller, Roy M.; Morrison, Leland Jean; Grace, Wynne Kevin; Kolar, Jerome D.

    2007-10-30

    An optical biosensor has a first enclosure with a pathogen recognition surface, including a planar optical waveguide and grating located in the first enclosure. An aperture is in the first enclosure for insertion of sample to be investigated to a position in close proximity to the pathogen recognition surface. A laser in the first enclosure includes means for aligning and means for modulating the laser, the laser having its light output directed toward said grating. Detection means are located in the first enclosure and in optical communication with the pathogen recognition surface for detecting pathogens after interrogation by the laser light and outputting the detection. Electronic means is located in the first enclosure and receives the detection for processing the detection and outputting information on the detection, and an electrical power supply is located in the first enclosure for supplying power to the laser, the detection means and the electronic means.

  4. Nanoparticles Modified ITO Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Z. H.

    2017-04-01

    Incorporation of nanomaterials with controlled molecular architecture shows great promise in improving electronic communication between biomolecules and the electrode substrate. In electrochemical applications metal nanoparticles (NPs) modified electrodes have been widely used and are emerging as candidates to develop highly sensitive electrochemical sensors. There has been a growing technological interest in modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes due to their prominent optoelectronic properties and their wide use as a transducing platform. The introduction of NPs into the transducing platform is commonly achieved by their adsorption onto conventional electrode surfaces in various forms, including that of a composite. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of metallic NPs for surface fabrication of ITO thin films leading to detection of specific biomolecules and applications as a biosensor platform.

  5. Biosensors ecològics

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez, Briza; Merkoçi, A.

    2009-01-01

    Si a principis de segle XX, els miners utilitzaven canaris tancats en gàbies per a detectar la presència de gasos letals, la química del segle XXI preserva la vida animal i dóna un pas de gegant en la detecció electroquímica. Investigadors de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona estudien la possibilitat d’utilitzar un nou biosensor per controlar la presència de fenol al medi ambient. Es tracta d’una substància manufacturada molt present en el camp de la farmacèutica o la clínica, entre d’altr...

  6. Nanoparticles Modified ITO Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Z. H.

    2016-12-01

    Incorporation of nanomaterials with controlled molecular architecture shows great promise in improving electronic communication between biomolecules and the electrode substrate. In electrochemical applications metal nanoparticles (NPs) modified electrodes have been widely used and are emerging as candidates to develop highly sensitive electrochemical sensors. There has been a growing technological interest in modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes due to their prominent optoelectronic properties and their wide use as a transducing platform. The introduction of NPs into the transducing platform is commonly achieved by their adsorption onto conventional electrode surfaces in various forms, including that of a composite. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of metallic NPs for surface fabrication of ITO thin films leading to detection of specific biomolecules and applications as a biosensor platform.

  7. Biosensor technology: technology push versus market pull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, John H T; Male, Keith B; Glennon, Jeremy D

    2008-01-01

    Biosensor technology is based on a specific biological recognition element in combination with a transducer for signal processing. Since its inception, biosensors have been expected to play a significant analytical role in medicine, agriculture, food safety, homeland security, environmental and industrial monitoring. However, the commercialization of biosensor technology has significantly lagged behind the research output as reflected by a plethora of publications and patenting activities. The rationale behind the slow and limited technology transfer could be attributed to cost considerations and some key technical barriers. Analytical chemistry has changed considerably, driven by automation, miniaturization, and system integration with high throughput for multiple tasks. Such requirements pose a great challenge in biosensor technology which is often designed to detect one single or a few target analytes. Successful biosensors must be versatile to support interchangeable biorecognition elements, and in addition miniaturization must be feasible to allow automation for parallel sensing with ease of operation at a competitive cost. A significant upfront investment in research and development is a prerequisite in the commercialization of biosensors. The progress in such endeavors is incremental with limited success, thus, the market entry for a new venture is very difficult unless a niche product can be developed with a considerable market volume.

  8. Overview of affinity biosensors in food analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pradip D

    2006-01-01

    The 4 major driving forces that are expected to lead to increased use of affinity biosensors that meet crucial industrial test specifications, e.g., fast, reliable, cost-effective, and use of low-skilled personnel, are (1) strict legislative framework, e.g., recent changes proposed to the European food safety and hygiene legislation, EC No. 178/2002; (2) industrial shift from quality control to quality assurance procedures, e.g., Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point, ensuring effective positioning in the global competitive trade; (3) just-in-time production resulting in 'right' product every time; and (4) consumer demand for safe and wholesome products. The affinity biosensors field has expanded significantly over the past decade, with a projected global biosensors market growth from $6.1 billion in 2004 to $8.2 billion in 2009, representing major industrial sectors (e.g., Pharma, Medicare, and Food). This brief review is targeted to affinity biosensors developed for the food industry and includes research and development leading to biosensors for microbiological and chemical analytes of industrial concern, commercial biosensors products on the market, and examples of future prospects in this diagnostic field.

  9. Gold nanoparticle-based electrochemical biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingarron, Jose M.; Yanez-Sedeno, Paloma; Gonzalez-Cortes, Araceli [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University Complutense of Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-08-01

    The unique properties of gold nanoparticles to provide a suitable microenvironment for biomolecules immobilization retaining their biological activity, and to facilitate electron transfer between the immobilized proteins and electrode surfaces, have led to an intensive use of this nanomaterial for the construction of electrochemical biosensors with enhanced analytical performance with respect to other biosensor designs. Recent advances in this field are reviewed in this article. The advantageous operational characteristics of the biosensing devices designed making use of gold nanoparticles are highlighted with respect to non-nanostructured biosensors and some illustrative examples are commented. Electrochemical enzyme biosensors including those using hybrid materials with carbon nanotubes and polymers, sol-gel matrices, and layer-by-layer architectures are considered. Moreover, electrochemical immunosensors in which gold nanoparticles play a crucial role in the electrode transduction enhancement of the affinity reaction as well as in the efficiency of immunoreagents immobilization in a stable mode are reviewed. Similarly, recent advances in the development of DNA biosensors using gold nanoparticles to improve DNA immobilization on electrode surfaces and as suitable labels to improve detection of hybridization events are considered. Finally, other biosensors designed with gold nanoparticles oriented to electrically contact redox enzymes to electrodes by a reconstitution process and to the study of direct electron transfer between redox proteins and electrode surfaces have also been treated. (author)

  10. Biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a biochemical assay for wide class of hydrophobic Coenzyme A esters wherein the analyte is caused to react with a specifically binding, modified protein, and thereby causing a detectable signal. A one step assay for hydrophobic carboxylic acid esters in whole blood, serum...

  11. Nanopore biosensors for detection of proteins and nucleic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maglia, Giovanni; Soskine, Mikhael

    2014-01-01

    Described herein are nanopore biosensors based on a modified cytolysin protein. The nanopore biosensors accommodate macromoiecules including proteins and nucleic acids, and may additionally comprise ligands with selective binding properties.

  12. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-based glucose biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kros, A.; Hövell, W.F.M. van; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Amperometric biosensors for the recognition of glucose oxidase (GOx) based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) were fabricated for the first time. The resulting biosensor has potential applications for long-term glucose measurements.

  13. Amperometric biosensor for Salmonella typhimurium detection in milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reports an amperometric biosensor for rapid and sensitive Salmonella Typhimurium detection in milk. The biosensor was assembled from the self-assembled monolayers technique on a gold surface. In this device, polyclonal antibodies were oriented by protein A. The biosensor structure was cha...

  14. A New Application of Carbon Nanotubes Constructing Biosensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes used for constructing biosensor was described for the first time. Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with carboxylic acid groups were used to immobilize glucose oxidase forming a glucose biosensor. The biosensor response can be determined by amperometric method at a low applied potential (0.40 V).

  15. Electrochemical biosensors: recommended definitions and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenot, D R; Toth, K; Durst, R A; Wilson, G S

    2001-01-01

    Two Divisions of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), namely Physical Chemistry (Commission 1.7 on Biophysical Chemistry formerly Steering Committee on Biophysical Chemistry) and Analytical Chemistry (Commission V.5 on Electroanalytical Chemistry) have prepared recommendations on the definition, classification and nomenclature related to electrochemical biosensors: these recommendations could, in the future, be extended to other types of biosensors. An electrochemical biosensor is a self-contained integrated device, which is capable of providing specific quantitative or semi-quantitative analytical information using a biological recognition element (biochemical receptor) which is retained in direct spatial contact with an electrochemical transduction element. Because of their ability to be repeatedly calibrated, we recommend that a biosensor should be clearly distinguished from a bioanalytical system, which requires additional processing steps, such as reagent addition. A device that is both disposable after one measurement, i.e. single use, and unable to monitor the analyte concentration continuously or after rapid and reproducible regeneration, should be designated a single use biosensor. Biosensors may be classified according to the biological specificity-conferring mechanism or, alternatively, to the mode of physico-chemical signal transduction. The biological recognition element may be based on a chemical reaction catalysed by, or on an equilibrium reaction with macromolecules that have been isolated, engineered or present in their original biological environment. In the latter cases. equilibrium is generally reached and there is no further, if any, net consumption of analyte(s) by the immobilized biocomplexing agent incorporated into the sensor. Biosensors may be further classified according to the analytes or reactions that they monitor: direct monitoring of analyte concentration or of reactions producing or consuming such analytes

  16. Biosensors for antioxidant evaluation in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Lucilene Dornelles; Kisner, Alexandre; Goulart, Marilia Oliveira Fonseca; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo

    2013-02-01

    The prevention of oxidative reactions in a biological medium as well as the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in chronic degenerative diseases are questions that continue to be investigated. Electrochemical biosensors have shown attractive features to evaluate the oxidative stress condition at a level comparable to chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. The biosensors developed so far are based on direct analysis of specific indicators such as biomarkers of oxidative stress on the monitoring of reactive oxygen species the free radicals in cells or tissues, aiming to obtain a correlation between the index obtained from these indicators with the oxidative stress levels in cells. In this review we will provide an overview of the development of electrochemical biosensors to evaluate the content of antioxidants and reactive oxygen species in physiological systems. Some discussion regarding the analysis of antioxidant capacity at the single cell level is also presented.

  17. Xanthine oxidase biosensor for monitoring meat spoilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, D. C.; Gomes, C.; McLamore, E. S.

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have designed an electrochemical biosensor for real-time detection of specific biomarkers of bacterial metabolism related to meat spoilage (hypoxanthine and xanthine). The selective biosensor was developed by assembling a `sandwich' of nanomaterials and enzymes on a platinum-iridium electrode (1.6 mm tip diameter). The materials deposited on the sensor tip include amorphous platinum nanoclusters (i.e. Pt black), reduced graphene oxide, nanoceria, and xanthine oxidase. Xanthine oxidase was encapsulated in laponite hydrogel and used for the biorecognition of hypoxanthine and xanthine (two molecules involved in the rotting of meat by spoilage microorganisms). The developed biosensor demonstrated good electrochemical performance toward xanthine with sensitivity of 2.14 +/- 1.48 μA/mM, response time of 5.2 +/- 1.5 sec, lower detection limit of 150 +/- 39 nM, and retained at least 88% of its activity after 7 days of continuous use.

  18. Graphene-Based Optical Biosensors and Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhiwen; He, Shijiang; Pei, Hao; Du, Dan; Fan, Chunhai; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-01-13

    This chapter focuses on the design, fabrication and application of graphene based optical nanobiosensors. The emerging graphene based optical nanobiosensors demonstrated the promising bioassay and biomedical applications thanking to the unique optical features of graphene. According to the different applications, the graphene can be tailored to form either fluorescent emitter or efficient fluorescence quencher. The exceptional electronic feature of graphene makes it a powerful platform for fabricating the SPR and SERS biosensors. Today the graphene based optical biosensors have been constructed to detect various targets including ions, small biomolecules, DNA/RNA and proteins. This chapter reviews the recent progress in graphene-based optical biosensors and discusses the opportunities and challenges in this field.

  19. Design & fabrication of cantilever array biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anja; Thundat, T

    2009-01-01

    Surface immobilization of functional receptors on microfabricated cantilever arrays offers a new paradigm for the development of biosensors based on nanomechanics. Microcantilever-based systems are capable of real-time, multiplexed detection of unlabeled disease markers in extremely small volumes......, electronic processing, and even local telemetry on a single chip have the potential of satisfying the need for highly sensitive and selective multiple-target detection in very small samples. Here we will review the design and fabrication process of cantilever-based biosensors....

  20. Biosensors for Inorganic and Organic Arsenicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed and is strongly associated with human health problems, including cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. To date, a number of biosensors for the detection of arsenic involving the coupling of biological engineering and electrochemical techniques has been developed. The properties of whole-cell bacterial or cell-free biosensors are summarized in the present review with emphasis on their sensitivity and selectivity. Their limitations and future challenges are highlighted.

  1. Biosensor technology for pesticides--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neelam; Bhardwaj, Atul

    2015-03-01

    Pesticides, due to their lucrative outcomes, are majorly implicated in agricultural fields for crop production enhancement. Due to their pest removal properties, pesticides of various classes have been designed to persist in the environment over a longer duration after their application to achieve maximum effectiveness. Apart from their recalcitrant structure and agricultural benefits, pesticides also impose acute toxicological effects onto the other various life forms. Their accumulation in the living system may prove to be detrimental if established in higher concentrations. Thus, their prompt and accurate analysis is a crucial matter of concern. Conventional techniques like chromatographic techniques (HPLC, GC, etc.) used for pesticides detection are associated with various limitations like stumpy sensitivity and efficiency, time consumption, laboriousity, requirement of expensive equipments and highly trained technicians, and many more. So there is a need to recruit the methods which can detect these neurotoxic compounds sensitively, selectively, rapidly, and easily in the field. Present work is a brief review of the pesticide effects, their current usage scenario, permissible limits in various food stuffs and 21st century advancements of biosensor technology for pesticide detection. Due to their exceptional performance capabilities, easiness in operation and on-site working, numerous biosensors have been developed for bio-monitoring of various environmental samples for pesticide evaluation immensely throughout the globe. Till date, based on sensing element (enzyme based, antibody based, etc.) and type of detection method used (Electrochemical, optical, and piezoelectric, etc.), a number of biosensors have been developed for pesticide detection. In present communication, authors have summarized 21st century's approaches of biosensor technology for pesticide detection such as enzyme-based biosensors, immunosensors, aptamers, molecularly imprinted polymers, and

  2. Photonic crystal biosensors towards on-chip integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threm, Daniela; Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Gerken, Martina

    2012-08-01

    Photonic crystal technology has attracted large interest in the last years. The possibility to generate highly sensitive sensor elements with photonic crystal structures is very promising for medical or environmental applications. The low-cost fabrication on the mass scale is as advantageous as the compactness and reliability of photonic crystal biosensors. The possibility to integrate microfluidic channels together with photonic crystal structures allows for highly compact devices. This article reviews different types of photonic crystal sensors including 1D photonic crystal biosensors, biosensors with photonic crystal slabs, photonic crystal waveguide biosensors and biosensors with photonic crystal microcavities. Their applications in biomolecular and pathogen detection are highlighted. The sensitivities and the detection limits of the different biosensors are compared. The focus is on the possibilities to integrate photonic crystal biosensors on-chip.

  3. Engineering an NADPH/NADP+ Redox Biosensor in Yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jie; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Pihl, Thomas Peter Boye

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors have emerged as powerful tools for timely and precise in vivo evaluation of cellular metabolism. In particular, biosensors that can couple intercellular cues with downstream signaling responses are currently attracting major attention within health science...... and biotechnology. Still, there is a need for bioprospecting and engineering of more biosensors to enable real-time monitoring of specific cellular states and controlling downstream actuation. In this study, we report the engineering and application of a transcription factor-based NADPH/NADP+ redox biosensor...... in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using the biosensor, we are able to monitor the cause of oxidative stress by chemical induction, and changes in NADPH/NADP+ ratios caused by genetic manipulations. Because of the regulatory potential of the biosensor, we also show that the biosensor can actuate upon...

  4. DNA Generated Electric Current Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lanshuang; Hu, Shengqiang; Guo, Linyan; Shen, Congcong; Yang, Minghui; Rasooly, Avraham

    2017-02-21

    In addition to its primary function as a genetic material, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is also a potential biologic energy source for molecular electronics. For the first time, we demonstrate that DNA can generate a redox electric current. As an example of this new functionality, DNA generated redox current was used for electrochemical detection of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a clinically important breast cancer biomarker. To induce redox current, the phosphate of the single stranded DNA aptamer backbone was reacted with molybdate to form redox molybdophosphate precipitate and generate an electrochemical current of ∼16.8 μA/μM cm(2). This detection of HER2 was performed using a sandwich detection assay. A HER2 specific peptide was immobilized onto a gold electrode surface for capturing HER2 in buffer and serum. The HER2 specific aptamer was used as both ligand to bind the captured HER2 and to generate a redox current signal. When tested for HER2 detection, the electrochemical current generated by the aptasensor was proportional to HER2 concentration in the range of 0.01 to 5 ng/mL, with a current generated in the range of ∼6.37 to 31.8 μA/cm(2) in both buffer and serum. This detection level is within the clinically relevant range of HER2 concentrations. This method of electrochemical signal amplification greatly simplifies the signal transduction of aptasensors, broadening their use for HER2 analysis. This novel approach of using the same aptamer as biosensor ligand and as transducer can be universally extended to other aptasensors for a wide array of biodetection applications. Moreover, electric currents generated by DNA or other nucleic acids can be used in molecular electronics or implanted devices for both power generation and measurement of output.

  5. Clinical Assessment Applications of Ambulatory Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Stephen N.; Yoshioka, Dawn T.

    2007-01-01

    Ambulatory biosensor assessment includes a diverse set of rapidly developing and increasingly technologically sophisticated strategies to acquire minimally disruptive measures of physiological and motor variables of persons in their natural environments. Numerous studies have measured cardiovascular variables, physical activity, and biochemicals…

  6. Optical Biosensors to Explore Biological Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palanco, Marta Espina; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Andersen, Nils H. Skovgaard

    2016-01-01

    their capability to work in biosensor devices. For example, Raman spectroscopy can be non-invasive and can provide 1 μm of spatial resolution in 1 second of collection time, well suited for sensing. Moreover, it may give information at the single cell and even approaching the single molecule scale. Here we present...

  7. Microbial Biosensors for Selective Detection of Disaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven microbial strains were screened for their ability to detect disaccharides as components of Clark-type oxygen biosensors. Sensors responded to varying degrees to maltose, cellobiose, sucrose, and melibiose, but none responded strongly to lactose. Although microbial sensors are relatively nons...

  8. Boar taint detection using parasitoid biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate the potential for a non-stinging wasp to be used as a biosensor in the pig industry, we trained wasps to 3 individual chemicals associated with boar taint. Training consisted of presenting the odors to hungry wasps while they were feeding on sugar. This associates the chemical with a fo...

  9. Methods for using redox liposome biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Quan; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and compositions for detecting the presence of biologically-important analytes by using redox liposome biosensors. In particular, the present invention provides liposome/sol-gel electrodes suitable for the detection of a wide variety of organic molecules, including but not limited to bacterial toxins.

  10. Development and Applications of Portable Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Balaji; Tung, Steve

    2015-08-01

    The significance of microfluidics-based and microelectromechanical systems-based biosensors has been widely acknowledged, and many reviews have explored their potential applications in clinical diagnostics, personalized medicine, global health, drug discovery, food safety, and forensics. Because health care costs are increasing, there is an increasing need to remotely monitor the health condition of patients by point-of-care-testing. The demand for biosensors for detection of biological warfare agents has increased, and research is focused on ways of producing small portable devices that would allow fast, accurate, and on-site detection. In the past decade, the demand for rapid and accurate on-site detection of plant disease diagnosis has increased due to emerging pathogens with resistance to pesticides, increased human mobility, and regulations limiting the application of toxic chemicals to prevent spread of diseases. The portability of biosensors for on-site diagnosis is limited due to various issues, including sample preparation techniques, fluid-handling techniques, the limited lifetime of biological reagents, device packaging, integrating electronics for data collection/analysis, and the requirement of external accessories and power. Many microfluidic, electronic, and biological design strategies, such as handling liquids in biosensors without pumps/valves, the application of droplet-based microfluidics, paper-based microfluidic devices, and wireless networking capabilities for data transmission, are being explored.

  11. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology.

  12. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JW

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jong-Wook Lee,1 Jangwon Song,1,2 Mintai P Hwang,1 Kwan Hyi Lee1,2 1Center for Biomaterials, Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology. Keywords: biosensing, M13 bacteriophage, T4 bacteriophage, bacterial detection, Escherichia coli, SPR sensor

  13. Electrochemical biosensors: recommended definitions and classification

    OpenAIRE

    Thevenot, Daniel,; Toth, Klara; Durst, Richard; Wilson, George

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Two Divisions of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), namely Physical Chemistry (Commission I.7 on Biophysical Chemistry formerly Steering Committee on Biophysical Chemistry) and Analytical Chemistry (Commission V.5 on Electroanalytical Chemistry) have prepared recommendations on the definition, classification and nomenclature related to electrochemical biosensors; these recommendations could, in the future, be extended to other types of biose...

  14. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  15. Applications of Nanomaterials in Electrochemical Enzyme Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodi Yang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor is defined as a kind of analytical device incorporating a biological material, a biologically derived material or a biomimic intimately associated with or integrated within a physicochemical transducer or transducing microsystem. Electrochemical biosensors incorporating enzymes with nanomaterials, which combine the recognition and catalytic properties of enzymes with the electronic properties of various nanomaterials, are new materials with synergistic properties originating from the components of the hybrid composites. Therefore, these systems have excellent prospects for interfacing biological recognition events through electronic signal transduction so as to design a new generation of bioelectronic devices with high sensitivity and stability. In this review, we describe approaches that involve nanomaterials in direct electrochemistry of redox proteins, especially our work on biosensor design immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD, horseradish peroxidase (HRP, cytochrome P450 (CYP2B6, hemoglobin (Hb, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. The topics of the present review are the different functions of nanomaterials based on modification of electrode materials, as well as applications of electrochemical enzyme biosensors.

  16. Recent Advances in Biosensor Technology for Potential Applications - An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneshvar, S; Sudhakumari, C C; Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian; Prakash, Hridayesh

    2016-01-01

    Imperative utilization of biosensors has acquired paramount importance in the field of drug discovery, biomedicine, food safety standards, defense, security, and environmental monitoring. This has led to the invention of precise and powerful analytical tools using biological sensing element as biosensor. Glucometers utilizing the strategy of electrochemical detection of oxygen or hydrogen peroxide using immobilized glucose oxidase electrode seeded the discovery of biosensors. Recent advances in biological techniques and instrumentation involving fluorescence tag to nanomaterials have increased the sensitive limit of biosensors. Use of aptamers or nucleotides, affibodies, peptide arrays, and molecule imprinted polymers provide tools to develop innovative biosensors over classical methods. Integrated approaches provided a better perspective for developing specific and sensitive biosensors with high regenerative potentials. Various biosensors ranging from nanomaterials, polymers to microbes have wider potential applications. It is quite important to integrate multifaceted approaches to design biosensors that have the potential for diverse usage. In light of this, this review provides an overview of different types of biosensors being used ranging from electrochemical, fluorescence tagged, nanomaterials, silica or quartz, and microbes for various biomedical and environmental applications with future outlook of biosensor technology.

  17. Recent advances in biosensor technology for potential applications - An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vigneshvar es

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Imperative utilization of biosensors has acquired paramount importance in the field of drug discovery, biomedicine, food safety standards, defence, security and environmental monitoring. This has led to the invention of precise and powerful analytical tools using biological sensing element as biosensor. Glucometers utilizing the strategy of electrochemical detection of oxygen or hydrogen peroxide using immobilized glucose oxidase electrode seeded the discovery of biosensors. Recent advances in biological techniques and instrumentation involving fluorescence tag to nanomaterials have increased the sensitive limit of biosensors. Use of aptamers or nucleotides, affibodies, peptide arrays and molecule imprinted polymers provide tools to develop innovative biosensors over classical methods. Integrated approaches provided a better perspective for developing specific and sensitive biosensors with high regenerative potentials. Variety of biosensors ranging from nanomaterials, polymers to microbes have wider potential applications. It is quite important to integrate multifaceted approaches to design biosensors that have the potential for diverse usage. In light of this, this review provides an overview of different types of biosensors being used ranging from electrochemical, fluorescence tagged, nanomaterials, silica or quartz and microbes for various biomedical and environmental applications with future outlook of biosensor technology.

  18. Future of biosensors: a personal view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Frieder W; Yarman, Aysu; Bachmann, Till; Hirsch, Thomas; Kubick, Stefan; Renneberg, Reinhard; Schumacher, Soeren; Wollenberger, Ulla; Teller, Carsten; Bier, Frank F

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors representing the technological counterpart of living senses have found routine application in amperometric enzyme electrodes for decentralized blood glucose measurement, interaction analysis by surface plasmon resonance in drug development, and to some extent DNA chips for expression analysis and enzyme polymorphisms. These technologies have already reached a highly advanced level and need minor improvement at most. The dream of the "100-dollar" personal genome may come true in the next few years provided that the technological hurdles of nanopore technology or of polymerase-based single molecule sequencing can be overcome. Tailor-made recognition elements for biosensors including membrane-bound enzymes and receptors will be prepared by cell-free protein synthesis. As alternatives for biological recognition elements, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been created. They have the potential to substitute antibodies in biosensors and biochips for the measurement of low-molecular-weight substances, proteins, viruses, and living cells. They are more stable than proteins and can be produced in large amounts by chemical synthesis. Integration of nanomaterials, especially of graphene, could lead to new miniaturized biosensors with high sensitivity and ultrafast response. In the future individual therapy will include genetic profiling of isoenzymes and polymorphic forms of drug-metabolizing enzymes especially of the cytochrome P450 family. For defining the pharmacokinetics including the clearance of a given genotype enzyme electrodes will be a useful tool. For decentralized online patient control or the integration into everyday "consumables" such as drinking water, foods, hygienic articles, clothing, or for control of air conditioners in buildings and cars and swimming pools, a new generation of "autonomous" biosensors will emerge.

  19. Electronic Biosensors Based on III-Nitride Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirste, Ronny; Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel; Bryan, Isaac; Bryan, Zachary; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-01-01

    We review recent advances of AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT)-based electronic biosensors. We discuss properties and fabrication of III-nitride-based biosensors. Because of their superior biocompatibility and aqueous stability, GaN-based devices are ready to be implemented as next-generation biosensors. We review surface properties, cleaning, and passivation as well as different pathways toward functionalization, and critically analyze III-nitride-based biosensors demonstrated in the literature, including those detecting DNA, bacteria, cancer antibodies, and toxins. We also discuss the high potential of these biosensors for monitoring living cardiac, fibroblast, and nerve cells. Finally, we report on current developments of covalent chemical functionalization of III-nitride devices. Our review concludes with a short outlook on future challenges and projected implementation directions of GaN-based HEMT biosensors.

  20. Biosensors in the small scale: methods and technology trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senveli, Sukru U; Tigli, Onur

    2013-03-01

    This study presents a review on biosensors with an emphasis on recent developments in the field. A brief history accompanied by a detailed description of the biosensor concepts is followed by rising trends observed in contemporary micro- and nanoscale biosensors. Performance metrics to quantify and compare different detection mechanisms are presented. A comprehensive analysis on various types and subtypes of biosensors are given. The fields of interest within the scope of this review are label-free electrical, mechanical and optical biosensors as well as other emerging and popular technologies. Especially, the latter half of the last decade is reviewed for the types, methods and results of the most prominently researched detection mechanisms. Tables are provided for comparison of various competing technologies in the literature. The conclusion part summarises the noteworthy advantages and disadvantages of all biosensors reviewed in this study. Furthermore, future directions that the micro- and nanoscale biosensing technologies are expected to take are provided along with the immediate outlook.

  1. A general strategy to construct small molecule biosensors in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Justin; Jester, Benjamin W; Tinberg, Christine E; Mandell, Daniel J; Antunes, Mauricio S; Chari, Raj; Morey, Kevin J; Rios, Xavier; Medford, June I; Church, George M; Fields, Stanley; Baker, David

    2015-12-29

    Biosensors for small molecules can be used in applications that range from metabolic engineering to orthogonal control of transcription. Here, we produce biosensors based on a ligand-binding domain (LBD) by using a method that, in principle, can be applied to any target molecule. The LBD is fused to either a fluorescent protein or a transcriptional activator and is destabilized by mutation such that the fusion accumulates only in cells containing the target ligand. We illustrate the power of this method by developing biosensors for digoxin and progesterone. Addition of ligand to yeast, mammalian, or plant cells expressing a biosensor activates transcription with a dynamic range of up to ~100-fold. We use the biosensors to improve the biotransformation of pregnenolone to progesterone in yeast and to regulate CRISPR activity in mammalian cells. This work provides a general methodology to develop biosensors for a broad range of molecules in eukaryotes.

  2. Recent advances in biosensors based on enzyme inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, A; Arduini, F; Moscone, D; Palleschi, G

    2016-02-15

    Enzyme inhibitors like drugs and pollutants are closely correlated to human and environmental health, thus their monitoring is of paramount importance in analytical chemistry. Enzymatic biosensors represent cost-effective, miniaturized and easy to use devices; particularly biosensors based on enzyme inhibition are useful analytical tools for fast screening and monitoring of inhibitors. The present review will highlight the research carried out in the last 9 years (2006-2014) on biosensors based on enzyme inhibition. We underpin the recent advances focused on the investigation in new theoretical approachs and in the evaluation of biosensor performances for reversible and irreversible inhibitors. The use of nanomaterials and microfluidic systems as well as the applications of the various biosensors in real samples is critically reviewed, demonstrating that such biosensors allow the development of useful devices for a fast and reliable alarm system.

  3. A catechol biosensor based on electrospun carbon nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofibers (CNFs were prepared by combining electrospinning with a high-temperature carbonization technique. And a polyphenol biosensor was fabricated by blending the obtained CNFs with laccase and Nafion. Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM were, respectively, employed to investigate the structures and morphologies of the CNFs and of the mixtures. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were employed to study the electrocatalysis of the catechol biosensor. The results indicated that the sensitivity of the biosensor was 41 µA·mM−1, the detection limit was 0.63 µM, the linear range was 1–1310 µM and the response time was within 2 seconds, which excelled most other laccase-based biosensor reported. Furthermore, the biosensor showed good repeatability, reproducibility, stability and tolerance to interferences. This novel biosensor also demonstrated its promising application in detecting catechol in real water samples.

  4. A catechol biosensor based on electrospun carbon nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dawei; Pang, Zengyuan; Chen, Xiaodong; Luo, Lei; Cai, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    Summary Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were prepared by combining electrospinning with a high-temperature carbonization technique. And a polyphenol biosensor was fabricated by blending the obtained CNFs with laccase and Nafion. Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) were, respectively, employed to investigate the structures and morphologies of the CNFs and of the mixtures. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were employed to study the electrocatalysis of the catechol biosensor. The results indicated that the sensitivity of the biosensor was 41 µA·mM−1, the detection limit was 0.63 µM, the linear range was 1–1310 µM and the response time was within 2 seconds, which excelled most other laccase-based biosensor reported. Furthermore, the biosensor showed good repeatability, reproducibility, stability and tolerance to interferences. This novel biosensor also demonstrated its promising application in detecting catechol in real water samples. PMID:24778958

  5. Fibre Optic Biosensor Assay of Newcastle Disease Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    A fluorometric sandwich immunoassay for Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was developed using a fibre optic biosensor. Antibodies directed against NDV...and low baseline variation. These and other properties of the fibre optic biosensor indicate that it has the potential to serve as an on-line...continuous monitoring device of an automated or semiautomated detection system. As a part of the fibre optic biosensor development, the surface coverage of

  6. A global benchmark study using affinity-based biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Rebecca L; Papalia, Giuseppe A; Flynn, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    To explore the variability in biosensor studies, 150 participants from 20 countries were given the same protein samples and asked to determine kinetic rate constants for the interaction. We chose a protein system that was amenable to analysis using different biosensor platforms as well as by users...... the remaining panel of participants was 620 pM with a standard deviation of 980 pM. These results demonstrate that when this biosensor assay was designed and executed appropriately, the reported rate constants were consistent, and independent of which protein was immobilized and which biosensor was used....

  7. Amperometric Biosensors for Real Time Assays of Organophosphates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Kuca

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available An amperometric biosensor based on acetylcholinesterase (AChE immobilized in gelatin was used to develop an assay for the organophosphate paraoxon. The more traditional manner employing preincubation was used for comparison between measurement procedures, although the aim of the study was to examine the performance of the biosensor for real time monitoring of organophosphates. The biosensor was immersed in a reaction chamber and paraoxon was injected inside. We were able to detect 200 pg of paraoxon within one minute or 2.5 ppb when the biosensor was preincubed in the sample solution for 15 minutes. The practical impact and expectations are discussed.

  8. Biosensors for security and bioterrorism applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nikoleli, Georgia-Paraskevi

    2016-01-01

    This book offers comprehensive coverage of biomarker/biosensor interactions for the rapid detection of weapons of bioterrorism, as well as current research trends and future developments and applications. It will be useful to researchers in this field who are interested in new developments in the early detection of such. The authors have collected very valuable and, in some aspects indispensable experience in the area i.e. in the development and application of portable biosensors for the detection of potential hazards. Most efforts are centered on the development of immunochemical assays including flow-lateral systems and engineered antibodies and their fragments. In addition, new approaches to the detection of enzyme inhibitors, direct enzymatic and microbial detection of metabolites and nutrients are elaborated. Some realized prototypes and concept devices applicable for the further use as a basis for the cooperation programs are also discussed. There is a particular focus on electrochemical and optical det...

  9. Biosensors in forensic analysis. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez-Sedeño, P; Agüí, L; Villalonga, R; Pingarrón, J M

    2014-05-01

    Forensic analysis is an important branch of modern Analytical Chemistry with many legal and socially relevant implications. Biosensors can play an important role as efficient tools in this field considering their well known advantages of sensitivity, selectivity, easy functioning, affordability and capability of miniaturization and automation. This article reviews the latest advances in the use of biosensors for forensic analysis. The different methodologies for the transduction of the produced biological events are considered and the applications to forensic toxicological analysis, classified by the nature of the target analytes, as well as those related with chemical and biological weapons critically commented. The article provides several Tables where the more relevant analytical characteristics of the selected reported methods are gathered.

  10. Microbial fuel cells for biosensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huijia; Zhou, Minghua; Liu, Mengmeng; Yang, Weilu; Gu, Tingyue

    2015-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) face major hurdles for real-world applications as power generators with the exception of powering small sensor devices. Despite tremendous improvements made in the last two decades, MFCs are still too expensive to build and operate and their power output is still too small. In view of this, in recently years, intensive researches have been carried out to expand the applications into other areas such as acid and alkali production, bioremediation of aquatic sediments, desalination and biosensors. Unlike power applications, MFC sensors have the immediate prospect to be practical. This review covers the latest developments in various proposed biosensor applications using MFCs including monitoring microbial activity, testing biochemical oxygen demand, detection of toxicants and detection of microbial biofilms that cause biocorrosion.

  11. Recent advances in biosensor based endotoxin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A P; Kumar, P S; Swain, S

    2014-01-15

    Endotoxins also referred to as pyrogens are chemically lipopolysaccharides habitually found in food, environment and clinical products of bacterial origin and are unavoidable ubiquitous microbiological contaminants. Pernicious issues of its contamination result in high mortality and severe morbidities. Standard traditional techniques are slow and cumbersome, highlighting the pressing need for evoking agile endotoxin detection system. The early and prompt detection of endotoxin assumes prime importance in health care, pharmacological and biomedical sectors. The unparalleled recognition abilities of LAL biosensors perched with remarkable sensitivity, high stability and reproducibility have bestowed it with persistent reliability and their possible fabrication for commercial applicability. This review paper entails an overview of various trends in current techniques available and other possible alternatives in biosensor based endotoxin detection together with its classification, epidemiological aspects, thrust areas demanding endotoxin control, commercially available detection sensors and a revolutionary unprecedented approach narrating the influence of omics for endotoxin detection.

  12. Design & fabrication of cantilever array biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Boisen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface immobilization of functional receptors on microfabricated cantilever arrays offers a new paradigm for the development of biosensors based on nanomechanics. Microcantilever-based systems are capable of real-time, multiplexed detection of unlabeled disease markers in extremely small volumes of samples. Currently available fabrication technology will allow the integration of electronic readout and sample introduction into a single unit, decreasing the device size, detection time, and cost. Biosensing technologies based on microfabricated cantilever arrays involving multiple cantilevers, electronic processing, and even local telemetry on a single chip have the potential of satisfying the need for highly sensitive and selective multiple-target detection in very small samples. Here we will review the design and fabrication process of cantilever-based biosensors.

  13. Cantilever-Based Biosensors in CMOS Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kirstein, K -U; Zimmermann, M; Vancura, C; Volden, T; Song, W H; Lichtenberg, J; Hierlemannn, A

    2011-01-01

    Single-chip CMOS-based biosensors that feature microcantilevers as transducer elements are presented. The cantilevers are functionalized for the capturing of specific analytes, e.g., proteins or DNA. The binding of the analyte changes the mechanical properties of the cantilevers such as surface stress and resonant frequency, which can be detected by an integrated Wheatstone bridge. The monolithic integrated readout allows for a high signal-to-noise ratio, lowers the sensitivity to external interference and enables autonomous device operation.

  14. Carbon nanotubes field effect transistors biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, M.T.; Tseng, Y. C.; Ormategui, N.; Loinaz, I.; Eritja Casadellà, Ramón; Salvador, Juan Pablo; Marco, María Pilar; Bokor, J.

    2012-01-01

    [EN] Carbon nanotube transistor arrays (CNTFETs) were used as biosensors to detect NA hybridization and to recognize two anabolic steroids, stanozolol (Stz) and methylboldenone (MB). Single strand DNA and antibodies specific for STz and MB were immobilized on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in situ in the device using two different approaches: direct noncovalent bonding of antibodies to the devices and covalently trough a polymer previously attached to the CNTFETs. A new approach to ensure specif...

  15. Biosensor for organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Sun, Samio; Li, Chen-Zhong; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Rosen, Barry P

    2014-01-21

    The toxic metalloid arsenic is widely distributed in food, water, and soil. While inorganic arsenic enters the environment primarily from geochemical sources, methylarsenicals either result from microbial biotransformation of inorganic arsenic or are introduced anthropogenically. Methylarsenicals such as monosodium methylarsonic acid (MSMA) have been extensively utilized as herbicides, and aromatic arsenicals such as roxarsone (Rox) are used as growth promoters for poultry and swine. Organoarsenicals are degraded to inorganic arsenic. The toxicological effects of arsenicals depend on their oxidation state, chemical composition, and bioavailability. Here we report that the active forms are the trivalent arsenic-containing species. We constructed a whole-cell biosensor utilizing a modified ArsR repressor that is highly selective toward trivalent methyl and aromatic arsenicals, with essentially no response to inorganic arsenic. The biosensor was adapted for in vitro detection of organoarsenicals using fluorescence anisotropy of ArsR-DNA interactions. It detects bacterial biomethylation of inorganic arsenite both in vivo and in vitro with detection limits of 10(-7) M and linearity to 10(-6) M for phenylarsenite and 5 × 10(-6) M for methylarsenite. The biosensor detects reduced forms of MSMA and roxarsone and offers a practical, low cost method for detecting activate forms and breakdown products of organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters.

  16. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qinglan; Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-08-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO2 dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  17. From chemosensing in microorganisms to practical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Surya K; Kundu, Tapanendu; Sain, Anirban

    2012-11-01

    Microorganisms like bacteria can sense concentrations of chemoattractants in their medium very accurately. They achieve this through interaction between the receptors on their cell surfaces and chemoattractant molecules (like sugar). Physical processes like diffusion set some limits on the accuracy of detection, which was discussed by Berg and Purcell in the late seventies. We re-examine their work in order to assess what insight it may offer for making efficient, practical biosensors. We model the functioning of a typical biosensor as a reaction-diffusion process in a confined geometry. Using available data first we characterize the system by estimating the kinetic constants for the binding and unbinding reactions between the chemoattractants and the receptors. Then we compute the binding flux for this system, which Berg and Purcell had discussed. Unlike in microorganisms where the interval between successive measurements determines the efficiency of the nutrient searching process, it turns out that biosensors depend on long time properties like signal saturation time, which we study in detail. We also develop a mean field description of the kinetics of the system.

  18. Sensitive-cell-based fish chromatophore biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Thomas K.; Chaplen, Frank W.; Jovanovic, Goran; Kolodziej, Wojtek; Trempy, Janine E.; Willard, Corwin; Liburdy, James A.; Pence, Deborah V.; Paul, Brian K.

    2004-07-01

    A sensitive biosensor (cytosensor) has been developed based on color changes in the toxin-sensitive colored living cells of fish. These chromatophores are highly sensitive to the presence of many known and unknown toxins produced by microbial pathogens and undergo visible color changes in a dose-dependent manner. The chromatophores are immobilized and maintained in a viable state while potential pathogens multiply and fish cell-microbe interactions are monitored. Low power LED lighting is used to illuminate the chromatophores which are magnified using standard optical lenses and imaged onto a CCD array. Reaction to toxins is detected by observing changes is the total area of color in the cells. These fish chromatophores are quite sensitive to cholera toxin, Staphococcus alpha toxin, and Bordatella pertussis toxin. Numerous other toxic chemical and biological agents besides bacterial toxins also cause readily detectable color effects in chromatophores. The ability of the chromatophore cell-based biosensor to distinguish between different bacterial pathogens was examined. Toxin producing strains of Salmonella enteritis, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Bacillus cereus induced movement of pigmented organelles in the chromatophore cells and this movement was measured by changes in the optical density over time. Each bacterial pathogen elicited this measurable response in a distinctive and signature fashion. These results suggest a chromatophore cell-based biosensor assay may be applicable for the detection and identification of virulence activities associated with certain air-, food-, and water-borne bacterial pathogens.

  19. Optoelectronic biosensor for remote monitoring of toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, George K.; Bassi, Amarjeet S.; Singh, Shikha; Fiorilli, Mina; Jauda, Lilana

    2001-02-01

    12 A biosensor telemetry system for the on-line remote monitoring of toxic sites is described in this paper. The device is a self-contained field measurement system that employs immobilized luminescent. Vibrio fisheri bacteria to detect airborne contaminants. The presence of toxic chemicals in the air will lead to a measurable decrease in the intensity of light produced by the bacteria population. Both cellular and environmental factors control the level of bioluminescence exhibited by the bacteria. The biological sensing element is placed inside a miniature airflow chamber that houses a light-to-frequency transducer, power supply, and Radio-Frequency (RF) transmitter to convert the intensity of bioluminescence exhibited by the bacteria population into a radio signal that is picked up by a RF receiver at a safe location. The miniature biosensor can be transported to the investigated on either a terrestrial or airborne robotic vehicle. Furthermore, numerous spatially distributed biosensors can be used to both map the extent and the rate-of-change in the dispersion of the hazardous contaminants over a large geographical area.

  20. Multiple Pathogen Detection Using Biosensors: Advancements and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advancements in biosensor research have considerably impacted clinical diagnostics for human health. Efforts in capitalizing on the sensitivity of biosensors for food pathogen detection are evident in the food safety/security research community. For practical application with foods that normally h...

  1. Oriented antibodies as versatile detection element in biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to explore orientation of detection elements on biosensor surfaces. To this end, different strategies were combined such as surface chemistry and protein functionalization, with the aim to generate a platform for oriented immobilization of antibodies in biosensors. Chapte

  2. A global benchmark study using affinity-based biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rich, Rebecca L.; Papalia, Giusseppe A.; Krishnamoorthy, Ganeshram; Beusink, Bianca; Pak, Brian J.; Myszka, David G.; more, more

    2009-01-01

    To explore the variability in biosensor studies, 150 participants from 20 countries were given the same protein samples and asked to determine kinetic rate constants for the interaction. We chose a protein system that was amenable to analysis using different biosensor platforms as well as by users o

  3. Translating University Biosensor Research to a High School Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, Caryn L.; Bank, Alex; Turpeinen, Dylan; King, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    The need to increase science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduates is great. To interest more students into STEM degrees, we made our graphene biosensor research portable, inexpensive, and safe to demonstrate technology development to high school students. The students increased their knowledge of biosensors and proteins, and…

  4. Engineering an NADPH/NADP(+) Redox Biosensor in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Pihl, Thomas P B; Pedersen, Kasper R; Jensen, Michael K; Keasling, Jay D

    2016-12-16

    Genetically encoded biosensors have emerged as powerful tools for timely and precise in vivo evaluation of cellular metabolism. In particular, biosensors that can couple intercellular cues with downstream signaling responses are currently attracting major attention within health science and biotechnology. Still, there is a need for bioprospecting and engineering of more biosensors to enable real-time monitoring of specific cellular states and controlling downstream actuation. In this study, we report the engineering and application of a transcription factor-based NADPH/NADP(+) redox biosensor in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using the biosensor, we are able to monitor the cause of oxidative stress by chemical induction, and changes in NADPH/NADP(+) ratios caused by genetic manipulations. Because of the regulatory potential of the biosensor, we also show that the biosensor can actuate upon NADPH deficiency by activation of NADPH regeneration. Finally, we couple the biosensor with an expression of dosage-sensitive genes (DSGs) and thereby create a novel tunable sensor-selector useful for synthetic selection of cells with higher NADPH/NADP(+) ratios from mixed cell populations. We show that the combination of exploitation and rational engineering of native signaling components is applicable for diagnosis, regulation, and selection of cellular redox states.

  5. Recent Development of Nano-Materials Used in DNA Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Ying

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available As knowledge of the structure and function of nucleic acid molecules has increased, sequence-specific DNA detection has gained increased importance. DNA biosensors based on nucleic acid hybridization have been actively developed because of their specificity, speed, portability, and low cost. Recently, there has been considerable interest in using nano-materials for DNA biosensors. Because of their high surface-to-volume ratios and excellent biological compatibilities, nano-materials could be used to increase the amount of DNA immobilization; moreover, DNA bound to nano-materials can maintain its biological activity. Alternatively, signal amplification by labeling a targeted analyte with nano-materials has also been reported for DNA biosensors in many papers. This review summarizes the applications of various nano-materials for DNA biosensors during past five years. We found that nano-materials of small sizes were advantageous as substrates for DNA attachment or as labels for signal amplification; and use of two or more types of nano-materials in the biosensors could improve their overall quality and to overcome the deficiencies of the individual nano-components. Most current DNA biosensors require the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in their protocols. However, further development of nano-materials with smaller size and/or with improved biological and chemical properties would substantially enhance the accuracy, selectivity and sensitivity of DNA biosensors. Thus, DNA biosensors without PCR amplification may become a reality in the foreseeable future.

  6. Bacterium-based NO2- biosensor for environmental applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, M.; Larsen, L.H.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Revsbech, N.P.

    2004-01-01

    A sensitive NO2- biosensor that is based on bacterial reduction of NO2- to N2O and subsequent detection of the N2O by a built-in electrochemical N2O sensor was developed. Four different denitrifying organisms lacking NO3- reductase activity were assessed for use in the biosensor. The relevant physio

  7. Genetically-encoded biosensors for monitoring cellular stress in bioprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzi, Karen M; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2015-02-01

    With the current wealth of transcriptomic data, it is possible to design genetically-encoded biosensors for the detection of stress responses and apply these to high-throughput bioprocess development and monitoring of cellular health. Such biosensors can sense extrinsic factors such as nutrient or oxygen deprivation and shear stress, as well as intrinsic stress factors like oxidative damage and unfolded protein accumulation. Alongside, there have been developments in biosensing hardware and software applicable to the field of genetically-encoded biosensors in the near future. This review discusses the current state-of-the-art in biosensors for monitoring cultures during biological manufacturing and the future challenges for the field. Connecting the individual achievements into a coherent whole will enable the application of genetically-encoded biosensors in industry.

