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Sample records for biorefinery ethanol succinic

  1. Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donal F. Day

    2009-03-31

    The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of

  2. Succinic Acid as a Byproduct in a Corn-based Ethanol Biorefinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MBI International

    2007-12-31

    MBI endeavored to develop a process for succinic acid production suitable for integration into a corn-based ethanol biorefinery. The project investigated the fermentative production of succinic acid using byproducts of corn mill operations. The fermentation process was attuned to include raw starch, endosperm, as the sugar source. A clean-not-sterile process was established to treat the endosperm and release the monomeric sugars. We developed the fermentation process to utilize a byproduct of corn ethanol fermentations, thin stillage, as the source of complex nitrogen and vitamin components needed to support succinic acid production in A. succinogenes. Further supplementations were eliminated without lowering titers and yields and a productivity above 0.6 g l-1 hr-1was achieved. Strain development was accomplished through generation of a recombinant strain that increased yields of succinic acid production. Isolation of additional strains with improved features was also pursued and frozen stocks were prepared from enriched, characterized cultures. Two recovery processes were evaluated at pilot scale and data obtained was incorporated into our economic analyses.

  3. Integration of Succinic Acid Production in a Dry Mill Ethanol Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-08-01

    This project seeks to address both issues for a dry mill ethanol biorefinery by lowering the cost of sugars with the development of an advanced pretreatment process, improving the economics of succinic acid (SA), and developing a model of an ethanol dry mill to evaluate the impact of adding different products and processes to a dry mill.

  4. Integrated production of cellulosic bioethanol and succinic acid from industrial hemp in a biorefinery concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuglarz, Mariusz; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop integrated biofuel (cellulosic bioethanol) and biochemical (succinic acid) production from industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) in a biorefinery concept. Two types of pretreatments were studied (dilute-acid and alkaline oxidative method). High cellulose recovery (>95%) as well as significant hemicelluloses solubilization (49-59%) after acid-based method and lignin solubilization (35-41%) after alkaline H2O2 method were registered. Alkaline pretreatment showed to be superior over the acid-based method with respect to the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol productivity. With respect to succinic acid production, the highest productivity was obtained after liquid fraction fermentation originated from steam treatment with 1.5% of acid. The mass balance calculations clearly showed that 149kg of EtOH and 115kg of succinic acid can be obtained per 1ton of dry hemp. Results obtained in this study clearly document the potential of industrial hemp for a biorefinery. PMID:26551652

  5. Integrated production of cellulosic bioethanol and succinic acid from industrial hemp in a biorefinery concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuglarz, Mariusz; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop integrated biofuel (cellulosic bioethanol) and biochemical (succinic acid) production from industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) in a biorefinery concept. Two types of pretreatments were studied (dilute-acid and alkaline oxidative method). High cellulose recovery (>95%) as well as significant hemicelluloses solubilization (49-59%) after acid-based method and lignin solubilization (35-41%) after alkaline H2O2 method were registered. Alkaline pretreatment showed to be superior over the acid-based method with respect to the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol productivity. With respect to succinic acid production, the highest productivity was obtained after liquid fraction fermentation originated from steam treatment with 1.5% of acid. The mass balance calculations clearly showed that 149kg of EtOH and 115kg of succinic acid can be obtained per 1ton of dry hemp. Results obtained in this study clearly document the potential of industrial hemp for a biorefinery.

  6. Integrated production of cellulosic bioethanol and succinic acid from industrial hemp in a biorefinery concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuglarz, Mariusz; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop integrated biofuel (cellulosic bioethanol) and biochemical (succinic acid) production from industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) in a biorefinery concept. Two types of pretreatments were studied (dilute-acid and alkaline oxidative method). High cellulose recovery...... productivity. With respect to succinic acid production, the highest productivity was obtained after liquid fraction fermentation originated from steam treatment with 1.5% of acid. The mass balance calculations clearly showed that 149 kg of EtOH and 115 kg of succinic acid can be obtained per 1 ton of dry hemp...

  7. Unconventional biomasses as feedstocks for production of biofuels and succinic acid in a biorefinery concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur Bragi

    production mainly due to their high carbohydrate content. A case study of a proposed macroalgae biorefinery concept highlighted the potential of post hydrolysis solid residue (PHSR) for the production of numerous additional products such as ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids, biodiesel, protein, feed, biogas......Biorefinery has the potential of displacing fossil fuels and oil-refinery based products. Within the biorefinery a palette of marketable commodities can be produced from biomass, including food, feed, biochemicals and biofuels. Which bioproducts are produced is largely dependent on the chemical....... The chemical composition of biomasses was determined in order to demonstrate their biorefinery potential. Bioethanol and biogas along with succinic acid production were the explored bioconversion routes, while potential production of other compounds was also investigated. Differences and changes in biomass...

  8. MBI Biorefinery: Corn to Biomass, Ethanol to Biochemicals and Biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-02-17

    The project is a continuation of DOE-funded work (FY02 and FY03) that has focused on the development of the ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment technology, fermentation production of succinic acid and new processes and products to enhance dry mill profitability. The primary objective for work beginning in April 2004 and ending in November 2005 is focus on the key issues related to the: (1) design, costing and construction plan for a pilot AFEX pretreatment system, formation of a stakeholder development team to assist in the planning and design of a biorefinery pilot plant, continued evaluation of corn fractionation technologies, corn oil extraction, AFEX treatment of corn fiber/DDGs; (2) development of a process to fractionate AFEX-treated corn fiber and corn stover--cellulose and hemicellulose fractionation and sugar recovery; and (3) development of a scalable batch succinic acid production process at 500 L at or below $.42/lb, a laboratory scale fed-batch process for succinic acid production at or below $.40/lb, a recovery process for succinic acid that reduces the cost of succinic acid by $.02/lb and the development of an acid tolerant succinic acid production strain at lab scale (last objective not to be completed during this project time period).

  9. IMPROVED BIOREFINERY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL, CHEMICALS, ANIMAL FEED AND BIOMATERIALS FROM SUGAR CANE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Donal F. Day

    2009-01-29

    /fermentation process yielded improvements beyond what was expected solely from the addition of sugar. In order to expand the economic potential for building a biorefinery, the conversion of enzyme hydrolysates of AFEX-treated bagasse to succinic acid was also investigated. This program established a solid basis for pre-treatment of bagasse in a manner that is feasible for producing ethanol at raw sugar mills.

  10. Valorization of macroalga Saccharina latissima as novel feedstock for fermentation-based succinic acid production in a biorefinery approach and economic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva Marinho, Goncalo; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the potential of the macroalga Saccharina latissima as feedstock for fermentation-based succinic acid production in a biorefinery approach. Seasonal variations in the content of carbohydrates, and fermentable sugars, had a significant impact on the succinic acid yield...

  11. Design of an Optimal Biorefinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawaz, Muhammad; Zondervan, Edwin; Woodley, John;

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose a biorefinery optimization model that can be used to find the optimal processing route for the production of ethanol, butanol, succinic acid and blends of these chemicals with fossil fuel based gasoline. The approach unites transshipment models with a superstructure...

  12. Design of an Optimal Biorefinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawaz, Muhammad; Zondervan, Edwin; Woodley, John;

    In this paper we propose a biorefinery optimization model that can be used to find the optimal processing route for the production of ethanol, butanol, succinic acid and blends of these chemicals with fossil fuel based gasoline. The approach unites transshipment models with a superstructure...

  13. Ethanol production from rape straw: Part of an oilseed rape biorefinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvaniti, Efthalia

    The aim of this study was 1) present an oilseed rape whole crop biorefinery; 2) to investigate the best available experimental conditions for production of cellulosic ethanol from rape straw, and included the processes of thermo-chemical pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and C6 fermentation......, and 3) to couple cellulosic ethanol production to production of cellulolytic enzymes that are needed for cellulosic ethanol production, inside a rape straw biorefinery. For the first is based less on available experiments, and more on literature review. The second and third study conclusions were drawn...... based more on experimental findings, and less to literature review. In Chapter 1, the problem context and background theory for biorefineries is presented. Finally, latest developments of upscaled biorefineries in Europe are summarized. In Chapter 2, a scenario about upgrading and expanding a typical...

  14. Laminaria digitata as a potential carbon source for succinic acid and bioenergy production in a biorefinery perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Gunnarsson, Ingólfur Bragi; Fotidis, Ioannis;

    2015-01-01

    productivity of 0.50 g L− 1 h− 1. Removal of carbohydrates from the macroalgal biomass through enzymatic hydrolysis resulted in up-concentration of protein and lipid fractions in the post-hydrolysis solid residue (PHSR). Energy recovery of PHSR and fermentation broth through anaerobic digestion corresponded......A novel biorefinery concept utilizing macroalgae Laminaria digitata to produce succinic acid, and direct the process residues for feed and energy production, is investigated in the present study. Enzymatic hydrolysis was performed at high solid loading (25% w v− 1) resulting in solubilization...... of the carbohydrates to soluble sugars, which accumulated in the liquid hydrolysate. The overall sugar recovery in the macroalgae hydrolysate was 78.23%. Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z was able to ferment macroalgae hydrolysate to succinic acid with a yield of 86.49% (g g− 1 of total sugars) and an overall...

  15. Bio-oil based biorefinery strategy for the production of succinic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Caixia; Thygesen, Anders; Liu, Yilan;

    2013-01-01

    was investigated. Results: The transgenic E. coli strain could grow in modified M9 medium containing 20 v/v% AP-bio-oil with an increase in OD from 0.25 to 1.09. And 0.38 g/L succinic acid was produced. With the presence of 4 g/L glucose in the medium, succinic acid concentration increased from 1.4 to 2.4 g....../L by addition of 20 v/v% AP-bio-oil. When enzymatic hydrolysate of corn stover was used as carbon source, 10.3 g/L succinic acid was produced. The obtained succinic acid concentration increased to 11.5 g/L when 12.5 v/v% AP-bio-oil was added. However, it decreased to 8 g/L when 50 v/v% AP-bio-oil was added. GC...

  16. Sweet sorghum biorefinery for production of fuel ethanol and value-added co-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    An integrated process has been developed for a sweet-sorghum biorefinery in which all carbohydrate components of the feedstock were used for production of fuel ethanol and industrial chemicals. In the first step, the juice was extracted from the stalks. The resulted straw (bagasse) then was pretreat...

  17. Construction Cost Sensitivity of a Lignocellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    OpenAIRE

    Busby, David P.; Philips, Andrew L.; Herndon, Cary W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The technology has been developed to convert feedstock with cellulose content into ethanol. However, ethanol produced from cellulosic feedstock is the same as ethanol distilled from grain. The objective of research is to determine the price per gallon of ethanol needed so that producing lignocellulosic based ethanol become economically feasible.

  18. Optimizing fermentation process miscanthus-to-ethanol biorefinery scale under uncertain conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberg, Matthew; Sanchez, Daniel L.; Lipman, Timothy E.

    2014-05-01

    Ethanol produced from cellulosic feedstocks has garnered significant interest for greenhouse gas abatement and energy security promotion. One outstanding question in the development of a mature cellulosic ethanol industry is the optimal scale of biorefining activities. This question is important for companies and entrepreneurs seeking to construct and operate cellulosic ethanol biorefineries as it determines the size of investment needed and the amount of feedstock for which they must contract. The question also has important implications for the nature and location of lifecycle environmental impacts from cellulosic ethanol. We use an optimization framework similar to previous studies, but add richer details by treating many of these critical parameters as random variables and incorporating a stochastic sub-model for land conversion. We then use Monte Carlo simulation to obtain a probability distribution for the optimal scale of a biorefinery using a fermentation process and miscanthus feedstock. We find a bimodal distribution with a high peak at around 10-30 MMgal yr-1 (representing circumstances where a relatively low percentage of farmers elect to participate in miscanthus cultivation) and a lower and flatter peak between 150 and 250 MMgal yr-1 (representing more typically assumed land-conversion conditions). This distribution leads to useful insights; in particular, the asymmetry of the distribution—with significantly more mass on the low side—indicates that developers of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries may wish to exercise caution in scale-up.

  19. A New Proposal of Cellulosic Ethanol to Boost Sugarcane Biorefineries: Techno-Economic Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Q. Albarelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercial simulator Aspen Plus was used to simulate a biorefinery producing ethanol from sugarcane juice and second generation ethanol production using bagasse fine fraction composed of parenchyma cells (P-fraction. Liquid hot water and steam explosion pretreatment technologies were evaluated. The processes were thermal and water integrated and compared to a biorefinery producing ethanol from juice and sugarcane bagasse. The results indicated that after thermal and water integration, the evaluated processes were self-sufficient in energy demand, being able to sell the surplus electricity to the grid, and presented water intake inside the environmental limit for São Paulo State, Brazil. The processes that evaluated the use of the bagasse fine fraction presented higher economic results compared with the use of the entire bagasse. Even though, due to the high enzyme costs, the payback calculated for the biorefineries were higher than 8 years for all cases that considered second generation ethanol and the net present value for the investment was negative. The reduction on the enzyme load, in a way that the conversion rates could be maintained, is the limiting factor to make second generation ethanol competitive with the most immediate uses of bagasse: fuel for the cogeneration system to surplus electricity production.

  20. Microbial production of succinic acid using crude and purified glycerol from a Crotalaria juncea based biorefinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvra Sadhukhan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial conversion of crude and purified glycerol obtained in the process of biorefining Crotalaria juncea is carried out to produce succinic acid using Escherichia coli. Batch tests are performed for nine different substrate concentrations of commercial, purified and crude glycerol, in order to observe cell growth and substrate utilization rate. Inhibitory (Halden-Andrew, Aiba-Edward, Tessier type and Andrews as well as non-inhibitory (Monod, Moser and Tessier models are fitted to the relationship between specific growth rate and substrate concentration obtained from the growth curves. Considering the inhibition effect, Aiba-Edward model ranked 1 out of 7 in case of two samples and Haldane-Andrew model ranked 1 in case of one sample. Aiba-Edward model gave the best fitment for a large range of concentrations of all the three types of glycerol, crude, purified and laboratory grade. Maximum production of succinic acid is obtained from commercial glycerol at pH 7 and 37.5 °C.

  1. Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2009-04-01

    Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling

  2. Optimal design of a multi-product biorefinery system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zondervan, E.; Nawaz, Mehboob; de Haan, André B.;

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose a biorefinery optimization model that can be used to find the optimal processing route for the production of ethanol, butanol, succinic acid and blends of these chemicals with fossil fuel based gasoline. The approach unites transshipment models with a superstructure...

  3. Design methodology for integrated downstream separation systems in an ethanol biorefinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh Rohani, Navid

    Energy security and environmental concerns have been the main drivers for a historic shift to biofuel production in transportation fuel industry. Biofuels should not only offer environmental advantages over the petroleum fuels they replace but also should be economically sustainable and viable. The so-called second generation biofuels such as ethanol which is the most produced biofuel are mostly derived from lignocellulosic biomasses. These biofuels are more difficult to produce than the first generation ones mainly due to recalcitrance of the feedstocks in extracting their sugar contents. Costly pre-treatment and fractionation stages are required to break down lignocellulosic feedstocks into their constituent elements. On the other hand the mixture produced in fermentation step in a biorefinery contains very low amount of product which makes the subsequent separation step more difficult and more energy consuming. In an ethanol biorefinery, the dilute fermentation broth requires huge operating cost in downstream separation for recovery of the product in a conventional distillation technique. Moreover, the non-ideal nature of ethanol-water mixture which forms an iseotrope at almost 95 wt%, hinders the attainment of the fuel grade ethanol (99.5 wt%). Therefore, an additional dehydration stage is necessary to purify the ethanol from its azeotropic composition to fuel-grade purity. In order to overcome the constraint pertaining to vapor-liquid equilibrium of ethanol-water separation, several techniques have been investigated and proposed in the industry. These techniques such as membrane-based technologies, extraction and etc. have not only sought to produce a pure fuel-grade ethanol but have also aimed at decreasing the energy consumption of this energy-intensive separation. Decreasing the energy consumption of an ethanol biorefinery is of paramount importance in improving its overall economics and in facilitating the way to displacing petroleum transportation fuel

  4. Perspectives on the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates in biorefineries associated with the production of sugar and ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luiziana Ferreira; Taciro, Marilda Keico; Raicher, Gil; Piccoli, Rosane Aparecida Moniz; Mendonça, Thatiane Teixeira; Lopes, Mateus Schreiner Garcez; Gomez, José Gregório Cabrera

    2014-11-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are biodegradable and biocompatible bacterial thermoplastic polymers that can be obtained from renewable resources. The high impact of the carbon source in the final cost of this polymer has been one of the major limiting factors for PHA production and agricultural residues, mainly lignocellulosic materials, have gained attention to overcome this problem. In Brazil, production of 2nd generation ethanol from the glucose fraction, derived from sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate has been studied. The huge amounts of remaining xylose will create an opportunity for the development of other bioprocesses, generating new products to be introduced into a biorefinery model. Although PHA production from sucrose integrated to a 1G ethanol and sugar mill has been proposed in the past, the integration of the process of 2G ethanol in the context of a biorefinery will provide enormous amounts of xylose, which could be applied to produce PHA, establishing a second-generation of PHA production process. Those aspects and perspectives are presented in this article.

  5. Current Pretreatment Technologies for the Development of Cellulosic Ethanol and Biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Marcos Henrique Luciano; Morais, Ana Rita C; da Costa Lopes, Andre M; Olekszyszen, Drielly Nayara; Bogel-Łukasik, Rafał; Andreaus, Jürgen; Pereira Ramos, Luiz

    2015-10-26

    Lignocellulosic materials, such as forest, agriculture, and agroindustrial residues, are among the most important resources for biorefineries to provide fuels, chemicals, and materials in such a way to substitute for, at least in part, the role of petrochemistry in modern society. Most of these sustainable biorefinery products can be produced from plant polysaccharides (glucans, hemicelluloses, starch, and pectic materials) and lignin. In this scenario, cellulosic ethanol has been considered for decades as one of the most promising alternatives to mitigate fossil fuel dependence and carbon dioxide accumulation in the atmosphere. However, a pretreatment method is required to overcome the physical and chemical barriers that exist in the lignin-carbohydrate composite and to render most, if not all, of the plant cell wall components easily available for conversion into valuable products, including the fuel ethanol. Hence, pretreatment is a key step for an economically viable biorefinery. Successful pretreatment method must lead to partial or total separation of the lignocellulosic components, increasing the accessibility of holocellulose to enzymatic hydrolysis with the least inhibitory compounds being released for subsequent steps of enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation. Each pretreatment technology has a different specificity against both carbohydrates and lignin and may or may not be efficient for different types of biomasses. Furthermore, it is also desirable to develop pretreatment methods with chemicals that are greener and effluent streams that have a lower impact on the environment. This paper provides an overview of the most important pretreatment methods available, including those that are based on the use of green solvents (supercritical fluids and ionic liquids).

  6. Evaluation of an integrated biorefinery based on fractionation of spent sulphite liquor for the production of an antioxidant-rich extract, lignosulphonates and succinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandri, Maria; Papapostolou, Harris; Komaitis, Michael; Stragier, Lutgart; Verstraete, Willy; Danezis, Georgios P; Georgiou, Constantinos A; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Koutinas, Apostolis A

    2016-08-01

    Spent sulphite liquor (SSL) has been used for the production of lignosulphonates (LS), antioxidants and bio-based succinic acid. Solvent extraction of SSL with isopropanol led to the separation of approximately 80% of the total LS content, whereas the fermentations carried out using the pretreated SSL with isopropanol led to the production of around 19g/L of succinic acid by both Actinobacillus succinogenes and Basfia succiniciproducens. Fractionation of SSL via nanofiltration to separate the LS and solvent extraction using ethyl acetate to separate the phenolic compounds produced a detoxified sugar-rich stream that led to the production of 39g/L of succinic acid by B. succiniciproducens. This fractionation scheme resulted also in the production of 32.4g LS and 1.15g phenolic-rich extract per 100g of SSL. Both pretreatment schemes removed significant quantities of metals and heavy metals. This novel biorefinery concept could be integrated in acidic sulphite pulping mills. PMID:27176670

  7. Integration of Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) in the Biorefinery for Production of Ethanol, H2 and Phenolics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Thomsen, Anne Belinda; Possemiers, Sam;

    2010-01-01

    procedure is proposed in which the ethanol biorefinery is coupled with a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), with the aim to further process and valorize the waste stream of bioethanol production. A MEC is an electrochemical system capable of oxidizing reducing equivalents, which results in hydrogen...

  8. A biorefinery approach for the production of xylitol, ethanol and polyhydroxybutyrate from brewer’s spent grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier A. Dávila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brewer’s spent grain (BSG is one of the most important byproducts of the brewing industry and its composition offers opportunities for developing value-added products. The objective of the research was to investigate the application of the biorefinery approach for production of xylitol, ethanol and polyhydroxybutyrate from BSG. The techno-economic and environmental aspects of two biorefinery scenarios, with and without heat integration, were studied. Results indicated that a standalone production of fuel ethanol from BSG was not feasible, the production of polyhydroxybutyrate was feasible only with heat integration and that the production of xylitol was feasible either with or without heat integration. Results indicated a calculated total production cost of 0.35, 3.63 and 3.36 USD/kg for xylitol, ethanol and polyhydroxybutyrate, respectively. Results suggested that heat integration allowed reducing the energy consumption associated with manufacturing all of the products in the biorefinery by 43%. Results of the environmental assessment indicated that heat integration lowered the potential environmental impact of the BSG processing. Results of the study thus indicated the superiority of a biorefinery for BSG processing that includes heat integration, from both the techno-economic and environmental impact points of view.

  9. An oil palm-based biorefinery concept for cellulosic ethanol and phytochemicals production: Sustainability evaluation using exergetic life cycle assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, thermo-environmental sustainability of an oil palm-based biorefinery concept for the co-production of cellulosic ethanol and phytochemicals from oil palm fronds (OPFs) was evaluated based on exergetic life cycle assessment (ExLCA). For the production of 1 tonne bioethanol, the exergy content of oil palm seeds was upgraded from 236 MJ to 77,999 MJ during the farming process for OPFs production. Again, the high exergy content of the OPFs was degraded by about 62.02% and 98.36% when they were converted into cellulosic ethanol and phenolic compounds respectively. With a total exergy destruction of about 958,606 MJ (internal) and 120,491 MJ (external or exergy of wastes), the biorefinery recorded an overall exergy efficiency and thermodynamic sustainability index (TSI) of about 59.05% and 2.44 per tonne of OPFs' bioethanol respectively. Due to the use of fossil fuels, pesticides, fertilizers and other toxic chemicals during the production, the global warming potential (GWP = 2265.69 kg CO2 eq.), acidification potential (AP = 355.34 kg SO2 eq.) and human toxicity potential (HTP = 142.79 kg DCB eq.) were the most significant environmental impact categories for a tonne of bioethanol produced in the biorefinery. The simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) unit emerged as the most exergetically efficient (89.66%), thermodynamically sustainable (TSI = 9.67) and environmentally friendly (6.59% of total GWP) production system. -- Highlights: • Thermo-environmental sustainability of palm-based biorefinery was assessed. • OPFs' exergy content was degraded when converted into bioethanol and phytochemicals. • Exergy efficiency (59.05%) and TSI (2.44) were recorded for the biorefinery • Global warming potential of 2265.6 kg CO2 eq. was recorded for the whole biorefinery

  10. ETHANOL PULPING AS A STAGE IN THE BIO-REFINERY OF OLIVE TREE PRUNINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Requejo,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials from olive tree pruning are an abundant agricultural residue in various Mediterranean regions. A suggested use of this residue is its separation in a main fraction (trunks and stems with diameter > 1 cm and a residual fraction (leaves and stems with diameter 1 < cm, using biorefinery procedures. The main fraction is cooked with ethanol, giving rise to a pulp, which can be used either in paper or in bioethanol production if before pulping the main fraction is subjected to a hydrothermal treatment. Pulping with 70% ethanol concentration, 185 °C for 80 min resulted in a pulp with a yield of 46.30% and a content of holocellulose, α-cellulose, and lignin of 77.17%, 62.49%, and 21.73%, respectively. The paper sheets obtained had a breaking length of 1168 m, a burst index of 0.44 kN /g, a tear index of 2.25 mN.m2/g, and a brightness of 43.66%. The pulp converted into bioethanol (by simultaneous hydrolysis and fermentation achieved a conversion of 70 g bioethanol/100 g potential bioethanol. The residual fraction of olive tree prunings was subjected to combustion to produce thermal energy. The heating value was 18700 kJ/kg, the flame temperature range was 1094 to 2013 ºC, and the dew point temperature range of the flue gases was 47 to 53 °C.

  11. Ethanol production from rape straw: Part of an oilseed rape biorefinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvaniti, E.

    2010-12-15

    Agricultural residues from rapeseed biodiesel industry (rapeseed cake, rape straw, crude glycerol), which represent the 82%wt. of the oilseed rape, currently have only low-grade applications in the market. For this, a scenario was built on exploiting qualities of rapeseed biodiesel residues for forming added-value products, and expanding and upgrading an existing biodiesel plant, to an oilseed rape biorefinery by 2020 in European ground. Selection of products was based on a technological feasibility study given the time frame, while priority was given to Low-Value-High-Volume readily marketed products, like production of energy and feed. Products selected except rapeseed biodiesel, were ethanol, biogas, enzymes energy, chemical building blocks, and superior quality animal fodder. The production lines were analyzed and prospects for 2020 were projected on a critical basis. Particular merit was given to two products, ethanol from cellulose, and cellulolytic enzymes from rape straw. Cellulosic ethanol from rape straw was optimized for all production steps, i.e. for thermo-chemical pretreatment, enzyme hydrolysis, and fermentation of C6 sugars. Thermo-chemical pretreatment was studied with Wet oxidation technique at different conditions of temperature, reaction time, and oxygen pressure, but also factors like pre-soaking straw in warm water, or recycling liquid were also studied. Wet oxidation has been extensively tested in the past for different substrates, and gives promising results with indicators that are important for cellulosic ethanol production; C6 sugars recovery, high digestibility for enzymes, and limited formed degradation products. Here, optimal pretreatment conditions for rape straw were first presoaking rape straw at 80 deg. C for 20 minutes, and then wet-oxidize with 12 bar of oxygen at 205 deg. C for 3 minutes. Recovery of cellulose and hemicellulose under these conditions was 105% and 106% respectively, while recovery of lignin was 86%. When this

  12. Developing biorefinery in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min En-Ze

    2006-01-01

    Biorefinery based on biomass resources is an important approach for the oil refining and petrochemical industry to achieve sustainable development.Two types of biorefinery suitable for China's biomass resources are presented in this paper.With sorgo and cassava as raw material,an ethanol-biorefinery for the production of ethanol-gasoline and chemicals is explored,and with rape seed and cotton seed oil as raw material,a biodiesel-biorefinery for the production of biodiesel and chemicals is also explored.The associated problems and measures taken are discussed in the end.

  13. Anaerobic digestion in combination with 2nd generation ethanol production for maximizing biofuels yield from lignocellulosic biomass – testing in an integrated pilot-scale biorefinery plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    An integrated biorefinery concept for 2nd generation bioethanol production together with biogas production from the fermentation effluent was tested in pilot-scale. The pilot plant comprised pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, hexose and pentose fermentation into ethanol and anaerobic digestion...... for mesophilic than for thermophilic operation. The effluent from the ethanol fermentation showed no signs of toxicity to the anaerobic microorganisms. Implementation of the biogas production from the fermentation effluent accounted for about 30% higher biofuels yield in the biorefinery compared to a system...

  14. Composition and stability of complexes of maleic and succinic acids with Cu2+ ions in water-ethanol solutions at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukumova, N. V.; Usacheva, T. R.; Thuan, Tran Thi Dieu; Sharnin, V. A.

    2014-10-01

    The composition and stability of coordination compounds of the anions of maleic (H2L) and succinic (H2Y) acids with copper(II) ions in water-ethanol solutions is studied by means of potentiometric titration at a sodium perchlorate ionic strength of 0.1 and a temperature of 298.15 K. The composition of the water-ethanol solvent was varied from 0 to 0.7 molar parts of ethanol for maleic acid and from 0 to 0.4 molar parts for succinic acid. The stability of monoligand complexes of copper ions with the anions of maleic and succinic acids grows with increase of ethanol concentration from 3.86 to 6.62 for logβCuL and from 2.98 to 6.01 for logβCuY. It is shown that a monotonic rise in stability upon an increase in the content of ethanol in solution is observed, while the values of logβCuL change more sharply. The succinic acid anion forms a stronger complex with copper ions than maleic acid anions do at an ethanol content of 0.4 molar parts. The possibility of the formation of a protonated CuHY+ particle is established.

  15. A biorefinery concept for simultaneous recovery of cellulosic ethanol and phenolic compounds from oil palm fronds: Process optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Biorefinery concept for simultaneous recovery of cellulose and phenolic compounds. • Sono-assisted organosolv/H2O2 pretreatment was used to isolate palm fronds cellulose. • Optimum conditions for pretreatment: 60 °C, 40 min, 1:20 g/ml, 3% NaOH concentration. • Optimum conditions yielded 55.3% cellulose, 20.1 g/l glucose and 0.769 g/g ethanol. • Pretreatment liquor contained 4.691 mg GAE/g phenolics. - Abstract: In this study, process optimization of an ultrasonic-assisted organosolv/liquid oxidative pretreatment (SOP) of oil palm fronds (OPFs) for the simultaneous recovery of cellulose, bioethanol and biochemicals (i.e. phenolic compounds) in a biorefinery concept was carried out. The effects of time (30–60 min.), temperature (40–80 °C), NaOH concentration (1–5%) and sample:solvent ratio (1:10–1:50 g/ml) on cellulose content, bioethanol yield and total phenolics contents (TPC) after SOP were investigated. At optimum conditions of pretreatment (i.e. 60 °C, 40 min, 3% w/v aq. NaOH and 1:20 g/ml sample to solvent ratio), the recovered cellulose (55.30%) which served as substrate for enzymatic hydrolysis and subsequent fermentation yielded about 20.1 g/l glucose, 11.3 g/l xylose and 9.3 g/l bioethanol (yield of 0.769 g/g). The pretreatment liquor (mostly regarded as wastes) obtained at the optimum pretreatment conditions contained about 4.691 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g OPFs of TPC, 0.297 mg vanillic acid (VA)/g OPFs, 1.591 mg gallic acid (GA)/g OPFs and 0.331 mg quercetin (QU)/g OPFs. The pretreatment liquor was again analyzed to possess high antiradical scavenging activity (about 97.2%) compared to the synthetic antioxidant, 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene (BHT) (80.7%) at 100 ppm. Thus one sustainable way of managing wastes in biorefinery is the recovery of multi-bioproducts (e.g. bioethanol and biochemicals) during the pretreatment process

  16. Biorefinery of corn cob for microbial lipid and bio-ethanol production: An environmental friendly process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Di; Dong, Zhongshi; Wang, Yong; Chen, Changjing; Li, Ping; Qin, Peiyong; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-07-01

    Microbial lipid and bio-ethanol were co-generated by an integrated process using corn cob bagasse as raw material. After pretreatment, the acid hydrolysate was used as substrate for microbial lipid fermentation, while the solid residue was further enzymatic hydrolysis for bio-ethanol production. The effect of acid loading and pretreatment time on microbial lipid and ethanol production were evaluated. Under the optimized condition for ethanol production, ∼131.3g of ethanol and ∼11.5g of microbial lipid were co-generated from 1kg raw material. On this condition, ∼71.6% of the overall fermentable sugars in corn cob bagasse could be converted into valuable products. At the same time, at least 33% of the initial COD in the acid hydrolysate was depredated.

  17. Biorefinery of corn cob for microbial lipid and bio-ethanol production: An environmental friendly process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Di; Dong, Zhongshi; Wang, Yong; Chen, Changjing; Li, Ping; Qin, Peiyong; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-07-01

    Microbial lipid and bio-ethanol were co-generated by an integrated process using corn cob bagasse as raw material. After pretreatment, the acid hydrolysate was used as substrate for microbial lipid fermentation, while the solid residue was further enzymatic hydrolysis for bio-ethanol production. The effect of acid loading and pretreatment time on microbial lipid and ethanol production were evaluated. Under the optimized condition for ethanol production, ∼131.3g of ethanol and ∼11.5g of microbial lipid were co-generated from 1kg raw material. On this condition, ∼71.6% of the overall fermentable sugars in corn cob bagasse could be converted into valuable products. At the same time, at least 33% of the initial COD in the acid hydrolysate was depredated. PMID:27060242

  18. Improving Energy Efficiency and Enabling Water Recycle in Biorefineries Using Bioelectrochemical Cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Improving biofuel yield and water reuse are two important issues in further development of biorefineries. The total energy content of liquid fuels (including ethanol and hydrocarbon) produced from cellulosic biomass via biochemical or hybrid bio-thermochemical routes can vary from 49% to 70% of the biomass entering the biorefinery, on an energy basis. Use of boiler for combustion of residual organics and lignin results in significant energy and water losses. An alternate process to improve energy recovery from the residual organic streams is via use of bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). The potential advantages of this alternative scheme in a biorefinery include minimization of heat loss and generation of a higher value product, hydrogen. The need for 5-15 gallons of water per gallon of ethanol can be reduced significantly via recycle of water after MEC treatment. Removal of inhibitory byproducts such as furans, phenolics and acetate in MFC/MECs to generate energy, thus, has dual advantages including improvements in energy efficiency and ability to recycle water. Conversion of the sugar- and lignin- degradation products to hydrogen is synergistic with biorefinery hydrogen requirements for upgrading F-T liquids and other byproducts to high-octane fuels and/or high value products. Some of these products include sorbitol, succinic acid, furan and levulinate derivatives, glycols, polyols, 1,4-butenadiol, phenolics polymers, etc. Potential process alternatives utilizing MECs in biorefineries capable of improving energy efficiency by up to 30% are discussed.

  19. Possibilities for sustainable biorefineries based on agricultural residues – A case study of potential straw-based ethanol production in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Biorefineries can produce ethanol, biogas, heat and power efficiently with profit. ► Location of plant is decided by raw material supply in the region. ► Increased production of high value compounds affects profitability. ► Energy efficiency is increased by availability of heat sinks. ► Several locations may be suitable for construction of a biorefinery plant. -- Abstract: This study presents a survey of the most important techno-economic factors for the implementation of biorefineries based on agricultural residues, in the form of straw, and biochemical conversion into ethanol and biogas, together with production of electricity and heat. The paper suggests locations where the necessary conditions can be met in Sweden. The requirements identified are regional availability of feedstock, the possibility to integrate with external heat sinks, appropriate process design and the scale of the plant. The scale of the plant should be adapted to the potential, regional, raw-material supply, but still be large enough to give economies of scale. The integration with heat sinks proved to be most important to achieve high energy-efficiency, but it was of somewhat less importance for the profitability. Development of pentose fermentation, leading to higher ethanol yields, was important to gain high profitability. Promising locations were identified in the county of Östergötland where integration with an existing 1st generation ethanol plant and district heating systems (DHSs) is possible, and in the county of Skåne where both a significant, potential straw supply and integration potential with DHSs are available.

  20. Biorefinery process for protein extraction from oriental mustard (Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.) using ethanol stillage

    OpenAIRE

    Ratanapariyanuch, Kornsulee; Tyler, Robert T.; Shim, Youn Young; Reaney, Martin JT

    2012-01-01

    Large volumes of treated process water are required for protein extraction. Evaporation of this water contributes greatly to the energy consumed in enriching protein products. Thin stillage remaining from ethanol production is available in large volumes and may be suitable for extracting protein rich materials. In this work protein was extracted from ground defatted oriental mustard (Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.) meal using thin stillage. Protein extraction efficiency was studied at pHs betwee...

  1. KRAFT MILL BIOREFINERY TO PRODUCE ACETIC ACID AND ETHANOL: TECHNICAL ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Mao

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The “near neutral hemicellulose extraction process” involves extraction of hemicellulose using green liquor prior to kraft pulping. Ancillary unit operations include hydrolysis of the extracted carbohydrates using sulfuric acid, removal of extracted lignin, liquid-liquid extraction of acetic acid, liming followed by separation of gypsum, fermentation of C5 and C6 sugars, and upgrading the acetic acid and ethanol products by distillation. The process described here is a variant of the “near neutral hemicellulose extraction process” that uses the minimal amount of green liquor to maximize sugar production while still maintaining the strength quality of the final kraft pulp. Production rates vary between 2.4 to 6.6 million gallons per year of acetic acid and 1.0 and 5.6 million gallons per year of ethanol, depending upon the pulp production rate. The discounted cash flow rate of return for the process is a strong function of plant size, and the capital investment depends on the complexity of the process. For a 1,000 ton per day pulp mill, the production cost for ethanol was estimated to vary between $1.63 and $2.07/gallon, and for acetic acid between $1.98 and $2.75 per gallon depending upon the capital equipment requirements for the new process. To make the process economically attractive, for smaller mill sizes the processing must be simplified to facilitate reductions in capital cost.

  2. Ethanol from a biorefinery waste stream: Saccharification of amylase, protease and xylanase treated wheat bran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ian P; Cook, Nicola M; Wilson, David R; Ryden, Peter; Robertson, James A; Waldron, Keith W

    2016-05-01

    Biorefining aims to exploit the full value of plant material by sequentially extracting and valorising its components. Many studies focus on the saccharification of virgin biomass sources, but it may be more efficient to pre-extract high-value components before hydrolysis to fermentable sugars. In the current study, a bran residue from de-starched, protein depleted and xylanase treated wheat bran has been subjected to hydrothermal pretreatment, saccharification and fermentation procedures to convert the residue to ethanol. The most effective pretreatment conditions (>190 °C, 10 min) and saccharification conditions were identified following bench-scale liquid hot water pretreatment. Pre-extraction of enzymatically-hydrolysable starch and xylan reduced the release of furfural production, particularly when lower pretreatment severities were used. Pilot-scale steam explosion of the lignocellulosic residue followed by cellulase treatment and conversion to ethanol at a high substrate concentration (19%) gave an ethanol titre of ≈ 25 g/L or a yield of 93% of the theoretical maximum.

  3. Ethanol from a biorefinery waste stream: Saccharification of amylase, protease and xylanase treated wheat bran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ian P; Cook, Nicola M; Wilson, David R; Ryden, Peter; Robertson, James A; Waldron, Keith W

    2016-05-01

    Biorefining aims to exploit the full value of plant material by sequentially extracting and valorising its components. Many studies focus on the saccharification of virgin biomass sources, but it may be more efficient to pre-extract high-value components before hydrolysis to fermentable sugars. In the current study, a bran residue from de-starched, protein depleted and xylanase treated wheat bran has been subjected to hydrothermal pretreatment, saccharification and fermentation procedures to convert the residue to ethanol. The most effective pretreatment conditions (>190 °C, 10 min) and saccharification conditions were identified following bench-scale liquid hot water pretreatment. Pre-extraction of enzymatically-hydrolysable starch and xylan reduced the release of furfural production, particularly when lower pretreatment severities were used. Pilot-scale steam explosion of the lignocellulosic residue followed by cellulase treatment and conversion to ethanol at a high substrate concentration (19%) gave an ethanol titre of ≈ 25 g/L or a yield of 93% of the theoretical maximum. PMID:26769514

  4. Pretreatment and Fractionation of Wheat Straw for Production of Fuel Ethanol and Value-added Co-products in a Biorefinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An integrated process has been developed for a wheat straw biorefinery. In this process, wheat straw was pretreated by soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA, which extensively removed lignin but preserved high percentages of the carbohydrate fractions for subsequent bioconversion. The pretreatment conditions included 15 wt% NH4OH, 1:10 solid:liquid ratio, 65 oC and 15 hours. Under these conditions, 48% of the original lignin was removed, whereas 98%, 83% and 78% of the original glucan, xylan, and arabinan, respectively, were preserved. The pretreated material was subsequently hydrolyzed with a commercial hemicellulase to produce a solution rich in xylose and low in glucose plus a cellulose-enriched solid residue. The xylose-rich solution then was used for production of value-added products. Xylitol and astaxanthin were selected to demonstrate the fermentability of the xylose-rich hydrolysate. Candida mogii and Phaffia rhodozyma were used for xylitol and astaxanthin fermentation, respectively. The cellulose-enriched residue obtained after the enzymatic hydrolysis of the pretreated straw was used for ethanol production in a fed-batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF process. In this process, a commercial cellulase was used for hydrolysis of the glucan in the residue and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is the most efficient commercial ethanol-producing organism, was used for ethanol production. Final ethanol concentration of 57 g/l was obtained at 27 wt% total solid loading.

  5. Fulton Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumait, Necy [BlueFire Ethanol, Irvine, CA (United States); Cuzens, John [BlueFire Ethanol, Irvine, CA (United States); Klann, Richard [BlueFire Ethanol, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-07-24

    Final report on work performed by BlueFire on the deployment of acid hydrolysis technology to convert cellulosic waste materials into renewable fuels, power and chemicals in a production facility to be located in Fulton, Mississippi.

  6. Efficient carbon dioxide utilization and simultaneous hydrogen enrichment from off-gas of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by succinic acid producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Aiyong; Kong, Xiangping; Wang, Chao; Wu, Hao; Jiang, Min; Ma, Jiangfeng; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-08-01

    The off-gas from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was firstly used to be CO2 source (co-substrate) for succinic acid production. The optimum ratio of H2/CO2 indicated higher CO2 partial pressures with presence of H2 could enhance C4 pathway flux and reductive product productivity. Moreover, when an inner recycling bioreactor was used for CO2 recycling at a high total pressure (0.2Mpa), a maximum succinic acid concentration of 65.7g·L(-1) was obtained, and a productivity of 0.76g·L(-1)·h(-1) and a high yield of 0.86g·g(-1) glucose were achieved. Furthermore, the hydrogen content was simultaneously enriched to 92.7%. These results showed one successful attempt to reuse the off-gas of ABE fermentation which can be an attractive CO2 source for succinic acid production. PMID:27142628

  7. Sustainability Assessment of a Biorefinery Complex in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Pariyapat Nilsalab; Kritana Prueksakorn; Shabbir H. Gheewala; Sébastien Bonnet

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a biorefinery complex in Thailand was assessed vis-à-vis sustainability. The complex studied includes plantations of sugarcane and a biorefinery system composed of several units including, a sugar mill, power plant, ethanol factory and fertilizer plant. The assessment aimed at evaluating the environmental and socio-economic implications relating to molasses-based ethanol production and use, and maximized utilization of the biomass materials produced as part of the biorefinery c...

  8. Pretreatment and fractionation of wheat straw for production of fuel ethanol and value-added co-products in a biorefinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    An integrated process has been developed for a wheat straw biorefinery. In this process wheat straw was pretreated by soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA), which extensively removed lignin but preserved high percentages of the carbohydrate fractions for subsequent bioconversion. The pretreatment condi...

  9. Zymomonas mobilis: a novel platform for future biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming Xiong; Wu, Bo; Qin, Han; Ruan, Zhi Yong; Tan, Fu Rong; Wang, Jing Li; Shui, Zong Xia; Dai, Li Chun; Zhu, Qi Li; Pan, Ke; Tang, Xiao Yu; Wang, Wen Guo; Hu, Qi Chun

    2014-01-01

    Biosynthesis of liquid fuels and biomass-based building block chemicals from microorganisms have been regarded as a competitive alternative route to traditional. Zymomonas mobilis possesses a number of desirable characteristics for its special Entner-Doudoroff pathway, which makes it an ideal platform for both metabolic engineering and commercial-scale production of desirable bio-products as the same as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on consideration of future biomass biorefinery. Z. mobilis has been studied extensively on both fundamental and applied level, which will provide a basis for industrial biotechnology in the future. Furthermore, metabolic engineering of Z. mobilis for enhancing bio-ethanol production from biomass resources has been significantly promoted by different methods (i.e. mutagenesis, adaptive laboratory evolution, specific gene knock-out, and metabolic engineering). In addition, the feasibility of representative metabolites, i.e. sorbitol, bionic acid, levan, succinic acid, isobutanol, and isobutanol produced by Z. mobilis and the strategies for strain improvements are also discussed or highlighted in this paper. Moreover, this review will present some guidelines for future developments in the bio-based chemical production using Z. mobilis as a novel industrial platform for future biofineries. PMID:25024744

  10. Zymomonas mobilis: a novel platform for future biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming Xiong; Wu, Bo; Qin, Han; Ruan, Zhi Yong; Tan, Fu Rong; Wang, Jing Li; Shui, Zong Xia; Dai, Li Chun; Zhu, Qi Li; Pan, Ke; Tang, Xiao Yu; Wang, Wen Guo; Hu, Qi Chun

    2014-01-01

    Biosynthesis of liquid fuels and biomass-based building block chemicals from microorganisms have been regarded as a competitive alternative route to traditional. Zymomonas mobilis possesses a number of desirable characteristics for its special Entner-Doudoroff pathway, which makes it an ideal platform for both metabolic engineering and commercial-scale production of desirable bio-products as the same as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on consideration of future biomass biorefinery. Z. mobilis has been studied extensively on both fundamental and applied level, which will provide a basis for industrial biotechnology in the future. Furthermore, metabolic engineering of Z. mobilis for enhancing bio-ethanol production from biomass resources has been significantly promoted by different methods (i.e. mutagenesis, adaptive laboratory evolution, specific gene knock-out, and metabolic engineering). In addition, the feasibility of representative metabolites, i.e. sorbitol, bionic acid, levan, succinic acid, isobutanol, and isobutanol produced by Z. mobilis and the strategies for strain improvements are also discussed or highlighted in this paper. Moreover, this review will present some guidelines for future developments in the bio-based chemical production using Z. mobilis as a novel industrial platform for future biofineries.

  11. Catalytic Processes in Biorefinery

    OpenAIRE

    Vitiello, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The biorefinery is a system that uses as feedstocks biomasses and recover from these energy, fuel and chemicals. There are many processes considered in the biorefinery system, but in this thesis the biorefinery that uses as feedstock oil, in particular dedicated crops and waste vegetable oils were considered. In the first part of this thesis the biodiesel production process was studied. One possible route to produce biodiesel from waste oils (carachetrized by high concentrations of Fr...

  12. Liquid-Liquid Equilibria of the Water-Ethanol-Dimethyl Succinate Ternary System%水,乙醇和丁二酸二甲酯三元体系的液体平衡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ErolInce; IsmailKirbaslar

    2002-01-01

    Liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) data for the ternary system water-ethanol-dimethyl succinate havebeen determined experimentally at temperatures ranging from 298.15 to 318.15 K at 5 K intervals. Complete phasediagrams were obtained by determining solubility and the tie-line data. Tie-line compositions were correlated byOthmer-Tobias method. The universal quasichemical functional group activity coefficient (UNIFAC) and modifiedUNIFAC methods were used to predict the phase equilibrium in the system using the interaction parameters determined from experimental data between groups CH3, CH2, OH, CH3COO and H2O. It is found that UNIFAC andmodified UNIFAC group interaction parameters used for LLE could not provide a good prediction. Distributioncoefficients and separation factors were evaluated for the immiscibility region.

  13. Co-production of ethanol, biogas, protein fodder and natural fertilizer in organic farming – Evaluation of a concept for a farm-scale biorefinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Kádár, Zsófia; Heiske, Stefan;

    2012-01-01

    -digested with clover grass silage to produce biogas. A method for ethanol production from rye was applied by utilizing inherent amylase activity from germination of the seed. Biogas potential of ethanol fermentation effluent was measured through anaerobic digestion trials. The effluent from the trials was assumed...... to serve as natural fertilizer. A technoeconomic analysis was also performed; total capital investment was estimated to be approximately 4 M USD. Setting a methane selling price according to available incentives for “green electricity” (0.72 USD/m3) led to a minimum ethanol selling price of 1.89 USD...

  14. Economically Viable Components from Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) in a Biorefinery Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Eva; Prade, Thomas; Angelidaki, Irini;

    2015-01-01

    Biorefinery applications are receiving growing interest due to climatic and waste disposal issues and lack of petroleum resources. Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) is suitable for biorefinery applications due to high biomass production and limited cultivation requirements. This paper...... focuses on the potential of Jerusalem artichoke as a biorefinery crop and the most viable products in such a case. The carbohydrates in the tubers were found to have potential for production of platform chemicals, e.g., succinic acid. However, economic analysis showed that production of platform chemicals...

  15. Pilot Scale Integrated Biorefinery for Producing Ethanol from Hybrid Algae: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-389

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pienkos, P. T.

    2013-11-01

    This collaboration between Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will provide valuable information regarding Direct to Ethanol technology. Specifically, the cooperative R&D will analyze the use of flue gas from industrial sources in the Direct to Ethanol process, which may demonstrate the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously producing a valuable product, i.e., ethanol. Additionally, Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will develop both a techno-economic model with full material and energy balances and an updated life-cycle analysis to identify greenhouse gas emissions relative to gasoline, each of which will provide a better understanding of the Direct to Ethanol process and further demonstrate that it is a breakthrough technology with varied and significant benefits.

  16. Techno-economic analysis for a sugarcane biorefinery: Colombian case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Jonathan; El-Halwagi, Mahmoud M; Cardona, Carlos A

    2013-05-01

    In this paper a techno-economic analysis for a sugarcane biorefinery is presented for the Colombian case. It is shown two scenarios for different conversion pathways as function of feedstock distribution and technologies for sugar, fuel ethanol, PHB, anthocyanins and electricity production. These scenarios are compared with the Colombian base case which simultaneously produce sugar, fuel ethanol and electricity. A simulation procedure was used in order to evaluate biorefinery schemes for all the scenarios, using Aspen Plus software, that include productivity analysis, energy calculations and economic evaluation for each process configuration. The results showed that the configuration with the best economic, environmental and social performance is the one that considers fuel ethanol and PHB production from combined cane bagasse and molasses. This result served as the basis to draw recommendations on technological and economic feasibility as well as social aspects for the implementation of such type of biorefinery in Colombia.

  17. Techno-economic analysis for a sugarcane biorefinery: Colombian case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Jonathan; El-Halwagi, Mahmoud M; Cardona, Carlos A

    2013-05-01

    In this paper a techno-economic analysis for a sugarcane biorefinery is presented for the Colombian case. It is shown two scenarios for different conversion pathways as function of feedstock distribution and technologies for sugar, fuel ethanol, PHB, anthocyanins and electricity production. These scenarios are compared with the Colombian base case which simultaneously produce sugar, fuel ethanol and electricity. A simulation procedure was used in order to evaluate biorefinery schemes for all the scenarios, using Aspen Plus software, that include productivity analysis, energy calculations and economic evaluation for each process configuration. The results showed that the configuration with the best economic, environmental and social performance is the one that considers fuel ethanol and PHB production from combined cane bagasse and molasses. This result served as the basis to draw recommendations on technological and economic feasibility as well as social aspects for the implementation of such type of biorefinery in Colombia. PMID:23021947

  18. Economically viable biochemical processes for the advanced rural biorefinery and downstream recovery operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rural biorefineries offer an alternative to traditional ethanol production by providing the opportunity to produce fuel on site to reduce costs associated with biomass transportation thus making the fuel economically viable. Widespread installation of rural biorefineries could lead to increased upt...

  19. Biorefineries: from concepts to reality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagemann, K. [DECHEMA e.V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The concept of biorefineries addresses the conversion of plant biomass to fuels, materials and chemicals, waste streams being minimized and used for the production of electricity and heat. Four different types are presently discussed: - Sugar-based biorefineries - Whole-crop biorefineries - Green biorefineries - Lignocellulose biorefineries Besides the lack of existing technical solutions and limited land resources, competition with food production and, as a consequence, rising raw material prices considered. (orig.)

  20. 玉米秸秆生物炼制燃料乙醇的研究%Biorefinery of Corn Stover for Fuel Ethanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱均均; 陈尚钘; 勇强; 徐勇; 陈牧; 余世袁

    2011-01-01

    Com stover was pretreated by moderate acid and then washed by water. The solid residue after filtration was hydrolyzat-ed to monosaccharide with cellulase for further fermentation to ethanol, white the liquid fraction after filtration was detoxified with trialkylamine extraction to ferment to ethanol. The material balance was carried out in the whole process. The results showed that the optimal pretreatment conditions were temperature 100 t, sulfuric acid mass fraction 3 % and time 12 h. After 24 h fermentation of the condensed enzymatic hydrolyzate containing 138. 72 g/L of glucose, the sugar utilization rate was 99.02 % and the ethanol mass concentration reached its peak value of 62.98 g/L, which corresponded to 89.90 % of the theoretical value. Pre-hydrolyzate was detoxified by trialkylamine extraction, 72.73 % of acetic acid, 42. 86 % of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and 100 % furfural could be removed. The fermentability of the detoxified prehydrolyzate was significantly improved. After 48 h fermentation of the detoxificated prehydrolyzate containing 7. 80 g/L of glucose and 52. 80 g/L of xylose, the sugar utilization rate was 93.17 % , and the ethanol concentration reached its peak value of 21.76 g/L, which corresponded to 82.34 % of the theoretical value. After materials balance, it required 6.8 t absolutely dry com stover to produce one ton ethanol. The process of this study provided the reference to realize the industrialization of hexose and pentose fermentation separately.%以玉米秸秆为原料,研究了中酸预处理条件下水洗得到的残渣经酶水解后进行己糖发酵、水洗液经三烷基胺萃取脱毒后进行戊糖发酵的乙醇得率,并对整个工艺进行了物料衡算.结果表明:中酸预处理的最佳条件为温度100℃,硫酸质量分数3%,时间12h.残渣的酶水解液浓缩至葡萄糖质量浓度为138.72g/L进行乙醇发酵,在24 h时糖利用率为99.02%,此时乙醇质量浓度达到最高为62.98 g

  1. Recovery Act : Heterogeneous Feed Biorefinery Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schofield, Richard [Enerkem Mississippi Biofuels LLC, Pontotoc, MS (United States)

    2015-03-15

    To overcome the hurdles associated with introducing a new technology, Enerkem applied to the US DOE for grant assistance with its Pontotoc, Mississippi, biorefinery under the DOE’s Demonstration of Integrated Biorefinery Operations FOA. Consistent with Enerkem’s strategic approach, the project proposed uses post sorted municipal solid waste blended with other forest residue. The proposed biorefinery is to be located within the boundaries of a working landfill, thus simplifying many aspects of environmental permitting while also reducing feedstock acquisition and transportation costs. An economic impact analysis was conducted using an adaptation of the US Department of Energy’s JEDI (Jobs and Economic Development Impact) model for an ethanol-producing biorefinery. The JEDI model, which does not have a thermochemical processing option, had to be configured to reflect a biomass feedstock and was thus adapted by Enerkem to account for the unique feedstock requirements and operations of the Project. According to this model, development, construction, and 2 years of operation of the biorefinery require an investment of approximately $140 million. Also, a construction period of 18 months will create significant direct and indirect employment. Indirect employment includes steel manufacturers, construction materials manufacturers, material shipping, equipment manufacturers and fabrication, etc. During the construction phase of the Project, 210 total jobs are expected to be created, including 145 direct jobs and 72 indirect or induced jobs. During the operating period, 131 jobs would be created, 95 of which are direct. It is anticipated that the project will create at least 10 new jobs (included in the above figures and in addition to the JEDI data) in the sorting and recycling sector, since the project will require operations in sorting MSW since valuable ferrous, nonferrous and recyclable plastic materials will be sorted from MSW as part of the process that isolates

  2. Sustainability Assessment of a Biorefinery Complex in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pariyapat Nilsalab

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a biorefinery complex in Thailand was assessed vis-à-vis sustainability. The complex studied includes plantations of sugarcane and a biorefinery system composed of several units including, a sugar mill, power plant, ethanol factory and fertilizer plant. The assessment aimed at evaluating the environmental and socio-economic implications relating to molasses-based ethanol production and use, and maximized utilization of the biomass materials produced as part of the biorefinery complex. Global warming potential, human development index and total value added are the three indicators that were selected to perform the assessment. The results obtained revealed that the maximization of biomass utilization at the level of the biorefinery complex provide greenhouse gases emissions reduction benefits, enhanced living conditions for sugarcane farmers and employees of the biorefinery, and economic benefits, particularly with regard to profit and income generation. These results could serve as a first step to further improve and design indicators for sustainability assessment of biomass utilization.

  3. Green biorefinery - Industrial implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, B; Schönicke, P; Hille, Ch

    2016-04-15

    Oil refineries currently generate a multitude of products for almost every sphere of life at very high efficiency. However, fossil raw materials are just available in limited quantities. The development of comparable BIOREFINERIES is necessary to make a variety of competitive biological products regarding their equivalent products based on fossil raw materials. The product range of a biorefinery comprises products that can be manufactured on the basis of crude oil, as well as such products that cannot be produced on the basis of crude oil (Kamm, Gruber, & Kamm, 2011). GREEN BIOREFINERIES [GBR's] are complex systems of sustainable, environment- and resource-friendly technologies for a comprehensive material and energy use or recovery of renewable raw materials in form of green and waste biomasses from a sustainable land use as target (Kamm et al., 2009; Digman, Runge, Shinners, & Hatfield, 2013). PMID:26675876

  4. The Succinated Proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkley, Eric D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John; Frizell, Norma

    2014-03-30

    Succination is a chemical modification of cysteine in protein by the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, yielding S-(2-succino)cysteine (2SC). Intracellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins are increased by hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in concert with mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress in adipocytes grown in high glucose medium and in adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes. Increased succination of proteins is also detected in the kidney of a fumarase conditional knock-out mouse which develops renal tumors. Keap1, the gatekeeper of the antioxidant response, was identified as a major succinated protein in renal cancer cells, suggesting that succination may play a role in activation of the antioxidant response. A wide range of proteins is subject to succination, including enzymes, adipokines, cytoskeletal proteins and ER chaperones with functional cysteine residues. There is also significant overlap between succinated and glutathionylated proteins, and with proteins containing cysteine residues that are readily oxidized to the sulfenic (cysteic) acid. Succination of adipocyte proteins is inhibited by uncouplers, which discharge the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and by ER stress inhibitors. 2SC serves as a biomarker of mitochondrial stress or dysfunction in chronic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and cancer, and recent studies suggest that succination is a mechanistic link between mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative and ER stress, and cellular progression toward apoptosis. In this article, we review the history of the succinated proteome and the challenges associated with measuring this non-enzymatic post-translational modification of proteins by proteomics approaches.

  5. Bis(4-methylimidazolium succinate succinic acid solvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, 2C4H7N2+·C4H4O42−·C4H6O4, the asymmetric unit consists of two 4-methylimidazolium cations, one succinate dianion and one netrual succinic acid molecule and within the latter components, the C—O, C=O and C...;O bonds are clearly evidenced from their relative distances. In the crystal structure, the individual components are linked by intermolecular N—H...O, O—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen bonds into a two-dimensional network parallel to the (101 plane in which R33(9, R33(12 and R44(18 hydrogen-bond motifs are present.

