WorldWideScience

Sample records for bioremediation field experiments

  1. Variably saturated flow and multicomponent biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a uranium bioremediation field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, Steven B; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H; Murray, Christopher J; Ward, Andy L; Dayvault, Richard D; Waichler, Scott R; Newcomer, Darrell R; Spane, Frank A; Long, Philip E

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional, coupled variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport and biogeochemical reactions controlling uranium behavior under pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. While the simulation of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado was generally consistent with behaviors identified in previous field experiments at the Rifle IFRC site, the additional process and property detail provided several new insights. A principal conclusion from this work is that uranium bioreduction is most effective when acetate, in excess of the sulfate-reducing bacteria demand, is available to the metal-reducing bacteria. The inclusion of an initially small population of slow growing sulfate-reducing bacteria identified in proteomic analyses led to an additional source of Fe(II) from the dissolution of Fe(III) minerals promoted by biogenic sulfide. The falling water table during the experiment significantly reduced the saturated thickness of the aquifer and resulted in reactants and products, as well as unmitigated uranium, in the newly unsaturated vadose zone. High permeability sandy gravel structures resulted in locally high flow rates in the vicinity of injection wells that increased acetate dilution. In downgradient locations, these structures created preferential flow paths for acetate delivery that enhanced local zones of TEAP reactivity and subsidiary reactions. Conversely, smaller transport rates associated with the lower permeability lithofacies (e.g., fine) and vadose zone were shown to limit acetate access and reaction. Once accessed by acetate, however, these same zones limited subsequent acetate dilution and provided longer residence times that resulted

  2. Ex situ bioremediation of a soil contaminated by mazut (heavy residual fuel oil)--a field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beškoski, Vladimir P; Gojgić-Cvijović, Gordana; Milić, Jelena; Ilić, Mila; Miletić, Srdjan; Solević, Tatjana; Vrvić, Miroslav M

    2011-03-01

    Mazut (heavy residual fuel oil)-polluted soil was exposed to bioremediation in an ex situ field-scale (600 m(3)) study. Re-inoculation was performed periodically with biomasses of microbial consortia isolated from the mazut-contaminated soil. Biostimulation was conducted by adding nutritional elements (N, P and K). The biopile (depth 0.4m) was comprised of mechanically mixed polluted soil with softwood sawdust and crude river sand. Aeration was improved by systematic mixing. The biopile was protected from direct external influences by a polyethylene cover. Part (10 m(3)) of the material prepared for bioremediation was set aside uninoculated, and maintained as an untreated control pile (CP). Biostimulation and re-inoculation with zymogenous microorganisms increased the number of hydrocarbon degraders after 50 d by more than 20 times in the treated soil. During the 5 months, the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content of the contaminated soil was reduced to 6% of the initial value, from 5.2 to 0.3 g kg(-1) dry matter, while TPH reduced to only 90% of the initial value in the CP. After 150 d there were 96%, 97% and 83% reductions for the aliphatic, aromatic, and nitrogen-sulphur-oxygen and asphaltene fractions, respectively. The isoprenoids, pristane and phytane, were more than 55% biodegraded, which indicated that they are not suitable biomarkers for following bioremediation. According to the available data, this is the first field-scale study of the bioremediation of mazut and mazut sediment-polluted soil, and the efficiency achieved was far above that described in the literature to date for heavy fuel oil.

  3. Predicting bioremediation of hydrocarbons: laboratory to field scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diplock, E E; Mardlin, D P; Killham, K S; Paton, G I

    2009-06-01

    There are strong drivers to increasingly adopt bioremediation as an effective technique for risk reduction of hydrocarbon impacted soils. Researchers often rely solely on chemical data to assess bioremediation efficiently, without making use of the numerous biological techniques for assessing microbial performance. Where used, laboratory experiments must be effectively extrapolated to the field scale. The aim of this research was to test laboratory derived data and move to the field scale. In this research, the remediation of over thirty hydrocarbon sites was studied in the laboratory using a range of analytical techniques. At elevated concentrations, the rate of degradation was best described by respiration and the total hydrocarbon concentration in soil. The number of bacterial degraders and heterotrophs as well as quantification of the bioavailable fraction allowed an estimation of how bioremediation would progress. The response of microbial biosensors proved a useful predictor of bioremediation in the absence of other microbial data. Field-scale trials on average took three times as long to reach the same endpoint as the laboratory trial. It is essential that practitioners justify the nature and frequency of sampling when managing remediation projects and estimations can be made using laboratory derived data. The value of bioremediation will be realised when those that practice the technology can offer transparent lines of evidence to explain their decisions.

  4. Bioremediation of weathered petroleum hydrocarbon soil contamination in the Canadian High Arctic: laboratory and field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanscartier, David; Laing, Tamsin; Reimer, Ken; Zeeb, Barbara

    2009-11-01

    The bioremediation of weathered medium- to high-molecular weight petroleum hydrocarbons (HCs) in the High Arctic was investigated. The polar desert climate, contaminant characteristics, and logistical constraints can make bioremediation of persistent HCs in the High Arctic challenging. Landfarming (0.3 m(3) plots) was tested in the field for three consecutive years with plots receiving very little maintenance. Application of surfactant and fertilizers, and passive warming using a greenhouse were investigated. The field study was complemented by a laboratory experiment to better understand HC removal mechanisms and limiting factors affecting bioremediation on site. Significant reduction of total petroleum HCs (TPH) was observed in both experiments. Preferential removal of compounds nC16 occurred, whereas in the field, TPH reduction was mainly limited to removal of compounds nC16 was observed in the fertilized field plots only. The greenhouse increased average soil temperatures and extended the treatment season but did not enhance bioremediation. Findings suggest that temperature and low moisture content affected biodegradation of HCs in the field. Little volatilization was measured in the laboratory, but this process may have been predominant in the field. Low-maintenance landfarming may be best suited for remediation of HCs compounds

  5. Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Pollutedwith Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.; Tabak, Henry H.

    2007-03-15

    Bioremediation of metals and radionuclides has had manyfield tests, demonstrations, and full-scale implementations in recentyears. Field research in this area has occurred for many different metalsand radionuclides using a wide array of strategies. These strategies canbe generally characterized in six major categories: biotransformation,bioaccumulation/bisorption, biodegradation of chelators, volatilization,treatment trains, and natural attenuation. For all field applicationsthere are a number of critical biogeochemical issues that most beaddressed for the successful field application. Monitoring andcharacterization parameters that are enabling to bioremediation of metalsand radionuclides are presented here. For each of the strategies a casestudy is presented to demonstrate a field application that uses thisstrategy.

  6. CRUDE OIL BIOREMEDIATION: THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE (PRESENTATION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a state-of-the-art extended abstract presentation summary of the outputs from the oil spill program over the last 11 years. It summarizes the results of 3 field studies involving intentional releases of crude oil: the Delaware study in 1994 (sandy beach), the St. Lawrence...

  7. Transformation of a petroleum pollutant during soil bioremediation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. JOVANCICEVIC

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The experiment of ex situ soil bioremediation was performed at the locality of the Oil Refinery in Pančevo (alluvial formation of the Danube River, Serbia polluted with an oil type pollutant. The experiments of biostimulation, bioventilation and reinoculation of an autochthonous microbial consortium were performed during the six-month period (May–November 2006. The changes in the quantity and composition of the pollutant, or the bioremediation effect, were monitored by analysis of the samples of the polluted soil taken in time spans of two weeks. In this way, from the beginning until the end of the experiment, 12 samples were collected and marked as P1–P12 (Pančevo 1–Pančevo 12. The results obtained showed that more significant changes in the composition of the oil pollutant occurred only during the last phases of the experiment (P8–P12. The activity of microorganisms was reflected in the increase of the quantity of polar oil fractions, mainly fatty acid fractions. In this way, the quantity of total eluate increased, and the quantity of the insoluble residue was reduced to a minimum, whereby the oil pollutant was transformed to a form that could be removed more efficiently and more completely from the soil, as a segment of the environment.

  8. Field application of a genetically engineered microorganism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation process monitoring and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayler, G.S.; Cox, C.D.; Ripp, S.; Nivens, D.E.; Werner, C.; Ahn, Y.; Matrubutham, U. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Burlage, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1998-11-01

    On October 30, 1996, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) commenced the first test release of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) for use in bioremediation. The specific objectives of the investigation were multifaceted and include (1) testing the hypothesis that a GEM can be successfully introduced and maintained in a bioremediation process, (2) testing the concept of using, at the field scale, reporter organisms for direct bioremediation process monitoring and control, and (3) acquiring data that can be used in risk assessment decision making and protocol development for future field release applications of GEMs. The genetically engineered strain under investigation is Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (King et al., 1990). The original P. fluorescens parent strain was isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated manufactured gas plant soil. Thus, this bacterium is able to biodegrade naphthalene (as well as other substituted naphthalenes and other PAHs) and is able to function as a living bioluminescent reporter for the presence of naphthalene contamination, its bioavailability, and the functional process of biodegradation. A unique component of this field investigation was the availability of an array of large subsurface soil lysimeters. This article describes the experience associated with the release of a genetically modified microorganism, the lysimeter facility and its associated instrumentation, as well as representative data collected during the first eighteen months of operation.

  9. Laboratory experiment on bioremediation of crude oil by microbial consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, M.; Wang, L. [Ocean Univ. of China, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Cao, L.; Sun, P. [State Ocean Administration, Qingdao, Shandong (China). North China Sea Environmental Monitoring Center

    2009-07-01

    Bioremediation has been touted as a promising method to remove oil from seawater. Studies have shown that 4 bacteria N1, N2, N3 and N4, isolated from seawater and oil-polluted coastal sediments in Qingdao Port, have a strong ability to degrade crude oil. Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted based on the microbial remediation functions of the bacterium flora. This paper reported on a study in which shake flask experiments were used to investigate the degradation conditions of the 4 strains. The flask tests were followed by small model basin tests where 4 strains were applied to the simulated marine environment. In the model basin test, the biodegradation rate reached 86.22 per cent. In the simulation experiment, the crude oil was analyzed by gas chromatography before and after biodegradation. The study showed that shake flask experiments provided better biodegradation conditions for the bacteria, resulting in high degradation rates. The 3 stages of laboratory-scale studies produced very similar biodegradation trends, although the degradation rate decreased slightly. It was concluded that the predominant flora chosen for this study may be feasible in treating contaminated sea water. 19 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  10. Field Implementation of Bioremediation at INDOT Facilities-Phase I

    OpenAIRE

    Nies, Loring F.; Baldwin, Brett Robert; Mesarch, Matthew B.

    2000-01-01

    Bioremediation is often the most cost-effective and successful technique available for the remediation of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic pollutants (e.g. petroleum). The goal of bioremediation is to stimulate naturally occurring microorganisms to biodegrade the contaminants to harmless products. To be in compliance with EPA regulations all underground fuel storage tanks must have spill, leak and corrosion protection. Many older obsolete tanks had deteriorated to the extent th...

  11. BIOREMEDIATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTES - RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD EVALUATIONS - 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    The proceedings of the 1995 Symposium on Bioremediation of Hazardous Wastes, hosted by the Office of Research and Development (ORD) of the EPA in Rye Brook, New York. he symposium was the eighth annual meeting for the presentation of research conducted by EPA's Biosystems Technol...

  12. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC) Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, D.B.

    2002-02-28

    The Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has established a Field Research Center (FRC) to support the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee for the DOE Headquarters Office of Biological and Environmental Research within the Office of Science.

  13. Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Polluted with Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    OpenAIRE

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2010-01-01

    Bioremediation of metals and radionuclides has had many field tests, demonstrations, and full-scale implementations in recent years. Field research in this area has occurred for many different metals and radionuclides using a wide array of strategies. These strategies can be generally characterized in six major categories: biotransformation, bioaccumulation/bisorption, biodegradation of chelators, volatilization, treatment trains, and natural attenuation. For all field applications there are ...

  14. Potential of Penicillium Species in the Bioremediation Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Leitão

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects on the environment of pollution, particularly that caused by various industrial activities, have been responsible for the accelerated fluxes of organic and inorganic matter in the ecosphere. Xenobiotics such as phenol, phenolic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, and heavy metals, even at low concentrations, can be toxic to humans and other forms of life. Many of the remediation technologies currently being used for contaminated soil and water involve not only physical and chemical treatment, but also biological processes, where microbial activity is the responsible for pollutant removal and/or recovery. Fungi are present in aquatic sediments, terrestrial habitats and water surfaces and play a significant part in natural remediation of metal and aromatic compounds. Fungi also have advantages over bacteria since fungal hyphae can penetrate contaminated soil, reaching not only heavy metals but also xenobiotic compounds. Despite of the abundance of such fungi in wastes, penicillia in particular have received little attention in bioremediation and biodegradation studies. Additionally, several studies conducted with different strains of imperfecti fungi, Penicillium spp. have demonstrated their ability to degrade different xenobiotic compounds with low co-substrate requirements, and could be potentially interesting for the development of economically feasible processes for pollutant transformation.

  15. Potential of Penicillium Species in the Bioremediation Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2009-01-01

    The effects on the environment of pollution, particularly that caused by various industrial activities, have been responsible for the accelerated fluxes of organic and inorganic matter in the ecosphere. Xenobiotics such as phenol, phenolic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metals, even at low concentrations, can be toxic to humans and other forms of life. Many of the remediation technologies currently being used for contaminated soil and water involve not only physical and chemical treatment, but also biological processes, where microbial activity is the responsible for pollutant removal and/or recovery. Fungi are present in aquatic sediments, terrestrial habitats and water surfaces and play a significant part in natural remediation of metal and aromatic compounds. Fungi also have advantages over bacteria since fungal hyphae can penetrate contaminated soil, reaching not only heavy metals but also xenobiotic compounds. Despite of the abundance of such fungi in wastes, penicillia in particular have received little attention in bioremediation and biodegradation studies. Additionally, several studies conducted with different strains of imperfecti fungi, Penicillium spp. have demonstrated their ability to degrade different xenobiotic compounds with low co-substrate requirements, and could be potentially interesting for the development of economically feasible processes for pollutant transformation. PMID:19440525

  16. Laboratory and field scale bioremediation of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) contaminated soils by means of bioaugmentation and biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Nidhi; Lata, Pushp; Jit, Simran; Sangwan, Naseer; Singh, Amit Kumar; Dwivedi, Vatsala; Niharika, Neha; Kaur, Jasvinder; Saxena, Anjali; Dua, Ankita; Nayyar, Namita; Kohli, Puneet; Geueke, Birgit; Kunz, Petra; Rentsch, Daniel; Holliger, Christof; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Lal, Rup

    2016-06-01

    Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) contaminated soils were treated for a period of up to 64 days in situ (HCH dumpsite, Lucknow) and ex situ (University of Delhi) in line with three bioremediation approaches. The first approach, biostimulation, involved addition of ammonium phosphate and molasses, while the second approach, bioaugmentation, involved addition of a microbial consortium consisting of a group of HCH-degrading sphingomonads that were isolated from HCH contaminated sites. The third approach involved a combination of biostimulation and bioaugmentation. The efficiency of the consortium was investigated in laboratory scale experiments, in a pot scale study, and in a full-scale field trial. It turned out that the approach of combining biostimulation and bioaugmentation was most effective in achieving reduction in the levels of α- and β-HCH and that the application of a bacterial consortium as compared to the action of a single HCH-degrading bacterial strain was more successful. Although further degradation of β- and δ-tetrachlorocyclohexane-1,4-diol, the terminal metabolites of β- and δ-HCH, respectively, did not occur by the strains comprising the consortium, these metabolites turned out to be less toxic than the parental HCH isomers.

  17. Bioremediation Education Science and Technology (BEST) Program Annual Report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2000-07-01

    The Bioremediation, Education, Science and Technology (BEST) partnership provides a sustainable and contemporary approach to developing new bioremedial technologies for US Department of Defense (DoD) priority contaminants while increasing the representation of underrepresented minorities and women in an exciting new biotechnical field. This comprehensive and innovative bioremediation education program provides under-represented groups with a cross-disciplinary bioremediation cirruculum and financial support, coupled with relevant training experiences at advanced research laboratories and field sites. These programs are designed to provide a stream of highly trained minority and women professionals to meet national environmental needs.

  18. Predominant growth of Alcanivorax during experiments on "oil spill bioremediation" in mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Simone; Denaro, Renata; Genovese, Maria; Giuliano, Laura; Yakimov, Michail M

    2007-01-01

    Mesocosm experiments were performed to study the changes on bacterial community composition following oil spill in marine environment. The analysis of 16S crDNA revealed a shift in the structure of initial bacterial population that was drastically different from that one measured after 15 days. The results showed that, after 15 days, bacteria closely related to the genus Alcanivorax became the dominant group of bacterial community in petroleum-contaminated sea water nitrogen and phosphorus amended. This suggested that these bacteria played the most important role in the process of bioremediation of oil-contaminated marine environments.

  19. Field metabolomics and laboratory assessments of anaerobic intrinsic bioremediation of hydrocarbons at a petroleum-contaminated site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Victoria A; Brubaker, Gaylen R; Zenker, Matthew J; Prince, Roger C; Gieg, Lisa M; Da Silva, Marcio L B; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Suflita, Joseph M

    2009-03-01

    Field metabolomics and laboratory assays were used to assess the in situ anaerobic attenuation of hydrocarbons in a contaminated aquifer underlying a former refinery. Benzene, ethylbenzene, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1,2,4- and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene were targeted as contaminants of greatest regulatory concern (COC) whose intrinsic remediation has been previously reported. Metabolite profiles associated with anaerobic hydrocarbon decay revealed the microbial utilization of alkylbenzenes, including the trimethylbenzene COC, PAHs and several n-alkanes in the contaminated portions of the aquifer. Anaerobic biodegradation experiments designed to mimic in situ conditions showed no loss of exogenously amended COC; however, a substantive rate of endogenous electron acceptor reduction was measured (55 ± 8 µM SO(4) day(-1)). An assessment of hydrocarbon loss in laboratory experiments relative to a conserved internal marker revealed that non-COC hydrocarbons were being metabolized. Purge and trap analysis of laboratory assays showed a substantial loss of toluene, m- and o-xylene, as well as several alkanes (C(6)-C(12)). Multiple lines of evidence suggest that benzene is persistent under the prevailing site anaerobic conditions. We could find no in situ benzene intermediates (phenol or benzoate), the parent molecule proved recalcitrant in laboratory assays and low copy numbers of Desulfobacterium were found, a genus previously implicated in anaerobic benzene biodegradation. This study also showed that there was a reasonable correlation between field and laboratory findings, although with notable exception. Thus, while the intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation was clearly evident at the site, non-COC hydrocarbons were preferentially metabolized, even though there was ample literature precedence for the biodegradation of the target molecules.

  20. Field trial on removal of petroleum-hydrocarbon pollutants using a microbial consortium for bioremediation and rhizoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro-Tobías, Paloma; Niqui, José L; Roca, Amalia; Solano, Jennifer; Fernández, Matilde; Bastida, Felipe; García, Carlos; Ramos, Juan L

    2015-02-01

    Petroleum waste sludges are toxic and dangerous that is why environmental protection agencies have declared their treatment top priority. Physicochemical treatments are expensive and environmentally unfriendly, while alternative biological treatments are less costly but, in general, work at a slower pace. An in situ bioremediation and rhizoremediation field scale trial was performed in an area contaminated with oil refinery sludge under semiarid climate. The bioremediation and rhizoremediation treatments included the use of an artificial consortium made up of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria,and the combined use of the mentioned consortium along with pasture plants respectively. Rhizoremediation revealed that the development of vegetation favoured the evolution of indigenous microbiota with potential to remove petroleum wastes. This was inferred as the decline of total petroleum hydrocarbons 7 months after the biological treatment.

  1. Microbial changes in rhizospheric soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons after bioremediation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xin; LI Pei-jun; ZHOU Qi-xing; XU Hua-xia; ZHANG Hai-rong

    2004-01-01

    Effects of bioremediation on microbial communities in soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons are a scientific problem to be solved. Changes in dominate microbial species and the total amount of microorganisms including bacteria and fungi in rhizospheric soils after bioremediation were thus evaluated using field bioremediation experiments. The results showed that there were changed dominant microorganisms including 11 bacterial strains which are mostly Gram positive bacteria and 6 fungal species which were identified. The total amount of microorganisms including bacteria and fungi increased after bioremediation of microbial agents combined with planting maize. On the contrary, fungi in rhizospheric soils were inhibited by adding microbial agents combined with planting soybean.

  2. Bioremediation of Creosote - contaminated Soil

    OpenAIRE

    BYSS, Marius

    2008-01-01

    Bioremediation of creosote-contaminated soil was studied employing the methods of soil microbial biology and using new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry analytical approach. The changes of the soil microbial community under the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) pollution impact were analyzed and described, as well as the changes during the bioremediation experiments. Laboratory-scale bioremediation experiments using the soil microbial community (consisted of bacteria...

  3. TOXICITY TRENDS DURING AN OIL SPILL BIOREMEDIATION EXPERIMENT ON A SANDY SHORELINE IN DELAWARE, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 13-week, refereed, inter-agency toxicity testing program involving five bioassay methods was used to document the effectiveness of shoreline bioremediation to accelerate toxicity reduction of an oiled sandy shoreline at Fowler Beach, Delaware, USA. The study was part of an inte...

  4. Effects of biosurfactant production by indigenous soil microorganisms on bioremediation of a co-contaminated soil in batch experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalali, F.; Mulligan, C.N. [Concordia Univ., Centre for Building Studies, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2007-07-01

    The challenge of remediating soils that are contaminated with both hydrocarbon compounds and metals was discussed, with particular reference to an in-situ bioremediation technique that was developed in the 1970s to deal with contaminated soils. The technique involves a two-stage process where water with added oxygen and nutrients is applied onto and injected into a contaminated area to stimulate the indigenous microbial populations in the soil. In addition to using organic pollutants as their carbon source, microorganisms can facilitate the removal of metals from the soil matrix and attenuate the toxicity of certain metals. Extraction wells placed downstream of the contaminated soils are used to remove and treat the water to eliminate any mobilized contaminants. This paper presented the results of batch experiments that evaluated the feasibility of biosurfactant production for the purpose of bioremediating a soil contaminated with aged petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals. The first phase of the study examined the growth of the native microbial population and the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons, the production of biosurfactant and the mobilization of the total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and metals into the aqueous phase. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons was observed in both soil and soil amended with nitrogen and phosphorous. However, the nutrient-amended soil had higher biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons, where 36 per cent of TPH was degraded by the end of the 50 day experiment, compared to 15 per cent for the non-amended soils. The concentration of biosurfactants in the same period increased 3 times their critical micelle concentration. It was concluded that biosurfactant production enhances the bioremediation of co-contaminated soils. 36 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  5. Effect of electric field on the performance of soil electro-bioremediation with a periodic polarity reversal strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, E; Villaseñor, J; Cañizares, P; Rodrigo, M A

    2016-03-01

    In this work, it is studied the effect of the electric fields (within the range 0.0-1.5 V cm(-1)) on the performance of electrobioremediation with polarity reversal, using a bench scale plant with diesel-spiked kaolinite with 14-d long tests. Results obtained show that the periodic changes in the polarity of the electric field results in a more efficient treatment as compared with the single electro-bioremediation process, and it does not require the addition of a buffer to keep the pH within a suitable range. The soil heating was not very important and it did not cause a change in the temperature of the soil up to values incompatible with the life of microorganisms. Low values of water transported by the electro-osmosis process were attained with this strategy. After only 14 d of treatment, by using the highest electric field studied in this work (1.5 V cm(-1)), up to 35.40% of the diesel added at the beginning of the test was removed, value much higher than the 10.5% obtained by the single bioremediation technology in the same period.

  6. Aerobic bioremediation of 1,2 dichloroethane and vinyl chloride at field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Gregory B.; Patterson, Bradley M.; Johnston, Colin D.

    2009-06-01

    Aerobic bioremediation of 1,2 dichloroethane (1,2 DCA) and vinyl chloride (VC) was evaluated at field scale in a layered, silty and fine-sand anaerobic aquifer. Maximum concentrations of 1,2 DCA (2 g/L) and VC (0.75 g/L) in groundwater were within 25% and 70% of pure compound solubility, respectively. Aerobic conditions were induced by injecting air into sparging wells screened 20.5-21.5 m below ground (17-18 m below the water table). Using a cycle of 23 h of air injection followed by three days of no air injection, fifty days of air injection were accumulated over a 12 month period which included some longer periods of operational shutdown. Oxygen and volatile organic compound probes, and multilevel samplers were used to determine changes of the primary contaminants and the associated inorganic chemistry at multiple locations and depths. Air (oxygen) was distributed laterally up to 25 m from the sparge points, with oxygen partial pressures up to 0.7 atmospheres (28-35 mg/L in groundwater) near to the sparge points. The dissolved mass of 1,2 DCA and VC was reduced by greater than 99% over the 590 m 2 trial plot. Significantly, pH declined from nearly 11 to less than 9, and sulfate concentrations increased dramatically, suggesting the occurrence of mineral sulfide (e.g., pyrite) oxidation. Chloride and bicarbonate (aerobic biodegradation by-products) concentration increases were used to estimate that 300-1000 kg of chlorinated hydrocarbons were biodegraded, although the ratio of 1,2 DCA to VC that was biodegraded remained uncertain. The mass biodegraded was comparable but less than the 400-1400 kg of chlorinated compounds removed from the aqueous phase within a 10,000 m 3 volume of the aquifer. Due to the likely presence of non-aqueous phase liquid, the relative proportion of volatilisation compared to biodegradation could not be determined. The aerobic biodegradation rates were greater than those previously estimated from laboratory-based studies.

  7. Bioremediation of marine oil spills: when and when not--the Exxon Valdez experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, Ronald; Bragg, James

    2009-03-01

    In this article we consider what we have learned from the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) in terms of when bioremediation should be considered and what it can accomplish. We present data on the state of oiling of Prince William Sound shorelines 18 years after the spill, including the concentration and composition of subsurface oil residues (SSOR) sampled by systematic shoreline surveys conducted between 2002 and 2007. Over this period, 346 sediment samples were analysed by GC-MS and extents of hydrocarbon depletion were quantified. In 2007 alone, 744 sediment samples were collected and extracted, and 222 were analysed. Most sediment samples from sites that were heavily oiled by the spill and physically cleaned and bioremediated between 1989 and 1991 show no remaining SSOR. Where SSOR does remain, it is for the most part highly weathered, with 82% of 2007 samples indicating depletion of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (Total PAH) of >70% relative to EVOS oil. This SSOR is sequestered in patchy deposits under boulder/cobble armour, generally in the mid-to-upper intertidal zone. The relatively high nutrient concentrations measured at these sites, the patchy distribution and the weathering state of the SSOR suggest that it is in a form and location where bioremediation likely would be ineffective at increasing the rate of hydrocarbon removal.

  8. Development of Field Guidance for Assessing Feasibility of Intrinsic Bioremediation to Restore Petroleum-Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    oxygen in ground water is limited by the solubility of oxygen. At 25°C, the maximum solubility of oxygen, according to Henry’s Law, is 8.32 mg/L ( Manahan ... Manahan , 1991:94). Nitrate. The use of nitrate as an anaerobic electron acceptor is wildly observed in intrinsic bioremediation. The primary reason is...Physical-Chemical Properties and Environm gll Fate for Organic Chemicals. Vol I. II. III. Boca Raton: Lewis Publishers, 1992. Manahan , Stanley E

  9. Mutagenic assessment of Prestige fuel oil spilled on the shore and submitted to field trials of bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueiro, Rosa Ana; Garrido, Manuel Joaquín; Araujo, Manuel

    2011-11-01

    The mutagenicy of the slightly weathered fuel oil from the Prestige oil spill and the effects of different bioremediation products (nutrients and/or microorganisms and biodiesel) on the potential mutagenic activity of this heavy fuel oil spilled on the shore were evaluated for a period of 1 year using the Ames Salmonella assay with strains TA98, TA100, TA1535 and TA1537 in the absence and presence of exogenous metabolic activation (S9 fraction from rat liver). The in situ bioremediation experiment was performed using tiles located in the supra-littoral and intertidal zones of a beach seriously affected by the fuel oil spill. The results obtained showed the mutagenic activity of the slightly weathered fuel oil extracts at the beginning of the experiment in strain TA98 that persisted for more than 150 days in both the untreated control and treated tiles independently of the zone of the beach considered. However, after 360 days neither the control nor the treated tiles in the intertidal zone showed mutagenic activity and a weak positive response in strain TA98 was detected for the control fuel oil extracts from supra-littoral tiles. The application of biodiesel to accelerate the biodegradation of this type of fuel oil may constitute a further genotoxic hazard to the environment, since the mutagenic response achieved from the biodiesel-fuel oil mixture in the first samplings (days 0 and 30) was more potent than that obtained from the control tiles. The mutagenic activity was detected along the study with S. typhimurium TA98 in both the presence and absence of S9 microsomal fraction, but the addition of S9 fraction in the assay always increased the number of revertants induced. In general, these findings suggest that the bioremediation strategies used were not effective in eliminating the genotoxic hazard associated with this heavy fuel oil attached to rocky substrate since they did not achieve a decrease in the mutagenic response with respect to the untreated control

  10. Soil mesocosm studies on atrazine bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagarkar, Sneha; Nousiainen, Aura; Shaligram, Shraddha; Björklöf, Katarina; Lindström, Kristina; Jørgensen, Kirsten S; Kapley, Atya

    2014-06-15

    Accumulation of pesticides in the environment causes serious issues of contamination and toxicity. Bioremediation is an ecologically sound method to manage soil pollution, but the bottleneck here, is the successful scale-up of lab-scale experiments to field applications. This study demonstrates pilot-scale bioremediation in tropical soil using atrazine as model pollutant. Mimicking field conditions, three different bioremediation strategies for atrazine degradation were explored. 100 kg soil mesocosms were set-up, with or without atrazine application history. Natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation were tested, where augmentation with an atrazine degrading consortium demonstrated best pollutant removal. 90% atrazine degradation was observed in six days in soil previously exposed to atrazine, while soil without history of atrazine use, needed 15 days to remove the same amount of amended atrazine. The bacterial consortium comprised of 3 novel bacterial strains with different genetic atrazine degrading potential. The progress of bioremediation was monitored by measuring the levels of atrazine and its intermediate, cyanuric acid. Genes from the atrazine degradation pathway, namely, atzA, atzB, atzD, trzN and trzD were quantified in all mesocosms for 60 days. The highest abundance of all target genes was observed on the 6th day of treatment. trzD was observed in the bioaugmented mesocosms only. The bacterial community profile in all mesocosms was monitored by LH-PCR over a period of two months. Results indicate that the communities changed rapidly after inoculation, but there was no drastic change in microbial community profile after 1 month. Results indicated that efficient bioremediation of atrazine using a microbial consortium could be successfully up-scaled to pilot scale.

  11. In Situ Bioremediation by Natural Attenuation: from Lab to Field Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwart, S. A.; Thornton, S.; Rees, H.; Lerner, D.; Wilson, R.; Romero-Gonzalez, M.

    2007-03-01

    In Situ Bioremediation is a passive technology to degrade soil and groundwater contamination in order to reduce environmental and human health risk. Natural attenuation is the application of engineering biotechnology principles to soil and groundwater systems as natural bioreactors to transform or immobilize contamination to less toxic or less bioavailable forms. Current advances in computational methods and site investigation techniques now allow detailed numerical models to be adequately parameterized for interpretation of processes and their interactions in the complex sub-surface system. Clues about biodegradation processes point to the dominant but poorly understood behaviour of attached growth microbial populations that exist within the context of biofilm formation. New techniques that combine biological imaging with non-destructive chemical analysis are providing new insights into attached growth influence on Natural Attenuation. Laboratory studies have been carried out in porous media packed bed reactors that physically simulate plume formation in aquifers. Key results show that only a small percentage of the total biomass within the plume is metabolically active and that activity is greatest at the plume fringe. This increased activity coincides with the zone where dispersive mixing brings dissolved O2 from outside the plume in contact with the contamination and microbes. The exciting new experimental approaches in lab systems offer tremendous potential to move Natural Attenuation and other in situ bioremediation approaches away from purely empirical engineering approaches, to process descriptions that are far more strongly based on first principles and that have a far greater predictive capacity for remediation performance assessment.

  12. Quality Assurance Plan for Field Activities at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, C.C.

    2002-02-28

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) program Field Research Center (FRC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The FRC is located in Bear Creek Valley within the Y-12 Plant area of responsibility on DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. The NABIR program is a long-term effort designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. The FRC provides a site for investigators in the NABIR program to conduct research and obtain samples related to in situ bioremediation. The FRC is integrated with existing and future laboratory and field research and provides a means of examining the biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) documents the quality assurance protocols for field and laboratory activities performed by the FRC staff. It supplements the requirements in the ORNL Nuclear Quality Assurance Program and the ESD Quality Assurance Program. The QAP addresses the requirements in Title 10 CFR, Part 830 Subpart A, ''Quality Assurance Requirements'', using a graded approach appropriate for Research and Development projects based on guidance from ''Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance Programs for Basic and Applied Research'' (DOE-ER-STD-6001-92). It also supports the NABIR FRC Management Plan (Watson and Quarles 2000a) which outlines the overall procedures, roles and responsibilities for conducting research at the FRC. The QAP summarizes the organization, work activities, and qualify assurance and quality control protocols that will be used to generate scientifically defensible data at the FRC. The QAP pertains to field

  13. BIOREMEDIATION TRAINING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioremediation encompasses a collection of technologies which use microbes to degrade or transform contaminants. Three technologies have an established track record of acceptable performance: aerobic bioventing for fuels; enhanced reductive dechlorination for chlorinated solvent...

  14. Enhancing the hexavalent chromium bioremediation potential of Acinetobacter junii VITSUKMW2 using statistical design experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulimi, Mrudula; Jamwal, Subika; Samuel, Jastin; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2012-12-01

    The Cr(VI) removal capability of Acinetobacter junii VITSUKMW2 isolated from the Sukinda chromite mine site was evaluated and enhanced using statistical design techniques. The removal capacity was evaluated at different pH values (5-11) and temperatures (30-40 degrees C) and with various carbon and nitrogen sources. Plackett- Burman design was used to select the operational parameters for bioremediation of Cr(VI). Three parameters (molasses, yeast extract, and Cr(VI) concentration) were chosen for further optimization using central composite design. The optimal combination of parameters was found to be 14.85 g/l molasses, 4.72 g/l yeast extract, and 54 mg/l initial Cr(VI), with 99.95% removal of Cr(VI) in 12 h. A. junii VITSUKMW2 was shown to have significant potential for removal of Cr(VI).

  15. Field Implementation Plan for the In-Situ Bioremediation Treatability Study at the Technical Area-V Groundwater Area of Concern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-31

    This Field Implementation Plan (FIP) was prepared by Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) and provides instruction on conducting a series of in-situ bioremediation (ISB) tests as described in the Revised Treatability Study Work Plan for In-Situ Bioremediation at the Technical Area-V Groundwater Area of Concern, referred to as the Revised Work Plan in this FIP. The Treatability Study is designed to gravity inject an electron-donor substrate and bioaugmentation bacteria into groundwater via three injection wells to perform bioremediation of the constituents of concern (COCs), nitrate and trichloroethene (TCE), in the regions with the highest concentrations at the Technical Area-V Groundwater (TAVG) Area of Concern (AOC). The Treatability Study will evaluate the effectiveness of bioremediation solution delivery and COC treatment over time. This FIP is designed for SNL/NM work planning and management. It is not intended to be submitted for regulator’s approval. The technical details presented in this FIP are subject to change based on field conditions, availability of equipment and materials, feasibility, and inputs from Sandia personnel and Aboveground Injection System contractor.

  16. Environmental Assessment for Selection and Operation of the Proposed Field Research Centers for the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-04-18

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), within the Office of Science (SC), proposes to add a Field Research Center (FRC) component to the existing Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. The NABIR Program is a ten-year fundamental research program designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. An FRC would be integrated with the existing and future laboratory and field research and would provide a means of examining the fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. The NABIR Program would continue to perform fundamental research that might lead to promising bioremediation technologies that could be demonstrated by other means in the future. For over 50 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have been responsible for the research, design, and production of nuclear weapons, as well as other energy-related research and development efforts. DOE's weapons production and research activities generated hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste products. Past disposal practices have led to the contamination of soils, sediments, and groundwater with complex and exotic mixtures of compounds. This contamination and its associated costs and risks represents a major concern to DOE and the public. The high costs, long duration, and technical challenges associated with remediating the subsurface contamination at DOE sites present a significant need for fundamental research in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences that will contribute to new and cost-effective solutions. One possible low-cost approach for remediating the subsurface contamination of DOE sites is through the use of a technology known as bioremediation. Bioremediation has been defined as the use of microorganisms to

  17. Cometabolic bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-15

    Cometabolic bioremediation is probably the most under appreciated bioremediation strategy currently available. Cometabolism strategies stimulate only indigenous microbes with the ability to degrade the contaminant and cosubstrate e.g. methane, propane, toluene and others. This highly targeted stimulation insures that only those microbes that can degrade the contaminant are targeted, thus reducing amendment costs, well and formation plugging, etc. Cometabolic bioremediation has been used on some of the most recalcitrant contaminants, e.g. PCE, TCE, MTBE, TNT, dioxane, atrazine, etc. Methanotrophs have been demonstrated to produce methane monooxygense, an oxidase that can degrade over 300 compounds. Cometabolic bioremediation also has the advantage of being able to degrade contaminants to trace concentrations, since the biodegrader is not dependent on the contaminant for carbon or energy. Increasingly we are finding that in order to protect human health and the environment that we must remediate to lower and lower concentrations, especially for compounds like endocrine disrupters, thus cometabolism may be the best and maybe the only possibility that we have to bioremediate some contaminants.

  18. Arctic bioremediation -- A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smallbeck, D.R.; Ramert, P.C. (Harding Lawson Associates, Novato, CA (United States)); Liddell, B.V.

    1994-05-01

    This paper discusses the use of bioremediation as an effective method to clean up diesel-range hydrocarbon spills in northern latitudes. The results of a laboratory study of microbial degradation of hydrocarbons under simulated arctic conditions showed that bioremediation can be effective in cold climates and led to the implementation of a large-scale field program. The results of 3 years of field testing have led to a significant reduction in diesel-range hydrocarbon concentrations in the contaminated area.

  19. MICROBIAL POPULATION CHANGES DURING BIOREMEDIATION OF AN EXPERIMENTAL OIL SPILL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three crude oil bioremediation techniques were applied in a randomized block field experiment simulating a coastal oil-spill. Four treatments (no oil control, oil alone, oil + nutrients, and oil + nutrients + an indigenous inoculum) were applied. In-situ microbial community str...

  20. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF STRATEGIES FOR OIL SPILL BIOREMEDIATION: POTENTIAL AND LIMITATION, LABORATORY TO FIELD (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several important additional research efforts were identified during the development of test systems and protocols for assessing the effectiveness and environmental safety of oil spill commercial bioremediation agents (CBAs). Research that examined CBA efficacy issues included: (...

  1. Ameliorating risk: Culturable and metagenomic monitoring of the 14 year decline of a genetically engineered microorganism at a bioremediation field site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, Alice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Smart, Abby E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chauhan, Archana [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ripp, Steven Anthony [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Williams, Daniel [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burton, Whitney [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Moser, Scott [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Sayler, Gary [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 represented the first genetically engineered microorganism to be approved in the United States for field release for applications related to subsurface soil bioremediation. In October 1996, strain HK44 was introduced into a replicated semi-contained array of soil lysimeters where its luciferase (luxCDABE)-based bioluminescent response to soil-borne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminants was detected and monitored for the next two years. At the termination of this experiment, it was decided that the lysimeters remain available for future longer-term monitoring efforts, and were thus covered and left essentially undisturbed until the initiation of a large sampling event in 2010, fourteen years after the original release. Although after extensive sampling culturable HK44 cells were not found, additional molecular and metagenomic analyses indicated that genetic signatures of HK44 cells still persisted, with genes diagnostic for the bioluminescent transposon carried by strain HK44 (luxA and tetA) being found at low concentrations (< 5000 copies/g).

  2. Microbial Consortia Development and Microcosm and Column Experiments for Enhanced Bioremediation of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds, West Branch Canal Creek Wetland Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Majcher, Emily H.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated solvents, including 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform, are reaching land surface in localized areas of focused ground-water discharge (seeps) in a wetland and tidal creek in the West Branch Canal Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Garrison, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, the U.S. Geological Survey is developing enhanced bioremediation methods that simulate the natural anaerobic degradation that occurs without intervention in non-seep areas of the wetland. A combination of natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation could provide a remedy for the discharging ground-water plumes that would minimize disturbance to the sensitive wetland ecosystem. Biostimulation (addition of organic substrate or nutrients) and bioaugmentation (addition of microbial consortium), applied either by direct injection at depth in the wetland sediments or by construction of a permeable reactive mat at the seep surface, were tested as possible methods to enhance anaerobic degradation in the seep areas. For the first phase of developing enhanced bioremediation methods for the contaminant mixtures in the seeps, laboratory studies were conducted to develop a microbial consortium to degrade 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and its chlorinated daughter products under anaerobic conditions, and to test biostimulation and bioaugmentation of wetland sediment and reactive mat matrices in microcosms. The individual components required for the direct injection and reactive mat methods were then combined in column experiments to test them under groundwater- flow rates and contaminant concentrations observed in the field. Results showed that both direct injection and the reactive mat are promising remediation methods, although the success of direct injection likely would depend on adequately distributing and maintaining organic substrate throughout the wetland sediment in the seep

  3. Review of WAG Field Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jes Reimer; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Skauge, A.

    2001-01-01

    recovery by combining better mobility control and contacting unswept zones, and by leading to improved microscopic displacement. This study is a review of the WAG field experience as it is found in the literature today,(1-108) from the first reported WAG injection in 1957 in Canada to the new experience...... from the North Sea. About 60 fields have been reviewed. Both onshore and offshore projects have been included, as well as WAG injections with hydrocarbon or nonhydrocarbon gases. Well spacing is very different from onshore projects, where fine patterns often are applied, to offshore projects, where...... well spacing is in the order of 1000 m. For the fields reviewed, a common trend for the successful injections is an increased oil recovery in the range of 5 to 10% of the oil initially in place (OIIP). Very few field trials have been reported as unsuccessful, but operational problems are often noted...

  4. Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling in the Simulation of Field-Scale Uranium Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, S.; Wilkins, M.; Fang, Y.; Williams, K. H.; Waichler, S.; Long, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling is used to improve understanding of the processes, properties, and conditions controlling uranium bio-immobilization in a field experiment where uranium-contaminated groundwater was amended with acetate and bicarbonate. The acetate stimulates indigenous microorganisms that catalyze metal reduction, including the conversion of aqueous U(VI) to solid-phase U(IV), which effectively removes uranium from solution. The initiation of the bicarbonate amendment prior to biostimulation was designed to promote U(VI) desorption that would increase the aqueous U(VI) available for bioreduction. The three-dimensional simulations were able to largely reproduce the timing and magnitude of the physical, chemical and biological responses to the acetate and bicarbonate amendment in the context of changing water table elevation and gradient. A time series of groundwater proteomic samples exhibited correlations between the most abundant Geobacter metallireducens proteins and the genome-scale metabolic model-predicted fluxes of intra-cellular reactions associated with each of those proteins. The desorption of U(VI) induced by the bicarbonate amendment led to initially higher rates of bioreduction compared to locations with minimal bicarbonate exposure. After bicarbonate amendment ceased, bioreduction continued at these locations whereas U(VI) sorption was the dominant removal mechanism at the bicarbonate-impacted sites.

  5. Biodegradation and bioremediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, H.-J.

    1996-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Alexander,M.: Biodegradation and bioremediation. Academic Press, Sandiego, USA, 1994......Anmeldelse af Alexander,M.: Biodegradation and bioremediation. Academic Press, Sandiego, USA, 1994...

  6. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in cold regions: Development of a pre-optimized biostimulation biopile-scale field assay in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Álvarez, L M; Ruberto, Lam; Lo Balbo, A; Mac Cormack, W P

    2017-03-02

    Bioremediation proved to be an effective approach to deal with soil contamination, especially in isolated, cold environments such as Antarctica. Biostimulation, involving the addition of macronutrients -mainly nitrogen and phosphorous- is considered the simplest and cheapest bioremediation process. Optimizing the levels of these nutrients is a key step prior to the application of a biostimulation strategy. In this work, N and P levels, optimized by Response Surface Methodology (RSM) at lab-scale, were applied to an Antarctic hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The process was performed on-site, using high density polyethylene geomembranes (800μm) to isolate treated soil from the surroundings and under environmental conditions at Carlini station (Antarctica) during 50days. Two 0.5ton biopiles were used as experimental units; a control biopile (CC), and a biostimulated system (BS), amended with N and P. At the end of the assay, hydrocarbon removal was significantly higher in BS system compared to CC (75.79% and 49.54% respectively), showing that the applied strategy was effective enough to perform a field-assay in Antarctica that significantly reduce soil contamination levels; and proving that RSM represents a fundamental tool for the optimization of nutrient levels to apply during bioremediation of fuel contaminated cold soils.

  7. Design and field-scale implementation of an "on site" bioremediation treatment in PAH-polluted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaez, A I; Lores, I; Sotres, A; Mendez-Garcia, C; Fernandez-Velarde, C; Santos, J A; Gallego, J L R; Sanchez, J

    2013-10-01

    An "on site" bioremediation program was designed and implemented in soil polluted with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), especially naphthalene. We began by characterizing the soil's physical and chemical properties. A microbiological screening corroborated the presence of microorganisms capable of metabolizing PAHs. We then analyzed the viability of bioremediation by developing laboratory microcosms and pilot scale studies, to optimize the costs and time associated with remediation. The treatment assays were based on different types of biostimulants, such as a slow or fast-release fertilizer, combined with commercial surfactants. Once the feasibility of the biostimulation was confirmed, a real-scale bioremediation program was undertaken in 900 m(3) of contaminated soil. The three-step design reduced PAH contamination by 94.4% at the end of treatment (161 days). The decrease in pollutants was concomitant with the selection of autochthonous bacteria capable of degrading PAHs, with Bacillus and Pseudomonas the most abundant genera.

  8. Management of groundwater in-situ bioremediation system using reactive transport modelling under parametric uncertainty: field scale application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verardo, E.; Atteia, O.; Rouvreau, L.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ bioremediation is a commonly used remediation technology to clean up the subsurface of petroleum-contaminated sites. Forecasting remedial performance (in terms of flux and mass reduction) is a challenge due to uncertainties associated with source properties and the uncertainties associated with contribution and efficiency of concentration reducing mechanisms. In this study, predictive uncertainty analysis of bio-remediation system efficiency is carried out with the null-space Monte Carlo (NSMC) method which combines the calibration solution-space parameters with the ensemble of null-space parameters, creating sets of calibration-constrained parameters for input to follow-on remedial efficiency. The first step in the NSMC methodology for uncertainty analysis is model calibration. The model calibration was conducted by matching simulated BTEX concentration to a total of 48 observations from historical data before implementation of treatment. Two different bio-remediation designs were then implemented in the calibrated model. The first consists in pumping/injection wells and the second in permeable barrier coupled with infiltration across slotted piping. The NSMC method was used to calculate 1000 calibration-constrained parameter sets for the two different models. Several variants of the method were implemented to investigate their effect on the efficiency of the NSMC method. The first variant implementation of the NSMC is based on a single calibrated model. In the second variant, models were calibrated from different initial parameter sets. NSMC calibration-constrained parameter sets were sampled from these different calibrated models. We demonstrate that in context of nonlinear model, second variant avoids to underestimate parameter uncertainty which may lead to a poor quantification of predictive uncertainty. Application of the proposed approach to manage bioremediation of groundwater in a real site shows that it is effective to provide support in

  9. Quantification of compositional changes of petroleum hydrocarbons by GC/FID and GC/MS during a long-term bioremediation experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine S.; Arvin, Erik; Svensmark, Bo;

    2000-01-01

    Samples from a long-term bioremediation experiment contaminated with two crude oils, Arabian Heavy and Gullfax, was used to analyze the compositional change of petroleum hydrocarbons. A time course of five different homologous series of petroleum hydrocarbons were analysed by GC/FID and GC......, that is, nor-hopanes, hopanes, methyl-hopanes, steranes, mono- og triaromatic steranes. The 17 alpha (H),21 beta (H)-hopane was found to be stable toward biodegradation and was used as reference compound The internal standard quantification method was used to quantify changes of the homologous series...... biodegradation occurs....

  10. A field trial for an ex-situ bioremediation of a drilling mud-polluted site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Avelizapa, N G; Roldán-Carrillo, T; Zegarra-Martínez, H; Muñoz-Colunga, A M; Fernández-Linares, L C

    2007-01-01

    The remediation of drilling mud-polluted sites in the Southeast of Mexico is a top priority for Mexican oil industry. The objective of this work was to find a technology to remediate these sites. A field trial was performed by composting in biopiles, where four 1ton soil-biopiles were established, one treatment in triplicate and one unamended biopile. Amended biopiles were added with nutrients to get a C/N/P ratio of 100/3/0.5 plus a bulking agent (straw) at a soil/straw ratio of 97/3. Moisture content was maintained around 30-35%. Results showed that, after 180 d, total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations decreased from 99300+/-23000mgTPHkg(-1) soil to 5500+/-770mgTPHkg(-1) for amended biopiles and to 22900+/-7800mgTPHkg(-1) for unamended biopile. An undisturbed soil control showed no change in TPH concentrations. Gas chromatographic analysis showed residual alkyl dibenzothiophene type compounds. Highest bacterial counts were observed during the first 30 d which correlated with highest TPH removal, whereas fungal count increased at the end of the experimentation period. Results suggested an important role of the straw, nutrient addition and water content in stimulating aerobic microbial activity and thus hydrocarbon removal. This finding opens an opportunity to remediate old polluted sites with recalcitrant and high TPH concentration.

  11. Using proteomic data to assess a genome-scale "in silico" model of metal reducing bacteria in the simulation of field-scale uranium bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, S.; Fang, Y.; Wilkins, M. J.; Long, P.; Rifle IFRC Science Team

    2011-12-01

    A series of field experiments in a shallow alluvial aquifer at a former uranium mill tailings site have demonstrated that indigenous bacteria can be stimulated with acetate to catalyze the conversion of hexavalent uranium in a groundwater plume to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. While this bioreduction of uranium has been shown to lower groundwater concentrations below actionable standards, a viable remediation methodology will need a mechanistic, predictive and quantitative understanding of the microbially-mediated reactions that catalyze the reduction of uranium in the context of site-specific processes, properties, and conditions. At the Rifle IFRC site, we are investigating the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, acetate-oxidizing iron and sulfate reducing bacteria, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. The simulation of three-dimensional, variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport during a uranium bioremediation field experiment includes a genome-scale in silico model of Geobacter sp. to represent the Fe(III) terminal electron accepting process (TEAP). The Geobacter in silico model of cell-scale physiological metabolic pathways is comprised of hundreds of intra-cellular and environmental exchange reactions. One advantage of this approach is that the TEAP reaction stoichiometry and rate are now functions of the metabolic status of the microorganism. The linkage of in silico model reactions to specific Geobacter proteins has enabled the use of groundwater proteomic analyses to assess the accuracy of the model under evolving hydrologic and biogeochemical conditions. In this case, the largest predicted fluxes through in silico model reactions generally correspond to high abundances of proteins linked to those reactions (e.g. the condensation reaction catalyzed by the protein

  12. Applied bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinchee, R.E.; Kittel, J.A. [eds.] [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Reisinger, H.J. [ed.] [Integrated Science and Technology, Inc., Marietta, GA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This volume is part of a ten volume set of papers derived from the Third International In Situ and On-Site Bioreclamation Symposium which was held in San Diego, California, in April 1995. The purpose of the conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on bioremediation. The papers in this volume focus on petroleum hydrocarbon bioremediation, with an emphasis on pilot-scale and field-scale applications. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  13. Laboratory method used for bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, M. Leslie; Taylor, Robert T.

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  14. Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides: What It Is and How It Works (2nd Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmisano, Anna; Hazen, Terry

    2003-09-30

    an insoluble salt in the sediment. In other cases, the opposite occurs--the solubility of the altered species increases, increasing the mobility of the contaminant and allowing it to be more easily flushed from the environment. Both of these kinds of transformations present opportunities for bioremediation of metals and radionuclides--either to lock them in place, or to accelerate their removal. DOE's goal is to reduce the risk and related exposure to ground water, sediment, and soil contamination at Department of Energy facilities. Subsurface bioremediation of metals and radionuclides at the site of contamination (in situ bioremediation) is not yet in widespread use. However, successful in situ applications of bioremediation to petroleum products and chlorinated solvents provide experience from which scientists can draw. Taken together, the accomplishments in these areas have led scientists and engineers to be optimistic about applying this technology to the mixtures of metals and radionuclides that are found at some of the most contaminated DOE sites. This primer examines some of the basic microbial and chemical processes that are a part of bioremediation, specifically the bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. The primer is divided into six sections, with the information in each building on that of the previous. The sections include features that highlight topics of interest and provide background information on specific biological and chemical processes and reactions. The first section briefly examines the scope of the contamination problem at DOE facilities. The second section gives a summary of some of the most commonly used bioremediation technologies, including successful in situ and ex situ techniques. The third discusses chemical and physical properties of metals and radionuclides found in contaminant mixtures at DOE sites, including solubility and the most common oxidation states in which these materials are found. The fourth section is an

  15. Influence of aggregate sizes and microstructures on bioremediation assessment of field-contaminated soils in pilot-scale biopiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W.; Akbari, A.; Frigon, D.; Ghoshal, S.

    2011-12-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of soils and groundwater is an environmental concern. Bioremediation has been frequently considered a cost-effective, less disruptive remedial technology. Formation of soil aggregate fractions in unsaturated soils is generally believed to hinder aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation due to the slow intra-pore diffusion of nutrients and oxygen within the aggregate matrix and to the reduced bioavailability of hydrocarbons. On the other hand, soil aggregates may harbour favourable niches for indigenous bacteria, providing protective microsites against various in situ environmental stresses. The size of the soil aggregates is likely to be a critical factor for these processes and could be interpreted as a relevant marker for biodegradation assessment. There have been only limited attempts in the past to assess petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in unsaturated soils as a function of aggregate size. This study is aimed at investigating the roles of aggregate sizes and aggregate microstructures on biodegradation activity. Field-aged, contaminated, clayey soils were shipped from Norman Wells, Canada. Attempts were made to stimulate indigenous microbial activity by soil aeration and nutrient amendments in a pilot-scale biopile tank (1m L×0.65m W×0.3 m H). A control biopile was maintained without the nutrient amendment but was aerated. The initial concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in the field-contaminated soils increased with increasing aggregate sizes, which were classified in three fractions: micro- (250-2000 μm) and macro-aggregates (>2000 μm). Compared to the TPH analyses at whole-soil level, the petroleum hydrocarbon analyses based on the aggregate-size levels demonstrated more clearly the extent of biodegradation of non-volatile, heavier hydrocarbons (C16-C34) in the soil. The removal of the C16-C34 hydrocarbons was 44% in macro-aggregates, but only 13% in meso-aggregates. The increased protein concentrations in macro

  16. Bioremediation of lead contaminated soil with Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomin; Peng, Weihua; Jia, Yingying; Lu, Lin; Fan, Wenhong

    2016-08-01

    Bioremediation with microorganisms is a promising technique for heavy metal contaminated soil. Rhodobacter sphaeroides was previously isolated from oil field injection water and used for bioremediation of lead (Pb) contaminated soil in the present study. Based on the investigation of the optimum culturing conditions and the tolerance to Pb, we employed the microorganism for the remediation of Pb contaminated soil simulated at different contamination levels. It was found that the optimum temperature, pH, and inoculum size for R. sphaeroides is 30-35 °C, 7, and 2 × 10(8) mL(-1), respectively. Rhodobacter sphaeroides did not remove the Pb from soil but did change its speciation. During the bioremediation process, more available fractions were transformed to less accessible and inert fractions; in particular, the exchangeable phase was dramatically decreased while the residual phase was substantially increased. A wheat seedling growing experiment showed that Pb phytoavailability was reduced in amended soils. Results inferred that the main mechanism by which R. sphaeroides treats Pb contaminated soil is the precipitation formation of inert compounds, including lead sulfate and lead sulfide. Although the Pb bioremediation efficiency on wheat was not very high (14.78% root and 24.01% in leaf), R. sphaeroides remains a promising alternative for Pb remediation in contaminated soil.

  17. Response of Archaeal communities in beach sediments to spilled oil and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röling, Wilfred F M; de Brito Couto, Ivana R; Swannell, Richard P J; Head, Ian M

    2004-05-01

    While the contribution of Bacteria to bioremediation of oil-contaminated shorelines is well established, the response of Archaea to spilled oil and bioremediation treatments is unknown. The relationship between archaeal community structure and oil spill bioremediation was examined in laboratory microcosms and in a bioremediation field trial. 16S rRNA gene-based PCR and denaturing gradient gel analysis revealed that the archaeal community in oil-free laboratory microcosms was stable for 26 days. In contrast, in oil-polluted microcosms a dramatic decrease in the ability to detect Archaea was observed, and it was not possible to amplify fragments of archaeal 16S rRNA genes from samples taken from microcosms treated with oil. This was the case irrespective of whether a bioremediation treatment (addition of inorganic nutrients) was applied. Since rapid oil biodegradation occurred in nutrient-treated microcosms, we concluded that Archaea are unlikely to play a role in oil degradation in beach ecosystems. A clear-cut relationship between the presence of oil and the absence of Archaea was not apparent in the field experiment. This may have been related to continuous inoculation of beach sediments in the field with Archaea from seawater or invertebrates and shows that the reestablishment of Archaea following bioremediation cannot be used as a determinant of ecosystem recovery following bioremediation. Comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that the majority of the Archaea detected (94%) belonged to a novel, distinct cluster of group II uncultured Euryarchaeota, which exhibited less than 87% identity to previously described sequences. A minor contribution of group I uncultured Crenarchaeota was observed.