  8. Introduction to biosensors from electric circuits to immunosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    This book equips students with a thorough understanding of various types of sensors and biosensors that can be used for chemical, biological, and biomedical applications, including but not limited to temperature sensors, strain sensor, light sensors, spectrophotometric sensors, pulse oximeter, optical fiber probes, fluorescence sensors, pH sensor, ion-selective electrodes, piezoelectric sensors, glucose sensors, DNA and immunosensors, lab-on-a-chip biosensors, paper-based lab-on-a-chip biosensors, and microcontroller-based sensors. The author treats the study of biosensors with an applications-based approach, including over 15 extensive, hands-on labs given at the end of each chapter. The material is presented using a building-block approach, beginning with the fundamentals of sensor design and temperature sensors, and ending with more complicated biosensors. New to this second edition are sections on op-amp filters, pulse oximetry, meat quality monitoring, advanced fluorescent dyes, autofluorescence, various...

  9. Acetylcholinesterase biosensor for carbaryl detection based on interdigitated array microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhili; Guo, Yemin; Sun, Xia; Cao, Yaoyao; Wang, Xiangyou

    2014-10-01

    In this study, an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor with superior accuracy and sensitivity was successfully developed based on interdigitated array microelectrodes (IAMs). IAMs have a series of parallel microband electrodes with alternating microbands connected together. Chitosan was used as the enzyme immobilization material, and AChE was used as the model enzyme for carbaryl detection to fabricate AChE biosensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used in conjunction with the fabricated biosensor to detect pesticide residues. Based on the inhibition of pesticides on the AChE activity, using carbaryl as model compounds, the biosensor exhibited a wide range, low detection limit, and high stability. Moreover, the biosensor can also be used as a new promising tool for pesticide residue analysis.

  10. Android integrated urea biosensor for public health awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranali P. Naik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Integration of a biosensor with a wireless network on the Android 4.2.1 (Jelly Bean platform has been demonstrated. The present study reports an android integrated user friendly Flow injection analysis-Enzyme thermistor (FIA-ET urea biosensor system. This android-integrated biosensor system will facilitate enhanced consumer health and awareness alongside abridging the gap between the food testing laboratory and the concerned higher authorities. Data received from a flow injection mode urea biosensor has been exploited as an integration point among the analyst, the food consumer and the responsible higher authorities. Using the urea biosensor as an example, an alarm system has also been demonstrated both graphically and through text message on a mobile handset. The presented sensor integrated android system will also facilitate decision making support system in various fields of food quality monitoring and clinical analysis.

  11. Silicon Photonic Biosensors for Lab-on-a-Chip Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Lechuga

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, we have witnessed a remarkable progress in the development of biosensor devices and their application in areas such as environmental monitoring, biotechnology, medical diagnostics, drug screening, food safety, and security, among others. The technology of optical biosensors has reached a high degree of maturity and several commercial products are on the market. But problems of stability, sensitivity, and size have prevented the general use of optical biosensors for real field applications. Integrated photonic biosensors based on silicon technology could solve such drawbacks, offering early diagnostic tools with better sensitivity, specificity, and reliability, which could improve the effectiveness of in-vivo and in-vitro diagnostics. Our last developments in silicon photonic biosensors will be showed, mainly related to the development of portable and highly sensitive integrated photonic sensing platforms.

  12. Introduction to Biosensors From Electric Circuits to Immunosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2013-01-01

    Introduction to Biosensors: From Electric Circuits to Immunosensors discusses underlying circuitry of sensors for biomedical and biological engineers as well as biomedical sensing modalities for electrical engineers while providing an applications-based approach to the study of biosensors with over 13 extensive, hands-on labs. The material is presented using a building-block approach, beginning with the fundamentals of sensor design and temperature sensors and ending with more complicated biosensors. This book also: Provides electrical engineers with the specific knowledge they need to understand biological sensing modalities Provides biomedical engineers with a solid background in circuits and systems Includes complete coverage of temperature sensors, electrochemical sensors, DNA and immunosensors, piezoelectric sensors and immunosensing in a micofluidic device Introduction to Biosensors: From Electric Circuits to Immunosensors aims to provide an interdisciplinary approach to biosensors that will be apprecia...

  13. Biosensors for environmental monitoring of endocrine disruptors: a review article

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Lopez de Alda, Maria J.; Barcelo, Damia [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, C/ Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034, Barcelona (Spain); Marco, Maria-Pilar [Department of Biological Organic Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, C/ Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034, Barcelona (Spain)

    2004-02-01

    This article provides an overview of the applications of biosensors in analysis and monitoring of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the environment. Special attention is devoted to the various types of physical-chemical signal transduction elements, biological mechanisms employed as sensing elements and techniques used for immobilisation of the bioreceptor molecules on the transducer surface. Two different classes of biosensors for EDCs are considered: biosensors that measure endocrine-disrupting effects, and biosensors that respond to the presence of a specific substance (or group of substances) based on the specific recognition of a biomolecule. Several examples of them are presented to illustrate the power of the biosensor technology for environmental applications. Future trends in the development of new, more advanced devices are also outlined. (orig.)

  14. Electrochemical uranyl cation biosensor with DNA oligonucleotides as receptor layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarczewska, Marta; Ziółkowski, Robert; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-04-01

    The present study aims at the further development of the uranyl oligonucleotide-based voltammetric biosensor, which takes advantage of strong interaction between UO2(2+) and phosphate DNA backbone. Herein we report the optimization of working parameters of previously elaborated electrochemical DNA biosensor. It is shown that the sensor sensitivity is highly dependent on the oligonucleotide probe length and the incubation time of sensor in a sample solution. Consequently, the highest sensitivity was obtained for 10-nucleotide sequence and 60 min incubation time. The lower detection limit towards uranyl cation for developed biosensor was 30 nM. The influence of mixed monolayers and the possibility of developing a non-calibration device were also investigated. The selectivity of the proposed biosensor was significantly improved via elimination of adenine nucleobases from the DNA probe. Moreover, the regeneration procedure was elaborated and tested to prolong the use of the same biosensor for 4 subsequent determinations of UO2(2+).

  15. Biosensor method and system based on feature vector extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Elias [Knoxville, TN; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Qi, Hairong [Knoxville, TN; Wang, Xiaoling [San Jose, CA

    2012-04-17

    A method of biosensor-based detection of toxins comprises the steps of providing at least one time-dependent control signal generated by a biosensor in a gas or liquid medium, and obtaining a time-dependent biosensor signal from the biosensor in the gas or liquid medium to be monitored or analyzed for the presence of one or more toxins selected from chemical, biological or radiological agents. The time-dependent biosensor signal is processed to obtain a plurality of feature vectors using at least one of amplitude statistics and a time-frequency analysis. At least one parameter relating to toxicity of the gas or liquid medium is then determined from the feature vectors based on reference to the control signal.

  16. Review of Micro/Nanotechnologies for Microbial Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Won eLim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A microbial biosensor is an analytical device with a biologically integrated transducer that generates a measurable signal indicating the analyte concentration. This method is ideally suited for the analysis of extracellular chemicals and the environment, and for metabolic sensory-regulation. Although microbial biosensors show promise for application in various detection fields, some limitations still remain such as poor selectivity, low sensitivity, and impractical portability. To overcome such limitations, microbial biosensors have been integrated with many recently developed micro/nanotechnologies and applied to a wide range of detection purposes. This review article discusses micro/nanotechnologies that have been integrated with microbial biosensors and summarizes recent advances and the applications achieved through such novel integration. Future perspectives on the combination of micro/nanotechnologies and microbial biosensors will be discussed, and the necessary developments and improvements will be strategically deliberated.

  17. Large Scale Bacterial Colony Screening of Diversified FRET Biosensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Litzlbauer

    Full Text Available Biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET between fluorescent protein mutants have started to revolutionize physiology and biochemistry. However, many types of FRET biosensors show relatively small FRET changes, making measurements with these probes challenging when used under sub-optimal experimental conditions. Thus, a major effort in the field currently lies in designing new optimization strategies for these types of sensors. Here we describe procedures for optimizing FRET changes by large scale screening of mutant biosensor libraries in bacterial colonies. We describe optimization of biosensor expression, permeabilization of bacteria, software tools for analysis, and screening conditions. The procedures reported here may help in improving FRET changes in multiple suitable classes of biosensors.

  18. Current Trends in Nanomaterial-Based Amperometric Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar Hayat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed an intensive research effort in the field of electrochemical sensors, with a particular focus on the design of amperometric biosensors for diverse analytical applications. In this context, nanomaterial integration in the construction of amperometric biosensors may constitute one of the most exciting approaches. The attractive properties of nanomaterials have paved the way for the design of a wide variety of biosensors based on various electrochemical detection methods to enhance the analytical characteristics. However, most of these nanostructured materials are not explored in the design of amperometric biosensors. This review aims to provide insight into the diverse properties of nanomaterials that can be possibly explored in the construction of amperometric biosensors.

  19. Electrochemical Affinity Biosensors in Food Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Campuzano

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Safety and quality are key issues of today’s food industry. Since the food chain is becoming more and more complex, powerful analytical methods are required to verify the performance of food safety and quality systems. Indeed, such methods require high sensitivity, selectivity, ability for rapid implementation and capability of automatic screening. Electroanalytical chemistry has, for decades, played a relevant role in food safety and quality assessment, taking more and more significance over time in the solution of analytical problems. At present, the implementation of electrochemical methods in the food is evident. This is in a large part due to the relevant results obtained by combining the attractive advantages of electrochemical transduction strategies (in terms of relatively simple hardware, versatility, interface with automatic logging and feasibility of application outside the laboratory environment with those from biosensors technology. Important examples of enzyme electrochemical biosensors are those dedicated to the determination of glucose, alcohol or cholesterol are important examples. In addition, other types of different electrochemical biosensing approaches have emerged strongly in the last years. Among these, the strategies involving affinity interactions have been shown to possess a large number of applications. Therefore, electrochemical immunosensors and DNA-based biosensors have been widely used to determine major and minor components in foodstuffs, providing sufficient data to evaluate food freshness, the quality of raw materials, or the origin of samples, as well as to determine a variety of compounds at trace levels related to food safety such as micotoxins, allergens, drugs residues or pathogen microorganisms. This review discusses some critical examples of the latest advances in this area, pointing out relevant methodologies related to the measurement techniques, including the use of nanostructured electrodes and

  20. Biosensors for functional food safety and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavecchia, Teresa; Tibuzzi, Arianna; Giardi, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The importance of safety and functionality analysis of foodstuffs and raw materials is supported by national legislations and European Union (EU) directives concerning not only the amount of residues of pollutants and pathogens but also the activity and content of food additives and the health claims stated on their labels. In addition, consumers' awareness of the impact of functional foods' on their well-being and their desire for daily healthcare without the intake pharmaceuticals has immensely in recent years. Within this picture, the availability of fast, reliable, low cost control systems to measure the content and the quality of food additives and nutrients with health claims becomes mandatory, to be used by producers, consumers and the governmental bodies in charge of the legal supervision of such matters. This review aims at describing the most important methods and tools used for food analysis, starting with the classical methods (e.g., gas-chromatography GC, high performance liquid chromatography HPLC) and moving to the use of biosensors-novel biological material-based equipments. Four types of bio-sensors, among others, the novel photosynthetic proteins-based devices which are more promising and common in food analysis applications, are reviewed. A particular highlight on biosensors for the emerging market of functional foods is given and the most widely applied functional components are reviewed with a comprehensive analysis of papers published in the last three years; this report discusses recent trends for sensitive, fast, repeatable and cheap measurements, focused on the detection of vitamins, folate (folic acid), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), fatty acids (in particular Omega 3), phytosterols and phytochemicals. A final market overview emphasizes some practical aspects ofbiosensor applications.

  1. Development of microbial biosensors for food analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukasiak, Justyna

    Microbial biosensors are analytical devices composed of a biological recognition element (microorganism) integrated to a signal transduction element (i.e. bioluminescence), converting a biochemical signal into quantifiable response. Due to their molecular properties they can be diversely designed...... grains. It is a dietary fiber, with potential as a functional food ingredient. In this study, reporter strains targeting specifically L-rhamnose, L-arabinose and Dxylose using three different signal transducers: bioluminescence (luxCDABE), fluorescence (gfp) and ice nucleation (inaZ) were developed...

  2. Biosensors and invasive monitoring in clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Córcoles, Emma P

    2013-01-01

    This volume examines the advances of invasive monitoring by means of biosensors and microdialysis. Physical and physiological parameters are commonly monitored in clinical settings using invasive techniques due to their positive outcome in patients’ diagnosis and treatment. Biochemical parameters, however, still rely on off-line measurements and require large pieces of equipment. Biosensing and sampling devices present excellent capabilities for their use in continuous monitoring of patients’ biochemical parameters. However, certain issues remain to be solved in order to ensure a more widespread use of these techniques in today’s medical practices.

  3. Bacteriophage biosensors for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokulova, Irina; Olsen, Eric; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2014-03-01

    An increasing number of disease-causing bacteria are resistant to one or more anti-bacterial drugs utilized for therapy. Early and speedy detection of these pathogens is therefore very important. Traditional pathogen detection techniques, that include microbiological and biochemical assays are long and labor-intensive, while antibody or DNA-based methods require substantial sample preparation and purification. Biosensors based on bacteriophages have demonstrated remarkable potential to surmount these restrictions and to offer rapid, efficient and sensitive detection technique for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  4. Surface Patterning and Nanowire Biosensor Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    submicron feature sizes, varying linearly in size with laser power and irradiation time. In Part II - “Nanoscale Biosensors” - Indium Arsenide (InAs) nanowires (NW) incorporated in field effect transistor (FET) devices provide a sensitive platform for detection of charged analyte species binding to the NW...... surface. A central limitation to this biosensor principle is the screening of analyte charge by mobile ions in electrolytes with physiological ionic strength. To overcome this problem, we propose to use as capture agents proteins which undergo large conformational changes. Using structure based protein...

  5. Assembling Amperometric Biosensors for Clinical Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Marina Lagier

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Clinical diagnosis and disease prevention routinely require the assessment ofspecies determined by chemical analysis. Biosensor technology offers several benefits overconventional diagnostic analysis. They include simplicity of use, specificity for the targetanalyte, speed to arise to a result, capability for continuous monitoring and multiplexing,together with the potentiality of coupling to low-cost, portable instrumentation. This workfocuses on the basic lines of decisions when designing electron-transfer-based biosensorsfor clinical analysis, with emphasis on the strategies currently used to improve the deviceperformance, the present status of amperometric electrodes for biomedicine, and the trendsand challenges envisaged for the near future.

  6. Construction and characterization of novel stress-responsive Deinococcal biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Min Ho; Lim, Sang Youg

    2012-01-15

    In this research, we constructed a recombinant whole-cell biosensor to detect mutagens (H2O2, mitomycin C, MNNG, bleomycin) using Deinococcus radiodurans and evaluated its possibility for actual application. We performed DNA microarray analysis and selected 10 candidate genes for biosensor recombinant plasmid construction. The expression of ddrA, ddrB, DR{sub 0}161, DR{sub 0}589, and pprA was highly increased after treatment of the target mutagens. Putative promoter region of the genes were used for LacZ-based biosensor plasmid construction by replacing groESL promoter of pRADZ3. Pormoter activity and specificity of the five recombinant LacZ-based biosensor strains harboring the recombinant plasmids was measured. The result indicated that the promoter region of ddrA is the most suitable promoter for the biosensor development. Red pigment-based biosensor plasmid was constructed by displacing lacZ with crtI. The sensor strain was constructed by transforming the sensor plasmid into crtI deleted mutant D. radiodurans strain. Finally, macroscopic detection of the target mutagens by the biosensor strain was evaluated. The strength of red pigment biosynthesis by this recombinant strain in response to the target mutagens was weaker than our expectation. Continuous damage to the sensor strain by the mutagens in the medium might be the main reason for this low red-pigment biosynthesis. Therefore, we propose that the LacZ-based biosensor is more effective than the biosensor using red pigment as indicator for the mutagen detection.

  7. Optimization of printing techniques for electrochemical biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuddin, Ahmad Anwar; Mansor, Ahmad Fairuzabadi Mohd; Rahim, Rosminazuin Ab; Nordin, Anis Nurashikin

    2017-03-01

    Electrochemical biosensors show great promise for point-of-care applications due to their low cost, portability and compatibility with microfluidics. The miniature size of these sensors provides advantages in terms of sensitivity, specificity and allows them to be mass produced in arrays. The most reliable fabrication technique for these sensors is lithography followed by metal deposition using sputtering or chemical vapor deposition techniques. This technique which is usually done in the cleanroom requires expensive masking followed by deposition. Recently, cheaper printing techniques such as screen-printing and ink-jet printing have become popular due to its low cost, ease of fabrication and mask-less method. In this paper, two different printing techniques namely inkjet and screen printing are demonstrated for an electrochemical biosensor. For ink-jet printing technique, optimization of key printing parameters, such as pulse voltages, drop spacing and waveform setting, in-house temperature and cure annealing for obtaining the high quality droplets, are discussed. These factors are compared with screen-printing parameters such as mesh size, emulsion thickness, minimum spacing of lines and curing times. The reliability and reproducibility of the sensors are evaluated using scotch tape test, resistivity and profile-meter measurements. It was found that inkjet printing is superior because it is mask-less, has minimum resolution of 100 µm compared to 200 µm for screen printing and higher reproducibility rate of 90% compared to 78% for screen printing.

  8. Antibody Fragments as Probe in Biosensor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Muyldermans

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Today’s proteomic analyses are generating increasing numbers of biomarkers, making it essential to possess highly specific probes able to recognize those targets. Antibodies are considered to be the first choice as molecular recognition units due to their target specificity and affinity, which make them excellent probes in biosensor development. However several problems such as difficult directional immobilization, unstable behavior, loss of specificity and steric hindrance, may arise from using these large molecules. Luckily, protein engineering techniques offer designed antibody formats suitable for biomarker analysis. Minimization strategies of antibodies into Fab fragments, scFv or even single-domain antibody fragments like VH, VL or VHHs are reviewed. Not only the size of the probe but also other issues like choice of immobilization tag, type of solid support and probe stability are of critical importance in assay development for biosensing. In this respect, multiple approaches to specifically orient and couple antibody fragments in a generic one-step procedure directly on a biosensor substrate are discussed.

  9. Development of a glucose binding protein biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweik, M.; Milanick, M.; Grant, S.

    2007-09-01

    Glucose binding protein (GBP) is a monomeric periplasmic protein. It is synthesized in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli which functions as a receptor for transport D-glucose. GBP binds glucose with high affinity. The binding mechanism is based on a hinge motion due to the protein conformational change. This change was utilized as an optical sensing mechanism by applying Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). The wild-type GBP lacks cysteine in its structure, but by introducing a single cysteine at a specific site by site-directed mutagenesis, this ensured single-label attachment at specific sites with a fluorescent probe. The other sites were amino sites, which were labeled with second fluorophore. The near IR FRET pair, Alexa Fluor 680 (AF680) and Alexa Fluor 750(AF750), was utilized. The AF680 targeted the amine sites, which was the donor fluorophore, while the AF750 labeled the single cysteine site, which was the acceptor fluorophore. The sensing system strategy was based on the fluorescence changes of the probe as the protein undergoes a structural change upon binding. This biosensor had the ability to detect down to 10 uM concentrations of glucose. Next the probes were uploaded into red blood cells via hypo osmotic dialysis. The sensor responded to glucose while encapsulated with the red cells. These results showed the feasibility of an intracellular glucose biosensor.

  10. Development of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Agmatine Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Gilbertsen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Agmatine, decarboxylated arginine, is an important intermediary in polyamine production for many prokaryotes, but serves higher functions in eukaryotes such as nitric oxide inhibition and roles in neurotransmission. Pseudomonas aeruginosa relies on the arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase pathways to convert arginine into putrescine. One of the two known agmatine deiminase operons, aguBA, contains an agmatine sensitive TetR promoter controlled by AguR. We have discovered that this promoter element can produce a titratable induction of its gene products in response to agmatine, and utilized this discovery to make a luminescent agmatine biosensor in P. aeruginosa. The genome of the P. aeruginosa lab strain UCBPP-PA14 was altered to remove both its ability to synthesize or destroy agmatine, and insertion of the luminescent reporter construct allows it to produce light in proportion to the amount of exogenous agmatine applied from ~100 nM to 1mM. Furthermore it does not respond to related compounds including arginine or putrescine. To demonstrate potential applications the biosensor was used to detect agmatine in spent supernatants, to monitor the development of arginine decarboxylase over time, and to detect agmatine in the spinal cords of live mice.

  11. A biosensor system using nickel ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prachi; Rathore, Deepshikha

    2016-05-01

    NiFe2O4 ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method and the structural characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction technique, where single cubic phase formation of nanoparticles was confirmed. The average particle size of NiFe2O4 was found to be 4.9 nm. Nanoscale magnetic materials are an important source of labels for biosensing due to their strong magnetic properties which are not found in biological systems. This property of the material was exploited and the fabrication of the NiFe2O4 nanoparticle based biosensor was done in the form of a capacitor system, with NiFe2O4 as the dielectric material. The biosensor system was tested towards different biological materials with the help of electrochemical workstation and the same was analysed through Cole-Cole plot of NiFe2O4. The performance of the sensor was determined based on its sensitivity, response time and recovery time.

  12. Development of a functionalized Xenon biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, Megan M.; Ruiz, E. Janette; Rubin, Seth M.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Winssinger, Nicolas; Schultz, Peter G.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-03-25

    NMR-based biosensors that utilize laser-polarized xenon offer potential advantages beyond current sensing technologies. These advantages include the capacity to simultaneously detect multiple analytes, the applicability to in vivo spectroscopy and imaging, and the possibility of remote amplified detection. Here we present a detailed NMR characterization of the binding of a biotin-derivatized caged-xenon sensor to avidin. Binding of functionalized xenon to avidin leads to a change in the chemical shift of the encapsulated xenon in addition to a broadening of the resonance, both of which serve as NMR markers of ligand-target interaction. A control experiment in which the biotin-binding site of avidin was blocked with native biotin showed no such spectral changes, confirming that only specific binding, rather than nonspecific contact, between avidin and functionalized xenon leads to the effects on the xenon NMR spectrum. The exchange rate of xenon (between solution and cage) and the xenon spin-lattice relaxation rate were not changed significantly upon binding. We describe two methods for enhancing the signal from functionalized xenon by exploiting the laser-polarized xenon magnetization reservoir. We also show that the xenon chemical shifts are distinct for xenon encapsulated in different diastereomeric cage molecules. This demonstrates the potential for tuning the encapsulated xenon chemical shift, which is a key requirement for being able to multiplex the biosensor.

  13. Liquid crystal interfaces: Experiments, simulations and biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Piotr

    Interfacial phenomena are ubiquitous and extremely important in various aspects of biological and industrial processes. For example, many liquid crystal applications start by alignment with a surface. The underlying mechanisms of the molecular organization of liquid crystals at an interface are still under intensive study and continue to be important to the display industry in order to develop better and/or new display technology. My dissertation research has been devoted to studying how complex liquid crystals can be guided to organize at an interface, and to using my findings to develop practical applications. Specifically, I have been working on developing biosensors using liquid-crystal/surfactant/lipid/protein interactions as well as the alignment of low-symmetry liquid crystals for potential new display and optomechanical applications. The biotechnology industry needs better ways of sensing biomaterials and identifying various nanoscale events at biological interfaces and in aqueous solutions. Sensors in which the recognition material is a liquid crystal naturally connects the existing knowledge and experience of the display and biotechnology industries together with surface and soft matter sciences. This dissertation thus mainly focuses on the delicate phenomena that happen at liquid interfaces. In the introduction, I start by defining the interface and discuss its structure and the relevant interfacial forces. I then introduce the general characteristics of biosensors and, in particular, describe the design of biosensors that employ liquid crystal/aqueous solution interfaces. I further describe the basic properties of liquid crystal materials that are relevant for liquid crystal-based biosensing applications. In CHAPTER 2, I describe the simulation methods and experimental techniques used in this dissertation. In CHAPTER 3 and CHAPTER 4, I present my computer simulation work. CHAPTER 3 presents insight of how liquid crystal molecules are aligned by

  14. Deep-probe metal-clad waveguide biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skivesen, Nina; Horvath, Robert; Thinggaard, S.

    2007-01-01

    Two types of metal-clad waveguide biosensors, so-called dip-type and peak-type, are analyzed and tested. Their performances are benchmarked against the well-known surface-plasmon resonance biosensor, showing improved probe characteristics for adlayer thicknesses above 150-200 nm. The dip-type metal......-clad waveguide sensor is shown to be the best all-round alternative to the surface-plasmon resonance biosensor. Both metal-clad waveguides are tested experimentally for cell detection, showing a detection linut of 8-9 cells/mm(2). (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  15. Development of biosensors and their application in metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jie; Jensen, Michael Krogh; Keasling, Jay

    2015-01-01

    for the desired phenotypes. However, methods available for microbial genome diversification far exceed our ability to screen and select for those variants with optimal performance. Genetically encoded biosensors have shown the potential to address this gap, given their ability to respond to small molecule binding...... and ease of implementation with high-throughput analysis. Here we describe recent progress in biosensor development and their applications in a metabolic engineering context. We also highlight examples of how biosensors can be integrated with synthetic circuits to exert feedback regulation...

  16. Cell-based biosensors: Towards the development of cellular monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Cell-based biosensors (CBBs), a research hotspot of biosensors, which treat living cells as sensing elements, can detect the functional information of biologically active analytes. They characterize with high sensitivity, excellent selectivity and rapid response, and have been applied in many fields, such as biomedicine, environmental monitoring and pharmaceutical screening. Recently cell-cultured technology, silicon microfabrication technology and genetic technology have promoted exploration of CBBs dramatically. To elucidate the novel research findings and applications of cell- based biosensors, this paper summarizes various research approaches, presents some challenges and proposes the research trends.

  17. Static sensitivity calculation of a novel fiber optic biosensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongchen Bai; Shuijie Qin; Jing Li; Dashun Huang; Xin Zhang

    2008-01-01

    A novel structure of fiber optic biosensor and its principle are introduced. The sample is detected in microchannels of several microns diameter in fiber optic biosensors. The relation between the optic fiber tapered angle and the fluorescence incident angle is calculated in signal receiving part. As the sensor is a zero-order system, calculating formula of the static sensitivity is derived. When ZnSe nano-crystalline cluster is used for marking the molecules, the static sensitivity for fiber optic biosensors is calculated. At the same time, the relation between the static sensitivity and the ratio of exciting wavelength to fluorescence wavelength is presented.

  18. CMOS Electrochemical Instrumentation for Biosensor Microsystems: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Xiaowen; Li, Lin; Mu, Xiaoyi; Genov, Roman; Mason, Andrew J

    2016-12-31

    Modern biosensors play a critical role in healthcare and have a quickly growing commercial market. Compared to traditional optical-based sensing, electrochemical biosensors are attractive due to superior performance in response time, cost, complexity and potential for miniaturization. To address the shortcomings of traditional benchtop electrochemical instruments, in recent years, many complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) instrumentation circuits have been reported for electrochemical biosensors. This paper provides a review and analysis of CMOS electrochemical instrumentation circuits. First, important concepts in electrochemical sensing are presented from an instrumentation point of view. Then, electrochemical instrumentation circuits are organized into functional classes, and reported CMOS circuits are reviewed and analyzed to illuminate design options and performance tradeoffs. Finally, recent trends and challenges toward on-CMOS sensor integration that could enable highly miniaturized electrochemical biosensor microsystems are discussed. The information in the paper can guide next generation electrochemical sensor design.

  19. Biosensor Urea Berbasis Biopolimer Khitin Sebagai Matriks Immobilisasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazruddin Nazaruddin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian tentang biosensor urea menggunakan biopolimer khitin sebagai matriks immobilisasi telah dilakukan. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui kinerja biosensor yang dihasilkan yang meliputi sensitivitas, trayek pengukuran, limit deteksi, waktu respon, koefisien selektifitas, dan waktu hidup. Penelitian meliputi beberapa tahap yaitu pembuatan membran polimer khitin dan immobilisasi enzim urease, pelekatan membran khitin pada elektroda pH, dan pengukuran parameter kinerja elektroda. Hasil pengukuran menunjukkan sensitivitas biosensor urea berbasis membran khitin adalah 19,11 mV/dekade, trayek pengukuran 10-4 – 10-8 M, limit deteksi 10-8 M, waktu respon 3,10–6,02 menit, dengan urutan kekuatan ion penggangu: NH4Cl > NaCl > CH3COONa > campuran garam > KCl > CaCl2 > asam askorbat. Kata kunci: biosensor, immobilisasi, khitin, urea

  20. Research on optical biosensor with up-converting phosphor marker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongkai Zhao; Xiangzhao Wang; Lei Zhou; Jing Wang; Lihua Huang; Zhongqiang Yan; Huijie Huang; Ruifu Yang; Lei Liu; Bingqiang Ren

    2006-01-01

    @@ An optical biosensor with up-converting phosphor (UCP) marker is developed for the sensitive rapid immunoassay to the specific biomolecule. UCP can emit visible light when excited by infrared light.

  1. CMOS Electrochemical Instrumentation for Biosensor Microsystems: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Xiaowen; Li, Lin; Mu, Xiaoyi; Genov, Roman; Mason, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Modern biosensors play a critical role in healthcare and have a quickly growing commercial market. Compared to traditional optical-based sensing, electrochemical biosensors are attractive due to superior performance in response time, cost, complexity and potential for miniaturization. To address the shortcomings of traditional benchtop electrochemical instruments, in recent years, many complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) instrumentation circuits have been reported for electrochemical biosensors. This paper provides a review and analysis of CMOS electrochemical instrumentation circuits. First, important concepts in electrochemical sensing are presented from an instrumentation point of view. Then, electrochemical instrumentation circuits are organized into functional classes, and reported CMOS circuits are reviewed and analyzed to illuminate design options and performance tradeoffs. Finally, recent trends and challenges toward on-CMOS sensor integration that could enable highly miniaturized electrochemical biosensor microsystems are discussed. The information in the paper can guide next generation electrochemical sensor design. PMID:28042860

  2. Cantilever-Based Microwave Biosensors: Analysis, Designs and Optimizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Chenhui; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Jónasson, Sævar Þór;

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel microwave readout scheme for measuring deflection of cantilevers in nanometer range. The cantilever deflection can be sensed by the variation of transmission levels or resonant frequencies of microwave signals. The sensitivity of the cantilever biosensor based on LC...... resonators is at first theoretically analyzed. A LC resonator based biosensor with beams is designed and optimized by using 3D electromagnetic (EM) simulations, where the beam is a typical variation of cantilevers. The sensitivity of the lossless biosensor is predicted as 4.6MHz/nm. The 3-dB bandwidths...... of the resonances are narrowed for improving the resolution of distinguishing resonances by reducing conductive loss of electrodes. The lossy biosensor can achieve the highest sensitivity as 5.6 MHz/nm and narrowest 3-dB bandwidth as 5 GHz....

  3. Indium Tin Oxide-Polyaniline Biosensor: Fabrication and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Grooms

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel indium tin oxide (ITO-polyaniline (Pani biosensor wasdesigned, fabricated, and characterized. Initial testing was conducted for the detection ofbovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV. The biosensor design was based upon the specific natureof antibodies to capture the target virus, and the conductive properties of self-doped Pani totranslate the antibody-antigen binding into a quantifying signal. The first part of the study wasto assess the feasibility of the self-doped Pani to be incorporated into the biosensor design byevaluating its several parameters, such as conductivity, physical structure, thermogravimetricproperties, and antibody-binding properties. The second part of the paper highlights thefabrication of the ITO-Pani biosensor to detect the presence of bovine viral diarrhea virus(BVDV in pure culture. Although only BVDV culture was tested in this study, the biosensoris versatile for the detection of other pathogen of interest by changing the specificity of theantibodies.

  4. An Electropolymerized Membrane Biosensor for Specific DNA Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG,Tu-Zhi(彭图治); CHENG,Qiong(程琼); YANG,F.Catherine

    2002-01-01

    A sensitive electrochemical biosensor for detecting the sequence of short DNA oligomers is represented. The biosensor is based on a platinum electrode covered a polymerized membrane of conductive monomer N-[6-(thien-3-yl) acetoxy]-pyrrolidine-2,5-dione (TAPD). The membrane of TAPD immobilizes a probe DNA on the electrode. The hybridization of the probe with a sequence-specific DNA in sample solutions is monitored by a self-synthesized electroactive indicator, which specifically intercalates in the hybrids on the electrode surface. The current signal of the biosensor is proportional to the concentration of the target DNA in samples, and a very low detection limit of 5 ×10-10 mol/L is found. The biosensor has been used to detect the short oligomers containing of HIV-1 and mycobacterrium nucleotide sequences.

  5. Highly sensitive biosensors based on water-soluble conjugated polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hui; WU Haiping; FAN Chunhai; LI Wenxin; ZHANG Zhizhou; HE Lin

    2004-01-01

    Conjugated, conductive polymers are a kind of important organic macromolecules, which has found applications in a variety of areas. The application of conjugated polymers in developing fluorescent biosensors represents the merge of polymer sciences and biological sciences. Conjugated polymers are very good light harvesters as well as fluorescent polymers, and they are also "molecular wires". Through elaborate designs, these important features, i.e. efficient light harvesting and electron/energy transfer, can be used as signal amplification in fluorescent biosensors. This might significantly improve the sensitivity of conjugated polymer-based biosensors. In this article, we reviewed the application of conjugated polymers, via either electron transfer or energy transfer, to detections of gene targets, antibodies or enzymes. We also reviewed recent efforts in conjugated polymer-based solid-state sensor designs as well as chip-based multiple target detection. Possible directions in this conjugated polymer-based biosensor area are also discussed.

  6. An Electropolymerized Membrane Biosensor for Speciffic DNA Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG,Tu-Zhi; CHENG,Qiong; 等

    2002-01-01

    A sensitive electrochemical biosensor for detecting the sequence of short DNA oligomers is represented.The biosensor is based on a platinum electrode covered a polymerized membrane of conductive monomer N-[6-(thien-3-yl)acetoxy]-pyrrolidine-2,5-dione(TAPD).The membrane of TAPD immobilizes a probe DNA on the electrode.The hybridization of the probe with a sequence-specific DNA in sample solutions is monitored by a self-synthesized electroactive indicator,which specifically intercalates in the hybrids on the electrode surface.The current signal of the biosensor is proportional to the concentration of the target DNA in samples,and a very low detection limit of 5×10-10mol/L is found.The biosensor has been used to detect the short oligomers containing of HIV-1 and mycobacterrium mucleotide sequences.

  7. BIOSENSORS: A SENSITIVE STRATEGY TO DETECT GLUCOSE IN BODY FLUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riddhi Patel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades diabetes is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in the world, thus inventing glucose biosensors with accurate continuous monitoring is of growing concern amongst the scientists worldwide. This manuscript reviews the development of glucose biosensors over the last 50 years since the invention of the first glucose sensing electrode and various approaches considered to develop accurate and modern techniques of glucose sensing. This review provides brief introduction to principles of various glucose biosensors with systemization and classification of glucose monitoring principles. Thus the main aim of this manuscript is to check history of glucose biosensors, comment on their current status and commercial aspects, and examine future challenges.

  8. Biosensor Arrays for Estimating Molecular Concentration in Fluid Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Abolfath-Beygi, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    This paper constructs dynamical models and estimation algorithms for the concentration of target molecules in a fluid flow using an array of novel biosensors. Each biosensor is constructed out of protein molecules embedded in a synthetic cell membrane. The concentration evolves according to an advection-diffusion partial differential equation which is coupled with chemical reaction equations on the biosensor surface. By using averaging theory methods and the divergence theorem, an approximate model is constructed that describes the asymptotic behaviour of the concentration as a system of ordinary differential equations. The estimate of target molecules is then obtained by solving a nonlinear least squares problem. It is shown that the estimator is strongly consistent and asymptotically normal. An explicit expression is obtained for the asymptotic variance of the estimation error. As an example, the results are illustrated for a novel biosensor built out of protein molecules.

  9. CMOS Electrochemical Instrumentation for Biosensor Microsystems: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern biosensors play a critical role in healthcare and have a quickly growing commercial market. Compared to traditional optical-based sensing, electrochemical biosensors are attractive due to superior performance in response time, cost, complexity and potential for miniaturization. To address the shortcomings of traditional benchtop electrochemical instruments, in recent years, many complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS instrumentation circuits have been reported for electrochemical biosensors. This paper provides a review and analysis of CMOS electrochemical instrumentation circuits. First, important concepts in electrochemical sensing are presented from an instrumentation point of view. Then, electrochemical instrumentation circuits are organized into functional classes, and reported CMOS circuits are reviewed and analyzed to illuminate design options and performance tradeoffs. Finally, recent trends and challenges toward on-CMOS sensor integration that could enable highly miniaturized electrochemical biosensor microsystems are discussed. The information in the paper can guide next generation electrochemical sensor design.

  10. Cryptophane-Folate Biosensor for 129Xe NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    2005) Head- to-tail peptide cyclodimerization by copper -catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. Engl. 44, 2215−2220. (55...cryptophane biosensor was synthesized in 20 nonlinear steps, which included functionalization with folate recognition moiety, solubilizing peptide , and...carbonic anhydrases I or II.36 Another example included a peptide - labeled 129Xe biosensor by Schlundt et al. that produced a 1 ppm downfield shift upon

  11. Last Advances in Silicon-Based Optical Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Gavela, Adrián; Grajales García, Daniel; Ramirez, Jhonattan C; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-02-24

    We review the most important achievements published in the last five years in the field of silicon-based optical biosensors. We focus specially on label-free optical biosensors and their implementation into lab-on-a-chip platforms, with an emphasis on developments demonstrating the capability of the devices for real bioanalytical applications. We report on novel transducers and materials, improvements of existing transducers, new and improved biofunctionalization procedures as well as the prospects for near future commercialization of these technologies.

  12. Biosensor Regeneration: A Review of Common Techniques and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, J A; Rushworth, J V H; Millner, P A

    2015-06-16

    Biosensors are ideally portable, low-cost tools for the rapid detection of pathogens, proteins, and other analytes. The global biosensor market is currently worth over 10 billion dollars annually and is a burgeoning field of interdisciplinary research that is hailed as a potential revolution in consumer, healthcare, and industrial testing. A key barrier to the widespread adoption of biosensors, however, is their cost. Although many systems have been validated in the laboratory setting and biosensors for a range of analytes are proven at the concept level, many have yet to make a strong commercial case for their acceptance. Though it is true with the development of cheaper electrodes, circuits, and components that there is a downward pressure on costs, there is also an emerging trend toward the development of multianalyte biosensors that is pushing in the other direction. One way to reduce the cost that is suitable for certain systems is to enable their reuse, thus reducing the cost per test. Regenerating biosensors is a technique that can often be used in conjunction with existing systems in order to reduce costs and accelerate the commercialization process. This article discusses the merits and drawbacks of regeneration schemes that have been proven in various biosensor systems and indicates parameters for successful regeneration based on a systematic review of the literature. It also outlines some of the difficulties encountered when considering the role of regeneration at the point of use. A brief meta-analysis has been included in this review to develop a working definition for biosensor regeneration, and using this analysis only ∼60% of the reported studies analyzed were deemed a success. This highlights the variation within the field and the need to normalize regeneration as a standard process across the field by establishing a consensus term.

  13. Ring-Interferometric Sol-Gel Bio-Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearman, Gregory (Inventor); Cohen, David (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A biosensor embodying the invention includes a sensing volume having an array of pores sized for immobilizing a first biological entity tending to bind to a second biological entity in such a manner as to change an index of refraction of the sensing volume. The biosensor further includes a ring interferometer, one volumetric section of the ring interferometer being the sensing volume, a laser for supplying light to the ring interferometer, and a photodetector for receiving light from the interferometer.

  14. Enzyme-based electrochemical biosensors for food safety: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Harish; Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Harish Kumar, Rani Neelam Electrochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa, Haryana, India Abstract: In recent years, food storage environment safety has been a major concern for food and health scientists. There is growing interest in electrochemical biosensors due to their high sensitivity and rapid response. The aim of this review article is to provide details regarding the development of enzyme-based electrochemical biosensors, and their use in t...

  15. A Conductometric Indium Oxide Semiconducting Nanoparticle Enzymatic Biosensor Array

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    We report a conductometric nanoparticle biosensor array to address the significant variation of electrical property in nanomaterial biosensors due to the random network nature of nanoparticle thin-film. Indium oxide and silica nanoparticles (SNP) are assembled selectively on the multi-site channel area of the resistors using layer-by-layer self-assembly. To demonstrate enzymatic biosensing capability, glucose oxidase is immobilized on the SNP layer for glucose detection. The packaged sensor c...

  16. Recent Progress in Electrochemical Biosensors for Glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uichi Akiba

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This review provides an overview of recent progress in the development of electrochemical biosensors for glycoproteins. Electrochemical glycoprotein sensors are constructed by combining metal and carbon electrodes with glycoprotein-selective binding elements including antibodies, lectin, phenylboronic acid and molecularly imprinted polymers. A recent trend in the preparation of glycoprotein sensors is the successful use of nanomaterials such as graphene, carbon nanotube, and metal nanoparticles. These nanomaterials are extremely useful for improving the sensitivity of glycoprotein sensors. This review focuses mainly on the protocols for the preparation of glycoprotein sensors and the materials used. Recent improvements in glycoprotein sensors are discussed by grouping the sensors into several categories based on the materials used as recognition elements.

  17. Fiber optic biosensor of immobilized firefly luciferase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡谨; 吉鑫松; 等

    2002-01-01

    Luciferase from firefly lantern extract was immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B,The kinetic properties of immobilized luciferase were extensively studied.The Km' for D-luciferin is 11.9umol/L,the optimum pH and temperature for Sepharose-bound enzyme were 7.8 and 25℃ respectively.A luminescence fiber optic biosensor,making use of immobilized crude luciferase was developed for assay of ATP.The peak light intensity was linear with respect to ATP concentration in range of 10-9-10-5mol/L.A biological application was also demonstrated with the determination of serum ATP from rats bred in low versus normal oxygen environments.

  18. Fiber optic biosensor of immobilized firefly luciferase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡谨; 孟文芳; 吉鑫松

    2002-01-01

    Luciferase from firefly lantern extract was immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. The kinetic properties of immobilized luciferase were extensively studied. The Km′ for D-luciferin is 11.9 μmol/L, the optimum pH and temperature for Sepharose-bound enzyme were 7.8 and 25℃ respectively. A luminescence fiber optic biosensor, making use of immobilized crude luciferase, was developed for assay of ATP. The peak light intensity was linear with respect to ATP concentration in range of 10-9-10-5 mol/L. A biological application was also demonstrated with the determination of serum ATP from rats bred in low versus normal oxygen environments.

  19. Surface plasmon enhanced effects in photonic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wu

    We have developed a novel design of multi-pass surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor with differential phase interrogation based on multi-pass interferometry. This new configuration provides an intrinsic phase amplification effect of over two-fold by placing the SPR sensor head in a signal arm of the interferometer so that the interrogating optical beam will traverse the sensor surface infinite number of times. Experimental interferometers based on the Michelson and Fabry-Perot configurations have been employed to experimentally verify this amplification effect through the comparison with the Mach-Zehnder configuration. Results obtained from the salt-water mixtures, antibody-antigen, and protein-DNA binding reaction have confirmed the expected phase measurement enhancement. We have demonstrated that the sensitivity limit of intensity-based SPR biosensors can be enhanced when we combine the contributions from phase with that of amplitude instead of just detecting the amplitude or phase variation only. Experimental results indicate that an enhancement factor of as much as 20 times is achievable, yet with no compromise in measurement dynamic range. While existing SPR biosensor systems are predominantly based on the angular scheme, which relies on detecting intensity variations associated with amplitude changes only, the proposed scheme may serve as a direct system upgrade approach for these systems. In addition, a surface plasmon enhanced ellipsometry (SPEE) biosensor scheme based on the use of a photoelastic modulator (PEM) has been explored. We showed that the polarization parameters of a laser beam, tan psi, cos Delta and ellipse orientation angle φ, can be directly measured by detecting the modulation signals at the 1st and 2nd harmonics of the modulation frequency under a certain birefringence geometry. This leads to an accurate measurement of refractive index variations within the evanescent field region close to the gold sensor surface, thereby enabling

  20. Recent Progress in Electrochemical Biosensors for Glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Uichi; Anzai, Jun-Ichi

    2016-12-01

    This review provides an overview of recent progress in the development of electrochemical biosensors for glycoproteins. Electrochemical glycoprotein sensors are constructed by combining metal and carbon electrodes with glycoprotein-selective binding elements including antibodies, lectin, phenylboronic acid and molecularly imprinted polymers. A recent trend in the preparation of glycoprotein sensors is the successful use of nanomaterials such as graphene, carbon nanotube, and metal nanoparticles. These nanomaterials are extremely useful for improving the sensitivity of glycoprotein sensors. This review focuses mainly on the protocols for the preparation of glycoprotein sensors and the materials used. Recent improvements in glycoprotein sensors are discussed by grouping the sensors into several categories based on the materials used as recognition elements.

  1. Odors Discrimination by Olfactory Epithelium Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingjun; Hu, Ning; Ye, Weiwei; Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    Humans are exploring the bionic biological olfaction to sense the various trace components of gas or liquid in many fields. For achieving the goal, we endeavor to establish a bioelectronic nose system for odor detection by combining intact bioactive function units with sensors. The bioelectronic nose is based on the olfactory epithelium of rat and microelectrode array (MEA). The olfactory epithelium biosensor generates extracellular potentials in presence of odor, and presents obvious specificity under different odors condition. The odor response signals can be distinguished with each other effectively by signal sorting. On basis of bioactive MEA hybrid system and the improved signal processing analysis, the bioelectronic nose will realize odor discrimination by the specific feature of signals response to various odors.

  2. Aptamer Based Microsphere Biosensor for Thrombin Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Fan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an optical microsphere resonator biosensor using aptamer asreceptor for the measurement of the important biomolecule thrombin. The sphere surface ismodified with anti-thrombin aptamer, which has excellent binding affinity and selectivityfor thrombin. Binding of the thrombin at the sphere surface is monitored by the spectralposition of the microsphere’s whispering gallery mode resonances. A detection limit on theorder of 1 NIH Unit/mL is demonstrated. Control experiments with non-aptameroligonucleotide and BSA are also carried out to confirm the specific binding betweenaptamer and thrombin. We expect that this demonstration will lead to the development ofhighly sensitive biomarker sensors based on aptamer with lower cost and higher throughputthan current technology.

  3. Progress in chemical luminescence-based biosensors: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, Aldo; Mirasoli, Mara; Michelini, Elisa; Di Fusco, Massimo; Zangheri, Martina; Cevenini, Luca; Roda, Barbara; Simoni, Patrizia

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors are a very active research field. They have the potential to lead to low-cost, rapid, sensitive, reproducible, and miniaturized bioanalytical devices, which exploit the high binding avidity and selectivity of biospecific binding molecules together with highly sensitive detection principles. Of the optical biosensors, those based on chemical luminescence detection (including chemiluminescence, bioluminescence, electrogenerated chemiluminescence, and thermochemiluminescence) are particularly attractive, due to their high-to-signal ratio and the simplicity of the required measurement equipment. Several biosensors based on chemical luminescence have been described for quantitative, and in some cases multiplex, analysis of organic molecules (such as hormones, drugs, pollutants), proteins, and nucleic acids. These exploit a variety of miniaturized analytical formats, such as microfluidics, microarrays, paper-based analytical devices, and whole-cell biosensors. Nevertheless, despite the high analytical performances described in the literature, the field of chemical luminescence biosensors has yet to demonstrate commercial success. This review presents the main recent advances in the field and discusses the approaches, challenges, and open issues, with the aim of stimulating a broader interest in developing chemical luminescence biosensors and improving their commercial exploitation.