  6. Comparative economic and environmental assessment of four beech wood based biorefinery concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzinski, Maik; Nitzsche, Roy

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze four conceptual beech wood based biorefineries generated during process design in terms of environmental and economic criteria. Biorefinery 1 annually converts 400,000 dry metric tons of beech wood into the primary products 41,600t/yr polymer-grade ethylene and 58,520tDM/yr organosolv lignin and the fuels 90,800tDM/yr hydrolysis lignin and 38,400t/yr biomethane. Biorefinery 2 is extended by the product of 58,400t/yr liquid "food-grade" carbon dioxide. Biorefinery 3 produces 69,600t/yr anhydrous ethanol instead of ethylene. Compared to biorefinery 3, biorefinery 4 additionally provides carbon dioxide as product. Biorefinery 3 and 4 seem most promising, since under basic assumptions both criteria, (i) economic effectiveness and (ii) reduction of potential environmental impacts, can be fulfilled. All four alternatives may reduce potential environmental impacts compared to reference systems using the ReCiPe methodology. Economic feasibilities of the analyzed biorefineries are highly sensitive. PMID:27285577

  7. Enhanced bioenergy recovery from rapeseed plant in a biorefinery concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Talebnia, Farid; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov;

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the utilization of the whole rapeseed plant (seed and straw) for multi-biofuels production in a biorefinery concept. Results showed that bioethanol production from straw was technically feasible with ethanol yield of 0.15 g ethanol/g dry straw after combined alkaline......% in the conventional biodiesel process to 60% in the biorefinery concept, by utilization of the whole rapeseed plant for biodiesel, bioethanol, biohydrogen and methane production....... peroxide and stream pretreatment. The byproducts (rapeseed cake, glycerol, hydrolysate and stillage) were evaluated for hydrogen and methane production. In batch experiments, the energy yields from each feedstock for, either methane production alone or for both hydrogen and methane, were similar. However...

  8. Preprocessing Moist Lignocellulosic Biomass for Biorefinery Feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal Yancey; Christopher T. Wright; Craig Conner; J. Richard Hess

    2009-06-01

    Biomass preprocessing is one of the primary operations in the feedstock assembly system of a lignocellulosic biorefinery. Preprocessing is generally accomplished using industrial grinders to format biomass materials into a suitable biorefinery feedstock for conversion to ethanol and other bioproducts. Many factors affect machine efficiency and the physical characteristics of preprocessed biomass. For example, moisture content of the biomass as received from the point of production has a significant impact on overall system efficiency and can significantly affect the characteristics (particle size distribution, flowability, storability, etc.) of the size-reduced biomass. Many different grinder configurations are available on the market, each with advantages under specific conditions. Ultimately, the capacity and/or efficiency of the grinding process can be enhanced by selecting the grinder configuration that optimizes grinder performance based on moisture content and screen size. This paper discusses the relationships of biomass moisture with respect to preprocessing system performance and product physical characteristics and compares data obtained on corn stover, switchgrass, and wheat straw as model feedstocks during Vermeer HG 200 grinder testing. During the tests, grinder screen configuration and biomass moisture content were varied and tested to provide a better understanding of their relative impact on machine performance and the resulting feedstock physical characteristics and uniformity relative to each crop tested.

  9. Towards lactic acid bacteria-based biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli, Roberto; Bosco, Francesca; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Bayer, Edward A; Pessione, Enrica

    2014-11-15

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have long been used in industrial applications mainly as starters for food fermentation or as biocontrol agents or as probiotics. However, LAB possess several characteristics that render them among the most promising candidates for use in future biorefineries in converting plant-derived biomass-either from dedicated crops or from municipal/industrial solid wastes-into biofuels and high value-added products. Lactic acid, their main fermentation product, is an attractive building block extensively used by the chemical industry, owing to the potential for production of polylactides as biodegradable and biocompatible plastic alternative to polymers derived from petrochemicals. LA is but one of many high-value compounds which can be produced by LAB fermentation, which also include biofuels such as ethanol and butanol, biodegradable plastic polymers, exopolysaccharides, antimicrobial agents, health-promoting substances and nutraceuticals. Furthermore, several LAB strains have ascertained probiotic properties, and their biomass can be considered a high-value product. The present contribution aims to provide an extensive overview of the main industrial applications of LAB and future perspectives concerning their utilization in biorefineries. Strategies will be described in detail for developing LAB strains with broader substrate metabolic capacity for fermentation of cheaper biomass.

  10. Thermochemical biorefinery based on dimethyl ether as intermediate: Technoeconomic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A thermochemical biorefinery based on bio-DME as intermediate is studied. ► The assessed concepts (12) lead to multi-product generation (polygeneration). ► In all concepts DME is converted by carbonylation or hydrocarbonylation. ► Rates of return are similar to or higher than plants producing a single product. -- Abstract: Thermochemical biorefinery based on dimethyl ether (DME) as an intermediate is studied. DME is converted into methyl acetate, which can either be hydrogenated to ethanol or sold as a co-product. Considering this option together with a variety of technologies for syngas upgrading, 12 different process concepts are analyzed. The considered products are ethanol, methyl acetate, H2, DME and electricity. The assessment of each alternative includes biomass pretreatment, gasification, syngas clean-up and conditioning, DME synthesis and conversion, product separation, and heat and power integration. A plant size of 500 MWth processing poplar chips is taken as a basis. The resulting energy efficiency to products ranges from 34.9% to 50.2%. The largest internal rate of return (28.74%) corresponds to a concept which produces methyl acetate, DME and electricity (exported to grid). A sensitivity analysis with respect to total plant investment (TPI), total operation costs (TOC) and market price of products was carried out. The overall conclusion is that, despite its greater complexity, this kind of thermochemical biorefinery is more profitable than thermochemical bioprocesses oriented to a single product.

  11. The realm of cellulases in biorefinery development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandel, Anuj K; Chandrasekhar, G; Silva, Messias Borges; Silvério da Silva, Silvio

    2012-09-01

    Geopolitical concerns (unstable supply of gasoline, environmental pollution, and regular price hikes), economic, and employment concerns have been prompting researchers, entrepreneurs, and policy makers to focus on harnessing the potential of lignocellulosic feedstock for fuel ethanol production and its commercialization. The carbohydrate skeleton of plant cell walls needs to be depolymerised into simpler sugars for their application in fermentation reactions as a chief carbon source of suitable ethnologic strains for ethanol production. The role of cellulolytic enzymes in the degradation of structural carbohydrates of the plant cell wall into ready-to-fermentable sugar stream is inevitable. Cellulase synergistically acts upon plant cell wall polysaccharides to release glucose into the liquid media. Cellulase predominantly dominates all the plant cell wall degrading enzymes due to their vast and diverse range of applications. Apart from the major applications of cellulases such as in detergent formulations, textile desizing, and development of monogastric feed for ruminants, their role in biorefinery is truly remarkable. This is a major area where new research tools based upon fermentation based formulations, biochemistry, and system biology to expedite the structure-function relationships of cellulases including cellulosomes and new designer enzymatic cocktails are required. In the last two decades, a considerable amount of research work has been performed on cellulases and their application in biomass saccharification. However, there are still technical and economic impediments to the development of an inexpensive commercial cellulase production process. Advancements in biotechnology such as screening of microorganisms, manipulation of novel cellulase encoding traits, site-specific mutagenesis, and modifications to the fermentation process could enhance the production of cellulases. Commercially, cheaper sources of carbohydrates and modified fermentation

  12. Comparative techno-economic assessment and LCA of selected integrated sugarcane-based biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnansounou, Edgard; Vaskan, Pavel; Pachón, Elia Ruiz

    2015-11-01

    This work addresses the economic and environmental performance of integrated biorefineries based on sugarcane juice and residues. Four multiproduct scenarios were considered; two from sugar mills and the others from ethanol distilleries. They are integrated biorefineries producing first (1G) and second (2G) generation ethanol, sugar, molasses (for animal feed) and electricity in the context of Brazil. The scenarios were analysed and compared using techno-economic value-based approach and LCA methodology. The results show that the best economic configuration is provided by a scenario with largest ethanol production while the best environmental performance is presented by a scenario with full integration sugar - 1G2G ethanol production. PMID:26255600

  13. Pyrolysis based bio-refinery for the production of bioethanol from demineralized ligno-cellulosic biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luque, Moreno L.; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Rossum, van G.; Oudenhoven, S.R.G; Kersten, S.R.A.; Berruti, F.; Rehmann, L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates a novel biorefinery approach for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass from pinewood. A combination of thermochemical and biochemical conversion was chosen with the main product being ethanol. Fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomasss with fractional condensation of the pro

  14. Technoeconomic analysis of biofuels: A wiki-based platform for lignocellulosic biorefineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein-Marcuschamer, Daniel; Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Simmons, Blake A.;

    2010-01-01

    We present a process model for a lignocellulosic ethanol biorefinery that is open to the biofuels academic community. Beyond providing a series of static results, the wiki-based platform provides a dynamic and transparent tool for analyzing, exploring, and communicating the impact of process...

  15. Engineering Cellulases for Biorefinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoj Kumar, PhD

    2010-06-27

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant, least expensive renewable natural biological resource for the production of biobased products and bioenergy is important for the sustainable development of human civilization in 21st century. For making the fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass, a reduction in cellulase production cost, an improvement in cellulase performance, and an increase in sugar yields are all vital to reduce the processing costs of biorefineries. Improvements in specific cellulase activities for non-complexed cellulase mixtures can be implemented through cellulase engineering based on rational design or directed evolution for each cellulase component enzyme, as well as on the reconstitution of cellulase components. In this paper, we will provide DSM's efforts in cellulase research and developments and focus on limitations. Cellulase improvement strategies based on directed evolution using screening on relevant substrates, screening for higher thermal tolerance based on activity screening approaches such as continuous culture using insoluble cellulosic substrates as a powerful selection tool for enriching beneficial cellulase mutants from the large library. We will illustrate why and how thermostable cellulases are vital for economic delivery of bioproducts from cellulosic biomass using biochemical conversion approach.

  16. Green chemistry, biofuels, and biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James H; Luque, Rafael; Matharu, Avtar S

    2012-01-01

    In the current climate of several interrelated impending global crises, namely, climate change, chemicals, energy, and oil, the impact of green chemistry with respect to chemicals and biofuels generated from within a holistic concept of a biorefinery is discussed. Green chemistry provides unique opportunities for innovation via product substitution, new feedstock generation, catalysis in aqueous media, utilization of microwaves, and scope for alternative or natural solvents. The potential of utilizing waste as a new resource and the development of integrated facilities producing multiple products from biomass is discussed under the guise of biorefineries. Biofuels are discussed in depth, as they not only provide fuel (energy) but are also a source of feedstock chemicals. In the future, the commercial success of biofuels commensurate with consumer demand will depend on the availability of new green (bio)chemical technologies capable of converting waste biomass to fuel in a context of a biorefinery.

  17. Green chemistry, biofuels, and biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James H; Luque, Rafael; Matharu, Avtar S

    2012-01-01

    In the current climate of several interrelated impending global crises, namely, climate change, chemicals, energy, and oil, the impact of green chemistry with respect to chemicals and biofuels generated from within a holistic concept of a biorefinery is discussed. Green chemistry provides unique opportunities for innovation via product substitution, new feedstock generation, catalysis in aqueous media, utilization of microwaves, and scope for alternative or natural solvents. The potential of utilizing waste as a new resource and the development of integrated facilities producing multiple products from biomass is discussed under the guise of biorefineries. Biofuels are discussed in depth, as they not only provide fuel (energy) but are also a source of feedstock chemicals. In the future, the commercial success of biofuels commensurate with consumer demand will depend on the availability of new green (bio)chemical technologies capable of converting waste biomass to fuel in a context of a biorefinery. PMID:22468603

  18. Shell Biorefinery: Dream or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Yang, Huiying; Yan, Ning

    2016-09-12

    Shell biorefinery, referring to the fractionation of crustacean shells into their major components and the transformation of each component into value-added chemicals and materials, has attracted growing attention in recent years. Since the large quantities of waste shells remain underexploited, their valorization can potentially bring both ecological and economic benefits. This Review provides an overview of the current status of shell biorefinery. It first describes the structural features of crustacean shells, including their composition and their interactions. Then, various fractionation methods for the shells are introduced. The last section is dedicated to the valorization of chitin and its derivatives for chemicals, porous carbon materials and functional polymers. PMID:27484462

  19. Potential Routes for Thermochemical Biorefineries

    OpenAIRE

    García Haro, Pedro; Ollero de Castro, Pedro Antonio; Vidal-Barrero, José Fernando; Villanueva Perales, Ángel Luis

    2013-01-01

    This critical review focuses on potential routes for the multi-production of chemicals and fuels in the framework of thermochemical biorefineries. The up-to-date research and development in this field has been limited to BTL/G (biomass-to-liquids/gases) studies, where biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas) is converted into a single product with/without the co-production of electricity and heat. Simultaneously, the interest on biorefineries is growing but mostly refers to the biochemical proc...

  20. Pretreatment techniques for biofuels and biorefineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhen (ed.) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, YN (China). Xishuangbanna Tropical Botonical Garden

    2013-02-01

    The first book focused on pretreatment techniques for biofuels contributed by the world's leading experts. Extensively covers the different types of biomass, various pretreatment approaches and methods that show the subsequent production of biofuels and chemicals. In addition to traditional pretreatment methods, novel techniques are also introduced and discussed. An accessible reference work for students, researchers, academicians and industrialists in biorefineries. This book includes 19 chapters contributed by the world's leading experts on pretreatment methods for biomass. It extensively covers the different types of biomass (e.g. molasses, sugar beet pulp, cheese whey, sugarcane residues, palm waste, vegetable oil, straws, stalks and wood), various pretreatment approaches (e.g. physical, thermal, chemical, physicochemical and biological) and methods that show the subsequent production of biofuels and chemicals such as sugars, ethanol, extracellular polysaccharides, biodiesel, gas and oil. In addition to traditional methods such as steam, hot-water, hydrothermal, diluted-acid, organosolv, ozonolysis, sulfite, milling, fungal and bacterial, microwave, ultrasonic, plasma, torrefaction, pelletization, gasification (including biogas) and liquefaction pretreatments, it also introduces and discusses novel techniques such as nano and solid catalysts, organic electrolyte solutions and ionic liquids. This book offers a review of state-of-the-art research and provides guidance for the future paths of developing pretreatment techniques of biomass for biofuels, especially in the fields of biotechnology, microbiology, chemistry, materials science and engineering. It intends to provide a systematic introduction of pretreatment techniques. It is an accessible reference work for students, researchers, academicians and industrialists in biorefineries.

  1. Succinic acid production from lignocellulosic hydrolysate by Basfia succiniciproducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvachúa, Davinia; Smith, Holly; St John, Peter C; Mohagheghi, Ali; Peterson, Darren J; Black, Brenna A; Dowe, Nancy; Beckham, Gregg T

    2016-08-01

    The production of chemicals alongside fuels will be essential to enhance the feasibility of lignocellulosic biorefineries. Succinic acid (SA), a naturally occurring C4-diacid, is a primary intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and a promising building block chemical that has received significant industrial attention. Basfia succiniciproducens is a relatively unexplored SA-producing bacterium with advantageous features such as broad substrate utilization, genetic tractability, and facultative anaerobic metabolism. Here B. succiniciproducens is evaluated in high xylose-content hydrolysates from corn stover and different synthetic media in batch fermentation. SA titers in hydrolysate at an initial sugar concentration of 60g/L reached up to 30g/L, with metabolic yields of 0.69g/g, and an overall productivity of 0.43g/L/h. These results demonstrate that B. succiniciproducens may be an attractive platform organism for bio-SA production from biomass hydrolysates. PMID:27179951

  2. Succinic Acid Production from Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate by Basfia succiniciproducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvachua, Davinia; Smith, Holly; John, Peter C.; Mohagheghi, Ali; Peterson, Darren J.; Black, Brenna A.; Dowe, Nancy; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-08-01

    The production of chemicals alongside fuels will be essential to enhance the feasibility of lignocellulosic biorefineries. Succinic acid (SA), a naturally occurring C4-diacid, is a primary intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and a promising building block chemical that has received significant industrial attention. Basfia succiniciproducens is a relatively unexplored SA-producing bacterium with advantageous features such as broad substrate utilization, genetic tractability, and facultative anaerobic metabolism. Here B. succiniciproducens is evaluated in high xylose-content hydrolysates from corn stover and different synthetic media in batch fermentation. SA titers in hydrolysate at an initial sugar concentration of 60 g/L reached up to 30 g/L, with metabolic yields of 0.69 g/g, and an overall productivity of 0.43 g/L/h. These results demonstrate that B. succiniciproducens may be an attractive platform organism for bio-SA production from biomass hydrolysates.

  3. Succination of proteins in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzell, Norma; Lima, Maria; Baynes, John W

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine is arguably the most reactive amino acid in protein. A wide range of cysteine derivatives is formed in vivo, resulting from oxidation, nitrosation, alkylation and acylation reactions. This review describes succination of proteins, an irreversible chemical modification of cysteine by the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, yielding S-(2-succinyl)cysteine (2SC). Intracellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins are increased by hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane and develop in concert with mitochondrial and oxidative stress in diabetes. Increased succination of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase explains the loss in specific activity of this enzyme in muscle of streptozotocin-diabetic rats and increased succination of adiponectin may explain the decreased secretion of adiponectin from adipose tissue in type 2 diabetes. In addition to GAPDH and adiponectin, other succinated proteins identified in adipocytes include cytoskeletal proteins (tubulin, actin) and chaperone proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Succination of adipocyte protein in vitro is inhibited by uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and by inhibitors of ER stress. 2SC serves as a biomarker of mitochondrial stress and recent studies suggest that succination is the mechanistic link between mitochondrial and ER stress in diabetes.

  4. Cell disruption for microalgae biorefineries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Günerken, E.; Hondt, d' E.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Garcia-Gonzalez, L.; Elst, K.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are a potential source for various valuable chemicals for commercial applications ranging from nutraceuticals to fuels. Objective in a biorefinery is to utilize biomass ingredients efficiently similarly to petroleum refineries in which oil is fractionated in fuels and a variety of product

  5. Advanced biofuels in a biorefinery approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, Henning (ed.)

    2012-07-01

    The conference was organized by the University of Copenhagen and Bio4Bio, a centre for development and implementation of biotechnology for bioenergy consisting of 8 Danish universities and companies. The conference was also coordinated with the International Energy Agency's two networks: Bioenergy Task 39 (commercializing liquid biofuels from biomass) and Task 42 (biorefineries). The conference was organized in the following sessions: Biorefineries seen from an ecological, economical and industrial point of view; Plants and biomass - input for the biorefinery; Biomass processing and pretreatment; Enzymatic hydrolysis in biorefineries; Sustainability; Fermentation technologies and systems biology; Biomass recalcitrance and conversion; Biorefinery technologies and integration; IEA Bioenergy Task 42; IEA Bioenergy Task 39; New materials and chemicals from biomass; Deployment of biorefinery technologies. The present report contains oral and poster abstracts, and most of them are indexed separately. (Author)

  6. Economic Risk Assessment of Early Stage Designs for Glycerol2Valorization in Biorefinery Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loureiro da Costa Lira Gargalo, Carina; Cheali, Peam; Posada, John A.;

    2016-01-01

    A systematic methodology to critically assess and screen among early stage design alternatives was developed for the use of glycerol. Through deterministic sensitivity analysis it was found that variations in the product and feedstock prices, total production cost, fixed capital investment...... (failure to achieve a positive NPV times the consequential profit loss). It was found that the best potential options for glycerol valorization is through the production of either (i) lactic acid (9 MM$ with 63% probability of failure to achieve a positive NPV); (ii) succinic acid (14 MM$ with 76......%); or finally, (iii) 1,2-propanediol (16 MM$ with 68%). As a risk reduction strategy, a multiproduct biorefinery is suggested which is capable of switching between the production of lactic acid and succinic acid. This solution comes with increased capital investment; however, it leads to more robust NPV...

  7. Hydrothermal pretreatments of macroalgal biomass for biorefineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz, Héctor A.; Rodríguez-Jasso, Rosa M.; Aguedo, Mario;

    2015-01-01

    in accordance with the integrated biorefineries. Furthermore, biorefinery concept requires processes that allow efficient utilization of all components of the biomass. The pretreatment step in a biorefinery is often based on hydrothermal principles of high temperatures in aqueous solution. Therefore......ecently, macroalgal biomass is gaining wide attention as an alternative in the production of biofuels (as bioetanol and biogas) and compounds with high added value with specific properties (antioxidants, anticoagulants, anti–inflammatories) for applications in food, medical and energy industries...

  8. Valorization of Sargassum muticum Biomass According to the Biorefinery Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa, Elena M; Moure, Andrés; Domínguez, Herminia

    2015-06-01

    The biorefinery concept integrates processes and technologies for an efficient biomass conversion using all components of a feedstock. Sargassum muticum is an invasive brown algae which could be regarded as a renewable resource susceptible of individual valorization of the constituent fractions into high added-value compounds. Microwave drying technology can be proposed before conventional ethanol extraction of algal biomass, and supercritical fluid extraction with CO2 was useful to extract fucoxanthin and for the fractionation of crude ethanol extracts. Hydrothermal processing is proposed to fractionate the algal biomass and to solubilize the fucoidan and phlorotannin fractions. Membrane technology was proposed to concentrate these fractions and obtain salt- and arsenic-free saccharidic fractions. Based on these technologies, this study presents a multipurpose process to obtain six different products with potential applications for nutraceutical, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:26110896

  9. Sustainability considerations for integrated biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azapagic, Adisa

    2014-01-01

    Integrated biorefineries have the potential to contribute towards sustainable production of transportation fuels, energy, and chemicals. However, because there are currently no commercial biorefining plants in operation, it is not clear how sustainable they really are. This paper sets out to examine key issues associated with biorefining that should be considered carefully along the whole supply chain to ensure sustainable development of the sector. PMID:24364880

  10. Swedish Pulp Mill Biorefineries. A vision of future possibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berntsson, Thore (Chamers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Axegaard, Peter; Backlund, Birgit; Samuelsson, Aasa; Berglin, Niklas; Lindgren, Karin (STFI-Packforsk, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-07-01

    Today, modern science could make it possible to develop techniques for refining almost the whole wood-matter, pulp mill side streams and bark compounds into platform chemicals, electricity, high quality fuels and structured feed-stock for chemicals and materials. The major challenge is to convert the state of basic scientific knowledge into industrial practise. Our definition of an integrated biorefinery is: 'Full utilization of the incoming biomass and other raw materials for simultaneous and economically optimized production of fibres, chemicals and energy'. Examples of products from a pulp mill biorefinery are: Chemicals and Materials (Phenols, adhesives, carbon fibres, activated carbon, binders, barriers, adhesives, antioxidants, surfactants, chelants, solvents, adhesives surfactants, descaling agents, specialty polymers, pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics etc., Biofuels (pellets, lignin fuel, methanol, DME, ethanol etc), Electricity (BLGCC, condensing power etc.). The new or increased amounts of traditional products can be made from internal and/or external biomass. Three different levels can be identified: A high degree of energy saving in future mills, especially chemical pulp mills, will lead to large amounts of excess internal biomass which can be transferred to products mentioned above, Components in e.g. the black liquor, forest residues and bark can be upgraded to more valuable ones and the energy balance of the mill is kept through fuel import, wholly or partly depending on the level of mill energy efficiency. This imported fuel can be biomass or other types. External (imported) biomass (in some cases together with excess internal biomass) can be upgraded using synergy effects of docking this upgrading to a pulp mill. Electricity has been included as one of the possible biorefinery products. The electricity production in a mill can be increased in several ways which cannot be directly considered as biorefineries, e.g. recovery boiler

  11. 75 FR 11840 - Biorefinery Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ..., 2008 (73 FR 70544). All loan guarantees will be made based upon the terms and conditions illustrated in... Rural Business-Cooperative Service Biorefinery Assistance Program AGENCY: Rural Business-Cooperative... is announcing a new application window to submit application for the Biorefinery Assistance...

  12. Biorefinery plant design, engineering and process optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Ehimen, Ehiazesebhor Augustine

    2014-01-01

    applicable for the planning and upgrading of intended biorefinery systems, and includes discussions on the operation of an existing lignocellulosic-based biorefinery platform. Furthermore, technical considerations and tools (i.e., process analytical tools) which could be applied to optimise the operations...

  13. Integrated Biorefineries: Biofuels, Biopower, and Bioproducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-05-06

    This fact sheet describes integrated biorefineries and the Program's work with them. A crucial step in developing the U.S. bioindustry is to establish integrated biorefineries capable of efficiently converting a broad range of biomass feedstocks into affordable biofuels, biopower, and other bioproducts.

  14. A biorefinery for mobility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacca, S; Moreira, J R

    2011-11-15

    Biofuels are considered as a carbon neutral alternative to hydrocarbons in the transport sector and this approach has triggered concerns about the impact the production of biofuels might have on land usage. Another option that might also lead to reduced emissions in the transport sector is electricity based on renewable energy sources such as biomass. Below, we assess the benefits and drawbacks of the joint production of ethanol and electricity in a sugar cane based refinery, and the use of both energy forms in privately owned automobiles. In this analysis, we have considered technology for energy production that is currently available and cost competitive. The results show that the amount of land that is required to power our current automobile use needs is less than what is typically stated. According to our results that are based on 2010 values, 2 million ha of land are sufficient to power the Brazilian automobile fleet, 25 million ha are enough to satisfy the needs of the U.S. fleet, and 67 million ha are sufficient to cover the global autofuel requirements. When minor efficiency gains are considered, 19 million ha will be enough to satisfy the fuel needs of the U.S. fleet in 2030, whereas land required to supply the Brazilian and global fleet remain basically unchanged. Our analysis shows that the harvested energy density of sugar cane is 306 GJ/ha/yr, which is 1.7 times the value usually reported in the literature for biofuels. As a result, taking advantage of the primary energy potential of sugar cane, only 4% of the world's available cropland area would be sufficient to produce fuels that would power the global car fleet.

  15. Anaerobic biorefinery: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatdeenarunat, Chayanon; Nguyen, Duc; Surendra, K C; Shrestha, Shilva; Rajendran, Karthik; Oechsner, Hans; Xie, Li; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been in use for many decades. To date, it has been primarily aimed at treating organic wastes, mainly manures and wastewater sludge, and industrial wastewaters. However, with the current advancements, a more open mind is required to look beyond these somewhat restricted original applications of AD. Biorefineries are such concepts, where multiple products including chemicals, fuels, polymers etc. are produced from organic feedstocks. The anaerobic biorefinery concept is now gaining increased attention, utilizing AD as the final disposal step. This review aims at evaluating the potential significance of anaerobic biorefineries, including types of feedstocks, uses for the produced energy, as well as sustainable applications of the generated residual digestate. A comprehensive analysis of various types of anaerobic biorefineries has been developed, including both large-scale and household level applications. Finally, future directives are highlighted showing how anaerobic biorefinery concept could impact the bioeconomy in the near future. PMID:27005786

  16. The Integrated Biorefinery: Conversion of Corn Fiber to Value-added Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susanne Kleff

    2007-03-24

    This presentation provides a summary of Michigan Biotechnology Institute's efforts to employ the corn fiber fraction of a dry grind ethanol plant as a feedstock to produce succinic acid which has potential as a building block intermediate for a wide range of commodity chemicals.

  17. Life cycle assessment of biofuels from an integrated Brazilian algae-sugarcane biorefinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugarcane ethanol biorefineries in Brazil produce carbon dioxide, electricity and heat as byproducts. These are essential inputs for algae biodiesel production. In this paper, we assessed ethanol's life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and fossil energy use produced in an integrated sugarcane and algae biorefinery where biodiesel replaces petroleum diesel for all agricultural operations. Carbon dioxide from cane juice fermentation is used as the carbon source for algae cultivation, and sugarcane bagasse is the sole source of energy for the entire facility. Glycerin produced from the biodiesel plant is consumed by algae during the mixotrophic growth phase. We assessed the uncertainties through a detailed Monte-Carlo analysis. We found that this integrated system can improve both the life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and the fossil energy use of sugarcane ethanol by around 10% and 50%, respectively, compared to a traditional Brazilian sugarcane ethanol distillery. - Highlights: • A high diesel consumption is associated to the ethanol sugarcane life-cycle. • Sugarcane industry can provide sources of carbon and energy for the algae growing. • The sugarcane-algae integration can improve the ethanol life-cycle performance. • This integration is a promising pathway for the deployment of algae biodiesel. • There are still significant techno-economic barriers associated with algae biodiesel

  18. Economically Viable Components from Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L. in a Biorefinery Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Johansson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biorefinery applications are receiving growing interest due to climatic and waste disposal issues and lack of petroleum resources. Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L. is suitable for biorefinery applications due to high biomass production and limited cultivation requirements. This paper focuses on the potential of Jerusalem artichoke as a biorefinery crop and the most viable products in such a case. The carbohydrates in the tubers were found to have potential for production of platform chemicals, e.g., succinic acid. However, economic analysis showed that production of platform chemicals as a single product was too expensive to be competitive with petrochemically produced sugars. Therefore, production of several products from the same crop is a must. Additional products are protein based ones from tubers and leaves and biogas from residues, although both are of low value and amount. High bioactive activity was found in the young leaves of the crop, and the sesquiterpene lactones are of specific interest, as other compounds from this group have shown inhibitory effects on several human diseases. Thus, future focus should be on understanding the usefulness of small molecules, to develop methods for their extraction and purification and to further develop sustainable and viable methods for the production of platform chemicals.

  19. Synthesis of carbon-14 labeled doxylamine succinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doxylamine succinate, N,N-dimethyl-2-[1-phenyl-1-(2-pyridinyl)-ethoxy]ethanamine succinate is an antihistamine used primarily as a sedative. Carbon-14 labeled doxylamine succinate, required for toxicological studies, was synthesized in two steps starting from 2-benzoyl pyridine. (author)

  20. 21 CFR 582.1091 - Succinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Succinic acid. 582.1091 Section 582.1091 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1091 Succinic acid. (a) Product. Succinic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  1. Solubility of α-Tocopheryl Succinate in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Using Offline HPLC-MS/MS Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hybertson, Brooks M.

    2007-01-01

    The solubility of the vitamin E-related compound α-tocopheryl succinate in supercritical carbon dioxide was measured at pressures ranging from (15.0 to 30.0) MPa and temperatures of (40 and 50) °C using a simple microsampling type apparatus with a 100.5 μL sample loop to remove aliquots and collect them in ethanol for off line analysis. α-Tocopheryl succinate concentrations in the collected samples were measured using HPLC-MS/MS analysis. The solubility of α-tocopheryl succinate in supercriti...

  2. Development of hemicelluloses biorefineries for integration into kraft pulp mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajao, Olumoye Abiodun

    The development and wide spread acceptance of production facilities for biofuels, biochemicals and biomaterials is an important condition for reducing reliance on limited fossil resources and transitioning towards a global biobased economy. Pulp and paper mills in North America are confronted with high energy prices, high production costs and intense competition from emerging economies and low demand for traditional products. Integrated forest biorefineries (IFBR) have been proposed as a mean to diversify their product streams, increase their revenue and become more sustainable. This is feasible because they have access to forest biomass, an established feedstock supply chain and wood processing experience. In addition, the integration of a biorefinery process that can share existing infrastructure and utilities on the site of pulp mill would significantly lower investment cost and associated risks. Kraft pulping mills are promising receptor processes for a biorefinery because they either possess a prehydrolysis step for extracting hemicelluloses sugars prior to wood pulping or it can be added by retrofit. The extracted hemicelluloses could be subsequently transformed into a wide range of value added products for the receptor mill. To successfully implement hemicelluloses biorefinery, novel processes that are technically and economically feasible are required. It is necessary to identify products that would be profitable, develop processes that are energy efficient and the receptor mill should be able to supply the energy, chemicals and material demands of the biorefinery unit. The objective of this thesis is to develop energy efficient and economically viable hemicelluloses biorefineries for integration into a Kraft pulping process. A dissolving pulp mill was the reference case study. The transformation of hemicellulosic sugars via a chemical and biochemical conversion pathway, with furfural and ethanol as representative products for each pathway was studied. In

  3. Kinetic analysis of bifidobacterial metabolism reveals a minor role for succinic acid in the regeneration of NAD+ through its growth-associated production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Meulen, Roel; Adriany, Tom; Verbrugghe, Kristof; De Vuyst, Luc

    2006-08-01

    Several strains belonging to the genus Bifidobacterium were tested to determine their abilities to produce succinic acid. Bifidobacterium longum strain BB536 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strain Bb 12 were kinetically analyzed in detail using in vitro fermentations to obtain more insight into the metabolism and production of succinic acid by bifidobacteria. Changes in end product formation in strains of Bifidobacterium could be related to the specific rate of sugar consumption. When the specific sugar consumption rate increased, relatively more lactic acid and less acetic acid, formic acid, and ethanol were produced, and vice versa. All Bifidobacterium strains tested produced small amounts of succinic acid; the concentrations were not more than a few millimolar. Succinic acid production was found to be associated with growth and stopped when the energy source was depleted. The production of succinic acid contributed to regeneration of a small part of the NAD+, in addition to the regeneration through the production of lactic acid and ethanol.

  4. AN EVOLUTION FROM PRETREATMENT TO FRACTIONATION WILL ENABLE SUCCESSFUL DEVELOPMENT OF THE INTEGRATED BIOREFINERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Bozell

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The current state of biorefinery development is focused almost entirely on the production of fuel ethanol. However, an ethanol-centric approach misses the crucial example set by the petrochemical industry. The ability to fractionate a raw material, rather than simply pretreating it, enables the parallel production of low value, high volume fuels and high value, low volume chemicals. By developing analogous fractionation processes for biomass, giving separate process streams of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, the biorefining industry will be able to recognize the synergistic advantages of producing both energy and profits.

  5. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Lignin-Rich Biorefinery Residues and Algae Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Jones, Susanne B.; Tjokro Rahardjo, Sandra A.

    2009-11-03

    This report describes the results of the work performed by PNNL using feedstock materials provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, KL Energy and Lignol lignocellulosic ethanol pilot plants. Test results with algae feedstocks provided by Genifuel, which provided in-kind cost share to the project, are also included. The work conducted during this project involved developing and demonstrating on the bench-scale process technology at PNNL for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of lignin-rich biorefinery residues and algae. A technoeconomic assessment evaluated the use of the technology for energy recovery in a lignocellulosic ethanol plant.

  6. Bioethanol production from Gracilaria verrucosa, a red alga, in a biorefinery approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Savindra; Gupta, Rishi; Kumar, Gaurav; Sahoo, Dinabandhu; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2013-05-01

    In this study, Gracilaria verrucosa, red seaweed has been used for production of agar and bioethanol. The algae harvested at various time durations resulted in extraction of ~27-33% agar. The leftover pulp was found to contain ~62-68% holocellulose, which on enzymatic hydrolysis yielded 0.87 g sugars/g cellulose. The enzymatic hydrolysate on fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced ethanol with an ethanol yield of 0.43 g/g sugars. The mass balance evaluation of the complete process demonstrates that developing biorefinery approach for exploiting Gracilaria verrucosa, a red alga, could be commercially viable.

  7. Research Progress of Zymomonas mobilis on Biorefinery System%运动发酵单胞菌在生物炼制中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何明雄; 吴波; 谭芙蓉; 王景丽; 税宗霞; 秦晗; 代立春; 胡启春

    2014-01-01

    Biorefinery technologies using lignocellulosic biomass as feedstock have become a hot topic and huge task in globle research and development,which are also an important goal of long-term biomass energy roadmap in both EU countries and the United States. However,the current overall level is still in pilot stage. China has abundant biomass resources, which has great potential in the production of biomass energy and bio-based chemicals,but also faces a lot of bottleneck problems to be solved in order to achieve commercial production. The lack of efficient fermentation strains simultaneously ferment cellulosic hydrolyzate, has become a key constraint in cellulosic biorefinery. Currently, Zymomonas mobilis has became a preferred host in cellulosic ethanol fermentation for its unique ED pathway. Z. mobilis also showed some advantages of higher specific rate of sugar uptake, etc.,which made it an ideal platform for commercial-scale production of desirable bio-products,such as sorbitol,gluconic acid, succinic acid and isobutanol. This paper reviewed the research history,molecular biology,strain improvement and its application in biorefinery system, and also put forwards that Z. mobilis could be considered as a noval important microbe platform of cellulosic biomass biorefinery system.%以木质纤维素生物质为原料的生物炼制技术已成为全球研发的热点和难点。欧盟国家和美国的中长期生物质能源发展路线图中均将木质纤维素生物炼制技术作为重要目标,但是目前整体水平尚处于中试阶段。我国的纤维素类生物质原料非常丰富,将其转化成燃料乙醇及生物基础化学品等具有较大的潜力,但当前要想实现商业化生产,还面临着很多瓶颈问题亟待解决。缺乏能够同时高效利用纤维素类水解物的发酵菌株,已成为纤维素生物质高效与高值转化的关键制约因素。运动发酵单胞菌是目前唯一一种通过ED途径兼性厌氧发酵

  8. Recovery of agricultural nutrients from biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Daniel E; Yang, Yu; McNamara, Patrick J; Mayer, Brooke K

    2016-09-01

    This review lays the foundation for why nutrient recovery must be a key consideration in design and operation of biorefineries and comprehensively reviews technologies that can be used to recover an array of nitrogen, phosphorus, and/or potassium-rich products of relevance to agricultural applications. Recovery of these products using combinations of physical, chemical, and biological operations will promote sustainability at biorefineries by converting low-value biomass (particularly waste material) into a portfolio of higher-value products. These products can include a natural partnering of traditional biorefinery outputs such as biofuels and chemicals together with nutrient-rich fertilizers. Nutrient recovery not only adds an additional marketable biorefinery product, but also avoids the negative consequences of eutrophication, and helps to close anthropogenic nutrient cycles, thereby providing an alternative to current unsustainable approaches to fertilizer production, which are energy-intensive and reliant on nonrenewable natural resource extraction. PMID:26948442

  9. Pyrolysis based bio-refinery for the production of bioethanol from demineralized ligno-cellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Luis; Westerhof, Roel; Van Rossum, Guus; Oudenhoven, Stijn; Kersten, Sascha; Berruti, Franco; Rehmann, Lars

    2014-06-01

    This paper evaluates a novel biorefinery approach for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass from pinewood. A combination of thermochemical and biochemical conversion was chosen with the main product being ethanol. Fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomasss with fractional condensation of the products was used as the thermochemical process to obtain a pyrolysis-oil rich in anhydro-sugars (levoglucosan) and low in inhibitors. After hydrolysis of these anhydro-sugars, glucose was obtained which was successfully fermented, after detoxification, to obtain bioethanol. Ethanol yields comparable to traditional biochemical processing were achieved (41.3% of theoretical yield based on cellulose fraction). Additional benefits of the proposed biorefinery concept comprise valuable by-products of the thermochemical conversion like bio-char, mono-phenols (production of BTX) and pyrolytic lignin as a source of aromatic rich fuel additive. The inhibitory effect of thermochemically derived fermentation substrates was quantified numerically to compare the effects of different process configurations and upgrading steps within the biorefinery approach. PMID:24681340

  10. Utilization of Ionic Liquids in Lignocellulose Biorefineries as Agents for Separation, Derivatization, Fractionation, or Pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleteiro, Susana; Rivas, Sandra; Alonso, José L; Santos, Valentín; Parajó, Juan C

    2015-09-23

    Ionic liquids (ILs) can play multiple roles in lignocellulose biorefineries, including utilization as agents for the separation of selected compounds or as reaction media for processing lignocellulosic materials (LCM). Imidazolium-based ILs have been proposed for separating target components from LCM biorefinery streams, for example, the dehydration of ethanol-water mixtures or the extractive separation of biofuels (ethanol, butanol) or lactic acid from the respective fermentation broths. As in other industries, ILs are potentially suitable for removing volatile organic compounds or carbon dioxide from gaseous biorefinery effluents. On the other hand, cellulose dissolution in ILs allows homogeneous derivatization reactions to be carried out, opening new ways for product design or for improving the quality of the products. Imidazolium-based ILs are also suitable for processing native LCM, allowing the integral benefit of the feedstocks via separation of polysaccharides and lignin. Even strongly lignified materials can yield cellulose-enriched substrates highly susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis upon ILs processing. Recent developments in enzymatic hydrolysis include the identification of ILs causing limited enzyme inhibition and the utilization of enzymes with improved performance in the presence of ILs.

  11. Economic Analysis of an Integrated Annatto Seeds-Sugarcane Biorefinery Using Supercritical CO2 Extraction as a First Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Q. Albarelli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE has been indicated to be utilized as part of a biorefinery, rather than as a stand-alone technology, since besides extracting added value compounds selectively it has been shown to have a positive effect on the downstream processing of biomass. To this extent, this work evaluates economically the encouraging experimental results regarding the use of SFE during annatto seeds valorization. Additionally, other features were discussed such as the benefits of enhancing the bioactive compounds concentration through physical processes and of integrating the proposed annatto seeds biorefinery to a hypothetical sugarcane biorefinery, which produces its essential inputs, e.g., CO2, ethanol, heat and electricity. For this, first, different configurations were modeled and simulated using the commercial simulator Aspen Plus® to determine the mass and energy balances. Next, each configuration was economically assessed using MATLAB. SFE proved to be decisive to the economic feasibility of the proposed annatto seeds-sugarcane biorefinery concept. SFE pretreatment associated with sequential fine particles separation process enabled higher bixin-rich extract production using low-pressure solvent extraction method employing ethanol, meanwhile tocotrienols-rich extract is obtained as a first product. Nevertheless, the economic evaluation showed that increasing tocotrienols-rich extract production has a more pronounced positive impact on the economic viability of the concept.

  12. Toward a common classification approach for biorefinery systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cherubini, F.; Jungmeier, G.; Wellisch, M.; Wilke, T.; Skiadas, I.; Ree, van R.; Jong, de E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with a biorefinery classification approach developed within International Energy Agency (IEA) Bioenergy Task 42. Since production of transportation biofuels is seen as the driving force for future biorefinery developments, a selection of the most interesting transportation biofuels

  13. Selective Conversion of Biorefinery Lignin into Dicarboxylic Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruoshui; Guo, Mond; Zhang, Xiao

    2014-02-01

    The emerging biomass-to-biofuel conversion industry has created an urgent need for identifying new applications for biorefinery lignin. This paper demonstrates a new route to producing dicarboxylic acids from biorefinery lignin through chalcopyrite-catalyzed oxidation in a highly selective process. Up to 95 % selectivity towards stable dicarboxylic acids was obtained for several types of biorefinery lignin and model compounds under mild, environmentally friendly reaction conditions. The findings from this study paved a new avenue to biorefinery lignin conversions and applications.

  14. Biorefineries – factories of the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kołtuniewicz Andrzej B.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Efforts were made to demonstrate that in biorefineries it is possible to manufacture all the commodities required for maintaining human civilisation on the current level. Biorefineries are based on processing biomass resulting from photosynthesis. From sugars, oils and proteins, a variety of food, feed, nutrients, pharmaceuticals, polymers, chemicals and fuels can further be produced. Production in biorefineries must be based on a few rules to fulfil sustainable development: all raw materials are derived from biomass, all products are biodegradable and production methods are in accordance with the principles of Green Chemistry and Clean Technology. The paper presents a summary of state-of-the-art concerning biorefineries, production methods and product range of leading companies in the world that are already implemented. Potential risks caused by the development of biorefineries, such as: insecurities of food and feed production, uncontrolled changes in global production profiles, monocultures, eutrophication, etc., were also highlighted in this paper. It was stressed that the sustainable development is not only an alternative point of view but is our condition to survive.

  15. Temporal and spatial variation in switchgrass biomass composition and theoretical ethanol yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on temporal and spatial variation in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) biomass composition as it affects ethanol yield (L Mg-1) at a biorefinery and ethanol production (L ha-1) at the field scale has previously not been available. Switchgrass biomass samples were collected from a region...

  16. Anaerobic digestion as final step of a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2010-01-01

    of suspended matter reduced the degradation efficiency. The retention time of the anaerobic system could be reduced from 70 to 7 h by additional removal of suspended matter by clarification. Implementation of the biogas production from the fermentation effluent accounted for about 30% higher carbon utilization...

  17. Biorefinery pulp mill - BiSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mielonen, K. [Lappeenranta University of Technology (Finland)], email: katriina.mielonen@lut.fi

    2012-07-01

    A need to utilize woody material in a more efficient way to produce pulp, biofuels and energy was seen as a key factor in the development of new pulp mill biorefineries. There are many alternatives to execute the biorefinery concept. In the Biorefinery Pulp Mill-project approached prehydrolysis of wood chips and acid hydrolysis of logging residue for the production of bioethanol, as well as the separation of lignin for the production of biodiesel were studied. The main goal of the project was to examine these new biofuel production methods and processes for the improvement of the competitiveness, energy effectiveness and economic profitability of domestic pulp mills, while keeping in mind the main product, chemical pulp.

  18. Modelling of the biorefinery scenarios - Bioscen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukkari, P. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)), e-mail: pertti.koukkari@vtt.fi; Alopaeus, V. (Aalto Univ., Espoo (Finland)), e-mail: ville.alopaeus@tkk.fi; Miettinen, K. (Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland)), e-mail: kaisa.miettinen@jyu.fi (and others)

    2011-11-15

    Bioscen project develops methods for modeling of biorefinery concepts. The project covers a range of approaches starting from collecting and predicting minute details of molecular properties of biorefining chemicals to optimizing energy efficiency and estimating the life cycle analysis of a complete production plant. The unit operations that are in the focus of the project are condensation of pyrolysis oil, chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass and microbial fermentation. The project develops surrogate-model based simulation and optimization of computationally demanding biorefinery scenarios. These metamodels are applied in flowsheet models of production plants in order to enable estimation of optimum for instance in terms of productivity, energy efficiency and running costs. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis for determining the most critical parameters in the process models is developed. As an example case of complete production process the project uses a concept of bark biorefinery to bioethanol and fine chemicals. (orig.)

  19. Succinic acid production from Jerusalem artichoke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur Bragi; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    In this work, A. succinogenes 130Z was used to produce succinic acid from Jerusalem artichoke tuber hydrolysate. Results showed that both fructose and glucose in the tuber hydrolysate were utilized for succinic acid production. The sugar utilization was found to be dependent on process control......, hence, when pH was fixed at 6.8 the sugar utilization of fructose was increased from 68.6% to 96.5% and the succinic acid production was also increased by 26.4% to yield 26.8 g/L succinic acid. In this study a one-step pretreatment/hydrolysis method was used where no enzymes were used. Our work suggests...... that Jerusalem artichoke tubers could be utilized for production of bio-succinic acid....

  20. Combined alkali and hydrothermal pretreatments for oat straw valorization within a biorefinery concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaní, Aloia; Tomaz, Pablo D; Garrote, Gil; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was the evaluation of lime pretreatment combined or not with previous step of autohydrolysis for oat straw valorization. Under selected conditions of lime pretreatment, 96% of glucan and 77% of xylan were recovered and 42% of delignification was achieved. Xylose fermentation to ethanol by metabolic engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae (MEC1133) strain improved the ethanol production by 22% achieving 41g/L. Alternatively, first step of autohydrolysis (S0=4.22) allowed a high oligosaccharides recovery (68%) and subsequent lime pretreatment attained a 57% of delignification and 99% of glucan to glucose conversion. Oat straw processed by autohydrolysis and lime pretreatment reached the maximal ethanol concentration (50g/L). Both strategies led to oat straw valorization into bioethanol, oligosaccharides and lignin indicating that these pretreatments are adequate as a first stage within an oat straw biorefinery. PMID:27591518

  1. Production of Succinic Acid for Lignocellulosic Hydrolysates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, B.H.; Nghiem, J.

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is to add and test new metabolic activities to existing microbial catalysts for the production of succinic acid from renewables. In particular, they seek to add to the existing organism the ability to utilize xylose efficiently and simultaneously with glucose in mixtures of sugars or to add succinic acid production to another strain and to test the value of this new capability for production of succinic acid from industrial lignocellulosic hydrolyasates. The Contractors and Participant are hereinafter jointly referred to as the 'Parties'. Research to date in succinic acid fermentation, separation and genetic engineering has resulted in a potentially economical process based on the use of an Escherichia coli strain AFP111 with suitable characteristics for the production of succinic acid from glucose. Economic analysis has shown that higher value commodity chemicals can be economically produced from succinic acid based on repliminary laboratory findings and predicted catalytic parameters. The initial target markets include succinic acid itself, succinate salts, esters and other derivatives for use as deicers, solvents and acidulants. The other commodity products from the succinic acid platform include 1,4-butanediol, {gamma}-butyrolactone, 2-pyrrolidinone and N-methyl pyrrolidinone. Current economic analyses indicate that this platform is competitive with existing petrochemical routes, especially for the succinic acid and derivatives. The report presents the planned CRADA objectives followed by the results. The results section has a combined biocatalysis and fermentation section and a commercialization section. This is a nonproprietary report; additional proprietary information may be made available subject to acceptance of the appropriate proprietary information agreements.

  2. Effects of Disruption Risks on Biorefinery Location Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Bai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available While ever-growing bio-ethanol production poses considerable challenges to the bioenergy supply chain, the risk of refinery operation disruptions further compromises the efficiency and reliability of the energy supply system. This paper applies discrete and continuous reliable facility location models to the design of reliable bio-ethanol supply chains so that the system can hedge against potential operational disruptions. The discrete model is shown to be suitable for obtaining the exact optimality for small or moderate instances, while the continuous model has superior computational tractability for large-scale applications. The impacts of both site-independent and dependent disruptions (i.e., due to flooding are analyzed in empirical case study for the State of Illinois (one of the main biomass supply states in the U.S.. The reliable solution is compared with a deterministic solution under the same setting. It is found that refinery disruptions, especially those site-dependent ones, affect both optimal refinery deployment and the supply chain cost. Sensitivity analysis is also conducted to show how refinery failure probability and fixed cost (for building biorefineries affect optimal supply chain configuration and the total expected system cost.

  3. Controlling accumulation of fermentation inhibitors in biorefinery recycle water using microbial fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnivetskaya Tatiana A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial fuel cells (MFC and microbial electrolysis cells are electrical devices that treat water using microorganisms and convert soluble organic matter into electricity and hydrogen, respectively. Emerging cellulosic biorefineries are expected to use large amounts of water during production of ethanol. Pretreatment of cellulosic biomass results in production of fermentation inhibitors which accumulate in process water and make the water recycle process difficult. Use of MFCs to remove the inhibitory sugar and lignin degradation products from recycle water is investigated in this study. Results Use of an MFC to reduce the levels of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, vanillic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxyacetophenone while simultaneously producing electricity is demonstrated here. An integrated MFC design approach was used which resulted in high power densities for the MFC, reaching up to 3700 mW/m2 (356 W/m3 net anode volume and a coulombic efficiency of 69%. The exoelectrogenic microbial consortium enriched in the anode was characterized using a 16S rRNA clone library method. A unique exoelectrogenic microbial consortium dominated by δ-Proteobacteria (50%, along with β-Proteobacteria (28%, α-Proteobacteria (14%, γ-Proteobacteria (6% and others was identified. The consortium demonstrated broad substrate specificity, ability to handle high inhibitor concentrations (5 to 20 mM with near complete removal, while maintaining long-term stability with respect to power production. Conclusion Use of MFCs for removing fermentation inhibitors has implications for: 1 enabling higher ethanol yields at high biomass loading in cellulosic ethanol biorefineries, 2 improved water recycle and 3 electricity production up to 25% of total biorefinery power needs.

  4. Simulating Pelletization Strategies to Reduce the Biomass Supply Risk at America’s Biorefineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Shane Carnohan; Andrew Ford; Allyson Beall

    2014-07-01

    Demand for cellulosic ethanol and other advanced biofuels has been on the rise, due in part to federal targets enacted in 2005 and extended in 2007. The industry faces major challenges in meeting these worthwhile and ambitious targets. The challenges are especially severe in the logistics of timely feedstock delivery to biorefineries. Logistical difficulties arise from seasonal production that forces the biomass to be stored in uncontrolled field-side environments. In this storage format physical difficulties arise; transportation is hindered by the low bulk density of baled biomass and the unprotected material can decay leading to unpredictable losses. Additionally, uncertain yields and contractual difficulties can exacerbate these challenges making biorefineries a high-risk venture. Investors’ risk could limit business entry and prevent America from reaching the targets. This paper explores pelletizer strategies to convert the lignocellulosic biomass into a denser form more suitable for storage. The densification of biomass would reduce supply risks, and the new system would outperform conventional biorefinery supply systems. Pelletizer strategies exhibit somewhat higher costs, but the reduction in risk is well worth the extra cost if America is to grow the advanced biofuels industry in a sustainable manner.

  5. Lignin pyrolysis for profitable lignocellulosic biorefineries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, de P.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Bio-based industries (pulp and paper and biorefineries) produce > 50 Mt/yr of lignin that results from fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass. Lignin is world's second biopolymer and a major potential source for production of performance materials and aromatic chemicals. Lignin valorization is

  6. 2009 Integrated Biorefinery Platform Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, John [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program‘s Integrated Biorefinery (IBR) platform review meeting, held on February 18–19, 2009, at the Westin National Harbor, National Harbor, Maryland.

  7. Biorefinery and Carbon Cycling Research Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, K. C., Adams; Thomas, T; Eiteman, Mark A; Kastner, James R; Mani, Sudhagar; Adolphson, Ryan

    2012-06-08

    In this project we focused on several aspects of technology development that advances the formation of an integrated biorefinery. These focus areas include: [ 1] pretreatment of biomass to enhance quality of products from thermochemical conversion; [2] characterization of and development of coproduct uses; [3] advancement in fermentation of lignocellulosics and particularly C5 and C6 sugars simultaneously, and [ 4] development of algal biomass as a potential substrate for the biorefinery. These advancements are intended to provide a diverse set of product choices within the biorefinery, thus improving the cost effectiveness of the system. Technical effectiveness was demonstrated in the thermochemical product quality in the form of lower tar production, simultaneous of use of multiple sugars in fermentation, use ofbiochar in environmental (ammonia adsorption) and agricultural applications, and production of algal biomass in wastewaters. Economic feasibility of algal biomass production systems seems attractive, relative to the other options. However, further optimization in all paths, and testing/demonstration at larger scales are required to fully understand the economic viabilities. The coproducts provide a clear picture that multiple streams of value can be generated within an integrated biorefinery, and these include fuels and products.

  8. Biorefinery of proteins from rubber plantation residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widyarani, R.

    2016-01-01

    Biorefinery of rubber tree side streams could add economic value and income for farmers, who already grow the trees for latex production. The objective of this research was to design a process for the recovery of proteinaceous fractions from rubber tree. The aimed applications were expected to be su

  9. Biorefinery and Hydrogen Fuel Cell Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.C. Das; Thomas T. Adams; Mark A. Eiteman; John Stickney; Joy Doran Peterson; James R. Kastner; Sudhagar Mani; Ryan Adolphson

    2012-06-12

    In this project we focused on several aspects of technology development that advances the formation of an integrated biorefinery. These focus areas include: [1] establishment of pyrolysis processing systems and characterization of the product oils for fuel applications, including engine testing of a preferred product and its pro forma economic analysis; [2] extraction of sugars through a novel hotwater extaction process, and the development of levoglucosan (a pyrolysis BioOil intermediate); [3] identification and testing of the use of biochar, the coproduct from pyrolysis, for soil applications; [4] developments in methods of atomic layer epitaxy (for efficient development of coatings as in fuel cells); [5] advancement in fermentation of lignocellulosics, [6] development of algal biomass as a potential substrate for the biorefinery, and [7] development of catalysts from coproducts. These advancements are intended to provide a diverse set of product choices within the biorefinery, thus improving the cost effectiveness of the system. Technical effectiveness was demonstrated in the pyrolysis biooil based diesel fuel supplement, sugar extraction from lignocelluose, use of biochar, production of algal biomass in wastewaters, and the development of catalysts. Economic feasibility of algal biomass production systems seems attractive, relative to the other options. However, further optimization in all paths, and testing/demonstration at larger scales are required to fully understand the economic viabilities. The various coproducts provide a clear picture that multiple streams of value can be generated within an integrated biorefinery, and these include fuels and products.

  10. 78 FR 60822 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Biorefinery Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Rural Business-Cooperative Service Notice of Funding Availability for the Biorefinery Assistance Program... Biorefinery Assistance Program (the ``Program'') to provide guaranteed loans for the development and... Programs, Energy Division, Attention: Biorefinery Assistance Program, 1400 Independence Avenue SW.,...

  11. Downstream processing of biotechnological produced succinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ke-Ke; Zhao, Xue-Bing; Zeng, Jing; Wu, Ru-Chun; Xu, Yun-Zhen; Liu, De-Hua; Zhang, Jian-An

    2012-08-01

    Succinic acid is a promising chemical which has a wide range of applications and can be biologically produced. The separation of succinic acid from fermentation broth makes more than 50 % of the total costs in their microbial production. This review summarizes the present state of methods studied for the recovery and purification of biologically produced succinate. Previous studies on the separation of succinic acid primarily include direct crystallization, precipitation, membrane separation, extraction, chromatography, and in situ separation. No single method has proved to be simple and efficient, and improvements are especially needed with regard to yield, purity, and energy consumption. It is argued that separation technologies coupled with upstream technology, in situ product removal, and biorefining strategy deserve more attentions in the future. PMID:22707056

  12. Role of succinic acid in chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1982-01-01

    Succinic acid is converted into other carboxylic acids by ionizing radiation. The results obtained have been correlated with the ready formation of this compound in prebiotic experiments. Its role in biological systems may be related to its prebiotic occurrence.

  13. Development of efficient, integrated cellulosic biorefineries : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teh, Kwee-Yan; Hecht, Ethan S.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Buffleben, George M.; Dibble, Dean C.; Lutz, Andrew E.