  18. Elucidating GPR Response to Biological Activity: Field and Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoflias, G. P.; Schillig, P. C.; McGlashan, M. A.; Roberts, J. A.; Devlin, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies of the geophysical signatures of biological processes in earth environments have resulted in the emergent field of “biogeophysics”. The ability to monitor remotely and to quantify active biological processes in the subsurface can have transformative implications to a wide range of investigations, including the bioremediation of contaminated sites. Previous studies have demonstrated that ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be used to detect the products of microbial activity in the subsurface, such as changes in bulk electrical conductivity, mineral dissolution and precipitation, and the formation of biogenic gas. We present field and laboratory experiments that offer insights to the response of GPR signals to microbial activity. In the field, time-lapse borehole radar tomography was used to monitor biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume over a period of two years. A dense grid of fourteen borehole pairs monitoring the bioactive region showed radar wave velocity changes of +/-4% and signal attenuation changes of +/-25%. These GPR observations correlated spatially and temporally to independent measurements of groundwater velocity and geochemical variations that occurred in response to microbial activity. The greatest relative changes in radar wave velocity of propagation and attenuation were observed in the region of enhanced bacterial stimulation where biomass growth was the greatest. Radar wave velocity and attenuation decreased during periods of enhanced biostimulation. Two laboratory experiments were conducted to further assess radar response to biomass growth. The first experiment monitored GPR wave transmission through a water-saturated quartz-sand reactor during the course of enhanced biostimulation. Radar wave velocity initially decreased as a result of bacterial activity and subsequently increased rapidly as biogenic gas formed in the pore space. Radar signal attenuation increased during the course of the experiment as a result of an

  19. The National Airborne Field Experiment Data Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, J. P.; Balling, Jan E.; Bell, M.

    2007-01-01

    The National Airborne Field Experiment's (NAFE) were a series of intensive experiments recently conducted in different parts of Australia. These hydrologic-focused experiments have been designed to answer a range of questions which can only be resolved through carefully planned and executed field...

  20. Bioremediation of Petroleum and Radiological Contaminated Soils at the Savannah River Site: Laboratory to Field Scale Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRIGMON, ROBINL.

    2004-06-07

    In the process of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations limited amounts of waste are generated containing petroleum, and radiological contaminated soils. Currently, this combination of radiological and petroleum contaminated waste does not have an immediate disposal route and is being stored in low activity vaults. SRS developed and implemented a successful plan for clean up of the petroleum portion of the soils in situ using simple, inexpensive, bioreactor technology. Treatment in a bioreactor removes the petroleum contamination from the soil without spreading radiological contamination to the environment. This bioreactor uses the bioventing process and bioaugmentation or the addition of the select hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. Oxygen is usually the initial rate-limiting factor in the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Using the bioventing process allowed control of the supply of nutrients and moisture based on petroleum contamination concentrations and soil type. The results of this work have proven to be a safe and cost-effective means of cleaning up low level radiological and petroleum-contaminated soil. Many of the other elements of the bioreactor design were developed or enhanced during the demonstration of a ''biopile'' to treat the soils beneath a Polish oil refinery's waste disposal lagoons. Aerobic microorganisms were isolated from the aged refinery's acidic sludge contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Twelve hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were isolated from the sludge. The predominant PAH degraders were tentatively identified as Achromobacter, Pseudomonas Burkholderia, and Sphingomonas spp. Several Ralstonia spp were also isolated that produce biosurfactants. Biosurfactants can enhance bioremediation by increasing the bioavailability of hydrophobic contaminants including hydrocarbons. The results indicated that the diversity of acid-tolerant PAH-degrading microorganisms in acidic oil wastes may

  1. Field experiment for blasting crater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Tu-qiang

    2008-01-01

    A series of single hole blasting crater experiments and a variable distance multi-hole simultaneous blasting experiment was carded in the Yunfu Troilite Mine, according to the Livingston blasting crater theory. We introduce in detail, our methodology of data collection and processing from our experiments. Based on the burying depth of the explosives, the blasting crater volume was fitted by the method of least squares and the characteristic curve of the blasting crater was obtained using the MATLAB software. From this third degree polynomial, we have derived the optimal burying depth, the critical burying depth and the optimal explosive specific charge of the blasting crater.

  2. Mineral transformation and biomass accumulation associated with uranium bioremediation at Rifle, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Williams, K.H.; Wilkins, M.J.; Hubbard, S.S.

    2009-04-20

    Injection of organic carbon into the subsurface as an electron donor for bioremediation of redox-sensitive contaminants like uranium often leads to mineral transformation and biomass accumulation, both of which can alter the flow field and potentially bioremediation efficacy. This work combines reactive transport modeling with a column experiment and field measurements to understand the biogeochemical processes and to quantify the biomass and mineral transformation/accumulation during a bioremediation experiment at a uranium contaminated site near Rifle, Colorado. We use the reactive transport model CrunchFlow to explicitly simulate microbial community dynamics of iron and sulfate reducers, and their impacts on reaction rates. The column experiment shows clear evidence of mineral precipitation, primarily in the form of calcite and iron monosulfide. At the field scale, reactive transport simulations suggest that the biogeochemical reactions occur mostly close to the injection wells where acetate concentrations are highest, with mineral precipitate and biomass accumulation reaching as high as 1.5% of the pore space. This work shows that reactive transport modeling coupled with field data can be an effective tool for quantitative estimation of mineral transformation and biomass accumulation, thus improving the design of bioremediation strategies.

  3. Field Experiments in Litter Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnie, William C.

    1973-01-01

    A series of urban and highway litter experiments in Richmond (Virginia), St. Louis, and Philadelphia indicated well-designed litter cans reduced littering about 15 percent along city streets and nearly 30 percent along highways. Also, the propensity to litter is critically affected by the characteristics of the individual and environmental…

  4. The Integration of Multimedia and Field Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, George

    A professor of science education at Florida State University shares his experiences with the growth of the field of environmental education and the problems inherent in trying to teach formal environmental education outdoors. Although field experience is best, it must be limited in most situations since logistics get in the way. Technology can…

  5. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  6. From theory to field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Bram

    2016-04-01

    Peter Raats' achievements in Haren (NL) 1986-1997 were based on a solid theoretical insight in hydrology and transport process in soil. However, Peter was also the driving force behind many experimental studies and applied research. This will be illustrated by a broad range of examples ranging from the dynamics of composting processes of organic material; modelling and monitoring nutrient leaching at field-scale; wind erosion; water and nutrient dynamics in horticultural production systems; oxygen diffusion in soils; and processes of water and nutrient uptake by plant roots. Peter's leadership led to may new approaches and the introduction of innovative measurement techniques in Dutch research; ranging from TDR to nutrient concentration measurements in closed fertigation systems. This presentation will give a brief overview how Peter's theoretical and mathematical insights accelerated this applied research.

  7. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and…

  8. A Field Experiment in Motivating Employee Ideas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Gibbs (Michael); S. Neckermann (Susanne); C. Siemroth (Christoph)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ We study the effects of a field experiment designed to motivate employee ideas, at a large technology company. Employees were encouraged to submit ideas on process and product improvements via an online system. In the experiment, the company randomized 19 account teams

  9. Overview of Field Experience - Degradation Rates & Lifetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Dirk; Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-09-14

    The way a PV module fails may depend not only on its design and the materials used in its construction, but also on the weather it experiences, the way it is mounted, and the quality control during its manufacture. This presentation gives an overview of Field Experience - what degradation rates and what lifetimes are being observed in various regions.

  10. Bioremediation of PCBs. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasson, K.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div., TN (United States); Abramowicz, D.A. [General Electric Co. Corporate Research and Development, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was signed between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and General Electric Company (GE) on August 12, 1991. The objective was a collaborative venture between researchers at GE and ORNL to develop bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The work was conducted over three years, and this report summarizes ORNL`s effort. It was found that the total concentration of PCBs decreased by 70% for sequential anaerobic-aerobic treatment compared with a 67% decrease for aerobic treatment alone. The sequential treatment resulted in PCB products with fewer chlorines and shorter halflives in humans compared with either anaerobic or aerobic treatment alone. The study was expected to lead to a technology applicable to a field experiment that would be performed on a DOE contaminated site.

  11. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and measurement of the spatial variation of magnetic field components along a line near magnets. We describe the experimental tasks, various difficulties students have throughout, and ways this lab makes even their incorrect predictions better. We suggest that developing lab activities of this nature brings a new dimension to the ways students learn and interact with field concepts.

  12. Fungi in Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadd, G. M.

    2001-12-01

    Bioremediation research has concentrated on organic pollutants, although the range of substances that can be transformed or detoxified by microorganisms includes both natural and synthetic organic materials and inorganic pollutants. The majority of applications developed to date involve bacteria, with a distinct lack of appreciation of the potential roles and involvement of fungi in bioremediation, despite clear evidence of their metabolic and morphological versatility. This book highlights the potential of filamentous fungi, including mycorrhizas, in bioremediation and discusses the physiology and chemistry of pollutant transformations.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic experiments on cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Stefani, Frank; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2008-01-01

    It is widely known that cosmic magnetic fields, including the fields of planets, stars, and galaxies, are produced by the hydromagnetic dynamo effect in moving electrically conducting fluids. It is less well known that cosmic magnetic fields play also an active role in cosmic structure formation by enabling outward transport of angular momentum in accretion disks via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Considerable theoretical and computational progress has been made in understanding both processes. In addition to this, the last ten years have seen tremendous efforts in studying both effects in liquid metal experiments. In 1999, magnetic field self-excitation was observed in the large scale liquid sodium facilities in Riga and Karlsruhe. Recently, self-excitation was also obtained in the French "von Karman sodium" (VKS) experiment. An MRI-like mode was found on the background of a turbulent spherical Couette flow at the University of Maryland. Evidence for MRI as the first instability of an hydrodynamica...

  14. Desorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from field-contaminated soil to a two-dimensional hydrophobic surface before and after bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Aitken, Michael D

    2012-10-01

    Dermal exposure can represent a significant health risk in settings involving potential contact with soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, there is limited work on the ability of PAHs in contaminated soil to reach the skin surface via desorption from the soil. We evaluated PAH desorption from a field-contaminated soil to a two-dimensional hydrophobic surface (C18 extraction disk) as a measure of potential dermal exposure as a function of soil loading (5-100 mg dry soil cm(-2)), temperature (20-40°C), and soil moisture content (2-40%) over periods up to 16d. The efficacy of bioremediation in removing the most readily desorbable PAH fractions was also evaluated. Desorption kinetics were described well by an empirical two-compartment kinetic model. PAH mass desorbed to the C18 disk kept increasing at soil loadings well above the estimated monolayer coverage, suggesting mechanisms for PAH transport to the surface other than by direct contact. Such mechanisms were reinforced by observations that desorption occurred even with dry or moist glass microfiber filters placed between the C18 disk and the soil. Desorption of all PAHs was substantially reduced at a soil moisture content corresponding to field capacity, suggesting that transport through pore air contributed to PAH transport to the C18 disk. The lower molecular weight PAHs had greater potential to desorb from soil than higher molecular weight PAHs. Biological treatment of the soil in a slurry-phase bioreactor completely eliminated PAH desorption to the C18 disks.

  15. Employee Recognition and Performance: A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Bradler (Christiane); A.J. Dur (Robert); S. Neckermann (Susanne); J.A. Non (Arjan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis paper reports the results from a controlled field experiment designed to investigate the causal effect of public recognition on employee performance. We hired more than 300 employees to work on a three-hour data-entry task. In a random sample of work groups, workers unexpectedly rec

  16. Teacher Knowledge Development in Early Field Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Casey; Jenkins, Jayne M.; Lux, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of physical education preservice teacher knowledge development has been primarily limited to study of a single semester of early field experience (EFE), with findings from these investigations driving EFE design. The purpose of this research was to investigate what types of knowledge develop and how knowledge evolves and interacts to…

  17. Employee recognition and performance: A field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bradler, C.; Dur, R.; Neckermann, S.; Non, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results from a controlled field experiment designed to investigate the causal effect of public recognition on employee performance. We hired more than 300 employees to work on a three-hour data-entry task. In a random sample of work groups, workers unexpectedly received recogn

  18. Bioremediation of oil-contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balba, T. [Conestoga-Rovers and Associates, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    One of the most prevalent contaminants in subsurface soil and groundwater are petroleum hydrocarbons. This paper presented bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons as one of the most promising treatment technologies. Petroleum hydrocarbons are categorized into four simple fractions: saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes. Bioremediation refers to the treatment process whereby contaminants are metabolized into less toxic or nontoxic compounds by naturally occurring organisms. The various strategies include: use of constitutive enzymes, enzyme induction, co-metabolism, transfer of plasmids coding for certain metabolic pathways, and production of biosurfactants to enhance bioavailability of hydrophobic compounds. Three case studies were presented: (1) bioremediation of heavy oils in soil at a locomotive maintenance yard in California, involving a multi-step laboratory treatability study followed by a field demonstration achieving up to 94 per cent removal of TPH in less than 16 weeks, (2) bioremediation of light oils in soil at an oil refinery in Germany where a dual process was applied (excavation and in-situ treatment), achieving an 84 per cent reduction within 24 weeks, and (3) bioremediation of oil-contaminated desert soil in Kuwait which involved landfarming, composting piles, and bioventing soil piles, achieving an 80 per cent reduction within 12 months. 7 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  19. Test of Bioremediation Method for Aging Oil Sludge Treatment in Xinjiang Oil-field%生物修复法处理新疆油田老化油泥试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慧敏; 张燕萍; 肖丰浦

    2016-01-01

    This paper takes the long-term piled up oily sludge in the northwest desert oil-field as the research objects. The activity of degradation of petroleum contaminants is strengthened by creating conditions conducive to microbial growth and reproduction. and the repairing effect is determined.Field test uses the experimental optimization of soil porosity (55%), soil moisture content(25%), bacteria agent additive amount 5%(mass fraction), N/P Ratio(10∶1) and additive amount of bio-surfactants5%. Oily sludge bioremediation ex-periment results show that oil content of oily sludge is 0.11%~0.29% after six months, which reached the harmless emissions standards prescribed by the state(less than 0.3%).%以西北荒漠地区油田长期堆放的含油污泥为研究对象,通过创造有利于微生物生长繁殖的条件,强化其降解石油类污染物的活性,测定修复效果。现场小试结果表明,采用试验优选的土壤孔隙度为55%、土壤含水率为25%、菌剂投加量为5%(质量分数)、氮磷比为10∶1、生物表面活性剂投加量为5%等参数,开展油泥生物修复试验,6个月后测得其含油量为0.11%~0.29%,达到了国家规定的无害化排放标准。

  20. Magnetic field homogeneity for neutron EDM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa

    2016-09-01

    The neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) is an observable which, if non-zero, would violate time-reversal symmetry, and thereby charge-parity symmetry of nature. New sources of CP violation beyond those found in the standard model of particle physics are already tightly constrained by nEDM measurements. Our future nEDM experiment seeks to improve the precision on the nEDM by a factor of 30, using a new ultracold neutron (UCN) source that is being constructed at TRIUMF. Systematic errors in the nEDM experiment are driven by magnetic field inhomogeneity and instability. The goal field inhomogeneity averaged over the experimental measurement cell (order of 1 m) is 1 nT/m, at a total magnetic field of 1 microTesla. This equates to roughly 10-3 homogeneity. A particularly challenging aspect of the design problem is that nearby magnetic materials will also affect the magnetic inhomogeneity, and this must be taken into account in completing the design. This poster will present the design methodology and status of the main coil for the experiment where we use FEA software (COMSOL) to simulate and analyze the magnetic field. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

  1. Polyhydroxyalkanoate as a slow-release carbon source for in situ bioremediation of contaminated aquifers: From laboratory investigation to pilot-scale testing in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierro, Lucia; Matturro, Bruna; Rossetti, Simona; Sagliaschi, Marco; Sucato, Salvatore; Alesi, Eduard; Bartsch, Ernst; Arjmand, Firoozeh; Papini, Marco Petrangeli

    2016-11-27

    A pilot-scale study aiming to evaluate the potential use of poly-3-hydroxy-butyrate (PHB) as an electron donor source for in situ bioremediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in groundwater was conducted. Compared with commercially available electron donors, PHB offers a restricted fermentation pathway (i.e., through acetic acid and molecular hydrogen) by avoiding the formation of any residual carbon that could potentially spoil groundwater quality. The pilot study was carried out at an industrial site in Italy, heavily contaminated by different chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). Prior to field testing, PHB was experimentally verified as a suitable electron donor for biological reductive dechlorination processes at the investigated site by microcosm studies carried out on site aquifer material and measuring the quantitative transformation of detected CAHs to ethene. Owing to the complex geological characteristics of the aquifer, the use of a groundwater circulation well (GCW) was identified as a potential strategy to enable effective delivery and distribution of electron donors in less permeable layers and to mobilise contaminants. A 3-screened, 30-m-deep GCW coupled with an external treatment unit was installed at the site. The effect of PHB fermentation products on the in situ reductive dechlorination processes were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results from the first 4 months of operation clearly demonstrated that the PHB fermentation products were effectively delivered to the aquifer and positively influenced the biological dechlorination activity. Indeed, an increased abundance of Dehalococcoides mccartyi (up to 6.6 fold) and reduced CAH concentrations at the installed monitoring wells were observed.

  2. In situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, M. Leslie; Taylor, Robert T.

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  3. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL N’Guessan

    2008-04-01

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation.

  4. (Notes) On Experience in the Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beloff, Laura

    2013-01-01

    at similarities that, no doubt, exist in some level, this article looks into one plausible difference between artistic and scientific practices. The article focuses on experience as a key aspect of artistic practice that uses organic materials or has a relation to sciences either through the methods and materials...... that there would not be experience within science but it is typically not the primary result aimed at within the (e.g. natural) sciences. The article deliberately avoids making any precise definitions for artistic practices that relate to science research to evade fixed perception of the field that is evolving...... and still in finding its shape and limits . Having been primarily situated in the field of the arts I will discuss the above stated issue through the perspective from the arts....

  5. Employee recognition and performance: A field experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Bradler, C.; Dur, R.; Neckermann, S.; Non, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results from a controlled field experiment designed to investigate the causal effect of public recognition on employee performance. We hired more than 300 employees to work on a three-hour data-entry task. In a random sample of work groups, workers unexpectedly received recognition after two hours of work. We find that recognition increases subsequent performance substantially, and particularly so when recognition is exclusively provided to the best performers. Remarkab...

  6. The influence of bioaugmentation and biosurfactant addition on bioremediation efficiency of diesel-oil contaminated soil: feasibility during field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulc, Alicja; Ambrożewicz, Damian; Sydow, Mateusz; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Piotrowska-Cyplik, Agnieszka; Marecik, Roman; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2014-01-01

    The study focused on assessing the influence of bioaugmentation and addition of rhamnolipids on diesel oil biodegradation efficiency during field studies. Initial laboratory studies (measurement of emitted CO2 and dehydrogenase activity) were carried out in order to select the consortium for bioaugmentation as well as to evaluate the most appropriate concentration of rhamnolipids. The selected consortium consisted of following bacterial taxa: Aeromonas hydrophila, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, Gordonia sp., Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Rhodococcus equi, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Xanthomonas sp. It was established that the application of rhamnolipids at 150 mg/kg of soil was most appropriate in terms of dehydrogenase activity. Based on the obtained results, four treatment methods were designed and tested during 365 days of field studies: I) natural attenuation; II) addition of rhamnolipids; III) bioaugmentation; IV) bioaugmentation and addition of rhamnolipids. It was observed that bioaugmentation contributed to the highest diesel oil biodegradation efficiency, whereas the addition of rhamnolipids did not notably influence the treatment process.

  7. Utilizing Urban Environments for Effective Field Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAvoy, S. E.; Knee, K.

    2014-12-01

    Research surveys suggest that students are demanding more applied field experiences from their undergraduate environmental science programs. For geoscience educators at liberal arts colleges without field camps, university vehicles, or even geology departments, getting students into the field is especially rewarding - and especially challenging. Here, we present strategies that we have used in courses ranging from introductory environmental science for non-majors, to upper level environmental methods and geology classes. Urban locations provide an opportunity for a different type of local "field-work" than would otherwise be available. In the upper-level undergraduate Environmental Methods class, we relied on a National Park area located a 10-minute walk from campus for most field exercises. Activities included soil analysis, measuring stream flow and water quality parameters, dendrochronology, and aquatic microbe metabolism. In the non-majors class, we make use of our urban location to contrast water quality in parks and highly channelized urban streams. Here we share detailed lesson plans and budgets for field activities that can be completed during a class period of 2.5 hours with a $75 course fee, show how these activities help students gain quantitative competency, and provide student feedback about the classes and activities.

  8. 中原油田石油污染土壤原位生物修复技术实验研究%Experimental study on in-situ bioremediation technique for oil contaminated soil in Zhongyuan Oil Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈立; 张发旺; 刘少玉; 何泽; 张胜

    2011-01-01

    The degradation microbial communities which were lab selective enrichment cultured from oil polluted soil of Zhongyuan Oil Field could fast grow using crude oil as carbon source.These microbial communities binding with Ryegrass and Alfalfa were used in experiments on combined in-situ bioremediation of oil contaminated soil.The experimental area was divided into five: microbial communities with Ryegrass,microbial communities with Alfalfa,only microbial communities,only Ryegrass and blank.After 99 d bioremediation,the cumulative degradation rate of petroleum hydrocarbon could reach 43.27% to 67.38%,which were much higher in the two areas of microbial communities with Ryegrass or Alfalfa.Whereas the cumulative degradation rate of blank area was lower than 2.5%.Those results showed that the selected microbial communities could obviously degrade the oil polluted soil in central plains oil field.The experimental results indicated that the inoculated degradation microbial communities generally need 1~3 d adaptive phase then being active,few nutriment such as soluble salt,NO-3,Cl-,etc could infiltrate into the lower soil layer(50 cm).The nitrogen fixation of Alfalfa roots may cause the distinct increase of NH+4.In addition,some factors containing temperature,water,oxygen,nutriment and minigeoenvirorment were optimized in the experiments.%通过实验室选择性富集培养,从中原油田石油污染土壤中获得了能以中原原油为碳源快速生长的石油降解菌群。结合黑麦草(Ryegrass)和苜蓿(Alfalfa),采用该降解菌群对原油污染土壤进行了原位生物联合修复实验。接入降解菌的实验区分种植黑麦草、种植苜蓿、未种植区,另设黑麦草区和空白区。经过99 d的生物修复,石油烃累计降解率达43.27%~67.38%,尤以2个微生物植物联合区修复效果为最佳,而空白区的累计降解率不足2.5%,说明所选菌群对中原油田污染土壤有明显的降解作用

  9. Controlled field study on the use of nitrate and oxygen for bioremediation of a gasoline source zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, J.R.; Barker, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    Controlled releases of unleaded gasoline were utilized to evaluate the biotransformation of the soluble aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene isomers, trimethylbenzene isomers, and naphthalene) within a source zone using nitrate and oxygen as electron acceptors. Experiments were conducted within two 2 m ?? 2 m ?? 3.5 m deep sheet-piling cells. In each treatment cell, a gasoline-contaminated zone was created below the water table. Groundwater amended with electron acceptors was then flushed continuously through the cells for 174 day. Electron-acceptor utilization and hydrocarbon-metabolite formation were noted in both cells, indicating that some microbial activity had been induced in response to flushing. Relative to the cell residence time, nitrate utilization was slow and aromatic-hydrocarbon mass losses in response to microaerophilic dissolved oxygen addition were not obvious under these in situ conditions. There was relatively little biotransformation of the aromatic hydrocarbons over the 2-m flow path monitored in this experiment. A large denitrifying population capable of aromatic hydrocarbon biotransformation failed to develop within the gasoline source zone over a 14-mo period of nitrate exposure.

  10. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallgren, Paul

    2009-03-30

    Bioremediation has been widely applied in the restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated. Parameters that may affect the rate and efficiency of biodegradation include temperature, moisture, salinity, nutrient availability, microbial species, and type and concentration of contaminants. Other factors can also affect the success of the bioremediation treatment of contaminants, such as climatic conditions, soil type, soil permeability, contaminant distribution and concentration, and drainage. Western Research Institute in conjunction with TechLink Environmental, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory studies to evaluate major parameters that contribute to the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated drill cuttings using land farming and to develop a biotreatment cell to expedite biodegradation of hydrocarbons. Physical characteristics such as soil texture, hydraulic conductivity, and water retention were determined for the petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil. Soil texture was determined to be loamy sand to sand, and high hydraulic conductivity and low water retention was observed. Temperature appeared to have the greatest influence on biodegradation rates where high temperatures (>50 C) favored biodegradation. High nitrogen content in the form of ammonium enhanced biodegradation as well did the presence of water near field water holding capacity. Urea was not a good source of nitrogen and has detrimental effects for bioremediation for this site soil. Artificial sea water had little effect on biodegradation rates, but biodegradation rates decreased after increasing the concentrations of salts. Biotreatment cell (biocell) tests demonstrated hydrocarbon biodegradation can be enhanced substantially when utilizing a leachate recirculation design where a 72% reduction of hydrocarbon concentration was observed with a 72-h period at a treatment temperature of 50 C. Overall, this study demonstrates the investigation of the effects of

  11. Combining Geoelectrical Measurements and CO2 Analyses to Monitor the Enhanced Bioremediation of Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils: A Field Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Noel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifers can be successfully remediated through enhanced biodegradation. However, in situ monitoring of the treatment by piezometers is expensive and invasive and might be insufficient as the information provided is restricted to vertical profiles at discrete locations. An alternative method was tested in order to improve the robustness of the monitoring. Geophysical methods, electrical resistivity (ER and induced polarization (IP, were combined with gas analyses, CO2 concentration, and its carbon isotopic ratio, to develop a less invasive methodology for monitoring enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons. The field implementation of this monitoring methodology, which lasted from February 2014 until June 2015, was carried out at a BTEX-polluted site under aerobic biotreatment. Geophysical monitoring shows a more conductive and chargeable area which corresponds to the contaminated zone. In this area, high CO2 emissions have been measured with an isotopic signature demonstrating that the main source of CO2 on this site is the biodegradation of hydrocarbon fuels. Besides, the evolution of geochemical and geophysical data over a year seems to show the seasonal variation of bacterial activity. Combining geophysics with gas analyses is thus promising to provide a new methodology for in situ monitoring.

  12. Bioremediation of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Frank Fanqing; Keasling, Jay D; Tang, Yinjie J

    2013-05-14

    The present invention provides a method comprising the use of microorganisms for nanotoxicity study and bioremediation. In some embodiment, the microorganisms are bacterial organisms such as Gram negative bacteria, which are used as model organisms to study the nanotoxicity of the fullerene compounds: E. coli W3110, a human related enterobacterium and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally important bacterium with versatile metabolism.

  13. Bioremediation, an environmental remediation technology for the bioeconomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Iain M M; Philp, Jim C

    2013-06-01

    Bioremediation differs from other industrial biotechnologies in that, although bioremediation contractors must profit from the activity, the primary driver is regulatory compliance rather than manufacturing profit. It is an attractive technology in the context of a bioeconomy but currently has limitations at the field scale. Ecogenomics techniques may address some of these limitations, but a further challenge would be acceptance of these techniques by regulators.

  14. 粗砂-砾石海滩溢油污染的现场生物修复%Field-Scale Bioremediation of Coarse Sand-Gravel Beach Contaminated by Oil Spill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁生康; 周平; 李广茹; 陈宇; 郭利果; 杨仕美; 吴亮

    2012-01-01

    在天津港六号码头的粗砂-砾石海滩进行了人工模拟溢油条件下的生物修复现场实验,考察了添加水溶性肥料、添加缓释肥料以及同时添加缓释肥料和石油烃降解菌等修复措施的有效性.结果表明,在120 d的修复时间内,同时添加缓释肥料和石油烃降解菌的体系石油烃生物降解常数(Ks)最高,达0.007 2 d-1,为对照体系的2.4倍,该体系中氮、磷浓度和石油烃降解菌数量在较长时间内都维持较高水平,表明接种的石油烃降解菌能够直接利用缓释肥料所释放出来的营养元素而快速生长繁殖;添加水溶性肥料的体系短期内氮、磷含量显著提高,石油烃降解菌密度明显增大,石油烃降解速率加快,Ks为对照试验池的1.8倍;而添加缓释肥料的体系氮、磷含量尽管明显高于对照体系,Ks却略低于对照体系,这可能是由于土著微生物无法直接利用缓释肥料所释放的营养元素,甚至其释放的尿素在局部形成高氨氮环境而抑制微生物的生长.%A series of field bioremediation experiments were undertaken on the coarse sand-gravel beach in Tianjin Port NO. 6 jetty, in which crude oil had been intentionally added into plots to simulate oil spill. The objectives were to evaluate the effectiveness of various bioremediation strategies, including addition of slow-release fertilize (SRF), addition of water-soluble fertilizer (WSF) and addition of SRF supplemented with oil-degrading bacteria (ODB). The results showed that the plots treated with addition of SRF and ODB had the highest biodegradation rate constant (ks) of hydrocarbons, which was as high as 0.007 2 d-1 and was 2.4 times that of the control plot, and accordingly the contents of dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus, as well as the density of ODB could keep a high level in a longer period of time. This indicated that ODB could directly utilize the nutrients realsed from SRF to multiply rapidly. The contents of

  15. The Influence of Soil Chemical Factors on In Situ Bioremediation of Soil Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breedveld, Gijs D.

    1997-12-31

    Mineral oil is the major energy source in Western society. Production, transport and distribution of oil and oil products cause serious contamination problems of water, air and soil. The present thesis studies the natural biodegradation processes in the soil environment which can remove contamination by oil products and creosote. The main physical/chemical processes determining the distribution of organic contaminants between the soil solid, aqueous and vapour phase are discussed. Then a short introduction to soil microbiology and environmental factors important for biodegradation is given. There is a discussion of engineered and natural bioremediation methods and the problems related to scaling up laboratory experiments to field scale remediation. Bioremediation will seldom remove the contaminants completely; a residue remains. Factors affecting the level of residual contamination and the consequences for contaminant availability are discussed. Finally, the main findings of the work are summarized and recommendations for further research are given. 111 refs., 41 figs., 19 tabs.

  16. Bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils: A recipe for success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittenbach, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    Bioremediation of land crude oil and lube oil spills is an effective and economical option. Other options include road spreading (where permitted), thermal desorption, and off-site disposal. The challenge for environment and operations managers is to select the best approach for each remediation site. Costs and liability for off-site disposal are ever increasing. Kerr-McGee`s extensive field research in eastern and western Texas provides the data to support bioremediation as a legitimate and valid option. Both practical and economical bioremediation as a legitimate and valid option. Both practical and economical, bioremediation also offers a lower risk of, for example, Superfund clean-up exposure than off-site disposal.

  17. C-2-Upgrade Field Reversed Configuration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Artem

    2016-10-01

    In the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment, tangential neutral beam injection (20 - 40 keV hydrogen, 4 MW total), coupled with electrically-biased plasma guns at the plasma ends, magnetic end plugs, and advanced surface conditioning, led to dramatic reductions in turbulence-driven losses and greatly improved plasma stability. Under such conditions, highly reproducible FRCs with a significant fast-ion population and total plasma temperature of about 1 keV were achieved. The FRC's were macroscopically stable and decayed on characteristic transport time scales of a few milliseconds. In order to sustain an FRC configuration, the C-2 device was upgraded with a new neutral beam injection (NBI) system, which can deliver a total of 10 + MW of hydrogen beam power, by far the largest ever used in a compact toroid plasma experiment. Compared to C-2, the beam energy was lowered to 15 keV and angled injection geometry was adopted to provide better beam coupling to the FRC. The upgraded neutral beams produce a dominant fast ion population that makes a dramatic beneficial impact on the overall plasma performance. Specifically: (1) high-performance, advanced beam-driven FRCs were produced and sustained for times significantly longer (5 + ms) than all characteristic plasma decay times without the beams, (2) the sustainment is fully correlated with neutral beam injection, (3) confinement of fast ions is close to the classical limit, and (4) new, benign collective fast ion effects were observed. Collectively, these accomplishments represent a dramatic advance towards the scientific validation of the FRC-based approach to fusion. This talk will provide a comprehensive overview of the C-2U device and recent experimental advances.

  18. Designing Effective Field Experiences for Nontraditional Preservice Special Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Michael S.; Jackson, Lewis; Yeh, Chyong-Hwa

    1996-01-01

    Five alternatives to traditional field experiences in special education are described and contrasted, including: infusion of experiences within content courses; traditional experiences offered during the summer session; working practica; roving practica; and specialized field-experiences. It is argued that these alternatives can provide…

  19. Fungal Bioremediation of Creosote-contaminated Soil

    OpenAIRE

    BYSS, Marius

    2008-01-01

    The influence of two ligninolytic fungi (Pleurotus ostreatus and Irpex lacteus) on bioremediation of creosote-contaminated soil was studied. The thesis describes the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentration decrease during the laboratory-scale experiments and reveals the changes in the present soil microbial community under the influence of either fungus. The thesis compares different impact on PAH concentrations and soil microbial community depending on the fungus applied.

  20. Assessing TCE source bioremediation by geostatistical analysis of a flux fence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zuansi; Wilson, Ryan D; Lerner, David N

    2012-01-01

    Mass discharge across transect planes is increasingly used as a metric for performance assessment of in situ groundwater remediation systems. Mass discharge estimates using concentrations measured in multilevel transects are often made by assuming a uniform flow field, and uncertainty contributions from spatial concentration and flow field variability are often overlooked. We extend our recently developed geostatistical approach to estimate mass discharge using transect data of concentration and hydraulic conductivity, so accounting for the spatial variability of both datasets. The magnitude and uncertainty of mass discharge were quantified by conditional simulation. An important benefit of the approach is that uncertainty is quantified as an integral part of the mass discharge estimate. We use this approach for performance assessment of a bioremediation experiment of a trichloroethene (TCE) source zone. Analyses of dissolved parent and daughter compounds demonstrated that the engineered bioremediation has elevated the degradation rate of TCE, resulting in a two-thirds reduction in the TCE mass discharge from the source zone. The biologically enhanced dissolution of TCE was not significant (~5%), and was less than expected. However, the discharges of the daughter products cis-1,2, dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) increased, probably because of the rapid transformation of TCE from the source zone to the measurement transect. This suggests that enhancing the biodegradation of cDCE and VC will be crucial to successful engineered bioremediation of TCE source zones.

  1. Developing a field experience for natural resource majors

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, F. A.; Shaw, J

    2002-01-01

    Conversion from quarters to semesters allowed us to reinvent the field experience for College of Natural Resource majors. The new field experience strives to teach students the fundamental measurement skills needed for a summer job and to provide field experience and opportunities for teamwork. “Camp” operates for four weeks following spring semester, allowing students time to obtain summer jobs with university, state, and federal employers, which capitalize on students’ newly acquired field ...

  2. Laboratory-scale in situ bioremediation in heterogeneous porous media: Biokinetics-limited scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xin; Hong, Eunyoung; Seagren, Eric A.

    2014-03-01

    Subsurface heterogeneities influence interfacial mass-transfer processes and affect the application of in situ bioremediation by impacting the availability of substrates to the microorganisms. However, for difficult-to-degrade compounds, and/or cases with inhibitory biodegradation conditions, slow biokinetics may also limit the overall bioremediation rate, or be as limiting as mass-transfer processes. In this work, a quantitative framework based on a set of dimensionless coefficients was used to capture the effects of the competing interfacial and biokinetic processes and define the overall rate-limiting process. An integrated numerical modeling and experimental approach was used to evaluate application of the quantitative framework for a scenario in which slow-biokinetics limited the overall bioremediation rate of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (naphthalene). Numerical modeling was conducted to simulate the groundwater flow and naphthalene transport and verify the system parameters, which were used in the quantitative framework application. The experiments examined the movement and biodegradation of naphthalene in a saturated, heterogeneous intermediate-scale flow cell with two layers of contrasting hydraulic conductivities. These experiments were conducted in two phases: Phase I, simulating an inhibited slow biodegradation; and Phase II, simulating an engineered bioremediation, with system perturbations selected to enhance the slow biodegradation rate. In Phase II, two engineered perturbations to the system were selected to examine their ability to enhance in situ biodegradation. In the first perturbation, nitrogen and phosphorus in excess of the required stoichiometric amounts were spiked into the influent solution to mimic a common remedial action taken in the field. The results showed that this perturbation had a moderate positive impact, consistent with slow biokinetics being the overall rate-limiting process. However, the second perturbation, which was to

  3. Laboratory-scale in situ bioremediation in heterogeneous porous media: biokinetics-limited scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xin; Hong, Eunyoung; Seagren, Eric A

    2014-03-01

    Subsurface heterogeneities influence interfacial mass-transfer processes and affect the application of in situ bioremediation by impacting the availability of substrates to the microorganisms. However, for difficult-to-degrade compounds, and/or cases with inhibitory biodegradation conditions, slow biokinetics may also limit the overall bioremediation rate, or be as limiting as mass-transfer processes. In this work, a quantitative framework based on a set of dimensionless coefficients was used to capture the effects of the competing interfacial and biokinetic processes and define the overall rate-limiting process. An integrated numerical modeling and experimental approach was used to evaluate application of the quantitative framework for a scenario in which slow-biokinetics limited the overall bioremediation rate of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (naphthalene). Numerical modeling was conducted to simulate the groundwater flow and naphthalene transport and verify the system parameters, which were used in the quantitative framework application. The experiments examined the movement and biodegradation of naphthalene in a saturated, heterogeneous intermediate-scale flow cell with two layers of contrasting hydraulic conductivities. These experiments were conducted in two phases: Phase I, simulating an inhibited slow biodegradation; and Phase II, simulating an engineered bioremediation, with system perturbations selected to enhance the slow biodegradation rate. In Phase II, two engineered perturbations to the system were selected to examine their ability to enhance in situ biodegradation. In the first perturbation, nitrogen and phosphorus in excess of the required stoichiometric amounts were spiked into the influent solution to mimic a common remedial action taken in the field. The results showed that this perturbation had a moderate positive impact, consistent with slow biokinetics being the overall rate-limiting process. However, the second perturbation, which was to

  4. The Cyborg Astrobiologist: First Field Experience

    OpenAIRE

    McGuire, Patrick C.; Ormö, Jens; Díaz-Martínez,Enrique; Rodríguez-Manfredi, José Antonio; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Ritter, Helge; Oesker, Markus; Ontrup, Joerg

    2004-01-01

    We present results from the first geological field tests of the `Cyborg Astrobiologist', which is a wearable computer and video camcorder system that we are using to test and train a computer-vision system towards having some of the autonomous decision-making capabilities of a field-geologist and field-astrobiologist. The Cyborg Astrobiologist platform has thus far been used for testing and development of these algorithms and systems: robotic acquisition of quasi-mosaics of images, real-time ...

  5. BIOREMEDIATION OF AN EXPERIMENTAL OIL SPILL ON THE SHORELINE OF DELAWARE BAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the summer of 1994, a field study was undertaken in Delaware in which light crude oil was intentionally released onto plots to evaluate bioremediation. The objectives were to obtain credible statistical evidence to determine if bioremediation with inorganic mineral nutrients ...

  6. Exploring Group Cohesion in a Higher Education Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcarne, Brian Keith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain understanding into the experience of group cohesion for university students participating in an academic field experience. A mixed methods approach was used following a two-phase, sequential research design to help provide a more complete explanation of how group cohesion was impacted by the field experience.…

  7. Integrated Field, Laboratory, and Modeling Studies to Determine the Effects of Linked Microbial and Physical Spatial Heterogeneity on Engineered Vadose Zone Bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Brokman; John Selker; Mark Rockhold

    2004-01-26

    While numerous techniques exist for remediation of contaminant plumes in groundwater or near the soil surface, remediation methods in the deep vadose zone are less established due to complex transport dynamics and sparse microbial populations. There is a lack of knowledge on how physical and hydrologic features of the vadose zone control microbial growth and colonization in response to nutrient delivery during bioremediation. Yet pollution in the vadose zone poses a serious threat to the groundwater resources lying deeper in the sediment. While the contaminants may be slowly degraded by native microbial communities, microbial degradation rates rarely keep pace with the spread of the pollutant. It is crucial to increase indigenous microbial degradation in the vadose zone to combat groundwater contamination.

  8. Integrated Field, Laboratory, and Modeling Studies to Determine the Effects of Linked Microbial and Physical Spatial Heterogeneity on Engineered Vadose Zone Bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockman, Fred J.; Selker, John S.; Rockhold, Mark L.

    2004-10-31

    Executive Summary - While numerous techniques exist for remediation of contaminant plumes in groundwater or near the soil surface, remediation methods in the deep vadose zone are less established due to complex transport dynamics and sparse microbial populations. There is a lack of knowledge on how physical and hydrologic features of the vadose zone control microbial growth and colonization in response to nutrient delivery during bioremediation. Yet pollution in the vadose zone poses a serious threat to the groundwater resources lying deeper in the sediment. While the contaminants may be slowly degraded by native microbial communities, microbial degradation rates rarely keep pace with the spread of the pollutant. It is crucial to increase indigenous microbial degradation in the vadose zone to combat groundwater contamination...

  9. Field Trips as Valuable Learning Experiences in Geography Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowka, Amy Richmond

    2012-01-01

    Field trips have been acknowledged as valuable learning experiences in geography. This article uses Kolb's (1984) experiential learning model to discuss how students learn and how field trips can help enhance learning. Using Kolb's experiential learning theory as a guide in the design of field trips helps ensure that field trips contribute to…

  10. A Functional Genomic Approach to Chlorinated Ethenes Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P. K.; Brodie, E. L.; MacBeth, T. W.; Deeb, R. A.; Sorenson, K. S.; Andersen, G. L.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.

    2007-12-01

    With the recent advances in genomic sciences, a knowledge-based approach can now be taken to optimize the bioremediation of trichloroethene (TCE). During the bioremediation of a heterogeneous subsurface, it is vital to identify and quantify the functionally important microorganisms present, characterize the microbial community and measure their physiological activity. In our field experiments, quantitative PCR (qPCR) was coupled with reverse-transcription (RT) to analyze both copy numbers and transcripts expressed by the 16S rRNA gene and three reductive dehalogenase (RDase) genes as biomarkers of Dehalococcoides spp. in the groundwater of a TCE-DNAPL site at Ft. Lewis (WA) that was serially subjected to biostimulation and bioaugmentation. Genes in the Dehalococcoides genus were targeted as they are the only known organisms that can completely dechlorinate TCE to the innocuous product ethene. Biomarker quantification revealed an overall increase of more than three orders of magnitude in the total Dehalococcoides population and quantification of the more liable and stringently regulated mRNAs confirmed that Dehalococcoides spp. were active. Parallel with our field experiments, laboratory studies were conducted to explore the physiology of Dehalococcoides isolates in order to develop relevant biomarkers that are indicative of the metabolic state of cells. Recently, we verified the function of the nitrogenase operon in Dehalococcoides sp. strain 195 and nitrogenase-encoding genes are ideal biomarker targets to assess cellular nitrogen requirement. To characterize the microbial community, we applied a high-density phylogenetic microarray (16S PhyloChip) that simultaneous monitors over 8,700 unique taxa to track the bacterial and archaeal populations through different phases of treatment. As a measure of species richness, 1,300 to 1,520 taxa were detected in groundwater samples extracted during different stages of treatment as well as in the bioaugmentation culture. We

  11. Magnetic Field Saturation in the Riga Dynamo Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gailitis, A; Platacis, E; Dementev, S; Cifersons, A; Gerbeth, G; Gundrum, T; Stefani, F; Christen, M; Will, G; Gailitis, Agris; Lielausis, Olgerts; Platacis, Ernests; Dement'ev, Sergej; Cifersons, Arnis; Gerbeth, Gunter; Gundrum, Thomas; Stefani, Frank; Christen, Michael; Will, Gotthard

    2001-01-01

    After the dynamo experiment in November 1999 had shown magnetic field self-excitation in a spiraling liquid metal flow, in a second series of experiments emphasis was placed on the magnetic field saturation regime as the next principal step in the dynamo process. The dependence of the strength of the magnetic field on the rotation rate is studied. Various features of the saturated magnetic field are outlined and possible saturation mechanisms are discussed.

  12. GRACE BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES - DARAMEND™ BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace Dearborn's DARAMEND™ Bioremediation Technology was developed to treat soils/sediment contaminated with organic contaminants using solid-phase organic amendments. The amendments increase the soil’s ability to supply biologically available water/nutrients to micro...

  13. Bacterial Community Dynamics and Hydrocarbon Degradation during a Field-Scale Evaluation of Bioremediation on a Mudflat Beach Contaminated with Buried Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Röling, Wilfred F. M.; Milner, Michael G.; Jones, D. Martin; Fratepietro, Francesco; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Daniel, Fabien; Head, Ian M.

    2004-01-01

    A field-scale experiment with a complete randomized block design was performed to study the degradation of buried oil on a shoreline over a period of almost 1 year. The following four treatments were examined in three replicate blocks: two levels of fertilizer treatment of oil-treated plots, one receiving a weekly application of liquid fertilizer and the other treated with a slow-release fertilizer; and two controls, one not treated with oil and the other treated with oil but not with fertili...

  14. Minimizing magnetic fields for precision experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Altarev, I; Lins, T; Marino, M G; Nießen, B; Petzoldt, G; Reisner, M; Stuiber, S; Sturm, M; Singh, J T; Taubenheim, B; Rohrer, H K; Schläpfer, U

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of measurements in fundamental and applied physics rely on magnetically shielded environments with sub nano-Tesla residual magnetic fields. State of the art magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) consist of up to seven layers of high permeability materials in combination with highly conductive shields. Proper magnetic equilibration is crucial to obtain such low magnetic fields with small gradients in any MSR. Here we report on a scheme to magnetically equilibrate MSRs with a 10 times reduced duration of the magnetic equilibration sequence and a significantly lower magnetic field with improved homogeneity. For the search of the neutron's electric dipole moment, our finding corresponds to a linear improvement in the systematic reach and a 40 % improvement of the statistical reach of the measurement. However, this versatile procedure can improve the performance of any MSR for any application.

  15. Outdoor Field Experience with Autonomous Stations

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, L; Blanco, A; Carolino, N; Cerda, M A; Conceicao, R; Cunha, O; Ferreira, M; Fonte, P; Luz, R; Mendes, L; Pereira, A; Pimenta, M; Sarmento, R; Tome, B

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades Resistive Plate Chambers were employed in the Cosmic Ray Experiments COVER-PLASTEX and ARGO/YBJ. In both experiments the detectors were housed indoors, likely owing to gas distribution requirements and the need to control environment variables that directly affect RPCs operational stability. But in experiments where Extended Air Shower (EAS) sampling is necessary, large area arrays composed by dispersed stations are deployed, rendering this kind of approach impossible. In this situation, it would be mandatory to have detectors that could be deployed in small standalone stations, with very rare opportunities for maintenance, and with good resilience to environmental conditions. Aiming to meet these requirements, we started some years ago the development of RPCs for Autonomous Stations. The results from indoor tests and measurements were very promising, both concerning performance and stability under very low gas flow rate, which is the main requirement for Autonomous Stations. In this w...

  16. NAVIGATING LIVED EXPERIENCE: REFLECTIONS FROM THE FIELD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Farrall

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article I use an autoethnographic approach to reflect on my experiences in Egypt—in which I came to live alongside converts to Islam and interact with adherents to militant salafist belief systems, as well as those who had disengaged from them. I outline how I came to have these lived experiences before explaining how they caused me to reexamine my understanding of radicalization and deradicalization in the militant salafist context, and to consider radicalization as a form of conversion.

  17. Enrichment of specific protozoan populations during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Dawn; Giloteaux, L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Thompson, Courtney A.; Roper, Thomas J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek

    2013-07-28

    The importance of bacteria in the anaerobic bioremediation of groundwater polluted with organic and/or metal contaminants is well-recognized and in some instances so well understood that modeling of the in situ metabolic activity of the relevant subsurface microorganisms in response to changes in subsurface geochemistry is feasible. However, a potentially significant factor influencing bacterial growth and activity in the subsurface that has not been adequately addressed is protozoan predation of the microorganisms responsible for bioremediation. In field experiments at a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, CO, acetate amendments initially promoted the growth of metal-reducing Geobacter species followed by the growth of sulfate-reducers, as previously observed. Analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences revealed a broad diversity of sequences closely related to known bacteriovorous protozoa in the groundwater prior to the addition of acetate. The bloom of Geobacter species was accompanied by a specific enrichment of sequences most closely related to the amoeboid flagellate, Breviata anathema, which at their peak accounted for over 80% of the sequences recovered. The abundance of Geobacter species declined following the rapid emergence of B. anathema. The subsequent growth of sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae was accompanied by another specific enrichment of protozoa, but with sequences most similar to diplomonadid flagellates from the family Hexamitidae, which accounted for up to 100% of the sequences recovered during this phase of the bioremediation. These results suggest a prey-predator response with specific protozoa responding to increased availability of preferred prey bacteria. Thus, quantifying the influence of protozoan predation on the growth, activity, and composition of the subsurface bacterial community is essential for predictive modeling of in situ uranium bioremediation strategies.

  18. Reexamining the Field Experience of Preservice Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Rita

    2003-01-01

    Investigated the teaching and learning responses of preservice teachers enrolled in a brief language arts field practicum prior to student teaching. Survey, observation, and journal data indicated that despite consistent efforts by university professors to help preservice teachers examine theory into practice during their practica, procedural…

  19. BIOREMEDIATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS: A FLEXIBLE VARIABLE SPEED TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons has evolved into a number of different processes. These processes include in-situ aquifer bioremediation, bioventing, biosparging, passive bioremediation with oxygen release compounds, and intrinsic bioremediation. Although often viewe...

  20. ORD RESEARCH PRIORITIES IN BIOREMEDIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    ORD is conducting research on bioremediation impacting Superfund sites, RCRA facilities, underground storage tanks and oil spills. Work supporting Superfund is focused on understanding monitored natural recovery in sediments for contaminants including PCBs and PAHs. Under RCRA,...

  1. Entrepreneurship, teams and sustainability: A series of field experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosendahl Huber, L.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation reports the results from three field experiments that were conducted within the setting of one of the leading, internationally renowned entrepreneurship education programs for primary schools called BizWorld. The first field experiment evaluates the program’s effectiveness in terms

  2. Microarray and real-time PCR analyses of the responses of high-arctic soil bacteria to hydrocarbon pollution and bioremediation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yergeau, Etienne; Arbour, Mélanie; Brousseau, Roland; Juck, David; Lawrence, John R; Masson, Luke; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2009-10-01

    High-Arctic soils have low nutrient availability, low moisture content, and very low temperatures and, as such, they pose a particular problem in terms of hydrocarbon bioremediation. An in-depth knowledge of the microbiology involved in this process is likely to be crucial to understand and optimize the factors most influencing bioremediation. Here, we compared two distinct large-scale field bioremediation experiments, located at the Canadian high-Arctic stations of Alert (ex situ approach) and Eureka (in situ approach). Bacterial community structure and function were assessed using microarrays targeting the 16S rRNA genes of bacteria found in cold environments and hydrocarbon degradation genes as well as quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR targeting key functional genes. The results indicated a large difference between sampling sites in terms of both soil microbiology and decontamination rates. A rapid reorganization of the bacterial community structure and functional potential as well as rapid increases in the expression of alkane monooxygenases and polyaromatic hydrocarbon-ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases were observed 1 month after the bioremediation treatment commenced in the Alert soils. In contrast, no clear changes in community structure were observed in Eureka soils, while key gene expression increased after a relatively long lag period (1 year). Such discrepancies are likely caused by differences in bioremediation treatments (i.e., ex situ versus in situ), weathering of the hydrocarbons, indigenous microbial communities, and environmental factors such as soil humidity and temperature. In addition, this study demonstrates the value of molecular tools for the monitoring of polar bacteria and their associated functions during bioremediation.

  3. In situ combustion field experiences in Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalba, M.; Estrada, M.; Bolivar, J. [INTEVEP, Caracas (Venezuela)

    1995-02-01

    A literature review of four in situ combustion projects: in Miga, Tia Juana, Melones and Morichal fields in Venezuela was made, and a summary of these projects is presented. Reservoir description and project performance data were analyzed. The behavior of the four in situ combustion field tests can be summarized as follows: The problems most often encountered were corrosion and high temperature producing wells. The direction in which the burning front moved was guided essentially by reservoir characteristics. The produced oil was upgraded by about 4{degrees} API, and viscosity was substantially reduced. For Mirochal and Miga fields, the analyses of available information from the combustion projects indicated that the process has been successful in the affected region. Conclusions from this review indicate that the two most frequent problems encountered were operational problems in producing wells and the direction of the burning front. The heterogeneous nature of the sands probably resulted in the burning front moving in a preferential direction, hence reducing areal sweep efficiency.

  4. Mechanisms of mercury bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essa, A M M; Macaskie, L E; Brown, N L

    2002-08-01

    Mercury is one of the most toxic heavy metals, and has significant industrial and agricultural uses. These uses have led to severe localized mercury pollution. Mercury volatilization after its reduction to the metallic form by mercury-resistant bacteria has been reported as a mechanism for mercury bioremediation [Brunke, Deckwer, Frischmuth, Horn, Lunsdorf, Rhode, Rohricht, Timmis and Weppen (1993) FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 11, 145-152; von Canstein, Timmis, Deckwer and Wagner-Dobler (1999) Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65, 5279-5284]. The reduction/volatilization system requires to be studied further, in order to eliminate the escape of the metallic mercury into the environment. Recently we have demonstrated three different mechanisms for mercury detoxification in one organism, Klebsiella pneumoniae M426, which may increase the capture efficiency of mercury.

  5. Tandem mirror and field-reversed mirror experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coensgen, F.H.; Simonen, T.C.; Turner, W.C.

    1979-08-21

    This paper is largely devoted to tandem mirror and field-reversed mirror experiments at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), and briefly summarizes results of experiments in which field-reversal has been achieved. In the tandem experiment, high-energy, high-density plasmas (nearly identical to 2XIIB plasmas) are located at each end of a solenoid where plasma ions are electrostatically confined by the high positive poentials arising in the end plug plasma. End plug ions are magnetically confined, and electrons are electrostatically confined by the overall positive potential of the system. The field-reversed mirror reactor consists of several small field-reversed mirror plasmas linked together for economic reasons. In the LLL Beta II experiment, generation of a field-reversed plasma ring will be investigated using a high-energy plasma gun with a transverse radial magnetic field. This plasma will be further heated and sustained by injection of intense, high-energy neutral beams.

  6. FINAL REPORT: Mechanistically-Base Field Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Brian D.

    2013-11-04

    Biogeochemical reactive transport processes in the subsurface environment are important to many contemporary environmental issues of significance to DOE. Quantification of risks and impacts associated with environmental management options, and design of remediation systems where needed, require that we have at our disposal reliable predictive tools (usually in the form of numerical simulation models). However, it is well known that even the most sophisticated reactive transport models available today have poor predictive power, particularly when applied at the field scale. Although the lack of predictive ability is associated in part with our inability to characterize the subsurface and limitations in computational power, significant advances have been made in both of these areas in recent decades and can be expected to continue. In this research, we examined the upscaling (pore to Darcy and Darcy to field) the problem of bioremediation via biofilms in porous media. The principle idea was to start with a conceptual description of the bioremediation process at the pore scale, and apply upscaling methods to formally develop the appropriate upscaled model at the so-called Darcy scale. The purpose was to determine (1) what forms the upscaled models would take, and (2) how one might parameterize such upscaled models for applications to bioremediation in the field. We were able to effectively upscale the bioremediation process to explain how the pore-scale phenomena were linked to the field scale. The end product of this research was to produce a set of upscaled models that could be used to help predict field-scale bioremediation. These models were mechanistic, in the sense that they directly incorporated pore-scale information, but upscaled so that only the essential features of the process were needed to predict the effective parameters that appear in the model. In this way, a direct link between the microscale and the field scale was made, but the upscaling process

  7. The development and application of engineered proteins for bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trewhella, J. [ed.

    1995-09-26

    Clean up of the toxic legacy of the Cold War is projected to be the most expensive domestic project the nation has yet undertaken. Remediation of the Department of Energy and Department of Defense toxic waste sites alone are projected to cost {approximately}$1 trillion over a 20-30 year period. New, cost effective technologies are needed to attack this enormous problem. Los Alamos has put together a cross-divisional team of scientist to develop science based bioremediation technology to work toward this goal. In the team we have expertise in: (1) molecular, ecosystem and transport modeling; (2) genetic and protein engineering; (3) microbiology and microbial ecology; (4) structural biology; and (5) bioinorganic chemistry. This document summarizes talks at a workshop of different aspects of bioremediation technology including the following: Introducing novel function into a Heme enzyme: engineering by excavation; cytochrome P-450: ideal systems for bioremediation?; selection and development of bacterial strains for in situ remediation of cholorinated solvents; genetic analysis and preparation of toluene ortho-monooxygenase for field application in remediation of trichloroethylene; microbial ecology and diversity important to bioremediation; engineering haloalkane dehalogenase for bioremediation; enzymes for oxidative biodegradation; indigenous bacteria as hosts for engineered proteins; performance of indigenous bacterial, hosting engineered proteins in microbial communities.