  4. Novel amperometric glucose biosensor based on MXene nanocomposite

    KAUST Repository

    Rakhi, R. B.

    2016-11-10

    A biosensor platform based on Au/MXene nanocomposite for sensitive enzymatic glucose detection is reported. The biosensor leverages the unique electrocatalytic properties and synergistic effects between Au nanoparticles and MXene sheets. An amperometric glucose biosensor is fabricated by the immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme on Nafion solubilized Au/ MXene nanocomposite over glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The biomediated Au nanoparticles play a significant role in facilitating the electron exchange between the electroactive center of GOx and the electrode. The GOx/Au/MXene/Nafion/GCE biosensor electrode displayed a linear amperometric response in the glucose concentration range from 0.1 to 18 mM with a relatively high sensitivity of 4.2 μAmM−1 cm−2 and a detection limit of 5.9 μM (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the biosensor exhibited excellent stability, reproducibility and repeatability. Therefore, the Au/MXene nanocomposite reported in this work is a potential candidate as an electrochemical transducer in electrochemical biosensors.

  5. Label-Free Microcavity Biosensors: Steps towards Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos Amarie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Personalized medicine has the potential to improve our ability to maintain health and treat disease, while ameliorating continuously rising healthcare costs. Translation of basic research findings to clinical applications within regulatory compliance is required for personalized medicine to become the new foundation for practice of medicine. Deploying even a few of the thousands of potential diagnostic biomarkers identified each year as part of personalized treatment workflows requires clinically efficient biosensor technologies to monitor multiple biomarkers in patients in real time. This paper discusses a critical component of a regulatory system, a microcavity optical biosensor for label-free monitoring of biomolecular interactions at physiologically-relevant concentrations. While most current biosensor research focuses on improving sensitivity, this paper emphasizes other characteristics a biosensor technology requires to be practical in a clinical setting, presenting robust microcavity biosensors which are easy to manufacture and integrate with microfluidics into flexible and redesignable platforms making the microcavity biosensors deployable for continuous monitoring of biomarkers in body fluids in the clinic,  in dense 2D random arrays for high-throughput applications like drug-library screening in interactomics, and of the secretory behavior of single cells in the laboratory.

  6. Ferrocene Derivative Mediator Bonded Sol-gel Membrane Glucose Biosensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUAN, Guang-Shan; KIM, Moon-Chang; HER, Dae-Sung; LEE, Heung-Lark

    2006-01-01

    The sol-gel derived glucose biosensor was developed, and the sol-gel membrane was organically modified by N-(3-triethoxysilylpropyl)-ferrocenylmethylamine (FcSi) as sol-gel precursor to make electrochemical biosensor.The structure of biosensor was sol-gel/FcSi+Gox/GC type (glucose oxidase, Gox). The ferrocene mediator was chemically immobilized to the silane network, and Gox was entrapped to the sol-gel glass network. Therefore,these structures prevented mediator leakage and retained the enzyme activity. Additionally, pH of electrolyte, temperature effects, and interference of positive substances with biosensor were investigated. And the electrochemical performance of biosensor was studied by amperometry. The results indicated that the linear range, detection limit,and response slope of biosensor was 2.00× 10-4-1.57× 10-3 mol·L-1, 2.0× 10-4 mol·L-1 and 5.06× 105 nA·mol-1 · L, respectively.

  7. Roughness effect on the efficiency of dimer antenna based biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Barchiesi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication process of nanodevices is continually improved. However, most of the nanodevices, such as biosensors present rough surfaces with mean roughness of some nanometers even if the deposition rate of material is more controlled. The effect of roughness on performance of biosensors was fully addressed for plane biosensors and gratings, but rarely addressed for biosensors based on Local Plasmon Resonance. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate numerically the influence of nanometric roughness on the efficiency of a dimer nano-biosensor (two levels of roughness are considered. Therefore, we propose a general numerical method, that can be applied to any other nanometric shape, to take into account the roughness in a three dimensional model. The study focuses on both the far-field, which corresponds to the experimental detected data, and the near-field, responsible for exciting and then detecting biological molecules. The results suggest that the biosensor efficiency is highly sensitive to the surface roughness. The roughness can produce important shifts of the extinction efficiency peak and a decrease of its amplitude resulting from changes in the distribution of near-field and absorbed electric field intensities.

  8. A general strategy to construct small molecule biosensors in eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Justin; Jester, Benjamin W; Tinberg, Christine E; Mandell, Daniel J; Antunes, Mauricio S; Chari, Raj; Morey, Kevin J; Rios, Xavier; Medford, June I; Church, George M; Fields, Stanley; Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors for small molecules can be used in applications that range from metabolic engineering to orthogonal control of transcription. Here, we produce biosensors based on a ligand-binding domain (LBD) by using a method that, in principle, can be applied to any target molecule. The LBD is fused to either a fluorescent protein or a transcriptional activator and is destabilized by mutation such that the fusion accumulates only in cells containing the target ligand. We illustrate the power of this method by developing biosensors for digoxin and progesterone. Addition of ligand to yeast, mammalian, or plant cells expressing a biosensor activates transcription with a dynamic range of up to ~100-fold. We use the biosensors to improve the biotransformation of pregnenolone to progesterone in yeast and to regulate CRISPR activity in mammalian cells. This work provides a general methodology to develop biosensors for a broad range of molecules in eukaryotes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10606.001 PMID:26714111

  9. Progress of new label-free techniques for biosensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Shengbo; Wang, Yajun; Feng, Qiliang; Wei, Ye; Ji, Jianlong; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-01-01

    The detection techniques used in biosensors can be broadly classified into label-based and label-free. Label-based detection relies on the specific properties of labels for detecting a particular target. In contrast, label-free detection is suitable for the target molecules that are not labeled or the screening of analytes which are not easy to tag. Also, more types of label-free biosensors have emerged with developments in biotechnology. The latest developed techniques in label-free biosensors, such as field-effect transistors-based biosensors including carbon nanotube field-effect transistor biosensors, graphene field-effect transistor biosensors and silicon nanowire field-effect transistor biosensors, magnetoelastic biosensors, optical-based biosensors, surface stress-based biosensors and other type of biosensors based on the nanotechnology are discussed. The sensing principles, configurations, sensing performance, applications, advantages and restriction of different label-free based biosensors are considered and discussed in this review. Most concepts included in this survey could certainly be applied to the development of this kind of biosensor in the future.

  10. CHARACTERISTICS AND OPTIMAL WORKING CONDITIONS OF AMPEROMETRIC BIOSENSOR FOR ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE DETERMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucherenko I. S.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Analytical characteristics of a biosensor based on glucose oxidase and hexokinase and intended for ATP determination were studied. Platinum disc electrodes were used as amperometric transducers. Range of working potentials for biosensor functioning was shown. An optimal time of enzymes immobilization was determined. Optimal conditions for biosensor functioning during work with biological fluids were selected. Biosensor work in three buffer solutions (PBS, tris and HEPES was investigated and it was shown that it was possible to obtain various operational characteristics of the biosensor depending on tasks that are assigned to it by varying the composition of sample. Reproducibility of biosensor responses to ATP and glucose during a day and of biosensor preparation was shown. The proposed biosensor can be further used for analysis of glucose and ATP content in water solutions.

  11. FIBER-OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DIRECT DETERMINATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS. (R823663)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A fiber-optic enzyme biosensor for the direct measurement of organophosphate nerveagents was developed. The basic element of this biosensor is organophosphorus hydrolaseimmobilized on a nylon membrane and attached to the common end of a bifurcated optical fiberbundle....

  12. Application of silicalite-modified electrode for the development of sucrose biosensor with improved characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyeshkova, Viktoriya M.; Dudchenko, Oleksandr Y.; Soldatkin, Oleksandr O.; Kasap, Berna Ozansoy; Lagarde, Florence; Kurç, Burcu Akata; Dzyadevych, Sergei V.

    2015-03-01

    The application of silicalite for improvement of working characteristics of conductometric enzyme biosensors for determination of sucrose was studied in this research. Biosensors based on different types of silicalite-modified electrodes were studied and compared according to their analytical characteristics. Polyethylenimine/glutaraldehyde/silicalite-modified biosensors showed higher sensitivity compared with others type of biosensors. Moreover, the polyethylenimine/glutaraldehyde/silicalite sucrose biosensors were characterized by high selectivity and signal reproducibility (relative standard deviation (RSD) = 2.78% for glucose measurements and RSD = 3.2% for sucrose measurements). Proposed biosensors were used for determination of sucrose in different samples of beverages. The obtained results had good correlation with results obtained by HPLC. Thus, polyethylenimine/glutaraldehyde/silicalite-modified biosensors have shown perspective characteristics for the development of effective conductometric enzyme biosensors.

  13. Biosentinel: Developing a Space Radiation Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Maria, Sergio R.; Marina, Diana B.; Parra, Macarena P.; Boone, Travis D.; Tan, Ming; Ricco, Antonio J.; Straume, Tore N.; Lusby, Terry C.; Harkness, T.; Reiss-Bubenheim, Debra; Brent, R.; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation presents a major challenge to human exploration and long-term residence in space. The deep-space radiation spectrum includes highly energetic particles that generate double strand breaks (DSBs), deleterious DNA lesions that are usually repaired without errors via homologous recombination (HR), a conserved pathway in all eukaryotes. While progress identifying and characterizing biological radiation effects using Earth-based facilities has been significant, no terrestrial source duplicates the unique space radiation environment.We are developing a biosensor-based nanosatellite to fly aboard NASAs Space Launch System Exploration Mission 1, expected to launch in 2017 and reach a 1AU (astronomic unit) heliocentric orbit. Our biosensor (called BioSentinel) uses the yeast S. cerevisiae to measure DSBs in response to ambient space radiation. The BioSentinel strain contains engineered genetic defects that prevent growth until and unless a radiation-induced DSB near a reporter gene activates the yeasts HR repair mechanisms. Thus, culture growth and metabolic activity directly indicate a successful DSB-and-repair event. In parallel, HR-defective and wild type strains will provide survival data. Desiccated cells will be carried within independent culture microwells, built into 96-well microfluidic cards. Each microwell set will be activated by media addition at different time points over 18 months, and cell growth will be tracked continuously via optical density. One reserve set will be activated only in the occurrence of a solar particle event. Biological measurements will be compared to data provided by onboard physical dosimeters and to Earth-based experiments.BioSentinel will conduct the first study of biological response to space radiation outside Low Earth Orbit in over 40 years. BioSentinel will thus address strategic knowledge gaps related to the biological effects of space radiation and will provide an adaptable platform to perform human

  14. Foreign Body Reaction to Implantable Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Vaddiraju, Santhisagar; Gu, Bing; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Burgess, Diane J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Implantable biosensors for continuous glucose monitoring can greatly improve diabetes management. However, their applications are still associated with some challenges and one of these is the gradual functionality loss postimplantation as a consequence of the foreign body response (FBR). Sensor miniaturization in combination with drug-eluting biocompatible coatings is a promising strategy to enhance in vivo performance. However, limited study has been performed to understand the effect of initial trauma and implant size on foreign body reaction as well as in vivo performance of implantable glucose sensors. Methods: Different initial trauma was induced by implanting composite coated dummy sensors into rats using various sized needles and 3 different-sized dummy sensors were implanted to examine the size effect. Histological evaluation was performed to relate the inflammatory cell counts and foreign body capsule thickness with the implantation needle size and sensor size respectively. The effect of biocompatible coating on the performance of implantable glucose sensors was determined using both coated amperometric glucose sensors and microdialysis probes. Results: The results revealed that the degree of acute inflammation was mainly controlled by the extent of the initial trauma: the greater the trauma, the greater the acute inflammatory response. Implant size did not affect the acute inflammatory phase. However, the extent of chronic inflammation and fibrous encapsulation were affected by sensor size: the smaller the size the less the extent of chronic inflammation and fibrous encapsulation. Glucose sensors implanted using 14 gauge needles showed significantly lower initial in vivo response compared to those implanted using 16 gauge needles. This was not observed for sensors with dexamethasone-eluting biocompatible coatings since inflammation was suppressed. Conclusions: The results of the current study indicate that the extent of the inflammatory

  15. Applications of commercial biosensors in clinical, food, environmental, and biothreat/biowarfare analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-06-01

    The lack of specific, low-cost, rapid, sensitive, and easy detection of biomolecules has resulted in the development of biosensor technology. Innovations in biosensor technology have enabled many biosensors to be commercialized and have enabled biomolecules to be detected onsite. Moreover, the emerging technologies of lab-on-a-chip microdevices and nanosensors offer opportunities for the development of new biosensors with much better performance. Biosensors were first introduced into the laboratory by Clark and Lyons. They developed the first glucose biosensor for laboratory conditions. Then in 1973, a glucose biosensor was commercialized by Yellow Springs Instruments. The commercial biosensors have small size and simple construction and they are ideal for point-of-care biosensing. In addition to glucose, a wide variety of metabolites such as lactate, cholesterol, and creatinine can be detected by using commercial biosensors. Like the glucose biosensors (tests) other commercial tests such as for pregnancy (hCG), Escherichia coli O157, influenza A and B viruses, Helicobacter pylori, human immunodeficiency virus, tuberculosis, and malaria have achieved success. Apart from their use in clinical analysis, commercial tests are also used in environmental (such as biochemical oxygen demand, nitrate, pesticide), food (such as glutamate, glutamine, sucrose, lactose, alcohol, ascorbic acid), and biothreat/biowarfare (Bacillus anthracis, Salmonella, Botulinum toxin) analysis. In this review, commercial biosensors in clinical, environmental, food, and biowarfare analysis are summarized and the commercial biosensors are compared in terms of their important characteristics. This is the first review in which all the commercially available tests are compiled together.

  16. Microbial Fuel Cell Transformation of Recalcitrant Organic Compounds in Support of Biosensor Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Microbial Fuel Cell Transformation of Recalcitrant Organic Compounds in Support of Biosensor ...in the United States. AFIT-ENV-14-M-62 Microbial Fuel Cell Transformation of Recalcitrant Organic Compounds in Support of Biosensor Research...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENV-14-M-62 Microbial Fuel Cell Transformation of Recalcitrant Organic Compounds in Support of Biosensor Research Marc

  17. A review of enzymatic uric acid biosensors based on amperometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erden, Pınar Esra; Kılıç, Esma

    2013-03-30

    This review summarizes the studies carried on the development of amperometric uric acid biosensors over the past twenty years. Sensing principles, enzyme immobilization techniques, the electrode types, different approaches and various matrices used for biosensor fabrication are presented along with their benefits and limitations. Uric acid biosensors based on different modes of transducing devices such as optical, potentiometric, conductometric are also referred.

  18. Electrochemical affinity biosensors for detection of mycotoxins: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Juan C; Bonel, Laura; Ezquerra, Alba; Hernández, Susana; Bertolín, Juan R; Cubel, Carlota; Castillo, Juan R

    2013-11-15

    This review discusses the current state of electrochemical biosensors in the determination of mycotoxins in foods. Mycotoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites produced by molds. The acute toxicity of these results in serious human and animal health problems, although it has been only since early 1960s when the first studied aflatoxins were found to be carcinogenic. Mycotoxins affect a broad range of agricultural products, most important cereals and cereal-based foods. A majority of countries, mentioning especially the European Union, have established preventive programs to control contamination and strict laws of the permitted levels in foods. Official methods of analysis of mycotoxins normally requires sophisticated instrumentation, e.g. liquid chromatography with fluorescence or mass detectors, combined with extraction procedures for sample preparation. For about sixteen years, the use of simpler and faster analytical procedures based on affinity biosensors has emerged in scientific literature as a very promising alternative, particularly electrochemical (i.e., amperometric, impedance, potentiometric or conductimetric) affinity biosensors due to their simplicity and sensitivity. Typically, electrochemical biosensors for mycotoxins use specific antibodies or aptamers as affinity ligands, although recombinant antibodies, artificial receptors and molecular imprinted polymers show potential utility. This article deals with recent advances in electrochemical affinity biosensors for mycotoxins and covers complete literature from the first reports about sixteen years ago.

  19. Biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone for portable biochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Diming; Liu, Qingjun

    2016-01-15

    Smartphone has been widely integrated with sensors, such as test strips, sensor chips, and hand-held detectors, for biochemical detections due to its portability and ubiquitous availability. Utilizing built-in function modules, smartphone is often employed as controller, analyzer, and displayer for rapid, real-time, and point-of-care monitoring, which can significantly simplify design and reduce cost of the detecting systems. This paper presents a review of biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone for portable biochemical detections. The biosensors and bioelectronics based on smartphone can mainly be classified into biosensors using optics, surface plasmon resonance, electrochemistry, and near-field communication. The developments of these biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone are reviewed along with typical biochemical detecting cases. Sensor strategies, detector attachments, and coupling methods are highlighted to show designs of the compact, lightweight, and low-cost sensor systems. The performances and advantages of these designs are introduced with their applications in healthcare diagnosis, environment monitoring, and food evaluation. With advances in micro-manufacture, sensor technology, and miniaturized electronics, biosensor and bioelectronic devices on smartphone can be used to perform biochemical detections as common and convenient as electronic tag readout in foreseeable future.

  20. Flexible Molybdenum Electrodes towards Designing Affinity Based Protein Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakoti, Vikramshankar; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-07-18

    Molybdenum electrode based flexible biosensor on porous polyamide substrates has been fabricated and tested for its functionality as a protein affinity based biosensor. The biosensor performance was evaluated using a key cardiac biomarker; cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI). Molybdenum is a transition metal and demonstrates electrochemical behavior upon interaction with an electrolyte. We have leveraged this property of molybdenum for designing an affinity based biosensor using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have evaluated the feasibility of detection of cTnI in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) by measuring impedance changes over a frequency window from 100 mHz to 1 MHz. Increasing changes to the measured impedance was correlated to the increased dose of cTnI molecules binding to the cTnI antibody functionalized molybdenum surface. We achieved cTnI detection limit of 10 pg/mL in PBS and 1 ng/mL in HS medium. The use of flexible substrates for designing the biosensor demonstrates promise for integration with a large-scale batch manufacturing process.

  1. Research in Adaptronic Automatic Control System and Biosensor System Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skopis Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the research on adaptronic systems made by the author and offers to use biosensors that can be later inserted into the adaptronic systems. Adaptronic systems are based, on the one hand, on the adaptronic approach when the system is designed not to always meet the worst condition, but to change the structure of the system according to the external conditions. On the other hand, it is an extension of common automatic control ad adaptive systems. So, in the introduction firstly the adaptronic approach and biosensor as a term is explained. Adaptive systems, upon which adaptronic ones are based, are also mentioned. Then the construction of biosensor is described, as well as some information is given about the classification of biosensors and their main groups. Also it is suggested to use lichen indicators in industry to control concentration of chemical substances in the air. After that mathematical models and computer experiments for adaptronic system and biosensor analysis are given.

  2. Polymer integrated waveguide optical biosensor by using spectral splitting effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaonan; Han, Xiuyou; Shao, Yuchen; Wu, Zhenlin; Liang, Yuxin; Teng, Jie; Bo, Shuhui; Morthier, Geert; Zhao, Mingshan

    2017-02-01

    The polymer waveguide optical biosensor based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) by using spectral splitting effect is investigated. The MZI based biosensor has two unequal width sensing arms. With the different mode dispersion responses of the two-arm waveguides to the cladding refractive index change, the spectral splitting effect of the output interference spectrum is obtained, inducing a very high sensitivity. The influence of the different mode dispersions between the two-arm waveguides on the spectral splitting characteristic is analyzed. By choosing different lengths of the two unequal width sensing arms, the initial dip wavelength of the interference spectrum and the spectral splitting range can be controlled flexibly. The polymer waveguide optical biosensor is designed, and its sensing property is analyzed. The results show that the sensitivity of the polymer waveguide optical biosensor by using spectral splitting effect is as high as 104 nm/RIU, with an improvement of 2-3 orders of magnitude compared with the slot waveguide based microring biosensor.

  3. Bioelectrochemical response of a choline biosensor fabricated by using polyaniline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the isoelectric point of an enzyme and the doping principle of conducting polymers,choline oxidase was doped in a polyaniline film to form a biosensor. The amperometric detection of choline is based on the oxidation of the H2O2 enzymatically produced on the choline biosensor. The response current of the biosensor as a function of temperature was determined from 3 to 40℃. An apparent activation energy of 22.8 kJ·mol-1 was obtained. The biosensor had a wide linear response range from 5 × 10-7 to 1 × 10-4 M choline with a correlation coefficient of 0.9999 and a detection limit of 0.2 μM,and had a high sensitivity of 61.9 mA·M-1·cm-2 at 0.50 V and at pH 8.0. The apparent Michaelis constant and the optimum pH for the immobilized enzyme are 1.4 mM choline and 8.4,respectively,which are very close to those of choline oxidase in solution. The effect of selected organic compounds on the response of the choline biosensor was studied.

  4. Design and characterization of auxotrophy-based amino acid biosensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Bertels

    Full Text Available Efficient and inexpensive methods are required for the high-throughput quantification of amino acids in physiological fluids or microbial cell cultures. Here we develop an array of Escherichia coli biosensors to sensitively quantify eleven different amino acids. By using online databases, genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis were identified that - upon deletion - should render the corresponding mutant auxotrophic for one particular amino acid. This rational design strategy suggested genes involved in the biosynthesis of arginine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, threonine, tryptophan, and tyrosine as potential genetic targets. A detailed phenotypic characterization of the corresponding single-gene deletion mutants indeed confirmed that these strains could neither grow on a minimal medium lacking amino acids nor transform any other proteinogenic amino acid into the focal one. Site-specific integration of the egfp gene into the chromosome of each biosensor decreased the detection limit of the GFP-labeled cells by 30% relative to turbidometric measurements. Finally, using the biosensors to determine the amino acid concentration in the supernatants of two amino acid overproducing E. coli strains (i.e. ΔhisL and ΔtdcC both turbidometrically and via GFP fluorescence emission and comparing the results to conventional HPLC measurements confirmed the utility of the developed biosensor system. Taken together, our study provides not only a genotypically and phenotypically well-characterized set of publicly available amino acid biosensors, but also demonstrates the feasibility of the rational design strategy used.

  5. A glucose biosensor based on partially unzipped carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huifang; Feng, Miao; Zhan, Hongbing

    2015-08-15

    An amperometric glucose biosensor based on direct electron transfer of glucose oxidase (GOD) self-assembled on the surface of partially unzipped carbon nanotubes (PUCNTs) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) has been successfully fabricated. PUCNTs were synthesized via a facile chemical oxidative etching CNTs and used as a novel immobilization matrix for GOD. The cyclic voltammetric result of the PUCNT/GOD/GCE showed a pair of well-defined and quasi-reversible redox peaks with a formal potential of -0.470V and a peak to peak separation of 37mV, revealing that the fast direct electron transfer between GOD and the electrode has been achieved. It is notable that the glucose determination has been achieved in mediator-free condition. The developed biosensor displayed satisfactory analytical performance toward glucose including high sensitivity (19.50μA mM(-1)cm(-2)), low apparent Michaelis-Menten (5.09mM), a wide linear range of 0-17mM, and also preventing the interference from ascorbic acid, uric acid and dopamine usually coexisting with glucose in human blood. In addition, the biosensor acquired excellent storage stabilities. This facile, fast, environment-friendly and economical preparation strategy of PUCNT-GOD may provide a new platform for the fabrication of biocompatible glucose biosensors and other types of biosensors.

  6. Recent Advances in Application of Biosensors in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwarul Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors research is a fast growing field in which tens of thousands of papers have been published over the years, and the industry is now worth billions of dollars. The biosensor products have found their applications in numerous industries including food and beverages, agricultural, environmental, medical diagnostics, and pharmaceutical industries and many more. Even though numerous biosensors have been developed for detection of proteins, peptides, enzymes, and numerous other biomolecules for diverse applications, their applications in tissue engineering have remained limited. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in application of novel biosensors in cell culture and tissue engineering, for example, real-time detection of small molecules such as glucose, lactose, and H2O2 as well as serum proteins of large molecular size, such as albumin and alpha-fetoprotein, and inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-g and TNF-α. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent advancements in biosensors for tissue engineering applications.

  7. Oxide-on-graphene field effect biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Liddell, Kristi; Wang, Junjie; Koger, Brandon; Keating, Christine; Zhu, J.

    2013-03-01

    Nanoelectronics-based detection schemes offer fast and label-free alternatives to bioanalysis. Here we report on the design, fabrication, and operation of ion-sensitive field-effect biosensors using large-area graphene sheets synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The graphene transducer channel has a high carrier mobility of approximately 5000cm2/Vs. Our oxide-on-graphene design uses thin HfO2 and SiO2 films to passivate the graphene channel and electrodes from electrolyte and uses the top SiO2 surface for sensing and linker chemistry. The pH sensitivity of the bare SiO2 is measured to be 46mV/pH, in good agreement with literature results. We demonstrate the silanization of the SiO2 surface with aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane (APTMS). The pH sensitivity of the APTMS-functionalized SiO2 is measured to be 43mV/pH. By applying the solution gate voltage in pulse, we eliminate hysteresis in the transfer curve of the graphene channel, which is a common challenge in achieving high-solution detection using nanostructure-based field effect sensors. The amine-functionalized SiO2 surface can be further functionalized with bio-probes to perform the detection of specific binding events such as DNA hybridization.

  8. Self-assembling holographic biosensors and biocomputers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, Yooli Kim; Bachand, George David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Trent, Amanda M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-05-01

    We present concepts for self-assembly of diffractive optics with potential uses in biosensors and biocomputers. The simplest such optics, diffraction gratings, can potentially be made from chemically-stabilized microtubules migrating on nanopatterned tracks of the motor protein kinesin. We discuss the fabrication challenges involved in patterning sub-micron-scale structures with proteins that must be maintained in aqueous buffers to preserve their activity. A novel strategy is presented that employs dry contact printing onto glass-supported amino-silane monolayers of heterobifunctional crosslinkers, followed by solid-state reactions of these cross-linkers, to graft patterns of reactive groups onto the surface. Successive solution-phase addition of cysteine-mutant proteins and amine-reactive polyethylene glycol allows assembly of features onto the printed patterns. We present data from initial experiments showing successful micro- and nanopatterning of lines of single-cysteine mutants of kinesin interleaved with lines of polyethylene, indicating that this strategy can be employed to arrays of features with resolutions suitable for gratings.

  9. Turning tryptophanase into odor-generating biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yaqin; Zhang, Zhuyuan; Ali, M Monsur; Sauder, Joanna; Deng, Xudong; Giang, Karen; Aguirre, Sergio D; Pelton, Robert; Li, Yingfu; Filipe, Carlos D M

    2014-03-01

    An odor-based sensor system that exploits the metabolic enzyme tryptophanase (TPase) as the key component is reported. This enzyme is able to convert an odorless substrate like S-methyl-L-cysteine or L-tryptophan into the odorous products methyl mercaptan or indole. To make a biosensor, TPase was biotinylated so that it could be coupled with a molecular recognition element, such as an antibody, to develop an ELISA-like assay. This method was used for the detection of an antibody present in nM concentrations by the human nose. TPase can also be combined with the enzyme pyridoxal kinase (PKase) for use in a coupled assay to detect adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). When ATP is present in the low μM concentration range, the coupled enzymatic system generates an odor that is easily detectable by the human nose. Biotinylated TPase can be combined with various biotin-labeled molecular recognition elements, thereby enabling a broad range of applications for this odor-based reporting system.

  10. Carbon nanotubes field effect transistors biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Marco

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube transistor arrays (CNTFETs wereused as biosensors to detect DNA hybridization andto recognize two anabolic steroids, stanozolol (Stzand methylboldenone (MB. Single strand DNA andantibodies specific for STz and MB were immobilizedon the carbon nanotubes (CNTs in situ in the deviceusing two different approaches: direct noncovalentbonding of antibodies to the devices and covalentlytrough a polymer previously attached to theCNTFETs. A new approach to ensure specificadsorption of the biomolecules to the nanotubeswas developed. The polymer poly(methylmethacrylate0.8-co-poly (ethyleneglycolmethacrylate0.8-co-N-succinimidyl methacrylate0.1was synthesized and bonded noncovalently to thenanotube. Aminated single-strand DNA or antibodiesspecific for Stz and MB were then attached covalentlyto the polymer. Statistically significant changes wereobserved in key transistor parameters for both DNAhybridization and steroids recognition. Regardingthe detection mechanism, in addition to chargetransfer, Schottky barrier, SB, modification, andscattering potential reported by other authors, anelectron/hole trapping mechanism leading tohysteresis modification has been determined. Thepresence of polymer seems to hinder the modulationof the electrode-CNT contact.

  11. Feasibility Studies on Si-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Renis

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paperis to summarize the efforts carried out so far in the fabrication of Si-based biosensors by a team of researchers in Catania, Italy. This work was born as a collaboration between the Catania section of the Microelectronic and Microsystem Institute (IMM of the CNR, the Surfaces and Interfaces laboratory (SUPERLAB of the Consorzio Catania Ricerche and two departments at the University of Catania: the Biomedical Science and the Biological Chemistry and Molecular Biology Departments. The first goal of our study was the definition and optimization of an immobilization protocol capable of bonding the biological sensing element on a Si-based surface via covalent chemical bonds. We chose SiO2 as the anchoring surface due to its biocompatibility and extensive presence in microelectronic devices. The immobilization protocol was tested and optimized, introducing a new step, oxide activation, using techniques compatible with microelectronic processing. The importance of the added step is described by the experimental results. We also tested different biological molecule concentrations in the immobilization solutions and the effects on the immobilized layer. Finally a MOS-like structure was designed and fabricated to test an electrical transduction mechanism. The results obtained so far and the possible evolution of the research field are described in this review paper.

  12. MEMS-based biosensors for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Tatsuro; Morita, Yasutaka; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2004-03-01

    Biosensors in connection with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) can be applied in many fields of research. In this paper, the reduction in the size of ELISA utilizing micro-chemical reaction is described in a microchamber array chip, and also a micro-flow antibody chip. The chips were fabricated by micro electromechanical system (MEMS) technology. The quantitative determination of dioxins was performed by using the chips. Glass or polystyrene beads were used for immobilization of an antibody at these chips. The antibody-immobilized beads were introduced into micro-flow channel or microchamber. As a competitive ELISA, sample solution mixed with horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated antigen, and non-HRP conjugated antigen was allowed to react in the microchamber or flow channel. As a sandwich assay, sample solution and HRP-conjugated antibody were sequentially added to the chamber. After the antigen-antibody reaction, addition of PBS buffer, hydrogen peroxide, and fluorogenic substrate produced the fluorescent dye. The resulting change in the fluorescence intensity was monitored by a fluorescence microscope.

  13. Aptamer-Functionalized Nano-Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chia Chiu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials have become one of the most interesting sensing materials because of their unique size- and shape-dependent optical properties, high surface energy and surface-to-volume ratio, and tunable surface properties. Aptamers are oligonucleotides that can bind their target ligands with high affinity. The use of nanomaterials that are bioconjugated with aptamers for selective and sensitive detection of analytes such as small molecules, metal ions, proteins, and cells has been demonstrated. This review focuses on recent progress in the development of biosensors by integrating functional aptamers with different types of nanomaterials, including quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles (NPs, metallic NPs, and carbon nanotubes. Colorimetry, fluorescence, electrochemistry, surface plasmon resonance, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, and magnetic resonance imaging are common detection modes for a broad range of analytes with high sensitivity and selectivity when using aptamer bioconjugated nanomaterials (Apt-NMs. We highlight the important roles that the size and concentration of nanomaterials, the secondary structure and density of aptamers, and the multivalent interactions play in determining the specificity and sensitivity of the nanosensors towards analytes. Advantages and disadvantages of the Apt-NMs for bioapplications are focused.

  14. Transient Convection, Diffusion, and Adsorption in Surface-Based Biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rasmus; Bruus, Henrik; Callisen, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and computational investigation of convection, diffusion, and adsorption in surface-based biosensors. In particular, we study the transport dynamics in a model geometry of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. The work, however, is equally relevant for other...... microfluidic surface-based biosensors, operating under flow conditions. A widely adopted approximate quasi-steady theory to capture convective and diffusive mass transport is reviewed, and an analytical solution is presented. An expression of the Damköhler number is derived in terms of the nondimensional...... concentration to the maximum surface capacity is critical for reliable use of the quasi-steady theory. Finally, our results provide users of surface-based biosensors with a tool for correcting experimentally obtained adsorption rate constants....

  15. Recent advances in nanomaterial-based biosensors for antibiotics detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Lingyi; Yao, Yao; Ping, Jianfeng; Ying, Yibin

    2017-05-15

    Antibiotics are able to be accumulated in human body by food chain and may induce severe influence to human health and safety. Hence, the development of sensitive and simple methods for rapid evaluation of antibiotic levels is highly desirable. Nanomaterials with excellent electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties have been recognized as one of the most promising materials for opening new gates in the development of next-generation biosensors. This review highlights the current advances in the nanomaterial-based biosensors for antibiotics detection. Different kinds of nanomaterials including carbon nanomaterials, metal nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, up-conversion nanoparticles, and quantum dots have been applied to the construction of biosensors with two main signal-transducing mechanisms, i.e. optical and electrochemical. Furthermore, the current challenges and future prospects in this field are also included to provide an overview for future research directions.

  16. Principles and Applications of Flow Injection Analysis in Biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1996-01-01

    In practical applications biosensors are often forced to operate under less than optimal conditions. Because of their construction, and the physical processes and chemical reactions involved in their operation, compromise conditions are frequently required to synchronize all events taking place....... Therefore, and in order to implement functions such as periodic calibration, conditioning and possible regeneration of the biosensor, and, very importantly, to yield the freedom to select the optimum detection means, it is advantageous to use these devices in a flow-through mode, particularly by employing...... the flow injection (FI) approach. The capacity of FI, as offering itself as a complementary facility to augment the performance of biosensors, and in many cases as an attractive alternative, is demonstrated by reference to selected examples, comprising assays based on enzymatic procedures with optical...

  17. Engineering prokaryotic transcriptional activators as metabolite biosensors in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise; Snoek, Tim; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin

    2016-01-01

    Whole-cell biocatalysts have proven a tractable path toward sustainable production of bulk and fine chemicals. Yet the screening of libraries of cellular designs to identify best-performing biocatalysts is most often a low-throughput endeavor. For this reason, the development of biosensors enabling...... real-time monitoring of production has attracted attention. Here we applied systematic engineering of multiple parameters to search for a general biosensor design in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on small-molecule binding transcriptional activators from the prokaryote superfamily...... of LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs). We identified a design supporting LTTR-dependent activation of reporter gene expression in the presence of cognate small-molecule inducers. As proof of principle, we applied the biosensors for in vivo screening of cells producing naringenin or cis...

  18. Biosensor for determination of glucose in real samples of beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Marques Lopes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor was developed for spectrophotometric determination of glucose concentrations in real samples of orange juice energetic drinks, and sport drinks. The biosensor consisted of glucose oxidase (GOD and horseradish peroxidase (HRP immobilized onto polyaniline activated with glutaraldehyde (PANIG. Immobilization parameters were optimized for GOD, and maximum immobilization yield was 16% when 5.0 mg of PANIG and 8.9 U prepared in 0.1 mol.L-1 sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0 reacted for 60 minutes at 4 °C with gentle stirring. The linear operational range for glucose determination using optimized operational parameters was between 0.05 and 6.0 mg.mL-1 with a very good reproducibility of response. The results obtained in the biosensor were compared with those obtained using free enzymes (commercial kits and then validated through statistical analysis using the Tukey test (95% confidence interval.

  19. Advances in arsenic biosensor development--a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Hardeep; Kumar, Rabindra; Babu, J Nagendra; Mittal, Sunil

    2015-01-15

    Biosensors are analytical devices having high sensitivity, portability, small sample requirement and ease of use for qualitative and quantitative monitoring of various analytes of human importance. Arsenic (As), owing to its widespread presence in nature and high toxicity to living creatures, requires frequent determination in water, soil, agricultural and food samples. The present review is an effort to highlight the various advancements made so far in the development of arsenic biosensors based either on recombinant whole cells or on certain arsenic-binding oligonucleotides or proteins. The role of futuristic approaches like surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and aptamer technology has also been discussed. The biomethods employed and their general mechanisms, advantages and limitations in relevance to arsenic biosensors developed so far are intended to be discussed in this review.

  20. DNA electrochemical biosensor for metallic drugs at physiological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Lopez, Angel J.; Vera, José L.; Meléndez, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Entrapment of dsSS-DNA into the polypyrrole-polyvinyl sulphonate (dsSS-DNA-PPy-PVS) film over indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass has been designed to detect titanium and platinum drugs, titanocene dichloride and cisplatin. The disposable dsSS-DNA-PPy-PVS/ITO biosensor was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, attenuated total reflectance Infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Amperometric studies by cyclic voltammetry using, dsSS-DNA-PPy PVS/ITO biosensor, demonstrated the ability of this biosensor to detect these metallic drugs in millimolar concentration by monitoring the decrease of the guanine oxidation signal as a result of the DNA damage. The concentration range detected for titanocene dichloride is 0.25 to 1.5 mM and for cisplatin is 0.06 to 1.0 mM. PMID:25705144

  1. Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofiber based Biosensor Platform for Glucose Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Mamun, Khandaker A.; Tulip, Fahmida S.; MacArthur, Kimberly; McFarlane, Nicole; Islam, Syed K.; Hensley, Dale

    2014-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) have recently become an important tool for biosensor design. Carbon nanofibers (CNF) have excellent conductive and structural properties with many irregularities and defect sites in addition to exposed carboxyl groups throughout their surfaces. These properties allow a better immobilization matrix compared to carbon nanotubes and offer better resolution when compared with the FET-based biosensors. VACNFs can be deterministically grown on silicon substrates allowing optimization of the structures for various biosensor applications. Two VACNF electrode architectures have been employed in this study and a comparison of their performances has been made in terms of sensitivity, sensing limitations, dynamic range, and response time. The usage of VACNF platform as a glucose sensor has been verified in this study by selecting an optimum architecture based on the VACNF forest density. Read More: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0129156414500062

  2. Wireless Distribution and Use of Bio-sensor Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyng, Morten; Kristensen, Margit; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht

    2007-01-01

      During emergency response use of wired bio-sensors create problems for the response workers. It is difficult to transport patients and checking of data requires you to be next to the patient. We will report on work in progress regarding development of a wireless bio-monitor system that supports...... distribution and use by all involved parties of bio-sensor data during emergency response. The system is being developed in close cooperation between doctors, paramedics and IT specialists using qualitative methods including ethnographically inspired field work and simulations of future work. The system...... evaluations have already demonstrated the usefulness of being able to move patients without having to take care of wires and being able to inspect bio-sensor data without being next to the patient. However, new problems have also emerged when no wires connect a patient to a display. E.g. how do you know whose...

  3. Orientation of llama antibodies strongly increases sensitivity of biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilling, Anke K; Hesselink, Thamara; van Houwelingen, Adèle; Cordewener, Jan H G; Jongsma, Maarten A; Schoffelen, Sanne; van Hest, Jan C M; Zuilhof, Han; Beekwilder, Jules

    2014-10-15

    Sensitivity of biosensors depends on the orientation of bio-receptors on the sensor surface. The objective of this study was to organize bio-receptors on surfaces in a way that their analyte binding site is exposed to the analyte solution. VHH proteins recognizing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) were used for making biosensors, and azides were introduced in the VHH to function as bioorthogonal reactive groups. The importance of the orientation of bio-receptors was addressed by comparing sensors with randomly oriented VHH (with multiple exposed azide groups) to sensors with uniformly oriented VHH (with only a single azide group). A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chip exposing cyclooctyne was reacted to azide functionalized VHH domains, using click chemistry. Comparison between randomly and uniformly oriented bio-receptors showed up to 800-fold increase in biosensor sensitivity. This technique may increase the containment of infectious diseases such as FMDV as its strongly enhanced sensitivity may facilitate early diagnostics.

  4. Power management design for lab-on-chip biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojian Yu; Moez, Kambiz; I-Chyn Wey; Jie Chen

    2016-08-01

    Over the past decades, we have witnessed the growth demands of portable lab-on-chip biosensors. These lab-on-chip devices are mostly powered by battery, and intelligent power management systems are required to provide supply voltage for different functional units on biosensors (e.g. a microfluidic control system might require higher voltage than the rest working units of biosensors). In this paper, a fully integrated multiple-stage voltage multiplier is proposed to provide high-voltage power needs. The proposed design was implemented with the IBM's 0.13um CMOS process with a maximum power efficiency of 81.02% and maximum voltage conversion efficiency of 99.8% under a supply voltage of 1.2 V.

  5. CMOS biosensors for in vitro diagnosis - transducing mechanisms and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ka-Meng; Mak, Pui-In; Law, Man-Kay; Martins, Rui P

    2016-09-21

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology enables low-cost and large-scale integration of transistors and physical sensing materials on tiny chips (e.g., key functions of biosensors: transducing and signal processing. Recent CMOS biosensors unified different transducing mechanisms (impedance, fluorescence, and nuclear spin) and readout electronics have demonstrated competitive sensitivity for in vitro diagnosis, such as detection of DNA (down to 10 aM), protein (down to 10 fM), or bacteria/cells (single cell). Herein, we detail the recent advances in CMOS biosensors, centering on their key principles, requisites, and applications. Together, these may contribute to the advancement of our healthcare system, which should be decentralized by broadly utilizing point-of-care diagnostic tools.

  6. Silicon carbide: a versatile material for biosensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros, Alexandra; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; Saddow, Stephen E

    2013-04-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) has been around for more than 100 years as an industrial material and has found wide and varied applications because of its unique electrical and thermal properties. In recent years there has been increased attention to SiC as a viable material for biomedical applications. Of particular interest in this review is its potential for application as a biotransducer in biosensors. Among these applications are those where SiC is used as a substrate material, taking advantage of its surface chemical, tribological and electrical properties. In addition, its potential for integration as system on a chip and those applications where SiC is used as an active material make it a suitable substrate for micro-device fabrication. This review highlights the critical properties of SiC for application as a biosensor and reviews recent work reported on using SiC as an active or passive material in biotransducers and biosensors.

  7. Towards an All-Polymer Biosensor for Early Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Nikolaj Ormstrup; Heegaard, Niels

    for measuring this. Lab-on-a-chip biosensors are one of the fastest growing technologies for in vitro diagnostics. The combination of microfluidics and biosensing offers exciting possibilities for producing extremely sensitive and low cost applications for medicine and diagnostics. This thesis include studies...... of polymerized p-toluenesulfonate doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT:TsO) nanowires. The PEDOT:TsO nanowires are demonstrated to be promising temperature sensors. We also show that the nanowires can be gated with a backgating potential, which is a requirement for using it as a biosensor. The nanowires...... were also shown to be able to measure changes in larger biological samples as cells. This shows a promise for utilizing the PEDOT:TsO nanowires as Aβ42 biosensors. A prototype for a lab-on-a-chip system consisting of a double assay sorting channel and a electrochemical impedance spectroscopy coulter...

  8. Xanthine Biosensor Based on Didodecyldimethylammonium Bromide Modified Pyrolytic Graphite Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG,Ji-Lin(唐纪琳); HAN,Xiao-Jun(韩晓军); HUANG,Wei-Min(黄卫民); WANG,Er-Kang(汪尔康)

    2002-01-01

    The vesicle of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB)which contained tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) was mixed with xanthine oxidase, and the mixture was cast on the pyrolytic graphite electrode. The lipid films were used to supply a biological environment resembling biomembrane on the surface of the electrode. TTF was used as a mediator because of its high electron-transfer efficiency. A novel xanthine biosensor based on cast DDAB film was developed. The effects of pH and operating potential were explored for optimum analytical performance by using the amperometric method. The response time of the biosensor was less than 10 s. The detection limit of the biosensor was 3.2 × 10-7 mol/L and the liner range was from 4 × 10-7 mol/L to 2.4 × 10-6 mol/L.

  9. Optical biosensor for simultaneous detection of captan and organophosphorus compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Young-Kee; Oh, Byung-Keun; Song, Sun-Young; Lee, Won Hong

    2003-05-01

    The optical biosensor consisting of GST and acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-immobilized gel film was developed to detect captan and organophosphorus compounds simultaneously in contaminated water. The sensing scheme was based on the measurement of decrease of products formation (s-(2,4-dinitrobenzene) glutathione and alpha-naphthol by GST and AChE, respectively) due to the inhibition by captan and organophosphorus compounds. The absorbance of s-(2,4-dinitrobenzene) glutathione and alpha-naphthol was detected at 400 and 500 nm, respectively, by a proposed optical biosensor system. It was observed that AChE was inhibited by both captan and organophosphorus compounds, and GST was inhibited only by captan. The simultaneous detection and quantification of captan and organophosphorus compounds could be successfully achieved by the proposed sensor system. The proposed biosensor could successfully detect the captan and organophosphorus compounds concentration from 0 to 2 ppm.

  10. Printable Ultrathin Metal Oxide Semiconductor-Based Conformal Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, You Seung; Bae, Sang-Hoon; Chen, Huajun; Yang, Jonathan L; Kim, Jaemyung; Andrews, Anne M; Weiss, Paul S; Yang, Yang; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2015-12-22

    Conformal bioelectronics enable wearable, noninvasive, and health-monitoring platforms. We demonstrate a simple and straightforward method for producing thin, sensitive In2O3-based conformal biosensors based on field-effect transistors using facile solution-based processing. One-step coating via aqueous In2O3 solution resulted in ultrathin (3.5 nm), high-density, uniform films over large areas. Conformal In2O3-based biosensors on ultrathin polyimide films displayed good device performance, low mechanical stress, and highly conformal contact determined using polydimethylsiloxane artificial skin having complex curvilinear surfaces or an artificial eye. Immobilized In2O3 field-effect transistors with self-assembled monolayers of NH2-terminated silanes functioned as pH sensors. Functionalization with glucose oxidase enabled d-glucose detection at physiologically relevant levels. The conformal ultrathin field-effect transistor biosensors developed here offer new opportunities for future wearable human technologies.

  11. Thin-film conductometric biosensors for glucose and urea determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shul'ga, A A; Soldatkin, A P; El'skaya, A V; Dzyadevich, S V; Patskovsky, S V; Strikha, V I

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of the developed conductometric biosensors for urea and glucose determination are described. Conductometric transducers based on thin-film interdigitated metal (Au, Cr, Cu, Ni) electrodes were studied, and enzymes urease and glucose oxidase were used for the selective membranes formation on the chips having gold electrodes. The influence of ionic strength and buffer capacity of the samples on the biosensors response in kinetic and steady-state modes of measurements was thoroughly tested. It was shown that the kinetic response of the sensors does not depend on the buffer capacity of the analyzed sample. In basic features the performance of the developed biosensors is rather close to that of respective enzyme field effect transistor, though the former are much superior when the technological complexity of the transducer itself is considered and taking into account that conductometric sensors require no reference electrode.

  12. Titanium dioxide-cellulose hybrid nanocomposite based conductometric glucose biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniruzzaman, Mohammad; Mahadeva, Suresha K.; Khondoker, Abu Hasan; Kim, Jaehwan

    2012-04-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of conductometric glucose biosensor based on glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilized TiO2-cellulose hybrid nanocomposite. TiO2 nanoparticles were blended with cellulose solution prepared by dissolving cotton pulp with lithium chloride/N, N-dimethylacetamide solvent to fabricate TiO2-cellulose hybrid nanocomposite. The enzyme (GOx) was immobilized into this hybrid material by physical adsorption method. The successful immobilization of GOx into TiO2-cellulose hybrid nanocomposite via covalent bonding between TiO2 and GOx was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron analysis. The linear response of our propose glucose biosensor is obtained in the range of 1-10mM with correlation coefficient of 0.93. Our study demonstrates TiO2-cellulose hybrid material as a potential candidate for an inexpensive, flexible and disposable glucose biosensor.