    2010-09-01

    Cellulosic ethanol, generated from lignocellulosic biomass sources such as grasses and trees, is a promising alternative to conventional starch- and sugar-based ethanol production in terms of potential production quantities, CO{sub 2} impact, and economic competitiveness. In addition, cellulosic ethanol can be generated (at least in principle) without competing with food production. However, approximately 1/3 of the lignocellulosic biomass material (including all of the lignin) cannot be converted to ethanol through biochemical means and must be extracted at some point in the biochemical process. In this project we gathered basic information on the prospects for utilizing this lignin residue material in thermochemical conversion processes to improve the overall energy efficiency or liquid fuel production capacity of cellulosic biorefineries. Two existing pretreatment approaches, soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) and the Arkenol (strong sulfuric acid) process, were implemented at Sandia and used to generated suitable quantities of residue material from corn stover and eucalyptus feedstocks for subsequent thermochemical research. A third, novel technique, using ionic liquids (IL) was investigated by Sandia researchers at the Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI), but was not successful in isolating sufficient lignin residue. Additional residue material for thermochemical research was supplied from the dilute-acid simultaneous saccharification/fermentation (SSF) pilot-scale process at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The high-temperature volatiles yields of the different residues were measured, as were the char combustion reactivities. The residue chars showed slightly lower reactivity than raw biomass char, except for the SSF residue, which had substantially lower reactivity. Exergy analysis was applied to the NREL standard process design model for thermochemical ethanol production and from a prototypical dedicated biochemical process, with process data

  14. Carbon recovery by fermentation of CO-rich off gases - Turning steel mills into biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molitor, Bastian; Richter, Hanno; Martin, Michael E; Jensen, Rasmus O; Juminaga, Alex; Mihalcea, Christophe; Angenent, Largus T

    2016-09-01

    Technological solutions to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from anthropogenic sources are required. Heavy industrial processes, such as steel making, contribute considerably to GHG emissions. Fermentation of carbon monoxide (CO)-rich off gases with wild-type acetogenic bacteria can be used to produce ethanol, acetate, and 2,3-butanediol, thereby, reducing the carbon footprint of heavy industries. Here, the processes for the production of ethanol from CO-rich off gases are discussed and a perspective on further routes towards an integrated biorefinery at a steel mill is given. Recent achievements in genetic engineering as well as integration of other biotechnology platforms to increase the product portfolio are summarized. Already, yields have been increased and the portfolio of products broadened. To develop a commercially viable process, however, the extraction from dilute product streams is a critical step and alternatives to distillation are discussed. Finally, another critical step is waste(water) treatment with the possibility to recover resources. PMID:27095410

  15. Integration of Biorefineries and Nuclear Cogeneration Power Plants - A Preliminary Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

    2009-03-01

    Biomass-based ethanol and nuclear power are two viable elements in the path to U.S. energy independence. Numerous studies suggest nuclear power could provide a practical carbon-free heat source alternative for the production of biomass-based ethanol. In order for this coupling to occur, it is necessary to examine the interfacial requirements of both nuclear power plants and bioethanol refineries. This report describes the proposed characteristics of a small cogeneration nuclear power plant, a biochemical process-based cellulosic bioethanol refinery, and a thermochemical process-based cellulosic biorefinery. Systemic and interfacial issues relating to the co-location of either type of bioethanol facility with a nuclear power plant are presented and discussed. Results indicate future co-location efforts will require a new optimized energy strategy focused on overcoming the interfacial challenges identified in the report.

  16. Biorefinery: a design tool for molecular gelators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, George; Shankar, Balachandran Vijai; Jadhav, Swapnil R; Vemula, Praveen Kumar

    2010-12-01

    Molecular gels, the macroscopic products of a nanoscale bottom-up strategy, have emerged as a promising functional soft material. The prospects of tailoring the architecture of gelator molecules have led to the formation of unique, highly tunable gels for a wide spectrum of applications from medicine to electronics. Biorefinery is a concept that integrates the processes of converting biomass/renewable feedstock and the associated infrastructure used to produce chemicals and materials, which is analogous to petroleum-based refinery. The current review assimilates the successful efforts to demonstrate the prospects of the biorefinery concept for developing new amphiphiles as molecular gelators. Amphiphiles based on naturally available raw materials such as amygdalin, vitamin C, cardanol, arjunolic acid, and trehalose that possess specific functionality were synthesized using biocatalysis and/or chemical synthesis. The hydrogels and organogels obtained from such amphiphiles were conceptually demonstrated for diverse applications including drug-delivery systems and the templated synthesis of hybrid materials. PMID:20465204

  17. Crystal structure of the bis(cyclohexylammonium succinate succinic acid salt adduct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modou Sarr

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title salt adduct, 2C6H14N+·C4H4O42−·C4H6O4, consists of two cyclohexylammonium cations, one succcinate dianion and one neutral succinic acid molecule. Succinate dianions and succinic acid molecules are self-assembled head-to-tail through O—H...O hydrogen bonds and adopt a syn–syn configuration, leading to a strand-like arrangement along [101]. The cyclohexylammonium cations have a chair conformation and act as multidentate hydrogen-bond donors linking adjacent strands through intermolecular N—H...O interactions to both the succinate and the succinic acid components. This results in two-dimensional supramolecular layered structures lying parallel to (010.

  18. Hemicellulose biorefineries: a review on biomass pretreatments

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalheiro, Florbela; Duarte, Luís C.; Gírio, Francisco M.

    2008-01-01

    Biomass pretreatment (BP) plays a crucial role in a lignocellulose feedstock-based biorefinery (LCFBR) for processing of three major output streams (cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin) into chemicals and biofuels. BP includes processing of lignocellulosic material (LCM) under aqueous, dilute acid or alkaline media to obtain a cellulosic fraction, which is then fermented to produce bioethanol. Hemicellulose is usually treated as a secondary stream due to lack of efficient fermentation of hem...

  19. BIORAF – Biorefinery Research Centre of Competence

    OpenAIRE

    Topka, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    The project, which started in 2012, creates an interdisciplinary center with high innovation potential for sustainable utilization of renewable sources, and will bring the Czech Republic to the leading position in next-generation biorefinery within next eight years. The project links the private sector with experts from different fields of science (e.g., biosciences, phycology, analytical chemistry, enzymology, microbiology, chemical and biochemical engineering, material engineering, etc.).

  20. Process design and economic analysis of a citrus waste biorefinery with biofuels and limonene as products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrasbi, Mehdi; Pourbafrani, Mohammad; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2010-10-01

    Process design and economic analysis of a biorefinery for the treatment of citrus wastes (CW) at different capacities was carried out. The CW is hydrolyzed using dilute sulfuric acid and then further processed to produce limonene, ethanol and biogas. The total cost of ethanol for base case process with 100,000 tons/year CW capacity was calculated as 0.91 USD/L, assuming 10 USD/ton handling and transportation cost of CW to the plant. However, this price is sensitive to the plant capacity. With constant price of methane and limonene, changing the plant capacity from 25,000 to 400,000 tons CW per year results in reducing ethanol costs from 2.55 to 0.46 USD/L in an economically feasible process. In addition, the ethanol production cost is sensitive to the transportation cost of CW. Increasing this cost from 10 to 30 USD/ton for the base case results in increasing the ethanol costs from 0.91 to 1.42 USD/L. PMID:20488693

  1. Final Technical Report: Improvement of Zymomonas mobilis for Commercial Use in Corn-based Biorefineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitz, William D.

    2010-12-07

    Between 2007 and 2010 DuPont conducted a program under DOE award DE-FC36-07GO17056 to develop and improve Zymomonas mobilis as an ethanologen for commercial use in biorefineries to produce cellulosic ethanol. This program followed upon an earlier DOE funded program in which DuPont, in collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) had developed a Zymomonas strain in conjunction with the development of an integrated cellulosic ethanol process. In the current project, we sought to maximize the utility of Zymomonas by adding the pathway to allow fermentation of the minor sugar arabinose, improve the utilization of xylose, improve tolerance to process hydrolysate and reduce the cost of producing the ethanologen. We undertook four major work streams to address these tasks, employing a range of approaches including genetic engineering, adaptation, metabolite and pathway analysis and fermentation process development. Through this project, we have developed a series of strains with improved characteristics versus the starting strain, and demonstrated robust scalability to at least the 200L scale. By a combination of improved ethanol fermentation yield and titer as well as reduced seed train costs, we have been able to reduce the capital investment and minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) by approximately 8.5% and 11% respectively vs. our starting point. Furthermore, the new strains we have developed, coupled with the learnings of this program, provide a platform for further strain improvements and advancement of cellulosic ethanol technology.

  2. Biorefineries. Prerequisite for the realization of a future bioeconomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagemann, K. [DECHEMA e.V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The current discussion on how to establish a bioeconomy aims in particular at a significant increase of the share of renewable raw materials in the feedstock pool for the production of chemicals and materials; this share currently is around 12%. Such products can be intermediate chemicals, presently already produced from petroleum. Other chemicals, which can be components of new value chains, are also being discussed. In addition materials like biopolymers are already used directly in consumer goods. These considerations imply a higher demand on renewable raw materials especially from plants. Biorefineries will play an important role in meeting this demand. The German Government has decided to draw up a roadmap being established by a group of independent experts from industry and academia. This roadmap describes in a systematic way status and perspectives of the different biorefinery concepts. It takes economic and ecological aspects into considerations and analyses the R and D demand. The following definition is taken as a basis for the analysis: 'A biorefinery is characterised by having a dedicated, integrative overall approach, using biomass as a versatile raw material source for the sustainable production of a spectrum of different intermediates and marketable products (chemicals, materials, bioenergy and food/feed co-products) by using the biomass components as complete as possible.' The analysis considers the following promising concepts: - Sugar biorefinery and Starch biorefinery; - Plant oil biorefinery including Algae lipid biorefinery; - Lignocellulose (Cellulose/Hemicellulose/Lignin) biorefinery including Green (green fibre/green juice) biorefinery; - Synthesis gas biorefinery; - Biogas biorefinery. The roadmap analyses the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the different concepts. For several specific examples preliminary economical and ecological assessment were carried out. The lecture will also give examples how these

  3. Solubility of α-Tocopheryl Succinate in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Using Offline HPLC-MS/MS Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybertson, Brooks M

    2007-05-01

    The solubility of the vitamin E-related compound α-tocopheryl succinate in supercritical carbon dioxide was measured at pressures ranging from (15.0 to 30.0) MPa and temperatures of (40 and 50) °C using a simple microsampling type apparatus with a 100.5 μL sample loop to remove aliquots and collect them in ethanol for off line analysis. α-Tocopheryl succinate concentrations in the collected samples were measured using HPLC-MS/MS analysis. The solubility of α-tocopheryl succinate in supercritical carbon dioxide ranged from mole fractions of 0.28 × 10(-5) at 15.0 MPa and 50 °C to 2.56 × 10(-5) at 30.0 MPa and 50 °C.

  4. Physical Energy Accounting in California: A Case Study of Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coughlin, Katie; Fridley, David

    2008-07-17

    California's target for greenhouse gas reduction in part relies on the development of viable low-carbon fuel alternatives to gasoline. It is often assumed that cellulosic ethanol--ethanol made from the structural parts of a plant and not from the food parts--will be one of these alternatives. This study examines the physical viability of a switchgrass-based cellulosic ethanol industry in California from the point of view of the physical requirements of land, water, energy and other material use. Starting from a scenario in which existing irrigated pastureland and fiber-crop land is converted to switchgrass production, the analysis determines the total acreage and water supply available and the resulting total biofuel feedstock output under different assumed yields. The number and location of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries that can be supported is also determined, assuming that the distance from field to biorefinery would be minimized. The biorefinery energy input requirement, available energy from the fraction of biomass not converted to ethanol, and energy output is calculated at various levels of ethanol yields, making different assumptions about process efficiencies. The analysis shows that there is insufficient biomass (after cellulose separation and fermentation into ethanol) to provide all the process energy needed to run the biorefinery; hence, the purchase of external energy such as natural gas is required to produce ethanol from switchgrass. The higher the yield of ethanol, the more external energy is needed, so that the net gains due to improved process efficiency may not be positive. On 2.7 million acres of land planted in switchgrass in this scenario, the switchgrass outputproduces enough ethanol to substitute for only 1.2 to 4.0percent of California's gasoline consumption in 2007.

  5. Life cycle greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol, biomethane and limonene production from citrus waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourbafrani, Mohammad; McKechnie, Jon; MacLean, Heather L.; Saville, Bradley A.

    2013-03-01

    The production of biofuel from cellulosic residues can have both environmental and financial benefits. A particular benefit is that it can alleviate competition for land conventionally used for food and feed production. In this research, we investigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of ethanol, biomethane, limonene and digestate from citrus waste, a byproduct of the citrus processing industry. The study represents the first life cycle-based evaluations of citrus waste biorefineries. Two biorefinery configurations are studied—a large biorefinery that converts citrus waste into ethanol, biomethane, limonene and digestate, and a small biorefinery that converts citrus waste into biomethane, limonene and digestate. Ethanol is assumed to be used as E85, displacing gasoline as a light-duty vehicle fuel; biomethane displaces natural gas for electricity generation, limonene displaces acetone in solvents, and digestate from the anaerobic digestion process displaces synthetic fertilizer. System expansion and two allocation methods (energy, market value) are considered to determine emissions of co-products. Considerable GHG reductions would be achieved by producing and utilizing the citrus waste-based products in place of the petroleum-based or other non-renewable products. For the large biorefinery, ethanol used as E85 in light-duty vehicles results in a 134% reduction in GHG emissions compared to gasoline-fueled vehicles when applying a system expansion approach. For the small biorefinery, when electricity is generated from biomethane rather than natural gas, GHG emissions are reduced by 77% when applying system expansion. The life cycle GHG emissions vary substantially depending upon biomethane leakage rate, feedstock GHG emissions and the method to determine emissions assigned to co-products. Among the process design parameters, the biomethane leakage rate is critical, and the ethanol produced in the large biorefinery would not meet EISA

  6. Life cycle greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol, biomethane and limonene production from citrus waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of biofuel from cellulosic residues can have both environmental and financial benefits. A particular benefit is that it can alleviate competition for land conventionally used for food and feed production. In this research, we investigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of ethanol, biomethane, limonene and digestate from citrus waste, a byproduct of the citrus processing industry. The study represents the first life cycle-based evaluations of citrus waste biorefineries. Two biorefinery configurations are studied—a large biorefinery that converts citrus waste into ethanol, biomethane, limonene and digestate, and a small biorefinery that converts citrus waste into biomethane, limonene and digestate. Ethanol is assumed to be used as E85, displacing gasoline as a light-duty vehicle fuel; biomethane displaces natural gas for electricity generation, limonene displaces acetone in solvents, and digestate from the anaerobic digestion process displaces synthetic fertilizer. System expansion and two allocation methods (energy, market value) are considered to determine emissions of co-products. Considerable GHG reductions would be achieved by producing and utilizing the citrus waste-based products in place of the petroleum-based or other non-renewable products. For the large biorefinery, ethanol used as E85 in light-duty vehicles results in a 134% reduction in GHG emissions compared to gasoline-fueled vehicles when applying a system expansion approach. For the small biorefinery, when electricity is generated from biomethane rather than natural gas, GHG emissions are reduced by 77% when applying system expansion. The life cycle GHG emissions vary substantially depending upon biomethane leakage rate, feedstock GHG emissions and the method to determine emissions assigned to co-products. Among the process design parameters, the biomethane leakage rate is critical, and the ethanol produced in the large biorefinery would not meet EISA

  7. Downstream processing of Isochrysis galbana: a step towards microalgal biorefinery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert-López, B.; Mendiola, J.A.; Fontecha, J.; Broek, van den L.A.M.; Sijtsma, L.; Cifuentes, A.; Herrero, M.; Ibáñez, E.

    2015-01-01

    An algae-based biorefinery relies on the efficient use of algae biomass through its fractionation of several valuable/bioactive compounds that can be used in industry. If this biorefinery includes green platforms as downstream processing technologies able to fulfill the requirements of green chemist

  8. 77 FR 5232 - Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for Repowering Assistance Payments to Eligible Biorefineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    .... Amount of payments. The Agency will determine the amount of payments to be made to a biorefinery by taking into consideration the percentage reduction in fossil fuel used by the biorefinery (including the... individual biorefinery can receive. The maximum amount an individual biorefinery can receive under...

  9. 2-Amino-5-bromopyridinium hydrogen succinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoong-Kun Fun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C5H6BrN2+·C4H5O4−, the pyridine N atom of the 2-amino-5-bromopyridine molecule is protonated. The protonated N atom and the amino group are linked via N—H...O hydrogen bonds to the carboxylate O atoms of the singly deprotonated succinate anion. The hydrogen succinate anions are linked via O—H...O hydrogen bonds. A weak intermolecular C—H...O hydrogen bond is also observed.

  10. Recovery of succinic acid from fermentation broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzrock, Tanja; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2010-03-01

    Succinic acid is of high interest as bio-feedstock for the chemical industry. It is a precursor for a variety of many other chemicals, e.g. 1,4-butandiol, tetrahydrofuran, biodegradable polymers and fumaric acid. Besides optimized production strains and fermentation processes it is indispensable to develop cost-saving and energy-effective downstream processes to compete with the current petrochemical production process. Various methods such as precipitation, sorption and ion exchange, electrodialysis, and liquid-liquid extraction have been investigated for the recovery of succinic acid from fermentation broth and are reviewed critically here. PMID:19898782

  11. Biomass supply chain optimisation for Organosolv-based biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarola, Sara; Patel, Mayank; Shah, Nilay

    2014-05-01

    This work aims at providing a Mixed Integer Linear Programming modelling framework to help define planning strategies for the development of sustainable biorefineries. The up-scaling of an Organosolv biorefinery was addressed via optimisation of the whole system economics. Three real world case studies were addressed to show the high-level flexibility and wide applicability of the tool to model different biomass typologies (i.e. forest fellings, cereal residues and energy crops) and supply strategies. Model outcomes have revealed how supply chain optimisation techniques could help shed light on the development of sustainable biorefineries. Feedstock quality, quantity, temporal and geographical availability are crucial to determine biorefinery location and the cost-efficient way to supply the feedstock to the plant. Storage costs are relevant for biorefineries based on cereal stubble, while wood supply chains present dominant pretreatment operations costs.

  12. Microbiota-Produced Succinate Improves Glucose Homeostasis via Intestinal Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vadder, Filipe; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Zitoun, Carine; Duchampt, Adeline; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Mithieux, Gilles

    2016-07-12

    Beneficial effects of dietary fiber on glucose and energy homeostasis have long been described, focusing mostly on the production of short-chain fatty acids by the gut commensal bacteria. However, bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber also produces large amounts of succinate and, to date, no study has focused on the role of succinate on host metabolism. Here, we fed mice a fiber-rich diet and found that succinate was the most abundant carboxylic acid in the cecum. Dietary succinate was identified as a substrate for intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN), a process that improves glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, dietary succinate improved glucose and insulin tolerance in wild-type mice, but those effects were absent in mice deficient in IGN. Conventional mice colonized with the succinate producer Prevotella copri exhibited metabolic benefits, which could be related to succinate-activated IGN. Thus, microbiota-produced succinate is a previously unsuspected bacterial metabolite improving glycemic control through activation of IGN. PMID:27411015

  13. 21 CFR 172.275 - Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Coatings, Films and Related Substances § 172.275 Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives. Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives identified in this section may be...

  14. Production of fermentable sugars from corn fiber using soaking in aqueous ammonia (saa) pretreatment and fermentation to succinic acid by Escherichia coli afp184

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conversion of corn fiber (CF), a by-product from the corn-to-ethanol conversion process, into fermentable sugar and succinic acid was investigated using soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) pretreatment followed by biological conversions including enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation using genetically ...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1091 - Succinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Succinic acid. 184.1091 Section 184.1091 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS §...

  16. Biodiesel biorefinery: opportunities and challenges for microbial production of fuels and chemicals from glycerol waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida João R M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The considerable increase in biodiesel production worldwide in the last 5 years resulted in a stoichiometric increased coproduction of crude glycerol. As an excess of crude glycerol has been produced, its value on market was reduced and it is becoming a “waste-stream” instead of a valuable “coproduct”. The development of biorefineries, i.e. production of chemicals and power integrated with conversion processes of biomass into biofuels, has been singled out as a way to achieve economically viable production chains, valorize residues and coproducts, and reduce industrial waste disposal. In this sense, several alternatives aimed at the use of crude glycerol to produce fuels and chemicals by microbial fermentation have been evaluated. This review summarizes different strategies employed to produce biofuels and chemicals (1,3-propanediol, 2,3-butanediol, ethanol, n-butanol, organic acids, polyols and others by microbial fermentation of glycerol. Initially, the industrial use of each chemical is briefly presented; then we systematically summarize and discuss the different strategies to produce each chemical, including selection and genetic engineering of producers, and optimization of process conditions to improve yield and productivity. Finally, the impact of the developments obtained until now are placed in perspective and opportunities and challenges for using crude glycerol to the development of biodiesel-based biorefineries are considered. In conclusion, the microbial fermentation of glycerol represents a remarkable alternative to add value to the biodiesel production chain helping the development of biorefineries, which will allow this biofuel to be more competitive.

  17. Biohydrogen, biomethane and bioelectricity as crucial components of biorefinery of organic wastes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor M; Munoz-Paez, Karla M; Escamilla-Alvarado, Carlos; Robledo-Narváez, Paula N; Ponce-Noyola, M Teresa; Calva-Calva, Graciano; Ríos-Leal, Elvira; Galíndez-Mayer, Juvencio; Estrada-Vázquez, Carlos; Ortega-Clemente, Alfredo; Rinderknecht-Seijas, Noemí F

    2014-05-01

    Biohydrogen is a sustainable form of energy as it can be produced from organic waste through fermentation processes involving dark fermentation and photofermentation. Very often biohydrogen is included as a part of biorefinery approaches, which reclaim organic wastes that are abundant sources of renewable and low cost substrate that can be efficiently fermented by microorganisms. The aim of this work was to critically assess selected bioenergy alternatives from organic solid waste, such as biohydrogen and bioelectricity, to evaluate their relative advantages and disadvantages in the context of biorefineries, and finally to indicate the trends for future research and development. Biorefining is the sustainable processing of biomass into a spectrum of marketable products, which means: energy, materials, chemicals, food and feed. Dark fermentation of organic wastes could be the beach-head of complete biorefineries that generate biohydrogen as a first step and could significantly influence the future of solid waste management. Series systems show a better efficiency than one-stage process regarding substrate conversion to hydrogen and bioenergy. The dark fermentation also produces fermented by-products (fatty acids and solvents), so there is an opportunity for further combining with other processes that yield more bioenergy. Photoheterotrophic fermentation is one of them: photosynthetic heterotrophs, such as non-sulfur purple bacteria, can thrive on the simple organic substances produced in dark fermentation and light, to give more H2. Effluents from photoheterotrophic fermentation and digestates can be processed in microbial fuel cells for bioelectricity production and methanogenic digestion for methane generation, thus integrating a diverse block of bioenergies. Several digestates from bioenergies could be used for bioproducts generation, such as cellulolytic enzymes and saccharification processes, leading to ethanol fermentation (another bioenergy), thus completing

  18. Biohydrogen, biomethane and bioelectricity as crucial components of biorefinery of organic wastes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor M; Munoz-Paez, Karla M; Escamilla-Alvarado, Carlos; Robledo-Narváez, Paula N; Ponce-Noyola, M Teresa; Calva-Calva, Graciano; Ríos-Leal, Elvira; Galíndez-Mayer, Juvencio; Estrada-Vázquez, Carlos; Ortega-Clemente, Alfredo; Rinderknecht-Seijas, Noemí F

    2014-05-01

    Biohydrogen is a sustainable form of energy as it can be produced from organic waste through fermentation processes involving dark fermentation and photofermentation. Very often biohydrogen is included as a part of biorefinery approaches, which reclaim organic wastes that are abundant sources of renewable and low cost substrate that can be efficiently fermented by microorganisms. The aim of this work was to critically assess selected bioenergy alternatives from organic solid waste, such as biohydrogen and bioelectricity, to evaluate their relative advantages and disadvantages in the context of biorefineries, and finally to indicate the trends for future research and development. Biorefining is the sustainable processing of biomass into a spectrum of marketable products, which means: energy, materials, chemicals, food and feed. Dark fermentation of organic wastes could be the beach-head of complete biorefineries that generate biohydrogen as a first step and could significantly influence the future of solid waste management. Series systems show a better efficiency than one-stage process regarding substrate conversion to hydrogen and bioenergy. The dark fermentation also produces fermented by-products (fatty acids and solvents), so there is an opportunity for further combining with other processes that yield more bioenergy. Photoheterotrophic fermentation is one of them: photosynthetic heterotrophs, such as non-sulfur purple bacteria, can thrive on the simple organic substances produced in dark fermentation and light, to give more H2. Effluents from photoheterotrophic fermentation and digestates can be processed in microbial fuel cells for bioelectricity production and methanogenic digestion for methane generation, thus integrating a diverse block of bioenergies. Several digestates from bioenergies could be used for bioproducts generation, such as cellulolytic enzymes and saccharification processes, leading to ethanol fermentation (another bioenergy), thus completing

  19. Process Simulation and Techno-Economic Evaluation of Alternative Biorefinery Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizpurua Gonzalez, Carlos Ernesto

    A biorefinery is a complex processing facility that uses sustainably produced biomass as feedstock to generate biofuels and chemical products using a wide variety of alternative conversion pathways. The alternative conversion pathways can be generally classified as either biochemical or thermochemical conversion. A biorefinery is commonly based on a core biomass conversion technology (pretreatment, hydrolysis, pyrolysis, etc.) followed by secondary processing stages that determine the specific product, and its recovery. In this study, techno-economic analysis of several different lignocellulosic biomass conversion pathways have been performed. First, a novel biochemical conversion, which used electron beam and steam explosion pretreatments for ethanol production was evaluated. This evaluation include both laboratory work and process modeling. Encouraging experimental results are obtained that showed the biomass had enhanced reactivity to the enzyme hydrolysis. The total sugar recovery for the hardwood species was 72% using 5 FPU/g enzyme dosage. The combination of electron beam and steam explosion provides an improvement in sugar conversion of more than 20% compared to steam explosion alone. This combination of pretreatments was modeled along with a novel ethanol dehydration process that is based on vapor permeation membranes. The economic feasibility of this novel pretreatment-dehydration technology was evaluated and compared with the dilute acid process proposed by NREL in 2011. Overall, the pretreatment-dehydration technology process produces the same ethanol yields (81 gal/bdton). However, the economics of this novel process does not look promising since the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) to generate an internal rate of return of 10% is of 3.09 /gal, compared to 2.28 /gal for the base case. To enhance the economic potential of a biorefinery, the isolation of value-added co-products was incorporated into the base dilute acid biorefinery process. In this

  20. Thermochemical hydrolysis of macroalgae Ulva for biorefinery: Taguchi robust design method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rui; Linzon, Yoav; Vitkin, Edward; Yakhini, Zohar; Chudnovsky, Alexandra; Golberg, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the impact of all process parameters on the efficiency of biomass hydrolysis and on the final yield of products is critical to biorefinery design. Using Taguchi orthogonal arrays experimental design and Partial Least Square Regression, we investigated the impact of change and the comparative significance of thermochemical process temperature, treatment time, %Acid and %Solid load on carbohydrates release from green macroalgae from Ulva genus, a promising biorefinery feedstock. The average density of hydrolysate was determined using a new microelectromechanical optical resonator mass sensor. In addition, using Flux Balance Analysis techniques, we compared the potential fermentation yields of these hydrolysate products using metabolic models of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild type, Saccharomyces cerevisiae RN1016 with xylose isomerase and Clostridium acetobutylicum. We found that %Acid plays the most significant role and treatment time the least significant role in affecting the monosaccharaides released from Ulva biomass. We also found that within the tested range of parameters, hydrolysis with 121 °C, 30 min 2% Acid, 15% Solids could lead to the highest yields of conversion: 54.134-57.500 gr ethanol kg(-1) Ulva dry weight by S. cerevisiae RN1016 with xylose isomerase. Our results support optimized marine algae utilization process design and will enable smart energy harvesting by thermochemical hydrolysis. PMID:27291594

  1. Sustainable bioethanol production combining biorefinery principles and intercropping strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, M.H.; Haugaard-Nielsen, H.; Petersson, A.; Thomsen, A.B.; Jensen, E.S. [Risoe National Lab., DTU, Biosystems Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2007-05-15

    species interactions as a response to the actual growing conditions observed which is not achieved with sole cropping of one species/cultivar. It is also concluded that when growing pea as a sole cropping available soil mineral N reduce N{sub 2} fixation and the full potential of symbiotic nitrogen fixation is not exploited which is regarded as an overall inefficient use of N sources. Using clover-grass intercropping raw materials, as another potential species combination with equivalent field responses to e.g. pea-wheat intercropping, conversion yields obtained in laboratory experiments show that wet oxidation is an efficient method for fractionating clover, grass, and clover-grass mixtures into a convertible solid cellulose fraction and a soluble hemicellulose fraction. The highest yield of fermentable sugars after enzymatic hydrolysis is achieved in clover-grass (mixed 1:1) pretreated at 195 deg. C for 10 minutes using 12 bar oxygen. The optimum pretreatment conditions for clover, grass, and clover-grass mixtures is not significantly different from that of wheat, which indicates that wheat straw and clover-grass (from intercropping) could be pretreated in one step. The produced sugars were converted into ethanol by Mucor indicus giving good ethanol yields Y{sub E/TS,Aerobic} = 0.37 and Y{sub E/TS,oxygen} {sub li} It is also concluded that fructans from unheated clover-grass juice can be co-converted into ethanol by natural enzymes and yeast increasing the ethanol production significantly. Using field data and biomass conversion yields obtained in laboratory experiments a decentralized biorefinery concept for co-production of bioethanol and biogas is described with strong emphasis on sustainability, localness and recycling principles. (au)

  2. A conceptual lignocellulosic 'feed+fuel' biorefinery and its application to the linked biofuel and cattle raising industries in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been argued by some that the substitution of biofuels for gasoline could increase greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, rather than reduce them. The increase is attributed to the indirect land use change effects of planting new grain and corn crops around the world to replace those progressively being devoted to ethanol production. In this paper, indirect effects are minimised by allowing land to be used for both food and fuel, rather than for one or the other. We present a sugarcane 'feed+fuel' biorefinery, which produces bioethanol and yeast biomass, a source of single-cell protein (SCP), that can be used as a high-protein animal feed supplement. The yeast SCP can partially substitute for grass in the feed of cattle grazing on pasture and thereby potentially release land for increased sugarcane production, with minimal land use change effects. Applying the concept conservatively to the Brazilian ethanol and livestock industry our model demonstrates that it would be technically feasible to raise ethanol production threefold from the current level of 27 GL to over 92 GL. The extra ethanol would meet biofuel market mandates in the US without bringing any extra land into agricultural or pastoral use. The analysis demonstrates a viable way to increase biofuel and food production by linking two value chains as called for by industrial ecology studies. - Highlights: → A proposed sugarcane 'feed+fuel' biorefinery producing bioethanol and yeast. → Yeast used as a high-protein animal feed supplement. → In cattle grazing, yeast substitutes for grass to release land for biomass production. → In Brazil our model demonstrates ethanol production raised threefold.

  3. Ethanol poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002644.htm Ethanol poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ethanol poisoning is caused by drinking too much alcohol. ...

  4. Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for growth and succinate production from levoglucosan, a pyrolytic sugar substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Um, Youngsoon; Bott, Michael; Woo, Han Min

    2015-10-01

    Thermochemical processing provides continuous production of bio-oils from lignocellulosic biomass. Levoglucosan, a pyrolytic sugar substrate C6H10O5 in a bio-oil, has been used for ethanol production using engineered Escherichia coli. Here we provide the first example for succinate production from levoglucosan with Corynebacterium glutamicum, a well-known industrial amino acid producer. Heterologous expression of a gene encoding a sugar kinase from Lipomyces starkeyi, Gibberella zeae or Pseudomonas aeruginosa was employed for levoglucosan conversion in C. glutamicum because the wild type was unable to utilize levoglucosan as sole carbon source. As result, expression of a levoglucosan kinase (LGK) of L. starkeyi only enabled growth with levoglucosan as sole carbon source in CgXII minimal medium by catalyzing conversion of levoglucosan to glucose-6-phosphate. Subsequently, the lgk gene was expressed in an aerobic succinate producer of C. glutamicum, strain BL-1. The recombinant strain showed a higher succinate yield (0.25 g g(-1)) from 2% (w/v) levoglucosan than the reference strain BL-1 from 2% (w/v) glucose (0.19 g g(-1)), confirming that levoglucosan is an attractive carbon substrate for C. glutamicum producer strains. In summary, we demonstrated that a pyrolytic sugar could be a potential carbon source for microbial cell factories. PMID:26363018

  5. Early stage design and analysis of biorefinery networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sin, Gürkan

    2013-01-01

    Recent work regarding biorefineries resulted in many competing concepts and technologies for conversion of renewable bio-based feedstock into many promising products including fuels, chemicals, materials, etc. The design of a biorefinery process requires, at its earlier stages, the selection...... of the process configuration which exhibits the best performances, for a given set of economical, technical and environmental criteria. To this end, we formulate a computer-aided framework as an enabling technology for early stage design and analysis of biorefineries. The tool represents different raw materials......, different products and different available technologies and proposes a conceptual (early stage) biorefinery network. This network can then be the basis for further detailed and rigorous model-based studies. In this talk, we demonstrate the application of the tool for generating an early stage optimal...

  6. Growing grass for a green biorefinery - an option for Ireland?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Keeffe, S.; Schulte, R.P.O.; O'Kiely, P.; O'Donoghue, C.; Lalor, S.T.J.; Struik, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Growing grass for a green biorefinery – an option for Ireland? Mind the gap: deciphering the gap between good intentions and healthy eating behaviour Halting biodiversity loss by 2020 – implications for agriculture A milk processing sector model for Ireland

  7. To The Biorefinery: Delivered Forestland and Agricultural Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    It can be challenging and costly to transport biomass feedstock supplies from the roadside, or farmgate, to a biorefinery. Given the geographic dispersion and lowbulk density of cellulosic feedstocks, cost effective scaling of commercial biorefinery operations requires overcoming many challenges. The Biomass Research and Development Board’s Feedstock Logistics Interagency Working Group identified four primary barriers related to biorefinery commercialization: • Capacity and efficiency of harvest and collection equipment • High-moisture content leading to degradation of biomass • Variable biomass quality upon arrival at the biorefinery • Costly transportation options.1 Further, feedstock supply systems do not currently mitigate risks such as low crop yield, fire, or competition for resource use. Delivery and preprocessing improvements will allow for the development of a commercial-scale bioenergy industry that achieves national production and cost targets.

  8. Efficiency improvements by geothermal heat integration in a lignocellulosic biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohel, M Imroz; Jack, Michael

    2010-12-01

    In an integrated geothermal biorefinery, low-grade geothermal heat is used as process heat to allow the co-products of biofuel production to become available for higher-value uses. In this paper we consider integrating geothermal heat into a biochemical lignocellulosic biorefinery so that the lignin-enriched residue can be used either as a feedstock for chemicals and materials or for on-site electricity generation. Depending on the relative economic value of these two uses, we can maximize revenue of a biorefinery by judicious distribution of the lignin-enriched residue between these two options. We quantify the performance improvement from integrating geothermal energy for an optimized system. We then use a thermodynamic argument to show that integrating geothermal heat into a biorefinery represents an improvement in overall resource utilization efficiency in all cases considered. Finally, possible future technologies for electricity generation are considered which could improve this efficiency further.

  9. Ethanol Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  10. Biorefinery approach for cassava-based industrial wastes: Current status and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Xie, Li; Yin, Zhixuan; Khanal, Samir Kumar; Zhou, Qi

    2016-09-01

    Cassava, an important food crop, has been extensively employed as raw materials for various agri-industries to produce starch, bioethanol and other biobased products/chemicals. These cassava-based industries also generate large quantities of wastes/residues, rich in organic matter and suspended solids, and pose significant environmental issues. Their complex biochemical composition with high organic content endows them with a great potential for bioconversion into value-added products via biorefinery thereby providing economic and environmental sustainability to cassava industries. This state-of-the-art review covers the source, composition and characteristics of cassava industrial wastes and residues, and their bioconversion into value-added products, mainly biofuels (ethanol and butanol), biogas, biosurfactant, organic acids and other valuable biochemicals among others. This paper also outlines future perspectives with respect to developing more effective and efficient bioconversion processes for converting the cassava wastes and residues into high-value products. PMID:27117291

  11. Biorefinery based on olive biomass. State of the art and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-García, J M; Niño, L; Martínez-Patiño, C; Álvarez, C; Castro, E; Negro, M J

    2014-05-01

    With currently more than nine million hectares, olive tree cultivation has spread worldwide, table olives and olive oil as the main products. Moreover, a number of by-products and residues derived from both tree cultivation and the process of industrial olive oil production, most having no practical applications, are obtained yearly. This paper reviews the research regarding these by-products, namely biomass from olive tree pruning, olive stones, olive pomace and wastewaters obtained from the process of olive oil production. Furthermore, a wide range of compounds has been identified and can be produced using a broad definition of the term biorefinery based on olive tree biomass. As an example, this paper reviews ethanol production as one of the main proposed applications, as well as research on other value-added products. Finally, this paper also assesses recent technological advances, future perspectives and challenges in each stage of the process.

  12. Downstream processing of Isochrysis galbana: a step towards microalgal biorefinery

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Mendiola, José A.; Fontecha, Javier; SIJTSMA Lolke; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Herrero, Miguel; Ibáñez, Elena; van den Broek, Lambertus A. M.

    2015-01-01

    An algae-based biorefinery relies on the efficient use of algae biomass through its fractionation of several valuable/bioactive compounds that can be used in industry. If this biorefinery includes green platforms as downstream processing technologies able to fulfill the requirements of green chemistry, it will end-up with sustainable processes. In the present study, a downstream processing platform has been developed to extract bioactive compounds from the microalga Isochrysis galbana using v...

  13. Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol and Butyl Acrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, Thomas [Archer Daniels Midland Company, Decatur, IL (United States); Erpelding, Michael [Archer Daniels Midland Company, Decatur, IL (United States); Schmid, Josef [Archer Daniels Midland Company, Decatur, IL (United States); Chin, Andrew [Archer Daniels Midland Company, Decatur, IL (United States); Sammons, Rhea [Archer Daniels Midland Company, Decatur, IL (United States); Rockafellow, Erin [Archer Daniels Midland Company, Decatur, IL (United States)

    2015-04-10

    Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol and Butyl Acrylate. The purpose of Archer Daniels Midlands Integrated Biorefinery (IBR) was to demonstrate a modified acetosolv process on corn stover. It would show the fractionation of crop residue to distinct fractions of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The cellulose and hemicellulose fractions would be further converted to ethanol as the primary product and a fraction of the sugars would be catalytically converted to acrylic acid, with butyl acrylate the final product. These primary steps have been demonstrated.

  14. The Macroalgae Biorefinery for Production of Bioethanol and Fish Feed from the Two Brown Algae: Laminaria Digitata and Saccharina Latissima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaoru; Bjerre, Anne-Belinda; Hansen, Jonas Høeg;

    A new Danish macroalgae project (Acronym MAB3) financed by the Danish Strategic Research Council presents an integrated macroalgae biorefinery concept. It was started from march 2012 and will continue for the next 4 years (2012-2016). Initial studies on the first harvested materials of wild...... Laminaria digtata (harvested during the summer 2012 from Limfjorden in Denmark), including cultivation, pretreatment and bioethanol set-up and trials will be presented in this presentation. The macroalgae substrates were screw-pressed to dewater and the algae biomass were fractionated before storage...... and conversion of the differently pretreated macroalgae biomass into ethanol by fermentation were compared. The protein contents and nutrient salts in residues from ethanol fermentation trials were characterized for potential fish feed. A first-step scenario for sustainability and feasibility assessment...

  15. Biorefineries based on coffee cut-stems and sugarcane bagasse: furan-based compounds and alkanes as interesting products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristizábal M, Valentina; Gómez P, Álvaro; Cardona A, Carlos A

    2015-11-01

    This work presents a techno-economic and environmental assessment for a biorefinery based on sugarcane bagasse (SCB), and coffee cut-stems (CCS). Five scenarios were evaluated at different levels, conversion pathways, feedstock distribution, and technologies to produce ethanol, octane, nonane, furfural, and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). These scenarios were compared between each other according to raw material, economic, and environmental characteristics. A single objective function combining the Net Present Value and the Potential Environmental Impact was used through the Analytic Hierarchy Process approach to understand and select the best configurations for SCB and CCS cases. The results showed that the configuration with the best economic and environmental performance for SCB and CCS is the one that considers ethanol, furfural, and octane production (scenario 1). The global economic margin was 62.3% and 61.6% for SCB and CCS respectively. The results have shown the potential of these types of biomass to produce fuels and platform products. PMID:26280100

  16. Bis(ethanolaminium succinate–succinic acid (1/1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Zhang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, 2C2H8NO+·C4H4O42−·C4H6O4, consists of half a succinate anion, half a succinic acid molecule and one ethanolaminium cation. The succinate anion and succinic acid molecule, both of which are located on inversion centres, are linked by O—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a chain along the [2overline{1}0] direction. The chain and the ethanolaminium cation are further connected by O—H...O and N—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  17. Techno-economic analysis for incorporating a liquid-liquid extraction system to remove acetic acid into a proposed commercial scale biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh, Mahdieh; Engelberth, Abigail S

    2016-07-01

    Mitigating the effect of fermentation inhibitors in bioethanol plants can have a great positive impact on the economy of this industry. Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) using ethyl acetate is able to remove fermentation inhibitors-chiefly, acetic acid-from an aqueous solution used to produce bioethanol. The fermentation broth resulting from LLE has higher performance for ethanol yield and its production rate. Previous techno-economic analyses focused on second-generation biofuel production did not address the impact of removing the fermentation inhibitors on the economic performance of the biorefinery. A comprehensive analysis of applying a separation system to mitigate the fermentation inhibition effect and to provide an analysis on the economic impact of removal of acetic acid from corn stover hydrolysate on the overall revenue of the biorefinery is necessary. This study examines the pros and cons associated with implementing LLE column along with the solvent recovery system into a commercial scale bioethanol plant. Using details from the NREL-developed model of corn stover biorefinery, the capital costs associated with the equipment and the operating cost for the use of solvent were estimated and the results were compared with the profit gain due to higher ethanol production. Results indicate that the additional capital will add 1% to the total capital and manufacturing cost will increase by 5.9%. The benefit arises from the higher ethanol production rate and yield as a consequence of inhibitor extraction and results in a $0.35 per gallon reduction in the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP). © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:971-977, 2016. PMID:27390294

  18. Succinic acid adsorption from fermentation broth and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Brian H; Nghiem, Nhuan P; Richardson, Gerald L

    2004-01-01

    More than 25 sorbents were tested for uptake of succinic acid from aqueous solutions. The best resins were then tested for successive loading and regeneration using hot water. The key desired properties for an ideal sorbent are high capacity, complete stable regenerability, and specificity for the product. The best resins have a stable capacity of about 0.06 g of succinic acid/g of resin at moderate concentrations (1-5 g/L) of succinic acid. Several sorbents were tested more exhaustively for uptake of succinic acid and for successive loading and regeneration using hot water. One resin, XUS 40285, has a good stable isotherm capacity, prefers succinate over glucose, and has good capacities at both acidic and neutral pH. Succinic acid was removed from simulated media containing salts, succinic acid, acetic acid, and sugar using a packed column of sorbent resin, XUS 40285. The fermentation byproduct, acetate, was completely separated from succinate. A simple hot water regeneration successfully concentrated succinate from 10 g/L (inlet) to 40-110 g/L in the effluent. If successful, this would lower separation costs by reducing the need for chemicals for the initial purification step. Despite promising initial results of good capacity (0.06 g of succinic/g of sorbent), 70% recovery using hot water, and a recovered concentration of >100 g/L, this regeneration was not stable over 10 cycles in the column. Alternative regeneration schemes using acid and base were examined. Two (XUS 40285 and XFS-40422) showed both good stable capacities for succinic acid over 10 cycles and >95% recovery in a batch operation using a modified extraction procedure combining acid and hot water washes. These resins showed comparable results with actual broth. PMID:15054284

  19. 76 FR 13349 - Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for Repowering Assistance Payments to Eligible Biorefineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... payments to be made to a biorefinery taking into consideration the percentage reduction in fossil fuel used by the biorefinery (including the quantity of fossil fuels a renewable biomass system is replacing... no minimum payment amount that an individual biorefinery can receive. The maximum amount...

  20. 76 FR 13351 - Notice of Funds Availability (NOFA) Inviting Applications for the Biorefinery Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... Applications for the Biorefinery Assistance Program AGENCY: Rural Business-Cooperative Service and Rural... acceptance of applications for funds available under the Biorefinery Assistance Program (the ``Program'') to..., Washington, DC 20250-3225. Agency Web site: http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/BCP_Biorefinery.html ....

  1. Multitasking mesoporous nanomaterials for biorefinery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Kapil

    in microalgae biorefinery. Two different integrated biorefinery systems are highlighted. (i) OM-MSNs are used to harvest microalgae and selectively sequester free fatty acids (FFAs). (ii) OM-MSNs are shown to selectively sequester FFAs and convert them into diesel-range liquid hydrocarbon fuels. A similar MSN supported metal nanoparticle catalyst is demonstrated to transform FFAs into green diesel with even greater activity and selectivity. The incorporation of a different organic functional group into MSN provides a selective adsorbent for separation and purification of alpha-tocopherol from microalgae oil. The functional group with electron deficient aromatic rings demonstrated high sequestration capacity and selectivity of alpha-tocopherol.

  2. Multitasking mesoporous nanomaterials for biorefinery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandel, Kapil [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    in microalgae biorefinery. Two different integrated biorefinery systems are highlighted. (i) OM-MSNs are used to harvest microalgae and selectively sequester free fatty acids (FFAs). (ii) OM-MSNs are shown to selectively sequester FFAs and convert them into diesel-range liquid hydrocarbon fuels. A similar MSN supported metal nanoparticle catalyst is demonstrated to transform FFAs into green diesel with even greater activity and selectivity. The incorporation of a different organic functional group into MSN provides a selective adsorbent for separation and purification of α-tocopherol from microalgae oil. The functional group with electron deficient aromatic rings demonstrated high sequestration capacity and selectivity of {alpha}-tocopherol.

  3. Assessing the life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of biorefineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokka, L.; Soimakallio, S.

    2009-12-15

    During the next decades there will be a growing demand for new land for food production due to population and economic growth. Simultaneously, global warming has been recognised as one of the most severe environmental problems of our time, and industrialised countries are negotiating on considerable emission cuts for the next decades. Biorefineries are considered by many as one solution for mitigation of climate change and improvement of the future security of food, chemical, forest and energy industries. Since increased use of biomass in biorefineries also implies increased use of land and auxiliary inputs, many have proposed to use by-products of food and forest industries in biorefineries. When assessing the global warming impacts of biorefineries, the setting of the spatial system boundary to include or exclude indirect impacts may significantly affect the results. In this paper, we discuss the life cycle greenhouse gas impacts of a hypothetical forest-based biorefinery by using two different approaches - attributional and consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) - to set the system boundary. The results imply that for those bio-based side-streams for which there presently exists use, the environmental benefits of diverting them to new uses as bio-fuel or bio-material are not straightforward and should be carefully and comprehensively studied before making decisions. (orig.)

  4. Modelling of the biorefinery scenarios - Bioscen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkanen, J.-P. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)], email: juha-pekka.pitkanen@vtt.fi

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of the BioScen project was to develop quantitative modelling approaches for the future biomass based processes producing fuels and chemicals. The aim of the project was in developing methods to estimate the necessary material properties for phase and reaction equilibria, for the calculation of unit processes and their integration to biorefining production plant simulations. Additional focus was laid on model optimisation and product life cycle analysis. As the biorefining technologies possess an extensive range from thermal pyrolysis to biochemical processing at ambient temperatures, a most generic thermodynamically based approach was selected to enable usage of the methods to the wide variety of possible applications. The methods were then applied to a number of case studies including modelling of flash condensation of pyrolysis oil, hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass and its product recovery and the subsequent fermentation processes for bioethanol and biobutanol, for which also a comparative life cycle analysis was performed. Flowsheet process simulation was applied to a conceptual wood bark biorefinery. Metamodelling techniques were used for both model and parameter optimisation, including their sensitivity analysis.

  5. Ethanol fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The inulin of chicory slices was hydrolyzed enzymically and fermented to ethanol. Maximum ethanol yield was achieved with fermentation combined with saccharification, using cellulase and inulinase for saccharification. The fermenting organism was Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Kluyveromyces fragilis, containing endogenous inulinase, was also used, but with lower yield.

  6. Synthesis of biorefinery networks using a superstructure optimization based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertran, Maria-Ona; Anaya-Reza, Omar; Lopez-Arenas, Maria Teresa;

    industrial system based on biomass, an inexpensive, abundant and renewable raw material, is being established with sustainability as the main driving force [1]. The processing facilities for the production of multiple products (including biofuels and chemicals) from biomass are referred as biorefineries [2......]. The optimal synthesis of biorefinery networks problem is defined as: given a set of biomass derived feedstock and a set of desired final products and specifications, determine a flexible, sustainable and innovative processing network with the targets of minimum cost and sustainable development taking...... into account the available technologies, geographical location, future technological developments and global market changes. The problem of optimal design of biorefinery networks is solved in this work through three different stages: (i) synthesis stage, (ii) design stage, and (iii) innovation stage...

  7. Superstructure-based optimization of biorefinery networks: Production of biodiesel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertran, Maria-Ona; Orsi, Albert; Gani, Rafiqul

    2015-01-01

    industrial system based on biomass, an inexpensive, abundant and renewable raw material, is being established with sustainability as the main driving force [1]. The processing facilities for the production of multiple products (including biofuels and chemicals) from biomass are referred as biorefineries [2......]. The optimal synthesis of biorefinery networks problem is defined as: given a set of biomass derived feedstock and a set of desired final products and specifications, determine a flexible, sustainable and innovative processing network with the targets of minimum cost and sustainable development taking...... into account the available technologies, geographical location, future technological developments and global market changes. The problem of optimal design of biorefinery networks is solved in this work through three different stages: (i) synthesis stage, (ii) design stage, and (iii) innovation stage...

  8. Waste biorefinery in arid/semi-arid regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo; Fang, Chuanji; Almardeai, Saleha; Javid, Usama; Yousuf, Ahasa; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2016-09-01

    The utilization of waste biorefineries in arid/semi-arid regions is advisable due to the reduced sustainable resources in arid/semi-arid regions, e.g. fresh water and biomass. This review focuses on biomass residues available in arid/semi-arid regions, palm trees residues, seawater biomass based residues (coastal arid/semi-arid regions), and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. The present review aims to describe and discuss the availability of these waste biomasses, their conversion to value chemicals by waste biorefinery processes. For the case of seawater biomass based residues it was reviewed and advise the use of seawater in the biorefinery processes, in order to decrease the use of fresh water. PMID:27072789

  9. Thermochemical Biorefineries with multiproduction using a platform chemical

    OpenAIRE

    García Haro, Pedro; Villanueva Perales, Ángel Luis; Arjona, Ricardo; Ollero de Castro, Pedro Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This critical review focuses on potential routes for the multi-production of chemicals and fuels in the framework of thermochemical biorefineries. The up-to-date research and development in this field has been limited to BTL/G (biomass-to-liquids/gases) studies, where biomass-derived -synthesis gas (syngas) is converted into a single product with/without the co-production of -electricity and heat. Simultaneously, the interest on biorefineries is growing but mostly refers to the biochemical pr...

  10. Toward a common classification approach for biorefinery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherubini, Francesco; Jungmeier, Gerfried; Wellisch, Maria;

    2009-01-01

    until 2020 is based on their characteristics to be mixed with gasoline, diesel and natural gas, reflecting the main advantage of using the already-existing infrastructure for easier market introduction. This classification approach relies on four main features: (1) platforms; (2) products; (3) feedstock......This paper deals with a biorefinery classification approach developed within International Energy Agency (IEA) Bioenergy Task 42. Since production of transportation biofuels is seen as the driving force for future biorefinery developments, a selection of the most interesting transportation biofuels...

  11. Biorefineries to integrate fuel, energy and chemical production processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica Bargiacchi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The world of renewable energies is in fast evolution and arouses political and public interests, especially as an opportunity to boost environmental sustainability by mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. This work aims at examining the possibilities related to the development of biorefineries, where biomass conversion processes to produce biofuels, electricity and biochemicals are integrated. Particular interest is given to the production processes of biodiesel, bioethanol and biogas, for which present world situation, problems, and perspectives are drawn. Potential areas for agronomic and biotech researches are also discussed. Producing biomass for biorefinery processing will eventually lead to maximize yields, in the non food agriculture.

  12. Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed preprocessing supply system designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, jr., David J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Langholtz, Matthew H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jacobson, Jacob [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwab, Amy [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wu, May [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Argo, Andrew [Sundrop Fuels, Golden, CO (United States); Brandt, Craig C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cafferty, Kara [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chiu, Yi-Wen [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dutta, Abhijit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Eaton, Laurence M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Searcy, Erin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-03-31

    The 2011 US Billion-Ton Update estimates that by 2030 there will be enough agricultural and forest resources to sustainably provide at least one billion dry tons of biomass annually, enough to displace approximately 30% of the country's current petroleum consumption. A portion of these resources are inaccessible at current cost targets with conventional feedstock supply systems because of their remoteness or low yields. Reliable analyses and projections of US biofuels production depend on assumptions about the supply system and biorefinery capacity, which, in turn, depend upon economic value, feedstock logistics, and sustainability. A cross-functional team has examined combinations of advances in feedstock supply systems and biorefinery capacities with rigorous design information, improved crop yield and agronomic practices, and improved estimates of sustainable biomass availability. A previous report on biochemical refinery capacity noted that under advanced feedstock logistic supply systems that include depots and pre-processing operations there are cost advantages that support larger biorefineries up to 10 000 DMT/day facilities compared to the smaller 2000 DMT/day facilities. This report focuses on analyzing conventional versus advanced depot biomass supply systems for a thermochemical conversion and refinery sizing based on woody biomass. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the economies of scale enabled by advanced logistics offsets much of the added logistics costs from additional depot processing and transportation, resulting in a small overall increase to the minimum ethanol selling price compared to the conventional logistic supply system. While the overall costs do increase slightly for the advanced logistic supply systems, the ability to mitigate moisture and ash in the system will improve the storage and conversion processes. In addition, being able to draw on feedstocks from further distances will decrease the risk of biomass supply to

  13. Data on the mechanisms underlying succinate-induced aortic contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga, Natália A; Simplicio, Janaina A; Leite, Letícia N; Vale, Gabriel T; Carballido, José M; Alves-Filho, José C; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2016-12-01

    We describe the mechanisms underlying the vascular contraction induced by succinate. The data presented here are related to the article entitled "Pharmacological characterization of the mechanisms underlying the vascular effects of succinate" (L.N. Leite, N.A. Gonzaga, J.A. Simplicio, G.T. Vale, J.M. Carballido, J.C. Alves-Filho, C.R. Tirapelli, 2016) [1]. Succinate acts as a signaling molecule by binding to a G-protein-coupled receptor termed GPR91, "Citric acid cycle intermediates as ligands for orphan G-protein-coupled receptors" (W. He, F.J. Miao, D.C. Lin, R.T. Schwandner, Z. Wang, J. Gao, J.L. Chen, H. Tian, L. Ling, 2004) [2]. Here we include data on the contractile effect of succinate in the aorta. Succinate contracted both endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortic rings isolated from male Wistar rats or C57BL/6 mice. Succinate was less effective at inducing contraction in arteries isolated from GPR91-deficient mice, when compared to its vascular effect in aortas from wild type mice. SB203508 (p38MAK inhibitor), SP600125 (JNK inhibitor) and Y27632 (Rho-kinase inhibitor) reduced succinate-induced contraction in both endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded rat aortic rings, while PD98059 (ERK1/2 inhibitor) did not affect succinate-induced contraction. The contractile response induced by succinate on endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded rat aortic rings was reduced by indomethacin (non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor), H7 (protein kinase C inhibitor), verapamil (Ca(2+) channel blocker) and tiron (superoxide anion scavenger).

  14. Design of a biomass-to-biorefinery logistics system through bio-inspired metaheuristic optimization considering multiple types of feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueba, Isidoro

    Bioenergy has become an important alternative source of energy to alleviate the reliance on petroleum energy. Bioenergy offers significant potential to mitigate climate change by reducing life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions relative to fossil fuels. The Energy Independence and Security Act mandate the use of 21 billion gallons of advanced biofuels including 16 billion gallons of cellulosic biofuels by the year 2022. It is clear that Biomass can make a substantial contribution to supplying future energy demand in a sustainable way. However, the supply of sustainable energy is one of the main challenges that mankind will face over the coming decades. For instance, many logistical challenges will be faced in order to provide an efficient and reliable supply of quality feedstock to biorefineries. 700 million tons of biomass will be required to be sustainably delivered to biorefineries annually to meet the projected use of biofuels by the year of 2022. This thesis is motivated by the urgent need of advancing knowledge and understanding of the highly complex biofuel supply chain. While corn ethanol production has increased fast enough to keep up with the energy mandates, production of biofuels from different types of feedstocks has also been incremented. A number of pilot and demonstration scale advanced biofuel facilities have been set up, but commercial scale facilities are yet to become operational. Scaling up this new biofuel sector poses significant economic and logistical challenges for regional planners and biofuel entrepreneurs in terms of feedstock supply assurance, supply chain development, biorefinery establishment, and setting up transport, storage and distribution infrastructure. The literature also shows that the larger cost in the production of biomass to ethanol originates from the logistics operation therefore it is essential that an optimal logistics system is designed in order to keep low the costs of producing ethanol and make possible the shift from

  15. Biomass Program 2007 Peer Review - Integrated Biorefinery Platform Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-10-27

    This document discloses the comments provided by a review panel at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Program Peer Review held on November 15-16, 2007 in Baltimore, MD and the Integrated Biorefinery Platform Review held on August 13-15, 2007 in Golden, Colorado.

  16. 75 FR 20073 - Repowering Assistance Payments to Eligible Biorefineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ..., infrastructure, venture capital, and technical support that can support rural communities, helping them to... likely to be whether the biorefinery has the capital, or access to the capital, for the repowering... private sector to generate the capital needed. This ] program provides incentives for more...

  17. 76 FR 7915 - Repowering Assistance Payments to Eligible Biorefineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... improve the quality of life in rural communities by providing leadership, infrastructure, venture capital... program is likely to be whether the biorefinery has the capital, or access to the capital, for the..., 2010 (75 FR 20073), the Agency published a proposed rule for Repowering Assistance Payments to...