  8. Bioremediation of PAHs and VOCs: Advances in clay mineral-microbial interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Rusmin, Ruhaida; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    Bioremediation is an effective strategy for cleaning up organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Advanced bioremediation implies that biotic agents are more efficient in degrading the contaminants completely. Bioremediation by microbial degradation is often employed and to make this process efficient, natural and cost-effective materials can serve as supportive matrices. Clay/modified clay minerals are effective adsorbents of PAHs/VOCs, and readily available substrate and habitat for microorganisms in the natural soil and sediment. However, the mechanism underpinning clay-mediated biodegradation of organic compounds is often unclear, and this requires critical investigation. This review describes the role of clay/modified clay minerals in hydrocarbon bioremediation through interaction with microbial agents in specific scenarios. The vision is on a faster, more efficient and cost-effective bioremediation technique using clay-based products. This review also proposes future research directions in the field of clay modulated microbial degradation of hydrocarbons.

  9. Genomic and physiological perspectives on bioremediation processes at the FRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Erick; Leigh, Mary Beth; Hemme, Christopher; Gentry, Terry; Harzman, Christina; Wu, Weimin; Criddle, Craig S.; Zhou, Jizhong; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James M.

    2006-04-05

    A suite of molecular and physiological studies, including metal reduction assays, metagenomics, functional gene microarrays and community sequence analyses were applied to investigate organisms involved in bioremediation processes at the ERSP Field Research Center and to understand the effects of stress on the makeup and evolution of microbial communities to inform effective remediation strategies.

  10. FIELD EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING AT CDG AIRPORTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaroson, R.

    2009-12-01

    Richard Ramaroson1,4, Klaus Schaefer2, Stefan Emeis2, Carsten Jahn2, Gregor Schürmann2, Maria Hoffmann2, Mikhael Zatevakhin3, Alexandre Ignatyev3. 1ONERA, Châtillon, France; 4SEAS, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA; 2FZK, Garmisch, Germany; (3)FSUE SPbAEP, St Petersburg, Russia. 2-month field campaigns have been organized at CDG airports in autumn 2004 and summer 2005. Air quality and ground air traffic emissions have been monitored continuously at terminals and taxi-runways, along with meteorological parameters onboard trucks and with a SODAR. This paper analyses the commercial engine emissions characteristics at airports and their effects on gas pollutants and airborne particles coupled to meteorology. LES model results for PM dispersion coupled to microphysics in the PBL are compared to measurements. Winds and temperature at the surface and their vertical profiles have been stored with turbulence. SODAR observations show the time-development of the mixing layer depth and turbulent mixing in summer up to 800m. Active low level jets and their regional extent have been observed and analyzed. PM number and mass size distribution, morphology and chemical contents are investigated. Formation of new ultra fine volatile (UFV) particles in the ambient plume downstream of running engines is observed. Soot particles are mostly observed at significant level at high power thrusts at take-off (TO) and on touch-down whereas at lower thrusts at taxi and aprons ultra the UFV PM emissions become higher. Ambient airborne PM1/2.5 is closely correlated to air traffic volume and shows a maximum beside runways. PM number distribution at airports is composed mainly by volatile UF PM abundant at apron. Ambient PM mass in autumn is higher than in summer. The expected differences between TO and taxi emissions are confirmed for NO, NO2, speciated VOC and CO. NO/NO2 emissions are larger at runways due to higher power. Reactive VOC and CO are more produced at low powers during idling at

  11. A "Medical Physics" Course Based Upon Hospital Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onn, David G.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a noncalculus, medical physics'' course with a basic element of direct hospital field experience. The course is intended primarily for premedical students but may be taken by nonscience majors. (Author/PR)

  12. Assessing herbicide leaching from field measurements and laboratory experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Cuevas Sánchez, Mª Victoria; Calderón, M.J.; Fernández Luque, José Enrique; Hermosín, M.C.; Moreno Lucas, Félix; Cornejo, J.

    2001-01-01

    Field and laboratory experiments with undisturbed soil columns were performed for assessing the mobility and persistence of chloridazon and lenacil in a clayey soil in the marshes of Lebrija, southwest Spain. In the laboratory we tried to evaluate the herbicides fate when applied with doses greater than normal, as it happens by overlap when spraying the herbicides. Thus, the herbicides doses in the field experiments were similar to those applied by the growers in the area, while the doses app...

  13. Bioremediation Kinetics of Pharmaceutical Industrial Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Šabić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, concerns about the occurrence and fate of pharmaceuticals that could be present in water and wastewater has gained increasing attention. With the public’s enhanced awareness of eco-safety, environmentally benign methods based on microorganisms have become more accepted methods of removing pollutants from aquatic systems. This study investigates bioremediation of pharmaceutical wastewater from pharmaceutical company Pliva Hrvatska d.o.o., using activated sludge and bioaugmented activated sludge with isolated mixed bacterial culture. The experiments were conducted in a batch reactor in submerged conditions, at initial concentration of organic matter in pharmaceutical wastewater, expressed as COD, 5.01 g dm–3 and different initial concentrations of activated sludge, which ranged from 1.16 to 3.54 g dm–3. During the experiments, the COD, pH, concentrations of dissolved oxygen and biomass were monitored. Microscopic analyses were performed to monitor the quality of activated sludge. Before starting with the bioremediation in the batch reactor, toxicity of the pharmaceutical wastewater was determined by toxicity test using bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The obtained results showed that the effective concentration of the pharmaceutical wastewater was EC50 = 17 % and toxicity impact index was TII50 = 5.9, meaning that the untreated pharmaceutical industrial effluent must not be discharged into the environment before treatment. The results of the pharmaceutical wastewater bioremediation process in the batch reactor are presented in Table 1. The ratio γXv ⁄ γX maintained high values throughout all experiments and ranged from 0.90 and 0.95, suggesting that the concentrations of biomass remained unchanged during the experiments. The important kinetic parameters required for performance of the biological removal process, namely μmax, Ks, Ki, Y and kd were calculated from batch experiments (Table 2. Figs. 1 and 2 show the experimental

  14. Bioremediation approaches for organic pollutants: a critical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Ramakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Venkateswarlu, Kadiyala; Sethunathan, Nambrattil; Naidu, Ravi

    2011-11-01

    Due to human activities to a greater extent and natural processes to some extent, a large number of organic chemical substances such as petroleum hydrocarbons, halogenated and nitroaromatic compounds, phthalate esters, solvents and pesticides pollute the soil and aquatic environments. Remediation of these polluted sites following the conventional engineering approaches based on physicochemical methods is both technically and economically challenging. Bioremediation that involves the capabilities of microorganisms in the removal of pollutants is the most promising, relatively efficient and cost-effective technology. However, the current bioremediation approaches suffer from a number of limitations which include the poor capabilities of microbial communities in the field, lesser bioavailability of contaminants on spatial and temporal scales, and absence of bench-mark values for efficacy testing of bioremediation for their widespread application in the field. The restoration of all natural functions of some polluted soils remains impractical and, hence, the application of the principle of function-directed remediation may be sufficient to minimize the risks of persistence and spreading of pollutants. This review selectively examines and provides a critical view on the knowledge gaps and limitations in field application strategies, approaches such as composting, electrobioremediation and microbe-assisted phytoremediation, and the use of probes and assays for monitoring and testing the efficacy of bioremediation of polluted sites.

  15. On the design of experiments to study extreme field limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Chen, M.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Koga, J. K.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Chen, P.; Mur, V. D.; Narozhny, N. B.; Popov, V. S.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Korn, G. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) and University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow 117218 (Russian Federation); University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik, Garching 85748 (Germany) and ELI Beamline Facility, Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic)

    2012-12-21

    We propose experiments on the collision of high intensity electromagnetic pulses with electron bunches and on the collision of multiple electromagnetic pulses for studying extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves. The effects of nonlinear QED will be revealed in these laser plasma experiments.

  16. On the design of experiments to study extreme field limits

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S S; Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P; Bulanov, S V; Esirkepov, T Zh; Kando, M; Koga, J K; Zhidkov, A G; Chen, P; Mur, V D; Narozhny, N B; Popov, V S; Thomas, A G R; Korn, G

    2012-01-01

    We propose experiments on the collision of high intensity electromagnetic pulses with electron bunches and on the collision of multiple electromagnetic pulses for studying extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves. The effects of nonlinear QED will be revealed in these laser plasma experiments.

  17. Bioremediation of Carbendazim by Streptomyces albogriseolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridhima Arya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbendazim (methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-ylcarbamate, or MBC is a benzimidazole fungicide which is used to protect crops against the attack of fungi. MBC has a half-life of about 3-12 months and remain persistent in the environment which may lead to many harmful consequences. Besides chemical and photo-catalytic degradation of pesticides, microbial degradation has now been evolved as a much effective and safer way to eliminate these harmful compounds from the environment. However, in the literature very few reports are available where microbial community is involved in degrading MBC. Hence, the present study was planned to investigate the role of microbes isolated from the field soils for the bioremediation of MBC. Soil samples were collected from wheat fields of northern regions of India. Enrichment culture technique was employed to isolate the bacterium which was found to be growing at higher concentrations of MBC up to 500µg/ml. After biochemical and morphological analysis, the bacterium was identified as Streptomyces albogriseolus. Streptomyces albogriseolus was found to degrade MBC in a time-dependent manner from the initial concentration of 29 ppm to 285.67ppb and 62.73ppb in 24hrs and 48hrs respectively. LCMS-MS analysis was carried out to detect 2-aminobenzimidazole, a metabolite formed after degradation in 10 hrs of growth which eventually disappeared after 24hrs of growth. The strain Streptomyces albogriseolus holds a promising potential to be an efficient MBC bioremediation agent.

  18. Understanding Trajectories of Experience in Situated Learning Field Trips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Canova Calori

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the role context plays in promoting engagement and exploration in situated learning experiences during field trips. We look at field trips where children engage with the physical and social context in order to learn about cultural and social aspects of the city they live in. By drawing on empirical data collected by means of qualitative methods, we discuss how learning unfolds along trajectories of experience towards pre-defined and emerging learning objectives. We reflect of the role technology can play in sup-porting learning experiences outside the classroom.

  19. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Romy; Wu, Cindy H.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2012-06-01

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ‘black box’ in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Finally, understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ‘black box’.

  20. An illustrated gardener's guide to transgenic Arabidopsis field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Martin; Jänkänpää, Hanna Johansson; Moen, Jon; Jansson, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Field studies with transgenic Arabidopsis lines have been performed over 8 yr, to better understand the influence that certain genes have on plant performance. Many (if not most) plant phenotypes cannot be observed under the near constant, low-stress conditions in growth chambers, making field experiments necessary. However, there are challenges in performing such experiments: permission must be obtained and regulations obeyed, the profound influence of uncontrollable biotic and abiotic factors has to be considered, and experimental design has to be strictly controlled. The aim here is to provide inspiration and guidelines for researchers who are not used to setting up such experiments, allowing others to learn from our mistakes. This is believed to be the first example of a 'manual' for field experiments with transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Many of the challenges encountered are common for all field experiments, and many researchers from ecological backgrounds are skilled in such methods. There is huge potential in combining the detailed mechanistic understanding of molecular biologists with ecologists' expertise in examining plant performance under field conditions, and it is suggested that more interdisciplinary collaborations will open up new scientific avenues to aid analyses of the roles of genetic and physiological variation in natural systems.

  1. Influencing attitudes toward science through field experiences in biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Deborah Mcintyre

    The purpose of this study was to determine how student attitudes toward science are influenced by field experiences in undergraduate biology courses. The study was conducted using two institutions of higher education including a 2-year lower-level and a 2-year upper-level institution. Data were collected through interviews with student participants, focus group discussions, students' journal entries, and field notes recorded by the researcher during the field activities. Photographs and video recordings were also used as documentation sources. Data were collected over a period of 34 weeks. Themes that emerged from the qualitative data included students' beliefs that field experiences (a) positively influence student motivation to learn, (b) increase student ability to learn the concepts being taught, and (c) provide opportunities for building relationships and for personal growth. The findings of the study reinforce the importance of offering field-study programs at the undergraduate level to allow undergraduate students the opportunity to experience science activities in a field setting. The research study was framed by the behavioral and developmental theories of attitude and experience including the Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen, 1991) and the Theory of Experiential Learning (Kolb, 1984).

  2. Effects of Electrokinetic Bioremediation of Electric Field on Sediment Microbial Activity%电动生物修复底泥中电场对微生物活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘广容; 叶春松; 钱勤; 陆伟

    2011-01-01

    Sediment pollution is quite a serious problem in the whole world.Hybrid technology of electrokinetic(EK) bioremediation was adopted to restore the polluted sediment.In this paper, effects of electric field were studied on the vulnerability of bacteria and the mobility of nutrient through the sediment.It was found that strong electric field (3 V·cm-1) would reduce the activity of bacteria, while the weak electric field (1 V·cm-1) could activate the microbial activity, and accordingly, dehydrogenase activity in sediment under weak electric field (1 V·cm-1)was higher than that under stronger electric field(3 V·cm-1 ).We found electric field could inhibit the growth of heterotrophic bacteria nearby cathode, and electric field polarity reversal might be an effective way to minimize such effects.Finally, the feasibility research of electrokinetic injection of nutrients into the sediments was made.The test proved that EK technology had the ability to introduce nitrogen compounds into the sediments, with the nitrate showing greater mobility than the ammonium.Meanwhile, the phosphate content decreased in the catholyte, but it did not transport through the sediments.%采用电动生物复合技术修复底泥,探讨了电场对底泥污染物中微生物的生长活性、营养物质的迁移等的影响.实验发现,强电场(3 V·cm-1)会降低细菌的活性,而弱电场(1 V·cm-1)可激活微生物的活性.相应地,弱电场下的底泥中脱氢酶活性高于强电场下的底泥;电场作用下阳极附近的异养菌生长会受到抑制;较高频率的电极正负极交替有助于消除电场作用对阳极附近异养菌总数的影响.用电动方法向底泥中注入营养物质,发现含氮化合物能在底泥中电动迁移,其中硝酸根的迁移性强于铵盐,而阴极室中磷含量下降,但磷酸根在底泥中未发生迁移.

  3. [Development of bioremediation in China--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhipei; Liu, Shuangjiang

    2015-06-01

    The development of bioremediation for contaminated soil in China during past 30 years was briefly reviewed, mainly including the developing stages, bioremediation techniques/strategies and their applications, and isolation, screening and characterizations of microbial strains for bioremediation as well as their efficiencies in bioremediation of contaminated soils. Finally, future development of bioremediation techniques/strategies and their applications were also discussed.

  4. Torsion-balance experiments and ultra-low-mass fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrano, William

    2017-01-01

    Many of the solutions to outstanding problems in modern cosmology posit new, ultra-light fields. Unifying General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics appears to require new ultra-light fields at some level. Such fields are also invoked to drive inflation and dark energy. Ultra-light fields may also make up much or all of the dark matter density of the universe. Torsion pendulums, a technology that dates to the 18th century, remain one of the most sensitive experimental techniques to search for ultra-light, weakly interacting fields. I will explain how torsion balance experiments can search for beyond-the-standard-model fields using laboratory-based as well as galactic sources, and the important cosmological implications of these measurements. I will also describe a new experimental signature for which certain torsion balance geometries make very sensitive direct dark matter detectors over a broad range of interesting dark matter parameter space.

  5. Bioremediation of marine sediments impacted by petroleum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Aike C; de Oliveira, Fernando J S; Bernardes, Diogo S; de França, Francisca P

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this work was to optimize the bioremediation of crude oil-contaminated sand sediment through the biostimulation technique. The soil was obtained in the mid-tide zone of Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and was artificially contaminated with crude oil at 14 g kg(-1). Bioremediation optimization was performed using an experimental design and statistical analysis of the following factors: supplementation with commercial biosurfactant Jeneil IBR 425 and commercial mineral NPK fertilizer. The response variable used was the biodegradation of the heavy oil fraction, HOF. The analysis of the studied factors and their interactions was executed using contour plots, Pareto diagram and ANOVA table. Experimental design results indicated that the supplementation with fertilizer at 100:25:25 C/N/P ratio and biosurfactant at 2 g kg(-1) yielded biodegradation of HOF at about 30% during 30 days of process. Some experiments were carried out using the experimental design results, yielding 65% of biodegradation of HOF and 100% of n- alkanes between C15 and C30 during 60 process days. Intrinsic biodegradation test was carried out, yielding 85% of biodegradation of n-alkanes between C15 and C30 during 30 days of process.

  6. Monitoring Physical and Biogeochemical Dynamics of Uranium Bioremediation at the Intermediate Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrell, A. N.; Figueroa, L. A.; Rodriguez, D.; Haas, A.; Revil, A.

    2011-12-01

    bioremediation at an intermediate scale, as well as examining the effects from introducing a flow field in a laboratory setting. Data collected from this experiment will help further characterize which factors are contributing to current increases. Additional information concerning the effect of geochemical changes in porosity may also be observed. The results of this work will allow the creation of a new data set collected from a more comprehensive laboratory monitoring network and will allow stakeholders to develop effective decision-making tools on the long-term remediation management at uranium contaminated sites. The data will also aid in the long-term prediction abilities of a reactive transport models. As in situ bioremediation offers a low cost alternative to ex situ treatment methods, the results of this work will help to both reduce cost at existing sites and enable treatment of sites that otherwise have no clear solution.

  7. Electronic journal management systems experiences from the field

    CERN Document Server

    Ives, Gary W

    2013-01-01

    Discover how to manage your library's electronic journals?with tips from those who've already met the challenge!The explosive growth of electronic journals presents unique challenges for libraries. Electronic Journal Management Systems: Experiences from the Field comprehensively examines these complex topics, including explanations of the automated systems libraries have developed or adopted, licensing issues, and the provision of access to electronic journals. Respected library professionals discuss their own experiences in the implementation and use of electronic journal management systems,

  8. Legal and social concerns to the development of bioremediation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilyard, G.R.; McCabe, G.H.; White, K.A.; Gajewski, S.W.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Jaksch, J.A.; Kirwan-Taylor, H.A.; McKinney, M.D.

    1996-09-01

    The social and legal framework within which bioremediation technologies must be researched, developed, and deployed in the US are discussed in this report. Discussions focus on policies, laws and regulations, intellectual property, technology transfer, and stakeholder concerns. These discussions are intended to help program managers, scientists and engineers understand the social and legal framework within which they work, and be cognizant of relevant issues that must be navigated during bioremediation technology research, development, and deployment activities. While this report focuses on the legal and social environment within which the DOE operates, the laws, regulations and social processes could apply to DoD and other sites nationwide. This report identifies specific issues related to bioremediation technologies, including those involving the use of plants; native, naturally occurring microbes; non-native, naturally occurring microbes; genetically engineered organisms; and microbial products (e.g., enzymes, surfactants, chelating compounds). It considers issues that fall within the following general categories: US biotechnology policy and the regulation of field releases of organisms; US environmental laws and waste cleanup regulations; intellectual property and patenting issues; technology transfer procedures for commercializing technology developed through government-funded research; stakeholder concerns about bioremediation proposals; and methods for assuring public involvement in technology development and deployment.

  9. Bioremediation of an area contaminated by a fuel spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, B; Izquierdo, A; Blasco, R; Pérez del Campo, P; Luque de Castro, M D

    2001-06-01

    In order to decontaminate a large area of restricted access contaminated by a fuel spill, laboratory and field studies were developed in two steps: (a) monitoring of the laboratory experiment on bacterial growth under aerobic and anaerobic conditions with and without addition of nutrients; and (b) use of the best conditions obtained in (a) for the decontamination of the soil. A hydraulic barrier was installed both to clean the aquifer and to avoid migration of hydrocarbons as a consequence of their solution in the groundwater and subsequent displacement. The objective was to create an ideal environment for the treatment of the affected area that favoured the growth of the indigenous bacteria (Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter) that biodegrade the hydrocarbons. Monitoring of the changes in the total concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil subjected to bacterial action was performed by gas chromatography. In a field study, the progress of biodegradation of hydrocarbons was evaluated in situ by changes in subsurface CO2/O2 levels by means of an analyser equipped with an infrared detector. Biostimulation and oxygen were the most influential factors for the biodegradation of the hydrocarbons. The use of bioventing of the soil was shown as an excellent technology to promote in situ bioremediation of the polluted area.

  10. Cooperation in a dynamic fishing game : A framed field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noussair, Charles; van Soest, Daan; Stoop, J.T.R.

    2015-01-01

    We derive a dynamic theoretical model of renewable resource extraction. In the social optimum, maximum extraction occurs in the last period only, while in the unique subgame perfect Nash equilibrium, the resource is depleted immediately. The predictions are tested in a field experiment conducted at

  11. Dynamic Incentive Effects of Relative Performance Pay: A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Delfgaauw (Josse); A.J. Dur (Robert); J.A. Non (Arjan); W.J.M.I. Verbeke (Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWe conduct a field experiment among 189 stores of a retail chain to study dynamic incentive effects of relative performance pay. Employees in the randomly selected treatment stores could win a bonus by outperforming three comparable stores from the control group over the course of four w

  12. Just keep it simple : a field experiment on fundraising letters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René; Crutzen, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies how the use of a colour picture in fundraising letters affect response rates and the amount donated in a fundraising campaign. Envelopes, with a full colour picture were tested against envelopes, without a picture in a controlled field experiment at a national religious charity in

  13. Violent Conflict and Behavior: a Field Experiment in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, M.J.; Nillesen, E.E.M.; Bulte, E.H.; Lensink, B.W.; Verwimp, P.; Soest, van D.P.

    2012-01-01

    We use a series of field experiments in rural Burundi to examine the impact of exposure to conflict on social, risk, and time preferences. We find that conflict affects behavior: individuals exposed to violence display more altruistic behavior towards their neighbors, are more risk-seeking, and have

  14. Violent conflict and behavior : A field experiment in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, M.J.; Nillesen, E.E.M.; Verwimp, P.; Bulte, E.H.; Lensink, B.W.; van Soest, D.P.

    2012-01-01

    We use a series of field experiments in rural Burundi to examine the impact of exposure to conflict on social, risk, and time preferences. We find that conflict affects behavior: individuals exposed to violence display more altruistic behavior towards their neighbors, are more risk-seeking, and have

  15. Experiments to investigate particulate materials in reduced gravity fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, M.; Eden, H. F.; Felsenthal, P.; Glaser, P. E.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1967-01-01

    Study investigates agglomeration and macroscopic behavior in reduced gravity fields of particles of known properties by measuring and correlating thermal and acoustical properties of particulate materials. Experiment evaluations provide a basis for a particle behavior theory and measure bulk properties of particulate materials in reduced gravity.

  16. Field experiment on transgenic cassava proves successful in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ A pioneer study on field tests of transgenic cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) by a Sino-Swiss research consortium has proved successful. The experiment was carried out in 2006 at an experimental station in Haikou, capital of south China's Hainan Province.

  17. The First Field Experience: Perspectives of Preservice and Cooperating Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brian, Mary; Stoner, Julia; Appel, Kelli; House, Jennifer J.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined perspectives of field experiences among preservice teachers and their cooperating teachers because of debate in the politically charged atmosphere of No Child Left Behind regarding teacher preparation programs. Nine pairs of preservice and cooperating teachers were observed and interviewed over the course of a semester to…

  18. Rational Ignorance in Education: A Field Experiment in Student Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Thomas S.; Jacob, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    Plagiarism appears to be a common problem among college students, yet there is little evidence on the effectiveness of interventions designed to minimize plagiarism. This study presents the results of a field experiment that evaluated the effects of a web-based educational tutorial in reducing plagiarism. We found that assignment to the treatment…

  19. Conflict between the Gravitational Field Energy and the Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Vera, R A

    2000-01-01

    From local and nonlocal experiments in gravitational (G) fields it is concluded, as a General Principle (GP), that "all of the well-defined parts of a measuring system obey the same inertial and G laws". The absolute values of their basic parameters change in identical proportion after any common change of G potential. To relate quantities measured in different G potentials they must be previously transformed to some Lorenz frame in some well-defined potential. The transformations derived from G time dilation experiments are simultaneously consistent with all of the other 'gravitational tests'. However "they are not consistent with the presumed energy exchange between the field and the bodies". The lack of energy of the field is justified from the GP, according to which 'particles and quanta in stationary state obey same inertial and G laws'. Such particle model, made up of radiation, has been previously used to account for relativistic quantum-mechanical properties of particles.

  20. Molecular analysis of phosphate limitation in Geobacteraceae during the bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N' Guessan, L.A.; Elifantz, H.; Nevin, K.P.; Mouser, P.J.; Methe, B.; Woodard, T. L.; Manley, K.; Williams, K. H.; Wilkins, M. J.; Larsen, J.T.; Long, P. E.; Lovley, D. R.

    2009-09-01

    Nutrient limitation is an environmental stress that may reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation strategies, especially when the contaminants are organic compounds or when organic compounds are added to promote microbial activities such as metal reduction. Genes indicative of phosphate-limitation were identified via microarray analysis of chemostat cultures of Geobacter sulfureducens. This analysis revealed that genes in the pst-pho operon, which is associated with a high affinity phosphate uptake system in other microorganisms, had significantly higher transcript abundance under phosphate-limiting conditions, with the genes pstB and phoU the most up-regulated. Quantitative PCR analysis of pstB and phoU transcript levels in G. sulfurreducens grown in chemostats demonstrated that the expression of these genes increased when phosphate was removed from the culture medium. Transcripts of pstB and phoU within the subsurface Geobacter species predominating during an in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment were more abundant than in chemostat cultures of G. sulfurreducens that were not limited for phosphate. Addition of phosphate to incubations of subsurface sediments did not stimulate dissimilatory metal reduction. The added phosphate was rapidly adsorbed onto the sediments. The results demonstrate that Geobacter species can effectively reduce U(VI) even when experiencing suboptimal phosphate concentrations and that increasing phosphate availability with phosphate additions is difficult to achieve due to the high reactivity of this compound. This transcript-based approach developed for diagnosing phosphate limitation should be applicable to assessing the potential need for additional phosphate in other bioremediation processes.

  1. Comparison of Microcosm Tests and a Field Demonstration of Cometabolic Air Sparging With Propane for the Bioremediation of Trichloroethylene and cis-Dichloroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, B.; Dolan, M. E.; Tovannabootr, A.; Azizian, M.; Semprini, L.; Magar, V. S.; Leeson, A.

    2001-12-01

    Cometabolic air sparging (CAS) is an innovative form of conventional air sparging, and is designed to degrade or remove chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon compounds (CAHs) in groundwater and to potentially treat these contaminants in the vadose zone. A CAS demonstration was conducted at McClellan AFB, California, for removal of chloroethenes (TCE, cis-DCE) from groundwater using propane as the cometabolic substrate. In support of this field demonstration both groundwater and vadose zone microcosm studies were performed. The microcosms were created with groundwater and aquifer materials from the demonstration site. Concentrations of compounds in the microcosms were created to mimic conditions where the demonstration was performed. The microcosms were used to test the potential of the propane-utilizers to transform the CAHs of interest, and determine their nutrient requirements while transforming these compounds. Results from the first season of field-testing showed propane-utilizers could be effectively stimulated in the saturated zone with repeated intermediate sparging of propane and air. The lag time for effective propane utilization to be observed in the field was about 30 to 40 days, while in laboratory microcosms the lag period was about 12 days. Consistent with the field tests the groundwater microcosms showed cis-DCE was more rapidly transformed than TCE. Microcosm tests also indicated that propane inhibited the transformation of cis-DCE and TCE, and as observed in the field, most of the transformation of these compounds occurred after propane was reduced to low concentrations. In the field demonstration propane utilization rates and rates of CAH removal slowed after three to four months of repeated propane additions, which coincided with the depletion of nitrogen (as nitrate) in the treatment zone. Similar results were obtained with repeated additions of propane to the microcosms. In the field test ammonia was added to the propane/air mixture to provide a

  2. Monitoring of ground water quality and heavy metals in soil during large scale bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated waste in India: case studies

    OpenAIRE

    Ajoy Kumar Mandal; Atanu Jana; Mr. Abhijit Datta; Sarma, Priyangshu M.; Banwari Lal; Jayati Datta

    2014-01-01

    Bioremediation using microbes has been well accepted as an environmentally friendly and economical treatment method for disposal of hazardous petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated waste (oily waste) and this type of bioremediation has been successfully conducted in laboratory and on a pilot scale in various countries, including India. Presently there are no federal regulatory guidelines available in India for carrying out field-scale bioremediation of oily waste using microbes. The results of th...

  3. Microrelief-Controlled Overland Flow Generation: Laboratory and Field Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface microrelief affects overland flow generation and the related hydrologic processes. However, such influences vary depending on other factors such as rainfall characteristics, soil properties, and initial soil moisture conditions. Thus, in-depth research is needed to better understand and evaluate the combined effects of these factors on overland flow dynamics. The objective of this experimental study was to examine how surface microrelief, in conjunction with the factors of rainfall, soil, and initial moisture conditions, impacts overland flow generation and runoff processes in both laboratory and field settings. A series of overland flow experiments were conducted for rough and smooth surfaces that represented distinct microtopographic characteristics and the experimental data were analyzed and compared. Across different soil types and initial moisture conditions, both laboratory and field experiments demonstrated that a rough soil surface experienced a delayed initiation of runoff and featured a stepwise threshold flow pattern due to the microrelief-controlled puddle filling-spilling-merging dynamics. It was found from the field experiments that a smooth plot surface was more responsive to rainfall variations especially during an initial rainfall event. However, enhanced capability of overland flow generation and faster puddle connectivity of a rough field plot occurred during the subsequent rain events.

  4. In situ vadose zone bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhener, Patrick; Ponsin, Violaine

    2014-06-01

    Contamination of the vadose zone with various pollutants is a world-wide problem, and often technical or economic constraints impose remediation without excavation. In situ bioremediation in the vadose zone by bioventing has become a standard remediation technology for light spilled petroleum products. In this review, focus is given on new in situ bioremediation strategies in the vadose zone targeting a variety of other pollutants such as perchlorate, nitrate, uranium, chromium, halogenated solvents, explosives and pesticides. The techniques for biostimulation of either oxidative or reductive degradation pathways are presented, and biotransformations to immobile pollutants are discussed in cases of non-degradable pollutants. Furthermore, research on natural attenuation in the vadose zone is presented.

  5. NATO SET-093 joint field experiment at Bourges, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, C.; Bruel, F.; Prieur, D.; Naz, P.; Miller, L. S.

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the NATO Task Group SET-093/RTG53/MSE (referred to as TG-53 in this report) Acoustic Detection of Weapons Firing Joint Field Experiment II conducted at the Etablissement Technique de Bourges (ETBS), Bourges, France, during 16 to 27 June 2008. This field experiment is a follow-on to the NATO TG-53 Acoustic Detection of Weapons Firing Joint Field Experiment I conducted at the Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG), Yuma, Arizona, USA, during 31 October to 4 November 2005 [1]. The objectives of the joint experiment were: (i) to collect acoustic signatures of direct and indirect firings from weapons' such as small arms, mortars, artillery, rockets, and C4 explosives, (ii) to analyze the propagation effects of grassy, wooded, and urban terrains, (iii) to share signatures collected from a variety of acoustic sensors, on the ground and in the air, distributed over a wide area, and (iv) to demonstrate the interoperability of disparate sensors developed by the various nations involved. The participating NATO countries , including France, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States of America, and Israel as well as part of the Mediterranean dialogue countries, deployed nearly 90 sensors and sensor systems over the test range area.

  6. Bioremediation: Copper Nanoparticles from Electronic-waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. MAJUMDER

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A single-step eco-friendly approach has been employed to synthesize copper nanoparticles. The superfast advancement in the field of electronics has given rise to a new type of waste called electronic waste. Since the physical and chemical recycling procedures have proved to be hazardous, the present work aims at the bioremediation of e-waste in order to recycle valuable metals. Microorganisms such as Fusarium oxysporum and Pseudomonas sp. were able to leach copper (84-130 nm from integrated circuits present on electronic boards under ambient conditions. Lantana camara, a weed commonly found in Maharashtra was also screened for leaching copper. The characteristics of the copper nanoparticles obtained were studied using X-ray diffraction analysis, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier Tranform Infrared analysis, Transmission electron microscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis and Cyclic Voltammetry. Copper nanoparticles were found to be effective against hospital strain Escherichia coli 2065.

  7. Precision magnetic field mapping for CERN experiment NA62

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, John R.; Ruggiero, Giuseppe; Bergsma, Felix

    2016-12-01

    In the CERN experiment NA62, low-mass straw-tube tracking-chambers have been designed to operate in vacuum and, in conjunction with precisely mapped magnetic fields, enable the determination of the trajectories of the charged decay products of a 75 GeV/c K+ with high accuracy. This is particularly important for the crucial measurement of the branching fraction for the decay K+ → π + ν ν, which has the potential to reveal BSM physics. The charged particles passing through the magnetic field of a dipole magnet receive a transverse-momentum kick, ΔP T = 270 MeV/c, which the physics requires to be determined to better than one part in a thousand. This puts stringent constraints on the required accuracy and precision of the magnetic field components at all points through which charged particles pass. Before reaching the dipole magnet the particles travel through an evacuated steel tank of length 90 m, where residual magnetic fields of typical size 50 μT modify the trajectories of the charged particles and require measurement with a precision of better than 10 μT. In this paper we describe in detail the different approaches to the measurement and analysis of the magnetic field for the two regions, the corrections to the raw data necessary to produce the final field map, and the physics validation procedures showing that the required accuracy and precision of the field maps have been achieved.

  8. Optimal conditions for bioremediation of oily seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahed, Mohammad Ali; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Mohajeri, Leila; Mohajeri, Soraya

    2010-12-01

    To determine the influence of nutrients on the rate of biodegradation, a five-level, three-factor central composite design (CCD) was employed for bioremediation of seawater artificially contaminated with crude oil. Removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was the dependent variable. Samples were extracted and analyzed according to US-EPA protocols. A significant (R(2)=0.9645, P<0.0001) quadratic polynomial mathematical model was generated. Removal from samples not subjected to optimization and removal by natural attenuation were 53.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Numerical optimization was carried out based on desirability functions for maximum TPH removal. For an initial crude oil concentration of 1g/L supplemented with 190.21 mg/L nitrogen and 12.71 mg/L phosphorus, the Design-Expert software predicted 60.9% hydrocarbon removal; 58.6% removal was observed in a 28-day experiment.

  9. USING PHYTOREMEDIATION AND BIOREMEDIATION FOR PROTECTION SOIL NEAR GRAVEYARD

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Ignatowicz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of present research was to assess the usefulness of Basket willow (Salix viminalis) to phytoremediation and bioremediation of sorption subsoil contaminated with pesticides. Studies upon purification of sorption material consisting of a soil and composting sewage sludge were conducted under pot experiment conditions. The study design included control pot along with 3 other ones polluted with pesticides. The vegetation season has lasted since spring till late autumn 2015. After acclimat...

  10. Sorting Through Affirmative Action: Two Field Experiments in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Affirmative action is a subject of intense debate. Supporters point to the increased representation of women and minority groups while critics contend that affirmative action can lead to inefficiencies. In this paper we present results from two field experiments that were designed to test how applicants sort in response to affirmative action rules that favor of women. Our results suggest that the criticism of affirmative action is misplaced. We find that affirmative action does not lead to lo...

  11. Tuning the Mass of Chameleon Fields in Casimir Force Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Ph; Davis, A C; Shaw, D J; Iannuzzi, D

    2010-01-01

    We have calculated the chameleon pressure between two parallel plates in the presence of an intervening medium that affects the mass of the chameleon field. As intuitively expected, the gas in the gap weakens the chameleon interaction mechanism with a screening effect that increases with the plate separation and with the density of the intervening medium. This phenomenon might open up new directions in the search of chameleon particles with future long range Casimir force experiments.

  12. Young's Double Slit Experiment in Quantum Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kenmoku, Masakatsu

    2011-01-01

    Young's double slit experiment is formulated in the framework of canonical quantum field theory in view of the modern quantum optics. We adopt quantum scalar fields instead of quantum electromagnetic fields ignoring the vector freedom in gauge theory. The double slit state is introduced in Fock space corresponding to experimental setup. As observables, expectation values of energy density and positive frequency part of current with respect to the double slit state are calculated which give the interference term. Classical wave states are realized by coherent double slit states in Fock space which connect quantum particle states with classical wave states systematically. In case of incoherent sources, the interference term vanishes by averaging random phase angles as expected.

  13. Study of the Bioremediation of Atrazine under Variable Carbon and Nitrogen Sources by Mixed Bacterial Consortium Isolated from Corn Field Soil in Fars Province of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansooreh Dehghani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrazine herbicide that is widely used in corn production is frequently detected in water resources. The main objectives of this research were focused on assessing the effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on atrazine biodegradation by mixed bacterial consortium and by evaluating the feasibility of using mixed bacterial consortium in soil culture. Shiraz corn field soil with a long history of atrazine application has been explored for their potential of atrazine biodegradation. The influence of different carbon compounds and the effect of nitrogen sources and a different pH (5.5–8.5 on atrazine removal efficiency by mixed bacterial consortium in liquid culture were investigated. Sodium citrate and sucrose had the highest atrazine biodegradation rate (87.22% among different carbon sources. Atrazine biodegradation rate decreased more quickly by the addition of urea (26.76% compared to ammonium nitrate. Based on the data obtained in this study, pH of 7.0 is optimum for atrazine biodegradation. After 30 days of incubation, the percent of atrazine reduction rates were significantly enhanced in the inoculated soils (60.5% as compared to uninoculated control soils (12% at the soil moisture content of 25%. In conclusion, bioaugmentation of soil with mixed bacterial consortium may enhance the rate of atrazine degradation in a highly polluted soil.

  14. An Integral, Multidisciplinary and Global Geophysical Field Experience for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, O.; Carrillo, D. J.; Pérez-Campos, X.

    2007-05-01

    The udergraduate program of Geophysical Engineering at the School of Engineering, of the Univesidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), went through an update process that concluded in 2006. As part of the program, the student takes three geophysical prospecting courses (gravity and magnetics, electric, electromagnetics, and seismic methods). The older program required a three-week field experience for each course in order to gradute. The new program considers only one extended field experience. This work stresses the importance of international academic exchange, where undergraduate students could participate, such as the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE), and interaction with research programs, such as the MesoAmerican Subduction Experiment (MASE). Also, we propose a scheeme for this activity based on those examples; both of them have in common real geophysical problems, from which students could benefit. Our proposal covers academic and logistic aspects to be taken into account, enhancing the relevance of interaction between other academic institutions, industry, and UNAM, in order to obtain a broader view of geophysics.

  15. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  16. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Schneck, K; Cerdeno, D G; Mandic, V; Rogers, H E; Agnese, R; Anderson, A J; Asai, M; Balakishiyeva, D; Barker, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Caldwell, D O; Calkins, R; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jardin, D M; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Lukens, P; Mahapatra, R; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Mendoza, J D Morales; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Roberts, A; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Toback, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wilson, J S; Wright, D H; Yang, X; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  17. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Fliermans, C.B.

    1997-07-14

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP).

  18. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water: The perspectives of history and hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    Bioremediation, the use of microbial degradation processes to detoxify environmental contamination, was first applied to petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water systems in the early 1970s. Since that time, these technologies have evolved in some ways that were clearly anticipated early investigators, and in other ways that were not foreseen. The expectation that adding oxidants and nutrients to contaminated aquifers would enhance biodegradation, for example, has been born out subsequent experience. Many of the technologies now in common use such as air sparging, hydrogen peroxide addition, nitrate addition, and bioslurping, are conceptually similar to the first bioremediation systems put into operation. More unexpected, however, were the considerable technical problems associated with delivering oxidants and nutrients to heterogeneous ground water systems. Experience has shown that the success of engineered bioremediation systems depends largely on how effectively directions and rates of ground water flow can be controlled, and thus how efficiently oxidants and nutrients can be delivered to contaminated aquifer sediments. The early expectation that injecting laboratory-selected or genetically engineered cultures of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria into aquifers would be a useful bioremediation technology has not been born out subsequent experience. Rather, it appears that petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are ubiquitous in ground water systems and that bacterial addition is usually unnecessary. Perhaps the technology that was least anticipated early investigators was the development of intrinsic bioremediation. Experience has shown that natural attenuation mechanisms - biodegradation, dilution, and sorption - limit the migration of contaminants to some degree in all ground water systems. Intrinsic bioremediation is the deliberate use of natural attenuation processes to treat contaminated ground water to specified concentration levels at predetermined

  19. Diverse Metabolic Capacities of Fungi for Bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Radhika; Khardenavis, Anshuman A; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-09-01

    Bioremediation refers to cost-effective and environment-friendly method for converting the toxic, recalcitrant pollutants into environmentally benign products through the action of various biological treatments. Fungi play a major role in bioremediation owing to their robust morphology and diverse metabolic capacity. The review focuses on different fungal groups from a variety of habitats with their role in bioremediation of different toxic and recalcitrant compounds; persistent organic pollutants, textile dyes, effluents from textile, bleached kraft pulp, leather tanning industries, petroleum, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, pharmaceuticals and personal care products, and pesticides. Bioremediation of toxic organics by fungi is the most sustainable and green route for cleanup of contaminated sites and we discuss the multiple modes employed by fungi for detoxification of different toxic and recalcitrant compounds including prominent fungal enzymes viz., catalases, laccases, peroxidases and cyrochrome P450 monooxygeneses. We have also discussed the recent advances in enzyme engineering and genomics and research being carried out to trace the less understood bioremediation pathways.

  20. Contributions of biosurfactants to natural or induced bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawniczak, Lukasz; Marecik, Roman; Chrzanowski, Lukasz

    2013-03-01

    The number of studies dedicated to evaluating the influence of biosurfactants on bioremediation efficiency is constantly growing. Although significant progress regarding the explanation of mechanisms behind biosurfactant-induced effects could be observed, there are still many factors which are not sufficiently elucidated. This corresponds to the fact that although positive influence of biosurfactants is often reported, there are also numerous cases where no or negative effect was observed. This review summarizes the recent finding in the field of biosurfactant-amended bioremediation, focusing mainly on a critical approach towards potential limitations and causes of failure while investigating the effects of biosurfactants on the efficiency of biodegradation and phytoextraction processes. It also provides a summary of successive steps, which should be taken into consideration when designing biosurfactant-related treatment processes.

  1. Biostimulated uranium immobilization within aquifers – from bench scale to field experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Veeramani, Harish; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Suvorova, Elena; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Barrows, Charles J.; Cerrato, Jose M.; Campbell, Kate M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Long, Philip E.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Giammar, Daniel E.; Bargar, John R.

    2011-12-29

    In situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated aquifers through microbially catalyzed reduction of mobile U(VI) species can only be successful if the U(IV) products are immobilized over long time-scales. Although uraninite is known for its low solubility and has been produced in nano-particulate form by several species of metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in laboratory studies, little is known about the stability of biogenic U(IV) in the subsurface. Using an up-scaling approach, we investigated the chemical and environmental stability of biogenic UO₂ nano-solids. Our results show that diffusive limitations due to aquifer porosity and microstructure may retard uraninite corrosion. Corrosion was also retarded by adsorption or incorporation of manganese. On the other hand, U(VI) bioreduction in field sediments generated U(IV) that was more labile than biogenic UO₂.

  2. Characterization of weathered petroleum hydrocarbons during a landfarming bioremediation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maletić Snežana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Landfarming bioremediation was performed over 2 years on soil heavily polluted with weathered oil and oil derivatives: 23200 mg kg-1 of mineral oil, 35300 mg kg-1 total hydrocarbons, and 8.65 mg kg-1 of total PAHs. During the experiment, mineral oil, total hydrocarbon and PAH concentrations decreased by approximately 53%, 27% and 72%, respectively. A GC/MS-Scan was used to identify the crude oil components that persist after bioremediation treatment of contaminated soil and the metabolites generated during this process. The data shows that in weathered-hydrocarbons contaminated soil, the number of initially detected compounds after the bioremediation process further decreased over a 2 year period, and at the same time several new compounds were observed at the end of experiment. Higher persistence was also shown for heavier n-alkanes and branched alkanes, which could be detected over a longer period of time. The analysis highlights the importance of n-alkanes, their substituted derivatives and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as the most significant pollutants.

  3. Vacuum magnetic linear birefringence using pulsed fields: the BMV experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cadène, A; Fouché, M; Battesti, R; Rizzo, C

    2013-01-01

    In this letter we present the measurement of the vacuum magnetic birefringence obtained using the first generation setup of the BMV experiment. In particular, we detail our procedure of data acquisition and our analysis which takes into account the symmetry properties of raw data with respect to the orientation of the magnetic field and the sign of the cavity birefringence. Our current value of vacuum magnetic linear birefringence k_CM was obtained with about 100 magnetic pulses and a maximum field of 6.5 T. We get k_CM = (-7.4 \\pm 8.7).10^{-21} T^{-2} at 3 sigma confidence level. Our result is a clear validation of our innovative experimental method.

  4. Field study of the bioremediation of oil-contaminated Dalian beach by marine oil-degrading bacterial agent%海洋石油降解菌剂在大连溢油污染岸滩修复中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑立; 曹磊; 崔志松; 高伟; 韩彬; 杨佰娟; 王绍良; 李倩; 周文俊; 张魁英

    2012-01-01

    对海洋石油降解菌群DC10的降解特性进行了研究,研制了基于该菌群的降解菌剂,并用于大连实际溢油岸滩生物修复实验,考察了降解菌剂对潮间带和潮上带油污的降解作用,通过分析C17/藿烷、C18/藿烷及总烷烃和总芳烃的降解率来评价其降解效果.降解菌群DC10在实验室条件下对石油的降解率高于各组成菌株,一周时间的石油降解率比对照提高了60%左右,能降解大部分的烷烃和芳烃.以DC10冻干菌粉辅以营养盐溶液研制降解菌剂,该菌剂在大连岸滩油污生物修复试验中显示出显著的降解效果.在为期12d的潮间带油污生物修复试验中,喷洒菌剂处理的C17/藿烷和C18/藿烷降解率相对于自然风化处理分别提高了40%和30%,而总烷烃和总芳烃降解率分别提高了80%和72%.在为期85 d的潮上带油污生物修复试验中,从C17/藿烷和C18/藿烷的降解率来看,喷洒菌剂处理对油污的降解程度仅略高于自然风化,但总烷烃和总芳烃的降解率分别提高了近30%和20%.%A marine oil-degrading bacterial consortium DC10 was prepared to an oil-degrading agent and further applied to the bioremediation of crude oil-contaminated Dalian beach. Field studies were carried out at the intertidal zone and supratidal zone respectively, and the effects of the oil-degrading agent were investigated by evaluating the decline of C17/hopane, C18/hopane. total petroleum alkanes and total petroleum aromatics. The oil-degrading consortium DC10 exhibited much higher degradation rates than the single de-grader comprising consortium DC10 under laboratory conditions. Compared to the sterile control, the degradation rates of consortium DC10 increased by 60% in 7 days, and most alkanes and aromatics in oil were disappeared. The oil-degrading agent supplemented with essential nutrient salts was proved to be effective in the field study on the bioremediation of oil-contaminated Dalian

  5. SRNL RADIONUCLIDE FIELD LYSIMETER EXPERIMENT: BASELINE CONSTRUCTION AND IMPLEMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Bagwell, L.; Powell, B.; Almond, P.; Emerson, H.; Hixon, A.; Jablonski, J.; Buchanan, C.; Waterhouse, T.

    2012-10-17

    The purpose of this document is to compile information regarding experimental design, facility design, construction, radionuclide source preparation, and path forward for the ten year Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Radionuclide Field Lysimeter Experiment at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This is a collaborative effort by researchers at SRNL and Clemson University. The scientific objectives of this study are to: Study long-term radionuclide transport under conditions more representative of vadose zone conditions than laboratory experiments; Provide more realistic quantification of radionuclide transport and geochemistry in the vadose zone, providing better information pertinent to radioactive waste storage solutions than presently exists; Reduce uncertainty and improve justification for geochemical models such as those used in performance assessments and composite analyses.

  6. EFEDA - European field experiment in a desertification-threatened area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolle, H.-J.; Andre, J.-C.; Arrue, J. L.; Barth, H. K.; Bessemoulin, P.; Brasa, A.; De Bruin, H. A. R.; Cruces, J.; Dugdale, G.; Engman, E. T.

    1993-01-01

    During June 1991 more than 30 scientific teams worked in Castilla-La Mancha, Spain, studying the energy and water transfer processes between soil, vegetation, and the atmosphere in semiarid conditions within the coordinated European research project EFEDA (European Field Experiment in Desertification-threatened Areas). Measurements were made from the microscale (e.g., measurements on single plants) up to a scale compatible with the grid size of global models. For this purpose three sites were selected 70 km apart and heavily instrumented at a scale in the order of 30 sq km. Aircraft missions, satellite data, and movable equipment were deployed to provide a bridge to the larger scale. This paper gives a description of the experimental design along with some of the preliminary results of this successful experiment.

  7. Experiments of cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Zhuowei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high Explosive Magnetic Flux Implosion Compression Generator (EMFICG is a kind of unique high energy density dynamic technique with characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising and could be suitable as a tool of cylindrical isentropic compression. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP have developed EMFICG technique and realized cylindrical isentropic compression. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5–6 Tesla were built first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive. The inner free surface velocity of sample was measured by PDV. The isentropic compression of a copper sample was verified and the isentropic pressure is over 100 GPa. The cylindrical isentropic compression process has been numerical simulated by 1D MHD code and the simulation results were compared with the experiments. Compared with the transitional X-ray flash radiograph measurement, this method will probably promote the data accuracy.

  8. A field experiment: reducing interpersonal discrimination toward pregnant job applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Whitney Botsford; Walker, Sarah Singletary; Hebl, Michelle Mikki R; King, Eden B

    2013-09-01

    The current research targets 4 potential stereotypes driving hostile attitudes and discriminatory behaviors toward pregnant women: incompetence, lack of commitment, inflexibility, and need for accommodation. We tested the relative efficacy of reducing concerns related to each of the stereotypes in a field experiment in which female confederates who sometimes wore pregnancy prostheses applied for jobs in a retail setting. As expected, ratings from 3 perspectives (applicants, observers, and independent coders) converged to show that pregnant applicants received more interpersonal hostility than did nonpregnant applicants. However, when hiring managers received (vs. did not receive) counterstereotypic information about certain pregnancy-related stereotypes (particularly lack of commitment and inflexibility), managers displayed significantly less interpersonal discrimination. Explicit comparisons of counterstereotypic information shed light on the fact that certain information may be more effective in reducing discrimination than others. We conclude by discussing how the current research makes novel theoretical contributions and describe some practical organizational implications for understanding and improving the experiences of pregnant workers.

  9. On Storks and Babies: Correlation, Causality and Field Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambrecht Anja

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The explosion of available data has created much excitement among marketing practitioners about their ability to better understand the impact of marketing investments. Big data allows for detecting patterns and often it seems plausible to interpret them as causal. While it is quite obvious that storks do not bring babies, marketing relationships are usually less clear. Apparent “causalities” often fail to hold up under examination. If marketers want to be sure not to walk into a causality trap, they need to conduct field experiments to detect true causal relationships. In the present digital environment, experiments are easier than ever to execute. However, they need to be prepared and interpreted with great care in order to deliver meaningful and genuinely causal results that help improve marketing decisions.

  10. Multi-Disciplinary Research Experiences Integrated with Industry –Field Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Lunsford

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this environmentally inquiry-based lab was to allow the students to engage into real-world concepts that integrate industry setting (Ohio Aggregate Industrial Mineral Association with the academia setting. Our students are engaged into a field trip where mining occurs to start the problem based learning of how the heavy metals leak in the mining process. These heavy metals such as lead and indium in the groundwater are a serious concern for the environment (Environmental Protection Agency from the mining process. The field experiences at the mining process assist in building our students interest in developing sensors to detect heavy metals of concern such as lead and indium simultaneously by a unique electrochemistry technique called Square Wave Anodic Stripping Voltammetry (SWASV. The field experience assists building the students interest in real –world application and what qualities do they want the electrochemical sensor to possess to be successful for real world usage. During the field trip the students are engaged into learning novel instrumentation such as an SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope to study the working electrode sensor developed to understand the sensor surface morphology properties better as well. The integration of industry setting with academia has been a positive experience for our students that has allowed their understanding of real-world science research needs to succeed in an industrial setting of research.

  11. Challenging oil bioremediation at deep-sea hydrostatic pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Scoma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Deepwater Horizon (DWH accident has brought oil contamination of deep-sea environments to worldwide attention. The risk for new deep-sea spills is not expected to decrease in the future, as political pressure mounts to access deep-water fossil reserves, and poorly tested technologies are used to access oil. This also applies to the response to oil-contamination events, with bioremediation the only (biotechnology presently available to combat deep-sea spills. Many questions about the fate of petroleum-hydrocarbons at deep-sea remain unanswered, as much as the main constraints limiting bioremediation under increased hydrostatic pressures and low temperatures. The microbial pathways fueling oil take up are unclear, and the mild upregulation observed for beta-oxidation-related genes in both water and sediments contrasts with the high amount of alkanes present in the spilled-oil. The fate of solid alkanes (tar and that of hydrocarbons degradation rates was largely overlooked, as the reason why the most predominant hydrocarbonoclastic genera were not enriched at deep-sea, despite being present at hydrocarbon seeps at the Gulf of Mexico. This mini-review aims at highlighting the missing information in the field, proposing a holistic approach where in situ and ex situ studies are integrated to reveal the principal mechanisms accounting for deep-sea oil bioremediation.

  12. Challenging Oil Bioremediation at Deep-Sea Hydrostatic Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoma, Alberto; Yakimov, Michail M.; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon accident has brought oil contamination of deep-sea environments to worldwide attention. The risk for new deep-sea spills is not expected to decrease in the future, as political pressure mounts to access deep-water fossil reserves, and poorly tested technologies are used to access oil. This also applies to the response to oil-contamination events, with bioremediation the only (bio)technology presently available to combat deep-sea spills. Many questions about the fate of petroleum-hydrocarbons within deep-sea environments remain unanswered, as well as the main constraints limiting bioremediation under increased hydrostatic pressures and low temperatures. The microbial pathways fueling oil bioassimilation are unclear, and the mild upregulation observed for beta-oxidation-related genes in both water and sediments contrasts with the high amount of alkanes present in the spilled oil. The fate of solid alkanes (tar), hydrocarbon degradation rates and the reason why the most predominant hydrocarbonoclastic genera were not enriched at deep-sea despite being present at hydrocarbon seeps at the Gulf of Mexico have been largely overlooked. This mini-review aims at highlighting the missing information in the field, proposing a holistic approach where in situ and ex situ studies are integrated to reveal the principal mechanisms accounting for deep-sea oil bioremediation. PMID:27536290

  13. Field experiments using SPEAR: a speech control system for UGVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatpar, Siddharth R.; Blanco, Chris; Czerniak, Jeffrey; Hoffman, Orin; Juneja, Amit; Pruthi, Tarun; Liu, Dongqing; Karlsen, Robert; Brown, Jonathan

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports on a Field Experiment carried out by the Human Research and Engineering Directorate at Ft. Benning to evaluate the efficacy of using speech to control an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) concurrently with a handcontroller. The SPEAR system, developed by Think-A-Move, provides speech-control of UGVs. The system picks up user-speech in the ear canal with an in-ear microphone. This property allows it to work efficiently in high-noise environments, where traditional speech systems, employing external microphones, fail. It has been integrated with an iRobot PackBot 510 with EOD kit. The integrated system allows the hand-controller to be supplemented with speech for concurrent control. At Ft. Benning, the integrated system was tested by soldiers from the Officer Candidate School. The Experiment had dual focus: 1) Quantitative measurement of the time taken to complete each station and the cognitive load on users; 2) Qualitative evaluation of ease-of-use and ergonomics through soldier-feedback. Also of significant benefit to Think-A-Move was soldier-feedback on the speech-command vocabulary employed: What spoken commands are intuitive, and how the commands should be executed, e.g., limited-motion vs. unlimited-motion commands. Overall results from the Experiment are reported in the paper.