  13. Paper electrodes for bioelectrochemistry: Biosensors and biofuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, Cloé; Marquette, Christophe A; Blum, Loïc J; Doumèche, Bastien

    2016-02-15

    Paper-based analytical devices (PAD) emerge in the scientific community since 2007 as low-cost, wearable and disposable devices for point-of-care diagnostic due to the widespread availability, long-time knowledge and easy manufacturing of cellulose. Rapidly, electrodes were introduced in PAD for electrochemical measurements. Together with biological components, a new generation of electrochemical biosensors was born. This review aims to take an inventory of existing electrochemical paper-based biosensors and biofuel cells and to identify, at the light of newly acquired data, suitable methodologies and crucial parameters in this field. Paper selection, electrode material, hydrophobization of cellulose, dedicated electrochemical devices and electrode configuration in biosensors and biofuel cells will be discussed.

  14. Recent advances in electrochemical biosensors based on graphene two-dimensional nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Luo, Yanan; Zhu, Chengzhou; Li, He; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-02-15

    Graphene as a star among two-dimensional nanomaterials has attracted tremendous research interest in the field of electrochemistry due to their intrinsic properties, including the electronic, optical, and mechanical properties associated with their planar structure. The marriage of graphene and electrochemical biosensors has created many ingenious biosensing strategies for applications in the areas of clinical diagnosis and food safety. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in the development of graphene based electrochemical biosensors. Special attention is paid to graphene-based enzyme biosensors, immunosensors, and DNA biosensors. Future perspectives on high-performance graphene-based electrochemical biosensors are also discussed.

  15. Surface plasmon resonance biosensors for detection of foodborne pathogens and toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homola, Jiří; Hegnerová, Kateřina; Vala, Milan

    2009-02-01

    In the last decade surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors have made great strides both in terms of technology and its applications. SPR biosensors have become a central tool for study of molecular interactions and have been widely used for detection of chemical and biological analytes. Food analysis belongs to major areas of potential applications of SPR biosensors. Therefore, numerous SPR biosensors for detection of analytes implicated in food safety (e.g. pathogens, toxins, drug residues, vitamins, hormones, chemical contaminants, and allergens) have been developed. This paper reviews recent developments in the field of SPR biosensors for food safety, in particular, for detection of foodborne pathogens and toxins.

  16. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-03

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  17. Whole-Cell Fluorescent Biosensors for Bioavailability and Biodegradation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ryan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Whole-cell microbial biosensors are one of the newest molecular tools used in environmental monitoring. Such biosensors are constructed through fusing a reporter gene such as lux, gfp or lacZ,to a responsive promoter. There have been many reports of the applications of biosensors, particularly their use in assaying pollutant toxicity and bioavailability. This paper reviews the basic concepts behind the construction of whole-cell microbial biosensors for pollutant monitoring, and describes the applications of two such biosensors for detecting the bioavailability and biodegradation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs.

  18. Electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on less aggregated graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Xiangjie; Zhou, Ming; Guo, Liping

    2017-03-15

    As a novel single-atom-thick sheet of sp(2) hybridized carbon atoms, graphene (GR) has attracted extensive attention in recent years because of its unique and remarkable properties, such as excellent electrical conductivity, large theoretical specific surface area, and strong mechanical strength. However, due to the π-π interaction, GR sheets are inclined to stack together, which may seriously degrade the performance of GR with the unique single-atom layer. In recent years, an increasing number of GR-based electrochemical sensors and biosensors are reported, which may reflect that GR has been considered as a kind of hot and promising electrode material for electrochemical sensor and biosensor construction. However, the active sites on GR surface induced by the irreversible GR aggregations would be deeply secluded inside the stacked GR sheets and therefore are not available for the electrocatalysis. So the alleviation or the minimization of the aggregation level for GR sheets would facilitate the exposure of active sites on GR and effectively upgrade the performance of GR-based electrochemical sensors and biosensors. Less aggregated GR with low aggregation and high dispersed structure can be used in improving the electrochemical activity of GR-based electrochemical sensors or biosensors. In this review, we summarize recent advances and new progress for the development of electrochemical sensors based on less aggregated GR. To achieve such goal, many strategies (such as the intercalation of carbon materials, surface modification, and structural engineering) have been applied to alleviate the aggregation level of GR in order to enhance the performance of GR-based electrochemical sensors and biosensors. Finally, the challenges associated with less aggregated GR-based electrochemical sensors and biosensors as well as related future research directions are discussed.

  19. Fluorescence-based biosensors from concepts to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, May C

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges of modern biology and medicine consists in finding means to visualize biomolecules in their natural environment with the greatest level of accuracy, so as to gain insight into their properties and behaviour in a physiological and pathological setting. This has been achieved thanks to the design of novel imaging agents, in particular to fluorescent biosensors. Fluorescence Biosensors comprise a large set of tools which are useful for fundamental purposes as well as for applications in biomedicine, drug discovery and biotechnology. These tools have been designed a

  20. Integral toxicity test of sea waters by an algal biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnina, Daniele; Campanella, Luigi; Sammartino, Maria Pia; Visco, Giovanni

    2002-04-01

    An integral toxicity test, based on an algal biosensor and suitable to be used in sea water, is presented. The biosensor was designed and built by coupling a Clark oxygen electrode as transducer and the marine alga Spirulina subsalsa as biological mediator; it constitutes the "core" in a lab-scale prototype of a flow apparatus suitable to continuously monitor, in sea water, the photosynthetic activity of the alga and, from its variation, the marine pollution from the toxicological point of view. Inorganic pollutants (heavy metals) were tested in previous researches while organic ones (chlorophenols, pesticides and surfactants) are the object of the present paper.

  1. Last Advances in Silicon-Based Optical Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Fernández Gavela

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We review the most important achievements published in the last five years in the field of silicon-based optical biosensors. We focus specially on label-free optical biosensors and their implementation into lab-on-a-chip platforms, with an emphasis on developments demonstrating the capability of the devices for real bioanalytical applications. We report on novel transducers and materials, improvements of existing transducers, new and improved biofunctionalization procedures as well as the prospects for near future commercialization of these technologies.

  2. Functionalized nanopipettes: toward label-free, single cell biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Paolo; Mak, Andy C; Pourmand, Nader

    2010-08-01

    Nanopipette technology has been proven to be a label-free biosensor capable of identifying DNA and proteins. The nanopipette can include specific recognition elements for analyte discrimination based on size, shape, and charge density. The fully electrical read-out and the ease and low-cost fabrication are unique features that give this technology an enormous potential. Unlike other biosensing platforms, nanopipettes can be precisely manipulated with submicron accuracy and used to study single cell dynamics. This review is focused on creative applications of nanopipette technology for biosensing. We highlight the potential of this technology with a particular attention to integration of this biosensor with single cell manipulation platforms.

  3. Low Noise Readout Circuit for Biosensor SoC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Yin-song; KONG Mou-fu; LI Xiang-quan; WANG Li

    2008-01-01

    Presented is a low noise interface circuit that is tuned to the needs of self-assembly monolayers biosensor SoC. The correlated double sampling(CDS) unit of the readout circuit can reduce 1/f noise, KTC noise and fixed noise of micro arrays effectively. The circuit is simulated in a 0.6 μm/level 7 standard CMOS process, and the simulated results show the output voltage has a good linearity with the transducing current of the micro arrays. This is a novel circuit including four amplifiers sharing a common half-circuit and the noise reducing CDS unit. It could be widely used for micro array biosensors.

  4. Multiplexed measurement of serum antibodies using an array biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Bondi, Maria C; Taitt, Chris Rowe; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C; Ligler, Frances S

    2006-04-15

    The array biosensor provides the capability for simultaneously measuring titers of antibody against multiple antigens. Human antibodies against four different targets, tetanus toxin, diphtheria toxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) and hepatitis B, were measured simultaneously in sera from eight different donors in a single assay and titers were determined. The assays could measure amounts of bound antibody as low as approximately 100 fg. Each individual serum exhibited a different pattern of reactivity against the four target antigens. Applications of this biosensor capability include monitoring for exposure to pathogens and for efficacy of vaccination.

  5. Graphene Based Electrochemical Sensors and Biosensors: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yuyan; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-05-01

    Graphene, emerging as a true 2-dimensional material, has received increasing attention due to its unique physicochemical properties (high surface area, excellent conductivity, high mechanical strength, and ease of functionalization and mass production). This article selectively reviews recent advances in graphene-based electrochemical sensors and biosensors. In particular, graphene for direct electrochemistry of enzyme, its electrocatalytic activity toward small biomolecules (hydrogen peroxide, NADH, dopamine, etc.), and graphene-based enzyme biosensors have been summarized in more detail; Graphene-based DNA sensing and environmental analysis have been discussed. Future perspectives in this rapidly developing field are also discussed.

  6. Detection limits in plasmonic whispering gallery mode biosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Swaim, Jon D; Bowen, Warwick P

    2011-01-01

    We analyze a whispering gallery mode biosensor with a metallic nanorod bound to its surface. It is found that a localized surface plasmon resonance in the nanorod can reduce the optical mode volume of the resonator by as much as four orders of magnitude via a local enhancement of the electric field, thus improving the detection sensitivity. Optical frequency shifts as large as 15 MHz are predicted for typical proteins and, for typical experimental parameters, the biosensor is predicted to be limited by laser frequency noise, leading to a minimum detectable polarizability on the order of 10 cubic angstroms.

  7. Piezoelectric Biosensors for Organophosphate and Carbamate Pesticides: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Marrazza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the great amount of pesticides currently being used, there is an increased interest for developing biosensors for their detection. Among all the physical transducers, piezoelectric systems have emerged as the most attractive due to their simplicity, low instrumentation costs, possibility for real-time and label-free detection and generally high sensitivity. This paper presents an overview of biosensors based on the quartz crystal microbalance, which have been reported in the literature for organophosphate and carbamate pesticide analysis.

  8. Development of biosensor based on imaging ellipsometry and biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, G., E-mail: gajin@imech.ac.c [NML, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Bei-si-huan west Rd., Beijing 100190 (China); Meng, Y.H.; Liu, L.; Niu, Y.; Chen, S. [NML, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Bei-si-huan west Rd., Beijing 100190 (China); Cai, Q.; Jiang, T.J. [Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2011-02-28

    So far, combined with a microfluidic reactor array system, an engineering system of biosensor based on imaging ellipsometry is installed for biomedical applications, such as antibody screen, hepatitis B markers detection, cancer markers spectrum and virus recognition, etc. Furthermore, the biosensor in total internal reflection (TIR) mode has be improved by a spectroscopic light, optimization settings of polarization and low noise CCD which brings an obvious improvement of 10 time increase in the sensitivity and SNR, and 50 times lower concentration in the detection limit with a throughput of 48 independent channels and the time resolution of 0.04 S.

  9. Effects of food surface topography on phage-based magnetoelastic biosensor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Shin; Chai, Yating; Zhao, Ruiting; Wikle, Howard C.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2014-05-01

    Phage-based magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors have proven useful in rapidly and inexpensively detecting food surface con- tamination. These biosensors are wireless, mass-sensitive biosensors and can be placed directly on food surfaces to detect the presence of target pathogens. Previously, millimeter-scale strip-shaped ME biosensors have been used to demonstrate direct detection of Salmonella Typhimurium on various fresh produce surfaces, including tomatoes, shell eggs, watermel- ons, and spinach leaves. Since the topography of these produce surfaces are different, and the biosensor must come into direct contact with Salmonella bacteria, food surfaces with large roughness and curvatures (e.g., spinach leaf surfaces) may allow the bacteria to avoid direct contact, thereby avoiding detection. The primary objective of this paper is, hence, to investigate the effects of food surface topography on the detection capabilities of the biosensors. Spinach leaf surfaces were selected as model surfaces, and detection experiments were conducted with differently sized biosensors (2 mm, 0.5 mm, and 150 μm in length). Spinach leaf roughness and curvatures of both adaxial (top) and abaxial (underside) surfaces were measured using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The experimental results showed that in spinach as the sen- sor was made smaller, the physical contact between the biosensors and bacteria were improved. Smaller sensors thereby enhance detection capabilities. When proper numbers of biosensors are used, micron-scale biosensors are anticipated to yield improved limits of detection over previously investigated millimeter-scale biosensors.

  10. ZnO nanowire-based glucose biosensors with different coupling agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Juneui [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sangwoo, E-mail: swlim@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fabrication of ZnO nanowire-based glucose biosensors using different coupling agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highest sensitivity for (3-aminopropyl)methyldiethoxysilane-treated biosensor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Larger amount of glucose oxidase and lower electron transfer resistance for (3-aminopropyl)methyldiethoxysilane-treated biosensor. - Abstract: ZnO-nanowire-based glucose biosensors were fabricated by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOx) onto a linker attached to ZnO nanowires. Different coupling agents were used, namely (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTMS), (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), and (3-aminopropyl)methyldiethoxysilane (APS), to increase the affinity of GOx binding to ZnO nanowires. The amount of GOx immobilized on the ZnO nanowires, the performance, sensitivity, and Michaelis-Menten constant of each biosensor, and the electron transfer resistance through the biosensor were all measured in order to investigate the effect of the coupling agent on the ZnO nanowire-based biosensor. Among the different biosensors, the APS-treated biosensor had the highest sensitivity (17.72 {mu}A cm{sup -2} mM{sup -1}) and the lowest Michaelis-Menten constant (1.37 mM). Since APS-treated ZnO nanowires showed the largest number of C-N groups and the lowest electron transfer resistance through the biosensor, we concluded that these properties were the key factors in the performance of APS-treated glucose biosensors.

  11. Mass sensitivity calculation of the protein layer using love wave SAW biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangdae; Kim, Ki Bok; Il Kim, Yong

    2012-07-01

    Love waves, a variety of surface acoustic waves (SAWs), can be used to detect very small biological surface interactions and so have a wide range of potential applications. To demonstrate the practicality of a Love wave SAW biosensor, we fabricated a 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor and compared it with a commercial surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) using glycerol-water solution with known densities and viscosities to calibrate the response signals of the biosensors. And the mass per unit area of anti-mouse IgG bound with protein G onto the sensitive layer of the biosensor was calculated on the basis of the calibration result. The sensitivity of the Love wave SAW biosensor was the same as or greater than that of the SPR biosensor. Furthermore, the Love wave SAW biosensor was capable of measuring a much wider range of viscosities than the SPR biosensor. Although the operating principle of the Love wave SAW biosensor is completely different from that of the SPR biosensor, the subtle changes in the viscoelastic properties of the biological layer that accompany biological binding reactions on the sensitive layer can be monitored and measured in the same ways as with the SPR biosensor.

  12. Recent progress in design of protein-based fluorescent biosensors and their cellular applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Tomonori; Hamachi, Itaru

    2014-12-19

    Protein-based fluorescent biosensors have emerged as key bioanalytical tools to visualize and quantify a wide range of biological substances and events in vitro, in cells, and even in vivo. On the basis of the construction method, the protein-based fluorescent biosensors can be principally classified into two classes: (1) genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors harnessing fluorescent proteins (FPs) and (2) semisynthetic biosensors comprised of protein scaffolds and synthetic fluorophores. Recent advances in protein engineering and chemical biology not only allowed the further optimization of conventional biosensors but also facilitated the creation of novel biosensors based on unique strategies. In this review, we survey the recent studies in the development and improvement of protein-based fluorescent biosensors and highlight the successful applications to live cell and in vivo imaging. Furthermore, we provide perspectives on possible future directions of the technique.

  13. Effect of different modifications of BEA-zeolites on operational characteristics of conductometric biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherenko, I S; Soldatkin, Capital O Cyrillic О; Soy, E; Kirdeciler, K; Öztürk, S; Akata, B; Jaffrezic-Renault, N; Soldatkin, A P; Dzyadevych, S V

    2012-08-01

    Effect of different modifications of zeolite Na(+)-BEA on working characteristics of urease-based conductometric biosensor was studied. As the biosensor sensitive elements were used bioselective membranes based on urease and various zeolites immobilised with bovine serum albumin on the surface of conductometric transducers. Influence of zeolites on sensitivity of urea biosensor was investigated as well as reproducibility of biosensor signal and reproducibility of activity of the bioselective element after different variants of urease immobilisation on the surface of conductometric transducer. The biosensors based on zeolites (NH4(+)-BEA 30 and H(+)-BEA 30) were shown to be the most sensitive. Concentration of these zeolites in the bioselective membrane was optimized. Use of zeolites modified with methyl viologen and silver was ascertained to be of no prospect for urea conductometric biosensors. It was demonstrated that characteristics of urea biosensors can be regulated, varying zeolites modifications and their concentrations in bioselective membranes.

  14. Potentiality of application of the conductometric L-arginine biosensors for the real sample analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffrezic-Renault N.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine an influence of serum components on the L-arginine biosensor sensitivity and to formulate practical recommendations for its reliable analysis. Methods. The L-arginine biosensor comprised arginase and urease co-immobilized by cross-linking. Results. The biosensor specificity was investigated based on a series of representative studies (namely, through urea determination in the serum; inhibitory effect studies of mercury ions; high temperature treatment of sensors; studying the biosensor sensitivity to the serum treated by enzymes, and selectivity studies. It was found that the response of the biosensor to the serum injections was determined by high sensitivity of the L-arginine biosensor toward not only to L-arginine but also toward two other basic amino acids (L-lysine and L-histidine. Conclusions. A detailed procedure of optimization of the conductometric biosensor for L-arginine determination in blood serum has been proposed.

  15. Lipid Microarray Biosensor for Biotoxin Detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Anup K.; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Moran-Mirabal, Jose C.; Edel, Joshua B.; Meyer, Grant D.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2006-05-01

    We present the use of micron-sized lipid domains, patterned onto planar substrates and within microfluidic channels, to assay the binding of bacterial toxins via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The lipid domains were patterned using a polymer lift-off technique and consisted of ganglioside-populated DSPC:cholesterol supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). Lipid patterns were formed on the substrates by vesicle fusion followed by polymer lift-off, which revealed micron-sized SLBs containing either ganglioside GT1b or GM1. The ganglioside-populated SLB arrays were then exposed to either Cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) or Tetanus toxin fragment C (TTC). Binding was assayed on planar substrates by TIRFM down to 1 nM concentration for CTB and 100 nM for TTC. Apparent binding constants extracted from three different models applied to the binding curves suggest that binding of a protein to a lipid-based receptor is strongly affected by the lipid composition of the SLB and by the substrate on which the bilayer is formed. Patterning of SLBs inside microfluidic channels also allowed the preparation of lipid domains with different compositions on a single device. Arrays within microfluidic channels were used to achieve segregation and selective binding from a binary mixture of the toxin fragments in one device. The binding and segregation within the microfluidic channels was assayed with epifluorescence as proof of concept. We propose that the method used for patterning the lipid microarrays on planar substrates and within microfluidic channels can be easily adapted to proteins or nucleic acids and can be used for biosensor applications and cell stimulation assays under different flow conditions. KEYWORDS. Microarray, ganglioside, polymer lift-off, cholera toxin, tetanus toxin, TIRFM, binding constant.4

  16. The development and application of FET-based biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, P.

    1986-01-01

    After having considered the general definition of biosensors, the specifications of one type are discussed here in more detail, namely the pH-sensitive ISFET, which is at present being clinically investigated for intravascular blood pH recording. Results, advantages and possible improvements will be

  17. Fluorescent proteins as genetically encoded FRET biosensors in life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochreiter, Bernhard; Garcia, Alan Pardo; Schmid, Johannes A

    2015-10-16

    Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a) cleavage; (b) conformational-change; (c) mechanical force and (d) changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them.

  18. Properties of Deterministic Aperiodic Photonic Nanostructures for Biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Moritz; Jahns, Sabrina; Neustock, Lars Thorben

    for these structures and are compared to the experimental results. [1] Jahns, S., Bräu, M., Meyer, B. O., Karrock, T., Gutekunst, S. B., Blohm, L., Selhuber-Unkel, C., Buhmann, R., Nazirizadeh, Y., Gerken, M. (2015). Handheld imaging photonic crystal biosensor for multiplexed, label-free protein detection. Biomedical...

  19. Scattering-Type Surface-Plasmon-Resonance Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas; Seshadri, Suresh

    2005-01-01

    Biosensors of a proposed type would exploit scattering of light by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Related prior biosensors exploit absorption of light by SPR. Relative to the prior SPR biosensors, the proposed SPR biosensors would offer greater sensitivity in some cases, enough sensitivity to detect bioparticles having dimensions as small as nanometers. A surface plasmon wave can be described as a light-induced collective oscillation in electron density at the interface between a metal and a dielectric. At SPR, most incident photons are either absorbed or scattered at the metal/dielectric interface and, consequently, reflected light is greatly attenuated. The resonance wavelength and angle of incidence depend upon the permittivities of the metal and dielectric. An SPR sensor of the type most widely used heretofore includes a gold film coated with a ligand a substance that binds analyte molecules. The gold film is thin enough to support evanescent-wave coupling through its thickness. The change in the effective index of refraction at the surface, and thus the change in the SPR response, increases with the number of bound analyte molecules. The device is illuminated at a fixed wavelength, and the intensity of light reflected from the gold surface opposite the ligand-coated surface is measured as a function of the angle of incidence. From these measurements, the angle of minimum reflection intensity is determined

  20. Synthesis and assessment of peptide-nanocellulosic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanocellulose is an ideal transducer surface for biosensors: it provides a high surface area, easily derivatized with bioactive molecules, and abrogates binding of proteins present in biological fluids where analytes and clinical biomarkers are of interest. Here an example of approaches to biosenso...

  1. Features and application of wearable biosensors in medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Ajami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the new technologies in the field of health is wearable biosensor, which provides vital signs monitoring of patients, athletes, premature infants, children, psychiatric patients, people who need long-term care, elderly, and people in impassable regions far from health and medical services. The aim of this study was to explain features and applications of wearable biosensors in medical services. This was a narrative review study that done in 2015. Search conducted with the help of libraries, books, conference proceedings, through databases of Science Direct, PubMed, Proquest, Springer, and SID (Scientific Information Database. In our searches, we employed the following keywords and their combinations; vital sign monitoring, medical smart shirt, smart clothing, wearable biosensors, physiological monitoring system, remote detection systems, remote control health, and bio-monitoring system. The preliminary search resulted in 54 articles, which published between 2002 and 2015. After a careful analysis of the content of each paper, 41 sources selected based on their relevancy. Although the use of wearable in healthcare is still in an infant stage, it could have a magic effect on healthcare. Smart wearable in the technology industry for 2015 is one that is looking to be a big and profitable market. Wearable biosensors capable of continuous vital signs monitoring and feedback to the user will be significantly effective in timely prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and control of diseases.

  2. Beyond graphene: Electrochemical sensors and biosensors for biomarkers detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollella, Paolo; Fusco, Giovanni; Tortolini, Cristina; Sanzò, Gabriella; Favero, Gabriele; Gorton, Lo; Antiochia, Riccarda

    2017-03-15

    Graphene's success has stimulated great interest and research in the synthesis and characterization of graphene-like 2D materials, single and few-atom-thick layers of van der Waals materials, which show fascinating and technologically useful properties. This review presents an overview of recent electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on graphene and on graphene-like 2D materials for biomarkers detection. Initially, we will outline different electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on chemically derived graphene, including graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide, properly functionalized for improved performances and we will discuss the various strategies to prepare graphene modified electrodes. Successively, we present electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on graphene-like 2D materials, such as boron nitride (BN), graphite-carbon nitride (g-C3N4), transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), transition metal oxides and graphane, outlining how the new modified 2D nanomaterials will improve the electrochemical performances. Finally, we will compare the results obtained with different sensors and biosensors for the detection of important biomarkers such as glucose, hydrogen peroxide and cancer biomarkers and highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the use of graphene and graphene-like 2D materials in different sensing platforms.

  3. A sensitive DNA capacitive biosensor using interdigitated electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Veselinovic, Milena; Yang, Lang; Geiss, Brian J; Dandy, David S; Chen, Tom

    2017-01-15

    This paper presents a label-free affinity-based capacitive biosensor using interdigitated electrodes. Using an optimized process of DNA probe preparation to minimize the effect of contaminants in commercial thiolated DNA probe, the electrode surface was functionalized with the 24-nucleotide DNA probes based on the West Nile virus sequence (Kunjin strain). The biosensor has the ability to detect complementary DNA fragments with a detection limit down to 20 DNA target molecules (1.5aM range), making it suitable for a practical point-of-care (POC) platform for low target count clinical applications without the need for amplification. The reproducibility of the biosensor detection was improved with efficient covalent immobilization of purified single-stranded DNA probe oligomers on cleaned gold microelectrodes. In addition to the low detection limit, the biosensor showed a dynamic range of detection from 1µL(-1) to 10(5)µL(-1) target molecules (20 to 2 million targets), making it suitable for sample analysis in a typical clinical application environment. The binding results presented in this paper were validated using fluorescent oligomers.

  4. Label-free biosensor based on long period grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, Francesco; Chiavaioli, Francesco; Giannetti, Ambra; Brenci, Massimo; Trono, Cosimo

    2013-03-01

    Long period gratings have been recently proposed as label-free optical devices for biochemical sensing. A biochemical interaction along the grating region changes the biolayer refractive index and a change in the fiber transmission spectrum occurs. The fiber biofunctionalization was performed with a novel chemistry using Eudragit L100 copolymer as opposed to the commonly-used silanization procedure. An IgG/anti-IgG bioassay was carried out for studying the antigen/antibody interaction. The biosensor was fully characterized, monitoring the kinetics during the antibody immobilization and achieving the calibration curve of the assay. To compare the biosensor performance, two LPG-based biosensors with distinct grating periods were characterized following the same bioassay protocol. Experimental results demonstrated an enhancement of the biosensor performance when the fundamental core mode of a single-mode fiber couples with a higher order cladding mode. Considering an LPG manufactured on a bare optical fiber, in which the coupling occurs with the 7-th cladding mode, a dynamic signal range of 0.33 nm, a working range of 1.7 - 1450 mg L-1 and a LOD of 500 μg L-1 were achieved

  5. Amperometric urea biosensors based on sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das G

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Gautam Das, Hyon Hee Yoon Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Gachon University, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea Abstract: An electrochemical biosensor based on sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite was developed for urea analysis. Oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of sulfonated graphene oxide was carried out by electrochemical methods in an aqueous environment. The structural properties of the nanocomposite were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The urease enzyme-immobilized sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite film showed impressive performance in the electroanalytical detection of urea with a detection limit of 0.050 mM and a sensitivity of 0.85 µA·cm-2·mM-1. The biosensor achieved a broad linear range of detection (0.12–12.3 mM with a notable response time of approximately 5 seconds. Moreover, the fabricated biosensor retained 81% of its initial activity (based on sensitivity after 15 days of storage at 4°C. The ease of fabrication coupled with the low cost and good electrochemical performance of this system holds potential for the development of solid-state biosensors for urea detection. Keywords: electrochemical deposition, sulfonated graphene oxide, urease

  6. Indicator Based and Indicator - Free Electrochemical DNA Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    of genomic material from infectious organisms. Methylene blue (MB) is an aromatic heterocycle that binds strongly to DNA via intercalation. MB...detection of disease- related point mutation in the guanine bases of the cyanobacteria . The resulting biosensors offer great promise for mismatch

  7. Bacillus subtilis Biosensor Engineered To Assess Meat Spoilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daszczuk, Alicja; Dessalegne, Yonathan; Drenth, Ismael; Hendriks, Elbrich; Jo, Emeraldo; van Lente, Tom; Oldebesten, Arjan; Parrish, Jonathon; Poljakova, Wlada; Purwanto, Annisa A.; van Raaphorst, Renske; Boonstra, Mirjam; van Heel, Auke; Herber, Martijn; van der Meulen, Sjoerd; Siebring, Jeroen; Sorg, Robin A.; Heinemann, Matthias; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2014-01-01

    Here, we developed a cell-based biosensor that can assess meat freshness using the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis as a chassis. Using transcriptome analysis, we identified promoters that are specifically activated by volatiles released from spoiled meat. The most strongly activated

  8. Biosensor immunoassay for flumequine in broiler serum and muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, W.; Gercek, H.; Cazemier, G.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2007-01-01

    Flumequine (Flu) is one of the fluoroquinolones most frequently applied for the treatment of broilers in The Netherlands. For the detection of residues of Flu in blood serum of broilers, a biosensor immunoassay (BIA) was developed which was fast (7.5 min per sample) and specific (no cross-reactivity

  9. Amperometric urea biosensors based on sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Gautam; Yoon, Hyon Hee

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical biosensor based on sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite was developed for urea analysis. Oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of sulfonated graphene oxide was carried out by electrochemical methods in an aqueous environment. The structural properties of the nanocomposite were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The urease enzyme-immobilized sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite film showed impressive performance in the electroanalytical detection of urea with a detection limit of 0.050 mM and a sensitivity of 0.85 (μA · cm(-2)·mM(-1). The biosensor achieved a broad linear range of detection (0.12-12.3 mM) with a notable response time of approximately 5 seconds. Moreover, the fabricated biosensor retained 81% of its initial activity (based on sensitivity) after 15 days of storage at 4°C. The ease of fabrication coupled with the low cost and good electrochemical performance of this system holds potential for the development of solid-state biosensors for urea detection.

  10. Entwicklung eines amperometrischen Biosensors zur Erfassung von Polyphenolen

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In der durchgeführten Arbeit wurden neue Immobilisierungsstrategien zur Etablierung eines amperometrischen Biosensors, welcher Polyphenole erfasst, untersucht. Ziel war es eine „Handheld-Unit“ unter Verwendung einer Dickschichtelektrode (Thick-Film Technology, TFT) zu entwickeln. Zur Erfassung von Polyphenolen wurde das Enzym Laccase ausgewählt, welche die Oxidation von Phenolen zu Chinonen katalysiert. Dabei wurden in dieser Arbe...

  11. Electrochemical biosensors: Recommended definitions and classification (Technical Report)

    OpenAIRE

    Thevenot, Daniel,; Toth, Klara; Durst, Richard; Wilson, George

    1999-01-01

    International audience; Two Divisions of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), namely Physical Chemistry (Commission I.7 on Biophysical Chemistry, formerly Steering Committee on Biophysical Chemistry) and Analytical Chemistry (Commission V.5 on Electroanalytical Chemistry), have prepared recommendations on the definition, classification and nomenclature related to electrochemical biosensors; these recommendations could, in the future, be extended to other types of bio...

  12. A global benchmark study using affinity-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Rebecca L.; Papalia, Giuseppe A.; Flynn, Peter J.; Furneisen, Jamie; Quinn, John; Klein, Joshua S.; Katsamba, Phini S.; Waddell, M. Brent; Scott, Michael; Thompson, Joshua; Berlier, Judie; Corry, Schuyler; Baltzinger, Mireille; Zeder-Lutz, Gabrielle; Schoenemann, Andreas; Clabbers, Anca; Wieckowski, Sebastien; Murphy, Mary M.; Page, Phillip; Ryan, Thomas E.; Duffner, Jay; Ganguly, Tanmoy; Corbin, John; Gautam, Satyen; Anderluh, Gregor; Bavdek, Andrej; Reichmann, Dana; Yadav, Satya P.; Hommema, Eric; Pol, Ewa; Drake, Andrew; Klakamp, Scott; Chapman, Trevor; Kernaghan, Dawn; Miller, Ken; Schuman, Jason; Lindquist, Kevin; Herlihy, Kara; Murphy, Michael B.; Bohnsack, Richard; Andrien, Bruce; Brandani, Pietro; Terwey, Danny; Millican, Rohn; Darling, Ryan J.; Wang, Liann; Carter, Quincy; Dotzlaf, Joe; Lopez-Sagaseta, Jacinto; Campbell, Islay; Torreri, Paola; Hoos, Sylviane; England, Patrick; Liu, Yang; Abdiche, Yasmina; Malashock, Daniel; Pinkerton, Alanna; Wong, Melanie; Lafer, Eileen; Hinck, Cynthia; Thompson, Kevin; Primo, Carmelo Di; Joyce, Alison; Brooks, Jonathan; Torta, Federico; Bagge Hagel, Anne Birgitte; Krarup, Janus; Pass, Jesper; Ferreira, Monica; Shikov, Sergei; Mikolajczyk, Malgorzata; Abe, Yuki; Barbato, Gaetano; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Krishnamoorthy, Ganeshram; Beusink, Bianca; Satpaev, Daulet; Tsang, Tiffany; Fang, Eric; Partridge, James; Brohawn, Stephen; Horn, James; Pritsch, Otto; Obal, Gonzalo; Nilapwar, Sanjay; Busby, Ben; Gutierrez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Gupta, Ruchira Das; Canepa, Sylvie; Witte, Krista; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; Cho, Yun Hee; D’Agata, Roberta; Schlick, Kristian; Calvert, Rosy; Munoz, Eva M.; Hernaiz, Maria Jose; Bravman, Tsafir; Dines, Monica; Yang, Min-Hsiang; Puskas, Agnes; Boni, Erica; Li, Jiejin; Wear, Martin; Grinberg, Asya; Baardsnes, Jason; Dolezal, Olan; Gainey, Melicia; Anderson, Henrik; Peng, Jinlin; Lewis, Mark; Spies, Peter; Trinh, Quyhn; Bibikov, Sergei; Raymond, Jill; Yousef, Mohammed; Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Feng, Yuguo; Emerick, Anne; Mundodo, Suparna; Guimaraes, Rejane; McGirr, Katy; Li, Yue-Ji; Hughes, Heather; Mantz, Hubert; Skrabana, Rostislav; Witmer, Mark; Ballard, Joshua; Martin, Loic; Skladal, Petr; Korza, George; Laird-Offringa, Ite; Lee, Charlene S.; Khadir, Abdelkrim; Podlaski, Frank; Neuner, Phillippe; Rothacker, Julie; Rafique, Ashique; Dankbar, Nico; Kainz, Peter; Gedig, Erk; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Boozer, Christina; Ly, Nguyen; Toews, Mark; Uren, Aykut; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Lewis, Kenneth; Chomey, Eugene; Pak, Brian J.; Myszka, David G.

    2013-01-01

    To explore the variability in biosensor studies, 150 participants from 20 countries were given the same protein samples and asked to determine kinetic rate constants for the interaction. We chose a protein system that was amenable to analysis using different biosensor platforms as well as by users of different expertise levels. The two proteins (a 50-kDa Fab and a 60-kDa glutathione S-transferase [GST] antigen) form a relatively high-affinity complex, so participants needed to optimize several experimental parameters, including ligand immobilization and regeneration conditions as well as analyte concentrations and injection/dissociation times. Although most participants collected binding responses that could be fit to yield kinetic parameters, the quality of a few data sets could have been improved by optimizing the assay design. Once these outliers were removed, the average reported affinity across the remaining panel of participants was 620 pM with a standard deviation of 980 pM. These results demonstrate that when this biosensor assay was designed and executed appropriately, the reported rate constants were consistent, and independent of which protein was immobilized and which biosensor was used. PMID:19133223

  13. Nuclear track-based biosensors with the enzyme laccase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Arellano, H. [Departamento de Ciencias Ambientales, División de Ciencias Biológicas y de la Salud, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Lerma, Av. de las Garzas No. 10, Col. El Panteón, Lerma de Villada, Municipio de Lerma, Estado de México, C.P. 52005 (Mexico); Fink, D., E-mail: fink@xanum.uam.mx [Division de Ciencias Naturales e Ingeneria, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Artificios 40, Col. Hidalgo, Del. Álvaro Obregón C.P. 01120, México, D.F. (Mexico); Nuclear Physics Institute, 25068 Řež (Czech Republic); Muñoz Hernández, G. [Division de Ciencias Naturales e Ingeneria, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Artificios 40, Col. Hidalgo, Del. Álvaro Obregón C.P. 01120, México, D.F. (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, PO Box 55-534, 09340 México, D.F. (Mexico); Vacík, J.; Hnatowicz, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute, 25068 Řež (Czech Republic); Alfonta, L. [Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, PO Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We construct a biosensor using polymer foils with laccase-clad etched nuclear tracks. • We use the biosensor for quantitation of phenolic compounds. • The biosensor can detect picomolar concentrations for some phenolic compounds. - Abstract: A new type of biosensors for detecting phenolic compounds is presented here. These sensors consist of thin polymer foils with laccase-clad etched nuclear tracks. The presence of suitable phenolic compounds in the sensors leads to the formation of enzymatic reaction products in the tracks, which differ in their electrical conductivities from their precursor materials. These differences correlate with the concentrations of the phenolic compounds. Corresponding calibration curves have been established for a number of compounds. The sensors thus produced are capable to cover between 5 and 9 orders of magnitude in concentration – in the best case down to some picomoles. The sensor's detection sensitivity strongly depends on the specific compound. It is highest for caffeic acid and acid blue 74, followed by ABTS and ferulic acid.

  14. Multiplex biosensor immunoassays for antibiotics in the food chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals may result in unwanted residues in food products. The main objective of the present research was to study the development and application of fast and automated multiplex surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor immunoassays (BIAs), based on mul

  15. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING A FIBEROPTIC BIOSENSOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and sensitive fiber optic biosensor assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. For this assay, a biotin-labeled capture oligonucleotide (38 mer) was immobilized to an avidin-coated quartz fiber. Hybridization of a dye-labeled complementary sequence was observed...

  16. Screening Substrate Properties of Microorganisms for Biosensor Detection of Oligosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oligosaccharides feature high biological activity ensuring their wide application in the biotechnology, food, and cosmetic industries. On the other hand they are considered environmental pollutants. The study outlines a biosensor approach to detect these substances which is important from above st...

  17. A versatile biosensor device for continuous biomedical monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhemrev-Boom, MM; Korf, J; Venema, K; Urban, G; Vadgama, P

    2001-01-01

    Although biosensors are by means suitable for continuous biomedical monitoring, due to fouling and blood clotting, in vivo performance is far from optimal. For this reason, ultrafiltration, microdialysis or open tubular flow is frequently used as interface. To secure quantitative recoveries of the a

  18. Aquatarium - Biosensor & Aquatarium set i et akustisk perspektiv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsay, Loren Mark

    2014-01-01

    om behovet for returskyl. Det andet projekt omhandler biosensorer. Her undersøger vi om en on-line monitering af drikkevandets bakteriologiske vandkvalitet løses bedst ved et system bestående af flere enkeltkomponenter: sensor, automatisk prøvetager, karakteriseringsanalyser. Der udvikles en mindre...

  19. Photonic Biosensor Chips for Label-Free Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin

    Optical fibers are ideal for transmission of light due to their low loss. This is less important for optical sensors where chemical compatibility, size and price are more important. These parameters can be optimized by using planar integrated optics and fabrication methods from the semiconductor ...... industry with adaptations to satisfy the requirements of biosensors....

  20. Conductometric biosensor for ethanol detection based on whole yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpan, Y I; Dzyadevich, S V; Zharova, V P; El'skaya, A V

    1994-01-01

    The quantification of ethanol in alcoholic beverages was performed by yeast cell-based conductometric biosensor. A membrane with yeast cells immobilized in 2% Ca-alginate gel was attached on gold planar electrodes. Changes in conductivity due to the specific consumption of ethanol by yeast cells were registered by the computer-controlled sensor system. The response time of the constructed microbial sensor was less than 5 min, linearity (in a logarithmic scale) was observed in the range of 5-100 mM alcohol concentration. It was established that pH value in their region from 5 to 8 did not influence the levels of initial signal. The increase of a buffer capacity in the sample results in the decrease of the biosensor output. The minimal detectable level of ethanol was 1 mM and the relative standard deviation appeared to be 10-12% for 15 repeated assays. When the system was operated and stored at 20-25 degrees C, the biosensor response was stable for only 3 days. However, when the microbial sensor was stored at 4 degrees C, the system was stable up to 12 days. Good correlation between the results obtained by a conductometric cell-biosensor and gas chromatograph was observed.

  1. Nanosized zeolites as a perspective material for conductometric biosensors creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherenko, Ivan; Soldatkin, Oleksandr; Kasap, Berna Ozansoy; Kirdeciler, Salih Kaan; Kurc, Burcu Akata; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Soldatkin, Alexei; Lagarde, Florence; Dzyadevych, Sergei

    2015-05-01

    In this work, the method of enzyme adsorption on different zeolites and mesoporous silica spheres (MSS) was investigated for the creation of conductometric biosensors. The conductometric transducers consisted of gold interdigitated electrodes were placed on the ceramic support. The transducers were modified with zeolites and MSS, and then the enzymes were adsorbed on the transducer surface. Different methods of zeolite attachment to the transducer surface were used; drop coating with heating to 200°C turned out to be the best one. Nanozeolites beta and L, zeolite L, MSS, and silicalite-1 (80 to 450 nm) were tested as the adsorbents for enzyme urease. The biosensors with all tested particles except zeolite L had good analytical characteristics. Silicalite-1 (450 nm) was also used for adsorption of glucose oxidase, acetylcholinesterase, and butyrylcholinesterase. The glucose and acetylcholine biosensors were successfully created, whereas butyrylcholinesterase was not adsorbed on silicalite-1. The enzyme adsorption on zeolites and MSS is simple, quick, well reproducible, does not require use of toxic compounds, and therefore can be recommended for the development of biosensors when these advantages are especially important.

  2. A novel urea conductometric biosensor based on zeolite immobilized urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirdeciler, Salih Kaan; Soy, Esin; Oztürk, Seçkin; Kucherenko, Ivan; Soldatkin, Oleksandr; Dzyadevych, Sergei; Akata, Burcu

    2011-09-15

    A new approach was developed for urea determination where a thin film of silicalite and zeolite Beta deposited onto gold electrodes of a conductometric biosensor was used to immobilize the enzyme. Biosensor responses, operational and storage stabilities were compared with results obtained from the standard membrane methods for the same measurements. For this purpose, different surface modification techniques, which are simply named as Zeolite Membrane Transducers (ZMTs) and Zeolite Coated Transducers (ZCTs) were compared with Standard Membrane Transducers (SMTs). Silicalite and zeolite Beta with Si/Al ratios 40, 50 and 60 were used to modify the conductometric electrodes and to study the biosensor responses as a function of changing zeolitic parameters. During the measurements using ZCT electrodes, there was no need for any cross-linker to immobilize urease, which allowed the direct evaluation of the effect of changing Si/Al ratio for the same type of zeolite on the biosensor responses for the first time. It was seen that silicalite and zeolite Beta added electrodes in all cases lead to increased responses with respect to SMTs. The responses obtained from ZCTs were always higher than ZMTs as well. The responses obtained from zeolite Beta modified ZMTs and ZCTs increased as a function of increasing Si/Al ratio, which might be due to the increased hydrophobicity and/or the acid strength of the medium.

  3. Amperometric urea biosensors based on sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Gautam; Yoon, Hyon Hee

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical biosensor based on sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite was developed for urea analysis. Oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of sulfonated graphene oxide was carried out by electrochemical methods in an aqueous environment. The structural properties of the nanocomposite were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The urease enzyme-immobilized sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite film showed impressive performance in the electroanalytical detection of urea with a detection limit of 0.050 mM and a sensitivity of 0.85 (μA · cm−2·mM−1. The biosensor achieved a broad linear range of detection (0.12–12.3 mM) with a notable response time of approximately 5 seconds. Moreover, the fabricated biosensor retained 81% of its initial activity (based on sensitivity) after 15 days of storage at 4°C. The ease of fabrication coupled with the low cost and good electrochemical performance of this system holds potential for the development of solid-state biosensors for urea detection. PMID:26346240

  4. Investigation of biosensor built with photonic crystal microcavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoling Wang; Naiguang Lü; Qiaofeng Tan; Guofan Jin

    2008-01-01

    The ultra-compact biosensor based on the two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PhC) microcavity is investigated. The performances of the sensor are analyzed theoretically using the Fabry-Perot (F-P) cavity model and simulated using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The simulation results go along with the theoretical analysis.

  5. Features and application of wearable biosensors in medical care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Sima; Teimouri, Fotooheh

    2015-01-01

    One of the new technologies in the field of health is wearable biosensor, which provides vital signs monitoring of patients, athletes, premature infants, children, psychiatric patients, people who need long-term care, elderly, and people in impassable regions far from health and medical services. The aim of this study was to explain features and applications of wearable biosensors in medical services. This was a narrative review study that done in 2015. Search conducted with the help of libraries, books, conference proceedings, through databases of Science Direct, PubMed, Proquest, Springer, and SID (Scientific Information Database). In our searches, we employed the following keywords and their combinations; vital sign monitoring, medical smart shirt, smart clothing, wearable biosensors, physiological monitoring system, remote detection systems, remote control health, and bio-monitoring system. The preliminary search resulted in 54 articles, which published between 2002 and 2015. After a careful analysis of the content of each paper, 41 sources selected based on their relevancy. Although the use of wearable in healthcare is still in an infant stage, it could have a magic effect on healthcare. Smart wearable in the technology industry for 2015 is one that is looking to be a big and profitable market. Wearable biosensors capable of continuous vital signs monitoring and feedback to the user will be significantly effective in timely prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and control of diseases. PMID:26958058

  6. Fluorescent Proteins as Genetically Encoded FRET Biosensors in Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochreiter, Bernhard; Pardo Garcia, Alan; Schmid, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a) cleavage; (b) conformational-change; (c) mechanical force and (d) changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them. PMID:26501285

  7. Fluorescent Proteins as Genetically Encoded FRET Biosensors in Life Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Hochreiter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a cleavage; (b conformational-change; (c mechanical force and (d changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them.

  8. Fluorescent biosensors for high throughput screening of protein kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Van, Thi Nhu Ngoc; Morris, May C

    2014-02-01

    High throughput screening assays aim to identify small molecules that interfere with protein function, activity, or conformation, which can serve as effective tools for chemical biology studies of targets involved in physiological processes or pathways of interest or disease models, as well as templates for development of therapeutics in medicinal chemistry. Fluorescent biosensors constitute attractive and powerful tools for drug discovery programs, from high throughput screening assays, to postscreen characterization of hits, optimization of lead compounds, and preclinical evaluation of candidate drugs. They provide a means of screening for inhibitors that selectively target enzymatic activity, conformation, and/or function in vitro. Moreover, fluorescent biosensors constitute useful tools for cell- and image-based, multiplex and multiparametric, high-content screening. Application of fluorescence-based sensors to screen large and complex libraries of compounds in vitro, in cell-based formats or whole organisms requires several levels of optimization to establish robust and reproducible assays. In this review, we describe the different fluorescent biosensor technologies which have been applied to high throughput screens, and discuss the prerequisite criteria underlying their successful application. Special emphasis is placed on protein kinase biosensors, since these enzymes constitute one of the most important classes of therapeutic targets in drug discovery.

  9. Development of an immunoFET biosensor for the detection of biotinylated PCR product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wannaporn Muangsuwan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ImmunoFET (IMFET biosensor is a simple platform for the detection of biotinylated products of polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Construction of the IMFET biosensor started with adsorption of 1.5 mg/mL of protein A (PA onto the insulated gate surface of ISFET for 90 min. Next, the immobilized 1/500 dilution of anti-biotin antibody was adsorbed onto the PA layer for 60 min. The IMFET biosensor was subsequently ready for detection of the biotinylated amplicon. The IMFET biosensor showed highly specific binding to the biotinylated PCR product of the phaE gene of Haloquadratum walsbyi DSM 16854. The phaE gene is a biomarker of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA producers that contain PHA synthase class III. The lowest amount of DNA template of H. walsbyi DSM 16854 that the IMFET biosensor could detect was 125 fg. The IMFET biosensor has a lower amount of detection compared with a DNA lateral flow biosensor from our previous study. The degree of linearity of the biosensor signal was influenced by the concentration of the biotinylated amplicon. The IMFET biosensor also has a short response time (approximately 30 times to detect the phaE amplicon compared to an agarose gel electrophoresis. The IMFET biosensor is a promising tool for the detection of the biotinylated PCR product, and it can be integrated into a micro total analysis system (μTAS.