  18. Techno-economical evaluation of protein extraction for microalgae biorefinery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sari, Y.W.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Bruins, M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to scarcity of fossil feedstocks, there is an increasing demand for biobased fuels. Microalgae are considered as promising biobased feedstocks. However, microalgae based fuels are not yet produced at large scale at present. Applying biorefinery, not only for oil, but also for other components

  19. Early-Stage Design and Analysis of Biorefinery Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheali, Peam; Quaglia, Alberto; Loureiro da Costa Lira Gargalo, Carina;

    2015-01-01

    A systematic framework with a superstructure-based optimization approach was presented for the early-stage design and analysis of biorefinery alternatives. This chapter presents a generic process modeling approach together with data collection and management for the multidisciplinary and multidim...

  20. A conceptual lignocellulosic 'feed+fuel' biorefinery and its application to the linked biofuel and cattle raising industries in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, John A., E-mail: jmathews@luiss.it [Competitive Dynamics and Global Strategy, LUISS Guido Carli University, Viale Romania 32, 00197 Roma (Italy); Tan Hao, E-mail: H.Tan@uws.edu.au [School of Management and CInIS Research Group, University of Western Sydney, Parramatta, Sydney, NSW 2150 (Australia); Moore, Michael J.B., E-mail: MichaelMoore@ShelstonIP.com [Level 21, 60 Margaret Street, Sydney, NSW 2000 (Australia); Bell, Geoff, E-mail: Geoff.Bell@microbiogen.com [Microbiogen Pty Ltd. Unit E2, Lane Cove Business Park, 16 Mars Road, Lane Cove, NSW 2066 (Australia)

    2011-09-15

    It has been argued by some that the substitution of biofuels for gasoline could increase greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, rather than reduce them. The increase is attributed to the indirect land use change effects of planting new grain and corn crops around the world to replace those progressively being devoted to ethanol production. In this paper, indirect effects are minimised by allowing land to be used for both food and fuel, rather than for one or the other. We present a sugarcane 'feed+fuel' biorefinery, which produces bioethanol and yeast biomass, a source of single-cell protein (SCP), that can be used as a high-protein animal feed supplement. The yeast SCP can partially substitute for grass in the feed of cattle grazing on pasture and thereby potentially release land for increased sugarcane production, with minimal land use change effects. Applying the concept conservatively to the Brazilian ethanol and livestock industry our model demonstrates that it would be technically feasible to raise ethanol production threefold from the current level of 27 GL to over 92 GL. The extra ethanol would meet biofuel market mandates in the US without bringing any extra land into agricultural or pastoral use. The analysis demonstrates a viable way to increase biofuel and food production by linking two value chains as called for by industrial ecology studies. - Highlights: > A proposed sugarcane 'feed+fuel' biorefinery producing bioethanol and yeast. > Yeast used as a high-protein animal feed supplement. > In cattle grazing, yeast substitutes for grass to release land for biomass production. > In Brazil our model demonstrates ethanol production raised threefold.

  1. Novel membrane-based biotechnological alternative process for succinic acid production and chemical synthesis of bio-based poly (butylene succinate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caixia; Ming, Wei; Yan, Daojiang; Zhang, Congcong; Yang, Maohua; Liu, Yilan; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Baohua; Wan, Yinhua; Xing, Jianmin

    2014-03-01

    Succinic acid was produced in a novel membrane-based fermentation and separation integrated system. With this integrated system, product inhibition was alleviated by removing acids and replenishing fresh broth. High cell density maintain for a longer time from 75 to 130h and succinic acid concentration increased from 53 to 73g/L. In the developed separation process, succinic acid was crystallized at a recovery of 85-90%. The purity of the obtained succinic acid crystals reached 99.4% as found by HPLC and (1)H NMR analysis. A crystallization experiment indicated that among by-products glucose had a negative effect on succinic acid crystallization. Poly (butylene succinate) (PBS) was synthesized using the purified succinic acid and (1)H NMR analysis confirmed that the composition of the synthesized PBS is in agreement with that from petro-based succinic acid. PMID:24472699

  2. Economical succinic acid production from cane molasses by Actinobacillus succinogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Peng; Zheng, Pu; Sun, Zhi-Hao; Ni, Ye; Dong, Jin-Jun; Zhu, Lei-Lei

    2008-04-01

    In this work, production of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes CGMCC1593 using cane molasses as a low cost carbon source was developed. In anaerobic bottles fermentation, succinic acid concentration of 50.6+/-0.9 g l(-1) was attained at 60 h using an optimum medium containing molasses pretreated with sulfuric acid, resulting in a succinic acid yield of 79.5+/-1.1% and sugar utilization of 97.1+/-0.6%. When batch fermentation was carried out in a 5-l stirred bioreactor with pretreated molasses, 46.4 g l(-1) of succinic acid was attained at 48 h and faster cells growth was also observed. Fed batch fermentation was performed to minimize the substrate (sugar) inhibition effect, giving 55.2 g l(-1) of succinic acid and 1.15 g l(-1)h(-1) of productivity at 48 h. The present study suggests that the inexpensive cane molasses could be utilized for the economical and efficient production of succinic acid by A. succinogenes. PMID:17532626

  3. Commercializing Biorefinery Technology: A Case for the Multi-Product Pathway to a Viable Biorefinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Liu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available While there may be many reasons why very interesting science ideas never reach commercial practice, one of the more prevalent is that the reaction or process, which is scientifically possible, cannot be made efficient enough to achieve economic viability. One pathway to economic viability for many business sectors is the multi-product portfolio. Research, development, and deployment of viable biorefinery technology must meld sound science with engineering and business economics. It is virtually axiomatic that increased value can be generated by isolating relatively pure substances from heterogeneous raw materials. Woody biomass is a heterogeneous raw material consisting of the major structural components, cellulose, lignin, and hemicelluloses, as well as minor components, such as extractives and ash. Cellulose is a linear homopolymer of D-glucopyrano-units with β-D(1®4 connections and is the wood component most resistant to chemical and biological degradation. Lignin is a macromolecule of phenylpropanoid units, second to cellulose in bio-resistance, and is the key component that is sought for removal from woody biomass in chemical pulping. Hemicelluloses are a collection of heteropolysaccharides, comprised mainly of 5- and 6-carbon sugars. Extractives, some of which have high commercial value, are a collection of low molecular weight organic and inorganic woody materials that can be removed, to some extent, under mild conditions. Applied Biorefinery Sciences, LLC (a private, New York, USA based company is commercializing a value-optimization pathway (the ABS Process™ for generating a multi-product portfolio by isolating and recovering homogeneous substances from each of the above mentioned major and minor woody biomass components. The ABS Process™ incorporates the patent pending, core biorefinery technology, “hot water extraction”, as developed at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY

  4. Succination of thiol groups in adipose tissue proteins in diabetes: succination inhibits polymerization and secretion of adiponectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzell, Norma; Rajesh, Mathur; Jepson, Matthew J; Nagai, Ryoji; Carson, James A; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2009-09-18

    S-(2-Succinyl)cysteine (2SC) is formed by reaction of the Krebs cycle intermediate fumarate with cysteine residues in protein, a process termed succination of protein. Both fumarate and succination of proteins are increased in adipocytes cultured in high glucose medium (Nagai, R., Brock, J. W., Blatnik, M., Baatz, J. E., Bethard, J., Walla, M. D., Thorpe, S. R., Baynes, J. W., and Frizzell, N. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 34219-34228). We show here that succination of protein is also increased in epididymal, mesenteric, and subcutaneous adipose tissue of diabetic (db/db) mice and that adiponectin is a major target for succination in both adipocytes and adipose tissue. Cys-39, which is involved in cross-linking of adiponectin monomers to form trimers, was identified as a key site of succination of adiponectin in adipocytes. 2SC was detected on two of seven monomeric forms of adiponectin immunoprecipitated from adipocytes and epididymal adipose tissue. Based on densitometry, 2SC-adiponectin accounted for approximately 7 and 8% of total intracellular adiponectin in cells and tissue, respectively. 2SC was found only in the intracellular, monomeric forms of adiponectin and was not detectable in polymeric forms of adiponectin in cell culture medium or plasma. We conclude that succination of adiponectin blocks its incorporation into trimeric and higher molecular weight, secreted forms of adiponectin. We propose that succination of proteins is a biomarker of mitochondrial stress and accumulation of Krebs cycle intermediates in adipose tissue in diabetes and that succination of adiponectin may contribute to the decrease in plasma adiponectin in diabetes.

  5. A visionary and conceptual macroalgae-based third-generation bioethanol (TGB) biorefinery in Sabah, Malaysia as an underlay for renewable and sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, Chun Sheng; Lee, Keat Teong [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Seberang Perai Selatan, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2010-02-15

    Several biofuel candidates were proposed to displace fossil fuels in order to eliminate the vulnerability of energy sector. Biodiesel and bioethanol produced from terrestrial plants have attracted the attention of the world as potential substitute. However, due to food vs. fuel competition as well as land consumption of these biofuel, they have brought much controversy and debate on their sustainability. In this respect, cultivation of macroalgae such as seaweed at sea water which does not expend arable land and fertilizers provides a possible solution for this energy issue. Carbohydrates derived from seaweeds contain hexose sugars which are suitable materials for fermentation to produce ethanol. Therefore, it is possible to produce fuel ethanol from seaweeds. The potential and prospective of seaweeds to play the role as a sustainable energy provider are demonstrated in this paper. This study offers a conceivable picture of macroalgae-based third-generation bioethanol biorefinery to stimulate the initiation of the exploration in the related field. (author)

  6. Switchgrass biomass to ethanol production economics: Field to fuel approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mohua

    Scope and Method of Study. Switchgrass has been proposed as a dedicated energy crop. The first essay determines switchgrass yield response to nitrogen fertilizer for a single annual harvest in July and for a single annual harvest in October based on a field experiments conducted at Stillwater, OK. Data were fitted to several functional forms to characterize both the July harvest and the October harvest response functions. Extending the harvest window to take advantage of reduction in harvest machinery investment costs has important biological consequences. The second essay determines the cost to deliver a ton of switchgrass biomass to a 2,000 tons per day plant located in Oklahoma. The model accounts for differences in yield and nitrogen fertilizer requirements across harvest months. The data were incorporated into a multi-region, multi-period, monthly time-step, mixed integer mathematical programming model that was constructed to determine the optimal strategy. Desirable feedstock properties, biomass to biofuel conversion rate, and investment required in plant differs depending on which conversion technology is used. The third essay determines the breakeven ethanol price for a cellulosic biorefinery. A comprehensive mathematical programming model that encompasses the chain from land acquisition to ethanol production was constructed and solved. Findings and Conclusions. The July and October harvest plateau yield of 4.36 and 5.49 tons per acre were achieved with an estimated annual nitrogen fertilizer application of 80 and 63 pounds per acre, respectively. Farm gate production costs were estimated to be 60 per ton for the July harvest and 50 per ton for the October harvest. Based on the model results, the strategy of extending harvest over many months is economically preferable to a strategy of harvesting only in peak yield harvest months. Restricting harvest to a two-month harvest season would increase the cost to deliver feedstock by 23 percent. For a capital

  7. Energy and environmental analysis of a rapeseed biorefinery conversion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldrin, Alessio; Balzan, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2013-01-01

    mechanisms determining the fate of products, lost opportunities and marginal productions. The results show that introduction of enzymatic transesterification and improved oil extraction procedure result in environmental benefits compared to a traditional process. Utilization of rapeseed straw seems to have......)-based environmental assessment of a Danish biorefinery system was carried out to thoroughly analyze and optimize the concept and address future research. The LCA study was based on case-specific mass and energy balances and inventory data, and was conducted using consequential LCA approach to take into account market...... positive effects on the greenhouse gases (GHG) footprint of the biorefinery system, with improvements in the range of 9 % to 29 %, depending on the considered alternative. The mass and energy balances showed the potential for improvement of straw treatment processes (hydrothermal pre-treatment and dark...

  8. Fair Oaks Dairy Farms Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Review Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Wold; Robert Divers

    2011-06-23

    At Fair Oaks Dairy, dried manure solids (''DMS'') are currently used as a low value compost. United Power was engaged to evaluate the feasibility of processing these DMS into ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. The Fair Oaks Dairy group is transitioning their traditional ''manure to methane'' mesophilic anaerobic digester platform to an integrated bio-refinery centered upon thermophilic digestion. Presently, the Digested Manure Solids (DMS) are used as a low value soil amendment (compost). United Power evaluated the feasibility of processing DMS into higher value ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. DMS was analyzed and over 100 potential technology providers were reviewed and evaluated. DMS contains enough carbon to be suitable as a biomass feedstock for conversion into ethanol by gasification technology, or as part of a conversion process that would include combined heat and power. In the first process, 100% of the feedstock is converted into ethanol. In the second process, the feedstock is combusted to provide heat to generate electrical power supporting other processes. Of the 100 technology vendors evaluated, a short list of nine technology providers was developed. From this, two vendors were selected as finalists (one was an enzymatic platform and one was a gasification platform). Their selection was based upon the technical feasibility of their systems, engineering expertise, experience in commercial or pilot scale operations, the ability or willingness to integrate the system into the Fair Oaks Biorefinery, the know-how or experience in producing bio-ethanol, and a clear path to commercial development.

  9. Biorefineries: Relocating Biomass Refineries to the Rural Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franka Papendiek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The field for application of biomass is rising. The demand for food and feeding stuff rises while at the same time energy, chemicals and other materials also need to be produced from biomass because of decreasing fossil resources. However, the biorefinery ideas and concepts can help to use the limited renewable raw materials more efficiently than today. With biorefineries, valuable products, such as platform chemicals, can be produced from agricultural feedstock, which can subsequently be further processed into a variety of substances by the chemical industry. Due to the role they play as producers of biomass, rural areas will grow in importance in the decades to come. Parts of the biorefinery process can be relocated to the rural areas to bring a high added value to these regions. By refining biomass at the place of production, new economic opportunities may arise for agriculturists, and the industry gets high-grade pre-products. Additionally, an on-farm refining can increase the quality of the products because of the instant processing. To reduce competition with the food production and to find new possibilities of utilisation for these habitats, the focus for new agricultural biomass should be on grasslands. But also croplands can provide more renewable raw materials without endangering a sustainable agriculture, e.g. by implementing legumes in the crop rotation. To decide if a region can provide adequate amounts of raw material for a biorefinery, new raw material assessment procedures have to be developed. In doing so, involvement of farmers is inevitable to generate a reliable study of the biomass refinery potentials.

  10. ClearFuels-Rentech Integrated Biorefinery Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, Joshua [Project Director

    2014-02-26

    The project Final Report describes the validation of the performance of the integration of two technologies that were proven individually on a pilot scale and were demonstrated as a pilot scale integrated biorefinery. The integrated technologies were a larger scale ClearFuels’ (CF) advanced flexible biomass to syngas thermochemical high efficiency hydrothermal reformer (HEHTR) technology with Rentech’s (RTK) existing synthetic gas to liquids (GTL) technology.

  11. Fungal Secretome for Biorefinery: Recent Advances in Proteomic Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Siu Kwan Sze; Adav, Sunil S.

    2013-01-01

    Fungal biotechnology has been well established in food and healthcare sector, and now being explored for lignocellulosic biorefinery due to their great potential to produce a wide array of extracellular enzymes for nutrient recycling. Due to global warming, environmental pollution, green house gases emission and depleting fossil fuel, fungal enzymes for lignocellulosic biomass refinery become a major focus for utilizing renewal bioresources. Proteomic technologies tender better biological und...

  12. Biowaste biorefinery in Europe: opportunities and research & development needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Fabio; Totaro, Grazia; Diels, Ludo; Reis, Maria; Duarte, Jose; Carioca, Osvaldo Beserra; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor M; Ferreira, Bruno Sommer

    2015-01-25

    This review aims to explore the needs and opportunities of research & development in the field of biowaste biorefinery in Europe. Modern industry in recent years is giving its close attention on organic waste as a new precious bioresource. Specific biowaste valorisation pathways are focusing on food processing waste, being food sector the first manufacture in Europe. Anyway they need to be further tested and validated and then transferred at the larger scale. In particular, they also need to become integrated, combining biomass pretreatments and recovery of biogenic chemicals with bioconversion processes in order to obtain a large class of chemicals. This will help to (a) use the whole biowaste, by avoiding producing residues and providing to the approach the required environmental sustainability, and (b) producing different biobased products that enter different markets, to get the possible economical sustainability of the whole biorefinery. However, the costs of the developed integrated processes might be high, mostly for the fact that the industry dealing with such issues is still underdeveloped and therefore dominated by high processing costs. Such costs can be significantly reduced by intensifying research & development on process integration and intensification. The low or no cost of starting material along with the environmental benefits coming from the concomitant biowaste disposal would offset the high capital costs for initiating such a biorefinery. As long as the oil prices tend to increase (and they will) this strategy will become even more attractive. PMID:24284045

  13. Ethanol dehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Uyazán

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This review outlines ethanol dehydration processes and their most important characteristics. It also deals with the main operating variables and some criteria used in designing the separation scheme. A differentiation is made between processes involving liquid steam balance in separation operations and those doing it by screening the difference in molecule size. The last part presents a comparison between the three main industrial processes, stressing their stengths and weaknesses from the operational, energy consumption and industrial services points of view.

  14. Traits of selected Clostridium strains for syngas fermentation to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael E; Richter, Hanno; Saha, Surya; Angenent, Largus T

    2016-03-01

    Syngas fermentation is an anaerobic bioprocess that could become industrially relevant as a biorefinery platform for sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. An important prerequisite for commercialization is adequate performance of the biocatalyst (i.e., sufficiently high production rate, titer, selectivity, yield, and stability of the fermentation). Here, we compared the performance of three potential candidate Clostridium strains in syngas-to-ethanol conversion: Clostridium ljungdahlii PETC, C. ljungdahlii ERI-2, and Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1. Experiments were conducted in a two-stage, continuously fed syngas-fermentation system that had been optimized for stable ethanol production. The two C. ljungdahlii strains performed similar to each other but different from C. autoethanogenum. When the pH value was lowered from 5.5 to 4.5 to induce solventogenesis, the cell-specific carbon monoxide and hydrogen consumption (similar rate for all strains at pH 5.5), severely decreased in JA1-1, but hardly in PETC and ERI-2. Ethanol production in strains PETC and ERI-2 remained relatively stable while the rate of acetate production decreased, resulting in a high ethanol/acetate ratio, but lower overall productivities. With JA1-1, lowering the pH severely lowered rates of both ethanol and acetate production; and as a consequence, no pronounced shift to solventogenesis was observed. The highest overall ethanol production rate of 0.301 g · L(-1)  · h(-1) was achieved with PETC at pH 4.5 with a corresponding 19 g/L (1.9% w/v) ethanol concentration and a 5.5:1 ethanol/acetate molar ratio. A comparison of the genes relevant for ethanol metabolism revealed differences between C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum that, however, did not conclusively explain the different phenotypes. PMID:26331212

  15. Traits of selected Clostridium strains for syngas fermentation to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael E; Richter, Hanno; Saha, Surya; Angenent, Largus T

    2016-03-01

    Syngas fermentation is an anaerobic bioprocess that could become industrially relevant as a biorefinery platform for sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. An important prerequisite for commercialization is adequate performance of the biocatalyst (i.e., sufficiently high production rate, titer, selectivity, yield, and stability of the fermentation). Here, we compared the performance of three potential candidate Clostridium strains in syngas-to-ethanol conversion: Clostridium ljungdahlii PETC, C. ljungdahlii ERI-2, and Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1. Experiments were conducted in a two-stage, continuously fed syngas-fermentation system that had been optimized for stable ethanol production. The two C. ljungdahlii strains performed similar to each other but different from C. autoethanogenum. When the pH value was lowered from 5.5 to 4.5 to induce solventogenesis, the cell-specific carbon monoxide and hydrogen consumption (similar rate for all strains at pH 5.5), severely decreased in JA1-1, but hardly in PETC and ERI-2. Ethanol production in strains PETC and ERI-2 remained relatively stable while the rate of acetate production decreased, resulting in a high ethanol/acetate ratio, but lower overall productivities. With JA1-1, lowering the pH severely lowered rates of both ethanol and acetate production; and as a consequence, no pronounced shift to solventogenesis was observed. The highest overall ethanol production rate of 0.301 g · L(-1)  · h(-1) was achieved with PETC at pH 4.5 with a corresponding 19 g/L (1.9% w/v) ethanol concentration and a 5.5:1 ethanol/acetate molar ratio. A comparison of the genes relevant for ethanol metabolism revealed differences between C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum that, however, did not conclusively explain the different phenotypes.

  16. Biofuels 2020: Biorefineries based on lignocellulosic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Miguel; Galan, Jose Luis; Laffarga, Joaquina; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2016-09-01

    The production of liquid biofuels to blend with gasoline is of worldwide importance to secure the energy supply while reducing the use of fossil fuels, supporting the development of rural technology with knowledge-based jobs and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. Today, engineering for plant construction is accessible and new processes using agricultural residues and municipal solid wastes have reached a good degree of maturity and high conversion yields (almost 90% of polysaccharides are converted into monosaccharides ready for fermentation). For the complete success of the 2G technology, it is still necessary to overcome a number of limitations that prevent a first-of-a-kind plant from operating at nominal capacity. We also claim that the triumph of 2G technology requires the development of favourable logistics to guarantee biomass supply and make all actors (farmers, investors, industrial entrepreneurs, government, others) aware that success relies on agreement advances. The growth of ethanol production for 2020 seems to be secured with a number of 2G plants, but public/private investments are still necessary to enable 2G technology to move on ahead from its very early stages to a more mature consolidated technology. PMID:27470921

  17. DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF SUMATRIPTAN SUCCINATE TRANSDERMAL PATCHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gururaj S. Kulkarni* and D. Narasinha Reddy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Most of the therapeutic agents are recommended through an oral route, but oral route has disadvantages like first pass metabolism, liver toxicity, etc, due to gastrointestinal pH. This leads poor bioavailability of drugs, which are not stable in G.I pH. To overcome this problem, increase the bioiavailibility, reduce the dose and dose dumping Transdermal delivery system is better option as novel drug delivery system, which bypass the hepatic first pass metabolism, and avoid drug degradation due to systemic absorption of the drug. Minimize plasma level fluctuations and extend the drug activity besides improving patient compliance. Sumatriptan succinate is a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor subtype agonist. Sumatriptan succinate is chemically designated as 3-[2-(dimethylaminoethyl]-N-methyl-indole-5-methanesulfonamide succinate. Sumatriptan succinate is a white to off-white powder that is readily soluble in water. Oral administration of Sumatriptan succinate suffers from poorbioavailability, partly due to presystemic metabolism- some of it gets broken down in the stomach and bloodstream before it reaches the target arteries. Sumatriptan is metabolized primarily by monoamine oxidase A into an indole acetic acid analogue, part of which is further conjugated with glucuronic acid. These metabolites excreted in the urine and bile. Only about 3% of the active drug may be recovered unchanged. Because of this the bioavailability is only 15% with half life is 2.5 hrs. In this work, the effort has done to improve bioavailability of the sumatriptan succinate by transdermal patches dosage form by using polymers HPMCK4M, carbopol934 and Dibutylpthalate as used as plasticizers.

  18. 77 FR 4276 - Notice of Funds Availability (NOFA) for the Biorefinery Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... Biorefinery Assistance Program AGENCY: Rural Business-Cooperative Service and Rural Utilities Service, USDA... for the Biorefinery Assistance Program for FY 2012. Applications will not be accepted under this program until further notice. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kelley Oehler, Energy Branch,...

  19. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) User Reference Guide: Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Goldberg, M.

    2015-02-01

    This guide -- the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model User Reference Guide -- was developed to assist users in operating and understanding the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model. The guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and data sources used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model estimates local (e.g., county- or state-level) job creation, earnings, and output from total economic activity for a given fast pyrolysis biorefinery. These estimates include the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the construction and operation phases of biorefinery projects.Local revenue and supply chain impacts as well as induced impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from the IMPLAN software program. By determining the local economic impacts and job creation for a proposed biorefinery, the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model can be used to field questions about the added value biorefineries might bring to a local community.

  20. Biophysical properties of phenyl succinic acid derivatised hyaluronic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Klitgaard, Søren; Skovsen, Esben;

    2010-01-01

    Modification of hyaluronic acid (HA) with aryl succinic anhydrides results in new biomedical properties of HA as compared to non-modified HA, such as more efficient skin penetration, stronger binding to the skin, and the ability to blend with hydrophobic materials. In the present study, hyaluronic...... acid has been derivatised with the anhydride form of phenyl succinic acid (PheSA). The fluorescence of PheSA was efficiently quenched by the HA matrix. HA also acted as a singlet oxygen scavenger. Fluorescence lifetime(s) of PheSA in solution and when attached to the HA matrix has been monitored...

  1. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2001-09-25

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  2. Simulating Succinate-Promoted Dissolution at Calcite {104} Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkhonto, D.; Sahai, N.

    2008-12-01

    Organic molecules of a wide range of molecular weights from small organic acids, amino-acids, acidic peptides and acidic proteins to humic and fulvic acids play a key role in modulating nucleation, crystal growth and dissolution of calcium carbonate polymorphs. In general, these acidic molecules inhibit calcite growth and, promote dissolution preferentially along specific crystallographic directions, in the process, regulating crystal shape and size, and even whether a metastable polymorph (e.g., vaterite or aragonite) is nucleated first. For example, chiral faces of calcite are selected by chiral amino-acids and the unusual {hk0} faces are expressed in the presence of amino-acids [Orme et al., 2001], and unusual heptagonal dissolution etch-pit are seen in the presence of succinate compared to the normal rhombohedral pits in water alone [Teng et al., 2006]. Thus, the presence of unusual crystal morphologies may indicate organic-mediated growth, thus serving as a biosignature. We have conducted the Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations using the Consistent Valence Force Field (CVFF) as implemented in the FORCITE© module of the Materials Studio © software package (Accelrys, Inc. TM) to model the adsorption of succinate, a dicarboxylic acid, and charge- balancing Na+ ions on dry and hydrated steps in different directions on the {104} cleavage face of calcite [Mkhonto and Sahai, in prep.]. At the site of succinate adsorption, we find elongation of the interatomic distances (Ca-OCO3,i) between surface Ca2+ cation and the oxygen of the underlying inorganic CO32- anion the first surface layer of calcite, compared to the corresponding distances in the presence of water alone, suggesting greater ease of surface Ca2+ detachment. This result is consistent with the empirically observed increase in overall dissolution rate with succinate [Teng et al., 2006]. Furthermore, succinate adsorption lowers the step energies, which explains the appearance of steps in the unsusual [42

  3. Biorefining of lignocellulosic feedstock--Technical, economic and environmental considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lin; van der Voet, Ester; Huppes, Gjalt

    2010-07-01

    Biorefinery, an example of a multiple products system, integrates biomass conversion processes and equipment to produce fuels, power and chemicals from biomass. This study focuses on technical design, economic and environmental analysis of a lignocellulosic feedstock (LCF) biorefinery producing ethanol, succinic acid, acetic acid and electricity. As the potential worldwide demand of succinic acid and its derivatives can reach 30 million tons per year, succinic acid is a promising high-value product if production cost and market price are substantially lowered. The results of the economic analysis show that the designed refinery has great potentials compared to the single-output ethanol plant; even when the price of succinic acid is lowered or the capital investment doubled. In terms of eco-efficiency, the LCF biorefinery shows better environmental performances mainly in global warming potential due to CO(2) fixation during acid fermentation. The overall evaluation of the eco-efficiency depends on the importance attached to each impact category.

  4. Sustainable bioethanol production combining biorefinery principles using combined raw materials from wheat undersown with clover-grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Haugaard-Nielsen, Henrik

    2008-05-01

    To obtain the best possible net energy balance of the bioethanol production the biomass raw materials used need to be produced with limited use of non-renewable fossil fuels. Intercropping strategies are known to maximize growth and productivity by including more than one species in the crop stand, very often with legumes as one of the components. In the present study clover-grass is undersown in a traditional wheat crop. Thereby, it is possible to increase input of symbiotic fixation of atmospheric nitrogen into the cropping systems and reduce the need for fertilizer applications. Furthermore, when using such wheat and clover-grass mixtures as raw material, addition of urea and other fermentation nutrients produced from fossil fuels can be reduced in the whole ethanol manufacturing chain. Using second generation ethanol technology mixtures of relative proportions of wheat straw and clover-grass (15:85, 50:50, and 85:15) were pretreated by wet oxidation. The results showed that supplementing wheat straw with clover-grass had a positive effect on the ethanol yield in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation experiments, and the effect was more pronounced in inhibitory substrates. The highest ethanol yield (80% of theoretical) was obtained in the experiment with high fraction (85%) of clover-grass. In order to improve the sugar recovery of clover-grass, it should be separated into a green juice (containing free sugars, fructan, amino acids, vitamins and soluble minerals) for direct fermentation and a fibre pulp for pretreatment together with wheat straw. Based on the obtained results a decentralized biorefinery concept for production of biofuel is suggested emphasizing sustainability, localness, and recycling principles. PMID:18338188

  5. Environmental benefits of the integrated production of ethanol and biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Integrated bioenergy systems can favor the sustainability of biofuels. ► We analyzed the integrated production of ethanol and biodiesel in Brazil. ► GHG emissions and fossil energy use in the ethanol life cycle would be reduced. ► Socio-economic and other environmental aspects must be analyzed in future works. -- Abstract: The biorefinery of the future will be an integrated complex that makes a variety of products (e.g., biofuels, chemicals, power and protein) from a variety of feedstocks. The objective of this work was to evaluate the environmental benefits, compared to the traditional sugarcane ethanol system, of the integrated production of ethanol and biodiesel through a sugarcane–soybean biorefinery concept in Brazil. The environmental aspects considered here were the fossil energy use and the greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions associated with ethanol production. In the Integrated System, soybean would be cultivated in part of the sugarcane reforming areas, which represents ∼17% of the total sugarcane area. Sugarcane and soybean oil would be processed in a combined ethanol–biodiesel plant, which would use only bagasse as fuel. All the demand for utilities of the biodiesel plant would be provided by the distillery. The output products of the combined plant would comprise sugarcane ethanol, soybean biodiesel (which would be used as diesel (B5) substitute in the sugarcane cultivation), bioelectricity and glycerin. The results indicate that the Integrated System can reduce the fossil energy consumption from 75 to 37 kJ/MJ of ethanol, when compared to the traditional system. For GHG emissions, the value would drop from 22.5 to 19.7 g CO2eq/MJ of ethanol. This analysis shows that the Integrated System is an important option to contribute to ethanol’s life cycle independence from fossil resources. This is an attractive environmental aspect, but socio-economic (as well as other environmental) aspects should also be analyzed in order to

  6. A biorefinery from Nannochloropsis sp. microalga--extraction of oils and pigments. Production of biohydrogen from the leftover biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, B P; Villalobos, F; Barragán, B E; Oliveira, A C; Batista, A P; Marques, P A S S; Mendes, R L; Sovová, H; Palavra, A F; Gouveia, L

    2013-05-01

    The microalga Nannochloropsis sp. was used in this study, in a biorefinery context, as biomass feedstock for the production of fatty acids for biodiesel, biohydrogen and high added-value compounds. The microalgal biomass, which has a high lipid and pigment content (mainly carotenoids), was submitted to supercritical CO2 extraction. The temperature, pressure and solvent flow-rate were evaluated to check their effect on the extraction yield. The best operational conditions to extract 33 g lipids/100 g dry biomass were found to be at 40 °C, 300 bar and a CO2 flow-rate of 0.62 g/min. The effect of adding a co-solvent (ethanol) was also studied. When supercritical CO2 doped with 20% (w/w) ethanol was used, it was possible to extract 45 g lipids/100 g dry biomass of lipids and recover 70% of the pigments. Furthermore, the remaining biomass after extraction was effectively used as feedstock to produce biohydrogen through dark fermentation by Enterobacter aerogenes resulting in a hydrogen production yield of 60.6 mL/g dry biomass.

  7. Optimal Design of Algae Biorefinery Processing Networks for the production of Protein, Ethanol and Biodiesel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheali, Peam; Vivion, Anthony; Gernaey, Krist V.;

    2015-01-01

    analysis such as microalgae production cost, composition of microalgae (e.g. oil content) and biodiesel/bioethanol market prices is considered. New optimal processing paths are found with potential of producing higher amount of biodiesel. Last, the methodology is intended as decision support tool for early...

  8. Microbiota-Produced Succinate Improves Glucose Homeostasis via Intestinal Gluconeogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vadder, Filipe; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Zitoun, Carine;

    2016-01-01

    Beneficial effects of dietary fiber on glucose and energy homeostasis have long been described, focusing mostly on the production of short-chain fatty acids by the gut commensal bacteria. However, bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber also produces large amounts of succinate and, to date...

  9. Nucleation kinetics of urea succinic acid -ferroelectric single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhivya, R.; Vizhi, R. Ezhil; Babu, D. Rajan

    2015-06-01

    Single crystals of Urea Succinic Acid (USA) were grown by slow cooling technique. The crystalline system was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction. The metastable zonewidth were carried out for various temperatures i.e., 35°, 40°, 45° and 50°C. The induction period is experimentally determined and various nucleation parameters have been estimated.

  10. 21 CFR 522.1884 - Prednisolone sodium succinate injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... inflammatory, allergic and less severe stress conditions, where immediate effect is not required, at 1 to 5...-1, 4-diene-3, 20-dione 21-succinate sodium salt. (b) Specifications. Each milliliter of prednisolone... other stress conditions at intervals of 12, 24, or 48 hours, depending upon the size of the animal,...

  11. Integrating biorefinery and farm biogeochemical cycles offsets fossil energy and mitigates soil carbon losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Paul R; Mitchell, James G; Pourhashem, Ghasideh; Spatari, Sabrina; Del Grosso, Stephen J; Parton, William J

    2015-06-01

    Crop residues are potentially significant sources of feedstock for biofuel production in the United States. However, there are concerns with maintaining the environmental functions of these residues while also serving as a feedstock for biofuel production. Maintaining soil organic carbon (SOC) along with its functional benefits is considered a greater constraint than maintaining soil erosion losses to an acceptable level. We used the biogeochemical model DayCent to evaluate the effect of residue removal, corn stover, and wheat and barley straw in three diverse locations in the USA. We evaluated residue removal with and without N replacement, along with application of a high-lignin fermentation byproduct (HLFB), the residue by-product comprised of lignin and small quantities of nutrients from cellulosic ethanol production. SOC always decreased with residue harvest, but the decrease was greater in colder climates when expressed on a life cycle basis. The effect of residue harvest on soil N2O emissions varied with N addition and climate. With N addition, N2O emissions always increased, but the increase was greater in colder climates. Without N addition, N2O emissions increased in Iowa, but decreased in Maryland and North Carolina with crop residue harvest. Although SOC was lower with residue harvest when HLFB was used for power production instead of being applied to land, the avoidance of fossil fuel emissions to the atmosphere by utilizing the cellulose and hemicellulose fractions of crop residue to produce ethanol (offsets) reduced the overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions because most of this residue carbon would normally be lost during microbial respiration. Losses of SOC and reduced N mineralization could both be mitigated with the application of HLFB to the land. Therefore, by returning the high-lignin fraction of crop residue to the land after production of ethanol at the biorefinery, soil carbon levels could be maintained along with the functional benefit of

  12. Pharmacological characterization of the mechanisms underlying the vascular effects of succinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Letícia N; Gonzaga, Natália A; Simplicio, Janaina A; do Vale, Gabriel T; Carballido, José M; Alves-Filho, José C; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2016-10-15

    We investigated the mechanisms underlying the vascular effects of succinate. Vascular reactivity experiments were performed in aortic rings isolated from male Wistar rats and C57BL/6 wild type (WT) or GPR91(-/-) mice. Nitrate/nitrite (NOx) was measured colorimetrically whereas 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α (stable product of prostacyclin) was measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was assessed by western immunoblotting. Functional assays revealed that the direct effect of succinate in the vasculature is biphasic. At lower concentrations succinate induced relaxation while at higher concentrations succinate induced vascular contraction. Succinate concentration dependently relaxed rat aortic rings with intact endothelium. Endothelial removal reduced, but not abolished succinate-induced relaxation. Similarly, succinate relaxed endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortas isolated from both C57BL/6 and GPR91(-/-) mice. Pre-incubation of endothelium-intact, but not endothelium-denuded rat aortic rings with l-NAME, indomethacin and tetraethylammonium (TEA) reduced succinate-induced relaxation. In endothelium-intact rings, succinate-induced relaxation was attenuated by ODQ, haemoglobin, Rp-8-Br-Pet-cGMPS, thapsigargin, wortmannin and SC-560. Blockade of K(+) channels with 4-aminopyridine, apamin and charybdotoxin reduced succinate-induced relaxation. Succinate increased the concentration of NOx and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α as well as eNOS phosphorylation at ser(1177) residue. CaCl2-induced contraction of endothelium-intact or endothelium-denuded aortas was not affected by succinate. The major finding of our study is that it first demonstrates a direct effect of succinate in the vasculature. Succinate displays a biphasic and concentration-dependent effect. The vascular relaxation induced by succinate is partially mediated by endothelial GPR91 receptors via the NO-cGMP pathway, a vasodilator cyclooxygenase (COX

  13. Energy Opportunities from Lignocellulosic Biomass for a Biorefinery Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Cotana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents some energy considerations concerning a biorefinery case study that has been carried out by the CRB/CIRIAF of the University of Perugia. The biorefinery is the case study of the BIT3G project, a national funded research project, and it uses the lignocellulosic biomass that is available in the territory as input materials for biochemical purposes, such as cardoon and carthamus. The whole plant is composed of several sections: the cardoon and carthamus seed milling, the oil refinement facilities, and the production section of some high quality biochemicals, i.e., bio-oils and fatty acids. The main goal of the research is to demonstrate energy autonomy of the latter section of the biorefinery, while only recovering energy from the residues resulting from the collection of the biomass. To this aim, this work presents the quantification of the energy requirements to be supplied to the considered biorefinery section, the mass flow, and the energy and chemical characterization of the biomass. Afterwards, some sustainability strategies have been qualitatively investigated in order to identify the best one to be used in this case study; the combined heat and power (CHP technology. Two scenarios have been defined and presented: the first with 6 MWt thermal input and 1.2 MWe electrical power as an output and the second with 9 MWt thermal input and 1.8 MWe electrical power as an output. The first scenario showed that 11,000 tons of residual biomass could ensure the annual production of about 34,000 MWht, equal to about the 72% of the requirements, and about 9600 MWhe, equal to approximately 60% of the electricity demand. The second scenario showed that 18,000 tons of the residual biomass could ensure the total annual production of about 56,000 MWht, corresponding to more than 100% of the requirements, and about 14,400 MWhe, equal to approximately 90% of the electricity demand. In addition, the CO2 emissions from the energy valorization

  14. Economic risk analysis and critical comparison of optimal biorefinery concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheali, Peam; Posada, John A.; Gernaey, Krist;

    2016-01-01

    value-added chemicals (diethyl ether and 1,3-butadiene), provides an improved resilience and robustness against market price fluctuations by reducing economic loss by 140 MM$/a (17% IRR); (iii) the economic analysis favors biochemical conversion technologies for a small production/processing capacity...... recommend that a comprehensive economic risk analysis, using for example the MonteCarlo technique, should be an integral part of the conceptual design, development, and optimization of biorefineries to help improve their economic robustness in view of the competitive market forchemicals and fuels....

  15. Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed pre-processing supply system designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David J. Muth, Jr.; Matthew H. Langholtz; Eric C. D. Tan; Jacob J. Jacobson; Amy Schwab; May M. Wu; Andrew Argo; Craig C. Brandt; Kara G. Cafferty; Yi-Wen Chiu; Abhijit Dutta; Laurence M. Eaton; Erin M. Searcy

    2014-08-01

    The 2011 US Billion-Ton Update estimates that by 2030 there will be enough agricultural and forest resources to sustainably provide at least one billion dry tons of biomass annually, enough to displace approximately 30% of the country's current petroleum consumption. A portion of these resources are inaccessible at current cost targets with conventional feedstock supply systems because of their remoteness or low yields. Reliable analyses and projections of US biofuels production depend on assumptions about the supply system and biorefinery capacity, which, in turn, depend upon economic value, feedstock logistics, and sustainability. A cross-functional team has examined combinations of advances in feedstock supply systems and biorefinery capacities with rigorous design information, improved crop yield and agronomic practices, and improved estimates of sustainable biomass availability. A previous report on biochemical refinery capacity noted that under advanced feedstock logistic supply systems that include depots and pre-processing operations there are cost advantages that support larger biorefineries up to 10 000 DMT/day facilities compared to the smaller 2000 DMT/day facilities. This report focuses on analyzing conventional versus advanced depot biomass supply systems for a thermochemical conversion and refinery sizing based on woody biomass. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the economies of scale enabled by advanced logistics offsets much of the added logistics costs from additional depot processing and transportation, resulting in a small overall increase to the minimum ethanol selling price compared to the conventional logistic supply system. While the overall costs do increase slightly for the advanced logistic supply systems, the ability to mitigate moisture and ash in the system will improve the storage and conversion processes. In addition, being able to draw on feedstocks from further distances will decrease the risk of biomass supply to

  16. Microbubble Distillation for Ethanol-Water Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atheer Al-yaqoobi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, a novel approach for separating ethanol-water mixture by microbubble distillation technology was investigated. Traditional distillation processes require large amounts of energy to raise the liquid to its boiling point to effect removal of volatile components. The concept of microbubble distillation by comparison is to heat the gas phase rather than the liquid phase to achieve separation. The removal of ethanol from the thermally sensitive fermentation broths was taken as a case of study. Consequently the results were then compared with those which could be obtained under equilibrium conditions expected in an “ideal” distillation unit. Microbubble distillation has achieved vapour compositions higher than that which could be obtained under traditional equilibrium conditions. The separation was achieved at liquid temperature significantly less than the boiling point of the mixture. In addition, it was observed that the separation efficiency of the microbubble distillation could be increased by raising the injected air temperature, while the temperature of the liquid mixture increased only moderately. The separation efficiency of microbubble distillation was compared with that of pervaporation for the recovery of bioethanol from the thermally sensitive fermentation broths. The technology could be controlled to give high separation and energy efficiency. This could contribute to improving commercial viability of biofuel production and other coproducts of biorefinery processing.

  17. Cellulosic ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindedam, Jane; Bruun, Sander; Jørgensen, Henning;

    2010-01-01

    Background Variations in sugar yield due to genotypic qualities of feedstock are largely undescribed for pilot-scale ethanol processing. Our objectives were to compare glucose and xylose yield (conversion and total sugar yield) from straw of five winter wheat cultivars at three enzyme loadings (2.......5, 5 and 10 FPU g-1 dm pretreated straw) and to compare particle size distribution of cultivars after pilot-scale hydrothermal pretreatment. Results Significant interactions between enzyme loading and cultivars show that breeding for cultivars with high sugar yields under modest enzyme loading could...... be warranted. At an enzyme loading of 5 FPU g-1 dm pretreated straw, a significant difference in sugar yields of 17% was found between the highest and lowest yielding cultivars. Sugar yield from separately hydrolyzed particle-size fractions of each cultivar showed that finer particles had 11% to 21% higher...

  18. Levulinic Acid Biorefineries: New Challenges for Efficient Utilization of Biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileidis, Filoklis D; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena

    2016-03-21

    Levulinic acid is a sustainable platform molecule that can be upgraded to valuable chemicals and fuel additives. This article focuses on the catalytic upgrading of levulinic acid into various chemicals such as levulinate esters, δ-aminolevulinic acid, succinic acid, diphenolic acid, γ-valerolactone, and γ-valerolactone derivatives such valeric esters, 5-nonanone, α-methylene-γ valerolactone, and other various molecular-weight alkanes (C9 and C18-C27 olefins). PMID:26847212

  19. Elementary Mode Analysis for the Rational Design of Efficient Succinate Conversion from Glycerol by Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available By integrating the restriction of oxygen and redox sensing/regulatory system, elementary mode analysis was used to predict the metabolic potential of glycerol for succinate production by E. coli under either anaerobic or aerobic conditions. It was found that although the theoretical maximum succinate yields under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions are 1.0 mol/mol glycerol, the aerobic condition was considered to be more favorable for succinate production. Although increase of the oxygen concentration would reduce the succinate yield, the calculation suggests that controlling the molar fraction of oxygen to be under 0.65 mol/mol would be beneficial for increasing the succinate productivity. Based on the elementary mode analysis, the rational genetic modification strategies for efficient succinate production under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were obtained, respectively. Overexpressing the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase or heterogonous pyruvate carboxylase is considered to be the most efficient strategy to increase the succinate yield.

  20. Life cycle assessment of sugarcane ethanol and palm oil biodiesel joint production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and palm tree (Elaeis guianeensis) are crops with high biofuel yields, 7.6 m3 ha−1 y−1 of ethanol and 4 Mg ha−1 y−1 of oil, respectively. The joint production of these crops enhances the sustainability of ethanol. The objective of this work was comparing a traditional sugarcane ethanol production system (TSES) with a joint production system (JSEB), in which ethanol and biodiesel are produced at the same biorefinery but only ethanol is traded. The comparison is based on ISO 14.040:2006 and ISO 14044:2006, and appropriate indicators. Production systems in Cerrado (typical savannah), Cerradão (woody savannah) and pastureland ecosystems were considered. Energy and carbon balances, and land use change impacts were evaluated. The joint system includes 100% substitution of biodiesel for diesel, which is all consumed in different cropping stages. Data were collected by direct field observation methods, and questionnaires applied to Brazilian facilities. Three sugarcane mills situated in São Paulo State and one palm oil refinery located in Para State were surveyed. The information was supplemented by secondary sources. Results demonstrated that fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions decreased, whereas energy efficiency increased when JSEB was compared to TSES. In comparison with TSES, the energy balance of JSEB was 1.7 greater. In addition, JSEB released 23% fewer GHG emissions than TSES. The ecosystem carbon payback time for Cerrado, Cerradão, and Degraded Grassland of JSEB was respectively 4, 7.7 and −7.6 years. These are typical land use types of the Brazilian Cerrado region for which JSEB was conceived. -- Highlights: ► LCA of ethanol and biodiesel joint production system. ► Sugarcane based biorefinery assessment in Brazil. ► Original Brazilian LCI data on ethanol and palm oil biodiesel production. ► Biofuel LCA with LUC sensitivity analisis for the Brazilian Cerrado Region.

  1. Systematic approach for synthesis of palm oil-based biorefinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NG, Rex T. L.; NG, Denny K. S.; LAM, Hon Loong [Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Centre of Excellence for Green Technologies, Univ. of Nottingham, Selangor, (Malaysia); TAY, Douglas H. S.; LIM, Joseph H. E. [2GGS Eco Solutions Sdn Bhd, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2012-11-01

    Various types of palm oil biomasses are generated from palm oil mill when crude palm oil (CPO) is produced from fresh fruit bunch (FFB). In the current practice, palm oil biomasses are used as the main source of energy input in the palm oil mill to produce steam and electricity. Moreover, those biomasses are regarded as by-products and can be reclaimed easily. Therefore, there is a continuous increasing interest concerning biomasses generated from the palm oil mill as a source of renewable energy. Although various technologies have been exploited to produce bio-fuel (i.e., briquette, pellet, etc.) as well as heat and power generation, however, no systematic approach which can analyse and optimise the synthesise biorefinery is presented. In this work, a systematic approach for synthesis and optimisation of palm oil-based biorefinery which including palm oil mill and refinery with maximum economic performance is developed. The optimised network configuration with achieves the maximum economic performance can also be determined. To illustrate the proposed approach, a case study is solved in this work.

  2. Uncertainty analysis in raw material and utility cost of biorefinery synthesis and design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheali, Peam; Quaglia, Alberto; Gernaey, Krist;

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the impact of uncertain data on the solution obtained by using a superstructure-based optimization approach in synthesis and design of biorefinery processing networks. In the early stages of biorefinery design, many of the data required for the formulation of the design problem...... material price and utility cost) on the design of a biorefinery process network....... are characterized by considerable uncertainty. These uncertainties might have significant impact on the results of the design problem, and therefore need to be carefully evaluated and managed, in order to generate candidates for robust design. In this contribution, we study the effect of data uncertainty (raw...

  3. A novel organic nonlinear optical crystal: Creatininium succinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel organic material complex of creatininium succinate (CS) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by the reaction of creatinine and succinic acid from aqueous solution by employing the technique of slow evaporation at room temperature. The structure of the grown crystal has been elucidated using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and the structure was refined by least-squares method to R = 0.027 for 1840 reflections. FT-IR spectral investigation has been carried out to identify the various functional groups in the title compound. UV–Vis transmission was carried out which shows the crystal has a good optical transmittance in the visible region with lower cutoff wavelength around 220 nm. Nonlinear optical property of the crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique

  4. A novel organic nonlinear optical crystal: Creatininium succinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thirumurugan, R.; Anitha, K., E-mail: singlecerystalxrd@gmail.ciom [School of Physics, Madurai Kamraj University, Madurai 625021 (India)

    2015-06-24

    A novel organic material complex of creatininium succinate (CS) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by the reaction of creatinine and succinic acid from aqueous solution by employing the technique of slow evaporation at room temperature. The structure of the grown crystal has been elucidated using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and the structure was refined by least-squares method to R = 0.027 for 1840 reflections. FT-IR spectral investigation has been carried out to identify the various functional groups in the title compound. UV–Vis transmission was carried out which shows the crystal has a good optical transmittance in the visible region with lower cutoff wavelength around 220 nm. Nonlinear optical property of the crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique.

  5. Positive Interaction Of Ethanol With Malic Acid In Postharvest Physiology Of Cut Spray Carnation ‘White Natila’

    OpenAIRE

    Begri Fatemeh; Hadavi Ebrahim; Nabigol Amrollah

    2014-01-01

    In this study, succinic acid (0, 1 and 2 mM), malic acid (0, 1 and 2 mM), ethanol (0, 2 and 4% v/v), and their mixtures were applied as preservative solutions for cut flowers of spread carnation cv. ‘White Natila’ and their effect on the longevity, the amount of absorbed solution, malondialdehyde and chlorophyll content, cell membrane stability, fresh, and dry weight and on a visual quality was determined. A similarity in the effect of malic acid and succinic acid on dry weight and fresh weig...

  6. Internal electron transfer within mitochondrial succinate-cytochrome C reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal electron transfer within succinate-cytochrome C reductase from pigeon breast muscle mitochondria was followed by the pulse radiolytic technique. The electron equivalent is transferred from an unknown donor to b type cytochrome(s), in a first order process with a rate constant of: 660 +- 150s-1. This process might be the rate determining step of electron transfer in mitochondria, since it is similar in rate to the turnover number of the mitochondrial respiratory chain

  7. Application of CAPEC Lipid Property Databases in the Synthesis and Design of Biorefinery Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertran, Maria-Ona; Cunico, Larissa; Gani, Rafiqul

    industrial system based on biomass, an inexpensive, abundant and renewable raw material, is being established with sustainability as the main driving force [1]. The processing facilities for the production of multiple products (including biofuels and chemicals) from biomass are referred as biorefineries [2......]. The wide variety and complex nature of components in biorefineries poses a challenge with respect to the synthesis and design of these types of processes. Whereas physical and thermodynamic property data or models for petroleum-based processes are widely available, most data and models for biobased...... processes are not. Lipids are present in biorefinery processes: they represent feedstock (vegetable oil, waste cooking oil, microalgal oil), intermediate products (fatty acids, glycerol) and final products in biorefineries, thus the prediction of their properties is of relevance for the synthesis and design...

  8. Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels, NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-10-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility and its availability to biofuels' industry partners who want to operate, test, and develop biorefining technology and equipment.

  9. Synthesis and Design of Biorefinery Processing Networks with Uncertainty and Sustainability analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheali, Peam; Gernaey, Krist; Sin, Gürkan

    -criteria assessment including technical, economics and sustainability. The expanded database and superstructure with uncertainty and sustainability analysis form a powerful process synthesis toolbox to be used in design of future biorefineries with multi-criteria evaluation (technical and economic feasibility...... for processing renewable feedstocks, with the aim of bridging the gap for fuel, chemical and material production. This project is focusing on biorefinery network design, in particular for early stage design and development studies. Optimal biorefinery design is a challenging problem. It is a multi...... to support the evaluation of processes and the generation of sustainable alternatives for identifying the optimal processing routes. One particular challenge here is to include proactively sustainability analysis as part of the synthesis of biorefinery networks. Another challenge is the handling of several...

  10. Cell-permeable succinate prodrugs bypass mitochondrial complex I deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehinger, Johannes K; Piel, Sarah; Ford, Rhonan; Karlsson, Michael; Sjövall, Fredrik; Frostner, Eleonor Åsander; Morota, Saori; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M; Cornell, Clive; Moss, Steven J; Metzsch, Carsten; Hansson, Magnus J; Fliri, Hans; Elmér, Eskil

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I (CI) deficiency is the most prevalent defect in the respiratory chain in paediatric mitochondrial disease. This heterogeneous group of diseases includes serious or fatal neurological presentations such as Leigh syndrome and there are very limited evidence-based treatment options available. Here we describe that cell membrane-permeable prodrugs of the complex II substrate succinate increase ATP-linked mitochondrial respiration in CI-deficient human blood cells, fibroblasts and heart fibres. Lactate accumulation in platelets due to rotenone-induced CI inhibition is reversed and rotenone-induced increase in lactate:pyruvate ratio in white blood cells is alleviated. Metabolomic analyses demonstrate delivery and metabolism of [(13)C]succinate. In Leigh syndrome patient fibroblasts, with a recessive NDUFS2 mutation, respiration and spare respiratory capacity are increased by prodrug administration. We conclude that prodrug-delivered succinate bypasses CI and supports electron transport, membrane potential and ATP production. This strategy offers a potential future therapy for metabolic decompensation due to mitochondrial CI dysfunction. PMID:27502960

  11. Balance and saving of GHG emissions in thermochemical biorefineries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A simplified methodology for the balance and saving of GHG emissions is provided. • The GHG balance has a physical meaning and does not depend on the fossil reference. • The GHG saving depends on regulation of energy carriers. • The impact of Bio-CCS incorporation and multiproduction is analyzed. • The co-production of chemicals needs to be included in future regulation. - Abstract: In this study, a simplified methodology for the calculation of the balance of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and corresponding saving compared with the fossil reference is presented. The proposed methodology allows the estimation of the anthropogenic GHG emissions of thermochemical biorefineries (net emitted to the atmosphere). In the calculation of the GHG balance, all relevant factors have been identified and analyzed including multiproduction, emissions from biogenic carbon capture and storage (Bio-CCS), co-feeding of fossil fuels (secondary feedstock) and possible carbon storage in biomass-derived products (chemicals). Therefore, it is possible to calculate the balance of GHG emissions of a hypothetical thermochemical biorefinery considering different alternatives of land-use, biomass feedstock, co-feeding of fossil fuels, Bio-CCS incorporation and final use of the products. The comparison of the estimated GHG balance with the corresponding fossil reference for each product is of special relevance in the methodology since it is the parameter used in European regulation for the fulfillment of sustainability criteria in biomass-derived fuels and liquids. The proposed methodology is tested using a previously assessed set of different process concepts of thermochemical biorefineries (techno-economic analysis). The resulting GHG balance and saving are analyzed to identify uncertainties and provide recommendations for future regulation. In all process concepts, the GHG savings are above the minimum requirement of GHG emissions for 2018. In the case of incorporating

  12. Effect of melatonin on motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadayian, A G; Bustamante, J; Czerniczyniec, A; Cutrera, R A; Lores-Arnaiz, S

    2014-06-01

    Increased reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial dysfunction occur during ethanol hangover. The aim of this work was to study the effect of melatonin pretreatment on motor performance and mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover. Male mice received melatonin solution or its vehicle in drinking water during 7 days and i.p. injection with EtOH (3.8 g/kg BW) or saline at the eighth day. Motor performance and mitochondrial function were evaluated at the onset of hangover (6h after injection). Melatonin improved motor coordination in ethanol hangover mice. Malate-glutamate-dependent oxygen uptake was decreased by ethanol hangover treatment and partially prevented by melatonin pretreatment. Melatonin alone induced a decrease of 30% in state 4 succinate-dependent respiratory rate. Also, the activity of the respiratory complexes was decreased in melatonin-pretreated ethanol hangover group. Melatonin pretreatment before the hangover prevented mitochondrial membrane potential collapse and induced a 79% decrement of hydrogen peroxide production as compared with ethanol hangover group. Ethanol hangover induced a 25% decrease in NO production. Melatonin alone and as a pretreatment before ethanol hangover significantly increased NO production by nNOS and iNOS as compared with control groups. No differences were observed in nNOS protein expression, while iNOS expression was increased in the melatonin group. Increased NO production by melatonin could be involved in the decrease of succinate-dependent oxygen consumption and the inhibition of complex IV observed in our study. Melatonin seems to act as an antioxidant agent in the ethanol hangover condition but also exhibited some dual effects related to NO metabolism.