  14. Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides: What It Is and How It Works (2nd Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmisano, Anna; Hazen, Terry

    2003-09-30

    an insoluble salt in the sediment. In other cases, the opposite occurs--the solubility of the altered species increases, increasing the mobility of the contaminant and allowing it to be more easily flushed from the environment. Both of these kinds of transformations present opportunities for bioremediation of metals and radionuclides--either to lock them in place, or to accelerate their removal. DOE's goal is to reduce the risk and related exposure to ground water, sediment, and soil contamination at Department of Energy facilities. Subsurface bioremediation of metals and radionuclides at the site of contamination (in situ bioremediation) is not yet in widespread use. However, successful in situ applications of bioremediation to petroleum products and chlorinated solvents provide experience from which scientists can draw. Taken together, the accomplishments in these areas have led scientists and engineers to be optimistic about applying this technology to the mixtures of metals and radionuclides that are found at some of the most contaminated DOE sites. This primer examines some of the basic microbial and chemical processes that are a part of bioremediation, specifically the bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. The primer is divided into six sections, with the information in each building on that of the previous. The sections include features that highlight topics of interest and provide background information on specific biological and chemical processes and reactions. The first section briefly examines the scope of the contamination problem at DOE facilities. The second section gives a summary of some of the most commonly used bioremediation technologies, including successful in situ and ex situ techniques. The third discusses chemical and physical properties of metals and radionuclides found in contaminant mixtures at DOE sites, including solubility and the most common oxidation states in which these materials are found. The fourth section is an

  15. A case study of the intrinsic bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, G.W.; Raterman, K.T.; Fisher, J.B.; Corgan, J.M. [and others

    1995-12-31

    Condensate liquids have been found to contaminate soil and groundwater at two gas production sites in the Denver Basin operated by Amoco Production Co. These sites have been closely monitored since July 1993 to determine whether intrinsic aerobic or anaerobic bioremediation of hydrocarbons occurs at a sufficient rate and to an adequate endpoint to support a no-intervention decision. Groundwater monitoring and analysis of soil cores suggest that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at these sites by multiple pathways including aerobic oxidation, Fe{sup 3+} reduction, and sulfate reduction. In laboratory experiments the addition of gas condensate hydrocarbons to saturated soil from the gas production site stimulated sulfate reduction under anaerobic and oxygen-limiting conditions, and nitrate and Fe{sup 3+} reduction under oxygen-limiting conditions, compared to biotic controls that lacked hydrocarbon and sterile controls. The sulfate reduction corresponded to a reduction in the amount of toluene relative to other hydrocarbons. These results confirmed that subsurface soils at the gas production site have the potential for intrinsic bioremediation of hydrocarbons.

  16. Case study: Bioremediation in the Aleutian Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, K.J.; Laford, H.D. [URS Consultants, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This case study describes the design, construction, and operation of a bioremediation pile on Adak Island, which is located in the Aleutian Island chain. Approximately 1,900 m{sup 3} of petroleum-contaminated soil were placed in the bioremediation pile. The natural bioremediation process was enhanced by an oxygen and nutrient addition system to stimulate microbial activity. Despite the harsh weather on the island, after the first 6 months of operation, laboratory analyses of soil samples indicated a significant (80%) reduction in diesel concentrations.

  17. Electrokinetic-enhanced bioremediation of organic contaminants: a review of processes and environmental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, R T; Harbottle, M J; Smith, J W N; Thornton, S F

    2014-07-01

    There is current interest in finding sustainable remediation technologies for the removal of contaminants from soil and groundwater. This review focuses on the combination of electrokinetics, the use of an electric potential to move organic and inorganic compounds, or charged particles/organisms in the subsurface independent of hydraulic conductivity; and bioremediation, the destruction of organic contaminants or attenuation of inorganic compounds by the activity of microorganisms in situ or ex situ. The objective of the review is to examine the state of knowledge on electrokinetic bioremediation and critically evaluate factors which affect the up-scaling of laboratory and bench-scale research to field-scale application. It discusses the mechanisms of electrokinetic bioremediation in the subsurface environment at different micro and macroscales, the influence of environmental processes on electrokinetic phenomena and the design options available for application to the field scale. The review also presents results from a modelling exercise to illustrate the effectiveness of electrokinetics on the supply electron acceptors to a plume scale scenario where these are limiting. Current research needs include analysis of electrokinetic bioremediation in more representative environmental settings, such as those in physically heterogeneous systems in order to gain a greater understanding of the controlling mechanisms on both electrokinetics and bioremediation in those scenarios.

  18. PROSPECTIVE IN-SILCO APPROACH IN BIOREMEDIATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON: SUCCESS SO FAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nadeem Khan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation has the potential to reduce contaminated environment inexpensively yet effectively. But, the lack of information about the factors controlling the growth and metabolism in microorganisms in polluted environment often limits its implementation. However rapid advances in the understanding of bioremediation are on the horizon. With advances in biotechnology, bioremediation has become one of the most rapidly developing fields of environmental restoration, utilizing microorganisms to reduce the concentration and toxicity of various chemical pollutants, such as petroleum hydrocarbons. In this mini-review, the current state of the field is described and the role of synthetic biology in biotechnology in short and medium term is discussed. A number of bioremediation strategies have been developed to treat contaminated wastes and sites. Selecting the most appropriate strategy to treat a specific site can be guided by considering three basic principles: the amenability of the pollutant to biological transformation to less toxic products, the bioavailability of the contaminant to microorganisms and the opportunity for bioprocess optimization. By the recent advances on in-silico dimensions of bioremediation, it seems that the synthetic biology software will soon drive the wet-lab implementation at molecular level.

  19. Field experience with floodwater diversion by complexed biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, M.K.; Chung, M.S.; Klaric, T.M.; Phelps, C.H.

    1984-04-01

    Due to preferential flow of the injected water through the most permeable zones, waterflooding of stratified reservoirs is generally inefficient. A process for improving the performance of waterfloods in such reservoirs has been developed; it is based on complexing biopolymers with multivalent cations to form gels for selective blocking of water-thief zones, thereby diverting the trailing floodwater to previously under-invaded reservoir regions to recover by-passed oil. This polymeric modification of stratification and of water injection profile leads to increased volumetric sweep of the reservoir by the floodwater and, in turn, to improved oil production. This paper summarizes Mobil's experience in its first seven field projects in Oklahoma using this process. A total of two hundred and five injection wells were treated with complexed biopolymers, resulting in substantial alteration of water flow patterns and in significant incremental oil recovery.

  20. Investigation of the bioremediation potential of aerobic zymogenous microorganisms in soil for crude oil biodegradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATJANA ŠOLEVIĆ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The bioremediation potential of the aerobic zymogenous microorganisms in soil (Danube alluvium, Pančevo, Serbia for crude oil biodegradation was investigated. A mixture of paraffinic types of oils was used as the substrate. The laboratory experiment of the simulated oil biodegradation lasted 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 days. In parallel, an experiment with a control sample was conducted. Extracts were isolated from the samples with chloroform in a separation funnel. From these extracts, the hydrocarbons were isolated by column chromatography and analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS. n-Alkanes, isoprenoids, phenanthrene and its derivatives with one and two methyl groups were quantitatively analyzed. The ability and efficiency of zymogenous microorganisms in soil for crude oil bioremediation was assessed by comparison between the composition of samples which were exposed to the microorganisms and the control sample. The investigated microorganisms showed the highest bioremediation potential in the biodegradation of n-alkanes and isoprenoids. A considerably high bioremediation potential was confirmed in the biodegradation of phenanthrene and methyl phenanthrenes. Low bioremediation potential of these microorganisms was proven in the case of polycyclic alkanes of the sterane and triterpane types and dimethyl phenanthrenes.

  1. ARM Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, L Ruby [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s ARM Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign contributes to CalWater 2015, a multi-agency field campaign that aims to improve understanding of atmospheric rivers and aerosol sources and transport that influence cloud and precipitation processes. The ultimate goal is to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of droughts and floods in California. With the DOE G-1 aircraft and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2) well equipped for making aerosol and cloud measurements, ACAPEX focuses specifically on understanding how aerosols from local pollution and long-range transport affect the amount and phase of precipitation associated with atmospheric rivers. ACAPEX took place between January 12, 2015 and March 8, 2015 as part of CalWater 2015, which included four aircraft (DOE G-1, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA] G-IV and P-3, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA] ER-2), the NOAA research ship Ron Brown, carrying onboard the AMF2, National Science Foundation (NSF)-sponsored aerosol and precipitation measurements at Bodega Bay, and the California Department of Water Resources extreme precipitation network.

  2. Frac-and-pack stimulation: Application, design, and field experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roodhart, L.P.; Fokker, P.A.; Davies, D.R.; Shlyapobersky, J.; Wong, G.K.

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses the criteria for selecting wells to be frac-and-packed. The authors show how systematic study of the inflow performance can be used to assess the potential of frac-and-packed wells, to identify the controlling factors, and to optimize design parameters. They also show that fracture conductivity is often the key to successful treatment. This conductivity depends largely on proppant size; formation permeability damage around the created fracture has less effect. Appropriate allowance needs to be made for flow restrictions caused by the presence of the perforations, partial penetration, and non-Darcy effects. They describe the application of the overpressure-calibrated hydraulic fracture model in frac-and-pack treatment design, and discuss some operational considerations with reference to field examples. The full potential of this promising new completion method can be achieved only if the design is tailored to the individual well. This demands high-quality input data, which can be obtained only from a calibration test. This paper presents their strategy for frac-and-pack design, drawing on examples from field experience. They also point out several areas that the industry needs to address, such as the sizing of proppant in soft formations and the interaction between fracturing fluids and resin in resin-coated proppant.

  3. Treatment of a mud pit by bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdalović, Jelena; Đurić, Aleksandra; Miletić, Srdjan; Ilić, Mila; Milić, Jelena; Vrvić, Miroslav M

    2016-08-01

    The mud generated from oil and natural gas drilling, presents a considerable ecological problem. There are still insufficient remedies for the removal and minimization of these very stable emulsions. Existing technologies that are in use, more or less successfully, treat about 20% of generated waste drilling mud, while the rest is temporarily deposited in so-called mud pits. This study investigated in situ bioremediation of a mud pit. The bioremediation technology used in this case was based on the use of naturally occurring microorganisms, isolated from the contaminated site, which were capable of using the contaminating substances as nutrients. The bioremediation was stimulated through repeated inoculation with a zymogenous microbial consortium, along with mixing, watering and biostimulation. Application of these bioremediation techniques reduced the concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons from 32.2 to 1.5 g kg(-1) (95% degradation) during six months of treatment.

  4. Biomarkers of marine pollution and bioremediation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    pollution and bioremediation Anupam Sarkar Accepted: 1 February 2006 / Published online: 4 May 2006 C211 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006 This special issue of Ecotoxicology is dealt with selected papers presented at the ‘International Workshop...

  5. Emerging technologies in bioremediation: constraints and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayu, Smriti; Karpouzas, Dimitrios G; Singh, Brajesh K

    2012-11-01

    Intensive industrialisation, inadequate disposal, large-scale manufacturing activities and leaks of organic compounds have resulted in long-term persistent sources of contamination of soil and groundwater. This is a major environmental, policy and health issue because of adverse effects of contaminants on humans and ecosystems. Current technologies for remediation of contaminated sites include chemical and physical remediation, incineration and bioremediation. With recent advancements, bioremediation offers an environmentally friendly, economically viable and socially acceptable option to remove contaminants from the environment. Three main approaches of bioremediation include use of microbes, plants and enzymatic remediation. All three approaches have been used with some success but are limited by various confounding factors. In this paper, we provide a brief overview on the approaches, their limitations and highlights emerging technologies that have potential to revolutionise the enzymatic and plant-based bioremediation approaches.

  6. Magnetic Field Experiment on Yinghuo-1 at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua

    Magnetic Field Experiment on Yinghuo-1 at Mars Hua Zhao, G. W. Zhu, J. D. Wang, M. F. Yu, L. Li, Y. Q. Sun, S. W. Chen, H. Z. Liao, and B. Zhou Center for Space Science and Applied Research (CSSAR), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China Abstract: A micro-satellite, Yinghuo-1, would be launched with Phobos-Grunt in October, 2009 to investigate the space environment around Mars. YH-1 and Phobos-Grunt forms a twopoint measurement configuration in the Martian space environment, and equipped with similar magnetic field and plasma detecting payload on two spacecraft would give some coordinated exploration around Mars. YH-1 would orbit Mars with periapsis of 800 km above the Martian surface, and apoapsis about 80000 km to the center of Mars. The orbit inclination is in the range of 0—7o to the Martian equator. A flux-gate type magnetometer, with two sensors, is developed for YH-1 spacecraft. Two sensors are mounted on one-side of the deployable solar panel with a radial separation about 45 cm to function as a gradiometer to minimize the affects of platform remanence. The dynamic range of √ magnetometer is with a 16-bit ADC converter, and the the noise level is better than 0.01 nT/ Hz, to measure three-component magnetic field from DC to 10Hz. Flux-gate magnetometer would work together with the Plasma Package onboard of YH-1 to investigate the Martian bow shock, magnetosheath, magnetic pileup region (MPR). A detail description of the flux-gate magnetometer is presented in this paper, with some test and calibration results.

  7. Biosurfactant-enhanced soil bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosaric, N.; Lu, G.; Velikonja, J. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-01

    Bioremediation of soil contaminated with organic chemicals is a viable alternative method for clean-up and remedy of hazardous waste sites. The final objective in this approach is to convert the parent toxicant into a readily biodegradable product which is harmless to human health and/or the environment. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons in soil can also efficiently be enhanced by addition or in-situ production of biosufactants. It was generally observed that the degradation time was shortened and particularly the adaptation time for the microbes. More data from our laboratories showed that chlorinated aromatic compounds, such as 2,4-dichlorophenol, a herbicide Metolachlor, as well as naphthalene are degraded faster and more completely when selected biosurfactants are added to the soil. More recent data demonstrated an enhanced biodegradation of heavy hydrocarbons in petrochemical sludges, and in contaminated oil when biosurfactants were present or were added prior to the biodegradation process.

  8. Bioremediation Potential of Terrestrial Fuel Spills †

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Hong-Gyu; Wang, Xiaoping; Bartha, Richard

    1990-01-01

    A bioremediation treatment that consisted of liming, fertilization, and tilling was evaluated on the laboratory scale for its effectiveness in cleaning up a sand, a loam, and a clay loam contaminated at 50 to 135 mg g of soil−1 by gasoline, jet fuel, heating oil, diesel oil, or bunker C. Experimental variables included incubation temperatures of 17, 27, and 37°C; no treatment; bioremediation treatment; and poisoned evaporation controls. Hydrocarbon residues were determined by quantitative gas...

  9. Bioremediation of wastewater using microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalivendra, Saikumar

    Population expansion and industrial development has deteriorated the quality of freshwater reservoirs around the world and has caused freshwater shortages in certain areas. Discharge of industrial effluents containing toxic heavy metals such as Cd and Cr into the environment have serious impact on human, animal and aquatic life. In order to solve these problems, the present study was focused on evaluating and demonstrating potential of microalgae for bioremediation of wastewater laden with nitrogen (N) in the form of nitrates, phosphorous (P) in the form of phosphates, chromium (Cr (VI)) and cadmium (Cd (II)). After screening several microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris and algae taken from Pleasant Hill Lake were chosen as candidate species for this study. The viability of the process was demonstrated in laboratory bioreactors and various experimental parameters such as contact time, initial metal concentration, algae concentration, pH and temperature that would affect remediation rates were studied. Based on the experimental results, correlations were developed to enable customizing and designing a commercial Algae based Wastewater Treatment System (AWTS). A commercial AWTS system that can be easily customized and is suitable for integration into existing wastewater treatment facilities was developed, and capital cost estimates for system including installation and annual operating costs were determined. The work concludes that algal bioremediation is a viable alternate technology for treating wastewater in an economical and sustainable way when compared to conventional treatment processes. The annual wastewater treatment cost to remove N,P is ~26x lower and to remove Cr, Cd is 7x lower than conventional treatment processes. The cost benefit analysis performed shows that if this technology is implemented at industrial complexes, Air Force freight and other Department of Defense installations with wastewater treatment plants, it could lead to millions of dollars in

  10. Initial characterization of a highly contaminated high explosives outfall in preparation for in situ bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betty A. Strietelmeier; Patrick J. Coyne; Patricia A. Leonard; W. Lamar Miller; Jerry R. Brian

    1999-12-01

    In situ bioremediation is a viable, cost-effective treatment for environmental contamination of many kinds. The feasibility of using biological techniques to remediate soils contaminated with high explosives (HE) requires laboratory evaluation before proceeding to a larger scale field operation. Laboratory investigations have been conducted at pilot scale which indicate that an anaerobic process could be successful at reducing levels of HE, primarily HMX, RDX and TNT, in contaminated soils. A field demonstration project has been designed to create an anaerobic environment for the degradation of HE materials. The first step in this project, initial characterization of the test area, was conducted and is the subject of this report. The levels of HE compounds found in the samples from the test area were higher than the EPA Method 8330 was able to extract without subsequent re-precipitation; therefore, a new method was developed using a superior extractant system. The test area sampling design was relatively simple as one might expect in an initial characterization. A total of 60 samples were each removed to a depth of 4 inches using a 1 inch diameter corer. The samples were spaced at relatively even intervals across a 20 foot cross-section through the middle of four 7-foot-long adjacent plots which are designed to be a part of an in situ bioremediation experiment. Duplicate cores were taken from each location for HE extraction and analysis in order to demonstrate and measure the heterogeneity of the contamination. Each soil sample was air dried and ball-milled to provide a homogeneous solid for extraction and analysis. Several samples had large consolidated pieces of what appeared to be solid HE. These were not ball-milled due to safety concerns, but were dissolved and the solutions were analyzed. The new extraction method was superior in that results obtained for several of the contaminants were up to 20 times those obtained with the EPA extraction method. The

  11. An Oceanographic Decision Support System for Scientific Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, T.; Das, J.; McCann, M. P.; Rajan, K.

    2011-12-01

    Thom Maughan, Jnaneshwar Das, Mike McCann, Danelle Cline, Mike Godin, Fred Bahr, Kevin Gomes, Tom O'Reilly, Frederic Py, Monique Messie, John Ryan, Francisco Chavez, Jim Bellingham, Maria Fox, Kanna Rajan Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute Moss Lading, California, United States Many of the coastal ocean processes we wish to observe in order to characterize marine ecosystems have large spatial extant (tens of square km) and are dynamic moving kilometers in a day with biological processes spanning anywhere from minutes to days. Some like harmful algal blooms generate toxins which can significantly impact human health and coastal economies. In order to obtain a viable understanding of the biogeochemical processes which define their dynamics and ecology, it is necessary to persistently observe, track and sample within and near the dynamic fields using augmented methods of observation such as autonomous platforms like AUVs, gliders and surface craft. Field experiments to plan, execute and manage such multitude of assets are challenging. To alleviate this problem the autonomous systems group with its collaborators at MBARI and USC designed, built and fielded a prototype Oceanographic Decision Support System (ODSS) that provides situational awareness and a single portal to visualize and plan deployments for the large scale October 2010 CANON field program as well as a series of 2 week field programs in 2011. The field programs were conducted in Monterey Bay, a known 'red tide' incubator, and varied from as many as twenty autonomous platforms, four ships and 2 manned airplanes to coordinated AUV operations, drifters and a single ship. The ODSS web-based portal was used to assimilate information from a collection of sources at sea, including AUVs, moorings, radar data as well as remote sensing products generated by partner organizations to provide a synthesis of views useful to predict the movement of a chlorophyll patch in the confines of the northern Monterey Bay

  12. Control of petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater by intrinsic and enhanced bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ku-Fan; Kao, Chih-Ming; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Surampalli, Rao Y; Lee, Mu-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    In the first phase of this study, the effectiveness of intrinsic bioremediation on the containment of petroleum hydrocarbons was evaluated at a gasoline spill site. Evidences of the occurrence of intrinsic bioremediation within the BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) plume included (1) decreased BTEX concentrations; (2) depletion of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate, and sulfate; (3) production of dissolved ferrous iron, methane, and CO2; (4) deceased pH and redox potential; and (5) increased methanogens, total heterotrophs, and total anaerobes, especially within the highly contaminated areas. In the second phase of this study, enhanced aerobic bioremediation process was applied at site to enhance the BTEX decay rates. Air was injected into the subsurface near the mid-plume area to biostimulate the naturally occurring microorganisms for BTEX biodegradation. Field results showed that enhanced bioremediation process caused the change of BTEX removal mechanisms from anaerobic biodegradation inside the plume to aerobic biodegradation. This variation could be confirmed by the following field observations inside the plume due to the enhanced aerobic bioremediation process: (1) increased in DO, CO2, redox potential, nitrate, and sulfate, (2) decreased in dissolved ferrous iron, sulfide, and methane, (3) increased total heterotrophs and decreased total anaerobes. Field results also showed that the percentage of total BTEX removal increased from 92% to 99%, and the calculated total BTEX first-order natural attenuation rates increased from 0.0092% to 0.0188% per day, respectively, after the application of enhanced bioremediation system from the spill area to the downgradient area (located approximately 300 m from the source area).

  13. Change of isoprenoids, steranes and terpanes during ex situ bioremediation of mazut on industrial level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beškoski Vladimir P.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of the ex situ bioremediation of soil contaminated by mazut (heavy residual fuel oil in the field scale (600 m3. A treatment-bed (thickness 0.4 m consisted of mechanically mixed mazut-contaminated soil, softwood sawdust as the additional carbon source and crude river sand, as bulking and porosity increasing material. The inoculation/reinoculation was conducted periodically using a biomass of a consortium of zymogenous microorganisms isolated from the bioremediation substrate. The biostimulation was performed through addition of nutritious substances (N, P and K. The aeration was improved by systematic mixing of the bioremediation system. After 50 days, the number of hydrocarbon degraders increased 100 times. Based on the changes in the group composition, the average biodegradation rate during bioremediation was 24 mg/kg/day for the aliphatic fraction, 6 mg/kg/day for the aromatic fraction, and 3 mg/kg/day for the nitrogen-sulphuroxygen compounds (NSO-asphaltene fraction. In the saturated hydrocarbon fraction, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS in the single ion-monitoring mode (SIM was applied to analyse isoprenoids pristane and phytane and polycyclic molecules of sterane and triterpane type. Biodegradation occurred during the bioremediation process, as well as reduction of relative quantities of isoprenoids, steranes, tri- and tetracyclic terpanes and pentacyclic terpanes of hopane type.

  14. Monitoring genetic and metabolic potential for in situ bioremediation: Mass spectrometry. 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, M.V.; Hurst, G.B.; Britt, P.F.; McLuckey, S.A.; Doktycz, M.J.

    1997-09-01

    'A number of US Department of Energy (DOE) sites are contaminated with mixtures of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) such as carbon tetrachloride, chloroform,. perchloroethylene, and trichloroethylene. At many of these sites, in situ microbial bioremediation is an attractive strategy for cleanup because it has the potential to degrade DNAPLs in situ without producing toxic byproducts. A rapid screening method to determine the broad range metabolic and genetic potential for contaminant degradation would greatly reduce the cost and time involved in assessment for in situ bioremediation as well as for monitoring ongoing bioremediation treatment. In this project, the ORNL Organic Mass Spectrometry (OMS) group is developing mass-spectrometry-based methods to screen for the genetic and metabolic potential for assessment and monitoring of in situ bioremediation of DNAPLs. In close collaboration, Professor Mary Lidstrom''s group at the University of Washington is identifying short DNA sequences related to microbial processes involved in the biodegradation of pollutants. This work will lay the foundation for development of a field-portable mass-spectrometry-based technique for rapid assessment and monitoring of bioremediation processes on site.'

  15. The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, M. C.; Brune, W. H.; Cantrell, C. A.; Rutledge, S. A.; Crawford, J. H.; Huntrieser, H.; Homeyer, C. R.; Nault, B.; Cohen, R. C.; Pan, L.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field experiment took place in the central U.S. in May and June 2012 and had the objectives of characterizing the effect of thunderstorms on the chemical composition of the lower atmosphere and determining the chemical aging of upper troposphere (UT) convective outflow plumes. DC3 employed ground-based radars, lightning mapping arrays, and weather balloon soundings in conjunction with aircraft measurements sampling the composition of the inflow and outflow of a variety of thunderstorms in northeast Colorado, West Texas to central Oklahoma, and northern Alabama. A unique aspect of the DC3 strategy was to locate and sample the convective outflow a day after active convection in order to measure the chemical transformations within the UT convective plume. The DC3 data are being analyzed to investigate transport and dynamics of the storms, scavenging of soluble trace gases and aerosols, production of nitrogen oxides by lightning, relationships between lightning flash rates and storm parameters, and chemistry in the UT that is affected by the convection. In this presentation, we give an overview of the DC3 field campaign and highlight results from the campaign that are relevant to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region. These highlights include stratosphere-troposphere exchange in connection with thunderstorms, the 0-12 hour chemical aging and new particle formation in the UT outflow of a dissipating mesoscale convective system observed on June 21, 2012, and UT chemical aging in convective outflow as sampled the day after convection occurred and modeled in the Weather Research and Forecasting coupled with Chemistry model.

  16. Fungal Laccases and Their Applications in Bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddolla Viswanath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laccases are blue multicopper oxidases, which catalyze the monoelectronic oxidation of a broad spectrum of substrates, for example, ortho- and para-diphenols, polyphenols, aminophenols, and aromatic or aliphatic amines, coupled with a full, four-electron reduction of O2 to H2O. Hence, they are capable of degrading lignin and are present abundantly in many white-rot fungi. Laccases decolorize and detoxify the industrial effluents and help in wastewater treatment. They act on both phenolic and nonphenolic lignin-related compounds as well as highly recalcitrant environmental pollutants, and they can be effectively used in paper and pulp industries, textile industries, xenobiotic degradation, and bioremediation and act as biosensors. Recently, laccase has been applied to nanobiotechnology, which is an increasing research field, and catalyzes electron transfer reactions without additional cofactors. Several techniques have been developed for the immobilization of biomolecule such as micropatterning, self-assembled monolayer, and layer-by-layer techniques, which immobilize laccase and preserve their enzymatic activity. In this review, we describe the fungal source of laccases and their application in environment protection.

  17. Effectiveness of bioremediation for the Prestige fuel spill : a summary of case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, J.R. [Oviedo Univ., Asturias (Spain); Gonzalez-Rojas, E.; Pelaez, A.I.; Sanchez, J [Oviedo Univ., Asturias (Spain). Inst. de Biotecnologia de Asturias; Garcia-Martinez, M.J.; Llamas, J.F. [Univ. Polictenica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain). Laboratorio de Estratigrafia Biomolecular

    2006-07-01

    This paper described novel bioremediation strategies used to remediate coastal areas in Spain impacted by the Prestige fuel oil spill in 2002. The bioremediation techniques were applied after hot pressurized water washing was used to remove hydrocarbons adhering to shorelines and rocks. Bioremediation strategies included monitored natural attenuation as well as accelerating biodegradation by stimulating indigenous populations through the addition of exogenous microbial populations. The sites selected for bioremediation were rocky shorelines of heterogenous granitic sediments with grain sizes ranging from sands to huge boulders; limestone-sandstone pebbles and cobbles; and fuel-coated limestone cliffs. Total surface area covered by the fuel was determined through the use of image analysis calculations. A statistical measurement of the fuel layer thickness was calculated by averaging the weights of multiple-fuel sampling increments. Bioremediation products included the use of oleophilic fertilizers; a biodegradable surfactant; and a microbial seeding agent. Determinations of saturate, aromatic, resins, and asphaltene (SARA) were performed using maltenes extraction and liquid chromatography. Microbial plating and selective enrichment with fuel as the sole carbon source were used to monitor the evolution of microbial populations in a variety of experiments. It was concluded that the biostimulation technique enhanced the efficiency of the in situ oleophilic fertilizers. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  18. Key Factors Controlling the Applicability and Efficiency of Bioremediation of Chlorinated Ethenes In Situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Yoshikawa, M.; Takeuchi, M.; Komai, T.

    2012-12-01

    Bioremediation has been considered as one of environmentally friendly and cost effective approaches for cleaning up the sites polluted by organic contaminants, such as chlorinated ethenes. Although bioremediation, in its widest sense, is not new, and many researches have been performed on bioremediation of different kinds of pollutants, an effective design and implication of in situ bioremediation still remains a challenging problem because of the complexity. Many factors may affect the applicability and efficiency of bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in situ, which include the type and concentration of contaminants, biological, geological and hydro-geological conditions of the site, physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater and soils to be treated, as well as the constraints in engineering. In this presentation, an overview together with a detailed discussion on each factor will be provided. The influences of individual factors are discussed using the data obtained or cited from different sites and experiments, and thus under different environmental conditions. The results of this study illustrated that 1) the establishment of microbial consortium is of crucial importance for a complete degradation of chlorinated ethenes, 2) in situ control of favorable conditions for increasing microbial activities for bio-degradation through a designed pathway is the key to success, 3) the focus of a successful remediation system is to design an effective delivery process that is capable of producing adequate amendment mixing of contaminant-degrading bacteria, appropriate concentrations of electron acceptors, electron donors, and microbial nutrients in the subsurface treatment area.

  19. Status of SRNL radiological field lysimeter experiment-Year 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Roberts, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Bagwell, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-10-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Radiological Field Lysimeter Experiment is a one-of-a-kind field facility designed to study radionuclide geochemical processes at a larger spatial scale (from grams to tens of kilograms sediment) and temporal scale (from months to 10 years) than is readily afforded through laboratory studies. The lysimeter facility is intended to capture the natural heterogeneity of moisture and temperature regimes in the vadose zone, the unsaturated subsurface region between the surface soil and the underlying aquifer. The 48 lysimeter columns, which contain various radionuclides (and stable iodine), were opened to rainfall infiltration on July 5, 2012. The objective of this report is to provide a status of the lysimeter facility operations and to compile data collected during FY13, including leachate volume, rainfall, and soil moisture and temperature in situ probe data. Radiological leachate data are not presented in this document but will be the subject of a separate document.1 Leachate samples were collected quarterly and shipped to Clemson University for radiological analyses. Rainfall, leachate volume, moisture and temperature probe data were collected continuously. During operations of the facility this year, there were four safety or technical concerns that required additional maintenance: 1) radioactivity was detected in one of the overflow bottles (captured water collected from the secondary containment that does not come in contact with the radiological source material); 2) rainwater accumulated within the sample-bottle storage sheds; 3) overflow containers collected more liquid than anticipated; and 4) significant spider infestation occurred in the sample-bottle storage sheds. To address the first three concerns, each of the lysimeter columns was re-plumbed to improve and to minimize the number of joint unions. To address the fourth concern regarding spiders, new sample-bottle water sheds were purchased and a pest control

  20. Bioremediation of the organochlorine pesticides, dieldrin and endrin, and their occurrence in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Emiko; Kawanaka, Youhei; Yun, Sun-Ja; Oyaizu, Hiroshi

    2009-08-01

    Dieldrin and endrin are persistent organic pollutants that cause serious environmental problems. Although these compounds have been prohibited over the past decades in most countries around the world, they are still routinely found in the environment, especially in the soil in agricultural fields. Bioremediation, including phytoremediation and rhizoremediation, is expected to be a useful cleanup method for this soil contamination. This review provides an overview of the environmental contamination by dieldrin and endrin, along with a summary of our current understanding and recent advances in bioremediation and phytoremediation of these pollutants. In particular, this review focuses on the types and abilities of plants and microorganisms available for accumulating and degrading dieldrin and endrin.

  1. Brevibacterium frigoritolerans as a Novel Organism for the Bioremediation of Phorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariyal, Monu; Gupta, V K; Mandal, Kousik; Jindal, Vikas

    2015-11-01

    Phorate, an organophosphorus insecticide, has been found effective for the control of various insect pests. However, it is an extremely hazardous insecticide and causes a potential threat to ecosystem. Bioremediation is a promising approach to degrade the pesticide from the soil. The screening of soil from sugarcane fields resulted in identification of Brevibacterium frigoritolerans, a microorganism with potential for phorate bioremediation was determined. B. frigoritolerans strain Imbl 2.1 resulted in the active metabolization of phorate by between 89.81% and 92.32% from soils amended with phorate at different levels (100, 200, 300 mg kg(-1) soil). But in case of control soil, 33.76%-40.92% degradation were observed. Among metabolites, sulfone was found as the main metabolite followed by sulfoxide. Total phorate residues were not found to follow the first order kinetics. This demonstrated that B. frigoritolerans has potential for bioremediation of phorate both in liquid cultures and agricultural soils.

  2. Idaho field experiment 1981. Volume 2: measurement data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Start, G E; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R; Cate, J H; Hukari, N F; Dickson, C R

    1984-04-01

    The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in southeastern Idaho over the upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were conducted between July 15 and 30, 1981. Releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made for 8-hour periods from 46m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24km square. Also, a single total integrated sample of about 30 hours duration was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72km square (using 6km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL MESONET. SF/sub 6/ tracer plume releases were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were collected. Volume II lists the data in tabular form or cites the special supplemental reports by other participating contractors. While the primary user file and the data archive are maintained on 9 track/1600 cpi magnetic tapes, listings of the individual values are provided for the user who either cannot utilize the tapes or wishes to preview the data. The accuracies and quality of these data are described.

  3. Games for groundwater governance: field experiments in Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Meinzen-Dick

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is a common-pool resource that is subject to depletion in many places around the world as a result of increased use of irrigation and water-demanding cash crops. Where state capacity to control groundwater use is limited, collective action is important to increase recharge and restrict highly water-consumptive crops. We present results of field experiments in hard rock areas of Andhra Pradesh, India, to examine factors affecting groundwater use. Two nongovernmental organizations (NGOs ran the games in communities where they were working to improve watershed and water management. Results indicate that, when the links between crop choice and groundwater depletion is made explicit, farmers can act cooperatively to address this problem. Longer NGO involvement in the villages was associated with more cooperative outcomes in the games. Individuals with more education and higher perceived community social capital played more cooperatively, but neither gender nor method of payment had a significantly effect on individual behavior. When participants could repeat the game with communication, similar crop choice patterns were observed. The games provided an entry point for discussion on the understanding of communities of the interconnectedness of groundwater use and crop choice.

  4. Geothermal injection treatment: process chemistry, field experiences, and design options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindle, C.H.; Mercer, B.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Blair, S.C.; Myers, D.A.

    1984-09-01

    The successful development of geothermal reservoirs to generate electric power will require the injection disposal of approximately 700,000 gal/h (2.6 x 10/sup 6/ 1/h) of heat-depleted brine for every 50,000 kW of generating capacity. To maintain injectability, the spent brine must be compatible with the receiving formation. The factors that influence this brine/formation compatibility and tests to quantify them are discussed in this report. Some form of treatment will be necessary prior to injection for most situations; the process chemistry involved to avoid and/or accelerate the formation of precipitate particles is also discussed. The treatment processes, either avoidance or controlled precipitation approaches, are described in terms of their principles and demonstrated applications in the geothermal field and, when such experience is limited, in other industrial use. Monitoring techniques for tracking particulate growth, the effect of process parameters on corrosion and well injectability are presented. Examples of brine injection, preinjection treatment, and recovery from injectivity loss are examined and related to the aspects listed above.

  5. A measurement system applicable for landslide experiments in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wen-Zhao; Xu, Xiang-Zhou; Wang, Wen-Long; Yang, Ji-Shan; Liu, Ya-Kun; Xu, Fei-Long

    2016-04-01

    Observation of gravity erosion in the field with strong sunshine and wind poses a challenge. Here, a novel topography meter together with a movable tent addresses the challenge. With the topography meter, a 3D geometric shape of the target surface can be digitally reconstructed. Before the commencement of a test, the laser generator position and the camera sightline should be adjusted with a sight calibrator. Typically, the topography meter can measure the gravity erosion on the slope with a gradient of 30°-70°. Two methods can be used to obtain a relatively clear video, despite the extreme steepness of the slopes. One method is to rotate the laser source away from the slope to ensure that the camera sightline remains perpendicular to the laser plane. Another way is to move the camera farther away from the slope in which the measured volume of the slope needs to be corrected; this method will reduce distortion of the image. In addition, installation of tent poles with concrete columns helps to surmount the altitude difference on steep slopes. Results observed by the topography meter in real landslide experiments are rational and reliable.

  6. Cooperation and conflict: field experiments in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Antonio S; Mace, Ruth

    2014-10-01

    The idea that cohesive groups, in which individuals help each other, have a competitive advantage over groups composed of selfish individuals has been widely suggested as an explanation for the evolution of cooperation in humans. Recent theoretical models propose the coevolution of parochial altruism and intergroup conflict, when in-group altruism and out-group hostility contribute to the group's success in these conflicts. However, the few empirical attempts to test this hypothesis do not use natural groups and conflate measures of in-group and unbiased cooperative behaviour. We conducted field experiments based on naturalistic measures of cooperation (school/charity donations and lost letters' returns) with two religious groups with an on-going history of conflict-Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland. Conflict was associated with reduced donations to out-group schools and the return of out-group letters, but we found no evidence that it influences in-group cooperation. Rather, socio-economic status was the major determinant of cooperative behaviour. Our study presents a challenge to dominant perspectives on the origins of human cooperation, and has implications for initiatives aiming to promote conflict resolution and social cohesion.

  7. Distribution of electric field for carbon nanotube assembly: Experiments (Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soongeun KWON; Soo-Hyun KIM; Kwang-ho KIM; Myung-chang KANG; Hyung-woo LEE

    2011-01-01

    The distribution effect of electric field on the alignment and attachment of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated.The experimental results were compared with the simulation results according to three different shaped electrodes. In previous simulation, the round shaped electrodes were expected to be more effective for aligning and attaching a single CNT between two electrodes than conical or rectangular shaped electrodes. To verify the simulation results, three different shaped electrodes were introduced and a single multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) was attached. The optimal conditions for aligning and attaching MWNTs such as the frequency, applied voltage and concentration of MWNTs solution were investigated. Through repeated experiments, frequency of 100 kHz-10 MHz, applied voltage of 0.3-1.3 Vrms/μm, concentration of 5 μg/mL in MWNTs solution were obtained as a possible condition range to attach MWNTs. Under these conditions, the yield of MWNTs attachment between two electrodes was up to 70%. In previous simulation, furthermore, it was verified that the size of the stable or quasi-stable region made CNTs aligned and attached on different shaped electrodes from the comparison of the experimental and simulation results. Most single MWNT attachment was accomplished on the round shaped electrodes.

  8. ASSESSMENT OF DISTILLERY EFFLUENT IRRIGATION ON SOIL MICROBES AND ITS BIOREMEDIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi D. M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the assessment of toxicity of distillery effluent on soil microorganisms and its quality improvement through bioremediation using Pseudomonas spp. Under lab scale experiment, different dilutions of distillery effluent i.e. 25%, 50%, 75% were used to examine effects on physico-chemical parameters of effluent and on soil microflora e.g. algae, bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes. The results revealed that dilution may reduce significantly the metal contents and other toxicants in the effluent as well as in the soil. Statistical analysis revealed that bioremediation of distillery effluent using Pseudomonas spp. caused significant reduction in BOD, COD, TDS, TN, TP and color. The study indicates that raw distillery effluent is harmful for soil microflora and bioremediation improves the quality of distillery effluent making it suitable as a soil amendment.

  9. Geophysical monitoring of hydrological and biogeochemical transformations associated with Cr(VI) bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Susan S; Williams, Ken; Conrad, Mark E; Faybishenko, Boris; Peterson, John; Chen, Jinsong; Long, Phil; Hazent, Terry

    2008-05-15

    Understanding how hydrological and biogeochemical properties change over space and time in response to remedial treatments is hindered by our ability to monitor these processes with sufficient resolution and over field relevant scales. Here, we explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological and biogeochemical transformations associated with a Cr(VI) bioremediation experiment performed at Hanford, WA. We first integrated hydrological wellbore and geophysical tomographic data sets to estimate hydrological zonation at the study site. Using results from laboratory biogeophysical experiments and constraints provided by field geochemical data sets, we then interpreted time-lapse seismic and radar tomographic data sets, collected during thirteen acquisition campaigns over a three year experimental period, in terms of hydrological and biogeochemical transformations. The geophysical monitoring data sets were used to infer: the spatial distribution of injected electron donor; the evolution of gas bubbles; variations in total dissolved solids (nitrate and sulfate) as a function of pumping activity; the formation of precipitates and dissolution of calcites; and concomitant changes in porosity. Although qualitative in nature, the integrated interpretation illustrates how geophysical techniques have the potential to provide a wealth of information about coupled hydrobiogeochemical responses to remedial treatments in high spatial resolution and in a minimally invasive manner. Particularly novel aspects of our study include the use of multiple lines of evidence to constrain the interpretation of a long-term, field-scale geophysical monitoring data set and the interpretation of the transformations as a function of hydrological heterogeneity and pumping activity.

  10. BIOSTIMULATION CAN SOMETIMES ENHANCE ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP - An Editorial Viewpoint on Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Exxon Valdex oil spill, which led to the enactment of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, gave rise to the largest bioremediation field trial ever attempted. A research sutdy was conducted by EPA in 1989 and 1990 to develop data to support the recommendation to go forward w...

  11. CONTAMINANT REDISTRIBUTION CAN CONFOUND INTERPRETATION OF OIL-SPILL BIOREMEDIATION STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The physical redistribution of oil between the inside and outside of experimental plots can affect the results of bioremediation field studies that are conducted on shorelines contaminated by real oil spills. Because untreated oil from the surrounding beach will enter the plot, ...

  12. Stimulating in situ surfactant production to increase contaminant bioavailability and augment bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haws, N. W.; Bentley, H. W.; Yiannakakis, A.; Bentley, A. J.; Cassidy, D. P.

    2006-12-01

    The effectiveness of a bioremediation strategy is largely dependent on relationships between contaminant sequestration (geochemical limitations) and microbial degradation potential (biological limitations). As contaminant bioavailability becomes mass transfer limited, contaminant removal will show less sensitivity to biodegradation enhancements without concurrent enhancements to rates of mass transfer into the bioavailable phase. Implementing a strategy that can simultaneously address geochemical and biological limitations is motivated by a subsurface zone of liquid petroleum hydrocarbons (LPH) contamination that is in excess of 10 acres (40,000 sq. meters). Biodegradation potential at the site is high; however, observed biodegradation rates are generally low, indicative of bioavailability limitations (e.g., low aqueous solubilities, nutrient deficiencies, and/or mass transfer limitations), and estimates indicate that bioremediation (i.e., biosparging/bioventing) with unaugmented biodegradation may be unable to achieve the remedial objectives within an acceptable time. Bench-scale experiments using soils native to the site provide evidence that, in addition to nutrient additions, a pulsed oxygen delivery can increase biodegradation rates by stimulating the microbial production of biosurfactants (rhamnolipids), leading to a reduction in surface tension and an increase in contaminant bioavailability. Pilot-scale tests at the field site are evaluating the effectiveness of stimulating in situ biosurfactant production using cyclic biosparging. The cyclic sparging creates extended periods of alternating aerobic and oxygen-depleted conditions in the submerged smear zone. The increased bioavailability of LPH and the resulting biodegradation enhancements during the test are evaluated using measurements of surface tension (as confirmation of biosurfactant accumulation) and nitrate concentrations (as substantiation of anaerobic biodegradation during shut-off periods). The

  13. Hydrogen as an Indicator to Assess Biological Activity During Trace-Metal Bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter R. Jaffe, John Komlos, Derick Brown

    2005-09-27

    2 concentration in the presence of an organic as electron donor is not only dependent on the biokinetic coefficients of the TEAP, but also the concentration of the organic substrate, and that the H2 concentration does not start to change very dramatically as long as the organic substrate concentration remains below the half saturation constant. The results for this phase of research are provided in Section 1. The second phase of research measured steady-state H2 concentrations under iron reducing conditions using NABIR Field Research Center background soil in a simulated bioremediation scenario involving acetate injection to stimulate indigenous microbial activity in a flow-through column. Steady-state H2 concentrations measured during this long-term (500 day) column experiment were higher than observed for iron-reducing conditions in the field even though evidence suggests that iron reduction was the dominant TEAP in the column. Additional column experiments were performed to determine the effect of iron bioavailability on steady-state H2 concentrations using the humics analogue, AQDS (9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid). The iron reduction rate in the column with AQDS was double the rate in a parallel column without AQDS and lower steady state H2 levels were observed in the presence of AQDS, indicating that even though iron reduction does occur, a decreased bioavailability of iron may inhibit iron reduction such that H2 concentrations increase to levels that are more typical for less energetically favorable reactions (sulfate-reduction, methanogenigesis). The results for this phase of research are in Section 2. A final phase of research measured the effect of carbon concentration and iron bioavailability on surface bound iron reduction kinetics and steady-state H2 levels using synthetic iron oxide coated sand (IOCS). Results show a significant decrease in the microbial iron reduction and acetate oxidation rates for systems with surface bound Fe(III) (IOCS

  14. Germination and initial growth of Campomanesia xanthocarpa O. Berg. (Myrtaceae), in petroleum-contaminated soil and bioremediated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogosz, A M; Bona, C; Santos, G O; Botosso, P C

    2010-11-01

    In 2000 there was an oil spill at the Getúlio Vargas Refinery (REPAR) in Paraná. Nearly five years after contamination and the use of bioremediation, a study was carried out to identify the effects of the contaminated soil and the bioremediated soil on the germination and initial growth of C. xanthocarpa. The experiment was established with soil from REPAR, with three treatment groups: contaminated soil (C), bioremediated soil (B) and uncontaminated soil (U); with five repetitions of 50 seeds each. There was no significant difference in the percentage of germination and the speed of germination index. The production of total biomass (30 - 60 days) and shoot biomass (60 days) was greater in the bioremediated soil compared to the other treatments. The averages for the root biomass were lower in the contaminated soil than in the bioremediated soil. The shoot length and the total length of the seedling in the contaminated soil and uncontaminated soil were lower than in the bioremediated soil.

  15. Germination and initial growth of Campomanesia xanthocarpa O. Berg. (Myrtaceae, in petroleum-contaminated soil and bioremediated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM. Gogosz

    Full Text Available In 2000 there was an oil spill at the Getúlio Vargas Refinery (REPAR in Paraná. Nearly five years after contamination and the use of bioremediation, a study was carried out to identify the effects of the contaminated soil and the bioremediated soil on the germination and initial growth of C. xanthocarpa. The experiment was established with soil from REPAR, with three treatment groups: contaminated soil (C, bioremediated soil (B and uncontaminated soil (U; with five repetitions of 50 seeds each. There was no significant difference in the percentage of germination and the speed of germination index. The production of total biomass (30 - 60 days and shoot biomass (60 days was greater in the bioremediated soil compared to the other treatments. The averages for the root biomass were lower in the contaminated soil than in the bioremediated soil. The shoot length and the total length of the seedling in the contaminated soil and uncontaminated soil were lower than in the bioremediated soil.

  16. Enhanced biodegradation of transformer oil in soils with cyclodextrin--from the laboratory to the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Mónika; Leitgib, Laura; Gruiz, Katalin; Fenyvesi, Eva; Szaniszló, Nikoletta; Szejtli, József; Fava, Fabio

    2005-03-01

    The use cyclodextrins for the intensification of bioremediation by improving the mobility and bioavailability of contaminants has recently been studied. In this work, the role of randomly methylated beta-cyclodextrin in the bioremediation of soils contaminated with transformer oil was studied both in bench scale bioreactors and through field experiments. The aims of this research were to (a) establish the scientific background of a cyclodextrin-based soil bioremediation technology, (b) demonstrate its feasibility and effectiveness in the field, and (c) develop an integrated methodology, consisting of a combination of physical, chemical, biological and ecotoxicological analytical methods, for efficiently monitoring the technology performances. The stepwise increasing scale of the experiments and the application of the integrated analytical methodology supported the development of a scientifically established new technology and the identification of the advantages and the limitations of its application in the field. At each phase of the study, randomly methylated beta-cyclodextrin was found to significantly enhance the bioremediation and detoxification of the transformer oil-contaminated soils employed by increasing the bioavailability of the pollutants and the activity of indigenous microorganisms.

  17. Changes in protein expression across laboratory and field experiments in Geobacter bemidjiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkley, Eric D; Wrighton, Kelly C; Castelle, Cindy J; Anderson, Brian J; Wilkins, Michael J; Shah, Vega; Arbour, Tyler; Brown, Joseph N; Singer, Steven W; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2015-03-06

    Bacterial extracellular metal respiration, as carried out by members of the genus Geobacter, is of interest for applications including microbial fuel cells and bioremediation. Geobacter bemidjiensis is the major species whose growth is stimulated during groundwater amendment with acetate. We have carried out label-free proteomics studies of G. bemidjiensis grown with acetate as the electron donor and either fumarate, ferric citrate, or one of two hydrous ferric oxide mineral types as electron acceptor. The major class of proteins whose expression changes across these conditions is c-type cytochromes, many of which are known to be involved in extracellular metal reduction in other, better-characterized Geobacter species. Some proteins with multiple homologues in G. bemidjiensis (OmcS, OmcB) had different expression patterns than observed for their G. sulfurreducens homologues under similar growth conditions. We also compared the proteome from our study to a prior proteomics study of biomass recovered from an aquifer in Colorado, where the microbial community was dominated by strains closely related to G. bemidjiensis. We detected an increased number of proteins with functions related to motility and chemotaxis in the Colorado field samples compared to the laboratory samples, suggesting the importance of motility for in situ extracellular metal respiration.

  18. Changes in protein expression across laboratory and field experiments in Geobacter bemidjiensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkley, Eric D.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Castelle, Cindy; Anderson, Brian J.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Shah, Vega; Arbour, Tyler; Brown, Joseph N.; Singer, Steven W.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2015-03-06

    Bacterial extracellular metal respiration, as carried out by members of the genus Geobacter, is of interest for applications including microbial fuel cells and bioremediation. Geobacter bemidjiensis is the major species whose growth is stimulated during groundwater amendment with acetate. We have carried out label-free proteomics studies of Geobacter bemidjiensis grown with acetate as the electron donor and either fumarate, ferric citrate, or one of two hydrous ferric oxide mineral types as electron acceptor. The major class of proteins whose expression changes across these conditions is c-type cytochromes, many of which are known to be involved in extracellular metal reduction in other, better-characterized Geobacter species. Some proteins with multiple homologues in G. bemidjiensis (OmcS, OmcB) had different expression patterns than observed for their G. sulfurreducens homologues under similar growth conditions. We also compared the proteome from our study to a prior proteomics study of biomass recovered from an aquifer in Colorado, where the microbial community was dominated by strains closely-related to G. bemidjiensis. We detected an increased number of proteins with functions related to motility and chemotaxis in the Colorado field samples compared to the laboratory samples, suggesting the importance of motility for in situ extracellular metal respiration.

  19. Near-Real-Time Geophysical and Biological Monitoring of Bioremediation Methods at a Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrell, A. N.; Haas, A.; Revil, A.; Figueroa, L. A.; Rodriguez, D.; Smartgeo

    2010-12-01

    Bioremediation has been utilized on subsurface uranium contamination at the Rifle IRFC site in Colorado by injecting acetate as an electron donor. However, successfully monitoring the progress of subsurface bioremediation over time is difficult and requires long-term stewardship considerations to ensure cost effective treatment due to biological, chemical, and hydrological heterogeneity. In order to better understand the complex heterogeneities of the subsurface and the resultant effect on microbial activity, innovative subsurface monitoring techniques must be investigated. The key hypothesis of this work is that a combination of data from electrode-based microbial monitoring, self potential monitoring, oxidation reduction potential, and water level sensors will provide sufficient information for identifying and localizing bioremediation activity and will provide better predictions of deleterious biogeochemical change. In order to test the proof-of-concept of these sensing techniques and to deconvolve the redox activity from other electric potential changing events involved in bioremediation, a 2D tank (2.4m x 1.2m x 0.6m) experiment has been developed. Field material obtained from the Rifle IRFC site will be packed in the tank and an artificial groundwater will flow across the tank through constant-head boundaries. The experiment will utilize sensors for electrode-based microbial monitoring, self potential monitoring, oxidation-reduction potential, and water level monitoring. Electrode-based microbial monitoring will be used to estimate microbial activity by measuring how much electrical current indigenous bacteria are producing. Self potential monitoring will be used to measure the natural electrical voltage potential between sampled points, providing indications of when and where electrical activity is occurring; such as reduction of radionuclides. In addition to the application of sensing technologies, this work will explore the application of a wireless sensor

  20. Communication, Community, and Disconnection: Pre-Service Teachers in Virtual School Field Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Christian; Eckdahl, Kelli; Morone, Mike; Cook, Vicki; Giblin, Thomas; Coon, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of 11 graduate-level pre-service teachers completing Virtual School Field Experiences (VSFEs) with cooperating teachers in fully online, asynchronous high school courses in New York State. The VSFEs included a 7-week online teacher training course, and a 7-week online field experience. Pre-service teachers…

  1. Large Scale Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Waste at Various Installations of ONGC. India: Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajoy Kumar Mandal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In situ and ex situ bioremediation of oil contaminated effluent pits, sludge pits, oil spilled land and tank bottom, and effluent treatment plant (ETP oily sludge was carried out at Ankleshwar, Mehsana, Assam and Cauvery Asset of Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Limited (ONGC, India. The types of contaminant were heavy paraffinic, asphaltic and light crude oil and emulsified oily sludge /contaminated soil. An indigenous microbial consortium was developed by assembling four species of bacteria, isolated from various oil contaminated sites of India, which could biodegrade different fractions of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH of the oily waste to environment friendly end products. The said consortium was on a large scale field applied to the above oil installations and it successfully bioremediated 30,706 tonnes of different types of oily waste. In 65 case studies of different batch size of in situ and ex situ bioremediation processes, the initial TPH content varying from 69.20 to 662.70 g/kg of oily waste has been biodegraded to 5.30 – 16.90 g/kg of oily waste in a range of 2 to 33 months. Biodegradation rate varied in the range of 0.22 – 1.10 Kg TPH /day/m2 area due to the climatic condition of the treatment zone and the type of waste treated. The bioremediated soil was non-toxic and natural vegetation was found to be grown on the same ground. Successful eco-restoration of one large effluent pit of 26,000 m2 area was carried out by cultivation of local fish species after completion of bioremediation. Bioremediation technology has helped ONGC with the management of their hazardous oily wastes in an environment friendly manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.68.2.5632

  2. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  3. Synergistic effects of bioremediation and electrokinetics in the remediation of petroleum-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuhai; Fan, Ruijuan; Li, Tingting; Hartog, Niels; Li, Fengmei; Yang, Xuelian

    2014-08-01

    The present study evaluated the coupling interactions between bioremediation (BIO) and electrokinetics (EK) in the remediation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) by using bio-electrokinetics (BIO-EK) with a rotatory 2-D electric field. The results demonstrated an obvious positive correlation between the degradation extents of TPH and electric intensity both in the EK and BIO-EK tests. The use of BIO-EK showed a significant improvement in degradation of TPH as compared to BIO or EK alone. The actual degradation curve in BIO-EK tests fitted well with the simulated curve obtained by combining the degradation curves in BIO- and EK-only tests during the first 60 d, indicating a superimposed effect of biological degradation and electrochemical stimulation. The synergistic effect was particularly expressed during the later phase of the experiment, concurrent with changes in the microbial community structure. The community composition changed mainly according to the duration of the electric field, leading to a reduction in diversity. No significant spatial shifts in microbial community composition and bacterial numbers were detected among different sampling positions. Soil pH was uniform during the experimental process, soil temperature showed no variations between the soil chambers with and without an electric field.

  4. A Comparison of Field-Based and Lab-Based Experiments to Evaluate User Experience of Personalised Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing debate in the literature regarding the tradeoffs between lab and field evaluation of mobile devices. This paper presents a comparison of field-based and lab-based experiments to evaluate user experience of personalised mobile devices at large sports events. A lab experiment is recommended when the testing focus is on the user interface and application-oriented usability related issues. However, the results suggest that a field experiment is more suitable for investigating a wider range of factors affecting the overall acceptability of the designed mobile service. Such factors include the system function and effects of actual usage contexts aspects. Where open and relaxed communication is important (e.g., where participant groups are naturally reticent to communicate, this is more readily promoted by the use of a field study.

  5. Electric-field-induced crack patterns: Experiments and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Tajkera; Choudhury, Moutushi Dutta; Dutta, Tapati; Tarafdar, Sujata

    2012-07-01

    We report a study of crack patterns formed in laponite gel drying in an electric field. The sample dries in a circular petri dish and the field is radial, acting inward or outward. A system of radial cracks forms in the setup with the center terminal positive, while predominantly cross-radial cracks form when the center is at a negative potential. The laponite accumulates near the negative terminal making the layer thicker at this end. A spring model on a square lattice is used to simulate the desiccation crack formation, with an additional radial force acting due to the electric field. With the radial force acting outward, radial cracks form and for the reversed field cross-radial cracks form. This conforms to the observation that laponite platelets become effectively positive due to overcharging and are attracted towards the negative terminal.

  6. Mechanistically-Based Field-Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Scheibe; Alexandre Tartakovsky; Brian Wood; Joe Seymour

    2007-04-19

    Effective environmental management of DOE sites requires reliable prediction of reactive transport phenomena. A central issue in prediction of subsurface reactive transport is the impact of multiscale physical, chemical, and biological heterogeneity. Heterogeneity manifests itself through incomplete mixing of reactants at scales below those at which concentrations are explicitly defined (i.e., the numerical grid scale). This results in a mismatch between simulated reaction processes (formulated in terms of average concentrations) and actual processes (controlled by local concentrations). At the field scale, this results in apparent scale-dependence of model parameters and inability to utilize laboratory parameters in field models. Accordingly, most field modeling efforts are restricted to empirical estimation of model parameters by fitting to field observations, which renders extrapolation of model predictions beyond fitted conditions unreliable. The objective of this project is to develop a theoretical and computational framework for (1) connecting models of coupled reactive transport from pore-scale processes to field-scale bioremediation through a hierarchy of models that maintain crucial information from the smaller scales at the larger scales; and (2) quantifying the uncertainty that is introduced by both the upscaling process and uncertainty in physical parameters. One of the challenges of addressing scale-dependent effects of coupled processes in heterogeneous porous media is the problem-specificity of solutions. Much effort has been aimed at developing generalized scaling laws or theories, but these require restrictive assumptions that render them ineffective in many real problems. We propose instead an approach that applies physical and numerical experiments at small scales (specifically the pore scale) to a selected model system in order to identify the scaling approach appropriate to that type of problem. Although the results of such studies will

  7. Missile launch detection electric field perturbation experiment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, R.J.; Rynne, T.M.