  10. Environmental sensing of heavy metals through whole cell microbial biosensors: a synthetic biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereza-Malcolm, Lara Tess; Mann, Gülay; Franks, Ashley Edwin

    2015-05-15

    Whole cell microbial biosensors are offering an alternative means for rapid, on-site heavy metal detection. Based in microorganisms, biosensing constructs are designed and constructed to produce both qualitative and quantitative outputs in response to heavy metal ions. Previous microbial biosensors designs are focused on single-input constructs; however, development of multiplexed systems is resulting in more flexible designs. The movement of microbial biosensors from laboratory based designs toward on-site, functioning heavy metal detectors has been hindered by the toxic nature of heavy metals, along with the lack of specificity of heavy metals promoter elements. Applying a synthetic biology approach with alternative microbial chassis may increase the robustness of microbial biosensors and mitigate these issues. Before full applications are achieved, further consideration has to be made regarding the risk and regulations of whole cell microbial biosensor use in the environment. To this end, a standard framework for future whole cell microbial biosensor design and use is proposed.

  11. Development of mercury (II) ion biosensors based on mercury-specific oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lanying; Wen, Yanli; Xu, Li; Xu, Qin; Song, Shiping; Zuo, Xiaolei; Yan, Juan; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-15

    Mercury (II) ion (Hg(2+)) contamination can be accumulated along the food chain and cause serious threat to the public health. Plenty of research effort thus has been devoted to the development of fast, sensitive and selective biosensors for monitoring Hg(2+). Thymine was demonstrated to specifically combine with Hg(2+) and form a thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) structure, with binding constant even higher than T-A Watson-Crick pair in DNA duplex. Recently, various novel Hg(2+) biosensors have been developed based on T-rich Mercury-Specific Oligonucleotide (MSO) probes, and exhibited advanced selectivity and excellent sensitivity for Hg(2+) detection. In this review, we explained recent development of MSO-based Hg(2+) biosensors mainly in 3 groups: fluorescent biosensors, colorimetric biosensors and electrochemical biosensors.

  12. A novel glutamine biosensor based on zinc oxide nanorod and glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Dilruba; Karakuş, Emine

    2016-01-01

    A novel biosensor for determination of L-glutamine in pharmaceutical glutamine powder was developed via immobilizing our produced glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina onto our prepared zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod and chitosan. ZnO nanorods were prepared as surface-dependent and surface-independent and both were used. The biosensor is specific for L-glutamine and the peculiar analytical properties (linearity range, reproducibility, and accuracy) of it were experimentally determined. The optimum operating conditions of the biosensor such as buffer concentration, buffer pH, and medium temperature effect on the response of biosensor were studied. Km and Vmax values for the our-producing glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina immobilized on the biosensor were also determined as 0.29 mM and 208.33 mV/min., respectively, from Lineweaver-Burk plot. The biosensor was then used for the determination of glutamine contained in pharmaceutical formulations.

  13. Glyco-biosensors: recent advances and applications for the detection of free and bound carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Stephen; Gerlach, Jared Q; Kane, Marian; Joshi, Lokesh

    2010-10-01

    The field of biosensor development now encompasses several areas specifically geared toward the rapid and sensitive detection, identification, and quantification of target analytes. In contrast to the more mature research and development of nucleic acid and protein biosensors, the development of 'glyco-biosensors' for detecting carbohydrates and conjugates of carbohydrates (glycoconjugates) is at a relatively nascent stage. The application of glyco-biosensors aims to open novel analytical and diagnostic avenues, encompassing industrial bioprocesses, biomedical and clinical applications. This area of research has been greatly aided by advancement brought by interdisciplinary mergers of engineering, biology, chemistry and physical sciences and enabling the miniaturization of detection platforms. In this review, we briefly introduce the need for glyco-biosensors, discuss current analytical technologies, and examine advances in glyco-biosensor approaches aimed at the detection and/or quantification of glycoconjugates or carbohydrates derived from glycoconjugates since 2005.

  14. A novel biosensor method for surfactant determination based on acetylcholinesterase inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherenko, I. S.; Soldatkin, O. O.; Arkhypova, V. M.; Dzyadevych, S. V.; Soldatkin, A. P.

    2012-06-01

    A novel enzyme biosensor based on acetylcholinesterase inhibition for the determination of surfactants in aqueous solutions is described. Acetylcholinesterase-based bioselective element was deposited via glutaraldehyde on the surface of conductometric transducers. Different variants of inhibitory analysis of surfactants were tested, and finally surfactant's concentration was evaluated by measuring initial rate of acetylcholinesterase inhibition. Besides, we studied the effect of solution characteristics on working parameters of the biosensor for direct measurement of acetylcholine and for inhibitory determination of surfactants. The biosensor's sensitivity to anionic and cationic surfactants (0.35 mg l-1) was tested. The high operational stability of the biosensor during determination of acetylcholine (RSD 2%) and surfactants (RSD 11%) was shown. Finally, we discussed the selectivity of the biosensor toward surfactants and other AChE inhibitors. The proposed biosensor can be used as a component of the multibiosensor for ecological monitoring of toxicants.

  15. Biosensor assay for determination of haptoglobin in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerstedt, Maria; Björck, Lennart; Persson Waller, Karin; Sternesjö, Ase

    2006-08-01

    Despite more than 30 years of research into mastitis diagnostics, there are few alternatives to the somatic cell count (SCC) in practical use for identification of cows with subclinical mastitis. Mastitis is not only an animal welfare problem, but also affects the yield, composition and technological properties of milk. Hence, dairy cooperatives give farmers a premium quality payment to encourage low SCC although there is no clear scientific data defining the level of SCC in bulk tank milk that is associated with additional benefits in terms of milk quality. Recent research on alternative markers for inflammatory reactions in the lactating cow, e.g. in mastitis, includes investigations of the acute phase protein, haptoglobin (Hp). So far, the content of Hp in milk has mainly been studied in relation to mastitis diagnostics, with little attention given to its importance for milk composition and technological properties. At present, Hp in milk is measured using ELISA, but this technique is not suitable for routine large-scale analysis. In recent years, optical biosensor technology has been used for automated and rapid quantitative analysis of different components in milk, but so far not for analysis of acute phase proteins. The aim of the present study was to develop a rapid and sensitive biosensor method to determine Hp in milk. An affinity sensor assay based on the interaction between Hp and haemoglobin was developed using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor technology. The assay was used to analyse Hp in composite milk samples from cows without any clinical signs of mastitis and quarter milk samples with a weak to strong reaction in the California Mastitis Test (CMT). A commercial ELISA for determination of Hp in milk was used for comparison. The limit of detection (LOD) of the biosensor assay was determined as 1.1 mg/l. Within-assay and between-day variations were determined both with bulk tank milk spiked with human Hp and with composite milk samples

  16. Development of a disposable pyruvate biosensor to determine pungency in onions (Allium cepa L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Abayomi, Louise Anike; Terry, Leon A.; White, S. F.; Warner, P J

    2006-01-01

    A disposable prototype pyruvate biosensor was constructed using pyruvate oxidase immobilised on mediated meldolas blue electrodes to determine pungency in onions (Allium cepa L.). The optimum operating potential was +150 mV (versus Ag/AgCl). A strong correlation between the biosensor response and untreated onion juice of known pyruvate concentration 2–12 μmol/g fresh weight (FW) was demonstrated. The biosensor was able to differentiate between low and high pungency onions. The detection limit...

  17. Improved Performance of the Potentiometric Biosensor for the Determination of Creatinine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Rasmussen, Claus/Dallerup; Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit

    2007-01-01

    The development of potentiometric biosensors for the determination of creatinine is attractive because it is a frequently analysed species in clinical chemistry. Contemporary methods of analysing creatinine engage chemicals harmful to the environment and generate large volumes of waste disposals....... By introducing a membrane-based potentiometric biosensor with immobilised creatinine deaminase, the measurements can be performed by miniaturised portable devices that are easy to handle and allow rapid analysis at a minimum consumption of chemicals. Thus, the enzymatic creatinine biosensors was revisited...

  18. A lactose flow injection analysis biosensor system for monitoring and process control

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    In this work an enzymatic lactose biosensor composed of the immobilized enzymes E- galactosidase and glucose oxidase was developed. Oxygen consumption during the reaction catalyzed by these enzymes was detected. The biosensor was integrated into an FIA (flow injection analysis) system that allows measurement of lactose on-line in less than three minutes. This biosensor was used to monitor lactose concentration during the production of E-galactosidase by the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus from ...

  19. Development of a Biosensor Nanofluidic Platform for Integration with Terahertz Spectroscopic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-27

    Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Development of a Biosensor Nanofluidic Platform for Integration With Terahertz Spectroscopic System The views...VA 22902 -8734 ABSTRACT Number of Papers published in peer-reviewed journals: Development of a Biosensor Nanofluidic Platform for Integration With...in sub-THz range required less than 0.01 ng of dry material. The developed highly sensitive biosensors operating at room temperature with

  20. A Bi-enzymatic Whole-Cell Algal Biosensor for Monitoring Waste Water Pollutants

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    International audience; Two algal whole cells biosensors are developed to measure specific toxicity of freshwater pollutants. Both optical and conductometric biosensors are based on inhibition of algal alkaline phosphatase (AP) and esterase activities. Chlorella vulgaris cells are immobilised on a membrane placed in front of an optical fiber bundle for optical sensing or deposited on the surface of an electrode for conductometric sensing. Phosphatase activity of the biosensor is strongly inhi...

  1. Development of Biological Oxygen Demand Biosensor for Monitoring the Fermentation Industry Effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Neelam Verma; Ashish Kumar Singh

    2013-01-01

    A biosensor was developed for the determination of BOD value of fermentation industry effluent. The developed biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing the microbial consortium on cellulose acetate (CA) membrane in close proximity to a DO probe electrode. The microbial consortium was harvested from the fermentation industry effluent. The BOD biosensor was calibrated by using a solution containing the equivalent amount of glucose/glutamic acid (GGA) as a standard sample solution. The response t...

  2. Engineering the bioelectrochemical interface using functional nanomaterials and microchip technique toward sensitive and portable electrochemical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaofang; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2016-02-15

    Electrochemical biosensors have played active roles at the forefront of bioanalysis because they have the potential to achieve sensitive, specific and low-cost detection of biomolecules and many others. Engineering the electrochemical sensing interface with functional nanomaterials leads to novel electrochemical biosensors with improved performances in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, stability and simplicity. Functional nanomaterials possess good conductivity, catalytic activity, biocompatibility and high surface area. Coupled with bio-recognition elements, these features can amplify signal transduction and biorecognition events, resulting in highly sensitive biosensing. Additionally, microfluidic electrochemical biosensors have attracted considerable attention on account of their miniature, portable and low-cost systems as well as high fabrication throughput and ease of scaleup. For example, electrochemical enzymetic biosensors and aptamer biosensors (aptasensors) based on the integrated microchip can be used for portable point-of-care diagnostics and environmental monitoring. This review is a summary of our recent progress in the field of electrochemical biosensors, including aptasensors, cytosensors, enzymatic biosensors and self-powered biosensors based on biofuel cells. We presented the advantages that functional nanomaterials and microfluidic chip technology bring to the electrochemical biosensors, together with future prospects and possible challenges.

  3. Immobilization techniques in the fabrication of nanomaterial-based electrochemical biosensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzbach, William; Ronkainen, Niina J

    2013-04-11

    The evolution of 1st to 3rd generation electrochemical biosensors reflects a simplification and enhancement of the transduction pathway. However, in recent years, modification of the transducer with nanomaterials has become increasingly studied and imparts many advantages. The sensitivity and overall performance of enzymatic biosensors has improved tremendously as a result of incorporating nanomaterials in their fabrication. Given the unique and favorable qualities of gold nanoparticles, graphene and carbon nanotubes as applied to electrochemical biosensors, a consolidated survey of the different methods of nanomaterial immobilization on transducer surfaces and enzyme immobilization on these species is beneficial and timely. This review encompasses modification of enzymatic biosensors with gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene.

  4. Recent research trends of radio-frequency biosensors for biomolecular detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee-Jo; Yook, Jong-Gwan

    2014-11-15

    This article reviews radio-frequency (RF) biosensors based on passive and/or active devices and circuits. In particular, we focus on RF biosensors designed for detection of various biomolecules such as biotin-streptavidin, DNA hybridization, IgG, and glucose. The performance of these biosensors has been enhanced by the introduction of various sensing schemes with diverse nanomaterials (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, magnetic and gold nanoparticles, etc.). In addition, the RF biosensing platforms that can be associated with an RF active system are discussed. Finally, the challenges of RF biosensors are presented and suggestions are made for their future direction and prospects.

  5. Design architecture of double spiral interdigitated electrode with back gate electrode for biosensor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathil, M. F. M.; Arshad, M. K. Md.; Hashim, U.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; M. Nuzaihan M., N.; Ayub, R. M.; Adzhri, R.; Zaki, M.; Azman, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the preparation method of photolithography chrome mask design used in fabrication process of double spiral interdigitated electrode with back gate biasing based biosensor. By learning the fabrication process flow of the biosensor, the chrome masks are designed through drawing using the AutoCAD software. The overall width and length of the device is optimized at 7.0 mm and 10.0 mm, respectively. Fabrication processes of the biosensor required three chrome masks, which included back gate opening, spiral IDE formation, and passivation area formation. The complete chrome masks design will be sent for chrome mask fabrication and for future use in biosensor fabrication.

  6. Investigation of Defect Free SiGe Nanowire Biosensor Modified by Dual Plasma Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ming; Chang, Tai-Yuan; Lai, Chiung-Hui; Chang, Kow-Ming; Chen, Chu-Feng; Lai, Yi-Lung; Whang, Allen Jong-Woei; Lai, Hui-Lung; Hsu, Terng-Ren

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been extensively investigated and discussed in various fields due to their unique physical properties. In this paper, we successfully produce SiGe NWs biosensor by VLSI technology. We propose the dual plasma technology with CF4 plasma pre-treatment and N2 plasma post-treatment for repairs of defects as well as optimization of SiGe NWs biosensor. The results indicate that sensitivity (S) of the biosensor with dual plasma technology has significantly improved at least 32.8%, suitable for producing industrial SiGe NWs biosensor in the future.

  7. Sensitive detection of maltose and glucose based on dual enzyme-displayed bacteria electrochemical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aihua; Lang, Qiaolin; Liang, Bo; Shi, Jianguo

    2017-01-15

    Glucoamylase-displayed bacteria (GA-bacteria) and glucose dehydrogenase-displayed bacteria (GDH-bacteria) were co-immobilized on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to construct GA-bacteria/GDH-bacteria/MWNTs/GCE biosensor. The biosensor was developed by optimizing the loading amount and the ratio of GA-bacteria to GDH-bacteria. The as-prepared biosensor exhibited a wide dynamic range of 0.2-10mM and a low detection limit of 0.1mM maltose (S/N=3). The biosensor also had a linear response to glucose in the range of 0.1-2.0mM and a low detection limit of 0.04mM glucose (S/N=3). Interestingly, at the same concentration, glucose was 3.75-fold sensitive than that of maltose at the proposed biosensor. No interferences were observed for other possible mono- and disaccharides. The biosensor also demonstrated good long-term storage stability and repeatability. Further, using both GDH-bacteria/MWNTs/GCE biosensor and GA-bacteria/GDH-bacteria/MWNTs/GCE biosensor, glucose and maltose in real samples can be detected. Therefore, the proposed biosensor is capable of monitoring the food manufacturing and fermentation process.

  8. A novel PDMS micro membrane biosensor based on the analysis of surface stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Shengbo; Witte, Hartmut

    2010-07-15

    The biological and medical application of biosensors is more and more important with the development of technology and society. Detection of cells and biological molecules utilizing biosensors based on the analysis of surface stress would facilitate inexpensive and high-throughput test and diagnosis. This paper presents a biocompatible surface stress-based polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro membrane biosensor. Each biosensor chip consists of two available PDMS micro membranes, one acts as active membrane and the other as reference. Biosensors were functionalized using different functional materials respectively: MUA (11 Mercapto 1 undecanoicacid), MUO (11 Mercapto 1 undecanol) and DOT (Dodecane thiol). Two biosensor test systems were built based on a white light interferometer and a fiber optic interferometer respectively. Finally, testing experiments using Escherichia coli (E. coli) were performed based on the biosensor test systems we built. The results of the experiments showed that the MUA is a better functional material to functionalize the biosensor membranes than MUO and DOT for E. coli detection, some properties of E. coli, such as healthily living and dead status, can be analyzed based on the PDMS micro membrane biosensors.

  9. Development of conductometric biosensor array for simultaneous determination of maltose, lactose, sucrose and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatkin, O O; Peshkova, V M; Saiapina, O Y; Kucherenko, I S; Dudchenko, O Y; Melnyk, V G; Vasylenko, O D; Semenycheva, L M; Soldatkin, A P; Dzyadevych, S V

    2013-10-15

    The aim of this work was to develop an array of biosensors for simultaneous determination of four carbohydrates in solution. Several enzyme systems selective to lactose, maltose, sucrose and glucose were immobilised on the surface of four conductometric transducers and served as bio-recognition elements of the biosensor array. Direct enzyme analysis carried out by the developed biosensors was highly sensitive to the corresponding substrates. The analysis lasted 2 min. The dynamic range of substrate determination extended from 0.001 mM to 1.0-3.0mM, and strongly depended on the enzyme system used. An effect of the solution pH, ionic strength and buffer capacity on the biosensors responses was investigated; the conditions of simultaneous operation of all biosensors were optimised. The data on cross-impact of the substrates of all biosensors were obtained; the biosensor selectivity towards possible interfering carbohydrates was tested. The developed biosensor array showed good signal reproducibility and storage stability. The biosensor array is suited for simultaneous, quick, simple, and selective determination of maltose, lactose, sucrose and glucose.

  10. Interfacial Structures and Properties of Organic Materials for Biosensors: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhou

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The capabilities of biosensors for bio-environmental monitoring have profound influences on medical, pharmaceutical, and environmental applications. This paper provides an overview on the background and applications of the state-of-the-art biosensors. Different types of biosensors are summarized and sensing mechanisms are discussed. A review of organic materials used in biosensors is given. Specifically, this review focuses on self-assembled monolayers (SAM due to their high sensitivity and high versatility. The kinetics, chemistry, and the immobilization strategies of biomolecules are discussed. Other representative organic materials, such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs, and conductive polymers are also introduced in this review.

  11. Nanoporous anti-fouling silicon membranes for biosensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, T A; Hansford, D J; Leoni, L; Essenpreis, M; Ferrari, M

    2000-01-01

    The ability to create biocompatible well-controlled membranes has been an area of great interest over the last few years, particularly for biosensor applications. The present study describes the fabrication and characterization of novel nanoporous micromachined membranes that exhibit selective permeability and low biofouling. Results indicate that such membranes can be fabricated with uniform pore sizes capable of the simultaneous exclusion of albumin and diffusion of glucose. Compared to polymeric membranes of similar pore size, micromachined silicon membranes allowed more than twice the amount of glucose diffusion after 240 min and complete albumin exclusion. Moreover, membranes exhibit no morphological change or degradability in the presence of biological proteins and fluids at 37 degrees C. The results point to the potential of using such membranes for implantable biosensor applications. With monodisperse pores sizes as small as 10 nm, these membranes offer advantages in their reproducibility, stability, and ability to be integrated in silicon-based biosensing technology.

  12. Nanobioengineering and Characterization of a Novel Estrogen Receptor Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfrid Boireau

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We constructed an original supramolecular assembly on a surface of sensor composed of an innovative combination of an engineered cytochrome b5 and a modified nucleic acid bound to a synthetic lipid hemimembrane. The protein/DNA block, called (PDNA 2, was synthesized and purified before its immobilization onto a hybrid bilayer reconstituted on a gold surface. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR and atomic force microscopy (AFM were engaged in parallel on the same substrates in order to better understand dynamic events that occur at the surface of the biosensor. Good correlations were obtained in terms of specificity and reversibility. These findings allow us to present a first application of such biosensor in the study of the interaction processes between nuclear receptor and DNA.

  13. Characterization of an hrp-aox-polyaniline-graphite composite biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina O. Santana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays there is an increasing demand to develop new and robust biosensors in order to detect low concentrations of different chemicals, in practical and small devices, giving fast and confident responses. The electrode material was a polyaniline-graphite-epoxy composite (PANI/GEC. Alcohol oxidase (AOX and horseradish peroxidase (HRP enzymes were immobilized and the responses were tested by cyclic voltammetry. The conductivities for the composites of graphite/polyaniline were determined. The cyclic voltammograms allowed detecting ethanol in pure diluted samples in a range from 0.036 to 2.62 M. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA were used to verify the thermal characteristics of the composites (0, 10, 20, 30 and 100 % of graphite. The Imax value was determined for the dual enzyme biosensor (0.0724 mA, and the Kapp m  as 1.41 M (with R2 =0.9912.

  14. Silaffin peptides as a novel signal enhancer for gravimetric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong-O; Sang, Byoung-In; Won, Keehoon; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2013-05-01

    Application of biomimetic silica formation to gravimetric biosensors has been conducted for the first time. As a model system, silaffin peptides fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were immobilized on a gold quartz crystal resonator for quartz crystal microbalances using a self-assembled monolayer. When a solution of silicic acid was supplied, silica particles were successfully deposited on the Au surface, resulting in a significant change in resonance frequency (i.e., signal enhancement) with the silaffin-GFP. However, frequency was not altered when bare GFP was used as a control. The novel peptide enhancer is advantageous because it can be readily and quantitatively conjugated with sensing proteins using recombinant DNA technology. As a proof of concept, this study shows that the silaffin domains can be employed as a novel and efficient biomolecular signal enhancer for gravimetric biosensors.

  15. Polyester Sulphonic Acid Interstitial Nanocomposite Platform for Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel I. Iwuoha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel enzyme immobilization platform was prepared on a platinum disk working electrode by polymerizing aniline inside the interstitial pores of polyester sulphonic acid sodium salt (PESA. Scanning electron microscopy study showed the formation of homogeneous sulphonated polyaniline (PANI nanotubes (~90 nm and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA confirmed that the nanotubes were stable up to 230 °C. The PANI:PESA nanocomposite showed a quasi-reversible redox behaviour in phosphate buffer saline. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP was immobilized on to this modified electrode for hydrogen peroxide detection. The biosensor gave a sensitivity of 1.33 μA (μM-1 and a detection limit of 0.185 μM for H2O2. Stability experiments showed that the biosensor retained more than 64% of its initial sensitivity over four days of storage at 4 °C.

  16. A PKD Channel-based Biosensor for Taste Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunsheng; Du, Liping; Hu, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Luhang; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    This study describes a micro electrode array (MEA)-based biosensor for taste transduction using heterologous expressed taste polycystic kidney disease-like (PKD) channels as molecular sensors. Taste PKD1L3/2L1 channels were expressed on the plasma membrane of human embryo kidney (HEK)-293 cells [1]. Then the cells were cultured on the surface of MEA chip [2] to record the responses of PKD channels to sour stimulations by monitoring membrane potential. The results indicate this MEA-based biosensor can record the special off-responses of PKD channels to sour stimulation in a non-invasive manner for a long term. It may provide an alternative tool for the research of taste transduction, especially for the characterization of taste ion channels.

  17. All-nanophotonic NEMS biosensor on a chip

    CERN Document Server

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu

    2014-01-01

    Integrated chemical and biological sensors give advantages in cost, size and weight reduction and open new prospects for parallel monitoring and analysis. Biosensors based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are the most attractive candidates for the integrated platform. However, actuation and transduction techniques (e.g. electrostatic, magnetomotive, thermal or piezoelectric) limit their operation to laboratory conditions. All-optical approach gives the possibility to overcome this problem, nevertheless, the existing schemes are either fundamentally macroscopic or excessively complicated and expensive in mass production. Here we propose a novel scheme of extremely compact NEMS biosensor monolithically integrated on a chip with all-nanophotonic transduction and actuation. It consists of the photonic waveguide and the nanobeam cantilever placed above the waveguide, both fabricated in the same CMOS-compatible process. Being in the near field of the strongly confined photonic mode, cantilever is efficiently...

  18. Using silver nanoparticle to enhance current response of biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiangling; Meng, Xianwei; Chen, Dong; Tang, Fangqiong; Jiao, Jun

    2005-09-15

    In this paper, we present a simple procedure to increase the sensitivity of a glucose biosensor. The feasibility of an amperometric glucose biosensor based on immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) in silver (Ag) sol was investigated for the first time. GOx was simply mixed with Ag nanoparticles and cross-linked with a polyvinyl butyral (PVB) medium by glutaraldehyde. Then a platinum electrode was coated with the mixed solution. The effects of the amount of the Ag particles used, with respect to the current response for enzyme electrodes, were studied. A set of experimental results indicate that the current response for the enzyme electrode containing hydrophobic Ag sol increased from 0.531 to 31.17 microA in the solution of 10 mmol/L beta-D glucose. The time reaching the steady-state current response reduced from 60 to 20s, three times less than those without Ag particles involved.

  19. An effective gold nanotubes electrode for amperometric biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunli; Zhu, Yingchun; Liu, Yanyan; Yang, Yu; Ruan, Qichao; Xu, Fangfang

    2010-12-01

    A sensitive and effective amperometric glucose biosensor based on gold nanotubes electrode (GNTE) was investigated. Gold nanotubes (GNTs), which were prepared by electroless plating of the metal within the pores of nanoporous polycarbonate (PC) track-etched membranes, were filled into a hollow teflon cylinder to construct a GNTE. Glucose oxidase (GOD) was immobilized on the electrode via glutaraldehyde cross-linkage method. The electrochemical properties were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The km value of the immobilized glucose oxidase on GNTE was 0.47 mM. The biosensor showed a linear range from 0.4 to 11 mM with excellent sensitivity of 8.77 microA cm(-2) mM(-1) and fast response time within 5 s.

  20. Biosensor. Recent research progress; Baiosensa. Saikin no kenkyu doko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsue, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yamada, H. [National Defence Academy, Yokosuka (Japan)

    1995-11-20

    Chemical sensor is made of up transducer that transfers the part and signal recognizing the measurement objects. Biosensor that normally transfers the amount of chemicals into electrical signal is a sensor in which living materials like enzyme, microorganism or antigen, antibody and so forth are used in the recognition part. Recently, the structure or the function of the living materials is clarified gradually with the significant progress in biofeedback, however, the synthesis of artificial material having same function as that of living materials is extremely difficult. Accordingly, it is very practical to develop high degree sensor function by using living materials with developed function in material recognition part, an important element of the sensor. In this report, solid state biosensor using electrode as a transducer is focused, and specially, recent research progress regarding the amperometric measurement which measures oxidation/reduction current is discussed. 35 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A magnetic biosensor system for detection of E. coli

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuquan

    2013-07-01

    This work describes a device for detecting E. coli bacteria by manipulating superparamagnetic beads to a sensing area and immobilizing them in a trapping well. The trapping well replaces the biochemical immobilization layer, which is commonly used in magnetic biosensor systems. A concept exploiting the volume difference between bare magnetic beads and magnetic bead-bioanalyte compounds is utilized to detect E. coli bacteria. Trapped beads are detected by the help of a tunnel magneto-resistive sensor. Frequency modulation is employed, in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, enabling the detection of individual superparamagnetic beads of 2.8 μm in diameter. Replacing the biochemical immobilization layer by the trapping well greatly simplifies the detection process. After applying the mixture of E. coli and magnetic beads to the biosensor system, bacteria detection is achieved in a single step, within a few minutes. © 2013 IEEE.

  2. Photoelectrochemical glucose biosensor incorporating CdS nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinjie Sun; Yihua Zhu; Xiaoling Yang; Chunzhong Li

    2009-01-01

    A novel photoelectrochemical biosensor incorporating nanosized CdS semiconductor crystals with enzyme to enhance photochemical reaction has been investigated. CdS nanoparticles were synthesized by using dendrimer PAMAM as inner templates. The CdS nanoparticles and glucose oxidase (GOD) were immobilized on Pt electrode via layer-by-layer (LbL) technique to fabricate a biological-inorganic hybrid system. Under ultraviolet light, the photo-effect of the CdS nanoparticles showed enhancement of the biosensor to detect glucose. Pt nanoparticles were mixed into the Nation film to immobilize the CdS/enzyme composites and to improve the charge transfer of the hybrid, Experimental results demonstrate the desirable characteristics of this biosensing system, e.g. a sensitivity of 1.83 μA/(mM cm~2), lower detection limit (1 μM), and acceptable reproducibility and stability.

  3. Nanomaterial-Based Biosensors for Detection of Pesticides and Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe nanomaterial-based biosensors for detecting OP pesticides and explosives. CNTs and functionalized silica nanoparticles have been chosen for this study. The biosensors were combined with the flow-injection system, providing great advantages for onsite, real-time, and continuous detection of environmental pollutants such as OPs and TNT. The sensors take advantage of the electrocatalytic properties of CNTs, which makes it feasible to achieve a sensitive electrochemical detection of the products from enzymatic reactions at low potential. This approach uses a large aspect ratio of silica nanoparticles, which can be used as a carrier for loading a large amount of electroactive species, such as poly(guanine), for amplified detection of explosives. These methods offer a new environmental monitoring tool for rapid, inexpensive, and highly sensitive detection of OPs or TNT compounds.

  4. Sensitive optical biosensors for unlabeled targets: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Xudong [Department of Biological Engineering, University of Missouri, 240D, Bond Life Sciences Center, 1201 E. Rollins Street, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)], E-mail: fanxud@missouri.edu; White, Ian M.; Shopova, Siyka I.; Zhu Hongying; Suter, Jonathan D.; Sun Yuze [Department of Biological Engineering, University of Missouri, 240D, Bond Life Sciences Center, 1201 E. Rollins Street, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)

    2008-07-14

    This article reviews the recent progress in optical biosensors that use the label-free detection protocol, in which biomolecules are unlabeled or unmodified, and are detected in their natural forms. In particular, it will focus on the optical biosensors that utilize the refractive index change as the sensing transduction signal. Various optical label-free biosensing platforms will be introduced, including, but not limited to, surface plasmon resonance, interferometers, waveguides, fiber gratings, ring resonators, and photonic crystals. Emphasis will be given to the description of optical structures and their respective sensing mechanisms. Examples of detecting various types of biomolecules will be presented. Wherever possible, the sensing performance of each optical structure will be evaluated and compared in terms of sensitivity and detection limit.

  5. Detection of Penicillin via Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying; MU Ying; JIN Wei; YANG Meng-chao; ZHANG Ti-qiang; ZHOU Chao; XIE Fei; SONG Qi; REN Hao; JIN Qin-han

    2012-01-01

    A method of using Au colloid to capture the decomposed product of penicillin,penicillamine,on a surface plasmon resonance(SPR) biosensor for the quantitative determination of penicillin was developed.Based on the decomposition of penicillin to generate penicillamine and penilloaldehyde,a high seositive biosensor for detecting penicillin was also developed.In our experiment,it was penicillamine rather than penicillin that has been measured.This is because penicillamine contains a functional group that makes it self-assembling on Au colloid to increase the molecular weight so as to improve the surface plasmon resonance signal.On a UV-Vis spectrophotometer,a high concentration of penicilliamine-Au complex was determined,indicating that penicillamine was already well combined with Au colloid.The method,using the combination of Au colloid with penicillamine,proved to detect penicillin.

  6. Surface grafted polymer brushes: potential applications in dengue biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baratela, Fernando Jose Costa; Higa, Olga Zazuco, E-mail: ozahiga@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Faria, Henrique Antonio Mendonca de; Queiroz, Alvaro Antonio Alencar de, E-mail: alencar@unifei.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), Itajuba, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica e Quimica

    2013-07-01

    A polymer brush membrane-based ultrasensitive biosensor for dengue diagnosis was constructed using poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) brushes immobilized onto low density polyethylene (LDPE) films. LDPE surface films were initially modified by Ar{sup +} ion irradiation to activate the polymer surface. Subsequently, graft polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate onto the activated LDPE surface was carried out under aqueous conditions to create patterned polymer brushes of PHEMA. The grafted PHEMA brushes were characterized by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle analysis. The SEM observations showed that selective surface activation with Ar+ implantation and graft polymerization on the selectively activated surface had occurred. The PHEMA brushes were electrically characterized in the presence of concentrations of human immunoglobulin (IgG). The proposed amperometric biosensor was successfully used for determination of IgG in physiologic samples with excellent responses. (author)

  7. New ways to develop biosensors towards addressing practical problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodub, N. F.

    2013-11-01

    The main modern approaches which were realized at the development of new generation of biosensors intended for application in field of diagnostics, food quality control and environmental monitoring are presented. The main attention was paid to creation of the multi-parametrical and multi-functional enzymatic and immune biosensors which were realized for the complex diagnostics of diabetes, autoimmune state and for the control of process of sugar production. The label-free bioaffine devices based on the nano-porouse silicon (NPS) with the registration of specific formed signal by chemiluminescence (ChL) and photoresistivity and intended for the determination mycotoxins and diagnostics of retroviral bovine leukemia (RBL) are analyzed too. Improving of ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) through changing silicon nitride on the cerium oxide is discussed as perspective approach in case of micotoxins and Salmonella control. In the conclusion the possibility to replace biological sensitive elements by artificial ones is considered.

  8. PROBING CANCER SIGNALING WITH RESONANT WAVEGUIDE GRATING BIOSENSORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ye

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Cancer is a collection of diseases that arise from the progressive accumulation of genetic alterations in somatic cells. Genomic approaches have identified a great variety of genetic abnormalities associated with tumorigenesis, and molecular imaging and quantification assays have further elucidated the complex interactions within or between pathways. It is acknowledged that it is proteins, rather than genes, to fulfill most cellular functions; and signaling proteins largely operate through a large and complex network. To this end, cancer is mostly a pathway dysregulated disease – a small number of core pathways are dominate in aberrant cell growth leading to cancer. Thus, understanding the functional consequences of dysregulated and/or mutant signaling proteins in the context of native signaling networks is the frontier in cancer research. Areas covered in this review This article reviews why resonant waveguide grating (RWG) biosensor cellular assays are considered to be integrative in nature, and how RWG biosensor can be used for mining the surface markers of cancer cells, and discovering core pathway(s) of cancer receptor signaling. What the reader will gain The reader will gain an overview of cancer biology from pathway perspective, and have a glimpse of potential implications of integrative cellular assays, as promised by RWG biosensor, in cancer research and diagnosis. Take home message Successful approaches for developing next-generation anti-cancer therapies and diagnostic protocols should take into account that the dysregulation of oncogenic pathways is central to tumorigenesis. The biosensor cellular assays offer unprecedented advantage in characterizing cancer biology. However, significant challenges are also presented in deconvoluting and validating cellular mechanisms identified in cancer receptor signaling using these assays. PMID:21113317

  9. Graphene-polymer-enzyme hybrid nanomaterials for biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The invention relates to a general chemical method for the synthesis of biocompatible hybrid nanomaterials which can be used in the development of new- type enzyme based biosensors. A one-step facile method is presented, in which polyethylenimine (PEI) serves as both a reducing agent for the redu...... for the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) into reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and a biological matrix for accommodation of enzymes....

  10. Porous silicon biosensor for the detection of autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane, Andrew O.; Szili, Endre J.; Reed, Joanne H.; Gordon, Tom P.; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2007-12-01

    Advances in porous silicon (pSi) technology have led to the development of new sensitive biosensors. The unique optical properties of pSi renders the material a perfect candidate for optical transducers exploiting photoluminescence or white light interference effects. The ability of biosensors exploiting these transduction mechanisms to quickly and accurately detect biological target molecules affords an alternative to current bioassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Here, we present a pSi biosensor that was developed to detect antibodies against the autoimmune protein La. This protein is associated with autoimmune diseases including rheumatic disorders, systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjogren's syndrome (SS). A fast and sensitive detection platform such as the one described here can be applied to the rapid diagnosis of these debilitating autoimmune diseases. The immobilisation of the La protein onto pSi films gave a protein receptor-decorated sensor matrix. A cascade of immunological reactions was then initiated to detect anti-La antibody on the functionalised pSi surface. In the presence of o-phenylenediamine (OPD), horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/H IIO II catalysed the formation of an oxidised radical species that accelerated pSi corrosion. pSi corrosion was detected as a blue-shift in the generated interference pattern, corresponding to a decrease in the effective optical thickness (EOT) of the pSi film. Compared to an ELISA, the pSi biosensor could detect the anti-La antibody at a similar concentration (500 - 125 ng/ml). Furthermore, we found that the experimental process can be significantly shortened resulting in detection of the anti-La antibody in 80 minutes compared to a minimum of 5 hours required for ELISA.

  11. Biosensores: Un Acercamiento a La Resonancia del Plasmon Superficial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardo Ramírez Frómeta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Los biosensores, o los sensores basados sobre materiales biológicos, son utilizados en la actualidad en una amplia variedad de disciplinas, incluyendo la industria alimenticia, la medicina, y la ciencia ambiental. Está llegando a ser cada vez más importante para los investigadores y los científicos en éstos y otros campos tener una comprensión de los diversos tipos de biosensores que puedan ser utilizados, los principios detrás de ellos, así como sus ventajas y limitaciones. El énfasis especial se ha dedicado a los biosensores de resonancia del plasmon superficial (SPR. El biosensor óptico basado en la técnica SPR ha ganado atención debido a su velocidad de detección, alta especificidad, alta sensibilidad y posibilidad de análisis en tiempo real. El dispositivo SPR detecta cambios mínimos en el índice de refracción de la superficie de detección y de su vecindad inmediata. Esta detección altamente sensible se basa en una excitación colectiva de los electrones (los plasmons superficiales en una película metálica sobre un substrato (Ej. cristal, conduciendo a la absorción total de la luz en un ángulo particular de incidencia el cual es dependiente de los índices de refracción de cualquiera de los lados de la película metálica.

  12. Multiplex biosensor immunoassays for antibiotics in the food chain

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals may result in unwanted residues in food products. The main objective of the present research was to study the development and application of fast and automated multiplex surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor immunoassays (BIAs), based on multi-component antibodies and/or combined immunoassays in serially connected flow channels, for the detection of selected antibiotics in the food chain. The scientific challenges to deal with were: t...

  13. Status of the AFRL/RW Bio-Sensors Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    identical counter-rotating NDFs; an internally designed ocellar stimulation rig (an automated Cardan arm with LED scene projection array, completing...automated Cardan arm. Facilities: The Bio-Sensors Lab (Dr Dennis Goldstein’s old Optics Lab where he did optical surface characterization of...eyes and ocelli (and stomatopod compound eye midband sensors). The automated Cardan arm with its movable LED array, described later in the

  14. Semiconductor Quantum Dots in Chemical Sensors and Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Nikos Chaniotakis; Frasco, Manuela F.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots are nanometre-scale semiconductor crystals with unique optical properties that are advantageous for the development of novel chemical sensors and biosensors. The surface chemistry of luminescent quantum dots has encouraged the development of multiple probes based on linked recognition molecules such as peptides, nucleic acids or small-molecule ligands. This review overviews the design of sensitive and selective nanoprobes, ranging from the type of target molecules to the optical ...

  15. Analysis of experimental biosensor/FIA lactose measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira L.S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Whey is an abundant effluent in the production of cheese and casein. The biotechnological utilization of this economically important and nutritive source is limited mainly because of the presence of high percentages of lactose. This disaccharide has poor solubility, which can cause crystallization and insufficient sweetness in dairy food; additionally, part of the adult population suffers from associated lactose intolerance diseases. There are several methods to determine lactose such as spectrophotometry, polarimetry, infrared spectroscopy, titrimetry and chromatography. However these methods are tedious and time-consuming due to long sample preparation. These disadvantages stimulated the development of an enzymatic lactose biosensor. It employs two immobilized enzymes, beta-galactosidase and glucose oxidase and the quantitative analysis of lactose is based on determination of oxygen consumption in the enzymatic reaction. The influence of temperature on the biosensor signal was experimentally studied. It was observed that a nonlinear relationship exists between the electric response of the biosensor - provided by CAFCA (Computer Assisted Flow Control & Analysis - ANASYSCON, Hannover - and lactose concentration. In this work, attempts were made to correlate these variables using a simple nonlinear model and multilayered neural networks, with the latter providing the best modeling of the experimental data.

  16. A biosensor for organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Sun, Samio; Li, Chen-Zhong; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    The toxic metalloid arsenic is widely distributed in food, water, and soil. While inorganic arsenic enters the environment primarily from geochemical sources, methylarsenicals either result from microbial biotransformation of inorganic arsenic or are introduced anthropogenically. Methylarsenicals such as monosodium methylarsonic acid (MSMA) have been extensively utilized as herbicides, and aromatic arsenicals such as roxarsone (Rox) are used as growth promoters for poultry and swine. Organoarsenicals are degraded to inorganic arsenic. The toxicological effects of arsenicals depend on their oxidation state, chemical composition, and bioavailability. Here we report that the active forms are the trivalent arsenic-containing species. We constructed a whole-cell biosensor utilizing a modified ArsR repressor that is highly selective toward trivalent methyl and aromatic arsenicals, with essentially no response to inorganic arsenic. The biosensor was adapted for in vitro detection of organoarsenicals using fluorescence anisotropy of ArsR-DNA interactions. It detects bacterial biomethylation of inorganic arsenite both in vivo and in vitro with detection limits of 10−7 M and linearity to 10−6 M for phenylarsenite and 5×10−6 M for methylarsenite. The biosensor detects reduced forms of MSMA and roxarsone and offers a practical, low cost method for detecting activate forms and breakdown products of organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters. PMID:24359149

  17. Applications of polymers for biomolecule immobilization in electrochemical biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teles, F.R.R. [IBB - Instituto de Biotecnologia e Bioengenharia, Centro de Engenharia Biologica e Quimica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Fonseca, L.P. [IBB - Instituto de Biotecnologia e Bioengenharia, Centro de Engenharia Biologica e Quimica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: luis.fonseca@ist.utl.pt

    2008-12-01

    Polymers are becoming inseparable from biomolecule immobilization strategies and biosensor platforms. Their original role as electrical insulators has been progressively substituted by their electrical conductive abilities, which opens a new and broad scope of applications. In addition, recent advances in diagnostic chips and microfluidic systems, together with the requirements of mass-production technologies, have raised the need to replace glass by polymeric materials, which are more suitable for production through simple manufacturing processes. Conducting polymers (CPs), in particular, are especially amenable for electrochemical biosensor development for providing biomolecule immobilization and for rapid electron transfer. It is expected that the combination of known polymer substrates, but also new transducing and biocompatible interfaces, with nanobiotechnological structures, like nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanoengineered 'smart' polymers, may generate composites with new and interesting properties, providing higher sensitivity and stability of the immobilized molecules, thus constituting the basis for new and improved analytical devices for biomedical and other applications. This review covers the state-of-the-art and main novelties about the use of polymers for immobilization of biomolecules in electrochemical biosensor platforms.

  18. An AC electrokinetics facilitated biosensor cassette for rapid pathogen identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Mengxing; Mohan, Ruchika; Lu, Yi; Liu, Tingting; Mach, Kathleen E; Sin, Mandy L Y; McComb, Mason; Joshi, Janhvi; Gau, Vincent; Wong, Pak Kin; Liao, Joseph C

    2013-07-01

    To develop a portable point-of-care system based on biosensors for common infectious diseases such as urinary tract infection, the sensing process needs to be implemented within an enclosed fluidic system. On chip sample preparation of clinical samples remains a significant obstacle to achieving robust sensor performance. Herein AC electrokinetics is applied in an electrochemical biosensor cassette to enhance molecular convection and hybridization efficiency through electrokinetics induced fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation. Using E. coli as an exemplary pathogen, we determined the optimal electrokinetic parameters for detecting bacterial 16S rRNA in the biosensor cassette based on the current output, signal-to-noise ratio, and limit of detection. In addition, a panel of six probe sets targeting common uropathogenic bacteria was demonstrated. The optimized parameters were also validated using patient-derived clinical urine samples. The effectiveness of electrokinetics for on chip sample preparation will facilitate the implementation of point-of-care diagnosis of urinary tract infection in the future.

  19. A novel wireless Love wave biosensor platform for multifunctional detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Taehyeon; Nam, Minwoo; Song, SeungYeon; Yoon, Hyun C.; Lee, Keekeun

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a novel wireless Love wave biosensor platform for multi-functional detection. A 440MHz wireless and surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based biosensor was developed on a 41° YX LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate for the simultaneous detection of Anti- Dinitrophenyl-KLH (anti-DNP) immunoglobulin G (IgG). The developed biosensor was composed of a SAW reflective delay lines structured by an interdigital transducer (IDT), shorted grating reflectors, poly(methyl-methacrylate) (PMMA) layer and two sensitive films (Cr/Au). The PMMA was used for the waveguide layer. Coupling of mode (COM) modeling was conducted to determine the optimal device parameters prior to fabrication. The fabricated devices were wirelessly characterized by using the network analyzer as the reader unit. The binding of anti-DNP to DNP receptor molecules induced a change in phase shifts of the original reflection peaks due to a mass loading effect. The phase shifts increased linearly with increasing anti-DNP concentration. The measured reflective coefficient S11 in the time domain showed high signal/noise (S/N) ratio, small signal attenuation, and few spurious peaks. The time positions of the reflection peaks were well matched with the predicted values from the simulation. The obtained sensitivity was 167.9°/μg/ml and 44.8°/ μg/ml for the 1st and the 2nd sensing area, respectively.

  20. A smart dust biosensor powered by kinesin motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thorsten; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Hess, Henry

    2009-03-01

    Biosensors can be miniaturized by either injecting smaller volumes into micro- and nanofluidic devices or immersing increasingly sophisticated particles known as 'smart dust' into the sample. The term 'smart dust' originally referred to cubic-millimetre wireless semiconducting sensor devices that could invisibly monitor the environment in buildings and public spaces, but later it also came to include functional micrometre-sized porous silicon particles used to monitor yet smaller environments. The principal challenge in designing smart dust biosensors is integrating transport functions with energy supply into the device. Here, we report a hybrid microdevice that is powered by ATP and relies on antibody-functionalized microtubules and kinesin motors to transport the target analyte into a detection region. The transport step replaces the wash step in traditional double-antibody sandwich assays. Owing to their small size and autonomous function, we envision that large numbers of such smart dust biosensors could be inserted into organisms or distributed into the environment for remote sensing.

  1. An innovative reactor-type biosensor for BOD rapid measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianlong; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Yeyao; Xu, Runhua; Sun, Zhonghua; Jie, Zhou

    2010-03-15

    Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) is one of the most important and widely used parameters for characterizing the organic pollution of water and wastewater. In this paper, a novel reactor-type biosensor for rapid measurement of BOD was developed, based on using immobilized microbial cell (IMC) beads as recognition bio-element in a completely mixed reactor which was used as determining chamber, replacing the traditionally used membrane as recognition bio-element. The IMC beads were freely suspended in the aqueous solution, so the mass transfer resistance for dissolved oxygen and organic compounds significantly reduced, and the quantity of the microbial cells used as recognition element can be easily adjusted, in comparison with the traditional membrane-type BOD biosensor, in which exists a unadjustable contradiction between the quantity of biomass and the thickness of the bio-membrane, thus limiting the stability and the detection limit. This novel kind of BOD biosensor significantly increased the sensitivity of the response, the detecting precision and prolonged the life time of the recognition element. The experimental data showed that the most appropriate temperature for biochemical reaction in the reactor was 30 degrees C, and the IMC beads could keep the bioactivity for about 70d at the detecting frequency of 8 times every day. The standard deviation of repeatability and the reproducibility of responses were within +/-6.4% and +/-5.0%, respectively, which are within acceptable bias limits, and meet the requirement of BOD rapid measurement.