  13. Effect of melatonin on motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadayian, A G; Bustamante, J; Czerniczyniec, A; Cutrera, R A; Lores-Arnaiz, S

    2014-06-01

    Increased reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial dysfunction occur during ethanol hangover. The aim of this work was to study the effect of melatonin pretreatment on motor performance and mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover. Male mice received melatonin solution or its vehicle in drinking water during 7 days and i.p. injection with EtOH (3.8 g/kg BW) or saline at the eighth day. Motor performance and mitochondrial function were evaluated at the onset of hangover (6h after injection). Melatonin improved motor coordination in ethanol hangover mice. Malate-glutamate-dependent oxygen uptake was decreased by ethanol hangover treatment and partially prevented by melatonin pretreatment. Melatonin alone induced a decrease of 30% in state 4 succinate-dependent respiratory rate. Also, the activity of the respiratory complexes was decreased in melatonin-pretreated ethanol hangover group. Melatonin pretreatment before the hangover prevented mitochondrial membrane potential collapse and induced a 79% decrement of hydrogen peroxide production as compared with ethanol hangover group. Ethanol hangover induced a 25% decrease in NO production. Melatonin alone and as a pretreatment before ethanol hangover significantly increased NO production by nNOS and iNOS as compared with control groups. No differences were observed in nNOS protein expression, while iNOS expression was increased in the melatonin group. Increased NO production by melatonin could be involved in the decrease of succinate-dependent oxygen consumption and the inhibition of complex IV observed in our study. Melatonin seems to act as an antioxidant agent in the ethanol hangover condition but also exhibited some dual effects related to NO metabolism. PMID:24713372

  14. Early-Stage Capital Cost Estimation of Biorefinery Processes: A Comparative Study of Heuristic Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagkari, Mirela; Couturier, Jean-Luc; Kokossis, Antonis; Dubois, Jean-Luc

    2016-09-01

    Biorefineries offer a promising alternative to fossil-based processing industries and have undergone rapid development in recent years. Limited financial resources and stringent company budgets necessitate quick capital estimation of pioneering biorefinery projects at the early stages of their conception to screen process alternatives, decide on project viability, and allocate resources to the most promising cases. Biorefineries are capital-intensive projects that involve state-of-the-art technologies for which there is no prior experience or sufficient historical data. This work reviews existing rapid cost estimation practices, which can be used by researchers with no previous cost estimating experience. It also comprises a comparative study of six cost methods on three well-documented biorefinery processes to evaluate their accuracy and precision. The results illustrate discrepancies among the methods because their extrapolation on biorefinery data often violates inherent assumptions. This study recommends the most appropriate rapid cost methods and urges the development of an improved early-stage capital cost estimation tool suitable for biorefinery processes. PMID:27484398

  15. Emerging bio-ethanol projects in Nigeria. Their opportunities and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite being a major petroleum producing and exporting country, Nigeria has for a long time imported refined petroleum products for domestic consumption. The country has recently made an entrance into the bio-energy sector by seeding the market with imported ethanol until enough capability exists for the domestic production of ethanol. The Nigerian Biofuel Policy was released in 2007 calling for the domestic production of bio-ethanol to meet the national demand of 5.14 billion litres/year. Some investors have responded by investing over $3.86 billion for the construction of 19 ethanol bio-refineries, 10,000 units of mini-refineries and feedstock plantations for the production of over 2.66 billion litres of fuel grade ethanol per annum. Also, another 14 new projects are in the offing. Of the 20 pioneer projects, 4 are at the conception phase, 8 are in the planning phase, and 7 are under construction with only 1 operational. The potential benefits of the emerging bio-ethanol projects include investment in the economy, employment, energy security and boost rural infrastructure, while the major challenge is land take (859,561 ha). This is the first time an attempt is been made to document the emerging bio-ethanol projects in Nigeria. (author)

  16. Emerging bio-ethanol projects in Nigeria: Their opportunities and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite being a major petroleum producing and exporting country, Nigeria has for a long time imported refined petroleum products for domestic consumption. The country has recently made an entrance into the bio-energy sector by seeding the market with imported ethanol until enough capability exists for the domestic production of ethanol. The Nigerian Biofuel Policy was released in 2007 calling for the domestic production of bio-ethanol to meet the national demand of 5.14 billion litres/year. Some investors have responded by investing over $3.86 billion for the construction of 19 ethanol bio-refineries, 10,000 units of mini-refineries and feedstock plantations for the production of over 2.66 billion litres of fuel grade ethanol per annum. Also, another 14 new projects are in the offing. Of the 20 pioneer projects, 4 are at the conception phase, 8 are in the planning phase, and 7 are under construction with only 1 operational. The potential benefits of the emerging bio-ethanol projects include investment in the economy, employment, energy security and boost rural infrastructure, while the major challenge is land take (859,561 ha). This is the first time an attempt is been made to document the emerging bio-ethanol projects in Nigeria.

  17. Emerging bio-ethanol projects in Nigeria. Their opportunities and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohimain, Elijah I. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design, School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, North Carolina A and T State University, 1601 E. Market St., Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Despite being a major petroleum producing and exporting country, Nigeria has for a long time imported refined petroleum products for domestic consumption. The country has recently made an entrance into the bio-energy sector by seeding the market with imported ethanol until enough capability exists for the domestic production of ethanol. The Nigerian Biofuel Policy was released in 2007 calling for the domestic production of bio-ethanol to meet the national demand of 5.14 billion litres/year. Some investors have responded by investing over $3.86 billion for the construction of 19 ethanol bio-refineries, 10,000 units of mini-refineries and feedstock plantations for the production of over 2.66 billion litres of fuel grade ethanol per annum. Also, another 14 new projects are in the offing. Of the 20 pioneer projects, 4 are at the conception phase, 8 are in the planning phase, and 7 are under construction with only 1 operational. The potential benefits of the emerging bio-ethanol projects include investment in the economy, employment, energy security and boost rural infrastructure, while the major challenge is land take (859,561 ha). This is the first time an attempt is been made to document the emerging bio-ethanol projects in Nigeria. (author)

  18. Dynamic Modeling, Optimization, and Advanced Control for Large Scale Biorefineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prunescu, Remus Mihail

    of the L1 adaptive output feedback controller [10] are developed: one for biomass pretreatment temperature [11] and another one for pH in enzymatic hydrolysis [12]. Biomass conversion is highly sensitive to these process parameters, which exhibit nonlinear behavior and can change nominal values...... years PhD project that was run by Technical University of Denmark (DTU) in collaboration with the largest Danish energy company DONG Energy A/S between 2012 and 2015. The company owns a demonstration scale second generation biorefinery in Kalundborg, Denmark, also known as the Inbicon demonstration...... plant [3]. The goal of the project is to utilize realtime data extracted from the large scale facility to formulate and validate first principle dynamic models of the plant. These models are then further exploited to derive model-based tools for process optimization, advanced control and real...

  19. Amyris, Inc. Integrated Biorefinery Project Summary Final Report - Public Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, David; Sato, Suzanne; Garcia, Fernando; Eppler, Ross; Cherry, Joel

    2014-03-12

    The Amyris pilot-scale Integrated Biorefinery (IBR) leveraged Amyris synthetic biology and process technology experience to upgrade Amyris’s existing Emeryville, California pilot plant and fermentation labs to enable development of US-based production capabilities for renewable diesel fuel and alternative chemical products. These products were derived semi-synthetically from high-impact biomass feedstocks via microbial fermentation to the 15-carbon intermediate farnesene, with subsequent chemical finishing to farnesane. The Amyris IBR team tested and provided methods for production of diesel and alternative chemical products from sweet sorghum, and other high-impact lignocellulosic feedstocks, at pilot scale. This enabled robust techno-economic analysis (TEA), regulatory approvals, and a basis for full-scale manufacturing processes and facility design.

  20. Improved Estimates of Air Pollutant Emissions from Biorefinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Eric C. D.

    2015-11-13

    We have attempted to use detailed kinetic modeling approach for improved estimation of combustion air pollutant emissions from biorefinery. We have developed a preliminary detailed reaction mechanism for biomass combustion. Lignin is the only biomass component included in the current mechanism and methane is used as the biogas surrogate. The model is capable of predicting the combustion emissions of greenhouse gases (CO2, N2O, CH4) and criteria air pollutants (NO, NO2, CO). The results are yet to be compared with the experimental data. The current model is still in its early stages of development. Given the acknowledged complexity of biomass oxidation, as well as the components in the feed to the combustor, obviously the modeling approach and the chemistry set discussed here may undergo revision, extension, and further validation in the future.

  1. Succinic acid production with metabolically engineered E. coli recovered from two-stage fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiang-Feng; Jiang, Min; Chen, Ke-Quan; Xu, Bing; Liu, Shu-Wen; Wei, Ping; Ying, Han-Jie

    2010-10-01

    Escherichia coli AFP111 cells recovered from spent two-stage fermentation broth were investigated for additional production of succinic acid under anaerobic conditions. Recovered cells produced succinic acid in an aqueous environment with no nutrient supplementation except for glucose and MgCO(3). In addition, initial glucose concentration and cell density had a significant influence on succinic acid mass yield and productivity. Although the final concentration of succinic acid from recovered cells was lower than from two-stage fermentation, an average succinic acid mass yield of 0.85 g/g was achieved with an average productivity of 1.81 g/l h after three rounds of recycling, which was comparable to two-stage fermentation. These results suggested that recovered cells might be reused for the efficient production of succinic acid. PMID:20495946

  2. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae microbial cell factories for succinic acid production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otero, José Manuel; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    deletions and over-expression, mutants that overproduce succinic acid have been engineered and thoroughly characterised. Metabolic engineering approaches developed promise to have broad applicability to industrial biotechnology platforms, as well as enhancing fundamental understanding of central carbon...... products is 18, 14, 54, and 9 C-mol/C-mol-glucose, respectively, with biotechnology production is C4 organic acids, encompassing fumaric, malic, and succinic acid. Succinic acid is a key building block molecule...... of systems biology tools to drive C6 carbon flux to succinic acid by enhancement of the two native pathways for succinic acid production: the TCA and glyoxylate cycles. S. cerevisiae does not naturally accumulate succinic acid; however, through the use of in silico metabolic predictions guiding targeted gene...

  3. Economic Impacts of Using Switchgrass as a Feedstock for Ethanol Production: A Case Study Located in East Tennessee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton C. English

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major motivations to establish a biobased energy sector in the United States is to promote economic development in the rural areas of the nation. This study estimated the economic impact of investing and operating a switchgrass-based ethanol plant in East Tennessee. Applying a spatially oriented mixed-integer mathematical programming model, we first determined the location of biorefinery, feedstock draw area, and the resources used in various feedstock supply systems by minimizing the total plant gate cost of feedstock. Based on the model output, an input-output model was utilized to determine the total economic impact, including direct, indirect, and induced effects of feedstock investment and annual production in the study region. Moreover, the economic impact of ethanol plant investment and annual conversion operation was analyzed. Results suggest that the total annual expenditures in an unprotected large round bale system generated a total $92.5 million in economic output within the 13 counties of East Tennessee. In addition, an estimated $234 million in overall economic output was generated through the operation of the biorefinery. This research showed that the least-cost configuration of the feedstock supply chain influenced the levels and types of economic impact of biorefinery.

  4. Maximizing biofuel production in a thermochemical biorefinery by adding electrolytic hydrogen and by integrating torrefaction with entrained flow gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lasse Røngaard

    2015-01-01

    analysis of two biorefineries integrating water electrolysis for the production of methanol. In both plants, torrefied woody biomass is supplied to an entrained flow gasifier, but in one of the plants, the torrefaction process occurs on-site, as it is integrated with the entrained flow gasification process....... The analysis shows that the biorefinery with integrated torrefaction has a higher biomass to methanol energy ratio (136% vs. 101%) as well as higher total energy efficiency (62% vs. 56%). By comparing with two identical biorefineries without electrolysis, it is concluded that the biorefinery with integrated...... torrefaction benefits most from the integration of electrolysis....

  5. Adipocyte protein modification by Krebs cycle intermediates and fumarate ester-derived succination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Allison M; Frizzell, Norma

    2013-11-01

    Protein succination, the non-enzymatic modification of cysteine residues by fumarate, is distinguishable from succinylation, an enzymatic reaction forming an amide bond between lysine residues and succinyl-CoA. Treatment of adipocytes with 30 mM glucose significantly increases protein succination with only a small change in succinylation. Protein succination may be significantly increased intracellularly after treatment with fumaric acid esters, however, the ester must be removed by saponification to permit 2SC-antibody detection of the fumarate adduct.

  6. Recovery of succinic acid produced by fermentation of a metabolically engineered Mannheimia succiniciproducens strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyohak; Huh, Yun Suk; Lee, Sang Yup; Hong, Won Hi; Hong, Yeon Ki

    2007-12-01

    There have recently been much advances in the production of succinic acid, an important four-carbon dicarboxylic acid for many industrial applications, by fermentation of several natural and engineered bacterial strains. Mannheimia succiniciproducens MBEL55E isolated from bovine rumen is able to produce succinic acid with high efficiency, but also produces acetic, formic and lactic acids just like other anaerobic succinic acid producers. We recently reported the development of an engineered M. succiniciproducens LPK7 strain which produces succinic acid as a major fermentation product while producing much reduced by-products. Having an improved succinic acid producer developed, it is equally important to develop a cost-effective downstream process for the recovery of succinic acid. In this paper, we report the development of a simpler and more efficient method for the recovery of succinic acid. For the recovery of succinic acid from the fermentation broth of LPK7 strain, a simple process composed of a single reactive extraction, vacuum distillation, and crystallization yielded highly purified succinic acid (greater than 99.5% purity, wt%) with a high yield of 67.05wt%. When the same recovery process or even multiple reactive extraction steps were applied to the fermentation broth of MBEL55E, lower purity and yield of succinic acid were obtained. These results suggest that succinic acid can be purified in a cost-effective manner by using the fermentation broth of engineered LPK7 strain, showing the importance of integrating the strain development, fermentation and downstream process for optimizing the whole processes for succinic acid production. PMID:17765349

  7. Thermochemical pretreatments for enhancing succinic acid production from industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur Bragi; Kuglarz, Mariusz; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov;

    2015-01-01

    in the highest overall sugar yield (73.5%), maximum succinic acid titer (21.9gL-1), as well as the highest succinic acid yield (83%). Results obtained clearly demonstrated the impact of different pretreatments on the bioconversion efficiency of industrial hemp into succinic acid.......The aim of this study was to develop an efficient thermochemical method for treatment of industrial hemp biomass, in order to increase its bioconversion to succinic acid. Industrial hemp was subjected to various thermochemical pretreatments using 0-3% H2SO4, NaOH or H2O2 at 121-180°C prior...

  8. Improving the environmental profile of wood panels via co-production of ethanol and acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earles, J Mason; Halog, Anthony; Shaler, Stephen

    2011-11-15

    The oriented strand board (OSB) biorefinery is an emerging technology that could improve the building, transportation, and chemical sectors' environmental profiles. By adding a hot water extraction stage to conventional OSB panel manufacturing, hemicellulose polysaccharides can be extracted from wood strands and converted to renewably sourced ethanol and acetic acid. Replacing fossil-based gasoline and acetic acid has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, among other possible impacts. At the same time, hemicellulose extraction could improve the environmental profile of OSB panels by reducing the level of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during manufacturing. In this study, the life cycle significance of such GHG, VOC, and other emission reductions was investigated. A process model was developed based on a mix of laboratory and industrial-level mass and energy flow data. Using these data a life cycle assessment (LCA) model was built. Sensitive process parameters were identified and used to develop a target production scenario for the OSB biorefinery. The findings suggest that the OSB biorefinery's deployment could substantially improve human and ecosystem health via reduction of select VOCs compared to conventionally produced OSB, gasoline, and acetic acid. Technological advancements are needed, however, to achieve desirable GHG reductions. PMID:21967719

  9. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  10. Biomass Supply Chain and Conversion Economics of Cellulosic Ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Ronalds W.

    2011-12-01

    Cellulosic biomass is a potential and competitive source for bioenergy production, reasons for such acclamation include: biomass is one the few energy sources that can actually be utilized to produce several types of energy (motor fuel, electricity, heat) and cellulosic biomass is renewable and relatively found everywhere. Despite these positive advantages, issues regarding cellulosic biomass availability, supply chain, conversion process and economics need a more comprehensive understanding in order to identify the near short term routes in biomass to bioenergy production. Cellulosic biomass accounts for around 35% to 45% of cost share in cellulosic ethanol production, in addition, different feedstock have very different production rate, (dry ton/acre/year), availability across the year, and chemical composition that affect process yield and conversion costs as well. In the other hand, existing and brand new conversion technologies for cellulosic ethanol production offer different advantages, risks and financial returns. Ethanol yield, financial returns, delivered cost and supply chain logistic for combinations of feedstock and conversion technology are investigated in six studies. In the first study, biomass productivity, supply chain and delivered cost of fast growing Eucalyptus is simulated in economic and supply chain models to supply a hypothetic ethanol biorefinery. Finding suggests that Eucalyptus can be a potential hardwood grown specifically for energy. Delivered cost is highly sensitive to biomass productivity, percentage of covered area. Evaluated at different financial expectations, delivered cost can be competitive compared to current forest feedstock supply. In the second study, Eucalyptus biomass conversion into cellulosic ethanol is simulated in the dilute acid pretreatment, analysis of conversion costs, cost share, CAPEX and ethanol yield are examined. In the third study, biomass supply and delivered cost of loblolly pine is simulated in economic

  11. Non-isothermal crystallization kinetics and characterization of biodegradable poly(butylene succinate-co-neopentyl glycol succinate) copolyesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen-Jie; Zhou, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Both biodegradable aliphatic neat poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) and poly(butylene succinate-co-neopentyl glycol succinate) (P(BS-co-NPGS)) copolyesters with different 1,4-butanediol/neopentyl glycol ratios were synthesized through a two-step process of transesterification and polycondensation using stannous chloride and 4-Methylbenzenesulfonic acid as the co-catalysts. The structure, non-isothermal crystallization behavior, crystalline morphology and crystal structure of neat PBS and P(BS-co-NPGS) copolyesters were characterized by (1)H NMR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarized optical microscope (POM) and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), respectively. The Avrami equation modified by Jeziorny and Mo's method was employed to describe the non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of the neat PBS and its copolyesters. The modified Avrami equation could adequately describe the primary stage of non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of the neat PBS and its copolyesters. Mo's method provided a fairly satisfactory description of the non-isothermal crystallization of neat PBS and its copolyesters. Interestingly, the values of 1/t1/2, Zc and F(T) obtained by the modified Avrami equation and Mo's method analysis indicated that the crystallization rate increased first and then decreased with an increase of NPGS content compared that of neat PBS, whereas the crystallization mechanism almost kept unchanged. The results of tensile testing showed that the ductility of PBS was largely improved by incorporating NPGS units. The elongation at break increased remarkably with increasing NPGS content. In particular, the sample with 20% NPGS content showed around 548% elongation at break. PMID:25491999

  12. Sugarcane biorefineries: Case studies applied to the Brazilian sugar–alcohol industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Advanced system of co-generation improves the energy performance of biorefineries. • Sugarcane straw as additional source of fuel in the biorefinery resulted positive. • The farming and transport of sugarcane cause the main environmental impacts. - Abstract: The use of biomasses is becoming increasingly appealing alternative, to give an partial solution lack of energy, with an ecofriendly approach, having on sugarcane a solid fundament; that receives the new and valuable complement of the innovative concept of the biorefineries it is productive installations, that can be summarized as to reach the higher overall yield from the raw materials, with the lowest environmental impact, at minimum energy input and giving the maximum of the energy output. The biorefinery is the true valuable option of a wide diversification, with by-products like the single cell protein and biogas from the distillery vinasse, new oxidants like methanol, second generation biofuels, biobutanol, etc. In this context this paper presents a study of five different configurations of biorefineries. Each case study being a system based on an autonomous distillery or sugar mill with an annexed distillery and coproduction of methanol from bagasse. The paper includes the use of sugarcane harvest residues (mainly straw) and a BIG–GT plant (Biomass Integrated Gasification–Gas Turbine) as alternatives to fulfill the energy demands of the complex

  13. Structural basis for the binding of succinate to succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ji; Fraser, Marie E

    2016-08-01

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase catalyzes the only step in the citric acid cycle that provides substrate-level phosphorylation. Although the binding sites for the substrates CoA, phosphate, and the nucleotides ADP and ATP or GDP and GTP have been identified, the binding site for succinate has not. To determine this binding site, pig GTP-specific succinyl-CoA synthetase was crystallized in the presence of succinate, magnesium ions and CoA, and the structure of the complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.2 Å resolution. Succinate binds in the carboxy-terminal domain of the β-subunit. The succinate-binding site is near both the active-site histidine residue that is phosphorylated in the reaction and the free thiol of CoA. The carboxy-terminal domain rearranges when succinate binds, burying this active site. However, succinate is not in position for transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphohistidine. Here, it is proposed that when the active-site histidine residue has been phosphorylated by GTP, the phosphohistidine displaces phosphate and triggers the movement of the carboxylate of succinate into position to be phosphorylated. The structure shows why succinyl-CoA synthetase is specific for succinate and does not react appreciably with citrate nor with the other C4-dicarboxylic acids of the citric acid cycle, fumarate and oxaloacetate, but shows some activity with L-malate. PMID:27487822

  14. Metabolic evolution of energy-conserving pathways for succinate production in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xueli; Jantama, Kaemwich; Moore, Jonathan C.; Jarboe, Laura R.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.; Lonnie O. Ingram

    2009-01-01

    During metabolic evolution to improve succinate production in Escherichia coli strains, significant changes in cellular metabolism were acquired that increased energy efficiency in two respects. The energy-conserving phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase (pck), which normally functions in the reverse direction (gluconeogenesis; glucose repressed) during the oxidative metabolism of organic acids, evolved to become the major carboxylation pathway for succinate production. Both PCK enzyme acti...

  15. 21 CFR 172.765 - Succistearin (stearoyl propylene glycol hydrogen succinate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Succistearin (stearoyl propylene glycol hydrogen succinate). 172.765 Section 172.765 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... propylene glycol hydrogen succinate). The food additive succistearin (stearoyl propylene glycol...

  16. Structural basis for the binding of succinate to succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ji; Fraser, Marie E

    2016-08-01

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase catalyzes the only step in the citric acid cycle that provides substrate-level phosphorylation. Although the binding sites for the substrates CoA, phosphate, and the nucleotides ADP and ATP or GDP and GTP have been identified, the binding site for succinate has not. To determine this binding site, pig GTP-specific succinyl-CoA synthetase was crystallized in the presence of succinate, magnesium ions and CoA, and the structure of the complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.2 Å resolution. Succinate binds in the carboxy-terminal domain of the β-subunit. The succinate-binding site is near both the active-site histidine residue that is phosphorylated in the reaction and the free thiol of CoA. The carboxy-terminal domain rearranges when succinate binds, burying this active site. However, succinate is not in position for transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphohistidine. Here, it is proposed that when the active-site histidine residue has been phosphorylated by GTP, the phosphohistidine displaces phosphate and triggers the movement of the carboxylate of succinate into position to be phosphorylated. The structure shows why succinyl-CoA synthetase is specific for succinate and does not react appreciably with citrate nor with the other C4-dicarboxylic acids of the citric acid cycle, fumarate and oxaloacetate, but shows some activity with L-malate.

  17. atp mutants of Escherichia coli fail to grow on succinate due to a transport deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boogerd, Fred; Boe, Lars; Michelsen, Ole;

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli atp mutants, which lack a functional Hf-ATPase complex, are capable of growth on glucose but not on succinate or other C-4-dicarboxylates (Suc(-) phenotype). Suc(+) revertants of an atp deletion strain were isolated which were capable of growth on succinate even though they lack ...

  18. Krebs cycle metabolite profiling for identification and stratification of pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas due to succinate dehydrogenase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, S; Peitzsch, M.; Rapizzi, E.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Qin, N.; Cubas, A.A. de; Schiavi, F.; Rao, J.U.; Beuschlein, F.; Quinkler, M.; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Opocher, G.; Mannelli, M.; Pacak, K.; Robledo, M.; Eisenhofer, G.

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Mutations of succinate dehydrogenase A/B/C/D genes (SDHx) increase susceptibility to development of pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PPGLs), with particularly high rates of malignancy associated with SDHB mutations. OBJECTIVE: We assessed whether altered succinate dehydrogenase product

  19. Evaporation of methyl- and dimethyl-substituted malonic, succinic, glutaric and adipic acid particles at ambient temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Jacob Garbrecht; Rosenørn, Thomas; Svenningsson, Birgitta;

    2004-01-01

    Evaporation; organic aerosols; vapor pressure; dicarboxylic acid; maonic acid; succinic acid; glutaric acid; adipic acid......Evaporation; organic aerosols; vapor pressure; dicarboxylic acid; maonic acid; succinic acid; glutaric acid; adipic acid...

  20. Collection of information on biorefinery research funding and research organisations (projects). Task 2.3.2 Outside Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annevelink, E.; Oever, van den M.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    This report provides an outlook on research into biorefineries in the US, Canada, Australia, China, India, Japan and Brazil. The results will be used for benchmarking or to indicate new opportunities. The most recent EU-funded Specific Support Action projects (Bioref-Integ, Biorefinery Euroview, Bio

  1. NREL 2012 Achievement of Ethanol Cost Targets: Biochemical Ethanol Fermentation via Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, L.; Schell, D.; Davis, R.; Tan, E.; Elander, R.; Bratis, A.

    2014-04-01

    For the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, the annual State of Technology (SOT) assessment is an essential activity for quantifying the benefits of biochemical platform research. This assessment has historically allowed the impact of research progress achieved through targeted Bioenergy Technologies Office funding to be quantified in terms of economic improvements within the context of a fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production process. As such, progress toward the ultimate 2012 goal of demonstrating cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol technology can be tracked. With an assumed feedstock cost for corn stover of $58.50/ton this target has historically been set at $1.41/gal ethanol for conversion costs only (exclusive of feedstock) and $2.15/gal total production cost (inclusive of feedstock) or minimum ethanol selling price (MESP). This year, fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production data generated by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers in their Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) successfully demonstrated performance commensurate with both the FY 2012 SOT MESP target of $2.15/gal (2007$, $58.50/ton feedstock cost) and the conversion target of $1.41/gal through core research and process improvements in pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation.

  2. Thermochemical pretreatments for enhancing succinic acid production from industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur B; Kuglarz, Mariusz; Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient thermochemical method for treatment of industrial hemp biomass, in order to increase its bioconversion to succinic acid. Industrial hemp was subjected to various thermochemical pretreatments using 0-3% H2SO4, NaOH or H2O2 at 121-180°C prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. The influence of the different pretreatments on hydrolysis and succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z was investigated in batch mode, using anaerobic bottles and bioreactors. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of hemp material pretreated with 3% H2O2 resulted in the highest overall sugar yield (73.5%), maximum succinic acid titer (21.9 g L(-1)), as well as the highest succinic acid yield (83%). Results obtained clearly demonstrated the impact of different pretreatments on the bioconversion efficiency of industrial hemp into succinic acid.

  3. Succination of proteins by fumarate: mechanism of inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatnik, Matthew; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2008-04-01

    S-(2-succinyl)cysteine (2SC) is a chemical modification of proteins formed by a Michael addition reaction between the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, and thiol groups in protein--a process known as succination of protein. Succination causes irreversible inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in vitro. GAPDH was immunoprecipitated from muscle of diabetic rats, then analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy. Succination of GAPDH was increased in muscle of diabetic rats, and the extent of succination correlated strongly with the decrease in specific activity of the enzyme. We propose that 2SC is a biomarker of mitochondrial and oxidative stress in diabetes and that succination of GAPDH and other thiol proteins may provide the chemical link between glucotoxicity and the pathogenesis of diabetic complications.

  4. Succinic acid production from corn stover by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation using Actinobacillus succinogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Pu; Fang, Lin; Xu, Yan; Dong, Jin-Jun; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhi-Hao

    2010-10-01

    Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) technique was applied for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes in a 5-l stirred bioreactor with corn stover as the raw material. The process parameters of SSF, including corn stover pretreatment condition, substrate concentration, enzyme loading and fermentation temperature were investigated. Results indicated that pretreating corn stover with diluted alkaline was beneficial for the succinic acid production, and succinic acid yield could be significantly increased when adding the cellulase supplemented with cellobiase. The maximal succinic acid concentration and yield could reach 47.4 g/l and 0.72 g/g-substrate, respectively. The corresponding operation conditions were summarized as follows: SSF operation at 38 °C for 48 h, diluted alkaline pretreated corn stover as substrate with concentration of 70 g/l, enzyme loading of 20FPU cellulase and 10 U cellobiase per gram substrate. This result suggested an industrial potential of succinic acid production by using SSF and corn stover.

  5. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cassava to succinic acid by Escherichia coli NZN111.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cuixia; Ding, Shaopeng; Wang, Dezheng; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the production of succinic acid from cassava starch and raw cassava instead of glucose by Escherichia coli NZN111 was investigated. During the two-stage fermentation, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) was applied in the anaerobic stage. The results showed that both the productivity and specific productivity in the process conducted at 40°C were higher than those in the cultivation conducted at 37°C. The yield of succinic acid based on the amount of added starch reached the highest level 0.86 g/g and cassava starch was almost totally hydrolyzed in the SSF process. With the improved cell density, 127.13 g/L of succinic acid was obtained. When the liquefied crude cassava powder was used directly in SSF, 106.17 g/L of succinic acid was formed. The result showed that crude cassava powder could be another cheap raw material for succinic acid formation. PMID:24787322

  6. Succinic semialdehyde as a substrate for the formation of gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bemmelen, F J; Schouten, M J; Fekkes, D; Bruinvels, J

    1985-11-01

    The conversion of succinic semialdehyde into gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by GABA-transaminase was measured in rat brain homogenate in the presence of different concentrations of the cosubstrate glutamate. The calculated kinetic parameters of succinic semialdehyde for GABA-transaminase were a limiting Km value of 168 microM and a limiting Vmax value of 38 mumol g-1 h-1. Combination with previously obtained data for the conversion of GABA into succinic semialdehyde revealed a kEq value of 0.04, indicating that equilibrium of GABA-transaminase is biased toward the formation of GABA. The increased formation of GABA in the presence of succinic semialdehyde was not due to an increased conversion of glutamate into GABA by glutamic acid decarboxylase. Therefore these results indicate that succinic semialdehyde can act as a precursor for GABA synthesis.

  7. Carbon Sources for Polyhydroxyalkanoates and an Integrated Biorefinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guozhan; Hill, David J.; Kowalczuk, Marek; Johnston, Brian; Adamus, Grazyna; Irorere, Victor; Radecka, Iza

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a group of bioplastics that have a wide range of applications. Extensive progress has been made in our understanding of PHAs’ biosynthesis, and currently, it is possible to engineer bacterial strains to produce PHAs with desired properties. The substrates for the fermentative production of PHAs are primarily derived from food-based carbon sources, raising concerns over the sustainability of their production in terms of their impact on food prices. This paper gives an overview of the current carbon sources used for PHA production and the methods used to transform these sources into fermentable forms. This allows us to identify the opportunities and restraints linked to future sustainable PHA production. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol are identified as two promising carbon sources for a sustainable production of PHAs. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol can be produced on a large scale during various second generation biofuels’ production. An integration of PHA production within a modern biorefinery is therefore proposed to produce biofuels and bioplastics simultaneously. This will create the potential to offset the production cost of biofuels and reduce the overall production cost of PHAs. PMID:27447619

  8. Ionizing radiation and a wood-based biorefinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Mark S.; Stipanovic, Arthur J.; Cheng, Kun; Barber, Vincent A.; Manning, Mellony; Smith, Jennifer L.; Sundar, Smith

    2014-01-01

    Woody biomass is widely available around the world. Cellulose is the major structural component of woody biomass and is the most abundant polymer synthesized by nature, with hemicellulose and lignin being second and third. Despite this great abundance, woody biomass has seen limited application outside of the paper and lumber industries. Its use as a feedstock for fuels and chemicals has been limited because of its highly crystalline structure, inaccessible morphology, and limited solubility (recalcitrance). Any economic use of woody biomass for the production of fuels and chemicals requires a "pretreatment" process to enhance the accessibility of the biomass to enzymes and/or chemical reagents. Electron beams (EB), X-rays, and gamma rays produce ions in a material which can then initiate chemical reactions and cleavage of chemical bonds. Such ionizing radiation predominantly scissions and degrades or depolymerizes both cellulose and hemicelluloses, less is known about its effects on lignin. This paper discusses how ionizing radiation can be used to make a wood-based biorefinery more environmentally friendly and profitable for its operators.

  9. Carbon Sources for Polyhydroxyalkanoates and an Integrated Biorefinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guozhan Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs are a group of bioplastics that have a wide range of applications. Extensive progress has been made in our understanding of PHAs’ biosynthesis, and currently, it is possible to engineer bacterial strains to produce PHAs with desired properties. The substrates for the fermentative production of PHAs are primarily derived from food-based carbon sources, raising concerns over the sustainability of their production in terms of their impact on food prices. This paper gives an overview of the current carbon sources used for PHA production and the methods used to transform these sources into fermentable forms. This allows us to identify the opportunities and restraints linked to future sustainable PHA production. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol are identified as two promising carbon sources for a sustainable production of PHAs. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol can be produced on a large scale during various second generation biofuels’ production. An integration of PHA production within a modern biorefinery is therefore proposed to produce biofuels and bioplastics simultaneously. This will create the potential to offset the production cost of biofuels and reduce the overall production cost of PHAs.

  10. Carbon Sources for Polyhydroxyalkanoates and an Integrated Biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guozhan; Hill, David J; Kowalczuk, Marek; Johnston, Brian; Adamus, Grazyna; Irorere, Victor; Radecka, Iza

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a group of bioplastics that have a wide range of applications. Extensive progress has been made in our understanding of PHAs' biosynthesis, and currently, it is possible to engineer bacterial strains to produce PHAs with desired properties. The substrates for the fermentative production of PHAs are primarily derived from food-based carbon sources, raising concerns over the sustainability of their production in terms of their impact on food prices. This paper gives an overview of the current carbon sources used for PHA production and the methods used to transform these sources into fermentable forms. This allows us to identify the opportunities and restraints linked to future sustainable PHA production. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol are identified as two promising carbon sources for a sustainable production of PHAs. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol can be produced on a large scale during various second generation biofuels' production. An integration of PHA production within a modern biorefinery is therefore proposed to produce biofuels and bioplastics simultaneously. This will create the potential to offset the production cost of biofuels and reduce the overall production cost of PHAs. PMID:27447619

  11. Biological processes for advancing lignocellulosic waste biorefinery by advocating circular economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Rossana; Faraco, Vincenza

    2016-09-01

    The actualization of a circular economy through the use of lignocellulosic wastes as renewable resources can lead to reduce the dependence from fossil-based resources and contribute to a sustainable waste management. The integrated biorefineries, exploiting the overall lignocellulosic waste components to generate fuels, chemicals and energy, are the pillar of the circular economy. The biological treatment is receiving great attention for the biorefinery development since it is considered an eco-friendly alternative to the physico-chemical strategies to increase the biobased product recovery from wastes and improve saccharification and fermentation yields. This paper reviews the last advances in the biological treatments aimed at upgrading lignocellulosic wastes, implementing the biorefinery concept and advocating circular economy. PMID:27131870

  12. Recent advances in yeast cell-surface display technologies for waste biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuo; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ren, Nan-Qi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    Waste biorefinery aims to maximize the output of value-added products from various artificial/agricultural wastes by using integrated bioprocesses. To make waste biorefinery economically feasible, it is thus necessary to develop a low-cost, environment-friendly technique to perform simultaneous biodegradation and bioconversion of waste materials. Cell-surface display engineering is a novel, cost-effective technique that can auto-immobilize proteins on the cell exterior of microorganisms, and has been applied for use with waste biofinery. Through tethering different enzymes (e.g., cellulase, lipase, and protease) or metal-binding peptides on cell surfaces, various yeast strains can effectively produce biofuels and biochemicals from sugar/protein-rich waste materials, catalyze waste oils into biodiesels, or retrieve heavy metals from wastewater. This review critically summarizes recent applications of yeast cell-surface display on various types of waste biorefineries, highlighting its potential and future challenges with regard to commercializing this technology. PMID:27039354

  13. Opportunities and prospects of biorefinery-based valorisation of pulp and paper sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottumukkala, Lalitha Devi; Haigh, Kate; Collard, François-Xavier; van Rensburg, Eugéne; Görgens, Johann

    2016-09-01

    The paper and pulp industry is one of the major industries that generate large amount of solid waste with high moisture content. Numerous opportunities exist for valorisation of waste paper sludge, although this review focuses on primary sludge with high cellulose content. The most mature options for paper sludge valorisation are fermentation, anaerobic digestion and pyrolysis. In this review, biochemical and thermal processes are considered individually and also as integrated biorefinery. The objective of integrated biorefinery is to reduce or avoid paper sludge disposal by landfilling, water reclamation and value addition. Assessment of selected processes for biorefinery varies from a detailed analysis of a single process to high level optimisation and integration of the processes, which allow the initial assessment and comparison of technologies. This data can be used to provide key stakeholders with a roadmap of technologies that can generate economic benefits, and reduce carbon wastage and pollution load. PMID:27080100

  14. Techno-economic risk analysis of glycerol biorefinery concepts against market price fluctuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gargalo, Carina L.; Cheali, Peam; Gernaey, Krist;

    A biorefinery integrates biomass conversion processes to produce fuels, power, and chemicals from bio-based feedstock. Through the synthesis of several products, a biorefinery can benefit from the differences in biomass composition and make the most of the value derived from the biomass feedstock...... sustainable design framework developed earlier [16] [1] [17] [10]. The economic risk analysis enables the user to perform a comprehensive assessment of alternatives using a probabilistic framework which helps to design a robust and competitive glycerol biorefinery....... glycerol prices. Therefore, in order to increase the economic competitiveness of the biodiesel industry, there is an increasing interest in adding value using the glycerol waste stream as feedstock for the synthesis of bio-derived building block compounds and polymers [5] [6] [7] [8] [4] [9]. Moreover...

  15. Upgrading of lignocellulosic biorefinery to value-added chemicals: Sustainability and economics of bioethanol-derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheali, Peam; Posada, John A.; Gernaey, Krist;

    2015-01-01

    In this study, several strategies to upgrade lignocellulosic biorefineries for production of value-added chemicals are systematically generated and evaluated with respect to economic and sustainability objectives. A superstructure-based process synthesis approach under uncertainty integrated...... with a sustainability assessment method is used as evaluation tool. First, an existing superstructure representing the lignocellulosic biorefinery design network is extended to include the options for catalytic conversion of bioethanol to value-added derivatives. Second, the optimization problem for process upgrade...... of operating profit for biorefineries producing bioethanol-derived chemicals (247 MM$/a and 241 MM$/a for diethyl ether and 1,3-butadiene, respectively). Second, the optimal designs for upgrading bioethanol (i.e. production of 1,3-butadiene and diethyl ether) performed also better with respect...

  16. Successive pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification of sugarcane bagasse in a packed bed flow-through column reactor aiming to support biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terán-Hilares, R; Reséndiz, A L; Martínez, R T; Silva, S S; Santos, J C

    2016-03-01

    A packed bed flow-through column reactor (PBFTCR) was used for pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse (SCB). Alkaline pretreatment was performed at 70 °C for 4h with fresh 0.3M NaOH solution or with liquor recycled from a previous pretreatment batch. Scheffersomyces stipitis NRRL-Y7124 was used for fermentation of sugars released after enzymatic hydrolysis (20 FPU g(-1) of dry SCB). The highest results for lignin removal were 61% and 52%, respectively, observed when using fresh NaOH or the first reuse of the liquor. About 50% of cellulosic and 57% of hemicellulosic fractions of pretreated SCBs were enzymatically hydrolyzed and the maximum ethanol production was 23.4 g L(-1) (ethanol yield of 0.4 gp gs(-1)), with near complete consumption of both pentoses and hexoses present in the hydrolysate during the fermentation. PBFTCR as a new alternative for SCB-biorefineries is presented, mainly considering its simple configuration and efficiency for operating with a high solid:liquid ratio. PMID:26720138

  17. Ethanol and neuronal metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, P; Ledig, M; M'Paria, J R

    1980-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on membrane enzymes (Na+, K+ and Mg2+ ATPases, 5'-nucleotidase, adenylate cyclase) alcohol dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and superoxide dismutase were studied in nerve cells (established cell lines, primary cultures of chick and rat brain) cultured in the presence of 100 mM ethanol, and in total rat brain, following various ethanol treatments of the rats (20% ethanol as the sole liquid source, intraperitoneal injection). The results show a difference between neuronal and glial cells. Most of the observed changes in enzymatic activities returned rapidly to control values when ethanol was withdrawn from the culture medium or from the diet. Alcohol dehydrogenase was more stimulated by ethanol than aldehyde dehydrogenase; therefore acetaldehyde may be accumulated. The inhibition of superoxide dismutase activity may allow an accumulation of cytotoxic O2- radicals in nervous tissue and may explain the polymorphism of lesions brought about by alcohol intoxication. PMID:6264495

  18. Lifecycle greenhouse gas implications of US national scenarios for cellulosic ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scown, Corinne D.; Nazaroff, William W.; Mishra, Umakant; Strogen, Bret; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Masanet, Eric; Santero, Nicholas J.; Horvath, Arpad; McKone, Thomas E.

    2012-03-01

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 set an annual US national production goal of 39.7 billion l of cellulosic ethanol by 2020. This paper explores the possibility of meeting that target by growing and processing Miscanthus × giganteus. We define and assess six production scenarios in which active cropland and/or Conservation Reserve Program land are used to grow to Miscanthus. The crop and biorefinery locations are chosen with consideration of economic, land-use, water management and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction objectives. Using lifecycle assessment, the net GHG footprint of each scenario is evaluated, providing insight into the climate costs and benefits associated with each scenario’s objectives. Assuming that indirect land-use change is successfully minimized or mitigated, the results suggest two major drivers for overall GHG impact of cellulosic ethanol from Miscanthus: (a) net soil carbon sequestration or emissions during Miscanthus cultivation and (b) GHG offset credits for electricity exported by biorefineries to the grid. Without these factors, the GHG intensity of bioethanol from Miscanthus is calculated to be 11-13 g CO2-equivalent per MJ of fuel, which is 80-90% lower than gasoline. Including soil carbon sequestration and the power-offset credit results in net GHG sequestration up to 26 g CO2-equivalent per MJ of fuel.

  19. Enhanced performance of alkylated graphene reinforced polybutylene succinate nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, A. S. Zainal; Yusoh, K.; Jamari, S. S.; Abdullah, A. H.; Ismail, Z.

    2016-07-01

    Polybutylene succinate (PBS) was being grafted with octadecylamine-functionalized graphene oxide (GO-ODA) to produce novel PBS/GO-ODA nanocomposites by solution blending technique. Alkylated graphene oxide has superhydrophobic surface thus improved the affinity of the filler with low polar polymer such as PBS. The structure and compatibility of the filler and nanocomposites were being characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Universal tensile machine (UTM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Enhancement of tensile strength and Young's modulus by 30% and 165% respectively was achieved with cooperation of 0.5% GO-ODA loading. The functionalization of GO-ODA in PBS matrix leads to the improvement in the nanocomposites properties.

  20. Mitochondrial stress causes increased succination of proteins in adipocytes in response to glucotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzell, Norma; Thomas, Sonia A; Carson, James A; Baynes, John W

    2012-07-15

    2SC [S-(2-succino)-cysteine] is a chemical modification formed by a Michael addition reaction of fumarate with cysteine residues in proteins. Formation of 2SC, termed 'succination' of proteins, increases in adipocytes grown in high-glucose medium and in adipose tissues of Type 2 diabetic mice. However, the metabolic mechanisms leading to increased fumarate and succination of protein in the adipocyte are unknown. Treatment of 3T3 cells with high glucose (30 mM compared with 5 mM) caused a significant increase in cellular ATP/ADP, NADH/NAD+ and Δψm (mitochondrial membrane potential). There was also a significant increase in the cellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins, which may be attributed to the increase in NADH/NAD+ and subsequent inhibition of tricarboxylic acid cycle NAD+-dependent dehydrogenases. Chemical uncouplers, which dissipated Δψm and reduced the NADH/NAD+ ratio, also decreased the fumarate concentration and protein succination. High glucose plus metformin, an inhibitor of complex I in the electron transport chain, caused an increase in fumarate and succination of protein. Thus excess fuel supply (glucotoxicity) appears to create a pseudohypoxic environment (high NADH/NAD+ without hypoxia), which drives the increase in succination of protein. We propose that increased succination of proteins is an early marker of glucotoxicity and mitochondrial stress in adipose tissue in diabetes.

  1. ATP-Based Ratio Regulation of Glucose and Xylose Improved Succinate Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengyu; Li, Jiaojiao; Liu, Huaiwei; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously engineered E. coli YL104H to efficiently produce succinate from glucose. Furthermore, the present study proved that YL104H could also co-utilize xylose and glucose for succinate production. However, anaerobic succinate accumulation using xylose as the sole carbon source failed, probably because of an insufficient supply of energy. By analyzing the ATP generation under anaerobic conditions in the presence of glucose or xylose, we indicated that succinate production was affected by the intracellular ATP level, which can be simply regulated by the substrate ratio of xylose to glucose. This finding was confirmed by succinate production using an artificial mixture containing different xylose to glucose ratios. Using xylose mother liquor, a waste containing both glucose and xylose derived from xylitol production, a final succinate titer of 61.66 g/L with an overall productivity of 0.95 g/L/h was achieved, indicating that the regulation of the intracellular ATP level may be a useful and efficient strategy for succinate production and can be extended to other anaerobic processes. PMID:27315279

  2. Effects of dissolved CO2 levels on the growth of Mannheimia succiniciproducens and succinic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyohak; Lee, Jeong Wook; Choi, Sol; You, Jong Kyun; Hong, Won Hi; Lee, Sang Yup

    2007-12-15

    A capnophilic rumen bacterium Mannheimia succiniciproducens produces succinic acid as a major fermentation end product under CO(2)-rich anaerobic condition. Since succinic acid is produced by carboxylation of C3 compounds during the fermentation, intracellular CO(2) availability is important for efficient succinic acid formation. Here, we investigated the metabolic responses of M. succiniciproducens to the different dissolved CO(2) concentrations (0-260 mM). Cell growth was severely suppressed when the dissolved CO(2) concentration was below 8.74 mM. On the other hand, cell growth and succinic acid production increased proportionally as the dissolved CO(2) concentration increased from 8.74 to 141 mM. The yields of biomass and succinic acid on glucose obtained at the dissolved CO(2) concentration of 141 mM were 1.49 and 1.52 times higher, respectively, than those obtained at the dissolved CO(2) concentration of 8.74 mM. It was also found that the additional CO(2) source provided in the form of NaHCO(3), MgCO(3), or CaCO(3) had positive effects on cell growth and succinic acid production. However, growth inhibition was observed when excessive bicarbonate salts were added. By the comparison of the activities of key enzymes, it was found that PEP carboxylation by PEP carboxykinase (PckA) is the most important for succinic acid production as well as the growth of M. succiniciproducens by providing additional ATP. PMID:17570706

  3. The succinate receptor as a novel therapeutic target for oxidative and metabolic stress-related conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina eAriza

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The succinate receptor (also known as GPR91 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is closely related to the family of P2Y purinoreceptors. It is expressed in a variety of tissues, including blood cells, adipose tissue, the liver, retina and kidney. In these tissues, this receptor and its ligand succinate have recently emerged as novel mediators in local stress situations, including ischemia, hypoxia, toxicity and hyperglycemia. Amongst others, the succinate receptor is involved in recruitment of immune cells to transplanted tissues. Moreover, it was shown to play a key role in the development of diabetic retinopathy. However, most prominently, the role of locally increased succinate levels and succinate receptor activation in the kidney, stimulating the systemic and local renin-angiotensin system, starts to unfold: The succinate receptor is a key mediator in the development of hypertension and possibly fibrosis in diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. This makes the succinate receptor a promising drug target to counteract or prevent cardiovascular and fibrotic defects in these expanding disorders. Recent development of SUCNR1-specific antagonists opens novel possibilities for research in models for these disorders and may eventually provide novel opportunities for the treatment of patients.

  4. [Effects of furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural on succinic acid production by Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Honghui; Wang, Jing; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Jie; Xing, Jianmin

    2013-10-01

    Succinic acid production by fermentation from biomass, especially the lignocellulosic hydrolysate, is an alternative to chemical synthesis. Many studies report the inhibition of cell growth and succinic acid production from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, hardly is known about the actual kinetic and mechanism of the inhibition of individual factors. In this study, we studied inhibition effects of furfurals and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) on cell growth and succinic acid production of engineered E. coli. Cell growth and succinic acid titer were severely inhibited by furfural and HMF with both concentrations higher than 0.8 g/L. Cell growth was totally inhibited when the concentration of furfural was above 6.4 g/L, or the concentration of HMF was above 12.8 g/L. At the concentration of maximum toleration, which was 3.2 g/L, furfural decreased the cell mass by 77.8% and the succinic acid titer by 36.1%. HMF decreased the cell mass by 13.6% and the succinic acid titer by 18.3%. Activity measurements of key enzymes revealed that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, malate dehydrogenase, fumarate reductase all were inhibited by furfural and HMF. This study gave a quantitative view to the succinic acid production under the inhibition of lignocellulose degradation products and will help overcome the difficulties of the lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation.

  5. ATP-Based Ratio Regulation of Glucose and Xylose Improved Succinate Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengyu; Li, Jiaojiao; Liu, Huaiwei; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously engineered E. coli YL104H to efficiently produce succinate from glucose. Furthermore, the present study proved that YL104H could also co-utilize xylose and glucose for succinate production. However, anaerobic succinate accumulation using xylose as the sole carbon source failed, probably because of an insufficient supply of energy. By analyzing the ATP generation under anaerobic conditions in the presence of glucose or xylose, we indicated that succinate production was affected by the intracellular ATP level, which can be simply regulated by the substrate ratio of xylose to glucose. This finding was confirmed by succinate production using an artificial mixture containing different xylose to glucose ratios. Using xylose mother liquor, a waste containing both glucose and xylose derived from xylitol production, a final succinate titer of 61.66 g/L with an overall productivity of 0.95 g/L/h was achieved, indicating that the regulation of the intracellular ATP level may be a useful and efficient strategy for succinate production and can be extended to other anaerobic processes. PMID:27315279

  6. Non-isothermal crystallization kinetics and characterization of biodegradable poly(butylene succinate-co-neopentyl glycol succinate) copolyesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wen-Jie; Zhou, Xiao-Ming, E-mail: xiaomingzhou@tust.edu.cn

    2015-01-01

    Both biodegradable aliphatic neat poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) and poly(butylene succinate-co-neopentyl glycol succinate) (P(BS-co-NPGS)) copolyesters with different 1,4-butanediol/neopentyl glycol ratios were synthesized through a two-step process of transesterification and polycondensation using stannous chloride and 4-Methylbenzenesulfonic acid as the co-catalysts. The structure, non-isothermal crystallization behavior, crystalline morphology and crystal structure of neat PBS and P(BS-co-NPGS) copolyesters were characterized by {sup 1}H NMR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarized optical microscope (POM) and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), respectively. The Avrami equation modified by Jeziorny and Mo's method was employed to describe the non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of the neat PBS and its copolyesters. The modified Avrami equation could adequately describe the primary stage of non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of the neat PBS and its copolyesters. Mo's method provided a fairly satisfactory description of the non-isothermal crystallization of neat PBS and its copolyesters. Interestingly, the values of 1/t{sub 1/2}, Z{sub c} and F(T) obtained by the modified Avrami equation and Mo's method analysis indicated that the crystallization rate increased first and then decreased with an increase of NPGS content compared that of neat PBS, whereas the crystallization mechanism almost kept unchanged. The results of tensile testing showed that the ductility of PBS was largely improved by incorporating NPGS units. The elongation at break increased remarkably with increasing NPGS content. In particular, the sample with 20% NPGS content showed around 548% elongation at break. - Highlights: • The incorporation of NPGS units reduced the spherulite size of BS unit. • The existence of NPGS units did not change the crystal structure of BS unit. • The NPGS units incorporated in PBS could significantly improve the ductility of

  7. Interaction of Palmitic Acid with Metoprolol Succinate at the Binding Sites of Bovine Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashiur Rahman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the binding profile as well as to notify the interaction of palmitic acid with metoprolol succinate at its binding site on albumin. Methods: The binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin (BSA was studied by equilibrium dialysis method (ED at 27°C and pH 7.4, in order to have an insight in the binding chemistry of the drug to BSA in presence and absence of palmitic acid. The study was carried out using ranitidine as site-1 and diazepam as site-2 specific probe. Results: Different analysis of binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin suggested two sets of association constants: high affinity association constant (k1 = 11.0 x 105 M-1 with low capacity (n1 = 2 and low affinity association (k2 = 4.0×105 M-1 constant with high capacity (n2 = 8 at pH 7.4 and 27°C. During concurrent administration of palmitic acid and metoprolol succinate in presence or absence of ranitidine or diazepam, it was found that palmitic acid displaced metoprolol succinate from its binding site on BSA resulting reduced binding of metoprolol succinate to BSA. The increment in free fraction of metoprolol succinate was from 26.27% to 55.08% upon the addition of increased concentration of palmitic acid at a concentration of 0×10-5 M to 16×10-5 M. In presence of ranitidine and diazepam, palmitic acid further increases the free fraction of metoprolol succinate from 33.05% to 66.95% and 40.68% to 72.88%, respectively. Conclusion: This data provided the evidence of interaction at higher concentration of palmitic acid at the binding sites on BSA, which might change the pharmacokinetic properties of metoprolol succinate.

  8. Succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes from batch fermentation of mixed sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almqvist, Henrik; Pateraki, Chrysanthi; Alexandri, Maria; Koutinas, Apostolis; Lidén, Gunnar

    2016-08-01

    Succinic acid production from the monosaccharides xylose, arabinose, glucose, mannose and galactose was studied using the bacterium Actinobacillus succinogenes. In Duran bottle cultures, containing 10 g/L of each of sugar, succinic acid was produced from all sugars except for galactose. The highest succinate yield, 0.56 g/g, was obtained with glucose, whereas the succinate yield was 0.42, 0.38 and 0.44 g/g for xylose, mannose and arabinose, respectively. The specific succinate productivity was 0.7 g/g h for glucose, but below 0.2 g/g h for the other sugars. Batch bioreactor fermentations were carried out using a sugar mixture of the five sugars giving a total concentration of 50 g/L, mimicking the distribution of sugars in spent sulfite liquor (SSL) from Eucalyptus which is rich in xylose. In this mixture, an almost complete conversion of all sugars (except galactose) was achieved resulting in a final succinate concentration of 21.8-26.8 g/L and a total yield of 0.59-0.68 g/g. There was evidence of co-consumption of glucose and xylose, whereas mannose was consumed after glucose. The main by-products were acetate 0.14-0.20 g/g and formate 0.08-0.13 g/g. NADH balance calculations suggested that NADH required for succinate production was not met solely from formate and acetate production, but other means of NADH production was necessary. Results from mixed sugar fermentations were verified using SSL as substrate resulting in a succinate yield of 0.60 g/g. In addition, it was found that CO2 sparging could replace carbonate supply in the form of MgCO3 without affecting the succinate yield. PMID:27255975

  9. Biomass Biorefinery for the production of Polymers and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Oliver P. Peoples

    2008-05-05

    The conversion of biomass crops to fuel is receiving considerable attention as a means to reduce our dependence on foreign oil imports and to meet future energy needs. Besides their use for fuel, biomass crops are an attractive vehicle for producing value added products such as biopolymers. Metabolix, Inc. of Cambridge proposes to develop methods for producing biodegradable polymers polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) in green tissue plants as well as utilizating residual plant biomass after polymer extraction for fuel generation to offset the energy required for polymer extraction. The primary plant target is switchgrass, and backup targets are alfalfa and tobacco. The combined polymer and fuel production from the transgenic biomass crops establishes a biorefinery that has the potential to reduce the nation’s dependence on foreign oil imports for both the feedstocks and energy needed for plastic production. Concerns about the widespread use of transgenic crops and the grower’s ability to prevent the contamination of the surrounding environment with foreign genes will be addressed by incorporating and expanding on some of the latest plant biotechnology developed by the project partners of this proposal. This proposal also addresses extraction of PHAs from biomass, modification of PHAs so that they have suitable properties for large volume polymer applications, processing of the PHAs using conversion processes now practiced at large scale (e.g., to film, fiber, and molded parts), conversion of PHA polymers to chemical building blocks, and demonstration of the usefulness of PHAs in large volume applications. The biodegradability of PHAs can also help to reduce solid waste in our landfills. If successful, this program will reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, as well as contribute jobs and revenue to the agricultural economy and reduce the overall emissions of carbon to the atmosphere.

  10. Techno-economical evaluation of protein extraction for microalgae biorefinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Y. W.; Sanders, J. P. M.; Bruins, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Due to scarcity of fossil feedstocks, there is an increasing demand for biobased fuels. Microalgae are considered as promising biobased feedstocks. However, microalgae based fuels are not yet produced at large scale at present. Applying biorefinery, not only for oil, but also for other components, such as carbohydrates and protein, may lead to the sustainable and economical microalgae-based fuels. This paper discusses two relatively mild conditions for microalgal protein extraction, based on alkali and enzymes. Green microalgae (Chlorella fusca) with and without prior lipid removal were used as feedstocks. Under mild conditions, more protein could be extracted using proteases, with the highest yields for microalgae meal (without lipids). The data on protein extraction yields were used to calculate the costs for producing 1 ton of microalgal protein. The processing cost for the alkaline method was € 2448 /ton protein. Enzymatic method performed better from an economic point of view with € 1367 /ton protein on processing costs. However, this is still far from industrially feasible. For both extraction methods, biomass cost per ton of produced product were high. A higher protein extraction yield can partially solve this problem, lowering processing cost to €620 and 1180 /ton protein product, using alkali and enzyme, respectively. Although alkaline method has lower processing cost, optimization appears to be better achievable using enzymes. If the enzymatic method can be optimized by lowering the amount of alkali added, leading to processing cost of € 633/ton protein product. Higher revenue can be generated when the residue after protein extraction can be sold as fuel, or better as a highly digestible feed for cattle.

  11. Market penetration of ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research examines in detail the technology and economics of substituting ethanol for gasoline. This endeavor examines three issues. First, the benefits of ethanol/gasoline blends are examined, and then the technical problems of large-scale implementation of ethanol. Second, ethanol production possibilities are examined in detail from a variety of feedstocks and technologies. The feedstocks are the starch/sugar crops and crop residues, while the technologies are corn wet mill, dry grind, and lignocellulosic fermentation. Examining in detail the production possibilities allows the researchers to identity the extent of technological change, production costs, byproducts, and GHG emissions. Finally, a U.S. agricultural model, FASOMGHG, is updated which predicts the market penetration of ethanol given technological progress, variety of technologies and feedstocks, market interactions, energy prices, and GHG prices. FASOMGHG has several interesting results. First, gasoline prices have a small expansionary impact on the U.S. ethanol industry. Both agricultural producers' income and cost both increase with higher energy prices. If wholesale gasoline is $4 per gallon, the predicted ethanol market penetration attains 53% of U.S. gasoline consumption in 2030. Second, the corn wet mill remains an important industry for ethanol production, because this industry also produces corn oil, which could be converted to biodiesel. Third, GHG prices expand the ethanol industry. However, the GHG price expands the corn wet mill, but has an ambiguous impact on lignocellulosic ethanol. Feedstocks for lignocellulosic fermentation can also be burned with coal to generate electricity. Both industries are quite GHG efficient. Finally, U.S. government subsidies on biofuels have an expansionary impact on ethanol production, but may only increase market penetration by an additional 1% in 2030, which is approximately 6 billion gallons. (author)

  12. Cellulosic ethanol. Potential, technology and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rarbach, M. [Sued-Chemie AG, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    -site enzyme production further reduces production costs substantially and assures independence from external suppliers. Aproprietary and innovative ethanol separation method cuts energy demand by up to 50% compared to standard distillation. Thus, the energy derived from the byproducts like lignin and fermentation meet the entire electricity and heat demand of the production process, leading to close to 100% GHG reductions of the resulting ethanol. In July 2011 construction started on a demonstration plant with an annual ethanol output of 1,000 tons. The plant started into operation in July 2012. It will demonstrate the economic competitiveness to first generation processes and constitutes the last step from laboratory to commercial production. Additionally, the technology opens up a pathway to a second generation sugar platform to ultimately produce green chemicals for a wide range of applications, e.g. organic acids (lactic acid, succinic acid..), green solvents, C4 alcohols, furfural or furfuryl alcohol and their derivates or other specialty and bulk chemicals which can be further converted into biobased plastics and polymers. (orig.)