    1993-04-28

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and SARA Inc. participated in the ATMD missile launch activities that occurred at WSMR during January 1993. LLNL and SARA deployed sensors for monitoring of basic phenomena. An attempt was made to measure perturbations of the earth geo-potential during the launch of a Lance missile. The occurrence of the perturbation is expected from the conducting body of the missile and the exhaust plume. A set of voltage-probe antennas were used to monitor the local electric field perturbation from the launch at ranges of approximately 1 km. Examination of the data acquired during the launch period failed to show identifiable correlation of the field variations with the launch event. Three reasons are ascribed to this lack of event data: (1) The electric field potential variations have a limited spatial correlation length - the fields measured in one region have little correlation to measurements made at distances of a kilometer away. The potential variations are related to localized atmospheric disturbances and are generally unpredictable. A value for the spatial correlation length is also not known. (2) The conductivity of the plume and missile body are not adequate to produce a field perturbation of adequate magnitude. Phenomena related to the exhaust plume and missile may exist and be outside of the collection range of the equipment employed for these measurements. (3) The presence of 60 Hz power line noise was of sufficient magnitude to irreversibly contaminate measurements.

  8. Taking Them into the Field: Mathematics Teacher Candidate Learning about Equity-Oriented Teaching Practices in a Mediated Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sara Sunshine

    2012-01-01

    Teacher education programs have been criticized as too theoretical with university courses disconnected from the practical realities of classrooms. This single case study investigates a model of teacher education that worked to bridge the coursework-fieldwork gap in teacher education. The Mediated Field Experience (MFE) is a field experience…

  9. It is an Experience, Not a Lesson: The Nature of High School Students' Experiences at a Biological Field Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Marc E.

    The purpose of this case study was to describe the nature of high school students' experiences in the immersive four-day field experience at Stone Laboratory Biological Field Station including excursions to Kelley's Island and South Bass Island. Six tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade students participated through interviews, photovoice, observations, and a survey. Pretrip semi-structured interviews were conducted to understand each participant student's relationship with science. Participants were given cameras to record their field trip experiences to relate what they found interesting, important, and exciting. Back at school after the field trip, the participants were asked to choose their five most meaningful photographs, and write a short essay to describe the significance of each image. A posttrip semi-structured interview explored each participant's experiences during the field trip. An unstructured interview was conducted to discuss each participant's full photograph gallery from the field trip. Interview transcripts were member checked with one minor wording change. Analysis consisted of open coding using apriori codes derived from the ecological framework and emergent codes derived from the data. Coding was duplicated through multiple readers. Significant findings included: 1) Prior experience, prior knowledge, and funds of knowledge added relevance and value to an experience, facilitating interest development; 2) Experiences appeared to be more meaningful when all the senses were stimulated; 3) Friends and peers were an essential part of a quality experience; 4) Quality experiences included a wow factor, or sudden awareness; 5) Teachers needed to be within the experience, not the focus of the experience, and needed to be available to answer questions, be enthusiastic when a discovery was made, and promote student reflection concerning their perceptions and discoveries; 6) A quality informal learning situation incorporated the cognitive/affective, physical

  10. MetaRouter: bioinformatics for bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Florencio; Guijas, David; Valencia, Alfonso; De Lorenzo, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Bioremediation, the exploitation of biological catalysts (mostly microorganisms) for removing pollutants from the environment, requires the integration of huge amounts of data from different sources. We have developed MetaRouter, a system for maintaining heterogeneous information related to bioremediation in a framework that allows its query, administration and mining (application of methods for extracting new knowledge). MetaRouter is an application intended for laboratories working in biodegradation and bioremediation, which need to maintain and consult public and private data, linked internally and with external databases, and to extract new information from it. Among the data-mining features is a program included for locating biodegradative pathways for chemical compounds according to a given set of constraints and requirements. The integration of biodegradation information with the corresponding protein and genome data provides a suitable framework for studying the global properties of the bioremediation network. The system can be accessed and administrated through a web interface. The full-featured system (except administration facilities) is freely available at http://pdg.cnb.uam.es/MetaRouter. Additional material: http://www.pdg.cnb.uam.es/biodeg_net/MetaRouter. PMID:15608267

  11. Downscaling the in vitro test of fungal bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: methodological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevinskas, Tomas; Mickienė, Rūta; Maruška, Audrius; Stankevičius, Mantas; Tiso, Nicola; Mikašauskaitė, Jurgita; Ragažinskienė, Ona; Levišauskas, Donatas; Bartkuvienė, Violeta; Snieškienė, Vilija; Stankevičienė, Antanina; Polcaro, Chiara; Galli, Emanuela; Donati, Enrica; Tekorius, Tomas; Kornyšova, Olga; Kaškonienė, Vilma

    2016-02-01

    The miniaturization and optimization of a white rot fungal bioremediation experiment is described in this paper. The optimized procedure allows determination of the degradation kinetics of anthracene. The miniaturized procedure requires only 2.5 ml of culture medium. The experiment is more precise, robust, and better controlled comparing it to classical tests in flasks. Using this technique, different parts, i.e., the culture medium, the fungi, and the cotton seal, can be analyzed. A simple sample preparation speeds up the analytical process. Experiments performed show degradation of anthracene up to approximately 60% by Irpex lacteus and up to approximately 40% by Pleurotus ostreatus in 25 days. Bioremediation of anthracene by the consortium of I. lacteus and P. ostreatus shows the biodegradation of anthracene up to approximately 56% in 23 days. At the end of the experiment, the surface tension of culture medium decreased comparing it to the blank, indicating generation of surfactant compounds.

  12. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, W.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective eld theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering or current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral di*erences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  13. Microbial Bioremediation of Fuel Oil Hydrocarbons in Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna Pavitran

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Pollution in marine environment due to heavier petroleum products such as high-speeddiesel is known to take from days to months for complete natural remediation owing to its lowvolatility. For the survival of marine flora and fauna, it is important to control pollution causedby such recalcitrant and xenobiotic substances. Several petroleum hydrocarbons found in natureare toxic and recalcitrant. Therefore, pollution due to high-speed diesel is a cause of concern.The natural dispersion of high-speed diesel, a slow process, is attributed to an overall combinedeffect of physico-chemical and biological processes which take months for complete dispersion.History of marine oil spill bioremediation indicates limited laboratory studies. But experiencesfrom various oil spill management and field trials indicate important role of bioremediation, where,biodegradation of hydrocarbons through microbial mediators plays a major role in pollutant oildispersion. These microbial mediators such as bioemulsifiers and fimbrae, help in emulsification,dispersion, allowing attachment of bacteria to oil layers, followed by substrate-specific enzymaticbiodegradation in water.

  14. Experimenting with Quantum Fields in Curved Spacetime in the Lab

    CERN Document Server

    Prémont-Schwarz, Isabeau

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we will investigate how one can create emergent curved spacetimes by locally tuning the coupling constants of condensed matter systems. In the continuum limit we thus obtain continuous effective quantum fields living on curved spacetimes. In particular, using Stingnet condensates we can obtain effective electromagnetism. We will show for example how we obtain quantum electrodynamics in a blackhole (Schwarzschild) spacetime.

  15. Soil Science as a Field Discipline - Experiences in Iowa, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burras, C. Lee

    2015-04-01

    Effective field understanding of soils is crucial. This is true everywhere but especially so in Iowa, a 15 million hectare state in the central USA's "corn belt." Iowa is intensely farmed and almost exclusively privately owned. Many regions of Iowa have had over 90% of their land area in row crops for the past 60 years. In these regions two very common land management strategies are tile drainage (1.5 million km total) and high rates of fertilization (e.g., 200 kg N/ha-yr for cropland) Iowa also has problematic environmental issues including high rates of erosion, excessive sediment and nutrient pollution in water bodies and episodic catastrophic floods. Given the preceding the Agronomy, Environmental Science and Sustainable Agriculture programs at Iowa State University (ISU) offer a strong suite of soil science classes - undergraduate through graduate. The objective of this presentation is to review selected field based soil science courses offered by those programs. This review includes contrasting and comparing campus-based and immersion classes. Immersion classes include ones offered at Iowa Lakeside Laboratory, as "soil judging" and internationally. Findings over the past 20 years are consistent. Students at all levels gain soil science knowledge, competency and confidence proportional to the amount of time spent in field activities. Furthermore their professional skepticism is sharpened. They are also preferentially hired even in career postings that do not require fieldwork. In other words, field learning results in better soil science professionals who have highly functional and sought after knowledge.

  16. International Field Experiences Promote Professional Development for Sustainability Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, R. Bruce; Kimmel, Courtney; Robertson, David P.; Mortimer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe, explain and evaluate a graduate education program that provides international project experiences and builds competencies related to collaborative problem-solving, cultural capacity to work globally and sustainable development. Design/methodology/approach: Qualitative analysis of survey data from 28 students…

  17. The Mistra experiment for field containment code validation first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caron-Charles, M.; Blumenfeld, L. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2001-07-01

    The MISTRA facility is a large scale experiment, designed for the purpose of thermal-hydraulics multi-D codes validation. A short description of the facility, the set up of the instrumentation and the test program are presented. Then, the first experimental results, studying helium injection in the containment and their calculations are detailed. (author)

  18. Incentives versus sorting in tournaments: evidence from a field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuven, E.; Oosterbeek, H.; Sonnemans, J.; van der Klaauw, B.

    2009-01-01

    A vast body of empirical studies lends support to the incentive effects of rankorder tournaments. Evidence comes from experiments in laboratories and non-experimental studies exploiting sports or firm data. Selection of competitors across tournaments may bias these non-experimental studies, whereas

  19. Incentives versus sorting in tournaments : evidence from a field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuven, E.; Oosterbeek, H.; Sonnemans, J.; van der Klauw, B.

    2007-01-01

    A vast body of empirical studies lends support to the incentive effects of rankorder tournaments. Direct evidence comes from experiments in laboratories or from non-experimental sports events (golf, tennis). The short duration of the tasks at hand or the lack of distractors may, however, limit the e

  20. Difficult Airway Management in Field Conditions: Somalia Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Ahmet Selim; Nasır, Serdar Nazif

    2015-10-01

    Difficult airway is defined as having the patient's mask ventilation or difficult tracheal intubation of an experienced anaesthesiologist. A number of reasons, such as congenital or acquired anatomical anomalies, can cause difficult intubation and difficult ventilation. Keeping all equipment ready for airway management of patients will reduce mortality and complications. In this case, it is intended that the submission of difficult airway management who encountered in mandibular reconstruction for mandible bone defect repairing with reconstruction plates before at the field conditions in Somalia.

  1. Sites for Student Field Experiences in Refugee Mental Health. Task VI--Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, George; And Others

    This report on sites for student field experiences in refugee mental health has been prepared by the University of Minnesota's Mental Health Technical Assistance Center for the state refugee assistance programs. After a brief introduction describing the mission of the Technical Assistance Center, the characteristics of field experience in mental…

  2. Using Field Experiments to Change the Template of How We Teach Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, John A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author explains why field experiments can improve what we teach and how we teach economics. Economists no longer operate as passive observers of economic phenomena. Instead, they participate actively in the research process by collecting data from field experiments to investigate the economics of everyday life. This change can…

  3. Community-Based Field Experiences in Teacher Education: Possibilities for a Pedagogical Third Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Heidi L.

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses the importance of community-based field experiences as a feature of teacher education programs. Through a qualitative case study, prospective teachers' work with homeless youth in an after-school initiative is presented. Framing community-based field experiences in teacher education through "third space" theory, the…

  4. The Influence of Technology-Rich Early Childhood Field Experiences on Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Nicholas; Lux, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Despite a comprehensive body of research on field experiences in teacher education, technology-rich early field experiences in early childhood environments is one particular area of inquiry lacking substantive current research. Therefore, this study was conducted to better understand how preservice teachers' perceptions of global concepts related…

  5. The Effects of Primary Sources and Field Trip Experience on the Knowledge Retention of Multicultural Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, James; Knapp, Doug; Benton, Gregory M.

    2007-01-01

    Although small in scope, this study attempted to analyze the impacts of primary sources and field trip experiences on multicultural education through first-hand narrative interviews, one year after the experience. In particular, it assessed the recollections of students who participated in a one-half-day field trip to George Washington Carver…

  6. Monitoring Genetic and Metabolic Potential for In-Situ Bioremediation: Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, Michelle V.; Britt, Phillip F.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2000-06-01

    A number of DOE sites are contaminated with dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene. At many of these sites, microbial bioremediation is an attractive strategy for cleanup, since it has the potential to degrade DNAPLs in situ. A rapid screening method to determine the broad range potential of a site's microbial population for contaminant degradation would greatly facilitate assessment for in situ bioremediation, as well as for monitoring ongoing bioremediation treatment. Current laboratory-based treatability methods are cumbersome and expensive. In this project, we are developing methods based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for rapid and accurate detection of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from microbial genes involved in biodegradation of pollutants. PCR primers are being developed to amplify DNA sequences that are amenable to MALDI-MS detection. This work will lay the foundation for development of a field-portable MS-based technique for rapid on site assessment and monitoring of bioremediation processes.

  7. Outdoor field experience with autonomous RPC based stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, L.; Assis, P.; Blanco, A.; Carolino, N.; Cerda, M. A.; Conceição, R.; Cunha, O.; Ferreira, M.; Fonte, P.; Luz, R.; Mendes, L.; Pereira, A.; Pimenta, M.; Sarmento, R.; Tomé, B.

    2016-09-01

    In the last two decades Resistive Plate Chambers were employed in the Cosmic Ray Experiments COVER-PLASTEX and ARGO/YBJ. In both experiments the detectors were housed indoors, likely owing to gas distribution requirements and the need to control environment variables that directly affect RPCs operational stability. But in experiments where Extended Air Shower (EAS) sampling is necessary, large area arrays composed by dispersed stations are deployed, rendering this kind of approach impossible. In this situation, it would be mandatory to have detectors that could be deployed in small standalone stations, with very rare opportunities for maintenance, and with good resilience to environmental conditions. Aiming to meet these requirements, we started some years ago the development of RPCs for Autonomous Stations. The results from indoor tests and measurements were very promising, both concerning performance and stability under very low gas flow rate, which is the main requirement for Autonomous Stations. In this work we update the indoor results and show the first ones concerning outdoor stable operation. In particular, a dynamic adjustment of the high voltage is applied to keep gas gain constant.

  8. Bioremediation of endosulfan in laboratory-scale constructed wetlands: effect of bioaugmentation and biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Congcong; Xie, HuiJun; Mu, Yang; Xu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Cui; Liang, Shuang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Xu, Jingtao; Wang, Qian

    2014-11-01

    Bioremediation is widely used in organic pollutants disposal. However, very little has been known on its application in constructed wetlands contaminated with organochlorine pesticide, endosulfan in particular. To evaluate the effect of bioremediation on endosulfan removal and clarify the fate, bioaugmentation and biostimulation were studied in laboratory-scale vertical-flow constructed wetlands. After 20 days' experiment, endosulfan isomers removal efficiencies were increased to 89.24-97.62 % through bioremediation. In bacteria bioaugmentation (E-in) and sucrose biostimulation (E-C), peak concentrations of endosulfan in sediment were reduced by 31.02-76.77 %, and plant absorption were 347.45-576.65 μg kg(-1). By contrast, plant absorption in KH2PO4 biostimulation (E-P) was increased to 811.64 and 1,067.68 μg kg(-1). Degradation process was probably promoted in E-in and E-C, while plant absorption was enhanced in E-P. Consequently, E-in and E-C were effective for endosulfan removal in constructed wetlands, while adding KH2PO4 had potential to cause air pollution. Additionally, combined bioremediation was not recommended.

  9. Practical Bioremediation Course – Laboratory Exercises on Biodegradation of Cationic Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Ivankovic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available 0 From the perspective of the lab exercises leader and teaching assistant for the Bioremediation course, it was very difficult to design and conduct a set of exercises that would fit the course curriculum and satisfactorily demonstrate bioremediation basics through practical laboratory work. Thus, Bioremediation course students designed the experiment with the help of the teaching assistant; a simulation of possible bioremediation of “Jarun” lake in Zagreb, Croatia, if contaminated with cationic surfactant. The experiment nicely showed how natural bioremediation differs from engineered bioremediation and the levels of success between different types of engineered bioremediation. The laboratory exercises were designed to be interesting and the results perceivable to the students.  Editor's Note:The ASM advocates that students must successfully demonstrate the ability to explain and practice safe laboratory techniques. For more information, read the laboratory safety section of the ASM Curriculum Recommendations: Introductory Course in Microbiology and the Guidelines for Biosafety in Teaching Laboratories, available at www.asm.org. The Editors of JMBE recommend that adopters of the protocols included in this article follow a minimum of Biosafety Level 2 practices. Normal 0 21 false false false HR X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Cambria","serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  10. Scaling of sand flux over bedforms- experiments to field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, B. J.; Mahon, R. C.; Ashley, T.; Alexander, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bed forms are one of the few geomorphic phenomena whose field and laboratory geometric scales have significant overlap. This is similarly true for scales of sediment transport. Whether in the lab or field, at low transport stages and high Rouse numbers where suspension is minimal, sand fluxes scale nonlinearly with transport stage. At high transport stages, and low Rouse numbers where suspension is substantial, sand transport scales with rouse number. In intermediate cases deformation of bed forms is a direct result of the exchange of sediment between the classically suspended and bed load volumes. These parameters are straightforwardly measured in the laboratory. However, practical difficulties and cost ineffectiveness often exclude bed-sediment measurements from studies and monitoring efforts aimed at estimating sediment loads in rivers. An alternative to direct sampling is through the measurement of evolution of bed topography constrained by sediment-mass conservation. Historically, the topographic-evolution approach has been limited to systems with negligible transport of sand in suspension. As was shown decades ago, pure bed load transport is responsible for the mean migration of trains of bed forms when no sediment is exchanged between individual bed forms. In contrast, the component of bed-material load that moves in suspension is responsible for changes in the size, shape, and spacing of evolving bed forms; collectively this is called deformation. The difference between bed-load flux and bed-material-load flux equals the flux of suspended bed material. We give a partial demonstration of this using available field and laboratory data and comparing them across geometric and sediment transport scales.

  11. From Perceptual Apparatus to Immersive Field of Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    , or orchestrators of emotions, many of these apparatuses were meant to be vehicles for regaining the consciousness of the body and the environment. Apparatuses that expand into space complete this particular genealogy – space itself becoming a mediating and conductive device capable of engendering these embedding...... situations, Sloterdijk remarks. Situated within the field of trans-disciplinary collaborations, the oeuvre of Werner Ruhnau comes to the fore as paradigmatic for illustrating these aspects. The joint projects with philosopher, artist and educator Hugo Kükelhaus, or artists such as Yves Klein and Adolf Luther...

  12. Tools and Setups for Experiments with AC and Rotating Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-01-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several…

  13. Targeting the Poor: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatas, Vivi; Banerjee, Abhijit; Hanna, Rema; Olken, Benjamin A.; Tobias, Julia

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment in 640 Indonesian villages on three approaches to target the poor: proxy-means tests (PMT), where assets are used to predict consumption; community targeting, where villagers rank everyone from richest to poorest; and a hybrid. Defining poverty based on PPP$2 per-capita consumption, community targeting and the hybrid perform somewhat worse in identifying the poor than PMT, though not by enough to significantly affect poverty outcomes for a typical program. Elite capture does not explain these results. Instead, communities appear to apply a different concept of poverty. Consistent with this finding, community targeting results in higher satisfaction. PMID:25197099

  14. A performance analysis study of a complex G field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repperger, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    A performance analysis on data from an experiment which illustrates the degradation of tracking performance as the human is subjected to an environmental stressor is presented. The performance changes are defined and the statistical properties of human tracking with and without the stress effects examined. Performance is evaluated using an extension of a phase plane technique. A quantiative determination of stress effects on performance is defined explicitly in terms of parameters of a density function identified from the empirical data. The distribution functions which characterize tracking in a phase plane representation of the closed loop error signal are determined.

  15. On the mean-field theory of the Karlsruhe Dynamo Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Rädler

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe an experiment has been constructed which demonstrates a homogeneous dynamo as is expected to exist in the Earth's interior. This experiment is discussed within the framework of mean-field dynamo theory. The main predictions of this theory are explained and compared with the experimental results. Key words. Dynamo, geodynamo, dynamo experiment, mean-field dynamo theory, a-effect

  16. The 1987 Federal field exercise: The DOE experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, M.V.; Gant, K.S.

    1989-06-01

    The second full-scale field exercise of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) was held at the Zion Nuclear Power Station, Zion, Illinois, in June 1987. The exercise incorporated the annual compliance exercise for the Zion plant and involved the operating utility, Commonwealth Edison Company, the states of Illinois and Wisconsin, local governments, volunteer groups, and representatives from 12 federal agencies. The 3-day exercise was played from many locations in the Zion area; Springfield, Illinois; Madison, Wisconsin; and Washington, DC. Approximately 1000 people participated in the exercise, which used a scenario in which an accident at the plant resulted in the release of radioactive material outside the plant boundary. The US Department of Energy (DOE) had major responsibilities during the planning, playing, and critiquing of the exercise; these functions are outlined in the report. This document describes the DOE participation in the planning and response during the exercise. During a radiological emergency, the FRERP gives DOE the responsibility for coordinating the federal radiological monitoring and assessment activities in support of the states and the cognizant federal agency. At Zion, a self-sufficient Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center was established by DOE at a nearby fairground in which over 200 people from DOE, the two states, and other federal agencies participated. Before the field exercise, a tabletop exercise and a dry run were held for training purposes. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Quantum Galileo's experiments and mass estimation in a gravitational field

    CERN Document Server

    Seveso, Luigi; Paris, Matteo G A

    2016-01-01

    We address the problem of estimating the mass of a (quantum) particle interacting with a classical gravitational field. In particular, we analyze in details the ultimate bounds to precision imposed by quantum mechanics and study the effects of gravity in a variety of settings. Our results show that the presence of a gravitational field generally leads to a precision gain, which can be significant in a regime half-way between the quantum and classical domains. We also address quantum enhancement to precision, i.e. the advantages coming from taking into account the quantum nature of the probe particle, and show that non-classicality is indeed a relevant resource for mass estimation. In particular, we suggest schemes for mass-sensing measurements using quantum probes and show that upon employing non-classical states like quantum coherent superpositions one may improve precisions by orders of magnitude. In addition, we discuss the compatibility of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) within the quantum regime usi...

  18. Developing Personal and Professional Identity: Teaming, Dialogue, and Inquiry in the Sophomore Professional Field Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Ruth J.; Sherman, Sharon J.; Rothstein, Michael; Lupo, Theresa R.

    This paper examines a model of supervision/field experience proposed for teacher candidates in the sophomore professional experience of a teacher preparation program. The approach envisions the sophomore experience as a dialogic process in which students and teachers construct knowledge and nurture dispositions needed for development of personal…

  19. Combination of bioremediation and electrokinetics for the in-situ treatment of diesel polluted soil: A comparison of strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena Ramírez, Esperanza; Villaseñor Camacho, José; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Cañizares, Pablo

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this work is to compare different strategies based on electrokinetic soil flushing and bioremediation for the remediation of diesel-polluted soil. Four options were tested at the laboratory scale: single bioremediation (Bio), performed as a control test; a direct combination of electrokinetic soil flushing and biological technologies (EKSF-Bio); EKSF-Bio with daily polarity reversal of the electric field (PR-EKSF-Bio); and a combination of electrokinetic soil flushing and a permeable reactive biological barrier (EKSF-BioPRB). Four batch experiments of 14 days duration were carried out for comparing technologies at room temperature with an electric field of 1.0 V cm(-1) (in EKSF). A diesel degrading microbial consortium was used. The experimental procedure and some specific details, such as the flushing fluids used, varied depending on the strategy. When using the EKSF-Bio option, a high buffer concentration was required to control the pH, causing soil heating, which negatively affected the biological growth and thus the diesel removal. The PR-EKSF-Bio and the EKSF-BioPRB options attained suitable operating conditions and improved the transport processes for biological growth. Polarity reversal was an efficient option for pH, moisture and temperature control. Homogeneous microbial growth was observed, and approximately 20% of the diesel was removed. The BioPRB option was not as efficient as PR-EKSF-Bio in controlling the operating conditions, but the central biobarrier protected the biological activity. Microbial growth was observed not only in the biobarrier but also in a large portion of the soil, and 29% of the diesel was removed in the short remediation test.

  20. Field experience and electrical characteristics of punctured porcelain suspension insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, D.H. [Institut de Recherche d`Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, PQ (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The condition and electrical characteristics of porcelain insulators in service at Hydro-Quebec were investigated through a series of live-line tests. More than 2,000 insulator strings on the distribution system were checked under energized field conditions using different detection devices. About 200 faulty insulators and representative sound insulators were removed and analyzed in the laboratory in an effort to assess the efficiency of the different devices used to detect the faulty insulators. The detection of faulty insulator units is necessary to maintain system reliability. Insulator deterioration was found to be caused by inherent porosity and manufacturing defects in the porcelain shell and by expansion forces produced by insulator pin-hole cement. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Experiment of Wireless Sensor Network to Monitor Field Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Sik Kim

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently the mobile wireless network has been drastically enhanced and one of the most efficient ways to realize the ubiquitous network will be to develop the converged network by integrating the mobile wireless network with other IP fixed network like NGN (Next Generation Network. So in this paper the term of the wireless ubiquitous network is used to describe this approach. In this paper, first, the wireless ubiquitous network architecture is described based on IMS which has been standardized by 3GPP (3rd Generation Partnership Program. Next, the field data collection system to match the satellite data using location information is proposed based on the concept of the wireless ubiquitous network architecture. The purpose of the proposed system is to provide more accurate analyzing method with the researchers in the remote sensing area.

  2. Improving Bioremediation of PAH Contaminated Soils by Thermal Pretreatment

    OpenAIRE

    Bonten, L.T.C.

    2001-01-01

    Numerous sites and large volumes of sediments in the Netherlands are contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which are of great concern because of their toxic and carcinogenic effects. Since PAH tend to sorb very strongly to the soil matrix, bioremediation is a slow process with often high residual concentrations after remediation. In this study it was tried to develop methods to improve bioremediation, this means to decrease residual concentrations after bioremediation. In ...

  3. Integrative analysis of Geobacter spp. and sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlett, M.; Zhuang, K.; Mahadevan, R.; Lovley, D.

    2012-03-01

    Enhancing microbial U(VI) reduction with the addition of organic electron donors is a promising strategy for immobilizing uranium in contaminated groundwaters, but has yet to be optimized because of a poor understanding of the factors controlling the growth of various microbial communities during bioremediation. In previous field trials in which acetate was added to the subsurface, there were two distinct phases: an initial phase in which acetate-oxidizing, U(VI)-reducing Geobacter predominated and U(VI) was effectively reduced and a second phase in which acetate-oxidizing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) predominated and U(VI) reduction was poor. The interaction of Geobacter and SRB was investigated both in sediment incubations that mimicked in situ bioremediation and with in silico metabolic modeling. In sediment incubations, Geobacter grew quickly but then declined in numbers as the microbially reducible Fe(III) was depleted whereas the SRB grow more slowly and reached dominance after 30-40 days. Modeling predicted a similar outcome. Additional modeling in which the relative initial percentages of the Geobacter and SRB were varied indicated that there was little to no competitive interaction between Geobacter and SRB when acetate was abundant. Further simulations suggested that the addition of Fe(III) would revive the Geobacter, but have little to no effect on the SRB. This result was confirmed experimentally. The results demonstrate that it is possible to predict the impact of amendments on important components of the subsurface microbial community during groundwater bioremediation. The finding that Fe(III) availability, rather than competition with SRB, is the key factor limiting the activity of Geobacter during in situ uranium bioremediation will aid in the design of improved uranium bioremediation strategies.

  4. Integrative analysis of the interactions between Geobacter spp. and sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlett, M.; Zhuang, K.; Mahadevan, R.; Lovley, D. R.

    2011-11-01

    Enhancing microbial U(VI) reduction with the addition of organic electron donors is a promising strategy for immobilizing uranium in contaminated groundwaters, but has yet to be optimized because of a poor understanding of the factors controlling the growth of various microbial communities during bioremediation. In previous field trials in which acetate was added to the subsurface, there were two distinct phases: an initial phase in which acetate-oxidizing, U(VI)-reducing Geobacter predominated and U(VI) was effectively reduced and a second phase in which acetate-oxidizing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) predominated and U(VI) reduction was poor. The interaction of Geobacter and SRB was investigated both in sediment incubations that mimicked in situ bioremediation and with in silico metabolic modeling. In sediment incubations, Geobacter grew quickly but then declined in numbers as the microbially reducible Fe(III) was depleted whereas the SRB grow more slowly and reached dominance after 30-40 days. Modeling predicted a similar outcome. Additional modeling in which the relative initial percentages of the Geobacter and SRB were varied indicated that there was little to no competitive interaction between Geobacter and SRB when acetate was abundant. Further simulations suggested that the addition of Fe(III) would revive the Geobacter, but have little to no effect on the SRB. This result was confirmed experimentally. The results demonstrate that it is possible to predict the impact of amendments on important components of the subsurface microbial community during groundwater bioremediation. The finding that Fe(III) availability, rather than competition with SRB, is the key factor limiting the activity of Geobacter during in situ uranium bioremediation will aid in the design of improved uranium bioremediation strategies.

  5. Integrative analysis of Geobacter spp. and sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lovley

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing microbial U(VI reduction with the addition of organic electron donors is a promising strategy for immobilizing uranium in contaminated groundwaters, but has yet to be optimized because of a poor understanding of the factors controlling the growth of various microbial communities during bioremediation. In previous field trials in which acetate was added to the subsurface, there were two distinct phases: an initial phase in which acetate-oxidizing, U(VI-reducing Geobacter predominated and U(VI was effectively reduced and a second phase in which acetate-oxidizing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB predominated and U(VI reduction was poor. The interaction of Geobacter and SRB was investigated both in sediment incubations that mimicked in situ bioremediation and with in silico metabolic modeling. In sediment incubations, Geobacter grew quickly but then declined in numbers as the microbially reducible Fe(III was depleted whereas the SRB grow more slowly and reached dominance after 30–40 days. Modeling predicted a similar outcome. Additional modeling in which the relative initial percentages of the Geobacter and SRB were varied indicated that there was little to no competitive interaction between Geobacter and SRB when acetate was abundant. Further simulations suggested that the addition of Fe(III would revive the Geobacter, but have little to no effect on the SRB. This result was confirmed experimentally. The results demonstrate that it is possible to predict the impact of amendments on important components of the subsurface microbial community during groundwater bioremediation. The finding that Fe(III availability, rather than competition with SRB, is the key factor limiting the activity of Geobacter during in situ uranium bioremediation will aid in the design of improved uranium bioremediation strategies.

  6. Integrative analysis of the interactions between Geobacter spp. and sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Lovley

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing microbial U(VI reduction with the addition of organic electron donors is a promising strategy for immobilizing uranium in contaminated groundwaters, but has yet to be optimized because of a poor understanding of the factors controlling the growth of various microbial communities during bioremediation. In previous field trials in which acetate was added to the subsurface, there were two distinct phases: an initial phase in which acetate-oxidizing, U(VI-reducing Geobacter predominated and U(VI was effectively reduced and a second phase in which acetate-oxidizing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB predominated and U(VI reduction was poor. The interaction of Geobacter and SRB was investigated both in sediment incubations that mimicked in situ bioremediation and with in silico metabolic modeling. In sediment incubations, Geobacter grew quickly but then declined in numbers as the microbially reducible Fe(III was depleted whereas the SRB grow more slowly and reached dominance after 30–40 days. Modeling predicted a similar outcome. Additional modeling in which the relative initial percentages of the Geobacter and SRB were varied indicated that there was little to no competitive interaction between Geobacter and SRB when acetate was abundant. Further simulations suggested that the addition of Fe(III would revive the Geobacter, but have little to no effect on the SRB. This result was confirmed experimentally. The results demonstrate that it is possible to predict the impact of amendments on important components of the subsurface microbial community during groundwater bioremediation. The finding that Fe(III availability, rather than competition with SRB, is the key factor limiting the activity of Geobacter during in situ uranium bioremediation will aid in the design of improved uranium bioremediation strategies.

  7. The design of long-term effective uranium bioremediation strategy using a community metabolic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, K; Ma, E; Lovley, Derek R; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2012-10-01

    Acetate amendment at uranium contaminated sites in Rifle, CO. leads to an initial bloom of Geobacter accompanied by the removal of U(VI) from the groundwater, followed by an increase of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) which are poor reducers of U(VI). One of the challenges associated with bioremediation is the decay in Geobacter abundance, which has been attributed to the depletion of bio-accessible Fe(III), motivating the investigation of simultaneous amendments of acetate and Fe(III) as an alternative bioremediation strategy. In order to understand the community metabolism of Geobacter and SRBs during artificial substrate amendment, we have created a genome-scale dynamic community model of Geobacter and SRBs using the previously described Dynamic Multi-species Metabolic Modeling framework. Optimization techniques are used to determine the optimal acetate and Fe(III) addition profile. Field-scale simulation of acetate addition accurately predicted the in situ data. The simulations suggest that batch amendment of Fe(III) along with continuous acetate addition is insufficient to promote long-term bioremediation, while continuous amendment of Fe(III) along with continuous acetate addition is sufficient to promote long-term bioremediation. By computationally minimizing the acetate and Fe(III) addition rates as well as the difference between the predicted and target uranium concentration, we showed that it is possible to maintain the uranium concentration below the environmental safety standard while minimizing the cost of chemical additions. These simulations show that simultaneous addition of acetate and Fe(III) has the potential to be an effective uranium bioremediation strategy. They also show that computational modeling of microbial community is an important tool to design effective strategies for practical applications in environmental biotechnology.

  8. The lure of local SETI: Fifty years of field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailleris, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    With the commemoration in October 2007 of the Sputnik launch, space exploration celebrated its 50th anniversary. Despite impressive technological and scientific achievements the fascination for space has weakened during the last decades. One contributing factor has been the gradual disappearance of mankind's hope of discovering extraterrestrial life within its close neighbourhood. In striking contrast and since the middle of the 20th century, a non-negligible proportion of the population have already concluded that intelligent beings from other worlds do exist and visit Earth through space vehicles popularly called Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs). In light of the continuous public interest for the UFO enigma symbolized by the recent widely diffused media announcements on the release of French and English governmental files; and considering the approach of broadening the strategies of the "Active SETI" approach and the existence of a rich multi-disciplinary UFO documentation of potential interest for SETI; this paper describes some past scientific attempts to demonstrate the physical reality of the phenomena and potentially the presence on Earth of probes of extraterrestrial origin. Details of the different instrumented field studies deployed by scientists and organizations during the period 1950-1990 in the USA, Canada and Europe are provided. In conclusion it will be argued that while continuing the current radio/optical SETI searches, there is the necessity to maintain sustaining attention to the topic of anomalous aerospace phenomena and to develop new rigorous research approaches.

  9. Field Experience with 3-Sun Mirror Module Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraas, Dr. Lewis [JX Crystals, Inc.; Avery, James E. [JX Crystals, Inc.; Huang, H, [JX Crystals, Inc.; Minkin, Leonid M [ORNL; Fraas, J. X. [JX Crystals, Inc.; Maxey, L Curt [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    JX Crystals 3-sun PV mirror modules have now been operating in four separate systems in the field for up to 2 years. Two post-mounted 2-axis tracking arrays of 12 modules each were installed at the Shanghai Flower Park in April of 2006. Then 672 modules were installed in a 100 kW array on N-S horizontal beam trackers at the Shanghai Flower Port in November of 2006. Finally, sets of 4 modules were installed on azimuth-tracking carousels on buildings at the Oak Ridge National Lab and at the U. of Nevada in Las Vegas in late 2007. All of these modules in each of these systems are still operating at their initial power ratings. No degradation in performance has been observed. The benefit of these 3-sun PV mirror modules is that they use 1/3 of the silicon single-crystal cell material in comparison to traditional planar modules. Since aluminum mirrors are much cheaper than high-purity single-crystal silicon-cells, these modules and systems should be much lower in cost when manufactured in high volume.

  10. Natural and accelerated bioremediation research program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This draft plan describes a ten-year program to develop the scientific understanding needed to harness and develop natural and enhanced biogeochemical processes to bioremediate contaminated soils, sediments and groundwater at DOE facilities. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) developed this program plan, with advice and assistance from DOE`s Office of Environmental Management (EM). The program builds on OHER`s tradition of sponsoring fundamental research in the life and environmental sciences and was motivated by OHER`s and Office of Energy Research`s (OER`s) commitment to supporting DOE`s environmental management mission and the belief that bioremediation is an important part of the solution to DOE`s environmental problems.

  11. Biosurfactant-enhanced bioremediation of hydrophobic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameotra, S.S.; Makkar, R.S. [Inst. of Microbial Technology, Chandigarh (India)

    2010-01-15

    Biosurfactants are surface-active compounds synthesized by a wide variety of microorganisms. They are molecules that have both hydrophobic and - philic domains and are capable of lowering the surface tension and the interfacial tension of the growth medium. Biosurfactants possess different chemical structures-lipopeptides, glycolipids, neutral lipids, and fatty acids. They are nontoxic biomolecules that are biodegradable. Biosurfactants also exhibit strong emulsification of hydrophobic compounds and form stable emulsions. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), crude on sludge, and pesticides call be toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic compounds that pollute the environment. They are released into the environment as a result of oil spillage and by-products of coal treatment processes. The low water solubility of these compounds limits their availability to microorganisms, which is a potential problem for bioremediation of contaminated sites. Microbially produced surfactants enhance the bioavailability of these hydrophobic compounds for bioremediation. Therefore, biosurfactant-enhanced solubility of pollutants has potential hioremediation applications.

  12. A Loop Current experiment: Field and remote measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Peter; Lugo-Fernández, Alexis; Sheinbaum, Julio

    2016-12-01

    An overview of a new comprehensive observational study of the Loop Current (LC) in the eastern Gulf of Mexico that encompassed full-depth and near-bottom moorings, pressure-equipped inverted echo sounders (PIES) and remote sensing is presented. The study array was designed to encompass the LC from the Campeche Bank to the west Florida escarpment. This overview centers about principal findings as they pertain to mesoscale dynamics. Two companion papers provide in-depth analyses. Three LC anticyclonic eddy separation events were observed with good 3D spatial coverage over the 2½ year extent of the field study; the three separations exhibited similar processes after the LC had extended into the eastern Gulf. Large scale (∼300 km wavelength, 40-60 day periods) southward propagating meanders developed on the eastern side of the LC over deep (∼3000 m) water that were the result of baroclinic instability between the upper layer meandering jet and lower layer cyclones and anticyclones. The lower layer was only highly energetic during relatively short (∼2-3 months) intervals just prior to or during eddy detachments because of baroclinic instability. The steepening of the meanders lead to a pinch-off of LC eddies. The deep lower-layer eddies, constrained by the closed topography of the southeastern Gulf, propagated westward across the detachment zone and appear to assist in achieving separation. Small scale (∼50-100 km, periods ∼10 days) frontal eddies, observed on the western side of the LC along the Campeche Bank slope, decay over the deep water of the northern part of an extended LC, and have little influence on lower layer eddies, the east side meanders and the eddy detachment processes.

  13. Tools and setups for experiments with AC and rotating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-09-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several experiments and describes setups and tools which are easy to obtain and work with. Free software is offered to generate the required signals by a personal computer. The experiments can be implemented in introductory physics courses on electromagnetism for undergraduates or specialized courses at high schools.

  14. Engineering microbial consortia to enhance biomining and bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Dietrich Brune

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In natural environments microorganisms commonly exist as communities of multiple species that are capable of performing more varied and complicated tasks than clonal populations. Synthetic biologists have engineered clonal populations with characteristics such as differentiation, memory and pattern formation, which are usually associated with more complex multicellular organisms. The prospect of designing microbial communities has alluring possibilities for environmental, biomedical and energy applications and is likely to reveal insight into how natural microbial consortia function. Cell signaling and communication pathways between different species are likely to be key processes for designing novel functions in synthetic and natural consortia. Recent efforts to engineer synthetic microbial interactions will be reviewed here, with particular emphasis given to research with significance for industrial applications in the field of biomining and bioremediation of acid mine drainage.

  15. Removing environmental organic pollutants with bioremediation and phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jun Won

    2014-06-01

    Hazardous organic pollutants represent a threat to human, animal, and environmental health. If left unmanaged, these pollutants could cause concern. Many researchers have stepped up efforts to find more sustainable and cost-effective alternatives to using hazardous chemicals and treatments to remove existing harmful pollutants. Environmental biotechnology, such as bioremediation and phytoremediation, is a promising field that utilizes natural resources including microbes and plants to eliminate toxic organic contaminants. This technology offers an attractive alternative to other conventional remediation processes because of its relatively low cost and environmentally-friendly method. This review discusses current biological technologies for the removal of organic contaminants, including chlorinated hydrocarbons, focusing on their limitation and recent efforts to correct the drawbacks.

  16. The enzymatic basis for pesticide bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Colin; Pandey, Gunjan; Hartley, Carol J.; Jackson, Colin J.; Cheesman, Matthew J.; Taylor, Matthew C.; Pandey, Rinku; Khurana, Jeevan L.; Teese, Mark; Coppin, Chris W; Weir, Kahli M.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Lal, Rup; Russell, Robyn J.; Oakeshott, John G.

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes are central to the biology of many pesticides, influencing their modes of action, environmental fates and mechanisms of target species resistance. Since the introduction of synthetic xenobiotic pesticides, enzymes responsible for pesticide turnover have evolved rapidly, in both the target organisms and incidentally exposed biota. Such enzymes are a source of significant biotechnological potential and form the basis of several bioremediation strategies intended to reduce the environmen...

  17. Monitoring of ground water quality and heavy metals in soil during large scale bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated waste in India: case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajoy Kumar Mandal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation using microbes has been well accepted as an environmentally friendly and economical treatment method for disposal of hazardous petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated waste (oily waste and this type of bioremediation has been successfully conducted in laboratory and on a pilot scale in various countries, including India. Presently there are no federal regulatory guidelines available in India for carrying out field-scale bioremediation of oily waste using microbes. The results of the present study describe the analysis of ground water quality as well as selected heavy metals in oily waste in some of the large-scale field case studies on bioremediation of oily waste (solid waste carried out at various oil installations in India. The results show that there was no contribution of oil and grease and selected heavy metals to the ground water in the nearby area due to adoption of this bioremediation process. The results further reveal that there were no changes in pH and EC of the groundwater due to bioremediation. In almost all cases the selected heavy metals in residual oily waste were within the permissible limits as per Schedule – II of Hazardous Waste Management, Handling and Transboundary Movement Act, Amendment 2008, (HWM Act 2008, by the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF, Government of India (GoI.

  18. Exploring whether behavior in context-free experiments is predictive of behavior in the field: Evidence from lab and field experiments in rural Sierra Leone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, M.J.; Turley, T.; Kontoleon, A.; Bulte, E.H.; List, J.

    2012-01-01

    We use a sample of subsistence farmers in Sierra Leone as respondents to compare behavior in a context-free experiment (a standard public goods game) and behavior in the field (a real development intervention). There is no meaningful correlation in behavior across contexts. This casts doubt on the p

  19. Part 1: Vadose-zone column studies of toluene (enhanced bioremediation) in a shallow unconfined aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, J.A.; Friedel, M.J.; Szmajter, R.J.; Cuffin, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of the laboratory study described in this paper were (1) to determine the effectiveness of four nutrient solutions and a control in stimulating the microbial degradation of toluene in the unsaturated zone as an alternative to bioremediation methodologies such as air sparging, in situ vitrification, or others (Part I), and (2) to compare the effectiveness of the addition of the most effective nutrient solution from Part I (modified Hoagland type, nitrate-rich) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on microbial degradation of toluene for repeated, simulated spills in the unsaturated zone (Part II). For Part 1, fifteen columns (30-cm diameter by 150-cm height), packed with air-dried, 0.25-mm, medium-fine sand, were prepared to simulate shallow unconfined aquifer conditions. Toluene (10 mL) was added to the surface of each column, and soil solution and soil gas samples were collected from the columns every third day for 21 days. On day 21, a second application of toluene (10 mL) was made, and the experiment was run for another 21 days. Solution 4 was the most effective for microbial degradation in Part I. For Part II, three columns were designated nutrient-rich 3-day toluene columns and received toluene injections every 3 days; three columns were designated as nutrient-rich 7-day columns and received toluene injections every 7 days; and two columns were used as controls to which no nutrient was added. As measured by CO2 respiration, the initial benefits for aerobic organisms from the O2 enhancement were sustained by the bacteria for only a short period of time (about 8 days). Degradation benefits from the nutrient solution were sustained throughout the experiment. The O2 and nutrient-enhanced columns degraded significantly more toluene than the control columns when simulating repeated spills onto the unsaturated zone, and demonstrated a potentially effective in situ bioremediation technology when used immediately or within days after a spill. The combined usage

  20. 小白菜联合铜绿假单胞菌对田间铅污染土壤的修复%Field Test of Bio-remediation of Lead Polluted Soil by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain M2 Combined with Pakchoi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金羽; 曲娟娟; 闫立龙; 孙兴滨

    2013-01-01

    For the bio-remediation of Pb pollution in soil ,a strain of Pb tolerant bacterium ,Pseudomonas aerugi-nosaM2 was inoculated to field cultivated pakchoi and its effects on the lead absorption by pakchoi in Pb con-taminated soil was investigated .The results showed that :M2 vaccination could reduce the inhibition of soil Pb pollution on the growth of pakchoi and promote absorption of Pb in soil ,the plant biomass and height were in-creased by 7% and 12% ,respectively .At the same time ,the soil Pb residual quantity in rhizosphere reduced a-bout 7% compared with non-inoculated groups .Throughout the growth period of pakchoi ,for the inoculated groups ,the soil urease and invertase activities were increased .In conclusion ,inoculating with Pb tolerant bacte-rium Pseudomonas aeruginosa M2 to Pb polluted soil could promote the bio-remediation of Pb by pakchoi in soil .%  针对土壤中铅(Pb)污染的生物修复,在种植小白菜的田间Pb处理土壤中,接种1株耐 Pb铜绿假单胞菌(Pseudomonas aeruginosa)M2菌株,研究其对小白菜吸收Pb的影响。结果表明:接种M2可以降低土壤Pb污染对小白菜生长的抑制作用,促进小白菜对土壤 Pb的吸收,使接种组小白菜生物量和株高分别增加7%和12%,根际土壤Pb残留量降低7%左右;接种处理的土壤脲酶和转化酶活性在小白菜整个生长期内均较未接种组高。结合前期盆栽试验结果得出,接种耐铅铜绿假单胞菌M 2,可以促进小白菜对Pb污染土壤的修复。

  1. Rhamnolipids enhance marine oil spill bioremediation in laboratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingguo; Bao, Mutai; Fan, Xiaoning; Liang, Shengkang; Sun, Peiyan

    2013-06-15

    This paper presents a simulated marine oil spill bioremediation experiment using a bacterial consortium amended with rhamnolipids. The role of rhamnolipids in enhancing hydrocarbon biodegradation was evaluated via GC-FID and GC-MS analysis. Rhamnolipids enhanced total oil biodegradation efficiency by 5.63%, with variation in normal alkanes, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and biomakers biodegradation. The hydrocarbons biodegradation by bacteria consortium overall follows a decreasing order of PAHs>n-alkanes>biomarkers, while in different order of PAHs>biomarkers>n-alkanes when rhamnolipids was used, and the improvement in the removal efficiency by rhamnolipids follows another order of biomarkers>n-alkanes>PAHs. Rhamnolipids played a negative role in degradation of those hydrocarbons with relatively volatile property, such as n-alkanes with short chains, PAHs and sesquiterpenes with simple structure. As to the long chain normal alkanes and PAHs and biomakers with complex structure, the biosurfactant played a positive role in these hydrocarbons biodegradation.

  2. Molecular tools to understand the bioremediation effect of plants and earthworms on contaminated marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Beatriz; Cañizares, Rosa; Macci, Cristina; Doni, Serena; Masciandaro, Grazia; Benitez, Emilio

    2015-12-30

    A meso-scale pilot plant was set up to test the efficiency of a bioremediation scheme applied to marine sediments contaminated by heavy metals and hydrocarbons. The experiment was implemented for three years in two stages using two remediation agents: plants (Paspalum vaginatum and Tamarix gallica) and earthworms (Eisenia fetida). DNA and RNA-based methodologies were applied to elucidate the dynamics of the bacterial population and were related to improving biological and chemical conditions of the sediments. Bioremediation strategies were successful in removing pollutants from the contaminated sediments and specialization within the bacterial community related to the type of contamination present was detected in the different stages of the process. The highest response of Gram-positive PAH-degraders to the contamination was detected at the beginning and after the first stage of the experiment, corresponding to the uppermost values of degradation.

  3. In situ groundwater and sediment bioremediation: barriers and perspectives at European contaminated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majone, Mauro; Verdini, Roberta; Aulenta, Federico; Rossetti, Simona; Tandoi, Valter; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Agathos, Spiros; Puig, Sebastià; Zanaroli, Giulio; Fava, Fabio

    2015-01-25

    This paper contains a critical examination of the current application of environmental biotechnologies in the field of bioremediation of contaminated groundwater and sediments. Based on analysis of conventional technologies applied in several European Countries and in the US, scientific, technical and administrative barriers and constraints which still need to be overcome for an improved exploitation of bioremediation are discussed. From this general survey, it is evident that in situ bioremediation is a highly promising and cost-effective technology for remediation of contaminated soil, groundwater and sediments. The wide metabolic diversity of microorganisms makes it applicable to an ever-increasing number of contaminants and contamination scenarios. On the other hand, in situ bioremediation is highly knowledge-intensive and its application requires a thorough understanding of the geochemistry, hydrogeology, microbiology and ecology of contaminated soils, groundwater and sediments, under both natural and engineered conditions. Hence, its potential still remains partially unexploited, largely because of a lack of general consensus and public concerns regarding the lack of effectiveness and control, poor reliability, and possible occurrence of side effects, for example accumulation of toxic metabolites and pathogens. Basic, applied and pre-normative research are all needed to overcome these barriers and make in situ bioremediation more reliable, robust and acceptable to the public, as well as economically more competitive. Research efforts should not be restricted to a deeper understanding of relevant microbial reactions, but also include their interactions with the large array of other relevant phenomena, as a function of the truly variable site-specific conditions. There is a need for a further development and application of advanced biomolecular tools for site investigation, as well as of advanced metabolic and kinetic modelling tools. These would allow a

  4. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 11 entitled: Evaluation of TCE contamination before and after the field experiment, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, B.M.; Athmer, C.J.; Sheridan, P.W. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Topical Report for Task No. 11 summarizes the results of TCE analysis in soil and carbon before and after conducting the field experiment. In addition, a discussion of the TCE material balance demonstrates that the Lasagna{trademark} process is effective in moving TCE from the contaminated soil into carbon treatment zones in the field experiment at DOE`s Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky.

  5. Institutional change and economic development : evidence from natural and artefactual field experiments in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melesse, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis title: Institutional Change and Economic Development: Evidence from Natural and Artefactual Field Experiments in Ethiopia Mequanint Biset Melesse Abstract Institutions are the essential underpinning of economic development. A large volume of empirical literature has documented conclusive evid

  6. MICROORGANISMS RESISTANCE OF THE CHERNOZEM POLLUTION BY ANTIBIOTICS IN THE CONDITIONS OF FIELD MODEL EXPERIMENT

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In article the problem of environmental pollution by veterinary antibiotics and acquisitions of resistance of pathogenic microorganisms to them is considered. In the conditions of field experiment resistance of chernozem microorganisms to pollution oxytetracycline and tylosin is studied

  7. How do you feel? Sampling of experiences within a mobile field trip support system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabuenca, Bernardo; Börner, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Tabuenca, B., & Börner, D. (2013, 30 May). How do you feel? Sampling of experiences within a mobile field trip support system. Workshop presentation at the 9th Joint European Summer School on Technology Enhanced Learning, Limassol, Cyprus.

  8. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition; proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Michael J; Callister, Stephen J; Miletto, Marzia; Williams, Kenneth H; Nicora, Carrie D; Lovley, Derek R; Long, Philip E; Lipton, Mary S

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  9. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition: Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, M.J.; Callister, S.J.; Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; Nicora, C.D.; Lovley, D.R.; Long, P.E.; Lipton, M.S.

    2010-02-15

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  10. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition; Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Miletto, Marzia; Williams, Kenneth H.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lovely, Derek R.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  11. The phosphate field experiment IB 0013; annual report of the IMPHOS experiment; the eighth year: 1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehlert, P.A.I.; Jansen, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    The results of the eighth year of the Dutch IMPHOS field trial IB 0013 on calcareous silt loam soil with potato are presented and discussed. At the first stages of crop growth, phosphorus fertilization had a positive effect on fresh and dry matter yields of biomass. At the final harvest the potato y

  12. pH Control for Effective Anaerobic Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C.; Barry, D.; Gerhard, J. I.; Kouznetsova, I.

    2007-12-01

    SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) is a 4-year collaborative project that aims to evaluate the performance of enhanced anaerobic bioremediation for the treatment of chlorinated solvent DNAPL source areas. The project focuses on a pilot scale demonstration at a trichloroethene (TCE) DNAPL field site, and includes complementary laboratory and modelling studies. Organic acids and hydrogen ions (HCl) typically build up in the treatment zone during anaerobic bioremediation. In aquifer systems with relatively low buffering capacity the generation of these products can cause significant groundwater acidification thereby inhibiting dehalogenating activity. Where the soil buffering capacity is exceeded, addition of buffer may be needed for the effective continuation of TCE degradation. As an aid to the design of remediation schemes, a geochemical model was designed to predict the amount of buffer required to maintain the source zone pH at a suitable level for dechlorinating bacteria (i.e. > 6.5). The model accounts for the amount of TCE to be degraded, site water chemistry, type of organic amendment and soil mineralogy. It assumes complete dechlorination of TCE, and further considers mineral dissolution and precipitation kinetics. The model is applicable to a wide range of sites. For illustration we present results pertinent to the SABRE field site. Model results indicate that, for the extensive dechlorination expected in proximity to the SABRE DNAPL source zone, significant buffer addition may be necessary. Additional simulations are performed to identify buffer requirements over a wider range of field conditions.

  13. Intrinsic bioremediation of MTBE-contaminated groundwater at a petroleum-hydrocarbon spill site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K. F.; Kao, C. M.; Chen, T. Y.; Weng, C. H.; Tsai, C. T.

    2006-06-01

    An oil-refining plant site located in southern Taiwan has been identified as a petroleum-hydrocarbon [mainly methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX)] spill site. In this study, groundwater samples collected from the site were analyzed to assess the occurrence of intrinsic MTBE biodegradation. Microcosm experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of biodegrading MTBE by indigenous microorganisms under aerobic, cometabolic, iron reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results from the field investigation and microbial enumeration indicate that the intrinsic biodegradation of MTBE and BTEX is occurring and causing the decrease in MTBE and BTEX concentrations. Microcosm results show that the indigenous microorganisms were able to biodegrade MTBE under aerobic conditions using MTBE as the sole primary substrate. The detected biodegradation byproduct, tri-butyl alcohol (TBA), can also be biodegraded by the indigenous microorganisms. In addition, microcosms with site groundwater as the medium solution show higher MTBE biodegradation rate. This indicates that the site groundwater might contain some trace minerals or organics, which could enhance the MTBE biodegradation. Results show that the addition of BTEX at low levels could also enhance the MTBE removal. No MTBE removal was detected in iron reducing and methanogenic microcosms. This might be due to the effects of low dissolved oxygen (approximately 0.3 mg/L) within the plume. The low iron reducers and methanogens (bioremediation using indigenous microorganisms would be a feasible technology to clean up this MTBE-contaminated site.

  14. Hydrogeophysical imaging of deposit heterogeneity and groundwater chemistry changes during DNAPL source zone bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J. E.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Wealthall, G. P.; Loke, M. H.; Dearden, R.; Wilson, R.; Allen, D.; Ogilvy, R. D.

    2010-10-01

    Robust characterization and monitoring of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones is essential for designing effective remediation strategies, and for assessing the efficacy of treatment. In this study high-resolution cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was evaluated as a means of monitoring a field-scale in-situ bioremediation experiment, in which emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) electron donor was injected into a trichloroethene source zone. Baseline ERT scans delineated the geometry of the interface between the contaminated alluvial aquifer and the underlying mudstone bedrock, and also the extent of drilling-induced physical heterogeneity. Time-lapse ERT images revealed major preferential flow pathways in the source and plume zones, which were corroborated by multiple lines of evidence, including geochemical monitoring and hydraulic testing using high density multilevel sampler arrays within the geophysical imaging planes. These pathways were shown to control the spatial distribution of the injected EVO, and a bicarbonate buffer introduced into the cell for pH control. Resistivity signatures were observed within the preferential flow pathways that were consistent with elevated chloride levels, providing tentative evidence from ERT of the biodegradation of chlorinated solvents.