  2. Aptamer-based Field-Effect Biosensor for Tenofovir Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbarinodehi, N.; Jolly, P.; Bhalla, N.; Miodek, A.; De Micheli, G.; Estrela, P.; Carrara, S.

    2017-01-01

    During medical treatment it is critical to maintain the circulatory concentration of drugs within their therapeutic range. A novel biosensor is presented in this work to address the lack of a reliable point-of-care drug monitoring system in the market. The biosensor incorporates high selectivity and sensitivity by integrating aptamers as the recognition element and field-effect transistors as the signal transducer. The drug tenofovir was used as a model small molecule. The biointerface of the sensor is a binary self-assembled monolayer of specific thiolated aptamer and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH), whose ratio was optimized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements to enhance the sensitivity towards the specific target. Surface plasmon resonance, performed under different buffer conditions, shows optimum specific and little non-specific binding in phosphate buffered saline. The dose-response behavior of the field-effect biosensor presents a linear range between 1 nM and 100 nM of tenofovir and a limit of detection of 1.2 nM. Two non-specific drugs and one non-specific aptamer, tested as stringent control candidates, caused negligible responses. The applications were successfully extended to the detection of the drug in human serum. As demonstrated by impedance measurements, the aptamer-based sensors can be used for real-time drug monitoring. PMID:28294122

  3. Computational Design of a Carbon Nanotube Fluorofullerene Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Ho Chung

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes offer exciting opportunities for devising highly-sensitive detectors of specific molecules in biology and the environment. Detection limits as low as 10−11 M have already been achieved using nanotube-based sensors. We propose the design of a biosensor comprised of functionalized carbon nanotube pores embedded in a silicon-nitride or other membrane, fluorofullerene-Fragment antigen-binding (Fab fragment conjugates, and polymer beads with complementary Fab fragments. We show by using molecular and stochastic dynamics that conduction through the (9, 9 exohydrogenated carbon nanotubes is 20 times larger than through the Ion Channel Switch ICSTM biosensor, and fluorofullerenes block the nanotube entrance with a dissociation constant as low as 37 pM. Under normal operating conditions and in the absence of analyte, fluorofullerenes block the nanotube pores and the polymer beads float around in the reservoir. When analyte is injected into the reservoir the Fab fragments attached to the fluorofullerene and polymer bead crosslink to the analyte. The drag of the much larger polymer bead then acts to pull the fluorofullerene from the nanotube entrance, thereby allowing the flow of monovalent cations across the membrane. Assuming a tight seal is formed between the two reservoirs, such a biosensor would be able to detect one channel opening and thus one molecule of analyte making it a highly sensitive detection design.

  4. DNA nanostructures based biosensor for the determination of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri, S Baby; Kamaraj, P; Arthanareeswari, M; Devikala, S

    2015-10-15

    Graphite electrode was modified using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), chitosan (CS), glutaraldehyde (GTA) and DNA nanostructures (nsDNA). DNA nanostructures of 50 nm in size were produced from single DNA template sequence using a simple two step procedure and were confirmed using TEM and AFM analysis. The modified electrode was applied to the electrochemical detection of aromatic compounds using EIS. The modified electrode was characterized using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). For comparison, electrochemical results derived from single stranded (50 bp length) and double stranded (50 bp length) DNA based biosensors were used. The results indicate that the modified electrode prior to nsDNA immobilization provides a viable platform that effectively promotes electron transfer between nsDNA and the electrode. The mode of binding between the nsDNA and aromatic compounds was investigated using EIS, indicating that the dominant interaction is non-covalent. nsDNA based biosensor was observed to act as an efficient biosensor in selective and sensitive identification of aromatic compounds.

  5. Photocolorimetric Biosensor for Detection of Cholinergic Organophosphorus Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Vymazalová

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To detect nerve agents in practice, the analytical methods such as gas, liquid and thin-layer chromatography, mass spectrometry or capillary electrophoresis are usually used. Apart from these analytical methods, we developed an analytical device (tape photocolorimetric biosensor based on the modified Ellman's cholinesterase biochemical reaction for multidetection of cholinergic organophosphorus compounds. Enzyme butyrylcholinesterase was used as a biorecognizing component and its activity was evaluated by red, blue, green (RGB sensor. This method eliminates errors in the evaluation and provides automatic data collection with their subsequent evaluation. The unique method of dosing allows appropriate dispensing of reagents in microlitres volumes and the whole system is simple to operate. Suitability of the constructed biosensors was evaluated using the six organophosphates (Tabun, sarin, Soman, cyclosin, VX and R33 compound. Biosensor showed the ability to measure substances at concentrations ranging between ~ 1×10-8 mg/l - 1×10-6 mg/l in the air, according to their inhibition effect.Defence Science Journal, 2012, 62(6, pp.399-403, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.62.2589

  6. Diamond-based protective layer for optical biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majchrowicz, D.; Ficek, M.; Baran, T.; WÄ sowicz, M.; Struk, P.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.

    2016-09-01

    Optical biosensors have become a powerful alternative to the conventional ways of measurement owing to their great properties, such as high sensitivity, high dynamic range, cost effectiveness and small size. Choice of an optical biosensor's materials is an important factor and impacts the quality of the obtained spectra. Examined biological objects are placed on a cover layer which may react with samples in a chemical, biological and mechanical way, therefore having a negative impact on the measurement reliability. Diamond, a metastable allotrope of carbon with sp3 hybridization, shows outstanding properties such as: great chemical stability, bio-compatibility, high thermal conductivity, wide bandgap and optical transparency. Additionally it possesses great mechanical durability, which makes it a long-lasting material. The protective diamond thin films were deposited on the substrate using Microwave Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW PA CVD) system. The surface morphology and roughness was assessed with atomic force microscopy and profilometry. We have performed a series of measurements to assess the biocompatibility of diamond thin films with whole blood. The results show that thin diamond protective layer does not affect the red blood cells, while retaining the sensors high resolution and dynamic range of measurement. Therefore, we conclude that diamond thin films are a viable protective coating for optical biosensors, which allows to examine many biological elements. We project that it can be particularly useful not only for biological objects but also under extreme conditions like radioactive or chemically aggressive environments and high temperatures.

  7. Amperometric electrochemical microsystem for a miniaturized protein biosensor array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao Yang; Yue Huang; Hassler, B L; Worden, R M; Mason, A J

    2009-06-01

    Protein-based bioelectrochemical interfaces offer great potential for rapid detection, continuous use, and miniaturized sensor arrays. This paper introduces a microsystem platform that enables multiple bioelectrochemical interfaces to be interrogated simultaneously by an onchip amperometric readout system. A post-complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication procedure is described that permits the formation of planar electrode arrays and self assembly of biosensor interfaces on the electrodes. The onchip, 0.5-mum CMOS readout electronics include a compact potentiostat that supports a very broad range of input currents-6 pA to 10 muA-to accommodate diverse biosensor interfaces. The 2.3 times 2.2-mm chip operates from a 5-V supply at 0.6 mA. A prototype electrochemical sensor platform, including an onchip potentiostat and miniaturized biosensor array, was characterized by using cyclic voltammetry. The linear relationship between the oxidization peak values and the concentrations of target analytes in the solution verifies functionality of the system and demonstrates the potential for future implementations of this platform in high sensitivity, low cost, and onchip protein-based sensor arrays.

  8. Design of highly sensitive multichannel bimetallic photonic crystal fiber biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Mohamed Farhat O.; Alrayk, Yassmin K. A.; Shaalan, Abdelhamid A.; El Deeb, Walid S.; Obayya, Salah S. A.

    2016-10-01

    A design of a highly sensitive multichannel biosensor based on photonic crystal fiber is proposed and analyzed. The suggested design has a silver layer as a plasmonic material coated by a gold layer to protect silver oxidation. The reported sensor is based on detection using the quasi transverse electric (TE) and quasi transverse magnetic (TM) modes, which offers the possibility of multichannel/multianalyte sensing. The numerical results are obtained using a finite element method with perfect matched layer boundary conditions. The sensor geometrical parameters are optimized to achieve high sensitivity for the two polarized modes. High-refractive index sensitivity of about 4750 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) and 4300 nm/RIU with corresponding resolutions of 2.1×10-5 RIU, and 2.33×10-5 RIU can be obtained according to the quasi TM and quasi TE modes of the proposed sensor, respectively. Further, the reported design can be used as a self-calibration biosensor within an unknown analyte refractive index ranging from 1.33 to 1.35 with high linearity and high accuracy. Moreover, the suggested biosensor has advantages in terms of compactness and better integration of microfluidics setup, waveguide, and metallic layers into a single structure.

  9. Designing new strategy for controlling DNA orientation in biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao; Ding, Hong-ming; Ren, Chun-lai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Orientation controllable DNA biosensors hold great application potentials in recognizing small molecules and detecting DNA hybridization. Though electric field is usually used to control the orientation of DNA molecules, it is also of great importance and significance to seek for other triggered methods to control the DNA orientation. Here, we design a new strategy for controlling DNA orientation in biosensors. The main idea is to copolymerize DNA molecules with responsive polymers that can show swelling/deswelling transitions due to the change of external stimuli, and then graft the copolymers onto an uncharged substrate. In order to highlight the responsive characteristic, we take thermo-responsive polymers as an example, and reveal multi-responsive behavior and the underlying molecular mechanism of the DNA orientation by combining dissipative particle dynamics simulation and molecular theory. Since swelling/deswelling transitions can be also realized by using other stimuli-responsive (like pH and light) polymers, the present strategy is universal, which can enrich the methods of controlling DNA orientation and may assist with the design of the next generation of biosensors. PMID:26400770

  10. Surface Modification on Acoustic Wave Biosensors for Enhanced Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D. Gallant

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in mass loading on the surface of acoustic biosensors result in output frequency shifts which provide precise measurements of analytes. Therefore, to detect a particular biomarker, the sensor delay path must be judiciously designed to maximize sensitivity and specificity. B-cell lymphoma 2 protein (Bcl-2 found in urine is under investigation as a biomarker for non-invasive early detection of ovarian cancer. In this study, surface chemistry and biofunctionalization approaches were evaluated for their effectiveness in presenting antibodies for Bcl-2 capture while minimizing non-specific protein adsorption. The optimal combination of sequentially adsorbing protein A/G, anti-Bcl-2 IgG and Pluronic F127 onto a hydrophobic surface provided the greatest signal-to-noise ratio and enabled the reliable detection of Bcl-2 concentrations below that previously identified for early stage ovarian cancer as characterized by a modified ELISA method. Finally, the optimal surface modification was applied to a prototype acoustic device and the frequency shift for a range of Bcl-2 concentration was quantified to demonstrate the effectiveness in surface acoustic wave (SAW-based detection applications. The surface functionalization approaches demonstrated here to specifically and sensitively detect Bcl-2 in a working ultrasonic MEMS biosensor prototype can easily be modified to detect additional biomarkers and enhance other acoustic biosensors.

  11. Electrochemical biosensors and logic devices based on aptamers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo Xiaolei; Lin Meihua; Fan Chunhai

    2013-01-01

    Aptamers are molecular recognition elements with high specificity that are selected from deoxyribonucleic acid/ribonucleic acid (DNA/RNA) library.Compared with the traditional protein recognition elements,aptamers have excellent properties such as cost-effective,stable,easy for synthesis and modification.In recent years,electrochemistry plays an important role in biosensor field because of its high sensitivity,high stability,fast response and easy miniaturization.Through the combination of these two technologies and our rational design,we constructed a series of biosensors and biochips that are simple,fast,cheap and miniaturized.Firstly,we designed an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) electrochemical biosensor based on the strand displacement strategy.We can detect as low as 10 nmol/L of ATP both in pure solution and complicated cell lysates.Secondly,we creatively split the aptamers into two fragments and constructed the sandwich assay platform only based on single aptamer sequence.We successfully transferred this design on biochips with multiple micro electrodes (6×6) and accomplished multiplex detection.In the fields of biochips and biocomputers,we designed several DNA logic gates with electric (electrochemical) signal as output which paves a new way for the development of DNA computer.

  12. Multiplexed site-specific electrode functionalization for multitarget biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrie, Karen; Jans, Karolien; Vos, Rita; Ardakanian, Niyousha; Verellen, Niels; Van Hoof, Chris; Lagae, Liesbet; Stakenborg, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Multitarget biosensors hold great promise to improve point-of-care diagnostics as they enable simultaneous detection of different biomolecular markers. Multiplexed detection of different markers, like genes, proteins, or a combination of both, propels advancement in numerous fields such as genomics, medical diagnosis and therapy monitoring. The functionalization of these biosensors, however, necessitates patterned immobilization of different bioreceptors, which remains challenging and time-consuming. We demonstrate a simple method for the patterned multiplexing of bioreceptors on a multi-electrode chip. By using the lithographically defined electrodes for surface functionalization, additional patterning steps become obsolete. Using the electrodes for self-aligned immobilization provides a spatial resolution that is limited by the electrode patterning process and that cannot be easily obtained by alternative dispensing or coating techniques. Via electrochemical reduction of diazonium salts combined with click chemistry, we achieved site-specific immobilization of two different ssDNA probes side by side on a single chip. This method was experimentally verified by cyclic voltammetry (CV), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and specific target recognition was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. The combination of the electroaddressability of electrografting with the chemoselectivity of click chemistry, offers a versatile platform for highly efficient site-specific functionalization of multitarget biosensors.

  13. A Nanofluidic Biosensor Based on Nanoreplica Molding Photonic Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wang; Chen, Youping; Ai, Wu; Zhang, Dailin

    2016-09-01

    A nanofluidic biosensor based on nanoreplica molding photonic crystal (PC) was proposed. UV epoxy PC was fabricated by nanoreplica molding on a master PC wafer. The nanochannels were sealed between the gratings on the PC surface and a taped layer. The resonance wavelength of PC-based nanofluidic biosensor was used for testing the sealing effect. According to the peak wavelength value of the sensor, an initial label-free experiment was realized with R6g as the analyte. When the PC-based biosensor was illuminated by a monochromatic light source with a specific angle, the resonance wavelength of the sensor will match with the light source and amplified the electromagnetic field. The amplified electromagnetic field was used to enhance the fluorescence excitation result. The enhancement effect was used for enhancing fluorescence excitation and emission when matched with the resonance condition. Alexa Fluor 635 was used as the target dye excited by 637-nm laser source on a configured photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) setup, and an initial PCEF enhancement factor was obtained.

  14. Biosensors Used for Quantification of Nitrates in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-Galindo Raul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is essential for the plant because it is used for the production of chlorophyll, proteins, nucleic acids, amino acids, and other cellular compounds; nitrogen is available in two forms: ammonium and nitrate. Several tools have been used to quantify nitrates in plants such as the Kjeldahl method and Dumas combustion digestion; however, they are destructive and long time-consuming methods. To solve these disadvantages, methods such as selective electrodes, optical sensors, reflectometers, and images based sensors have been developed; nonetheless, all these techniques show interference when carrying out measurements. Currently, biosensors based on genetic constructions, based on the response of promoter gene fused to Gene Fluorescent Protein (GFP, are gaining popularity, because they improve the accuracy of measurements of nitrate by avoiding the interference of carriers ion, high salt conditions, and other factors. The present review shows the different methods to quantify the nitrogen in plants; later, a biosensors perspective is presented, mainly focused on biosensors based on organism genetically modified. The review presents a list of promoter and reporter genes that could be used to develop different kind of sensors, and a perspective of sensors to measure quantitatively the nitrogen is presented.

  15. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-03-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection.

  16. A Novel Biosensor to Detect MicroRNAs Rapidly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Ying Liao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available δ-free F0F1-ATPase within chromatophore was constructed as a novel biosensor to detect miRNA targets. Specific miRNA probes were linked to each rotary β subunits of F0F1-ATPase. Detection of miRNAs was based on the proton flux change induced by light-driven rotation of δ-free F0F1-ATPase. The hybridization reaction was indicated by changes in the fluorescent intensity of pH-sensitive CdTe quantum dots. Our results showed that the assay was attomole sensitivities (1.2×10−18 mol to target miRNAs and capable of distinguishing among miRNA family members. Moreover, the method could be used to monitor real-time hybridization without any complicated fabrication before hybridization. Thus, the rotary biosensor is not only sensitive and specific to detect miRNA target but also easy to perform. The δ-free F0F1-ATPase-based rotary biosensor may be a promising tool for the basic research and clinical application of miRNAs.

  17. Uses of biosensors in the study of viral antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Regenmortel, M H; Altschuh, D; Chatellier, J; Rauffer-Bruyère, N; Richalet-Sécordel, P; Saunal, H

    1997-01-01

    The introduction in 1990 of a new biosensor technology based on surface plasmon resonance has greatly simplified the measurement of binding interactions in biology. This new technology known as biomolecular interaction analysis makes it possible to visualize the binding process as a function of time by following the increase in refractive index that occurs when one of the interacting partners binds to its ligand immobilized on the surface of a sensor chip. None of the reactants needs to be labelled, which avoids the artefactual changes in binding properties that often result when the molecules are labelled. Biosensor instruments are well-suited for the rapid mapping of viral epitopes and for identifying which combinations of capturing and detector Mabs will give the best results in sandwich assays. Biosensor binding data are also useful for selecting peptides to be used in diagnostic solid-phase immunoassays. Very small changes in binding affinity can be measured with considerable precision which is a prerequisite for analyzing the functional effect and thermodynamic implications of limited structural changes in interacting molecules. On-rate (ka) and off-rate (kd) kinetic constants of the interaction between virus and antibody can be readily measured and the equilibrium affinity constant K can be calculated from the ratio ka/kd = K.

  18. [Enzyme biosensors for penicillin determination based on conductometric planar electrodes and pH-sensitive field effect transistor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipova, V N; Dziadevich, S V; Soldatkin, A P; El'skaia, A V

    1996-01-01

    The enzyme biosensors for penicillin determination based on conductometric planar electrodes and pH-sensitive field effect transistors have been described and their working parameters have been compared. The influence of pH, buffer capacity and ionic strength of the samples on the biosensors response has been studied. Short response time and high operational stability are characteristics of the developed biosensors.

  19. Protease biosensors based on peptide-nanocellulose conjugates: from molecular design to dressing interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of point of care diagnostic protease sensors applied to wound healing has received increased interest for chronic wound treatment and as an interface with chronic wound dressings. Biosensor technology has grown exponentially in recent years. Here we focus on nanocelluosic biosensor t...

  20. Quantification of bioavailable chlortetracycline in pig feces using a bacterial whole-cell biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L. H.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Sørensen, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial whole-cell biosensors were used to measure the concentration of chlortetracycline (CTC) in the feces of pigs. In this study, the Escherichia coli biosensor used has a detection limit of 0.03 mg/kg CTC in pig feces. The tetracycline concentration was correlated with the appearance...

  1. A novel conductometric biosensor based on hexokinase for determination of adenosine triphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherenko, I S; Kucherenko, D Yu; Soldatkin, O O; Lagarde, F; Dzyadevych, S V; Soldatkin, A P

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a simple and inexpensive reusable biosensor for determination of the concentration of adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) in aqueous samples. The biosensor is based on a conductometric transducer which contains two pairs of gold interdigitated electrodes. An enzyme hexokinase was immobilized onto one pair of electrodes, and bovine serum albumin-onto another pair (thus, a differential mode of measurement was used). Conditions of hexokinase immobilization on the transducer by cross-linking via glutaraldehyde were optimized. Influence of experimental conditions (concentration of magnesium ions, ionic strength and concentration of the working buffer) on the biosensor work was studied. The reproducibility of biosensor responses and operational stability of the biosensor were checked during one week. Dry storage at -18 °C was shown to be the best conditions to store the biosensor. The biosensor was successfully applied for measurements of ATP concentration in pharmaceutical samples. The proposed biosensor may be used in future for determination of ATP and/or glucose in water samples.

  2. Development of mediator-type biosensor to wirelessly monitor whole cholesterol concentration in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Mai; Murata, Masataka; Hibi, Kyoko; Huifeng, Ren; Endo, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    We developed a wireless monitoring system to monitor fish condition by tracking the change in whole cholesterol concentration. The whole cholesterol concentration of fish is a source of steroid hormones or indicator of immunity level, which makes its detection important for tracking physiological condition of fish. Wireless monitoring system comprises of mediator-type biosensor and wireless transmission device. Biosensor is implantable to fish body, and transmission device is so light, in that fish is allowed to swim freely during monitoring. Cholesterol esterase and oxidase were fixated on to the detection site of biosensor and used to detect the whole cholesterol concentration. However, cholesterol oxidase incorporates oxidation-reduction reaction of oxygen for detection, which concentration fluctuates easily due to change in environmental condition. Meanwhile, mediator-type biosensor enables monitoring of whole cholesterol concentration by using mediator to substitute that oxidation-reduction reaction of oxygen. Characteristic of fabricated mediator-type biosensor was tested. The sensor output current of mediator-type biosensor remained stable compared to output current of non-mediator-type biosensor under fluctuating oxygen concentration of 0-8 ppm, which implied that this sensor is less affected by change in dissolved oxygen concentration. That biosensor was then implanted into fish for wireless monitoring. As a result, approximately 48 h of real-time monitoring was successful.

  3. Development of Peptide Nanotube-Modified Biosensors for Gas-Phase Organophosphate Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Chemistry, vol. 78: 835-843, 2006. 23. Marrs, T. C., Organophosphate Poisoning , Pharmaceutical Therapy, vol. 58: 51- 66, 1993. 24. Mlsna, T. E...DEVELOPMENT OF PEPTIDE NANOTUBE-MODIFIED BIOSENSORS FOR GAS-PHASE ORGANOPHOSPHATE DETECTION...States. AFIT-ENV-13-M-35 DEVELOPMENT OF PEPTIDE NANOTUBE-MODIFIED BIOSENSORS FOR GAS-PHASE ORGANOPHOSPHATE DETECTION THESIS Presented

  4. Development of a Quartz Crystal Microbalance Biosensor with Aptamers as Bio-recognition Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Yao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal in any biosensor development project is its use for actual sample detection. Recently, there has been an interest in biosensors with aptamers as bio-recognition elements, but reported examples all deal with standards, not human serum. In order to verify the differences of aptamer-based biosensor and antibody-based biosensor in clinical detection, a comparison of the performance of aptamer-based and antibody-based quartz crystal microbalance (QCM biosensors for the detection of immunoglobulin E (IgE in human serum was carried out. Aptamers (or antibodies specific to IgE were immobilized on the gold surface of a quartz crystal. The frequency shifts of the QCM were measured. The linear range with the antibody (10–240 μg/L compared to that of the aptamer (2.5–200 μg/L, but a lower detection limit could be observed in the aptamer-based biosensor. The reproducibility of the two biosensors was comparable. The aptamers were equivalent or superior to antibodies in terms of specificity and sensitivity. In addition, the aptamer receptors could tolerate repeated affine layer regeneration after ligand binding and recycling of the biosensor with little loss of sensitivity. When stored for three weeks, the frequency shifts of the aptamer-coated crystals were all greater than 90% of those on the response at the first day.

  5. Detection of egg yolk antibodies reflecting Salmonella enteritidis infections using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, M.E.; Bouma, A.; Eerden, van E.; Landman, W.J.M.; Knapen, van F.; Stegeman, J.A.; Bergwerff, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor assay was developed on the basis of a lipopolysaccharide antigen of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis (S. enterica serovar enteritidis) to detect egg yolk antibodies against S. enterica serovar enteritidis. This biosensor assay was compared to two co

  6. RNA aptamer-based electrochemical biosensor for selective and label-free analysis of dopamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farjami, Elahe; Campos, Rui; Nielsen, Jesper Sejrup

    2013-01-01

    , including dopamine precursors and metabolites and other neurotransmitters (NT). Here we report an electrochemical RNA aptamer-based biosensor for analysis of dopamine in the presence of other NT. The biosensor exploits a specific binding of dopamine by the RNA aptamer, immobilized at a cysteamine...

  7. Biosensor for point-of-care diagnostic and on-site measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a biosensor for detection of a target substance in a sample with impedance spectroscopy, the biosensor comprising 1) a first non-conducting substrate comprising a primary substrate surface; 2) a conducting polymer electrode layer comprising one or more conducting polymers layers...

  8. Quantification of bioavailable chlortetracycline in pig feces using a bacterial whole-cell biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Aarestrup, Frank; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial whole-cell biosensors were used to measure the concentration of chlortetracycline (CTC) in the feces of pigs. In this study, the Escherichia coli biosensor used has a detection limit of 0.03 mg/kg CTC in pig feces. The tetracycline concentration was correlated with the appearance...

  9. Detection of ochratoxin A in beer samples with a label-free monolithically integrated optoelectronic biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagkali, Varvara; Petrou, Panagiota S.; Salapatas, Alexandros; Makarona, Eleni; Peters, Jeroen; Haasnoot, Willem; Jobst, Gerhard; Economou, Anastasios; Misiakos, Konstantinos; Raptis, Ioannis; Kakabakos, Sotirios E.

    2017-01-01

    An optical biosensor for label-free detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) in beer samples is presented. The biosensor consists of an array of ten Mach-Zehnder interferometers (MZIs) monolithically integrated along with their respective broad-band silicon light sources on the same Si chip (37mm2

  10. Non-steady response of BOD biosensor for the determination of biochemical oxygen demand in wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velling, Siiri; Mashirin, Alexey; Hellat, Karin; Tenno, Toomas

    2011-01-01

    A biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) biosensor for effective and expeditious BOD(7) estimations was constructed and the non-steady phase of the output signal was extensively studied. The modelling approach introduced allows response curve reconstruction and a curve fitting procedure of good quality, resulting in parameters indicating the relationship between response and organic substrate concentration and stability properties of the BOD biosensor. Also, the immobilization matrixes of different thicknesses were characterized to determine their suitability for bio-sensing measurements in non-stationary conditions, as well as for the determination of the mechanical durability of the BOD biosensor in time. The non-steady response of the experimental output of the BOD biosensor was fitted according to the developed model that enables to determine the stability of the biosensor output and dependency on biodegradable organic substrate concentration. The calibration range of the studied BOD biosensor in OECD synthetic wastewater was 15-110 mg O(2) L(-1). Repeatability tests showed relative standard deviation (RSD) values of 2.8% and 5.8% for the parameter τ(d), characterizing the transient output of the amperometric oxygen sensor in time, and τ(s), describing the dependency of the transient response of the BOD biosensor on organic substrate concentration, respectively. BOD biosensor experiments for the evaluation of the biochemical oxygen demand of easily degradable and refractory municipal wastewater showed good concurrence with traditional BOD(7) analysis.

  11. Imaging real-time HIV-1 virion fusion with FRET-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel M.; Padilla-Parra, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    We have produced a novel, simple and rapid method utilising genetically encodable FRET-based biosensors to permit the detection of HIV-1 virion fusion in living cells. These biosensors show high sensitivity both spatially and temporally, and allow the real-time recovery of HIV-1 fusion kinetics in both single cells and cell populations simultaneously. PMID:26300212

  12. Detection of ochratoxin A in beer samples with a label-free monolithically integrated optoelectronic biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagkali, Varvara; Petrou, Panagiota S.; Salapatas, Alexandros; Makarona, Eleni; Peters, Jeroen; Haasnoot, Willem; Jobst, Gerhard; Economou, Anastasios; Misiakos, Konstantinos; Raptis, Ioannis; Kakabakos, Sotirios E.

    2016-01-01

    An optical biosensor for label-free detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) in beer samples is presented. The biosensor consists of an array of ten Mach-Zehnder interferometers (MZIs) monolithically integrated along with their respective broad-band silicon light sources on the same Si chip (37mm2

  13. Design and Development of Biosensors for the Detection of Heavy Metal Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziella L. Turdean

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many compounds (including heavy metals, HMs used in different fields of industry and/or agriculture act as inhibitors of enzymes, which, as consequence, are unable to bind the substrate. Even if it is not so sensitive, the method for detecting heavy metal traces using biosensors has a dynamic trend and is largely applied for improving the “life quality”, because of biosensor's sensitivity, selectivity, and simplicity. In the last years, they also become more and more a synergetic combination between biotechnology and microelectronics. Dedicated biosensors were developed for offline and online analysis, and also, their extent and diversity could be called a real “biosensor revolution”. A panel of examples of biosensors: enzyme-, DNA-, imuno-, whole-cell-based biosensors were systematised depending on the reaction type, transduction signal, or analytical performances. The mechanism of enzyme-based biosensor and the kinetic of detection process are described and compared. In this context, is explainable why bioelectronics, nanotechnology, miniaturization, and bioengineering will compete for developing sensitive and selective biosensors able to determine multiple analytes simultaneously and/or integrated in wireless communications systems.

  14. cAMP biosensors applied in molecular pharmacological studies of G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-01-01

    end-point assays for quantifying GPCR-mediated changes in intracellular cAMP levels exist. More recently, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP biosensors that can quantify intracellular cAMP levels in real time have been developed. These FRET-based cAMP biosensors have been used...... primarily in single cell FRET microscopy to monitor and visualize changes in cAMP upon GPCR activation. Here, a similar cAMP biosensor with a more efficient mCerulean/mCitrine FRET pair is described for use in the 384-well plate format. After cloning and expression in HEK293 cells, the biosensor...... is characterized in the 384-well plate format and used for measuring the signaling of the G(s)-coupled ß(2)-adrenergic receptor. The procedures described may be applied for other FRET-based biosensors in terms of characterization and conversion to the 384-well plate format....

  15. Application of genetically engineered microbial whole-cell biosensors for combined chemosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Yuan, Sheng; Zhong, Wen-Hui; Siddikee, Md Ashaduzzaman; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2016-02-01

    The progress of genetically engineered microbial whole-cell biosensors for chemosensing and monitoring has been developed in the last 20 years. Those biosensors respond to target chemicals and produce output signals, which offer a simple and alternative way of assessment approaches. As actual pollution caused by human activities usually contains a combination of different chemical substances, how to employ those biosensors to accurately detect real contaminant samples and evaluate biological effects of the combined chemicals has become a realistic object of environmental researches. In this review, we outlined different types of the recent method of genetically engineered microbial whole-cell biosensors for combined chemical evaluation, epitomized their detection performance, threshold, specificity, and application progress that have been achieved up to now. We also discussed the applicability and limitations of this biosensor technology and analyzed the optimum conditions for their environmental assessment in a combined way.

  16. A review of electrogenerated chemiluminescent biosensors for assays in biological matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Erin M; Maddipati, Sai Sujana; Snyder, Sarah M

    2016-10-01

    Electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) is the production of light via electron transfer reactions between electrochemically produced reagents. ECL-based biosensors use specific biological interactions to recognize an analyte and produce a luminescent signal. Biosensors fabricated with novel biorecognition species have increased the number of analytes detected. Some of these analytes include peptides, cells, enzymes and nucleic acids. ECL biosensors are selective, simple, sensitive and have low detection limits. Traditional methods use ruthenium complexes or luminol to generate ECL. Nanomaterials can be incorporated into ECL biosensors to improve efficiency, but also represent a new class of ECL emitters. This article reviews the application of ruthenium complex, luminol and nanomaterial-based ECL biosensors to making measurements in biological matrices over the past 4 years.

  17. Electrochemical biosensors for rapid detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Wang, Ronghui; Li, Yanbin

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical biosensors have shown great promise in the development of rapid methods for the detection of foodborne pathogens and have been intensively studied over the past two decades. The scope of this review is to summarize the advancements made in the development of electrochemical biosensors for the rapid detection of one of the most common foodborne pathogens, Escherichia coli O157:H7. The article is intended to include different configurations of electrochemical biosensors based on the sensing principles and measured electrical parameters, as well as the latest improvements of technology in the progress of electrochemical biosensor development to detect E. coli O157:H7. By discussing the current and future trend based on some of excellent published literatures and reviews, this survey is hoped to illustrate a broad and comprehensive understanding of electrochemical biosensors for the detection of foodborne pathogens.

  18. Graphene as a signal amplifier for preparation of ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Jaroslav; Kasák, Peter; Tkac, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnostics of diseases performed with minimal money and time consumption has become achievable due to recent advances in development of biosensors. These devices use biorecognition elements for selective interaction with an analyte and signal readout is obtained via different types of transducers. Operational characteristics of biosensors have been reported to improve substantially, when a diverse range of nanomaterials was employed. This review presents construction of electrochemical biosensors based on graphene, atomically thin 2D carbon crystals, which is currently intensively studied nanomaterial. The most attractive directions of graphene applications in biosensor preparation are discussed here including novel detection and amplification schemes exploiting graphene's unique electrochemical, physical and chemical properties. The future of graphene-based biosensors is most likely bright, but there is still a lot of work to do to fulfill high expectations.

  19. Sensitive impedimetric biosensor for direct detection of diazinon based on lipases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Zehani, Nedjla; Dzyadevych, Sergei; Kherrat, Rochdi

    2014-07-01

    Two novel impedimetric biosensors for highly sensitive and rapid quantitative detection of diazinon in an aqueous medium were developed using two types of lipase, from Candida Rugosa (microbial source) (CRL) and from porcine pancreas (animal source) (PPL) immobilized onto a functionalized gold electrode. The lipase is characterized to specifically catalyze the hydrolysis of ester functions leading to the transformation of diazinon into diethyl phosphorothioic acid (DETP) and 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (IMHP). The developed biosensors both presented a large wide range of linearity up to 50µM with a detection limit of 10 nM for the CRL biosensor and 0.1 µM for the PPL biosensor. A comparative study was carried out between the two biosensors and results showed higher sensitivity for the CRL sensor. Moreover, it presented good accuracy and reproducibility, and had very good storage and multiple use stability for 25 days when stored at 4°C.

  20. Sensitive impedimetric biosensor for direct detection of diazinon based on lipases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole J Jaffrezic-Renault

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Two novel impedimetric biosensors for highly sensitive and rapid quantitative detection of diazinon in an aqueous medium were developed using two types of lipase, from Candida Rugosa (microbial source (CRL and from porcine pancreas (animal source (PPL immobilized onto a functionalized gold electrode. The lipase is characterized to specifically catalyze the hydrolysis of ester functions leading to the transformation of diazinon into diethyl phosphorothioic acid (DETP and 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (IMHP. The developed biosensors both presented a large wide range of linearity up to 50µM with a detection limit of 10 nM for the CRL biosensor and 0.1 µM for the PPL biosensor. A comparative study was carried out between the two biosensors and results showed higher sensitivity for the CRL sensor. Moreover, it presented good accuracy and reproducibility, and had very good storage and multiple use stability for 25 days when stored at 4°C.

  1. Development of aptamers for in vivo and in vitro biosensor applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Lasse Holm

    is generating new and faster ways of screening and optimizing using biosensors. In this thesis we develop new functional biological recognition modules for biosensors. These DNA- and RNA-based recognition modules are called aptamers and are developed to interact with targets of choice. Aptamers are developed...... application) and small molecule food additives (for optimization production in cell factories). Additionally, the characterization an all-polymer physicochemical biosensor is presented for the detection of antibiotics in food products. These results have lead to the ongoing development of a high......-throughput allpolymeric biosensor device at DTU Nanotech and also resulted in extended funding of 3M DKK from the Danish National Innovation Foundation, Biosyntia and The Technical University of Denmark to advance the use of aptamers and biosensors in cell-factory development....

  2. Recent Progress of Commercially Available Biosensors in China and Their Applications in Fermentation Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yan; Feng Dong; Bi Chun-yuan; Zhu Si-rong; Shi Jian-guo

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors, which are the products of the biotechnology industry, are among the key projects of the 7th, 8th, and 9th Five-year Plans of China Science & Technology Developing Programs, respectively, and they play an important role in developing and reforming traditional biotechnology. SBA series biosensor analyzer, as the only one commercial biosensor in China, has attracted lots of attention in the process of information gathering and measurement for biological industry with the development of technology and society. In this paper, we presented an overview of the most important contributions dealing with the monitoring of the biochemical analytes in fermentation processes using SBA series biosensor analyzers in China. Future trends of the biosensor analyzer in China were also mentioned in the last section.

  3. A study of the electron transfer and photothermal effect of gold nanorods on a glucose biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Huiyu; Yang Liuqing; Ren Xiangling; Tang Fangqiong; Ren Jun [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Chen Dong, E-mail: tangfq@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Beijing Creative Nanophase Hi-Tech Company, Limited, Beijing 100086 (China)

    2010-05-07

    A new glucose biosensor based on the electron transfer and photothermal effect of gold nanorods (GNRs) is reported here. The biosensor was prepared by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOx) on a platinum (Pt) electrode by a composite film consisting of GNRs, polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and glutaraldehyde. GNRs were synthesized by a gold seed-mediated cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant-assisted approach. The fabrication, characterization and analytical performance of the glucose biosensor based on GNRs are described in this paper. Moreover, the modulation of the biosensor by the photothermal effect based on the unique surface plasma resonance (SPR) property of GNRs was investigated for the first time. The results show that the current response of a glucose biosensor can significantly increase, induced by the electrical conductivity and photothermal effect of GNRs.

  4. A study of the electron transfer and photothermal effect of gold nanorods on a glucose biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiyu; Chen, Dong; Yang, Liuqing; Ren, Xiangling; Tang, Fangqiong; Ren, Jun

    2010-05-01

    A new glucose biosensor based on the electron transfer and photothermal effect of gold nanorods (GNRs) is reported here. The biosensor was prepared by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOx) on a platinum (Pt) electrode by a composite film consisting of GNRs, polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and glutaraldehyde. GNRs were synthesized by a gold seed-mediated cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant-assisted approach. The fabrication, characterization and analytical performance of the glucose biosensor based on GNRs are described in this paper. Moreover, the modulation of the biosensor by the photothermal effect based on the unique surface plasma resonance (SPR) property of GNRs was investigated for the first time. The results show that the current response of a glucose biosensor can significantly increase, induced by the electrical conductivity and photothermal effect of GNRs.

  5. Bacterial host and reporter gene optimization for genetically encoded whole cell biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutesco, Catherine; Prévéral, Sandra; Escoffier, Camille; Descamps, Elodie C T; Prudent, Elsa; Cayron, Julien; Dumas, Louis; Ricquebourg, Manon; Adryanczyk-Perrier, Géraldine; de Groot, Arjan; Garcia, Daniel; Rodrigue, Agnès; Pignol, David; Ginet, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Whole-cell biosensors based on reporter genes allow detection of toxic metals in water with high selectivity and sensitivity under laboratory conditions; nevertheless, their transfer to a commercial inline water analyzer requires specific adaptation and optimization to field conditions as well as economical considerations. We focused here on both the influence of the bacterial host and the choice of the reporter gene by following the responses of global toxicity biosensors based on constitutive bacterial promoters as well as arsenite biosensors based on the arsenite-inducible Pars promoter. We observed important variations of the bioluminescence emission levels in five different Escherichia coli strains harboring two different lux-based biosensors, suggesting that the best host strain has to be empirically selected for each new biosensor under construction. We also investigated the bioluminescence reporter gene system transferred into Deinococcus deserti, an environmental, desiccation- and radiation-tolerant bacterium that would reduce the manufacturing costs of bacterial biosensors for commercial water analyzers and open the field of biodetection in radioactive environments. We thus successfully obtained a cell survival biosensor and a metal biosensor able to detect a concentration as low as 100 nM of arsenite in D. deserti. We demonstrated that the arsenite biosensor resisted desiccation and remained functional after 7 days stored in air-dried D. deserti cells. We also report here the use of a new near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent reporter candidate, a bacteriophytochrome from the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, which showed a NIR fluorescent signal that remained optimal despite increasing sample turbidity, while in similar conditions, a drastic loss of the lux-based biosensors signal was observed.

  6. Performance of a Cyanobacteria Whole Cell-Based Fluorescence Biosensor for Heavy Metal and Pesticide Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmijah Surif

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Whole cell biosensors always face the challenge of low stability of biological components and short storage life. This paper reports the effects of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (pHEMA immobilization on a whole cell fluorescence biosensor for the detection of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Cd, and pesticides (dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D, and chlorpyrifos. The biosensor was produced by entrapping the cyanobacterium Anabaena torulosa on a cellulose membrane, followed by applying a layer of pHEMA, and attaching it to a well. The well was then fixed to an optical probe which was connected to a fluorescence spectrophotometer and an electronic reader. The optimization of the biosensor using several factors such as amount of HEMA and drying temperature were undertaken. The detection limits of biosensor without pHEMA for Cu, Cd, Pb, 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos were 1.195, 0.027, 0.0100, 0.025 and 0.025 µg/L respectively. The presence of pHEMA increased the limits of detection to 1.410, 0.250, 0.500, 0.235 and 0.117 µg/L respectively. pHEMA is known to enhance the reproducibility of the biosensor with average relative standard deviation (RSD of ±1.76% for all the pollutants tested, 48% better than the biosensor without pHEMA (RSD = ±3.73%. In storability test with Cu 5 µg/L, the biosensor with pHEMA performed 11.5% better than the test without pHEMA on day-10 and 5.2% better on day-25. pHEMA is therefore a good candidate to be used in whole cell biosensors as it increases reproducibility and enhances biosensor storability.

  7. Flow-injection amperometric glucose biosensors based on graphene/Nafion hybrid electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Bong Gill, E-mail: k1811@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (BK21 Program), KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Jinkyu, E-mail: JINQ@paran.com [Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Basic Sciences, Kyung Hee University, 1 Hoegidong, Dongdamoongu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hoon Sik, E-mail: khs2004@khu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Basic Sciences, Kyung Hee University, 1 Hoegidong, Dongdamoongu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, HoSeok, E-mail: phs0727@khu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seochon-dong, Giheung-gu, Youngin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    Graphical abstract: Amperometric biosensors based on graphene hybrids showed the fast, sensitive, and stable amperometric responses in the flow injection system for automatically monitoring glucose. Display Omitted Highlights: > Flow-injection amperometric glucose biosensors were fabricated using reduced graphene oxide/Nafion hybrids. > The electrochemical kinetics of biosensors were comprehensively investigated by analysing electron transfer rate, charge transfer resistance, and ion diffusion coefficient, respectively. > The biosensors exhibited the fast, sensitive, and stable amperometric responses in the flow injection system for detecting glucose. - Abstract: In this research, we demonstrated the fabrication of flow-injection amperometric glucose biosensors based on RGO/Nafion hybrids. The nanohybridization of the reduced graphene oxide (RGO) by Nafion provided the fast electron transfer (ET) for the sensitive amperometric biosensor platforms. The ET rate (k{sub s}) and the charge transfer resistance (R{sub CT}) of GOx-RGO/Nafion hybrids were evaluated to verify the accelerated ET. Moreover, hybrid biosensors revealed a quasi-reversible and surface controlled process, as confirmed by the low peak-to-peak ({Delta}E{sub p}) and linear relations between I{sub p} and scan rate ({nu}). Hybrid biosensors showed the fast response time of {approx}3 s, the sensitivity of 3.8 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, the limit of detection of 170 {mu}M, and the linear detection range of 2-20 mM for the flow-injection amperometric detection of glucose. Furthermore, interference effect of oxidizable species such as ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) on the performance of hybrid biosensors was prevented at the operating potential of -0.20 V even under the flow injection mode. Therefore, the fast, sensitive, and stable amperometric responses of hybrid biosensors in the flow injection system make it highly suitable for automatically monitoring glucose.

  8. Comparative study of thermal stability of magnetostrictive biosensor between two kinds of biorecognition elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Xue-mei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Guntupalli, R.; Lakshmanan, R.S.; Chin, Bryan A. [Materials Research and Education Center, Auburn University, AL 36849 (United States); Hu, Jing, E-mail: jinghoo@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Materials Research and Education Center, Auburn University, AL 36849 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Magnetostrictive biosensors specific to Salmonella typhimurium were prepared by immobilizing antibody or phage as biorecognition elements onto the magnetostrictive sensor platform. The sensors were stored at temperatures of 25 °C (room temperature), 45 °C and 65 °C, respectively, and the ability to bind S. typhimurium was detected by testing the resonant frequency shift using a HP network analyzer after exposure to 1 mL of 1 × 10{sup 9} cfu/mL of S. typhimurium at a predetermined schedule. The binding of S. typhimurium to biosensors was confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results showed that there existed an initial sudden drop in the average density of S. typhimurium bound to the biosensor surface versus duration at different temperatures for the two kinds of recognition elements, and the binding ability to S. typhimurium of phage-immobilized biosensors was much better than that of antibody-immobilized biosensors, with longevity longer than 30 days at all tested temperatures, though decreasing gradually over the testing period. While the longevity of antibody-immobilized biosensors was only about 30, 8 and 5 days at room temperature (25 °C), 45 °C and 65 °C, respectively. Meanwhile, the activation energy of the two kinds of biosensors was investigated, and it was found that phage immobilized sensors showed much higher activation energy than antibody immobilized sensors, which resulted in less dependency on temperature and thus having much better thermal stability than antibody immobilized sensors. - Highlights: • Phage immobilized biosensors has much better thermal stability. • The longevity of phage immobilized biosensors was longer than 30 days even at 65 °C. • The activation energy of phage immobilized biosensors is much higher.

  9. Preparation and electrochemical application of a new biosensor based on plant tissue/polypyrrole for determination of acetaminophen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gholamhossein Rounaghi; Roya Mohammadzadeh Kakhki

    2012-10-01

    Banana tissue containing polyphenol oxidase was incorporated into polypyrrole matrix to make a biosensor for the analysis of acetaminophen (ACT). The electrocatalytic behaviour of oxidized acetaminophen was studied at the surface of the biosensor, using various electrochemical methods. The advantages of this biosensor for the determination of acetaminophen are excellent catalytic activity, good detection limit and high exchange current density. The electrochemical and structural properties of the electrode were assessed using cyclic voltammetry, differential voltammetry, chronoamperometric techniques. The analytical properties (sensitivity, p) of this biosensor increased with plant tissue loading. Also this new biosensor was successfully applied for determination of acetaminophen in biologic samples.

  10. Fabrication of nanostructures and nanostructure based interfaces for biosensor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Devesh

    Nanoparticles have applications from electronics, composites, drug-delivery, imaging and sensors etc. Fabricating and controlling shape and size of nanoparticles and also controlling the positioning of these particles in 1, 2 or 3-d structures is of most interest. The underlying theme of this study is to develop simple and efficient techniques to fabricate nanoparticles from polymers, and also achieve control in shape, size and functionalization of nanoparticles, while applying them in biosensor applications. First part of the dissertation studies the fabrication of nanostructures using anodized alumina membrane as template. It discusses the fabrication design for injecting polystyrene nanoparticles inside the pores of anodized alumina membranes and heating the membrane to coalesce the particles into tapered nanoparticles. Various parameters like temperature and amount of injected particles can vary the size and shape of fabricated nanoparticles. Later it focuses on the fabrication of metallic nanostructures using the alumina membranes without the aid of the injection system. It utilizes the difference in the functionality of the pore edges of cleaved alumina membrane with respect to the pore walls to first deposit charged polymers using layer-by-layer deposition followed by deposition of nickel. Second part of this study involves immobilization of enzymes for biosensor applications. It describes a biosensor interface developed by immobilization of tyrosinase using layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition process. The interface was modified with functional nanoparticles and their influence on the response of biosensor was studied. Tyrosinase sensor was further extended to develop a novel biosensor which was used to study real time inhibition of NEST, a subunit of the medically relevant membrane protein, neuropathy target esterase. The biosensor was developed to give real time monitoring of dose dependent decrease in activity of NEST. Final part of this study emphasizes on

  11. Biosensors and nanobiosensors for therapeutic drug and response monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeating, Kristy S; Aubé, Alexandra; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-21

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is required for pharmaceutical drugs with dosage limitations or toxicity issues where patients undergoing treatment with these drugs require frequent monitoring. This allows for the concentration of such pharmaceutical drugs in a patient's biofluid to be closely monitored in order to assess the pharmacokinetics, which could result in an adjustment of dosage or in medical intervention if the situation becomes urgent. Biosensors are a class of analytical techniques competent in the rapid quantification of therapeutic drugs and recent developments in instrumental platforms and in sensing schemes, as well as the emergence of nanobiosensors, have greatly contributed to the principal examples of these sensors for therapeutic drug monitoring. Based on initial success stories, it is clear that (nano)biosensors could pave the way for therapeutic drug monitoring of many commonly administered drugs and for new drugs that will be introduced to the market allowing for safe and optimal dosing across a wide range of pharmaceuticals. In this review, we report on the recent developments in biosensing and nanobiosensing techniques and, focussing mainly on anti-cancer agents and antibiotics, we discuss the different classes of molecules upon which therapeutic drug monitoring has already been successfully applied. The potential contributions of (nano)biosensors are also reviewed for the emerging areas of therapeutic response monitoring, where markers are monitored to ensure compliance of a patient to a treatment and in the area of cellular response to therapeutic drugs in order to identify cytotoxic effects of drugs on cells or to identify patients responding to a drug.