  13. Synthesis and design of optimal biorefinery using an expanded network with thermochemical and biochemical biomass conversion platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheali, Peam; Gernaey, Krist; Sin, Gürkan

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the development of an expanded biorefinery processing network for producing biofuels that combines biochemical and thermochemical conversion platforms. The expanded network is coupled to a framework that uses a superstructure based optimization approach to generate and compare...... of 72 processing intervals . This superstructure was integrated with an earlier developed superstructure for biochemical conversion routes thereby forming a formidable number of biorefinery alternatives. The expanded network was demonstrated to be versatile and useful as a decision support tool...... for identifying at early stage optimal biorefinery concept with respect to technical, economic and environmental criteria....

  14. Toward a Computer-Aided Synthesis and Design of Biorefinery Networks: Data Collection and Management Using a Generic Modeling Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheali, Peam; Gernaey, Krist; Sin, Gürkan

    2014-01-01

    Recent research into biorefineries resulted in many competing concepts and technologies for conversion of renewable biobased feedstock into an array of promising products including fuels, chemicals, materials, etc. The topic of this study is collection and management of the complex biorefinery data...... parameters includes reaction yield, utility consumption, and separation efficiency among others, which are identified on the basis of input−output data (generated from rigorous models) collected from detailed biorefinery case studies reported in the open literature. The outcome is a verified database...

  15. 76 FR 32355 - Notice of Funds Availability (NOFA) Inviting Applications for the Biorefinery Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-06

    ... Assistance program (the ``Program'') in the Federal Register (76 FR 13351) announcing the availability of... February 14, 2011 (76 FR 8404). As there was some confusion about the information to be provided, the... Availability (NOFA) Inviting Applications for the Biorefinery Assistance Program AGENCY: Rural...

  16. Sustainable multipurpose biorefineries for third-generation biofuels and value-added co-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern biorefinery facilities conduct many types of processes, including those producing advanced biofuels, commodity chemicals, biodiesel, and value-added co-products such as sweeteners and bioinsecticides, with many more co-products, chemicals and biofuels on the horizon. Most of these processes ...

  17. Implications of silica on biorefineries – interactions with organic material and mineral elements in grasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Duy Michael; Sørensen, Hanne Risbjerg; Knudsen, Niels Ole;

    2015-01-01

    Biorefineries aim to convert low value biomasses into high value products. The feedstock biomasses are often high-silica agricultural waste products such as rice straw, wheat straw, corn stover, sugarcane bagasse, or empty fruit bunches. This causes challenges, since silica is problematic...

  18. Alternative use of grassland biomass for biorefinery in Ireland: a scoping study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Keeffe, S.

    2010-01-01

    The need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependency on fossil fuels has been one of the main driving forces to use renewable resources for energy and chemicals. The integrated use of grassland biomass for the production of chemicals and energy, also known as Green Biorefinery (GBR), has recei

  19. Optimal processing pathway selection for microalgae-based biorefinery under uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Zaman, Muhammad; Lee, Jay H.;

    2015-01-01

    and shortage in the available technical information. A stochastic mixed integer nonlinear programming (sMINLP) problem is formulated for determining the optimal biorefinery configurations based on a superstructure model where parameter uncertainties are modeled and included as sampled scenarios. The solution...

  20. The Chemistry and Technology of Furfural Production in Modern Lignocellulose-Feedstock Biorefineries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcotullio, G.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation deals with biorefinery technology development, i.e. with the development of sustainable industrial methods aimed at the production of chemicals, fuels, heat and power from lignocellulosic biomass. This work is particularly focused on the production of furfural from hemicellulose-de

  1. Separation and Concentration of Succinic Adic from Multicomponent Aqueous Solutions by Nanofiltration Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antczak Jerzy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper applies the determined suitability of nanofiltration (NF membrane separation for selective isolation and concentration of succinic acid from aqueous solutions which are post-fermentation multicomponent fluids. The study analyzed the influence of concentration and the pH of the separated solutions on the efficiency and selectivity of NF process that runs in a module equipped with a ceramic membrane. Moreover, the effect of applied trans-membrane pressure on the retention of succinic acid and sodium succinate has been studied. The investigations have shown that in the used NF module the retention of succinic acid salt is equal almost 50% in the case of a three-component model solution, although the degree of retention depends on both the transmembrane pressure and the initial concentration of separated salt.

  2. Industrial systems biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enables novel succinic acid cell factory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Otero

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most well characterized eukaryote, the preferred microbial cell factory for the largest industrial biotechnology product (bioethanol, and a robust commerically compatible scaffold to be exploitted for diverse chemical production. Succinic acid is a highly sought after added-value chemical for which there is no native pre-disposition for production and accmulation in S. cerevisiae. The genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of S. cerevisiae enabled in silico gene deletion predictions using an evolutionary programming method to couple biomass and succinate production. Glycine and serine, both essential amino acids required for biomass formation, are formed from both glycolytic and TCA cycle intermediates. Succinate formation results from the isocitrate lyase catalyzed conversion of isocitrate, and from the α-keto-glutarate dehydrogenase catalyzed conversion of α-keto-glutarate. Succinate is subsequently depleted by the succinate dehydrogenase complex. The metabolic engineering strategy identified included deletion of the primary succinate consuming reaction, Sdh3p, and interruption of glycolysis derived serine by deletion of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, Ser3p/Ser33p. Pursuing these targets, a multi-gene deletion strain was constructed, and directed evolution with selection used to identify a succinate producing mutant. Physiological characterization coupled with integrated data analysis of transcriptome data in the metabolically engineered strain were used to identify 2(nd-round metabolic engineering targets. The resulting strain represents a 30-fold improvement in succinate titer, and a 43-fold improvement in succinate yield on biomass, with only a 2.8-fold decrease in the specific growth rate compared to the reference strain. Intuitive genetic targets for either over-expression or interruption of succinate producing or consuming pathways, respectively, do not lead to increased succinate. Rather, we

  3. Succinic acid in aqueous solution : connecting microscopic surface composition and macroscopic surface tension

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Josephina; Julin, Jan; Dalirian, Maryam; Prisle, Nønne; Öhrwall, Gunnar; Persson, Ingmar; Björneholm, Olle; Riipinen, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    The water vapor interface of aqueous solutions of succinic acid, where pH values and bulk concentrations were varied, has been studied using surface sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It was found that succinic acid has a considerably higher propensity to reside in the aqueous surface region than its deprotonated form, which is effectively depleted from the surface due to the two strongly hydrated carboxylate groups. From both XPS experim...

  4. Carbon dioxide metabolism by Actinomyces viscosus: pathways for succinate and aspartate production.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, A T; Breeding, L C

    1980-01-01

    14C-labeled bicarbonate was incorporated into trichloroacetic acid-insoluble material by cell suspensions of A. viscosus strain M100 and also into the four-carbon fermentation product, succinate, but not into the three-carbon fermentation product, lactate. The initial step in the conversion of 14C-labeled bicarbonate into both trichloroacetic acid-insoluble material and succinate was catalyzed by the enzyme phosphoenolypyruvate carboxylase, which served to convert the glycolytic intermediate,...

  5. Effect of Growth Phase Feeding Strategies on Succinate Production by Metabolically Engineered Escherichia coli▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Min; Liu, Shu-wen; Ma, Jiang-feng; Chen, Ke-quan; Yu, Li; Yue, Fang-fang; Xu, Bing; WEI, PING

    2009-01-01

    Aerobic growth conditions significantly influenced anaerobic succinate production in two-stage fermentation by Escherichia coli AFP111 with knockouts in rpoS, pflAB, ldhA, and ptsG genes. At a low cell growth rate limited by glucose, enzymes involved in the reductive arm of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glyoxylate shunt showed elevated activities, providing AFP111 with intracellular redox balance and increased succinic acid yield and productivity.

  6. Cascade processing of wheat bran through a biorefinery approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • About 98% of total sugars were successfully converted and recovered from wheat bran. • LHW and effective enzyme-assisted extraction method is used to obtain total sugar. • Sequential treatment of various materials can be a great value to the industry. • High pressure and LHW can be a valuable treatment for the lignocellulosic materials. • Protein separation can be done with LHW. - Abstract: Structural characteristics of wheat bran such as surface area, crystallinity, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content significantly affect the yield of biorefinery products such as protein, fermentable sugar and lignin. The aim of the study was to use a sequence of high pressure extraction and hydrolysis processes in a cascade to create high potential value added products, namely, proteins, fermentable sugars and lignin. In the present study, four different sets of experiments were carried out step by step in a cascade sequence. The main experiments were the sequential extraction and hydrolysis which were optimized using design of experiments. Protein extraction from wheat bran was performed in a fixed bed reactor and was maximized to 1.976 g/L at the elicited optimum conditions which were 80 °C, pH 9.3 for a duration of 30 min. In the sequential experiment, process parameters such as temperature, flow rate and duration were optimized for liquid hot water (LHW) hydrolysis. The maximum reducing sugar concentration was 200 g/kg which corresponded to 34% per dry biomass obtained at a flow rate of 5 ml/min, temperature of 210 °C during a 45 min treatment. The following step was enzymatic hydrolysis to saccharify the cellulose under high pressure, where the independent variables were pressure, temperature and process time in order to ascertain the process conditions maximizing the reducing sugar content, where a positive correlation was observed between the solid–liquid loading ratio and reducing sugar yield. In the final step, the lignin content of

  7. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humbird, D.; Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Kinchin, C.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.; Olthof, B.; Worley, M.; Sexton, D.; Dudgeon, D.

    2011-03-01

    This report describes one potential biochemical ethanol conversion process, conceptually based upon core conversion and process integration research at NREL. The overarching process design converts corn stover to ethanol by dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, and co-fermentation. Building on design reports published in 2002 and 1999, NREL, together with the subcontractor Harris Group Inc., performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process. This update reflects NREL's current vision of the biochemical ethanol process and includes the latest research in the conversion areas (pretreatment, conditioning, saccharification, and fermentation), optimizations in product recovery, and our latest understanding of the ethanol plant's back end (wastewater and utilities). The conceptual design presented here reports ethanol production economics as determined by 2012 conversion targets and 'nth-plant' project costs and financing. For the biorefinery described here, processing 2,205 dry ton/day at 76% theoretical ethanol yield (79 gal/dry ton), the ethanol selling price is $2.15/gal in 2007$.

  8. Is it possible to produce succinic acid at a low pH?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzbashev, Tigran V; Yuzbasheva, Evgeniya Y; Laptev, Ivan A; Sobolevskaya, Tatiana I; Vybornaya, Tatiana V; Larina, Anna S; Gvilava, Ilia T; Antonova, Svetlana V; Sineoky, Sergey P

    2011-01-01

    Bio-based succinate is still a matter of special emphasis in biotechnology and adjacent research areas. The vast majority of natural and engineered producers are bacterial strains that accumulate succinate under anaerobic conditions. Recently, we succeeded in obtaining an aerobic yeast strain capable of producing succinic acid at low pH. Herein, we discuss some difficulties and advantages of microbial pathways producing "succinic acid" rather than "succinate." It was concluded that the peculiar properties of the constructed yeast strain could be clarified in view of a distorted energy balance. There is evidence that in an acidic environment, the majority of the cellular energy available as ATP will be spent for proton and anion efflux. The decreased ATP:ADP ratio could essentially reduce the growth rate or even completely inhibit growth. In the same way, the preference of this elaborated strain for certain carbon sources could be explained in terms of energy balance. Nevertheless, the opportunity to exclude alkali and mineral acid waste from microbial succinate production seems environmentally friendly and cost-effective.

  9. [Succinic acid production from sucrose and sugarcane molasses by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Ma, Jiangfeng; Wu, Mingke; Ji, Yaliang; Chen, Wufang; Ren, Xinyi; Jiang, Min

    2015-04-01

    Sugarcane molasses containing large amounts of sucrose is an economical substrate for succinic acid production. However, Escherichia coli AFP111 cannot metabolize sucrose although it is a promising candidate for succinic acid production. To achieve sucrose utilizing ability, we cloned and expressed cscBKA genes encoding sucrose permease, fructokinase and invertase of non-PTS sucrose-utilization system from E. coli W in E. coli AFP111 to generate a recombinant strain AFP111/pMD19T-cscBKA. After 72 h of anaerobic fermentation of the recombinant in serum bottles, 20 g/L sucrose was consumed and 12 g/L succinic acid was produced. During dual-phase fermentation comprised of initial aerobic growth phase followed by anaerobic fermentation phase, the concentration of succinic acid from sucrose and sugarcane molasses was 34 g/L and 30 g/L, respectively, at 30 h of anaerobic phase in a 3 L fermentor. The results show that the introduction of non-PTS sucrose-utilization system has sucrose-metabolizing capability for cell growth and succinic acid production, and can use cheap sugarcane molasses to produce succinic acid.

  10. Production of succinic acid from oil palm empty fruit bunch cellulose using Actinobacillus succinogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasma, Satriani Aga; Daik, Rusli; Maskat, Mohamad Yusof

    2013-11-01

    Succinic acid is a common metabolite in plants, animals and microorganisms. It has been used widely in agricultural, food and pharmaceutical industries. Enzymatic hydrolysate glucose from oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) cellulose was used as a substrate for succinic acid production using Actinobacillus succinogenes. Using cellulose extraction from OPEFB can enhance the production of glucose as a main substrate for succinic acid production. The highest concentration of glucose produced from enzymatic hydrolysis is 167 mg/mL and the sugar recovery is 0.73 g/g of OPEFB. By optimizing the culture medium for succinic acid fermentation with enzymatic hydrolysate of OPEFB cellulose, the nitrogen sources could be reduced to just only 2.5 g yeast extract and 2.5 g corn step liquor. Batch fermentation was carried out using enzymatic hydrolysate of OPEFB cellulose with yeast extract, corn steep liquor and the salts mixture, 23.5 g/L succinic acid was obtained with consumption of 72 g/L glucose in enzymatic hydrolysate of OPEFB cellulose at 38 hours and 37°C. This study suggests that enzymatic hydrolysate of OPEFB cellulose maybe an alternative substrate for the efficient production of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes.

  11. Improving succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes from raw industrial carob pods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Margarida; Roca, Christophe; Reis, Maria A M

    2016-10-01

    Carob pods are an inexpensive by-product of locust bean gum industry that can be used as renewable feedstock for bio-based succinic acid. Here, for the first time, unprocessed raw carob pods were used to extract a highly enriched sugar solution, afterwards used as substrate to produce succinic acid using Actinobacillus succinogenes. Batch fermentations containing 30g/L sugars resulted in a production rate of 1.67gSA/L.h and a yield of 0.39gSA/g sugars. Taking advantage of A. succinogenes' metabolism, uncoupling cell growth from succinic acid production, a fed-batch mode was implemented to increase succinic acid yield and reduce by-products formation. This strategy resulted in a succinic acid yield of 0.94gSA/g sugars, the highest yield reported in the literature for fed-batch and continuous experiments, while maintaining by-products at residual values. Results demonstrate that raw carob pods are a highly efficient feedstock for bio-based succinic acid production. PMID:27394995

  12. Succinic acid production from corn cob hydrolysates by genetically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Zhang, Hengli; Cai, Heng; Zhou, Zhihui; Chen, Yilu; Chen, Yali; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum wild type lacks the ability to utilize the xylose fractions of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. In the present work, we constructed a xylose metabolic pathway in C. glutamicum by heterologous expression of the xylA and xylB genes coming from Escherichia coli. Dilute-acid hydrolysates of corn cobs containing xylose and glucose were used as a substrate for succinic acid production by recombinant C. glutamicum NC-2. The results indicated that the available activated charcoal pretreatment in dilute-acid hydrolysates of corn cobs could be able to overcome the inhibitory effect in succinic acid production. Succinic acid was shown to be efficiently produced from corn cob hydrolysates (55 g l(-1) xylose and 4 g l(-1) glucose) under oxygen deprivation with addition of sodium carbonate. Succinic acid concentration reached 40.8 g l(-1) with a yield of 0.69 g g(-1) total sugars within 48 h. It was the first report of succinic acid production from corn cob hydrolysates by metabolically engineered C. glutamicum. This study suggested that dilute-acid hydrolysates of corn cobs may be an alternative substrate for the efficient production of succinic acid by C. glutamicum. PMID:24078255

  13. Preliminary analysis of cellulose-based ethanol production: pathways and challenges in the Rio Grande do Sul alcohol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Fialho Blos

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The production of ethanol in Brazil has contributed towards the replacement of fossil fuels over the past few years. Among those initiatives, the production of ethanol from cellulose is one of the areas drawing the interest of different research centers in developed countries. Hence, the production of ethanol opens up new perspectives for Brazilian states. In light of this backdrop, this paper aims at characterizing and understanding the state of the art in different technological courses and production configuration alternatives present in different parts of the world regarding cellulose-based ethanol production. To that end, research was conducted at the lumber and industrial companies connected to cellulose-based ethanol production. In other parts of the globe, the ability of planned forests to provide energy is promising, given the positive energy balance and the increase in carbon dioxide sequestering, paramount in times of global warming. The association with other crops may become a source of productive diversity for small farmers residing in degraded areas or those presenting low economic dynamism. There is the need to develop new research efforts and look more deeply into the environmental issues involved, as well as further assessment on the economic and social viability of such projects.Key-words: cellulosic ethanol, biorefinery, biomass, agrienergy, bioenergy.

  14. Algal biorefinery-based industry: an approach to address fuel and food insecurity for a carbon-smart world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhadra, Bobban

    2011-01-15

    Food and fuel production are intricately interconnected. In a carbon-smart society, it is imperative to produce both food and fuel sustainably. Integration of the emerging biorefinery concept with other industries can bring many environmental deliverables while mitigating several sustainability-related issues with respect to greenhouse gas emissions, fossil fuel usage, land use change for fuel production and future food insufficiency. A new biorefinery-based integrated industrial ecology encompasses the different value chain of products, coproducts, and services from the biorefinery industries. This paper discusses a framework to integrate the algal biofuel-based biorefinery, a booming biofuel sector, with other industries such as livestock, lignocellulosic and aquaculture. Using the USA as an example, this paper also illustrates the benefits associated with sustainable production of fuel and food. Policy and regulatory initiatives for synergistic development of the algal biofuel sector with other industries can bring many sustainable solutions for the future existence of mankind. PMID:20981716

  15. Biological denitrification using poly(butanediol succinate) as electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiqiang; Yin, Yanan; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-07-01

    Poly(butanediol succinate) (PBS), a biodegradable polymer, was used as both solid carbon source and biofilm carrier for biological nitrate removal process, in which PBS was filled in a packed-bed bioreactor. The denitrification performance and the microbial diversity of biofilm attached on the surface of PBS were investigated. The experimental results showed that the volumetric denitrification rate was 0.60 kg m(-3) day(-1) when NO3-N loading rate was 0.63 kg m(-3) day(-1), and the average NO2-N concentration was below 0.20 mg L(-1). The effluent pH value decreased slightly from a range of 6.98-7.87 to 6.46-7.18. The analysis of microbial community structure of biofilm by pyrosequencing method showed that Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum (89.87 %), and β-Proteobacteria represented the most abundant class. Among the 76 identified genera, Dechloromonas (10.26 %), Alicycliphilus (9.15 %), Azospira (8.92 %), and Sinobacteraceae-uncultured (8.75 %) were the abundant genera. PBS, as a promising alternative carbon source, is a suitable solid carbon source and biofilm carrier for nitrate removal. PMID:26960320

  16. Metoprolol succinate extended release/hydrochlorothiazide combination tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Hainer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available James W Hainer, Jennifer SuggAstraZeneca LP, Wilmington, DE, USAAbstract: Lowering elevated blood pressure (BP with drug therapy reduces the risk for catastrophic fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Given the heterogeneity of hypertension as a disease, the marked variability in an individual patient’s BP response, and low response rates with monotherapy, expert groups such as the Joint National Committee (JNC emphasize the value of combination antihypertensive regimens, noting that combinations, usually of different classes, have additive antihypertensive effects. Metoprolol succinate extended-release tablet is a beta-1 (cardio-selective adrenoceptor-blocking agent formulated to provide controlled and predictable release of metoprolol. Hydrochlorothiazide (HCT is a well-established diuretic and antihypertensive agent, which promotes natruresis by acting on the distal renal tubule. The pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety/tolerability of the antihypertensive combination tablet, metoprolol extended release hydrochlorothiazide, essentially reflect the well-described independent characteristics of each of the component agents. Not only is the combination product more effective than monotherapy with the individual components but the combination product allows a low-dose multidrug regimen as an alternative to high-dose monotherapy, thereby, minimizing the likelihood of dose-related side-effects.Keywords: antihypertensive, blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, combination product

  17. Competitiveness of Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Compared to US Corn Ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Crago, Christine Lasco; Khanna, Madhu; Barton, Jason; Giuliani, Eduardo; Amaral, Weber

    2010-01-01

    Corn ethanol produced in the US and sugarcane ethanol produced in Brazil are the world’s leading sources of biofuel. Current US biofuel policies create both incentives and constraints for the import of ethanol from Brazil, and together with the competitiveness and greenhouse gas intensity of sugarcane ethanol compared to corn ethanol will determine the extent of these imports. This study analyzes the supply-side determinants of this competitiveness and compares the greenhouse gas intensity of...

  18. [Effect of phenolic ketones on ethanol fermentation and cellular lipid composition of Pichia stipitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinlong; Cheng, Yichao; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Junjun; Chen, Tingting; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Yu, Shiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Lignin degradation products are toxic to microorganisms, which is one of the bottlenecks for fuel ethanol production. We studied the effects of phenolic ketones (4-hydroxyacetophenone, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone and 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy-acetophenone) derived from lignin degradation on ethanol fermentation of xylose and cellular lipid composition of Pichia stipitis NLP31. Ethanol and the cellular fatty acid of yeast were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Results indicate that phenolic ketones negatively affected ethanol fermentation of yeast and the lower molecular weight phenolic ketone compound was more toxic. When the concentration of 4-hydroxyacetophenone was 1.5 g/L, at fermentation of 24 h, the xylose utilization ratio, ethanol yield and ethanol concentration decreased by 42.47%, 5.30% and 9.76 g/L, respectively, compared to the control. When phenolic ketones were in the medium, the ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids (UFA/SFA) of yeast cells was improved. When 1.5 g/L of three aforementioned phenolic ketones was added to the fermentation medium, the UFA/SFA ratio of yeast cells increased to 3.03, 3.06 and 3.61, respectively, compared to 2.58 of the control, which increased cell membrane fluidity and instability. Therefore, phenolic ketones can reduce the yeast growth, increase the UFA/SFA ratio of yeast and lower ethanol productivity. Effectively reduce or remove the content of lignin degradation products is the key to improve lignocellulose biorefinery. PMID:27382768

  19. [Effect of phenolic ketones on ethanol fermentation and cellular lipid composition of Pichia stipitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinlong; Cheng, Yichao; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Junjun; Chen, Tingting; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Yu, Shiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Lignin degradation products are toxic to microorganisms, which is one of the bottlenecks for fuel ethanol production. We studied the effects of phenolic ketones (4-hydroxyacetophenone, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone and 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy-acetophenone) derived from lignin degradation on ethanol fermentation of xylose and cellular lipid composition of Pichia stipitis NLP31. Ethanol and the cellular fatty acid of yeast were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Results indicate that phenolic ketones negatively affected ethanol fermentation of yeast and the lower molecular weight phenolic ketone compound was more toxic. When the concentration of 4-hydroxyacetophenone was 1.5 g/L, at fermentation of 24 h, the xylose utilization ratio, ethanol yield and ethanol concentration decreased by 42.47%, 5.30% and 9.76 g/L, respectively, compared to the control. When phenolic ketones were in the medium, the ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids (UFA/SFA) of yeast cells was improved. When 1.5 g/L of three aforementioned phenolic ketones was added to the fermentation medium, the UFA/SFA ratio of yeast cells increased to 3.03, 3.06 and 3.61, respectively, compared to 2.58 of the control, which increased cell membrane fluidity and instability. Therefore, phenolic ketones can reduce the yeast growth, increase the UFA/SFA ratio of yeast and lower ethanol productivity. Effectively reduce or remove the content of lignin degradation products is the key to improve lignocellulose biorefinery.

  20. Assessment of BIOrefinery concepts and the implications for agricultural and forestry POLicy : Deliverable 7.6 : BIOPOL Final report

    OpenAIRE

    Annevelink, E.; Kamm, B.; Schönicke, P.; Menrad, K.; Kurka, S.; Klein, A.; Rogulska, M.; Karbowski, A.; Peck, P.; McCormick, K; Lenhart, J; P. Capros; Agathokles, D.E.; Reith, J.H.; Mozaffarian, H.

    2009-01-01

    BIOPOL is a two-year research project funded by the European Commission since 2007 through the Sixth Framework Programme. The overall goal of BIOPOL is to assess the status (technical, social, environmental, political, and implementation) of innovative BIOrefinery concepts and the implications for agricultural and forestry POLicy. Biorefinery concepts are aimed at relevant market-competitive and environmental-friendly synthesis of bio-products (chemicals and/or materials) together with the pr...

  1. Ethanol and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, A Y; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Neve, E; Matsumoto, H; Nishitani, Y; Minowa, Y; Fukui, Y; Bailey, S M; Patel, V B; Cunningham, C C; Zima, T; Fialova, L; Mikulikova, L; Popov, P; Malbohan, I; Janebova, M; Nespor, K; Sun, G Y

    2001-05-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a workshop at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The chair was Albert Y. Sun. The presentations were (1) Ethanol-inducible cytochrome P-4502E1 in alcoholic liver disease, by Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg and Etienne Neve; (2) Regulation of NF-kappaB by ethanol, by H. Matsumoto, Y. Nishitani, Y. Minowa, and Y. Fukui; (3) Chronic ethanol consumption increases concentration of oxidized proteins in rat liver, by Shannon M. Bailey, Vinood B. Patel, and Carol C. Cunningham; (4) Antiphospholipids antibodies and oxidized modified low-density lipoprotein in chronic alcoholic patients, by Tomas Zima, Lenka Fialova, Ludmila Mikulikova, Ptr Popov, Ivan Malbohan, Marta Janebova, and Karel Nespor; and (5) Amelioration of ethanol-induced damage by polyphenols, by Albert Y. Sun and Grace Y. Sun. PMID:11391077

  2. Ethanol production from lignocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Wood, Brent E.

    2001-01-01

    This invention presents a method of improving enzymatic degradation of lignocellulose, as in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, through the use of ultrasonic treatment. The invention shows that ultrasonic treatment reduces cellulase requirements by 1/3 to 1/2. With the cost of enzymes being a major problem in the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, this invention presents a significant improvement over presently available methods.

  3. Obtaining petrochemical products from ethanol; Obtencao de produtos petroquimicos a partir do etanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverio, Carlos Augusto N.; Oliveira, Claudia Vasconcellos R. de; Joao, Rafael Richard; Hashizume, Tulio Kenji C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Currently, high oil prices, low availability of traditional raw material (natural gas and petrochemical naphtha), increasing recognition of the importance of the preservation of nature and reducing emissions of pollutants have been creating a great opportunity for the petrochemical industry to seek alternative materials from renewable resources. The ethanol, which obtained a virtuous journey as fuel, is a very promising alternative to be used for the production of petrochemical products. However, the use of ethanol as a raw material will require a considerable increase in its production, what can be achieved through the development of new production technologies based on biomass and the construction of integrated biorefineries. So, this study aims to identify and compare conventional petrochemical routes with routes from this renewable raw material in order to evaluate their technical and economic feasibility. A preliminary analysis was performed between four petrochemical products: acetic acid, acetaldehyde, the ethyl acetate and ethylene. From this initial analysis, acetic acid and ethylene were selected for a more comprehensive feasibility study considering their production using ethanol as raw material, what is called ethanol chemistry. (author)

  4. Fungal protein and ethanol from lignocelluloses using Rhizopus pellets under simultaneous saccharification, filtration and fermentation (SSFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh FazeliNejad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The economic viability of the 2nd generation bioethanol production process cannot rely on a single product but on a biorefinery built around it. In this work, ethanol and fungal biomass (animal feed were produced from acid-pretreated wheat straw slurry under an innovative simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and filtration (SSFF strategy. A membrane unit separated the solids from the liquid and the latter was converted to biomass or to both biomass and ethanol in the fermentation reactor containing Rhizopus sp. pellets. Biomass yields of up to 0.34 g/g based on the consumed monomeric sugars and acetic acid were achieved. A surplus of glucose in the feed resulted in ethanol production and reduced the biomass yield, whereas limiting glucose concentrations resulted in higher consumption of xylose and acetic acid. The specific growth rate, in the range of 0.013-0.015/h, did not appear to be influenced by the composition of the carbon source. Under anaerobic conditions, an ethanol yield of 0.40 g/g was obtained. The present strategy benefits from the easier separation of the biomass from the medium and the fungus ability to assimilate carbon residuals in comparison with when yeast is used. More specifically, it allows in-situ separation of insoluble solids leading to the production of pure fungal biomass as a value-added product.

  5. Positive Interaction Of Ethanol With Malic Acid In Postharvest Physiology Of Cut Spray Carnation ‘White Natila’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begri Fatemeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, succinic acid (0, 1 and 2 mM, malic acid (0, 1 and 2 mM, ethanol (0, 2 and 4% v/v, and their mixtures were applied as preservative solutions for cut flowers of spread carnation cv. ‘White Natila’ and their effect on the longevity, the amount of absorbed solution, malondialdehyde and chlorophyll content, cell membrane stability, fresh, and dry weight and on a visual quality was determined. A similarity in the effect of malic acid and succinic acid on dry weight and fresh weight loss were found. Ethanol positively affected most of the studied traits, including the vase life and fresh weight loss. The preservative solution containing 1 mM of malic acid and 4% ethanol resulted in the longest average vase life - 11.1 days compared to 8.9 days in the control. Malic acid showed a significant positive synergism with ethanol that makes it reasonable to combine them in preservative solutions intended to extend the vase life of cut spray carnation.

  6. Ternary solution of sodium chloride, succinic acid and water; surface tension and its influence on cloud droplet activation

    OpenAIRE

    J. Vanhanen; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Anttila, T.; T. Raatikainen; Viisanen, Y; H. Lihavainen

    2008-01-01

    Surface tension of ternary solution of sodium chloride, succinic acid and water was measured as a function of both composition and temperature by using the capillary rise technique. Both sodium chloride and succinic acid are found in atmospheric aerosols, the former being main constituent of marine aerosol. Succinic acid was found to decrease the surface tension of water already at very low concentrations. Sodium chloride increased the surface tension linearly as a function of the concentrati...

  7. Ternary solution of sodium chloride, succinic acid and water ? surface tension and its influence on cloud droplet activation

    OpenAIRE

    H. Lihavainen; Viisanen, Y; Anttila, T.; A.-P. Hyvärinen; J. Vanhanen

    2008-01-01

    Surface tension of ternary solution of sodium chloride, succinic acid and water was measured as a function of both composition and temperature by using the capillary rise technique. Both sodium chloride and succinic acid are found in atmospheric aerosols, the former being main constituent of marine aerosol. Succinic acid was found to decrease the surface tension of water already at very low concentrations. Sodium chloride increased the surface tension linearly as a function of the concentrati...

  8. Urinary Bladder Paragangliomas: Analysis of Succinate Dehydrogenase and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sounak; Zhang, Jun; Rivera, Michael; Erickson, Lori A

    2016-09-01

    Paragangliomas of the urinary bladder can arise sporadically or as a part of hereditary syndromes including those with underlying mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) genes, which serve as tumor suppressors. SDH deficiency can be screened for by absence of immunohistochemical detection of SDHB. In this study of 11 cases, clinical follow-up was available for 9/11 cases. The cases were reviewed and graded based on the grading system for adrenal pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (GAPP) criteria. Immunohistochemistry was performed for Ki67 and SDHB. Proliferative index was calculated by quantification of Ki67-positive cells at hot spots. The medical record was accessed for documentation of germline SDH mutations. Urinary bladder paragangliomas had a female predilection (8/11 cases), and 5/11 cases exhibited metastatic behavior. Patients with metastatic disease tended to be younger (mean age 43 vs 49 years), have larger lesions (5.8 vs 1.5 cm), and presented with catecholamine excess (4/4 vs 2/6 patients with non-metastatic lesions). Patients with metastatic disease had a higher mean Ki67 proliferation rate (4.9 vs 1.3 %) and GAPP score (mean of 5.8 vs 3.8) (p = 0.01). IHC for SDHB expression revealed loss of expression in 2/6 cases of non-metastatic paragangliomas compared to 4/5 patients with metastatic paragangliomas. Interestingly, of these four patients, two had a documented mutation of SDHB, one patient had a SDHC mutation, and another patient had a history of familial disease without mutation analysis being performed. Our study, suggests that SDH loss was suggestive of metastatic behavior in addition to younger age at diagnosis, larger tumor size, and higher Ki67 proliferation rate and catecholamine type. PMID:27262318

  9. Process economics of renewable biorefineries: butanol and ethanol production in integrated bioprocesses from lignocellulosics and other industrial by-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter provides process economic details on production of butanol from lignocellulosic biomass and glycerol in integrated bioreactors where numerous unit operations are combined. In order to compare various processes, economic evaluations were performed using SuperPro Designer Software (versio...

  10. RRR-α-tocopheryl succinate inhibits human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell growth by inducing apoptosis and DNA synthesis arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Wu; Yan Zhao; Bai-He Liu; Yao Li; Fang Liu; Jian Guo; Wei-Ping Yu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of growth inhibition ofhuman gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell with RRR-α-tocopherylsuccinate (VES), a derivative of natural Vitamin E, viainducing apoptosis and DNA synthesis arrest.METHODS: Human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells wereregularly incubated in the presence of VES at 5, 10 and20mg@ L 1(VES was dissolved in absolute ethanol anddiluted in RPMI 1640 complete condition mediacorrespondingly to a final concentration of VES and 1mL@L-1 ethanol), succinic acid and ethanol equivalents asvehicle (VEH) control andcondition media only asuntreated (UT) control. Trypan blue dye exclusionanalysis and MTT assay were applied to detect the cellproliferation. 37kBq of tritiated thymidine was added tocells and [3H] TdR uptake was measured to observe DNAsynthesis. Apoptotic morphology was observed byelectron microscopy and DAPI staining. Flow cytometryand terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTPnick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were performed to detectVES-triggered apoptosis.RESULTS: VES inhibited SGC-7901 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. The growth curve showed suppressionby 24.7%, 49.2% and 68.7% following 24h of VEStreatment at 5, 10 and 20 mg@L 1, respectively, similar tothe findings from MTT assay. DNA synthesis wasevidently reduced by 35%, 45% and 98% after 24h VEStreatment at 20 mg@ L-1 and 48h at 10 and 20 mg@ L 1,respectively. VES induced SGC-7901 cells to undergoapoptosis with typically apoptotic characteristics,including morphological changes of chromatincondensation, chromatin crescent formation/margination,nucleus fragmentation and apoptotic body formation,typical apoptotic sub-G1 peak by flow cytometry andincrease of apoptotic cells by TUNEL assay in which 90%of cells underwent apoptosis after 48h of VES treatment at20 mcg@L-1.CONCLUSION: VES can inhibit human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell growth by inducing apoptosis and DNA synthesisarrest. Inhibition of SGC-7901 cell growth by VES is dose-and time

  11. A methodology to assess the contribution of biorefineries to a sustainable bio-based economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maga, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Within this thesis for the first time an integrative methodology to assess the sustainability of biorefineries and bio-based products has been developed which is based on a fundamental understanding of sustainability as presented in the Brundtland report. The applied integrative concept of sustainability as developed by the Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis (ITAS) overcomes the widespread thinking in three pillars of sustainability and opens up new perspectives. The methodology developed addresses innovative life cycle assessment evaluation methods on midpoint level as well as on the area of protection and adopts state-of-the-art assessment procedures e.g. to determine water deprivation. It goes far beyond the scope of conventional LCA studies and examines effects on human health, on the environment, on the development of knowledge and physical capital, and on regional development and acceptance. In order to validate the developed method it was applied to an algae biorefinery currently under development and construction in the south of Spain. For this assessment for the first time extensive process data was collected of a real algae biorefinery which uses municipal waste water as a culture medium for microalgae. The use of waste water allows to reduce the demand for fresh water and avoids additional fertilisation of microalgae. Moreover, the analysed algae biorefinery replaces conventional waste water treatment by a biological purification and produces biogas by an anaerobic pretreatment of waste water as well as by anaerobic digestion of algae. After several purification steps the biogas can be used as automotive fuel and thus contributes to further development and increased use of biofuels. On the one hand the sustainability assessment shows that this way of waste water treatment contributes to climate protection and to the conservation of fossil energy carrier. On the other hand approximately ten times more land is needed and twenty times

  12. Development of a biorefinery optimized biofuel supply curve for the Western United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A resource assessment and biorefinery siting optimization model was developed and implemented to assess potential biofuel supply across the Western United States from agricultural, forest, urban, and energy crop biomass. Spatial information including feedstock resources, existing and potential refinery locations and a transportation network model is provided to a mixed integer-linear optimization model that determines the optimal locations, technology types and sizes of biorefineries to satisfy a maximum profit objective function applied across the biofuel supply and demand chain from site of feedstock production to the product fuel terminal. The resource basis includes preliminary considerations of crop and residue sustainability. Sensitivity analyses explore possible effects of policy and technology changes. At a target market price of 19.6 $ GJ-1, the model predicts a feasible production level of 610-1098 PJ, enough to supply up to 15% of current regional liquid transportation fuel demand. (author)

  13. Strategy and design of Innovation Policy Road Mapping for a waste biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama Mohan, S

    2016-09-01

    Looming energy crisis, climate change concerns coupled with decreasing fossil fuel resources has garnered significant global attention toward development of alternative, renewable, carbon-neutral and eco-friendly fuels to fulfil burgeoning energy demands. Waste utilization and its management are being pursued with renewed interest due to the gamut of biobased products it can offer apart from providing enough energy to meet a major fraction of the world's energy demand. Biorefining is the sustainable processing of biomass into a spectrum of marketable products and energy. Integrating all components of waste treatment culminating into biobased products and energy recovery in a single integrated waste biorefinery is self sufficient, highly sustainable and is very beneficial. Designing systematic innovation policies are essential for development and commercialization of new technologies in this important futuristic research area. This communication explores Innovation Policy Road Mapping (IPRM) methodology available in the literature and applies it to design integrated waste biorefinery.

  14. Identification and genetic characterization of maize cell wall variation for improved biorefinery feedstock characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauly, Markus [UC Berkeley; Hake, Sarah [USDA Albany

    2013-10-31

    The objectives of this program are to 1) characterize novel maize mutants with altered cell walls for enhanced biorefinery characteristics and 2) find quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to biorefinery characteristics by taking advantage of the genetic diversity of maize. As a result a novel non-transgenic maize plant (cal1) has been identified, whose stover (leaves and stalk) contain more glucan in their walls leading to a higher saccharification yield, when subjected to a standard enzymatic digestion cocktail. Stacking this trait with altered lignin mutants yielded evene higher saccharification yields. Cal-1 mutants do not show a loss of kernel and or biomass yield when grown in the field . Hence, cal1 biomass provides an excellent feedstock for the biofuel industry.

  15. Biorefineries for the production of top building block chemicals and their derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Sol; Song, Chan Woo; Shin, Jae Ho;

    2015-01-01

    Due to the growing concerns on the climate change and sustainability on petrochemical resources, DOE selected and announced the bio-based top 12 building blocks and discussed the needs for developing biorefinery technologies to replace the current petroleum based industry in 2004. Over the last 10...... years after its announcement, many studies have been performed for the development of efficient technologies for the bio-based production of these chemicals and derivatives. Now, ten chemicals among these top 12 chemicals, excluding the l-aspartic acid and 3-hydroxybutyrolactone, have already been...... commercialized or are close to commercialization. In this paper, we review the current status of biorefinery development for the production of these platform chemicals and their derivatives. In addition, current technological advances on industrial strain development for the production of platform chemicals...

  16. Waste biorefinery models towards sustainable circular bioeconomy: Critical review and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Mohan, S; Nikhil, G N; Chiranjeevi, P; Nagendranatha Reddy, C; Rohit, M V; Kumar, A Naresh; Sarkar, Omprakash

    2016-09-01

    Increased urbanization worldwide has resulted in a substantial increase in energy and material consumption as well as anthropogenic waste generation. The main source for our current needs is petroleum refinery, which have grave impact over energy-environment nexus. Therefore, production of bioenergy and biomaterials have significant potential to contribute and need to meet the ever increasing demand. In this perspective, a biorefinery concept visualizes negative-valued waste as a potential renewable feedstock. This review illustrates different bioprocess based technological models that will pave sustainable avenues for the development of biobased society. The proposed models hypothesize closed loop approach wherein waste is valorised through a cascade of various biotechnological processes addressing circular economy. Biorefinery offers a sustainable green option to utilize waste and to produce a gamut of marketable bioproducts and bioenergy on par to petro-chemical refinery. PMID:27068056

  17. Applications of de-oiled microalgal biomass towards development of sustainable biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Rahulkumar; Paliwal, Chetan; Ghosh, Tonmoy; Pancha, Imran; Chokshi, Kaumeel; Mitra, Madhusree; Ghosh, Arup; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-08-01

    In view of commercialization of microalgal biofuel, the de-oiled microalgal biomass (DMB) is a surplus by-product in the biorefinery process that needs to be exploited to make the process economically attractive and feasible. This DMB, rich in carbohydrates, proteins, and minerals, can be used as feed, fertilizer, and substrate for the production of bioethanol/bio-methane. Further, thermo-chemical conversion of DMB results into fuels and industrially important chemicals. Future prospects of DMB also lie with its conversion into novel biomaterials like nanoparticles and carbon-dot which have biomedical importance. The lowest valued application of DMB is to use it for adsorption of dyes and heavy metals from industrial effluents. This study reviews how DMB can be utilized for different applications and in the generation of valuable co-products. The value addition of DMB would thereby improve the overall cost economics of the microalgal bio-refinery. PMID:27161655

  18. Synthesis of Optimal Processing Pathway for Microalgae-based Biorefinery under Uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Lee, Jay H.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2015-01-01

    decision making, we propose a systematic framework for the synthesis and optimal design of microalgae-based processing network under uncertainty. By incorporating major uncertainties into the biorefinery superstructure model we developed previously, a stochastic mixed integer nonlinear programming (s......The research in the field of microalgae-based biofuels and chemicals is in early phase of the development, and therefore a wide range of uncertainties exist due to inconsistencies among and shortage of technical information. In order to handle and address these uncertainties to ensure robust......MINLP) problem is formulated for determining the optimal biorefinery structure under given parameter uncertainties modelled as sampled scenarios. The solution to the sMINLP problem determines the optimal decisions with respect to processing technologies, material flows, and product portfolio in the presence...

  19. A methodology to assess the contribution of biorefineries to a sustainable bio-based economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within this thesis for the first time an integrative methodology to assess the sustainability of biorefineries and bio-based products has been developed which is based on a fundamental understanding of sustainability as presented in the Brundtland report. The applied integrative concept of sustainability as developed by the Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis (ITAS) overcomes the widespread thinking in three pillars of sustainability and opens up new perspectives. The methodology developed addresses innovative life cycle assessment evaluation methods on midpoint level as well as on the area of protection and adopts state-of-the-art assessment procedures e.g. to determine water deprivation. It goes far beyond the scope of conventional LCA studies and examines effects on human health, on the environment, on the development of knowledge and physical capital, and on regional development and acceptance. In order to validate the developed method it was applied to an algae biorefinery currently under development and construction in the south of Spain. For this assessment for the first time extensive process data was collected of a real algae biorefinery which uses municipal waste water as a culture medium for microalgae. The use of waste water allows to reduce the demand for fresh water and avoids additional fertilisation of microalgae. Moreover, the analysed algae biorefinery replaces conventional waste water treatment by a biological purification and produces biogas by an anaerobic pretreatment of waste water as well as by anaerobic digestion of algae. After several purification steps the biogas can be used as automotive fuel and thus contributes to further development and increased use of biofuels. On the one hand the sustainability assessment shows that this way of waste water treatment contributes to climate protection and to the conservation of fossil energy carrier. On the other hand approximately ten times more land is needed and twenty times

  20. Strategy and design of Innovation Policy Road Mapping for a waste biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama Mohan, S

    2016-09-01

    Looming energy crisis, climate change concerns coupled with decreasing fossil fuel resources has garnered significant global attention toward development of alternative, renewable, carbon-neutral and eco-friendly fuels to fulfil burgeoning energy demands. Waste utilization and its management are being pursued with renewed interest due to the gamut of biobased products it can offer apart from providing enough energy to meet a major fraction of the world's energy demand. Biorefining is the sustainable processing of biomass into a spectrum of marketable products and energy. Integrating all components of waste treatment culminating into biobased products and energy recovery in a single integrated waste biorefinery is self sufficient, highly sustainable and is very beneficial. Designing systematic innovation policies are essential for development and commercialization of new technologies in this important futuristic research area. This communication explores Innovation Policy Road Mapping (IPRM) methodology available in the literature and applies it to design integrated waste biorefinery. PMID:27039350

  1. Significance of CO2 donor on the production of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Wei

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Succinic acid is a building-block chemical which could be used as the precursor of many industrial products. The dissolved CO2 concentration in the fermentation broth could strongly regulate the metabolic flux of carbon and the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP carboxykinase, which are the important committed steps for the biosynthesis of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes. Previous reports showed that succinic acid production could be promoted by regulating the supply of CO2 donor in the fermentation broth. Therefore, the effects of dissolved CO2 concentration and MgCO3 on the fermentation process should be investigated. In this article, we studied the impacts of gaseous CO2 partial pressure, dissolved CO2 concentration, and the addition amount of MgCO3 on succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618. We also demonstrated that gaseous CO2 could be removed when MgCO3 was fully supplied. Results An effective CO2 quantitative mathematical model was developed to calculate the dissolved CO2 concentration in the fermentation broth. The highest succinic acid production of 61.92 g/L was obtained at 159.22 mM dissolved CO2 concentration, which was supplied by 40 g/L MgCO3 at the CO2 partial pressure of 101.33 kPa. When MgCO3 was used as the only CO2 donor, a maximal succinic acid production of 56.1 g/L was obtained, which was just decreased by 7.03% compared with that obtained under the supply of gaseous CO2 and MgCO3. Conclusions Besides the high dissolved CO2 concentration, the excessive addition of MgCO3 was beneficial to promote the succinic acid synthesis. This was the first report investigating the replaceable of gaseous CO2 in the fermentation of succinic acid. The results obtained in this study may be useful for reducing the cost of succinic acid fermentation process.

  2. The Chemistry and Technology of Furfural Production in Modern Lignocellulose-Feedstock Biorefineries

    OpenAIRE

    Marcotullio, G.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation deals with biorefinery technology development, i.e. with the development of sustainable industrial methods aimed at the production of chemicals, fuels, heat and power from lignocellulosic biomass. This work is particularly focused on the production of furfural from hemicellulose-derived pentoses. The possibility of producing materials, chemicals, and fuels from biomass has a long history. Unfortunately fossil resources, in particular oil, have dominated last century both in ...

  3. Analysing performance of bio-refinery systems by integrating black liquor gasification with chemical pulp mills

    OpenAIRE

    Naqvi, Muhammad Raza

    2012-01-01

    Mitigation of climate change and energy security are major driving forces for increased biomass utilization. The pulp and paper industry consumes a large proportion of the biomass worldwide including bark, wood residues, and black liquor. Due to the fact that modern mills have established infrastructure for handling and processing biomass, it is possible to lay foundation for future gasification based bio-refineries to poly-produce electricity, chemicals or bio-fuels together with pulp and pa...

  4. Feasibility Study of a Multiproduct Biorefinery in West Texas From Using Cotton Gin Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Tangaoui, Abbes; Michael, Farmer

    2014-01-01

    This research is a feasibility study of a multiproduct Biorefinery from using cotton gin waste in West Texas. This region is traditionally known by its important production of upland cotton and where there is an important concentration of gin mills. An important and cheap quantity of cotton gin waste results from the ginning process could be transformed from a liability with respect to environment to a valuable feedstock to produce a portfolio of bio-products in small and distributed biorefin...

  5. Applications of Process Synthesis: Moving from Conventional Chemical Processes towards Biorefinery Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Zhihong; Chen, Bingzhen; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about diminishing petroleum reserves, enhanced worldwide demand for fuels and fluctuations in the global oil market, together with climate change and national security have promoted many initiatives for exploring alternative, non-petroleum based processes. Among these initiatives...... be predicted to play a significant role in the design and commercialization of sustainable and cost-effective biorefinery processes. The main objective of this perspective paper is to elucidate the potential opportunities that biorenewables processing offers to optimal synthesis; challenges and future...

  6. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations

  7. Doxofylline and methylprednisolone sodium succinate are stable and compatible under normal injection conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Feng, Enfu; Su, Li; Xu, Guili

    2013-03-01

    To assess the physical compatibility and chemical stability of doxofylline with methylprednisolone sodium succinate in 0.9% sodium chloride or 5% dextrose injection for intravenous infusion. Twenty mL doxofylline solution (0.74 mg/mL) and 1 mL methylprednisolone sodium succinate solution (0.15 mg/mL) were added into 250 mL polyolefin bags containing 5% dextrose injection or 0.9% sodium chloride injection, and stored for 24 h at 20-25(°)C. Chemical compatibility was measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and physical compatibility was determined visually. The results showed that samples were clear and colorless when viewed in normal fluorescent room light. The pH value exhibited little change. The particulate content of > 25 μm was low and within the specification limit. The particulate content of > 10 μm decreased over time and was similar to the control solution. Analysis of chemical stability revealed that doxofylline is stable with methylprednisolone sodium succinate for up to 24 h, and the degradation of methylprednisolone sodium succinate is unrelated to doxofylline, but is closely related to the pH value of the solution. Doxofylline and methylprednisolone sodium succinate did not affect the stability of each other. PMID:23455194

  8. Genotoxicity of meso-2,3-dimercapto succinic acid-coated silver sulfide quantum dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Özkan Vardar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanotecnology products have been used in wide applications in chemistry, electronics, energy generation, and medicine. Despite significant interest in developing quantum dots (QDs for biomedical applications, many researchers are convinced that QDs will never be used for the treatment of patients because of their potential toxicity. In various in vitro cell culture studies, the cytotoxic properties of some QD have been demonstrated and they have been suggested to be toxic in humans. In this study, the cytotoxic properties of Ag2S-(Meso-2,3-Dimercapto Succinic acid nanomaterials in V79 cells (Chinese lung fibroblast cell line were determined by MTT assay. The genotoxic effects of Ag2S-(Meso-2,3-Dimercapto Succinic acid were evaluated by the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis. The cells were treated with Ag2S-(Meso-2,3-Dimercapto Succinic acid at the concentrations of 5- 2000 µg/ml. No cytotoxic effect of Ag2S-(Meso-2,3-Dimercapto Succinic acid at all concentrations studied was observed. No significant increases in DNA damage were found at the studied concentrations when compared to negative control in V79 cells. In conclusion, further in vitro and in vivo studies are required to determine the safety doses of Ag2S-(Meso-2,3-Dimercapto Succinic acid.

  9. Optimization of succinic acid fermentation with Actinobacillus succinogenes by response surface methodology (RSM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-jian ZHANG; Qiang LI; Yu-xiu ZHANG; Dan WANG; Jian-min XING

    2012-01-01

    Succinic acid is considered as an important platform chemical.Succinic acid fermentation with Actinobacillus succinogenes strain BE-1 was optimized by central composite design (CCD) using a response surface methodology (RSM).The optimized production of succinic acid was predicted and the interactive effects between glucose,yeast extract,and magnesium carbonate were investigated.As a result,a model for predicting the concentration of succinic acid production was developed.The accuracy of the model was confirmed by the analysis of variance (ANOVA),and the validity was further proved by verification experiments showing that percentage errors between actual and predicted values varied from 3.02% to 6.38%.In addition,it was observed that the interactive effect between yeast extract and magnesium carbonate was statistically significant.In conclusion,RSM is an effective and useful method for optimizing the medium components and investigating the interactive effects,and can provide valuable information for succinic acid scale-up fermentation using A.succinogenes strain BE-1.

  10. Ionic liquid pretreatment to increase succinic acid production from lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caixia; Yan, Daojiang; Li, Qiang; Sun, Wei; Xing, Jianmin

    2014-11-01

    In this study, pinewood and corn stover pretreated with the ionic liquid (IL) 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AmimCl) were used as a feedstock for succinic acid production. Results reveal that 5% (v/v) AmimCl inhibited bacterial growth, whereas 0.01% (v/v) AmimCl inhibited succinic acid production. AmimCl was effective in extracting cellulose from pinewood and in degrading pinewood into a uniform pulp, as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of pinewood extract reached 72.16%. The combinations of AmimCl pretreatment with steam explosion or with hot compressed water were effective in treating corn stover, whereas AmimCl treatment alone did not result in a significant improvement. Pinewood extract produced 20.7g/L succinic acid with an average yield of 0.37g per gram of biomass. Workflow calculations indicated pine wood pretreated with IL has a theoretical yield of succinic acid of 57.1%. IL pretreatment led to increase in succinic acid yields.

  11. Pretreatment of spent sulphite liquor via ultrafiltration and nanofiltration for bio-based succinic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pateraki, Chrysanthi; Ladakis, Dimitrios; Stragier, Lutgart; Verstraete, Willy; Kookos, Ioannis; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Koutinas, Apostolis

    2016-09-10

    Ultrafiltration and nanofiltration of spent sulphite liquor (SSL) has been employed to evaluate the simultaneous production of lignosulphonates and bio-based succinic acid using the bacterial strains Actinobacillus succinogenes and Basfia succiniciproducens. Ultrafiltration with membranes of 10, 5 and 3kDa molecular weight cut-off results in significant losses of lignosulphonates (26-50%) in the permeate stream, while nanofiltration using membrane with 500Da molecular weight cut-off results in high retention yields of lignosulphonates (95.6%) in the retentate stream. Fed-batch bioreactor cultures using permeates from ultrafiltrated SSL resulted in similar succinic acid concentration (27.5g/L) and productivity (0.4g/L/h) by both strains. When permeates from nanofiltrated SSL were used, the strain B. succiniciproducens showed the highest succinic acid concentration (33.8g/L), yield (0.58g per g of consumed sugars) and productivity (0.48g/L/h). The nanofiltration of 1t of thick spent sulphite liquor could lead to the production of 306.3kg of lignosulphonates and 52.7kg of succinic acid, whereas the ultrafiltration of 1t of thick spent sulphite liquor using a 3kDa membrane could result in the production of 237kg of lignosulphonates and 71.8kg of succinic acid when B. succiniproducens is used in both cases. PMID:27374402

  12. Ethanol fuels in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The largest alternative transportation fuels program in the world today is Brazil's Proalcool Program. About 6.0 million metric tons of oil equivalent (MTOE) of ethanol, derived mainly from sugar cane, were consumed as transportation fuels in 1991 (equivalent to 127,000 barrels of crude oil per day). Total primary energy consumed by the Brazilian economy in 1991 was 184.1 million MTOE, and approximately 4.3 million vehicles -- about one third of the total vehicle fleet or about 40 percent of the total car population -- run on hydrous or open-quotes neatclose quotes ethanol at the azeotropic composition (96 percent ethanol, 4 percent water, by volume). Additional transportation fuels available in the country are diesel and gasoline, the latter of which is defined by three grades. Gasoline A (regular, leaded gas)d has virtually been replaced by gasoline C, a blend of gasoline and up to 22 percent anhydrous ethanol by volume, and gasoline B (premium gasoline) has been discontinued as a result of neat ethanol market penetration

  13. Use of residual banana for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production: case of study in an integrated biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Javier M; Cardona, Carlos A; Higuita, Juan C

    2014-12-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate is a type of biopolymer that can be produced from hydrolyzed polysaccharide materials and could eventually replace polypropylene and polyethylene, being biodegradable, biocompatible and produced from renewable carbon sources. However, polyhydroxybutyrate is not still competitive compared to petrochemical polymers due to their high production costs. The improvement of the production processes requires a search for new alternative raw materials, design of the pretreatment technique and improvement in the fermentation and separation steps. In addition, if the polyhydroxybutyrate production is coupled into a multiproduct biorefinery it could increase the economic and environmental availability of the process through energy and mass integration strategies. In this work alternatives of energy and mass integrations for the production of polyhydroxybutyrate into a biorefinery from residual banana (an agro-industrial waste) were analyzed. The results show that the energetic integration can reduce up to 30.6% the global energy requirements of the process and the mass integration allows a 35% in water savings. Thus, this work demonstrates that energy and mass integration in a biorefinery is a very important way for the optimal use of energy and water resources hence decreasing the production cost and the negative environmental impacts.