  15. Sample cell for in-field X-ray diffraction experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Höglin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A sample cell making it possible to perform synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction experiments in a magnetic field of 0.35 T has been constructed. The device is an add-on to an existing sample cell and contains a strong permanent magnet of NdFeB-type. Experiments have shown that the setup is working satisfactory making it possible to perform in-field measurements.

  16. Field and Experience Influences on Ethical Decision-Making in the Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Mumford, Michael D.; Connelly, Shane; Murphy, Stephen T.; Devenport, Lynn D.; Antes, Alison L.; Brown, Ryan P.; Hill, Jason H.; Waples, Ethan P.

    2009-01-01

    Differences across fields and experience levels are frequently considered in discussions of ethical decision-making and ethical behavior. In the present study, doctoral students in the health, biological, and social sciences completed measures of ethical decision-making. The effects of field and level of experience with respect to ethical decision-making, metacognitive reasoning strategies, social-behavioral responses, and exposure to unethical events were examined. Social and biological scie...

  17. Bioremediation of Mixtures of High Molecular Weight Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Wu, J.; Shi, X.; Sun, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Although bioremediation has been considered as one of the most promising means to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from polluted environments, the efficacy of PAHs bioremediation still remains challenged, especially for high molecular weight PAHs (HMW PAHs) and their mixtures. This study was focused on (a) isolation and characterization of pure strain and mixed microbial communities able to degrade HMW PAHs and (b) further evaluation of the ability of the isolated microbes to degrade HMW PAHs mixtures in the absence and presence of indigenous flora. Fluoranthene, benzo[b]fluoranthene and pyrene were selected as the representative HMW PAHs in this study. A pure bacterial strain, identified as Herbaspirillum chlorophenolicum FA1, was isolated from activated sludge. A mixed bacterial community designated as consortium-4 was isolated from petroleum contaminated soils, containing Pseudomonas sp. FbP1、Enterobacter sp. FbP2、Hydrogenophaga sp. FbP3 and Luteolibacter pohnpeiensis. FbP4. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that bacterial strains of Herbaspirillum chlorophenolicum FA1 and Luteolibacter pohnpeiensis. FbP4 can also degrade fluoranthene, benzo[b]fluoranthene and pyrene. Experiment results showed that both strain FA1 and consortium-4 could degrade fluoranthene, benzo[b]fluoranthene and pyrene within a wide range of temperature, pH and initial PAHs concentration. Degradation of HMW PAHs mixtures (binary and ternary) demonstrated the interactive effects that can alter the rate and extent of biodegradation within a mixture. The presence of indigenous flora was found to either increase or decrease the degradation of HMW PAHs, suggesting possible synergistic or competition effects. Biodegradation kinetics of HMW PAHs for sole substrates, binary and ternary systems was evaluated, with the purpose to better characterize and compare the biodegradation process of individual HMW PAH and mixtures of HMW PAHs. Results of this study

  18. Teaching Elementary Mathematics: A Resource for Field Experiences. 3rd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nancy L.

    2006-01-01

    This book is a hands-on field manual for elementary school teachers. It features a range of activities that offer opportunities for reflection while enhancing student field experiences, through observation and practicum. The first section of the book provides activities that focus on collecting information about the school and its resources, and…

  19. Career Field Experience: A Look at On-site Usage by High School Communication Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Thomas

    The career field experience program at a midwestern high school places broadcasting students on location for observation of the profession and optional job training or work. In addition to radio and television stations, field locations include advertising agencies with production studios, corporate production facilities, recording studios, cable…

  20. The Effectiveness of Using Previsit Instructional Materials on Learning for a Museum Field Trip Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, Eugene D.

    1981-01-01

    Determined the effect of using previsit instructional materials on student learning for a museum field trip experience. Ten earth science classes were assigned to experimental (instruction over field trip) and control (normal class instruction) groups. Found previsit instructional materials significantly increased student test scores. (DS)

  1. A Field-Based Learning Experience for Introductory Level GIS Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Tom

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a pedagogic foundation for introducing a field-based geographic information systems (GIS) experience to the GIS curriculum at the university level and uses a dual evaluation methodology to monitor student learning and satisfaction. Students learned the basics of field-based global position systems (GPS) and GIS data…

  2. A prototype vector magnetic field monitoring system for a neutron electric dipole moment experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Nouri, N; Brown, M A; Carr, R; Filippone, B; Osthelder, C; Plaster, B; Slutsky, S; Swank, C

    2015-01-01

    We present results from a first demonstration of a magnetic field monitoring system for a neutron electric dipole moment experiment. The system is designed to reconstruct the vector components of the magnetic field in the interior measurement region solely from exterior measurements.

  3. Measurement and tricubic interpolation of the magnetic field for the OLYMPUS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bernauer, J C; Elbakian, G; Gavrilov, G; Goerrissen, N; Hasel, D K; Henderson, B S; Holler, Y; Karyan, G; Ludwig, J; Marukyan, H; Naryshkin, Y; O'Connor, C; Russell, R L; Schmidt, A; Schneekloth, U; Suvorov, K; Veretennikov, D

    2016-01-01

    The OLYMPUS experiment used a 0.3 T toroidal magnetic spectrometer to measure the momenta of outgoing charged particles. In order to accurately determine particle trajectories, knowledge of the magnetic field was needed throughout the spectrometer volume. For that purpose, the magnetic field was measured at over 36,000 positions using a three-dimensional Hall probe actuated by a system of translation tables. We used these field data to fit a numerical magnetic field model, which could be employed to calculate the magnetic field at any point in the spectrometer volume. Calculations with this model were computationally intensive; for analysis applications where speed was crucial, we pre-computed the magnetic field and its derivatives on an evenly spaced grid so that the field could be interpolated between grid points. We developed a spline-based interpolation scheme suitable for SIMD implementations, with a memory layout chosen to minimize space and optimize the cache behavior to quickly calculate field values....

  4. Seventh Fleet field training exercise : Fleet Battle Experiment Kilo : fires initiatives final report

    OpenAIRE

    Schacher, G. E.; Pilnick, Steve; Irvine, Nelson; Gallup, Shelley

    2003-01-01

    Fleet Battle Experiment Kilo was conducted during Seventh Fleet exercise Tandem Thrust 03. During the Field Training Exercise phase, testing of Time Sensitive Targets processes using the Joint Fires Network was carried out. This report contains results obtained on contributions made by the Joint Fires Network to Navy Time Sensitive Targeting and experiment lessons learned. NA

  5. Preservice Science Teachers' Field Experiences with Educational Technologies as Part of Portfolio Development: A Turkish Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Hunkar; Gucum, Berna; Hakverdi, Meral

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the usage of educational technology of pre-service science teachers in their field experiences. This study was carried out on 45 pre-service science teachers taking School Experience and Practice Teaching courses at Hacettepe University in Turkey. The data were obtained from the evaluation of pre-service…

  6. Respondent Conditioning in Online Panel Surveys: Results of Two Field Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struminskaya, Bella

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we investigate changes in survey reporting due to prior interviewing. Two field experiments were implemented in a probability-based online panel in which the order of the questionnaires was switched. Although experimental methods for studying panel conditioning are favorable, experi

  7. Ecogenomics of microbial communities in bioremediation of chlorinated contaminated sites

    OpenAIRE

    Maphosa, Farai; Shakti H Lieten; Dinkla, Inez; Stams, Alfons J.; Smidt, Hauke; Fennell, Donna E.

    2012-01-01

    Organohalide compounds such as chloroethenes, chloroethanes, and polychlorinated benzenes are among the most significant pollutants in the world. These compounds are often found in contamination plumes with other pollutants such as solvents, pesticides, and petroleum derivatives. Microbial bioremediation of contaminated sites, has become commonplace whereby key processes involved in bioremediation include anaerobic degradation and transformation of these organohalides by organohalide respirin...

  8. BIOREMEDIATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN MARINE HABITATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioremediation is being increasingly seen as an effective environmentally benign treatment for shorelines contaminated as a result of marine oil spills. Despite a relatively long history of research on oil-spill bioremediation, it remains an essentially empirical technology and m...

  9. Magnetic field reversals: the geodynamo, laboratory experiments and models (Lewis Fry Richardson Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauve, S.

    2009-04-01

    I will first compare reversals of Earth's magnetic field known from palaeomagnetic data to the ones observed in a laboratory experiment for the magnetic field generated by a turbulent flow of liquid sodium (VKS experiment). Despite major differences between the flow in Earth's core and in the experiment, both systems display reversals that share a lot of similar properties. I will understand them using a simple model in the framework of low dynamical system theory. Finally, I will discuss what can be learnt from numerical simulations.

  10. Optimal sampler siting for atmospheric tracer experiments taking into account uncertainties in the wind field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitovranov, Sergei E.; Federov, Valery V.; Edwards, Leslie L.

    The problem of sampling sites for atmospheric tracer experiments were considered in Federov and Pitorvranov (working paper WP-85-65, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria, 1988). There it was assumed that the wind direction during an experimental tracer release could be accurately predetermined and would remain constant for the duration of the experiment. In general, this assumption of a constant wind field is not met. In this work we develop an approach which overcomes this deficiency. The monitoring network design problem is considered for cases which include prior uncertain wind fields during a designed experiment.

  11. IGCP 450/502 Field Workshop——a 5054-km field geology experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fred Kamona; Gregor Borg; Wayne Goodfellow

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction The UNESCO/IUGS working groups on sediment-hosted sulphide deposits of West Gondwana (IGCP 450) and on global comparison of volcanic-hosted massive sulphide districts (IGCP 502) sponsored a joint international field workshop from 27 September to 6th October 2005 to various Proterozoic base metal deposits in South Africa and Namibia. Although the focus was on deposits of Namibia and South Africa, the perspective was global and drew on our current understanding of this broad class of deposits world-wide.

  12. Application of compost for effective bioremediation of organic contaminants and pollutants in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kästner, Matthias; Miltner, Anja

    2016-04-01

    Soils contaminated with hazardous chemicals worldwide are awaiting remediation activities; bioremediation is often considered as a cost-effective remediation approach. Potential bioapproaches are biostimulation, e.g. by addition of nutrients, fertiliser and organic substrates, and bioaugmentation by addition of compound-degrading microbes or of organic amendments containing active microorganisms, e.g. activated sludge or compost. In most contaminated soils, the abundance of the intrinsic metabolic potential is too low to be improved by biostimulation alone, since the physical and chemical conditions in these soils are not conducive to biodegradation. In the last few decades, compost or farmyard manure addition as well as composting with various organic supplements have been found to be very efficient for soil bioremediation. In the present minireview, we provide an overview of the composting and compost addition approaches as 'stimulants' of natural attenuation. Laboratory degradation experiments are often biased either by not considering the abiotic factors or by focusing solely on the elimination of the chemicals without taking the biotic factors and processes into account. Therefore, we first systemise the concepts of composting and compost addition, then summarise the relevant physical, chemical and biotic factors and mechanisms for improved contaminant degradation triggered by compost addition. These factors and mechanisms are of particular interest, since they are more relevant and easier to determine than the composition of the degrading community, which is also addressed in this review. Due to the mostly empirical knowledge and the nonstandardised biowaste or compost materials, the field use of these approaches is highly challenging, but also promising. Based on the huge metabolic diversity of microorganisms developing during the composting processes, a highly complex metabolic diversity is established as a 'metabolic memory' within developing and mature

  13. Bioremediation of industrially contaminated soil using compost and plant technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiwo, A M; Gbadebo, A M; Oyedepo, J A; Ojekunle, Z O; Alo, O M; Oyeniran, A A; Onalaja, O J; Ogunjimi, D; Taiwo, O T

    2016-03-05

    Compost technology can be utilized for bioremediation of contaminated soil using the active microorganisms present in the matrix of contaminants. This study examined bioremediation of industrially polluted soil using the compost and plant technology. Soil samples were collected at the vicinity of three industrial locations in Ogun State and a goldmine site in Iperindo, Osun State in March, 2014. The compost used was made from cow dung, water hyacinth and sawdust for a period of twelve weeks. The matured compost was mixed with contaminated soil samples in a five-ratio pot experimental design. The compost and contaminated soil samples were analyzed using the standard procedures for pH, electrical conductivity (EC), organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), phosphorus, exchangeable cations (Na, K, Ca and Mg) and heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn and Cr). Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) seeds were also planted for co-remediation of metals. The growth parameters of Kenaf plants were observed weekly for a period of one month. Results showed that during the one-month remediation experiment, treatments with 'compost-only' removed 49 ± 8% Mn, 32 ± 7% Fe, 29 ± 11% Zn, 27 ± 6% Cu and 11 ± 5% Cr from the contaminated soil. On the other hand, treatments with 'compost+plant' remediated 71 ± 8% Mn, 63 ± 3% Fe, 59 ± 11% Zn, 40 ± 6% Cu and 5 ± 4% Cr. Enrichment factor (EF) of metals in the compost was low while that of Cu (EF=7.3) and Zn (EF=8.6) were high in the contaminated soils. Bioaccumulation factor (BF) revealed low metal uptake by Kenaf plant. The growth parameters of Kenaf plant showed steady increments from week 1 to week 4 of planting.

  14. Treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environment through bioremediation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kriti; Chandra, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Bioremediation play key role in the treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated environment. Exposure of petroleum hydrocarbon into the environment occurs either due to human activities or accidentally and cause environmental pollution. Petroleum hydrocarbon cause many toxic compounds which are potent immunotoxicants and carcinogenic to human being. Remedial methods for the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment include various physiochemical and biological methods. Due to the negative consequences caused by the physiochemical methods, the bioremediation technology is widely adapted and considered as one of the best technology for the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment. Bioremediation utilizes the natural ability of microorganism to degrade the hazardous compound into simpler and non hazardous form. This paper provides a review on the role of bioremediation in the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment, discuss various hazardous effects of petroleum hydrocarbon, various factors influencing biodegradation, role of various enzymes in biodegradation and genetic engineering in bioremediation.

  15. Rocket to Creativity: A Field Experience in Problem-Based and Project-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon F. Dole

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to examine the impact of a field experience in problem-based (PBL and project-based learning (PjBL on pre-service and in-service teachers’ conceptions of experiential learning. In our study, participants had been enrolled in a hybrid class that included an online component in which they learned about PBL and PjBL and an experiential component in which they facilitated PBL and PjBL with children in grades 1-9 during a one-week field experience on a university campus. The goal of the field experience is for teachers to change their practice from didactic to inquiry and to promote critical and creative thinking in their students. We used a case study method that involved data derived from six different sources: online structured interviews, follow-up telephone interviews, discussion board posts, reflections, course feedback, and observations. The main theme that emerged from the data analysis was the critical role the field experience played in applying theory to practice. Sub-themes included understanding the process of implementing PBL and PjBL, mastering the logistics of PBL and PjBL, becoming facilitators, and collaborating with partners. Results showed that the field experience gave the teachers the “courage” to experiment with a student-centered methodology.

  16. Bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil by composting: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajthaml, T; Bhatt, M; Sasek, V; Matĕjů, V

    2002-01-01

    Composting technique was used for bioremediation of industrial soil originating from a former tar-contaminated site. The composting process was regulated by aeration to keep optimal temperature gradient and concentrations of O2 and CO2 inside the composting pile. The efficiency of bioremediation was evaluated by performing analysis of 11 individual three- to six-ring unsubstituted aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and estimating of changes in ecotoxicity of the contaminated soil. After 42 d of composting, PAH with 3-4 rings were removed from 42 to 68%, other higher-molar mass PAH from 35 to 57%. Additional 100 d of compost maturation in open-air field did not result in a further decrease of PAH. Ecotoxicity tests performed with bioluminescent bacteria Vibrio fischerii showed a decrease in toxicity both after composting and maturation phases. However, toxicity tests on mustard-seed germination did not reveal any significant changes during composting and maturation phases.

  17. [Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by cold-adapted microorganisms: research advance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-jie; Wang, Xiang; Lu, Gui-lan; Wang, Qun-hui; Li, Fa-sheng; Guo, Guan-lin

    2011-04-01

    Cold-adapted microorganisms such as psychrotrophs and psychrophiles widely exist in the soils of sub-Arctic, Arctic, Antarctic, alpine, and high mountains, being the important microbial resources for the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons at low temperature. Using the unique advantage of cold-adapted microorganisms to the bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in low temperature region has become a research hotspot. This paper summarized the category and cold-adaptation mechanisms of the microorganisms able to degrade petroleum hydrocarbon at low temperature, biodegradation characteristics and mechanisms of different petroleum fractions under the action of cold-adapted microorganisms, bio-stimulation techniques for improving biodegradation efficiency, e. g., inoculating petroleum-degrading microorganisms and adding nutrients or bio-surfactants, and the present status of applying molecular biotechnology in this research field, aimed to provide references to the development of bioremediation techniques for petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.

  18. Genotoxicity assessment of soils from wastewater irrigation areas and bioremediation sites using the Vicia faba root tip micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y F; Gong, P; Wilke, B M; Zhang, W; Song, X Y; Sun, T H; Ackland, M L

    2007-02-01

    Genotoxicity potential of soils taken from wastewater irrigation areas and bioremediation sites was assessed using the Vicia faba root tip micronucleus assay. Twenty five soils were tested, of which 8 were uncontaminated soils and taken as the control to examine the influence of soil properties; 6 soils were obtained from paddy rice fields with a history of long-term wastewater irrigation; 6 soils were obtained from bioremediation sites to examine effects of bioremediation; and 5 PAH-contaminated soils were used to examine methodological effects between direct soil exposure and exposure to aqueous soil extracts on micronuclei (MN) frequency ( per thousand) in the V. faba root tips. Results indicate that soil properties had no significant influences on MN frequencies (p > 0.05) when soil pH varied between 3.4 to 7.6 and organic carbon between 0.4% and 18.6%. The MN frequency measured in these control soils ranged from 1.6 per thousand to 5.8 per thousand. MN frequencies in soils from wastewater irrigation areas showed 2- to 48-fold increase as compared with the control. Soils from bioremediation sites showed a mixed picture: MN frequencies in some soils decreased after bioremediation, possibly due to detoxification; whereas in other cases remediated soils induced higher MN frequencies, suggesting that genotoxic substances might be produced during bioremediation. Exposure to aqueous soil extracts gave a higher MN frequency than direct exposure in 3 soils. However, the opposite was observed in the other two soils, suggesting that both exposure routes should be tested in case of negative results from one route. Data obtained from this study indicate that the MN assay is a sensitive assay suitable for evaluating genotoxicity of soils.

  19. High bacterial biodiversity increases degradation performance of hydrocarbons during bioremediation of contaminated harbor marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Anno, Antonio; Beolchini, Francesca; Rocchetti, Laura; Luna, Gian Marco; Danovaro, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    We investigated changes of bacterial abundance and biodiversity during bioremediation experiments carried out on oxic and anoxic marine harbor sediments contaminated with hydrocarbons. Oxic sediments, supplied with inorganic nutrients, were incubated in aerobic conditions at 20 °C and 35 °C for 30 days, whereas anoxic sediments, amended with organic substrates, were incubated in anaerobic conditions at the same temperatures for 60 days. Results reported here indicate that temperature exerted the main effect on bacterial abundance, diversity and assemblage composition. At higher temperature bacterial diversity and evenness increased significantly in aerobic conditions, whilst decreased in anaerobic conditions. In both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, biodegradation efficiencies of hydrocarbons were significantly and positively related with bacterial richness and evenness. Overall results presented here suggest that bioremediation strategies, which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity rather than the selection of specific taxa, may significantly increase the efficiency of hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated marine sediments.

  20. A high-altitude balloon experiment to probe stratospheric electric fields from low latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurubaran, Subramanian; Shanmugam, Manu; Jawahar, Kaliappan; Emperumal, Kaliappan; Mahavarkar, Prasanna; Buduru, Suneel Kumar

    2017-02-01

    The Earth's electrical environment hosts a giant electrical circuit, often referred to as the global electric circuit (GEC), linking the various sources of electrical generators located in the lower atmosphere, the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. The middle atmosphere (stratosphere and mesosphere) has been traditionally believed to be passively transmitting electric fields generated elsewhere. Some observations have reported anomalously large electric fields at these altitudes, and the scientific community has had to revisit the earlier hypothesis time and again. At stratospheric altitudes and especially at low latitudes, horizontal electric fields are believed to be of ionospheric origin. Though measurements of these fields from a balloon platform are challenging because of their small magnitudes (around a few mV m-1), a suitably designed long-duration balloon experiment capable of detecting such small fields can provide useful information on the time evolution of ionospheric electric fields, which is otherwise possible only using radar or satellite in situ measurements. We present herein details of one such experiment, BEENS (Balloon Experiment on the Electrodynamics of Near Space), carried out from a low-latitude site in India. The instrument package for this experiment is comprised of four deployable booms for measurements of horizontal electric fields and one inclined boom for vertical electric field measurements, all equipped with conducting spheres at the tip. The experiment was conducted from Hyderabad (17.5° N, 78.6° E) during the post-midnight hours on 14 December 2013. In spite of a few shortcomings we report herein, a noticeable feature of the observations has been the detection of horizontal electric fields of ˜ 5 mV m-1 at the stratospheric altitudes of ˜ 35 km.

  1. Eliciting Public Attitudes Regarding Bioremediation Cleanup Technologies: Lessons Learned from a Consensus Workshop in Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denise Lach, Principle Investigator; Stephanie Sanford, Co-P.I.

    2003-03-01

    During the summer of 2002, we developed and implemented a ''consensus workshop'' with Idaho citizens to elicit their concerns and issues regarding the use of bioremediation as a cleanup technology for radioactive nuclides and heavy metals at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The consensus workshop is a derivation of a technology assessment method designed to ensure dialogue between experts and lay people. It has its origins in the United States in the form of ''consensus development conferences'' used by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to elicit professional knowledge and concerns about new medical treatments. Over the last 25 years, NIH has conducted over 100 consensus development conferences. (Jorgensen 1995). The consensus conference is grounded in the idea that technology assessment and policy needs to be socially negotiated among many different stakeholders and groups rather than narrowly defined by a group of experts. To successfully implement new technology, the public requires access to information that addresses a full complement of issues including understanding the organization proposing the technology. The consensus conference method creates an informed dialogue, making technology understandable to the general public and sets it within perspectives and priorities that may differ radically from those of the expert community. While specific outcomes differ depending on the overall context of a conference, one expected outcome is that citizen panel members develop greater knowledge of the technology during the conference process and, sometimes, the entire panel experiences a change in attitude toward the technology and/or the organization proposing its use (Kluver 1995). The purpose of this research project was to explore the efficacy of the consensus conference model as a way to elicit the input of the general public about bioremediation of radionuclides and heavy metals at Department of Energy sites

  2. Field-scale experiments reveal persistent yield gaps in low-input and organic cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Alexandra N.; Snapp, Sieglinde S.; Robertson, G. Philip

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of production-system performance is largely based on observations at the experimental plot scale. Although yield gaps between plot-scale and field-scale research are widely acknowledged, their extent and persistence have not been experimentally examined in a systematic manner. At a site in southwest Michigan, we conducted a 6-y experiment to test the accuracy with which plot-scale crop-yield results can inform field-scale conclusions. We compared conventional versus alternative, that is, reduced-input and biologically based–organic, management practices for a corn–soybean–wheat rotation in a randomized complete block-design experiment, using 27 commercial-size agricultural fields. Nearby plot-scale experiments (0.02-ha to 1.0-ha plots) provided a comparison of plot versus field performance. We found that plot-scale yields well matched field-scale yields for conventional management but not for alternative systems. For all three crops, at the plot scale, reduced-input and conventional managements produced similar yields; at the field scale, reduced-input yields were lower than conventional. For soybeans at the plot scale, biological and conventional managements produced similar yields; at the field scale, biological yielded less than conventional. For corn, biological management produced lower yields than conventional in both plot- and field-scale experiments. Wheat yields appeared to be less affected by the experimental scale than corn and soybean. Conventional management was more resilient to field-scale challenges than alternative practices, which were more dependent on timely management interventions; in particular, mechanical weed control. Results underscore the need for much wider adoption of field-scale experimentation when assessing new technologies and production-system performance, especially as related to closing yield gaps in organic farming and in low-resourced systems typical of much of the developing world. PMID:28096409

  3. Active cancellation of stray magnetic fields in a Bose-Einstein condensation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedman, C. J.; Dall, R. G.; Byron, L. J.; Truscott, A. G.

    2007-02-01

    A method of active field cancellation is described, which greatly reduces the stray magnetic field within the trap region of a Bose-Einstein condensation experiment. An array of six single-axis magnetic sensors is used to interpolate the field at the trap center, thus avoiding the impractical requirement of placing the sensor within the trap. The system actively suppresses all frequencies from dc to approximately 3000 Hz, and the performance is superior to conventional active Helmholtz cancellation systems. A method of reducing the field gradient, by driving the six Helmholtz coils independently, is also investigated.

  4. POTENTIAL FUNGI FOR BIOREMEDIATION OF INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vara Saritha

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Two fungi (unidentified were isolated from soil and marine environ-ments. These isolates were used for bioremediation of pulp and paper mill effluent at the laboratory scale. The treatment resulted in the reduction of color, lignin, and COD of the effluent in the order of 78.6%, 79.0%, and 89.4% in 21 days. A major part of reductions in these parameters occurred within 5 days of the treatment, which was also characterized by a steep decline in the pH of the effluent. The enzyme activity of these fungi was also tested, and the clearance zone was obtained in the plate assay.

  5. POTENTIAL FUNGI FOR BIOREMEDIATION OF INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Vara Saritha; Avasn Maruthi; Mukkanti, K.

    2010-01-01

    Two fungi (unidentified) were isolated from soil and marine environ-ments. These isolates were used for bioremediation of pulp and paper mill effluent at the laboratory scale. The treatment resulted in the reduction of color, lignin, and COD of the effluent in the order of 78.6%, 79.0%, and 89.4% in 21 days. A major part of reductions in these parameters occurred within 5 days of the treatment, which was also characterized by a steep decline in the pH of the effluent. The enzyme activity of t...

  6. Fourth field experiment on atmospheric dispersion around the isolated hill Sophienhoehe in September 1989. Methods - experiments - data bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeuner, G. [ed.; Heinemann, K. [ed.

    1993-05-01

    In order to establish a data bank for the validation of advanced dispersion models, comprehensive meteorological measurements and dispersion experiments in a complex terrain with a well measured topography were carried out. These investigations became possible in cooperation with several external groups and with the financial support of the `Bundesminister fuer Umwelt, Naturschutz und Reaktorsicherheit`. In this report the methods, experiments and results (data bank) of the fourth field experiment are described. (orig.) [Deutsch] Um eine Datenbasis fuer die Validierung von fortgeschrittenen Ausbreitungsmodellen zur Verfuegung zu stellen, wurden umfangreiche meteorologische Messungen und Ausbreitungsexperimente in einem gut vermessenen nicht ebenem Gelaende durchgefuehrt. Diese Untersuchungen wurden durch die Zusammenarbeit mit verschiedenen externen Gruppen und die finanzielle Unterstuetzung des Bundesministers fuer Umwelt, Naturschutz und Reaktorsicherheit ermoeglicht. In diesem Bericht sind die Methoden, die Experimente und die Ergebnisse der vierten Messkampagne zusammengestellt. (orig.)

  7. Lead uptake and translocation by willows in pot and field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhivotovsky, Olena P; Kuzovkina, Yulia A; Schulthess, Cristian P; Morris, Tom; Pettinelli, Dawn

    2011-09-01

    Plant growth and lead (Pb) uptake by seven willow varieties were investigated in pot and field experiments to assess the suitability of willows for phytoremediation of Pb at heavily contaminated sites such as skeet ranges. Differences in uptake and translocation of Pb in Salix were observed between pot and field experiments. In the pot experiment, willows grown in Pb-contaminated field soil for 6 months showed tolerance to very high soil Pb concentration (21,360 mg kg(-1)), and with the addition of EDTA were able to take up and translocate more than 1000 mg kg(-1) Pb into above-ground tissues. In the field experiment, all willow varieties showed tolerance to heterogeneously high soil Pb concentrations. Plants were also able to take up and translocate Pb into above-ground tissues. However, after 4.5 months, the lead concentration in the above-ground tissues of willows grown in soil amended with EDTA was less than 200 mg kg(-1). The results from the pot experiment suggest that Salix varieties have the potential to take up and translocate significant amounts of Pb into above-ground tissues using EDTA. However, to verify the phytoextraction abilities of Salix in the field, additional research is needed.

  8. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, Kristina [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Slater, Lee [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  9. Effect of Biochar on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Nitrogen Cycling in Laboratory and Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Nikolas; Harter, Johannes; Kaldamukova, Radina; Ruser, Reiner; Graeff-Hönninger, Simone; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    The extensive use of nitrogen (N) fertilizers in agriculture is a major source of anthropogenic N2O emissions contributing 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Soil biochar amendment has been suggested as a means to reduce both CO2 and non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions. The reduction of N2O emissions by biochar has been demonstrated repeatedly in field and laboratory experiments. However, the mechanisms of the reduction remain unclear. Further it is not known how biochar field-weathering affects GHG emissions and how agro-chemicals, such as the nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP), that is often simultaneously applied together with commercial N-fertilizers, impact nitrogen transformation and N2O emissions from biochar amended soils. In order investigate the duration of the biochar effect on soil N2O emissions and its susceptibility to DMPP application we performed a microcosm and field study with a high-temperature (400 ° C) beech wood derived biochar (60 t ha-1 and 5 % (w/w) biochar in the field and microcosms, respectively). While the field site contained the biochar already for three years, soil and biochar were freshly mixed for the laboratory microcosm experiments. In both studies we quantified GHG emissions and soil nitrogen speciation (nitrate, nitrite, ammonium). While the field study was carried out over the whole vegetation period of the sunflower Helianthus annuus L., soil microcosm experiments were performed for up to 9 days at 28° C. In both experiments a N-fertilizer containing DMPP was applied either before planting of the sunflowers or at the beginning of soil microcosms incubation. Laboratory microcosm experiments were performed at 60% water filled pore space reflecting average field conditions. Our results show that biochar effectively reduced soil N2O emissions by up to 60 % in the field and in the soil microcosm experiments. No significant differences in N2O emission mitigation potential between field-aged and fresh

  10. Integration of Field Geophysics and Geology in an International Setting: Multidisciplinary Geoscience Field Experience at the University of Western Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenders, A. J.; Banerjee, N.; Pratt, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    The pedagogical value of the field experience is unequaled: students, teaching assistants, and professors alike return with a renewed sense of purpose, community, and the context in which to place classroom education. It is widely regarded as valuable to personal development, and is required by the Canadian Council of Professional Geoscientists for professional registration. As part of our ongoing International Geoscience Field Experience Initiative, Earth Sciences students at the University of Western Ontario have the opportunity to enhance their education through a study abroad program. The focus is on a residential field experience to world-class localities, offered with the collaboration of internationally recognized academic researchers, government survey personnel, and industry leaders. Recent trips have included the Sn-W mineralization in the Cornwall district of the U.K., the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) in Portugal and Spain, and the metallogenic belts of Western Turkey. The integration of geological knowledge with geophysical data was one of the key organizing principles of our recent field trips to the IPB and Western Turkey. This integration is a foundation of modern Earth Sciences, and common practice in industry, it is relatively rare in classroom settings. Lectures before departure and evening exercises during the field trip supplemented the core undergraduate curriculum in geophysics, reviewing gravity, DC resistivity, induced polarization (IP), and magnetotelluric methods, focusing on application to mineral exploration. During our trip to the IPB, partnership with industry allowed students the opportunity to work with state of the art geophysical data, acquired on an exploration prospect visited during the field trip. Multi-parameter geophysical inversions of the IP and MT data produced cross-sections in depth - results interpretable by the students in the complex geological environment of the Iberian Pyrite Belt. Although the students gained valuable

  11. Bioremediation:A review of applications and problems to be resolved

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qixing; HUA Tao

    2004-01-01

    This review article describes the factors affecting bioremediation processes including: goals of bioremediation and the optimal ecological conditions required; inoculation of microorganisms; cometabolism; bioavailability and its improvement; biological evolution and its utilization;monitoring and control of bioremediation processes; identification of bioremediation effectiveness and ecological remediation and its key elements. The current progress in bioremediation techniques is summarized. The direction of future development, research and applications is also examined.

  12. Interaction of 4-rotational gauge field with orbital moment, gravi-diamagnetic effect and orbit experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Babourova, Olga V

    2010-01-01

    A direct interaction of the 4-rotational (Lorentzian) gauge field with the angular orbital momentum of an external field is considered. This interaction appears in a new Poincar\\'{e} gauge theory of gravitation, in which tetrads are not true gauge fields, but represent to be some functions of the translational and 4-rotational gauge fields. The given interaction leads to a new effect: the existence of an electronic orbits precession under the action of an intensive external gravitational field (gravi-diamagnetic effect), and also substantiates the existence of the direct interaction of the proper angular momentum of a gyroscope with the torsion field, which theoretically can be generated by the rotational angular momentum of the planet the Earth. The latter interaction can be detected by the experiment "Gravity Probe B" (GP-B) on a satellite orbit

  13. Bioremediation of Cd-DDT co-contaminated soil using the Cd-hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii and DDT-degrading microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Zhi-qiang [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resources Science, Zhejiang University, Zijingang Campus, Hangzhou 310058 (China); College of Agriculture, Hainan University, Renmin Road 58, Haikou 570228 (China); Yang, Xiao-e, E-mail: xyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resources Science, Zhejiang University, Zijingang Campus, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Wang, Kai; Huang, Hua-gang; Zhang, Xincheng [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resources Science, Zhejiang University, Zijingang Campus, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Fang, Hua [Department of Plant Protection, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Zijingang Campus, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Li, Ting-qiang [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resources Science, Zhejiang University, Zijingang Campus, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Alva, A.K. [U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Prosser, WA (United States); He, Zhen-li [University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Indian River Research and Education Center, Fort Pierce, FL 34945 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Planting of S. alfredii is an effective technique for phytoextraction of Cd and DDs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soil inoculation with Pseudomonas sp. DDT-1 increases root biomass of S. alfredii. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soil inoculation with Pseudomonas sp. DDT-1 improves the removal efficiency of DDs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The plant-microbe strategy is promising for remediation of Cd-DDT co-contaminated soil. - Abstract: The development of an integrated strategy for the remediation of soil co-contaminated by heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants is a major research priority for the decontamination of soil slated for use in agricultural production. The objective of this study was to develop a bioremediation strategy for fields co-contaminated with cadmium (Cd), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and its metabolites 1, 1-dichloro-2, 2-bis (4-chlorophenyl) ethylene (DDE) and 1, 1-dichloro-2, 2-bis (4-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDD) (DDT, DDE, and DDD are collectively called DDs) using an identified Cd-hyperaccumulator plant Sedum alfredii (SA) and DDT-degrading microbes (DDT-1). Initially, inoculation with DDT-1 was shown to increase SA root biomass in a pot experiment. When SA was applied together with DDT-1, the levels of Cd and DDs in the co-contaminated soil decreased by 32.1-40.3% and 33.9-37.6%, respectively, in a pot experiment over 18 months compared to 3.25% and 3.76% decreases in soil Cd and DDs, respectively, in unplanted, untreated controls. A subsequent field study (18-month duration) in which the levels of Cd and DDs decreased by 31.1% and 53.6%, respectively, confirmed the beneficial results of this approach. This study demonstrates that the integrated bioremediation strategy is effective for the remediation of Cd-DDs co-contaminated soils.

  14. Influence of a precepitator on bioremedial processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nježić Zvonko B.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural environment represents a dynamic bioreactor with numerous chemical, biochemical and microbiological processes through which harmful materials are destroyed, so that living organisms and human beings are not endanger. Controlled anthropogenic actions can assist the natural ecosystem to become an efficient bioremedial unit and to reduce the level of effluents produced in the biotechnological transformations during massive food production. In this study, a monitoring system for the chemical oxygen demand (COD and the heavy metal levels in water was established, followed by construction and building of a precipitator in order to prevent discharging of sludge. The results contribute to the hypothesis of existence of in situ bioremedial processes in the observed ecosystem. The significant influence of the precipitator on the decrease of pollution was demonstrated: a decrease of both the COD value and the heavy metal levels downstream from the precipitator for about 15%. Therefore it can be concluded that the precipitator significantly contributes to the ecosystem by the reduction of pollutant level.

  15. The Kwajalein bioremediation demonstration: Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.R. Jr.; Walker, A.B.

    1994-12-01

    The US Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) Base, located in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) in the east-central Pacific Ocean, has significant petroleum hydrocarbon contamination resulting from years of military activities. Because of its remoteness, the lack of on-site sophisticated remediation or waste disposal facilities, the amenability of petroleum hydrocarbons to biodegradation, and the year-round temperature favorable for microbial activity, USAKA requested, through the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), that a project be conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using bioremediation for environmental restoration of contaminated sites within the atoll. The project was conducted in four distinct phases: (1) initial site characterization and on-site biotreatability studies, (2) selection of the demonstration area and collection of soil columns, (3) laboratory column biotreatability studies, and (4) an on-site bioremediation demonstration. The results of phases (1) and (3) have been detailed in previous reports. This report summarizes the results of phases (1) and (3) and presents phases (2) and (4) in detail.

  16. Bioremediation of coal contaminated soil under sulfate-reducing condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwano, Y.; Shimizu, Y. [Kyoto University, Shiga (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biodegradation of coal-derived hydrocarbons, especially high molecular weight (HMW) components, under anaerobic conditions. For this purpose biodegradation experiments were performed, using specifically designed soil column bioreactors. For the experiment, coal-contaminated soil was prepared, which contains high molecular weight hydrocarbons at high concentration (approx. 55.5 mgC g-drysoil{sup -1}). The experiment was carried out in two different conditions: sulfate reducing (SR) condition (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}=10 mmol 1{sup -1} in the liquid medium) and control condition (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} {lt} 0.5 mmol 1{sup -1}). Although no degradation was observed under the control condition, the resin fraction decreased to half (from 6,541 to 3,386 mgC g-soil{sup -1}) under SR condition, with the concomitant increase of two PAHs (phenanthrene and fluoranthene 9 and 2.5 times, respectively). From these results, we could conclude that high molecular hydrocarbons were biodegradable and transformed to low molecular weight PAHs under the sulfate-reducing condition. Since these PAHs are known to be biologically degraded under aerobic condition, a serial combination of anaerobic (sulfate reducing) and then aerobic bioremediations could be effective and useful for the soil pollution by petroleum and/or coal derived hydrocarbons.

  17. Megagauss field generation for high-energy-density plasma science experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovang, Dean Curtis; Struve, Kenneth William; Porter, John Larry Jr.

    2008-10-01

    There is a need to generate magnetic fields both above and below 1 megagauss (100 T) with compact generators for laser-plasma experiments in the Beamlet and Petawatt test chambers for focused research on fundamental properties of high energy density magnetic plasmas. Some of the important topics that could be addressed with such a capability are magnetic field diffusion, particle confinement, plasma instabilities, spectroscopic diagnostic development, material properties, flux compression, and alternate confinement schemes, all of which could directly support experiments on Z. This report summarizes a two-month study to develop preliminary designs of magnetic field generators for three design regimes. These are, (1) a design for a relatively low-field (10 to 50 T), compact generator for modest volumes (1 to 10 cm3), (2) a high-field (50 to 200 T) design for smaller volumes (10 to 100 mm3), and (3) an extreme field (greater than 600 T) design that uses flux compression. These designs rely on existing Sandia pulsed-power expertise and equipment, and address issues of magnetic field scaling with capacitor bank design and field inductance, vacuum interface, and trade-offs between inductance and coil designs.

  18. Frequency Shifts Induced by Field Gradients in Muon $g-2$ Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nouri, N; Golub, R; Plaster, B

    2016-01-01

    Two prominent efforts aimed at probing beyond Standard Model physics, searches for a neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) and measurements of the muon $g-2$ anomalous magnetic moment, employ spin precession techniques. In the most recent neutron EDM experiment, frequency shifts induced by magnetic field gradients and $\\mathbf{E} \\times \\mathbf{v}$ motional fields were a significant source of systematic error. We consider the possibility of a similar effect in the most recent muon $g-2$ experiment, and find that such an effect could potentially be as large as $\\sim 1$ ppm fractional error, to be compared with the reported $\\sim 0.5$ ppm error.

  19. Remote Sensor Application Studies Progress Report, July L, 1968 to June 30, 1969. Controlled Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, L.C.; Offield, T.W.; Watson, R.D.; Cannon, P.J.; Grolier, H.J.; Pohn, H.A.; Watson, Kenneth

    1970-01-01

    Field Sites have been selected for controlled experiments to analyze physical and chemical parameters affecting the response of electromagnetic radiation to geological materials. Considerations in the selection of the sites are the availability of good exposures of nearly monomineralic rocks, level of geologic understanding, and ease of access. Seven sites, where work is underway or planned, contain extensive outcrops of the following rocks: stanstone, limestone, dolomite, and gypsum. Field measurement of quartz have been conducted at four sites.

  20. 'The Real Classroom Is Outside—Get into It!' Teaching through Field Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Field-based experiences can be powerful influences on students of any age, from pre-college through grad school, as well as on the general public. Every place-based learning experience will be different because the combination of location, participant background, available resources, and other factors will be unique. But certain shared goals, necessities, and similarities can be recognized. Intended outcomes should be identified in advance to inform planning. Preparation for field experiences should involve the students along with other participants. More-experienced students can become role models for new-comers. Field experiences involve active learning, as participants are fully immersed in the sampling site and have all senses stimulated. Constantly-changing variables highlight interconnectedness of Earth processes and fosters Systems Thinking. Decisions about the most effective ways to communicate data and results will differ from what might be based on classroom or laboratory venues. Three examples of field-based learning will be provided. One involves collaboration between educational specialists at a scientific research institution, the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, with high school students enrolled in their school's Authentic Science Research program. The second describes orientation for beginning graduate students to the geology, geography, and history of their new home region through a tourist boat ride, the well-known Circle Ride around Manhattan. The third illustrates use of 'eco-hikes' to enhance environmental understanding for Open House and other visitors. These can serve as models for designing experience-based programs in other situations.

  1. New parameters for a better evaluation of vegetative bioremediation, leaching, and phytodesalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabhi, Mokded; Atia, Abdallah; Abdelly, Chedly; Smaoui, Abderrazak

    2015-10-21

    Vegetative bioremediation of calcareous sodic and saline-sodic soils is a biological approach for soil desalination by plants. It is based on three main processes: (i) sodium release from cation exchange sites, (ii) its leaching, and/or (iii) phytodesalination (Na(+) uptake by plant roots and its accumulation in shoots). Leaching needs sufficient rainfall and/or adequate irrigation. Thus, under non-leaching conditions, phytodesalination is the only existing process in terms of sodium removal. Several works tried to evaluate these processes; used plants were grown in field, in lysimeters, or in non-perforated pots. The evaluation of vegetative bioremediation, leaching, and phytodesalination was mainly based on plant analyses (including biomass production, sodium accumulation, test culture, and co-culture) and soil analyses (porosity, salinity, sodicity...). Nevertheless, used parameters are not enough to ensure comparisons between results found in different investigations. The present study introduces new parameters like phytodesalination efficiency, yield, and rate as well as vegetative bioremediation and leaching yields and rates. Our study is also illustrated by an estimation of all parameters for several previously-published data from our own works and those of other authors. Obtained results showed usefulness of these parameters and some of them can be extended to heavy metal phytoexraction.

  2. Chlorite dismutases - a heme enzyme family for use in bioremediation and generation of molecular oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Chlorite is a serious environmental concern, as rising concentrations of this harmful anthropogenic compound have been detected in groundwater, drinking water, and soil. Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are therefore important molecules in bioremediation as Clds catalyze the degradation of chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen. Clds are heme b-containing oxidoreductases present in numerous bacterial and archaeal phyla. This review presents the phylogeny of functional Clds and Cld-like proteins, and demonstrates the close relationship of this novel enzyme family to the recently discovered dye-decolorizing peroxidases. The available X-ray structures, biophysical and enzymatic properties, as well as a proposed reaction mechanism, are presented and critically discussed. Open questions about structure-function relationships are addressed, including the nature of the catalytically relevant redox and reaction intermediates and the mechanism of inactivation of Clds during turnover. Based on analysis of currently available data, chlorite dismutase from "Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii" is suggested as a model Cld for future application in biotechnology and bioremediation. Additionally, Clds can be used in various applications as local generators of molecular oxygen, a reactivity already exploited by microbes that must perform aerobic metabolic pathways in the absence of molecular oxygen. For biotechnologists in the field of chemical engineering and bioremediation, this review provides the biochemical and biophysical background of the Cld enzyme family as well as critically assesses Cld's technological potential.

  3. Residues of endosulfan in surface and subsurface agricultural soil and its bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odukkathil, Greeshma; Vasudevan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of many hydrophobic pesticides has been reported by various workers in various soil environments and its bioremediation is a major concern due to less bioavailability. In the present study, the pesticide residues in the surface and subsurface soil in an area of intense agricultural activity in Pakkam Village of Thiruvallur District, Tamilnadu, India, and its bioremediation using a novel bacterial consortium was investigated. Surface (0-15 cm) and subsurface soils (15-30 cm and 30-40 cm) were sampled, and pesticides in different layers of the soil were analyzed. Alpha endosulfan and beta endosulfan concentrations ranged from 1.42 to 3.4 mg/g and 1.28-3.1 mg/g in the surface soil, 0.6-1.4 mg/g and 0.3-0.6 mg/g in the subsurface soil (15-30 cm), and 0.9-1.5 mg/g and 0.34-1.3 mg/g in the subsurface soil (30-40 cm) respectively. Residues of other persistent pesticides were also detected in minor concentrations. These soil layers were subjected to bioremediation using a novel bacterial consortium under a simulated soil profile condition in a soil reactor. The complete removal of alpha and beta endosulfan was observed over 25 days. Residues of endosulfate were also detected during bioremediation, which was subsequently degraded on the 30th day. This study revealed the existence of endosulfan in the surface and subsurface soils and also proved that the removal of such a ubiquitous pesticide in the surface and subsurface environment can be achieved in the field by bioaugumenting a biosurfactant-producing bacterial consortium that degrades pesticides.

  4. Fates of nickel and fluoranthene during the bioremediation by Pleurotus eryngii in three different soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xia; Dong, Shunwen; Shi, Wenjin; Gao, Ni; Zuo, Lei; Xu, Heng

    2016-11-01

    This study focused on the bioremediation role of Pleurotus eryngii in different characteristics soils contaminated with nickel (Ni) and fluoranthene. The results of bioremediation experiments showed that fluoranthene had a positive effect on the growth of P. eryngii, whereas Ni exerted a negative influence. The concentration of fluoranthene significantly decreased in inoculated soil accounting for 86.39-91.95% of initial concentration in soils and 71.46-81.76% in non-inoculated soils, which showed that the dissipation of fluoranthene was enhanced by mushroom inoculating. The highest removal rates of fluoranthene in sandy loam, loamy clay, and sandy soils reached to 87.81, 86.39, and 91.95%, respectively, which demonstrated that P. eryngii was more suitable for the bioremediation of sandy soil contaminated with fluoranthene. In addition, the presence of Ni tended to decrease the dissipation of fluoranthene in inoculated soil. Higher ligninolytic enzymes activities were detected in inoculated soils, resulting in the enhanced dissipation of fluoranthene in inoculated soils. Furthermore, P. eryngii had the ability to uptake Ni (4.88-39.53 mg kg(-1) ) in co-contamination soil. In conclusion, the inoculating of P. eryngii was effective in remediating of Ni-fluoranthene co-contaminated soils.

  5. Dynamics of microbial community during bioremediation of phenanthrene and chromium(VI)-contaminated soil microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarrolaza, Agustín; Coppotelli, Bibiana M; Del Panno, María T; Donati, Edgardo R; Morelli, Irma S

    2009-02-01

    The combined effect of phenanthrene and Cr(VI) on soil microbial activity, community composition and on the efficiency of bioremediation processes has been studied. Biometer flask systems and soil microcosm systems contaminated with 2,000 mg of phenanthrene per kg of dry soil and different Cr(VI) concentrations were investigated. Temperature, soil moisture and oxygen availability were controlled to support bioremediation. Cr(VI) inhibited the phenanthrene mineralization (CO(2) production) and cultivable PAH degrading bacteria at levels of 500-2,600 mg kg(-1). In the bioremediation experiments in soil microcosms the degradation of phenanthrene, the dehydrogenase activity and the increase in PAH degrading bacteria counts were retarded by the presence of Cr(VI) at all studied concentrations (25, 50 and 100 mg kg(-1)). These negative effects did not show a correlation with Cr(VI) concentration. Whereas the presence of Cr(VI) had a negative effect on the phenanthrene elimination rate, co-contamination with phenanthrene reduced the residual Cr(VI) concentration in the water exchangeable Cr(VI) fraction (WEF) in comparison with the soil microcosm contaminated only with Cr(VI). Clear differences were found between the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns of each soil microcosm, showing that the presence of different Cr(VI) concentrations did modulate the community response to phenanthrene and caused perdurable changes in the structure of the microbial soil community.

  6. The effect of soil type on the bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghollahi, Ali; Fazaelipoor, Mohammad Hassan; Schaffie, Mahin

    2016-09-15

    In this research the bioremediation of four different types of contaminated soils was monitored as a function of time and moisture content. The soils were categorized as sandy soil containing 100% sand (type I), clay soil containing more than 95% clay (type II), coarse grained soil containing 68% gravel and 32% sand (type III), and coarse grained with high clay content containing 40% gravel, 20% sand, and 40% clay (type IV). The initially clean soils were contaminated with gasoil to the concentration of 100 g/kg, and left on the floor for the evaporation of light hydrocarbons. A full factorial experimental design with soil type (four levels), and moisture content (10 and 20%) as the factors was employed. The soils were inoculated with petroleum degrading microorganisms. Soil samples were taken on days 90, 180, and 270, and the residual total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was extracted using soxhlet apparatus. The moisture content of the soils was kept almost constant during the process by intermittent addition of water. The results showed that the efficiency of bioremediation was affected significantly by the soil type (Pvalue bioremediation was not statistically significant for the investigated levels. The removal percentage in the clay soil was improved to 57% (within a month) in a separate experiment by more frequent mixing of the soil, indicating low availability of oxygen as a reason for low degradation of hydrocarbons in the clay soil.

  7. Development and application of the lux gene for environmental bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlage, Robert S.; Yang, Zamin; Palmer, Robert J., Jr.; Sayler, Gary S.; Khang, Yongho

    1996-11-01

    Bioremediation is the use of living systems, usually microorganisms, to treat a quantity of soil or water for the presence of hazardous wastes. Bioremediation has many advantages over other remediation approaches, including cost savings, versatility, and the ability to treat the wastes in situ. In order to study the processes of microbial bioremediation, we have constructed bacterial strains that incorporate genetically engineered bioreporter genes. These bioreporter genes allow the bacteria to be detected during in situ processes, as manifested by their ability to bioluminesce or to fluoresce. This bioreporter microorganisms are described, along with the technology for detecting them and the projects which are benefiting from their application.

  8. Bioremediation techniques applied to aqueous media contaminated with mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez-Riaño, Möritz; Benavides-Otaya, Holman D

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the environmental and human health impacts of mercury contamination have driven the search for alternative, eco-efficient techniques different from the traditional physicochemical methods for treating this metal. One of these alternative processes is bioremediation. A comprehensive analysis of the different variables that can affect this process is presented. It focuses on determining the effectiveness of different techniques of bioremediation, with a specific consideration of three variables: the removal percentage, time needed for bioremediation and initial concentration of mercury to be treated in an aqueous medium.

  9. Development and application of the lux gene for environmental bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlage, R.S.; Yang, Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Palmer, R.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology; Khang, Y. [Yeungnam Univ., Kyongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-01

    Bioremediation is the use of living systems, usually microorganisms, to treat a quantity of soil or water for the presence of hazardous wastes. Bioremediation has many advantages over other remediation approaches, including cost savings, versatility, and the ability to treat the wastes in situ. In order to study the processes of microbial bioremediation, the authors have constructed bacterial strains that incorporate genetically engineered bioreporter genes. These bioreporter genes allow the bacteria to be detected during in situ processes, as manifested by their ability to bioluminescence or to fluoresce. This bioreporter microorganisms are described, along with the technology for detecting them and the projects which are benefiting from their application.

  10. Field experience in science for fifth grade students---a mixed methods study of learning environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Barbara E.

    The purpose of this research is to compare students' perceptions of the learning environment in a traditional science classroom and a field study classroom. This mixed methods study used a sequential explanatory design. Phase one was the quantitative phase using two survey tools. A modified version of the "What is happening in this Classroom Survey" (WIHIC) (Fraser et al., 1996) and the "Test of Science Related Attitudes" (TOSRA) (Fraser, 1982) was administered to 60 fifth grade students from one school. Data was then disaggregated by socioeconomic class and ethnicity. Results from Phase one showed that students prefer the classroom for investigation and prefer the field environment for enjoyment of science. Differences in ethnicity and class were small but Hispanic students prefer the field for investigation and equity. Students that are low socio-economic class rank cooperation in the field higher than the classroom and students that do not qualify for free or reduced lunch prefer the field environment for enjoyment of science. Finally, there are strong correlations for the variables of cooperation, investigation, equity and enjoyment of science in both the classroom and the field environment. Questions raised from the analysis of the survey data were further explored through qualitative data collection methods in phase two. Student responses to three questions were coded using template analysis to provide answers to the "how and why" field experience effects students' attitudes toward science. Three themes emerged from the coding of the results. These results showed that students are physically engaged, develop a sense of place and learn skills in the field that reinforce concepts learned in the classroom. This information will help teachers in developing quality and meaningful experiences for all students. "Closing the gaps among minority groups while improving achievement of all students constitutes the dual goals of education in the nation" (Lee et al., 2004

  11. Plot-scale field experiment of surface hydrologic processes with EOS implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Macari, Emir J.; Costes, Nicholas C.

    1992-01-01

    Plot-scale hydrologic field studies were initiated at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to a) investigate the spatial and temporal variability of surface and subsurface hydrologic processes, particularly as affected by vegetation, and b) develop experimental techniques and associated instrumentation methodology to study hydrologic processes at increasingly large spatial scales. About 150 instruments, most of which are remotely operated, have been installed at the field site to monitor ground atmospheric conditions, precipitation, interception, soil-water status, and energy flux. This paper describes the nature of the field experiment, instrumentation and sampling rationale, and presents preliminary findings.

  12. Ultrafast electron field emission from gold resonant antennas studied by two terahertz pulse experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Strikwerda, Andrew C.;

    2015-01-01

    Summary form only given. Ultrafast electron field emission from gold resonant antennas induced by strong terahertz (THz) transient is investigated using two THz pulse experiments. It is shown that UV emission from nitrogen plasma generated by liberated electrons is a good indication of the local...... electric field at the antenna tip. Using this method resonant properties of antennas fabricated on high resistivity silicon are investigated in the strong field regime. Decrease of antenna Q-factor due to ultrafast carrier multiplication in the substrate is observed....

  13. Experience-based Learning in Acadia National Park: a Successful, Long-running, Model Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, M.

    2015-12-01

    This two-week field course has been offered alternate summers since 2000 in Acadia National Park on Mount Desert Island, Maine and addresses the geological history, physical and biological oceanography and principles of community ecology applicable to terrestrial and/or marine communities of coastal Maine. The course is often transformative and deeply meaningful to the students, many of whom have limited travel experience. The essential components of experience-based learning are well represented in this class with multiple opportunities for abstract conceptualization, active experimentation, concrete hands-on experiences and reflective observation built into the course. Each day begins with a lecture introducing concepts, which are then made concrete though daily field trips (4-8 hours in duration) into the park that include rigorous hiking, some kayaking and one commercial nature cruise. Field trips include hands-on experience with lecture concepts, on-site lessons in field methods, and data collection for independent projects. Each field trip is tied to a specific independent project, which are generated by the instructor, but self-selected by the students. Every student is actively involved in data collection during each field trip, with one student in charge of the collection each day. Daily guided journaling in three parts (scientific, personal and creative) and evening discussions provide ample opportunity for the student to reflect on the scientific content of the course, examine their personal reactions to what they have experienced and to be creative, sharing prior experiences, prior learning and their personalities. The course includes two exams, each following a week of lecture and field experiences. Independent research projects include the production of a manuscript-formatted report complete with statistical analysis of the data and a literature-based discussion of the conclusions. The combination of experiential reinforcement of concepts, abundant

  14. Enabling Field Experiences in Introductory Geoscience Classes through the Use of Immersive Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysey, S. M.; Smith, E.; Sellers, V.; Wyant, P.; Boyer, D. M.; Mobley, C.; Brame, S.

    2015-12-01

    Although field experiences are an important aspect of geoscience education, the opportunity to provide physical world experiences to large groups of introductory students is often limited by access, logistical, and financial constraints. Our project (NSF IUSE 1504619) is investigating the use of immersive virtual reality (VR) technologies as a surrogate for real field experiences in introductory geosciences classes. We are developing a toolbox that leverages innovations in the field of VR, including the Oculus Rift and Google Cardboard, to enable every student in an introductory geology classroom the opportunity to have a first-person virtual field experience in the Grand Canyon. We have opted to structure our VR experience as an interactive game where students must explore the Canyon to accomplish a series of tasks designed to emphasize key aspects of geoscience learning. So far we have produced two demo products for the virtual field trip. The first is a standalone "Rock Box" app developed for the iPhone, which allows students to select different rock samples, examine them in 3D, and obtain basic information about the properties of each sample. The app can act as a supplement to the traditional rock box used in physical geology labs. The second product is a fully functioning VR environment for the Grand Canyon developed using satellite-based topographic and imagery data to retain real geologic features within the experience. Players can freely navigate to explore anywhere they desire within the Canyon, but are guided to points of interest where they are able to complete exercises that will be aligned with specific learning goals. To this point we have integrated elements of the "Rock Box" app within the VR environment, allowing players to examine 3D details of rock samples they encounter within the Grand Canyon. We plan to provide demos of both products and obtain user feedback during our presentation.