  12. Integration of Fractal Biosensor in a Digital Microfluidic Platform

    KAUST Repository

    Mashraei, Yousof

    2016-06-08

    The digital microfluidic (DMF) platform introduces many applications in biomedical assays. If it is to be commercially available to the public, it needs to have the essential features of smart sensing and a compact size. In this work, we report on a fractal electrode biosensor that is used for both droplet actuation and sensing C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration levels to assess cardiac disease risk. Our proposed electrode is the first two-terminal electrode design to be integrated into DMF platforms. A simulation of the electrical field distribution shows reduced peak intensities and uniform distribution of the field. When compared to a V-notch square electrode, the fractal electrode shows a superior performance in both aspects, i.e. field uniformity and intensity. These improvements are translated into a successful and responsive actuation of a water droplet with 100V. Likewise, the effective dielectric strength is improved by a 33% increase in the fractal electrode breakdown voltage. Additionally, the capability of the fractal electrode to work as a capacitive biosensor is evaluated with CRP quantification test. Selected fractal electrodes undergo a surface treatment to immobilize anti-CRP antibodies on their surface. The measurement shows a response to the added CRP in capacitance within three minutes. When the untreated electrodes were used for quantification, there was no significant change in capacitance, and this suggested that immobilization was necessary. The electrodes configuration in the fabricated DMF platform allows the fractal electrodes to be selectively used as biosensors, which means the device could be integrated into point-of-care applications.

  13. Electrochemical enzymatic biosensors using carbon nanofiber nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Li, Yi-fen; Swisher, Luxi Z.; Syed, Lateef U.; Prior, Allan M.; Nguyen, Thu A.; Hua, Duy H.

    2012-10-01

    The reduction of electrode size down to nanometers could dramatically enhance detection sensitivity and temporal resolution. Nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) are of particular interest for ultrasensitive biosensors. Here we report the study of two types of biosensors for measuring enzyme activities using NEAs fabricated with vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs). VACNFs of ~100 nm in average diameter and 3-5 μm in length were grown on conductive substrates as uniform vertical arrays which were then encapsulated in SiO2 matrix leaving only the tips exposed. We demonstrate that such VACNF NEAs can be used in profiling enzyme activities through monitoring the change in electrochemical signals induced by enzymatic reactions to the peptides attached to the VACNF tip. The cleavage of the tetrapeptide with a ferrocene tag by a cancerrelated protease (legumain) was monitored with AC voltammetry. Real-time electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (REIS) was used for fast label-free detection of two reversible processes, i.e. phosphorylation by c-Src tyrosine kinase and dephosphorylation by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). The REIS data of phosphorylation were slow and unreliable, but those of dephosphorylation showed large and fast exponential decay due to much higher activity of phosphatase PTP1B. The kinetic data were analyzed with a heterogeneous Michaelis-Menten model to derive the "specificity constant" kcat/Km, which is 8.2x103 M-1s-1 for legumain and (2.1 ± 0.1) x 107 M-1s-1 for phosphatase (PTP1B), well consistent with literature. It is promising to develop VACNF NEA based electrochemical enzymatic biosensors as portable multiplex electronic techniques for rapid cancer diagnosis and treatment monitoring.

  14. Functionalized graphene oxide for the fabrication of paraoxon biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hangyu; Li, Zhe-fei; Snyder, Alexandra; Xie, Jian; Stanciu, Lia A

    2014-05-27

    There is an increasing need to develop biosensors for the detection of harmful pesticide residues in food and water. Here, we report on a versatile strategy to synthesize functionalized graphene oxide nanomaterials with abundant affinity groups that can capture histidine (His)-tagged acetylcholinesterase (AChE) for the fabrication of paraoxon biosensors. Initially, exfoliated graphene oxide (GO) was functionalized by a diazonium reaction to introduce abundant carboxyl groups. Then, Nα,Nα-bis(carboxymethyl)-l-lysine hydrate (NTA-NH2) and Ni(2+) were anchored onto the GO based materials step by step. AChE was immobilized on the functionalized graphene oxide (FGO) through the specific binding between Ni-NTA and His-tag. A low anodic oxidation potential was observed due to an enhanced electrocatalytic activity and a large surface area brought about by the use of FGO. Furthermore, a sensitivity of 2.23 μA mM(-1) to the acetylthiocholine chloride (ATChCl) substrate was found for our composite covered electrodes. The electrodes also showed a wide linear response range from 10 μM to 1mM (R(2)=0.996), with an estimated detection limit of 3 μM based on an S/N=3. The stable chelation between Ni-NTA and His-tagged AChE endowed our electrodes with great short-term and long-term stability. In addition, a linear correlation was found between paraoxon concentration and the inhibition response of the electrodes to paraoxon, with a detection limit of 6.5×10(-10) M. This versatile strategy provides a platform to fabricate graphene oxide based nanomaterials for biosensor applications.

  15. Influence of different nanoparticles on electrochemical behavior of glucose biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenkova, R. D.; Ivanov, Y. L.; Godjevargova, T. I.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of nanosized particles on the glucose oxidase loading and the performance of amperometric glucose bionsensors were studied. Four enzyme electrodes (Pt/PAN/GOD, Pt/PAN/NZ/GOD, Pt/PAN/NZ/MNP/GOD, Pt/PAN/NZ/MWNT/GOD) were prepared by cross-linking of glucose oxidase (GOD) on nanocomposite material. Nanocomposites were prepared by entrapping nanozeolite (NZ), multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) and magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) film. Cyclic voltammetric kinetic studies have been carried out with the four biosensors and the surface concentration of the adsorbed electroactive species on the electrodes was estimated. The highest enzyme concentration on the electrode surface corresponded to the electrodes prepared by nanozeolite separate (Pt/PAN/NZ/GOD) and combined with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Pt/PAN/NZ/MWNT/GOD). The sensitivity of these two biosensors was the highest and that is in accordance with the greater amount of the adsorbed electroactive species on the electrodes (0.373 mol.cm-2). This was indication that a good synergistic effect happened when MWNTs and NZ were combined and these greatly improve the electron transfer ability of the sensor interface. Amperometric measurement of the two glucose oxidase electrodes (Pt/PAN/NZ/GOD and Pt/PAN/NZ/MWNT/GOD) with best results was carried out. The linear concentration interval of the Pt/PAN/NZ/MWNT/GOD biosensor was up to 3 mM, the detection limit - 0.02 mM glucose and the storage stability - 81% of its initial current response after 30 days.

  16. Comparative study of semi-specific Aeromonas hydrophila and universal Pseudomonas fluorescens biosensors for BOD measurements in meat industry wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raud, Merlin; Tenno, Toomas; Jõgi, Eerik; Kikas, Timo

    2012-04-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila P69.1 (A. hydrophila) was used to construct a semi-specific biosensor to estimate biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in high fat and grease content wastewaters. A. hydrophila cells were grown in fat containing medium to induce necessary enzymes for transport and degradation of fatty substances. Universal biosensor based on non-specific Pseudomonas fluorescens P75 (P. fluorescens) was used to conduct comparison experiments. Biosensors were calibrated using OECD synthetic wastewater and steady-state method, subsequently several experiments with synthetic and industrial wastewaters were conducted. A linear range up to 45 mg l(-1) BOD(7) was gained using A. hydrophila biosensor, in comparison to 40 mg l(-1) BOD(7) obtained using P. fluorescens biosensors. The lower limit of detection was 5 mg l(-1) BOD(7). Service life of A. hydrophila and P. fluorescens biosensors were 110 and 115 days, respectively. The response time of the biosensors depended on the BOD(7) of measuring solution and was up to 20 min when analyzing different wastewaters. Both biosensors underestimated BOD in meat industry wastewater from 43% up to 71%, but more accurate results could be obtained with A. hydrophila biosensor. Semi-specific A. hydrophila biosensor was able to measure proportion of fat found in wastewater sample, while other refractory compounds remained undetectable to both biosensors.

  17. Superlens Biosensor with Photonic Crystals in Negative Refraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Dorrani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have presented the study on one structure fabricated with photonic crystals for use as biosensors with superlensing property in dimensions of nano and micro with negative refractive index. In a special frequency, this type of photonic crystal acts as Left-Handed Metamaterial (LHM. It is shown that by a suitable choice of design parameters, such as, dimensions of bars, it is possible to reach sensing property by this structure in two-dimensional triangular photonic crystals. The structure investigated in three size and results shows the slab of photonic crystals prosperous process that, with sensing applications can has imaging applications.

  18. Biosensor platform based on carbon nanotubes covalently modified with aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, I. A.; Rubtsova, E. I.; Golovin, A. V.; Bobrinetskiy, I. I.

    2016-12-01

    We developed a new platform for biosensing applications. Aptamers as sensitive agents have a great potential and gives us possibility to have highest possible selectivity among other sensing agents like enzymes or antibodies. We covalently bound aptamers to the functional groups of c-CNTs and then put this system on the surface of polymer substrate. Thus we got high sensitive flexible transparent biological sensors. We also suggest that by varying aptamer type we can make set of biosensors for disease detection which can be integrated into self-healthcare systems and gadgets.

  19. Integration of fractal biosensor in a digital microfluidic platform

    KAUST Repository

    Mashraei, Yousof

    2015-11-01

    Fractal capacitive electrodes have been successfully integrated into a digital microfluidic open-platform. These electrodes perform actuation and withstand voltages up to 300V without insulation-layer breakdown. They were used to quantify the concentration levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) to determine the risk of cardiovascular disease. The capacitance increased sevenfold and stabilized in less than 5 minutes. The sensor shows a decreasing trend of capacitance readouts with the increase of concentrations. The same immunoassay was tested with untreated electrodes and showed no significant response, which suggests that immobilization was necessary. This configuration allows the electrodes to be used as biosensors.

  20. A capacitive biosensor based on an interdigitated electrode with nanoislands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ha-Wook; Chang, Young Wook; Lee, Ga-yeon; Cho, Sungbo; Kang, Min-Jung; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2014-09-24

    A capacitive biosensor based on an interdigitated electrode (IDE) with nanoislands was developed for label-free detection of antigen-antibody interactions. To enable sensitive capacitive detection of protein adsorption, the nanoislands were fabricated between finger electrodes of the IDE. The effect of the nanoislands on the sensitive capacitive measurement was estimated using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein. Additionally, a parylene-A film was coated on the IDE with nanoislands to improve the efficiency of protein immobilization. By using HRP and hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) as model analytes, the effect of the parylene-A film on the capacitive detection of protein adsorption was demonstrated.

  1. Biosensor regeneration via substrate electric potential: A physical mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rui-Bin; Lei, U.

    2010-06-01

    Literatures showed that the immune type biosensors can be regenerated by applying a voltage (ΔΦ) across the combined macromolecules but the underlying physics was not clarified. By incorporating an electric double layer force and a van der Waals force into a weight-ensemble Brownian dynamics simulation, we found that the dissociation rate constant for biotin-streptavidin increases exponentially with ΔΦ, and reaches 418-fold when ΔΦ equals 1 V. Macroscopic diffusion simulations using such enhanced dissociation rate constants agree with the previous experiments, and explain quantitatively the finding that the regeneration using square-wave voltage is superior to that using saw-tooth voltage.

  2. Gallium nitride electrodes for membrane-based electrochemical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, T; Steinhoff, G; von Ribbeck, H-G; Stutzmannn, M; Eickhoff, M; Tanaka, M

    2009-10-01

    We report on the deposition of planar lipid bilayers (supported membranes) on gallium nitride (GaN) electrodes for potential applications as membrane-based biosensors. The kinetics of the lipid membrane formation upon vesicle fusion were monitored by simultaneous measurements of resistance and capacitance of the membrane using AC impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range between 50 mHz and 50 kHz. We could identify a two-step process of membrane spreading and self-healing. Despite its relatively low resistance, the membrane can be modeled by a parallel combination of an ideal resistor and capacitor, indicating that the membrane efficiently blocks the diffusion of ions.

  3. A new PANI biosensor based on catalase for cyanide determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Hakkı Mevlüt; Aydin, Tuba

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide is one of the most widespread of compounds measured in environmental analysis due to their toxic effects on environment and health. We report a highly sensitive, reliable, selective amperometric sensor for determination of cyanide, using a polyaniline conductive polymer. The enzyme catalase was immobilized by electropolymerization. The steps during the immobilization were controlled by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Optimum pH, temperature, aniline concentration, enzyme concentration, and the number of scans obtained during electropolymerization, were investigated. In addition, the cyanide present in artificial waste water samples was determined. In the characterization studies of the biosensor, some parameters such as reproducibility and storage stability, were analyzed.

  4. Hybrid plasmon photonic crystal resonance grating for integrated spectrometer biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong; Guo, Junpeng

    2015-01-15

    Using nanofabricated hybrid metal-dielectric nanohole array photonic crystal gratings, a hybrid plasmonic optical resonance spectrometer biosensor is demonstrated. The new spectrometer sensor technique measures plasmonic optical resonance from the first-order diffraction rather than via the traditional method of measuring optical resonance from transmission. The resonance spectra measured with the new spectrometer technique are compared with the spectra measured using a commercial optical spectrometer. It is shown that the new optical resonance spectrometer can be used to measure plasmonic optical resonance that otherwise cannot be measured with a regular optical spectrometer.

  5. Photonic Crystal Biosensor Based on Optical Surface Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Dietler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A label-free biosensor device based on registration of photonic crystal surface waves is described. Angular interrogation of the optical surface wave resonance is used to detect changes in the thickness of an adsorbed layer, while an additional simultaneous detection of the critical angle of total internal reflection provides independent data of the liquid refractive index. The abilities of the device are demonstrated by measuring of biotin molecule binding to a streptavidin monolayer, and by measuring association and dissociation kinetics of immunoglobulin G proteins. Additionally, deposition of PSS / PAH polyelectrolytes is recorded in situ resulting calculation of PSS and PAH monolayer thicknesses separately.

  6. BioSentinel: Developing a Space Radiation Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Maria, Sergio R.

    2015-01-01

    BioSentinel is an autonomous fully self-contained science mission that will conduct the first study of the biological response to space radiation outside low Earth orbit (LEO) in over 40 years. The 4-unit (4U) BioSentinel biosensor system, is housed within a 6-Unit (6U) spacecraft, and uses yeast cells in multiple independent microfluidic cards to detect and measure DNA damage that occurs in response to ambient space radiation. Cell growth and metabolic activity will be measured using a 3-color LED detection system and a metabolic indicator dye with a dedicated thermal control system per fluidic card.

  7. Fabrication of polyimide based microfluidic channels for biosensor devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zulfiqar, Azeem; Pfreundt, Andrea; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2015-01-01

    The ever-increasing complexity of the fabrication process of Point-of-care (POC) devices, due to high demand of functional versatility, compact size and ease-of-use, emphasizes the need of multifunctional materials that can be used to simplify this process. Polymers, currently in use for the fabr...... in uniformity of PI is also compared to the most commonly used SU8 polymer, which is a near UV sensitive epoxy resin. The potential applications of PI processing are POC and biosensor devices integrated with microelectronics....

  8. An Optical Biosensor for Bacillus Cereus Spore Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengquan; Tom, Harry W. K.

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate a new transduction scheme for optical biosensing. Bacillus cereus is a pathogen that may be found in food and dairy products and is able to produce toxins and cause food poisoning. It is related to Bacillus anthracis (anthrax). A CCD array covered with micro-structured glass coverslip is used to detect the optical resonant shift due to the binding of the antigen (bacillus cereus spore) to the antibody (polyclonal antibody). This novel optical biosensor scheme has the potential for detecting 10˜100 bioagents in a single device as well as the potential to test for antigens with multiple antibody tests to avoid ``false positives.''

  9. Responsive Hydrogels for Label-Free Signal Transduction within Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Gawel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogels have found wide application in biosensors due to their versatile nature. This family of materials is applied in biosensing either to increase the loading capacity compared to two-dimensional surfaces, or to support biospecific hydrogel swelling occurring subsequent to specific recognition of an analyte. This review focuses on various principles underpinning the design of biospecific hydrogels acting through various molecular mechanisms in transducing the recognition event of label-free analytes. Towards this end, we describe several promising hydrogel systems that when combined with the appropriate readout platform and quantitative approach could lead to future real-life applications.

  10. Tunable Ultrasonic Energy Harvesting for Implantable Biosensors and Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, M.; Eovino, B. E.; Beker, L.; Bourouina, T.; Lin, L.

    2016-11-01

    This work reports a tunable ultrasonic energy harvesting (UEH) device capable of high power output and/or large bandwidth based on concentric piezoelectric ring-shaped structures. Two different designs are presented: (1) the single ring-shaped UEH (r-UEH), and (2) concentric r-UEHs. Concentric r-UEHs can save space and therefore can provide benefits in powering low-power implantable biosensors and medical devices. This paper presents results of simulation studies and initial experiments of a single r-UEH.

  11. Porous silicon localization for implementation in matrix biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benilov, A. [Laboratoire d' Electronique, Optoelectronique et Microsystemes, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, BP 163-69131 Ecully Cedex (France) and Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, 64 Volodymyrska, 01033 Kiev (Ukraine)]. E-mail: arthur@univ.kiev.ua; Cabrera, M. [Laboratoire d' Electronique, Optoelectronique et Microsystemes, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, BP 163-69131 Ecully Cedex (France); Skryshevsky, V. [Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, 64 Volodymyrska, 01033 Kiev (Ukraine); Martin, J.-R. [Laboratoire d' Electronique, Optoelectronique et Microsystemes, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, BP 163-69131 Ecully Cedex (France)

    2007-05-15

    The search of appropriate substrates and methods of surface DNA functionalisation is one of the important tasks of semiconductor biosensors. In this work we develop a method of light-assisted porous silicon etching in order to localize porous silicon spots on silicon substrate for matrix fluorophore-labeled DNA sensors implementation. The principal difference of porous spots localization proposed is considered for n- and p-type Si substrates under the condition of supplementary illumination. The tuning of the porous profile via applying of lateral electric field is proposed and experimentally proved.

  12. Electrochemical biosensors based on nanofibres for cardiac biomarker detection: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Babak; Ghani, Mozhdeh; Shoushtari, Ahmad Mousavi; Rabiee, Mohammad

    2016-04-15

    The vital importance of early and accurate diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) to prevent the irreversible damage or even death of patients has driven the development of biosensor devices for detection and quantification of cardiac biomarkers. Electrochemical biosensors offer rapid sensing, low cost, portability and ease of use. Over the past few years, nanotechnology has contributed to a tremendous improvement in the sensitivity of biosensors. In this review, the authors summarise the state-of-the-art of the application of one particular type of nanostructured material, i.e. nanofibres, for use in electrochemical biosensors for the ultrasensitive detection of cardiac biomarkers. A new way of classifying the nanofibre-based electrochemical biosensors according to the electrical conductance and the type of nanofibres is presented. Some key data from each article reviewed are highlighted, including the mechanism of detection, experimental conditions and the response range of the biosensor. The primary aim of this review is to emphasise the prospects for nanofibres for the future development of biosensors in diagnosis of CVDs as well as considering how to improve their characteristics for application in medicine.

  13. Biosensors based on enzyme field-effect transistors for determination of some substrates and inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyadevych, Sergei V; Soldatkin, Alexey P; Korpan, Yaroslav I; Arkhypova, Valentyna N; El'skaya, Anna V; Chovelon, Jean-Marc; Martelet, Claude; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2003-10-01

    This paper is a review of the authors' publications concerning the development of biosensors based on enzyme field-effect transistors (ENFETs) for direct substrates or inhibitors analysis. Such biosensors were designed by using immobilised enzymes and ion-selective field-effect transistors (ISFETs). Highly specific, sensitive, simple, fast and cheap determination of different substances renders them as promising tools in medicine, biotechnology, environmental control, agriculture and the food industry. The biosensors based on ENFETs and direct enzyme analysis for determination of concentrations of different substrates (glucose, urea, penicillin, formaldehyde, creatinine, etc.) have been developed and their laboratory prototypes were fabricated. Improvement of the analytical characteristics of such biosensors may be achieved by using a differential mode of measurement, working solutions with different buffer concentrations and specific agents, negatively or positively charged additional membranes, or genetically modified enzymes. These approaches allow one to decrease the effect of the buffer capacity influence on the sensor response in an aim to increase the sensitivity of the biosensors and to extend their dynamic ranges. Biosensors for the determination of concentrations of different toxic substances (organophosphorous pesticides, heavy metal ions, hypochlorite, glycoalkaloids, etc.) were designed on the basis of reversible and/or irreversible enzyme inhibition effect(s). The conception of an enzymatic multibiosensor for the determination of different toxic substances based on the enzyme inhibition effect is also described. We will discuss the respective advantages and disadvantages of biosensors based on the ENFETs developed and also demonstrate their practical application.

  14. Biosensor-based control of nitrification inhibitor in municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayasu, Y; Tanaka, H; Inui, T; Tanaka, Y

    2006-01-01

    The effect of potassium cyanide (KCN) on nitrification processes in municipal wastewater treatment plants was studied by batch nitrification tests, which indicated that nitrification processes tend to be inhibited at a lower KCN concentration than the present discharge standard to sewerage. The experiment of the biosensor using nitrifying bacteria was also conducted for continuous monitoring of nitrification inhibitor in influent wastewater, and demonstrated that the biosensor can detect KCN at as low as EC10 of the abovementioned batch nitrification test. Moreover, to determine the effectiveness of application of the biosensor to avoid the impact of KCN due to an accidental spillage in a sewerage system, KCN was intentionally injected into the experimental models of activated sludge process equipped both with and without the biosensor. The model with the biosensor that could detect KCN could divert the wastewater including KCN to a refuge tank, which resulted in the avoidance of upset of the activated sludge process. On the other hand, the model without the biosensor was upset in the nitrification process due to KCN. Such differences demonstrate the effectiveness of the biosensor applied to countermeasures of an accidental spillage of toxic chemicals to avoid upset of nitrification in municipal wastewater treatment plants.

  15. Potentiometric urea biosensor based on an immobilised fullerene-urease bio-conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedfar, Kasra; Heng, Lee Yook; Ling, Tan Ling; Rezayi, Majid

    2013-12-06

    A novel method for the rapid modification of fullerene for subsequent enzyme attachment to create a potentiometric biosensor is presented. Urease was immobilized onto the modified fullerene nanomaterial. The modified fullerene-immobilized urease (C60-urease) bioconjugate has been confirmed to catalyze the hydrolysis of urea in solution. The biomaterial was then deposited on a screen-printed electrode containing a non-plasticized poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PnBA) membrane entrapped with a hydrogen ionophore. This pH-selective membrane is intended to function as a potentiometric urea biosensor with the deposition of C60-urease on the PnBA membrane. Various parameters for fullerene modification and urease immobilization were investigated. The optimal pH and concentration of the phosphate buffer for the urea biosensor were 7.0 and 0.5 mM, respectively. The linear response range of the biosensor was from 2.31 × 10-3 M to 8.28 × 10-5 M. The biosensor's sensitivity was 59.67 ± 0.91 mV/decade, which is close to the theoretical value. Common cations such as Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and NH4+ showed no obvious interference with the urea biosensor's response. The use of a fullerene-urease bio-conjugate and an acrylic membrane with good adhesion prevented the leaching of urease enzyme and thus increased the stability of the urea biosensor for up to 140 days.

  16. Live imaging of protein kinase activities in transgenic mice expressing FRET biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamioka, Yuji; Sumiyama, Kenta; Mizuno, Rei; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Hirata, Eishu; Kiyokawa, Etsuko; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Genetically-encoded biosensors based on the principle of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been widely used in biology to visualize the spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling molecules. Despite the increasing multitude of these biosensors, their application has been mostly limited to cultured cells with transient biosensor expression, due to particular difficulties in the development of transgenic mice that express FRET biosensors. In this study, we report the efficient generation of transgenic mouse lines expressing heritable and functional biosensors for ERK and PKA. These transgenic mice were created by the cytoplasmic co-injection of Tol2 transposase mRNA and a circular plasmid harbouring Tol2 recombination sites. High expression of the biosensors in a wide range of cell types allowed us to screen newborn mice simply by inspection. Observation of these transgenic mice by two-photon excitation microscopy yielded real-time activity maps of ERK and PKA in various tissues, with greatly improved signal-to-background ratios. Our transgenic mice may be bred into diverse genetic backgrounds; moreover, the protocol we have developed paves the way for the generation of transgenic mice that express other FRET biosensors, with important applications in the characterization of physiological and pathological signal transduction events in addition to drug development and screening.

  17. The research of differential reference electrode arrayed flexible IGZO glucose biosensor based on microfluidic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Syun; Chou, Jung-Chuan; Liao, Yi-Hung; Chen, Ruei-Ting; Huang, Min-Siang; Wu, Tong-Yu

    2017-03-01

    This study used a fast, simple, and low-cost method to fabricate arrayed flexible glucose biosensor, and the glucose biosensor was integrated with microfluidic framework for investigating sensing characteristics of glucose biosensor at the dynamic conditions. The indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) was adopted as sensing membrane and it was deposited on aluminum electrodes / polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate by the radio frequency sputtering system. Then, we utilized screen-printed technology to accomplish miniaturization of glucose biosensor. Finally, the glucose sensing membrane was composed of glucose oxidase (GOx) and nafion, which was dropped on IGZO sensing membrane to complete glucose biosensor. According to the experimental results, we found that optimal sensing characteristics of arrayed flexible IGZO glucose biosensor at the dynamic conditions were better than at the static conditions. The optimal average sensitivity and linearity of the arrayed flexible IGZO glucose biosensor were 7.255 mV/mM and 0.994 at 20 µL/min flow rate, respectively.

  18. Enzyme-linked, aptamer-based, competitive biolayer interferometry biosensor for palytoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shunxiang; Zheng, Xin; Hu, Bo; Sun, Mingjuan; Wu, Jihong; Jiao, Binghua; Wang, Lianghua

    2017-03-15

    In this study, we coupled biolayer interferometry (BLI) with competitive binding assay through an enzyme-linked aptamer and developed a real-time, ultra-sensitive, rapid quantitative method for detection of the marine biotoxin palytoxin. Horseradish peroxidase-labeled aptamers were used as biorecognition receptors to competitively bind with palytoxin, which was immobilized on the biosensor surface. The palytoxin: horseradish peroxidase-aptamer complex was then submerged in a 3,3'-diaminobenzidine solution, which resulted in formation of a precipitated polymeric product directly on the biosensor surface and a large change in the optical thickness of the biosensor layer. This change could obviously shift the interference pattern and generate a response profile on the BLI biosensor. The biosensor showed a broad linear range for palytoxin (200-700pg/mL) with a low detection limit (0.04pg/mL). Moreover, the biosensor was applied to the detection of palytoxin in spiked extracts and showed a high degree of selectivity for palytoxin, good reproducibility, and stability. This enzyme-linked, aptamer-based, competitive BLI biosensor offers a promising method for rapid and sensitive detection of palytoxin and other analytes.

  19. Whole-cell Gluconobacter oxydans biosensor for 2-phenylethanol biooxidation monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkmayerová, Andrea; Bertóková, Anikó; Sefčovičová, Jana; Stefuca, Vladimír; Bučko, Marek; Vikartovská, Alica; Gemeiner, Peter; Tkáč, Ján; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2015-01-07

    A microbial biosensor for 2-phenylethanol (2-PE) based on the bacteria Gluconobacter oxydans was developed and applied in monitoring of a biotechnological process. The cells of G. oxydans were immobilized within a disposable polyelectrolyte complex gel membrane consisting of sodium alginate, cellulose sulphate and poly(methylene-co-guanidine) attached onto a miniaturized Clark oxygen electrode, forming whole cell amperometric biosensor. Measured changes in oxygen concentration were proportional to changes in 2-PE concentration. The biosensor sensitivity was 864 nA mM(-1) (RSD=6%), a detection limit of 1 μM, and the biosensor response towards 2-PE was linear in the range 0.02-0.70 mM. The biosensor preserved 93% of its initial sensitivity after 7h of continuous operation and exhibited excellent storage stability with loss of only 6% of initial sensitivity within two months, when stored at 4°C. The developed system was designed and successfully used for an off-line monitoring of whole course of 2-PE biooxidation process producing phenylacetic acid (PA) as industrially valuable aromatic compound. The biosensor measurement did not require the use of hazardous organic solvent. The biosensor response to 2-PE was not affected by interferences from PA and phenylacetaldehyde at concentrations present in real samples during the biotransformation and the results were in a very good agreement with those obtained via gas chromatography.

  20. Gold nanostar-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiong; Sun, Ying; Ma, Pinyi; Zhang, Di; Li, Shuo; Wang, Xinghua; Song, Daqian, E-mail: songdq@jlu.edu.cn

    2016-03-24

    A new high-sensitivity surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on biofunctional gold nanostars (AuNSs) and carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide (cGO) sheets was described. Compared with spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), the anisotropic structure of AuNSs, which concentrates the electric charge density on its sharp tips, could enhance the local electromagnetic field and the electronic coupling effect significantly. cGO was obtained by a diazonium reaction of graphene oxide (GO) with 4-aminobenzoic acid. Compared with GO, cGO could immobilize more antibodies due to the abundant carboxylic groups on its surface. Testing results show that there are fairly large improvements in the analytical performance of the SPR biosensor using cGO/AuNSs-antigen conjugate, and the detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 0.0375 μg mL{sup −1}, which is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor. - Highlights: • A sensitive and versatile SPR biosensor was constructed for detection of pig IgG. • Biofunctional gold nanostars were used to amplify the response signals. • The strategy employed carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide as biosensing substrate. • The detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor.

  1. Study of nano biosensors%纳米生物传感器的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡新霞

    2005-01-01

    Point of care testing (POCT) based on biosensors has been recently received increasingly interesting in the world. Using biosensor technology for biomedical analysis has demonstrated many advantages. However, low cost and high accurate biosensors for clinical analysis, particularly for POCT is still a common problem for commercialization of the most biosensors[1, 2].In this work, it has the goals to develop materials (including nano materials) and methods for producing disposable biosensors capable with low cost, high reliability & sensitivity, robustness, low volume sample, and creating portable sensor systems (Figure 1) for testing human metabolites, biochemical markers without reagents. On top of the use of electrochemical method and Nano, MEMS technology, hemoglobin, creative kinase, alanine aminotransferas (ALT), Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST), glucose, lactate, ketone (β-Hydroxybutyrate), cholesterol have been tested using thin film electrode biosensors, modified with nanoporous and nanostructured materials (Figure 2). The electrxode has high surface-to-volume ratio and excellent hydrophilicity, thus the electrode possesses high catalytic activities for electrolytic processes and are ideal candidates for biosensors.It is significant for the applications in clinical diagnosis of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, home health care,sports, physical performance of athletes, blood screen. Glycated hemoglobin, creatine kinase MB (CK-MB), myoglobin, cardiac tropenin I (cTnI), cardiac troponin T (cTnT) are interesting to be tested for the next study.

  2. Comparison of the efficiency control of mycotoxins by some optical immune biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyshyk, N. F.; Starodub, N. F.

    2013-11-01

    It was compared the efficiency of patulin control at the application of such optical biosensors which were based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and nano-porous silicon (sNPS). In last case the intensity of the immune reaction was registered by measuring level of chemiluminescence (ChL) or photocurrent of nPS. The sensitivity of this mycotoxin determination by first type of immune biosensor was 0.05-10 mg/L Approximately the same sensitivity as well as the overall time analysis were demonstrated by the immune biosensor based on the nPS too. Nevertheless, the last type of biosensor was simpler in technical aspect and the cost of analysis was cheapest. That is why, it was recommend the nPS based immune biosensor for wide screening application and SPR one for some additional control or verification of preliminary obtained results. In this article a special attention was given to condition of sample preparation for analysis, in particular, micotoxin extraction from potao and some juices. Moreover, it was compared the efficiency of the above mentioned immune biosensors with such traditional approach of mycotoxin determination as the ELISA-method. In the result of investigation and discussion of obtained data it was concluded that both type of the immune biosensors are able to fulfill modern practice demand in respect sensitivity, rapidity, simplicity and cheapness of analysis.

  3. A novel nitrite biosensor based on conductometric electrode modified with cytochrome c nitrite reductase composite membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Siqing; Leonard, Didier; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Zhang, Jiao; Bessueille, François; Goepfert, Yves; Wang, Xuejiang; Chen, Ling; Zhu, Zhiliang; Zhao, Jianfu; Almeida, M Gabriela; Silveira, Célia M

    2009-02-15

    A conductometric biosensor for nitrite detection was developed using cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) extracted from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 cells immobilized on a planar interdigitated electrode by cross-linking with saturated glutaraldehyde (GA) vapour in the presence of bovine serum albumin, methyl viologen (MV), Nafion, and glycerol. The configuration parameters for this biosensor, including the enzyme concentration, ccNiR/BSA ratio, MV concentration, and Nafion concentration, were optimized. Various experimental parameters, such as sodium dithionite added, working buffer solution, and temperature, were investigated with regard to their effect on the conductance response of the biosensor to nitrite. Under the optimum conditions at room temperature (about 25 degrees C), the conductometric biosensor showed a fast response to nitrite (about 10s) with a linear range of 0.2-120 microM, a sensitivity of 0.194 microS/microM [NO(2)(-)], and a detection limit of 0.05 microM. The biosensor also showed satisfactory reproducibility (relative standard deviation of 6%, n=5). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M,app)) was 338 microM. When stored in potassium phosphate buffer (100mM, pH 7.6) at 4 degrees C, the biosensor showed good stability over 1 month. No obvious interference from other ionic species familiar in natural waters was detected. The application experiments show that the biosensor is suitable for use in real water samples.

  4. A comparative study of enzyme immobilization strategies for multi-walled carbon nanotube glucose biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jin; Jaroch, David; Rickus, Jenna L; Marshall Porterfield, D [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University (United States); Claussen, Jonathan C; Ul Haque, Aeraj; Diggs, Alfred R [Physiological Sensing Facility, Bindley Bioscience Center and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University (United States); McLamore, Eric S [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida (United States); Calvo-Marzal, Percy, E-mail: porterf@purdue.edu [Department of Chemistry, Purdue University (United States)

    2011-09-02

    This work addresses the comparison of different strategies for improving biosensor performance using nanomaterials. Glucose biosensors based on commonly applied enzyme immobilization approaches, including sol-gel encapsulation approaches and glutaraldehyde cross-linking strategies, were studied in the presence and absence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Although direct comparison of design parameters such as linear range and sensitivity is intuitive, this comparison alone is not an accurate indicator of biosensor efficacy, due to the wide range of electrodes and nanomaterials available for use in current biosensor designs. We proposed a comparative protocol which considers both the active area available for transduction following nanomaterial deposition and the sensitivity. Based on the protocol, when no nanomaterials were involved, TEOS/GOx biosensors exhibited the highest efficacy, followed by BSA/GA/GOx and TMOS/GOx biosensors. A novel biosensor containing carboxylated MWNTs modified with glucose oxidase and an overlying TMOS layer demonstrated optimum efficacy in terms of enhanced current density (18.3 {+-} 0.5 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}), linear range (0.0037-12 mM), detection limit (3.7 {mu}M), coefficient of variation (2%), response time (less than 8 s), and stability/selectivity/reproducibility. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} response tests demonstrated that the most possible reason for the performance enhancement was an increased enzyme loading. This design is an excellent platform for versatile biosensing applications.

  5. Using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Typhimurium in Chicken Carcass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-bin Lan; Shi-zhou Wang; Yong-guang Yin; W.Clint Hoffmann; Xiao-zhe Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Chicken is one of the most popular meat products in the world. Salmonella Typhimurium is a common foodborne pathogens associated with the processing of poultry. An optical Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) biosensor was sensitive to the presence of Salmonella Typhimurium in chicken carcass. The Spreeta biosensor kits were used to detect Salmonella Typhimurium on chicken carcass successfully. A taste sensor like electronic tongue or biosensors was used to basically "taste" the object and differentiated one object from the other with different taste sensor signatures. The surface plasmon resonance biosensor has potential for use in rapid, real-time detection and identification of bacteria, and to study the interaction of organisms with different antisera or other molecular species. The selectivity of the SPR biosensor was assayed using a series of antibody concentrations and dilution series of the organism. The SPR biosensor showed promising to detect the existence of Salmonella Typhimurium at 1×106 CFU/ml. Initial results show that the SPR biosensor has the potential for its application in pathogenic bacteria monitoring. However, more tests need to be done to confirm the detection limitation.

  6. Optical biosensors for food quality and safety assurance-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narsaiah, K; Jha, Shyam Narayan; Bhardwaj, Rishi; Sharma, Rajiv; Kumar, Ramesh

    2012-08-01

    Food quality and safety is a scientific discipline describing handling, preparation and storage of food in ways that prevent food borne illness. Food serves as a growth medium for microorganisms that can be pathogenic or cause food spoilage. Therefore, it is imperative to have stringent laws and standards for the preparation, packaging and transportation of food. The conventional methods for detection of food contamination based on culturing, colony counting, chromatography and immunoassay are tedious and time consuming while biosensors have overcome some of these disadvantages. There is growing interest in biosensors due to high specificity, convenience and quick response. Optical biosensors show greater potential for the detection of pathogens, pesticide and drug residues, hygiene monitoring, heavy metals and other toxic substances in the food to check whether it is safe for consumption or not. This review focuses on optical biosensors, the recent developments in the associated instrumentation with emphasis on fiber optic and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biosensors for detecting a range of analytes in food samples, the major advantages and challenges associated with optical biosensors. It also briefly covers the different methods employed for the immobilization of bio-molecules used in developing biosensors.

  7. Nanomaterials-based enzyme electrochemical biosensors operating through inhibition for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanoglu, Sevinc; Ozkan, Sibel A; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-03-15

    In recent years great progress has been made in applying nanomaterials to design novel biosensors. Use of nanomaterials offers to biosensing platforms exceptional optical, electronic and magnetic properties. Nanomaterials can increase the surface of the transducing area of the sensors that in turn bring an increase in catalytic behaviors. They have large surface-to-volume ratio, controlled morphology and structure that also favor miniaturization, an interesting advantage when the sample volume is a critical issue. Biosensors have great potential for achieving detect-to-protect devices: devices that can be used in detections of pollutants and other treating compounds/analytes (drugs) protecting citizens' life. After a long term focused scientific and financial efforts/supports biosensors are expected now to fulfill their promise such as being able to perform sampling and analysis of complex samples with interest for clinical or environment fields. Among all types of biosensors, enzymatic biosensors, the most explored biosensing devices, have an interesting property, the inherent inhibition phenomena given the enzyme-substrate complex formation. The exploration of such phenomena is making remarkably important their application as research and applied tools in diagnostics. Different inhibition biosensor systems based on nanomaterials modification has been proposed and applied. The role of nanomaterials in inhibition-based biosensors for the analyses of different groups of drugs as well as contaminants such as pesticides, phenolic compounds and others, are discussed in this review. This deep analysis of inhibition-based biosensors that employ nanomaterials will serve researchers as a guideline for further improvements and approaching of these devices to real sample applications so as to reach society needs and such biosensor market demands.

  8. NiO nanoparticle-based urea biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Manisha; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2013-03-15

    NiO nanoparticles (NiO-NPs) have been exploited successfully for the fabrication of a urea biosensor. A thin film of NiO nanoparticles deposited on an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate serves as an efficient matrix for the immobilisation of urease (Ur), the specific enzyme for urea detection. The prepared bioelectrode (Ur/NiO-NP/ITO/glass) is utilised for urea sensing using cyclic voltammetry and UV-visible spectroscopy. NiO nanoparticles act as electro-catalytic species that are based on the shuttling of electrons between Ni(2+) and Ni(3+) in the octahedral site and result in an enhanced electrochemical current response. The prepared bioelectrode (Ur/NiO-NPs/ITO/glass) exhibits a high sensitivity of 21.3 μA/(mM (*) cm(2)) and a good linearity in a wide range (0.83-16.65 Mm) of urea concentrations with fast response time of 5s. The low value of the Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)=0.34 mM) indicates the high affinity of Ur towards the analyte (urea). The high catalytic activity, along with the redox behaviour of NiO-NPs, makes it an efficient matrix for the realisation of a urea biosensor.

  9. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Lu

    2008-03-01

    We aim to develop new DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides, such as uranium, technetium, and plutonium, and metal contaminants, such as lead, chromium, and mercury. The sensors will be highly sensitive and selective. They will be applied to on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation, and stability of the individual contaminants before and during bioremediation, and for long-term monitoring of DOE contaminated sites. To achieve this goal, we have employed a combinatorial method called “in vitro selection” to search from a large DNA library (~ 1015 different molecules) for catalytic DNA molecules that are highly specific for radionuclides or other metal ions through intricate 3-dimensional interactions as in metalloproteins. Comprehensive biochemical and biophysical studies have been performed on the selected DNA molecules. The findings from these studies have helped to elucidate fundamental principles for designing effective sensors for radionuclides and metal ions. Based on the study, the DNA have been converted to fluorescent or colorimetric sensors by attaching to it fluorescent donor/acceptor pairs or gold nanoparticles, with 11 part-per-trillion detection limit (for uranium) and over million fold selectivity (over other radionuclides and metal ions tested). Practical application of the biosensors for samples from the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center (FRC) at Oak Ridge has also been demonstrated.

  10. Aryl Diazonium Chemistry for the Surface Functionalization of Glassy Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; van den Hurk, Remko; Cao, Yong; Du, Rongbing; Sun, Xuejun; Wang, Yiyu; McDermott, Mark T; Evoy, Stephane

    2016-03-14

    Nanostring resonator and fiber-optics-based biosensors are of interest as they offer high sensitivity, real-time measurements and the ability to integrate with electronics. However, these devices are somewhat impaired by issues related to surface modification. Both nanostring resonators and photonic sensors employ glassy materials, which are incompatible with electrochemistry. A surface chemistry approach providing strong and stable adhesion to glassy surfaces is thus required. In this work, a diazonium salt induced aryl film grafting process is employed to modify a novel SiCN glassy material. Sandwich rabbit IgG binding assays are performed on the diazonium treated SiCN surfaces. Fluorescently labelled anti-rabbit IgG and anti-rabbit IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles were used as markers to demonstrate the absorption of anti-rabbit IgG and therefore verify the successful grafting of the aryl film. The results of the experiments support the effectiveness of diazonium chemistry for the surface functionalization of SiCN surfaces. This method is applicable to other types of glassy materials and potentially can be expanded to various nanomechanical and optical biosensors.

  11. Integrated optical biosensor for rapid detection of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathesz, Anna; Valkai, Sándor; Újvárosy, Attila; Aekbote, Badri; Sipos, Orsolya; Stercz, Balázs; Kocsis, Béla; Szabó, Dóra; Dér, András

    2016-02-01

    In medical diagnostics, rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria from body fluids is one of the basic issues. Most state-of-the-art methods require optical labeling, increasing the complexity, duration and cost of the analysis. Therefore, there is a strong need for developing selective sensory devices based on label-free techniques, in order to increase the speed, and reduce the cost of detection. In a recent paper, we have shown that an integrated optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a highly sensitive all-optical device made of a cheap photopolymer, can be used as a powerful lab-on-a-chip tool for specific, labelfree detection of proteins. By proper modifications of this technique, our interferometric biosensor was combined with a microfluidic system allowing the rapid and specific detection of bacteria from solutions, having the surface of the sensor functionalized by bacterium-specific antibodies. The experiments proved that the biosensor was able to detect Escherichia coli bacteria at concentrations of 106 cfu/ml within a few minutes, that makes our device an appropriate tool for fast, label-free detection of bacteria from body fluids such as urine or sputum. On the other hand, possible applications of the device may not be restricted to medical microbiology, since bacterial identification is an important task in microbial forensics, criminal investigations, bio-terrorism threats and in environmental studies, as well.

  12. Escherichia coli bacteria detection by using graphene-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Elnaz; Buntat, Zolkafle; Afroozeh, Abdolkarim; Zeinalinezhad, Alireza; Nikoukar, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Graphene is an allotrope of carbon with two-dimensional (2D) monolayer honeycombs. A larger detection area and higher sensitivity can be provided by graphene-based nanosenor because of its 2D structure. In addition, owing to its special characteristics, including electrical, optical and physical properties, graphene is known as a more suitable candidate compared to other materials used in the sensor application. A novel model employing a field-effect transistor structure using graphene is proposed and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of graphene are employed to model the sensing mechanism. This biosensor can detect Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, providing high levels of sensitivity. It is observed that the graphene device experiences a drastic increase in conductance when exposed to E. coli bacteria at 0-10(5) cfu/ml concentration. The simple, fast response and high sensitivity of this nanoelectronic biosensor make it a suitable device in screening and functional studies of antibacterial drugs and an ideal high-throughput platform which can detect any pathogenic bacteria. Artificial neural network and support vector regression algorithms have also been used to provide other models for the I-V characteristic. A satisfactory agreement has been presented by comparison between the proposed models with the experimental data.

  13. All-nanophotonic NEMS biosensor on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu.; Stebunov, Yury V.

    2015-06-01

    Integrated chemical and biological sensors give advantages in cost, size and weight reduction and open new prospects for parallel monitoring and analysis. Biosensors based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are the most attractive candidates for the integrated platform. However, actuation and transduction techniques (e.g. electrostatic, magnetomotive, thermal or piezoelectric) limit their operation to laboratory conditions. All-optical approach gives the possibility to overcome this problem, nevertheless, the existing schemes are either fundamentally macroscopic or excessively complicated and expensive in mass production. Here we propose a novel scheme of extremely compact NEMS biosensor monolithically integrated on a chip with all-nanophotonic transduction and actuation. It consists of the nanophotonic waveguide and the nanobeam cantilever placed above the waveguide, both fabricated in the same CMOS-compatible process. Being in the near field of the strongly confined photonic or plasmonic mode, cantilever is efficiently actuated and its response is directly read out using the same waveguide, which results in a very high sensitivity and capability of single-molecule detection even in atmosphere.

  14. Production of miniaturized biosensors through laser-induced forward transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Duocastella, M.; Colina, M.; Serra, P.; Morenza, J. L.