  14. Synergy between bio-based industry and the feed industry through biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teekens, Amanda M; Bruins, Marieke E; van Kasteren, Johannes Mn; Hendriks, Wouter H; Sanders, Johan Pm

    2016-06-01

    Processing biomass into multi-functional components can contribute to the increasing demand for raw materials for feed and bio-based non-food products. This contribution aims to demonstrate synergy between the bio-based industry and the feed industry through biorefinery of currently used feed ingredients. Illustrating the biorefinery concept, rapeseed was selected as a low priced feed ingredient based on market prices versus crude protein, crude fat and apparent ileal digestible lysine content. In addition it is already used as an alternative protein source in diets and can be cultivated in European climate zones. Furthermore, inclusion level of rapeseed meal in pig diet is limited because of its nutritionally active factors. A conceptual process was developed to improve rapeseeds nutritional value and producing other bio-based building blocks simultaneously. Based on the correlation between market prices of feed ingredients and its protein and fat content, the value of refined products was estimated. Finally, a sensitivity analysis, under two profit scenario, shows that the process is economically feasible. This study demonstrates that using biorefinery processes on feed ingredients can improve feed quality. In conjunction, it produces building blocks for a bio-based industry and creates synergy between bio-based and feed industry for more efficient use of biomass. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Catalytic processes towards the production of biofuels in a palm oil and oil palm biomass-based biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Thiam Leng; Bhatia, Subhash

    2008-11-01

    In Malaysia, there has been interest in the utilization of palm oil and oil palm biomass for the production of environmental friendly biofuels. A biorefinery based on palm oil and oil palm biomass for the production of biofuels has been proposed. The catalytic technology plays major role in the different processing stages in a biorefinery for the production of liquid as well as gaseous biofuels. There are number of challenges to find suitable catalytic technology to be used in a typical biorefinery. These challenges include (1) economic barriers, (2) catalysts that facilitate highly selective conversion of substrate to desired products and (3) the issues related to design, operation and control of catalytic reactor. Therefore, the catalytic technology is one of the critical factors that control the successful operation of biorefinery. There are number of catalytic processes in a biorefinery which convert the renewable feedstocks into the desired biofuels. These include biodiesel production from palm oil, catalytic cracking of palm oil for the production of biofuels, the production of hydrogen as well as syngas from biomass gasification, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) for the conversion of syngas into liquid fuels and upgrading of liquid/gas fuels obtained from liquefaction/pyrolysis of biomass. The selection of catalysts for these processes is essential in determining the product distribution (olefins, paraffins and oxygenated products). The integration of catalytic technology with compatible separation processes is a key challenge for biorefinery operation from the economic point of view. This paper focuses on different types of catalysts and their role in the catalytic processes for the production of biofuels in a typical palm oil and oil palm biomass-based biorefinery. PMID:18434141

  16. Cost evaluation of cellulase enzyme for industrial-scale cellulosic ethanol production based on rigorous Aspen Plus modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Cost reduction on cellulase enzyme usage has been the central effort in the commercialization of fuel ethanol production from lignocellulose biomass. Therefore, establishing an accurate evaluation method on cellulase enzyme cost is crucially important to support the health development of the future biorefinery industry. Currently, the cellulase cost evaluation methods were complicated and various controversial or even conflict results were presented. To give a reliable evaluation on this important topic, a rigorous analysis based on the Aspen Plus flowsheet simulation in the commercial scale ethanol plant was proposed in this study. The minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) was used as the indicator to show the impacts of varying enzyme supply modes, enzyme prices, process parameters, as well as enzyme loading on the enzyme cost. The results reveal that the enzyme cost drives the cellulosic ethanol price below the minimum profit point when the enzyme is purchased from the current industrial enzyme market. An innovative production of cellulase enzyme such as on-site enzyme production should be explored and tested in the industrial scale to yield an economically sound enzyme supply for the future cellulosic ethanol production.

  17. Operant Ethanol Self-Administration in Ethanol Dependent Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Marcelo F; Howard C Becker

    2014-01-01

    While rats have been predominantly used to study operant ethanol self-administration behavior in the context of dependence, several studies have employed operant conditioning procedures to examine changes in ethanol self-administration behavior as a function of chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal experience in mice. This review highlights some of the advantages of using operant conditioning procedures for examining the motivational effects of ethanol in animals with a history of dependenc...

  18. PREPARATION OF STARCH SUCCINATE WITH INTERMEDIATE DS BY AQUEOUS SLURRY REACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUChangying; WANGBin; 等

    2001-01-01

    The succinylation of cornstarch by slurry reaction has been studied using sodium hydroxide as catalyst.Several reaction parameters affecting the succinylation were investigated including the concentration of starch in water,the ratio of succinic anhydride to starch,the reaction time and the reaction temperature,The favorable conditions for an intermediate degree of substitution(DS) and reasonably high reaction efficiency(RE) are pH 8.5-9.0,50% starch by weight to water.succinic anhydride to starch 1/1(w/w),reaction time 4h,reaction temperature 30℃ .Under these conditions,the DS of 0.45 and RE of 28% were achieved.The addition of an adequate amount of crosslinking agent imparted starch succinate water absorbency.

  19. Industrial Systems Biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Enables Novel Succinic Acid Cell Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otero, José Manuel; Cimini, Donatella; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb;

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most well characterized eukaryote, the preferred microbial cell factory for the largest industrial biotechnology product (bioethanol), and a robust commerically compatible scaffold to be exploitted for diverse chemical production. Succinic acid is a highly sought...... production. Glycine and serine, both essential amino acids required for biomass formation, are formed from both glycolytic and TCA cycle intermediates. Succinate formation results from the isocitrate lyase catalyzed conversion of isocitrate, and from the α-keto-glutarate dehydrogenase catalyzed conversion...... after added-value chemical for which there is no native pre-disposition for production and accmulation in S. cerevisiae. The genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of S. cerevisiae enabled in silico gene deletion predictions using an evolutionary programming method to couple biomass and succinate...

  20. Crystallization and immersion freezing ability of oxalic and succinic acid in multicomponent aqueous organic aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert; Höhler, Kristina; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This study reports on heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of immersed oxalic and succinic acid crystals in the temperature range from 245 to 215 K, as investigated with expansion cooling experiments using suspended particles. In contrast to previous laboratory work with emulsified solution droplets where the precipitation of solid inclusions required a preceding freezing/evaporation cycle, we show that immersed solids readily form by homogeneous crystallization within aqueous solution droplets of multicomponent organic mixtures, which have noneutonic compositions with an excess of oxalic or succinic acid. Whereas succinic acid crystals did not act as heterogeneous ice nuclei, immersion freezing by oxalic acid dihydrate crystals led to a reduction of the ice saturation ratio at freezing onset by 0.066-0.072 compared to homogeneous freezing, which is by a factor of 2 higher than previously reported laboratory data. These observations emphasize the importance of oxalic acid in heterogeneous ice nucleation.

  1. PREPARATION OF STARCH SUCCINATE WITH INTERMEDIATE DS BY AQUEOUS SLURRY REACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The succinylation of cornstarch by slurry reaction has been studied using sodium hydroxide as catalyst. Several reaction parameters afJecting the succinylation were investigated including the concentration of starch in water, the ratio of succinic anhydride to starch, the reaction time and the reaction temperature. The favorable conditions for an intermediate degree of substitution (DS) and reasonably high reaction efficiency (RE) are pH 8.5~9.0, 50% starch by weight to water, succinic anhydride to starch I/I (w/w), reaction time 4h, reaction temperature 30 ℃Under these conditions, the DS of 0.45 and RE of 28% were achieved. The addition of an adequate amount of crosslinking agent imparted starch succinate water absorbency.

  2. Secondary isotope effects in intramolecular catalysis. Mono-p-bromophenyl succinate hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandour, R.D.; Stella, V.J.; Coyne, M.; Schowen, R.L.; Icaza, E.A.

    1978-04-28

    Kinetic isotope effects have been measured for the intramolecular nucleophilic carboxylate-catalyzed hydrolysis, k/sub s/, of mono-p-bromophenyl succinate and mono-p-bromophenyl succinate-d/sub 4/. The resulting isotope effect, k/sub s//sup h/sub 4///k/sub s//sup d/sub 4//, equals 1.035, a normal effect. This is contrary to what is expected for acyl transfer reactions where the transition-state structure resembles a tetrahedral intermediate. However, the direction of the isotope effect is in agreement with a transition-state structure resembling succinic anhydride. Combining this result with previous kinetic and structural studies, a detailed transition-state structure for the hydrolysis reaction is proposed. 31 references, 2 tables.

  3. Conversion of Indigenous Agricultural Waste Feedstocks to Fuel Ethanol. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-504

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elander, Richard [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-27

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a world leader in biomass conversion research and Ecopetrol American Inc., Ecopetrol S.A.'s U.S. subsidiary. The research and development efforts described in the Joint Work Statement (JWS) will take advantage of the strengths of both parties. NREL will use its Integrated Biorefinery Facility and vast experience in the conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to fuel ethanol to develop processes for the conversion of Ecopetrol's feedstocks. Ecopetrol will establish the infrastructure in Columbia to commercialize the conversion process.

  4. Days available for harvesting switchgrass and the cost to deliver switchgrass to a biorefinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seonghuyk

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was to estimate the number of suitable field workdays per month in which switchgrass can be harvested in Oklahoma at different probability levels. This study also sought to determine the effect of the number of workdays on the cost to deliver a flow of feedstock to a biorefinery. A soil moisture balance model, drying model of cut grasses, and empirical CDF were used to determine the number of field workdays for mowing and baling operations at different probability levels. A mixed integer mathematical programming model was used to determine the optimal biorefinery location, the quantity of biomass feedstock, monthly harvest and storage quantities, optimal number of mowing and raking-baling-stacking harvest machines, and the cost to deliver feedstock to a biorefinery. Findings and conclusions. Harvest cost depends on the number of required harvest machines, which are constrained by the number of field workdays during the harvest window. The number of workdays for mowing and baling varies across months and regions. At the 95 percent probability level, October is the month with the least amount of time for baling switchgrass (average nine days). The southeast region of Oklahoma, which on average receives the most precipitation, has the least number of available workdays (174 mowing days and 115 baling days for a year). This information was used to determine the investment required in harvest machines to provide lignocellulosic biomass to a biorefinery. The optimal number of harvest units was 48 for mowing and 20 for raking-baling-stacking, which requires an average investment in harvest machines of 11.2 million for a 2,000 dry tons per day biorefinery. The estimated cost to deliver feedstock was 49.7 per ton and harvest cost was 17.0. Under the assumption of only three days available in each month as workdays, the estimated cost to deliver feedstock and harvest cost were 141 and $109, respectively. Ignoring or using

  5. Maintenance of homeostasis in the aging hypothalamus: The central and peripheral roles of succinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas T. Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the phenotype resulting from accumulation of genetic, cellular, and molecular damages. Many factors have been identified as either the cause or consequence of age-related decline in functions and repair mechanisms. The hypothalamus is the source and a target of many of these factors and hormones responsible for the overall homeostasis in the body. With advanced age, the sensitivity of the hypothalamus to various feedback signals begins to decline. In recent years, several aging-related genes have been identified and their signaling pathways elucidated. These gene products include mTOR, IKK-β/NF-κB complex, and HIF-1α, an important cellular survival signal. All of these activators/modulators of the aging process have also been identified in the hypothalamus and shown to play crucial roles in nutrient sensing, metabolic regulation, energy balance, reproductive function, and stress adaptation. This illustrates the central role of the hypothalamus in aging.Inside the mitochondria, succinate is one of the most prominent intermediates of the Krebs cycle. Succinate oxidation in mitochondria provides the most powerful energy output per unit time. Extra-mitochondrial succinate triggers a host of succinate receptor (SUCN1 or GPR91-mediated signaling pathways in many peripheral tissues including the hypothalamus. One of the actions of succinate is to stabilize the hypoxia and cellular stress conditions by inducing the transcriptional regulator HIF-1α. Through these actions, it is hypothesized that succinate has the potential to restore the gradual but significant loss in functions associated with cellular senescence and systemic aging.

  6. Ethanol: economic gain or drain?

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua A. Byrge; Kevin L. Kliesen

    2008-01-01

    Corn-based ethanol can make a dent in demand for oil, but at what price? Food costs go up. Environmental damage worsens. If oil prices fall, ethanol production will probably collapse-as it did 20 years ago.

  7. Regulation of fructose uptake and catabolism by succinate in Azospirillum brasilense.

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, A; S. Ghosh

    1987-01-01

    Fructose uptake and catabolism in Azospirillum brasilense is dependent on three fructose-inducible enzymes (fru-enzymes): (i) enzyme I and (ii) enzyme II of the phosphoenolpyruvate:fructose phosphotransferase system and (iii) 1-phosphofructokinase. In minimal medium containing 3.7 mM succinate and 22 mM fructose as sources of carbon, growth of A. brasilense was diauxic, succinate being utilized in the first phase of growth and fructose in the second phase with a lag period between the two gro...

  8. The possible role of hydrothermal vents in chemical evolution: Succinic acid radiolysis and thermolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Castañeda, J.; Colín-García, M.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.

    2014-07-01

    In this research, the behavior under a high radiation field or high temperature of succinic acid, a dicarboxylic acid clue in metabolic routes, is studied. For this purpose, the molecule was irradiated with gamma rays in oxygen-free aqueous solutions, and the thermal decomposition was studied in a static system at temperatures up to 90 °C, simulating a white hydrothermal vent. Our results indicate that a succinic acid is a relatively stable compound under irradiation. The gamma radiolysis yields carbon dioxide and di- and tricarboxylic acids such as malonic, carboxysuccinic, and citric acids. The main products obtained by the thermal treatment were CO2 and propionic acid.

  9. Metabolic evolution of two reducing equivalent-conserving pathways for high-yield succinate production in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinna; Tan, Zaigao; Xu, Hongtao; Chen, Jing; Tang, Jinlei; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-07-01

    Reducing equivalents are an important cofactor for efficient synthesis of target products. During metabolic evolution to improve succinate production in Escherichia coli strains, two reducing equivalent-conserving pathways were activated to increase succinate yield. The sensitivity of pyruvate dehydrogenase to NADH inhibition was eliminated by three nucleotide mutations in the lpdA gene. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity increased under anaerobic conditions, which provided additional NADH. The pentose phosphate pathway and transhydrogenase were activated by increased activities of transketolase and soluble transhydrogenase SthA. These data suggest that more carbon flux went through the pentose phosphate pathway, thus leading to production of more reducing equivalent in the form of NADPH, which was then converted to NADH through soluble transhydrogenase for succinate production. Reverse metabolic engineering was further performed in a parent strain, which was not metabolically evolved, to verify the effects of activating these two reducing equivalent-conserving pathways for improving succinate yield. Activating pyruvate dehydrogenase increased succinate yield from 1.12 to 1.31mol/mol, whereas activating the pentose phosphate pathway and transhydrogenase increased succinate yield from 1.12 to 1.33mol/mol. Activating these two pathways in combination led to a succinate yield of 1.5mol/mol (88% of theoretical maximum), suggesting that they exhibited a synergistic effect for improving succinate yield.

  10. Synthesis of tocopheryl succinate phospholipid conjugates and monitoring of phospholipase A2 activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Palle Jacob; Viart, Helene Marie-France; Melander, Fredrik;

    2012-01-01

    Tocopheryl succinates (TOSs) are, in contrast to tocopherols, highly cytotoxic against many cancer cells. In this study the enzyme activity of secretory phospholipase A2 towards various succinate-phospholipid conjugates has been investigated. The synthesis of six novel phospholipids is described,...

  11. Pilot-Scale Biorefinery: Sustainable Transport Fuels from Biomass and Algal Residues via Integrated Pyrolysis, Catalytic Hydroconversion and Co-processing with Vacuum Gas Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Olarte, M. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hart, T. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-21

    Beginning in 2010, UOP, along with the Department of Energy and other project partners, designed a pathway for an integrated biorefinery to process solid biomass into transportation fuel blendstocks. The integrated biorefinery (IBR) would convert second generation feedstocks into pyrolysis oil which would then be upgraded into fuel blendstocks without the limitations of traditional biofuels.

  12. First workshop on the possibilities of biorefinery concepts for the industry : held at hotel "De Wageningse Berg", Wageningen, the Netherlands (16 June 2006) : official minutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annevelink, E.; Jong, de E.; Ree, van R.; Zwart, R.W.R.

    2006-01-01

    On June the 16th the first ¿workshop on the possibilities of biorefinery concepts for the industry¿ was held, bringing together different Dutch stakeholders, and addressing common as well as conflicting technical and market issues with regard to biorefinery opportunities. The first-of-akind workshop

  13. Techno-economic analysis of corn stover fungal fermentation to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Pimphan; Tews, Iva J.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Karagiosis, Sue A.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-11-01

    This techno-economic analysis assesses the process economics of ethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstock by fungi in order to identify promising opportunities and the research needed to achieve them. Based on literature derived data, four different ethanologen strains are considered in this study: native and recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the natural pentose-fermenting yeast, Pichia stipitis and the filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Organism performance and technology readiness are split into three groups: near-term (<5 years), mid-term (5-10 years) and long-term (>10 years) process deployment. Processes classified as near-term could reasonably be developed in this shorter time frame, as suggested by recent literature. Mid-term technology process models are based on lab-scale experimental data, and yields near the theoretical limit are used to estimate long-term technology goals. Further research and economic evaluation on the integrated production of chemicals and fuels in biorefineries are recommended.

  14. Reactions of ethanol on Ru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, J. M.; Lee, C. J.; F. Bijkerk,

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption and reactions of ethanol on Ru(0001) were studied with temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). Ethanol was found to adsorb intact onto Ru(0001) below 100 K. From 175 K to 200 K, ethanol is converted into ethoxy groups, which und

  15. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeff Dahlberg, Ph D; Ed Wolfrum, Ph D

    2010-06-30

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called "dedicated bioenergy crops" including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help

  16. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, Jeffrey A. [Univ. of California, Parlier, CA (United States). Kearney Research and Extension Center; Wolfrum, Edward J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). Process and Analytical Engineering Group

    2010-09-28

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called "dedicated bioenergy crops" including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help

  17. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, Jeff; Wolfrum, Ed

    2010-06-30

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called “dedicated bioenergy crops” including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy

  18. Biorefining in the prevailing energy and materials crisis: a review of sustainable pathways for biorefinery value chains and sustainability assessment methodologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parajuli, Ranjan; Dalgaard, Tommy; Jørgensen, Uffe;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current paper is to discuss the sustainability aspect of biorefinery systems with focus on biomass supply chains, processing of biomass feedstocks in biorefinery platforms and sustainability assessment methodologies. From the stand point of sustainability, it is important to optimize...... the agricultural production system and minimize the related environmental impacts at the farming system level. These impacts are primarily related to agri-chemical inputs and the related undesired environmental emissions and to the repercussions from biomass production. At the same time, the biorefineries need...... a year-round supply of biomass and about 40–60% of the total operating cost of a typical biorefinery is related to the feedstocks chosen, and thus highlights on the careful prioritization of feedstocks mainly based on their economic and environmental loadings. Regarding the processing in biorefinery...

  19. Investigating the potential of thermophilic species for ethanol production from industrial spent sulfite liquor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Weissgram

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermophilic microorganisms hold a great potential for bioethanol production on waste biomass, due to their ability to utilize pentoses and hexoses alike. However, to date hardly any data on thermophiles growing directly on industrial substrates like spent sulfite liquor (SSL are available. This contribution investigates the ability of Thermoanaerobacter species to utilize the main sugars in the used SSL (mannose, glucose and xylose and the effect of process parameters (pH, temperature and sugar concentration on their growth. Based on these results the strain T. mathranii was chosen for further studies. The ability of T. mathranii to grow directly on SSL was investigated and the effect of several inhibiting substances on growth was elucidated. Furthermore it was tested whether pretreatment with activated charcoal can increase the fermentability of SSL. The fermentations were evaluated based on yields and specific rates. It could be shown that T. mathranii was able to ferment all sugars in the investigated softwood SSL and fermented diluted, untreated SSL (up to 2.7% (w/w dry matter. Pretreatment with activated charcoal could slightly reduce the amount of phenols in the substrate and thus facilitate growth and ethanol production on higher SSL concentrations (up to 4.7% (w/v dry matter. Ethanol yields of 0.29-0.44 Cmmol of ethanol per Cmmol sugar were obtained on untreated and pretreated spent sulfite liquor, respectively. These results on an industrial substrate strengthen the claim that thermophilic microorganisms might be the optimal candidates for forest biorefinery.

  20. Biocompatibility and drug release behavior of scaffolds prepared by coaxial electrospinning of poly(butylene succinate) and polyethylene glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llorens, E.; Ibañez, H. [Departament d' Enginyeria Química, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Valle, L.J. del, E-mail: luis.javier.del.valle@upc.edu [Departament d' Enginyeria Química, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Puiggalí, J. [Departament d' Enginyeria Química, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Center for Research in Nano-Engineering (CrNE), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Edifici C, C/Pasqual i Vila s/n, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain)

    2015-04-01

    Scaffolds constituted by electrospun microfibers of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) were studied. Specifically, coaxial microfibers having different core–shell distributions and compositions were considered as well as uniaxial micro/nanofibers prepared from mixtures of both polymers. Processing conditions were optimized for all geometries and compositions and resulting morphologies (i.e. diameter and surface texture) characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Chemical composition, molecular interactions and thermal properties were evaluated by FTIR, NMR, XPS and differential scanning calorimetry. The PEG component of electrospun fibers could be solubilized by immersion of scaffolds in aqueous medium, giving rise to high porosity and hydrophobic samples. Nevertheless, a small amount of PEG was retained in the PBS matrix, suggesting some degree of mixing. Solubilization was slightly dependent on fiber structure; specifically, the distribution of PEG in the core or shell of coaxial fibers led to higher or lower retention levels, respectively. Scaffolds could be effectively loaded with hydrophobic drugs having antibacterial and anticarcinogenic activities like triclosan and curcumin, respectively. Their release was highly dependent on their chemical structure and medium composition. Thus, low and high release rates were observed in phosphate buffer saline (SS) and SS/ethanol (30:70 v/v), respectively. Slight differences in the release of triclosan were found depending on fiber distribution and composition. Antibacterial activity and biocompatibility were evaluated for both loaded and unloaded scaffolds. - Highlights: • Coaxial microfibers with different hydrophobicities were studied. • The surface morphology of the coaxial fiber shows the distribution of polymers. • Coaxial fiber microstructure favors the polymer molecular orientation. • These hybrid materials have greater advantages for loading and drug release. • PEG

  1. A Sustainable Ethanol Distillation System

    OpenAIRE

    Yuelei Yang; Dan Zhang; Kevin Boots

    2012-01-01

    The discarded fruit and vegetable waste from the consumer and retailer sectors provide a reliable source for ethanol production. In this paper, an ethanol distillation system has been developed to remove the water contents from the original wash that contains only around 15% of the ethanol. The system has an ethanol production capacity of over 100,000 liters per day. It includes an ethanol condenser, a wash pre-heater, a main exhaust heat exchanger as well as a fractionating column. One uniqu...

  2. Novel DDR Processing of Corn Stover Achieves High Monomeric Sugar Concentrations from Enzymatic Hydrolysis (230 g/L) and High Ethanol Concentration (10% v/v) During Fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Jennings, Ed; Shekiro, Joe; Kuhn, Erik M.; O' Brien, Marykate; Wang, Wei; Schell, Daniel J.; Himmel, Mike; Elander, Richard T.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2015-04-03

    Distilling and purifying ethanol, butanol, and other products from second and later generation lignocellulosic biorefineries adds significant capital and operating cost for biofuels production. The energy costs associated with distillation affects plant gate and life cycle analysis costs. Lower titers in fermentation due to lower sugar concentrations from pretreatment increase both energy and production costs. In addition, higher titers decrease the volumes required for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation vessels. Therefore, increasing biofuels titers has been a research focus in renewable biofuels production for several decades. In this work, we achieved over 200 g/L of monomeric sugars after high solids enzymatic hydrolysis using the novel deacetylation and disc refining (DDR) process on corn stover. The high sugar concentrations and low chemical inhibitor concentrations from the DDR process allowed ethanol titers as high as 82 g/L in 22 hours, which translates into approximately 10 vol% ethanol. To our knowledge, this is the first time that 10 vol% ethanol in fermentation derived from corn stover without any sugar concentration or purification steps has been reported. Techno-economic analysis shows the higher titer ethanol achieved from the DDR process could significantly reduce the minimum ethanol selling price from cellulosic biomass.

  3. [Determination of succinic acid in desvenlafaxine succinate by high performance ion-exclusion chromatography and high performance ion-exchange chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yanping; Li, Jinghua; Sun, Wei; Liu, Guixia; Lu, Jinghua; Shan, Guangzhi

    2016-02-01

    New methods were developed for the determination of succinic acid in desvenlafaxine succinate (DVS) by high performance ion-exclusion chromatography (HPIEC) and high performance ion-exchange chromatography (HPIC). HPIEC and HPIC methods were used separately to determinate the succinic acid in DVS. With HPIEC, the sample was diluted with 2. 50 x 10(-3) mol/L sulfuric acid solution and filtrated by 0. 22 µm polyether sulfone filter membrane, and then analyzed by HPIEC directly without any further pretreatment. The analytical column was Phenomenex Rezex ROA-organic Acid H+(8%) (300 mmx7. 8 mm). The mobile phase was 2. 50x10(-3) mol/L sulfuric acid solution at the flow rate of 0. 5 mL/min. The column temperature was set at 40 °C, and the detection wavelength was 210 nm. The injection volume was 10 KL. The assay was quantified by external standard method. With HPIC, the sample was diluted with ultrapure water and filtrated by 0. 22 µm polyether sulfone filter membrane, and then analyzed by HPIC directly without any further pretreatment. The analytical column was Dionex IonPac AS11-HC (250 mm x 4 mm) with a guard column IonPacAG11-HC (50 mm x 4 mm). Isocratic KOH elute generator was used at the flow rate of 1. 0 mL/min. The detection was performed by a Dionex suppressed (DIONEX AERS 500 4-mm) conductivity detector. The injection volume was 10 µL. The content computation was performed with peak area external reference method. The results of HPIEC method for succinic acid were 28. 8%, 28. 9% and 28. 9%, while the results of HPIEC method were 28. 2%, 28. 6% and 28. 6%. The results of HPIEC and HPIC methods were not significantly different. The two methods can both be used to determine the contents of succinic acid in DVS. The surveillance analytical method should be chosen according to the situation. PMID:27382725

  4. Roadmap biorefineries within the scope of action plans of the Federal Government for the material and energetic utilization of renewable raw materials; Roadmap Bioraffinerien im Rahmen der Aktionsplaene der Bundesregierung zur stofflichen und energetischen Nutzung nachwachsender Rohstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-05-15

    In order to determine the current status and the further energy demand of different biorefinery concepts, the Federal Government has announced the development of a 'Roadmap biorefineries' under involvement of business and science. This comprehensive overview on different technologies and on possibilities of realization now is available and includes the following aspects: (1) Biorefineries in te context of utilizing biomass; (2) Definition and systematics of biorefineries, state of the art and initial situation; (3) Technological description and analysis; (4) Economic and ecologic classification; (5) Challenges of the establishment of biorefineries - SWOT analysis; (6) need for action.

  5. Ethanol production by engineered thermophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Daniel G; Sparling, Richard; Lynd, Lee R

    2015-06-01

    We compare a number of different strategies that have been pursued to engineer thermophilic microorganisms for increased ethanol production. Ethanol production from pyruvate can proceed via one of four pathways, which are named by the key pyruvate dissimilating enzyme: pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), pyruvate formate lyase (PFL), and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). For each of these pathways except PFL, we see examples where ethanol production has been engineered with a yield of >90% of the theoretical maximum. In each of these cases, this engineering was achieved mainly by modulating expression of native genes. We have not found an example where a thermophilic ethanol production pathway has been transferred to a non-ethanol-producing organism to produce ethanol at high yield. A key reason for the lack of transferability of ethanol production pathways is the current lack of understanding of the enzymes involved. PMID:25745810

  6. DOEGO85004_1: Final Non-proprietary Technical Report, Generating Process and Economic Data for Preliminary Design of PureVision Biorefineries DOEGO85004_2: One Original Final Proprietary Technical Report to be mailed to DOE Golden.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadam, Kiran L., Ph.D; Lehrburger, Ed

    2008-01-17

    The overall objective of the project was to define a two-stage reactive fractionation process for converting corn stover into a solid cellulose stream and two liquid streams containing mostly hemicellulosic sugars and lignin, respectively. Toward this goal, biomass fractionation was conducted using a small continuous pilot unit with a nominal capacity of 100 pounds per day of dry biomass to generate performance data using primarily corn stover as feedstock. In the course of the program, the PureVision process was optimized for efficient hemicellulose hydrolysis in the first stage employing autohydrolysis and delignification in the second stage using sodium hydroxide as a catalyst. The remaining cellulose was deemed to be an excellent substrate for producing fermentation sugars, requiring 40% less enzymes for hydrolysis than conventional pretreatment systems using dilute acid. The fractionated cellulose was also determined to have potential higher-value applications as a pulp product. The lignin coproduct was determined to be substantially lower in molecular weight (MW) compared to lignins produced in the kraft or sulfite pulping processes. This low-MW lignin can be used as a feed and concrete binder and as an intermediate for producing a range of high-value products including phenolic resins. This research adds to the understanding of the biomass conversion area in that a new process was developed in the true spirit of biorefineries. The work completed successfully demonstrated the technical effectiveness of the process at the pilot level indicating the technology is ready to advance to a 2–3 ton per day scale. No technical showstoppers are anticipated in scaling up the PureVision fractionation process to commercial scale. Also, economic feasibility of using the PureVision process in a commercial-scale biorefinery was investigated and the minimum ethanol selling price for the PureVision process was calculated to be $0.94/gal ethanol vs. $1.07/gal ethanol for the

  7. Complex formation and solubility of Pu(IV) with malonic and succinic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Takagi, I.; Moriyama, H. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Fujiwara, A. [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Kulyako, Y.M.; Perevalov, S.A.; Myasoedov, B.F. [Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow (RU). V.I. Vernadsky Inst. of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry (GEOKHI)

    2009-07-01

    The complex formation constants of tetravalent plutonium ion with malonic and succinic acids in aqueous solution were determined by the solvent-extraction method. Also, by taking the known values of the solubility products, the hydrolysis constants and the formation constants, the experimental solubility data of plutonium in the presence of carboxylates were analyzed. (orig.)

  8. Amorphous/crystal and polymer/filler interphases in biocomposites from poly(butylene succinate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signori, Francesca [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici (CNR-IPCF), Via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Pelagaggi, Martina [Universita di Pisa - Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Via Risorgimento 35, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Bronco, Simona [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici (CNR-IPCF), Via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Righetti, Maria Cristina, E-mail: righetti@ipcf.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici (CNR-IPCF), Via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2012-09-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The existence of intermolecular interactions between poly(butylene succinate) and hemp fibres was proved from specific heat capacities data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different degrees of mobility of the poly(butylene succinate) amorphous segments were evidenced at the amorphous/crystal interphase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Devitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction in poly(butylene succinate) was found to occur before and simultaneously with the fusion. - Abstract: Poly(butylene succinate)-hemp composites (PBS-hemp), with hemp content in the range 0-40 wt.%, were prepared in the melt and characterized. This paper focuses on the detailed analysis of the thermal behaviour of the PBS-hemp composites, investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), to enlighten the polymer/fibre interphase features. The occurrence of specific intermolecular interactions between PBS and hemp was assessed from specific heat capacity data. Different degrees of mobility of the PBS amorphous segments were found at the amorphous/crystal interphases. A broadening of the bulk glass transition was observed, and attributed to the presence of polymer segments slightly constrained. Moreover, a rigid amorphous fraction that devitrifies at temperatures higher than the bulk glass transition, partly before the melting region and partly simultaneously with the fusion, was observed and quantified, and attributed to the presence of major constraints probably occurring in geometrically restricted areas.

  9. Coordination compounds of succinate some 3d-metals with thiosemicarbazone furfurol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In article the results of synthesis and investigations of the Ni (II), Co (II), Cu (II) and Zn succinates with thiosemicarbazone furfurol complexes were shown. The consistence, individuality, the pattern of coordination of apical ligand and the thermal behavior of obtained complexes were established. (author)

  10. Acetate:succinate CoA-transferase in the hydrogenosomes of Trichomonas vaginalis: Identification and characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.W.A. Grinsven; S. Rosnowsky (Silke); S.W.H. van Weelden (Susanne); S. Pütz (Simone); M. van der Giezen (Mark); W. Martin (William); J.J. van Hellemond (Jaap); A.G.M. Tielens (Aloysius); K. Henze (Katrin)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAcetate:succinate CoA-transferases (ASCT) are acetate-producing enzymes in hydrogenosomes, anaerobically functioning mitochondria and in the aerobically functioning mitochondria of trypanosomatids. Although acetate is produced in the hydrogenosomes of a number of anaerobic microbial euka

  11. A complete industrial system for economical succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Zheng, Xiao-Yu; Fang, Xiao-Jiang; Liu, Shu-Wen; Chen, Ke-Quan; Jiang, Min; Wei, Ping; Ouyang, Ping-Kai

    2011-05-01

    An industrial fermentation system using lignocellulosic hydrolysate, waste yeast hydrolysate, and mixed alkali to achieve high-yield, economical succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes was developed. Lignocellulosic hydrolysate and waste yeast hydrolysate were used efficiently as carbon sources and nitrogen source instead of the expensive glucose and yeast extract. Moreover, as a novel method for regulating pH mixed alkalis (Mg(OH)(2) and NaOH) were first used to replace the expensive MgCO(3) for succinic acid production. Using the three aforementioned substitutions, the total fermentation cost decreased by 55.9%, and 56.4 g/L succinic acid with yield of 0.73 g/g was obtained, which are almost the same production level as fermentation with glucose, yeast extract and MgCO(3). Therefore, the cheap carbon and nitrogen sources, as well as the mixed alkaline neutralize could be efficiently used instead of expensive composition for industrial succinic acid production. PMID:21470857

  12. Nano-encapsulation of coenzyme Q10 using octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch (OSA-ST) was used to encapsulate Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). CoQ10 was dissolved in rice bran oil (RBO), and incorporated into an aqueous OSA-ST solution. High pressure homogenization (HPH) of the mixture was conducted at 170 MPa for 5-6 cycles. The resulting ...

  13. Methods for upgrading of a fuel gas and succinic acid production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention provides methods of upgrading of a CO2-containing fuel gas comprising the use of anaerobic succinic acid-producing microorganisms. Thus, the present invention provides a method for simultaneous upgrading of a CO2-containing fuel gas and biosuccinic acid production....

  14. Studies on Cross-linking of succinic acid with chitosan/collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapas Mitra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study summarizes the cross-linking property of succinic acid with chitosan /collagen. In detail, the chemistry behind the cross-linking and the improvement in mechanical and thermal properties of the cross-linked material were discussed with suitable instruments and bioinformatics tools. The concentration of succinic acid with reference to the chosen polymers was optimized. A 3D scaffold prepared using an optimized concentration of succinic acid (0.2% (w/v with chitosan (1.0% (w/v and similarly with collagen (0.5% (w/v, was subjected to surface morphology, FT-IR analysis, tensile strength assessment, thermal stability and biocompatibility. Results revealed, cross-linking with succinic acid impart appreciable mechanical strength to the scaffold material. In silico analysis suggested the prevalence of non-covalent interactions, which played a crucial role in improving the mechanical and thermal properties of the cross-linked scaffold. The resultant 3D scaffold may find application as wound dressing material, as an implant in clinical applications and as a tissue engineering material.

  15. Immunolocalization of succinate dehydrogenase in the esophagus epithelium of domesticated mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, W.; Kacza, J.; I. N. Hornickel; Schoennagel, B.

    2013-01-01

    Using immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the esophagus epithelia of seven domesticated mammals (horse, cattle, goat, pig, dog, laboratory rat, cat) of three nutrition groups (herbivorous, omnivorous, carnivorous) were studied to get first information about energy generation, as demonstrated by succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities. Distinct reaction intensities could be observed in all esophageal cell layers of the different species studied reflecting moderate...

  16. Nucleation kinetics of urea succinic acid –ferroelectric single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhivya, R. [Crystal growth and Crystallography Division, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore-632014, Tamilnadu (India); Voohrees College, Vellore-632014, Tamilnadu (India); Vizhi, R. Ezhil, E-mail: rezhilvizhi@vit.ac.in, E-mail: revizhi@gmail.com; Babu, D. Rajan [Crystal growth and Crystallography Division, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore-632014, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-06-24

    Single crystals of Urea Succinic Acid (USA) were grown by slow cooling technique. The crystalline system was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction. The metastable zonewidth were carried out for various temperatures i.e., 35°, 40°, 45° and 50°C. The induction period is experimentally determined and various nucleation parameters have been estimated.

  17. Efficient production of succinic acid from Palmaria palmata hydrolysate by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olajuyin, Ayobami Matthew; Yang, Maohua; Liu, Yilan; Mu, Tingzhen; Tian, Jiangnan; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Xing, Jianmin

    2016-08-01

    Succinic acid, a C4 dicarboxylic acid is used in many fields such as food, agriculture, pharmaceutical and polymer industries. In this study, microbial production of succinic acid from Palmaria palmata was investigated for the first time. In engineered Escherichia coli KLPPP, lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate formate lyase, phosphotransacetylase-acetate kinase and pyruvate oxidase genes were deleted while phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was overexpressed. The recombinant exhibited higher molar yield of succinic acid on galactose (1.20±0.02mol/mol) than glucose (0.48±0.03mol/mol). The concentration and molar yield of succinic acid were 22.40±0.12g/L and 1.13±0.02mol/mol total sugar respectively after 72h dual phase fermentation from P. palmata hydrolysate which composed of glucose (12.57±0.17g/L) and galactose (18.03±0.10g/L). The results demonstrate that P. palmata red macroalgae biomass represents a novel and an economically alternative feedstock for biochemicals production. PMID:27203224

  18. Co- and Terpolyesters based on isosorbide and succinic acid for coating applications : synthesis and characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordover, B.A.J.; Staalduinen, van V.G.; Duchateau, R.; Koning, C.E.; Benthem, van R.A.T.M.; Mak, M.; Heise, A.; Frissen, A.E.; Haveren, van J.

    2006-01-01

    Co- and terpolyesters based on succinic acid and isosorbide in combination with other renewable monomers such as 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, and citric acid were synthesized and characterized. Linear polyesters were obtained via melt polycondensation of nonactivated dicarboxylic acids with OH f

  19. Electrospun Nanoporous Poly(butylenes succinate-co-bytylene terephthalate Nonwoven Mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A traditional Chinese drug “Yunnan Baiyao” is used as an additive in poly(butylenes succinate-co-bytylene terephthalate (PBST solution, which is a kind of biodegradable aliphatic-aromatic copolyesters, to produce microspheres with nanoporosity by electrospinning; the tunable size of nanoporosity can be controlled by changing the voltage applied in the electrospinning process.

  20. Co-production of electricity and ethanol, process economics of value prior combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Economics of producing cellulosic ethanol and bio-power in the same facility using an autohydrolysis process. ► Feedstock considerably affect the economics of the biorefinery facility. ► Lower moisture content improves financial performance of the bio-power business. - Abstract: A process economic analysis of co-producing bioethanol and electricity (value prior to combustion) from mixed southern hardwood and southern yellow pine is presented. Bioethanol is produced by extracting carbohydrates from wood via autohydrolysis, membrane separation of byproducts, enzymatic hydrolysis of extracted oligomers and fermentation to ethanol. The residual solids after autohydrolysis are pressed and burned in a power boiler to generate steam and electricity. A base case scenario of biomass combustion to produce electricity is presented as a reference to understand the basics of bio-power generation economics. For the base case, minimum electricity revenue of $70–$96/MWh must be realized to achieve a 6–12% internal rate of return. In the alternative co-production cases, the ethanol facility is treated as a separate business entity that purchases power and steam from the biomass power plant. Minimum ethanol revenue required to achieve a 12% internal rate of return was estimated to be $0.84–$1.05/l for hardwood and $0.74–$0.85/l for softwood. Based on current market conditions and an assumed future ethanol selling price of $0.65/l, the co-production of cellulosic bioethanol and power does not produce financeable returns. A risk analysis indicates that there is a probability of 26.6% to achieve an internal rate of return equal or higher than 12%. It is suggested that focus be placed on improving yield and reducing CAPEX before this technology can be applied commercially. This modeling approach is a robust method to evaluate economic feasibility of integrated production of bio-power and other products based on extracted hemicellulose.

  1. Bio-ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    -20% for transportation. At that time, the electric car/fuel cell car has probably had time enough to mature, and it has a much higher energy efficiency. Therefore, bio-ethanol is not the right intermediate (short term) technology, and it is not the right long term technology either......Throughout the world, nations are seeking ways to decrease CO2 emissions and to reduce their dependency on fossil fuels, especially oil and gas deriving from so-called politically unstable regions. The efforts comprise the energy sector (heat and electricity) as well as the transport sector......, that biomass substitutes gas in the heat & power sector and gas substitute oil in the transport sector. By taking this path, we overall achieve almost twice as high a CO2 reduction and save almost twice as much oil, as if we want to substitute the oil via car engines through conversion to ethanol. We must...

  2. CLINICAL AND ECONOMICAL ASSESSMENTS OF METOPROLOL TARTRATE/SUCCINATE USAGE IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Soura

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and clinicoeconomical studies review is presented as well as results of author’s comparative cost analysis on metoprolol tartrate (Betaloc and metoprolol succinate (Betaloc ZOK usage in patients with ischemic heart disease. Efficacy of metoprolol therapy is proven in randomized clinical studies in patients with angina and myocardial infarction (MI. In angina patients metoprolol prevents cardiac attacks, MI, reduces nitroglycerine consumption, increases exercise tolerability, prolongs the exercise time before ST segment depression (succinate better than tartrate, decrease of angina intensity. In MI patients metoprolol therapy reduces mortality, sudden death, recurring MI and the rate of early post MI angina attacks. Nowadays metoprolol is the only β-blocker having indication on secondary MI prevention. Besides for the present metoprolol succinate is the only β-blocker with proven direct antisclerosis effect. According to Swedish clinicoeconomical study in patients after MI secondary prevention with metoprolol therapy saves the costs in comparison with placebo. American clinicoeconomical model of metoprolol and atenolol usage in all patients with MI could result in significant reduction in mortality and recurring MI rate, prolong the life and improve its quality, save financial resources. The cost of monthly treatment of angina patient with metoprolol tartrate (Betaloc and metoprolol succinate (Betaloc ZOK is 135 and 354 rubles, respectively. The price range of comparative β-blockers in ascending order is the following: atenolol (Atenolol Nicomed → metoprolol tartrate (Betaloc → metoprolol succinate (Betaloc ZOK → bisoprolol (Concor → nebivolol (Nebilet. In conclusion, metoprolol therapy is the one of mostly economically reasonable approach.

  3. Xylose fermentation to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  4. Knowledge management in a waste based biorefinery in the QbD paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Anurag S; Chopda, Viki R; Gomes, James

    2016-09-01

    Shifting resource base from fossil feedstock to renewable raw materials for production of chemical products has opened up an area of novel applications of industrial biotechnology-based process tools. This review aims to provide a concise and focused discussion on recent advances in knowledge management to facilitate efficient and optimal operation of a biorefinery. Application of quality by design (QbD) and process analytical technology (PAT) as tools for knowledge creation and management at different levels has been highlighted. Role of process integration, government policies, knowledge exchange through collaboration, and use of databases and computational tools have also been touched upon. PMID:27090404

  5. Optimal design of microalgae-based biorefinery: Economics, opportunities and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Lee, Jay H.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have great potential as a feedstock for the production of a wide range of end-products under the broad concept of biorefinery. In an earlier work, we proposed a superstructure based optimization model to find the optimal processing pathway for the production of biodiesel from microalgal...... biomass, and identified several challenges with the focus being on utilizing lipids extracted microalgal biomass for economic and environmentally friendly production of useful energy products. In this paper, we expand the previous optimization framework by considering the processing of microalgae residue...

  6. Identifying the point of departures for the detailed sustainability assessment of biomass feedstocks for biorefinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parajuli, Ranjan; Knudsen, Marie Trydeman; Dalgaard, Tommy

    aspects between the current application and future potentials. In Denmark, straw is widely used as a source of energy for heat and power production and for animal production. Thus, the overall sustainability and the year-round supply should be examined, particularly if it acts as a principal feedstock...... for biorefineries and potential impacts to the existing market. This study aims to assist in the sustainability assessment of straw conversion in the biochemical conversion routes to deliver bioethanol and other biobased products. For the comparison, conversion of straw to produce heat and electricity in a Combined...

  7. Knowledge management in a waste based biorefinery in the QbD paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Anurag S; Chopda, Viki R; Gomes, James

    2016-09-01

    Shifting resource base from fossil feedstock to renewable raw materials for production of chemical products has opened up an area of novel applications of industrial biotechnology-based process tools. This review aims to provide a concise and focused discussion on recent advances in knowledge management to facilitate efficient and optimal operation of a biorefinery. Application of quality by design (QbD) and process analytical technology (PAT) as tools for knowledge creation and management at different levels has been highlighted. Role of process integration, government policies, knowledge exchange through collaboration, and use of databases and computational tools have also been touched upon.

  8. Effect of Market Price Uncertainties on the Design of Optimal Biorefinery Systems—A Systematic Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheali, Peam; Quaglia, Alberto; Gernaey, Krist V.;

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a computer-aided decision support tool for identifying optimal biorefinery concepts for production of biofuels at an early design stage. To this end, a framework that uses a superstructure-based process synthesis approach integrated with uncertainty analysis...... the design space, generic but simple models describing the processing tasks, and the formulation and solution of an MINLP problem under deterministic and stochastic conditions to identify the optimal processing route for multiple raw materials and products. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of market price...

  9. Sequential Fermentation with Selected Immobilized Non-Saccharomyces Yeast for Reduction of Ethanol Content in Wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonico, Laura; Comitini, Francesca; Oro, Lucia; Ciani, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The average ethanol content of wine has increased over the last two decades. This increase was due to consumer preference, and also to climate change that resulted in increased grape maturity at harvest. In the present study, to reduce ethanol content in wine, a microbiological approach was investigated, using immobilized selected strains of non-Saccharomyces yeasts namely Starmerella bombicola, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora osmophila, and Hanseniaspora uvarum to start fermentation, followed by inoculation of free Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The immobilization procedures, determining high reaction rates, led a feasible sequential inoculation management avoiding possible contamination under actual winemaking. Under these conditions, the immobilized cells metabolized almost 50% of the sugar in 3 days, while S. cerevisiae inoculation completed all of fermentation. The S. bombicola and M. pulcherrima initial fermentations showed the best reductions in the final ethanol content (1.6 and 1.4% v/v, respectively). Resulting wines did not have any negative fermentation products with the exception of H. uvarum sequential fermentation that showed significant amount of ethyl acetate. On the other hand, there were increases in desirable compounds such as glycerol and succinic acid for S. bombicola, geraniol for M. pulcherrima and isoamyl acetate and isoamyl alcohol for H. osmophila sequential fermentations. The overall results indicated that a promising ethanol reduction could be obtained using sequential fermentation of immobilized selected non-Saccharomyces strains. In this way, a suitable timing of second inoculation and an enhancement of analytical profile of wine were obtained. PMID:27014203

  10. Sequential Fermentation with Selected Immobilized Non-Saccharomyces Yeast for Reduction of Ethanol Content in Wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonico, Laura; Comitini, Francesca; Oro, Lucia; Ciani, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The average ethanol content of wine has increased over the last two decades. This increase was due to consumer preference, and also to climate change that resulted in increased grape maturity at harvest. In the present study, to reduce ethanol content in wine, a microbiological approach was investigated, using immobilized selected strains of non-Saccharomyces yeasts namely Starmerella bombicola, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora osmophila, and Hanseniaspora uvarum to start fermentation, followed by inoculation of free Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The immobilization procedures, determining high reaction rates, led a feasible sequential inoculation management avoiding possible contamination under actual winemaking. Under these conditions, the immobilized cells metabolized almost 50% of the sugar in 3 days, while S. cerevisiae inoculation completed all of fermentation. The S. bombicola and M. pulcherrima initial fermentations showed the best reductions in the final ethanol content (1.6 and 1.4% v/v, respectively). Resulting wines did not have any negative fermentation products with the exception of H. uvarum sequential fermentation that showed significant amount of ethyl acetate. On the other hand, there were increases in desirable compounds such as glycerol and succinic acid for S. bombicola, geraniol for M. pulcherrima and isoamyl acetate and isoamyl alcohol for H. osmophila sequential fermentations. The overall results indicated that a promising ethanol reduction could be obtained using sequential fermentation of immobilized selected non-Saccharomyces strains. In this way, a suitable timing of second inoculation and an enhancement of analytical profile of wine were obtained. PMID:27014203

  11. A Sustainable Ethanol Distillation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuelei Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The discarded fruit and vegetable waste from the consumer and retailer sectors provide a reliable source for ethanol production. In this paper, an ethanol distillation system has been developed to remove the water contents from the original wash that contains only around 15% of the ethanol. The system has an ethanol production capacity of over 100,000 liters per day. It includes an ethanol condenser, a wash pre-heater, a main exhaust heat exchanger as well as a fractionating column. One unique characteristic of this system is that it utilizes the waste heat rejected from a power plant to vaporize the ethanol, thus it saves a significant amount of energy and at the same time reduces the pollution to the environment.

  12. Future Biorefinery strategic focus area of Forestcluster Ltd. - FuBio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaedda, L. (Forestcluster Ltd, Helsinki (Finland)), email: lars.gadda@forestcluster.fi; Weymarn, N. von (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)), email: niklas.weymarn@vtt.fi

    2011-11-15

    Forestcluster Ltd. was founded in 2007 to aid in the implementation of the National Research Strategy of the Finnish forest-based sector. Forestcluster is also one of the six Strategic Centres for Science, Technology and Innovation in Finland. Future Biorefinery (hereinafter: Fu- Bio) is one of the three strategic focus areas of Forestcluster. FuBio is planned to last for five years. The main objective of FuBio is to establish, in Finland, globally competitive knowledge platforms within the field of wood biorefinery R and D for the renewal of the forest industry and creation of new business. FuBio is focused on development of novel value chains, in which wood is refined into especially materials and chemicals. A knowledge platform, in this context, includes people, but also new process concepts, improved processing technologies, including new propriety technologies, as well as state-of-the-art preindustrial processing equipment, novel business ideas and coarse tools to evaluate the business potential of the concepts. The FuBio activities were initiated in March 2009, when the 2-year research programme, 'FuBio Joint Research 1', was launched. In June 2011, two new programmes were launched, namely: 'FuBio Joint Research 2' and 'FuBio Products from dissolved cellulose'. The FuBio programmes are partly financed by the Tekes BioRefine programme. (orig)

  13. Chemical conversion of hemicellulose coproducts from forest biorefineries to polymers and chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boluk, Y.; Jost, R. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Raw material is the basis of the chemical industry. This presentation discussed the chemical conversion of hemicellulose coproducts from forest biorefineries to polymers and chemicals. Biorefining pretreatment processes open up the biomass structure, release hemicelluloses and overcome the resistance to enzymatic hydrolysis. Although hemicellulose is the second most abundant carbohydrate, it does not have many industrial applications. The state of released hemicellulose whether polymeric, oligomeric or monosaccharides depends primarily on the pretreatment process conditions. Physical pretreatment methods include high-pressure steaming and steam explosion; milling and grinding; extrusion; and high-energy radiation. The chemical pretreatment methods involve the use of alkali, acid, gas and oxidizing agents as well as solvents. The biological pretreatment methods involve the use of lignin consuming fungi and cellulose consuming fungi. A profitable use of C5 sugars in monomeric, oligomeric and polymeric forms is necessary for a viable wood to bioethanol process. Hemicellulose composition varies depending on the biomass source. It usually has a lower molecular weight than cellulose, contains branching, and is comprised of several different monosaccharides. The existing commercial chemical products include xylitol, mannitol, and furfural. The hemicellulose coproducts from a lignocellulosic biorefinery have the potential to become a feasible replacement for their fossil-based equivalents. tabs., figs.

  14. GHG sustainability compliance of rapeseed-based biofuels produced in a Danish multi-output biorefinery system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldrin, Alessio; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    biorefinery system were determined using five different emission allocation principles. The results show that emission savings ranged from -34 % to 71 %, indicating the need for a better definition of regulatory calculation principles. The calculated emission factors differed significantly from default values...

  15. Conceptual design of sustainable integrated microalgae biorefineries: Parametric analysis of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and techno-economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posada, John; Brentner, Laura; Ramirez, Andrea; Patel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This study covers four main aspects of the conceptual design of sustainable integrated microalgae-based biorefineries using flue gas from CO2-intensive industries (i.e. 100% CO2): i) screening of technologies (4 options for cultivation, 3 for culture dewatering, 3 for cell disruption, 4 for lipids e

  16. System visualization of integrated biofuels and high value chemicals developed within the MacroAlgaeBiorefinery (MAB3) project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seghetta, Michele; Hasler, Berit; Bastianoni, Simone;

    growth in open seas absorbs considerable amount of nitrogen, phosphorus (limiting water eutrophication) and heavy metals. The modeled system aims to valorize all the biomass components produced in the biorefinery processes and internalize all positive and negative impacts of the services provided...

  17. Assessment of BIOrefinery concepts and the implications for agricultural and forestry POLicy : Deliverable 7.6 : BIOPOL Final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annevelink, E.; Kamm, B.; Schönicke, P.; Menrad, K.; Kurka, S.; Klein, A.; Rogulska, M.; Karbowski, A.; Peck, P.; McCormick, K.; Lenhart, J.; Capros, P.; Agathokles, D.E.; Reith, J.H.; Mozaffarian, H.; Meesters, K.P.H.; Ree, van R.; Bennett, S.; Bauen, A.W.

    2009-01-01

    BIOPOL is a two-year research project funded by the European Commission since 2007 through the Sixth Framework Programme. The overall goal of BIOPOL is to assess the status (technical, social, environmental, political, and implementation) of innovative BIOrefinery concepts and the implications for a

  18. Assessment of a novel alder biorefinery concept to meet demands of economic feasibility, energy production and long term environmental sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tobias; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Thomsen, Sune Tjalfe

    2013-01-01

    a literature study and by using a method developed during the study for first hand assessment and comparison of biorefinery system characteristics. The management of an average alder plantation in a 6-year coppicing system was found to fixate atmospheric nitrogen to the soil in yearly rates between 50 and 200...

  19. Hydrothermal Treatment (HTT) of Microalgae: Evaluation of the Process As Conversion Method in an Algae Biorefinery Concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Alba, L.; Torri, C.; Samori, C.; Spek, van der J.J.; Fabbri, D.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Brilman, D.W.F.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrothermal treatment (HTT) technology is evaluated for its potential as a process to convert algae and algal debris into a liquid fuel, within a sustainable algae biorefinery concept in which, next to fuels (gaseous and liquid), high value products are coproduced, nutrients and water are recyc

  20. Life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) impacts of a novel process for converting food waste to ethanol and co-products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Co-fermentation using SSF at ambient temperature has potential as an ethanol pathway. • Bio-refinery GHG emissions are similar to corn and MSW ethanol production processes. • Net production GHG impact is negative with inclusion of waste disposal avoidance. • Food waste diversion from landfills is the largest contributor to GHG benefits. - Abstract: Waste-to-ethanol conversion is a promising technology to provide renewable transportation fuel while mitigating feedstock risks and land use conflicts. It also has the potential to reduce environmental impacts from waste management such as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that contribute to climate change. This paper analyzes the life cycle GHG emissions associated with a novel process for the conversion of food processing waste into ethanol (EtOH) and the co-products of compost and animal feed. Data are based on a pilot plant co-fermenting retail food waste with a sugary industrial wastewater, using a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process at room temperature with a grinding pretreatment. The process produced 295 L EtOH/dry t feedstock. Lifecycle GHG emissions associated with the ethanol production process were 1458 gCO2e/L EtOH. When the impact of avoided landfill emissions from diverting food waste to use as feedstock are considered, the process results in net negative GHG emissions and approximately 500% improvement relative to corn ethanol or gasoline production. This finding illustrates how feedstock and alternative waste disposal options have important implications in life cycle GHG results for waste-to-energy pathways

  1. NEUROPEPTIDE Y (NPY) SUPPRESSES ETHANOL DRINKING IN ETHANOL-ABSTINENT, BUT NOT NON-ETHANOL-ABSTINENT, WISTAR RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Gilpin, N.W.; Stewart, R B; Badia-Elder, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    In outbred rats, increases in brain neuropeptide Y (NPY) activity suppress ethanol consumption in a variety of access conditions, but only following a history of ethanol dependence. NPY reliably suppresses ethanol drinking in alcohol-preferring (P) rats and this effect is augmented following a period of ethanol abstinence. The purpose of this experiment was to examine the effects of NPY on 2-bottle choice ethanol drinking and feeding in Wistar rats that had undergone chronic ethanol vapor exp...

  2. Characterization of an alcoholic hepatic steatosis model induced by ethanol and high-fat diet in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Alves de Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic liver disease is characterized by a wide spectrum of liver damage, which increases when ethanol is associated with high-fat diets (HFD. This work aimed to establish a model of alcoholic hepatic steatosis (AHS by using a combination of 10% ethanol and sunflower seeds as the source of HFD. Male rats received water or 10% ethanol and regular chow diet and/or HFD, which consisted of sunflower seeds. The food consumption, liquid intake and body weight of the rats were monitored for 30 days. After this period, blood was collected for biochemical evaluation, and liver samples were collected for histological, mitochondrial enzyme activity and oxidative stress analyses. Our results indicated that the combination of 10% ethanol and HFD induced micro- and macrosteatosis and hepatocyte tumefaction, decreased the levels of reduced glutathione and glutathione S-transferase activity and increased the level of lipoperoxidation and superoxide dismutase activity. The mitochondrial oxidation of NADH and succinate were partially inhibited. Complexes I and II were the main inhibition sites. Hepatic steatosis was successfully induced after 4 weeks of the diet, and the liver function was modified. The combination of 10% ethanol and sunflower seeds as an HFD produced an inexpensive model to study AHS in rats.

  3. Succinate-CoA ligase deficiency due to mutations in SUCLA2 and SUCLG1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrozzo, Rosalba; Verrigni, Daniela; Rasmussen, Magnhild;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The encephalomyopathic mtDNA depletion syndrome with methylmalonic aciduria is associated with deficiency of succinate-CoA ligase, caused by mutations in SUCLA2 or SUCLG1. We report here 25 new patients with succinate-CoA ligase deficiency, and review the clinical and molecular findings...... in these and 46 previously reported patients. PATIENTS AND RESULTS: Of the 71 patients, 50 had SUCLA2 mutations and 21 had SUCLG1 mutations. In the newly-reported 20 SUCLA2 patients we found 16 different mutations, of which nine were novel: two large gene deletions, a 1 bp duplication, two 1 bp deletions, a 3 bp...... insertion, a nonsense mutation and two missense mutations. In the newly-reported SUCLG1 patients, five missense mutations were identified, of which two were novel. The median onset of symptoms was two months for patients with SUCLA2 mutations and at birth for SUCLG1 patients. Median survival was 20 years...

  4. Reactive processing of maleic anhydride-grafted poly(butylene succinate and the compatibilizing effect on poly(butylene succinate nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Mohd Ishak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, maleic anhydride-grafted poly(butylene succinate (PBS-g-MA was synthesized via reactive meltgrafting process using different initiator contents. The grafting efficiency was increased with the initiator content, manifested by the higher degree of grafting in PBS-g-MA. The grafting reaction was confirmed through Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Then, PBS-g-MA was incorporated into organo-montmorillonite (OMMT filled poly(butylene succinate (PBS nanocomposites as compatibilizer. Mechanical properties of PBS nanocomposites were enhanced after compatibilized with PBS-g-MA, due to the better dispersion of OMMT in PBS matrix and the improved filler-matrix interfacial interactions. This was verifiable through X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC showed that the degree of crystallinity and melting temperature increased after addition of PBS-g-MA. However, the presence of PBS-g-MA did not favor the thermal stability of the nanocomposites, as reported in the thermogravimetry (TGA.