  15. Three-Axis Magnetic Field Measurements in the TCSU RMF Current Drive Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velas, K. M.; Milroy, R. D.

    2011-10-01

    A 3-axis probe was installed on TCSU shortly before its shutdown. The probe has 90 windings that simultaneously measure Br, Bθ, and Bz at 30 radial positions and is fully translatable. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Initially, data has been processed with a 10 kHz low pass filter to capture the steady field. Higher frequency content has more shot-to-shot variability; it is difficult to map this axially. Plans include using a band pass filter to isolate the RMF frequency, which is consistent between shots. It is anticipated that the RMF field, in conjunction with the steady field, will yield a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. The 3- axis probe measurements are used to calculate the end-shorting torque, which opposes the RMF torque. Data from even- and odd-parity experiments will be compared. The NIMROD code has been adapted to simulate the TCSU experiment using boundary conditions adjusted to match both even- and odd-parity experimental conditions. A comparison of the n = 0 components of the calculated fields to the 3- axis probe measurements shows agreement in the magnetic field structure of the FRC as well as in the jet region.

  16. Self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Nilson, P. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-06-01

    Electric and self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser Facility were investigated employing radiography with ˜10- to 60-MeV protons. The experiment used plastic-shell targets with imposed surface defects (glue spots, wires, and mount stalks), which enhance self-generated fields. The fields were measured during the 1-ns laser drive with an on-target intensity ˜1015 W/cm2. Proton radiographs show multiple ring-like structures produced by electric fields ˜107 V/cm and fine structures from surface defects, indicating self-generated fields up to ˜3 MG. These electric and magnetic fields show good agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations when the latter include the ∇Te × ∇ne source, Nernst convection, and anisotropic resistivity. The simulations predict that self-generated fields affect heat fluxes in the conduction zone and, through this, affect the growth of local perturbations.

  17. An Experimenting Field Approach for the Numerical Solution of Multiphase Flow in Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu; Bao, Kai

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we apply the experimenting pressure field technique to the problem of the flow of two or more immiscible phases in porous media. In this technique, a set of predefined pressure fields are introduced to the governing partial differential equations. This implies that the velocity vector field and the divergence at each cell of the solution mesh can be determined. However, since none of these fields is the true pressure field entailed by the boundary conditions and/or the source terms, the divergence at each cell will not be the correct one. Rather the residue which is the difference between the true divergence and the calculated one is obtained. These fields are designed such that these residuals are used to construct the matrix of coefficients of the pressure equation and the right-hand side. The experimenting pressure fields are generated in the solver routine and are fed to the different routines, which may be called physics routines, which return to the solver the elements of the matrix of coefficients. Therefore, this methodology separates the solver routines from the physics routines and therefore results in simpler, easy to construct, maintain, and update algorithms.

  18. A 7 T Pulsed Magnetic Field Generator for Magnetized Laser Plasma Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangyue; Liang, Yihan; Song, Falun; Yuan, Peng; Wang, Yulin; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A pulsed magnetic field generator was developed to study the effect of a magnetic field on the evolution of a laser-generated plasma. A 40 kV pulsed power system delivered a fast (~230 ns), 55 kA current pulse into a single-turn coil surrounding the laser target, using a capacitor bank of 200 nF, a laser-triggered switch and a low-impedance strip transmission line. A one-dimensional uniform 7 T pulsed magnetic field was created using a Helmholtz coil pair with a 6 mm diameter. The pulsed magnetic field was controlled to take effect synchronously with a nanosecond heating laser beam, a femtosecond probing laser beam and an optical Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) detector. The preliminary experiments demonstrate bifurcation and focusing of plasma expansion in a transverse magnetic field.

  19. Risk Attitudes, Sample Selection and Attrition in a Longitudinal Field Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten Igel

    Longitudinal experiments allow one to compare inferences about behavior over time for the same individuals, and evaluate the temporal stability of latent preferences. But longitudinal experiments entail the possibility of sample selection and sample attrition over time, confounding inferences about...... to findings of temporal stability in overall risk aversion. However, that stability is around different levels of risk aversion than one might naively infer without the controls for sample selection and attrition we are able to implement. This evidence of “randomization bias” from sample selection...... is important given the popularity of field experiments that rely on randomization, and the effects that risk attitudes have for economic behavior in general....

  20. Cultural norms, cooperation, and communication: Taking experiments to the field in indigenous communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rucha Ghate

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Extensive experimental research has been devoted to the study of behaviour in laboratory settings related to public goods, common-pool resources, and other social dilemmas.  When subjects are anonymous and not allowed to communicate, they tend not to cooperate.  To the surprise of game theorists, however, simply allowing subjects to communicate in a laboratory setting enables them to achieve far more cooperative outcomes.  This finding has now been replicated in many laboratory experiments in multiple countries and in some initial field experiments.  Carefully conducted laboratory experiments do have strong internal validity.  External validity, however, requires further research beyond the initial field experiments that have already been conducted.  In this paper, we report on a series of common-pool resource field experiments conducted in eight indigenous communities in India that have very long traditions of shared norms and mutual trust.  Two experimental designs were used in all eight villages: a “no-communication” game that was repeated in ten rounds where no one was allowed verbal or written communication and a “communication game” in which the same five participants were allowed to communicate with each other at the beginning of each round before making their decisions.  The findings from these field experiments are substantially different from the findings of similar experiments conducted in experimental laboratories.  Subjects tended to cooperate in the first design even in the absence of communication.  The shared norms in these indigenous communities are so deeply embedded that communication is not needed to adopt cooperative decisions.  Communication does, however, tend to homogenize group and individual outcomes so that communities that are overly cooperative tend to reduce cooperation slightly and those with small deviations in the other direction tend to move toward the optimal solution.

  1. Impact of organic carbon and nutrients mobilized during chemical oxidation on subsequent bioremediation of a diesel-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Nora B; Grotenhuis, Tim; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2014-02-01

    Remediation with in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) impacts soil organic matter (SOM) and the microbial community, with deleterious effects on the latter being a major hurdle to coupling ISCO with in situ bioremediation (ISB). We investigate treatment of a diesel-contaminated soil with Fenton's reagent and modified Fenton's reagent coupled with a subsequent bioremediation phase of 187d, both with and without nutrient amendment. Chemical oxidation mobilized SOM into the liquid phase, producing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations 8-16 times higher than the untreated field sample. Higher aqueous concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorous species were also observed following oxidation; NH4(+) increased 14-172 times. During the bioremediation phase, dissolved carbon and nutrient species were utilized for microbial growth-yielding DOC concentrations similar to field sample levels within 56d of incubation. In the absence of nutrient amendment, the highest microbial respiration rates were correlated with higher availability of nitrogen and phosphorus species mobilized by oxidation. Significant diesel degradation was only observed following nutrient amendment, implying that nutrients mobilized by chemical oxidation can increase microbial activity but are insufficient for bioremediation. While all bioremediation occurred in the first 28d of incubation in the biotic control microcosm with nutrient amendment, biodegradation continued throughout 187d of incubation following chemical oxidation, suggesting that chemical treatment also affects the desorption of organic contaminants from SOM. Overall, results indicate that biodegradation of DOC, as an alternative substrate to diesel, and biological utilization of mobilized nutrients have implications for the success of coupled ISCO and ISB treatments.

  2. Evaluation of Oil Removal Efficiency and Enzymatic Activity in Some fungal Strains for Bioremediation of Petroleum-Polluted Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Mohsenzadeh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Petroleum pollution is a global disaster and there are several soil cleaning methods including bioremediation.Methods: In a field study, fugal strains were isolated from oil-contaminated sites of Arak refinery (Iran and their growth ability was checked in potato dextrose agar (PDA media containing 0-10% v/v crude oil, the activity of three enzymes (Catalase, Peroxidase and Phenol Oxidase was evaluated in the fungal colonies and bioremediation ability of the fungi was checked in the experimental pots containing 3 kg sterilized soil and different concentrations of petroleum (0-10% w/w.Results: Four fungal strains, Acromonium sp., Alternaria sp., Aspergillus terreus and Penicillium sp., were selected asthe most resistant ones. They were able to growth in the subjected concentrations and Alternaria sp. showed thehighest growth ability in the petroleum containing media. The enzyme assay showed that the enzymatic activity was increased in the oil-contaminated media. Bioremediation results showed that the studied fungi were able to decrease petroleum pollution. The highest petroleum removing efficiency of Aspergillus terreus, Penicillium sp.,Alternaria sp. and Acromonium sp. was evaluated in the 10%, 8%, 8% and 2% petroleum pollution respectively.Conclusions: Fungi are important microorganisms in decreasing of petroleum pollution. They have bioremediation potency that is related to their enzymatic activities.

  3. Genetic basis and importance of metal resistant genes in bacteria for bioremediation of contaminated environments with toxic metal pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Surajit; Dash, Hirak R; Chakraborty, Jaya

    2016-04-01

    Metal pollution is one of the most persistent and complex environmental issues, causing threat to the ecosystem and human health. On exposure to several toxic metals such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, and mercury, several bacteria has evolved with many metal-resistant genes as a means of their adaptation. These genes can be further exploited for bioremediation of the metal-contaminated environments. Many operon-clustered metal-resistant genes such as cadB, chrA, copAB, pbrA, merA, and NiCoT have been reported in bacterial systems for cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, and nickel resistance and detoxification, respectively. The field of environmental bioremediation has been ameliorated by exploiting diverse bacterial detoxification genes. Genetic engineering integrated with bioremediation assists in manipulation of bacterial genome which can enhance toxic metal detoxification that is not usually performed by normal bacteria. These techniques include genetic engineering with single genes or operons, pathway construction, and alternations of the sequences of existing genes. However, numerous facets of bacterial novel metal-resistant genes are yet to be explored for application in microbial bioremediation practices. This review describes the role of bacteria and their adaptive mechanisms for toxic metal detoxification and restoration of contaminated sites.

  4. Evaluation of oil removal efficiency and enzymatic activity in some fungal strains for bioremediation of petroleum-polluted soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsenzadeh Fariba

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Petroleum pollution is a global disaster and there are several soil cleaning methods including bioremediation. Methods In a field study, fugal strains were isolated from oil-contaminated sites of Arak refinery (Iran and their growth ability was checked in potato dextrose agar (PDA media containing 0-10% v/v crude oil, the activity of three enzymes (Catalase, Peroxidase and Phenol Oxidase was evaluated in the fungal colonies and bioremediation ability of the fungi was checked in the experimental pots containing 3 kg sterilized soil and different concentrations of petroleum (0-10% w/w. Results Four fungal strains, Acromonium sp., Alternaria sp., Aspergillus terreus and Penicillium sp., were selected as the most resistant ones. They were able to growth in the subjected concentrations and Alternaria sp. showed the highest growth ability in the petroleum containing media. The enzyme assay showed that the enzymatic activity was increased in the oil-contaminated media. Bioremediation results showed that the studied fungi were able to decrease petroleum pollution. The highest petroleum removing efficiency of Aspergillus terreus, Penicillium sp., Alternaria sp. and Acromonium sp. was evaluated in the 10%, 8%, 8% and 2% petroleum pollution respectively. Conclusions Fungi are important microorganisms in decreasing of petroleum pollution. They have bioremediation potency that is related to their enzymatic activities.

  5. Against-the-Grain Teacher Education: A Study of Coursework, Field Experience, and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jesse; Fish, Dale R.

    1997-01-01

    This study explored how preservice elementary teachers experienced coursework and field experiences that fostered commitment to socially and pedagogically progressive teaching, especially development of against-the-grain perspectives. Interviews and observations indicated that against-the-grain perspectives evolved from complex interactions of…

  6. Rational Ignorance in Education: A Field Experiment in Student Plagiarism. NBER Working Paper No. 15672

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Thomas S.; Jacob, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the concern that student plagiarism has become increasingly common, there is relatively little objective data on the prevalence or determinants of this illicit behavior. This study presents the results of a natural field experiment designed to address these questions. Over 1,200 papers were collected from the students in undergraduate…

  7. Development of Preservice Teachers' Value Orientations during a Secondary Methods Course and Early Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofo, Seidu; Curtner-Smith, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have examined the value orientations of physical education preservice teachers (PTs). The purposes of this study were to: (1) describe the extent to which one cohort of PTs' value orientations changed and developed during a secondary methods course and early field experience (EFE); and (2) determine why PTs' value orientations changed…

  8. The Effects of Prize Spread and Noise in Elimination Tournaments: A Natural Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Delfgaauw (Josse); A.J. Dur (Robert); J.A. Non (Arjan); W.J.M.I. Verbeke (Willem)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe conduct a field experiment in a large retail chain to test basic predictions of tournament theory regarding prize spread and noise. A random subset of the 208 stores participates in two-stage elimination tournaments. Tournaments differ in the distribution of prize money across winners

  9. Effects of supervision on tax compliance: Evidence from a field experiment in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangl, Katharina; Torgler, Benno; Kirchler, Erich; Hofmann, Eva

    2014-06-01

    We conduct a field experiment on tax compliance, focusing on newly founded firms. As a novelty the effect of tax authorities' supervision on timely tax payments is examined. Interestingly, results show no positive overall effect of close supervision on tax compliance.

  10. Aha Malawi! Envisioning Field Experiences That Nurture Cultural Competencies for Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    This theoretical study uses the context of the writer's personal encounters in Malawi, Africa, to propose a conceptual model for creating diverse field experiences based on best practices in critical pedagogy, service learning, and the underpinnings of transformational learning theory, for the purpose of increasing the probability of meaningful…

  11. Formal law and customary change : A lab-in-field experiment in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cecchi, Francesco; Melesse, Mequanint Biset

    2016-01-01

    Do customary courts strategically adapt arbitration outcomes if they face increased competition by the formal law? Through a lab-in-field experiment with villagers and real customary judges in rural Ethiopia, we show that post-arbitration payouts to agents disfavored by the customary system are down

  12. Field Biology Experiences of Undergraduate Students: The Impact of Novelty Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Debby R. E.; Cotton, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Fieldwork is generally considered an essential aspect of teaching and learning about biology, at both school and university level. However, previous research suggests that the novelty of being in an unfamiliar field environment can negatively, as well as positively, impact on the student experience and learning. This research uses the framework of…

  13. Using Experiment and Computer Modeling to Determine the Off-Axis Magnetic Field of a Solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietor-Santos, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01

    The study of the ideal solenoid is a common topic among introductory-based physics textbooks and a typical current arrangement in laboratory hands-on experiences where the magnetic field inside a solenoid is determined at different currents and at different distances from its center using a magnetic probe. It additionally provides a very simple…

  14. Coupled fluid-flow and magnetic-field simulation of the Riga dynamo experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjereš, S.; Hanjalić, K.; Renaudier, S.; Stefani, F.; Gerbeth, G.; Gailitis, A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic fields of planets, stars, and galaxies result from self-excitation in moving electroconducting fluids, also known as the dynamo effect. This phenomenon was recently experimentally confirmed in the Riga dynamo experiment [ A. Gailitis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4365 (2000) ; A. Gailitis et

  15. ITER test blanket module error field simulation experiments at DIII-D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaffer, M. J.; Snipes, J. A.; Gohil, P.; P. de Vries,; Evans, T. E.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Gao, X.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gates, D. A.; Greenfield, C.M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Kramer, G. J.; La Haye, R. J.; Liu, S.; Loarte, A.; Nave, M. F. F.; Osborne, T. H.; Oyama, N.; Park, J. K.; Ramasubramanian, N.; Reimerdes, H.; Saibene, G.; Salmi, A.; Shinohara, K.; Spong, D. A.; Solomon, W. M.; Tala, T.; Zhu, Y. B.; Boedo, J. A.; Chuyanov, V.; Doyle, E. J.; Jakubowski, M.; Jhang, H.; Nazikian, R. M.; Pustovitov, V. D.; Schmitz, O.; Srinivasan, R.; Taylor, T. S.; Wade, M. R.; You, K. I.; Zeng, L.

    2011-01-01

    Experiments at DIII-D investigated the effects of magnetic error fields similar to those expected from proposed ITER test blanket modules (TBMs) containing ferromagnetic material. Studied were effects on: plasma rotation and locking, confinement, L-H transition, the H-mode pedestal, edge localized m

  16. Restoration of a Terrestrialized Soak Lake of an Irish Raised Bog: Results of Field Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crushell, P.H.; Smolders, A.J.P.; Schouten, M.G.C.; Robroek, B.J.M.; Wirdum, van G.; Roelofs, J.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Soaks (areas of mesotrophic/minerotrophic vegetation within acid bog) add to the overall heterogeneity and biodiversity of raised bog landscapes due to the presence of flora and fauna communities not typically associated with acid bog systems. A field experiment was set up to investigate the potenti

  17. Field Experience Supervision: A Comparison of Cooperating Teachers' and College Supervisors' Evaluations of Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunn, Lorie L.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored and compared the ways in which school-based cooperating teachers and college supervisors evaluate student teachers. The scores allocated to student teachers by school-based cooperating teachers and college supervisors in the final field experience evaluations of student teachers were analyzed. A mixed methods research design…

  18. The Preservice Teachers Are Watching: Framing and Reframing the Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherff, Lisa; Singer, Nancy Robb

    2012-01-01

    In this article we employ Sizers' (1999) school- and classroom-based lenses for observation and apply them to the events and interactions that teacher education students see during school-based field experiences. Our data include online reflections and discussions among 33 students enrolled in a teacher education program at a large, public…

  19. Anonymity in giving in a natural context : an economic field experiment in thirty churches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetevent, Adriaan R.

    2003-01-01

    The role of anonymity in giving is examined in a field experiment performed in thirty Dutch churches. For a period of 29 weeks, the means by which offerings are gathered is determined by chance, prescribing for each offering the use of either `closed' collection bags or open collection baskets. When

  20. MICROORGANISMS RESISTANCE OF THE CHERNOZEM POLLUTION BY ANTIBIOTICS IN THE CONDITIONS OF FIELD MODEL EXPERIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akimenko Y. V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In article the problem of environmental pollution by veterinary antibiotics and acquisitions of resistance of pathogenic microorganisms to them is considered. In the conditions of field experiment resistance of chernozem microorganisms to pollution oxytetracycline and tylosin is studied

  1. New indoor environment chambers and field experiment offices for research on human comfort, health and productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Langkilde, Gunnar; Fanger, Povl Ole

    2004-01-01

    The article describes three new indoor environment chambers, a new laboratory for the study of air movement in spaces and five offices for controlled environment exposures of human subjects in field experiments at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University...

  2. Theory, Experimental Design, and Econometrics Are Complementary (And So Are Lab and Field Experiments)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten; Rutström, E. Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    This book confronts and debates the issues faced by the growing field of experimental economics. For example, as experimental work attempts to test theory, it raises questions about the proper relationship between theory and experiments. As experimental results are used to inform policy...

  3. The identifiable victim effect in charitable giving: evidence from a natural field experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesner, Tine; Rasmussen, O. D.

    2014-01-01

    We design a natural field experiment to enhance our understanding of the role of the identifiable victim effect in charitable giving. Using direct mail solicitations to 25797 prior donors of a nonprofit charity, we tested the responsiveness of donors to make a contribution to either an identifiab...

  4. Teacher Candidates' Implementation of the Personal and Social Responsibility Model in Field Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okseon

    2012-01-01

    With the teacher concerns theory (Fuller, 1969) as a theoretical framework, this study has set out to examine how physical education teacher candidates perceive their implementation of the Personal and Social Responsibility Model (Hellison, 2003) and how they actually implement it during field experience. Five teacher candidates (three female, two…

  5. More than "Just" Changing Diapers: The Experiences of Preservice Early Childhood Teachers in Infant Field Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Lisa Marie Powell

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that early childhood preservice teachers are typically being prepared to work with children from birth through age 8, preservice field experiences with infants continue to be largely missing in early childhood teacher preparation programs Since the education and care of infants often takes place in vastly different settings than…

  6. FLASH MHD simulations of experiments that study shock-generated magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Scopatz, A.; Weide, K.

    2015-12-01

    We summarize recent additions and improvements to the high energy density physics capabilities in FLASH, highlighting new non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) capabilities. We then describe 3D Cartesian and 2D cylindrical FLASH MHD simulations that have helped to design and analyze experiments conducted at the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a laser illuminates a carbon rod target placed in a gas-filled chamber. A magnetic field diagnostic (called a Bdot) employing three very small induction coils is used to measure all three components of the magnetic field at a chosen point in space. The simulations have revealed that many fascinating physical processes occur in the experiments. These include megagauss magnetic fields generated by the interaction of the laser with the target via the Biermann battery mechanism, which are advected outward by the vaporized target material but decrease in strength due to expansion and resistivity; magnetic fields generated by an outward expanding shock via the Biermann battery mechanism; and a breakout shock that overtakes the first wave, the contact discontinuity between the target material and the gas, and then the initial expanding shock. Finally, we discuss the validation and predictive science we have done for this experiment with FLASH.

  7. The role of status and leadership style in sales contests: A natural field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Verbeke; R.P. Bagozzi; F.D. Belschak

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the question whether status alone, as compared to a combined financial/status incentive, is strong enough to motivate team members taking part in a retail sales contest to sell more goods to customers. Using a two-phase natural field experiment, we studied the impact of a sales

  8. Mind the Gap. Combining Theory and Practice in a Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Tuija A.; Tuovila, Seija

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we describe a collegial case study conducted in one Finnish university during the last field experience in a primary school teacher education program and discuss pedagogy of supervision from university supervisors' perspectives. The aim of the study was to clarify the role of university supervisors and try out a collegial…

  9. The Efficacy of Drama in Field Experience: A Qualitative Study Using MAXQDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaldi, Senel; Yerliyurt, Nazli Sila

    2017-01-01

    This study attempted to evaluate the views of senior preservice preschool teachers on the efficacy of drama activities in their field experience in terms of the effect of students' learning, socialization, individual or group work skills and school connectedness and also disclosed the suggestions of senior preservice preschool teachers for faculty…

  10. The effects of payment instruments on charitable giving: Evidence from a field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetevent, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on a door-to-door field experiment on the effects of introducing portable debit terminals for mobile payment authorization on the contributions to charity. About 4,500 households are approached, randomly divided in three experimental treatments, distinguished by the possibility fo

  11. Engineering and agronomy aspects of a long-term precision agriculture field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much research has been conducted on specific precision agriculture tools and implementation strategies, but little has been reported on long-term evaluation of integrated precision agriculture field experiments. In 2004 our research team developed and initiated a multi-faceted “precision agriculture...

  12. Using Norm-Based Appeals to Increase Response Rates in Evaluation Research: A Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Shalini; Stokols, Daniel; Marino, Anne Heberger

    2012-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to test the effectiveness of norm-based persuasive messages for increasing response rates in online survey research. Participants in an interdisciplinary conference were asked to complete two successive postconference surveys and randomly assigned to one of two groups at each time point. The experimental group…

  13. Conducting Supervised Experiential Learning/Field Experiences for Students' Development and Career Reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Jerome I.

    A major problem in the educational system of the United States is that a great number of students and graduates lack a career objective, and, therefore, many workers are unhappy. Offering a variety of supervised field experiences, paid or unpaid, in which students see workers in their occupations will help students identify career choices.…

  14. Does the Unemployement Benefit Institution Affect the Productivity of Workers? Evidence from a Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco, M.; Dalton, P.S.; Vargas, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: We investigate whether and how the type of unemployment bene t institution affects productivity. We designed a field experiment to compare workers' productivity under a welfare system, where the unemployed receive an unconditional monetary transfer, with their productivity under a workfare

  15. The Impact of a Social Justice Service-Learning Field Experience in a Social Foundations Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkler, Barri; hannah, c. lynne; Tinkler, Alan; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This interpretive study examines the outcomes of using a social justice service-learning field experience in a social foundations course to help illuminate for teacher candidates the often "invisible" institutionalized inequities of public schools. The findings demonstrate how social justice service-learning can be used as a field…

  16. Aspergillus flavus: A potential Bioremediator for oil contaminated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.Avasn Maruthi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation is cost-effective, environmentally friendly treatment for oily contaminated sites by the use of microorganisms. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to establish the performance of fungal isolates in degradation of organic compounds contained in soils contaminated with petrol and diesel. As a result of the laboratory screening, two natural fungal strains capable of degrading total organic carbons (TOC were prepared from isolates enriched from the oil contaminated sites. Experiments were conducted in Erlenmeyer flasks under aerobic conditions, with TOC removal percentage varied from 0.7 to 32% depending on strains type and concentration. Strains Phanerocheate chrysosporium and Aspergillus niger exhibited the highest TOC removal percentage of 32 and 21%, respectively, before nutrient addition. TOC removal rate was enhanced after addition of nutrients to incubated flasks. The highest TOC reduction (45% was estimated after addition of combination of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphur to Phanerocheate chrysosporium strains. Results of experimental work carried out elucidate that the fungi like Phanerocheate chrysosporium and Aspergillus niger were capabled of producing enzymes at a faster rate to decompose the substrate hydrocarbon and released more CO2 and hence these potential fungi can be utilized effectively as agents of biodegradation in waste recycling process and Bioremediation of oil contaminated sites.

  17. The bioremediation potential of marine sandy sediment microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Răzvan POPOVICIU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The natural microbiota from marine sandy sediments on the Romanian sea coast was tested for resilience in case of hydrocarbon contamination, for estimating the number of (culturable hydrocarbon and lipid oil-degrading microorganisms and for determining the influence of inorganic nitrate and phosphate nutrients on hydrocarbon spill bioremediation process, by microcosm experiments.Results show that hydrocarbon contamination affects the bacteriobenthos both in terms of cell numbers and composition. Bacterial numbers showed a rapid decrease (28% in four days, followed by a relatively fast recovery (two weeks. The pollution favoured the increase of Gram-positive bacterial proportion (from around 25% to 33%Sandy sediment microbiota in both sites studied contained microorganisms able to use mineral or lipid oils as sole carbon sources, usually around 103-104/cm3, with variations according to the sediment grain size and substrate used.The biostimulation experiments showed that, in absence of water dynamism (and, implicitly, an efficient oxygenation, the addition of nitrogen and phosphorus can be ineffective and even inhibit the remediation process, probably due to eutrophication.

  18. Transient heterogeneity in an aquifer undergoing bioremediation of hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillig, P C; Devlin, J F; Roberts, J A; Tsoflias, G P; McGlashan, M A

    2011-01-01

    Localized, transient heterogeneity was studied in a sand aquifer undergoing benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene bioremediation using a novel array of multilevel, in situ point velocity probes (PVPs). The experiment was conducted within a sheet-pile alleyway to maintain a constant average flow direction through time. The PVPs measured changes in groundwater velocity direction and magnitude at the centimeter scale, making them ideal to monitor small-scale changes in hydraulic conductivity (K). Velocities were shown to vary nonuniformly by up to a factor of 3 when a source of oxygen was established down-gradient of the petroleum spill. In spite of these local variations, the average groundwater velocity within the 7 m × 20 m sheet-piled test area only varied within ± 25%. The nonuniform nature of the velocity variations across the gate indicated that the changes were not due solely to seasonal hydraulic gradient fluctuations. At the conclusion of the experiment, microbial biomass levels in the aquifer sediments was approximately 1 order of magnitude higher in the oxygen-amended portion of the aquifer than at the edge of the plume or in locations up-gradient of the source. These data suggest that the transient velocities resulted, at least in part, from enhanced biological activity that caused transient heterogeneities in the porous medium.

  19. Semifield testing of a bioremediation tool for atrazine-contaminated soils: evaluating the efficacy on soil and aquatic compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelinho, Sónia; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Silva, Cátia; Costa, Catarina; Viana, Paula; Viegas, Cristina A; Fialho, Arsénio M; Ribeiro, Rui; Sousa, José Paulo

    2012-07-01

    The present study evaluated the bioremediation efficacy of a cleanup tool for atrazine-contaminated soils (Pseudomonas sp. ADP plus citrate [P. ADP + CIT]) at a semifield scale, combining chemical and ecotoxicological information. Three experiments representing worst-case scenarios of atrazine contamination for soil, surface water (due to runoff), and groundwater (due to leaching) were performed in laboratory simulators (100 × 40 × 20 cm). For each experiment, three treatments were set up: bioremediated, nonbioremediated, and a control. In the first, the soil was sprayed with 10 times the recommended dose (RD) for corn of Atrazerba and with P. ADP + CIT at day 0 and a similar amount of P. ADP at day 2. The nonbioremediated treatment consisted of soil spraying with 10 times the RD of Atrazerba (day 0). After 7 d of treatment, samples of soil (and eluates), runoff, and leachate were collected for ecotoxicological tests with plants (Avena sativa and Brassica napus) and microalgae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) species. In the nonbioremediated soils, atrazine was very toxic to both plants, with more pronounced effects on plant growth than on seed emergence. The bioremediation tool annulled atrazine toxicity to A. sativa (86 and 100% efficacy, respectively, for seed emergence and plant growth). For B. napus, results point to incomplete bioremediation. For the microalgae, eluate and runoff samples from the nonbioremediated soils were extremely toxic; a slight toxicity was registered for leachates. After only 7 d, the ecotoxicological risk for the aquatic compartments seemed to be diminished with the application of P. ADP + CIT. In aqueous samples obtained from the bioremediated soils, the microalgal growth was similar to the control for runoff samples and slightly lower than control (by 11%) for eluates.

  20. Assessment of three approaches of bioremediation (Natural Attenuation, Landfarming and Bioagumentation - Assistited Landfarming) for a petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, C; Spada, V; Sciarrillo, R

    2017-03-01

    Contamination with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) subsequent to refining activities, is currently one of the major environmental problems. Among the biological remediation approaches, landfarming and in situ bioremediation strategies are of great interest. Purpose of this study was to verify the feasibility of a remediation process wholly based on biological degradation applied to contaminated soils from a decommissioned refinery. This study evaluated through a pot experiment three bioremediation strategies: a) Natural Attenuation (NA), b) Landfarming (L), c) Bioaugmentation-assisted Landfarming (LB) for the treatment of a contaminated soil with petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs). After a 90-days trial, Bioagumentation - assistited Landfarming approach produced the best results and the greatest evident effect was shown with the most polluted samples reaching a reduction of about 86% of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), followed by Landfarming (70%), and Natural Attenuation (57%). The results of this study demonstrated that the combined use of bioremediation strategies was the most advantageous option for the treatment of contaminated soil with petroleum hydrocarbons, as compared to natural attenuation, bioaugmentation or landfarming applied alone. Besides, our results indicate that incubation with an autochthonous bacterial consortium may be a promising method for bioremediation of TPH-contaminated soils.

  1. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments aiming to demonstrate magnetic field amplification via turbulent dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Rigby, A.; Bott, A.; Bell, A. R.; Bingham, R.; Casner, A.; Cattaneo, F.; Churazov, E. M.; Emig, J.; Flocke, N.; Fiuza, F.; Forest, C. B.; Foster, J.; Graziani, C.; Katz, J.; Koenig, M.; Li, C.-K.; Meinecke, J.; Petrasso, R.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S.; Ryu, D.; Ryutov, D.; Weide, K.; White, T. G.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.

    2017-04-01

    The universe is permeated by magnetic fields, with strengths ranging from a femtogauss in the voids between the filaments of galaxy clusters to several teragauss in black holes and neutron stars. The standard model behind cosmological magnetic fields is the nonlinear amplification of seed fields via turbulent dynamo to the values observed. We have conceived experiments that aim to demonstrate and study the turbulent dynamo mechanism in the laboratory. Here, we describe the design of these experiments through simulation campaigns using FLASH, a highly capable radiation magnetohydrodynamics code that we have developed, and large-scale three-dimensional simulations on the Mira supercomputer at the Argonne National Laboratory. The simulation results indicate that the experimental platform may be capable of reaching a turbulent plasma state and determining the dynamo amplification. We validate and compare our numerical results with a small subset of experimental data using synthetic diagnostics.

  2. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Models Using Denver 2006 Field Experiment Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nash’at N.; Pruis, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted a series of wake vortex field experiments at Denver in 2003, 2005, and 2006. This paper describes the lidar wake vortex measurements and associated meteorological data collected during the 2006 deployment, and includes results of recent reprocessing of the lidar data using a new wake vortex algorithm and estimates of the atmospheric turbulence using a new algorithm to estimate eddy dissipation rate from the lidar data. The configuration and set-up of the 2006 field experiment allowed out-of-ground effect vortices to be tracked in lateral transport further than any previous campaign and thereby provides an opportunity to study long-lived wake vortices in moderate to low crosswinds. An evaluation of NASA's fast-time wake vortex transport and decay models using the dataset shows similar performance as previous studies using other field data.

  3. Laboratory experiments on plasma jets in a magnetic field using high-power lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishio K.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The experiments to simulate astrophysical jet generation are performed using Gekko XII (GXII HIPER laser system at the Institute of Laser Engineering. In the experiments a fast plasma flow generated by shooting a CH plane (10 μm thickness is observed at the rear side of the plane. By separating the focal spot of the main beams, a non-uniform plasma is generated. The non-uniform plasma flow in an external magnetic field (0.2∼0.3 T perpendicular to the plasma is more collimated than that without the external magnetic field. The plasma β, the ratio between the plasma and magnetic pressure, is ≫ 1, and the magnetic Reynolds number is ∼150 in the collimated plasma. It is considered that the magnetic field is distorted by the plasma flow and enhances the jet collimation.

  4. Simulation of Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Fields for AMiBA Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Park, C G; Park, Chan-Gyung; Park, Changbom

    2002-01-01

    We have made a topological study of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps by simulating the AMiBA experiment results. A $\\Lambda$CDM CMB sky is adopted to make mock interferometric observations designed for the AMiBA experiment. CMB polarization fields are reconstructed from the AMiBA mock visibility data using the maximum entropy method. We have also considered effects of Galactic foregrounds on the CMB polarization fields. The genus statistic is calculated from the simulated $Q$ and $U$ polarization maps, where $Q$ and $U$ are Stokes parameters. Our study shows that the Galactic foreground emission, even at low Galactic latitude, is expected to have small effects on the CMB polarization field. Increasing survey area and integration time is essential to detect non-Gaussian signals of cosmological origin through genus measurement.

  5. Dynamic changes of bacterial community under bioremediation with Sphingobium sp. LY-6 in buprofezin-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Hou, Qianqian; Liu, Wanru; Meng, Yawen; Wang, Guangli

    2015-08-01

    Buprofezin is a commonly used chemical with satisfactory biological activity against sucking insect pests, but its disposal can cause serious environmental problems. To study the feasibility of remedying contamination by buprofezin, microcosm experiments were carried out to study the effects of various concentrations of buprofezin and Sphingobium sp. LY-6 on soil bacterial communities in soils collected from vegetable fields. In this experiment, the results showed that buprofezin was effectively degraded by Sphingobium sp. LY-6 in incubation soils. Comparing to non-incubated soils, the cumulative degradation ratio of buprofezin was significantly increased, up to the extent of 85 and 51%, in the initial concentration of 10 and 100 mg kg(-1). The abundance and community structure of the bacterial communities were analysed by real-time PCR (qPCR) and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The findings suggest that buprofezin had a negative effect on soil bacterial community, and decreases in bacterial abundance were observed in the later part of the incubation period. The bacterial community structure and diversity shifted significantly at each sampling time. In conclusion, the buprofezin-degrading strain LY-6 played a major role in the bioremediation of the buprofezin-contaminated soil and influenced the dynamics and structure of the bacterial community, demonstrating the great potential of exogenous microorganisms for soil remediation.

  6. Ecogenomics of microbial communities in bioremediation of chlorinated contaminated sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maphosa, F.; Lieten, S.; Dinkla, I.; Stams, A.J.M.; Fennel, D.E.

    2012-01-01

    Organohalide compounds such as chloroethenes, chloroethanes, and polychlorinated benzenes are among the most significant pollutants in the world. These compounds are often found in contamination plumes with other pollutants such as solvents, pesticides, and petroleum derivatives. Microbial bioremedi

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: GRACE DEARBORN INC. DARAMEND™ BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DARAMEND™ Bioremediation Technology may be applied to the remediation of soils and sediments contaminated by a wide variety of organic contaminants including chlorinated phenols, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and petroleum hydrocarbons. The technology may be ap...

  8. Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in aquifer thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ni, Z.

    2015-01-01

      Subjects: bioremediation; biodegradation; environmental biotechnology, subsurface and groundwater contamination; biological processes; geochemistry; microbiology The combination of enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) and aquife

  9. Heavy Metal Polluted Soils: Effect on Plants and Bioremediation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. U. Chibuike

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils polluted with heavy metals have become common across the globe due to increase in geologic and anthropogenic activities. Plants growing on these soils show a reduction in growth, performance, and yield. Bioremediation is an effective method of treating heavy metal polluted soils. It is a widely accepted method that is mostly carried out in situ; hence it is suitable for the establishment/reestablishment of crops on treated soils. Microorganisms and plants employ different mechanisms for the bioremediation of polluted soils. Using plants for the treatment of polluted soils is a more common approach in the bioremediation of heavy metal polluted soils. Combining both microorganisms and plants is an approach to bioremediation that ensures a more efficient clean-up of heavy metal polluted soils. However, success of this approach largely depends on the species of organisms involved in the process.

  10. Guidelines for the Bioremediation of Marine Shorelines and Freshwater Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    For oil spill responders:presents rational approach, evaluates current practices and state-of-the-art research results pertaining to bioremediation of hydrocarbon contamination relative to types and amounts of amendments used, application frequency, extent

  11. Pre-Service English Teachers' Perceptions and Practice of Field Experience and Professional Learning from Expert Teachers' Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chin-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Though it is well known that pre-service teachers' field experiences are recognized as key to enhancing teaching practice, Taiwanese pre-service teachers who take "Teaching Methods and Materials" in elementary school's seven areas often complain that they lack field experience. They do not have the opportunity to experience teaching…

  12. Urban Field Experiences for Undergraduate Liberal Arts Students: Using Compromised Environments as Living Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAvoy, S. E.; Knee, K.

    2015-12-01

    While urban environments may lack the beauty of relatively pristine field sites, they can be used to deliver an effective demonstration of actual environmental damage. Students demanding applied field experiences from their undergraduate environmental science programs can be well served in urban settings. Here, we present strategies for integrating degraded urban systems into the undergraduate field experience. Urban locations provide an opportunity for a different type of local "field-work" than would otherwise be available. In the upper-level undergraduate Environmental Methods class, we relied on a National Park area located a 10-minute walk from campus for most field exercises. Activities included soil analysis, measuring stream flow and water quality parameters, dendrochronology, and aquatic microbe metabolism. In the non-majors class, we make use of our urban location to contrast water quality in parks and highly channelized urban streams. Students spend labs immersed in streams and wetlands heavily impacted by the urban runoff their city generates. Here we share lesson plans and budgets for field activities that can be completed during a class period of 2.5 hours with a $75 course fee, show how these activities help students gain quantitative competency.

  13. In pursuit of a science of agriculture: the role of statistics in field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Giuditta

    2015-09-01

    Since the beginning of the twentieth century statistics has reshaped the experimental cultures of agricultural research taking part in the subtle dialectic between the epistemic and the material that is proper to experimental systems. This transformation has become especially relevant in field trials and the paper will examine the British agricultural institution, Rothamsted Experimental Station, where statistical methods nowadays popular in the planning and analysis of field experiments were developed in the 1920s. At Rothamsted statistics promoted randomisation over systematic arrangements, factorisation over one-question trials, and emphasised the importance of the experimental error in assessing field trials. These changes in methodology transformed also the material culture of agricultural science, and a new body, the Field Plots Committee, was created to manage the field research of the agricultural institution. Although successful, the vision of field experimentation proposed by the Rothamsted statisticians was not unproblematic. Experimental scientists closely linked to the farming community questioned it in favour of a field research that could be more easily understood by farmers. The clash between the two agendas reveals how the role attributed to statistics in field experimentation defined different pursuits of agricultural research, alternately conceived of as a scientists' science or as a farmers' science.

  14. Measurement and tricubic interpolation of the magnetic field for the OLYMPUS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernauer, J.C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Cambridge, MA (United States); Diefenbach, J. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Elbakian, G. [Alikhanyan National Science Laboratory (Yerevan Physics Institute), Yerevan (Armenia); Gavrilov, G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Goerrissen, N. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Hasell, D.K.; Henderson, B.S. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Cambridge, MA (United States); Holler, Y. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Karyan, G. [Alikhanyan National Science Laboratory (Yerevan Physics Institute), Yerevan (Armenia); Ludwig, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Marukyan, H. [Alikhanyan National Science Laboratory (Yerevan Physics Institute), Yerevan (Armenia); Naryshkin, Y. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); O' Connor, C.; Russell, R.L.; Schmidt, A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schneekloth, U. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Suvorov, K.; Veretennikov, D. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    The OLYMPUS experiment used a 0.3 T toroidal magnetic spectrometer to measure the momenta of outgoing charged particles. In order to accurately determine particle trajectories, knowledge of the magnetic field was needed throughout the spectrometer volume. For that purpose, the magnetic field was measured at over 36,000 positions using a three-dimensional Hall probe actuated by a system of translation tables. We used these field data to fit a numerical magnetic field model, which could be employed to calculate the magnetic field at any point in the spectrometer volume. Calculations with this model were computationally intensive; for analysis applications where speed was crucial, we pre-computed the magnetic field and its derivatives on an evenly spaced grid so that the field could be interpolated between grid points. We developed a spline-based interpolation scheme suitable for SIMD implementations, with a memory layout chosen to minimize space and optimize the cache behavior to quickly calculate field values. This scheme requires only one-eighth of the memory needed to store necessary coefficients compared with a previous scheme (Lekien and Marsden, 2005 [1]). This method was accurate for the vast majority of the spectrometer volume, though special fits and representations were needed to improve the accuracy close to the magnet coils and along the toroidal axis.

  15. ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

    2009-04-21

    This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal

  16. The joys of mapping: qualitative insights into the student experience of a residential geoscience field course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Alison

    2010-05-01

    Using a mixed-format survey instrument, Boyle et al. (2007) identify significant effects in the affective domain resulting from participation in residential fieldwork. These findings are echoed by Stokes & Boyle (2009) in a separate, more detailed, study into the experiences of geoscience students when learning geologic mapping. While providing a quantifiable measure of changes in the students' attitudes and feelings, however, these survey data provide limited information about the experiences that have resulted in these changes, or of the factors likely to have influenced them. In order to gain a deeper insight into the students' affective responses, the quantitative data collected during this study were supplemented with qualitative data from in-situ and group interviews, open (free-text) survey questions, and direct observation of fieldwork activities. This provided a richness and depth of information that could not be achieved from quantitative data alone, and thus afforded a greater understanding of the students' experiences of this particular field activity. The survey findings showed that positive feelings and attitudes present at the start of the mapping field course became reinforced, but closer scrutiny of the data revealed that over half of the student cohort (57%) embarked on the fieldwork with some degree of worry, concern, or anxiety. The qualitative data enabled the source of these negative feelings to be identified, and provided evidence that these were overcome as a result of participating in the fieldwork. Thematic content analysis of the data resulted in the emergence of ten major themes; these provided a clear indication of factors significant to the student experience, and of specific aspects of the field course likely to generate either positive or negative affective responses. Further, these data highlighted the complexity of the learning process, and demonstrated the extent to which experiences varied between individual students. The social

  17. Healthy environments for healthy people: bioremediation today and tomorrow.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaventura, C; Johnson, F. M.

    1997-01-01

    Increases in environmental contamination lead to a progressive deterioration of environmental quality. This condition challenges our global society to find effective measures of remediation to reverse the negative conditions that severely threaten human and environmental health. We discuss the progress being made toward this goal through application of bioremediation techniques. Bioremediation generally utilizes microbes (bacteria, fungi, yeast, and algae), although higher plants are used in ...

  18. Development of combinatorial bacteria for metal and radionuclide bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. C. Matin, Ph. D.

    2006-06-15

    The grant concerned chromate [Cr(VI)] bioremediation and it was our aim from the outset to construct individual bacterial strains capable of improved bioremediation of multiple pollutants and to identify the enzymes suited to this end. Bacteria with superior capacity to remediate multiple pollutants can be an asset for the cleanup of DOE sites as they contain mixed waste. I describe below the progress made during the period of the current grant, providing appropriate context.

  19. Effectiveness of bioremediation for the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, James R.; Prince, Roger C.; Harner, E. James; Atlas, Ronald M.

    1994-03-01

    The effectiveness of bioremediation for oil spills has been difficult to establish on dynamic, heterogeneous marine shorelines. A new interpretative technique used following the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska shows that fertilizer applications significantly increased rates of oil biodegradation. Biodegradation rates depended mainly on the concentration of nitrogen within the shoreline, the oil loading, and the extent to which natural biodegradation had already taken place. The results suggest ways to improve the effectiveness of bioremediation measures in the future.

  20. A new technique of solar bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaalal, O. [University General Requirements Unit, UAE University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Tango, M.; Islam, M. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2005-03-15

    Disinfection with solar energy has been in practice for centuries. This article uses this old technology and builds on some of its unique features in order to develop an effective method of bioremediation. Recently, a strain of thermophilic bacteria was isolated from the environment of the United Arab Emirates. These bacteria show extraordinary resistance to heat and have their maximum growth rate around 80{sup o}C. They are found to be extremely efficient in remediating petroleum contaminants in the presence of high salinity water (simulated seawater). This article investigates the potential of using these facultative bacteria in a bioreactor in conjunction with solar irradiation. The bioreactor, recently developed at the UAE University, uses air flow through a transverse perforated pipe in order to create effective mixing, leading to optimum growth environment for bacteria. Solar energy is used in two ways. UV radiation from the sun destroys most pathogens and creates an environment that offers little competition for the thermophilic bacteria that cannot be destroyed with the UV. Also, the second advantage of the solar energy is the increase in temperature of the reactor water to a level that is more suitable for growth of the thermophilic bacteria. Heat also decreases the viscosity and interfacial tension of the petroleum contaminant, leading to the profuse emulsification. Emulsification makes more bacteria available to the petroleum contaminant and enhances bioremediation. Detailed pictorial visualization performed with a computer image analyzer showed the extinction of bacteria other than the useful thermophilic bacteria and helped measure their growth. Finally, mathematical models are developed for determining the degradation rate in the presence of solar exposure. Corrections are made to accommodate both the effects of temperature, salinity, and solar intensity. To the best of the knowledge of the authors, this coupling has not been done before. Predictive

  1. Quantifying Temporal Autocorrelations for the Expression of Geobacter species mRNA Gene Transcripts at Variable Ammonium Levels during in situ U(VI) Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouser, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to develop decision-making tools for the prediction and optimization of subsurface bioremediation strategies, we must be able to link the molecular-scale activity of microorganisms involved in remediation processes with biogeochemical processes observed at the field-scale. This requires the ability to quantify changes in the in situ metabolic condition of dominant microbes and associate these changes to fluctuations in nutrient levels throughout the bioremediation process. It also necessitates a need to understand the spatiotemporal variability of the molecular-scale information to develop meaningful parameters and constraint ranges in complex bio-physio-chemical models. The expression of three Geobacter species genes (ammonium transporter (amtB), nitrogen fixation (nifD), and a housekeeping gene (recA)) were tracked at two monitoring locations that differed significantly in ammonium (NH4+) concentrations during a field-scale experiment where acetate was injected into the subsurface to simulate Geobacteraceae in a uranium-contaminated aquifer. Analysis of amtB and nifD mRNA transcript levels indicated that NH4+ was the primary form of fixed nitrogen during bioremediation. Overall expression levels of amtB were on average 8-fold higher at NH4+ concentrations of 300 μM or more than at lower NH4+ levels (average 60 μM). The degree of temporal correlation in Geobacter species mRNA expression levels was calculated at both locations using autocorrelation methods that describe the relationship between sample semi-variance and time lag. At the monitoring location with lower NH4+, a temporal correlation lag of 8 days was observed for both amtB and nifD transcript patterns. At the location where higher NH4+ levels were observed, no discernable temporal correlation lag above the sampling frequency (approximately every 2 days) was observed for amtB or nifD transcript fluctuations. Autocorrelation trends in recA expression levels at both locations indicated that

  2. Detrimental adsorbate fields in experiments with cold Rydberg gases near surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Hattermann, H; Karlewski, F; Jessen, F; Cano, D; Fortágh, J

    2012-01-01

    We observe the shift of Rydberg levels of rubidium close to a copper surface when atomic clouds are repeatedly deposited on it. We measure transition frequencies of rubidium to S and D Rydberg states with principal quantum numbers n between 31 and 48 using the technique of electromagnetically induced transparency. The spectroscopic measurement shows a strong increase of electric fields towards the surface that evolves with the deposition of atoms. Starting with a clean surface, we measure the evolution of electrostatic fields in the range between 30 and 300 \\mum from the surface. We find that after the deposition of a few hundred atomic clouds, each containing ~10^6 atoms, the field of adsorbates reaches 1 V/cm for a distance of 30 \\mum from the surface. This evolution of the electrostatic field sets serious limitations on cavity QED experiments proposed for Rydberg atoms on atom chips.

  3. Detrimental adsorbate fields in experiments with cold Rydberg gases near surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattermann, H.; Mack, M.; Karlewski, F.; Jessen, F.; Cano, D.; Fortágh, J.

    2012-08-01

    We observe the shift of Rydberg levels of rubidium close to a copper surface when atomic clouds are repeatedly deposited on it. We measure transition frequencies of rubidium to S and D Rydberg states with principal quantum numbers n between 31 and 48 using the technique of electromagnetically induced transparency. The spectroscopic measurement shows a strong increase of electric fields towards the surface that evolves with the deposition of atoms. Starting with a clean surface, we measure the evolution of electrostatic fields in the range between 30 and 300 μm from the surface. We find that after the deposition of a few hundred atomic clouds, each containing ˜106 atoms, the field of adsorbates reaches 1 V/cm for a distance of 30 μm from the surface. This evolution of the electrostatic field sets serious limitations on cavity QED experiments proposed for Rydberg atoms on atom chips.

  4. Simulating Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) with a Guide Field using Fluid Code, HiFi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budner, Tamas; Chen, Yangao; Meier, Eric; Ji, Hantao; MRX Team

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a phenomenon that occurs in plasmas when magnetic field lines effectively ``break'' and reconnect resulting in a different topological configuration. In this process, energy that was once stored in the magnetic field is transfered into the thermal velocity of the particles, effectively heating the plasma. MRX at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory creates the conditions under which reconnection can occur by initially ramping the current in two adjacent coils and then rapidly decreasing with and without a guide magnetic field along the reconnecting current. We simulate this experiment using a fluid code called HiFi, an implicit and adaptive high order spectral element modeling framework, and compare our results to experimental data from MRX. The purpose is to identify physics behind the observed reconnection process for the field line break and the resultant plasma heating.

  5. Experience with wavefront sensor and deformable mirror interfaces for wide-field adaptive optics systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basden, A. G.; Atkinson, D.; Bharmal, N. A.; Bitenc, U.; Brangier, M.; Buey, T.; Butterley, T.; Cano, D.; Chemla, F.; Clark, P.; Cohen, M.; Conan, J.-M.; de Cos, F. J.; Dickson, C.; Dipper, N. A.; Dunlop, C. N.; Feautrier, P.; Fusco, T.; Gach, J. L.; Gendron, E.; Geng, D.; Goodsell, S. J.; Gratadour, D.; Greenaway, A. H.; Guesalaga, A.; Guzman, C. D.; Henry, D.; Holck, D.; Hubert, Z.; Huet, J. M.; Kellerer, A.; Kulcsar, C.; Laporte, P.; Le Roux, B.; Looker, N.; Longmore, A. J.; Marteaud, M.; Martin, O.; Meimon, S.; Morel, C.; Morris, T. J.; Myers, R. M.; Osborn, J.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Raynaud, H.; Reeves, A. P.; Rousset, G.; Sanchez Lasheras, F.; Sanchez Rodriguez, M.; Santos, J. D.; Sevin, A.; Sivo, G.; Stadler, E.; Stobie, B.; Talbot, G.; Todd, S.; Vidal, F.; Younger, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in adaptive optics (AO) have led to the implementation of wide field-of-view AO systems. A number of wide-field AO systems are also planned for the forthcoming Extremely Large Telescopes. Such systems have multiple wavefront sensors of different types, and usually multiple deformable mirrors (DMs). Here, we report on our experience integrating cameras and DMs with the real-time control systems of two wide-field AO systems. These are CANARY, which has been operating on-sky since 2010, and DRAGON, which is a laboratory AO real-time demonstrator instrument. We detail the issues and difficulties that arose, along with the solutions we developed. We also provide recommendations for consideration when developing future wide-field AO systems.

  6. Experience with wavefront sensor and deformable mirror interfaces for wide-field adaptive optics systems

    CERN Document Server

    Basden, A G; Bharmal, N A; Bitenc, U; Brangier, M; Buey, T; Butterley, T; Cano, D; Chemla, F; Clark, P; Cohen, M; Conan, J -M; de Cos, F J; Dickson, C; Dipper, N A; Dunlop, C N; Feautrier, P; Fusco, T; Gach, J L; Gendron, E; Geng, D; Goodsell, S J; Gratadour, D; Greenaway, A H; Guesalaga, A; Guzman, C D; Henry, D; Holck, D; Hubert, Z; Huet, J M; Kellerer, A; Kulcsar, C; Laporte, P; Roux, B Le; Looker, N; Longmore, A J; Marteaud, M; Martin, O; Meimon, S; Morel, C; Morris, T J; Myers, R M; Osborn, J; Perret, D; Petit, C; Raynaud, H; Reeves, A P; Rousset, G; Lasheras, F Sanchez; Rodriguez, M Sanchez; Santos, J D; Sevin, A; Sivo, G; Stadler, E; Stobie, B; Talbot, G; Todd, S; Vidal, F; Younger, E J

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in adaptive optics (AO) have led to the implementation of wide field-of-view AO systems. A number of wide-field AO systems are also planned for the forthcoming Extremely Large Telescopes. Such systems have multiple wavefront sensors of different types, and usually multiple deformable mirrors (DMs). Here, we report on our experience integrating cameras and DMs with the real-time control systems of two wide-field AO systems. These are CANARY, which has been operating on-sky since 2010, and DRAGON, which is a laboratory adaptive optics real-time demonstrator instrument. We detail the issues and difficulties that arose, along with the solutions we developed. We also provide recommendations for consideration when developing future wide-field AO systems.

  7. Endophytic microorganisms--promising applications in bioremediation of greenhouse gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępniewska, Z; Kuźniar, A

    2013-11-01

    Bioremediation is a technique that uses microbial metabolism to remove pollutants. Various techniques and strategies of bioremediation (e.g., phytoremediation enhanced by endophytic microorganisms, rhizoremediation) can mainly be used to remove hazardous waste from the biosphere. During the last decade, this specific technique has emerged as a potential cleanup tool only for metal pollutants. This situation has changed recently as a possibility has appeared for bioremediation of other pollutants, for instance, volatile organic compounds, crude oils, and radionuclides. The mechanisms of bioremediation depend on the mobility, solubility, degradability, and bioavailability of contaminants. Biodegradation of pollutions is associated with microbial growth and metabolism, i.e., factors that have an impact on the process. Moreover, these factors have a great influence on degradation. As a result, recognition of natural microbial processes is indispensable for understanding the mechanisms of effective bioremediation. In this review, we have emphasized the occurrence of endophytic microorganisms and colonization of plants by endophytes. In addition, the role of enhanced bioremediation by endophytic bacteria and especially of phytoremediation is presented.

  8. Study on the Bioremediation of Soil Pollution in Orchard%果园土壤污染生物修复研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宝申; 王炳华; 高树青; 刘秀春; 高艳敏; 陈宝江; 杨华

    2009-01-01

    [目的]弄清土壤污染的生物修复作用机理.[方法]通过果园田间试验和土壤模拟试验,研究施用果树生物有机肥对果园土壤生物修复的作用.[结果]生物有机肥提高了根域土壤多酚氧化酶、脲酶、磷酸酶等酶的活力;促进了根域土壤对Pb2+等重金属的钝化;增加了有益真菌、放线菌、细菌等活性菌的数量,降低了根腐病菌、疫腐病菌、白/紫纹羽病菌和线虫等有害生物的数量.[结论]该研究为生物有机肥在果树上的推广应用提供了依据.%[ Objective] The aim was to study the bioremediation mechanism of soil pollution. [ Method] The effects of applying biological organic fertilizers on the bioremediation of soil pollution in orchard were studied by orchard field experiment and soil simulation experiment. [Result] The biological organic fertilizers improved the activities of enzymes (like polyphenol oxidase, urease, phosphatase etc) in root-zone soil, promoted the passivation of heavy metals (Pb~(2+)) by root-zone soil, increased the quantity of active bacterium (like beneficial fungi, ac-tinomycetes, bacterium etc) and decreased the quantity of harmful biology (like Fusarium oxysporum, Moniliophthora roreri, Ruselliniu necu-trix/Helicobasidium mompa Tanakae, nematode etc). [Conclusion] The study results provide some references for the popularization and application of biological organic fertilizers on fruit trees.