    2007-05-01

    Lasers are adequate tools for the production of patterns with high spatial resolution owing to the high focusing power of their radiation. Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique allowing the deposition of tiny amounts of material from a donor thin film through the action of a pulsed laser beam. A laser pulse is focused onto the donor thin film through a transparent support, what results in the transference of a small area of the film onto a receptor substrate that is placed parallel to the film-support system. Although LIFT was originally developed to operate with solid films, it has been demonstrated that deposition is also viable from liquid films. In this case, a small amount of liquid is directly ejected from the film onto the receptor substrate, where it rests deposited in the form of a microdroplet. This makes LIFT adequate for biosensors preparation, since biological solutions can be transferred onto solid substrates to produce micrometric patterns of biomolecules. In this case, the liquid solvent acts as transport vector of the biomolecules. The viability of the technique has been demonstrated through the preparation of functional miniaturized biosensors showing similar performances and higher scales of integration than those prepared through more conventional techniques.

  15. A simple enzyme based biosensor on flexible plastic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakamedala, Senaka K.; Alshakhouri, Haidar T.; Agarwal, Mangilal; Fang, Ji; DeCoster, Mark A.

    2010-08-01

    An enzyme based biosensor was fabricated by employing a simple, inexpensive and rapid xurography fabrication process. The electrodes and channel were made from the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethyelenedioxythiphene) poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). PEDOT:PSS was selectively deposited using a polyimide tape mask. The tape mask was peeled off from the substrate after annealing the polymer in vacuum. Polymer wells of defined dimensions were made and were attached to the device to accommodate the solutions. This sensor utilizes the change in current as a parameter to measure different analyte concentrations. Initial experiments were done by using the sensor for glucose detection. The sensor is able to detect the glucose concentrations approximately from 1 μM to 10 mM range covering glucose in human saliva (8-210 μM). The glucose oxidase activity was independently measured using colorimetric method and the results indicate that the sensor retains the enzyme activity and can be used as a biosensor to detect various analytes. The analyte of interest can be measured by preloading the corresponding enzyme into the wells.

  16. Microfluidic transmission surface plasmon resonance enhancement for biosensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertvachirapaiboon, Chutiparn; Baba, Akira; Ekgasit, Sanong; Shinbo, Kazunari; Kato, Keizo; Kaneko, Futao

    2017-01-01

    The microfluidic transmission surface plasmon resonance (MTSPR) constructed by assembling a gold-coated grating substrate with a microchannel was employed for biosensor application. The transmission surface plasmon resonance spectrum obtained from the MTSPR sensor chip showed a strong and narrow surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak located between 650 and 800 nm. The maximum SPR excitation was observed at an incident angle of 35°. The MTSPR sensor chip was employed for glucose sensor application. Gold-coated grating substrates were functionalized using 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid sodium salt and subsequently functionalized using a five-bilayer poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) to facilitate the coupling/decoupling of the surface plasmon and to prepare a uniform surface for sensing. The detection limit of our developed system for glucose was 2.31 mM. This practical platform represents a high possibility of further developing several biomolecules, multiplex systems, and a point-of-care assay for practical biosensor applications.

  17. Development of Biosensors Based on Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yuehe; Tu, Yi; Lu, Fang; Ren, Zhifeng

    2004-12-28

    The fabrication, electrochemical characterization, and sensing applications of low-site density carbon nanotubes based nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) are reported in this work. Spin-coating of an epoxy resin provides a new way to create the electrode passivation layer that effectively reduces the current leakage and eliminates the electrode capacitance by sealing the side-wall of CNTs. The CNT-NEAs fabricated in our work effectively use the open ends of CNTs for electrochemical sensing. The open ends of the CNTs have fast electron transfer rates similar to a graphite edge-plane electrode, while the side-walls present very slow electron transfer rates similar to the graphitic basal plane. Cyclic voltammetry showed the sigmoidal shape curves with low capacitive current and scan-rate-independent limiting current. The successful development of a glucose biosensor based on CNT-NEAs for the selective detection of glucose is also described. Glucose oxidase was covalently immobilized on the CNTs tips via carbodiimide chemistry by forming amide linkages between the amine residues and carboxylic acid groups on the open ends of CNTs. The biosensor effectively performs selective electrochemical detections of glucose in the presence of common interferences.

  18. Aryl Diazonium Chemistry for the Surface Functionalization of Glassy Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; van den Hurk, Remko; Cao, Yong; Du, Rongbing; Sun, Xuejun; Wang, Yiyu; McDermott, Mark T.; Evoy, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Nanostring resonator and fiber-optics-based biosensors are of interest as they offer high sensitivity, real-time measurements and the ability to integrate with electronics. However, these devices are somewhat impaired by issues related to surface modification. Both nanostring resonators and photonic sensors employ glassy materials, which are incompatible with electrochemistry. A surface chemistry approach providing strong and stable adhesion to glassy surfaces is thus required. In this work, a diazonium salt induced aryl film grafting process is employed to modify a novel SiCN glassy material. Sandwich rabbit IgG binding assays are performed on the diazonium treated SiCN surfaces. Fluorescently labelled anti-rabbit IgG and anti-rabbit IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles were used as markers to demonstrate the absorption of anti-rabbit IgG and therefore verify the successful grafting of the aryl film. The results of the experiments support the effectiveness of diazonium chemistry for the surface functionalization of SiCN surfaces. This method is applicable to other types of glassy materials and potentially can be expanded to various nanomechanical and optical biosensors. PMID:26985910

  19. An Effective Amperometric Biosensor Based on Gold Nanoelectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yingchun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A sensitive amperometric biosensor based on gold nanoelectrode array (NEA was investigated. The gold nanoelectrode array was fabricated by template-assisted electrodeposition on general electrodes, which shows an ordered well-defined 3D structure of nanowires. The sensitivity of the gold NEA to hydrogen peroxide is 37 times higher than that of the conventional electrode. The linear range of the platinum NEA toward H2O2is from 1 × 10−6to 1 × 10−2 M, covering four orders of magnitudes with detection limit of 1 × 10−7 M and a single noise ratio (S/N of four. The enzyme electrode exhibits an excellent response performance to glucose with linear range from 1 × 10−5to 1 × 10−2 M and a fast response time within 8 s. The Michaelis–Menten constantkm and the maximum current densityi maxof the enzyme electrode were 4.97 mM and 84.60 μA cm−2, respectively. This special nanoelectrode may find potential application in other biosensors based on amperometric signals.

  20. Numerical simulation on development of a SAW based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten, S. T.; Hashim, U.; Sudin, A.; Arshad, M. K. Md.; Liu, W. W.; Foo, K. L.; Voon, C. H.; Wee, F. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Salleh, N. H. M.; Nazwa, T.

    2016-07-01

    Surface acoustic waves can be generated at the free surface of an elastic solid. For this property, surface acoustic based devices were initially developed for the telecommunication purpose such as signal filters and resonators. The acoustic energy is strongly confined on the surface of the surface acoustic waves (SAW) based devices and consequent their ultra-sensitivity to the surface perturbation. This has made SAW permits the highly sensitive detection of utterly diminutive charges on the surface. Hence, SAW based devices have been modified to be sensors for the mass loading effect on its surface and this is perfectly for biosensor development. There have been a lot of complicated theoretical models for the SAW devices development since 1960 as signal filters and resonators such as from delta function model, equivalent circuit model, to the current SAW models such as coupling-of-modes (COM) model, P-matrix model and Computer Simulation Technology Studio Suite (CST). However, these models are more tailored for the telecommunication application purposes and very complex. Thus, this paper presents the finite element analysis (FEA) modeling, COMSOL Multiphysics which is used to study the mass loading effect on SAW which will be used as biosensor. This study managed to simulate the mass loading sensitivity of 8.71×107 kHz/g mm-2.

  1. Wearable salivary uric acid mouthguard biosensor with integrated wireless electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jayoung; Imani, Somayeh; de Araujo, William R; Warchall, Julian; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Paixão, Thiago R L C; Mercier, Patrick P; Wang, Joseph

    2015-12-15

    This article demonstrates an instrumented mouthguard capable of non-invasively monitoring salivary uric acid (SUA) levels. The enzyme (uricase)-modified screen printed electrode system has been integrated onto a mouthguard platform along with anatomically-miniaturized instrumentation electronics featuring a potentiostat, microcontroller, and a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) transceiver. Unlike RFID-based biosensing systems, which require large proximal power sources, the developed platform enables real-time wireless transmission of the sensed information to standard smartphones, laptops, and other consumer electronics for on-demand processing, diagnostics, or storage. The mouthguard biosensor system offers high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability towards uric acid detection in human saliva, covering the concentration ranges for both healthy people and hyperuricemia patients. The new wireless mouthguard biosensor system is able to monitor SUA level in real-time and continuous fashion, and can be readily expanded to an array of sensors for different analytes to enable an attractive wearable monitoring system for diverse health and fitness applications.

  2. Micro-photonic cylindrical waveguide based protein biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padigi, Sudhaprasanna Kumar [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Portland State University, 160-11 FAB, 1900 SW Fourth Avenue, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Asante, Kofi [Department of Physics, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Kovvuri, Vijay Sekhar Reddy [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Portland State University, 160-11 FAB, 1900 SW Fourth Avenue, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Reddy, Ravi Kiran Kondama [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Portland State University, 160-11 FAB, 1900 SW Fourth Avenue, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Rosa, Andres La [Department of Physics, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Prasad, Shalini [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Portland State University, 160-11 FAB, 1900 SW Fourth Avenue, Portland, OR 97201 (United States)

    2006-09-14

    In this paper we experimentally demonstrate the fabrication and operation of a rapidly prototyped optical cylindrical micro-waveguide based biosensor. This device works on the principle of variation to the light intensity and path of coupled input light due to the binding of protein bio-molecules onto the micro-waveguide surface as a method of physical transduction. The variation to the coupled light intensity and path is dependent on the nature of the bio-molecule and the density of the bio-molecules. This technique has been used to identify protein biomarkers for inflammation and thrombosis, namely myeloperoxidase (MPO) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The detection limit that has been demonstrated is pg ml{sup -1}. The detection speed is of the order of seconds from the time of injection of the bio-molecule. The optical signature that is obtained to identify a protein bio-molecule is entirely dependent on the nature of adsorption of the bio-molecule on to the cylindrical cavity surfaces. This in turn is dependent on the protein conformation and the surface charge of the bio-molecules. Hence a specific protein bio-molecule generates a unique optical identifier based on the nature of binding/adsorption to the cavity surface. This physical phenomenon is exploited to identify individual proteins. This technique is a demonstration of detection of nano-scale protein bio-molecules using the optical biosensor technique with unprecedented sensitivity.

  3. Virus-Enabled Biosensor for Human Serum Albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Alana F; Edgar, Joshua M; Majumdar, Sudipta; Briggs, Jeffrey S; Patterson, Shae V; Tan, Ming X; Kudlacek, Stephan T; Schneider, Christine A; Weiss, Gregory A; Penner, Reginald M

    2017-01-17

    The label-free detection of human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous buffer is demonstrated using a simple, monolithic, two-electrode electrochemical biosensor. In this device, both millimeter-scale electrodes are coated with a thin layer of a composite containing M13 virus particles and the electronically conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene) or PEDOT. These virus particles, engineered to selectively bind HSA, serve as receptors in this biosensor. The resistance component of the electrical impedance, Zre, measured between these two electrodes provides electrical transduction of HSA binding to the virus-PEDOT film. The analysis of sample volumes as small as 50 μL is made possible using a microfluidic cell. Upon exposure to HSA, virus-PEDOT films show a prompt increase in Zre within 5 s and a stable Zre signal within 15 min. HSA concentrations in the range from 100 nM to 5 μM are detectable. Sensor-to-sensor reproducibility of the HSA measurement is characterized by a coefficient-of-variance (COV) ranging from 2% to 8% across this entire concentration range. In addition, virus-PEDOT sensors successfully detected HSA in synthetic urine solutions.

  4. Disposable amperometric biosensor based on nanostructured bacteriophages for glucose detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yu Ri; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Kim, Ju Hwan; Nam, Chang Hoon; Kim, Soo Won

    2010-10-01

    The selection of electrode material profoundly influences biosensor science and engineering, as it heavily influences biosensor sensitivity. Here we propose a novel electrochemical detection method using a working electrode consisting of bio-nanowires from genetically modified filamentous phages and nanoparticles. fd-tet p8MMM filamentous phages displaying a three-methionine (MMM) peptide on the major coat protein pVIII (designated p8MMM phages) were immobilized on the active area of an electrochemical sensor through physical adsorption and chemical bonding. Bio-nanowires composed of p8MMM phages and silver nanoparticles facilitated sensitive, rapid and selective detection of particular molecules. We explored whether the composite electrode with bio-nanowires was an effective platform to detect the glucose oxidase. The current response of the bio-nanowire sensor was high at various glucose concentrations (0.1 µm-0.1 mM). This method provides a considerable advantage to demonstrate analyte detection over low concentration ranges. Especially, phage-enabled bio-nanowires can serve as receptors with high affinity and specificity for the detection of particular biomolecules and provide a convenient platform for designing site-directed multifunctional scaffolds based on bacteriophages and may serve as a simple method for label-free detection.

  5. Polycrystalline-Diamond MEMS Biosensors Including Neural Microelectrode-Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna H. Wang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Diamond is a material of interest due to its unique combination of properties, including its chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Polycrystalline diamond (poly-C has been used in experimental biosensors that utilize electrochemical methods and antigen-antibody binding for the detection of biological molecules. Boron-doped poly-C electrodes have been found to be very advantageous for electrochemical applications due to their large potential window, low background current and noise, and low detection limits (as low as 500 fM. The biocompatibility of poly-C is found to be comparable, or superior to, other materials commonly used for implants, such as titanium and 316 stainless steel. We have developed a diamond-based, neural microelectrode-array (MEA, due to the desirability of poly-C as a biosensor. These diamond probes have been used for in vivo electrical recording and in vitro electrochemical detection. Poly-C electrodes have been used for electrical recording of neural activity. In vitro studies indicate that the diamond probe can detect norepinephrine at a 5 nM level. We propose a combination of diamond micro-machining and surface functionalization for manufacturing diamond pathogen-microsensors.

  6. Polycrystalline-Diamond MEMS Biosensors Including Neural Microelectrode-Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varney, Michael W; Aslam, Dean M; Janoudi, Abed; Chan, Ho-Yin; Wang, Donna H

    2011-08-15

    Diamond is a material of interest due to its unique combination of properties, including its chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Polycrystalline diamond (poly-C) has been used in experimental biosensors that utilize electrochemical methods and antigen-antibody binding for the detection of biological molecules. Boron-doped poly-C electrodes have been found to be very advantageous for electrochemical applications due to their large potential window, low background current and noise, and low detection limits (as low as 500 fM). The biocompatibility of poly-C is found to be comparable, or superior to, other materials commonly used for implants, such as titanium and 316 stainless steel. We have developed a diamond-based, neural microelectrode-array (MEA), due to the desirability of poly-C as a biosensor. These diamond probes have been used for in vivo electrical recording and in vitro electrochemical detection. Poly-C electrodes have been used for electrical recording of neural activity. In vitro studies indicate that the diamond probe can detect norepinephrine at a 5 nM level. We propose a combination of diamond micro-machining and surface functionalization for manufacturing diamond pathogen-microsensors.

  7. Bacterial Biosensors for Measuring Availability of Environmental Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Roelof van der Meer

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, pollution risk assessment is based on the measurement of a pollutant’s total concentration in a sample. The toxicity of a given pollutant in the environment, however, is tightly linked to its bioavailability, which may differ significantly from the total amount. Physico-chemical and biological parameters strongly influence pollutant fate in terms of leaching, sequestration and biodegradation. Bacterial sensorreporters, which consist of living micro-organisms genetically engineered to produce specific output in response to target chemicals, offer an interesting alternative to monitoring approaches. Bacterial sensor-reporters detect bioavailable and/or bioaccessible compound fractions in samples. Currently, a variety of environmental pollutants can be targeted by specific biosensor-reporters. Although most of such strains are still confined to the lab, several recent reports have demonstrated utility of bacterial sensing-reporting in the field, with method detection limits in the nanomolar range. This review illustrates the general design principles for bacterial sensor-reporters, presents an overview of the existing biosensor-reporter strains with emphasis on organic compound detection. A specific focus throughout is on the concepts of bioavailability and bioaccessibility, and how bacteria-based sensing-reporting systems can help to improve our basic understanding of the different processes at work.

  8. Energy harvesting for human wearable and implantable bio-sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitcheson, Paul D

    2010-01-01

    There are clear trade-offs between functionality, battery lifetime and battery volume for wearable and implantable wireless-biosensors which energy harvesting devices may be able to overcome. Reliable energy harvesting has now become a reality for machine condition monitoring and is finding applications in chemical process plants, refineries and water treatment works. However, practical miniature devices that can harvest sufficient energy from the human body to power a wireless bio-sensor are still in their infancy. This paper reviews the options for human energy harvesting in order to determine power availability for harvester-powered body sensor networks. The main competing technologies for energy harvesting from the human body are inertial kinetic energy harvesting devices and thermoelectric devices. These devices are advantageous to some other types as they can be hermetically sealed. In this paper the fundamental limit to the power output of these devices is compared as a function of generator volume when attached to a human whilst walking and running. It is shown that the kinetic energy devices have the highest fundamental power limits in both cases. However, when a comparison is made between the devices using device effectivenesses figures from previously demonstrated prototypes presented in the literature, the thermal device is competitive with the kinetic energy harvesting device when the subject is running and achieves the highest power density when the subject is walking.

  9. Accelerated myotube formation using bioprinting technology for biosensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaofeng; Gao, Guifang; Qiu, Yongjun

    2013-03-01

    Muscle-powered, biological, microelectro-mechanical system is promising for actuator and biosensor applications. Functional conjugation between the cells, tissues, and biomolecules to the microdevice is crucial for this application. Bioprinting as an enabling technology possesses the advantages of high throughput, digital control, and highly accurate delivery of various biological factors to the desired locations for numerous applications such as 3D tissue fabrication. We have now evaluated the feasibility of the precise placement of mouse myoblasts onto micro-sized cantilevers. The evenly aligned printed cells fused with each other and formed mature myotubes after only 4 days. In contrast, it took more than 14 days for randomly deposited cells to do so. The printed myotubes were functional and responded to the electrical stimulation synchronously. Furthermore, the integrated Bio-MEMS device responded to the chemical stimulation spontaneously which demonstrated the potential as a functional biosensor. The contractility of the system was recovered quickly after the removal of the chemical stimulation, which indicated the flexibility of this system and the recycling potential.

  10. Fluorescent biosensors enabled by graphene and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Honglu; Aldalbahi, Ali; Zuo, Xiaolei; Fan, Chunhai; Mi, Xianqiang

    2017-03-15

    During the past few years, graphene and graphene oxide (GO) have attracted numerous attentions for the potential applications in various fields from energy technology, biosensing to biomedical diagnosis and therapy due to their various functionalization, high volume surface ratio, unique physical and electrical properties. Among which, graphene and graphene oxide based fluorescent biosensors enabled by their fluorescence-quenching properties have attracted great interests. The fluorescence of fluorophore or dye labeled on probes (such as molecular beacon, aptamer, DNAzymes and so on) was quenched after adsorbed on to the surface of graphene. While in the present of the targets, due to the strong interactions between probes and targets, the probes were detached from the surface of graphene, generating dramatic fluorescence, which could be used as signals for detection of the targets. This strategy was simple and economy, together with great programmable abilities of probes; we could realize detection of different kinds of species. In this review, we first briefly introduced the history of graphene and graphene oxide, and then summarized the fluorescent biosensors enabled by graphene and GO, with a detailed account of the design mechanism and comparison with other nanomaterials (e.g. carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles). Following that, different sensing platforms for detection of DNAs, ions, biomolecules and pathogens or cells as well as the cytotoxicity issue of graphene and GO based in vivo biosensing were further discussed. We hope that this review would do some help to researchers who are interested in graphene related biosening research work.

  11. Angle-resolved diffraction grating biosensor based on porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Changwu; Jia, Zhenhong; Liu, Yajun; Mo, Jiaqing; Li, Peng; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an optical biosensor based on a porous silicon composite structure was fabricated using a simple method. This structure consists of a thin, porous silicon surface diffraction grating and a one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal. An angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum was obtained by measuring the diffraction efficiency at a range of incident angles. The angle-resolved diffraction efficiency of the 2nd and 3rd orders was studied experimentally and theoretically. The device was sensitive to the change of refractive index in the presence of a biomolecule indicated by the shift of the diffraction efficiency spectrum. The sensitivity of this sensor was investigated through use of an 8 base pair antifreeze protein DNA hybridization. The shifts of the angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum showed a relationship with the change of the refractive index, and the detection limit of the biosensor reached 41.7 nM. This optical device is highly sensitive, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate. Using shifts in diffraction efficiency spectrum to detect biological molecules has not yet been explored, so this study establishes a foundation for future work.

  12. Detection of Salmonella typhimurium using polyclonal antibody immobilized magnetostrictive biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntupalli, R.; Hu, Jing; Lakshmanan, Ramji S.; Wan, Jiehui; Huang, Shichu; Yang, Hong; Barbaree, James M.; Huang, T. S.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2006-05-01

    Novel mass-sensitive, magnetostrictive sensors have a characteristic resonant frequency that can be determined by monitoring the magnetic flux emitted by the sensor in response to an applied, time varying, magnetic field. This magnetostrictive platform has a unique advantage over conventional sensor platforms in that measurement is wireless or remote. These biosensors can thus be used in-situ for detecting pathogens and biological threat agents. In this work, we have used a magnetostrictive platform immobilized with a polyclonal antibody (the bio-molecular recognition element) to form a biosensor for the detection of Salmonella typhimurium. Upon exposure to solutions containing Salmonella typhimurium bacteria, the bacteria were bound to the sensor and the additional mass of the bound bacteria caused a shift in the sensor's resonant frequency. Responses of the sensors to different concentrations of S. typhimurium were recorded and the results correlated with those obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of samples. Good agreement between the measured number of bound bacterial cells (attached mass) and frequency shifts were obtained. The longevity and specificity of the selected polyclonal antibody were also investigated and are reported.

  13. A Conductometric Indium Oxide Semiconducting Nanoparticle Enzymatic Biosensor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongjin; Ondrake, Janet; Cui, Tianhong

    2011-01-01

    We report a conductometric nanoparticle biosensor array to address the significant variation of electrical property in nanomaterial biosensors due to the random network nature of nanoparticle thin-film. Indium oxide and silica nanoparticles (SNP) are assembled selectively on the multi-site channel area of the resistors using layer-by-layer self-assembly. To demonstrate enzymatic biosensing capability, glucose oxidase is immobilized on the SNP layer for glucose detection. The packaged sensor chip onto a ceramic pin grid array is tested using syringe pump driven feed and multi-channel I–V measurement system. It is successfully demonstrated that glucose is detected in many different sensing sites within a chip, leading to concentration dependent currents. The sensitivity has been found to be dependent on the channel length of the resistor, 4–12 nA/mM for channel lengths of 5–20 μm, while the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant is 20 mM. By using sensor array, analytical data could be obtained with a single step of sample solution feeding. This work sheds light on the applicability of the developed nanoparticle microsensor array to multi-analyte sensors, novel bioassay platforms, and sensing components in a lab-on-a-chip. PMID:22163696

  14. A Conductometric Indium Oxide Semiconducting Nanoparticle Enzymatic Biosensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhong Cui

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a conductometric nanoparticle biosensor array to address the significant variation of electrical property in nanomaterial biosensors due to the random network nature of nanoparticle thin-film. Indium oxide and silica nanoparticles (SNP are assembled selectively on the multi-site channel area of the resistors using layer-by-layer self-assembly. To demonstrate enzymatic biosensing capability, glucose oxidase is immobilized on the SNP layer for glucose detection. The packaged sensor chip onto a ceramic pin grid array is tested using syringe pump driven feed and multi-channel I–V measurement system. It is successfully demonstrated that glucose is detected in many different sensing sites within a chip, leading to concentration dependent currents. The sensitivity has been found to be dependent on the channel length of the resistor, 4–12 nA/mM for channel lengths of 5–20 µm, while the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant is 20 mM. By using sensor array, analytical data could be obtained with a single step of sample solution feeding. This work sheds light on the applicability of the developed nanoparticle microsensor array to multi-analyte sensors, novel bioassay platforms, and sensing components in a lab-on-a-chip.

  15. A conductometric indium oxide semiconducting nanoparticle enzymatic biosensor array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongjin; Ondrake, Janet; Cui, Tianhong

    2011-01-01

    We report a conductometric nanoparticle biosensor array to address the significant variation of electrical property in nanomaterial biosensors due to the random network nature of nanoparticle thin-film. Indium oxide and silica nanoparticles (SNP) are assembled selectively on the multi-site channel area of the resistors using layer-by-layer self-assembly. To demonstrate enzymatic biosensing capability, glucose oxidase is immobilized on the SNP layer for glucose detection. The packaged sensor chip onto a ceramic pin grid array is tested using syringe pump driven feed and multi-channel I-V measurement system. It is successfully demonstrated that glucose is detected in many different sensing sites within a chip, leading to concentration dependent currents. The sensitivity has been found to be dependent on the channel length of the resistor, 4-12 nA/mM for channel lengths of 5-20 μm, while the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant is 20 mM. By using sensor array, analytical data could be obtained with a single step of sample solution feeding. This work sheds light on the applicability of the developed nanoparticle microsensor array to multi-analyte sensors, novel bioassay platforms, and sensing components in a lab-on-a-chip.

  16. Noninvasive glucose monitoring using saliva nano-biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Millions of people worldwide live with diabetes and several millions die from it each year. A noninvasive, painless method of glucose testing would highly improve compliance and glucose control while reducing complications and overall disease management costs. To provide accurate, low cost, and continuous glucose monitoring, we have developed a unique, disposable saliva nano-biosensor. More than eight clinical trials on real-time noninvasive salivary glucose monitoring were carried out on two healthy individuals (a 2–3 h-period for each trial, including both regular food and standard glucose beverage intake with more than 35 saliva samples obtained. Excellent clinical accuracy was revealed as compared to the UV Spectrophotometer. By measuring subjects’ salivary glucose and blood glucose in parallel, we found the two generated profiles share the same fluctuation trend but the correlation between them is individual dependent. There is a time lag between the peak glucose values from blood and from saliva. However, the correlation between the two glucose values at fasting is constant for each person enabling noninvasive diagnosis of diabetes through saliva instead of blood. Furthermore, a good correlation of glucose levels in saliva and in blood before and 2 h after glucose intake was observed. Glucose monitoring before and 2 h after meals is usually prescribed by doctors for diabetic patients. Thus, this disposable biosensor will be an alternative for real-time salivary glucose tracking at any time.

  17. Photonic crystal waveguide-based biosensor for detection of diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Harshita; Kaler, Rajinder S.; Painam, Balveer

    2016-07-01

    A biosensor is a device that is used to detect the analytes or molecules of a sample by means of a binding mechanism. A two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide-based biosensor is designed with a diamond-shaped ring resonator and two waveguides: a bus waveguide and a drop waveguide. The sensing mechanism is based on change in refractive index of the analytes, leading to a shift in the peak resonant wavelength. This mechanism can be used in the field of biomedical treatment where different body fluids such as blood, tears, saliva, or urine can be used as the analyte in which different components of the fluid can be detected. It can also be used to differentiate between the cell lines of a normal and an unhealthy human being. Average value of quality factor for this device comes out to be 1082.2063. For different analytes used, the device exhibits enhanced sensitivity and, hence, it is useful for the detection of diseases.

  18. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Based on Smart Phone Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Qiang; Chen, Shimeng; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Hanqi; Peng, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate a fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on smart phone platforms. The light-weight optical components and sensing element are connected by optical fibers on a phone case. This SPR adaptor can be conveniently installed or removed from smart phones. The measurement, control and reference channels are illuminated by the light entering the lead-in fibers from the phone’s LED flash, while the light from the end faces of the lead-out fibers is detected by the phone’s camera. The SPR-sensing element is fabricated by a light-guiding silica capillary that is stripped off its cladding and coated with 50-nm gold film. Utilizing a smart application to extract the light intensity information from the camera images, the light intensities of each channel are recorded every 0.5 s with refractive index (RI) changes. The performance of the smart phone-based SPR platform for accurate and repeatable measurements was evaluated by detecting different concentrations of antibody binding to a functionalized sensing element, and the experiment results were validated through contrast experiments with a commercial SPR instrument. This cost-effective and portable SPR biosensor based on smart phones has many applications, such as medicine, health and environmental monitoring.

  19. A Novel Photoelectrochemical Biosensor for Tyrosinase and Thrombin Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiexia Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel photoelectrochemical biosensor for step-by-step assay of tyrosinase and thrombin was fabricated based on the specific interactions between the designed peptide and the target enzymes. A peptide chain with a special sequence which contains a positively charged lysine-labeled terminal, tyrosine at the other end and a cleavage site recognized by thrombin between them was designed. The designed peptide can be fixed on surface of the CdTe quantum dots (QDs-modified indium-tin oxide (ITO electrode through electrostatic attraction to construct the photoelectrochemical biosensor. The tyrosinase target can catalyze the oxidization of tyrosine by oxygen into ortho-benzoquinone residues, which results in a decrease in the sensor photocurrent. Subsequently, the cleavage site could be recognized and cut off by another thrombin target, restoring the sensor photocurrent. The decrease or increase of photocurrent in the sensor enables us to assay tyrosinase and thrombin. Thus, the detection of tyrosinase and thrombin can be achieved in the linear range from 2.6 to 32 μg/mL and from 4.5 to 100 μg/mL with detection limits of 1.5 μg/mL and 1.9 μg/mL, respectively. Most importantly, this strategy shall allow us to detect different classes of enzymes simultaneously by designing various enzyme-specific peptide substrates.

  20. Application of oxygen-independent biosensor for testing yeast fermentation capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtinaitiene, Bogumila; Razumiene, Julija; Gureviciene, Vidute; Melvydas, Vytautas; Marcinkeviciene, Liucija; Bachmatova, Irina; Meskys, Rolandas; Laurinavicius, Valdas

    2010-10-15

    The pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent soluble glucose dehydrogenase based carbon paste electrodes were investigated and applied for glucose monitoring in the oxygen deficient media. Reagentless biosensors possessing a wide linear range (up to 5 mM glucose with a detection limit of 0.12 mM) were designed. The oxygen-insensitive response of the biosensor creates the opportunity to use it as a flow-through device for continuous monitoring of glucose in media during the wine yeast fermentation process. The analysis of glucose assimilation rate by yeast strains using the developed biosensor correlated well (R2=0.9938) with convenient yeast testing methods.

  1. Study of a low-cost trimodal polymer waveguide for interferometric optical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jhonattan C; Lechuga, Laura M; Gabrielli, Lucas H; Hernandez-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2015-05-04

    A novel evanescent wave biosensor based on modal interaction between the fundamental mode and the second order mode is proposed and numerically demonstrated. By taking advantage of their symmetries, it is possible to design a device where only the fundamental and the second order modes can propagate, without excitation of the first order mode. With this selection of modes it is possible to achieve a high sensitivity behavior in the biosensor configuration, due to the strong interaction between the evanescent field and the outer surface as compared to previous evanescent wave-based biosensor designs.

  2. Self-assembled magnetic bead biosensor for measuring bacterial growth and antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Paivo; McNaughton, Brandon H; Albertson, Theodore; Sinn, Irene; Mofakham, Sima; Elbez, Remy; Newton, Duane W; Hunt, Alan; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-08-20

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance is one of the major concerns of modern healthcare worldwide, and the development of rapid, growth-based, antimicrobial susceptibility tests is key for addressing it. The cover image shows a self-assembled asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) biosensor developed for rapid detection of bacterial growth. Using the biosensors, the minimum inhibitory concentration of a clinical E. coli isolate can be measured within two hours, where currently tests take 6-24 hours. A 16-well prototype is also constructed for simple and robust observation of the self-assembled AMBR biosensors.

  3. Bi nanowire-based thermal biosensor for the detection of salivary cortisol using the Thomson effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Hyun Lee, Jung; Kim, MinGin; Kim, Jeongmin; Song, Min-Jung; Jung, Hyo-Il; Lee, Wooyoung

    2013-09-01

    We present a study of a thermal biosensor based on bismuth nanowire that is fabricated for the detection of the human stress hormone cortisol using the Thomson effect. The Bi nanowire was grown using the On-Film Formation of Nanowires (OFF-ON) method. The thermal device was fabricated using photolithography, and the sensing area was modified with immobilized anti-cortisol antibodies conjugated with protein G for the detection of cortisol. The voltages were measured with two probe tips during surface modification to investigate the biochemical reactions in the fabricated thermal biosensor. The Bi nanowire-based thermal biosensor exhibited low detection limit and good selectivity for the detection of cortisol.

  4. Design of surface plasmon resonance biosensor with one dimensional photonic crystal for detection of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sharifi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, development of highly sensitive biosensors is the main purpose of researchers to diagnose and prevent diseases. Accordingly, in this paper, surface plasmon resonance (SPR biosensor has been designed based on one dimensional layered structures. With regard to the fact that the quality of SPR sensors strongly depends on the reflectance amplitude and full width at half maximum (FWHM of the SPR curves, a novel structure, , is presented using transfer matrix method (TMM, to satisfy these two condition. Besides, the sensitivity of this biosensor has been calculated and it has been employed to diagnose leukemia for Jurkat cells.

  5. Papers Based Electrochemical Biosensors: From Test Strips to Paper-Based Microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bingwen; Du, Dan; Hua, Xin; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-05-08

    Papers based biosensors such as lateral flow test strips and paper-based microfluidic devices (or paperfluidics) are inexpensive, rapid, flexible, and easy-to-use analytical tools. An apparent trend in their detection is to interpret sensing results from qualitative assessment to quantitative determination. Electrochemical detection plays an important role in quantification. This review focuses on electrochemical (EC) detection enabled biosensors. The first part provides detailed examples in paper test strips. The second part gives an overview of paperfluidics engaging EC detections. The outlook and recommendation of future directions of EC enabled biosensors are discussed in the end.

  6. Electrochemical and optical biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanostructures: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Rui; Li, Chang Ming; Wu, Nianqiang

    2011-06-01

    Nanomaterials and nanostructures exhibit unique size-tunable and shape-dependent physicochemical properties that are different from those of bulk materials. Advances of nanomaterials and nanostructures open a new door to develop various novel biosensors. The present work has reviewed the recent progress in electrochemical, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescent biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanostructures. An emphasis is put on the research that demonstrates how the performance of biosensors such as the limit of detection, sensitivity and selectivity is improved by the use of nanomaterials and nanostructures.

  7. Comparative study of binding constants from Love wave surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance biosensors using kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangdae; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Ki-Bok

    2013-11-01

    Biosensors are used in a variety of fields for early diagnosis of diseases, measurement of toxic contaminants, quick detection of pathogens, and separation of specific proteins or DNA. In this study, we fabricated and evaluated the capability of a high sensitivity Love wave surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor. The experimental setup was composed of the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, a signal measurement system, a liquid flow system, and a temperature-control system. Subsequently, we measured the lower limit of detection (LOD) of the 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, and calculated the association and dissociation constants between protein G and anti-mouse IgG using kinetic analysis. We compared these results with those obtained using a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. We found that the LOD of the SAW biosensor for anti-mouse IgG and mouse IgG was 0.5 and 1 microg/ml, respectively, and the resultant equilibrium association and dissociation constants were similar to the corresponding values obtaining using the commercial SPR biosensor. Thus, we conclude that the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor exhibited the high sensitivity of the commercial SPR biosensor and was able to analyze the binding properties of the ligand and receptor by kinetic analysis similarly to the commercial SPR biosensor.

  8. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors Bactérias bioluminescentes: os genes lux como biosensores ambientais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia da Silva Nunes-Halldorson

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in environmental studies, with special emphasis on the Microtox toxicity bioassay. Also, the general ecological significance of bioluminescence will be addressed.Bactérias que emitem bioluminescência são amplamente distribuídas em ambientes naturais. Ao longo dos anos vários pesquisadores vêm estudando a fisiologia, bioquímica e controle genético da bioluminescência. Essas descobertas têm revolucionado a Área de Microbiologia Ambiental através da utilização dos genes lux como biosensores em estudos ambientais. Esta revisão examinará a cronologia de descobertas científicas da bioluminescência bacteriana e as aplicações atuais em estudos ambientais, salientando a utilização do teste de toxicidade Microtox. A significância ecológica da bioluminescência será também examinada.

  9. BioSentinel: Biosensors for Deep-Space Radiation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokugamage, Melissa P.; Santa Maria, Sergio R.; Marina, Diana B.; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    The BioSentinel mission will be deployed on NASA's Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) in 2018. We will use the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a biosensor to study the effect of deep-space radiation on living cells. The BioSentinel mission will be the first investigation of a biological response to space radiation outside Low Earth Orbit (LEO) in over 40 years. Radiation can cause damage such as double stand breaks (DSBs) on DNA. The yeast cell was chosen for this mission because it is genetically controllable, shares homology with human cells in its DNA repair pathways, and can be stored in a desiccated state for long durations. Three yeast strains will be stored dry in multiple microfluidic cards: a wild type control strain, a mutant defective strain that cannot repair DSBs, and a biosensor strain that can only grow if it gets DSB-and-repair events occurring near a specific gene. Growth and metabolic activity of each strain will be measured by a 3-color LED optical detection system. Parallel experiments will be done on the International Space Station and on Earth so that we can compare the results to that of deep space. One of our main objectives is to characterize the microfluidic card activation sequence before the mission. To increase the sensitivity of yeast cells as biosensors, desiccated yeast in each card will be resuspended in a rehydration buffer. After several weeks, the rehydration buffer will be exchanged with a growth medium in order to measure yeast growth and metabolic activity. We are currently working on a time-course experiment to better understand the effects of the rehydration buffer on the response to ionizing radiation. We will resuspend the dried yeast in our rehydration medium over a period of time; then each week, we will measure the viability and ionizing radiation sensitivity of different yeast strains taken from this rehydration buffer. The data obtained in this study will be useful in finalizing the card activation sequence for

  10. Multiplex Serum Cytokine Immunoassay Using Nanoplasmonic Biosensor Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengyu; Chung, Meng Ting; McHugh, Walker; Nidetz, Robert; Li, Yuwei; Fu, Jianping; Cornell, Timothy T.; Shanley, Thomas P.; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2015-01-01

    Precise monitoring of the rapidly changing immune status during the course of a disease requires multiplex analysis of cytokines from frequently sampled human blood. However, the current lack of rapid, multiplex, and low volume assays makes immune monitoring for clinical decision-making (e.g., critically ill patients) impractical. Without such assays, immune monitoring is even virtually impossible for infants and neonates with infectious diseases and/or immune mediated disorders as access to their blood in large quantities is prohibited. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR)-based microfluidic optical biosensing is a promising approach to fill this technical gap as it could potentially permit real-time refractometric detection of biomolecular binding on a metallic nanoparticle surface and sensor miniaturization, both leading to rapid and sample-sparing analyte analysis. Despite this promise, practical implementation of such a microfluidic assay for cytokine biomarker detection in serum samples has not been established primarily due to the limited sensitivity of LSPR biosensing. Here, we developed a high-throughput, label-free, multiarrayed LSPR optical biosensor device with 480 nanoplasmonic sensing spots in microfluidic channel arrays and demonstrated parallel multiplex immunoassays of six cytokines in a complex serum matrix on a single device chip while overcoming technical limitations. The device was fabricated using easy-to-implement, one-step microfluidic patterning and antibody conjugation of gold nanorods (AuNRs). When scanning the scattering light intensity across the microarrays of AuNR ensembles with dark-field imaging optics, our LSPR biosensing technique allowed for high-sensitivity quantitative cytokine measurements at concentrations down to 5–20 pg/mL from a 1 µL serum sample. Using the nanoplasmonic biosensor microarray device, we demonstrated the ability to monitor the inflammatory responses of infants following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB

  11. Nanoelectrode and nanoparticle based biosensors for environmental and health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Lateef Uddin

    Reduction in electrode size down to nanometers dramatically enhances the detection sensitivity and temporal resolution. Here we explore nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) and nanoparticles in building high performance biosensors. Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) of diameter ˜100 nm were grown on a Si substrate using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. SiO2 embedded CNF NEAs were then fabricated using techniques like chemical vapor deposition, mechanical polishing, and reactive ion etching, with CNF tips exposed at the final step. The effect of the interior structure of CNFs on electron transfer rate (ETR) was investigated by covalently attaching ferrocene molecules to the exposed end of CNFs. Anomalous differences in the ETR were observed between DC voltammetry (DCV) and AC voltammetry (ACV). The findings from this study are currently being extended to develop an electrochemical biosensor for the detection of cancerous protease (legumain). Preliminary results with standard macro glassy carbon electrodes show a significant decrease in ACV signal, which is encouraging. In another study, NEA was employed to capture and detect pathogenic bacteria using AC dielectrophoresis (DEP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). A nano-DEP device was fabricated using photolithography processes to define a micro patterned exposed active region on NEA and a microfluidic channel on macro-indium tin oxide electrode. Enhanced electric field gradient at the exposed CNF tips was achieved due to the nanometer size of the electrodes, because of which each individual exposed tip can act as a potential DEP trap to capture the pathogen. Significant decrease in the absolute impedance at the NEA was also observed by EIS experiments. In a final study, we modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with luminol to develop chemiluminescence (CL) based blood biosensor. Modified GNPs were characterized by UV-Vis, IR spectroscopy and TEM. We have applied this CL method for the

  12. Synthetic Receptor-Based Biosensor for Safety and Security Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop a sensitive and specific biosensor worthy of field deployment for autonomous operations. The underlying technology will enable in situ...

  13. Oligonucleotide-based biosensors for in vitro diagnostics and environmental hazard detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Il Young; Lee, Eun Hee; Suh, Ah Young; Lee, Seung Jin; Lee, Hyukjin

    2016-04-01

    Oligonucleotide-based biosensors have drawn much attention because of their broad applications in in vitro diagnostics and environmental hazard detection. They are particularly of interest to many researchers because of their high specificity as well as excellent sensitivity. Recently, oligonucleotide-based biosensors have been used to achieve not only genetic detection of targets but also the detection of small molecules, peptides, and proteins. This has further broadened the applications of these sensors in the medical and health care industry. In this review, we highlight various examples of oligonucleotide-based biosensors for the detection of diseases, drugs, and environmentally hazardous chemicals. Each example is provided with detailed schematics of the detection mechanism in addition to the supporting experimental results. Furthermore, future perspectives and new challenges in oligonucleotide-based biosensors are discussed.

  14. Recent Advances in Electrochemical Biosensors Based on Fullerene-C60 Nano-Structured Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilehvar, Sanaz; De Wael, Karolien

    2015-11-23

    Nanotechnology is becoming increasingly important in the field of (bio)sensors. The performance and sensitivity of biosensors is greatly improved with the integration of nanomaterials into their construction. Since its first discovery, fullerene-C60 has been the object of extensive research. Its unique and favorable characteristics of easy chemical modification, conductivity, and electrochemical properties has led to its tremendous use in (bio)sensor applications. This paper provides a concise review of advances in fullerene-C60 research and its use as a nanomaterial for the development of biosensors. We examine the research work reported in the literature on the synthesis, functionalization, approaches to nanostructuring electrodes with fullerene, and outline some of the exciting applications in the field of (bio)sensing.

  15. Novel biosensors based on flavonoid-responsive transcriptional regulators introduced into Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siedler, Solvej; Stahlhut, Steen Gustav; Malla, Sailesh

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the construction of two flavonoid biosensors, which can be applied for metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli strains. The biosensors are based on transcriptional regulators combined with autofluorescent proteins. The transcriptional activator FdeR from Herbaspirillum...... seropedicae SmR1 responds to naringenin, while the repressor QdoR from Bacillus subtilis is inactivated by quercetin and kaempferol. Both biosensors showed over a 7-fold increase of the fluorescent signal after addition of their specific effectors, and a linear correlation between the fluorescence intensity...... and externally added flavonoid concentration. The QdoR-biosensor was successfully applied for detection of kaempferol production in vivo at the single cell level by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Furthermore, the amount of kaempferol produced highly correlated with the specific fluorescence of E. coli...

  16. New Trends in the Design of Enzyme-based Biosensors for Medical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchetti, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    A biosensor is a self-contained integrated device, which is capable of providing specific quantitative or semiquantitative analytical information using a biological (or biomimetic) recognition element, which is retained in direct spatial contact with an electrochemical transduction element. One of the main features of biosensors is the remarkable selectivity that their biological components confer on them. Enzymes are the most common and well-developed recognition system of the family known as catalytic biosensors. This mini-review is focused on enzyme-based biosensors for medical applications. In particular, the new trends for the technology are described. A special emphasis is devoted to the non-invasive and painless monitoring of body metabolites, such as glucose.

  17. [Inducible specific lux-biosensors for the detection of antibiotics: construction and main parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, V Iu; Ryzhenkova, K V; Manukhov, I V; Zavil'gel'skiĭ, G B

    2014-01-01

    Based on Escherichia coli, highly sensitive specific lux-biosensors for the detection of tetracycline and beta-lactam antibiotics, quinolones, and aminoglycosides have been obtained. To make biosensors, bacteria were used that contained fungal plasmids pTetA'::lux, pAmpC'::lux, pColD'::lux, and plbpA'::lux, in which transcription of the reporter Photorhabdus luminescens luxCDABE genes occurred from the inducible promoters of the tetA, ampC, cda, and ibpA genes, respectively. The main parameters (threshold sensitivity and response time) of lux-biosensors were measured. The high specificity of biosensors responding only to antibiotics of a certain type was demonstrated.

  18. Preparation of Micro-biosensor and Its Application in Monitoring in vivo Change of Dopamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Xian; DING Hong; WANG Zhifang

    2005-01-01

    The self-made high sensitivity and selectivity micro-biosensor was applied to monitor the change of dopamine in cerebral nucleus in rats in vivo. The micro-biosensor was prepared and used to detect dopamine level in vitro and monitor the dynamic change of dopamine in different cerebral nucleus in vivo. The results showed the lowest concentration of dopamine that could be detected by the biosensor was 32.5 nmol/L. Its positive peak was significantly different from that of AA, 5-HTP and E. The biosensor could keep working for monitoring the dopamine concentration in the cerebral tissue for more than 10 h. It was concluded that the microsensor has high sensitivity and selectivity to dopamine and can be used to dynamically monitor the change of dopamine in vivo.

  19. Immobilization Techniques in the Fabrication of Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Biosensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niina J. Ronkainen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of 1st to 3rd generation electrochemical biosensors reflects a simplification and enhancement of the transduction pathway. However, in recent years, modification of the transducer with nanomaterials has become increasingly studied and imparts many advantages. The sensitivity and overall performance of enzymatic biosensors has improved tremendously as a result of incorporating nanomaterials in their fabrication. Given the unique and favorable qualities of gold nanoparticles, graphene and carbon nanotubes as applied to electrochemical biosensors, a consolidated survey of the different methods of nanomaterial immobilization on transducer surfaces and enzyme immobilization on these species is beneficial and timely. This review encompasses modification of enzymatic biosensors with gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene.

  20. Self-Assembled Biosensors on a Solid Interface for Rapid Detection and Growth Monitoring of Bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Kinnunen, Paivo; Craig, Elizabeth; Brahmasandra, Sundu; McNaughton, Brandon H

    2012-01-01

    Developing rapid methods for pathogen detection and growth monitoring at low cell and analyte concentrations is an important goal, which numerous technologies are working towards solving. Rapid biosensors have already made a dramatic impact on improving patient outcomes and with continued development, these technologies may also help limit the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and reduce the ever expanding risk of foodborne illnesses. One technology that is being developed with these goals in mind is asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) biosensors. Self-assembled AMBR biosensors have been demonstrated at water/air and water/oil interfaces, and here, for the first time, we report on self-assembled AMBR biosensors used at a solid interface. The solid interface configuration was used to measure the growth of Escherichia coli with two distinct phenomena at low cell concentrations: firstly, the AMBR rotational period decreased and secondly, the rotational period increased after several division times. Ta...