  5. Synthesis of diethyl succinate catalyzed by functional ionic liquids%功能化离子液体催化合成丁二酸二乙酯

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡晶晶; 赵地顺; 李静静; 胡甜甜; 翟建华

    2016-01-01

    Four kinds of functional ionic liquids,1-methyl-3-(3-sulfopropyl)imidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([C3 SO3 Hmim]HSO4 ),1-ethyl-3-(3-sulfopropyl)imidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([C3 SO3 Emim]HSO4 ), 1-propyl-3-(3-sulfopropyl)imidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([C3 SO3 Pmim]HSO4 ),1-butyl-3-(3-sulfoprop-yl)imidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([C3 SO3 Bmim]HSO4 ),were designed and synthesized.The properties of samples were characterized by FTIR,1 H NMR and TG.The catalytic activities of the functional ionic liquid were investigated by the esterification of succinic anhydride with ethanol.The results showed that under the optimized conditions n(succinic anhydride)∶n(ethanol)=1∶2.5,catalyst dosage 9%,water carrying agent dosage 35%,reaction temperature 90 ℃ and reaction time 5 h,the yield of diethyl succi-nate was up to 92.28%.The ionic liquids dried in vacuum till remained high activity after reused for 8 times.Moreover,compared to conventional industrial catalysts,ionic liquid catalyst needed less,and had the superiorities of less by-product,mild reaction conditions,high yield and the catalyst could be recy-cled,and has the potential of replacing the traditional sulfuric acid in catalytic esterification reaction.%采用两步法合成了4种不同阳离子的功能化离子液体:1-甲基-3-(3-磺丙基)咪唑硫酸氢盐([C3 SO3 Hmim] HSO4)、1-乙基-3-(3-磺丙基)咪唑硫酸氢盐([C3SO3Emim]HSO4)、1-丙基-3-(3-磺丙基)咪唑硫酸氢盐([C3SO3-Pmim]HSO4)、1-丁基-3-(3-磺丙基)咪唑硫酸氢盐([C3 SO3 Bmim]HSO4)。通过FTIR、1 H NMR和TG分析了离子液体的结构和热稳定性。并将其应用于催化丁二酸酐和乙醇的酯化反应中,考察了4种离子液体的催化活性。结果表明,离子液体[C3SO3Bmim]HSO4的催化效果较好,在n(丁二酸酐)∶n(乙醇)=1∶2.5,催化剂用量9%,环己烷用量35%,反应温度90℃的条件下反应5 h后,丁二酸二乙酯的收率可达92

  6. Volatility of NH3 from internally mixed sodium succinate-NH4SO4 particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Zhang, Yunhong

    2016-04-01

    Contributing the complicacy of atmospheric constituents, aerosol particles may undergo complicated heterogeneous reactions that have profound consequences on their hygroscopic properties and volatility. Ammonia (NH3) is a ubiquitous trace atmospheric gas in the troposphere and has negative effects on human health and climate forcing of ambient aerosols. In addition, atmospheric cycle of NH3 is complex in atmosphere, therefore it necessary to get insights to the complexity of gas-to-aerosol NH3 partitioning, which results in large uncertainties in the sources and distributions of NH3. By using in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR), we report here the volatility of NH3 from the laboratory generated sodium succinate with ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) at a 1:1 molar ratio as well as its effect on the hygroscopicity of the mixtures. The loss of the NH4+ peak at 1451cm-1 and the formation of peaks at 1718 and 1134 cm-1 due to C = O stretching asymmetric vibration of -COOH and ν3 (SO42-) stretching of sodium sulfate indicate that sodium succinate reacts with (NH4)2SO4, releasing NH3 and forming succinic acid and sodium sulfate on dehydration process. The formation of less hygroscopic succinic acid and volatility of NH3 in mixtures leads to a significant decrease in the total water content. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the reaction between (NH4)2SO4 and dicarboxylate salts, which may represent an important particle-gas partitioning for ammonia and thus elucidate another underlying ammonia cycle in atmosphere. These results could be helpful to understand the mutual transformation process of dicarboxylic acids and dicarboxylate salts.

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Octenyl Succinic Anhydride Modified Taro Starch Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Suisui; Dai, Lei; Qin, Yang; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2016-01-01

    The polar surface and hydrophilicity of starch nanoparticles (SNPs) result in their poor dispersibility in nonpolar solvent and poor compatibility with hydrophobic polymers, which limited the application in hydrophobic system. To improve their hydrophobicity, SNPs prepared through self-assembly of short chain amylose debranched from cooked taro starch, were modified by octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA). Size via dynamic light scattering of OSA-SNPs increased compared with SNPs. Fourier transfo...

  8. The H+/O ratio of proton translocation linked to the oxidation of succinate by mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krab, K; Soos, J; Wikström, M

    1984-12-10

    In a recent communication Lehninger and co-workers (Costa, L.E., Reynaferje, B., and Lehninger, A.L. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 4802-4811) reported values approaching 8 for the H+/O ratio of vectorial proton ejection from rat liver mitochondria respiring with succinate. Here we present a rigorous analysis of these measurements which reveals that they may significantly overestimate the true H+/O stoicheiometry. PMID:6096164

  9. Effect of vitamin E succinate on inflammatory cytokines induced by high-intensity interval training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Sarir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Scope: The anti-inflammatory effect of vitamin E under moderate exercises has been evaluated. However, the effect of vitamin E succinate, which has more potent anti-inflammatory effect than other isomers of vitamin E has not been evaluated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of vitamin E succinate on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a and interleukin-6 (IL-6 production induced by high-intensity interval training (HIIT. Materials and Methods: In the present study, 24 rats were randomly divided into control (C, supplementation (S, HIIT, and HIIT + supplementation (HIIT+S groups. HIIT training protocol on a treadmill (at a speed of 40-54 m/min and vitamin E succinate supplementation (60 mg/kg/day was conducted for 6 weeks. Results: Serum IL-6 in the HIIT group significantly increased compared with the C group (350.42 ± 123.31 pg/mL vs 158.60 ± 41.96 pg/mL; P = 0.002. Also, serum TNF-a concentrations significantly enhanced (718.15 ± 133.42 pg/mL vs 350.87 ± 64.93 pg/mL; P = 0.001 in the HIIT group compared with the C group. Treatment of the training group with vitamin E numerically reduced IL-6 and TNF-a when compared with the HIIT group (217.31 ± 29.21 and 510.23 ± 217.88, respectively, P > 0.05. However, no significant changes were observed in serum TNF-a (P = 0.31 and IL-6 (P = 0.52 concentrations in the HIIT + S group compared with the C group. Conclusion: HIIT-induced IL-6 and TNF-α decreased by administration of Vitamin E succinate.

  10. Volatility of NH3 from internally mixed sodium succinate-NH4SO4 particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Zhang, Yunhong

    2016-04-01

    Contributing the complicacy of atmospheric constituents, aerosol particles may undergo complicated heterogeneous reactions that have profound consequences on their hygroscopic properties and volatility. Ammonia (NH3) is a ubiquitous trace atmospheric gas in the troposphere and has negative effects on human health and climate forcing of ambient aerosols. In addition, atmospheric cycle of NH3 is complex in atmosphere, therefore it necessary to get insights to the complexity of gas-to-aerosol NH3 partitioning, which results in large uncertainties in the sources and distributions of NH3. By using in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR), we report here the volatility of NH3 from the laboratory generated sodium succinate with ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) at a 1:1 molar ratio as well as its effect on the hygroscopicity of the mixtures. The loss of the NH4+ peak at 1451cm‑1 and the formation of peaks at 1718 and 1134 cm‑1 due to C = O stretching asymmetric vibration of -COOH and ν3 (SO42‑) stretching of sodium sulfate indicate that sodium succinate reacts with (NH4)2SO4, releasing NH3 and forming succinic acid and sodium sulfate on dehydration process. The formation of less hygroscopic succinic acid and volatility of NH3 in mixtures leads to a significant decrease in the total water content. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the reaction between (NH4)2SO4 and dicarboxylate salts, which may represent an important particle-gas partitioning for ammonia and thus elucidate another underlying ammonia cycle in atmosphere. These results could be helpful to understand the mutual transformation process of dicarboxylic acids and dicarboxylate salts.

  11. Development and Validation of First Order Derivative Spectrophotometric method for simultaneous estimation of Nifedipine and Metoprolol Succinate in Synthetic Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sojitra Rajanit

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The present manuscript describe simple, sensitive, rapid, accurate, precise and economical first derivative spectrophotometric method for the simultaneous determination of Nifedipine (NIFand Metoprolol Succinate (METin synthetic mixture. The derivative spectrophotometric method was based on the determination of both the drugs at their respective zero crossing point (ZCP. The first order derivative spectra was obtained in methanol and the determinations were made at 283.80 nm (ZCP of nifedipine for metoprolol succinate and 242.60 nm (ZCP of metoprolol succinate for nifedipine. The linearity was obtained in the concentration range of succinate 5-25 μg/ml for nifedipine and 25-125μg/ml for metoprolol. The mean recovery was 99.64 and 99.41 for Nifedipine and Metoprolol succinate, respectively. The method was found to be simple, sensitive, accurate and precise and was applicable for the simultaneous determination of Nifedipine and Metoprolol succinate in synthetic mixture. The results of analysis have been validated statistically and by recovery studies.

  12. Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618 fermentation medium optimization for the production of succinic acid by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Wen; Wang, Cheng-Cheng; Liu, Rui-Sang; Li, Hong-Mei; Wan, Duan-Ji; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2012-01-01

    As a potential intermediary feedstock, succinic acid takes an important place in bulk chemical productions. For the first time, a method combining Plackett-Burman design (PBD), steepest ascent method (SA), and Box-Behnken design (BBD) was developed to optimize Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618 fermentation medium. First, glucose, yeast extract, and MgCO(3) were identified to be key medium components by PBD. Second, preliminary optimization was run by SA method to access the optimal region of the key medium components. Finally, the responses, that is, the production of succinic acid, were optimized simultaneously by using BBD, and the optimal concentration was located to be 84.6 g L(-1) of glucose, 14.5 g L(-1) of yeast extract, and 64.7 g L(-1) of MgCO(3). Verification experiment indicated that the maximal succinic acid production of 52.7 ± 0.8 g L(-1) was obtained under the identified optimal conditions. The result agreed with the predicted value well. Compared with that of the basic medium, the production of succinic acid and yield of succinic acid against glucose were enhanced by 67.3% and 111.1%, respectively. The results obtained in this study may be useful for the industrial commercial production of succinic acid. PMID:23093852

  13. Model-guided metabolic gene knockout of gnd for enhanced succinate production in Escherichia coli from glucose and glycerol substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienda, Bashir Sajo; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Illias, Rosli Md

    2016-04-01

    The metabolic role of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (gnd) under anaerobic conditions with respect to succinate production in Escherichia coli remained largely unspecified. Herein we report what are to our knowledge the first metabolic gene knockout of gnd to have increased succinic acid production using both glucose and glycerol substrates in E. coli. Guided by a genome scale metabolic model, we engineered the E. coli host metabolism to enhance anaerobic production of succinic acid by deleting the gnd gene, considering its location in the boundary of oxidative and non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. This strategy induced either the activation of malic enzyme, causing up-regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (ppc) and down regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (ppck) and/or prevents the decarboxylation of 6 phosphogluconate to increase the pool of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) that is required for the formation of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). This approach produced a mutant strain BMS2 with succinic acid production titers of 0.35 g l(-1) and 1.40 g l(-1) from glucose and glycerol substrates respectively. This work further clearly elucidates and informs other studies that the gnd gene, is a novel deletion target for increasing succinate production in E. coli under anaerobic condition using glucose and glycerol carbon sources. The knowledge gained in this study would help in E. coli and other microbial strains development for increasing succinate production and/or other industrial chemicals. PMID:26878126

  14. Comparsion of the Effects of Succinate and NADH on Postmortem Metmyoglobin Redcutase Activity and Beef Colour Stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xiao-guang; WANG Zhen-yu; TANG Meng-tian; MA Chang-wei; DAI Rui-tong

    2014-01-01

    In two experiments, the effects of succinate and NADH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) on metmyoglobin reductase activity and electron transport chain-linked metmyoglobin reduction were investigated and compared. In experiment 1, metmyoglobin (MetMb), substrate and inhibitors were incubated with mitochondria. Comparsion of the effects of succinate and NADH on MetMb reduction was investigated. The MetMb percentage in sample treated with 8 mol L-1 succinate decreased by about 69%after 3 h incubation, and the effect was inhibited by the addition of 10 mol L-1 electron transfer chain complex II inhibitor malonic acid;the MetMb percentage in samples treated with 2 mol L-1 NADH decreased by 56%and the effect was inhibited by the addition of 0.02 mol L-1 electron transport chain complex I inhibitor rotenone. These results indicated that electron transport chain played an important role in MetMb reduction. Both complex II and complex I take part in the MetMb reduction in mitochondria through different pathways. NADH-MetMb reduction system was less stable than succinate-MetMb system. In experiment 2, the beef longissimus dorsi muscle was blended with different concentrations of succinate or NADH. Enhancing patties with higher concentration of succinate or NADH improved colour stability in vacuum packaged samples (P<0.05). These results veriifed that mitochondria electron transport chain is related to the MetMb reduction in meat system.

  15. Simulated Ethanol Transportation Patterns and Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Wyatt; Seth D. Meyer

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol production booms in the Midwest in 2007. Regulations require ethanol be included as a fuel additive in many areas as of 2006, though consumer willingness to adopt ethanol blends voluntarily is uncertain and benchmark ethanol and oil prices fluctuate. In this context, we jointly simulate consumer demand for ethanol and ethanol transportation costs. Results demonstrate a non-linear relationship between benchmark prices and transportation costs that depends critically on (1) the prevalen...

  16. Ethanol from mixed waste paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology, markets, and economics for converting mixed waste paper to ethanol in Washington were assessed. The status of enzymatic and acid hydrolysis projects were reviewed. The market for ethanol blended fuels in Washington shows room for expansion. The economics for a hypothetical plant using enzymatic hydrolysis were shown to be profitable

  17. Synthesis of Vitamin E Succinate from Candida rugosa Lipase in Organic Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xiang-jun; HU Yi; JIANG Ling; GONG Ji-hong; HUANG He

    2013-01-01

    A screening of commercially available lipases for the synthesis of vitamin E succinate showed that lipase from Candida rugosa presented the highest yield.The synthesis of vitamin E succinate in organic solvents with different lgP values ranging from-1.3 to 3.5 was investigated.Of particular interest was that dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) with the lowest lgP exhibited the highest yield among all the organic solvents used.It suggests that lgP is incapable of satisfactorily predicting the biocompatibility of organic solvents due to the complexity of enzymatic reaction with hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates in organic solvent.Effects of different operating conditions,such as molar ratio of substrate,enzyme concentration,reaction temperature,mass transfer,and reaction time were also studied.Under the optimum conditions of 10 g/L enzyme,a stirring rate of 100 r/min,a substrate molar ratio of 5:1 at 55 C for 18 h,a satisfactory yield(46.95%) was obtained.The developed method has a potential to be used for efficient enzymatic production of vitamin E succinate.

  18. Redox stress is not essential for the pseudo-hypoxic phenotype of succinate dehydrogenase deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selak, Mary A; Durán, Raul V; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2006-01-01

    HIFalpha prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) are a family of enzymes that regulate protein levels of the alpha subunit of the hypoxia inducible transcription factor (HIF) under different oxygen levels. PHDs catalyse the conversion of a prolyl residue, molecular oxygen and alpha-ketoglutarate to hydroxy-prolyl, carbon dioxide and succinate in a reaction dependent on ferrous iron and ascorbate as cofactors. Recently it was shown that pseudo-hypoxia, HIF induction under normoxic conditions, is an important feature of tumours generated as a consequence of inactivation of the mitochondrial tumour suppressor 'succinate dehydrogenase' (SDH). Two models have been proposed to describe the link between SDH inhibition and HIF activation. Both models suggest that a mitochondrial-generated signal leads to the inhibition of PHDs in the cytosol, however, the models differ in the nature of the proposed messenger. The first model postulates that mitochondrial-generated hydrogen peroxide mediates signal transduction while the second model implicates succinate as the molecular messenger which leaves the mitochondrion and inhibits PHDs in the cytosol. Here we show that pseudo-hypoxia can be observed in SDH-suppressed cells in the absence of oxidative stress and in the presence of effective antioxidant treatment.

  19. Synthesis, Characterization and Biological Evaluation of Succinate Prodrugs of Curcuminoids for Colon Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornchai Rojsitthisak

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel series of succinyl derivatives of three curcuminoids were synthesized as potential prodrugs. Symmetrical (curcumin and bisdesmethoxycurcumin and unsymmetrical (desmethoxycurcumin curcuminoids were prepared through aldol condensation of 2,4-pentanedione with different benzaldehydes. Esterification of these compounds with a methyl or ethyl ester of succinyl chloride gave the corresponding succinate prodrugs in excellent yields. Anticolon cancer activity of the compounds was evaluated using Caco-2 cells. The succinate prodrugs had IC50 values in the 1.8–9.6 ��M range, compared to IC50 values of 3.3–4.9 μM for the parent compounds. Curcumin diethyl disuccinate exhibited the highest potency and was chosen for stability studies. Hydrolysis of this compound in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4 and in human plasma followed pseudo first-order kinetics. In phosphate buffer, the kobs and t1/2 for hydrolysis indicated that the compound was much more stable than curcumin. In human plasma, this compound was able to release curcumin, therefore our results suggest that succinate prodrugs of curcuminoids are stable in phosphate buffer, release the parent curcumin derivatives readily in human plasma, and show anti-colon cancer activity.

  20. Modeling conformational redox-switch modulation of human succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamazian, Gaik; Ho Chang, Jeong; Knyazev, Sergey; Stepanov, Eugene; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Porozov, Yuri

    2015-12-01

    Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) converts succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to succinic acid in the mitochondrial matrix and is involved in the metabolism of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The molecular structure of human SSADH revealed the intrinsic regulatory mechanism--redox-switch modulation--by which large conformational changes are brought about in the catalytic loop through disulfide bonding. The crystal structures revealed two SSADH conformations, and computational modeling of transformation between them can provide substantial insights into detailed dynamic redox modulation. On the basis of these two clear crystal structures, we modeled the conformational motion between these structures in silico. For that purpose, we proposed and used a geometry-based coarse-grained mathematical model of long-range protein motion and the related modeling algorithm. The algorithm is based on solving the special optimization problem, which is similar to the classical Monge-Kantorovich mass transportation problem. The modeled transformation was supported by another morphing method based on a completely different framework. The result of the modeling facilitates better interpretation and understanding of the SSADH biological role. PMID:26422261

  1. Microbial production of Propionic and Succinic acid from Sorbitol using Propionibacterium acidipropionici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Juliana C; Valença, Gustavo P; Moran, Paulo J S; Rodrigues, J Augusto R

    2015-01-01

    Three sequential fermentative batches were carried out with cell recycle in four simultaneously operating bioreactors maintained at pH 6.5, 30°C, and 100 rpm. P. acidipropionici ATCC 4875 was able to produce propionic and succinic acid from sorbitol. The concentration of propionic acid decreased slightly from 39.5 ± 5.2 g L(-1) to 34.4 ± 1.9 g L(-1), and that of succinic acid increased significantly from 6.1 ± 2.1 g L(-1) to 14.8 ± 0.9 g L(-1) through the sequential batches. In addition, a small amount of acetic acid was produced that decreased from 3.3 ± 0.4 g L(-1) to 2.0 ± 0.3 g L(-1) through the batches. The major yield for propionic acid was 0.613 g g(-1) in the first batch and succinic acid it was 0.212 g g(-1) in the third batch. The minor yield of acetic acid was 0.029 g g(-1), in the second and third batches.

  2. Efficient and repeated production of succinic acid by turning sugarcane bagasse into sugar and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengcheng; Tao, Shengtao; Zheng, Pu

    2016-07-01

    Here we reported an endeavor in making full use of sugarcane bagasse for biological production of succinic acid. Through NaOH pre-treatment and multi-enzyme hydrolysis, a reducing sugar solution mainly composed of glucose and xylose was obtained from the sugarcane bagasse. By optimizing portions of cellulase, xylanase, β-glucanase and pectinase in the multi-enzyme "cocktail", the hydrolysis percentage of the total cellulose in pre-treated sugarcane bagasse can be as high as 88.5%. A. succinogenes CCTCC M2012036 was used for converting reducing sugars into succinic acid in a 3-L bioreactor with a sugar-fed strategy to prevent cell growth limitation. Importantly, cells were found to be adaptive on the sugarcane bagasse residue, offering possibilities of repeated batch fermentation and replacement for MgCO3 with soluble NaHCO3 in pH modulation. Three cycles of fermentation without activity loss were realized with the average succinic acid yield and productivity to be 80.5% and 1.65g·L(-1)·h(-1). PMID:27035471

  3. Aqueous Phase Photo-Oxidation of Succinic Acid: Changes in Hygroscopic Properties and Reaction Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, P. K.; Ninokawa, A.; Hofstra, J.; de Lijser, P.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have been identified as important factors in understanding climate change. The extent to which aerosols affect climate is determined, in part, by hygroscopic properties which can change as a result of atmospheric processing. Dicarboxylic acids, components of atmospheric aerosol, have a wide range of hygroscopic properties and can undergo oxidation and photolysis reactions in the atmosphere. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of succinic acid aerosol, a non-hygroscopic four carbon dicarboxylic acid, were measured with a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and compared to reaction products resulting from the aqueous phase photo-oxidation reaction of hydrogen peroxide and succinic acid. Reaction products were determined and quantified using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a function of hydrogen peroxide:succinic acid concentration ratio and photolysis time. Although reaction products include larger non-hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. adipic acid) and smaller hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. malonic and oxalic acids), comparison of hygroscopic growth curves to Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) predictions suggests that the hygroscopic properties of many of the product mixtures are largely independent of the hygroscopicity of the individual components. This study provides a framework for future investigations to fully understand and predict the role of chemical reactions in altering atmospheric conditions that affect climate.

  4. Out of plane distortions of the heme b of Escherichia coli succinate dehydrogenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quang M Tran

    Full Text Available The role of the heme b in Escherichia coli succinate dehydrogenase is highly ambiguous and its role in catalysis is questionable. To examine whether heme reduction is an essential step of the catalytic mechanism, we generated a series of site-directed mutations around the heme binding pocket, creating a library of variants with a stepwise decrease in the midpoint potential of the heme from the wild-type value of +20 mV down to -80 mV. This difference in midpoint potential is enough to alter the reactivity of the heme towards succinate and thus its redox state under turnover conditions. Our results show both the steady state succinate oxidase and fumarate reductase catalytic activity of the enzyme are not a function of the redox potential of the heme. As well, lower heme potential did not cause an increase in the rate of superoxide production both in vitro and in vivo. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectrum of the heme in the wild-type enzyme is a combination of two distinct signals. We link EPR spectra to structure, showing that one of the signals likely arises from an out-of-plane distortion of the heme, a saddled conformation, while the second signal originates from a more planar orientation of the porphyrin ring.

  5. Solid-Liquid Equilibria of Succinic Acid in Cyclohexanone, Cyclohexanol and Their Mixed Solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Lihua; MA Peisheng; SONG Weiwei

    2007-01-01

    Solubilities were measured for succinic acid dissolved in cyclohexanone, cyclohexanol and 5 of their mixed solvents at the temperature range from 291.85 K to 358.37 K using a dynamic method. The solubility data were regressed by λh equation, withthe average absolute relative deviation 3.47%. The binary interaction parameter is 0.306 7 for the mixed solvent of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol was determined by correlating the experimental solubilities with the modified λh equation. When the binary interaction parameter was determined, it can be used to extrapolate the solubilities of succinic acid in mixed solvents of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol at any proportion. The average absolute relative deviation was 7.69% by using the modified λh equation to correlate the solubility data, however, the average absolute relative deviation was 8.89% by using NRTL equation to correlate the solubility data. The results show that the accuracy of the modified λh equation is better than that of the NRTL equation for the solubility of succinic acid in the 5 mixed solvents of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol.

  6. Cost and greenhouse gas emission tradeoffs of alternative uses of lignin for second generation ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhashem, Ghasideh; Adler, Paul R.; McAloon, Andrew J.; Spatari, Sabrina

    2013-06-01

    Second generation ethanol bioconversion technologies are under demonstration-scale development for the production of lignocellulosic fuels to meet the US federal Renewable Fuel Standards (RFS2). Bioconversion technology utilizes the fermentable sugars generated from the cellulosic fraction of the feedstock, and most commonly assumes that the lignin fraction may be used as a source of thermal and electrical energy. We examine the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission and techno-economic cost tradeoffs for alternative uses of the lignin fraction of agricultural residues (corn stover, and wheat and barley straw) produced within a 2000 dry metric ton per day ethanol biorefinery in three locations in the United States. We compare three scenarios in which the lignin is (1) used as a land amendment to replace soil organic carbon (SOC); (2) separated, dried and sold as a coal substitute to produce electricity; and (3) used to produce electricity onsite at the biorefinery. Results from this analysis indicate that for life cycle GHG intensity, amending the lignin to land is lowest among the three ethanol production options (-25 to -2 g CO2e MJ-1), substituting coal with lignin is second lowest (4-32 g CO2e MJ-1), and onsite power generation is highest (36-41 g CO2e MJ-1). Moreover, the onsite power generation case may not meet RFS2 cellulosic fuel requirements given the uncertainty in electricity substitution. Options that use lignin for energy do so at the expense of SOC loss. The lignin-land amendment option has the lowest capital cost among the three options due to lower equipment costs for the biorefinery’s thermal energy needs and use of biogas generated onsite. The need to purchase electricity and uncertain market value of the lignin-land amendment could raise its cost compared to onsite power generation and electricity co-production. However, assuming a market value (50-100/dry Mg) for nutrient and soil carbon replacement in agricultural soils, and potentially

  7. Cost and greenhouse gas emission tradeoffs of alternative uses of lignin for second generation ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Second generation ethanol bioconversion technologies are under demonstration-scale development for the production of lignocellulosic fuels to meet the US federal Renewable Fuel Standards (RFS2). Bioconversion technology utilizes the fermentable sugars generated from the cellulosic fraction of the feedstock, and most commonly assumes that the lignin fraction may be used as a source of thermal and electrical energy. We examine the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission and techno-economic cost tradeoffs for alternative uses of the lignin fraction of agricultural residues (corn stover, and wheat and barley straw) produced within a 2000 dry metric ton per day ethanol biorefinery in three locations in the United States. We compare three scenarios in which the lignin is (1) used as a land amendment to replace soil organic carbon (SOC); (2) separated, dried and sold as a coal substitute to produce electricity; and (3) used to produce electricity onsite at the biorefinery. Results from this analysis indicate that for life cycle GHG intensity, amending the lignin to land is lowest among the three ethanol production options (−25 to −2 g CO2e MJ−1), substituting coal with lignin is second lowest (4–32 g CO2e MJ−1), and onsite power generation is highest (36–41 g CO2e MJ−1). Moreover, the onsite power generation case may not meet RFS2 cellulosic fuel requirements given the uncertainty in electricity substitution. Options that use lignin for energy do so at the expense of SOC loss. The lignin–land amendment option has the lowest capital cost among the three options due to lower equipment costs for the biorefinery’s thermal energy needs and use of biogas generated onsite. The need to purchase electricity and uncertain market value of the lignin–land amendment could raise its cost compared to onsite power generation and electricity co-production. However, assuming a market value ($50–$100/dry Mg) for nutrient and soil carbon replacement in agricultural

  8. Structural modification of hemicelluloses and lignin based on the biorefinery process with white-rot fungal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian-Feng; Yang, Hai-Yan; Kun, Wang; Liu, Xing-E

    2016-11-20

    On the concept of biorefinery, hemicellulosic and lignin fractions were isolated from white-rot fungal Trametes velutina D10149 biodegraded poplar, and the structural modification was elucidated in detail according to the different incubation duration. Transversal-section Raman images showed that the fiber secondary walls were preferentially degraded, whereas the compound middle lamellae, including the cell corner regions, were mainly intact after 16 weeks incubation. More importantly, lignin and carbohydrates were simultaneously removed within the fiber secondary wall. From wet chemistry analysis, the yields and structural properties for both hemicellulosic and lignin fractions were not significantly altered. The synergistic effect of ligninolytic system finally obviously appeared after 16 weeks incubation, evidenced by the remarkable decrement of hemicellulose and lignin molecular weights. Additionally, the preferential degradation of S units in lignin biomacromolecule was further confirmed by composition analysis of cell wall phenolics and the integration of 2D NMR correlations in the aromatic region. PMID:27561466

  9. A Review: Mesoporous Santa Barbara Amorphous-15, Types, Synthesis and Its Applications towards Biorefinery Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norhasyimi Rahmat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Santa Barbara Amorphous (SBA-15 is significant mesoporous silica with exclusive and important properties of highly ordered mesopores, hydrothermally stable and thick wall, profusely large surface area and huge pore volume which render it as promising catalyst for wide applications. However, the purely siliceous SBA-15 which lacks of acidity characteristic hinders its ideal capabilities as catalyst. Moreover, functionalization and modification of SBA-15 could enhance and optimize its catalytic activity. Conclusion/Recommendations: Thus, in this review, the various types and different synthesis of modifying SBA-15 are discussed in detail towards its application in biorefinery production. The catalytic activities in various operating conditions and reactions are also reviewed for future reference and scope of studies.

  10. Lignin-rich biomass of cotton by-products for biorefineries via pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiao; Liang, Jiajin; Wu, Shubin

    2016-10-01

    Pyrolysis was demonstrated to investigate the thermal decomposition characteristics and potential of lignin-rich cotton by-products cotton exocarp (CE) and spent mushroom substrate consisted of cotton by-products (MSC) for biorefineries. The chemical component and structure alteration of CE and MSC was found to affect their thermochemical behaviors. The bio-oil yield from CE was 58.13wt% while the maximum yield from MSC was 45.01% at 600°C. The phenolic compounds obtained from CE and MSC were 33.9% and 39.2%, respectively. The yield of acetic acid from MSC between 400 and 600°C was about 30-38% lower than that from CE, which suggests the high quality of bio-oil was obtained. Biochar from MSC via slow pyrolysis had a high mass yield (44.38wt%) with well-developed pore structure. PMID:27393830

  11. Characterization of biomasses from the north and northeast regions of Brazil for processes in biorefineries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magale Karine Diel RAMBO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn search for renewable energy sources, the Brazilian residual biomasses stand out due to their favorable physical and chemical properties, low cost, and their being less pollutant. Therefore, they are likely to be used in biorefineries in the production of chemical inputs to substitute fossil fuels. This substitution is possible due to the high contents of carbohydrates (>40%, low contents of extractives (<20%, ashes (<8% and moisture (<8% found in these residual biomasses. High calorific values of all residues also offer them the chance to be used in combustion. A principal components analysis (PCA was performed for better understanding of the samples and their hysic-chemical properties. Thus, this study aimed to characterize biomasses from the north (babassu residues, such as mesocarp and endocarp; pequi and Brazil nut and northeast (agave and coconut regions of Brazil, in order to contribute to the preservation of the environment and strengthen the economy of the region.

  12. Potential of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) as a biorefinery crop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur Bragi; Svensson, S.-E.; Johansson, E.;

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of Jerusalem artichoke in a biorefinery context was not investigated so far. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of this plant as feedstock for production of bioethanol, protein and inulin. We investigated the biomass productivity and chemical composition...... biomass productivity was 88% higher in September than in December. Fresh tuber biomass productivity showed large variations between harvests, where the maximum average productivity in December was 3.4 times higher than in September. Inulin content in dry tubers was between 76 and 85% making the plant...... an excellent crop, for e.g. inulin extraction, production of high fructose syrup or fermentations. Less mature plants were shown to have degree of polymerization (DP) up to 14, which makes biomass useful as dietary fibre, while the inulin DP in tubers harvested later became as low as 6, showing lower potential...

  13. Integrated torrefaction vs. external torrefaction - A thermodynamic analysis for the case of a thermochemical biorefinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lasse Røngaard

    2014-01-01

    Integrated and external torrefaction is analyzed and compared via thermodynamic modeling. In this paper, integrated torrefaction is defined as torrefaction integrated with entrained flow gasification. External torrefaction is defined as the decentralized production of torrefied wood pellets...... and centralized conversion of the pellets by entrained flow gasification. First, the syngas production of the two methods was compared. Second, the two methods were compared by considering complete biorefineries with either integrated torrefaction or external torrefaction. The first part of the analysis showed...... that the biomass to syngas efficiency can be increased from 63% to 86% (LHV-dry) when switching from external torrefaction to integrated torrefaction. The second part of the analysis showed that the total energy efficiency (biomass to methanol + net electricity) could be increased from 53% to 63% when switching...

  14. Microbial electrolysis cells for waste biorefinery: A state of the art review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-09-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) is an emerging technology for energy and resource recovery during waste treatment. MECs can theoretically convert any biodegradable waste into H2, biofuels, and other value added products, but the system efficacy can vary significantly when using different substrates or are operated in different conditions. To understand the application niches of MECs in integrative waste biorefineries, this review provides a critical analysis of MEC system performance reported to date in terms of H2 production rate, H2 yield, and energy efficiency under a variety of substrates, applied voltages and other crucial factors. It further discusses the mutual benefits between MECs and dark fermentation and argues such integration can be a viable approach for efficient H2 production from renewable biomass. Other marketable products and system integrations that can be applied to MECs are also summarized, and the challenges and prospects of the technology are highlighted. PMID:27020129

  15. A Framework for Sustainable Design of Algal Biorefineries: Economic Aspects and Life Cycle Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheali, Peam; Loureiro da Costa Lira Gargalo, Carina; Gernaey, Krist;

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, a framework for sustainable design of algal biorefineries with respect to economic and environmental objectives is presented. As part of the framework, a superstructure is formulated to represent the design space – describing technologies developed for processing various types...... of algae feedstock for the production of biodiesel and co-products. Relevant data and parameters for each process such as yield, conversion, operational cost is then collected using a standardized format (a generic model) and stored in a database. The sustainable design problem is then formulated...... mathematically as a mixed integer nonlinear programming problem, and is solved first to identify the optimal designs with respect to economic optimality. These optimal designs are then analyzed further in terms of environmental performance using life cycle analysis. For sustainability analysis, in total five...

  16. Bioethanol, biohydrogen and biogas production from wheat straw in a biorefinery concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaparaju, Prasad Laxmi-Narasimha; Serrano, Maria; Thomsen, Anne Belinda;

    2009-01-01

    The production of bioethanol, biohydrogen and biogas from wheat straw was investigated within a biorefinery framework. Initially, wheat straw was hydrothermally liberated to a cellulose rich fiber fraction and a hemicellulose rich liquid fraction (hydrolysate). Enzymatic hydrolysis and subsequent....... Additionally, evaluation of six different wheat straw-to-biofuel production scenaria showed that either use of wheat straw for biogas production or multi-fuel production were the energetically most efficient processes compared to production of mono-fuel such as bioethanol when fermenting C6 sugars alone. Thus......, multiple biofuels production from wheat straw can increase the efficiency for material and energy and can presumably be more economical process for biomass utilization. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  17. Microbial electrolysis cells for waste biorefinery: A state of the art review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-09-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) is an emerging technology for energy and resource recovery during waste treatment. MECs can theoretically convert any biodegradable waste into H2, biofuels, and other value added products, but the system efficacy can vary significantly when using different substrates or are operated in different conditions. To understand the application niches of MECs in integrative waste biorefineries, this review provides a critical analysis of MEC system performance reported to date in terms of H2 production rate, H2 yield, and energy efficiency under a variety of substrates, applied voltages and other crucial factors. It further discusses the mutual benefits between MECs and dark fermentation and argues such integration can be a viable approach for efficient H2 production from renewable biomass. Other marketable products and system integrations that can be applied to MECs are also summarized, and the challenges and prospects of the technology are highlighted.

  18. Understanding Potential Air Emissions from a Cellulosic Biorefinery Producing Renewable Diesel Blendstock.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yimin; Heath, Garvin A.; Renzaglia, Jason; Thomas, Mae

    2015-06-22

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, through the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), mandates increased use of biofuels, including cellulosic biofuels. The RFS is expected to spur the development of advanced biofuel technologies (e.g., new and innovative biofuel conversion pathways) as well as the construction of biorefineries (refineries that produce biofuels) using these technologies. To develop sustainable cellulosic biofuels, one of the goals of the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy is to minimize air pollutants from the entire biofuel supply chain, as stated in their 2014 Multi-Year Program Plan (2014). Although biofuels in general have been found to have lower life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum fuels on an energy basis, biomass feedstock production, harvesting, transportation, processing and conversion are expected to emit a wide range of other air pollutants (e.g., criteria air pollutants, hazardous air pollutants), which could affect the environmental benefits of biofuels when displacing petroleum fuels. While it is important for policy makers, air quality planners and regulators, biofuel developers, and investors to understand the potential implications on air quality from a growing biofuel industry, there is a general lack of information and knowledge about the type, fate and magnitude of potential air pollutant emissions from the production of cellulosic biofuels due to the nascent stage of this emerging industry. This analysis assesses potential air pollutant emissions from a hypothetical biorefinery, selected by BETO for further research and development, which uses a biological conversion process of sugars to hydrocarbons to produce infrastructural-compatible renewable diesel blendstock from cellulosic biomass.

  19. 生物炼制技术研究新进展%Advance in biorefinery technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭天伟; 俞建良; 张栩

    2011-01-01

    生物炼制是以可再生生物质资源为原料,替代化石资源,生产能源、化工产品和生物材料的低碳型工业模式,是社会经济实现可持续发展的重大战略需求.随着全世界对生物炼制的深入研究,新的技术和产品不断涌现,各种生物技术平台和经济技术评价体系不断建立和完善,促进了生物炼制过程的健康飞速发展.本文从生物质原料、生物转化技术和热化学转化技术等多个方面,介绍了目前世界各国在生物炼制领域取得的最新研究进展和发展方向,展望了生物炼制发展前景.%Biorefinery that utilizes renewable biomass for production of fuels, chemicals and bio-materials has become more and more important in chemical industry than ever before.Biotechnological platforms and thermochemical platforms are developed to transfer the efficiency and logic of fossil-based chemistry and petroleum refinery as well as energy production onto the renewable biomass industry. This article presents the up-to-date development of biorefinery in technologies and applications from the aspects of renewable feedstocks, bioconversion technologies, and thermochemical technologies. Future perspectives are discussed.

  20. Forest biorefinery: Potential of poplar phytochemicals as value-added co-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devappa, Rakshit K; Rakshit, Sudip K; Dekker, Robert F H

    2015-11-01

    The global forestry industry after experiencing a market downturn during the past decade has now aimed its vision towards the integrated biorefinery. New business models and strategies are constantly being explored to re-invent the global wood and pulp/paper industry through sustainable resource exploitation. The goal is to produce diversified, innovative and revenue generating product lines using on-site bioresources (wood and tree residues). The most popular product lines are generally produced from wood fibers (biofuels, pulp/paper, biomaterials, and bio/chemicals). However, the bark and other tree residues like foliage that constitute forest wastes, still remain largely an underexploited resource from which extractives and phytochemicals can be harnessed as by-products (biopharmaceuticals, food additives and nutraceuticals, biopesticides, cosmetics). Commercially, Populus (poplar) tree species including hybrid varieties are cultivated as a fast growing bioenergy crop, but can also be utilized to produce bio-based chemicals. This review identifies and underlines the potential of natural products (phytochemicals) from Populus species that could lead to new business ventures in biorefineries and contribute to the bioeconomy. In brief, this review highlights the importance of by-products/co-products in forest industries, methods that can be employed to extract and purify poplar phytochemicals, the potential pharmaceutical and other uses of >160 phytochemicals identified from poplar species - their chemical structures, properties and bioactivities, the challenges and limitations of utilizing poplar phytochemicals, and potential commercial opportunities. Finally, the overall discussion and conclusion are made considering the recent biotechnological advances in phytochemical research to indicate the areas for future commercial applications from poplar tree species.

  1. Bio-Refineries Bioprocess Technologies for Waste-Water Treatment, Energy and Product Valorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith Cowan, A.

    2010-04-01

    Increasing pressure is being exerted on communities and nations to source energy from forms other than fossil fuels. Also, potable water is becoming a scarce resource in many parts of the world, and there remains a large divide in the demand and utilization of plant products derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and non-GMOs. The most extensive user and manager of terrestrial ecosystems is agriculture which is also the de facto steward of natural resources. As stated by Miller (2008) no other industry or institution comes close to the comparative advantage held for this vital responsibility while simultaneously providing food, fiber, and other biology-based products, including energy. Since modern commercial agriculture is transitioning from the production of bulk commodities to the provision of standardized products and specific-attribute raw materials for differentiated markets, we can argue that processes such as mass cultivation of microalgae and the concept of bio-refineries be seen as part of a `new' agronomy. EBRU is currently exploring the integration of bioprocess technologies using microalgae as biocatalysts to achieve waste-water treatment, water polishing and endocrine disruptor (EDC) removal, sustainable energy production, and exploitation of the resultant biomass in agriculture as foliar fertilizer and seed coatings, and for commercial extraction of bulk commodities such as bio-oils and lecithin. This presentation will address efforts to establish a fully operational solar-driven microalgae bio-refinery for use not only in waste remediation but to transform waste and biomass to energy, fuels, and other useful materials (valorisation), with particular focus on environmental quality and sustainability goals.

  2. Significance of CO2 donor on the production of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618

    OpenAIRE

    Zou Wei; Zhu Li-Wen; Li Hong-Mei; Tang Ya-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Succinic acid is a building-block chemical which could be used as the precursor of many industrial products. The dissolved CO2 concentration in the fermentation broth could strongly regulate the metabolic flux of carbon and the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase, which are the important committed steps for the biosynthesis of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes. Previous reports showed that succinic acid production could be promoted by regulating ...

  3. Toward homosuccinate fermentation: metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for anaerobic production of succinate from glucose and formate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsanov, Boris; Brocker, Melanie; Bott, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the capability of Corynebacterium glutamicum for anaerobic succinate production from glucose under nongrowing conditions. In this work, we have addressed two shortfalls of this process, the formation of significant amounts of by-products and the limitation of the yield by the redox balance. To eliminate acetate formation, a derivative of the type strain ATCC 13032 (strain BOL-1), which lacked all known pathways for acetate and lactate synthesis (Δcat Δpqo Δpta-ackA ΔldhA), was constructed. Chromosomal integration of the pyruvate carboxylase gene pyc(P458S) into BOL-1 resulted in strain BOL-2, which catalyzed fast succinate production from glucose with a yield of 1 mol/mol and showed only little acetate formation. In order to provide additional reducing equivalents derived from the cosubstrate formate, the fdh gene from Mycobacterium vaccae, coding for an NAD(+)-coupled formate dehydrogenase (FDH), was chromosomally integrated into BOL-2, leading to strain BOL-3. In an anaerobic batch process with strain BOL-3, a 20% higher succinate yield from glucose was obtained in the presence of formate. A temporary metabolic blockage of strain BOL-3 was prevented by plasmid-borne overexpression of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene gapA. In an anaerobic fed-batch process with glucose and formate, strain BOL-3/pAN6-gap accumulated 1,134 mM succinate in 53 h with an average succinate production rate of 1.59 mmol per g cells (dry weight) (cdw) per h. The succinate yield of 1.67 mol/mol glucose is one of the highest currently described for anaerobic succinate producers and was accompanied by a very low level of by-products (0.10 mol/mol glucose).

  4. Model-driven in Silico glpC Gene Knockout Predicts Increased Succinate Production from Glycerol in Escherichia Coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Sajo Mienda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic engineered targeting for increased succinate production in Escherichia coli using glycerol as a low cost carbon source has attracted global attention in recent years. Succinate production in engineered E. coli has progressed significantly using an experimental trial and error approach. The use of a model-guided, targeted metabolic gene knockout prediction for increased succinate production from glycerol under anaerobic conditions in E. coli still remains largely underexplored. In this study, we applied a model-driven, targeted glpC/b2243 in silico metabolic gene knockout using E. coli genome scale model iJO1366 under the OptFlux software platform with the aim of predicting high succinate flux. The results indicated that the mutant model lacking the glpC/b2243 gene will demonstrate increased succinate flux that is 30% higher than its wild-type control model. We can hypothesize that an additional NADH molecule was generated following the deletion of the gene and/or the alternatively preferred GldA-DhaKLM fermentative route for glycerol metabolism in E. coli may have been activated. Although the exact metabolic mechanism involved in increasing the succinate flux still remains obscure; the current study informs other studies that a model-driven, metabolic glpC/b2243 gene knockout could be applicable in filling our knowledge gap using a comprehensive experimental inquiry in the future; leading to a better understanding of the underlying metabolic function of this gene in relation to succinate production in E. coli from glycerol.

  5. Analysis of supply chain, scale factor, and optimum plant capacity for the production of ethanol from corn stover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed model is used to perform a thorough analysis on ethanol production from corn stover via the dilute acid process. The biomass supply chain cost model accounts for all steps needed to source corn stover including collection, transportation, and storage. The manufacturing cost model is based on work done at NREL; attainable conversions of key process parameters are used to calculate production cost. The choice of capital investment scaling function and scaling parameter has a significant impact on the optimum plant capacity. For the widely used exponential function, the scaling factors are functions of plant capacity. The pre-exponential factor decreases with increasing plant capacity while the exponential factor increases as the plant capacity increases. The use of scaling parameters calculated for small plant capacities leads to falsely large optimum plants; data from a wide range of plant capacities is required to produce accurate results. A mathematical expression to scale capital investment for fermentation-based biorefineries is proposed which accounts for the linear scaling behavior of bio-reactors (such as saccharification vessels and fermentors) as well as the exponential nature of all other plant equipment. Ignoring the linear scaling behavior of bio-reactors leads to artificially large optimum plant capacities. The minimum production cost is found to be in the range of 789–830 $ m−3 which is significantly higher than previously reported. Optimum plant capacities are in the range of 5750–9850 Mg d−1. The optimum plant capacity and production cost are highly sensitive to farmer participation in biomass harvest for low participation rates. -- Highlights: •A detailed model is used to perform a technoeconomic analysis for the production of ethanol from corn stover. •The capital investment scaling factors were found to be a function of plant capacity. •Bio-reactors (such as saccharification vessels and fermentors) in large size

  6. THE FEASIBILITY OF ETHANOL PRODUCTION IN TEXAS

    OpenAIRE

    Klose, Steven L.; Anderson, David P.; Outlaw, Joe L.; Herbst, Brian K.; Richardson, James W.

    2003-01-01

    The resurgence of interest in ethanol production has also prompted interest in Texas. Projected net present values for ethanol plant investment are well below zero for corn based ethanol plants, but are positive for sorghum. Sensitivity analysis indicates relatively small increases in ethanol price are needed to make production viable.

  7. Biorefinery Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-01

    Fact sheet summarizing NREL's techno-economic analysis and life-cycle assessment capabilities to connect research with future commercial process integration, a critical step in the scale-up of biomass conversion technologies.

  8. Ethanol production from waste materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shahid Iqbal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Experiment was designed for ethanol production using corn andother organic waste material containing starch contents andcellulosic material while barely used for diastase and acidicdigestion methods. The effect of temperature, yeast, barely diastaseand various dilutions of acid (sulfuric acids were investigated onethanol production. The result showed that corn yielded highamount of ethanol (445ml as compared to cellulosic material whichproduced 132ml of ethanol from one kg of weight. It was also notedthat with the increase of barely and yeast amount in a proper mannercan increase ethanol production from different starch sources. It wasalso noted that acid dilutions affected cellulose digestion where highyield of reducing sugar was noted at 0.75% of sulfuric acid dilution.It was concluded from the present experiment that economicalsources of starch and various dilutions of acids should be tried oncellulose digestion for bio-fuel production to withstand in thisenergy crisis time.

  9. Co-generation of microbial lipid and bio-butanol from corn cob bagasse in an environmentally friendly biorefinery process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Di; Dong, Zhongshi; Wang, Yong; Chen, Changjing; Li, Ping; Qin, Peiyong; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-09-01

    Biorefinery process of corn cob bagasse was investigated by integrating microbial lipid and ABE fermentation. The effects of NaOH concentration on the fermentations performance were evaluated. The black liquor after pretreatment was used as substrate for microbial lipid fermentation, while the enzymatic hydrolysates of the bagasse were used for ABE fermentation. The results demonstrated that under the optimized condition, the cellulose and hemicellulose in raw material could be effectively utilized. Approximate 87.7% of the polysaccharides were converted into valuable biobased products (∼175.7g/kg of ABE along with ∼36.6g/kg of lipid). At the same time, almost half of the initial COD (∼48.9%) in the black liquor could be degraded. The environmentally friendly biorefinery process showed promising in maximizing the utilization of biomass for future biofuels production. PMID:27259190

  10. Wheat bran biorefinery: an investigation on the starch derived glucose extraction accompanied by pre- and post-treatment steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirpanalan, Özge; Reisinger, Michael; Huber, Florian; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Novalin, Senad

    2014-07-01

    Wheat bran, a side product of the milling industry, can be considered as a feedstock for biorefineries. Unlike other lignocellulosic feedstock, wheat bran contains a reasonable amount of starch, which is not of recalcitrant nature. Therefore, it can be extracted without a costly pretreatment process. The present work evaluates the extraction of starch derived glucose in relation to a wheat bran biorefinery. The purity of free glucose extracted quantitatively was 44%. The extract was concentrated by threefold via nanofiltration, thereby reaching a glucose concentration of 49 g/L. Hydrothermal treatment (180°C - 20 min) of the starch-free bran did not induce the formation of hydroxymethylfurfural and levulinic acid. Interestingly, the furfural level increased compared to the process, in which bran was treated hydrothermally without a preceding starch extraction. By separation of water-extractables prior to enzymatic hydrolysis, the free glucose purity was increased to 58%, however the yield of glucose decreased to 61%. PMID:24835741

  11. Assessment of a novel alder biorefinery concept to meet demands of economics feasibility, energy production and long term environmental sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tobias; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Thomsen, Sune Tjalfe

    2012-01-01

    A biorefinery concept based on alder tree plantations on degenerated or marginalized soils is developed to illustrate how it is possible to comply with indicators of economic feasibility, fossil fuel depletion concerns and long term sustainability issues. The biorefinery is based on grey alder...... (Alnus incana), and provide the following end products: Heat and power, bio-pharmaceuticals (diaryl heptanoids), Bio-SNG, ethyl acetate, replenished soils and a carbon sink. Several system setups were examined and compared. The optimal design obtained the following production characteristics: Total...... system Energy Return on energy Invested 4.4, total system Exergy Return on exergy Invested 3.5, Net Energy Output 78 GJ/ha/year, Net Exergy Output 50 GJ/ha/year, Net carbon sequestration 0.8 ton CO2-eq/ha/year, Total product value 2030 euro/ha/year and Net Dry Matter Removal 90%....

  12. Secondary liquefaction in ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of producing ethanol by fermentation, said method comprising a secondary liquefaction step in the presence of a themostable acid alpha-amylase or, a themostable maltogenic acid alpha-amylase.......The invention relates to a method of producing ethanol by fermentation, said method comprising a secondary liquefaction step in the presence of a themostable acid alpha-amylase or, a themostable maltogenic acid alpha-amylase....

  13. Ethanol Production, Food and Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade de Sa, Saraly; Palmer, Charles; Engel, Stefanie

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the direct and indirect impacts of ethanol production on land use, deforestation and food production. A partial equilibrium model of a national economy with two sectors and two regions, one of which includes a residual forest, is developed. It analyses how an exogenous increase in the ethanol price affects input allocation (land and labor) between sectors (energy crop and food). Three potential effects are identified. First, the standard and well-documented effect of d...

  14. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF HPTLC METHOD FOR SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF METOPROLOL SUCCINATE AND ATORVASTATIN CALCIUM IN A PHARMACEUTICAL DOSAGE FORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginoya Charmi G.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A new, simple, precise, accurate and selective high performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of Metoprolol succinate and Atorvastatin calcium in a marketed formulation. Chromatographic separation was carried out on Merck TLC aluminium sheets of silica gel 60F254 using Acetonitrile: Methanol: Ethyl acetate: Glacial acetic acid (2: 4: 4: 0.06 % v/v/v/v as mobile phase followed by densitometric analysis at 223 nm. This system was found to give compact spots for Metoprolol succinate (Rf value of 0.32 ± 0.005 and Atorvastatin calcium (Rf value of 0.77 ± 0.004. The method was validated in terms of linearity, accuracy, precision, limit of detection, limit of quantification and specificity in accordance with International Conference on Harmonization (ICH guidelines. The calibration curve was found to be linear between 500 to 3000 and 200 to 1200 ng/spot for Metoprolol succinate and Atorvastatin calcium, respectively with significantly high value of correlation coefficient (r2 > 0.99. The limits of detection and quantitation were found to be 0.8432 and 2.5553 ng/spot, respectively for Metoprolol succinate and 27.8428 and 84.3662 ng/spot, respectively for Atorvastatin calcium. The proposed method was found to be accurate, precise, reproducible, specific and sensitive and can be applicable for the simultaneous determination of Metoprolol succinate and Atorvastatin calcium in marketed formulation.

  15. Performance analyses of a neutralizing agent combination strategy for the production of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Cheng; Zhu, Li-Wen; Li, Hong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2012-05-01

    A neutralizing agent combination strategy was developed to enhance the succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618. First, a maximal succinic acid production of 48.2 g/L was obtained at a culture pH of 7.5. Second, NaOH and KOH were screened to identify the optimal neutralizing agent for pH control. However, the production of succinic acid did not increase, and severe cell flocculation was observed due to a high concentration of metal ions when only one neutralizing agent was used to control pH. Finally, a neutralizing agent combination strategy was developed with a supply of neutralizing agents with OH(-) and carbonate. The cell flocculation was eliminated, and a maximum succinic acid production of 59.2 g/L was obtained with 5 M NaOH and 40 g/L of MgCO(3); this production was 27.9% higher than that obtained with NaOH alone. The results obtained in this study may be useful for the large-scale industrial production of succinic acid. PMID:22002101

  16. Preparation and performance of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose esters of substituted succinates for in vitro supersaturation of a crystalline hydrophobic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ligeng; Hillmyer, Marc A

    2014-01-01

    We prepared hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) esters of substituted succinates and examined their performance for improving the aqueous solubility of crystalline hydrophobic drugs in spray-dried dispersions (SDDs). From one HPMC, we synthesized five HPMC esters using various monosubstituted succinic anhydrides. These HPMC esters along with a commercial HPMC acetate succinate (HPMCAS) were spray-dried from solutions with phenytoin. The SDDs with different matrices at 10 wt % loading had very similar bulk properties with a minimal amount of detectable crystalline phenytoin as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (powder XRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In solution, while the SDD with HPMCAS was very effective at achieving high levels of phenytoin supersaturation initially, it was not competent at maintaining such supersaturation due to the rapid crystallization of the dissolved phenytoin. Alternatively, SDDs with several synthesized HPMC esters of substituted succinates not only achieved rather high initial supersaturation but also maintained high concentrations for extended time (i.e., 1.5 h and longer). Such maintenance was largely ascribed to the inhibition of phenytoin nucleation. Structure-property relationships were established, and the most successful systems contained a high degree of substitution and a combination of a thioether with neighboring weak electron-withdrawing groups in the substituted succinic anhydrides. The effective maintenance of supersaturated solutions was only found in SDDs with rather low drug loadings, which indicates the significance of sufficiently high concentrations of polymer additives in the dissolution media. PMID:24320108

  17. Modulation of drug release rate of diltiazem-HCl from hydrogel matrices of succinic acid-treated ispaghula husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohel, M C; Amin, A F; Chhabaria, M T; Panchal, M K; Lalwani, A N

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of using succinic acid-treated ispaghula husk in matrix-based tablets of diltiazem-HCl was investigated. The sample prepared using 4:1 weight ratio of ispaghula husk to succinic acid showed improved swelling and gelling. A 3(2) factorial design was employed to investigate the effect of amount of succinic acid-treated ispaghula husk and dicalcium phosphate (DCP) on the percentage of the drug dissolved in 60, 300, and 480 min from the compressed tablets. The results of multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the significance of the amount of succinic acid-treated ispaghula husk was greater in magnitude than that of the amount of DCP in controlling the drug release. Acceptable batches were identified from a contour plot with constraints on the percentage drug released at the three sampling times. A mathematical model was also evolved to describe the entire dissolution profile. The results of F-test revealed that the Higuchi model fits well to the in vitro dissolution data. The tablets showed considerable radial and axial swelling in distilled water. Succinic acid-treated ispaghula husk can be used as an economical hydrophilic matrixing agent.

  18. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  19. Ethanol from lignocellulosic biomasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report are presented results achieved on the process optimisation of bioethanol production from wheat straw, carried out within the ENEA's project of biomass exploitation for renewable energy. The process consists of three main steps: 1) biomass pretreatment by means of steam explosion; 2) enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose fraction; 3) fermentation of glucose. To perform the hydrolysis step, two commercial enzymatic mixtures have been employed, mainly composed by β-glucosidase (cellobiase), endo-glucanase and exo-glucanase. The ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to ferment the glucose in he hydrolyzates. Hydrolysis yield of 97% has been obtained with steam exploded wheat straw treated at 2200C for 3 minutes and an enzyme to substrate ratio of 4%. It has been pointed out the necessity of washing with water the pretreated what straw, in order to remove the biomass degradation products, which have shown an inhibition effect on the yeast. At the best process conditions, a fermentation yield of 95% has been achieved. In the Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation process, a global conversion of 92% has been obtained, which corresponds to the production of about 170 grams of ethanol per kilogram of exploded straw

  20. Production of mexican brown macroalgae fucoidan and fucosidases under an integral green technology bioproceses by the biorefinery concept

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Jasso, Rosa M.; Ruiz, Hector A.; Victorino-Jasso, Gabriela; Cervantes-Cisneros, Daniela E.; Cabello-Galindo, Alejandra; Cristóbal N Aguilar; J.A. Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Marine ecosystem can be considered a rather exploited source of natural substances with enormous bioactive potential. In Mexico macro-algae study remain forgotten for research and economic purposes besides the high amount of this resource along the west and east coast. For that reason the Bioferinery Group of the Autonomous University of Coahuila, have been studying the biorefinery concept in order to recover high value byproducts of Mexican brown macro-algae including polysacc...