  9. Bioremediation Well Borehole Soil Sampling and Data Analysis Summary Report for the 100-N Area Bioremediation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. A. Gamon

    2009-09-28

    The purpose of this report is to present data and findings acquired during the drilling and construction of seven bioremediation wells in the 100-N Area in conjunction with remediation of the UPR-100-N-17 petroleum waste site.

  10. Laboratory experiments investigating magnetic field production via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Channing; Fiuza, Frederico; Ross, James Steven; Zylstra, Alex; Pollock, Brad; Drake, R. Paul; Froula, Dustin; Gregori, Gianluca; Kugland, Nathan; Kuranz, Carolyn; Levy, Matthew; Li, Chikang; Meinecke, Jena; Petrasso, Richard; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Sakawa, Youichi; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Takabe, Hideke; Turnbull, David; Park, Hye-Sook

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are often associated with the presence of strong magnetic fields in a plasma flow. The magnetic fields required for shock formation may either be initially present, for example in supernova remnants or young galaxies, or they may be self-generated in systems such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In the case of GRB outflows, the intense magnetic fields are greater than those seeded by the GRB progenitor or produced by misaligned density and temperature gradients in the plasma flow (the Biermann-battery effect). The Weibel instability is one candidate mechanism for the generation of sufficiently strong fields to create a collisionless shock. Despite their crucial role in astrophysical systems, observation of the magnetic fields produced by Weibel instabilities in experiments has been challenging. Using a proton probe to directly image electromagnetic fields, we present evidence of Weibel-generated magnetic fields that grow in opposing, initially unmagnetized plasma flows from laser-driven laboratory experiments. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that the instability efficiently extracts energy from the plasma flows, and that the self-generated magnetic energy reaches a few percent of the total energy in the system. This result demonstrates an experimental platform suitable for the investigation of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock formation in supernova remnants, large-scale magnetic field amplification, and the radiation signature from gamma-ray bursts.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. The generation and amplification of intergalactic magnetic fields in analogue laboratory experiments with high power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, G.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.

    2015-11-01

    The advent of high-power laser facilities has, in the past two decades, opened a new field of research where astrophysical environments can be scaled down to laboratory dimensions, while preserving the essential physics. This is due to the invariance of the equations of magneto-hydrodynamics to a class of similarity transformations. Here we review the relevant scaling relations and their application in laboratory astrophysics experiments with a focus on the generation and amplification of magnetic fields in cosmic environment. The standard model for the origin of magnetic fields is a multi stage process whereby a vanishing magnetic seed is first generated by a rotational electric field and is then amplified by turbulent dynamo action to the characteristic values observed in astronomical bodies. We thus discuss the relevant seed generation mechanisms in cosmic environment including resistive mechanism, collision-less and fluid instabilities, as well as novel laboratory experiments using high power laser systems aimed at investigating the amplification of magnetic energy by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Future directions, including efforts to model in the laboratory the process of diffusive shock acceleration are also discussed, with an emphasis on the potential of laboratory experiments to further our understanding of plasma physics on cosmic scales.

  12. Rethermalization of a field-reversed configuration plasma in translation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himura, Haruhiko; Okada, Shigefumi; Sugimoto, Satoshi; Goto, Seiichi

    1995-01-01

    A translation experiment of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma is performed on the FIX machine [Shiokawa and Goto, Phys. Fluids B 5, 534 (1993)]. The translated FRC bounces between magnetic mirror fields at both ends of a confinement region. The plasma loses some of its axial kinetic energy when it is reflected by the magnetic mirror field, and eventually settles down in the confinement region. In this reflection process, the plasma temperature rises significantly. Such plasma rethermalization has been observed in OCT-L1 experiments [Ito et al., Phys. Fluids 30, 168 (1987)], but rarely in FRX-C/T experiments [Rej et al., Phys. Fluids 29, 852 (1986)]. It is found that the rethermalization depends on the relation between the plasma temperature and the translation velocity. The rethermalization occurs only in the case where the translation velocity exceeds the sound velocity. This result implies the rethermalization is caused by a shock wave induced within the FRC when the plasma is reflected by the magnetic mirror field.

  13. CRISP. D3.3. Final report on field experiments and tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warmer, C.J.; Kamphuis, I.G. [ECN Energy in the Built Environment and Networks, Petten (Netherlands); Gustavsson, R. [Blekinge Institute of Technology BTH, Karlskrona (Sweden); Andrieu, C. [IDEA, Grenoble (France)

    2006-06-15

    This document describes the high level results of the three field experiments and tests performed within the CRISP project. The aims of the document are: To give an account of the lessons learned from the experiments as they have been performed; To give recommendations for strategic use of intelligent ICT in high-DG power networks (thinking forward from our experience in the experiments); and To compile 'industrial guidelines and recommendations' for the strategic use of intelligent ICT for various operational aspects of high-DG power networks. These strategic recommendations will not only cover technology issues, but also business, economic, and market considerations. The role of utilities and third parties in utilising this new technology in this changing scene forms an important issue to be dealt with.

  14. Copper sulphate reduces the metabolic activity of Gammarus fossarum in laboratory and field experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidlin, Lara, E-mail: lara.schmidlin@unibas.ch; Fumetti, Stefanie von; Nagel, Peter

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Copper-contaminated food significantly reduces the ETS activity of G. fossarum. • The ETS and feeding activity of G. fossarum were significantly higher in the lab. • A combination of test chamber experiments in the laboratory and field is optimal. - Abstract: The specialised fauna of freshwater springs is affected by contamination of the water with xenobiotics from human activities in the surrounding landscape. We assessed the effects of exposure to toxins in laboratory and field experiments by using copper sulphate as a model substance and Gammarus fossarum Koch, 1836, as the model organism. This amphipod is a common representative of the European spring fauna and copper is a widespread contaminant, mainly from agricultural practice. The experiments were conducted in test chambers placed in flow channels and directly in a spring. The gammarids were fed with conditioned beech leaf discs, which had been exposed to a 0.8 mg Cu/L solution for 96 h. The feeding activity of the amphipods was quantified on the level of the organism; and the respiratory electron transport system (ETS) assay was conducted in order to determine changes on the cellular level in the test organisms. The results show that the feeding activity, when the leaf discs were contaminated with copper, was not significantly different from the control. The ETS activity of the gammarids, which had been feeding on the copper contaminated leaf discs was however significantly reduced. The results followed the same pattern for gammarids from both the laboratory and the spring. By conducting the experiments not only in a laboratory but also directly in a spring in the field, we took a crucial step towards a more realistic approach when examining environmental pollutants on an organism. Our findings demonstrate the importance of conducting experiments out in the field, in natural conditions, as well as in the laboratory.

  15. Geoelectrical monitoring of bioremediation: the DNAPL problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.; Kulessa, B.; Kalin, R.

    2009-12-01

    Geo-electrical methods (e.g. resistivity, induced polarization and self potential) are increasingly being utilized as monitoring aids in remediation experiments. Recent field applications highlight the potential value of these methods in long-term monitoring, and current laboratory research is improving the quantitative interpretation of these geo-electrical signals. However, whereas this has proven true for the remediation of insoluble particles (e.g. heavy metals) and light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs), geoelectrical monitoring of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) has proven more challenging. Here we report the results of a column experiment aimed at monitoring bio-degradation of DNAPLs using geo-electrical and electrodic potential (based on reactions at the surface of electrodes) methods. We recorded strong electrodic potential signals concurrent with the degradation of the DNAPL as evident from geochemical monitoring (pH,Eh, total organic content, alkalinity, fluid conductivity, gas chromatography/and mass spectrometry). However, resistivity and induced polarization measurements were unresponsive to the degradation processes and apparently insensitive to microbial activity in this DNAPL contaminated system. Our results suggest that some of the characteristic biogeophysical signals associated with microbial growth detected in uncontaminated and LNAPL contaminated systems may not necessarily be observed during DNAPL biodegradation during the time-scale of typical laboratory and field geophysical experiments.

  16. SU-E-J-233: A Facility for Radiobiological Experiments in a Large Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlone, M; Heaton, R; Keller, H [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wouters, B [Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jaffray, D [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing medical linear accelerators with integrated image guidance by MRI. Less work has been done on the fundamental biology of cell survival in the presence of a strong magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to describe an experimental system capable of measuring cell survival response in the types of MRI-linac systems currently under development. Methods: We have integrated a cobalt irradiator with a solenoid magnet. The solenoid magnet has inner diameter of 10 cm. To enable measurement of the biological effects as a function of depth, we are utilizing the sliced gel technique, in which cells are embedded and fixed within a gelatin matrix. Irradiated cells at defined positions (sub mm resolution) can subsequently be recovered and assessed for cell survival or other biological effects. Results: The magnetic field profile in the solenoid has a peak magnetic field 36 cm below the top edge of the magnet bore and can be placed at and SAD of 100 cm. At a solenoid current of 35 A, the peak magnetic field is 0.25 T. The dose rate of the cobalt irradiator is 16 cGy/min at 100 cm SAD. EBT3 film was used to demonstrate the system functionality. It was irradiated at 1 cm depth at 100 cm SSD with a 4×4 field to 1.5 Gy in a 0.25 T magnetic field. The dose profile was similar between this film and the control exposure without magnetic field. Conclusion: Integrating a cobalt irradiator with a high field magnet is demonstrated. The magnetic field at the cobalt defining head was minimal and did not interfere with the functioning of this unit. Cell survival experiments can be reproduced exactly in the presence or absence of a magnetic field since a resistive magnet is used.

  17. Females and STEM: Determining the K-12 Experiences that Influenced Women to Pursue STEM Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Anne Marie

    In the United States, careers in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) are increasing yet there are not enough trained personnel to meet this demand. In addition, of those that seek to pursue STEM fields in the United States, only 26% are female. In order to increase the number of women seeking STEM based bachelor's degrees, K-12 education must provide a foundation that prepares students for entry into these fields. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to determine the perceived K-12 experiences that influenced females to pursue a STEM field. Twelve college juniors or seniors seeking a degree in Biology, Mathematics, or Physics were interviewed concerning their K-12 experiences. These interviews were analyzed and six themes emerged. Teacher passion and classroom characteristics such as incorporating challenging activities played a significant role in the females' decisions to enter STEM fields. Extra-curricular activities such as volunteer and mentor opportunities and the females' need to benefit others also influenced females in their career choice. Both the formal (within the school) and informal (outside of the traditional classroom) pipeline opportunities that these students encountered helped develop a sense of self-efficacy in science and mathematics; this self-efficacy enabled them to persist in pursuing these career fields. Several participants cited barriers that they encountered in K-12 education, but these barriers were primarily internal as they struggled with overcoming self-imposed obstacles in learning and being competitive in the mathematics and science classrooms. The experiences from these female students can be used by K-12 educators to prepare and encourage current female students to enter STEM occupations.

  18. Research on On-Site Experiment of Bioremediation on Oil-Contaminated Soil by Mixed Microorganism Bacteria Agent%混合菌剂修复油污土壤现场试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张璇; 陈丽华; 常沁春; 雒晓芳; 张浩

    2013-01-01

    把5株石油降解菌制成的混合菌剂投加到现场油污土壤中,通过分析残油中石油各组分的含量以及土壤氮、磷含量,脱氢酶活性和土壤微生物数量的变化,研究了菌剂现场修复油污土壤的能力和影响因素.结果表明:混合菌剂在现场试验中表现出了对低、高浓度油污土壤良好的降解效果,优先降解饱和烷烃,其次是芳香烃,石油烃降解率在60 d时达到了88%以上.在降解过程中,细菌对饱和烃的降解作用最明显,每类菌对于石油的降解都起着一定作用.添加氮、磷元素达到合适比例时,对污染土壤的石油降解有显著的促进作用.%Mixed bacteria agent made of 5 petroleum degrading strains was added to the oil-contaminated soil of site.The content of each component in oil,the soil nitrogen,phosphorus content of residual oil and the change of dehydrogenase activity and soil microbial quantity were analyzed,in order to study remediation ability of mixed bacteria for oil-polluted soil and influence factors.The results show that:the mixed bacteria in the field tests has a good degradation effect for low,high oil-contaminated soil,and preferentially degrade alkanes,secondly aromatic hydrocarbons.The degradation rate of petroleum hydrocarbon in 60 d reaches more than 88%.In the process of degradation,bacteria degrade saturated hydrocarbons obviously; each type of bacteria for oil degradation plays a certain role.Adding nitrogen,phosphorus elements reached the right proportion has significant promoting effect on degradation of petroleum contaminated soil.

  19. Acoustic radiation field of the truncated parametric source generated by a piston radiator model and experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiaoliang; ZHU Zhemin; DU Gonghuan; TANG Haiqing; LI Shui; MIAO Rongxing

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented to describe the parametric acoustic field generated by a piston radiator. In the model, the high-frequency primary wave interaction region that is truncated by a low-pass acoustic filter can be viewed as a cylindrical source within the Rayleigh distance of the piston. When the radius of the piston is much smaller than the length of the parametric region, this model is reduced to the Berketey's End-Fire Line Array model. Comparison between numerical calculations and experimental measurement show that the generated parametric sound field (especially near the axis) agrees well with the experiment results.

  20. Mean Interplanetary Magnetic Field Measurement Using the ARGO-YBJ Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aielli, G; Bartoli, B; Bernardini, P; Bi, X J; Bleve, C; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Bussino, S; Melcarne, A K Calabrese; Camarri, P; Cao, Z; Cappa, A; Cardarelli, R; Catalanotti, S; Cattaneo, C; Celio, P; Chen, S Z; Chen, T L; Chen, Y; Creti, P; Cui, S W; Dai, B Z; Staiti, G D'Alí; Danzengluobu,; Dattoli, M; De Mitri, I; Piazzoli, B D'Ettorre; De Vincenzi, M; Di Girolamo, T; Ding, X H; Di Sciascio, G; Feng, C F; Feng, Z Y; Feng, Zhenyong; Galeazzi, F; Galeotti, P; Gargana, R; Gou, Q B; Guo, Y Q; He, H H; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Huang, Q; Iacovacci, M; Iuppa, R; James, I; Jia, H Y; Labaciren,; Li, H J; Li, J Y; Li, X X; Liberti, B; Liguori, G; Liu, C; Liu, C Q; Liu, M Y; Liu, J; Lu, H; Ma, X H; Mancarella, G; Mari, S M; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Mastroianni, S; Meng, X R; Montini, P; Ning, C C; Pagliaro, A; Panareo, M; Perrone, L; Pistilli, P; Qu, X B; Rossi, E; Ruggieri, F; Saggese, L; Salvini, P; Santonico, R; Shen, P R; Sheng, X D; Shi, F; Stanescu, C; Surdo, A; Tan, Y H; Vallania, P; Vernetto, S; Vigorito, C; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wu, C Y; Wu, H R; Yao, Z G; Xu, B; Xue, L; Yan, Y X; Yang, Q Y; Yang, X C; Yuan, A F; Zha, M; Zhang, H M; Zhang, JiLong; Zhang, JianLi; Zhang, L; Zhang, P; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhaxiciren,; Zhou, X X; Zhu, F R; Zhu, Q Q; Zizzi, G

    2011-01-01

    The sun blocks cosmic ray particles from outside the solar system, forming a detectable shadow in the sky map of cosmic rays detected by the ARGO-YBJ experiment in Tibet. Because the cosmic ray particles are positive charged, the magnetic field between the sun and the earth deflects them from straight trajectories and results in a shift of the shadow from the true location of the sun. Here we show that the shift measures the intensity of the field which is transported by the solar wind from the sun to the earth.

  1. Spatiotemporal properties of Sub-Rayleigh and supershear rupture velocity fields: Theory and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Michael; Bhat, Harsha S.; Rosakis, Ares J.

    2016-08-01

    Fundamental spatiotemporal field properties and particle velocity waveform signatures of sub-Rayleigh and supershear ruptures were experimentally investigated through a series of laboratory earthquake experiments. We appeal to dynamic rupture theory to extract and highlight previously unnoticed aspects and results, which are of direct relevance to our new experiments. Kinematic relationships derived from both singular and non-singular solutions are applied to analyze and interpret various features observed in these experiments. A strong correspondence is demonstrated between particle velocity records obtained in lab experiments and synthetic particle velocity waveform profiles derived from theory. Predicted temporal profiles, sense of particle motion, and amplitude decay properties of sub-Rayleigh and supershear particle velocity waveforms are experimentally verified. In a particular set of supershear rupture experiments, the fault-normal (FN) and fault-parallel (FP) velocity waveforms were simultaneously recorded at fixed, off-fault field points as a shear Mach front swept these locations. Particle velocity records collected over a broad range of stable supershear rupture speeds validate the predicted scaling relationship δu˙1s / δu˙2s =√{Vr2 / Cs2-1 } =βs, between the FP (δu1ṡ) and the FN (δu2ṡ) velocity jumps propagated by a shear Mach front. Additional experimental findings include detailed rupture speed measurements of sub-Rayleigh and supershear ruptures and the observation of a supershear daughter crack with vanishing shear Mach front.

  2. Impact of chemical oxidation on indigenous bacteria and mobilization of nutrients and subsequent bioremediation of crude oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinlan; Deng, Xin; Cui, Yiwei; Kong, Fanxing

    2016-12-15

    Fenton pre-oxidation provides nutrients to promote bioremediation. However, the effects of the indigenous bacteria that remain following Fenton oxidation on nutrient mobilization and subsequent bioremediation remain unclear. Experiments were performed with inoculation with native bacteria and foreign bacteria or without inoculation after four regimens of stepwise pre-oxidations. The effects of the indigenous bacteria remaining after stepwise oxidation on nutrient mobilization and subsequent bioremediation over 80 days were investigated. After stepwise Fenton pre-oxidation at a low H2O2 concentration (225×4), the remaining indigenous bacterial populations reached their peak (4.8±0.17×10(6)CFU/g), the nutrients were mobilized rapidly, and the subsequent bioremediation of crude oil was improved (biodegradation efficiency of 35%). However, after stepwise Fenton pre-oxidation at a high H2O2 concentration (450×4), only 3.6±0.16×10(3)CFU/g of indigenous bacteria remained, and the indigenous bacteria that degrade C15-C30 alkanes were inhibited. The nutrient mobilization was then highly limited, and only 19% of total petroleum hydrocarbon was degraded. Furthermore, the recovery period after the low H2O2 concentration stepwise Fenton pre-oxidation (225×4) was less than 20 days, which was 20-30 days shorter than with the other pre-oxidation treatments. Therefore, stepwise Fenton pre-oxidation at a low H2O2 concentration protects indigenous bacterial populations and improves the nutrient mobilization and subsequent bioremediation.

  3. Design and Experiments of the High Voltage Pulsed Electric Fields Sterilization System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xihai; FANG Junlong; SHEN Weizheng

    2008-01-01

    This experiment designed the pulsed electric fields (PEF) of high intensity of 100 kV. cml sterilization system. Fluorescent pseudomonas as target cell was operated 180 s in the PEF. By observing the difference of the bacteria before and after the disposal by TEM, it is found that the cell wails of the treated bacteria were broken. Irreversible perforations were formed on the cell membrane. The cell inclusions and cell fragments were leaked. The cell died as a result. The results showed that the PEF sterilization system designed can be used for liquid food sterilization experiments.

  4. Geochemistry studies pertaining to the G-tunnel radionuclide migration field experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, A.E.; Aguilar, R.D.; Bayhurst, B.P.

    1982-11-01

    This report presents the results of geochemical studies of Tunnel Bed tuff that were performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory or done at its direction as part of the Nevada Test Site G-Tunnel Radionuclide Migration Field Experiment. A tuff-treated water was prepared and used in laboratory-scale measurements of radionuclide sorption onto crushed Tunnel Bed tuff, pulverized fracture-fill material, tuff wafers, and a solid tuff core. Modelling studies were undertaken to determine the effects of matrix diffusion and unsaturated tuff on the proposed fracture-flow experiments. The initial results of those studies are presented in this report.

  5. Characterization and Transcription of Arsenic Respiration and Resistance Genes During In Situ Uranium Bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giloteaux, L.; Holmes, Dawn E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Montgomery, Alison P.; Smith, Jessica A.; Orellana, Roberto; Thompson, Courtney A.; Roper, Thomas J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2013-02-04

    The possibility of arsenic release and the potential role of Geobacter in arsenic biogeochemistry during in situ uranium bioremediation was investigated because increased availability of organic matter has been associated with substantial releases of arsenic in other subsurface environments. In a field experiment conducted at the Rifle, CO study site, groundwater arsenic concentrations increased when acetate was added. The number of transcripts from arrA, which codes for the alpha subunit of dissimilatory As(V) reductase, and acr3, which codes for the arsenic pump protein Acr3, were determined with quantitative RT-PCR. Most of the arrA (> 60%) and acr3-1 (> 90%) sequences that were recovered were most similar to Geobacter species, while the majority of acr3-2 (>50%) sequences were most closely related to Rhodoferax ferrireducens. Analysis of transcript abundance demonstrated that transcription of acr3-1 by the subsurface Geobacter community was correlated with arsenic concentrations in the groundwater. In contrast, Geobacter arrA transcript numbers lagged behind the major arsenic release and remained high even after arsenic concentrations declined. This suggested that factors other than As(V) availability regulated transcription of arrA in situ even though the presence of As(V) increased transcription of arrA in cultures of G. lovleyi, which was capable of As(V) reduction. These results demonstrate that subsurface Geobacter species can tightly regulate their physiological response to changes in groundwater arsenic concentrations. The transcriptomic approach developed here should be useful for the study of a diversity of other environments in which Geobacter species are considered to have an important influence on arsenic biogeochemistry.

  6. Large Eddy Simulation and Field Experiments of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C.; Parlange, M. B.; van Hout, R.

    2006-12-01

    Dispersion of airborne pollen by the wind has been a subject of interest for botanists and allergists for a long time. More recently, the development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and subsequent contamination of natural plant populations has brought even more interest to this field. A critical question is how far from the source field pollen grains will be advected. Clearly the answer depends on the aerodynamic properties of the pollen, geometrical properties of the field, topography, local vegetation, wind conditions, atmospheric stability, etc. As a consequence, field experiments are well suited to provide some information on pollen transport mechanisms but are limited to specific field and weather conditions. Numerical simulations do not have this drawback and can be a useful tool to study pollen dispersal in a variety of configurations. It is well known that the dispersion of particles in turbulent fields is strongly affected by the large scale coherent structures. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is a technique that allows us to study the typical distances reached by pollen grains and, at the same time, resolve the larger coherent structures present in the atmospheric boundary layer. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using LES. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of extreme importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. In both cases we make use of the theoretical profile for suspended particles derived by Kind (1992). Field experiments were performed to study the applicability of the theoretical profile to pollen grains and the results are encouraging. Airborne concentrations as well as ground deposition from the simulations are compared to experimental data to validate the

  7. USING PHYTOREMEDIATION AND BIOREMEDIATION FOR PROTECTION SOIL NEAR GRAVEYARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Ignatowicz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present research was to assess the usefulness of Basket willow (Salix viminalis to phytoremediation and bioremediation of sorption subsoil contaminated with pesticides. Studies upon purification of sorption material consisting of a soil and composting sewage sludge were conducted under pot experiment conditions. The study design included control pot along with 3 other ones polluted with pesticides. The vegetation season has lasted since spring till late autumn 2015. After acclimatization, the mixture of chloroorganic pesticides was added into 3 experimental pots. After harvest, it was found that pesticide contents in sorption subsoil (from 0.0017 to 0.0087 mg kg DM were much higher than in control soil (from 0.0005 to 0.0027 mg kg DM. Achieved results initially indicate that Basket willow (Salix viminalis can be used for reclamation of soils contaminated with pesticides, particularly for vitality prolongation of sorption barrier around the pesticide burial area. In future, it would allow for applying the sorption screen around pesticide burial area, which reduces pesticide migration into the environment, and grown energetic plants – through phytoremediation – would prolong the sorbent vitality and remove pesticides from above ground parts by means of combustion.

  8. Nanoassembly of immobilized ligninolytic enzymes for biocatalysis, bioremediation, and biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuila, Debasish; Tien, Ming; Lvov, Yuri M.; McShane, Michael J.; Aithal, Rajendra K.; Singh, Saurabh; Potluri, Avinash; Kaul, Swati; Patel, Devendra S.; Krishna, Gopal

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) from white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosoporium, have been shown to degrade various harmful organic compounds ranging from chlorinated compounds to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) to polymeric dyes. The problems in using immobilized enzymes for biocatalysis/bioremediation are their loss of activity and long-term stability. To address these issues, adsorption by layer-by-layer assembly (LbL) using polyelectrolytes, entrapment using gelatin, and chmisorption using coupling reagents have been investigated. In order to increase surface area for catalysis, porous silicon, formed by electrochemical etching of silicon, has been considered. The efficacy of these extremely stable nanoassemblies towards degradation of model organic compounds-veratryl alcohol (VA and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP)-in aqueous and in a mixture of aqueous/acetone has already been demonstrated. In parallel, we are pursuing development of sensors using these immobilized enzymes. Experiments carried out in solution show that NO can reversibly bind Ferri-LiP to produce a diamagnetic complex with a distinct change in its optical spectrum. NO can be photolyzed off to produce the spectrum of native paramagnetic ferri-species. Preliminary data on the detection of NO by LiP, based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using fiber optic probe, are presented.

  9. Field experiment on coalmine heat disaster governance using cold source from surface water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Pingye; Zhu Guolong; Liu Yuqing; Duan Mengmeng; Wu Junyin

    2014-01-01

    Regarding the lack of cold source for underground cooling systems from either mine inflow or return air, field experiments were taken in a high temperature deep coal mine with abundant cold source from surface water. Taking Sanhejian coal mine as an example, this paper introduced the technology scheme of heat disaster governance using surface water cold source. The paper presents the basics of this field experiment at the beginning, following by the design and site layout of the cooling system including the analysis and calculation of cold source. Numerical calculation method is also applied based on the operation parameters to simulate the influence to the surface river ecosystem. The results suggest that the temperature of surface water shall be lower than 34 ?C after heat exchange, and when more cooling capacities are needed in the future, increasing the water flow is more favorable than increasing the cooling range of water, which is better for the ecological environment protection.

  10. Comparison of laboratory and field experience of PWSCC in Alloy 182 weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, P.; Meunier, M.-C.; Steltzlen, F. [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, Paris La Defense (France); Calonne, O.; Foucault, M. [AREVA NP, Centre Technique, Le Creusot Cedex (France); Combrade, P. [ACXCOR, Saint Etienne (France); Amzallag, C. [EDF, SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    2007-07-01

    Laboratory studies of stress corrosion cracking of the nickel base weld metal, Alloy 182, in simulated PWR primary water suggest similar resistance to crack initiation and somewhat enhanced propagation rates relative to wrought Alloy 600. By contrast, field experience of cracking in the primary circuits of PWRs shows in general much better performance for Alloy 182 relative to Alloy 600 than would be anticipated from laboratory studies. This paper endeavours to resolve this apparent conundrum. It draws on the conclusions of recent research that has focussed on the role of surface finish, particularly cold work and residual stresses resulting from different fabrication processes, on the risk of initiating IGSCC in nickel base alloys in PWR primary water. It also draws on field experience of stress corrosion cracking that highlights the important role of surface finish for crack initiation. (author)

  11. Modeling of coherent ultrafast magneto-optical experiments: Light-induced molecular mean-field model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinschberger, Y. [Instituto de Física dos Materiais da Universidade do Porto, Departamento de Física et Astronomia, Rua do campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Hervieux, P.-A. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS UMR 7504 BP 43 - F-67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-12-28

    We present calculations which aim to describe coherent ultrafast magneto-optical effects observed in time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Our approach is based on a nonlinear semi-classical Drude-Voigt model and is used to interpret experiments performed on nickel ferromagnetic thin film. Within this framework, a phenomenological light-induced coherent molecular mean-field depending on the polarizations of the pump and probe pulses is proposed whose microscopic origin is related to a spin-orbit coupling involving the electron spins of the material sample and the electric field of the laser pulses. Theoretical predictions are compared to available experimental data. The model successfully reproduces the observed experimental trends and gives meaningful insight into the understanding of magneto-optical rotation behavior in the ultrafast regime. Theoretical predictions for further experimental studies are also proposed.

  12. Teacher Education Reform in Far East Russia: Integrating Field Experiences with Action Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigory A. Kapranov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, the Russian Far Eastern Federal University teacher education faculty redesigned field-experience practica to improve teacher candidates’ professional reflection, practical classroom instruction, and capacity for action research. For each academic year, faculty aspired to achieve these goals by collaborating to develop field experiences that differentiated mentoring of teacher candidates to fit with their professional goals and preparation levels. The purpose for this study is to investigate the effectiveness of this reform by comparing pre-reform senior theses to post-reform senior theses on a series of outcomes. Using a mixed-methods approach, findings indicate that post-reform teacher candidates outperformed pre-reform candidates on thesis quality. Specifically, post-reformed candidates were better able to make theoretical connections to their practice as evidenced by their action research topics and findings.

  13. An anaerobic field injection experiment in a landfill leachate plume (Grindsted, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Ludvigsen, L.

    1999-01-01

    Redox conditions may be environmental factors which affect the fate of the xenobiotic organic compounds. Therefore the redox conditions were characterized in an anaerobic, leachate-contaminated aquifer 15–60 m downgradient from the Grindsted Landfill, Denmark, where an field injection experiment...... to the sediment samples. Samples were investigated with respect to groundwater chemistry, including hydrogen and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and sediment geochemistry, and bioassays were performed. The groundwater chemistry, including redox sensitive species for a large number of samples, varied over time during...... the experimental period of 924 days owing to variations in the leachate from the landfill. However, no indication of change in the redox environment resulting from the field injection experiment or natural variation was observed in the individual sampling points. The methane, Fe(II), hydrogen, and VFA groundwater...

  14. Fate of Methane and Ethanol-Blended Fuels in Soil: Laboratory and Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, D. M.; de Sieyes, N. R.; Peng, J.; Schmidt, R.; Buelow, M. C.; Felice, M.

    2015-12-01

    Our research site is within the UC Davis Putah Creek Riparian Reserve in Davis, CA; climate is semi-arid and soils are sandy loams and silts. We are conducting three types of controlled release experiments in the field: 1) Gas mixture, a continuous release of methane, sometimes with other gases included, with the composition and release rate changing over time to allow examination of various hypotheses, 2) E10 (gasoline with 10% ethanol): a continuous release of E10 NAPL at rate equal to documented low rate releases from underground storage tanks (USTs) that are difficult or impossible to detect with current practical approaches (<0.04 gallons per day); 3) E85: release at same rate as the E10 release. In the field experiments, gas or NAPL is released from a stainless steel drive point with 0.5 cm slotted section at 1 m bgs; we monitor temperature, pressure, moisture content, and soil gas composition in the soil, and efflux of carbon dioxide, methane, oxygen, water vapor, and other species to/ from soil to atmosphere. Periodic coring allows examination of the microbial community composition with depth. Laboratory microcosm and column tests assisted in planning the E10 and E85 field experiments above, evaluated the effect of moisture content on methane oxidation, and allowed testing and refinement of the monitoring approaches in the field We found that up to 40% of the methane released can be accounted for by efflux from soil to the atmosphere. The percentage in the efflux depends on the rate of release, and, based on literature and our microcosms with methane-spiked PCRR soils, we hypothesize that the very low moisture content of the soils in this drought year limits in situ methane oxidation. Efflux of carbon dioxide accounted for up to 20% of the E10 release rate under our lab column conditions, which we believe were oxygen-limited compared to the field conditions. We also detected low molecular weight hydrocarbons in the column efflux, though the concentrations

  15. ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

    2009-04-21

    This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal

  16. Phytoremediation and bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs): state of knowledge and research perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passatore, Laura; Rossetti, Simona; Juwarkar, Asha A; Massacci, Angelo

    2014-08-15

    This review summarizes the bioremediation and phytoremediation technologies proposed so far to detoxify PCB-contaminated sites. A critical analysis about the potential and limits of the PCB pollution treatment strategies by means of plants, fungi and bacteria are elucidated, including the new insights emerged from recent studies on the rhizosphere potential and on the implementation of simultaneous aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation processes. The review describes the biodegradation and phytoremediation processes and elaborates on the environmental variables affecting contaminant degradation rates, summarizing the amendments recommended to enhance PCB degradation. Additionally, issues connected with PCB toxicology, actual field remediation strategies and economical evaluation are discussed.

  17. Do Schools Discriminate Against Homosexual Parents? Evidence from an Internet Field Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Serrano, Luis; Meix-Llop, Enric

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of homosexual rights is a controversial issue in many countries. Spain was the third country in the world (after Netherlands and Belgium) to introduce a law recognizing homosexual marriage and adoption of children. In this paper, we examine for the first time whether schools are more hesitant to give feedback to homosexual parents during children's pre-registration period in Spain. In order to do that, we designed an internet field experiment to be conducted in schools. We cre...

  18. Leadership and influence: Evidence from an artefactual field experiment on local public good provision

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of leadership on the level and evolution of pro-social behavior using an artefactual field experiment on local public good provision. Participants decide how much to contribute to an actual conservation project. They can then revise their donations after being randomly matched in pairs on the basis of their authority and having observed each other’s contributions. Authority is measured through a social ranking exercise identifying formal and moral leaders within ...

  19. Gravitational Hertz experiment with electromagnetic radiation in a strong magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kolosnitsyn, N I

    2015-01-01

    Brief review of principal ideas in respect of the high frequency gravitational radiation generated and detected in the laboratory condition is presented. Interaction of electro-magnetic and gravitational waves into a strong magnetic field is considered as a more promising variant of the laboratory GW-Hertz experiment. The formulae of the direct and inverse Gertsenshtein-Zeldovich effect are derived. Numerical estimates are given and a discussion of a possibility of observation of these effects in a lab is carried out.

  20. Remediation of copper contaminated soil by using different particle sizes of apatite: a field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jinfeng; Hu, Tiantian; Cang, Long; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    The particle size of apatite is one of the critical factors that influence the adsorption of heavy metals on apatite in the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils using apatite. However, little research has been done evaluating the impact of different particle sizes of apatite on immobilization remediation of heavy metal polluted soils in field. In this study, the adsorption isothermal experiments of copper on three kinds of apatite was tested, and the field experiment by using different particle sizes apatite [nano-hydroxyapatite (NAP), micro-hydroxyapatite (MAP), ordinary particle apatite (OAP)] at a same dosage of 25.8 t/ha (1.16 %, W/W) was also conducted. Ryegrass was chosen as the test plant. The ryegrass biomass, the copper contents in ryegrass and the copper fractionations in soil were determined after field experiments. Results of adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption amounts of copper on OAP was the lowest among different particles. The adsorption amounts of copper on MAP was higher than NAP at high copper equilibrium concentration (>1 mmol L(-1)), an opposite trend was obtained at low copper concentration (soil pH, decrease the available copper concentration in soil, provide more nutrient phosphate and promote the growth of ryegrass. The ryegrass biomass and the copper accumulation in ryegrass were the highest in MAP among all treatments. The effective order of apatite in phytoremediation of copper contaminated field soil was MAP > NAP > OAP, which was attributed to the high adsorption capacity of copper and the strong releasing of phosphate by MAP.

  1. Sexual Orientation Discrimination in the United Kingdom's Labour Market: A Field Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Drydakis, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Deviations from heteronormativity affect labour market dynamics. Hierarchies of sexual orientation can result in job dismissals, wage discrimination, and the failure to promote gay and lesbian individuals to top ranks. In this paper, I report on a field experiment (144 job-seekers and their correspondence with 5,549 firms) that tested the extent to which sexual orientation affects the labour market outcomes of gay and lesbian job-seekers in the United Kingdom. Their minority sexual orientatio...

  2. Does the Unemployement Benefit Institution Affect the Productivity of Workers? Evidence from a Field Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: We investigate whether and how the type of unemployment bene t institution affects productivity. We designed a field experiment to compare workers' productivity under a welfare system, where the unemployed receive an unconditional monetary transfer, with their productivity under a workfare system, where the transfer is received conditional on the unemployed spending some time on ancillary activities. First, we fi nd that having an unemployment bene fit institution, regardless of whe...

  3. A SOCIAL MEDIA CAMPAIGN APPLICATION IN A MARKETING FIELD EXPERIENCE COURSE

    OpenAIRE

    Mine Ucok Hughes

    2014-01-01

    Most university students today use social media daily, are knowledgeable about a myriad of applications, and can navigate numerous platforms, such as Facebook and Twitter. Despite their affinity for social media, however, it is not clear whether or not they understand how social media can be used to create effective marketing strategies. This paper describes a social media assignment that was incorporated into a marketing field experience course for undergraduate students. The aim of the pape...

  4. INTERRUPTED IN-SITU COMPRESSIVE DEFORMATION EXPERIMENTS ON MMC FOAMS IN AN XCT: EXPERIMENTS AND ESTIMATION OF DISPLACEMENT FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Losch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of a metal-matrix composite foam are investigated by interrupted in-situ compressive deformation experiments within an X-ray computed tomography device (XCT. Each in-situ experiment generates a sequence of reconstructed 3D images of the foam microstructure. From these data, the deformation field is estimated by registring the images corresponding to three consecutive steps. To this end, the generic registration framework of the itk software suite is exploited and combined with several image preprocessing steps. Both segmented (binary images having just two grey values for foreground (strut structure and background (pore space and the result of the Euclidean distance transform (EDT on pore space and solid phase are used. The estimation quality is evaluated based on a sequence of synthetic data sets, where the foam’s microstructure is modelled by a random Laguerre tessellation. For large deformations, a combination of non-rigid registration for the EDT images and partwise-rigid registration on strongly deformed regions of the binary images, yields surprisingly small estimation errors.

  5. ITER test blanket module error field simulation experiments at DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, M. J.; Snipes, J. A.; Gohil, P.; de Vries, P.; Evans, T. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Gao, X.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gates, D. A.; Greenfield, C. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Kramer, G. J.; La Haye, R. J.; Liu, S.; Loarte, A.; Nave, M. F. F.; Osborne, T. H.; Oyama, N.; Park, J.-K.; Ramasubramanian, N.; Reimerdes, H.; Saibene, G.; Salmi, A.; Shinohara, K.; Spong, D. A.; Solomon, W. M.; Tala, T.; Zhu, Y. B.; Boedo, J. A.; Chuyanov, V.; Doyle, E. J.; Jakubowski, M.; Jhang, H.; Nazikian, R. M.; Pustovitov, V. D.; Schmitz, O.; Srinivasan, R.; Taylor, T. S.; Wade, M. R.; You, K.-I.; Zeng, L.; DIII-D Team

    2011-10-01

    Experiments at DIII-D investigated the effects of magnetic error fields similar to those expected from proposed ITER test blanket modules (TBMs) containing ferromagnetic material. Studied were effects on: plasma rotation and locking, confinement, L-H transition, the H-mode pedestal, edge localized modes (ELMs) and ELM suppression by resonant magnetic perturbations, energetic particle losses, and more. The experiments used a purpose-built three-coil mock-up of two magnetized ITER TBMs in one ITER equatorial port. The largest effect was a reduction in plasma toroidal rotation velocity v across the entire radial profile by as much as Δv/v ~ 60% via non-resonant braking. Changes to global Δn/n, Δβ/β and ΔH98/H98 were ~3 times smaller. These effects are stronger at higher β. Other effects were smaller. The TBM field increased sensitivity to locking by an applied known n = 1 test field in both L- and H-mode plasmas. Locked mode tolerance was completely restored in L-mode by re-adjusting the DIII-D n = 1 error field compensation system. Numerical modelling by IPEC reproduces the rotation braking and locking semi-quantitatively, and identifies plasma amplification of a few n = 1 Fourier harmonics as the main cause of braking. IPEC predicts that TBM braking in H-mode may be reduced by n = 1 control. Although extrapolation from DIII-D to ITER is still an open issue, these experiments suggest that a TBM-like error field will produce only a few potentially troublesome problems, and that they might be made acceptably small.

  6. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual field tours in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Kingston

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field tour for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD, and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS and geographical information systems (GIS. The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students. A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field tour over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field tour in particular. Our experiences are highly relevant to the implementation of novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  7. ITER Test Blanket Module Error Field Simulation Experiments at DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffer, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego; Testa, D. [CRPP, Switzerland; Snipes, J. A. [ITER Organization, Cadarache, France; Gohil, P. [General Atomics; De Vries, P. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham, UK; Evans, T. E. [General Atomics, San Diego; Fenstermacher, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Gao, X. [Academia Sinica, Institute of Plasma Physics, Hefei, China; Garofalo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego; Gates, D.A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Greenfield, C. M. [General Atomics; Heidbrink, W. [University of California, Irvine; La Haye, R. [General Atomics, San Diego; Liu, S. [ASIPP, Hefei, China; Loarte, A. [ITER Organization, Cadarache, France; Nave, M. F. F. [Association EURATOM/IST, Lisbon, Portugal; Osborne, T.H. [General Atomics, San Diego; Oyama, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Park, J. K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Ramasubramanian, N. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, India; Reimerdes, H. [Columbia University; Saibene, G. [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona, Spain; Saimi, A. [Aalto University, Finland; Shinohara, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka; Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Solomon, W. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Tala, T. [Association Euratom-Tekes, Finland; Zhu, Y. B. [University of California, Irvine; Zhai, K. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Boedo, J. [University of California, San Diego; Chuyanov, V. [ITER Organization, Cadarache, France; Doyle, E. J. [University of California, Los Angeles; Jakubowski, M. W. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald, Germany; Jhang, H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Nazikian, Raffi [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Pustovitov, V. D. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Schmitz, O. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Sanchez, Raul [ORNL; Srinivasan, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, India; Taylor, T. S. [General Atomics, San Diego; Wade, M. [General Atomics, San Diego; You, K. I. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Zeng, L. [University of California, Los Angeles

    2011-01-01

    Experiments at DIII-D investigated the effects of magnetic error fields similar to those expected from proposed ITER test blanket modules (TBMs) containing ferromagnetic material. Studied were effects on: plasma rotation and locking, confinement, L-H transition, the H-mode pedestal, edge localized modes (ELMs) and ELM suppression by resonant magnetic perturbations, energetic particle losses, and more. The experiments used a purpose-built three-coil mock-up of two magnetized ITER TBMs in one ITER equatorial port. The largest effect was a reduction in plasma toroidal rotation velocity v across the entire radial profile by as much as Delta upsilon/upsilon similar to 60% via non-resonant braking. Changes to global Delta n/n, Delta beta/beta and Delta H(98)/H(98) were similar to 3 times smaller. These effects are stronger at higher beta. Other effects were smaller. The TBM field increased sensitivity to locking by an applied known n = 1 test field in both L-and H-mode plasmas. Locked mode tolerance was completely restored in L-mode by re-adjusting the DIII-D n = 1 error field compensation system. Numerical modelling by IPEC reproduces the rotation braking and locking semi-quantitatively, and identifies plasma amplification of a few n = 1 Fourier harmonics as the main cause of braking. IPEC predicts that TBM braking in H-mode may be reduced by n = 1 control. Although extrapolation from DIII-D to ITER is still an open issue, these experiments suggest that a TBM-like error field will produce only a few potentially troublesome problems, and that they might be made acceptably small.

  8. Survey of academic field experiences (SAFE: trainees report harassment and assault.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn B H Clancy

    Full Text Available Little is known about the climate of the scientific fieldwork setting as it relates to gendered experiences, sexual harassment, and sexual assault. We conducted an internet-based survey of field scientists (N = 666 to characterize these experiences. Codes of conduct and sexual harassment policies were not regularly encountered by respondents, while harassment and assault were commonly experienced by respondents during trainee career stages. Women trainees were the primary targets; their perpetrators were predominantly senior to them professionally within the research team. Male trainees were more often targeted by their peers at the research site. Few respondents were aware of mechanisms to report incidents; most who did report were unsatisfied with the outcome. These findings suggest that policies emphasizing safety, inclusivity, and collegiality have the potential to improve field experiences of a diversity of researchers, especially during early career stages. These include better awareness of mechanisms for direct and oblique reporting of harassment and assault and, the implementation of productive response mechanisms when such behaviors are reported. Principal investigators are particularly well positioned to influence workplace culture at their field sites.

  9. High Precision Magnetic Field Scanning System for the New Muon g-2 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ran; Muon g-2 collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The New Muon g-2 Experiment (E989) at Fermilab will measure the anomalous magnetic moment of muon aμ aiming at a precision of 140 ppb. This new experiment will shed light on the long-standing 3.5 standard deviation between the previous muon g-2 measurement (E821) at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Standard Model calculation, and potentially discover new physics. The New Muon g-2 Experiment measures the precession frequency of muon in a uniform magnetic field, and the magnetic field experienced by the muons needs to be measured with a precision better than 70 ppb. For the measurement of the magnetic field in the muon storage region, the former trolley system from E821 with 17 NMR probes was refurbished and upgraded with new electronics, probes and a modern motion control system. A test solenoid magnet was set up at Argonne National Laboratory for calibrating the NMR probes and the precision studies of systematic uncertainties. In this presentation, we will describe the trolley motion control scheme, the trolley position measurement methods, the electronic system for activating and reading the NMR probes and the test solenoid facility.

  10. Path planning of mobile robot by mixing experience with modified artificial potential field method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huasong Min

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a new method is proposed to help the mobile robot to avoid many kinds of collisions effectively, which combined past experience with modified artificial potential field method. In the process of the actual global obstacle avoidance, system will invoke case-based reasoning algorithm using its past experience to achieve obstacle avoidance when obstacles are recognized as known type; otherwise, it will invoke the modified artificial potential field method to solve the current problem and the new case will also be retained into the case base. In case-based reasoning, we innovatively consider that all the complex obstacles are retrieved by two kinds of basic build-in obstacle models (linear obstacle and angle-type obstacle. Our proposed experience mixing with modified artificial potential field method algorithm has been simulated in MATLAB and implemented on actual mobile robot platform successfully. The result shows that the proposed method is applicable to the dynamic real-time obstacle avoidance under unknown and unstructured environment and greatly improved the performances of robot path planning not only to reduce the time consumption but also to shorten the moving distance.

  11. Shift of the critical mixing temperature in strong electric fields. Theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzechowski, Kazimierz; Adamczyk, Mariusz; Wolny, Alicja; Tsori, Yoav

    2014-06-26

    We study the shift in the critical temperature T(c) in binary mixtures in strong electric fields. In experiments we measure the nonlinear dielectric effect (NDE) in a mixture of nitrobenze and n-octane and calculate Piekara's factor. We find that the critical anomaly of Piekara's factor is a function of an electric field strength. We propose to explain this observation as a result of a downward shift of T(c), and this allows us to calculate (∂T(c)/∂E(2)) = (-22 ± 10) × 10(-16) (K m(2))/V(2). In the theoretical part we amend Landau and Lifshitz's formula and show that the downward shift of Tc can be estimated from a simple mean-field theory taking into account the linear and quadratic terms in an expansion of the constitutive relation ε(x) between the electric constant ε and mixture composition x.

  12. Bioremediation of Tannery Wastewater by Chromium Resistant Fungal Isolate Fusarium Chlamydosporium SPFS2-g

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smiley Sharma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study assessed the bioremediation potential of Fusarium chlamydosporium SPFS2-g isolated from tannery effluent enriched soil. The isolate exhibited minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for Cr(VI as 500 ppm. The treatment of tannery wastewater with Fusarium chlamydosporium in shake flask experiment resulted in the reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD, color, Cr(VI, total suspended solids (TSS, turbidity, Na+, Cl-, and NO3- in the order of 71.80, 64.69, 100, 36.47, 22.77, 11.69, 27.87 and 62.33%, respectively after six days of treatment duration.

  13. ADX: a high field, high power density, Advanced Divertor test eXperiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, R.; Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; ADX Team

    2014-10-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment (ADX) - a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research program on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. This high field (6.5 tesla, 1.5 MA), high power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) facility would utilize Alcator magnet technology to test innovative divertor concepts for next-step DT fusion devices (FNSF, DEMO) at reactor-level boundary plasma pressures and parallel heat flux densities while producing high performance core plasma conditions. The experimental platform would also test advanced lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion-cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) actuators and wave physics at the plasma densities and magnetic field strengths of a DEMO, with the unique ability to deploy launcher structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-field side - a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and wave physics is most favorable for efficient current drive, heating and flow drive. This innovative experiment would perform plasma science and technology R&D necessary to inform the conceptual development and accelerate the readiness-for-deployment of FNSF/DEMO - in a timely manner, on a cost-effective research platform. Supported by DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  14. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments of colliding jets: Turbulent amplification of seed magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Graziani, Carlo; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Donald; Lee, Dongwook; Meinecke, Jena; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    In this study we present high-resolution numerical simulations of laboratory experiments that study the turbulent amplification of magnetic fields generated by laser-driven colliding jets. The radiative magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations discussed here were performed with the FLASH code and have assisted in the analysis of the experimental results obtained from the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a pair of thin Carbon foils is placed in an Argon-filled chamber and is illuminated to create counter-propagating jets. The jets carry magnetic fields generated by the Biermann battery mechanism and collide to form a highly turbulent region. The interaction is probed using a wealth of diagnostics, including induction coils that are capable of providing the field strength and directionality at a specific point in space. The latter have revealed a significant increase in the field's strength due to turbulent amplification. Our FLASH simulations have allowed us to reproduce the experimental findings and to disentangle the complex processes and dynamics involved in the colliding flows. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by DOE NNSA ASC.

  15. Experiments with low energy ion beam transport into toroidal magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The stellarator-type storage ring for accumulation of multi- Ampere proton and ion beams with energies in the range of $100~AkeV$ to $1~AMeV$ is designed at Frankfurt university. The main idea for beam confinement with high transversal momentum acceptance was presented in EPAC2006. This ring is typically suited for experiments in plasma physics and nuclear astrophysics. The accumulator ring with a closed longitudinal magnetic field is foreseen with a strength up to $6-8~T$. The experiments with two room temperature 30 degree toroids are needed. The beam transport experiments in toroidal magnetic fields were first described in EPAC2008 within the framework of a proposed low energy ion storage ring. The test setup aims on developing a ring injection system with two beam lines representing the main beam line and the injection line. The primary beam line for the experiments was installed and successfully commissioned in 2009. A special diagnostics probe for \\textit{"in situ"} ion beam detection was installed.This...

  16. Field warming experiments shed light on the wheat yield response to temperature in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuang; Piao, Shilong; Huang, Yao; Wang, Xuhui; Ciais, Philippe; Huang, Mengtian; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Peng, Shushi

    2016-11-01

    Wheat growth is sensitive to temperature, but the effect of future warming on yield is uncertain. Here, focusing on China, we compiled 46 observations of the sensitivity of wheat yield to temperature change (SY,T, yield change per °C) from field warming experiments and 102 SY,T estimates from local process-based and statistical models. The average SY,T from field warming experiments, local process-based models and statistical models is -0.7+/-7.8(+/-s.d.)% per °C, -5.7+/-6.5% per °C and 0.4+/-4.4% per °C, respectively. Moreover, SY,T is different across regions and warming experiments indicate positive SY,T values in regions where growing-season mean temperature is low, and water supply is not limiting, and negative values elsewhere. Gridded crop model simulations from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project appear to capture the spatial pattern of SY,T deduced from warming observations. These results from local manipulative experiments could be used to improve crop models in the future.

  17. Fate of herbicides in a shallow aerobic aquifer: A continuous field injection experiment (Vejen,Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette; Rügge, K.; Tuxen, Nina;

    2001-01-01

    A continuous, natural gradient, field injection experiment, involving six herbicides and a tracer, was performed in a shallow aerobic aquifer near Vejen, Denmark. Bentazone, ()-2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) propanoic acid (MCPP), dichlorprop, isoproturon, and the dichlobenil metabolite 2,6-dichlor......, with selected individual points for a longer period. The bromide plume followed a complex path through the monitoring network downgradient of the injection wells. The plume movement was controlled by spatially varied hydraulic conductivities of the sand deposit and influenced by asynchronous seasonal variation...... in groundwater potentials. An average flow velocity of 0.5 m/d was observed, as depicted by bromide. Bentazone, BAM, MCPP, and dichlorprop retardation was negligible, and only slight retardation of isoproturon was observed in the continuous injection experiment and a preceding pulse experiment. No degradation...

  18. Complex magnetic field exposure system for in vitro experiments at intermediate frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodato, Rossella; Merla, Caterina; Pinto, Rosanna; Mancini, Sergio; Lopresto, Vanni; Lovisolo, Giorgio A

    2013-04-01

    In occupational environments, an increasing number of electromagnetic sources emitting complex magnetic field waveforms in the range of intermediate frequencies is present, requiring an accurate exposure risk assessment with both in vitro and in vivo experiments. In this article, an in vitro exposure system able to generate complex magnetic flux density B-fields, reproducing signals from actual intermediate frequency sources such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, for instance, is developed and validated. The system consists of a magnetic field generation system and an exposure apparatus realized with a couple of square coils. A wide homogeneity (99.9%) volume of 210 × 210 × 110 mm(3) was obtained within the coils, with the possibility of simultaneous exposure of a large number of standard Petri dishes. The system is able to process any numerical input sequence through a filtering technique aimed at compensating the coils' impedance effect. The B-field, measured in proximity to a 1.5 T MRI bore during a typical examination, was excellently reproduced (cross-correlation index of 0.99). Thus, it confirms the ability of the proposed setup to accurately simulate complex waveforms in the intermediate frequency band. Suitable field levels were also attained. Moreover, a dosimetry index based on the weighted-peak method was evaluated considering the induced E-field on a Petri dish exposed to the reproduced complex B-field. The weighted-peak index was equal to 0.028 for the induced E-field, indicating an exposure level compliant with the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Bioelectromagnetics 34:211-219, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Determination of the sediment oxidation capacity by column and field experiments with reactive tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dethlefsen, F.; Bliss, F.; Wachter, T.; Dahmke, A. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geowissenschaften; Meckenstock, R. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften

    2003-07-01

    The oxidation capacity of ferric iron in column studies was determined by phosphate tracer tests and validated by biodegradation experiments with toluene as a carbon source and the iron(III)-oxide reducing bacterium Geobacter metallireducens as well as with wet chemical extraction. Toluene mass balance, Fe(II) production and tracer test results showed that about 1/3 of the total Fe(III) mass had been reduced during the biodegradation experiment. The redox reactive tracer sulfide is supposed to be more practicable for field purposes, because a sulfide mass or electron balance enables evaluation of the tracer test. In this way, consideration of mineral specific sorption parameters and long residence periods of a sorptive reactive tracer can be avoided. Laboratory column experiments were performed with an artificially composed sediment (quartz sand and ferrihydrite) as well as with natural sediments from the margin of the benzene contaminated RETZINA test site in Zeitz (Germany). Fast reaction kinetics of sulfide with iron(III) minerals allowed the observation of a successive fixation of black iron sulfides in all the glas columns. Depending on the mineral iron content, the sedimentary oxidation capacity of the column material was used up in few days to weeks. Mass of sulfide reacted in the tracer test and sulfide mass recovered by sediment extraction after the experiment were in very good agreement. Evaluation of the column experiments confirmed the calculated ratio that 3 molar equivalents sulfide were used to reduce and fix 2 molar equivalents of Fe(III). Mean Fe(III) content of natural sediment samples (drilling SafZz 28/02 in Zeitz) was 0.35 mg/g sediment determined by laboratory sulfide tracer test and 5 M HCl extractions. Finally, a single well push-pull test was performed at the RETZINA test site Zeitz to test the applicability of the sulfide tracer in a field-scale experiment. (orig.)

  20. Rehabilitation of oil polluted soils by bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, Mihail; Parvan, Lavinia; Cioroianu, Mihai; Carmen, Sirbu; Constantin, Carolina

    2015-04-01

    In Romania about 50,000 ha are polluted with oil and/or brine. The main sources of pollution are the different activities using petroleum products: extraction, transport, treatment, refining and distribution. Taking into acoount the large areas and the cost per unit area, bioremediation was tested as a method of rehabilitation. To stimulate the performance of the bioremediation process for a polluted soil (luvisol) by 3% oil, different methods were tested: -application of a bacterial inoculum consisting of species of the Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter genera;- application of two types of absorbent materials, 16 t/ha peat and 16, respectively, 32 kg/ha Zeba (starch-based polymer, superabsorbent); -mineral fertilization with N200P200K200 and 5 different liquid fertilizer based on potassium humates extracted from lignite in a NPK matrix with micronutrients and added monosaccharides (4 and 8%). After 45 days from the treatment (60 days from pollution) the following observations have been noticed: • the application of only bacterial inoculum had no significant effect on the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons; • the use of 650 l/ha AH-SH fertilizer (potassium humate in a NPK matrix) led to a 47% decrease of TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbons); • the application of 16 t/ha peat, together with the bacterial inoculum and the AH-SG2 liquid fertilizer (containing humates of potassium in a NPK matrix with microelements and 8% monosaccharides, in which the nitrogen is amide form) led to a 50% decrease of the TPH content; • the application of 16 kg/ha Zeba absorbent together with bacterial inoculum and 650 l/ha AH-SG1 liquid fertilizer (containing humates of potassium in a NPK matrix with microelements and 4% monosaccharide in which the nitrogen is in amide form) led to a 57% decrease of the TPH content; • the application of 32 kg/ha Zeba absorbent, together with the AH-SG2 fertilizer, led to a 58% decrease of the TPH content.